Science.gov

Sample records for labyrinthectomy petrous apicectomy

  1. Partial labyrinthectomy petrous apicectomy approach to the petroclival region: an anatomic and technical study.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Amitabha; Nanda, Anil

    2002-07-01

    The petroclival region generally is thought to be an inaccessible area in the intracranial compartment. A number of ways of reaching this area during surgery have been described, including the presigmoid petrosal approach. The partial labyrinthectomy petrous apicectomy approach is a relatively new approach to this region and is a variant of the presigmoid petrosal approach. This study aims to demonstrate the technique and the microsurgical anatomy of the partial labyrinthectomy petrous apicectomy approach and to provide a quantitative study of its exposure to compare it with other common approaches to this region, particularly the presigmoid petrosal approach. Bilateral stepwise dissections were performed on 15 formalin-fixed and dye-injected cadaveric heads (30 sides) under x3 to x40 magnification. A temporal craniotomy was performed after a complete mastoidectomy. A partial labyrinthectomy and petrous apicectomy were performed next. The amount of dura exposed was measured before and after the partial labyrinthectomy and the petrous apicectomy. By measuring the angles of exposure, the approach was examined to analyze how much increased access was gained. This approach provided wide exposure to the petroclival region, the cerebellopontine angle, Meckel's cave, the cavernous sinus, and the prepontine region. On average, there was an increase of 10.8 mm in horizontal exposure as compared with the retrolabyrinthine approach. The average angle of vision achieved with the clival pit as the target was 58.9 degrees. In most of the specimens, an area from the IIIrd to the IXth cranial nerves was easily visible without any significant brain retraction. A high jugular bulb did not reduce the exposure. The partial labyrinthectomy petrous apicectomy approach converts two narrow tunnels into a wide corridor. It increases the angle of exposure markedly, providing easy and excellent exposure of the otherwise difficult-to-access petroclival region, and it may also preserve hearing.

  2. The partial labyrinthectomy petrous apicectomy approach to petroclival meningiomas. A quantitative anatomic comparison with other approaches to the same region.

    PubMed

    Mandelli, C; Porras, L; López-Sánchez, C; Sicuri, G M; Lomonaco, I; García-Martínez, V

    2008-04-01

    The partial labyrinthectomy petrous apicectomy (PLPA) approach is a transpetrous route that provides the advantages of the labyrinthine removal but with hearing preservation. Using seven temporal bone tissue blocks and three formaldehyde-fixed cadaveric heads we have made a morphometric and comparative study on this approach that summarizes the invasiveness, the optimal surgical exposure, the anatomic complexity of the skull base approaches and, on the other hand, the spirit of preservation that is the constant aim of modern neurosurgery. The morphometric analysis is designed to make the bony phase of the PLPA approach safer and to define the relationship between petrous landmarks. The comparative study is made between the PLPA and other neurosurgical routes enhancing the potentiality of the PLPA approach that permits a wider angle of incidence towards the brainstem than with the retrosigmoid routes.

  3. Early Conquest of the Rock: Julius Lempert's Life and the Complete Apicectomy Technique for the Treatment of Suppurative Petrous Apicitis

    PubMed Central

    Krisht, Khaled M.; Shelton, Clough; Couldwell, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Julius Lempert (1891–1968) was one of the most revolutionary and innovative neuro-otologists of the 20th century. He had a remarkable role in advancing the field of otolaryngology to its modern shape and form, especially through his groundbreaking introduction of the fenestration procedure for the treatment of otosclerosis. Although he is highly celebrated by many neuro-otologists for his contributions to our surgical and anatomical understanding of the petrous bone, he is not well known to the neurosurgical community. In this article, we give a detailed account of Dr. Lempert's life and discuss his invaluable contribution to skull base petrous bone anatomy and surgery through his pioneering work on the complete apicectomy for the treatment of suppurative petrous apicitis. PMID:25844295

  4. Early Conquest of the Rock: Julius Lempert's Life and the Complete Apicectomy Technique for the Treatment of Suppurative Petrous Apicitis.

    PubMed

    Krisht, Khaled M; Shelton, Clough; Couldwell, William T

    2015-03-01

    Julius Lempert (1891-1968) was one of the most revolutionary and innovative neuro-otologists of the 20th century. He had a remarkable role in advancing the field of otolaryngology to its modern shape and form, especially through his groundbreaking introduction of the fenestration procedure for the treatment of otosclerosis. Although he is highly celebrated by many neuro-otologists for his contributions to our surgical and anatomical understanding of the petrous bone, he is not well known to the neurosurgical community. In this article, we give a detailed account of Dr. Lempert's life and discuss his invaluable contribution to skull base petrous bone anatomy and surgery through his pioneering work on the complete apicectomy for the treatment of suppurative petrous apicitis.

  5. Endoscopic-Assisted Posterior Intradural Petrous Apicectomy in Petroclival Meningiomas: A Clinical Series and Assessment of Perioperative Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Tatagiba, Marcos; Rigante, Luigi; Mesquita Filho, Paulo; Ebner, Florian H; Roser, Florian

    2015-12-01

    To describe the clinical feasibility and outcome of the endoscopic-assisted posterior intradural petrous apicectomy approach (PIPA) for petroclival meningiomas extending into the supratentorial space. From 2005-2013, 29 patients with a petroclival meningioma underwent tumor removal through a PIPA approach. The approach consists of a retrosigmoid approach, intradural anterior resection of the petrous apex and microsurgical removal of the tumor, followed by endoscopic-assisted visualization and removal of tumor parts in the middle fossa or anterior to the brainstem. Patients consisted of 7 men and 22 women; the mean age of patients was 52.7 years. In 24 patients, surgery was performed with the patient in a semisitting position; in 5 patients, surgery was performed with the patient in a supine position. A total resection was achieved in 19 patients (66%). A Karnofsky performance scale score >60% was recorded in 27 patients (93%), with surgical complications that involved a cerebrospinal fluid leak in 3 patients, bleeding in the surgical cavity in 2 patients, and pneumocephalus in 1 patient. The most frequent postoperative neurologic deficit was facial palsy (34%), which disappeared or improved consistently in all but 1 patient, who required a cranial nerve VII-cranial nerve XII anastomosis. For petroclival meningiomas extending into the middle fossa, the endoscopic-assisted PIPA approach is safe and straightforward. The principal advantages of the PIPA approach are familiarity with the retrosigmoid route; the absence of temporal lobe retraction; and early control of the cranial nerves, vessels, and brainstem. However, careful patient selection regarding tumor extension is fundamental to obtaining optimal outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Petrosectomy and Topographical Anatomy in Traditional Kawase and Posterior Intradural Petrous Apicectomy (PIPA) Approach: An Anatomical Study.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Luigi; Herlan, Stephan; Tatagiba, Marcos Soares; Stanojevic, Milan; Hirt, Bernhard; Ebner, Florian Heinrich

    2016-02-01

    To compare the anatomical exposure and petrosectomy extent in the Kawase and posterior intradural petrous apicectomy (PIPA) approaches. Kawase and PIPA approaches were performed on 4 fixed cadaveric heads (3 alcohol-fixed, 1 formaldehyde-fixed silicone-injected; 4 Kawase and 4 PIPA approaches). The microsurgical anatomy was examined by means of Zeiss Opmi CS/NC-4 microscopes. HD Karl Storz Endoscopes (AIDA system) were used to display intradural exposure. Petrosectomy volumes was assessed by comparing pre- and postoperative thin-slice computed tomography scans (Analyze 12.0; AnalyzeDirect Mayo Clinic). The Kawase approach exposed the rhomboid fossa with Meckel's cave extradurally, the upper half of the clivus, superior cerebellopontine angle, ventrolateral brainstem, the intrameatal region, basilar apex, and the preganglionic root of cranial nerve (CN) V, CN III-IV-VI intradurally. The PIPA approach exposed the cerebello-pontine angle with CN VI-XII, Meckel's cave, CN III-V, and the middle and lower clivus intradurally from a posterior view. The area of surgical exposure is wide in both approaches; however, the volume of petrosectomy, the working angle, and surgical corridor differ significantly. The Kawase approach allows wide exposure of the middle cranial fossa (MCF) and posterior cranial fossa, requiring extradural temporal lobe retraction and an extradural petrosectomy with preservation of the internal acoustic meatus and cochlea. No temporal lobe retraction and direct control of neurovascular structures make the PIPA approach a valid alternative for lesions extending mostly in the Posterior cranial fossa with minor extension in the MCF. The longer surgical corridor, cerebellar retraction, and limited exposure of the anterior brainstem make this approach less indicated for lesions with major extension in the MCF and the anterior cavernous sinus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Paraganglioma presenting as cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex.

    PubMed

    Heman-Ackah, Selena E; Huang, Tina C

    2013-09-01

    We report the unique finding of a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma associated with a paraganglioma, also known as a glomus jugulare tumor, in a 52-year-old woman who presented to our department with pulsatile tinnitus, hearing loss, aural fullness, and disequilibrium. She had been treated for a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma 20 years earlier, at which time she had undergone drainage of the granuloma via subtotal petrous apicectomy. When she came to our facility approximately 20 years later, she had signs and symptoms consistent with a jugular paraganglioma, which was likely to have been present at the time of her initial presentation for the cholesterol granuloma. In fact, microscopic bleeding from the paraganglioma might have led to the formation of the cholesterol granuloma. The metachronous presentation of these two entities, which to our knowledge has not been reported previously in the literature, indicates the potential association of paragangliomas with the formation of cholesterol granulomas of the petrous apex.

  8. Petrous Bone Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Mario; Zini, Carlo; Gamoletti, Roberto; Frau, Niccolò; Taibah, Abdel Kader; Russo, Alessandra; Pasanisi, Enrico

    1993-01-01

    Petrous bone cholesteatoma is a rare pathologic entity and may be a difficult surgical challenge because of potential involvement of the facial nerve, carotid artery, dura mater, otic capsule, and risk of cerebrospinal fluid leak. The objective of this article is to present a personal classification of petrous bone cholesteatomas, a survey of recent surgical attitudes, and our present surgical strategy based on our experience with 54 operations between 1978 and 1990. Radical petromastoid exenteration with marsupialization and the middle cranial fossa approach were used only for small pure infra- or supralabyrinthine cholesteatomas, respectively. The enlarged transcochlear approach with closure of the external auditory canal was used for infralabyrinthine, infralabyrinthine-apical, and massive petrous bone cholesteatomas. Five cases with petrous bone cholesteatomas in different locations are described in detail to present the signs and symptoms together with the management. ImagesFigure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18 PMID:17170912

  9. Neurovestibular Compensation following Ototoxic Lesion and Labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanshenas, Hamed; Ashouri, Anousheh; Kaufman, Galen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Unilateral labyrinthectomy and intra-tympanic gentamycin have been employed in the treatment of Ménière's disease, but the efficacy of these techniques has not been well established. Objective The objective of this study is to measure the time course of recovery from a unilateral labyrinthectomy either after ipsilateral topical treatment with gentamicin to the inner ear or without the previous insult. Methods Twenty-nine adult Mongolian gerbils were randomized into two experimental groups. Group 1 (n = 17) received a right ear gentamicin drug-induced lesion by unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Group 2 (n = 12) only received a right unilateral labyrinthectomy lesion. We measured the horizontal vestibulo-ocular responses in gerbils before and after the lesion. The gerbils received an angular acceleration stimulus and their eye movements were recorded. Results The gentamicin lesion resulted in a quicker recovery. Experimental groups underwent a similar time course of recovery. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between the two groups. Both groups displayed adaptation to the lesion by day 21, but long-term compensation did not completely revert to the original pre-lesion state. Conclusions In a lesion requiring both static and dynamic compensation as in UL, the need for a static compensation may alter pre-existing compensation from a previous dynamic insult and require a new compensation. A previous lesion and adaptation is not preserved for a second lesion and the subject has to re-compensate. Therefore, surgical treatment in Meniere's disease such as UL can be considered without prior gentamicin treatment. Static and dynamic compensations do not appear to be as independent as previous studies have suggested. PMID:27096015

  10. Recovery from unilateral labyrinthectomy in rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Fetter, M; Zee, D S

    1988-02-01

    1. We recorded eye movements in six rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral labyrinthectomy and quantified the compensation for both the static and the dynamic disturbances of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR). 2. When first recorded after labyrinthectomy (18-20 h postlesion), all animals had a spontaneous nystagmus with mean slow-phase velocities ranging from 24 to 54 degrees/s measured in darkness and 0-4 degrees/s measured in the light. The level of nystagmus diminished quickly, and by postoperative day 25 mean values ranged from 4 to 22 degrees/s, measured in darkness. The waveform of individual slow phases was variable, but in the first postoperative week its trajectory usually showed an increasing, or an increasing then decreasing, velocity. This finding indicates that peripheral vestibular lesions can alter the function of the ocular motor eye-position integrator. 3. The VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity, corrected for spontaneous nystagmus) during rotations (30-300 degrees/s) in the dark was diminished from nearly 1.0 preoperatively to approximately 0.5 when first measured after labyrinthectomy, except for rotations toward the lesioned side at high speeds for which the gain was even lower. Within the first few postoperative days, for rotations toward the intact side, the VOR gain increased rapidly, to approximately 0.8. For rotations toward the lesioned side similar behavior was noted for stimuli of 30-60 degrees/s, but at higher velocities compensation proceeded more slowly. By 3 mo postoperatively gains had reached values ranging from 0.77 to 1.03 for rotations toward the intact side and from 0.61 to 0.98 for rotations toward the lesioned side. Values were higher for lower-velocity stimuli. 4. Caloric testing with ice water in the unoperated ear elicited nystagmus with a mean value of maximum slow-phase velocity of 129 degrees/s preoperatively and 195 degrees/s 3 mo postoperatively. There was no caloric response on the lesioned side. From the

  11. Cholesterol granuloma and other petrous apex lesions.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Brandon

    2015-04-01

    This article presents the latest information on the presentation, diagnosis, imaging characteristics, management, and outcomes for petrous apex cholesterol granulomas. An in-depth review of the pathophysiology and surgical approaches is presented along with a summary of other petrous apex lesions and their imaging characteristics.

  12. Labyrinthectomy and Vestibular Neurectomy for Intractable Vertiginous Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, Alfredo Vega; Hidalgo, Lourdes Olivia Vales; Arévalo, Rodrigo Jácome; Diaz, Marite Palma

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy are considered the surgical procedures with the highest possibility of controlling medically untreatable incapacitating vertigo. Ironically, after 100 years of the introduction of both transmastoid labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy, the choice of which procedure to use rests primarily on the evaluation of the hearing and of the surgical morbidity. Objective To review surgical labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy for the treatment of incapacitating vestibular disorders. Data Sources PubMed, MD consult and Ovid-SP databases. Data Synthesis In this review we describe and compare surgical labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy. A contrast between surgical and chemical labyrinthectomy is also examined. Proper candidate selection, success in vertigo control and complication rates are discussed on the basis of a literature review. Conclusions Vestibular nerve section and labyrinthectomy achieve high and comparable rates of vertigo control. Even though vestibular neurectomy is considered a hearing sparing surgery, since it is an intradural procedure, it carries a greater risk of complications than transmastoid labyrinthectomy. Furthermore, since many patients whose hearing is preserved with vestibular nerve section may ultimately lose that hearing, the long-term value of hearing preservation is not well established. Although the combination of both procedures, in the form of a translabyrinthine vestibular nerve section, is the most certain way to ablate vestibular function for patients with no useful hearing and disabling vertigo, some advocate for transmastoid labyrinthectomy alone, considering that avoiding opening the subarachnoid space minimizes the possible intracranial complications. Chemical labyrinthectomy may be considered a safer alternative, but the risks of hearing loss when hearing preservation is desired are also high. PMID:28382129

  13. Primate translational vestibuloocular reflexes. IV. Changes after unilateral labyrinthectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy on the properties of the translational vestibuloocular reflexes (trVORs) were investigated in rhesus monkeys trained to fixate near targets. Translational motion stimuli consisted of either steady-state lateral and fore-aft sinusoidal oscillations or short-lasting transient displacements. During small-amplitude, steady-state sinusoidal lateral oscillations, a small decrease in the horizontal trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance was observed during the first week after labyrinthectomy. These deficits gradually recovered over time. In addition, the vertical response component increased, causing a tilt of the eye velocity vector toward the lesioned side. During large, transient lateral displacements, the deficits were larger and longer lasting. Responses after labyrinthectomy were asymmetric, with eye velocity during movements toward the side of the lesion being more compromised. The most profound effect of the lesions was observed during fore-aft motion. Whereas responses were kinematically appropriate for fixation away from the side of the lesion (e.g., to the left after right labyrinthectomy), horizontal responses were anticompensatory during fixation at targets located ipsilateral to the side of the lesion (e.g., for targets to the right after right labyrinthectomy). This deficit showed little recovery during the 3-mo post-labyrinthectomy testing period. These results suggest that inputs from both labyrinths are important for the proper function of the trVORs, although the details of how bilateral signals are processed and integrated remain unknown.

  14. Primate translational vestibuloocular reflexes. IV. Changes after unilateral labyrinthectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy on the properties of the translational vestibuloocular reflexes (trVORs) were investigated in rhesus monkeys trained to fixate near targets. Translational motion stimuli consisted of either steady-state lateral and fore-aft sinusoidal oscillations or short-lasting transient displacements. During small-amplitude, steady-state sinusoidal lateral oscillations, a small decrease in the horizontal trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance was observed during the first week after labyrinthectomy. These deficits gradually recovered over time. In addition, the vertical response component increased, causing a tilt of the eye velocity vector toward the lesioned side. During large, transient lateral displacements, the deficits were larger and longer lasting. Responses after labyrinthectomy were asymmetric, with eye velocity during movements toward the side of the lesion being more compromised. The most profound effect of the lesions was observed during fore-aft motion. Whereas responses were kinematically appropriate for fixation away from the side of the lesion (e.g., to the left after right labyrinthectomy), horizontal responses were anticompensatory during fixation at targets located ipsilateral to the side of the lesion (e.g., for targets to the right after right labyrinthectomy). This deficit showed little recovery during the 3-mo post-labyrinthectomy testing period. These results suggest that inputs from both labyrinths are important for the proper function of the trVORs, although the details of how bilateral signals are processed and integrated remain unknown.

  15. Temperature variation during apicectomy with Er:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Bodrumlu, Emre; Keskiner, Ilker; Sumer, Mahmut; Sumer, A Pinar; Telcıoglu, N Tuba

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the generated temperature of the Er:YAG laser, with three different pulse durations for apicectomy, compared with tungsten bur and surgical saw. Apicectomy is an endodontic surgery performed to remove the root apex and curette adjacent periapical tissue because of lesions of the apical area that are not healing properly. Sixty single-rooted extracted human teeth were resected by three cutting methods: tungsten bur, surgical saw, and Er:YAG laser irradiation with three different pulse durations; pulse duration 50 μs, pulse duration 100 μs, and pulse duration 300 μs. Teflon-insulated, type K thermocouples were used to measure temperature changes during the apicectomy process. Data were analyzed using the general linear models procedure of the SPSS statistical software program. Although there was no statistically significant difference for the mean values of temperature changes at 1 mm away to the cutting site of teeth, there was statistically significant difference among groups for the mean values of temperature changes at 3 mm away to the cutting site of teeth. Additionally, there was statistically significant difference among groups for the total time required for apicectomy. The laser irradiation with pulse duration 50 μs appears to have the lowest temperature rise and the shortest time required for apicectomy of the three pulse durations. However, Er:YAG laser for apicectomy in all pulse durations could be used safely for resection in endodontics in the presence of sufficient water.

  16. Osteoid osteoma of the petrous bone.

    PubMed

    Iffenecker, C; Rocher, P; Rabia, M H; Dhina, Z; Bobin, S; Quillard, J; Doyon, D

    1997-11-01

    We present a case of osteoid osteoma of the petrous bone presenting with progressive sensorineural hearing loss. CT showed a dense homogeneous mass at the promontory surrounded by a thin bony border. On MRI this lesion gave intermediate signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images and enhanced intensely with gadolinium. Surgical removal and pathological study proved the diagnosis.

  17. [Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to petrous endostosis].

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Jacinto; Royano-Sánchez, Manuel; Bejarano-Parra, Macarena; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio; Rico-Cotelo, María; Ortega-Martínez, Marta

    2017-03-10

    Arterial neurovascular compression is hypothesised to be the main cause of primary trigeminal neuralgia. Although it is the most common cause, other pathologies, such as tumours in the cerebellopontine angle, can cause trigeminal pain. We report a case of a 44-year-old female patient with right trigeminal neuralgia without satisfactory response to medical treatment. Cerebral MRI showed no structural injuries. During microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve, endostosis of the internal aspect of the petrous bone was found to compress the trigeminal nerve. The pain disappeared completely in the early postsurgical period, after the complete drilling of the endostosis and microvascular decompression. The patient remains asymptomatic one year later. Endostosis of the petrous bone is a rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia. A proper review of preoperative studies would enable the definitive surgical approach to be optimised.

  18. Congenital cholesteatoma of the petrous pyramid.

    PubMed

    Horn, K L; Shea, J J; Brackmann, D E

    1985-09-01

    A 20-year follow-up was done on a patient with a large congenital cholesteatoma of the petrous apex. The patient was treated successfully with marsupialization through a radical mastoidectomy and sphenoid sinusotomy. Cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated continued cholesteatoma growth. Bone-conduction thresholds remained normal despite replacement of the internal auditory canal by cholesteatoma matrix. The patient continues to have chronic otorrhea, but is otherwise asymptomatic.

  19. Image guided surgery for petrous apex lesions.

    PubMed

    Van Havenbergh, T; Koekelkoren, E; De Ridder, D; Van De Heyning, P; Verlooy, J

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate whether computer-assisted frameless stereotactic navigation in the temporal bone provides sufficient clinical application accuracy and thus a useful tool in temporal bone surgery. Two patients with petrous apex cholesterol granuloma were operated on by an epidural middle fossa approach using a Stealth/Medtronic trade mark neuronavigation system. Based on literature data optimal skin fiducial placement and registration methods were used. Intra-operative accuracy was checked using three precise anatomical landmarks. Drilling of the petrous apex bone was guided by neuronavigation. Postoperative Computed Tomography (CT) images were fused with the preoperative CT and planning. The application of image-guidance in temporal bone surgery causes no additional burden to the patient nor prolongs the operating time. The accuracy measured at the anatomical landmarks was under 2,0 mm. This is confirmed by evaluation of bone removal through image fusion of pre- and postoperative CT-scan. The clinical application of a neuronavigation system during petrous apex surgery can be regarded as useful. Using all available data on registration methods it seems possible to obtain intra-operative application accuracies of <2,0 mm. Additional cadaver work is being performed to support these data.

  20. Intraosseous Schwannoma of the Petrous Apex.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kohno, Maya; Kameyama, Kaori; Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2015-07-01

    Background and Importance Intraosseous schwannoma is a relatively rare clinical entity that typically arises in vertebral and mandibular bone. Intraosseous schwannoma located entirely within the petrous bone is exceedingly rare, and only two cases have been reported to date. Clinical Presentation A 47-year-old Asian man was referred to our hospital with a chief complaint of double vision. Neurologic examination revealed left abducens nerve palsy. Radiologic imaging showed a 35-mm osteolytic expansive lesion located in the left petrous apex. We made a preoperative diagnosis of chondrosarcoma and performed surgical resection. Surgery was performed via a left subtemporal epidural approach with anterior petrosectomy. The histopathologic diagnosis of the tumor was schwannoma. Schwannoma arising from cranial nerves was excluded from intraoperative findings in conjunction with the results for cranial nerves, and intraosseous schwannoma was diagnosed. Postoperative course was uneventful, and abducens nerve palsy resolved immediately after surgery. Conclusion The differential diagnosis of intraosseous schwannoma should be considered for an osteolytic mass lesion within the petrous apex. Subcapsular tumor removal was considered ideal in terms of preservation of the cranial nerves and vessels around the tumor.

  1. Cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, W.W.M.; Solti-Bohman, L.G.; Brackmann, D.E.; Gruskin, P.

    1984-12-01

    Cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex is a readily recognizable and treatable entity that is more common than previously realized. Cholesterol granuloma grows slowly in the petrous apex as a mass lesion until it produces hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, and facial twitching. Twelve cases of cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex are illustrated; ten of these analyzed in detail, especially with respect to CT findings. A sharply and smoothly marginated expansile lesion in the petrous apex, isodense with plain and nonenhancing on CT, is in all probability a cholesterol granuloma. Preoperative recognition by CT is important for planning proper treatment.

  2. Aspergillosis of the Petrous Apex and Meckel's Cave.

    PubMed

    Ederies, Ash; Chen, Joseph; Aviv, Richard I; Pirouzmand, Farhad; Bilbao, Juan M; Thompson, Andrew L; Symons, Sean P

    2010-05-01

    Cranial cerebral aspergillosis is a rare entity in immunocompetent patients. Invasive disease involving the petrous apex and Meckel's cave has rarely been described. We present a case of localized invasive petrous apical and Meckel's cave disease in an immunocompetent patient who presented with hemicranial neuralgic pain.

  3. Petrous apex arachnoid cyst extending into Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Batra, Arun; Tripathi, Rajendra Prasad; Singh, Anil Kumar; Tatke, Medha

    2002-09-01

    A rare case of arachnoid cyst involving the petrous apex with an unusual clinical presentation has been described with special emphasis in the imaging features and importance of accurate presurgical diagnosis. Differentiation from the other benign lesions involving the petrous apex and the role of newer MR techniques in the diagnosis of these lesions has been highlighted.

  4. The changing role of the apicectomy operation in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chandler, N P; Koshy, S

    2002-10-01

    Enormous progress has been made in the last quarter of a century in understanding the nature of root canal infection and periapical disease. New techniques and materials may be expected to increase the already high success of conventional root canal treatment. Surgical intervention is required for cases where retreatment has failed or is not an option, and the tooth is to be retained rather than extracted. This article reviews the operation of apicectomy and how this minor oral surgical procedure has evolved. Recent modifications to techniques and materials are likely to improve its success, allowing conservation of previously unsaveable teeth.

  5. Comparing Ancient DNA Preservation in Petrous Bone and Tooth Cementum

    PubMed Central

    Margaryan, Ashot; Stenderup, Jesper; Lynnerup, Niels; Willerslev, Eske; Allentoft, Morten E.

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale genomic analyses of ancient human populations have become feasible partly due to refined sampling methods. The inner part of petrous bones and the cementum layer in teeth roots are currently recognized as the best substrates for such research. We present a comparative analysis of DNA preservation in these two substrates obtained from the same human skulls, across a range of different ages and preservation environments. Both substrates display significantly higher endogenous DNA content (average of 16.4% and 40.0% for teeth and petrous bones, respectively) than parietal skull bone (average of 2.2%). Despite sample-to-sample variation, petrous bone overall performs better than tooth cementum (p = 0.001). This difference, however, is driven largely by a cluster of viking skeletons from one particular locality, showing relatively poor molecular tooth preservation (<10% endogenous DNA). In the remaining skeletons there is no systematic difference between the two substrates. A crude preservation (good/bad) applied to each sample prior to DNA-extraction predicted the above/below 10% endogenous DNA threshold in 80% of the cases. Interestingly, we observe signficantly higher levels of cytosine to thymine deamination damage and lower proportions of mitochondrial/nuclear DNA in petrous bone compared to tooth cementum. Lastly, we show that petrous bones from ancient cremated individuals contain no measurable levels of authentic human DNA. Based on these findings we discuss the pros and cons of sampling the different elements. PMID:28129388

  6. Sixth Nerve Palsy from Cholesterol Granuloma of the Petrous Apex

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, Ségolène; Maeder, Philippe; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Kawasaki, Aki

    2017-01-01

    Herein, we report a patient who had an isolated sixth nerve palsy due to a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma. The sixth nerve palsy appeared acutely and then spontaneously resolved over several months, initially suggesting a microvascular origin of the palsy. Subsequent recurrences of the palsy indicated a different pathophysiologic etiology and MRI revealed the lesion at the petrous apex. Surgical resection improved the compressive effect of the lesion at Dorello’s canal and clinical improvement was observed. A relapsing–remitting sixth nerve palsy is an unusual presentation of this rare lesion. PMID:28261154

  7. [Multifrequency vestibular study after vestibular neurotomy and chemical labyrinthectomy].

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Dumas, G; Righini, C; Karkas, A; Hitter, A; Schmerber, S

    2008-06-01

    Vestibular neurotomy (VN) and chemical labyrinthectomy (CL) are the two most common techniques of vestibular deafferention to treat patients with intractable vertigo. A long-term evaluation of vestibular function has been performed with a variety of vestibular tests to find out whether there persisted any residual vestibular function after each technique. We called in all patients who have been treated for the last 10 years and have no known vestibular disease in the non treated ear. Low frequencies were analyzed with caloric tests, medium frequencies with the head-shaking test and head-impulse test, and high frequencies with the skull vibration test. The otolithic function was explored with the subjective vertical visual analysis and otolithic myogenic evoked potentials. Nine patients treated with VN and 12 with CL presented to our department. We were thus able to compare VN and CL patients with a group of 10 normal patients and another group of nine patients that had had a translabyrinthine approach for an acoustic neuroma. We found out that vestibular responses did persist in seven out of nine (78 %) patients after VN and 11 out of 12 (92 %) patients after CL. On the other hand, no vestibular response was detected following resection of vestibular schwannoma through a translabyrinthine approach. We came to the conclusion that the two latter techniques, unlike vestibulocochlear nerve section via the translabyrinthine approach, are only incomplete methods of vestibular deafferention.

  8. [Management of apicectomy and root canal obturation completed one time under direct vision].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi-bo; Zhu, Qiang; Cao, Zhi-zhong

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of apicectomy and root canal obturation completed one time under direct vision on chronic periapical periodontitis of anterior teeth. 34 cases(40 teeth) with RCT failing or larger periodontal lesion, which couldn't be cured depending on RCT only, were chosen for this clinical study. They were randomly divided into two groups with 20 teeth in each group. Root canal obturation was done after apicectomy under direct vision(group A),or apicectomy was done after RCT(group B).The time of filling process, the ratio of postobturation pain, the obturation quality and short-term efficiency of the treatment were assessed. The data were separately subjected to t test, Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test with SPSS12.0 software package. The time of filling process in group A was significantly less than group B (P<0.05); No statistically significant difference was found between group A and group B in the ratio of postobturation pain, obturation quality and clinical therapeutic efficiency. The method of apicectomy and root canal obturation completed one time under direct vision is rapid, simple and effective in treating chronic periapical periodontitis of anterior teeth.The short-term clinical therapeutic efficiency is similar to that of apicectomy done after RCT.

  9. Endoscopy-assisted surgery of the petrous apex.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Douglas E

    2004-02-01

    Five large petrous apex lesions, 4 cholesterol granulomas and 1 cholesteatoma, were managed with a combination of microsurgical and endoscopic techniques. Retrospective review of clinical experience in an academic medical center. Traditional microsurgical approaches, infracochlear and/or retrofacial, were used in all cases, followed by endoscopic examination and debridement of the interior of the cysts. In all cases residual disease or fibrous septae within the cysts were found endoscopically that were not evident through use of the operating microscope. In all cases, the lesions were successfully managed without operative complications. The addition of endoscopic visualization to traditional microsurgical approaches allowed exposure of recesses within the lesions, removal of debris and inspissated secretions, and identification and removal of septae and fibrous bands within the petrous apex lesions that would not have been identified with the operating microscope alone. No surgical or postsurgical complications occurred in any of the cases, including facial weakness, hearing loss, or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak.

  10. Periodontal status following trapezoidal and semilunar flaps in apicectomy.

    PubMed

    Chindia, M L; Valderhaug, J

    1995-09-01

    Apicectomy is offered where routine endodontics cannot resolve periapical inflammation. This study compared the influence on periodontal attachment level of two surgical procedures, the trapezoidal (TF) and the semilunar (SF) flaps. Twenty patients aged 16-44 years (mean 23.2 years), were randomly assigned to either flap procedure. Prior to surgery the patients received periodontal prophylaxis and oral hygiene instruction. Records were made of gingival indices, pocket depth and the distance from the cemento-enamel junction to the bottom of the gingival pocket. The measurements involved buccal surfaces of 13 to 23. The TF flap extended from 14 to 24 between the interdental papillae, whereas the SF flap was carried in a semi circle from 14 to 24 about 2mm from the attached gingiva. The surgical wounds were closed with black silk sutures. Antibiotics and analgesics were prescribed. Sutures were removed after one week. On recall after 6, 12 and 24 weeks the same measurements as before surgery were made. No statistically significant change was observed in pocket depth or attachment level between TF and SF flaps (p > 0.05). However, the TF flap produced less noticeable scarification than the SF flap.

  11. Three-year outcomes of apicectomy (apicoectomy): Mining an insurance database.

    PubMed

    Raedel, Michael; Hartmann, Andrea; Bohm, Steffen; Walter, Michael H

    2015-10-01

    The outcome of apicectomy in clinical reality is supposed to be different compared to outcomes reported from clinical trials. The objective of this study was to measure the outcome of apicectomies under practice conditions by mining an insurance data base. This retrospective study was based on claims data of a major German national health insurance company (BARMER GEK). Through the company's data warehouse fee codes and treatment dates were accessible and allowed the tracing of clinical courses. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses for the target event 'extraction' were conducted for all teeth that underwent apicectomies within a 3 year period. Testing for differences among survival rates across groups was performed with the Log-Rank-test. A total of 93,797 teeth in 77,636 patients could be traced after apicectomy. The cumulative 3-year survival rate was 81.6%. Anterior teeth showed a significantly higher survival rate of 84.0% compared to premolars (80.4%) and molars (80.2%). The survival rate in men (83.5%) was significantly higher than in women (80.6%). Analysis of survival by age revealed continuously declining survival rates with age (93.3% for subjects under 18 years of age to 75.6% for subjects over 84 years of age). The 3-year outcomes of apicectomy were still acceptable for an intervention that is mostly conducted as a retreatment after failure of a preceding measure. However at a population level, the question remains to be answered whether other treatment options would potentially be more effective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma of the Petrous Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy C.; Thorell, William E.; Treves, John S.; Fidler, Mary E.; Moore, Gary F.; Leibrock, Lyal G.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is an unusual, benign bone lesion that most commonly affects the maxilla and mandible; skull involvement is rare. The etiology is uncertain but may be related to trauma. GCRG is difficult to distinguish from giant cell tumor of the bone and has a lower recurrence rate. Thirteen reports of temporal bone GCRG in 11 patients have been reported. One report of a petrous GCRG in a 3-year-old girl has been identified. A 38-year-old male presented with a 2-year history of fullness in his left ear, ipsilateral hearing loss, and intermittent cacosmia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large left-sided anterior temporal extradural mass. The patient underwent a left frontotemporal craniotomy and resection of a left temporal fossa tumor that involved the petrous and squamous parts of the temporal bone. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful, except for increased hearing loss secondary to opening of the epitympanum. Follow-up at one month revealed no other problems. Histopathology of the specimen was consistent with a giant cell reparative granuloma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2p91-aFigure 3 PMID:17171108

  13. How to approach a bilobed petrous apex granuloma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Benson, Aaron G

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol granulomas are the most common lesions involving the petrous apex. However, they are still an uncommon finding overall, and they often remain undiagnosed until they have become extremely large and symptomatic. Many surgical approaches to the petrous apex exist. Factors that often influence the surgical approach include the surgeon's experience, the patient's anatomy, and the patient's hearing status. The purpose of this case report-which involved a 66-year-old woman who was referred to our clinic for evaluation of severe headaches, dizziness, and left-sided pulsatile tinnitus-is to demonstrate the definitive need for an extended middle fossa approach when a bilobed petrous apex mass is encountered.

  14. A 5-year audit of outcome of apicectomies carried out in a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, A. J.; Hughes, C. E.; Dixon, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    Success rates of up to 90% have been claimed for apicectomy. However, the conditions that this procedure is carried out under at district general hospitals may be at variance with such studies. A 5-year audit of outcome was therefore carried out within a district general hospital. It was found that 89% of apicected teeth still remained at 5 years. Outcome was not influenced by any of the factors examined, and could not be predicted radiographically. Most failures occurred after the average postoperative review period of 10.5 months. Patient satisfaction with the procedure was high at over 90%. Based on these results it was concluded that apicectomy was an effective procedure when carried out by staff of all grades within the district general hospital, and that repeated follow-up appointments with radiographs over the first postoperative year were not useful. PMID:7574319

  15. Long-term results of amalgam versus glass ionomer cement as apical sealant after apicectomy.

    PubMed

    Jesslén, P; Zetterqvist, L; Heimdahl, A

    1995-01-01

    A total of 67 teeth in 64 patients were treated with apicectomy and retrograde fillings. They were randomized to receive fillings of amalgam or glass ionomer cement in a comparative clinical study. Healing was evaluated clinically and radiographically after 1 and 5 years. Evaluation showed no difference in healing capacity between the two materials. Overall success rates in both groups were registered as 90% at 1 year and 85% at 5 years. Contamination with blood or saliva during insertion of the filling material did not affect healing adversely. The study shows that the 5-year follow-up result can be predicted in more than 95% of the cases at the 1-year follow-up. It can be concluded that glass ionomer cement is a valid alternative to amalgam as an apical sealant after apicectomy with equally good long-term clinical results.

  16. Effects of acetyl-DL-leucine in vestibular patients: a clinical study following neurotomy and labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Ferber-Viart, C; Dubreuil, C; Vidal, P P

    2009-01-01

    For 40 years, the amino acid acetyl-DL-leucine (or isoleucine - Tanganil) has been used in clinical practice to reduce imbalance and autonomic manifestations associated with acute vertigo crises. In animal models, acetyl-DL-leucine accelerates vestibular compensation following unilateral labyrinthectomy, and has only minor effects on normal vestibular function. Our work in animal models suggested that acetyl-DL-leucine acted mainly on abnormally hyperpolarized and/or depolarized vestibular neurons by restoring their membrane potential towards a mean value of -65 to -60 mV. Acute vestibular disorders are associated with asymmetrical spontaneous activities of vestibular neurons, so this previous study suggested that acetyl-DL-leucine may reduce acute, vestibular-related imbalances in humans. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the efficacy of acetyl-DL-leucine during the acute stage following neurotomy or labyrinthectomy in patients undergoing surgery for unilateral vestibular acoustic neurinoma, or suffering from unilateral and intractable Ménière's disease. By clinical testing of the vestibular function, patients were categorized according to the degree of compensation of the vestibular deafferentation prior to surgery. For patients who had achieved a close to perfect compensation before surgery, acetyl-DL-leucine had minor or no effect after surgery. For patients who displayed residual vestibular function before surgery, acetyl-DL-leucine eased the static vestibular syndromes, which followed neurotomy. Our findings tend to confirm the view that acetyl-DL-leucine mainly acts, in humans, on abnormally hyperpolarized and/or depolarized vestibular neurons by restoring their membrane potential towards normal values; this is consistent with findings in guinea pigs following unilateral labyrinthectomy. Moreover, it suggests that the degree of caloric paresis of the patients before neurotomy is useful both to predict the outcome of any acute vestibular syndrome

  17. In vitro study of the variable square pulse Er:YAG laser cutting efficacy for apicectomy.

    PubMed

    Grgurević, Josko; Grgurević, Lovro; Miletić, Ivana; Karlović, Zoran; Krmek, Silvana Jukić; Anić, Ivica

    2005-06-01

    Variable square pulse (VSP) Er:YAG laser should be quicker than older Er:YAG lasers. The objectives were: (1) comparison of VSP laser and mechanical handpiece efficacy for apicectomy and (2) determination of optimal pulse width/energy/frequency combination. Sixty extracted, single-rooted mature human teeth with round apical parts were instrumented, root filled, cleaned, and divided into four groups. Apical 2 mm of each root were apicectomized with mechanical handpiece and Er:YAG laser with three different settings (LaserA = 200 mJ/300 microseconds/ 8 Hz; LaserB = 200 mJ/100 microseconds/8 Hz; LaserC = 380 mJ/100 microseconds/20 Hz). Timing results were statistically compared. LaserC was the most efficient setting. Differences between groups were significant except between LaserC-Mechanical and LaserA-LaserC (P < 0.05). VSP Er:YAG laser used for apicectomy is slower by a factor of 7-31 than mechanical handpiece, but treatment outcome is acceptable. Optimal settings for apicectomy with VSP laser are 380 mJ/100 microseconds/20 Hz. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) using membranes and calcium sulphate after apicectomy: a comparative histomorphometrical study.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, G; Murashima, Y; Wadachi, R; Sawada, N; Suda, H

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of resorbable and non-resorbable membranes, and calcium sulphate on bone regeneration in osseous defects in conjunction with apicectomy. The mandibular third and fourth premolars of 12 beagle dogs were root treated, and apicectomies were performed. The osseous defects were divided randomly into five groups. In groups A, B and C the osseous defects were covered with e-PTFE membranes, PLGA membranes, and collagen membranes, respectively. In group D, defects were filled with calcium sulphate. Nothing was used in group E, which served as controls. The dogs were sacrificed 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Undemineralized sections were obtained and evaluated histomorphometrically. Newly formed cortical bone had closed the defect in the cortical plate in all groups at 16 weeks. The degree of concavity of the new cortical bone at 16 weeks in groups A and D was significantly less than in group B (P < 0.01). The percentage of regenerated bone in group A was significantly greater than in groups B (P < 0.01), C (P < 0.05) and E (P < 0.05). In group D, it was significantly greater than in groups B (P < 0.01) and E (P < 0.05). The data suggests that e-PTFE membrane is more effective compared to resorbable membranes and controls for bone regeneration after apicectomy, and that calcium sulphate could be substituted for e-PTFE membrane.

  19. Patient perceived burden of implant placement compared to surgical tooth removal and apicectomy.

    PubMed

    Reissmann, Daniel R; Poulopoulos, Georgios; Durham, Justin

    2015-12-01

    To assess how patients actually perceive implant placement, to evaluate whether patients' perceived burdens are related to specific stages during implant placement, and to compare patients' perceptions during implant placement with other surgical procedures. A sample of 287 patients was consecutively recruited. Only patients with implantations (n=45), surgical tooth removal (n=147), or apicectomies (n=95) were included. Patients' perceptions during oral surgery and implantation were assessed using the Burdens in Oral Surgery Questionnaire (BiOS-Q). Effects of treatment on BiOS-Q total and domain scores were assessed using multivariate linear regression analyses, and effect sizes (Cohen's d) were computed. Overall, patients' perceived burdens during oral surgery were low indicated by a mean BiOS-Q total score of 28.5 points, with lowest scores for Side effects (19.4) and highest scores for Anesthesia (34.1). Among treatment groups, implantation was perceived least unpleasant. This was related to lower burdens during Bone and soft tissue manipulation during implantation than during surgical tooth removal (difference: 14.8 points; d=0.8) or apicectomy (difference: 13.1 points; d=0.7). Implantation has a low overall perceived burden and is significantly less burdensome during bone and soft tissue manipulation than surgical tooth removal or apicectomy. Patients can be informed that implant placement is less unpleasing than other commonly performed oral surgery procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional organization of primate translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes and effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; McHenry, M. Q.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes (trVORs) are characterized by distinct spatio-temporal properties and sensitivities that are proportional to the inverse of viewing distance. Anodal (inhibitory) labyrinthine stimulation (100 microA, < 2 s) during motion decreased the high-pass filtered dynamics, as well as horizontal trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance. Cathodal (excitatory) currents had opposite effects. Translational VORs were also affected after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Animals lost their ability to modulate trVOR sensitivity as a function of viewing distance acutely after the lesion. These deficits partially recovered over time, albeit a significant reduction in trVOR sensitivity as a function of viewing distance remained in compensated animals. During fore-aft motion, the effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy were more dramatic. Both acute and compensated animals permanently lost their ability to modulate fore-aft trVOR responses as a function of target eccentricity. These results suggest that (1) the dynamics and viewing distance-dependent properties of the trVORs are very sensitive to changes in the resting firing rate of vestibular afferents and, consequently, vestibular nuclei neurons; (2) the most irregularly firing primary otolith afferents that are most sensitive to labyrinthine electrical stimulation might contribute to reflex dynamics and sensitivity; (3) inputs from both labyrinths are necessary for the generation of the translational VORs.

  1. Functional organization of primate translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes and effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; McHenry, M. Q.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes (trVORs) are characterized by distinct spatio-temporal properties and sensitivities that are proportional to the inverse of viewing distance. Anodal (inhibitory) labyrinthine stimulation (100 microA, < 2 s) during motion decreased the high-pass filtered dynamics, as well as horizontal trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance. Cathodal (excitatory) currents had opposite effects. Translational VORs were also affected after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Animals lost their ability to modulate trVOR sensitivity as a function of viewing distance acutely after the lesion. These deficits partially recovered over time, albeit a significant reduction in trVOR sensitivity as a function of viewing distance remained in compensated animals. During fore-aft motion, the effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy were more dramatic. Both acute and compensated animals permanently lost their ability to modulate fore-aft trVOR responses as a function of target eccentricity. These results suggest that (1) the dynamics and viewing distance-dependent properties of the trVORs are very sensitive to changes in the resting firing rate of vestibular afferents and, consequently, vestibular nuclei neurons; (2) the most irregularly firing primary otolith afferents that are most sensitive to labyrinthine electrical stimulation might contribute to reflex dynamics and sensitivity; (3) inputs from both labyrinths are necessary for the generation of the translational VORs.

  2. Homer syndrome after thoracoscopic apicectomy for spontaneous pneumothorax as a complication of chest tube placement.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Micaela; Golinelli, Marco; Colli, Giovanni; Mullineris, Barbara; Melotti, Gianluigi

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of Horner syndrome occurring secondary only to the high insertion of a chest tube after video-thoracoscopic apicectomy for spontaneous pneumothorax. Because all other causes could be ruled out, the Authors assume that the lesion to the sympathetic nerve fibres was caused by pressure exerted by the tip of the chest tube. Horner syndrome due to this cause can easily be avoided. The tip of the chest tube should be kept at the level of, or below, the third posterior rib, unless the clinical situation dictates otherwise. This cause of Horner syndrome must be taken into account because, if recognized and treated promptly, it can be fully resolved.

  3. Labyrinthectomy changes T-type calcium channels in vestibular neurones of the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Ris, Laurence; Capron, Brigitte; Nonclercq, Denis; Alexandre, Henri; Sindic, Christian; Toubeau, Gérard; Godaux, Emile

    2003-08-26

    In the vestibular nuclei of the awake guinea pig, all neurones are spontaneously active. After unilateral labyrinthectomy, this activity virtually disappears on the ipsilateral side, but is completely restored one week later. In a recent study, we observed that the restoration of spontaneous activity was correlated with an increase in pacemaker activity. In the current study, we found that the ratio of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurones endowed with one of the currents known to play a role in pacemaker activity (i.e. low-threshold calcium current; LTCC) increased from 29% in control guinea pigs to 65% in animals labyrinthectomised on the ipsilateral side one week earlier. Yet this change was not correlated with a modification of the ratio of neurones expressing any of the three related protein-channels (alpha1G, alpha1H and alpha1I).

  4. Calcium sulphate as a bone substitute for various osseous defects in conjunction with apicectomy.

    PubMed

    Murashima, Y; Yoshikawa, G; Wadachi, R; Sawada, N; Suda, H

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium sulphate on various osseous defects when used in conjunction with apicectomy. Mandibular third and fourth premolars of 11 beagle dogs were used. After root-canal treatment and apicectomy, three types of osseous defects were prepared on both sides of the mandible as follows: type 1, osseous defect communicating with the gingival sulcus: type 2, large osseous defect including two roots; type 3, 'through and through' osseous defect. The experimental side was allocated randomly, and the osseous defects were filled with medical grade calcium sulphate. The defects on the opposite side were left unfilled as controls. The dogs were sacrificed at 8 and 16 weeks postoperatively. Undemineralized sections were obtained and examined histomorphometrically. In type 1 defects, bone was not observed on the buccal side of the root on either experimental or control side at 8 and 16 weeks. In both type 2 and 3 defects, bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) values on the experimental side were significantly higher than those on the control side (P < 0.01), and mineral apposition rate (MAR) values on the experimental side were significantly higher than those on the control side (P < 0.01). The use of calcium sulphate was effective in bone regeneration on both large osseous defects and 'through and through' osseous defects. It was less effective in osseous defects communicating with the gingival sulcus.

  5. Orthograde retreatment and apexification after unsuccessful endodontic treatment, retreatment and apicectomy.

    PubMed

    Sedgley, C M; Wagner, R

    2003-11-01

    To describe a case where a second orthograde retreatment was successful in the management of an infected mandibular right first molar that previously had received both orthograde and retrograde treatments. Periapical surgery is unlikely to be successful unless the root canal system has been adequately debrided and sealed. A case is described where orthograde endodontic treatment, retreatment and apicectomy were unsuccessful in the management of and infected mandibular right first molar. The periapical radiolucency eventually disappeared following a second orthograde retreatment. Teh second retreatment included 12 months of intracanal calcium hydroxide placement to promote apexification, thus allowing subsequent controlled obturation with gutta percha and AH26. At a 5-year review following completion of treatment, the tooth remained asymptomatic and was in normal function. Orthograde retreatment is a treatment option to manage refractory lesions in teeth that have previously received endodontic treatment, retreatment and apicectomy. Orthograde retreatment using long-term intracanal calcium hydroxide can help promote root-end closure of a resected apex.

  6. Strontium Isotope Signals in Cremated Petrous Portions as Indicator for Childhood Origin

    PubMed Central

    Harvig, Lise; Frei, Karin Margarita; Price, T. Douglas; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Dental enamel is currently of high informative value in studies concerning childhood origin and human mobility because the strontium isotope ratio in human dental enamel is indicative of geographical origin. However, many prehistoric burials involve cremation and although strontium retains its original biological isotopic composition, even when exposed to very high temperatures, intact dental enamel is rarely preserved in cremated or burned human remains. When preserved, fragments of dental enamel may be difficult to recognize and identify. Finding a substitute material for strontium isotope analysis of burned human remains, reflecting childhood values, is hence of high priority. This is the first study comparing strontium isotope ratios from cremated and non-cremated petrous portions with enamel as indicator for childhood origin. We show how strontium isotope ratios in the otic capsule of the petrous portion of the inner ear are highly correlated with strontium isotope ratios in dental enamel from the same individual, whether inhumed or cremated. This implies that strontium isotope ratios in the petrous bone, which practically always survives cremation, are indicative of childhood origin for human skeletal remains. Hence, the petrous bone is ideal as a substitute material for strontium isotope analysis of burned human remains. PMID:25010496

  7. Strontium isotope signals in cremated petrous portions as indicator for childhood origin.

    PubMed

    Harvig, Lise; Frei, Karin Margarita; Price, T Douglas; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Dental enamel is currently of high informative value in studies concerning childhood origin and human mobility because the strontium isotope ratio in human dental enamel is indicative of geographical origin. However, many prehistoric burials involve cremation and although strontium retains its original biological isotopic composition, even when exposed to very high temperatures, intact dental enamel is rarely preserved in cremated or burned human remains. When preserved, fragments of dental enamel may be difficult to recognize and identify. Finding a substitute material for strontium isotope analysis of burned human remains, reflecting childhood values, is hence of high priority. This is the first study comparing strontium isotope ratios from cremated and non-cremated petrous portions with enamel as indicator for childhood origin. We show how strontium isotope ratios in the otic capsule of the petrous portion of the inner ear are highly correlated with strontium isotope ratios in dental enamel from the same individual, whether inhumed or cremated. This implies that strontium isotope ratios in the petrous bone, which practically always survives cremation, are indicative of childhood origin for human skeletal remains. Hence, the petrous bone is ideal as a substitute material for strontium isotope analysis of burned human remains.

  8. Optimal Ancient DNA Yields from the Inner Ear Part of the Human Petrous Bone

    PubMed Central

    Pinhasi, Ron; Fernandes, Daniel; Sirak, Kendra; Novak, Mario; Connell, Sarah; Alpaslan-Roodenberg, Songül; Gerritsen, Fokke; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Gromov, Andrey; Raczky, Pál; Anders, Alexandra; Pietrusewsky, Michael; Rollefson, Gary; Jovanovic, Marija; Trinhhoang, Hiep; Bar-Oz, Guy; Oxenham, Marc; Matsumura, Hirofumi; Hofreiter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The invention and development of next or second generation sequencing methods has resulted in a dramatic transformation of ancient DNA research and allowed shotgun sequencing of entire genomes from fossil specimens. However, although there are exceptions, most fossil specimens contain only low (~ 1% or less) percentages of endogenous DNA. The only skeletal element for which a systematically higher endogenous DNA content compared to other skeletal elements has been shown is the petrous part of the temporal bone. In this study we investigate whether (a) different parts of the petrous bone of archaeological human specimens give different percentages of endogenous DNA yields, (b) there are significant differences in average DNA read lengths, damage patterns and total DNA concentration, and (c) it is possible to obtain endogenous ancient DNA from petrous bones from hot environments. We carried out intra-petrous comparisons for ten petrous bones from specimens from Holocene archaeological contexts across Eurasia dated between 10,000-1,800 calibrated years before present (cal. BP). We obtained shotgun DNA sequences from three distinct areas within the petrous: a spongy part of trabecular bone (part A), the dense part of cortical bone encircling the osseous inner ear, or otic capsule (part B), and the dense part within the otic capsule (part C). Our results confirm that dense bone parts of the petrous bone can provide high endogenous aDNA yields and indicate that endogenous DNA fractions for part C can exceed those obtained for part B by up to 65-fold and those from part A by up to 177-fold, while total endogenous DNA concentrations are up to 126-fold and 109-fold higher for these comparisons. Our results also show that while endogenous yields from part C were lower than 1% for samples from hot (both arid and humid) parts, the DNA damage patterns indicate that at least some of the reads originate from ancient DNA molecules, potentially enabling ancient DNA analyses of

  9. The use of the erbium yttrium aluminium garnet (2,940 nm) in a laser-assisted apicectomy procedure.

    PubMed

    Reyhanian, A; Parker, S; Moshonov, J

    2008-09-27

    If conventional endodontic treatment is not possible or not successful, apical endodontic surgery may be indicated. New techniques, materials and technologies have been used to increase the already high success rate of root canal treatment. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of the Erbium:YAG (2,940 nm) laser in treatment of apicectomy as a central tool, with the advantages of enhanced patient comfort, better bactericidal and decontamination effects.

  10. Responses of central vestibular neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation in compensated macaques after unilateral labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Newlands, Shawn D; Wei, Min

    2013-10-01

    After vestibular labyrinth injury, behavioral measures of vestibular function partially recover through the process of vestibular compensation. The present study was performed to improve our understanding of the physiology of macaque vestibular nucleus neurons in the compensated state (>6 wk) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). The responses of neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation at a series of frequencies (0.1-2.0 Hz) and peak velocities (7.5-210°/s) were examined to determine how the behavior of these cells differed from those in animals with intact labyrinths. The sensitivity of neurons responding to ipsilateral rotation (type I) did not differ between the intact and injured sides after UL, although this sensitivity was lower bilaterally after lesion than before lesion. The sensitivity of neurons that increase firing with contralateral rotation (type II) was higher ipsilateral to the UL than before lesion or in the nucleus contralateral to the UL. UL did not increase asymmetry in the responses of individual type I or II neurons to ipsilateral vs. contralateral rotation, nor does it change the power law relationship between neuronal firing and level of stimulation. Increased sensitivities of contralesional type I neurons to the remaining vestibular nerve input and increased efficacy of inhibitory vestibular commissures projecting to the ipsilesional vestibular nucleus appear to be responsible for recovery of dynamic function of central vestibular neurons in compensated animals. The portion of type I neurons on the ipsilesional side is reduced in compensated animals, which likely accounts for the asymmetries in vestibular reflexes and perception that characterize vestibular function after UL.

  11. Responses of central vestibular neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation in compensated macaques after unilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Min

    2013-01-01

    After vestibular labyrinth injury, behavioral measures of vestibular function partially recover through the process of vestibular compensation. The present study was performed to improve our understanding of the physiology of macaque vestibular nucleus neurons in the compensated state (>6 wk) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). The responses of neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation at a series of frequencies (0.1–2.0 Hz) and peak velocities (7.5–210°/s) were examined to determine how the behavior of these cells differed from those in animals with intact labyrinths. The sensitivity of neurons responding to ipsilateral rotation (type I) did not differ between the intact and injured sides after UL, although this sensitivity was lower bilaterally after lesion than before lesion. The sensitivity of neurons that increase firing with contralateral rotation (type II) was higher ipsilateral to the UL than before lesion or in the nucleus contralateral to the UL. UL did not increase asymmetry in the responses of individual type I or II neurons to ipsilateral vs. contralateral rotation, nor does it change the power law relationship between neuronal firing and level of stimulation. Increased sensitivities of contralesional type I neurons to the remaining vestibular nerve input and increased efficacy of inhibitory vestibular commissures projecting to the ipsilesional vestibular nucleus appear to be responsible for recovery of dynamic function of central vestibular neurons in compensated animals. The portion of type I neurons on the ipsilesional side is reduced in compensated animals, which likely accounts for the asymmetries in vestibular reflexes and perception that characterize vestibular function after UL. PMID:23864379

  12. Expression of glycine receptors and gephyrin in rat medial vestibular nuclei and flocculi following unilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Zhou, Liu-Qing; Shi, Hong; Leng, Yang-Ming; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Su-Lin; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2016-01-01

    The medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and the cerebellar flocculus have been known to be the key areas involved in vestibular compensation (VC) following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). In this study, we examined the role of gephyrin and glycine receptor (GlyR) in VC using Sprague-Dawley rats, in an aim to gain deeper insight into the mechanisms responsible for VC. The expression of the α1 and β subunits of GlyR and gephyrin was immunohistochemically localized in rat MVN and flocculi. The mRNA and protein expression of GlyR (α1 and β subunits) and gephyrin was quantitatively determined by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis at 8 h, and at 1, 3 and 7 days following UL. It was found that in the ipsilateral MVN, the mRNA and protein expression of the β subunit of GlyR was significantly increased in comparison to the sham-operated (P<0.01) rats, and in comparison to the contralateral side (P<0.01) at 8 h following UL. In the ipsilateral flocculi, GlyR β protein expression was significantly elevated (P<0.01 for all), as compared to the sham-operated rats at 8 h, and at 1 and 3 days and to the contralateral side 8 h, 1 and 3 days following UL. No significant differences were observed in the mRNA and protein expression of GlyR α1 and gephyrin in the MVN or flocculi between the two sides (ipsilateral and contralateral) in the UL group, and between the sham-operated group and the UL group at any time point. The findings of our study thus suggest that GlyR plays a major role in the recovery of the resting discharge of the deafferented MVN neurons in the central vestibular system. PMID:28026001

  13. Primary aneurysmal bone cyst of the petrous temporal bone: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mayur; Velho, Vernon; Kharosekar, Hrushikesh

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) arising in the petrous portion of the temporal bone is a rare entity with only five such reported cases in the literature. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who presented with a tender swelling in the right preauricular region with right ear discharge and conductive hearing loss of 4 years' duration. Computed tomography and Magnetic Resonance imaging showed a destructive lesion in the right petrous bone with cavitation consistent with the diagnosis of ABC. Gross total resection of the lesion was achieved and diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient had no recurrence at 12 months of follow-up. This report presents the unusual location of an uncommon bony tumor with a review of its clinical, radiological, and histopathological features as well as the treatment modalities available. PMID:27695554

  14. Giant Petrous Bone Cholesteatoma: Combined Microscopic Surgery and an Adjuvant Endoscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Savastano, Ersilia; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Re, Massimo; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Petrous bone cholesteatomas (PBCs) are epidermoid cysts, which have developed in the petrous portion of the temporal bone and may be congenital or acquired. Cholesteatomas arising in this region have a tendency to invade bone and functional structures and the middle and posterior fossae reaching an extensive size. Traditionally, surgery of a giant PBC contemplates lateral transtemporal or middle fossa microscopic surgery; however, in recent years, endoscopic surgical techniques (primary or complementary endoscopic approach) are starting to receive a greater consensus for middle ear and mastoid surgeries. We report the rare case of an 83-year-old Caucasian male affected by a giant cholesteatoma that eroded the labyrinth and the posterior fossa dura and extended to the infralabyrinthine region, going beyond the theca and reaching the first cervical vertebra. The giant cholesteatoma was managed through a combined approach (microscopic and, subsequently, complementary endoscopic approach). In this case report, we illustrate some advantages of this surgical choice.

  15. Giant Petrous Bone Cholesteatoma: Combined Microscopic Surgery and an Adjuvant Endoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Iannella, Giannicola; Savastano, Ersilia; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Re, Massimo; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Petrous bone cholesteatomas (PBCs) are epidermoid cysts, which have developed in the petrous portion of the temporal bone and may be congenital or acquired. Cholesteatomas arising in this region have a tendency to invade bone and functional structures and the middle and posterior fossae reaching an extensive size. Traditionally, surgery of a giant PBC contemplates lateral transtemporal or middle fossa microscopic surgery; however, in recent years, endoscopic surgical techniques (primary or complementary endoscopic approach) are starting to receive a greater consensus for middle ear and mastoid surgeries. We report the rare case of an 83-year-old Caucasian male affected by a giant cholesteatoma that eroded the labyrinth and the posterior fossa dura and extended to the infralabyrinthine region, going beyond the theca and reaching the first cervical vertebra. The giant cholesteatoma was managed through a combined approach (microscopic and, subsequently, complementary endoscopic approach). In this case report, we illustrate some advantages of this surgical choice. PMID:26937334

  16. Simultaneous Labyrinthectomy and Cochlear Implantation for Patients with Single-Sided Ménière's Disease and Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Doobe, G.; Ernst, A.; Ramalingam, R.; Mittmann, P.; Todt, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the treatment outcome of a simultaneous labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation in patients with single-sided Ménière's disease and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Study Design. Prospective study. Method. Five patients with single-sided Ménière's disease with active vertigo and functional deafness were included. In all cases, simultaneous cochlear implantation combined with labyrinthectomy surgery was performed. The outcome has been evaluated by the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and speech recognition. Results. The combined labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation led in all patients to a highly significant reduction of dizziness up to a restitutio ad integrum. After activation of the cochlear implant and rehabilitation, a mean monosyllabic speech understanding of 69% at 65 dB was observed. Conclusion. For patients with single-sided Ménière's disease and profound sensorineural hearing loss the simultaneous labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation are efficient method for the treatment of vertigo as well as the rehabilitation of the auditory system. PMID:26380275

  17. Effectiveness of Submucosal Dexamethasone to Control Postoperative Pain & Swelling in Apicectomy of Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shahzad Ali; Khan, Irfanullah; Shah, Humera Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal dexamethasone injection to control postoperative pain and swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth. Methods A randomized, controlled trial comprising 60 adult patients (68.3% male, 31.7% female) with no local or systemic problems was conducted. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was given 4mg dexamethasone injection perioperatively. Group B (control group) was treated conventionally without any steroid injection. Postoperative pain and swelling was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Objective measurements of facial pain and swelling were performed daily up to six days postoperatively. Results Dexamethasone group showed significant reduction in pain and swelling postoperatively compared with the control. Conclusion Submucosal dexamethasone 4mg injection is an effective therapeutic strategy for swift and comfortable improvement after surgical procedure and has a significant effect on reducing postoperative pain and swelling. The treatment offers a simple, safe, painless, noninvasive and cost effective therapeutic option for moderate and severe cases. PMID:23267293

  18. Effectiveness of submucosal dexamethasone to control postoperative pain & swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shahzad Ali; Khan, Irfanullah; Shah, Humera Shahzad

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal dexamethasone injection to control postoperative pain and swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth. A randomized, controlled trial comprising 60 adult patients (68.3% male, 31.7% female) with no local or systemic problems was conducted. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was given 4mg dexamethasone injection perioperatively. Group B (control group) was treated conventionally without any steroid injection. Postoperative pain and swelling was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Objective measurements of facial pain and swelling were performed daily up to six days postoperatively. Dexamethasone group showed significant reduction in pain and swelling postoperatively compared with the control. Submucosal dexamethasone 4mg injection is an effective therapeutic strategy for swift and comfortable improvement after surgical procedure and has a significant effect on reducing postoperative pain and swelling. The treatment offers a simple, safe, painless, noninvasive and cost effective therapeutic option for moderate and severe cases.

  19. Molar apicectomy with amalgam root-end filling: results of a prospective study in two district general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wesson, C M; Gale, T M

    2003-12-20

    To determine the five-year success rates, site or sites of failure, prognostic indicators and lower lip morbidity associated with molar apicectomy using amalgam root-end filling. Multicentre, prospective study. The departments of oral and maxillo-facial surgery in two district general hospitals. One thousand and seven molar apicectomy procedures, combined with amalgam root-end filling were expedited during the period 1974-1995. A five-year review of each operated tooth was carried out or attempted between 1979-2000. Of the 790 (78%) operated molars successfully reviewed at 5 years or later 451 (57%) exhibited 'complete healing' and 39 (5%) 'uncertain healing'. Three hundred (38%) were classified as 'unsatisfactory healing' (failures), and these included 12 which were assumed to be of periodontal origin. Whilst longitudinal root fracture, perforation and/or infection in the furcation, periodontal disease or a non-restorable crown accounted for treatment failure and often the need to remove teeth subsequently, the study probably pointed to the apical ends of the roots rather than the furcation as being the major sites at which 'unsatisfactory healing' occurred. Mandibular first molars attracted the highest 'complete healing' rate (60%) and mandibular second molars the lowest (46%). 'Good' root canal treatment (RCT) at the outset improved the prognosis of a root-end filling (REF) whilst the absence of RCT compromised it. Cystic change pointed to a better prognosis than apical granulomatous change as did a deep compared with a shallow 'bone cuff'. Disease at the furcation suggested a worse prognosis. Teeth which showed 'complete healing' at 1 year had a 75% probability of maintaining this outcome at 5 years. Sensory disturbance of variable duration occurred in the lower lip following 20-21% of mandibular molar procedures. In the majority of cases (79-80%) this had remitted within 3 months. A permanent deficit occurred in 8 patients (1%) where the apicectomy could

  20. Can cochlear function be preserved after a modified translabyrinthine approach to eradicate a huge cholesteatoma extending to the petrous apex?

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Ju; Lee, Jun Ho; Jung, Sang Ho; Park, Chan Hum; Hong, Seok Min

    2009-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to show that the modified translabyrinthine approach with partial ablation of the labyrinths is useful for preserving hearing in our experience involving three clinical cases with huge cholesteatomas extending to the petrous apex. A retrospective analysis of patient medical records was done in a tertiary referral medical center. All three patients studied had huge cholesteatomas extending to the petrous apex and were treated surgically with a modified translabyrinthine approach between October 2005 and December 2006. The modified translabyrinthine approach was used in all patients. Long-term hearing results were obtained. The cholesteatoma sac was removed completely in all patients. Pure tone audiometry demonstrated that the hearing had been saved in two patients. We concluded that the modified translabyrinthine approach is useful for preserving hearing postoperatively when a huge cholesteatoma exists involving the petrous region or a vestibular schwannoma in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle.

  1. Spontaneous Petrous Carotid Artery Occlusive Dissection Treated by Local Fibrinolysis and Stent Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Villa, G.; Cellerini, M.; Mangiafico, S.; Ammannati, F.; Giordano, G. P.

    2004-01-01

    Summary This paper reports a case of local thrombolytic therapy followed by stenting of the petrous carotid in a young woman with recurrent transient ischemic attacks from spontaneous dissection. A total of four overlapping balloon-expandable stents were delivered in two different sessions one month apart. The procedure resulted in a potentially efficacious treatment for the prevention or reduction of cerebral damages from ischemia. At follow-up three months later the patient was symptom-free and DSA revealed a delayed proximal small pseudoaneurysm and a carotid-cavernous fistula. At one year follow-up the patient was still symptom-free with unmodified findings at cerebral angiography. PMID:20587226

  2. Endoscopic Endonasal Infrapetrous Transpterygoid Approach to the Petroclival Junction for Petrous Apex Chondrosarcoma: Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Adrian J; Bonney, Phillip A; Iser, Courtney R; Ali, Rohaid; Sanclement, Jose A; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Chondrosarcomas of the skull base are rare tumors that present difficult management considerations due to the pathoanatomical relationships of the tumor to adjacent structures. We present the case of a 25-year-old female patient presenting with a chondrosarcoma of the right petrous apex extending inferiorly, medial to the cranial nerves. The tumor was resected via an endoscopic endonasal infrapetrous transpterygoid approach that achieved complete resection and an excellent long-term outcome with no complications. Technical nuances and potential pitfalls of the case are discussed in depth including measures to protect the carotid artery while performing the required drilling of the skull base to access the lesion.

  3. Endoscopic Endonasal Infrapetrous Transpterygoid Approach to the Petroclival Junction for Petrous Apex Chondrosarcoma: Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Adrian J.; Bonney, Phillip A.; Iser, Courtney R.; Ali, Rohaid; Sanclement, Jose A.; Sughrue, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas of the skull base are rare tumors that present difficult management considerations due to the pathoanatomical relationships of the tumor to adjacent structures. We present the case of a 25-year-old female patient presenting with a chondrosarcoma of the right petrous apex extending inferiorly, medial to the cranial nerves. The tumor was resected via an endoscopic endonasal infrapetrous transpterygoid approach that achieved complete resection and an excellent long-term outcome with no complications. Technical nuances and potential pitfalls of the case are discussed in depth including measures to protect the carotid artery while performing the required drilling of the skull base to access the lesion. PMID:26251785

  4. Recurrent aseptic meningitis as a rare but important presentation of congenital petrous apex cholesteatoma: the value of appropriate imaging

    PubMed Central

    MacKeith, Samuel A; Soledad-Juarez, Maria; Tiberti, Liliana; Orfila, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We describe the presentation, investigation and challenging management of a young adult with recurrent aseptic meningitis. The presence of cholesterol and triglycerides in the cerebrospinal fluid sample was recognised as a potential sign of an underlying dermoid or epidermoid cyst. We demonstrate how appropriate imaging of the skull base with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI can help differentiate between lesions of the petrous apex, facilitating the diagnosis of a petrous apex congenital cholesteatoma/epidermoid cyst. Awareness of this unusual mode of presentation of a rare disease, as well as knowledge of key diagnostic investigations, may allow for earlier identification, treatment and reduced morbidity/mortality. PMID:24614768

  5. [Vestibular neurotomy versus chemical labyrinthectomy for disabling Menière disease].

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Dumas, G; Nguyen, D-Q; Mohr, E; Hitter, A; Schmerber, S

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the efficiency on the vertigos and the impact on the audition of the vestibular neurotomy (VN) and the chemical labyrinthectomy (CL) in patients with severe Menière's disease, in order to determine the precise place for each technique in treatment algorithm. Retrospective study of 71 VN (performed between 1986 and 2003) and 35 CL (performed between 1997 and 2003). These two treatments both aim at obtaining a vestibular deafferentation in order to free definitely the patient of vertigo manifestations. Vestibular results have been assessed by caloric tests performed before and 6 months after treatment. Subjective success was evaluated by searching for recurrent attacks of vertigo and by the AAO-HNS (American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Society) scale of subjective evaluation of vertigos (follow-up of 6.4 years after VN and 2.4 years after CL). Pure tone audiometry before treatment and then 6 months later was performed. Complications of two types of treatment were recorded and evaluated. In 90% of the cases after VN and 86% of the cases after CL, caloric tests indicated a strong vestibular hyporeflexy (hypovalence > 90%). Attacks of vertigo reoccurred in 5.6% of the cases when the hyporeflexy was strong and 85.7% of the cases when it was weak. The quality of the vestibular results on vertigo depends on the degree of hypovalence after treatment. An improvement of the AAO-HNS scale have been obtained in 93% of the cases in the NV group and in 81% of the cases in the LC group. Attacks of vertigo were recurrent in 7% of the patients operated on by VN and 11.4% of the patients treated by CL. Mean pure tone auditory thresholds changed from 50.24 dB HL to 55.64 dB HL (p=0.003) in the VN group and from 69.11 dB HL to 74.51 dB HL (p=0.41) in the CL group. Comparison of the variations of the mean pure tone auditory thresholds before treatment and 6 months after the end of the treatment doesn't show any significant difference between the 2 groups (p > 0

  6. Gradenigo's syndrome as first presentation of solitary osseous plasmacytoma of the petrous apex.

    PubMed

    Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Hamidi, Mehrdokht; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2014-07-01

    Plasma cell tumors of the skull base are rare in neurosurgical practice. True solitary osseous plasmacytoma of the skull base without development of multiple myeloma is extremely rare. We report a case of typical Gradenigo's syndrome, including left abducens nerve palsy, left facial pain and paresthesia in V1 and V2 distribution of trigeminal nerve caused by solitary osseous plasmacytoma of the left petrous apex. The patient was a 46-year-old man who presented with diplopia for two days. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed a hyperintense mass on T1-weighted images and slightly hypointense mass on T2-weighted images in the left petrous apex and left parasellar area. Through a left subtemporal middle fossa approach, subtotal resection of the lesion was performed. Histopathological examination of the lesion revealed plasmacytoma. The patient received 54 Gy radiation for the local tumor. Four months after radiation, the abducens palsy improved. Four years after treatment, the patient remained well with no symptoms or signs of local recurrence or progression to multiple myeloma.

  7. Petrous apex cephalocoele: contribution of coexisting intracranial pathologies to the aetiopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Duran, S; Hatipoglu, H G; Cılız, D S; Elverici, E; Sakman, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to show the MRI findings of petrous apex cephalocoele (PAC) and the other intracranial pathologies that coexist with PAC, and to discuss the contribution of the co-existing pathologies to aetiopathogenesis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of our imaging archive for the period from January 2012 to October 2013 revealed 13 patients with PAC (12 females and 1 male; age range, 26–69 years). 11 patients underwent MRI examination of the cranium, and 2 patients underwent MRI examination of the sellar region. We evaluated the lesions for content, signal intensity, enhancement, relation to petrous apex and Meckel's cave. Images were also evaluated for coexisting pathologies. Results: The presenting symptoms included headache, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and trigeminal neuropathy. All patients had PAC. All lesions were located posterolateral to the Meckel's cave and were isointense with CSF signal on all pulse sequences. All lesions were continuous with Meckel's cave. Coexisting pathologies included intracranial aneurysmal dilatation, empty sella, mass in hypophysis, arachnoid cyst, inferior herniation of parahippocampal gyrus and optic nerve sheath CSF distension. Conclusion: Coexistence with other intracranial pathologies supports the possibility of CSF imbalance and/or intracranial hypertension in the aetiopathogenesis of PAC. Advances in knowledge: This study examined the contribution of the co-existing intracranial pathologies to the aetiopathogenesis of PAC. PMID:25651410

  8. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. III. Responses after labyrinthectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasker, D. M.; Hullar, T. E.; Minor, L. B.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in four squirrel monkeys after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Spontaneous nystagmus was measured at the beginning and end of each testing session. During the period that animals were kept in darkness (4 days), the nystagmus at each of these times measured approximately 20 degrees /s. Within 18-24 h after return to the light, the nystagmus (measured in darkness) decreased to 2.8 +/- 1.5 degrees /s (mean +/- SD) when recorded at the beginning but was 20.3 +/- 3.9 degrees /s at the end of the testing session. The latency of the VOR measured from responses to steps of acceleration (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) was 8.4 +/- 0.3 ms for responses to ipsilesional rotations and 7.7 +/- 0.4 ms for contralesional rotations. During the period that animals were kept in darkness after the labyrinthectomy, the gain of the VOR measured during the steps of acceleration was 0.67 +/- 0.12 for contralesional rotations and 0.39 +/- 0.04 for ipsilesional rotations. Within 18-24 h after return to light, the VOR gain for contralesional rotations increased to 0.87 +/- 0.08, whereas there was only a slight increase for ipsilesional rotations to 0.41 +/- 0. 06. A symmetrical increase in the gain measured at the plateau of head velocity was noted after the animals were returned to light. The VOR evoked by sinusoidal rotations of 2-15 Hz, +/-20 degrees /s, showed a better recovery of gain at lower (2-4 Hz) than at higher (6-15 Hz) frequencies. At 0.5 Hz, gain decreased symmetrically when the peak amplitude was increased from 20 to 100 degrees /s. At 10 Hz, gain was decreased for ipsilesional half-cycles and increased for contralesional half-cycles when velocity was raised from 20 to 50 degrees /s. A model incorporating linear and nonlinear pathways was used to simulate the data. Selective increases in the gain for the linear pathway accounted for the

  9. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. III. Responses after labyrinthectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasker, D. M.; Hullar, T. E.; Minor, L. B.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in four squirrel monkeys after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Spontaneous nystagmus was measured at the beginning and end of each testing session. During the period that animals were kept in darkness (4 days), the nystagmus at each of these times measured approximately 20 degrees /s. Within 18-24 h after return to the light, the nystagmus (measured in darkness) decreased to 2.8 +/- 1.5 degrees /s (mean +/- SD) when recorded at the beginning but was 20.3 +/- 3.9 degrees /s at the end of the testing session. The latency of the VOR measured from responses to steps of acceleration (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) was 8.4 +/- 0.3 ms for responses to ipsilesional rotations and 7.7 +/- 0.4 ms for contralesional rotations. During the period that animals were kept in darkness after the labyrinthectomy, the gain of the VOR measured during the steps of acceleration was 0.67 +/- 0.12 for contralesional rotations and 0.39 +/- 0.04 for ipsilesional rotations. Within 18-24 h after return to light, the VOR gain for contralesional rotations increased to 0.87 +/- 0.08, whereas there was only a slight increase for ipsilesional rotations to 0.41 +/- 0. 06. A symmetrical increase in the gain measured at the plateau of head velocity was noted after the animals were returned to light. The VOR evoked by sinusoidal rotations of 2-15 Hz, +/-20 degrees /s, showed a better recovery of gain at lower (2-4 Hz) than at higher (6-15 Hz) frequencies. At 0.5 Hz, gain decreased symmetrically when the peak amplitude was increased from 20 to 100 degrees /s. At 10 Hz, gain was decreased for ipsilesional half-cycles and increased for contralesional half-cycles when velocity was raised from 20 to 50 degrees /s. A model incorporating linear and nonlinear pathways was used to simulate the data. Selective increases in the gain for the linear pathway accounted for the

  10. Rare case study of a primary carcinoma of the petrous bone and a brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Atallah, Ihab; Karkas, Alexandre; Righini, Christian Adrien; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Temporal bone carcinoma is an aggressive tumor with multiple unconfirmed risk factors. Herein, we present a rare case of a primary petrous bone carcinoma in a female patient (65 years old) with an irrelevant medical history. She presented a postauricular swelling that revealed a multilocular osteolytic cystic lesion of the mastoid portion of the temporal bone on the CT scan. The patient underwent resection of the lesion and pathological analysis revealed moderately to well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Postoperative radiotherapy was carried out. Until the present time, the patient shows complete remission on regular clinical and radiological follow-up. Although no widely accepted strategy for managing temporal bone tumors exists, a review of the literature showed that surgery with or without radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Preoperative assessment and accurate staging are vital in ensuring that the treatment is adequate for each disease stage. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Endoscopic endonasal approach to cholesterol granulomas of the petrous apex: a series of 17 patients: clinical article.

    PubMed

    Paluzzi, Alessandro; Gardner, Paul; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Pinheiro-Neto, Carlos D; Scopel, Tiago Fernando; Koutourousiou, Maria; Snyderman, Carl H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report the results in a consecutive series of patients who had undergone an endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) for drainage of a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma (CG). Seventeen cases with a confirmed diagnosis of petrous apex CG were identified from a database of more than 1600 patients who had undergone an EEA to skull base lesions at the authors' institution in the period from 1998 to 2011. Clinical outcomes were reviewed and compared with those in previous studies of open approaches. Nine patients underwent a transclival approach and 8 patients underwent a combined transclival and infrapetrous approach. A Silastic stent was used in 11 patients (65%), a miniflap in 4 (24%), and a simple marsupialization of the cyst in 3 (18%). All symptomatic patients had partial or complete improvement of their symptoms postoperatively and at the follow-up (mean follow-up 20 months, range 3-67 months). Complications developed in 3 patients (18%) including epistaxis, chronic serous otitis media, eye dryness, and a transient sixth cranial nerve palsy. Two patients (12%) had a symptomatic recurrence of the cyst requiring repeat endoscopic endonasal drainage. There were no instances of internal carotid artery injuries, CSF leaks, or new hearing loss. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 2 days (range 0.7-4.6 days). These results were comparable with those in previous studies of open approaches to petrous apex CGs. There was a strong correlation between the size of the cyst and the type of approach chosen (Rpb [point biserial correlation coefficient] = +0.67, p = 0.003359) and a very strong correlation between the degree of medial extension (defined by the V-angle) and the choice of approach (Rpb = +0.81, p < 0.0001). Based on these observations, the authors developed an algorithm for guiding the choice of the most appropriate route of drainage. The EEA is a safe and effective alternative to traditional open approaches to petrous apex CGs.

  12. A minimally-invasive method for sampling human petrous bones from the cranial base for ancient DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Sirak, Kendra A; Fernandes, Daniel M; Cheronet, Olivia; Novak, Mario; Gamarra, Beatriz; Balassa, Tímea; Bernert, Zsolt; Cséki, Andrea; Dani, János; Gallina, József Zsolt; Kocsis-Buruzs, Gábor; Kővári, Ivett; László, Orsolya; Pap, Ildikó; Patay, Róbert; Petkes, Zsolt; Szenthe, Gergely; Szeniczey, Tamás; Hajdu, Tamás; Pinhasi, Ron

    2017-06-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) research involves invasive and destructive sampling procedures that are often incompatible with anthropological, anatomical, and bioarcheological analyses requiring intact skeletal remains. The osseous labyrinth inside the petrous bone has been shown to yield higher amounts of endogenous DNA than any other skeletal element; however, accessing this labyrinth in cases of a complete or reconstructed skull involves causing major structural damage to the cranial vault or base. Here, we describe a novel cranial base drilling method (CBDM) for accessing the osseous labyrinth from the cranial base that prevents damaging the surrounding cranial features, making it highly complementary to morphological analyses. We assessed this method by comparing the aDNA results from one petrous bone processed using our novel method to its pair, which was processed using established protocols for sampling disarticulated petrous bones. We show a decrease in endogenous DNA and molecular copy numbers when the drilling method is used; however, we also show that this method produces more endogenous DNA and higher copy numbers than any postcranial bone. Our results demonstrate that this minimally-invasive method reduces the loss of genetic data associated with the use of other skeletal elements and enables the combined craniometric and genetic study of individuals with archeological, cultural, and evolutionary value.

  13. Comparative study of dentine permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 microm TEA CO2 and Er:YAG laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gouw-Soares, S; Stabholz, A; Lage-Marques, J L; Zezell, D M; Groth, E B; Eduardo, C P

    2004-04-01

    Failure of apicectomies is generally attributed to dentine surface permeability as well as to the lack of an adequate marginal sealing of the retrofilling material, which allows the percolation of microorganisms and their products from the root canal system to the periodontal region, thus compromising periapical healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dentine and the marginal permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 micro m TEA CO(2) or Er:YAG 2.94 micro m laser irradiation. Sixty-five single rooted human endodontically treated teeth were divided into five experimental groups: group I (control), apicectomy with high speed bur; group II, similar procedure to that of group I, followed by dentinal surface treatment with 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser; group III, similar procedure to group I followed by dentinal surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m; group IV, apicectomy and surface treatment with CO(2) 9.6 micro m laser; and group V, apicectomy and surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m. The analysis of methylene blue dye infiltration through the dentinal surface and the retrofilling material demonstrated that the samples from the groups that were irradiated with the lasers showed significantly lower infiltration indexes than the ones from the control group. These results were compatible with the structural morphological changes evidenced through SEM analysis. Samples from groups II and IV (9.6 micro m CO(2)) showed clean smooth surfaces, fusion, and recrystallized dentine distributed homogeneously throughout the irradiated area sealing the dentinal tubules. Samples from groups III and V (Er:YAG 2.94 micro m) also presented clean surfaces, without smear layer, but roughly compatible to the ablationed dentine and without evidence of dentinal tubules. Through the conditions of this study, the Er:YAG 2.94 micro m and the 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser used for root canal resection and dentine surface treatment showed a reduction of

  14. Responses of non-eye movement central vestibular neurons to sinusoidal horizontal translation in compensated macaques after unilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nan; Wei, Min

    2014-01-01

    After vestibular labyrinth injury, behavioral deficits partially recover through the process of vestibular compensation. The present study was performed to improve our understanding of the physiology of the macaque vestibular system in the compensated state (>7 wk) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Three groups of vestibular nucleus neurons were included: pre-UL control neurons, neurons ipsilateral to the lesion, and neurons contralateral to the lesion. The firing responses of neurons sensitive to linear acceleration in the horizontal plane were recorded during sinusoidal horizontal translation directed along six different orientations (30° apart) at 0.5 Hz and 0.2 g peak acceleration (196 cm/s2). This data defined the vector of best response for each neuron in the horizontal plane, along which sensitivity, symmetry, detection threshold, and variability of firing were determined. Additionally, the responses of the same cells to translation over a series of frequencies (0.25–5.0 Hz) either in the interaural or naso-occipital orientation were obtained to define the frequency response characteristics in each group. We found a decrease in sensitivity, increase in threshold, and alteration in orientation of best responses in the vestibular nuclei after UL. Additionally, the phase relationship of the best neural response to translational stimulation changed with UL. The symmetry of individual neuron responses in the excitatory and inhibitory directions was unchanged by UL. Bilateral central utricular neurons still demonstrated two-dimension tuning after UL, consistent with spatio-temporal convergence from a single vestibular end-organ. These neuronal data correlate with known behavioral deficits after unilateral vestibular compromise. PMID:24717349

  15. Vestibular neurectomy vs. chemical labyrinthectomy in the treatment of disabling Menière's disease: a long-term comparative study.

    PubMed

    Schmerber, Sébastien; Dumas, Georges; Morel, Nils; Chahine, Karim; Karkas, Alexandre

    2009-08-01

    To compare the efficiency of vestibular neurectomy (VN) and chemical labyrinthectomy (CL) in the treatment of Menière's disease's disabling vertigo, and to assess their subsequent effects on hearing. This is a retrospective study of 58 VN procedures and 35 CL procedures. Treatment results were assessed by caloric testing and pure-tone audiometry performed before and after treatment. Subjective success was defined by the number of recurrent attacks of vertigo and by the AAO-HNS vertigo scale. Caloric testing revealed strong vestibular hyporeflexia in 91.0% of VN cases and 86.0% of CL cases. Vertigo recurred in 7.0% of cases in the VN group and in 11.4% of cases in the CL group. Mean pure-tone auditory thresholds increased from 45.00dB HL to 50.84dB HL (p=0.19) in the VN group and from 69.11dB HL to 74.51dB HL (p=0.41) in the CL group. Vestibular neurectomy and chemical labyrinthectomy offer similar control of vertigo in patients with Menière's disease. CL is a simple, minimally invasive procedure that emerges as an effective method for treating Menière's disabling vertigo without causing significant hearing deterioration.

  16. N-Acetyl-L-Leucine Accelerates Vestibular Compensation after Unilateral Labyrinthectomy by Action in the Cerebellum and Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p < 0.03) and the N-acetyl-L-leucine groups (p < 0.01), compared to the sham treatment group, but not in the N-acetyl-D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by

  17. N-acetyl-L-leucine accelerates vestibular compensation after unilateral labyrinthectomy by action in the cerebellum and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Günther, Lisa; Beck, Roswitha; Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p < 0.03) and the N-acetyl-L-leucine groups (p < 0.01), compared to the sham treatment group, but not in the N-acetyl-D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by

  18. Hearing preservation in acoustic neuroma resection: Analysis of petrous bone measurement and intraoperative application

    PubMed Central

    Tanrikulu, Levent; Lohse, Peer; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Naraghi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an increased risk for labyrinthine injury for the resection of acoustic neuromas (AN) on the suboccipital, retrosigmoid approach. Prognostic factors should be analyzed for the postoperative hearing function. Methods: We examined 51 patients with ANs using preoperative intact hearing function. Audiological data were obtained by pure tone audiogram (PTA) and speech audiogram. The preoperative and postoperative anatomical localization of the labyrinth was measured with specific distances regarding the tumor and corresponding anatomy of the posterior fossa by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Postoperative MRI controls confirmed no injuries to the labyrinth (0%). The postoperative hearing results showed 100% hearing preservation for T1-tumors (<1 ml/<1.1 cm), 50% for T2-tumors (1–4 ml/1.1–1.8 cm), 40% for T3-tumors (4–8 ml/1.8–2.3 cm) and 18% for T4-tumors (>8 ml/>2.3 cm). Postoperative deafness was seen in all cases with ventral tumor extension higher than 5.5 mm. Postoperative loss of hearing was seen in all cases with hearing preservation with 6–8% of speech discrimination and an increase in the hearing threshold of 12 dB in the PTA compared to the preoperative hearing status. Conclusion: Petrous bone measurement by high-resolution MRI data enables safe surgical exposure of the internal acoustic canal with avoidance of injury to the labyrinth and a better postoperative prognosis, especially for intrameatal ANs and for the resection of intrameatal portions of larger neuromas. The prognostic factors enable the patients and the surgeon a better estimation of postoperative results regarding deafness and postoperative hypacusis and support a consolidated treatment planning. PMID:28144470

  19. Petrous apex cephalocele and empty sella/arachnoid cyst coexistence: a clue for cerebrospinal fluid pressure imbalance?

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Hatice Gül; Cetin, Mehmet Ali; Gürses, Mehmet Ali; Dağlioğlu, Ergun; Sakman, Bülent; Yüksel, Enis

    2010-03-01

    To reveal the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) properties of incidental petrous apex cephalocele (PAC) and coexisting empty sella-arachnoid cyst. We reviewed our archive from June 2005 to July 2008. Four patients were diagnosed with PAC (four females; age range, 41-60 years; mean, 48.5). All patients underwent MRI examination of the cranium. We evaluated the lesions for extension into the neighboring structures, content, signal intensity, enhancement, and relation to Meckel's cave, petrous apex and for the presence of empty sella. The presenting symptoms included headache for three patients and diplopia for one patient. All patients had bilateral PAC, more prominent on one side. All lesions were centered posterolateral to the Meckel's cave. They were isointense to cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity and continuous with Meckel's cave on T1W, T2W and FLAIR sequences. In two patients, there was no diffusion restriction on diffusion-weighted MR images and the ADC map. Three patients had empty sella. One patient had arachnoid cyst. Coexistence with empty sella-arachnoid cyst raises the possibility of cerebrospinal fluid inbalance in the etiology.

  20. “Spontaneous” CSF Fistula due to Transtegmental Brain Herniation in Combination with Signs of Increased Intracranial Pressure and Petrous Bone Hyperpneumatization: An Illustrative Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Diones; Fermin-Delgado, Rafael; Stoeter, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Importance Transtegmental brain herniation into the petrous bone is a rare cause of rhinoliquorrhea. Our case presents a combination of several typical clinical and imaging findings illustrating the ongoing etiologic discussion of such cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas. Clinical Presentation A 53-year-old man presented with nasal discharge after a strong effort to suppress coughing. Imaging revealed a transtegmental herniation of parts of the inferior temporal gyrus into the petrous bone and in addition a combination of signs of chronically increased intracranial pressure and a hyperpneumatization of the petrous bone. The fistula was closed by a middle cranial fossa approach. Conclusion The case illustrates the two main predisposing factors for development of petrous bone CSF fistulas: increased intracranial pressure and thinning of the tegmental roof due to extensive development of air cells. Because the CSF leakage repair does not change the underlying cause, patients have to be informed about the possibility of developing increased intracranial pressure and recurrences of brain herniations at other sites. PMID:25485224

  1. "Spontaneous" CSF Fistula due to Transtegmental Brain Herniation in Combination with Signs of Increased Intracranial Pressure and Petrous Bone Hyperpneumatization: An Illustrative Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Diones; Fermin-Delgado, Rafael; Stoeter, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Background and Importance Transtegmental brain herniation into the petrous bone is a rare cause of rhinoliquorrhea. Our case presents a combination of several typical clinical and imaging findings illustrating the ongoing etiologic discussion of such cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas. Clinical Presentation A 53-year-old man presented with nasal discharge after a strong effort to suppress coughing. Imaging revealed a transtegmental herniation of parts of the inferior temporal gyrus into the petrous bone and in addition a combination of signs of chronically increased intracranial pressure and a hyperpneumatization of the petrous bone. The fistula was closed by a middle cranial fossa approach. Conclusion The case illustrates the two main predisposing factors for development of petrous bone CSF fistulas: increased intracranial pressure and thinning of the tegmental roof due to extensive development of air cells. Because the CSF leakage repair does not change the underlying cause, patients have to be informed about the possibility of developing increased intracranial pressure and recurrences of brain herniations at other sites.

  2. Accuracy of computer-aided geometric three-dimensional reconstruction of the human petrous bone based on serial unstained celloidin sections

    PubMed Central

    WEI, XIAN-FENG; ZHANG, XIAO-YANG; YUAN, WU; LI, YUN-SHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the petrous bone with computer image-processing technology, which could be beneficial for the teaching of anatomy and for surgical procedures. The unstained celloidin sections of human temporal bone were digitized with high resolution and quality, and then processed with Amira® software to include alignment, segmentation and reconstruction. The integral structure of the human inner ear was presented with computer modeling, including the petrous bone, bone labyrinth, internal carotid artery canal, internal jugular vein canal, sigmoid sinus, inferior petrosal sinus, glossopharyngeal meatus, vagal meatus, internal acoustic meatus, facial nerve canal, greater superficial petrosal nerve, vestibular aqueduct, extraosseous portion of the endolymphatic sac, round and oval window, processus cochleariformis and pyramidal eminence. The 3D model showed detailed structure of the external and internal petrous bone, as well as their spatial relationship. The present study suggests the feasibility of comprehensive 3D reconstruction of the petrous bone using unstained celloidin sections, which may provide advantages for future study. PMID:25780396

  3. Osteolytic clear cell meningioma of the petrous bone occurring 36 years after posterior cranial fossa irradiation: Case report.

    PubMed

    Ben Nsir, A; Ben Hamouda, K; Hammedi, F; Kilani, M; Hattab, N

    2016-01-01

    While bone invasion and hyperostosis are frequent phenomena in meningiomas, primary intraosseous meningiomas are rare and their occurrence in the skull base is an extraordinary exception. Moreover, radiation-induced meningiomas represent a unique clinical dilemma given the fact that patients with these tumors had often received a prior full course of radiotherapy. A 42-year-old man presented with a 3-month history of progressively worsening facial asymmetry. His medical history was consistent for a posterior cranial fossa irradiation at the age of 6 years for a non-confirmed brain stem tumor. On admission his Karnofsky performance status was graded as 50% and his neurological examination showed a complete right facial nerve paralysis and hearing impairment. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an osteolytic tumor invading the whole right petrous bone without intracranial involvement. As the tumor reached the external auditory canal, a tissue sample was obtained locally. Pathological examination of the lesion identified a grade II clear cell meningioma and the patient was consequently addressed for an intensity modulated radiation therapy. His condition remained unchanged till the most recent follow-up examination, 8 months later. To the best of our knowledge, a radiation induced osteolytic clear cell meningioma of the petrous bone has not been previously reported. As little literature exists regarding the use of adjuvant therapies for these tumors, intensity modulated radiation therapy remains an attractive treatment option in case of pervious irradiation and general status alteration. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. The Changes in mGluR2 and mGluR7 Expression in Rat Medial Vestibular Nucleus and Flocculus Following Unilateral Labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Zhou, Liu-Qing; Zhang, Su-Lin; Liu, Bo; Leng, Yang-Ming; Zhou, Ren-Hong; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and the cerebellar flocculus are the key areas, which contribute to the behavioral recovery (“vestibular compensation”) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). In these areas, how the genetic activities of the metabotropic glutamate receptors mGluR2 and mGluR7 performance after UL is unknown. With the means of quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry, we analyzed the expression of mGluR2 and mGluR7 in the bilateral MVN and the flocculus of rats in different stages after UL (the 1st, 3rd, and 7th day). Our results show that in the MVN, the mRNA, and protein expressions of mGluR7 were ipsilaterally decreased at the 1st day following UL. However, in the MVN, no change was observed in the mRNA and protein expressions of mGluR2. On the other hand, the mRNA and protein expression of mGluR2 were enhanced in the ipsilateral flocculus at the 1st day following UL, while in the flocculus no change was shown in mGluR7 mRNA and protein expressions. Our results suggest that mGluR2 and mGluR7 may contribute to the early rebalancing of spontaneous resting activity in the MVN. PMID:24264036

  5. Detailed anatomy knowledge: first step to approach petroclival meningiomas through the petrous apex. Anatomy lab experience and surgical series.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Roberto; Sameshima, Tetsuro; Pacca, Paolo; Crobeddu, Emanuela; Garbossa, Diego; Ducati, Alessandro; Zenga, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Petroclival meningiomas are a challenge for neurosurgeons due to the complex anatomy of the region that is rich of vessels and nerves. A perfect and detailed knowledge of the anatomy is very demanding in neurosurgery, especially in skull base surgery. The authors describe the microsurgical anatomy to perform an anterior petrosectomy based on their anatomical and surgical experience and perform a literature review. The temporal bone is the most complex and fascinating bone of skull base. The apex is located in the angle between the greater wing of the sphenoid and the occipital bone. Removing the petrous apex exposes the clivus. The approach directed through the temporal bone in this anatomical area is referred to as an anterior petrosectomy. The area that must be drilled is the rhomboid fossa that is defined by the Kawase, premeatal, and postmeatal triangles. In Division of Neurosurgery - University of Turin, 130 patients, from August 2013 to September 2015, underwent surgical resection of intracranial meningiomas. In this group, we have operated 7 PCMs and 5 of these were approached performing an anterior petrosectomy with good results. In our conclusions, we feel that this surgery require an advanced knowledge of human anatomy and a specialized training in interpretation of radiological and microsurgical anatomy both in the dissection lab and in the operating room.

  6. Changes in beta-2 adrenergic receptor and AMP-activated protein kinase alpha-2 subunit in the rat vestibular nerve after labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Tadashi; Horii, Arata; Uno, Atsuhiko; Imai, Takao; Okazaki, Suzuyo; Kamakura, Takefumi; Takimoto, Yasumitsu; Inohara, Hidenori

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, to elucidate the role of vestibular ganglion (VG) after the unilateral labyrinthine damage, we examined quantitative changes in mRNA expression of beta-adrenergic receptors (bARs) and AMP-activated protein kinase alpha catalytic subunits (aAMPKs) in VG after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) in rats. Using the real-time PCR method, beta2 AR mRNA expression in bilateral VG and AMPK alpha2 mRNA expression in the ipsilateral VG were significantly up-regulated with the maximum increase at the postoperative 7 day and 1 day, respectively. The up-regulation of beta2 AR in bilateral VG was long-lasting until 28 days after UL and that of AMPK alpha2 in the ipsilateral VG was just transient within 7 days after UL. These mRNA changes were supported by immunohistochemical data. According to previous reports, both of bARs and aAMPKs could regulate mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP) mRNA expression in several kinds of tissues and therefore might have thermogenic neurotransmission and antioxidant neuroprotective roles in neuronal tissues. UL requires not only long-lasting response of VG for central vestibular neuro-plasticity around 2-4 weeks but rapid response of VG against apoptosis of peripheral vestibular epithelia-neuronal synapses. The present findings suggest that beta2 AR in bilateral VG and AMPK alpha2 in the ipsilateral VG might play important signaling roles after the unilateral labyrinthine damage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Changes in Histamine Receptors (H1, H2, and H3) Expression in Rat Medial Vestibular Nucleus and Flocculus after Unilateral Labyrinthectomy: Histamine Receptors in Vestibular Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Leng, Yangming; Zhou, Renhong; Kong, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular compensation is the process of behavioral recovery following peripheral vestibular lesion. In clinics, the histaminergic medicine is the most widely prescribed for the treatment of vertigo and motion sickness, however, the molecular mechanisms by which histamine modulates vestibular function remain unclear. During recovery from the lesion, the modulation of histamine receptors in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and the flocculus may play an important role. Here with the means of quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry, we studied the expression of histamine receptors (H1, H2, and H3) in the bilateral MVN and the flocculus of rats on the 1st, 3rd, and 7th day following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Our results have shown that on the ipsi-lesional flocculus the H1, H2 and H3 receptors mRNA and the protein increased significantly on the 1st and 3rd day, with compare of sham controls and as well the contralateral side of UL. However, on the 7th day after UL, this expression returned to basal levels. Furthermore, elevated mRNA and protein levels of H1, H2 and H3 receptors were observed in the ipsi-lesional MVN on the 1st day after UL compared with sham controls and as well the contralateral side of UL. However, this asymmetric expression was absent by the 3rd post-UL. Our findings suggest that the upregulation of histamine receptors in the MVN and the flocculus may contribute to rebalancing the spontaneous discharge in bilateral MVN neurons during vestibular compensation. PMID:23840519

  8. Extradural subtemporal transzygomatic approach to the clival and paraclival region with endoscopic assist.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Filippo; Boari, Nicola; Roberti, Fabio; Gragnaniello, Cristian; Biglioli, Federico; Caputy, Anthony J; Mortini, Pietro

    2012-09-01

    The authors describe the extradural subtemporal transzygomatic (ESTZ) approach and its variants to expose the clival and paraclival areas. A microanatomical study was conducted to quantify the clival and paraclival exposure and the maneuverability areas obtained by microscope and endoscope using the ESTZ approach. Section versus preservation of the third trigeminal branch (V3) and petrous apicectomy to obtain a wider clival exposure and a better internal carotid artery control are discussed. Eight cadaveric specimens were dissected to obtain morphometric measurements after performing the ESTZ approach and its variants. Anatomic areas exposed by the approaches were calculated using the ImageJ 1.37a software. The ESTZ approach performed with sectioning of V3 and petrous apicectomy allowed for a mean incremental exposed area of 1.8 cm2 (range, 1.24-2.43 cm2). The mean amount of additional anatomic areas visualized after the ESTZ approach with petrous apicectomy if compared with the ESTZ approach without petrous apicectomy was 24% (range, 14.4%-37.5%). The mean percentage increase of maneuverability area after petrous apicectomy was 69.9% (range, 43.8%-96.6%). The ESTZ approach is suitable when dealing with extradural tumors of the middle-upper clivus extending into the ipsilateral paraclival area. V3 section and petrous apicectomy increase the operability, the surgical exposure, and the maneuverability area and improve vascular control on the internal carotid artery. Application of endoscopy does not impact on the maneuverability area but enhances the visualization of blind corners; endoscopic surgical view without drilling the petrous apex is comparable to that obtained by the microscope after petrous apicectomy.

  9. Periapical Bone Healing after Apicectomy with and without Retrograde Root Filling with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A 6-year Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Casper; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Christiansen, René; Wenzel, Ann; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte

    2016-04-01

    In cases of post-treatment periapical disease, retreatment may be necessary. To choose the most appropriate retreatment method, knowledge of the long-term prognosis is important. Surgical endodontic retreatment (SER) is a relevant treatment method. This study assessed changes in outcome from 1 to 6 years after surgery. SER was performed on teeth randomly allocated to have a MTA root-end filling (MTA group) or smoothing of the orthograde gutta-percha filling after apicectomy (GP group). Patients participating in the 1-year follow-up were reinvited for a 6-year clinical and radiographic examination. Three observers assessed treatment outcome both clinically and radiographically from the 1-year and 6-year follow-up examination. At the 6-year follow-up, 39 of 52 teeth were available and examined (75% participation rate). In the MTA group, 16 of 19 teeth (86%) and in the GP group 11 of 20 teeth (55%) were assessed as successful (P = .04). In the MTA group and the GP group, 80% and 90%, respectively, of teeth assessed as successful at the 1-year follow-up remained successful. All unsuccessful teeth in the MTA group (3 teeth) were lost because of vertical root fracture. The proportion of healed cases was larger in the MTA group than in the GP group at both the 1-year and 6-year follow-up. Findings indicate that a 1-year follow-up may not be sufficient in assessing the long-term outcome of surgical endodontic retreatment. With a longer follow-up, other factors not directly related to the endodontic treatment may be relevant for a successful outcome. This needs further investigation in larger patient samples. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Morphological assessment of dentine and cementum following apicectomy with Zekrya burs and Er:YAG laser associated with direct and indirect Nd:YAG laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Abilio Albuquerque Maranhão; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Barletta, Fernando Branco; Vieira-Júnior, Nilson Dias; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula

    2010-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the apical surface morphology of maxillary central incisors resected 3.0 mm from the tooth apex using Zekrya burs or Er:YAG laser, with or without subsequent direct Nd:YAG laser irradiation (apical and buccal surfaces) and indirect irradiation (palatal surface). Forty maxillary central incisors were instrumented and obturated. The roots were divided into 4 groups according to the root resection method (Zekrya bur or Er:YAG laser - 1.8 W, 450 mJ, 4 Hz, 113 J/cm(2)) and further surface treatment (none or Nd:YAG laser - 2.0 W, 100 mJ, 20 Hz, 124 J/cm(2)). The teeth were prepared for SEM analysis. Scores ranging from 1 to 4 were attributed to cut quality and morphological changes. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and by Dunn's test. SEM images showed irregular surfaces on the apical portions resected with Zekrya burs, with smear layer and grooves in the resected dentine and slight gutta-percha displacement and plasticization. On the other hand, apicectomies carried out with Er:YAG laser showed morphological changes compatible with ablated dentine, with rough surfaces and craters. In spite of the presence of plasticized gutta-percha, with the presence of bubbles, an irregular adaptation of the filling material to the root walls was also observed. Direct Nd:YAG laser irradiation of the apical and buccal surfaces of the resected roots resulted in areas of resolidification and fusion in the dentine and cementum, with a vitrified aspect; indirect Nd:YAG laser irradiation of the palatal surfaces yielded a lower number of changes in the cementum, with irregular resolidification areas. There were no differences in terms of cut quality between the use of burs and Er:YAG laser or between the 2 surfaces (apical and buccal) treated with Nd:YAG laser with direct irradiation. However, morphological changes were significantly less frequent on surfaces submitted to indirect irradiation (palatal) when compared with those directly irradiated

  11. Changes in number of water-filled vesicles of choroid plexus in early and late phase of experimental rabbit subarachnoid hemorrhage model: the role of petrous ganglion of glossopharyngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Kanat, Ayhan; Turkmenoglu, Osman Nuri; Yolas, Coskun; Gundogdu, Cemal; Aydın, Nazan

    2014-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) secretion may be increased in the early phases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), possibly via ischemic glossopharyngeal nerve discharges, and decreased due to glossopharyngeal nerve degeneration in the late phase of SAH; but this reflex pathway has not been definitively investigated. We studied the relationship between petrous ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve (GPN) and water vesicles of the choroid plexus (CP) in the early and late phases of SAH. This study was conducted on 30 rabbits, divided into four groups, with five rabbits in the control group (group I), five rabbits in the sham group (Group II), and 20 rabbits in the SAH group. In the SAH group, five of the animals were decapitated after 4 days of cisternal blood injections (Group III), and the other 15 animals were decapitated after 20 days of injections (Group IV). The Petrous Ganglia and CPs of lateral ventricles were removed and stained for stereological analysis. The mean number of follicles per cubic millimeter was 5.3 ± 1.2 the in control group (Group I), 4.5 ± 0.9 in the sham group (Group II), 16.60 ± 3.77 the in early decapitated group (Group III), and 4.30 ± 0.84 in the late decapitated group (Group IV). The mean number of degenerated neuron density of petrous ganglions was 6 ± 2, 50 ± 6, 742 ± 96, and 2.420 ± 350 in the control (Group I), sham (Group II), early decapitated (Group III), and late decapitated group (Group IV), respectively. The mean number of water vesicles was statistically different after SAH between the early decapitated group (group III) and the late decapitated group (group IV) (P < 0.05). We studied the relationship between petrous ganglion cells of the GPN and water vesicles of CP in the early and late phases of SAH, and found that CP vesicles are increased in the early phase of SAH due to irritation of GPN, and decreased in the late phase due to ischemic insult of the petrous ganglion and

  12. Stance and balance following bilateral labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, J M; Inglis, J T

    1993-01-01

    Although vestibular input codes head acceleration, it is not clear whether or not this signal is critical for triggering the initial postural response to a perturbation of stance, and for determining the appropriate direction of response. These experiments were designed to examine the contribution of vestibular inputs to the control of balance in the freely standing cat. Four cats were trained to stand quietly on a moveable force platform. The animal's stance was unexpected perturbed by applying a linear ramp-and-hold translation to the support surface in each of eight different directions in the horizontal plane. The characteristics of quiet stance and the response to the perturbations were quantified in terms of the 3-D ground reaction forces under each paw and the EMG activity in selected muscles. The animals were bilaterally labyrinthectomized, and their responses compared before and after lesion. The cats were able to stand stably on the platform within 2-3 days of the lesion. During quiet stance, there was no change in the distribution of vertical forces under the paws and no increase in sway area. Horizontal plane forces, which were normally outwardly directed on the diagonals, became more laterally directed and transiently larger in amplitude. The level of tonic EMG activity increased in some extensors and flexors, and decreased in others, compared to control. The responses to platform translation were characterized by normal spatial and temporal patterns and latencies of EMG activity. Furthermore, all cats continued to use the force constraint strategy that is characteristic of the intact animal (Macpherson, 1988a). The only clear deficit in performance was a transient hypermetria, characterized by an over-response to the translation. Although the cats over-responded, they were still able to maintain their balance successfully. The moderate changes in quiet stance and in response to perturbation gradually returned to control values over 8-10 days following the lesion. These results suggest that vestibular information is not necessary for triggering appropriate postural responses evoked by support surface translations, nor for selecting the direction of response.

  13. [Mechanisms of microbial corrosion on petrous materials].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Alarcón, G; de la Torre, M A

    1994-01-01

    Present studies related to stone weathering demonstrate that the biological activity of bacteria, algae, fungi and lichens play an important role in the biodegradative processes implied in stone building decay. In natural environments is not possible to separate the damage provoked by microorganisms from damage caused by physical and chemical agents. In vitro assays carried out with microbes isolated from weathered stones are required in order to understand the biological mechanisms involved in stone deterioration. We have demonstrated, by means of different techniques as commented in the text, that filamentous fungi contribute greatly to stone biodeterioration by using different mechanisms: (a) mechanical (hyphae growth and penetration in stony substrate); and (b) biochemical (organic acid excretion, cation release, chelation and deposition of organic salts, precipitation of neoformation salts and metals oxidation).

  14. Retrosigmoid approach for resection of petrous apex meningioma.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Daniel G; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Makonnen, Girma; Zoli, Matteo; Naudy, Cristian; Muto, Jun; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 50-year-old female with a 1-year history of right-side facial numbness, as well as an electric shock-like sensation on the right-side of the face and tongue. She was previously diagnosed with vertigo and trigeminal neuralgia. MRI was obtained showing a large right cerebellopontine angle mass. A retrosigmoid approach was performed and total removal was achieved after dissection of tumor from brainstem and cranial nerves IV, V, VI, VII and VIII. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of a meningioma (WHO Grade I). The patient was discharged neurologically intact on the third postoperative day free of complications. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/-tR0FtMiUDg .

  15. Spontaneous osteo-dural fistulae of petrous bone posterior wall.

    PubMed

    Junet, P; Bertolo, A; Schmerber, S

    2013-12-01

    To raise awareness of the possibility of spontaneous temporal bone cerebrospinal fistula in case of clear retrotympanic effusion. A 63-year-old man with no particular history presented with unilateral spontaneous right retrotympanic clear effusion. CT found defects in the posterior part of the right temporal bone, in contact with arachnoid granulations, with no other visible abnormalities. Unilateral clear retrotympanic effusion in an adult subject should, apart from serous otitis media, suggest possible cerebrospinal fistula. In the absence of otologic or traumatic history, arachnoid granulation is one possible etiology, inducing spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leakage when facing the temporal bone. Diagnosis is suggested by bone defects in the tegmen tympani or posterior wall of the temporal bone on CT, with the adjacent mastoid cavities filled with fluid. Pneumococcal vaccination and early surgical repair of the fistula should be performed to avoid neuromeningeal infection. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Sudden hearing loss following non-petrous craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J C; Bird, P A; Bonkowski, J A

    2010-01-01

    We present two patients with known otosclerosis undergoing craniotomy for conditions unrelated to the temporal bone who experienced sudden sensorineural hearing loss. In both patients, the hearing loss was noted immediately post-operatively and there was no subsequent recovery. Sudden hearing loss is a rare complication of non-otologic, non-cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. To our knowledge it has not been described in patients with otosclerosis undergoing craniotomy. This is a rare event that may occur in patients with vulnerable ears, such as those with otosclerosis or pre-existing sensorineural hearing loss.

  17. Pneumomediastinum, bilateral pneumothorax, pleural effusion, and surgical emphysema after routine apicectomy caused by vomiting.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Archita; Baldwin, Andrew; Intosh, Ian Mc; Krishnan, A

    2008-03-01

    Mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema may occur after dental and oral surgery as a result of iatrogenic introduction of air or injury to the tracheobronchial tree. We report a patient who developed emphysema and pneumothorax after dentoalveolar surgery, which made diagnosis and management difficult. We suggest that persistent postoperative vomiting caused inhalation of mediastinal and intrathoracic air.

  18. Studies suggest alternatives to amalgam as a retrograde filling material for apicectomy.

    PubMed

    Naito, Toru

    2004-01-01

    Sources were Medline and the Cochrane Library. Studies included were in vivo with human subjects, had experimental and control groups, and gave quantitative results in English, German or French. Success and failure rates were derived from randomised controlled trials (RCT), clinical controlled trials (CCT), cohort studies (CS) and case-controlled studies (CCS). Qualitative synthesis of results was performed. Two RCT, six CCT and 14 CCS were identified. The two RCT suggest that glass ionomer may be more effective than amalgam, conversely one CCT showed amalgam to be more effective. CCTs also suggest that EBA (reinforced zinc oxide eugenol) cement, composite with GLUMA (Bayer AG., Leverkusen, Germany) and gold leaf retrograde filling may be more effective than amalgam. A further CCT suggested that gutta-percha used as a retrograde filing is less effective than when used following an orthograde approach. Based on the outcome of two RCT, glass ionomer appears as effective as amalgam. EBA cement, composite with GLUMA and gold leaf and orthograde gutta-percha may also be as effective as amalgam. Evidence is limited, however, and further research is needed.

  19. Effects of low-dose midazolam with propofol in patient-controlled sedation (PCS) for apicectomy.

    PubMed

    Küçükyavuz, Zuhal; Cambazoğlu, Mine

    2004-06-01

    We studied the effects of low-dose midazolam with propofol for patient control sedation (PCS) in 30 healthy (ASA grade I) patients who were randomly allocated into two equal groups (n = 15 in each). They were given a propofol infusion of 2mg/kg/h after a bolus dose of 0.7 mg/kg. The second group was given the 2mg/kg/h propofol infusion after a dose of midazolam 0.03 mg/kg and a bolus dose of propofol 0.7 mg/kg. The standard dose for PCS was propofol 0.2mg/kg in both groups. Clinical data were taken and haemodynamic variables, and oxygen saturation were recorded before and on the 5th, 10th, 20th, and 30th minutes during the operations. The level of sedation, amnesia and conditions of each patient were evaluated during the study. Patients' satisfaction was recorded using a modified visual analogue scale (VAS). All results were evaluated statistically. We conclude that low-dose midazolam with propofol during PCS neither reduced oxygen saturation nor prolonged the time of discharge. Low-dose midazolam with propofol also improved the acceptability and comfort for patients and made the operation easier, which makes it preferable to propofol alone.

  20. Efficacy of healing process of bone defects after apicectomy: results after 6 and 12 months.

    PubMed

    Dominiak, M; Lysiak-Drwal, K; Gedrange, T; Zietek, M; Gerber, H

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of selected surgical treatment techniques of bone defects after apectomy. A total of 106 postresection bone defects, located in maxilla and mandible were included in the study: the defects were treated with resorbable collagen membrane (BG I- 26 defects), xenogenic bovine material (BOC II- 30 defects) and xenogenic bovine material with platelet rich plasma (BOC/PRP III- 20 defects). In the control group the defects were left to heal spontaneously. Clinical and radiological assessment was performed at 6 and 12 months after the procedures. The analysis among groups revealed higher efficiency of the method of treatment that uses guide bone regeneration in comparison to the group in both post-operative control periods. After 6 months, the differences were statistically significant for each group using the regeneration methods, but after 12 months only for the BOC/PRP group. Treatment using selected guided bone regeneration techniques proved superior to the control group in both observation periods, but after 6 as well 12 months the best results in the BOC/PRP group were observed.

  1. [Malformations and abnormalities of the petrous portion of the temporal bone].

    PubMed

    Reith, W; Yilmaz, U; Heumüller, I

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the procedure of choice in the diagnostics of abnormalities of the middle and inner ear. It allows a detailed presentation of anatomical features and achieves the prerequisites for selection of the various therapeutic options. The highly diverse abnormalities can be described using detailed imaging analyses. Malformations with an abnormally developed modiolus are assumed to be early embryological defects, such as the classical Mondini dysplasia. The essential therapeutic option for middle ear deformities is still a cochlear implant. The domain of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not only in the analysis of the cochlear nerve and for exclusion of fibrosis or ossification of the labyrinth but is also able to visualize details of isolated malformations, such as an extended vestibular aqueduct or subtle alterations to the vestibule or can visualize them better in comparison to CT. Radiological diagnostics are used not only for classification but also to recognize typical clinical problem situations and play a key role in the diagnostics of hearing disorders and selection of the optimal therapeutic procedure.

  2. Reductions in body temperature and spontaneous activity in rats exposed to horizontal rotation: abolition following chemical labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Ossenkopp, K P; Rabi, Y J; Eckel, L A; Hargreaves, E L

    1994-08-01

    The effect of horizontal rotation of male rats (70 rpm) on core temperature and spontaneous motor activity levels was examined. In Experiment 1, subjects were chemically labyrinthectomized (VNX) by intratympanic (IT) injections of sodium arsanilate and control rats (VNS) received IT injections of saline. Half of the rats in each group were subsequently rotated and the other half sham rotated. Measurement of body temperature prior to, immediately after, and 20 min following rotation revealed significant (all p < 0.01) reductions in temperature immediately after treatment, and 20 min later, in VNS rats. Sham-rotated VNS and all VNX rats failed to exhibit any significant changes in temperature following treatment. In Experiment 2, motor activity level was monitored in chemically labyrinthectomized (VNX) and control (VNS) rats prior to, and following, horizontal rotation. The VNS rats exhibited large (all p < 0.01) depressions in measures of horizontal and vertical spontaneous motor activity following rotation treatment, whereas VNX rats exhibited similar levels of activity in the pre- and postrotation period. These experiments show that, as in humans, exposing rats to horizontal rotation results in reduction of body temperature and motor activity, and that these physiological and behavioral changes require a functional vestibular system.

  3. Clinical study of refractory apical periodontitis treated by apicectomy. Part 1. Root canal morphology of resected apex.

    PubMed

    Wada, M; Takase, T; Nakanuma, K; Arisue, K; Nagahama, F; Yamazaki, M

    1998-01-01

    The morphology of the root apex was analysed by observation of the anatomy of specimens obtained by apicoectomy in cases of refractory apical periodontitis that did not respond to nonsurgical root canal treatment. Apical ramifications were present in 19 (70%) of the roots, while one were found in the remaining eight (3%) roots. This frequency is far higher than that reported by other investigators, suggesting that there is a close relationship between the anatomical complexity of the root canal and the occurrence of refractory apical periodontitis.

  4. Apical sealing quality of in vitro apicectomy procedures after using both Er:YAG and Nd:YAG.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Sivieri-Araujo, Gustavo; Zielak, Joao Cesar; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Moriyama, Lilian Tan; Berbert, Fabio Luiz Camargo Villela

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the apical sealing of dentinal tubules after root-end surface cutting by using Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers. After root-canal instrumentation and filling, apices of 50 extracted maxillary canine human teeth were resected by Er:YAG with 400 mJ, 10 Hz, for 30 sec. The samples were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 10): (GI) treated without root-end cavity, but with Nd:YAG (1.0 W, 10 Hz, 20 sec) for dentinal tubules sealing; (GII) treated with root-end cavity without the use of Nd:YAG; (GIII) treated with root-end cavity and Nd:YAG application; (GIV) treated with root-end cavity made by Er:YAG with no focus and without Nd:YAG application; and (GV) treated without root-end cavity and without Nd:YAG application. The root-end cavities were performed by using Er:YAG at 300 mJ, 10 Hz, for 20 sec. Subsequently, all teeth were waterproofed and immersed in 2% methylene blue for 48 h in a vacuum environment. The samples were longitudinally sectioned, and microleakage was measured. ANOVA and the Fisher LSD test showed that GIV was less susceptible to microleakage than were the other groups (p < 0.05). Interestingly, the use of the Er:YAG with no focus showed superior dentinal tubule sealing in comparison with the other groups, even with or without root-end cavity and Nd:YAG application.

  5. Extensive intratemporal cholesteatomas: presentation, complications and surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vashishth, Ashish; Singh Nagar, Tilak Raj; Mandal, Shantanu; Venkatachalam, Vellore Pattabhiram

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to review the clinical features, complications, surgical management and post-operative outcomes of medially invasive extensive cholesteatomas and intracranial complications of cholesteatoma. The retrospective review was carried out at a tertiary referral center and included 20 patients presenting with extensive intratemporal cholesteatomas between 2011 and 2013. Inclusion criteria were involvement of the labyrinth, facial nerve, posterior fossa dura and intracranial complications. The mean age of the patients was 20 years. Profuse foul-smelling otorrhoea and severe otalgia/temporal headache were the most common presenting features. Intracranial complications were observed in nine patients, most commonly temporal lobe abscess; 14/20 patients exhibited profound hearing loss. One case exhibited massive labyrinthine petrous apex cholesteatoma. Labyrinthine destruction was seen in all cases of facial nerve involvement. Management of intracranial complications preceded canal wall-down mastoidectomy with or without partial labyrinthectomy and subtotal petrosectomy (transotic) with blind sac closure for petrous cholesteatoma. Facial nerve infiltration was observed in one case, whereas eight cases exhibited gross dehiscence of the fallopian canal. Disease clearance was complete in all cases with two mortalities in patients with intracranial complications. Post-operative course was uncomplicated in all other patients apart from a case of wound dehiscence. All patients remain disease free after a minimum and maximum follow-up of 6 months and 2 years, respectively. Extensive intratemporal cholesteatomas and intracranial complications caused by them continue to pose a challenge to the management of otitis media in the current era and merit early recognition, surgical management and follow-up.

  6. Surgical Procedures for Vestibular Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... using only the opposite ear to maintain balance. Chemical labyrinthectomy A chemical labyrinthectomy is also known as transtympanic or intratympanic ... ear by filling the scala tympani with a chemical solution. Click here to download the "Surgery for ...

  7. Apicectomy with the Er:YAG laser or bur, followed by retrograde root filling with zinc oxide/eugenol or sealer 26.

    PubMed

    Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Padovan, Lia Almeida Prado De Araújo; Padovan, Luis Eduardo Marques; Duarte, Marco Antônio Húngaro; Fraga, Sylvio De Campos; Curvêllo, Victor Prado

    2005-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of root resection, by means of the use of erbium:YAG laser in sealing two different materials, OZE and Sealer 26, in retrograde obturations. Few studies with sufficient data have been conducted in this area. Forty uniradicular teeth were used. They were biomechanically prepared using the step-back technique and obturated using the lateral condensation technique. The teeth were divided into two groups of 20 teeth, one group using the erbium:YAG laser (350 mJ and 6 Hz) for the resection process and the other using the Zekrya Drill, in high rotation. Then, the retrograde cavities were prepared using a micro counter-angle with a number 2 spherical bur. After preparing the cavities, the teeth were impermeabilized and divided into two subgroups. One subgroup used the retrograde obturation technique with Sealer 26 cement, and the other subgroup used OZE. After completing the retrograde obturation, the teeth were immersed in 2% methylene blue for a 7-day period. Teeth were then removed from the dye, washed, scraped, and sectioned in the vestibule-lingual direction. The results were analyzed with the aid of a magnifying lens, and scores were attributed based on the magnitude of infiltration. The data were then submitted to statistical analysis. No statistical difference was noticed regarding the root resection methods; however, in comparing materials, Sealer 26 was statistically superior to OZE. In the subgroup comparison, a significant difference was noticed in the Laser and Sealer 26 and the Laser and OZE and bur and OZE.

  8. Learning by doing virtually.

    PubMed

    von Sternberg, N; Bartsch, M S; Petersik, A; Wiltfang, J; Sibbersen, W; Grindel, T; Tiede, U; Warnke, P H; Heiland, M; Russo, P A J; Terheyden, H; Pohlenz, P; Springer, I N

    2007-05-01

    Selective reduction of bone without collateral damage (nerves, teeth) is essential in apicectomy. To test whether skills acquired on a virtual apicectomy simulator (VOXEL-MAN system with integrated force-feedback) are transferable from virtual to physical reality, two groups of trainees were compared. Group 1 received computer-based virtual surgical training before performing an apicectomy in a pig cadaver model. The probability of preserving vital neighboring structures was improved significantly, i.e. six-fold, after virtual surgical training (P<0.001). The average volume of the bony defects created by the trainees of Group 2 (mean: 0.47 ml) was significantly (P<0.001) larger than by the trainees of Group 1 (mean: 0.25 ml). Most importantly, the ability to objectively self-assess performance was significantly improved after virtual training. Training with a virtual apicectomy simulator appears to be effective, and the skills acquired are transferable to physical reality.

  9. Fracture of skull base with delayed multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Altan; Gurelik, Mustafa; Gumus, Cesur; Kunt, Tanfer

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a pediatric case of delayed glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, and facial nerve palsies after a head injury. Computed tomography scan of the skull base revealed the fracture of the petrous part of the temporal bone, and the fracture involved the tip of petrous pyramid, in front of the jugular foramen. The anatomical features, mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed.

  10. Internal carotid false aneurysm after thermocoagulation of the gasserian ganglion.

    PubMed

    Schmerber, Sébastien; Vasdev, Ashok; Chahine, Karim; Tournaire, Romain; Bing, Fabrice

    2008-08-01

    To identify petrous internal carotid bleeding aneurysm as a complication of gasserian ganglion thermocoagulation. A single case presenting with epistaxis and otorrhagia 1 month after gasserian ganglion thermocoagulation in the treatment of refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Gasserian ganglion thermocoagulation, computed tomographic scan, and angiocomputed tomographic scan revealing petrous internal carotid ruptured aneurysm and internal carotid embolization. Radiologic diagnosis of the vascular injury after gasserian ganglion thermocoagulation. Radiologic identification of ruptured internal carotid artery as the cause of simultaneous epistaxis and otorrhagia. Gasserian ganglion thermocoagulation may cause aneurysm and rupture of the petrous portion of the internal carotid artery.

  11. Gradenigo syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, S; Uran, N; Kavas, I; Ozgur, T

    1993-01-01

    The case is presented of a 13-year-old boy with recurrent episodes of otitis media who developed Gradenigo syndrome. Mastoid and petrous bone involvement were demonstrated by CT. Symptoms resolved with antibiotic treatment.

  12. Trigeminal Neuralgia Due to a Small Meckel's Cave Epidermoid Tumor: Surgery Using an Extradural Corridor.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Sunil V; Hegde, Alangar S

    2009-09-01

    Tumors at the petrous apex are associated with a variety of symptoms, which most often involve the trigeminal nerve. The authors present a rare case of a small epidermoid tumor in Meckel's cave that caused medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical challenge associated with approaches to such lesions is discussed. The skull base tumor was excised completely through a small temporal craniotomy. The practicality of neuronavigation in reaching the petrous apex using a small extradural window is presented.

  13. Refractory Positional Vertigo With Apogeotropic Horizontal Nystagmus After Labyrinthitis: Surgical Treatment and Identification of Dysmorphic Ampullae.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sameer; Heidenreich, Katherine D; McHugh, Jonathan B; Altschuler, Richard A; Carender, Wendy J; Telian, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    To describe the rationale, intraoperative details, and histopathologic findings discovered when treating an unusual case of apogeotropic horizontal canal positional vertigo with a transmastoid labyrinthectomy. A single case report. Therapeutic. Resolution of apogeotropic nystagmus and improvement of positional vertigo. The apogeotropic variant of horizontal canal positional vertigo can be a difficult entity to treat. This report describes a patient who developed profound sensorineural hearing loss and vertigo after an acute left labyrinthitis. Ten months later, she developed vertigo with apogeotropic positional nystagmus involving the left horizontal semicircular canal. Particle repositioning maneuvers and vestibular physical therapy were unsuccessful. In addition, she developed intermittent positional vertigo affecting the ipsilateral vertical semicircular canals. Given the persistence of her vertigo, multiple canal involvement, and patient preference for definitive treatment, a transmastoid labyrinthectomy was performed. Intraoperatively, the ampulla of the horizontal canal as well as that of the other canals was grossly abnormal as later confirmed on histology. After surgery, her apogeotropic nystagmus and vertigo resolved, and her balance ability gradually improved to a highly functional level. This case illustrates a unique form of positional vertigo that developed and persisted after acute labyrinthitis. Conservative measures were unsuccessful and a transmastoid labyrinthectomy documented dense inflammatory tissue involving all three ampullae. We postulate that the post-labyrinthitic inflammatory changes resulted in mass loading of the membranous ampullae, causing abnormal nystagmus patterns and positional vertigo, which resolved after the labyrinthectomy.

  14. Reappearance of activity in the vestibular neurones of labyrinthectomized guinea-pigs is not delayed by cycloheximide

    PubMed Central

    Ris, Laurence; Wattiez, Ruddy; de Waele, Catherine; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Godaux, Emile

    1998-01-01

    In mammals, unilateral labyrinthectomy induces an immediate depression of the resting discharges in the neurones of the ipsilateral vestibular nuclei. Later on, a spontaneous restoration of this activity occurs. The aim of the present study was to test the possibility that protein synthesis could be involved in the start of this process in the guinea-pig.Cycloheximide (CHX), a protein synthesis inhibitor, was injected intramuscularly 1 h before (30 mg kg−1) and 5 h after (15 mg kg−1) labyrinthectomy.In a first group of animals, CHX was found to induce an inhibition of protein synthesis at levels ranging from 71 to 93 % for 9 h after labyrinthectomy.In a second group of alert animals, we studied single unit activity of second-order vestibular neurones. It was found that, in the 12–16 h post-labyrinthectomy period, at a time when restoration began in guinea-pigs not treated with CHX, the discharges in the labyrinthectomized group treated with CHX were not different from those observed in a previous study in labyrinthectomized animals not treated with CHX.We conclude that protein synthesis is not required for the start of restoration of activity in the vestibular neurones deprived of their ipsilateral labyrinthine input. PMID:9763641

  15. [Individual management of Meniere's disease and evaluation of functional outcome].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Yang, Jun; Wu, Hao; Huang, Qi; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Zhihua

    2011-08-01

    To investigate individual management for Meniere's disease and analyze outcomes of nonsurgical and surgical management of Meniere's disease. Patients with Meniere's disease were staged according to hearing and quality of life. The individual management according to the staging was established, including outpatient treatment (lifestyle change, medical management and intratympanic steroids), endolymphatic sac decompression or drainage, vestibular neurectomy and labyrinthectomy. The characteristics of patients who underwent surgical management were analyzed. The functional outcomes of surgery in dizziness, hearing loss and quality of life were evaluated for 12-month postoperative follow-up. Twenty patients underwent intratympanic injection of dexamethasone. Dizziness improved in 70% (14/20), tinnitus improved in 41% (7/17), and aural fullness improved in 36% (4/11). There were 55 patients who underwent surgical managements for 57 times. Endolymphatic sac decompression or drainage was carried out in 27 patients for 28 times, vestibular neurectomy in 26 patients and labyrinthectomy in 3 patients. Vertigo control rate was 75% in patients with endolymphatic sac decompression or drainage, 100% in vestibular neurectomy and 100% in labyrinthectomy at 12-month postoperative follow-up. The non-surgical management and endolymphatic sac decompression or drainage can improve vertigo and ameliorate quality of life. Vestibular neurectomy and labyrinthectomy are effective surgical managements to eliminate vertigo. The management of Meniere's disease depends on several factors: stages of vertigo and hearing, quality of life, surgical contraindications and subjective desire. Therefore, the management for Menieres disease must be individualized for each patient.

  16. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma shown by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Saeed, S R; Birzgalis, A R; Ramsden, R T

    1994-01-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas are rare benign tumours which present with progressive or fluctuant audiovestibular symptoms and may mimic Meniéres disease. The size and position of these lesions make preoperative diagnosis unusual and most are discovered incidentally at labyrinthectomy. A case is reported which was diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery.

  17. Evaluation of dental anxiety in patients undergoing dentoalveolar surgery with laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Ugurlu, Faysal; Cavus, Onur; Kaya, Alper; Sener, Cem B

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental anxiety in patients undergoing apicectomy procedures performed with conventional instruments or an erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Twenty-eight patients undergoing apicectomy were divided into two groups; roots were removed with an Er:YAG laser in group A (n=14) and with conventional instruments in group B (n=14). All patients completed preoperative State-Trait Anxiety Inventories (STAI) and postoperative questionnaires. Although state anxiety, trait anxiety, and postoperative questionnaire scores were lower in patients undergoing Er:YAG laser treatment than in those treated with conventional instruments, the differences were not statistically significant. Surgical instruments affect the anxiety levels of dental patients. Even with the STAI scores being lower for patients treated with Er:YAG, use of the Er:YAG laser alone cannot contribute to the resolution of dental anxiety. A patient's individual condition is the major factor influencing that patient's anxiety level.

  18. [New surgical approach in apicoectomy of maxillary molars' palatal root].

    PubMed

    Hrusztics, Aminett; Bogdán, Sándor; Fellegi, Veronika; Szabó, György

    2003-06-01

    The term of apicectomy has been well-known for more than 200 years, nevertheless it is not performed frequently on molars. As a result of this a lot of molars became extracted. The aim of the authors was to present the new surgical technique which is described in detail. The radicular cyst localised on the palatal root of the first maxillary molar was operated on. Uneventful healing was obtained. This surgical technique is recommended in some special cases.

  19. Mitochondrial ribosome and Ménière's disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pacheu-Grau, David; Pérez-Delgado, Laura; Gómez-Díaz, Covadonga; Fraile-Rodrigo, Jesus; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2012-08-01

    Ménière's disease patients experience vestibular disability. When most of medical treatments fail, a chemical labyrinthectomy using aminoglycosides is indicated. However, this process frequently causes hearing damage. Aminoglycosides, interacting with mitochondrial rRNAs, alter mitochondrial protein synthesis and the oxidative phosphorylation system, which provide most of the energy in sensory hair cells. For this reason, we hypothesized that genetic variation in mitochondrial rRNA genes and in two nuclear genes coding for proteins that also modify the susceptibility to aminoglycosides might affect the risk of hearing loss in Ménière's disease patients suffering chemical labyrinthectomy. However, there were no differences in mitochondrial rRNA, TFB1M or MRPS12 genetic variation between those patients that experienced or did not experience hearing loss. This is only a pilot study and larger studies are required to use this therapeutic approach in a rational way and decrease the risk of hearing damage.

  20. Tinnitus Outcome in Surgery for Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Wazen; Caruso

    1997-01-01

    The effect of surgery for vertigo on tinnitus was evaluated in 90 patients who underwent surgery for disabling vertigo for Menieres disease. The three procedures studies included a destructive labyrinthectomy, endolymphatic sac decompression and shunt, and vestibular neurectomy. Patients who underwent a vestibular neurectomy had a significantly better tinnitus outcome than those who underwent shunt surgery (50% vs 22.7%). The labyrinthectomy and the neurectomy groups showed an equal positive response of 50%. The severity of the preoperative hearing loss did not correlate with the tinnitus outcome in all groups. Patients who have serviceable hearing and require surgery for disabling vertigo appear to have a better chance of tinnitus control with the vestibular neurectomy rather than an endolymphatic sac decompression and shunt.

  1. Anatomic variation of the abducens nerve in a single cadaver dissection: the "petrobasilar canal".

    PubMed

    Pizzolorusso, Felice; Cirotti, Andrea; Pizzolorusso, Gianfranco

    2017-04-01

    Anatomic variations of the petrosphenoid ligament, Dorello's canal and the course of the abducens nerve have been extensively described over the past years. In the present report of a single cadaver dissection, we describe an unusual course of the abducens nerve at the level of the petrous bone. The right abducens nerve did not enter Dorello's canal, but ran below the petrous bone through a narrow canal in the petrobasilar suture, which we called the "petrobasilar canal". No anatomic variations of the left abducens nerve were noted.

  2. Otolithic Membrane Damage in Patients with Endolymphatic Hydrops and Drop Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Calzada, Audrey P.; Lopez, Ivan A.; Ishiyama, Gail; Ishiyama, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Objectives 1. Evaluate the otolithic membrane in patients with endolymphatic hydrops (EH) and vestibular drop attacks (VDA) undergoing ablative labyrinthectomy. 2. Correlate intraoperative findings to archival temporal bone specimens of patients with EH. Study Design Retrospective case review Setting Tertiary referral center Specimen source 1. Patients undergoing labyrinthectomy for incapacitating Meniere’s disease (MD), delayed EH, VDA, or acoustic neuroma (AN) between 2004 and 2011. 2. Archival temporal bone specimens of patients with MD. Interventions Ablative labyrinthectomy Main outcome measures Examination of the utricular otolithic membrane. Results The otolithic membrane of the utricle was evaluated intraoperatively in 28 patients undergoing labyrinthectomy. 7 (25%) had a history of VDA, 6 (21%) had delayed EH, 9 (32%) had MD, and 6 (21%) had AN. All patients with VDA showed evidence of a disrupted utricular otolithic membrane, whereas only 50% and 56% of patients with delayed EH and MD respectively, demonstrated otolithic membrane disruption (p = 0.051). None of the patients with AN showed otolithic membrane disruption (p = 0.004). The mean thickness of the otolithic membrane in 5 archival temporal bone MD specimens was 11.45 micrometers versus 38 micrometers in normal specimens (p=0.001). Conclusions The otolithic membrane is consistently damaged in patients with VDA. In addition, there is a significantly higher incidence of otolithic membrane injury in patients with MD and delayed EH compared to patients without hydrops, suggesting that the underlying pathophysiology in VDA results from injury to the otolithic membrane of the saccule and utricle, resulting in free-floating otoliths and atrophy. PMID:23064391

  3. How I do it: epidural anterior petrosectomy.

    PubMed

    Roche, Pierre-Hugues; Lubrano, Vincent F; Noudel, Rémy

    2011-06-01

    Among the potential approaches to access the petroclival area, epidural anterior petrosectomy (EAP) appears to be the most direct and conservative transpetrous route. In this article, we aim to detail the relevant surgical steps necessary to perform EAP in a reproducible and safe manner. The temporo-pterional bone flap is tailored to access the floor of the middle fossa and expose the foramen ovale and foramen spinosum. Elevation of the dura covering the upper surface of the petrous apex is conducted medially toward the level of the petrous ridge. Identification of the landmarks of the rhomboid fossa delineates the limits of the drilling zone (necessary for removal of the petrous apex)-beneath Meckel's cave and just anterior to the anterior margin of the internal auditory meatus. The tentorium is divided at its free edge and is followed by opening of the posterior fossa dura. Epidural anterior petrosectomy is a conservative trans-petrous approach that offers an excellent direct surgical corridor for exposure of disease processes involving Meckel's cave, the petroclival area and the ventrolateral pons.

  4. Tuberculoma of the Cavernous Sinus and Meckel's Cave in a Child.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V R Roopesh; Madhugiri, Venkatesh S; Verma, Surendra Kumar; Barathi, S Deepak; Yadav, Awdhesh Kumar; Bidkar, Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculous infection of the cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave is extremely rare. In this report, we describe a patient with tuberculoma of the cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave, extending to the petrous apex. The patient underwent microsurgical excision of the lesion and antitubercular chemotherapy resulting in a good outcome. We describe the diagnostic difficulties and review the relevant literature.

  5. Carbonization of a radicular cyst using fiber-optic diode laser: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kafas, Panagiotis; Kalfas, Sotirios

    2008-01-01

    A female patient, 51 years old, complaint of painful swelling on the anatomical area of the upper left lateral incisor. The diagnosis of radicular cyst was confirmed histo-pathologically. Nowadays, radicular cysts may be treated using conventional root canal methods or surgical apicectomy. The possible soft-laser reaction to radicular cysts after contact application has not been investigated. We present an in vitro case of a diagnosed radicular cyst which carbonized after contact application of diode laser. The need for future clinical trials will be essential to prove the sensitivity of this procedure in humans. PMID:18713459

  6. Effect of physical exercise prelabyrinthectomy on locomotor balance compensation in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, M.; Ohashi, K.; Yoshihara, T.; MacDonald, S.

    1989-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of physical exercise, during a prepathology state, on locomotor balance compensation after subsequent unilateral labyrinthectomy in squirrel monkeys. An experimental group underwent 3 hr. of daily running exercise on a treadmill for 3 mo. prior to the surgery, whereas a control group was not exercised. Postoperatively, the locomotor balance function of both groups was tested for 3 mo. There was no significant difference in gait deviation counts in the acute phase of compensation. However, in the chronic compensation maintenance phase, the number of gait deviation counts was fewer in the exercise group, which showed significantly better performance stability.

  7. Effect of physical exercise prelabyrinthectomy on locomotor balance compensation in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, M.; Ohashi, K.; Yoshihara, T.; MacDonald, S.

    1989-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of physical exercise, during a prepathology state, on locomotor balance compensation after subsequent unilateral labyrinthectomy in squirrel monkeys. An experimental group underwent 3 hr. of daily running exercise on a treadmill for 3 mo. prior to the surgery, whereas a control group was not exercised. Postoperatively, the locomotor balance function of both groups was tested for 3 mo. There was no significant difference in gait deviation counts in the acute phase of compensation. However, in the chronic compensation maintenance phase, the number of gait deviation counts was fewer in the exercise group, which showed significantly better performance stability.

  8. The History and Evolution of Surgery on the Vestibular Labyrinth.

    PubMed

    Naples, James G; Eisen, Marc D

    2016-11-01

    The history of surgery on the vestibular labyrinth is rich but sparsely documented in the literature. The story begins over a century ago with the labyrinthectomy in an era that consisted exclusively of ablative surgery for infection or vertigo. Improved understanding of vestibular physiology and pathology produced an era of selective ablation and hearing preservation that includes semicircular canal occlusion for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. An era of restoration began with a discovery of superior semicircular canal dehiscence and its repair. The final era of vestibular replacement is upon us as the possibility of successful prosthetic vestibular implantation becomes reality. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  9. Vestibular-related neuroscience and manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, Makoto

    1988-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the human vestibular system are examined, reviewing the results of recent investigations. The functional, neurophysiological, and neurochemical changes which occur during adaptation to weightlessness are discussed; theoretical models proposed to explain the underlying mechanism are outlined; and particular attention is given to the author's experiments on squirrel monkeys. There, good correlations were found between (1) the recovery of locomotor balance function in the acute compensation phase after unilateral labyrinthectomy and (2) the bilateral imbalance in the optical density of GABA-like immunoreactivity.

  10. Vestibular-related neuroscience and manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, Makoto

    1988-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the human vestibular system are examined, reviewing the results of recent investigations. The functional, neurophysiological, and neurochemical changes which occur during adaptation to weightlessness are discussed; theoretical models proposed to explain the underlying mechanism are outlined; and particular attention is given to the author's experiments on squirrel monkeys. There, good correlations were found between (1) the recovery of locomotor balance function in the acute compensation phase after unilateral labyrinthectomy and (2) the bilateral imbalance in the optical density of GABA-like immunoreactivity.

  11. Risk factors for tooth loss in an adult population: a radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Golnosh; Vaeth, Michael; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Wenzel, Ann; Isidor, Flemming

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the incidence and identify risk factors for tooth loss during a 5-year period in a randomly selected Danish population. In 1997 and 2003, 473 randomly selected adults received a full-mouth radiographic examination. The total number of teeth was 12,444. For each tooth, the following information was recorded from the radiographs: marginal bone level, filling, crown, root canal post, root filling, apicectomy, periapical status and caries lesion. Unconditional and conditional logistic regression analyses were used to identify risk factors for tooth loss. During the study period, 107 teeth in 60 individuals were lost. On the individual level, reduced marginal bone level and apical periodontitis (AP) were highly associated with tooth loss. On the tooth level, a reduced marginal bone level, AP and apicectomy were strongly associated with tooth loss. Canines were not lost often, whereas tooth loss was more frequently observed in molars and premolars than in incisors. A reduced marginal bone level and AP were associated with tooth loss over time. Furthermore, there was a higher risk of tooth loss in the posterior regions than in the anterior region.

  12. Interpositional carotid artery bypass strategies in the surgical management of aneurysms and tumors of the skull base.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K; Couldwell, William T

    2003-03-15

    Cerebral revascularization is an important component in the surgical management of complex skull base tumors and aneurysms. Patients who harbor complex aneurysms that cannot be clipped directly and in whom parent vessel occlusion cannot be tolerated may require cerebrovascular bypass surgery. In cases in which skull base tumors encase the carotid artery (CA) and a resection is desired, a cerebrovascular bypass may be necessary in planned CA occlusion or sacrifice. In this review the authors discuss options for performing high-flow anterograde interposition CA bypass for lesions of the skull base. The authors review three important bypass techniques involving saphenous vein grafts: the cervical-to-petrous internal carotid artery (ICA), petrous-to-supraclinoid ICA, and cervical-to-supraclinoid ICA bypass. These revascularization techniques are important tools in the surgical treatment of complex aneurysms and tumors of the skull base and cavernous sinus.

  13. [Use of the ISG viewing wand on the temporal bone. A model study].

    PubMed

    Vogele, M; Freysinger, W; Bale, R; Gunkel, A R; Thumfart, W F

    1997-02-01

    Surgical interventions in the petrous bone have to be performed in close relationship to vital and delicate anatomical structures. In cases of revision surgery or with massive pathological changes 3D computer-assisted navigation provides an essential tool for preoperative planning, definition of target structures and intraoperative orientation. This technology can help to diminish intraoperative risks for the patient and may help to optimize any microsurgery. In this report we present our first experiences in using the ISG Viewing Wand in the petrous bone through a specially designed model. By recording more than 4000 single measurements we found that the ISG Viewing Wand can be used with sufficient precision. We have now outlined the most important conditions necessary for possible application to a patient.

  14. [Synopsis of a standardized, schematic analysis of the ossicles and tympanic walls, visualized with high-resolution computed tomography (using help lines and pictograms)].

    PubMed

    Grobovschek, M

    1988-09-01

    As in other radiological examinations there is an essay to show the ossicles and their surrounding tympanic walls of the petrous bone in the high resolution computed tomography. This should be standardized to simplify the interpretation and to allow the comparison. For the axial imaging of the ossicles corresponding to their particular topographic situation the head is tilted to the non-examined side and a little bit dorsally flected to turn especially the stapes in the scanning plane and to image the malleus and incus axially. The standard slices of the tympanon were schematized with the help of pictogramms. This allows a faster orientation and an easier recognition of a changed topographical situation meaning a pathological condition. The coronary view is as the important second part of the HR CT of the petrous bone integrated.

  15. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  16. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  17. Sexual dimorphism of the lateral angle of the internal auditory canal and its potential for sex estimation of burned human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, David; Thompson, Tim J U; Cunha, Eugénia

    2015-09-01

    The potential of the petrous bone for sex estimation has been recurrently investigated in the past because it is very resilient and therefore tends to preserve rather well. The sexual dimorphism of the lateral angle of the internal auditory canal was investigated in two samples of cremated Portuguese individuals in order to assess its usefulness for sex estimation in burned remains. These comprised the cremated petrous bones from fleshed cadavers (N = 54) and from dry and disarticulated bones (N = 36). Although differences between males and females were more patent in the sample of skeletons, none presented a very significant sexual dimorphism, thus precluding any attempt of sex estimation. This may have been the result of a difficult application of the method and of a differential impact of heat-induced warping which is known to be less frequent in cremains from dry skeletons. Results suggest that the lateral angle method cannot be applied to burned human skeletal remains.

  18. [Vertigo induced by noise or pressure to the left ear].

    PubMed

    Seidel, D U; Dülks, A; Remmert, S

    2011-06-01

    A 49-year-old male patient presented with recently acquired vertigo induced by noise or pressure to the left ear. With appropriate stimulation, oscillopsia with a rotatory component could be reproduced in videooculography. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) showed increased amplitudes and a lowered threshold on the left side. CT of the petrous bone showed a bony dehiscence of the left superior semicircular canal. Conservative therapy was initiated as a first step.

  19. Extradural Dermoid Cyst of the Anterior Infratemporal Fossa. Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Filomena, Carol A.; Nonaka, Yoichi; Matsuda, Masahide; Zomorodi, Ali R.; Friedman, Allan H.; Fukushima, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare in the skull base. There have been 10 reported cases of dermoid cysts in the cavernous sinus, two in the petrous apex, and one in the extradural Meckel cave. This is the first case report of a dermoid cyst in the anterior infratemporal fossa attached to the anterior dura of the foramen ovale. The clinical presentation, radiologic findings, histologic features, tumor origin, and operative technique are described along with a review of the literature. PMID:26623226

  20. CT appearances of external ear canal cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, P N; Francis, I S; Wareing, M J; Cox, T C

    1997-09-01

    External ear canal cholesteatoma (EECC) is rare in ear, nose and throat (ENT) practice. Two cases, one bilateral, are described. Computed tomography demonstrates the extent of bony involvement. Erosion of the external canal should not be overlooked when reviewing CT of the petrous bone in cases of discharge from the ear. EECC may necessitate surgery and delay in the diagnosis of EECC can result in progressive bony destruction.

  1. Potential of the navigated controlled surgery at the lateral skull base with the navigated control unit (NCU 2.0).

    PubMed

    Hofer, Mathias; Lueth, Tim; Dietz, Andreas; Strauss, Gero

    2012-01-01

    Segmentation for navigated control was in the first generation very time consuming. In the present version (NCU 2.0) the risk structure is segmented (instead of the work space), this leads to an enormous decrease in preparation time. In additional, new safety functions were integrated. The segmentation feasibility was tested on patient data and proved to be successful. The automatic stop function was tested on petrous bone models and showed no damage to the facial nerve.

  2. Extradural Dermoid Cyst of the Anterior Infratemporal Fossa. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Filomena, Carol A; Nonaka, Yoichi; Matsuda, Masahide; Zomorodi, Ali R; Friedman, Allan H; Fukushima, Takanori

    2015-11-01

    Dermoid cysts are rare in the skull base. There have been 10 reported cases of dermoid cysts in the cavernous sinus, two in the petrous apex, and one in the extradural Meckel cave. This is the first case report of a dermoid cyst in the anterior infratemporal fossa attached to the anterior dura of the foramen ovale. The clinical presentation, radiologic findings, histologic features, tumor origin, and operative technique are described along with a review of the literature.

  3. Cervical internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm complicating malignant otitis externa: first case report.

    PubMed

    Baker, Andrew; Rizk, Habib; Carroll, William; Lambert, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery (ICA) is a rare complication of head and neck infections. To date, three cases of petrous ICA pseudoaneurysm have been described as a complication of otogenic infection, including only one secondary to malignant otitis externa. We present here the first case of cervical ICA pseudoaneurysm as a complication of malignant otitis externa, and stress the importance of timely diagnosis to avoid fatal outcomes. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. [Basilar impression as a cause of trigeminal neuralgia: report of a case].

    PubMed

    da Silva, J A; da Silva, E B

    1982-06-01

    A case of basilar impression associated with Arnold-Chiari malformation and with trigeminal neuralgia is reported. The radiological examination of the skull showed marked asymmetry of the petrous bone with the tip of the odontoid apophysis located 30 mm above the McGregor line. Treatment consisted of craiectomy of the posterior fossa and cervical laminetomy (C1 to C3). The postoperative course was uneventful with total disappearance of the trigeminal neuralgia.

  5. Epidermoid tumor within Meckel's cave--case report.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, T; Dindorkar, K; Muzumdar, D; Goel, A

    2000-01-01

    A rare case of an epidermoid tumor lying within Meckel's cave is reported. A 27-year-old housewife presented with complaints of right facial hypesthesia for two and a half years. On examination she had partial loss of touch sensation in the right trigeminal nerve distribution. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a tumor located at the right petrous apex and cavernous sinus. The epidermoid tumor was excised through a lateral basal subtemporal approach. The symptoms resolved following surgery.

  6. [Isolated apical petrositis: an atypical case of Gradenigo's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zengel, P; Wiekström, M; Jäger, L; Matthias, C

    2007-03-01

    In 1904 Guiseppe Gradenigo described an infection of the apex of the petrous part of the temporal bone from acute otitis media with the clinical symptoms of unilateral pain around the eye, diplopia due to sixth nerve paralysis and persistant otorrhea. While this infection became evident by inward extension from petrositis in the majority of fatal cases from acute otitis media in the preantibiotic era, it has now become very rare. Today, cases mainly derive from cholesteatomas or chronic osteomyelitis of the petrous bone. However, due to intense antibiotic treatment in acute otitis media clinical signs of petrositis may be less typical compared to former times. We report on a 12-year-old boy with rapid onset of sixth nerve paralysis without clinical signs of acute otitis media or mastoiditis. CT and NMR imaging confirmed infection of the petrous apex. He was treated by mastoidectomy with exploration of a posterior cell group from the epitympanon around the semicircular canals and subsequent high dose intravenous antibiotics. The patient recovered without any loss of inner ear or facial nerve function. The paralysis of the sixth nerve disappeared completely within 6 weeks.

  7. Subtemporal-anterior transtentoral approach to middle cranial fossa microsurgical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiming; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Wei; Feng, Yugong; Li, Gang

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to describe the topography of inferior and external dura mater of the middle cranial fossa through subtemporal-anterior transpetrosal approach and discuss the feasibility of improving the approach. Eight formalin-fixed adult cadaveric heads were studied, with the bones milled away in the lateral triangle region of the petrous bone, Kawase rhombus region, and inner triangle region of the petrous apex. The distances between the targets in these regions, as well as the angles after the dissection of zygomatic arch, were measured, and then the exposed petroclival and retrochiasmatic areas were observed under the microscope. There were significant variations in the distances between targets in the 3 milled regions among the specimens. After the dissection of zygomatic arch, the surgical view got an average increase of 12 degrees. The subtemporal anterior transpetrosal approach, as an improved subtemporal approach, can expose the lesions optimally, causing no injury to the hearing and reducing injuries to temporal lobe. On the other hand, the lateral bone of the petrous parts of the temporal bone is removed so as to improve the view to the retrochiasmatic area and expand the operative field.

  8. Cremated human remains: is measurement of the lateral angle of the meatus acusticus internus a reliable method of sex determination?

    PubMed

    Masotti, Sabrina; Succi-Leonelli, Elisa; Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the lateral angle (LA) method-based on the measurement of the angle at which the internal acoustic canal opens up to the surface of the petrous bone-for sex determination in cremated skeletal remains of Italians. The sample consisted of 160 adult individuals of known age and sex who had recently died and were cremated in the crematorium of Ferrara (northern Italy). Several studies have demonstrated that the petrous portion of the temporal bone may be a valuable tool for sex diagnosis in unburned skeletal remains. Since petrous bones are usually preserved after cremation, this method could be of particular interest in the case of burned skeletal remains. The repeatability of intra- and inter-observer measurements was good. The results indicated that male and female lateral angles were significantly different but that the values did not differ among age-groups. There was no bilateral difference in LA. However, neither the 45° angle, proposed in earlier studies as the sectioning point for this variable from male and female data distributions, nor another angular value allowed satisfactory discrimination between the sexes in our sample. The influence of the "age" factor (about 82 % of females were of ≥ 75 years of age) on the results is critically discussed. The results of this study suggest that the LA method is not sufficiently reliable to assess the sex of elderly Italian individuals from their burned remains and thus should only be used in conjunction with other sexing techniques.

  9. Surgery for vertigo: 10-year audit from a contemporary vertigo clinic.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, U; Srivastava, A; Sikka, K; Thakar, A

    2015-12-01

    To present the profile of patients undergoing surgical treatment for vertigo at a contemporary institutional vertigo clinic. A retrospective analysis of clinical charts. The charts of 1060 patients, referred to an institutional vertigo clinic from January 2003 to December 2012, were studied. The clinical profile and long-term outcomes of patients who underwent surgery were analysed. Of 1060 patients, 12 (1.13 per cent) were managed surgically. Of these, disease-modifying surgical procedures included perilymphatic fistula repair (n = 7) and microvascular decompression of the vestibular nerve (n = 1). Labyrinth destructive procedures included transmastoid labyrinthectomy (n = 2) and labyrinthectomy with vestibular nerve section (n = 1). One patient with vestibular schwannoma underwent both a disease-modifying and destructive procedure (translabyrinthine excision). All patients achieved excellent vertigo control, classified as per the American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 1995 criteria. With the advent of intratympanic treatments, surgical treatments for vertigo have become further limited. However, surgery with directed intent, in select patients, can give excellent results.

  10. Cochlin expression in vestibular endorgans obtained from patients with Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Audrey P; Lopez, Ivan A; Beltran Parrazal, Luis; Ishiyama, Akira; Ishiyama, Gail

    2012-11-01

    The distribution of cochlin and its associated basement membrane proteins (collagen IV, collagen II, laminin-β2, and nidogen-1) were evaluated in the vestibular endorgans of subjects with Meniere's disease and compared with normal specimens. Cochlin mRNA expression in vestibular endorgans from Meniere's disease specimens was also investigated. Specimens were obtained from patients who had Meniere's disease and who were undergoing ablative labyrinthectomy. Control specimens were obtained both from autopsy specimens with documented normal audiovestibular function and from patients undergoing labyrinthectomy for acoustic neuroma excision. In the normal control specimens, cochlin immunoreactivity was found evenly distributed in the stroma of the cristae ampullaris and maculae of the utricle. In Meniere's specimens, cochlin immunoreactivity was markedly increased; this was associated with an increase in cochlin mRNA expression as shown by real-time reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction. Collagen IV and laminin-β2 immunoreactivity was significantly decreased in Meniere's specimens. Nidogen-1 and collagen II immunoreactivity was unchanged in Meniere's specimens when compared with normal samples. Cochlin upregulation has been implicated in the hereditary audiovestibulopathy, DFNA9. The increased expression of cochlin and decreased expression of collagen IV and laminin in Meniere's disease are suggestive that the overexpression of cochlin contributes to the dysfunctional inner ear homeostasis seen in this disease.

  11. Influence of vestibular input on spatial and nonspatial memory and on hippocampal NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Besnard, S; Machado, M L; Vignaux, G; Boulouard, M; Coquerel, A; Bouet, V; Freret, T; Denise, P; Lelong-Boulouard, V

    2012-04-01

    It has recently been shown that a lack of vestibular sensory information decreases spatial memory performance and induces biochemical changes in the hippocampus in rodents. After vestibular neurectomy, patients display spatial memory deficit and hippocampal atrophy. Our objectives were to explore: (a) spatial (Y maze, radial-arm maze), and non-spatial (object recognition) memory performance, (b) modulation of NMDA receptors within the hippocampus using radioligand binding, and (c) hippocampal atrophy, using MRI, in a rat model of bilateral labyrinthectomy realized in two operations. Chemical vestibular lesions (VLs) were induced in 24 animals by transtympanic injections of sodium arsanilate (30 mg/0.1 ml/ear), one side being lesioned 3 weeks after the other. The control group received transtympanic saline solution (0.1 ml/ear) (n = 24). Spatial memory performance (Y maze and radial maze) decreased after VL. Conversely, non-spatial memory performance (object recognition) was not affected by VL. No hippocampal atrophy was observed with MRI, but density of NMDA receptors were increased in the hippocampus after VL. These findings show that the lack of vestibular information induced specific deficits in spatial memory. Additionally, quantitative autoradiographic data suggest the involvement of the glutamatergic system in spatial memory processes related to vestibular information. When studying spatial memory performances in the presence of vestibular syndrome, two-step labyrinthectomy is a suitable procedure for distinguishing between the roles of the specific components of vestibular input loss and those of impaired locomotor activity.

  12. Dissociations between behavioural recovery and restoration of vestibular activity in the unilabyrinthectomized guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Ris, L; Capron, B; de Waele, C; Vidal, P P; Godaux, E

    1997-01-01

    1. In the guinea-pig, a unilateral labyrinthectomy induces postural disturbances and an ocular nystagmus which abate or disappear over time. These behavioural changes are accompanied by an initial collapse and a subsequent restoration of the spontaneous activity in the neurones of the ipsilateral vestibular nuclei. Recently, it has been shown that the vestibular neuronal activity remained collapsed over at least 10 h whereas its restoration was complete 1 week after the lesion. The aims of this study were to determine when restoration of spontaneous activity in the partially deafferented vestibular neurones started and to compare the time courses of the behavioural and neuronal recoveries in guinea-pigs that had undergone a unilateral labyrinthectomy. 2. Neuronal discharge measurements were made using chronic extracellular recording of single unit activity. After a left labyrinthectomy, electrodes, were placed on the site of the destroyed labyrinth to enable stimulation of the left vestibular nerve. Behavioural measurements included chronic recording of eye movements by the scleral search coli technique. After a left labyrinthectomy, lateral deviation of the head, twisting of the head, and eye velocity of the slow phases of the nystagmus were measured. 3. The neuronal activity of the rostral part of the vestibular nuclear complex on the lesioned side was recorded in alert guinea-pigs over 4 h recording sessions between 12 and 72 h after the lesion. 4. The criterion used to select vestibular neurones for analysis was their recruitment by an electric shock on the vestibular nerve. In addition, in order to explore a uniform population, we focused on neurones recruited at monosynaptic latencies (0.85-1.15 ms). 5. For each recording period, the mean resting rate was calculated animal by animal and the grand mean of these individual resting rate means was calculated. Previously, a decline in the grand mean resting rate from 35.8 +/- 6.0 spikes s-1 (control state) to 7

  13. Anatomical study of the cavernous sinus emphasizing operative approaches and related vascular and neural reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, L N; Burgess, J; Akin, O

    1987-12-01

    The efficacy of three operative approaches to the cavernous sinus (CS) and the possibilities of vascular and cranial nerve reconstruction in and around the CS were studied in 50 cadaver specimens (25 heads). The lateral operative approach was through the lateral wall, between Cranial Nerves V1 and IV, or between Cranial Nerves V1 and V2. The superior approach was through the superior wall of the CS after removing the anterior clinoid process and unroofing the optic canal. The inferior approach followed the petrous internal carotid artery (ICA) into the CS after an extradural subtemporal exposure or after a combined subtemporal and infratemporal fossa exposure. The different exposures of the spaces of the CS and of the intracavernous structures provided by the superior and the lateral approaches were complementary. The exposure provided by the inferior approach was minimal; however, the junction of the petrous and cavernous ICA was best exposed by this route. The combined subtemporal and infratemporal fossa approach exposed the petrous ICA (for proximal control or for reconstruction) with the greatest ease and with the least temporal lobe retraction. The combination of the superior and lateral approaches and the complete mobilization of the intracavernous ICA facilitated its repair after experimental lacerations. Lacerations of either the inferior and the inferomedial aspects of any portion of the cavernous ICA or of the anterior surface of the posterior vertical segment of the artery were the most difficult to repair. End-to-end anastomosis was more difficult with the posterior third of the artery than with the anterior two-thirds. A vein graft with an average length of 3.5 cm could be sutured from the petrous to the supraclinoid ICA to bypass the cavernous ICA, with an average occlusion time of 45 minutes. End-to-end technique was judged better for the proximal anastomosis, but end (graft)-to-side anastomosis was easier to perform at the distal end because of the

  14. Endoscopic transsphenoidal anterior petrosal approach for locally aggressive tumors involving the internal auditory canal, jugular fossa, and cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Masahiro; Kondo, Kenji; Hanakita, Shunya; Hasegawa, Hirotaka; Yoshino, Masanori; Teranishi, Yu; Kin, Taichi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Reports about endoscopic endonasal surgery for skull base tumors involving the lateral part of petrous apex remain scarce. The authors present their experience with the endoscopic transsphenoidal anterior petrosal (ETAP) approach through the retrocarotid space for tumors involving the internal auditory canal, jugular fossa, and cavernous sinus. METHODS The authors performed the ETAP approach in 10 patients with 11 tumors (bilateral in 1 patient) that extensively occupied the lateral part of petrous apex, e.g., the internal auditory canal and jugular fossa. Eight patients presented with diplopia (unilateral abducens nerve palsy), 3 with tinnitus, and 1 with unilateral hearing loss with facial palsy. After wide anterior sphenoidotomy, the sellar floor, clival recess, and carotid prominence were verified. Tumors were approached via an anteromedial petrosectomy through the retrocarotid triangular space, defined by the cavernous and vertical segments of the internal carotid artery (ICA), the clivus, and the petrooccipital fissure. The surgical window was easily enlarged by drilling the petrous bone along the petrooccipital fissure. After exposure of the tumor and ICA, dissection and resection of the tumor were mainly performed under direct visualization with 30° and 70° endoscopes. RESULTS Gross-total resection was achieved in 8 patients (9 tumors). In a patient with invasive meningioma, the tumor was strongly adherent to the ICA, necessitating partial resection. Postoperatively, all 8 patients who had presented with abducens nerve palsy preoperatively showed improvement within 6 months. In the patient presenting with hearing loss and facial palsy, the facial palsy completely resolved within 3 months, but hearing loss remained. Regarding complications, 3 patients showed mild and transient abducens nerve palsy resolving within 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Postoperative CSF rhinorrhea requiring surgical repair was observed in 1 patient. No patient

  15. [Skull vibratory test in partial vestibular lesions--influence of the stimulus frequency on the nystagmus direction].

    PubMed

    Dumas, G; Perrin, P; Morel, N; N'Guyen, D Q; Schmerber, S

    2005-01-01

    Results of the skull vibratory test (SVT) in partial unilateral vestibular peripheral lesions (PUVL) are different from the results in total vestibular lesions (TUVL). To reveal a correlation between the results of the analysis of the skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) horizontal component and the side of the lesion; to correlate these results with the stimulus frequency. To find out a predictive correlation between the SVN horizontal and vertical components and the topography of a vestibular lesion. To appreciate the degree of vestibular deafferentation (extended to high frequencies) provoked by gentamicin labyrinthectomy and its efficiency in Meniere's disease. 53 patients with a SVN and a PUVL were included and compared with 10 TUVL and 10 normal subjects. Protocol included a HST (2 Hz), a SVT at 30, 60 and 100 Hz and a caloric test. Recordings were performed with a 2D and 3D VNG device. In PUVL, SVN at 30, 60 and 100 Hz was obtained in 80, 90 and 90% of cases respectively. SVN is correlated with the side of the lesion at 30, 60 and 100 Hz respectively in 65%, 63%, 80% of cases. SVN is not correlated with the side of the lesion in 20% of Meniere's disease, in 8% of vestibular neuritis and in 6% of vestibular schwannoma. In PUVL HSN is correlated with the side of the lesion in 69% of cases. The direction of the HSN and of the SVN was different in 23% when the nystagmus attended at the same time for both tests. In PUVL the direction of the SVN is different at 100 Hz and 30 Hz in 16% of cases when they are concomittant on the same patient. After Gentamicine labyrinthectomy, the coherence of the results in caloric test, HSN and SVN (areflexy and lesional nystagmus beating toward the safe side) was correlated with the efficiency of the therapy. A SVN vertical component was met in 10% of PUVL (essentially in anterior canal dehiscence and few cases of partial labyrinthitis). The horizontal SVN SPV is significantly slower in PUVL than in TUVL patients (p=0.0004). The SVT

  16. Evaluation of apical cavity preparation with a new type of ultrasonic diamond tip.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Ricardo A; de Moraes, Ivaldo G; Garcia, Roberto B; Bernardineli, Norberti; Baldi, Jarcio V; Victorino, Fausto R; Vasconcelos, Bruno C; Duarte, Marco A H; Bramante, Clovis M

    2007-04-01

    This study evaluated the time, occurrence of fracture, and quality of apical cavity preparation with three different ultrasonic diamond tips: Satelec, Trinity, and a new type, CVD (chemical vapor deposition), using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Thirty human single-rooted premolars were selected, submitted to apicectomy, and prepared with ultrasonic tips; impressions were then obtained. The presence of fractures was evaluated on the impressions, and the quality of preparation was evaluated by SEM analysis of teeth and scoring by two examiners. The group prepared with the CVD tips exhibited the shorter preparation time and did not present fractures. There was no statistically significant difference in the quality of preparation for the three tips. The three brands of ultrasonic tips produced adequate grinding without altering the morphology of the apical foramen.

  17. Poland's syndrome and recurrent pneumothorax: is there a connection?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the possible connection of Poland's syndrome with the presence of lung bullae and, thus, with an increased risk for recurrent pneumothorax. Patients-methods. Two male patients, aged 19 and 21 years respectively were submitted to our department after their second incident of pneumothorax. Both had Poland's syndrome (unilaterally hypoplastic chest wall with pectoralis major muscle atrophy) and both had multiple bullae to the ipsilateral lung based on CT findings. The patients were treated operatively (bullectomy, lung apicectomy, partial parietal pleurectomy and chemical pleurodesis) due to the recurrent state of their pneumothorax. Results. The patients had good results with total expansion of the affected lung. Conclusions. Poland's syndrome can be combined with ipsilateral presence of lung bullae, a common cause of pneumothorax. Whether this finding is part or a variation of the syndrome needs to be confirmed by a larger number of similar cases. PMID:21418595

  18. Laser applications in endodontics: an update review.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed

    2009-02-01

    The search for new devices and technologies for endodontic procedures always has been challenging. Since the development of the ruby laser by Maiman in 1960 and the application of the laser for endodontics by Weichman in 1971, a variety of potential applications for lasers in endodontics have been proposed. With the development of thinner, more flexible and durable laser fibres, laser applications in endodontics have increased. Since laser devices are still relatively costly, access to them is limited. The purpose of this paper is to summarise laser applications in endodontics, including their use in pulp diagnosis, dentinal hypersensitivity, pulp capping and pulpotomy, sterilisation of root canals, root canal shaping and obturation and apicectomy. The effects of lasers on root canal walls and periodontal tissues are also reviewed.

  19. Patient discomfort following periapical surgery.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, René; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Hørsted-Bindslev, Preben; Wenzel, Ann

    2008-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess patient discomfort following periapical surgery. Forty-two patients with apical periodontitis were allocated to apicectomy with either smoothening of the gutta-percha root filling or a retrograde root filling with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Pooling all patients, VAS score for pain peaked 3 hours postoperatively (mean VAS = 29). The VAS score for swelling peaked 1 day postoperatively (mean VAS = 41). Patients' overall perception of postoperative discomfort was induced by (questions asked at the day for suture removal): Oral awareness (36 yes, 6 no); swelling (30 yes, 12 no); compromised chewing ability (18 yes, 24 no); pain (15 yes, 27 no). There was no correlation between the operating time and VAS scores for pain and swelling (r < or = .25, P > .11). Patients experienced little pain and moderate swelling after periapical surgery. Oral awareness was the most reported reason for postoperative discomfort. The operating time was not a decisive factor in relation to postoperative discomfort.

  20. Endodontic re-treatment associated with the elimination of amalgam root-end filling through sinus tracts: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Soares, Janir Alves; Nunes, Eduardo; Silveira, Frank Ferreira; Santos, Suelleng Maria Cunha; Oliveira, Maiolino Thomaz Fonseca

    2009-08-01

    Two patients presented with complaints of recurrent drainage of purulent exudate from sinus tracts, inflammation and pain after endodontic re-treatment of the maxillary left (Case 1) and right (Case 2) lateral incisors. The periapical lesions persisted after apical curettage, apicectomy and root-end filling with silver amalgam. Radiographic examination exposed the poor quality of the endodontic treatments and the silver amalgam root-end fillings, which were associated with periapical radiolucent areas in both teeth. The sinus tract persisted after root canal cleaning and shaping, followed by a calcium hydroxide root canal dressing. The root-end fillings were periapically dislodged with endodontic K-files, and showed progressive displacement by sinus tracts up to elimination in the oral cavity. Follow ups of 42 and 65 months post procedure revealed clinical disappearance of the symptoms, sinus tracts and exudates, and radiographs revealed that the repair process of the periapical radiolucent areas was quite advanced.

  1. Do Parameters Of Irradiation Influences The Apical Sealing Of Er:YAG Laser Apicetomies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Aparecida Maria Cordeiro; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2011-08-01

    Failures on the sealing of the tooth apex are responsible for many failures of apical surgeries. The Er:YAG laser has been proposed as an alternative for the use of rotator instruments on surgical endodontics. 12 human extracted canines had root endodontic treatment being the apical limit was set at 1mm before the apical foramen and were distributed into 2 groups. On group I, apicectomy was performed with the Er:YAG laser (250 mJ/15 Hz). Apical cut was performed of perpendicular mode with 3mm from the apical foramen. On Group II, the same procedures and the same sequence as above was used, varying only the parameters of the Er:YAG laser (400 mJ/6 Hz). The specimens were divided into groups and fixed, by the cervical third, on wax. Impermeabilization of the residual root apical third was performed following the same procedures used in the cervical third but the residual apex was left free from the impermeabilization. After that, the roots were immersed in a 2% methylene blue solution and placed in a bacteriological oven for 48 h. The segments were visually observed and the one showing greatest level of dye leakage was selected and kept in individual container and coded accordingly. Apical staining was measured using a stereoscopic magnifying glass; a compass; and caliper. The results showed that Group I showed significantly different higher mean level of dye leakage (5.67±4.9, p<0.05). There was a significantly difference between the groups. It is concluded that the apicectomies carried out with 400 mJ/6 Hz showed the smallest infiltration value.

  2. Meniere's disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Vibert, Dominique; Caversaccio, Marco; Häusler, Rudolf

    2010-10-01

    Menière disease usually begins in adults from 20 to 60 years old, and occurs in more than 10% of patients older than 65. The treatment of Menière disease in the elderly represents a challenge because of polymedication. Antivertiginous drugs such as betahistine and cinnarizin give good results with minor secondary effects. In contrast, major vestibular suppressor drugs such as thiethylperazin must be avoided as long-term treatment because of their side effects. Definitive vestibular surgical deafferentations such as labyrinthectomy and selective vestibular neurectomy represent optional procedures but must be carefully evaluated from case to case. Ablative procedures remain the efficient treatment of drop attacks, which represent a high potential risk of severe injuries by older patients sometimes with important social consequences.

  3. [Surgery for vertigo].

    PubMed

    Lacombe, H

    2009-04-01

    Spontaneous recovery or central compensation makes surgical procedures rare in patients with vertigo. Surgery for vertigo proposed after pharmacological or physical therapy fails to eliminate Ménière's disease and some very rare cases of paroxystic positional vertigo. The main target in treating Ménière's disease is to promote vestibular compensation, which is possible only with a nonprogressive and stable deficit leading to readjustment of vestibular reflexes. Surgical procedures can be classified as nondestructive (endolymphatic sac decompression, vestibular nerve decompression, patching of perilymphatic fistulas), selectively destructive (middle fossa or retrosigmoid vestibular neurotomy, lateral semi-circular plugging) and destructive (labyrinthectomy). Surgical indications essentially concern incapacitating vertigo and depend mainly on hearing status. In Ménière's disease, vestibular neurotomy can be regarded as the gold standard considering its good results on vertiginous episodes; however, scoring with functional and quality-of-life scales bring out residual deficiency in some cases.

  4. Changing trends in the surgical treatment of Ménière's disease: results of a 10-year survey.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Herbert; Lewis, William B; Jackson, Lance E; Rosenberg, Seth I; Thompson, Jack H; Hoffmann, Karen K

    2003-03-01

    In order to discern trends in surgical procedures used to treat Ménière's disease in the United States during the 1990s, we mailed a questionnaire to 700 members of the American Otological Society and the American Neurotology Society. These physicians were asked about the frequency, results, and complications of surgical procedures for Ménière's disease that they had performed between Jan. 1, 1990, and Dec. 31, 1999. Questionnaires were returned by 137 surgeons (19.6%). Their responses indicated that the number of vestibular neurectomies, labyrinthectomies, and endolymphatic sac surgeries all decreased during 1999. Meanwhile, the use of office-administered intratympanic gentamicin therapy increased rapidly throughout the entire 10-year period, and by 1999 it had become the most frequently used invasive treatment for Ménière's disease. Surgeons now seem to reserve inpatient procedures for cases where intratympanic gentamicin fails to control vertigo.

  5. The effects of area postrema lesions and selective vagotomy on motion-induced conditioned taste aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; Sutton, R. L.; Mckenna, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversion (CTA) is one of several behaviors which was suggested as a putative measure of motion sickness in rats. A review is made of studies which used surgical disruption of area postrema or the vagus nerve to investigate whether CTA and vomiting induced by motion may depend on common neural pathways or structures. When the chemoreceptive function of the area postrema (AP) is destroyed by complete ablation, rats develop CTA and cats and monkeys develop CTA and vomit. Thus the AP is not crucially involved in either CTA or vomiting induced by motion. However, after complete denervation of the stomach or after labyrinthectomy rats do not develop CTA when motion is used as the unconditioned stimulus. Studies of brainstem projections of the vagus nerve, the area postrema, the periaqueductal grey, and the vestibular system are used as the basis for speculation about regions which could mediate both motion-induced vomiting and behavioral food aversion.

  6. Invasive middle ear cholesterol granuloma involving the basal turn of the cochlea with profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Murugasu, Euan; Yong, Tan Tiong; Yoon, Chong Pek

    2004-05-01

    A retrospective surgical case review. A tertiary-care, university teaching hospital. The authors describe a unique case operated on for a middle ear cholesterol granuloma, which had invaded the cochlea and vestibule causing profound sensorineural deafness. Extended radical mastoidectomy and labyrinthectomy with musculofascial seal. Successful postoperative outcome with no recurrence seen after 2 years of follow up. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of a primary middle ear cholesterol granuloma with direct invasion into the cochlea. Such invasion of the otic capsule by cholesterol granulomas is rare and presents a diagnostic challenge to the attending otologist and radiologist. Salient points of the case history, pathogenesis, imaging studies, histopathology, and management are presented with a review of the current literature.

  7. Changes of some amino acid concentrations in the medial vestibular nucleus of conscious rats following acute hypotension.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Lan; An, Ying; Jin, Qing-Hua; Kim, Min Sun; Park, Byung Rim; Jin, Yuan-Zhe

    2010-06-14

    Microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to measure the changes of certain amino acids in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) of conscious rats in order to understand whether those amino acids are involved in the regulation of blood pressure. Acute hypotension was induced by infusing sodium nitroprusside (SNP) into the femoral vein. In the control group, glutamate (Glu) release increased, though gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine (Tau) release decreased in the MVN following acute hypotension. In the unilateral labyrinthectomy group, the levels of Glu, GABA, and Tau were unchanged in the ipsilateral MVN to the lesion following acute hypotension. Furthermore, in the contralateral MVN to the lesion, Glu release increased, and GABA and Tau release decreased following acute hypotension. These results suggest that SNP-induced acute hypotension can influence the activity of neurons in the MVN through afferent signals from peripheral vestibular receptors, and that certain amino acid transmitters in the MVN are involved in this process.

  8. Morphometric analysis of posterior fossa in Indian CP angle acoustic schwannoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Patibandla, Mohana Rao; Panigrahi, Manas K.; Gurram, Paniraj L.; Thotakura, Amit Kumar; Kulkarni, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the morphometry of posterior fossa in Indian CP angle schwannoma patients in order to know its influence on the extent of excision of the CP angle acoustic schwannomas. Materials and Methods: One hundred cases of cerebellopontine angle schwannomas treated surgically by the senior author and 20 controls between January 2006 and June 2011 were consecutively investigated with computed tomography (CT) using the high-resolution CT bone windows before surgery. Evaluation of anatomic parameters of the petrous bone and posterior fossa cavity were done in all patients and controls. Data were entered in Excel software and were analyzed using NCSS software. All possible regression analysis was done to select the important variables to be included in the model to predict the excision of tumor with these variables. A prediction model was developed defining the binary outcome as total excision or subtotal excision as dependent variable and the morphometric data and grading of tumor as independent variables. Results: Interpetrous distance (IP) is the distance between the two petrous apices. Sigmoid distance (IS) distance is the distance between the two sigmoid points. Sigmoid point is the point at which the scalloped impression of the sigmoid sinus straightens to join the occipital bone posteriorly. SAG is the distance between the mid IP point and the mid-point on the inner wall of the occipital bone. The PM angle was 47.8±4.14 degrees (38-58), the PA angle was 42.68±4.47 degrees (34-53), the IP distance was 2.07±0.13 cm (1.5-2.8), the sagittal diameter of posterior fossa was 6.22±0.73 cm (5.1-9.8) and the intersigmoid distance was 9.45±0.73 cm (7.4-11). There was no significant gender difference in the posterior fossa morphometry between patients and controls. Inter-sigmoid distance and the petrous-apex angle were more in the Indians when compared to the European population mentioned in the Mathies and Samii study. Conclusions: The posterior fossa

  9. Gradenigo's syndrome--surgical management in a child.

    PubMed

    Humayun, Hassan Nabeel; Akhtar, Shabbir; Ahmed, Shakeel

    2011-04-01

    Otits media is a common problem. Some of its complications that were seen frequently in the preantibiotic era are rare today. We report a case of an 8 year boy who presented with earache, retro-orbital pain and diplopia secondary to a sixth nerve palsy--Gradenigo's syndrome. In this syndrome infection from the middle ear spreads medially to the petrous apex of the temporal bone. Work-up includes CT scan of the temporal bones. Timely management with intravenous antibiotics (+ surgery) is needed to prevent intra-cranial complications.

  10. Skull Base Clear Cell Carcinoma, Metastasis of Renal Primary Tumor: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Ilson; Platin, Enrique; Klaassen, Rodrigo; Spencer, M. Loreto; García, Cesar; Alarcón, Ricardo; Ulloa, David

    2013-01-01

    We report on a patient who presented with cranial nerve VI bilateral paresis, absence of pharyngeal reflex, dysarthria, right tongue deviation, and right facial paralysis. Imaging studies showed an expansive process in the cranial base with clivus and petrous apex osteolysis. A biopsy confirmed the presence of clear cell adenocarcinoma and suspicion of renal tumor metastases. Abdominal imaging studies revealed a mass in the right kidney. Consequently, radiotherapy was performed, and the patient was enrolled in a palliative care and pain control program. PMID:24019781

  11. Surgically Clipping a Posterolaterally Projecting Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm With Anterior Petroclinoid Fold Fenestration.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shishun; Shi, Xiaodong; Chu, Xiaoshuai; Yuan, Xunhui; Sun, Gaoling; Bai, Yun'an; Liang, Aijun

    2017-01-01

    The anterior petroclinoid fold (APF) is a ligamentous structure consisting of collagen fiber and extends from the petrous apex to the anterior clinoid process. During the surgical clipping of some posterolaterally projecting posterior communicating artery aneurysms, it may pose a technical challenge due to obscuration of the aneurismal neck by the APF. Herein, the authors describe a simple and effective technique utilizing fenestration of the APF to facilitate visualization and surgical clipping of these aneurysms. To the best knowledge of us, this technique of the APF fenestration has been reported in only a few patients.

  12. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Holanda, Maurus Marques; Pereira Neto, Normando Guedes; de Moura Peixoto, Gustavo; Pinheiro Santos, Rayan Haquim

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil. PMID:25972713

  13. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Holanda, Maurus Marques; Pereira Neto, Normando Guedes; de Moura Peixoto, Gustavo; Pinheiro Santos, Rayan Haquim

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil.

  14. Surgical treatment of traumatic injuries of the cranial base.

    PubMed

    Lin, Derrick T; Lin, Alice C

    2013-10-01

    Skull-base fractures involve one or more of the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone, orbital plate of the frontal bone, sphenoid bone, occipital bone, and petrous or temporal bone. Although the fractures themselves only require reduction and reconstruction when the skull base is severely comminuted and altered, even small fractures and the traumatic shear forces can create tears in the meninges and thus predispose to cerebrospinal fluid leaks. This article explores the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative management of skull-base fractures, which most commonly involves resolution of the cerebrospinal fluid leak and the prevention of future leaks or meningoencephaloceles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Morphometric analysis of posterior fossa in Indian CP angle acoustic schwannoma patients.

    PubMed

    Patibandla, Mohana Rao; Panigrahi, Manas K; Gurram, Paniraj L; Thotakura, Amit Kumar; Kulkarni, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    To study the morphometry of posterior fossa in Indian CP angle schwannoma patients in order to know its influence on the extent of excision of the CP angle acoustic schwannomas. One hundred cases of cerebellopontine angle schwannomas treated surgically by the senior author and 20 controls between January 2006 and June 2011 were consecutively investigated with computed tomography (CT) using the high-resolution CT bone windows before surgery. Evaluation of anatomic parameters of the petrous bone and posterior fossa cavity were done in all patients and controls. Data were entered in Excel software and were analyzed using NCSS software. All possible regression analysis was done to select the important variables to be included in the model to predict the excision of tumor with these variables. A prediction model was developed defining the binary outcome as total excision or subtotal excision as dependent variable and the morphometric data and grading of tumor as independent variables. Interpetrous distance (IP) is the distance between the two petrous apices. Sigmoid distance (IS) distance is the distance between the two sigmoid points. Sigmoid point is the point at which the scalloped impression of the sigmoid sinus straightens to join the occipital bone posteriorly. SAG is the distance between the mid IP point and the mid-point on the inner wall of the occipital bone. The PM angle was 47.8±4.14 degrees (38-58), the PA angle was 42.68±4.47 degrees (34-53), the IP distance was 2.07±0.13 cm (1.5-2.8), the sagittal diameter of posterior fossa was 6.22±0.73 cm (5.1-9.8) and the intersigmoid distance was 9.45±0.73 cm (7.4-11). There was no significant gender difference in the posterior fossa morphometry between patients and controls. Inter-sigmoid distance and the petrous-apex angle were more in the Indians when compared to the European population mentioned in the Mathies and Samii study. The posterior fossa morphological parameters of the Indian and European population

  16. Postoperative CT findings in acoustic neurinomas operated upon by a translabyrinthine approach.

    PubMed

    Larsson, E M; Cronqvist, S; Sundbärg, G; Mercke, U; Harris, S

    1986-01-01

    The findings at CT examinations, performed on 46 patients with acoustic neurinomas about 6 months after translabyrinthine surgery, were analyzed and compared with preoperative findings. Direct as well as indirect signs of expansion had disappeared postoperatively. Bulging of cerebellar tissue towards the operative defect in the petrous bone, a finding not connected with local adhesions, was notable. Hypodensity in the vicinity of the removed tumor occurred either due to local widening of the subarachnoid space or due to changes within the cerebellar parenchyma. Local and general widening of the fourth ventricle as a sign of atrophy was a frequent finding.

  17. Transorbital-transpetrosal penetrating cerebellar injury--case report.

    PubMed

    Kitakami, A; Kirikae, M; Kuroda, K; Ogawa, A

    1999-02-01

    A 4-year-old boy presented with a transorbital-transpetrosal penetrating head injury after a butter knife had penetrated the left orbit. The knife tip reached the posterior fossa after penetrating the petrous bone. Wide craniotomy and the pterional, subtemporal, and lateral suboccipital approaches were performed for safe removal of the object. The patient was discharged with left-sided blindness, complete left ophthalmoplegia, and hypesthesia of the left face. Early angiography is recommended to identify vascular injury which could result in fatal intracranial hemorrhage.

  18. Expanded Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to Skull Base Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, J. Drew; Vender, John R.; Alleyne, Cargill H.; Solares, C. Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cranial base meningiomas have traditionally been addressed via frontal or frontolateral approaches. However, with the advances in endoscopic endonasal treatment of pituitary lesions, the transphenoidal approach is being expanded to address lesions of the petrous ridge, anterior clinoid, clivus, sella, parasellar region, tuberculum, planum, olfactory groove, and crista galli regions. The expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEEA) has the advantage of limiting brain retraction and resultant brain edema, as well as minimizing manipulation of neural structures. Herein, we describe the techniques of transclival, transphenoidal, transplanum, and transcribiform resections of anterior skull base meningiomas. Selected cases are presented. PMID:23730542

  19. Multi-modal coding of three-dimensional rotation and translation in area MSTd: Comparison of visual and vestibular selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Katsumasa; Gu, Yong; May, Paul J.; Newlands, Shawn D.; DeAngelis, Gregory C.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that most neurons in the dorsal medial superior temporal area (MSTd) signal the direction of self-translation (i.e., heading) in response to both optic flow and inertial motion. Much less is currently known about the response properties of MSTd neurons during self-rotation. We have characterized the three-dimensional tuning of MSTd neurons while monkeys passively fixated a central, head-fixed target. Rotational stimuli were either presented using a motion platform or simulated visually using optic flow. Nearly all MSTd cells were significantly tuned for the direction of rotation in the absence of optic flow, with more neurons preferring roll than pitch or yaw rotations. The preferred rotation axis in response to optic flow was generally opposite to that during physical rotation. This result differs sharply from our findings for translational motion, where roughly half of MSTd neurons have congruent visual and vestibular preferences. Previous studies of MSTd responses to motion in darkness have assumed a vestibular origin for the activity observed. We have directly verified this assumption by recording from MSTd neurons after bilateral labyrinthectomy. Selectivity for physical rotation and translation stimuli was eliminated after labyrinthectomy, whereas selectivity to optic flow was unaffected. Overall, the lack of MSTd neurons with congruent rotation tuning for visual and vestibular stimuli suggests that MSTd does not integrate these signals to produce a robust percept of self-rotation. Vestibular rotation signals in MSTd may instead be used to compensate for the confounding effects of rotatory head movements on optic flow. PMID:17804635

  20. Device setting modifications for 3D flatpanel imaging in skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Hassepass, Frederike; Maier, Wolfgang; Aschendorff, Antje; Bulla, Stefan; Vach, Werner; Laszig, Roland; Grauvogel, Tanja D

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the image quality and clinical implementation after setting modification of a three-dimensional isocentric C-arm fluoroscopic image intensifier system combined with a digital flatpanel detector as a new tool for sinus and petrous bone surgery. Image acquisition was performed using two cadaveric heads. Experimental design was oriented to the clinically sensible intraoperative setup. Different tube currents and orbital movements of the C-arm system were evaluated for image quality by three otolaryngological surgeons using predetermined landmarks. Modification of the X-ray intensity did not attain statistically significant values compared to the X-ray-intensity predetermined by producer (12.0-18.5 mA, p > 0.05) for either sinus or for petrous bone scans. Elliptical orbital movement resulted in significantly superior image quality than data sets acquired by circular orbital movement (3.194 vs. 2.809, p < 0.0001). New C-arm systems with 3D-capabiltity offer a promising tool for intraoperative near real-time image guidance. Image quality of the skull base can be improved significantly with optimized system settings.

  1. Fat graft-assisted internal auditory canal closure after retrosigmoid transmeatal resection of acoustic neuroma: Technique for prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Azad, Tareq; Mendelson, Zachary S; Wong, Anni; Jyung, Robert W; Liu, James K

    2016-02-01

    The retrosigmoid transmeatal approach remains an important strategy in the surgical management of acoustic neuromas. Gross total resection of acoustic neuromas requires removal of tumor within the cerebellopontine angle as well as tumor involving the internal auditory canal (IAC). Drilling into the petrous bone of the IAC can expose petrous air cells, which can potentially result in a fistulous tract to the nasopharynx manifesting as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. We describe our method of IAC closure using autologous fat graft and assessed the rates of postoperative CSF leakage. We performed a retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients who underwent retrosigmoid transmeatal resection of acoustic neuroma who underwent our method of fat graft-assisted IAC closure. We assessed rates of postoperative CSF leak (incisional leak, rhinorrhea, or otorrhea), pseudomeningocele formation, and occurrence of meningitis. Twenty-four patients (10 males, 14 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range 18-84) underwent fat graft-assisted IAC closure. No lumbar drains were used postoperatively. There were no instances of postoperative CSF leak (incisional leak, rhinorrhea, or otorrhea), pseudomeningocele formation, or occurrence of meningitis. There were no graft site complications. Our results demonstrate that autologous fat grafts provide a safe and effective method of IAC defect closure to prevent postoperative CSF leakage after acoustic tumor removal via a retrosigmoid transmeatal approach. The surgical technique and operative nuances are described.

  2. A case of generalized lymphatic anomaly causing skull-base leakage and bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kenichi; Goji, Aya; Inoue, Miki; Kawahito, Masami; Taki, Masako; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-13

    Generalized lymphatic anomaly is a multifocal lymphatic malformation that affects the skin, thoracic viscera, and bones. A 3year-old Japanese boy presented with right facial palsy due to cystic tumors in the ipsilateral petrous bone. Pericardial effusion had been found incidentally and generalized lymphatic anomaly had been diagnosed by pericardial biopsy. Petrous bone tumor had been followed up without surgery. At the age of seven he presented with fever and disturbance of consciousness, and bacterial meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae was diagnosed. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed middle skull-base leakage due to lymphatic malformation. He achieved complete recovery under intensive care with antibiotics and mechanical ventilation. One year later, he presented with multiple cystic formations in bilateral femora. At the 3-year follow-up, the patient was healthy with no recurrence of meningitis and osteolytic lesions in the femora were non-progressive. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful for demonstration of skull-base leakage by generalized lymphatic anomaly. We should consider generalized lymphatic anomaly among the differential diagnoses for skull-base leakage.

  3. As solid as a rock-comparison of CE- and MPS-based analyses of the petrosal bone as a source of DNA for forensic identification of challenging cranial bones.

    PubMed

    Kulstein, Galina; Hadrys, Thorsten; Wiegand, Peter

    2017-07-28

    Short tandem repeat (STR) typing from skeletal remains can be a difficult task. Dependent on the environmental conditions of the provenance of the bones, DNA can be degraded and STR typing inhibited. Generally, dense and compact bones are known to preserve DNA better. Several studies already proved that femora and teeth have high DNA typing success rates. Unfortunately, these elements are not present in all cases involving skeletal remains. Processing partial or singular skeletal elements, it is favorable to select bone areas where DNA preservation is comparably higher. Especially, cranial bones are often accidentally discovered during criminal investigations. The cranial bone is composed of multiple parts. In this examination, we evaluated the potential of the petrous bone for human identification of skeletal remains in forensic case work. Material from different sections of eight unknown cranial bones and-where available-additionally other skeletal elements, collected at the DNA department of the Institute of Legal Medicine in Ulm, Germany, from 2010 to 2017, were processed with an optimized DNA extraction and STR typing strategy. The results highlight that STR typing from the petrous bones leads to reportable profiles in all individuals, even in cases where the analysis of the parietal bone failed. Moreover, the comparison of capillary electrophorese (CE) typing to massively parallel sequencing (MPS) analysis shows that MPS has the potential to analyze degraded human remains and is even capable to provide additional information about phenotype and ancestry of unknown individuals.

  4. Microsurgical Anatomy of the Internal Acoustic Meatus as Seen Using the Retrosigmoid Approach.

    PubMed

    Scerrati, Alba; Lee, Jung-Shun; Zhang, Jun; Ammirati, Mario

    2016-06-01

    To show via a retrosigmoid approach the bony labyrinth anatomy and its relationship with the internal acoustic meatus so as to provide guidelines for a safer drilling to the fundus using this approach. Few studies deal with the complex anatomy of petrous bone structures as observed by a retrosigmoid approach. Ten retrosigmoid approaches were performed bilaterally on five fresh cadaveric heads. Afterward high-resolution computed tomographic scans were obtained. Measurements of landmarks and distances between important topographic structures of the pyramid were obtained on its surface using a navigation system. Semicircular canals, vestibular aqueduct, and internal acoustic meatus were dissected to show their anatomy and relationships. The anatomy of the inner ear structures was shown. Opening of the internal acoustic meatus was accomplished without injury to the labyrinth in 9 out of 10 sides. The distance between the drilled bone of the internal acoustic meatus and the vestibule was calculated on the postoperative computed tomographic scan. The mean value was 1.43 mm (SD, 0.30 mm; range, 1.0-1.8 mm). A better knowledge of the anatomy of the semicircular canals and of the vestibular aqueduct as observed by a retrosigmoid approach, together with their relationships to the fundus and other petrous bone landmarks, can be useful to get a general orientation in acoustic neuroma surgery. Using this information together with the neuronavigation, we were able to successfully open the internal acoustic meatus without entering labyrinthine structures in 90% of the study dissections.

  5. Garcin syndrome resulting from a giant cell tumor of the skull base in a child.

    PubMed

    Bibas-Bonet, Hilda; Fauze, Ricardo A; Lavado, María Graciela; Páez, Rafael O; Nieman, Judith

    2003-05-01

    Garcin syndrome is characterized by a progressive ipsilateral involvement of cranial nerves, culminating in paralysis of all or at least seven of them, without sensory or motor long-tract disturbance, with no intracranial hypertension, and with osteoclastic involvement in the skull base on radiographic computed tomography. Giant cell tumor is a primary bone tumor rarely affecting the skull base. An 8-year-old female presented with a 3-month history of increasingly worsening right otalgia, tinnitus, hearing loss, right facial numbness, and diplopia. She was admitted with a 2-week history of swallowing difficulties, voice change, and right shoulder pain. Neurologic examination disclosed unilateral paralysis of the right fifth through twelfth cranial nerves, with no other abnormal neurologic findings. Skull radiographic computed tomography revealed lytic lesions in the right temporal petrous portion. Computed tomographic scan indicated a destructive mass involving the right greater wing of the sphenoid bone and temporal petrous apex. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a tumor arising from the temporosphenoidal region, infiltrating neither the brain nor the brainstem. No hydrocephalus was observed. Biopsy revealed giant cell tumor. Posterior treatment consisted of radiotherapy. At an 8-year follow-up, the patient was well but with functional sequelae. There is no magnetic resonance imaging evidence of tumor growth. No other giant cell tumor presenting as Garcin syndrome is known to have been reported.

  6. Searching for the mother missed since the Second World War.

    PubMed

    Zupanič Pajnič, Irena; Petaros, Anja; Balažic, Jože; Geršak, Ksenija

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to perform the genetic identification of a human cranium from a Second World War gravesite in Slovenia and find out if it belonged to the mother of a woman used as a family reference. Both genetic and anthropological examinations were carried out. The genetic examination was performed on 2 molars and petrous bone. Prior to DNA isolation 0.5 g of tooth and bone powder was decalcified. The DNA was purified in a Biorobot EZ1 (Qiagen) device. The nuclear DNA of the samples was quantified and short tandem repeat (STR) typing performed using two different autosomal and Y-STR kits. Up to 22.4 ng DNA/g of powder was obtained from samples analyzed. We managed to obtain nuclear DNA for successful STR typing from the left second molar and from the petrous bone. Full autosomal genetic profile including amelogenin locus revealed the male origin of the cranium that was further confirmed by the analyses of Y-STRs. The same conclusions were adopted after the anthropological analysis which identified the cranium as that of a very young Caucasoid male. The male origin of the cranium rejected the possibility of motherhood for the compared daughter. For traceability in the event of contamination, we created an elimination database including genetic profiles of the nuclear and Y-STRs of all persons that had been in contact with the analyzed cranium and no match was found.

  7. Transoral carotid ultrasonography using a micro convex probe with B-flow imaging for extracranial internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Sakima, Hirokuni; Isa, Katsunori; Anegawa, Takahiro; Kokuba, Kazuhito; Nakachi, Koh; Goya, Yoshino; Tokashiki, Takashi; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Ohya, Yusuke

    2012-11-01

    We report on transoral carotid ultrasonography using a micro convex probe with B-flow imaging for determining spontaneous extracranial internal carotid artery dissection just below the petrous portion. A 49-year-old man suffered cortical and subcortical infarction in the region of the right middle cerebral artery. Magnetic resonance angiography on the third day of admission revealed spontaneous recanalization of the right internal carotid artery associated with an intimal flap-like structure at the petrous portion. Transoral carotid ultrasonography using a micro convex probe revealed right extracranial internal carotid artery dissection, showing an increased diameter of the right extracranial internal carotid artery with double lumen formation, stenosis of the true lumen, and a mobile intimal flap in B-flow imaging. Transoral carotid ultrasonography using a micro convex probe was helpful to attempt a self-expanding stent for recanalizing right extracranial internal carotid artery dissection. The patient recovered and was discharged ambulatory. The size of the micro convex probe was optimum for transoral carotid ultrasonography in our patient. Micro convex probe is more commonly used than the standard transoral carotid ultrasonography probe, which lacks versatility. We consider that transoral carotid ultrasonography using a micro convex probe could be routinely used for ultrasonographic evaluation of extracranial internal carotid artery dissection.

  8. Development of a snake-like dexterous manipulator for skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Coemert, Suat; Anzhu Gao; Carey, John P; Traeger, Mattias F; Taylor, Russell H; Lueth, Tim C; Armand, Mehran

    2016-08-01

    Petrous apex lesions constitute considerable surgical challenges due to their location in the skull base and close relationship with critical structures such as inner ear, carotid arteries, facial nerves and jugular bulb. These lesions often cannot be treated completely with rigid tools due to the limited accessibility. We are aiming to develop a snake-like manipulator to assist surgeons with the infralabyrinthine treatment of petrous apex lesions with increased dexterity. This snake-like dexterous manipulator (SDM) with 3.3 mm outer diameter and 40 mm working length was designed including a tool channel with a diameter of 1.8 mm and an endoscope channel with a diameter of 0.7 mm. The SDM can be actuated in one plane and two directions enabling the C- and S-shaped bends and rotated around its longitudinal axis. The constant curvature modeling was implemented to predict the deflection in one direction. Experiments were carried out with optical microscope to find out different bending modes. Experimental bending modes were in a good agreement with the theoretical ones in terms of the bending behavior. However tip position prediction showed discrepancies up to 1 mm in X and 2 mm in Z axes.

  9. Interactive Web-based learning module on CT of the temporal bone: anatomy and pathology.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Grace S; LoGerfo, Sung E; Richardson, Michael L; Anzai, Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    An interactive Web-based learning module on the temporal bone has been developed. It shows normal temporal bone anatomy in four imaging planes: axial, coronal, and parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the petrous bone. After reviewing the normal anatomy, users should be able to identify key imaging features of pathologic conditions of the temporal bone. Children with congenital abnormalities of the temporal bone may present with conductive or sensorineural hearing loss or both and may have a genetic syndrome. Acute otitis media is the most common infection of the temporal bone and is most prevalent among children. Although imaging is unnecessary in uncomplicated otitis media, it is important for evaluation of infectious complications. Classically, temporal bone fractures were described as longitudinal or transverse with respect to the long axis of the petrous bone. However, it is increasingly recognized that many fractures have both longitudinal and transverse components. Patients with temporal bone fractures may have conductive or sensorineural hearing loss in addition to other complications. The most common tumor of the temporal bone at the cerebellopontine angle is the vestibular schwannoma. Paraganglioma is the second most common tumor of the temporal bone and the most common tumor of the middle ear. Supplemental material available at http://uwmsk.org/temporalbone/atlas.html. RSNA, 2012

  10. Upper Nasopharyngeal Corridor for Transnasal Endoscopic Drainage of Petroclival Cholesterol Granulomas: Alternative Access in Conchal Sphenoid Patients

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Nefize; Baum, Griffin R.; Holland, Christopher M.; Ahmad, Faiz U.; Henriquez, Oswaldo A.; Pradilla, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholesterol granulomas arising at the petrous apex can be treated via traditional open surgical, endoscopic, and endoscopic-assisted approaches. Endoscopic approaches require access to the sphenoid sinus, which is technically challenging in patients with conchal sphenoidal anatomy. Clinical Presentation A 55-year-old woman presented with intermittent headaches and tinnitus. Formal audiometry demonstrated moderately severe bilateral hearing loss. CT of the temporal bones and sella revealed a well-demarcated expansile lytic mass. MRI of the face, orbit, and neck showed a right petrous apex mass measuring 22 × 18 × 19 mm that was hyperintense on T1- and T2-weighted images without enhancement, consistent with a cholesterol granuloma. The patient had a conchal sphenoidal anatomy. Operative Technique Herein, we present an illustrative case of a low-lying petroclival cholesterol granuloma in a patient with conchal sphenoidal anatomy to describe an alternative high nasopharyngeal corridor for endoscopic transnasal transclival access. Postoperative Course Postoperatively, the patient's symptoms recovered and no complications occurred. Follow-up imaging demonstrated a patent drainage tract without evidence of recurrence. Conclusion In patients with a conchal sphenoid sinus, endoscopic transnasal transclival access can be gained using a high nasopharyngeal approach. This corridor facilitates safe access to these lesions and others in this location. PMID:26929897

  11. [Computed tomography in the diagnosis of intracranial trigeminal neuroma].

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Wang, D; Deng, K

    1993-12-01

    CT scans of 12 cases of intracranial trigeminal neuroma were presented. Three of the neuromas were located in petrous apex-middle cranial fossa, two in posterior cranial fossa, and 7 in both the middle and posterior cranial fossae. The tumors appeared hypo- and isodense on the plain CT scan. After contrast infusion, all tumors were well circumscribed with marked enhancement, which was homogeneous, inhomogeneous or circular. None of the trigeminal neuroma had surrounding brain edema. Of 12 cases, 10 showed change of cranial bones, which included dilatation of Meckle's cave and destructions of petrous apex, clivus and the bottom of middle cranial fossa. The tumor in one case extended to paranasopharyngeal space from the bottom of middle cranial fossa, Various features of trigeminal neuroma on CT were reviewed. Also presented were the author's experiences in differentiating intracranial trigeminal neuroma from meningiom, from pituitary adenoma spreading to parasella and glioma adjacent to cranial bottom in middle cranial fossa, and from acoustic neuroma, meningioma, cholesteatoma in cerebellopontine angle.

  12. Risk of bleeding after dentoalveolar surgery in patients taking anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Ferdinand I; van Minnen, Baucke; Jansma, Johan; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2014-03-01

    To avoid increasing the risk of thromboembolic events, it is recommended that treatment with anticoagulants should be continued during dentoalveolar operations. We have evaluated the incidence of bleeding after dentoalveolar operations in a prospective study of 206 patients, 103 who were, and 103 who were not, taking anticoagulants. Seventy-one were taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors and 32 vitamin K antagonists. Patients were treated according to guidelines developed at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), The Netherlands. The operations studied included surgical extraction (when the surgeon had to incise the gingiva before extraction), non-surgical extraction, apicectomy, and placement of implants. Patients were given standard postoperative care and those taking vitamin K antagonists used tranexamic acid mouthwash postoperatively. No patient developed a severe bleed that required intervention. Seven patients (7%) taking anticoagulants developed mild postoperative bleeds. Patients taking vitamin K antagonists reported 3 episodes (9%) compared with 4 (6%) in the group taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors. Among patients not taking anticoagulants, two (2%) developed mild bleeding. The differences between the groups were not significant. All bleeding was controlled by the patients themselves with compression with gauze. We conclude that dentoalveolar surgery is safe in patients being treated with anticoagulants provided that the conditions described in the ACTA guidelines are met.

  13. Cone Beam CT use in the pre-prosthetic evaluation of endodontically treated of the rear maxilla

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; OTTRIA, L.; NEZZO, M.; NERONI, L.; FANUCCI, E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY With our study we wanted to compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional radiography (orthopanoramic and intraoral radiography) and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) for the diagnosis of periapical lesions on the posterior elements of the upper maxilla endodontically treated. The images were analyzed by a radiologist and an endodontist whose interpretation of radiological examinations is unique. Were examined 34 molars (23 first molars and 13 second molars) with a total of 102 roots. The CBCT detected a significantly higher number of lesions (43%, p <0.001) compared to conventional radiography. Our results demonstrate that the CBCT can be inserted into the diagnostic routine for the evaluation of all pre-prosthetic posterior elements of the upper jaw endodontically treated in addition to the diagnostic techniques 2D, especially when in the treatment plan is provided the realization of an abutment. The CBCT, which has reduction of cost and absorption of radiation with respect to the conventional CT, is also very useful even when there is a need to perform a surgical treatment-endodontic (apicectomy) of a lesion diagnosed with 2D techniques. PMID:23285405

  14. Histopathological profile of surgically removed persistent periapical radiolucent lesions of endodontic origin.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Firth, N

    2009-03-01

    To determine the types of periapical lesions associated with root filled teeth with persistent periapical pathosis that required surgical treatment based on specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Periapical lesions from a consecutive clinical sample of 100 patients were examined histopathologically to determine a definitive diagnosis. Females were more represented (n = 56), the average age was 46.5 years and there were no age differences between gender or lesion type. A diagnosis of periapical granuloma was the most common finding with a similar number present in females (n = 40) and males (n = 37). A cyst was present in 18% of the cases with a majority of females (n = 12) represented in the sample. Evidence of foreign material, with an appearance consistent with endodontic sealer materials, was seen in 25 periapical granulomas, two cysts and one scar. Two periapical scars were seen, one had a history of apicectomy and amalgam root-end filling while the other was associated with extruded root filling material. By using defined clinical inclusion and exclusion criteria a predictable clinical diagnosis of a persistent periapical lesion due to endodontic origin can be reliably made. Periapical granulomas and cysts were the most common periapical lesions of endodontic origin associated with persistent periapical pathosis with the overall incidence of periapical cysts similar to previous studies. The presence of endodontic material in a high proportion of periapical lesions suggests a cause-effect association with the inference that clinicians should employ canal preparation techniques that limit apical extrusion of material.

  15. Sealing ability of MTA and radiopaque Portland cement with or without calcium chloride for root-end filling.

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Eduardo Antunes; Broon, Norberto Juárez; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes; Bernardineli, Norberti

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) on the sealing ability of three Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) cements, ProRoot MTA, MTA-Angelus, and radiopaque White Portland cement (WPC), for retrograde root filling. Seventy roots of extracted single-rooted teeth were instrumented and obturated. After sectioning the samples at 2 mm from the apex, they received one layer of Araldite and two coats of nail enamel, except for the apical dentinal surface submitted to apicectomy. Standardized retrograde cavities were prepared, filled with one of the materials, and immersed in 0.2% Rhodamine B solution for 72 hours. Dye leakage was analyzed on a light microscope with ocular micrometer. Kruskal-Wallis and Miller tests were used to compare groups arranged in increasing order of leakage, according to mean rank of scores: WPC+CaCl(2), MTA-Angelus+CaCl(2), ProRoot MTA+CaCl(2), MTA-Angelus, ProRoot MTA, and WPC. CaCl(2) improved the sealing ability of all three MTA cements.

  16. Calculus-like deposit on the apical external root surface of teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ricucci, D; Martorano, M; Bate, A L; Pascon, E A

    2005-04-01

    To report two cases in which calculus-like material was found on external root surfaces of (i) an extracted root and (ii) an apicected part of a root, both of which were removed due to post-treatment refractory apical periodontitis. In each case, there was a fistulous tract, which did not heal after conventional root canal treatment. The first case did not heal even after apical surgery, and subsequent tooth extraction revealed calculus-like material on a root surface of complex anatomy. The second case showed radiographic signs of healing after apicectomy. Histology of the apical biopsy revealed a calculus-like material on the external surface of the root apex. It is suggested that the presence of calculus on the root surfaces of teeth with periapical lesions may contribute towards the aetiology of failure. Biofilm on the external root surface has been implicated in the failure of apical periodontitis to heal, despite adequate root canal treatment. Calculus-like material was found, in two cases, on the root surface of teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis, where the only communication externally was a sinus tract.

  17. A case of a cholesterol granuloma occluding the external auditory canal in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ji Sun; Kim, Mee-Seon; Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2014-09-01

    Cholesterol granulomas are benign granulomatous lesions caused by tissue reaction to a foreign body such as cholesterol crystals. These crystals have been are associated with pathological conditions of pneumatized spaces, including those causing inadequate aeration, obstruction of drainage, and hemorrhage in pneumatized spaces, and where materials trapping materials, such as hemosiderin or cholesterol become trapped, and then forming a cholesterol granuloma. Cholesterol granulomas are frequently found in the temporal bones, with the middle ear, mastoid caverna, and petrous apex being the most commonly affected sites. As there have been few reported cases of cholesterol granulomas presenting as a mass in the external acoustic canal (EAC), a cholesterol granuloma occluding the entire EAC in a pediatric patient is considered quite rare. We encountered a large cholesterol granuloma occupying the entire EAC, resulting in total EAC occlusion in a 12-year-old girl. The granuloma was diagnosed via medical imaging and surgically excised.

  18. A mistaken identity: rhabdomyosarcoma of the middle ear cleft misdiagnosed as chronic suppurative otitis media with temporal lobe abscess

    PubMed Central

    Muranjan, Mamta; Karande, Sunil; Parikh, Shefali; Sankhe, Shilpa

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old girl presented with a 3-month history of left side facial palsy, followed sequentially by purulent ear discharge, complete external ophthalmoplaegia and blurred vision. On clinical examination she was febrile with left-sided conductive hearing loss. She was clinically diagnosed to have chronic suppurative otitis media of the unsafe type with petrous apicitis, middle cranial fossa abscess and cavernous sinus involvement. Preliminary CT scan findings were reported as a large left temporal lobe abscess and left otitis media with cholesteatoma. MRI of the brain obtained later corroborated the abnormalities detected on the CT scan. Ten days after admission, a mass was seen protruding from the external auditory canal. A biopsy of the mass was obtained and sent for histopathological examination. Meanwhile, review of the MRI suggested an aggressive neoplasm such as sarcoma/rhabdomyosarcoma. Histopathology clinched the final diagnosis of an anaplastic type of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the middle ear cleft. PMID:25240007

  19. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrell, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Guerra, Manuel A Rojo; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2015-12-24

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to observe natural selection directly by analysing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report a genome-wide scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest ancient DNA data set yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians who lived between 6500 and 300 bc, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide ancient DNA from Anatolian Neolithic farmers, whose genetic material we obtained by extracting from petrous bones, and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe's first farmers. We also report a transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5600 and 300 bc, which allows us to identify admixture into the steppe from at least two external sources. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height.

  20. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R.; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrel, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vayacheslav; Rojo Guerra, Manuel A.; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W.; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to directly witness natural selection by analyzing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report the first scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest genome-wide dataset yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians dating to between 6500 and 1000 BCE, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include the first genome-wide data from the Anatolian Neolithic culture whose genetic material we extracted from the DNA-rich petrous bone and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe’s first farmers. We also report a complete transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5500 and 1200 BCE that allows us to recognize admixture from at least two external sources into steppe populations during this period. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height. PMID:26595274

  1. Simple Transposition Technique for Microvascular Decompression Using an Expanded Polytetrafluoroethylene “Belt”: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Yuichiro; UCHIDA, Masashi; ONODERA, Hidetaka; HIRAMOTO, Jun; YOSHIDA, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a standard surgical procedure for treating vascular compression syndromes. There are two basic ways to perform MVD: interposition using a prosthesis and transposition. With the transposition technique, adhesions and granuloma around the decompression site are avoided, but the required operation is more complex than that for the interposition method. We describe a simple, quick MVD transposition procedure that uses a small “belt” cut from a sheet of 0.3-mm-thick expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane. The belt has a hole at the wide end and the other end tapered to a point. The belt is encircled around offending vessels by inserting the pointed end into the hole. The pointed end is then passed through a dural tunnel over the posterior wall of the petrous bone and is tied two or three times. This method avoids the risks involved in handling a surgical needle close to the cranial nerves and vessels. PMID:24097088

  2. Simple transposition technique for microvascular decompression using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene "belt": technical note.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuichiro; Uchida, Masashi; Onodera, Hidetaka; Hiramoto, Jun; Yoshida, Yasuyuki

    2014-06-17

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a standard surgical procedure for treating vascular compression syndromes. There are two basic ways to perform MVD: interposition using a prosthesis and transposition. With the transposition technique, adhesions and granuloma around the decompression site are avoided, but the required operation is more complex than that for the interposition method. We describe a simple, quick MVD transposition procedure that uses a small "belt" cut from a sheet of 0.3-mm-thick expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane. The belt has a hole at the wide end and the other end tapered to a point. The belt is encircled around offending vessels by inserting the pointed end into the hole. The pointed end is then passed through a dural tunnel over the posterior wall of the petrous bone and is tied two or three times. This method avoids the risks involved in handling a surgical needle close to the cranial nerves and vessels.

  3. Gorham-Stout syndrome affecting the temporal bone with cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Noriko; Ogiwara, Hideki; Miyazaki, Osamu; Kitamuara, Masayuki; Nishina, Sachiko; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Maekawa, Takanobu; Morota, Nobuhito

    2013-09-01

    Gorham-Stout syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by progressive osteolysis that leads to the disappearance of bone. Lymphvascular proliferation causes the local destruction of bony tissue. Owing to the low incidence of this syndrome, little is known about its etiology or treatment. We present an 11-year-old girl with Gorham-Stout syndrome that involved right petrous apex in temporal bone and upper clivus, which cause intracranial pressure increase and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. The patient required surgical repair of CSF leakage by extradural middle fossa approach with temporal fascia flap. Combined treatment with interferon and propranolol prevented the progression of osteolysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antleroma in a free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Munk, B A; Garrison, E; Clemons, B; Keel, M Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A 2-year-old male free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) was diagnosed with bilateral expansile tumors of antler origin. The deer was found dead by a landowner in High Springs, Florida. Two roughly spherical, multilobular, broad-based, bony, velvet-covered masses originated from each antler pedicle. These masses replaced or displaced many of the bones and soft tissues of the skull and extended through the left cribriform plate and the right petrous temporal bone, compressing portions of the brain. Microscopically, the masses closely resembled normal-growing antler, containing all the elements thereof but with areas of necrosis and hemorrhage suggestive of ischemi or trauma. Tumorlike outgrowths termed antleromas have been described in free-ranging and captive cervids and typically are associated with disruptions in the seasonal rise and fall of circulating testosterone necessary for normal antler growth, casting, and regeneration. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. MRI of paraganglioma of the filum terminale

    SciTech Connect

    Boncoeur-Martel, M.P.; Lesort, A.; Moreau, J.J.; Labrousse, F.; Roche, I.; Bouillet, P.; Pascaud, J.L.; Dupuy, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Paragangliomas are benign tumors arising from paraganglionic cells of the sympathetic nervous system. They are of neuroectodermal derivation, with the majority occurring in the adrenal medulla. Extraadrenal locations are usually nonfunctioning and mostly observed (90%) in the head and neck region (carotid body or glomus jugulare tumors). Rare reported locations include the mediastinum, retroperitoneum, lungs, duodenum, and bladder. Within the CNS, paragangliomas have been observed in the pineal region, petrous ridge, sella turcica, and spinal canal. Paraganglioma of the cauda equina was first reported, but not recognized as such, in 1970. We know of 10 reports that describe MRI appearance. We present a new case and review the imaging findings of a paraganglioma of the filum terminale. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Diversities in presentations of extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Neelakantan, Shiba; Nair, Preeti P; Emmanuel, Roby V; Agrawal, Kavita

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) has been increasing worldwide over the last few years. Tuberculous lymphadenitis is the most common form of the disease and is reported to occur in 25–60% of all EPTB cases. It is commonly seen in the cervical lymph nodes, but may also be in the larynx, pharynx, parotid and rarely, in the sinuses and petrous bone. The posterior triangle, supraclavicular and jugular nodes are most frequently affected. They are usually unilateral, although diffuse adenopathy may occur. TB involving cervical lymph nodes represents 50% of extrapulmonary TB. A series of six cases of tuberculous lymphadenitis with varying clinical features is documented here to alert one of its prevalence in developing countries. PMID:23449832

  7. Ophthalmic artery aneurysm treated by surgical clipping and balloon-assisted temporary carotid occlusion.

    PubMed

    Dehdashti, Amir R

    2015-07-01

    A 29-year-old woman is diagnosed with a large broad-base right ophthalmic artery aneurysm. Despite an intact visual field, she complained of mild right visual blurriness. Between endovascular and surgical treatments, surgery was favored due to her young age. It was decided to perform the surgery with simultaneous endovascular temporary carotid balloon occlusion. A right pterional craniotomy and intradural anterior clinoidectomy were performed, the balloon was positioned in the petrous carotid, and the distal durai ring was opened exposing the proximal neck. Under temporary proximal carotid balloon occlusion and distal carotid clip occlusion, the aneurysm was fully dissected and clipped. Intraoperative angiogram confirmed complete aneurysm occlusion and patency of the ophthalmic artery. The patient's neurological exam remained unchanged. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/BIQKTl9bDqA .

  8. Lateral skull base chondroblastoma resected with facial nerve posterior transposition.

    PubMed

    Adnot, J; Langlois, O; Tollard, E; Crahes, M; Auquit-Auckbur, I; Marie, J-P

    2017-05-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare tumor that can involve the temporal bone. Because it is a benign tumor, functional surgery must be proposed. We report a case of a patient with a massive chondroblastoma operated on with preservation of the facial nerve, and description of the surgical technique. A 37-year-old man presented with a 9-month history of a growing left pre-auricular mass and hearing loss. Neuroimaging showed an osteolytic mass invading the temporal bone and temporomandibular joint. Excision was performed via a transpetrosal and transcochlear approach with posterior transposition of the facial nerve. EMG monitoring was effective in preventing facial palsy. Four years later, no sign of recurrence was observed. Chondroblastoma is a locally aggressive tumor, especially when located in the petrous bone and temporomandibular joint. The suggested treatment is a complete excision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. [Apical petrositis, osteomyelitis of the base of the skull bones and of the first cervical vertebra in a 5 year-old children following chicken pox].

    PubMed

    Bogomil'sky, M R; Polunin, M M; Zelikovich, E I; Soldatsky, Yu L; Burova, O V

    2016-01-01

    This publication was designed to describe a rare case of development of apicalpetrositis in a child presenting with acute otitis mediafollowing chicken pox experienced in the preceding period. We carried out the study with the use of computed tomography (CT) that demonstrated destruction of the temporal bone, bones of the base of the skull and of the first cervical vertebra. The treatment strategy chosen for the management of this condition that included antibiotic therapy and expectant observation proved justified and can be recommended as an algorithm of choice taking into consideration the difficulty of surgical approach to the apex of the petrous pyramid. However, this approach is associated with the high risk of disability arising from the potential injury to the craniocerebral nerves.

  10. Pipeline embolization device and subsequent vessel sacrifice for treatment of a bleeding carotid pseudoaneurysm at the skull base: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodayan, Yasha; Shetty, Vilaas S; Blackburn, Spiros L; Reynolds, Matthew R; Cross, DeWitte T; Moran, Christopher J

    2013-09-01

    An attempt at parent vessel reconstruction with Pipeline embolization devices to treat a mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery at the skull base is presented. A 50-year-old woman with malignant otitis externa and bilateral temporal bone osteomyelitis presented with brisk bleeding from her left ear. She had bony dehiscence of the left carotid canal at CT and extravasation from a pseudoaneurysm of the carotid petrous segment at angiography. Carotid tortuosity proximally precluded placing a covered stent. After the lesion stopped bleeding spontaneously and given the presence of bilateral osteomyelitis putting the contralateral carotid at risk, the decision was made to attempt preservation of the parent vessel with flow diversion. However, bleeding recurred after 12 days, necessitating carotid sacrifice. This first reported experience in treating a carotid pseudoaneurysm at the skull base with the Pipeline device shows that transient cessation of bleeding is insufficient for flow diversion to be effective.

  11. Morphometry of the primate bony labyrinth: a new method based on high-resolution computed tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Spoor, F; Zonneveld, F

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for taking accurate measurements of the bony labyrinth of humans and other primates using high-resolution computed tomography (CT). The measurements comprise 8 dimensions, 14 orientations and 2 indices of the labyrinth, as well as 7 orientations of related structures of the petrous pyramid. Comparison of the measurements taken from CT scans with those taken from subsequently made casts and cryosections demonstrates that the method is sufficiently accurate to permit the morphometric analysis of labyrinthine size and shape. Since the CT method is nondestructive, fast and easy to perform, it is applicable to large samples and to rare or precious anthropological specimens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7649826

  12. Bilateral Facial Paralysis Caused by Bilateral Temporal Bone Fracture: A Case Report and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Eliçora, Sultan Şevik; Dinç, Aykut Erdem; Bişkin, Sultan; Damar, Murat; Bilgin, Ergin

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral facial paralysis caused by bilateral temporal bone fracture is a rare clinical entity, with seven cases reported in the literature to date. In this paper, we describe a 40-year-old male patient with bilateral facial paralysis and hearing loss that developed after an occupational accident. On physical examination, House-Brackmann (HB) facial paralysis of grade 6 was observed on the right side and HB grade 5 paralysis on the left. Upon temporal bone computed tomography (CT) examination, a fracture line exhibiting transverse progression was observed in both petrous temporal bones. Our patient underwent transmastoid facial decompression surgery of the right ear. The patient refused a left-side operation. Such patients require extensive monitoring in intensive care units because the presence of multiple injuries means that facial functions are often very difficult to evaluate. Therefore, delays may ensue in both diagnosis and treatment of bilateral facial paralysis. PMID:26175920

  13. Bilateral Facial Paralysis Caused by Bilateral Temporal Bone Fracture: A Case Report and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Eliçora, Sultan Şevik; Dinç, Aykut Erdem; Bişkin, Sultan; Damar, Murat; Bilgin, Ergin

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral facial paralysis caused by bilateral temporal bone fracture is a rare clinical entity, with seven cases reported in the literature to date. In this paper, we describe a 40-year-old male patient with bilateral facial paralysis and hearing loss that developed after an occupational accident. On physical examination, House-Brackmann (HB) facial paralysis of grade 6 was observed on the right side and HB grade 5 paralysis on the left. Upon temporal bone computed tomography (CT) examination, a fracture line exhibiting transverse progression was observed in both petrous temporal bones. Our patient underwent transmastoid facial decompression surgery of the right ear. The patient refused a left-side operation. Such patients require extensive monitoring in intensive care units because the presence of multiple injuries means that facial functions are often very difficult to evaluate. Therefore, delays may ensue in both diagnosis and treatment of bilateral facial paralysis.

  14. Off-label uses of the Pipeline embolization device: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Purvee D; Chalouhi, Nohra; Atallah, Elias; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Hasan, David; Zarzour, Hekmat; Rosenwasser, Robert; Jabbour, Pascal

    2017-06-01

    The Pipeline embolization device (PED) is the most widely used flow diverter in endovascular neurosurgery. In 2011, the device received FDA approval for the treatment of large and giant aneurysms in the internal carotid artery extending from the petrous to the superior hypophyseal segments. However, as popularity of the device grew and neurosurgeons gained more experience, its use has extended to several other indications. Some of these off-label uses include previously treated aneurysms, acutely ruptured aneurysms, small aneurysms, distal circulation aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, fusiform aneurysms, dissecting aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, and even carotid-cavernous fistulas. The authors present a literature review of the safety and efficacy of the PED in these off-label uses.

  15. En bloc mastoidectomy to avoid postoperative retroauricular deformity in the transpetrosal approach.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Y; Matsuzawa, M; Sakakibara, Y; Sekino, H

    1998-10-01

    The authors describe a surgical technique to avoid postoperative retroauricular deformity following the transpetrosal approach. After removing a one-piece temporal and suboccipital bone flap, the mastoid process is cut obliquely by using a sagittal saw towards an imaginary line drawn from the point on the petrous ridge just lateral to the arcuate eminence to the burr hole opened medial to the occipital groove. This technique allows en bloc removal of the mastoid process without resulting bone defects. Three patients who were treated with this technique and followed up for more than 1 year showed good cosmetic results with no complications including cerebrospinal fluid leakage. We believe this en bloc mastoidectomy offers a definite advantage in regard to avoid postoperative retroauricular deformity.

  16. Clinical Significance of an Unusual Variation

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, M. Senthil; Sudha, R.; Bhargavan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The infrahyoid muscles are involved in vocalisation and swallowing; among these, the sternothyroid muscle is derived from the common primitive sheet. The improper differentiation of this muscle may therefore result in morphological variations. We report an unusual variation found during the dissection of a 65-year-old male cadaver at the Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College, Madagadipet, Pondicherry, India, in 2015. An anomalous belly of the right sternothyroid muscle was observed between the internal jugular (IJ) vein and the internal carotid artery with an additional insertion into the tympanic plate and petrous part of the temporal bone and the presence of a levator glandulae thyroideae muscle. The anomalous muscle may compress the IJ vein if it is related to the neurovascular structures of neck; hence, knowledge of variations of the infrahyoid muscles can aid in the evaluation of IJ vein compression among patients with idiopathic symptoms resulting from venous congestion. PMID:28003898

  17. Comparison of temporal bone fractures in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Min; Kim, Myung Gu; Hong, Seok Min; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2013-05-01

    Contrary to our expectation, that the clinical characteristics of temporal bone fracture would differ in children and adults, we found that the two groups were similar. Most studies of temporal bone fractures have been performed in adults. To our knowledge, no study has investigated differences in temporal bone fractures in children and adults. We therefore investigated differences in temporal bone fractures in adults and children by examining the manifestations and clinical symptoms of temporal bone fractures in pediatric patients. The demographic and clinical characteristics were assessed in 32 children and 186 adults with temporal bone fractures. All patients underwent computed tomography of the temporal bone. Causes of fracture, gender distribution, manifestations of temporal bone fracture, and clinical symptoms were similar in adults and children (p > 0.05 each). Petrous fracture, ear fullness, dizziness, and tinnitus were significantly more frequent in adults than in children (p < 0.05 each).

  18. [The vestibular system: from structure to function].

    PubMed

    Collard, M

    1994-02-01

    The two vestibular receptors, right and left, hidden in the petrous part of the temporal bone with the cochlear receptors, receive information from angular and linear movements of the head and transform them into a nerve message sent to the nuclei of the brainstem, which are connected directly on the one hand to the oculomotor nuclei, at the origin of the oculovestibular reflex (induction of nystagmus), and on the other hand, to the spinal motor neurons, at the origin of the vestibulospinal reflex. These reflexes are associated with responses to visual and somaesthetic information for maintenance or return to the standing position, which characterises the function of equilibrium. Vertigo and disorders of balance reflect a conflict of information between these two labyrinths, or between the vestibular apparatus and the messages issued by other captors, and sometimes also dysfunction of central nervous system treatment of information or a lesion of the effector motor systems.

  19. X-linked progressive mixed deafness: A new microdeletion that involves a more proximal region in Xq21

    SciTech Connect

    Piussan, C.; Mathieu, M.; Kolski, C.; Strunski, V.; Hanauer, A.; Dahl, N.; Biancalana, V.; Heyberger, S.

    1995-01-01

    We report a large two-generation pedigree with seven affected males segregating for an X-linked mixed conductive sensorineural deafness. The patients present with atypical Mondini-like dysplasia, dilated petrous facial canal, dilatation of the internal auditory meatus fully connected with enlarged cochlear canals, and, in one patient, a wide bulbous posterior labyrinth. Obligatory carrier females are mildly affected. Molecular characterization of this family revealed a deletion of locus DXS169, in Xq21.1. Loci DXS72 and DXS26, which, respectively, flank DXS169 proximally and distally, were intact. Since a gene responsible for X-linked progressive mixed deafness with perilymphatic gusher (DFN3) has previously been assigned by deletion mapping to a slightly more distal interval between DXS26 and DXS121, this study indicates either two different deafness genes or the involvement of a very large region in Xq21. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Genome flux and stasis in a five millennium transect of European prehistory

    PubMed Central

    Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R.; Teasdale, Matthew D.; McLaughlin, Russell L.; Gonzalez-Fortes, Gloria; Mattiangeli, Valeria; Domboróczki, László; Kővári, Ivett; Pap, Ildikó; Anders, Alexandra; Whittle, Alasdair; Dani, János; Raczky, Pál; Higham, Thomas F. G.; Hofreiter, Michael; Bradley, Daniel G; Pinhasi, Ron

    2014-01-01

    The Great Hungarian Plain was a crossroads of cultural transformations that have shaped European prehistory. Here we analyse a 5,000-year transect of human genomes, sampled from petrous bones giving consistently excellent endogenous DNA yields, from 13 Hungarian Neolithic, Copper, Bronze and Iron Age burials including two to high (~22 × ) and seven to ~1 × coverage, to investigate the impact of these on Europe’s genetic landscape. These data suggest genomic shifts with the advent of the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, with interleaved periods of genome stability. The earliest Neolithic context genome shows a European hunter-gatherer genetic signature and a restricted ancestral population size, suggesting direct contact between cultures after the arrival of the first farmers into Europe. The latest, Iron Age, sample reveals an eastern genomic influence concordant with introduced Steppe burial rites. We observe transition towards lighter pigmentation and surprisingly, no Neolithic presence of lactase persistence. PMID:25334030

  1. The suprameatal dural flap for superior petrosal vein protection during the retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach.

    PubMed

    Mortini, Pietro; Gagliardi, Filippo; Boari, Nicola; Spina, Alfio; Bailo, Michele; Franzin, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The drilling of the suprameatal bone during the retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach (RISA) puts the superior petrosal vein complex at risk of heating and mechanical injury, which may lead to cerebellar swelling and infarction. We present a new technique to protect the superior petrosal venous complex during suprameatal bone drilling. A microanatomical laboratory investigation on cadaver was conducted. The surgical technique is described and intraoperative schematic pictures are provided. The surgical steps of this technique and the related intraoperative images are reported. One case illustration regarding the removal of a large petrous apex meningioma with Meckel cave extension is described to demonstrate the application of the technique in a clinical setting. Reflecting a dural flap onto the posterior trigeminal nerve root and the superior petrosal vein complex can be a simple way to protect the nerve and the vein during the suprameatal bone drilling during the RISA. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Surgical removal of giant acoustic neurinomas involving the skull base. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Ikota, T; Abe, H

    1989-10-01

    Neurinomas arising from the peripheral branch of the acoustic nerve distal to the internal auditory canal in the temporal bone are rare. Two advanced skull-base neurinomas are described which were situated mainly in the temporal petrous bone, and extended to the parapharyngeal space anteriorly, to the lateral cervical portion inferiorly, into the sphenoidal sinus medially, and into the middle and posterior cranial fossae compressing the brain stem. Both patients had been deaf for several years without other neurological deficits. The operative findings revealed that the fifth, seventh, and caudal cranial nerves were intact; therefore, it was suspected that these neurinomas originated primarily within the cochlea or the vestibule in the temporal bone. The tumors were completely removed via an extradural approach, with good results. Since the surgical treatment of such advanced skull-base neurinomas is difficult, the operative infratemporal fossa approach is described in detail.

  3. [Differential diagnosis of space demands in the cerebellopontine angle].

    PubMed

    Holst, B; Grunwald, I Q; Brill, G; Reith, W

    2004-11-01

    Most of the space demands in the cerebellopontine angle lie extra-axially. Important structures run within the cisterns of the cerebellopontine angle, such as the trigeminal, facial and vestibulocochlear nerves as well as the anterior inferior and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries and the veins which lead to the petrosal sinus. The most common space demands are caused by acoustic neuromas, meningeomas, vascular ectasia and aneurysms. Less common are epidermoid and other schwannomas as well as metastases, paragangliomas and arachnoidal cysts. Intra-axial tumours in the area of the cerebellopontine angle include the medulloblastoma, astrocytoma and the ependymoma, which occurs predominantly in children, in addition to the uncommon choroid plexus papilloma. Nearby, there are also space demands around the petrous bone, such as cholesterol granuloma, malignant otitis media, paraganglioma and metastases. For differential diagnosis, an understanding of the space requirements of the tumours in the cerebellopontine angle is needed in addition to knowledge of the anatomical structures.

  4. Surgically Cured, Relapsed Pneumococcal Meningitis Due to Bone Defects, Non-invasively Identified by Three-dimensional Multi-detector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Takayoshi; Morita, Akihiko; Shiobara, Keiji; Hara, Makoto; Minami, Masayuki; Shijo, Katsunori; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Shigihara, Shuntaro; Haradome, Hiroki; Abe, Osamu; Kamei, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old Japanese man presented with a history of bacterial meningitis (BM). He was admitted to our department with a one-day history of headache and was diagnosed with relapse of BM based on the cerebrospinal fluid findings. The conventional imaging studies showed serial findings suggesting left otitis media, a temporal cephalocele, and meningitis. Three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3D-MDCT) showed left petrous bone defects caused by the otitis media, and curative surgical treatment was performed. Skull bone structural abnormalities should be considered a cause of relapsed BM. 3D-MDCT was useful for revealing the causal minimal bone abnormality and performing pre-surgical mapping. PMID:27980270

  5. Peripheral facial palsy, the only presentation of a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the skull base

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Kang, Ben; Joo, Eun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Kwon, Young Se

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral facial palsy is rarely caused by primary neoplasms, which are mostly constituted of tumors of the central nervous system, head and neck, and leukemia. Presentation of case A 2-month-old male infant presented with asymmetric facial expression for 3 weeks. Physical examination revealed suspicious findings of right peripheral facial palsy. Computed tomography of the temporal bone revealed a suspicious bone tumor centered in the right petrous bone involving surrounding bones with extension into the middle ear cavity and inner ear. Subtotal resection of the tumor was performed due to crucial structures adjacent the mass. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the resected tumor was consistent with primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Conclusion We report a rare case of a primitive neuroectodermal tumor located at the skull base presenting with only peripheral facial palsy. PMID:26710328

  6. Clinical computed tomography: Illustrated procedural guide

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, L.C.; Lipcamon, J.D.; Yie-Chiu, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents an overview of physics and instrumentation. It addresses the role of the CT technologist; discusses the use of contrast media, its potential complications, and their avoidance, discusses techniques for scanning the brain, sella, orbits, petrous temporal bones, paranasal sinuses, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and spine; and demonstrates the normal anatomy of the foregoing regions. All this is followed by 171 examples of disease; a chapter on CT-guided biopsy and drainage procedures; and a description, in tabular form, of six different models of CT scanners, with the parameters for 15 separate examinations tabulated for each model of machine. The scanning techniques are presented in recipe fashion without clear reasons for the choices made or discussion on how choices can be varied for different clinical problems. They are also oriented toward one model of CT scanner. The anatomic sections are good but can be found in numerous other publications.

  7. A case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss from Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Arthur Harry; Khan, Akbar Ali; Good, Catriona; Baer, Simon T

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disorder, with resultant bilateral sensorineural hearing loss unreported in adults. A 42-year-old man presented with 4 months of right-sided tinnitus and hearing loss treated initially as otitis media with effusion. He re-presented 5 months later with progressive bilateral hearing loss—sensorineural (>100 dB) on pure tone audiogram. CT showed bilateral petrous temporal bone and calvarial lesions. Biopsy confirmed diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis and chemotherapy was started. Though uncommon, Langerhans cell histiocytosis should be considered among the differentials of persistent otological symptoms, as its progressive nature can cause bilateral irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26341162

  8. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Ryang; Kanda, Fumio; Kobessho, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Koji; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Kudo, Masatoshi; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2006-11-07

    We describe a rare case of HCV-related recurrent multiple hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves in a 50-year-old woman. The patient presented with symptoms of ptosis, fixation of the right eyeball, and left abducens palsy, indicating disturbances of the right oculomotor and trochlear nerves and bilateral abducens nerves. Brain contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed an ill-defined mass with abnormal enhancement around the sella turcica. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed that the mass involved the clivus, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex. On contrast-enhanced MRI with gadolinium-chelated contrast medium, the mass showed inhomogeneous intermediate enhancement. The diagnosis of metastatic HCC to the skull base was made on the basis of neurological findings and imaging studies including CT and MRI, without histological examinations. Further studies may provide insights into various methods for diagnosing HCC metastasizing to the craniospinal area.

  9. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  10. Head and neck paragangliomas: clinical and molecular genetic classification

    PubMed Central

    Offergeld, Christian; Brase, Christoph; Yaremchuk, Svetlana; Mader, Irina; Rischke, Hans Christian; Gläsker, Sven; Schmid, Kurt W; Wiech, Thorsten; Preuss, Simon F; Suárez, Carlos; Kopeć, Tomasz; Patocs, Attila; Wohllk, Nelson; Malekpour, Mahdi; Boedeker, Carsten C; Neumann, Hartmut PH

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas are tumors arising from specialized neural crest cells. Prominent locations are the carotid body along with the vagal, jugular, and tympanic glomus. Head and neck paragangliomas are slowly growing tumors, with some carotid body tumors being reported to exist for many years as a painless lateral mass on the neck. Symptoms depend on the specific locations. In contrast to paraganglial tumors of the adrenals, abdomen and thorax, head and neck paragangliomas seldom release catecholamines and are hence rarely vasoactive. Petrous bone, jugular, and tympanic head and neck paragangliomas may cause hearing loss. The internationally accepted clinical classifications for carotid body tumors are based on the Shamblin Class I–III stages, which correspond to postoperative permanent side effects. For petrous-bone paragangliomas in the head and neck, the Fisch classification is used. Regarding the molecular genetics, head and neck paragangliomas have been associated with nine susceptibility genes: NF1, RET, VHL, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2 (SDH5), and TMEM127. Hereditary HNPs are mostly caused by mutations of the SDHD gene, but SDHB and SDHC mutations are not uncommon in such patients. Head and neck paragangliomas are rarely associated with mutations of VHL, RET, or NF1. The research on SDHA, SDHAF2 and TMEM127 is ongoing. Multiple head and neck paragangliomas are common in patients with SDHD mutations, while malignant head and neck paraganglioma is mostly seen in patients with SDHB mutations. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. Good postoperative results can be expected in carotid body tumors of Shamblin Class I and II, whereas operations on other carotid body tumors and other head and neck paragangliomas frequently result in deficits of the cranial nerves adjacent to the tumors. Slow growth and the tendency of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas to be multifocal may justify less aggressive treatment strategies. PMID:22584701

  11. The bony labyrinth of Neanderthals.

    PubMed

    Spoor, Fred; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Braun, Marc; Zonneveld, Frans

    2003-02-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive comparative analysis of the Neanderthal bony labyrinth, a structure located inside the petrous temporal bone. Fifteen Neanderthal specimens are compared with a Holocene human sample, as well as with a small number of European Middle Pleistocene hominins, and early anatomically modern and European Upper Palaeolithic humans. Compared with Holocene humans the bony labyrinth of Neanderthals can be characterized by an anterior semicircular canal arc which is smaller in absolute and relative size, is relatively narrow, and shows more torsion. The posterior semicircular canal arc is smaller in absolute and relative size as well, it is more circular in shape, and is positioned more inferiorly relative to the lateral canal plane. The lateral semicircular canal arc is absolutely and relatively larger. Finally, the Neanderthal ampullar line is more vertically inclined relative to the planar orientation of the lateral canal. The European Upper Palaeolithic and early modern humans are most similar, although not fully identical to Holocene humans in labyrinthine morphology. The European Middle Pleistocene hominins show the typical semicircular canal morphology of Neanderthals, with the exception of the arc shape and inferiorly position of the posterior canal and the strongly inclined ampullar line. The marked difference between the labyrinths of Neanderthals and modern humans can be used to assess the phylogenetic affinities of fragmentary temporal bone fossils. However, this application is limited by a degree of overlap between the morphologies. The typical shape of the Neanderthal labyrinth appears to mirror aspects of the surrounding petrous pyramid, and both may follow from the phylogenetic impact of Neanderthal brain morphology moulding the shape of the posterior cranial fossa. The functionally important arc sizes of the Neanderthal semicircular canals may reflect a pattern of head movements different from that of modern humans, possibly

  12. Anatomical landmarks for transnasal endoscopic skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Sandu, Kishore; Monnier, Philippe; Pasche, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Resection of midline skull base lesions involve approaches needing extensive neurovascular manipulation. Transnasal endoscopic approach (TEA) is minimally invasive and ideal for certain selected lesions of the anterior skull base. A thorough knowledge of endonasal endoscopic anatomy is essential to be well versed with its surgical applications and this is possible only by dedicated cadaveric dissections. The goal in this study was to understand endoscopic anatomy of the orbital apex, petrous apex and the pterygopalatine fossa. Six cadaveric heads (3 injected and 3 non injected) and 12 sides, were dissected using a TEA outlining systematically, the steps of surgical dissection and the landmarks encountered. Dissection done by the "2 nostril, 4 hands" technique, allows better transnasal instrumentation with two surgeons working in unison with each other. The main surgical landmarks for the orbital apex are the carotid artery protuberance in the lateral sphenoid wall, optic nerve canal, lateral optico-carotid recess, optic strut and the V2 nerve. Orbital apex includes structures passing through the superior and inferior orbital fissure and the optic nerve canal. Vidian nerve canal and the V2 are important landmarks for the petrous apex. Identification of the sphenopalatine artery, V2 and foramen rotundum are important during dissection of the pterygopalatine fossa. In conclusion, the major potential advantage of TEA to the skull base is that it provides a direct anatomical route to the lesion without traversing any major neurovascular structures, as against the open transcranial approaches which involve more neurovascular manipulation and brain retraction. Obviously, these approaches require close cooperation and collaboration between otorhinolaryngologists and neurosurgeons.

  13. Middle fossa approach: microsurgical anatomy and surgical technique from the neurosurgical perspective.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, Necmettin; Sanus, Galip Zihni; Ulu, Mustafa Onur; Tanriverdi, Taner; Akar, Ziya; Rubino, Pablo A; Rhoton, Albert L

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to call attention to the subtemporal approach directed through the petrous apex to the IAM. We studied the microsurgical anatomy of the middle floor to delineate a reliable angle between the GSPN and the IAM to precisely localize and expose the IAM from above. A new technique for the elevation of middle fossa floor in an anterior-to-posterior direction has also been examined in cadaveric dissections and performed in surgery. The microsurgical anatomy of the middle fossa floor was studied in 10 adult cadaveric heads (20 sides) after meatal drilling on the middle fossa. Five latex-injected specimens were dissected in a stepwise manner to further define the microsurgical anatomy of the middle fossa approach. The middle fossa approach is illustrated in a patient for the decompression of the facial nerve to demonstrate the surgical technique and limitations of bone removal. Elevation of middle fossa dura in an anterior-to-posterior direction leads to early identification of the GSPN, where the nerve passes under V3. The most reliable and easily appreciated angle to be used in localizing the IAM is between the IAM and the long axis of the GSPN, which is approximately 61 degrees . Beginning drilling the meatus medially at the petrous ridge is safer than beginning laterally, where the facial and vestibulocochlear nerves become more superficial. The cochlea anteromedially, vestibule posterolaterally, and superior semicircular canal posteriorly significantly limit the bone removal at the lateral part of the IAM. The surgical technique for the middle fossa approach which includes an anterior-to-posterior elevation of middle fossa dura starting from the foramen ovale and uses the angle between the IAM and the long axis of the GSPN to localize the meatus from above may be an alternative to previously proposed surgical methods.

  14. [Severe temporal bone fractures in children: clinical presentation, complications and sequelae observed in the last 11 years].

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Alcarria, A J; Navarro-Mingorance, A; Reyes-Domínguez, S B; León-León, M C; Cepillo-Boluda, A; López López-Guerrero, A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical presentation, complications and sequelae in patients with temporal bone fracture in the last 11 years. A total of 27 patient medical records were retrospectively analysed. Of the 27 patients who were admitted for temporal bone fracture from 2001 to 2012, 13 (48%) had no petrous involvement (Group 1), and 14 (52%) with petrous involvement (Group 2). Patients in Group 2 had a longer P-ICU stay: median 4.5 days (RI: 2.75-22.25 d) vs 2 (RI: 1-3 d) (P=.018); more days on mechanical ventilation support: median 3 days (RI: 1.50-17 d) vs 1 (RI: 1-1.25 d). This group also had a higher frequency in sequelae (P=.04 OR=1.4 (95% CI: 1.05-1.95)) and a higher incidence in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula (P<.02; OR 2.33; 95% CI (1.27-4.27)). Severity scores (PRIMS III and PTI) showed no significant differences. Some degree of hearing loss was observed in 31% of the patients. Traffic accident was the main cause of trauma (33%), followed by falls (27%). There were 2 deaths and 4 (15%) had permanent sequelae. Isolated temporal bone fractures usually have a good outcome in children, but in some cases they can be fatal or have permanent sequelae. Long term follow up is recommended by authors. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel technique for cranial reconstruction following retrosigmoid craniectomy using demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Pabaney, Aqueel H; Reinard, Kevin A; Asmaro, Karam; Malik, Ghaus M

    2015-09-01

    A versatile neurosurgical approach, the retrosigmoid craniectomy (RS) has traditionally been associated with high rates of post-operative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, headaches, and aesthetic defects. We introduce a simple surgical strategy for bony cranial reconstruction designed to minimize peri-operative complications and improve cosmetic outcomes. In accordance with the Institutional Review Board, the senior author's (G.M.M.) records were queried between 2006 and 2014. We identified 50 consecutive patients who underwent demineralized bone matrix (DBM)-augmented cranioplasty after RS for MVD (DBM group) and 92 consecutive patients in whom standard cranial reconstruction was undertaken using autologous bone chips only after RS for MVD (non-DBM group). Demographic and clinical information regarding the laterality of each operation, intra-dural drilling for petrous hyperostosis, method of dural closure, length of hospitalization, presence of post-operative headaches, and procedure-related complications were collected and analyzed. The DBM and non-DBM cohorts were well matched for age, laterality of procedure, surgical indications, primary versus revision surgery, intra-dural drilling of petrous hyperostosis, and dural closure techniques. Trigeminal neuralgia was the most common surgical indication (98.6%) in each cohort. Post-operatively, 15% of patients in non-DBM group experienced chronic headaches at the last follow-up compared to only 8% of the patients in the DBM group (p=0.21). The non-DBM patients also suffered more incisional pain in comparison to the DBM patients (7.6% vs. 0%, p=0.045). DBM-augmented reconstruction of posterior fossa defects resulted in low rates of post-operative headaches, better cosmetic outcomes, and represents a simple and effective cranioplasty option for skull base surgeons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Endoscope-assisted retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach for surgical treatment of trigeminal schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Samii, Madjid; Alimohamadi, Maysam; Gerganov, Venelin

    2014-12-01

    Trigeminal schwannomas are the most common intracranial nonvestibular schwannomas, and the dumbbell-shaped subtype is the most challenging. To evaluate the efficiency and safety of the endoscope-assisted retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach (EA-RISA) for dumbbell trigeminal schwannomas and to compare EA-RISA with classic RISA. A retrospective study of all patients with trigeminal schwannomas was performed with a focus on dumbbell tumors. Tumors were classified according to a modified Samii classification. Extent of tumor removal, outcome, and morbidity rates in the 2 subgroups were compared. Twenty patients were enrolled: 8 had dumbbell-shaped tumors (type C1), 8 had middle fossa tumors (A1-3), 3 had extracranial extension (D2), and 1 had posterior fossa tumor. Gross total resection was achieved in 15 and near-total resection in 5 patients. In 4 patients with dumbbell tumors, the classic RISA (Samii approach) was used; EA-RISA was used in the other 4 patients. The extent of petrous apex drilling was determined individually on the basis of the anatomic variability of suprameatal tubercle and degree of tumor-induced petrous apex erosion; in 2 patients, only minimal drilling was needed. The endoscope was applied after microsurgical tumor removal and in 3 of 4 patients revealed a significant unrecognized tumor remnant in the anterolateral and superolateral aspects of the Meckel cave. Thus, the EA-RISA technique allowed gross total resection of the tumor. The EA-RISA enlarges the exposure obtained with the classic RISA. Its judicious use can help achieve safe and radical removal of dumbbell-shaped trigeminal schwannomas (C1 type).

  17. Composition and distribution of elements and ultrastructural topography of a human cardiac calculus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Li; Chang, Hsiao-Huang; Huang, Pei-Jung; Chu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2013-04-01

    Trace elements (TEs) may contribute to the formation of calculi or stones or be involved in the aetiopathogenesis of stone diseases. The compositions and spatial distribution of elements from the inner nucleus to outer crust of the cardiac calculus were investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer. The surface topograph, distribution map of elements, elemental and chemical compositions were also determined by environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM)-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Twenty-five elements were identifiable from 18 positions on the cardiac calculus by EDXRF spectrometer, in which the highest concentrations of toxic TEs (Ni, Pt, Hg, Sn, Pb, W, Au, Al, Si) and higher levels of essential TEs (Ca, Sr, Cr, P) were detected. A moderate positive Pearson's correlation between TEs concentrations of Mg, Ca or P and location differences from centre to periphery in the cardiac calculus was observed. A positive correlation was also found for Ca/Zn and Ca/Cu, indicating the gradual increase of calcium concentration from inner nucleus to outer crust of cardiac calculus. The drop-like nodules/crystals on the surface of petrous part of cardiac calculus were observed from ESEM analysis. ESEM-EDX analysis determined the calculus to be predominantly composed of calcium hydroxyapatite and cholesterol, as indicated by the petrous surface and drop-like nodules/crystals, respectively. This composition was confirmed using a portable Raman analyser. The spatial distribution analysis indicated a gradual increase in Mg, P and Ca concentrations from the inner nucleus to the outer crust of the cardiac calculus. The major chemical compositions of calcium hydroxyapatite and cholesterol were detected on this cardiac calculus.

  18. Effects of lesions of the caudal cerebellar vermis on cardiovascular regulation in awake cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, M. J.; Cotter, L. A.; Arendt, H. E.; Cass, S. P.; Yates, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    The vestibular system is known to participate in cardiovascular regulation during movement and postural alterations. The present study considered whether lesions of two regions of the posterior cerebellar vermis (the nodulus and uvula) that provide inputs to vestibular nucleus regions that affect control of blood pressure would alter cardiovascular responses during changes in posture. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in awake cats during nose-up tilts up to 60 degrees in amplitude before and following aspiration lesions of the nodulus or uvula; in most animals, cardiovascular responses were also recorded following the subsequent removal of vestibular inputs. Lesions of the nodulus or uvula did not affect baseline blood pressure or heart rate, although cardiovascular responses during nose-up tilts were altered. Increases in heart rate that typically occurred during 60 degrees nose-up tilt were attenuated in all three animals with lesions affecting both dorsal and ventral portions of the uvula; in contrast, the heart rate responses were augmented in the two animals with lesions mainly confined to the nodulus. Furthermore, following subsequent removal of vestibular inputs, uvulectomized animals, but not those with nodulus lesions, experienced more severe orthostatic hypotension than has previously been reported in cerebellum-intact animals with bilateral labyrinthectomies. These data suggest that the cerebellar nodulus and uvula modulate vestibulo-cardiovascular responses, although the two regions play different roles in cardiovascular regulation.

  19. Additive Role of the Vestibular End Organ and Baroreceptors on the Regulation of Blood Pressure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yan; Yang, Yan-Zhao; Jiang, Xian; Li, Li-Wei; Jin, Guang-Shi; Kim, Min Sun

    2013-01-01

    Contribution of the vestibular end organ to regulation of arterial pressure was quantitatively compared with the role of baroreceptors in terms of baroreflex sensitivity and c-Fos protein expression in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Baroreflex sensitivity and c-Fos protein expression in the RVLM were measured in conscious rats that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy (BL) and/or baroreceptor unloading. BL attenuated baroreflex sensitivity during intravenous infusion of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), but did not significantly affect the sensitivity following infusion of phenylephrine (PE). Baroreflex sensitivity became positive following sinoaortic denervation (SAD) during infusion of PE and attenuated sensitivity during infusion of SNP. Baroreflex sensitivity also became positive following double ablation (BL+SAD) during infusion of PE, and attenuated sensitivity during infusion of SNP. c-Fos protein expression increased significantly in the RVLM in the sham group after SNP administration. However, the BL, SAD, and SAD+BL groups showed significant decreases in c-Fos protein expression compared with that in the sham group. The SAD group showed more reduced c-Fos protein expression than that in the BL group, and the SAD+BL group showed less expression than that in the SAD group. These results suggest that the vestibular system cooperates with baroreceptors to maintain arterial pressure during hypotension but that baroreceptors regulate arterial pressure during both hypotension and hypertension. Additionally, afferent signals for maintaining blood pressure from the vestibular end organs and the baroreceptors may be integrated in the RVLM. PMID:23946697

  20. Adaptive Changes in Sensorimotor Coordination and Motion Sickness Following Repeated Exposures to Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, D. L.; Taylor, L. C.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    Virtual environments offer unique training opportunities, particularly for training astronauts and preadapting them to the novel sensory conditions of microgravity. Two unresolved human factors issues in virtual reality (VR) systems are: 1) potential "cybersickness", and 2) maladaptive sensorimotor performance following exposure to VR systems. Interestingly, these aftereffects are often quite similar to adaptive sensorimotor responses observed in astronauts during and/or following space flight. Initial interpretation of novel sensory information may be inappropriate and result in perceptual errors. Active exploratory behavior in a new environment, with resulting feedback and the formation of new associations between sensory inputs and response outputs, promotes appropriate perception and motor control in the new environment. Thus, people adapt to consistent, sustained alterations of sensory input such as those produced by microgravity, unilateral labyrinthectomy and experimentally produced stimulus rearrangements. The purpose of this research was to compare disturbances in sensorimotor coordination produced by dome and head-mounted virtual environment displays and to examine the effects of exposure duration, and repeated exposures to VR systems. The first study examined disturbances in balance control, and the second study examined disturbances in eye-head-hand (EHH) and eye-head coordination.

  1. [The effect of microgravity on the state of compensation in one-side labyrinthisized newts].

    PubMed

    Gorgiladze, G I; Samarin, G I

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were performed on newts Pleurodeles waltii subjected to one-side labyrinthectomy 1, 2, 5, and 6 mos prior to a spaceflight on board the orbital complex Mir. Duration of the exposure in microgravity was 8, 31 and 73 days. Destruction of one labyrinth in the newts brought about a number of characteristic reactions, i.e. rollover, circling and sideway movements with the head on a solid substrate and spinning about the longitudinal body axis when in water. These reactions were directed exclusively towards the labyrinthectomized side, their intensity faded, and typically in 1.5 mos. following surgery the motor activity of the newts was close to the norm. In the weight-free conditions the animals appeared to lose compensation they had formed on Earth. During 1.5 days of return the newts were unable to walk and their heads were turned towards the labyrinthectomized side. Immersed in water, the animals started spinning also towards this side. Two days later, they regained the ability to walk without assistance but with evident signs of ataxia. In 40 days after flight, the animals still exhibited locomotor disturbances during walk and swimming.

  2. Non-Pharmacological Countermeasure to Decrease Landing Sickness and Improve Functional Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Kreutzberg, G. A.; Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Mulavara, A. P.; Reschke, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Upon return from long-duration spaceflight, 100% of crewmembers experience motion sickness (MS) symptoms. The interactions between crewmembers' adaptation to a gravitational transition, the performance decrements resulting from MS and/or use of promethazine (PMZ), and the constraints imposed by mission task demands could significantly challenge and limit an astronaut's ability to perform functional tasks during gravitational transitions. Stochastic resonance (SR) is "noise benefit": adding noise to a system might increase the information (examples to the left and above). Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS), or low levels of noise applied to the vestibular system, improves balance and locomotor performance (Goel et al. 2015, Mulavara et al. 2011, 2015). In hemi-lesioned rat models, Samoudi et al. 2012 found that SVS increased GABA release on the lesioned, but not the intact side. Activation of the GABA pathway is important in modulating MS and promoting adaptability (Cohen 2008) and was seen to reverse MS symptoms in rats after unilateral labyrinthectomy (Magnusson et al. 2000). Thus, SVS could be used to promote GABA pathways to reduce MS and promote adaptability, eliminate the need for PMZ or other performance-inhibiting drugs.

  3. Consequences of postural changes and removal of vestibular inputs on the movement of air in and out of the lungs of conscious felines.

    PubMed

    Arshian, M; Holtje, R J; Cotter, L A; Rice, C D; Cass, S P; Yates, B J

    2007-07-01

    A variety of experimental approaches in human subjects and animal models established that the vestibular system contributes to regulation of respiration. In cats, the surgical elimination of labyrinthine signals produced changes in the spontaneous activity and posturally related responses of a number of respiratory muscles. However, these effects were complex and sometimes varied between muscle compartments, such that the physiological role of vestibulo-respiratory responses is unclear. The present study determined the functional significance of vestibulo-respiratory influences by examining the consequences of a bilateral labyrinthectomy on breathing rate and the pressure, volume, and flow rate of air exchanged during inspiration and expiration as body orientation with respect to gravity was altered. Data were collected from conscious adult cats acclimated to breathing through a facemask connected to a pneuomotach during 60 degrees head-up pitch and ear-down roll body rotations. Removal of vestibular inputs resulted in a 15% reduction in breathing rate, a 13% decrease in minute ventilation, a 16% decrease in maximal inspiratory airflow rate, and a 14% decrease in the maximal expiratory airflow rate measured when the animals were in the prone position. However, the lesions did not appreciably affect phasic changes in airflow parameters related to alterations in posture. These results suggest that the role of the vestibular system in the control of breathing is to modify baseline respiratory parameters in proportion to the general intensity of ongoing movements, and not to rapidly alter ventilation in accordance with body position.

  4. Effects of lesions of the caudal cerebellar vermis on cardiovascular regulation in awake cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, M. J.; Cotter, L. A.; Arendt, H. E.; Cass, S. P.; Yates, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    The vestibular system is known to participate in cardiovascular regulation during movement and postural alterations. The present study considered whether lesions of two regions of the posterior cerebellar vermis (the nodulus and uvula) that provide inputs to vestibular nucleus regions that affect control of blood pressure would alter cardiovascular responses during changes in posture. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in awake cats during nose-up tilts up to 60 degrees in amplitude before and following aspiration lesions of the nodulus or uvula; in most animals, cardiovascular responses were also recorded following the subsequent removal of vestibular inputs. Lesions of the nodulus or uvula did not affect baseline blood pressure or heart rate, although cardiovascular responses during nose-up tilts were altered. Increases in heart rate that typically occurred during 60 degrees nose-up tilt were attenuated in all three animals with lesions affecting both dorsal and ventral portions of the uvula; in contrast, the heart rate responses were augmented in the two animals with lesions mainly confined to the nodulus. Furthermore, following subsequent removal of vestibular inputs, uvulectomized animals, but not those with nodulus lesions, experienced more severe orthostatic hypotension than has previously been reported in cerebellum-intact animals with bilateral labyrinthectomies. These data suggest that the cerebellar nodulus and uvula modulate vestibulo-cardiovascular responses, although the two regions play different roles in cardiovascular regulation.

  5. ACTH4 -10, Substance P, and Dizolcipine (Mk-801) Accelerate Functional Recovery After Hemilabyrinthectomy in Goldfish

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, R.; Huston, J. P.; Spieler, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the goldfish model of hemilabyrinthectomy for investigating potential recovery-promoting drugs. In this lesion model, the unilateral removal of the labyrinth induces a postural imbalance in response to light (Dorsal Light Reflex), from which the animals can recover over time. The behavioral effects of two neuropeptides were tested–namely, of substance P and ACTH4-10, both of which are known to promote functional recovery in several other lesion models. Furthermore, the effect of MK- 801, an antagonist of the glutamatergic NMDAreceptor subtype, was tested because this substance has also been shown to exert a neuroprotective effect. After lesion of the right labyrinth, the animals (n=12) were treated intraperitoneally daily either with vehicle (n=12), substance P (n=11), ACTH4-10 (n=12), or MK- 801 (n=12). Another group (n=11), which served as a non-lesion control, did not receive hemilabyrinthectomy or systemic injections. The lesion group, treated post-operatively with vehicle, did not recover from the postural deviation over the 24-d testing period. In contrast, all three test substances accelerated the functional recovery after unilateral labyrinthectomy. The decrease of the dorsal light reflex persisted even after cessation of drug treatment after 20d. The results indicate that using the dorsal light reflex in the model of hemilabyrinthectomy in goldfish provides a useful approach to studying the ability of potential new neurotrophic or neuroprotective drugs to promote functional recovery. PMID:11486488

  6. Effect of Vestibulosympathetic Reflex and Baroreflex on Expression of pERK in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius following Acute Hypotension in Conscious Rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xian; Lan, Yan; Jin, Yuan-Zhe; Park, Joo Young; Park, Byung Geon; Ameer, Abdul Nasir; Park, Byung Rim

    2014-08-01

    Control of blood pressure is maintained by the interaction between the arterial baroreflex and vestibulosympathetic reflex during postural changes. In this study, the contributions of vestibular receptors and baroreceptors to the maintenance of blood pressure following acute hypotension were compared in terms of phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase (pERK) expression in the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS). Expression of pERK in the NTS was measured in conscious rats that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy (BL) and/or sinoaortic denervation (SAD) 5, 10, 20, and 40 min following acute hypotension induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) infusion. Expression of pERK increased significantly in the NTS in the control group following SNP infusion, and the expression peaked at 10 min after SNP infusion. The number of pERK positive neurons increased following SNP infusion in BL, SAD, and BL+SAD groups, although the increase was smaller than in control group. The BL group showed a relatively higher reduction in pERK expression than the SAD group, and the pERK expression in the NTS was localized to the caudal portion of the nuclei in the BL and SAD groups. These results suggest that the vestibular receptors may play a key role in maintaining blood pressure following acute hypotension; thus, the vestibular system may contribute to compensate for orthostatic hypotension.

  7. Influence of the parameters of the Er:YAG laser on the apical sealing of apicectomized teeth.

    PubMed

    Marques, Aparecida Maria Cordeiro; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth M M; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Noia, Manuela Pimentel; Oliveira, Priscila Chagas; Brugnera Junior, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima Antonia Aparecida; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2011-07-01

    Failures in the sealing of the tooth apex have been considered to be responsible for most of the failures of apical surgeries. The Er:YAG laser has been proposed as an alternative for the use of rotator instruments in surgical endodontics due to its precision, lack of vibration, less post-operative discomfort, bacterial reduction, and less stress for patients and professionals. Following approval by the ethics committee, 12 extracted human canines without previous endodontic treatment with anatomically normal roots and free from apical lesions were washed in running tap water and disinfected. The teeth were sectioned axially at the crown-root junction and submitted to routine endodontic treatment. The apical limit was set at 1 mm before the apical foramen. The root canals were routinely filled with Gutta-Percha points and Sealer 26 and were randomly distributed into two groups (n = 6). In group I, apicectomy was performed with the Er:YAG laser (KAVO KEY Laser II®, Germany, λ = 2.940 nm, pulsed mode, 2051 tip, with air spray cooling, 250 mJ/15 Hz). Apical cut was performed of perpendicular mode 3 mm from the apical foramen. In group II, the same procedures and the same sequence as above was used, varying only the parameters of the Er:YAG laser (400 mJ/6 Hz). Sealing of the cervical end the apex was carried out with acrylic resin; the roots were covered by a layer of epoxy glue and two layers of nail polish. The specimens were divided into groups and fixed, by the cervical third, on wax. Impermeabilization of the residual root apical third was performed following the same procedures used in the cervical third but the residual apex was left free from the impermeabilization. After that, the roots were immersed in a 2% methylene blue solution and placed in a bacteriological oven for 48 h and then washed in running tap water for 2 h. The samples were sagittally split into two parts. The segments were visually observed and the one showing the greatest

  8. Persistent extraradicular infection in root-filled asymptomatic human tooth: scanning electron microscopic analysis and microbial investigation after apical microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Signoretti, Fernanda G C; Endo, Marcos S; Gomes, Brenda P F A; Montagner, Francisco; Tosello, Fernanda B; Jacinto, Rogério C

    2011-12-01

    Procedural accidents have a negative effect on healing and might contribute to the persistence of infections in inaccessible apical areas, requiring surgical intervention. This report describes a case of persistent apical periodontitis of a lower left first molar associated with the sinus tract and a periapical lesion that required nonsurgical endodontic retreatment and apical surgery for resolution. The tooth had received endodontic treatment 3 years ago and had to be retreated using the crown-down technique with chemical auxiliary substance (2% chlorhexidine gel), foramen patency, and enlargement and was filled in a single appointment. The occlusal access cavity was immediately restored with composite resin. After 1 month, it could be observed that the sinus tract persisted and, radiographically, the lesion remained unaltered. Therefore, endodontic microsurgery was indicated. Apical microsurgery was performed under magnification with the use of a dental operating microscope including apicectomy, root end with ultrasound, and sealing with mineral trioxide aggregate. A microbiological sample was collected from the apical lesion. The resected distal root apex was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The following species were detected: Actinomyces naeslundii and Actinomyces meyeri, Propionibacterium propionicum, Clostridium botullinum, Parvimonas micra, and Bacteroides ureolyticus; scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed bacterial biofilm surrounding the apical foramen and external radicular surface. Gutta-percha overfilling at the apex because of a zip caused during initial endodontic treatment could be observed. A 6-month follow-up showed apparent radiographic periapical healing, which progressed after 24 months. Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria and extraradicular biofilm seem to participate in the maintenance of persistent periapical pathology, and endodontic retreatment followed by periapical microsurgery proved to be a successful alternative in the

  9. Detection of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions by real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Selcuk M.; Yavuz, Muhammed S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies have investigated the occurrence of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in samples from apical periodontitis lesions and a role in the pathogenesis of this disease has been suggested. Because genotype distribution and seroprevalence of EBV and HCMV differ among populations, it is important to determine the presence of these viruses in endodontic periapical lesions of different populations. The aims of this study were to determine the presence of HCMV and EBV DNAs in samples from Turkish patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions using real-time polymerase chain reaction method and to evaluate their presence in both symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions. Study Design: Periapical samples were collected from 12 asymptomatic and 16 symptomatic periapical lesions in conjunction with apicectomy. HCMV and EBV DNAs were identified in the samples by real-time PCR. The chi-squared test with Yates’s correction or the Fisher’s exact test was used to analyse the significance of differences. Results: HCMV DNA was detected in 10 of the 16 (62.5%) symptomatic and in five of the 12 (41.7 %) asymptomatic periapical study lesions. The EBV DNA was identified in seven of the 16 (43.7 %) symptomatic and three of the 12 (25 %) asymptomatic periapical lesions. The difference in occurrence of HCMV and EBV DNA between symptomatic and asymptomatic periapical lesions was not statistically significant. (All comparisons have p > 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HCMV and EBV is a frequent inhabitant of both symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions of endodontic origin in Turkish population. Key words:Human cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, apical periodontitis, Polymerase chain reaction method. PMID:23722135

  10. Diagnostic validity of periapical radiography and CBCT for assessing periapical lesions that persist after endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Casper; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Reibel, Jesper; Wenzel, Ann; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte

    2017-07-14

    Traditionally, healing after surgical endodontic retreatment (SER); i.e. apicectomy with or without a retrograde filling, is assessed in periapical radiographs (PR). Recently, the use of Cone Beam CT (CBCT) has increased within endodontics. Generally, CBCT detects more periapical lesions than PR, but basic research on the true nature of these lesions is missing. The objective was to assess the diagnostic validity of PR and CBCT for determining inflammation in SER-cases that were re-operated (SER-R) due to unsuccessful healing, using histology of the periapical lesion as reference for inflammation. Records from 149 patients, receiving SER 2004-10, were screened. In total 108 patients (119 teeth) were recalled for clinical follow-up examination, PR and CBCT, of which 74 patients (83 teeth) participated. Three observers assessed PR and CBCT as "successful healing" or "unsuccessful healing" using Rud and Molven´s criteria. SER-R was offered to all non-healed teeth with expected favorable prognosis for subsequent functional retention. During SER-R, biopsy was performed and histopathology verified whether or not inflammation was present. All re-operated cases were assessed non-healed in CBCT while 11 of these were assessed successfully healed in PR. Nineteen biopsies were examined. Histopathologic diagnosis revealed 42% (teeth=8) without periapical inflammation, 16% (teeth=3) with mild inflammation, and 42% (teeth=8) with moderate to intense inflammation. A correct diagnosis was obtained in 58% with CBCT (true positives) and 63% with PR (true positives+true negatives). Of the re-operated teeth, 42% had no periapical inflammatory lesion, and hence no benefit from SER-R. Not all lesions observed in CBCT represented periapical inflammatory lesions.

  11. Gruber, Gradenigo, Dorello, and Vail: key personalities in the historical evolution and modern-day understanding of Dorello's canal.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Renuka K; Reddy, Rohit K; Jyung, Robert W; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Liu, James K

    2016-01-01

    A century ago an ambitious young anatomist in Rome, Primo Dorello, who sought to understand the cause of abducent nerve palsy that often occurred in patients with severe middle ear infections, conducted intricate studies on the intracranial course of the nerve. In his findings, he identified that the abducent nerve passes through a narrow sinus near the apex of the petrous bone, which formed an osteofibrous canal. Dorello suggested that in this enclosed region the abducent nerve may be particularly vulnerable to compression due to the vascular edema accompanying the infection. Although his work was widely appreciated, it was not well received by all. Interestingly, Giuseppe Gradenigo, one of the most prominent Italian otologists of the early 20th century, who was known for his work on a triad of symptoms (Gradenigo's syndrome) that accompanies petrous apicitis, a result of severe middle ear infections, was obstinate in his criticism of Dorello's findings. Thus a scientific duel began, with a series of correspondence between these two academics-one who was relatively new to the otological community (Dorello) and one who was well reputed in that community (Gradenigo). The disagreement ultimately ebbed in 1909, when Dorello published a report in response to Gradenigo's criticisms and convinced Gradenigo to change his views. Today Dorello's canal is widely recognized as a key landmark in skull base surgery of the petroclival region and holds clinical significance due to its relation to the abducent nerve and surrounding vascular structures. Yet, although academics such as Dorello and Gradenigo are recognized for their work on the canal, it is important not to forget the others throughout history who have contributed to the modern-day understanding of this anatomical structure. In fact, although the level of anatomical detail found in Dorello's work was previously unmatched, the first description of the canal was made by the experienced Austrian anatomist Wenzel Leopold

  12. Short latency vestibular evoked potentials in the chicken embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophysiological responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were recorded in chicken embryos incubated for 19 or 20 days (E19/E20). Responses occurred within the first 16 ms following the stimulus onset. The evoked potentials disappeared following bilateral labyrinthectomy, but persisted following cochlear destruction alone, thus demonstrating that the responses were vestibular. Approximately 8 to 10 response peaks could be identified. The first 4 positive and corresponding negative components (early peaks with latencies < 6.0 ms) were scored and latencies and amplitudes quantified. Vestibular response latencies were significantly longer (P < 0.01) and amplitudes significantly smaller (P < 0.001) than those observed in 2-week-old birds. Mean response threshold for anesthetized embryos was -15.9dBre 1.0 g/ms, which was significantly higher (P < 0.03) than those observed in 2-week-old birds (-23.0dBre 1.0 g/ms). Latency/intensity functions (that is, slopes) were not significantly different between embryos and 2-week-old animals, but amplitude/intensity functions for embryos were significantly shallower than those for 2-week-old birds (P < 0.001). We presume that these differences reflect the refinement of sensory function that occurs following 19 to 20 days of incubation. The recording of vestibular evoked potentials provides an objective, direct and noninvasive measure of peripheral vestibular function in the embryo and, as such, the method shows promise as an investigative tool. The results of the present study form the definitive basis for using vestibular evoked potentials in the detailed study of avian vestibular ontogeny and factors that may influence it.

  13. The Magnus-Rademaker Scientific Film Collection: Ethical Issues on Animal Experimentation (1908-1940).

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J; Lameris, Bregt

    2016-01-01

    The Magnus-Rademaker scientific film collection (1908-1940) deals with the physiology of body posture by the equilibrium of reflex musculature contractions for which experimental studies were carried out with animals (e.g., labyrinthectomies, cerebellectomies, and brain stem sections) as well as observations done on patients. The films were made for demonstrations at congresses as well as educational objectives and film stills were published in their books. The purpose of the present study is to position these films and their makers within the contemporary discourse on ethical issues and animal rights in the Netherlands and the earlier international debates. Following an introduction on animal rights and antivivisection movements, we describe what Magnus and Rademaker thought about these issues. Their publications did not provide much information in this respect, probably reflecting their adherence to implicit ethical codes that did not need explicit mentioning in publications. Newspaper articles, however, revealed interesting information. Unnecessary suffering of an animal never found mercy in Magnus' opinion. The use of cinematography was expanded to the reduction of animal experimentation in student education, at least in the case of Rademaker, who in the 1930s was involved in a governmental committee for the regulation of vivisection and cooperated with the antivivisection movement. This resulted not only in a propaganda film for the movement but also in films that demonstrate physiological experiments for students with the purpose to avert repetition and to improve the teaching of experiments. We were able to identify the pertinent films in the Magnus-Rademaker film collection. The production of vivisection films with this purpose appears to have been common, as is shown in news messages in European medical journals of the period.

  14. [Intralabyrinthine schwannomas : Surgical management and hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implants. German version].

    PubMed

    Plontke, S K; Rahne, T; Pfister, M; Götze, G; Heider, C; Pazaitis, N; Strauss, C; Caye-Thomasen, P; Kösling, S

    2017-05-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas (ILS) are a rare differential diagnosis of sudden hearing loss and vertigo. In an own case series of 12 patients, 6 tumors showed an intracochlear, 3 an intravestibular, 1 a transmodiolar including the cerebello-pontine angle (CPA), 1 a transotic including the CPA and 1 a multilocular location. The tumors were removed surgically in 9 patients, whereas 3 patients opted for a "wait-and-test-and-scan" strategy. Of the surgical patients, 3 underwent labyrinthectomy and cochlear implant (CI) surgery in a single stage procedure; 1 patient received extended cochleostomy with CI surgery; 3 underwent partial or subtotal cochleoectomy, with partial cochlear reconstruction and CI surgery (n = 1) or implantation of electrode dummies for possible later CI following repeated MRI follow-up (n = 2); and in 2 patients, the tumors of the internal auditory canal and cerebellopontile angle exhibiting transmodiolar or transmacular growth were removed by combined translabyrinthine-transotic resection. For the intracochlear tumors, vestibular function could mostly be preserved after surgery. In all cases with CI surgery, hearing rehabilitation was successful, although speech discrimination was limited for the case with subtotal cochleoectomy. Surgical removal of intracochlear schwannomas via partial or subtotal cochleoectomy is, in principle, possible with preservation of vestibular function. In the authors' opinion, radiotherapy of ILS is only indicated in isolated cases. Provided performed early enough, cochlear implantation after surgical removal of ILS is an option for auditory rehabilitation, thus representing-in contrast to the "wait-and-test-and-scan" strategy-a therapeutic approach.

  15. The Frog Vestibular System as a Model for Lesion-Induced Plasticity: Basic Neural Principles and Implications for Posture Control

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, François M.; Straka, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Studies of behavioral consequences after unilateral labyrinthectomy have a long tradition in the quest of determining rules and limitations of the central nervous system (CNS) to exert plastic changes that assist the recuperation from the loss of sensory inputs. Frogs were among the first animal models to illustrate general principles of regenerative capacity and reorganizational neural flexibility after a vestibular lesion. The continuous successful use of the latter animals is in part based on the easy access and identifiability of nerve branches to inner ear organs for surgical intervention, the possibility to employ whole brain preparations for in vitro studies and the limited degree of freedom of postural reflexes for quantification of behavioral impairments and subsequent improvements. Major discoveries that increased the knowledge of post-lesional reactive mechanisms in the CNS include alterations in vestibular commissural signal processing and activation of cooperative changes in excitatory and inhibitory inputs to disfacilitated neurons. Moreover, the observed increase of synaptic efficacy in propriospinal circuits illustrates the importance of limb proprioceptive inputs for postural recovery. Accumulated evidence suggests that the lesion-induced neural plasticity is not a goal-directed process that aims toward a meaningful restoration of vestibular reflexes but rather attempts a survival of those neurons that have lost their excitatory inputs. Accordingly, the reaction mechanism causes an improvement of some components but also a deterioration of other aspects as seen by spatio-temporally inappropriate vestibulo-motor responses, similar to the consequences of plasticity processes in various sensory systems and species. The generality of the findings indicate that frogs continue to form a highly amenable vertebrate model system for exploring molecular and physiological events during cellular and network reorganization after a loss of vestibular function

  16. Analysis of the Baroreceptor and Vestibular Receptor Inputs in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla following Hypotension in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yan; Lu, Huan-Jun; Jiang, Xian; Li, Li-Wei; Yang, Yan-Zhao; Jin, Guang-Shi; Park, Joo Young; Kim, Min Sun

    2015-01-01

    Input signals originating from baroreceptors and vestibular receptors are integrated in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) to maintain blood pressure during postural movement. The contribution of baroreceptors and vestibular receptors in the maintenance of blood pressure following hypotension were quantitatively analyzed by measuring phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase (pERK) expression and glutamate release in the RVLM. The expression of pERK and glutamate release in the RVLM were measured in conscious rats that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy (BL) and/or sinoaortic denervation (SAD) following hypotension induced by a sodium nitroprusside (SNP) infusion. The expression of pERK was significantly increased in the RVLM in the control group following SNP infusion, and expression peaked 10 min after SNP infusion. The number of pERK positive neurons increased following SNP infusion in BL, SAD, and BL+SAD groups, although the increase was smaller than seen in the control group. The SAD group showed a relatively higher reduction in pERK expression when compared with the BL group. The level of glutamate release was significantly increased in the RVLM in control, BL, SAD groups following SNP infusion, and this peaked 10 min after SNP infusion. The SAD group showed a relatively higher reduction in glutamate release when compared with the BL group. These results suggest that the baroreceptors are more powerful in pERK expression and glutamate release in the RVLM following hypotension than the vestibular receptors, but the vestibular receptors still have an important role in the RVLM. PMID:25729278

  17. Menière's disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Michel; Liard, Pierre; Vibert, Dominique; Häusler, Rudolf

    2002-01-01

    To assess the prevalence, presentation, treatment, and evolution of Menière's disease in elderly patients (> or = 65 yr old). Retrospective clinical study and case report. A neuro-otology referral center at the university hospital in Bern, Switzerland, and a neurotologic practice in Geneva, Switzerland. Patients were selected from the hospital clinic and otolaryngologic practice registers. Among 8423 neurotologic checkups performed between 1988 and 1998, 432 (5.1%) patients had definite Menière's disease and 66 (15.3%) of these patients were > or = 65 years old. The files of these 66 patients were analyzed. Menière's disease in the elderly had 2 modes of presentation: reactivation of longstanding Menière's disease (40.9%) and de novo Menière's disease (59.1%), where the first dizzy spells, tinnitus, and hearing loss appeared after 65 years of age. Drop attacks occurred in 11.1 and 25.6% of the cases, respectively, and could be responsible for misdiagnosis of strokes of the brainstem. The patients were treated by mild antivertiginous drugs (betahistine, cinnarizine). Twenty-seven patients (41%) underwent surgery: transtympanic ventilation tubes (19 patients), sacculotomy (4 patients), vestibular neurectomy (3 patients), surgical labyrinthectomy (1 patient). The vertigo spells disappeared in 73.3 to 100% of the cases according to the type of surgery performed. Our study shows that Menière's disease in the elderly is not at all uncommon. It can appear as a de novo disease or as a reactivated longstanding disease. Drop attacks are more frequent than reported in general patient populations with Menière's disease and can mimic a stroke of the brainstem. Medical and surgical treatments have to be cautious because many of these elderly patients are fragile.

  18. Treatment of Menière's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Jeffrey D; Trevino, Carolina; Schubert, Michael C; Carey, John P

    2015-04-01

    Diagnosis of Menière's disease is made with a characteristic patient history, including discrete episodes of vertigo lasting 20 min or longer, accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss, which is typically low frequency at first, aural fullness, and tinnitus. Workup includes audiometry, a contrast enhanced MRI of the internal auditory canals, and exclusion of other diseases that can produce similar symptoms, like otosyphilis, autoimmune inner ear disease, perilymphatic fistula, superior semicircular canal syndrome, Lyme disease, multiple sclerosis, vestibular paroxysmia, and temporal bone tumors. A history of migraine should be sought as well because of a high rate of co-occurrence (Rauch, Otolaryngol Clin North Am 43:1011-1017, 2010). Treatment begins with conservative measures, including low salt diet, avoidance of stress and caffeine, and sleep hygiene. Medical therapy with a diuretic is the usual next step. If that fails to control symptoms, then the options of intratympanic (IT) steroids and betahistine are discussed. Next tier treatments include the Meniett device and endolymphatic sac surgery, but the efficacy of both is controversial. If the above measures fail to provide symptomatic control of vertigo, then ablative therapies like intratympanic gentamicin are considered. Rarely, vestibular nerve section or labyrinthectomy is considered for a patient with severe symptoms who does not show a reduction in vestibular function with gentamicin. Benzodiazepines and anti-emetics are used for symptomatic control during vertigo episodes. Rehabilitative options for unilateral vestibular weakness include physical therapy and for unilateral hearing loss include conventional hearing aids, contralateral routing of sound (CROS) and osseointegrated hearing aids.

  19. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vignaux, G.; Chabbert, C.; Gaboyard-Niay, S.; Travo, C.; Machado, M.L.; Denise, P.; Comoz, F.; Hitier, M.; Landemore, G.; Philoxène, B.; Besnard, S.

    2012-01-01

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, the oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.

  20. Short latency vestibular evoked potentials in the chicken embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophysiological responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were recorded in chicken embryos incubated for 19 or 20 days (E19/E20). Responses occurred within the first 16 ms following the stimulus onset. The evoked potentials disappeared following bilateral labyrinthectomy, but persisted following cochlear destruction alone, thus demonstrating that the responses were vestibular. Approximately 8 to 10 response peaks could be identified. The first 4 positive and corresponding negative components (early peaks with latencies < 6.0 ms) were scored and latencies and amplitudes quantified. Vestibular response latencies were significantly longer (P < 0.01) and amplitudes significantly smaller (P < 0.001) than those observed in 2-week-old birds. Mean response threshold for anesthetized embryos was -15.9dBre 1.0 g/ms, which was significantly higher (P < 0.03) than those observed in 2-week-old birds (-23.0dBre 1.0 g/ms). Latency/intensity functions (that is, slopes) were not significantly different between embryos and 2-week-old animals, but amplitude/intensity functions for embryos were significantly shallower than those for 2-week-old birds (P < 0.001). We presume that these differences reflect the refinement of sensory function that occurs following 19 to 20 days of incubation. The recording of vestibular evoked potentials provides an objective, direct and noninvasive measure of peripheral vestibular function in the embryo and, as such, the method shows promise as an investigative tool. The results of the present study form the definitive basis for using vestibular evoked potentials in the detailed study of avian vestibular ontogeny and factors that may influence it.

  1. Vestibular short latency responses to pulsed linear acceleration in unanesthetized animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Linear acceleration transients were used to elicit vestibular compound action potentials in non-invasively prepared, unanesthetized animals for the first time (chicks, Gallus domesticus, n = 33). Responses were composed of a series of up to 8 dominant peaks occurring within 8 msec of the stimulus. Response amplitudes for 1.0 g stimulus ranged from 1 to 10 microV. A late, slow, triphasic, anesthesia-labile component was identified as a dominant response feature in unanesthetized animals. Amplitudes increased and latencies decreased as stimulus intensity was increased (MANOVA P less than 0.05). Linear regression slope ranges were: amplitudes = 1.0-5.0 microV/g; latencies = -300 to -1100 microseconds/g. Thresholds for single polarity stimuli (0.035 +/- 0.022 g, n = 11) were significantly lower than those of alternating polarity (0.074 +/- 0.028 g, n = 18, P less than 0.001). Bilateral labyrinthectomy eliminated responses whereas bilateral extirpation of cochleae did not significantly change response thresholds. Intense acoustic masking (100/104 dB SL) produced no effect in 2 animals, but did produce small to moderate effects on response amplitudes in 7 others. Changes were attributed to effects on vestibular end organs. Results of unilateral labyrinth blockade (tetrodotoxin) suggest that P1 and N1 preferentially reflect ipsilateral eighth nerve compound action potentials whereas components beyond approximately 2 msec reflect activity from vestibular neurons that depend on both labyrinths. The results demonstrate that short latency vestibular compound action potentials can be measured in unanesthetized, non-invasively prepared animals.

  2. Correlation of Fos expression and circling asymmetry during gerbil vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Shinder, M. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular compensation is a central nervous system process resulting in recovery of functional movement and control following a unilateral vestibular lesion. Small pressure injections of phosphorothioate 20mer oligonucleotides were used to probe the role of the Fos transcription protein during vestibular compensation in the gerbil brainstem. During isoflurane gas anesthesia, antisense probes against the c-fos mRNA sequence were injected into the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei unilaterally prior to a unilateral surgical labyrinthectomy. Anionic dyes, which did not interact with the oligonucleotides, were used to mark the injection site and help determine the extent of diffusion. The antiFos oligonucleotide injections reduced Fos expression at the injection site in neurons which normally express Fos after the lesion, and also affected circling behavior induced by hemilabyrinthectomy. With both ipsilateral and contralateral medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei injections, less ipsilateral and more contralateral circling was noted in animals injected with antiFos injections as compared to non-injected controls. The degree of change in these behaviors was dependent upon the side of the injection. Histologically, antiFos injections reduced the number of Fos immunolabeled neurons around the injection site, and increased Fos expression contralaterally. The correlation of the number of neurons with Fos expression to turning behavior was stronger for contralateral versus ipsilateral turns, and for neurons in the caudal and ipsilateral sub-regions of the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. The results are discussed in terms of neuronal firing activity versus translational activity based on the asymmetrical expression of the Fos inducible transcription factor in the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. Although ubiquitous in the brain, transcription factors like Fos can serve localized and specific roles in sensory-specific adaptive stimuli. Antisense

  3. Vestibular short latency responses to pulsed linear acceleration in unanesthetized animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Linear acceleration transients were used to elicit vestibular compound action potentials in non-invasively prepared, unanesthetized animals for the first time (chicks, Gallus domesticus, n = 33). Responses were composed of a series of up to 8 dominant peaks occurring within 8 msec of the stimulus. Response amplitudes for 1.0 g stimulus ranged from 1 to 10 microV. A late, slow, triphasic, anesthesia-labile component was identified as a dominant response feature in unanesthetized animals. Amplitudes increased and latencies decreased as stimulus intensity was increased (MANOVA P less than 0.05). Linear regression slope ranges were: amplitudes = 1.0-5.0 microV/g; latencies = -300 to -1100 microseconds/g. Thresholds for single polarity stimuli (0.035 +/- 0.022 g, n = 11) were significantly lower than those of alternating polarity (0.074 +/- 0.028 g, n = 18, P less than 0.001). Bilateral labyrinthectomy eliminated responses whereas bilateral extirpation of cochleae did not significantly change response thresholds. Intense acoustic masking (100/104 dB SL) produced no effect in 2 animals, but did produce small to moderate effects on response amplitudes in 7 others. Changes were attributed to effects on vestibular end organs. Results of unilateral labyrinth blockade (tetrodotoxin) suggest that P1 and N1 preferentially reflect ipsilateral eighth nerve compound action potentials whereas components beyond approximately 2 msec reflect activity from vestibular neurons that depend on both labyrinths. The results demonstrate that short latency vestibular compound action potentials can be measured in unanesthetized, non-invasively prepared animals.

  4. Vestibular Lesion-Induced Developmental Plasticity in Spinal Locomotor Networks during Xenopus laevis Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Beyeler, Anna; Rao, Guillaume; Ladepeche, Laurent; Jacques, André; Simmers, John; Le Ray, Didier

    2013-01-01

    During frog metamorphosis, the vestibular sensory system remains unchanged, while spinal motor networks undergo a massive restructuring associated with the transition from the larval to adult biomechanical system. We investigated in Xenopus laevis the impact of a pre- (tadpole stage) or post-metamorphosis (juvenile stage) unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) on young adult swimming performance and underlying spinal locomotor circuitry. The acute disruptive effects on locomotion were similar in both tadpoles and juvenile frogs. However, animals that had metamorphosed with a preceding UL expressed restored swimming behavior at the juvenile stage, whereas animals lesioned after metamorphosis never recovered. Whilst kinematic and electrophysiological analyses of the propulsive system showed no significant differences in either juvenile group, a 3D biomechanical simulation suggested that an asymmetry in the dynamic control of posture during swimming could account for the behavioral restoration observed in animals that had been labyrinthectomized before metamorphosis. This hypothesis was subsequently supported by in vivo electromyography during free swimming and in vitro recordings from isolated brainstem/spinal cord preparations. Specifically, animals lesioned prior to metamorphosis at the larval stage exhibited an asymmetrical propulsion/posture coupling as a post-metamorphic young adult. This developmental alteration was accompanied by an ipsilesional decrease in propriospinal coordination that is normally established in strict left-right symmetry during metamorphosis in order to synchronize dorsal trunk muscle contractions with bilateral hindlimb extensions in the swimming adult. Our data thus suggest that a disequilibrium in descending vestibulospinal information during Xenopus metamorphosis leads to an altered assembly of adult spinal locomotor circuitry. This in turn enables an adaptive compensation for the dynamic postural asymmetry induced by the vestibular imbalance

  5. Vestibular lesion-induced developmental plasticity in spinal locomotor networks during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Anna; Rao, Guillaume; Ladepeche, Laurent; Jacques, André; Simmers, John; Le Ray, Didier

    2013-01-01

    During frog metamorphosis, the vestibular sensory system remains unchanged, while spinal motor networks undergo a massive restructuring associated with the transition from the larval to adult biomechanical system. We investigated in Xenopus laevis the impact of a pre- (tadpole stage) or post-metamorphosis (juvenile stage) unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) on young adult swimming performance and underlying spinal locomotor circuitry. The acute disruptive effects on locomotion were similar in both tadpoles and juvenile frogs. However, animals that had metamorphosed with a preceding UL expressed restored swimming behavior at the juvenile stage, whereas animals lesioned after metamorphosis never recovered. Whilst kinematic and electrophysiological analyses of the propulsive system showed no significant differences in either juvenile group, a 3D biomechanical simulation suggested that an asymmetry in the dynamic control of posture during swimming could account for the behavioral restoration observed in animals that had been labyrinthectomized before metamorphosis. This hypothesis was subsequently supported by in vivo electromyography during free swimming and in vitro recordings from isolated brainstem/spinal cord preparations. Specifically, animals lesioned prior to metamorphosis at the larval stage exhibited an asymmetrical propulsion/posture coupling as a post-metamorphic young adult. This developmental alteration was accompanied by an ipsilesional decrease in propriospinal coordination that is normally established in strict left-right symmetry during metamorphosis in order to synchronize dorsal trunk muscle contractions with bilateral hindlimb extensions in the swimming adult. Our data thus suggest that a disequilibrium in descending vestibulospinal information during Xenopus metamorphosis leads to an altered assembly of adult spinal locomotor circuitry. This in turn enables an adaptive compensation for the dynamic postural asymmetry induced by the vestibular imbalance

  6. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  7. Morphologically mixed chemical-electrical synapses formed by primary afferents in rodent vestibular nuclei as revealed by immunofluorescence detection of connexin36 and vesicular glutamate transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Nagy, J I; Bautista, W; Blakley, B; Rash, J E

    2013-11-12

    Axon terminals forming mixed chemical/electrical synapses in the lateral vestibular nucleus of rat were described over 40 years ago. Because gap junctions formed by connexins are the morphological correlate of electrical synapses, and with demonstrations of widespread expression of the gap junction protein connexin36 (Cx36) in neurons, we investigated the distribution and cellular localization of electrical synapses in the adult and developing rodent vestibular nuclear complex, using immunofluorescence detection of Cx36 as a marker for these synapses. In addition, we examined Cx36 localization in relation to that of the nerve terminal marker vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (vglut-1). An abundance of immunolabeling for Cx36 in the form of Cx36-puncta was found in each of the four major vestibular nuclei of adult rat and mouse. Immunolabeling was associated with somata and initial dendrites of medium and large neurons, and was absent in vestibular nuclei of Cx36 knockout mice. Cx36-puncta were seen either dispersed or aggregated into clusters on the surface of neurons, and were never found to occur intracellularly. Nearly all Cx36-puncta were localized to large nerve terminals immunolabeled for vglut-1. These terminals and their associated Cx36-puncta were substantially depleted after labyrinthectomy. Developmentally, labeling for Cx36 was already present in the vestibular nuclei at postnatal day 5, where it was only partially co-localized with vglut-1, and did not become fully associated with vglut-1-positive terminals until postnatal day 20-25. The results show that vglut-1-positive primary afferent nerve terminals form mixed synapses throughout the vestibular nuclear complex, that the gap junction component of these synapses contains Cx36, that multiple Cx36-containing gap junctions are associated with individual vglut-1 terminals and that the development of these mixed synapses is protracted over several postnatal weeks.

  8. Morphologically mixed chemical-electrical synapses formed by primary afferents in rodent vestibular nuclei as revealed by immunofluorescence detection of connexin36 and vesicular glutamate transporter-1

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, James I.; Bautista, Wendy; Blakley, Brian; Rash, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Axon terminals forming mixed chemical/electrical synapses in the lateral vestibular nucleus of rat were described over forty years ago. Because gap junctions formed by connexins are the morphological correlate of electrical synapses, and with demonstrations of widespread expression of the gap junction protein connexin36 (Cx36) in neurons, we investigated the distribution and cellular localization of electrical synapses in the adult and developing rodent vestibular nuclear complex, using immunofluorescence detection of Cx36 as a marker for these synapses. In addition, we examined Cx36 localization in relation to that of the nerve terminal marker vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (vglut-1). An abundance of immunolabelling for Cx36 in the form of Cx36-puncta was found in each of the four major vestibular nuclei of adult rat and mouse. Immunolabelling was associated with somata and initial dendrites of medium and large neurons, and was absent in vestibular nuclei of Cx36 knockout mice. Cx36-puncta were seen either dispersed or aggregated into clusters on the surface of neurons, and were never found to occur intracellularly. Nearly all Cx36-puncta were localized to large nerve terminals immunolabelled for vglut-1. These terminals and their associated Cx36-puncta were substantially depleted after labyrinthectomy. Developmentally, labelling for Cx36 was already present in the vestibular nuclei at postnatal day 5, where it was only partially co-localized with vglut-1, and did not become fully associated with vglut-1-positive terminals until postnatal day 20 to 25. The results show that vglut-1-positive primary afferent nerve terminals form mixed synapses throughout the vestibular nuclear complex, that the gap junction component of these synapses contain Cx36, that multiple Cx36-containing gap junctions are associated with individual vglut-1 terminals and that the development of these mixed synapses is protracted over several postnatal weeks. PMID:23912039

  9. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  10. Neurogenic Potential of the Vestibular Nuclei and Behavioural Recovery Time Course in the Adult Cat Are Governed by the Nature of the Vestibular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dutheil, Sophie; Lacour, Michel; Tighilet, Brahim

    2011-01-01

    Functional and reactive neurogenesis and astrogenesis are observed in deafferented vestibular nuclei after unilateral vestibular nerve section in adult cats. The newborn cells survive up to one month and contribute actively to the successful recovery of posturo-locomotor functions. This study investigates whether the nature of vestibular deafferentation has an incidence on the neurogenic potential of the vestibular nuclei, and on the time course of behavioural recovery. Three animal models that mimic different vestibular pathologies were used: unilateral and permanent suppression of vestibular input by unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN), or by unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL, the mechanical destruction of peripheral vestibular receptors), or unilateral and reversible blockade of vestibular nerve input using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Neurogenesis and astrogenesis were revealed in the vestibular nuclei using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) as a newborn cell marker, while glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) were used to identify astrocytes and GABAergic neurons, respectively. Spontaneous nystagmus and posturo-locomotor tests (static and dynamic balance performance) were carried out to quantify the behavioural recovery process. Results showed that the nature of vestibular loss determined the cellular plastic events occurring in the vestibular nuclei and affected the time course of behavioural recovery. Interestingly, the deafferented vestibular nuclei express neurogenic potential after acute and total vestibular loss only (UVN), while non-structural plastic processes are involved when the vestibular deafferentation is less drastic (UL, TTX). This is the first experimental evidence that the vestibular complex in the brainstem can become neurogenic under specific injury. These new data are of interest for understanding the factors favouring the expression of functional neurogenesis in adult mammals in a brain repair perspective, and are of

  11. In vitro effects of acetyl-DL-leucine (tanganil) on central vestibular neurons and vestibulo-ocular networks of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Vibert, N; Vidal, P P

    2001-02-01

    For 40 years, the amino acid acetyl-DL-leucine (or isoleucine/Tanganil) has been used in clinical practice to reduce the imbalance and autonomic signs associated with acute vertigo crises. In animal models, acetyl-DL-leucine was shown to accelerate vestibular compensation following unilateral labyrinthectomy, while having only minor effects on normal vestibular function. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this study, the effect of acetyl-DL-leucine on the activity of central vestibular neurons of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and/or the overall activity of vestibular-related networks was electrophysiologically measured in brainstem slices and in the isolated, in vitro whole brain (IWB) of guinea-pig. Only moderate effects were obtained in normal animals, where both excitatory and inhibitory actions of acetyl-DL-leucine were obtained. However, intracellular recordings from MVN neurons revealed that the nature of the response depended on the resting membrane potential. The neurons excited by acetyl-DL-leucine were significantly hyperpolarized compared to nonsensitive cells, whereas the neurons inhibited by this compound tended to display higher than normal membrane potentials. In accordance with these data, acetyl-DL-leucine reduced the prominent asymmetry characterizing the vestibular-related networks of IWBs taken from previously labyrinthectomized animals, by decreasing the activity of the abnormally depolarized neurons on the hyperactive side. Altogether, our results suggest that acetyl-DL-leucine might act mainly on abnormally hyperpolarized and/or depolarized MVN neurons, by bringing back their membrane potential towards a mean value of -65 to -60 mV. Since in animal models, acute vestibular disorders are associated with asymmetrical spontaneous activities of MVN neurons, this study suggests how acetyl-DL-leucine may reduce acute, vestibular-related imbalances in humans.

  12. Chronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, N. G.; Tang, F.; Corcoran, M. L.; Fox, R. A.; Man, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    In studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (beta-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.

  13. Role of the flocculus in mediating vestibular nucleus neuron plasticity during vestibular compensation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Alex R; Seckl, Jonathan R; Dutia, Mayank B

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the role of the cerebellar flocculus in mediating the adaptive changes that occur in the intrinsic properties of brainstem medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons during vestibular compensation. Ipsi-lesional, but not contra-lesional, flocculectomy prevented the compensatory increase in intrinsic excitability (CIE) that normally occurs in the de-afferented MVN neurons within 4 h after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Flocculectomy did not, however, prevent the down-regulation of efficacy of GABA receptors that also occurs in these neurons after UL, indicating that these responses of the MVN neurons to deafferentation are discrete, parallel processes. CIE was also abolished by intra-floccular microinjection of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist AIDA, and the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolymaleimide I (BIS-I). The serene-threonine kinase inhibitor H-7 had no effect when microinjected at the time of de-afferentation, but abolished CIE if microinjected 2 h later. These cellular effects are in line with the recently reported retardatory effects of BIS-I and H-7 on behavioural recovery after UL. They demonstrate that the increase in intrinsic excitability in MVN neurons during vestibular compensation is cerebellum dependent, and requires mGluR activation and protein phosphorylation in cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, microinjection of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU38486 into the ipsi-lesional flocculus also abolished CIE in MVN neurons. Thus an important site for glucocorticoids in facilitating vestibular compensation is within the cerebellar cortex. These observations ascribe functional significance to the high levels of GR and 11-β-HSD Type 1 expression in cerebellum. PMID:12482895

  14. Chronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, N. G.; Tang, F.; Corcoran, M. L.; Fox, R. A.; Man, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    In studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (beta-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.

  15. Neuronal detection thresholds during vestibular compensation: contributions of response variability and sensory substitution.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Mohsen; Mitchell, Diana E; Dale, Alexis; Carriot, Jerome; Sadeghi, Soroush G; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-04-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for processing self-motion, allowing normal subjects to discriminate the direction of rotational movements as slow as 1-2 deg s(-1). After unilateral vestibular injury patients' direction-discrimination thresholds worsen to ∼20 deg s(-1), and despite some improvement thresholds remain substantially elevated following compensation. To date, however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this recovery have not been addressed. Here, we recorded from first-order central neurons in the macaque monkey that provide vestibular information to higher brain areas for self-motion perception. Immediately following unilateral labyrinthectomy, neuronal detection thresholds increased by more than two-fold (from 14 to 30 deg s(-1)). While thresholds showed slight improvement by week 3 (25 deg s(-1)), they never recovered to control values - a trend mirroring the time course of perceptual thresholds in patients. We further discovered that changes in neuronal response variability paralleled changes in sensitivity for vestibular stimulation during compensation, thereby causing detection thresholds to remain elevated over time. However, we found that in a subset of neurons, the emergence of neck proprioceptive responses combined with residual vestibular modulation during head-on-body motion led to better neuronal detection thresholds. Taken together, our results emphasize that increases in response variability to vestibular inputs ultimately constrain neural thresholds and provide evidence that sensory substitution with extravestibular (i.e. proprioceptive) inputs at the first central stage of vestibular processing is a neural substrate for improvements in self-motion perception following vestibular loss. Thus, our results provide a neural correlate for the patient benefits provided by rehabilitative strategies that take advantage of the convergence of these multisensory cues.

  16. Correlation of Fos expression and circling asymmetry during gerbil vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Shinder, M. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular compensation is a central nervous system process resulting in recovery of functional movement and control following a unilateral vestibular lesion. Small pressure injections of phosphorothioate 20mer oligonucleotides were used to probe the role of the Fos transcription protein during vestibular compensation in the gerbil brainstem. During isoflurane gas anesthesia, antisense probes against the c-fos mRNA sequence were injected into the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei unilaterally prior to a unilateral surgical labyrinthectomy. Anionic dyes, which did not interact with the oligonucleotides, were used to mark the injection site and help determine the extent of diffusion. The antiFos oligonucleotide injections reduced Fos expression at the injection site in neurons which normally express Fos after the lesion, and also affected circling behavior induced by hemilabyrinthectomy. With both ipsilateral and contralateral medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei injections, less ipsilateral and more contralateral circling was noted in animals injected with antiFos injections as compared to non-injected controls. The degree of change in these behaviors was dependent upon the side of the injection. Histologically, antiFos injections reduced the number of Fos immunolabeled neurons around the injection site, and increased Fos expression contralaterally. The correlation of the number of neurons with Fos expression to turning behavior was stronger for contralateral versus ipsilateral turns, and for neurons in the caudal and ipsilateral sub-regions of the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. The results are discussed in terms of neuronal firing activity versus translational activity based on the asymmetrical expression of the Fos inducible transcription factor in the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. Although ubiquitous in the brain, transcription factors like Fos can serve localized and specific roles in sensory-specific adaptive stimuli. Antisense

  17. Neurocinematography in Pre-World War II Netherlands: The Magnus-Rademaker Collection.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J; Lameris, Bregt; Hielscher, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Historical films made by neuroscientists have shown up in several countries during past years. Although originally supposed to have been lost, we recently found a collection of films produced between 1909 and 1940 by Rudolf Magnus (1873-1927), professor of pharmacology (Utrecht) and his student Gysbertus Rademaker (1887-1957), professor of physiology (1928, succeeding Willem Einthoven) and neurology (1945, both in Leiden). Both collections deal with the physiology of body posture by the equilibrium of reflex musculature contractions for which experimental studies were done with animals (labyrinthectomies, cerebellectomies, and brainstem sections) and observations on patients. The films demonstrate the results of these studies. Moreover, there are films with babies showing tonic neck reflexes and moving images capturing adults with cerebellar symptoms following cerebellectomies for tumors and several other conditions. Magnus' studies resulted in his well-known Körperstellung (1924, "Body Posture") and Rademaker's research in his Das Stehen (1931, "Standing"). The films probably had an educative and scientific purpose. Magnus demonstrated his films at congresses, including the Eighth International Congress of Physiologists (Vienna, 1910) and Rademaker screened his moving images at meetings of the Amsterdam Neurologists Society (at several occasions as reflected in the Winkler-Monakow correspondence and the Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde). Next to these purposes, the films were used to analyze movement and a series of images from the films were published in articles and books. The films are important historical sources that provide a portrait of the pre-World War II era in neuroscience, partly answering questions on how physicians dealt with patients and researchers with their laboratory animals. Moreover, the films confirm that cinematography was an important scientific tool in neuroscience research.

  18. Short-term galvanic vestibular stimulation promotes functional recovery and neurogenesis in unilaterally labyrinthectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Shaabani, Moslem; Lotfi, Yones; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Hooshmandi, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Current experimental research on the therapeutic effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) has mainly focused on neurodegenerative disorders. However, it primarily stimulates the vestibular nuclei and could be potentially effective in modulating imbalance between them in the case of unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Fifty male Wistar rats (180-220g) were used in 5 groups of 10: intact, sham, right-UL (RUL; without intervention), and two other right-UL groups with GVS intervention [one group treated with low rate GVS (GVS.LF; 6-7Hz), and the other treated with high rate GVS (GVS.HF; 17-18Hz)]. The UL models were prepared by intratympanic injection of sodium arsanilate. GVS protocols were implemented 30min/day and continued for 14 days via ring-shaped copper electrodes inserted subcutaneously over each mastoid. Functional recovery was assessed by several postural tests including support surface area, landing and air-righting reflexes, and rotarod procedure. Immunohistochemical investigations were performed on ipsi- and contra-lesional medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki67, as markers of cell proliferation. Behavioral evaluations showed significant functional recovery of GVS-treated groups compared to RUL group. The percent of marked cells with BrdU and Ki67 were significantly higher in the ipsilesional MVN of both GVS-treated groups compared with other groups. Our findings confirmed the effectiveness of GVS-intervention in accelerating static and dynamic vestibular compensation. This could be explained by the cell proliferation in ipsilesional MVN cells and rapid rebalancing of the VNs and the modulation of their motor outputs. Therefore, GVS could be promising for rehabilitating patients with unilateral vestibular weakness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of the Temporal Bone Presenting with Headache and Partial Facial Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kletke, Stephanie N.; Popovic, Snezana; Algird, Almunder; Alobaid, Abdullah; Reddy, Kesava K. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are benign bony lesions that rarely affect the skull base. Very few cases of temporal bone ABCs have been reported. We describe the first case of a temporal bone ABC that was thought to be consistent with a meningioma based on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Clinical Presentation An otherwise healthy 23-year-old woman presented with a pulsatile noise in her left ear and a 4-week history of throbbing headache with nausea. There was no associated emesis, visual or auditory changes, or other neurologic features. Neurologic examination revealed a left lower motor neuron facial paresis. Computed tomography and MRI studies demonstrated a large lesion in the left middle cranial fossa skull base with erosion of the petrous temporal bone. Based on the presence of a “dural tail” on preoperative contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging, the lesion was interpreted to likely be consistent with a meningioma. An orbitozygomatic approach was utilized for surgical excision. Histopathologic evaluation was consistent with an ABC. Conclusion Postoperatively the patient had improvement in the lower motor neuron facial paresis. It is important to consider ABC in the differential diagnosis of intracranial lesions accompanied by the dural tail sign on MRI. PMID:26251800

  20. Prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leakage and delayed loss of preserved hearing after vestibular schwannoma removal: reconstruction of the internal auditory canal in the suboccipital transmeatal approach--technical note.

    PubMed

    Yamakami, I; Kobayashi, E; Ono, J; Yamaura, A

    2000-11-01

    The suboccipital transmeatal approach uses packing of a muscle or fat graft into the internal auditory canal (IAC) to prevent postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. However, preserved hearing after removal of vestibular schwannomas may decline over time because of the progressive constriction of cochlear vascular supply due to scarring of the IAC. We propose a surgical technique for IAC reconstruction, which separates the preserved cochlear nerve and vasculature from the graft, and regains the CSF space in the IAC. Prior to the drilling of the posterior wall of the IAC, the dura mater of the petrous bone forming the posterior wall of the IAC is harvested for IAC reconstruction. After completion of tumor removal, a "roof" of the IAC is reconstructed using the dura mater, and a muscle or fat graft soaked with fibrin glue is placed on the "roof" of the IAC. The IAC was reconstructed using this technique in 26 consecutive patients with vestibular schwannomas who underwent tumor removal via the suboccipital transmeatal approach. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the regained CSF space in the IAC. No delayed hearing loss occurred in four patients with preserved hearing. No CSF leakage occurred after surgery. This new technique of IAC reconstruction may prevent delayed hearing loss as well as postoperative CSF leakage after removal of vestibular schwannomas via the suboccipital transmeatal approach.

  1. Is the lateral angle of the internal acoustic canal sexually dimorphic in non-adults? An investigation by routine cranial magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Afacan, G O; Onal, T; Akansel, G; Arslan, A S

    2017-09-08

    The lateral angle of the internal acoustic canal is one of the measurements of petrous bone that has been previously studied for sex estimation, mostly in adults. We aimed at evaluating the effects of age, side, and sex on the lateral angle of the internal acoustic canal in pediatric patients. Pediatric routine cranial MRI studies were retrospectively investigated for this study. The lateral angle was measured on T2-weighted axial images when the anterior and posterior lips of the meatus and the cochlea were clearly visible on the same image. The data were evaluated for age, side and sex-related changes. Although 552 temporal bones from 273 patients were inspected, due to exclusion criteria lateral angle could be satisfactorily measured only in 101 temporal bones from 58 patients. The measurements did not differ significantly between sexes. An age-related, statistically significant decrease was observed for the entire pediatric sample studied, as well as for the males, but not for females. The measurements did not differ from side to side. The significant age-related decrease in lateral angle in male pediatric patients that was not detected in female counterparts may be the reflection of a sex-related difference in temporal bone development during childhood. Routine cranial MRI data may help investigators study age and sex-related changes in lateral angle in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Internal carotid artery stenosis associated with giant cell arteritis: case report and discussion

    PubMed Central

    Zarar, Amna; Zafar, Taqi T; Khan, Asif A; Suri, M Fareed K; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrovascular ischemic events associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) are uncommon and have been reported in 3%–4% of patients. We describe a case report of GCA associated with intracranial stenosis and review various angiographic findings. Case presentation A 66-year-old man presented with worsening headache and vision loss. A recent magnetic resonance angiogram of the head and neck showed multiple intracranial stenosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis demonstrated increased protein of 135.6 mg/dL, with two white blood cells/µL. No bacteria were observed in the CSF on gram staining, and cultures were negative for bacterial growth. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was noted to be 14 mm/h, and C-reactive protein was 1.514 mg/L at admission. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis panels were negative. On digital subtraction angiography, patient had predominantly narrowing and irregularities in petrous and cavernous segments of the internal carotid arteries bilaterally. The diagnosis of GCA was confirmed by temporal artery biopsy. He was treated with steroids, and a followup angiogram 6 weeks later showed minimal resolution of the angiographic findings. Patient reported complete resolution of headaches and visual loss. Conclusion Bilateral internal carotid arteries stenosis may be seen in patients presenting with typical symptoms of GCA and may persist after steroid treatment despite resolution of clinical symptoms. PMID:25566338

  3. Closure of the middle ear with special reference to the development of the tegmen tympani of the temporal bone

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Verdugo-López, Samuel; Abe, Shin-ichi; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2011-01-01

    Closure of the middle ear is believed to be closely related to the evolutionary development of the mammalian jaw. However, few comprehensive descriptions are available on fetal development. We examined paraffin-embedded specimens of 20 mid-term human fetuses at 8–25 weeks of ovulation age (crown-rump length or CRL, 38–220 mm). After 9 weeks, the tympanic bone and the squamous part of the temporal bone, each of which was cranial or caudal to Meckel's cartilage, grew to close the lateral part of the tympanosquamosal fissure. At the same time, the cartilaginous tegmen tympani appeared independently of the petrous part of the temporal bone and resulted in the petrosquamosal fissure. Subsequently, the medial part of the tympanosquamosal fissure was closed by the descent of a cartilaginous inferior process of the tegmen tympani. When Meckel's cartilage changed into the sphenomandibular ligament and the anterior ligament of the malleus, the inferior process of the tegmen tympani interposed between the tympanic bone and the squamous part of the temporal bone, forming the petrotympanic fissure for the chorda tympani nerve and the discomalleolar ligament. Therefore, we hypothesize that, in accordance with the regression of Meckel's cartilage, the rapidly growing temporomandibular joint provided mechanical stress that accelerated the growth and descent of the inferior process of the tegmen tympani via the discomalleolar ligament. The usual diagram showing bony fissures around the tegmen tympani may overestimate the role of the tympanic bone in the fetal middle-ear closure. PMID:21477146

  4. Clinical controversy in orbitary cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Tatiana; Bontas, Ecaterina; Vladescu, Teodora Gh; St Tihoan, Cecilia; Gherghescu, Gheorghe

    2006-04-01

    Cholesterol granulomas are tumor-like lesions very rarely encountered in the orbital, frontal sinus, and maxillary sinus sites but with higher frequency in the middle-ear and petrous apex. Theoretically, cholesterol granulomas develop as a reaction to localized hemorrhages, often occurring in bony sites with no blood and blood products drainage. We present 5 cases with exophthalmoses, namely, 3 cases with granuloma and 2 cases with cholesteatoma, all being characterized by the presence of cholesterol spikes at the histologic examination. Henderson (Orbital tumors. 3rd ed. New York: Raven Press; 1994) reports cholesterol spikes in medical literature as structures with different histologic names as hematic cyst, intraorbital hematoma, subperiostal hemorrhages, chocolate cyst, and xanthomatosis reactive lesions of bone. In fact, cholesterol granuloma is the term for the pocket of hematogenous debris found in the frontal bone at surgery. We try to review the spectrum of clinical-pathological and radiographic features that characterize cholesterol granuloma but with the same surgical way management.

  5. Percutaneous inner-ear access via an image-guided industrial robot system

    PubMed Central

    Baron, S; Eilers, H; Munske, B; Toennies, JL; Balachandran, R; Labadie, RF; Ortmaier, T; Webster, RJ

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided robots have been widely used for bone shaping and percutaneous access to interventional sites. However, due to high-accuracy requirements and proximity to sensitive nerves and brain tissues, the adoption of robots in inner-ear surgery has been slower. In this paper the authors present their recent work towards developing two image-guided industrial robot systems for accessing challenging inner-ear targets. Features of the systems include optical tracking of the robot base and tool relative to the patient and Kalman filter-based data fusion of redundant sensory information (from encoders and optical tracking systems) for enhanced patient safety. The approach enables control of differential robot positions rather than absolute positions, permitting simplified calibration procedures and reducing the reliance of the system on robot calibration in order to ensure overall accuracy. Lastly, the authors present the results of two phantom validation experiments simulating the use of image-guided robots in inner-ear surgeries such as cochlear implantation and petrous apex access. PMID:20718268

  6. Java brucea and Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of cholesterol granuloma in the suprasellar and sellar regions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhe; Cao, Yang; Zhai, Lin-zhu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: A cholesterol granuloma (CG) is usually found in the middle ear, papilla, orbits, petrous apex, and choroid plexus, but is highly uncommon in the skull. In spite of benign clinicopathological lesions, bone erosion can be seen occasionally in the patient with CG. The optimal treatment strategy is radical surgery, but complete excision is usually impossible due to anatomical restrictions and a risk of injury to the key structures located nearby. Here, we report a patient with CGs in the suprasellar and sellar regions who was successfully treated with Java brucea and Chinese herbal medicine. Patient concerns: A 31-year-old man presenting with progressive decreased vision in both eyes was analyzed. Diagnoses: A skull magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed a low-density tumor in the uprasellar and sellar regions and histopathological examination revealed a CG. Interventions: The patient was referred the surgery and radiotherapy. In the meantime, brucea soft capsules and herbal medicine combined were administered to him. Outcomes: The related clinical symptoms and signs resolved significantly after several months, as his therapy progressed. The patient showed no sign of recurrence during the treatment period. Furthermore, he was still alive and disease-free at 37 months of follow-up visit. Lessons: Overall, brucea soft capsules and a Chinese herbal formula treatment combined could be beneficial in improving the patient's quality of life with CG in the skull. PMID:28151875

  7. Retrospective correction of B0-field-induced geometric distortions in multislice echo planar images: a 3D solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, Roderick W.; Coburn, Edward A.

    2000-04-01

    A method has been developed to utilize a 3D B0 fieldmap, with a multi-volume-of-interest segmentation map, to quantify and correct geometric distortions in echo-planar images. The purpose is to provide accurate co-registration of anatomical MRI to functional MRI time course sequences. A data structure capable of extracting and reporting the necessary information forms a central part of the solution. Images were obtained from a 1.5 Tesla scanner with an experimental y-gradient insert coil. Two 3D-gradient echo sequences supply the data needed to calculate the B0 map across the volume. Segmentation of the volume into brain/background produces the data needed for the phase unwrapping and volume(s) of interest generation, from which the global B0 variation map is obtained. Subsequent EPI acquisition yields the fMRI time- course information. Tests were carried out on a phantom and a human volunteer engaged in a motor task (finger-tapping). Strong distortions were measured, and subsequently corrected, particularly near the petrous bone/mastoid air cells and in the frontal and maxillary sinuses. Additionally, a strong eddy current resulting from the unshielded y-gradient was detected. The method facilitates geometric distortion correction through an imaging volume, containing multiple regions of interest within a slice, starting from a single starting point.

  8. MR Imaging of Orbital Inflammatory Pseudotumors with Extraorbital Extension

    PubMed Central

    Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Bum Soo; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Young Joo; Jung, Ae Kyung; Park, Chan Sub; Song, Soon-Young; Park, Noh Hyuck; Kim, Mi Sung

    2005-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate a variety of MR imaging findings of orbital inflammatory pseudotumors with extraorbital extension. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the MR features of five patients, who were diagnosed clinically and radiologically as having an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor with extraorbital extension. Results The types of orbital pseudotumors were a mass in the orbital apex (n = 3), diffuse form (n = 2), and myositis (n = 1). The extraorbital extension of the orbital pseudotumor passed through the superior orbital fissure in all cases, through the inferior orbital fissure in two cases, and through the optic canal in one case. The orbital lesions extended into the following areas: the cavernous sinus (n = 4), the middle cranial fossa (n = 4), Meckel's cave (n = 2), the petrous apex (n = 2), the clivus (n = 2), the pterygopalatine fossa and infratemporal fossa (n = 2), the foramen rotundum (n = 1), the paranasal sinus (n = 1), and the infraorbital foramen (n = 1). On MR imaging, the lesions appeared as an isosignal intensity with gray matter on the T1-weighted images, as a low signal intensity on the T2-weighted images and showed a marked enhancement on the post-gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (post-Gd-DTPA) T1-sequences. The symptoms of all of the patients improved when they were given high doses of steroids. Three of the five patients experienced a recurrence. Conclusion MR imaging is useful for demonstrating the presence of a variety of extraorbital extensions of orbital inflammatory pseudotumors. PMID:15968146

  9. A prognostic scoring system for locoregional control in nasopharyngeal carcinoma following conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.H.; Tsai, S.Y.; Horng, C.-F.; Yen, K.L.; Jian, James J.; Chan, Kwan-Yee; Lin, C.-Y.; Terng, S.-D.; Tsou, M.-H.; Chu, N.-M.; Chen, H.-H.; Hsieh, C.-I.; Tan, T.-D.; Chen, P.-L.; Chung, Y.L.; Huang, Andrew T. |

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: This study established a prognostic scoring system for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), which estimates the probability of locoregional (LR) control following definitive conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with nondisseminated NPC at initial presentation (n = 630) were enrolled in this study. All patients had magnetic resonance imaging of the head and neck and were treated with conformal radiotherapy. Among them, 93% had concurrent chemotherapy, and 76% had postradiation chemotherapy. The extent of the primary tumor, age at diagnosis, primary tumor size, tumor and nodal classification, histology, and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level before treatment were included in the analysis for building a prognostic scoring system. The end point for this study was LR control. Results: The prognostic score was defined as the number of adverse prognostic factors present at diagnosis. Four factors had similarly independent prognostic effects (hazard ratio, 2.0-2.6): age >40 years, histologic WHO type I-II, serum LDH level {>=}410 U/L, and involvement of two or more sites of the following anatomic structures, i.e., sphenoid floor, clivus marrow, clivus cortex, prevertebral muscles, and petrous bone. The score predicted the 5-year probability of LR control as follows: 0 (15% of the patients), 100%; 1 (42% of the patients), 93%; 2 (29% of the patients), 83%; 3 or higher (13% of the patients), 71%. Conclusion: This scoring system is useful in the decision-making for individual patients and the design of clinical trials to improve LR control for advanced-stage NPC.

  10. Contralateral Cochlear Labyrinthine Concussion without Temporal Bone Fracture: Unusual Posttraumatic Consequence

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, D.; Silva, J. M. Duque; del Álamo, P. Ortega

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Labyrinthine concussion is a term used to describe a rare cause of sensorineural hearing loss with or without vestibular symptoms occurring after head trauma. Isolated damage to the inner ear without involving the vestibular organ would be designated as a cochlear labyrinthine concussion. Hearing loss is not a rare finding in head trauma that involves petrous bone fractures. Nevertheless it generally occurs ipsilateral to the side of the head injury and extraordinarily in the contralateral side and moreover without the presence of a fracture. Case Report. The present case describes a 37-year-old patient with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus in his right ear after a blunt head trauma of the left-sided temporal bone (contralateral). Otoscopy and radiological images showed no fractures or any abnormalities. A severe sensorineural hearing loss was found in his right ear with a normal hearing of the left side. Conclusion. The temporal bone trauma requires a complete diagnostic battery which includes a neurotologic examination and a high resolution computed tomography scan in the first place. Hearing loss after a head injury extraordinarily occurs in the contralateral side of the trauma as what happened in our case. In addition, the absence of fractures makes this phenomenon even more unusual. PMID:27738540

  11. Dorello's Canal for Laymen: A Lego-Like Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Ezer, Haim; Banerjee, Anirban Deep; Thakur, Jai Deep; Nanda, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Objective Dorello's canal was first described by Gruber in 1859, and later by Dorello. Vail also described the anatomy of Dorello's canal. In the preceding century, Dorello's canal was clinically important, in understanding sixth nerve palsy and nowadays it is mostly important for skull base surgery. The understanding of the three dimensional anatomy, of this canal is very difficult to understand, and there is no simple explanation for its anatomy and its relationship with adjacent structures. We present a simple, Lego-like, presentation of Dorello's canal, in a stepwise manner. Materials and Methods Dorello's canal was dissected in five formalin-fixed cadaver specimens (10 sides). The craniotomy was performed, while preserving the neural and vascular structures associated with the canal. A 3D model was created, to explain the canal's anatomy. Results Using the petrous pyramid, the sixth nerve, the cavernous sinus, the trigeminal ganglion, the petorclival ligament and the posterior clinoid, the three-dimensional structure of Dorello's canal was defined. This simple representation aids in understanding the three dimensional relationship of Dorello's canal to its neighboring structures. Conclusion Dorello's canal with its three dimensional structure and relationship to its neighboring anatomical structures could be reconstructed using a few anatomical building blocks. This method simplifies the understanding of this complex anatomical structure, and could be used for teaching purposes for aspiring neurosurgeons, and anatomy students. PMID:23730547

  12. Transposition of the paraclival carotid artery: a novel concept of self-retaining vascular retraction during endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery technical report.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jacob L; Sampath, Raghuram; Casey, Michael A; Quattlebaum, Steven Craig; Ramakrishnan, Vijay R; Youssef, A Samy

    2016-08-01

    Fixed retraction of the internal carotid artery (ICA) has previously been described for use during transcranial microscopic surgery. We report the novel use of a self-retaining microvascular retractor for static repositioning and protection of the ICA during expanded endonasal endoscopic approaches to the paramedian skull base. The transmaxillary, transpterygoid approach was performed in five cadaver heads (ten sides). The self-retaining microvascular retractor was used to laterally reposition the pterygopalatine fossa contents during exposure of the pterygoid base/plates and the paraclival ICA to expose the petrous apex. Maximum ICA retraction distance was measured in the x-axis for all ten sides. The average horizontal distance of ICA retraction measured at the mid-paraclival segment for all ten sides was 4.75 mm. In all cases, the carotid artery was repositioned without injury to the vessel or disruption of the surrounding neurovascular structures. Static repositioning of the ICA and other delicate neurovascular structures was effectively performed during endonasal, endoscopic cadaveric surgery of the skull base and has potential merits in live patients.

  13. Virtual temporal bone: an interactive 3-dimensional learning aid for cranial base surgery.

    PubMed

    Kockro, Ralf A; Hwang, Peter Y K

    2009-05-01

    We have developed an interactive virtual model of the temporal bone for the training and teaching of cranial base surgery. The virtual model was based on the tomographic data of the Visible Human Project. The male Visible Human's computed tomographic data were volumetrically reconstructed as virtual bone tissue, and the individual photographic slices provided the basis for segmentation of the middle and inner ear structures, cranial nerves, vessels, and brainstem. These structures were created by using outlining and tube editing tools, allowing structural modeling either directly on the basis of the photographic data or according to information from textbooks and cadaver dissections. For training and teaching, the virtual model was accessed in the previously described 3-dimensional workspaces of the Dextroscope or Dextrobeam (Volume Interactions Pte, Ltd., Singapore), whose interfaces enable volumetric exploration from any perspective and provide virtual tools for drilling and measuring. We have simulated several cranial base procedures including approaches via the floor of the middle fossa and the lateral petrous bone. The virtual model suitably illustrated the core facts of anatomic spatial relationships while simulating different stages of bone drilling along a variety of surgical corridors. The system was used for teaching during training courses to plan and discuss operative anatomy and strategies. The Virtual Temporal Bone and its surrounding 3-dimensional workspace provide an effective way to study the essential surgical anatomy of this complex region and to teach and train operative strategies, especially when used as an adjunct to cadaver dissections.

  14. Microsurgical and Endoscopic Anatomy for Intradural Temporal Bone Drilling and Applications of the Electromagnetic Navigation System: Various Extensions of the Retrosigmoid Approach.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ken; Komune, Noritaka; Matsuo, Satoshi; Kohno, Michihiro

    2017-07-01

    The use of the retrosigmoid approach has recently been expanded by several modifications, including the suprameatal, transmeatal, suprajugular, and inframeatal extensions. Intradural temporal bone drilling without damaging vital structures inside or beside the bone, such as the internal carotid artery and jugular bulb, is a key step for these extensions. This study aimed to examine the microsurgical and endoscopic anatomy of the extensions of the retrosigmoid approach and to evaluate the clinical feasibility of an electromagnetic navigation system during intradural temporal bone drilling. Five temporal bones and 8 cadaveric cerebellopontine angles were examined to clarify the anatomy of retrosigmoid intradural temporal bone drilling. Twenty additional cerebellopontine angles were dissected in a clinical setting with an electromagnetic navigation system while measuring the target registration errors at 8 surgical landmarks on and inside the temporal bone. Retrosigmoid intradural temporal bone drilling expanded the surgical exposure to allow access to the petroclival and parasellar regions (suprameatal), internal acoustic meatus (transmeatal), upper jugular foramen (suprajugular), and petrous apex (inframeatal). The electromagnetic navigation continuously guided the drilling without line of sight limitation, and its small devices were easily manipulated in the deep and narrow surgical field in the posterior fossa. Mean target registration error was less than 0.50 mm during these procedures. The combination of endoscopic and microsurgical techniques aids in achieving optimal exposure for retrosigmoid intradural temporal bone drilling. The electromagnetic navigation system had clear advantages with acceptable accuracy including the usability of small devices without line of sight limitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N Vinay; Gugapriya, T S; Guru, Arun T; Kumari, Sd Nalina

    2016-01-01

    Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome (DDMS) refers to atrophy or hypoplasia of one cerebral hemisphere, due to an insult to the developing brain in fetal or early childhood period. Age of presentation depends on the time of neurologic insult, and characteristic changes may be seen only in adolescence. Male gender and left hemisphere are more frequently involved. A 17-year-old female adolescent with a history of recurrent refractory seizures, hemiplegia and mental retardation reported to Department of Radiology for computed tomography (CT) assessment of brain. On examination, she had facial asymmetry, delayed milestones, and spastic hemiplegia. The CT brain showed right cortical atrophy with ventricular dilatation, prominent sulci, and shifting of falx to the right side. Bone window image showed asymmetry in skull vault thickness, the width of diploic space, the size of paranasal air sinuses and inclination of the petrous ridge between the affected and normal sides. As the above case deviates from the usual presentation of male left sided DDMS, hence the report.

  16. Direct radiocarbon dating and DNA analysis of the Darra-i-Kur (Afghanistan) human temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Douka, Katerina; Slon, Viviane; Stringer, Chris; Potts, Richard; Hübner, Alexander; Meyer, Matthias; Spoor, Fred; Pääbo, Svante; Higham, Tom

    2017-06-01

    The temporal bone discovered in the 1960s from the Darra-i-Kur cave in Afghanistan is often cited as one of the very few Pleistocene human fossils from Central Asia. Here we report the first direct radiocarbon date for the specimen and the genetic analyses of DNA extracted and sequenced from two areas of the bone. The new radiocarbon determination places the find to ∼4500 cal BP (∼2500 BCE) contradicting an assumed Palaeolithic age of ∼30,000 years, as originally suggested. The DNA retrieved from the specimen originates from a male individual who carried mitochondrial DNA of the modern human type. The petrous part yielded more endogenous ancient DNA molecules than the squamous part of the same bone. Molecular dating of the Darra-i-Kur mitochondrial DNA sequence corroborates the radiocarbon date and suggests that the specimen is younger than previously thought. Taken together, the results consolidate the fact that the human bone is not associated with the Pleistocene-age deposits of Darra-i-Kur; instead it is intrusive, possibly re-deposited from upper levels dating to much later periods (Neolithic). Despite its Holocene age, the Darra-i-Kur specimen is, so far, the first and only ancient human from Afghanistan whose DNA has been sequenced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Combined Intradural Presigmoid-Transtransversarium-Transcondylar Approach to the Whole Clivus and Anterior Craniospinal Region

    PubMed Central

    Ammirati, Mario; Ma, Jianya; Canalis, Rinaldo; Martin, Neil; Black, Keith; Cheatham, Mel; Bloch, Joseph; Becker, Donald

    1993-01-01

    Surgical exposure of the clivus is difficult because of its proximity to vital neurovascular structures. The anatomic bases of a new surgical approach to this area are discussed. A supra-auricular skin incision is extended toward the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The vertebral artery is exposed from C2 to the occiput unroofing the foramen transversarium of C1. The bone removal consists of a posterior temporal craniotomy, a suboccipital craniectomy, including mastoidectomy with sigmoid sinus unroofing, removal of the lateral margin of the foramen magnum, of the medial third of the occipital condyle, and retrolabyrinthine petrous drilling. Posterior retraction of the vertebral artery facilitates occipital condyle drilling. Intradural exposure of the petroclival region is achieved by L-shaped cutting of the dura with the long branch placed infratentorially anterior to the sigmoid sinus. Intradural exposure of the craniospinal/upper cervical areas is achieved by cutting of the dura medial to the distal sigmoid sinus and by longitudinal cutting of the dura anterior to the vertebral artery. This approach allows multiple ports of entry to the clivus with full control of the vertebrobasilar system, and of the dural sinuses, and is anatomically suited for controlled removal of tumors located in these areas. This approach, or segments of it, has been used successfully in the treatment of large neoplasms of the craniovertebral junction. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17170911

  18. Skull base osteomyelitis in otitis externa: The utility of triphasic and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography bone scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Panda, Naresh Kumar; Das, Ashim; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2013-01-01

    Background: Skull base osteomyelitis (SBO) refers to infection that has spread beyond the external auditory canal to the base of the skull in advanced stages of otitis externa. Clinically, it may be difficult to differentiate SBO from severe otitis externa without bony involvement. This study was performed to determine the role of three phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) and single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) in detecting SBO. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed records of 20 patients (14 M, 6 F) with otitis externa and suspected SBO. TPBS and SPECT/CT of the skull were performed. Findings were correlated with clinical, laboratory and diagnostic CT scan findings. Results: All patients were diabetic with elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. A total of 18 patients had bilateral and two unilateral symptoms. Cranial nerves were involved in eight patients and microbiological culture of ear discharge fluid positive in seven. Early images showed increased temporal vascularity in nine patients and increased soft-tissue uptake in 10, while delayed images showed increased bone uptake in 19/20 patients. Localized abnormal tracer uptake was shown by SPECT/CT in the mastoid temporal (15), petrous (11), sphenoid (3) and zygomatic (1) and showed destructive changes in five. Thus, TPBS was found positive for SBO in 10/20 patients and changed the management in four. Conclusion: Our study suggests that TPBS with SPECT/CT is a useful non-invasive investigation for detection of SBO in otitis externa. PMID:24163508

  19. Skull base osteomyelitis in otitis externa: The utility of triphasic and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Panda, Naresh Kumar; Das, Ashim; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2013-04-01

    Skull base osteomyelitis (SBO) refers to infection that has spread beyond the external auditory canal to the base of the skull in advanced stages of otitis externa. Clinically, it may be difficult to differentiate SBO from severe otitis externa without bony involvement. This study was performed to determine the role of three phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) and single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) in detecting SBO. We retrospectively analyzed records of 20 patients (14 M, 6 F) with otitis externa and suspected SBO. TPBS and SPECT/CT of the skull were performed. Findings were correlated with clinical, laboratory and diagnostic CT scan findings. All patients were diabetic with elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. A total of 18 patients had bilateral and two unilateral symptoms. Cranial nerves were involved in eight patients and microbiological culture of ear discharge fluid positive in seven. Early images showed increased temporal vascularity in nine patients and increased soft-tissue uptake in 10, while delayed images showed increased bone uptake in 19/20 patients. Localized abnormal tracer uptake was shown by SPECT/CT in the mastoid temporal (15), petrous (11), sphenoid (3) and zygomatic (1) and showed destructive changes in five. Thus, TPBS was found positive for SBO in 10/20 patients and changed the management in four. Our study suggests that TPBS with SPECT/CT is a useful non-invasive investigation for detection of SBO in otitis externa.

  20. Ardipithecus ramidus and the evolution of the human cranial base.

    PubMed

    Kimbel, William H; Suwa, Gen; Asfaw, Berhane; Rak, Yoel; White, Tim D

    2014-01-21

    The early Pliocene African hominoid Ardipithecus ramidus was diagnosed as a having a unique phylogenetic relationship with the Australopithecus + Homo clade based on nonhoning canine teeth, a foreshortened cranial base, and postcranial characters related to facultative bipedality. However, pedal and pelvic traits indicating substantial arboreality have raised arguments that this taxon may instead be an example of parallel evolution of human-like traits among apes around the time of the chimpanzee-human split. Here we investigated the basicranial morphology of Ar. ramidus for additional clues to its phylogenetic position with reference to African apes, humans, and Australopithecus. Besides a relatively anterior foramen magnum, humans differ from apes in the lateral shift of the carotid foramina, mediolateral abbreviation of the lateral tympanic, and a shortened, trapezoidal basioccipital element. These traits reflect a relative broadening of the central basicranium, a derived condition associated with changes in tympanic shape and the extent of its contact with the petrous. Ar. ramidus shares with Australopithecus each of these human-like modifications. We used the preserved morphology of ARA-VP 1/500 to estimate the missing basicranial length, drawing on consistent proportional relationships in apes and humans. Ar. ramidus is confirmed to have a relatively short basicranium, as in Australopithecus and Homo. Reorganization of the central cranial base is among the earliest morphological markers of the Ardipithecus + Australopithecus + Homo clade.

  1. In vivo testing of a bioabsorbable magnesium alloy serving as total ossicular replacement prostheses.

    PubMed

    Lensing, Rebecca; Behrens, Peter; Müller, Peter Paul; Lenarz, Thomas; Stieve, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been investigated in different fields of medicine and represent a promising biomaterial for implants due to characteristics like bioabsorbability and osteoinduction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usability of magnesium as implant material in middle ear surgery. Magnesium implants were placed into the right middle ear of eighteen New Zealand White rabbits. Nine animals were euthanized after four weeks and nine animals after three month. The petrous bones were removed and embedded in epoxy resin. The specimens were then polished, stained and evaluated with the aid of a light microscope. The histological examination revealed a good biocompatibility. After four weeks, a beginning corrosion of the implant's surface and low amount of trabecular bone formation in the area of the stapes base plate was observed. A considerable degradation of implants and obvious bone formation was found three month after implantation. The magnesium alloy used in the present study partly corroded too fast, so that a complete bone reconstruction could not be established in time. The increased osteoinduction on the stapes base plate resulted in a tight bone-implant bonding. Thus, a promising application of magnesium could be a coating of biomaterials in order to improve the bony integration of implants.

  2. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with multifocal bone lesions: comparative clinical features between single and multi-systems.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Kinugawa, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Akinobu; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Ohki, Kentaro; Shioda, Yoko; Tsunematsu, Yukiko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Morimoto, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) can be a single system or multi-system disease. Both disease types can be associated with multi-focal bone lesions, but their bone involvement patterns have not been compared systematically. Of the new pediatric LCH cases enrolled into the JLSG-02 study during 2002-2007, 67 cases of single system multifocal bone (SMFB) LCH and 97 cases of multi-system bone (MSB) LCH were analyzed to determine if the bone involvement patterns differ in these two types, and whether these differences correlate with outcome. Statistical analysis was performed with Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher's exact test, and other measures. Onset ages were higher for SMFB (P < 0.001), but the two types did not differ in the number of bone lesions per patient. The skull was most frequently affected in both types, followed by the spine. Lesions in the temporal bone (P = 0.002), ear-petrous bone (P < 0.001), orbita (P = 0.003), and zygomatic bone (P = 0.016) were significantly more common in MSB. The two types did not differ in response to treatment, but MSB was associated with a significantly higher incidence of diabetes insipidus (DI) (P < 0.001). Novel measures are required in preventing the development of DI in MSB-type LCH patients with "risk" bone lesions.

  3. Abducens nerve palsy due to inferior petrosal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Siddiqui, Junaid; Katirji, Bashar

    2017-02-24

    Isolated unilateral abducens nerve palsy is usually due to ischemia, trauma or neoplasm. Dorello's canal is the space between the petrous apex and superolateral portion of the clivus, bound superiorly by Gruber's ligament. The abducens nerve travels with inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) though the Dorello's canal before entering the cavernous sinus. A 31-year-old man presented with neck pain, and binocular horizontal diplopia, worse looking towards left and at distance. He had a history of intravenous drug abuse but no history of hypertension or diabetes. On examination, he had complete left 6th nerve palsy with normal fundi, pupils, and other cranial nerves. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was detected with naïve tricuspid valve endocarditis and multiple septic emboli to lungs with infarcts. His cerebrospinal fluid was normal. MRI of the brain was normal. MRV of head and neck showed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein, left sigmoid sinus and left inferior petrosal sinus with normal cavernous sinus and no evidence of mastoiditis. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics. He was not anticoagulated for fear of pulmonary hemorrhage from pulmonary infarcts. Although cerebral venous sinus thrombosis commonly presents with elevated intracranial pressure, isolated ipsilateral 6th nerve palsy from its compression in Dorello's canal due to thrombosis of the ipsilateral inferior petrosal sinus is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only two patients have been reported with isolated abducens palsy due to IPS thrombosis; one caused by septic emboli and the other developed it during IPS cortisol level sampling.

  4. Endovascular treatment of an infected pseudoaneurysm secondary to retropharyngeal abscess in a child

    PubMed Central

    Diehn, Felix E; Lindsay, Christopher W; Morris, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    We describe a rare case of carotid pseudoaneurysm secondary to a retropharyngeal abscess, treated with coil embolization in a 2-year-old boy. The patient presented to an emergency department with symptoms suggesting meningitis but was subsequently diagnosed with streptococcal pharyngitis. He was discharged home on oral antibiotics after a short hospitalization. He returned to the emergency department two weeks later with limited neck motion and pain. Neck CT demonstrated a retropharyngeal abscess with a large left cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) pseudoaneurysm. The petrous ICA distal to the pseudoaneurysm had thrombosed prior to treatment. The ICA proximal to the pseudoaneurysm was sacrificed with coil embolization. Post-treatment imaging demonstrated complete thrombosis of the pseudoaneurysm but also demonstrated acute strokes in the left MCA/ACA watershed distribution. His parents noted that the patient was clumsier and exhibited some mild speech changes and a steppage gait prior to evaluation in the ED; therefore, these were thought to be secondary to emboli from partial thrombosis of the pseudoaneurysm prior to treatment. The patient was discharged home in good condition and his neurological function improved. PMID:26060279

  5. Dual-Port 2D and 3D Endoscopy: Expanding the Limits of the Endonasal Approaches to Midline Skull Base Lesions with Lateral Extension

    PubMed Central

    Beer-Furlan, Andre; Evins, Alexander I.; Rigante, Luigi; Anichini, Giulio; Stieg, Philip E.; Bernardo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate a novel dual-port endonasal and subtemporal endoscopic approach targeting midline lesions with lateral extension beyond the intracavernous carotid artery anteriorly and the Dorello canal posteriorly. Methods Ten dual-port approaches were performed on five cadaveric heads. All specimens underwent an endoscopic endonasal approach from the sella to middle clivus. The endonasal port was combined with an anterior or posterior endoscopic extradural subtemporal approach. The anterior subtemporal port was placed directly above the middle third of the zygomatic arch, and the posterior port was placed at its posterior root. The extradural space was explored using two-dimensional and three-dimensional endoscopes. Results The anterior subtemporal port complemented the endonasal port with direct access to the Meckel cave, lateral sphenoid sinus, superior orbital fissure, and lateral and posterosuperior compartments of the cavernous sinus; the posterior subtemporal port enhanced access to the petrous apex. Endoscopic dissection and instrument maneuverability were feasible and performed without difficulty in both the anterior and posterior subtemporal ports. Conclusion The anterior and posterior subtemporal ports enhanced exposure and control of the region lateral to the carotid artery and Dorello canal. Dual-port neuroendoscopy is still minimally invasive yet dramatically increases surgical maneuverability while enhancing visualization and control of anatomical structures. PMID:25072012

  6. Microsurgical treatment of tentorial meningiomas: Report of 30 patients

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Tahara, Adriana; de Almeida, Antonio Nogueira; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tentorial meningiomas represent about 5% of intracranial meningiomas. This article reviews our recent institutional series of patients with tentorial meningiomas, proposes a simplified classification and analyzes postoperative evolution, discussing the salient features in the management of these patients. Methods: From 1998 to 2005, 30 patients (22 female and 8 male) with tentorial meningiomas were operated at our institution. Thirteen patients had tumor restricted to the infratentorial space; 12, to the supratentorial space; and in 5 cases, the tumor involved both compartments. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 8 years. A total of 35 surgical procedures were performed in 30 patients, where 26 procedures were performed through a single approach (2, ITSC; 10, RS; 5, SOIH; 5, ST; and 4, TT); and 9, through combined approaches (7, ITSC/ SOIH; and 2, RS/ST). Results: Simpson I resection was achieved in 17 patients. Tumors involving both compartments, involving the petrous sinus, and attached to the torcula limited complete resection. Twenty-two out of 30 patients were able to return to their regular life with no or minimal neurological sequelae. Most frequent complications in our series were shunt dependence, CSF fistulae, diffuse brain injury and visual field defects. Overall, our series revealed 3% mortality and 23% morbidity. Conclusion: Tentorial meningiomas are associated with significant morbidity related to the nervous and vascular structures surrounding the tumor. Partial tumor removal may be necessary in some cases. PMID:20847917

  7. Recent Trends in Neuro-endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke, Cerebral Aneurysms, Carotid Stenosis, and Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    MATSUMARU, Yuji; ISHIKAWA, Eiichi; YAMAMOTO, Tetsuya; MATSUMURA, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers for emergent large vessel occlusion has been proved by randomized trials. Mechanical thrombectomy is increasingly being adopted in Japan since stent retrievers were first approved in 2014. An urgent clinical task is to offer structured systems of care to provide this treatment in a timely fashion to all patients with emergent large vessel occlusion. Treatment with flow-diverting stents is currently a preferred treatment option worldwide for large and giant unruptured aneurysms. Initial studies reported high rates of complete aneurysm occlusion, even in large and giant aneurysms, without delayed aneurysmal recanalization and/or growth. The Pipeline Embolic Device is a flow diverter recently approved in Japan for the treatment of large and giant wide-neck unruptured aneurysms in the internal carotid artery, from the petrous to superior hypophyseal segments. Carotid artery stenting is the preferred treatment approach for carotid stenosis in Japan, whereas it remains an alternative for carotid endarterectomy in Europe and the United States. Carotid artery stenting with embolic protection and plaque imaging is effective in achieving favorable outcomes. The design and conclusions of a randomized trial of unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations (ARUBA) trial, which compared medical management alone and medical management with interventional therapy in patients with an unruptured arteriovenous brain malformation, are controversial. However, the annual bleeding rate (2.2%) of the medical management group obtained from this study is worthy of consideration when deciding treatment strategy. PMID:28458385

  8. [Characteristics and applications of a flat panel computer tomography system].

    PubMed

    Knollmann, F; Valencia, R; Buhk, J-H; Obenauer, S

    2006-09-01

    To assess a new flat panel volume computed tomography (FP-VCT) with very high isotropic spatial resolution as well as high Z-axis coverage. The prototype of an FP-VCT scanner with a detector cell size of 0.2 mm was used for numerous phantom studies, specimen examinations, and animal research projects. The high spatial resolution of the new system can be used to accurately determine solid tumor volume, thus allowing for earlier assessment of the therapeutic response. In animal experimentation, whole-body perfusion mapping of mice is feasible. The high spatial resolution also improves the classification of coronary artery atherosclerotic plaques in the isolated post mortem human heart. With the depiction of intramyocardial segments of the coronary arteries, investigations of myocardial collateral circulation are feasible. In skeletal applications, an accurate analysis of the smallest bony structures, e. g., petrous bone and dental preparations, can be successfully performed, as well as investigations of repetitive studies of fracture healing and the treatment of osteoporosis. The introduction of FP-VCT opens up new applications for CT, including the field of molecular imaging, which are highly attractive for future clinical applications. Present limitations include limited temporal resolution and necessitate further improvement of the system.

  9. What Is Expected of the Facial Nerve in Michel Aplasia? Anatomic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Zarandy, Masoud Motasaddi; Kouhi, Ali; Kashany, Shervin Sharif; Rabiei, Sohrab; Hajimohamadi, Fatemeh; Rabbani-Anari, Mahtab

    2010-01-01

    We sought better understanding about the facial nerve anatomy in the rare inner ear Michel anomaly to help better define this aplasia and prevent potential complications in surgery on these patients. The data from computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance images of six Michel aplastic ears (three patients) were evaluated for a facial nerve course. Facial nerve course and anatomic landmarks were noted. Based on data obtained from this group of very rare patients, three different facial nerve anatomies were encountered. The first patient had normal-looking mastoid cells, normal middle ear ossicles, and a completely formed facial nerve canal through the middle ear. The second patient had pneumatized mastoid air cells despite an anomalous ossicular chain. This patient also had a facial nerve canal but not through the middle ear. In the third patient, although mastoid cells were present, neither ossicles nor a definite facial nerve canal could be detected. With guidance provided by the anatomy of the other parts of the ear, such as air cells and the ossicular chain, the danger zones posing a high probability of facial nerve injury can be predicted. Although all Michel aplasias may have aplastic petrous bone in common, there are some degrees of variation. PMID:21772803

  10. Anterior Petrosectomy: Consecutive Series of 46 Patients with Attention to Approach-Related Complications

    PubMed Central

    Gompel, Jamie J. Van; Alikhani, Puya; Youssef, A. Samy; Loveren, Harry R. van; Boyev, K. Paul; Agazzi, Sivero

    2015-01-01

    Objective Anterior petrosectomy(AP) was popularized in the 1980s and 1990s as micro-neurosurgery proliferated. Original reports concentrated on the anatomy of the approach and small case series. Recently, with the advent of additional endonasal approaches to the petrous apex, the morbidity of AP remains unclear. This report details approach-related morbidity around and under the temporal lobe. Methods A total of 46 consecutive patients identified from our surgical database were reviewed retrospectively. Results Of the 46 patients, 61% were women. Median age of the patients was 50 years (mean: 48 ± 2 years). Median follow-up of this cohort was 66 months. Most procedures dealt with intradural pathology (n = 40 [87%]). Approach-related morbidity consisted of only two patients (4%) with new postoperative seizures. There were only two significant postoperative hemorrhages (4%). Cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in two patients (4%) requiring reoperation. Conclusion Approach-related complications such as seizures and hematoma were infrequent in this series, < 4%. This report describes a contemporary group of patients treated with open AP and should serve as a comparison for approach-related morbidity of endoscopic approaches. Given the pathologies treated with this approach, the morbidity appears acceptable. PMID:26401480

  11. Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Castelnuovo, Paolo; Dallan, Iacopo; Battaglia, Paolo; Bignami, Maurizio

    2010-05-01

    Endoscopic techniques have undergone tremendous advancement in the past years. From the management of phlogistic pathologies, we have learned to manage skull base lesions and even selected intracranial diseases. Current anatomical knowledge plus computer-aided surgery has enabled surgeons to remove large lesions in the paranasal sinuses extending beyond the boundaries of the sinuses themselves. In this sense, management of benign diseases via endoscopic routes is nowadays well accepted whilst the role of endoscopic techniques in sinonasal malignancies is still under investigation. Nowadays, it is possible to tackle different pathologies placed not only in the ventral skull base, but also extended laterally (infratemporal fossa and petrous apex) and even, in really selected cases, within the orbit. The ability to resect and reconstruct has improved significantly. At the moment, the improvement in surgical techniques, like the four-handed technique, has rendered endoscopic procedures capable of managing complex pathologies, according the same surgical principles of the open approaches. From now onwards, frameless neuronavigation, modular approaches, intraoperative imaging systems and robotic surgery are and will be an increasingly important part of endonasal surgery, and they will be overtaken by further evolution.

  12. Time-saving and fail-safe dissection method for vestibulocochlear organs in gross anatomy classes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Konno, Naoaki; Ishizawa, Akimitsu; Kanatsu, Yoshinori; Funakoshi, Kodai; Akashi, Hideo; Zhou, Ming; Abe, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    Because the vestibulocochlear organs are tiny and complex, and are covered by the petrous part of the temporal bone, they are very difficult for medical students to dissect and visualize during gross anatomy classes. Here, we report a time-saving and fail-safe procedure we have devised, using a hand-held hobby router. Nine en bloc temporal bone samples from donated human cadavers were used as trial materials for devising an appropriate procedure for dissecting the vestibulocochlear organs. A hand-held hobby router was used to cut through the temporal bone. After trials, the most time-saving and fail-safe method was selected. The performance of the selected method was assessed by a survey of 242 sides of 121 cadavers during gross anatomy classes for vestibulocochlear dissection. The assessment was based on the observation ratio. The best procedure appeared to be removal of the external acoustic meatus roof and tympanic cavity roof together with removal of the internal acoustic meatus roof. The whole procedure was completed within two dissection classes, each lasting 4.5 hr. The ratio of surveillance for the chorda tympani and three semicircular canals by students was significantly improved during 2013 through 2016. In our dissection class, "removal of the external acoustic meatus roof and tympanic cavity roof together with removal of the internal acoustic meatus roof" was the best procedure for students in the limited time available. Clin. Anat. 30:703-710, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Quantitative analysis of the cochlea using three-dimensional reconstruction based on microcomputed tomographic images.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kang-Jae; Lee, Ju-Young; Kim, Jeong-Nam; Yoo, Ja-Young; Shin, Chuog; Song, Wu-Chul; Koh, Ki-Seok

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide data on various dimensions of the normal cochlea using three-dimensional reconstruction based on high-resolution micro-CT images. The petrous parts of 39 temporal bones were scanned by micro-computed tomography (CT) with a slice thickness of 35 μm. The micro-CT images were used in reconstructing three-dimensional volumes of the bony labyrinth using computer software. The volumes were used to measure 12 dimensions of the cochlea, and statistical analysis was carried out. The dimensions of cochleae varied widely between different specimens. The mean height and length of the cochlea were 3.8 and 9.7 mm, respectively. The angle between the basal and middle turns was slightly larger in males than in females, while none of the other 11 dimensions differed significantly between males and females. The cochlear accessory canals were observed in about half of the cases (51.3%). Correlation analysis among measured items revealed positive correlations among several of the measured dimensions. The present study could investigate the detailed anatomy of the normal cochlea using high-resolution imaging technologies. The results of the present study could be helpful for the precise diagnosis of congenital cochlear malformations and for producing optimized cochlear implants.

  14. Upregulation of Phosphorylated HSP27, PRDX2, GRP75, GRP78 and GRP94 in Acquired Middle Ear Cholesteatoma Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kuen Yao; Yeh, Tai Sheng; Huang, Han Hsiang; Hung, Kuo Feng; Chai, Chee Yin; Chen, Wan Tzu; Tsai, Shih Meng; Chang, Ning Chia; Chien, Chen Yu; Wang, Hsun Mo; Wu, Yu Jen

    2013-01-01

    Cholesteatoma is a destructive and expanding growth of keratinizing squamous epithelium in the middle ear or petrous apex. The molecular and cellular processes of the pathogenesis of acquired middle ear cholesteatoma have not been fully understood. In this study, comparative proteomic analysis was conducted to investigate the roles of specific proteins in the pathways regarding keratinocyte proliferation in cholesteatoma. The differential proteins were detected by comparing the two-dimension electrophoresis (2-DE) maps of the epithelial tissues of 12 attic cholesteatomas with those of retroauricular skins. There were 14 upregulated proteins in the epithelial tissues of cholesteatoma in comparison with retroauricular skin. The modulation of five crucial proteins, HSP27, PRDX2, GRP75, GRP78 and GRP94, was further determined by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Phosphorylation of HSP27 at Ser-82 was identified by mass spectroscopy. The results of this study suggested that phosphorylated HSP27 is the end expression of two potential signal-transduction pathways, and together with PRDX2, they are very likely involved in the proliferation of keratinocytes in cholesteatoma. Upregulations of GRP75, GRP78 and GRP94 in keratinocytes may be able to counter endoplasmic reticulum stress, to inhibit cell apoptosis, to prevent protein unfolding and to promote cholesteatoma growth. PMID:23852020

  15. Coexistence of intracranial epidermoid tumor and multiple cerebral aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Pei-Sen; Lin, Zhang-Ya; Zheng, Shu-Fa; Lin, Yuan-Xiang; Yu, Liang-Hong; Jiang, Chang-Zhen; Kang, De-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: There were a few case reports concerning epidermoid tumor coexisted with multiple cerebral aneurysms. Here, we present one case of coexistence of intracranial epidermoid tumor and multiple cerebral aneurysms and performed a literature review. Patient concerns: A 42 years old male patient was admitted to our institution with complaints of headache and dizziness. Interventions: The radiological examinations showed a hypointense lesion in the right parasellar and petrous apex region and an ipsilateral saccular aneurysm originated from the M2–M3 junction of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and a saccular aneurysm of the clinoid segment of right internal carotid artery (ICA). Interventions: The patients underwent a right frontotemporal approach for removal of the epidermoid tumor and clipping of the MCA aneurysm in one stage. The aneurysm located at the clinoid segment of ICA was invisible and untreated during operation. Outcomes: No postoperative complications were found in the patient. The patient's follow up after 5 years of surgical treatment was uneventful, and the untreated aneurysm remains stable. Lessons: The coexistence of intracranial epidermoid tumor and cerebral aneurysm is a rare event. The secondly inflammation in cerebral arterial wall may be responsible for the aneurysm formation. Surgical treatment of the intracranial epidermoid tumor and cerebral aneurysm repair may be an optimal scheme in one stage. PMID:28151901

  16. Trigeminal Neuralgia Attributable to Intraneural Trigeminocerebellar Artery: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    The trigeminocerebellar artery (TCA) is a branch of the basilar artery supplying both the trigeminal nerve root and the cerebellar hemisphere. Despite its proximity to the trigeminal nerve, only a few cases of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) caused by TCA compression of the trigeminal nerve have been reported. Moreover, TN caused by blood vessel penetration of the trigeminal nerve is very rare. We present a case of an 82-year-old female patient with typical episodes of TN. The radiologic studies showed that the offending artery was a unique branch of the basilar artery originating at a higher level than that of the usual anterior inferior cerebellar artery. During microvascular decompression surgery we were able to identify the offending vessel supplying the trigeminal nerve root and traveling between the sensory and motor root of the trigeminal nerve as an intraneural TCA. To shift the TCA away from the root entry zone, we dissected the epineurium of trigeminal nerve parallel to its axis and anchored the proximal portion of the TCA to the petrous dura. The patient's pain was completely gone immediately after the operation, with no neurologic deficits reported. The TCA is a potential offending vessel in TN because of trigeminal nerve compression, and the longitudinal dissection of the trigeminal nerve to make space between the vessel and the nerve roots may be an effective procedure to relieve TN caused by pressing intraneural vessels. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. IERAPSI project: simulation of a canal wall-up mastoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Neri, E; Sellari Franceschini, S; Berrettini, S; Caramella, D; Bartolozzi, C

    2006-03-01

    Among the various EU research projects concerning the medical application of virtual reality, the project Ist-1999-12175, called IERAPSI (Integrated Environment for the Rehearsal and Planning of Surgical Interventions), specifically addressed the creation of a virtual and interactive surgical field for the temporal bone using three-dimensional images derived from CT data. We report on the experience obtained in the IERAPSI project in simulating a canal wall-up mastoidectomy. A surgeon with extensive experience in surgery of the petrous bone performed the mastoidectomy. The operative field included the mastoid, with its substantial differences in density between the cortex and the pneumatized bone, together with soft tissue structures, both on the border and inside the bone. The simulation is better in the first part of the operation than in the second part, suffering from a lack of haptic feedback from soft tissue and the surgical tool in deeper contexts, and under-representation of the variability inherent in pneumatized bone. This said, the excellent representation of dust production and removal, 3D simulation through color, and very good visual and haptic feedback in the early stage of the procedure are impressive. IERAPSI represents a potential surgical planning theater for the training of students and young surgeons, but is also expected to aid expert surgeons in the preoperative planning of difficult cases.

  18. Fibromyxoma of the Lateral Skull Base in a Child: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Klimo, Paul; Jha, Tushar; Choudhri, Asim F.; Joyner, Royce; Michael, L. Madison

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Fibromyxomas and myxomas are benign tumors of mesenchymal origin usually found outside the nervous system, most commonly in the atrium of the heart. They can also arise in the mandible or maxilla, but it is exceedingly rare to find them within the skull base. The history, histologic features, and the literature, with emphasis on other pediatric cases, are reviewed for this uncommon skull base neoplasm. Methods We describe the case of a 13-year-old girl who presented with a 1-year history of facial weakness, numbness, and hearing loss. A large locally destructive tumor centered in the petrous bone was found on magnetic resonance imaging. Results A mastoidectomy combined with a middle fossa craniotomy was performed for gross total resection. The child is disease free 12 months after surgery. Conclusion Diagnosis could not be made solely on radiographic studies because of the lack of pathognomonic imaging features. Radical resection provided the patient the best chance of cure. Long-term surveillance is necessary to monitor for tumor recurrence. PMID:24303345

  19. Percutaneous inner-ear access via an image-guided industrial robot system.

    PubMed

    Baron, S; Eilers, H; Munske, B; Toennies, J L; Balachandran, R; Labadie, R F; Ortmaier, T; Webster, R J

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided robots have been widely used for bone shaping and percutaneous access to interventional sites. However, due to high-accuracy requirements and proximity to sensitive nerves and brain tissues, the adoption of robots in inner-ear surgery has been slower. In this paper the authors present their recent work towards developing two image-guided industrial robot systems for accessing challenging inner-ear targets. Features of the systems include optical tracking of the robot base and tool relative to the patient and Kalman filter-based data fusion of redundant sensory information (from encoders and optical tracking systems) for enhanced patient safety. The approach enables control of differential robot positions rather than absolute positions, permitting simplified calibration procedures and reducing the reliance of the system on robot calibration in order to ensure overall accuracy. Lastly, the authors present the results of two phantom validation experiments simulating the use of image-guided robots in inner-ear surgeries such as cochlear implantation and petrous apex access.

  20. Anterior Petrosectomy: Consecutive Series of 46 Patients with Attention to Approach-Related Complications.

    PubMed

    Van Gompel, Jamie J; Alikhani, Puya; Youssef, A Samy; Loveren, Harry R van; Boyev, K Paul; Agazzi, Sivero

    2015-09-01

    Objective Anterior petrosectomy(AP) was popularized in the 1980s and 1990s as micro-neurosurgery proliferated. Original reports concentrated on the anatomy of the approach and small case series. Recently, with the advent of additional endonasal approaches to the petrous apex, the morbidity of AP remains unclear. This report details approach-related morbidity around and under the temporal lobe. Methods A total of 46 consecutive patients identified from our surgical database were reviewed retrospectively. Results Of the 46 patients, 61% were women. Median age of the patients was 50 years (mean: 48 ± 2 years). Median follow-up of this cohort was 66 months. Most procedures dealt with intradural pathology (n = 40 [87%]). Approach-related morbidity consisted of only two patients (4%) with new postoperative seizures. There were only two significant postoperative hemorrhages (4%). Cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in two patients (4%) requiring reoperation. Conclusion Approach-related complications such as seizures and hematoma were infrequent in this series, < 4%. This report describes a contemporary group of patients treated with open AP and should serve as a comparison for approach-related morbidity of endoscopic approaches. Given the pathologies treated with this approach, the morbidity appears acceptable.

  1. Quantifying temporal bone morphology of great apes and humans: an approach using geometric morphometrics

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles A; Lynch, John M; Kimbel, William H

    2002-01-01

    The hominid temporal bone offers a complex array of morphology that is linked to several different functional systems. Its frequent preservation in the fossil record gives the temporal bone added significance in the study of human evolution, but its morphology has proven difficult to quantify. In this study we use techniques of 3D geometric morphometrics to quantify differences among humans and great apes and discuss the results in a phylogenetic context. Twenty-three landmarks on the ectocranial surface of the temporal bone provide a high level of anatomical detail. Generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA) is used to register (adjust for position, orientation and scale) landmark data from 405 adults representing Homo, Pan, Gorilla and Pongo. Principal components analysis of residuals from the GPA shows that the major source of variation is between humans and apes. Human characteristics such as a coronally orientated petrous axis, a deep mandibular fossa, a projecting mastoid process, and reduced lateral extension of the tympanic element strongly impact the analysis. In phenetic cluster analyses, gorillas and orangutans group together with respect to chimpanzees, and all apes group together with respect to humans. Thus, the analysis contradicts depictions of African apes as a single morphotype. Gorillas and orangutans lack the extensive preglenoid surface of chimpanzees, and their mastoid processes are less medially inflected. These and other characters shared by gorillas and orangutans are probably primitive for the African hominid clade. PMID:12489757

  2. Anatomy of the murine and human cochlea visualized at the cellular level by synchrotron-radiation-based micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, B.; Lareida, A.; Beckmann, F.; Diakov, G. M.; Kral, F.; Schwarm, F.; Stoffner, R.; Gunkel, A. R.; Glueckert, R.; Schrott-Fischer, A.; Fischer, J.; Andronache, A.; Freysinger, W.

    2006-08-01

    Diseases of the hearing organ and impairment affect a significant fraction of population. Therefore, the hearing organ embedded as a helical structure in the cochlea within the hardest human osseous structure inside the petrous bone is intensively investigated. Currently, studies of the cochlea with true micrometer resolution or better are destructive. Membranes and three-dimensional vessel structures of post-mortem explanted human cochlea were only visualized with limited spatial resolution or deformed anatomical features resulting from preparation artifacts. We have applied a preparation and staining protocol developed for electron microscopy, which allows the visualization and quantification of a great variety of soft-tissue structures including the Reissner's membrane, the tectorial membrane, basilar membrane, modiolus, lamina radialis, and Nuel's space by the use of synchrotron-radiation-based micro computed tomography at the beamline BW 2 (HASYLAB at DESY). The level of detail can be even improved by the application of sophisticated computer vision tools, which enables the extraction of the vascular tree down to the capillaries and of the course of nerve fibers as well as the topology of the osseous lamina radialis, which assembles the nerve fibers from the hair-cells to the ganglia in the center of the cochlea, the modiolus. These non-destructively obtained three-dimensional data are principal for the refined understanding of the hearing process by membranes morphologies and further anatomical features at the cellular level and for teaching purposes in medical curricula.

  3. Surgical Anatomy of the Extended Middle Cranial Fossa Approach

    PubMed Central

    Arìstegui, Miguel; Cokkeser, Yasar; Saleh, Essam; Naguib, Maged; Landolfi, Mauro; Taibah, Abdel; Sanna, Mario

    1994-01-01

    The extended middle cranial fossa approach includes removal of the petrous bone from its subtemporal surface in order to expose widely the internal auditory canal and the posterior fossa dura around its porus while preserving all the important and closely related anatomical structures. We have dissected 25 temporal bones and five fresh cadavers in order to define the limits of this approach. Measurements were obtained between the different structures to find reliable angles and distances that could guide working in this area. A new method of identification of the internal auditory canal is discussed based on the measurements taken. The results of the present work showed wide variations in the different structures. The arcuate eminence was coincident with the superior semicircular canal in only 48% of bones. Dehiscence of the geniculate ganglion and of the internal carotid artery was noted in 16% and 20% of specimens, respectively. The angles measured between the different structures showed great variations. However, the angle between the internal auditory canal and superior petrosal sinus was constant. Though the extended middle cranial fossa is a versatile approach, it affords a limited access to the cerebellopontine angle. A thorough understanding of the complex and variable anatomy of this area is necessary should this approach be utilized. ImagesFigure 1p183-bFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171170

  4. Neurologic Deficits Including Auditory Loss and Recovery of Function in Horses with Temporohyoid Osteoarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Aleman, M; Spriet, M; Williams, D C; Nieto, J E

    2016-01-01

    Auditory loss is a common deficit in horses with temporohyoid osteoarthropathy (THO), however, recovery of function is unknown. To investigate neurologic function with emphasis in audition in horses with THO after treatment. To describe anatomical alterations of the petrous temporal bone that might result in auditory loss. Twenty-four horses with a clinical diagnosis of THO. Prospective study. A brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) study was done as part of the criteria for inclusion in horses with a clinical diagnosis of THO from the years of 2005 to 2014. Physical and neurologic status and BAER findings were recorded. Brainstem auditory evoked response variables were compared by using Wilcoxon sign test. Fisher's exact test was also used. Significance was set at P < 0.05. The most common signs included auditory loss (100% of horses), vestibular and facial nerve dysfunction (83%), and exposure ulcerative keratitis (71%). Concurrent left laryngeal hemiparesis was observed in 61% of horses through endoscopy. Auditory dysfunction was bilateral in 50% of the cases (complete and partial), and unilateral affecting more commonly the right ear (R = 8, L = 4). Short- and long-term follow-up revealed persistent auditory loss in all horses based on abnormal response to sound, and further confirmed through a BAER in 8 horses. Auditory dysfunction appears to be a permanent neurologic deficit in horses diagnosed with THO despite overall neurologic improvement. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Following Translabyrinthine Resection of Cerebellopontine Angle Tumors: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peter M.M.C.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Do, Huy M.; Blevins, Nikolas H.

    2011-01-01

    We describe two cases of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) developing in a delayed fashion after translabyrinthine resection of cerebellopontine angle tumors. Two patients in an academic tertiary referral center, a 46-year-old woman and a 67-year-old man, underwent translabyrinthine resection of a 2-cm left vestibular schwannoma and a 4-cm left petrous meningioma, respectively. Both patients subsequently developed DAVF, and in each case the diagnosis was delayed despite serial imaging follow-up. In one patient, cerebrospinal fluid diversion before DAVF was identified as the cause of her intracranial hypertension; the other patient was essentially asymptomatic but with a high risk of hemorrhage due to progression of cortical venous drainage. Endovascular treatment was effective but required multiple sessions due to residual or recurrent fistulas. Dural arteriovenous fistula is a rare complication of translabyrinthine skull base surgery. Diagnosis requires a high index of clinical suspicion and an understanding of subtle imaging findings that may be present on follow-up studies performed for tumor surveillance. Failure to recognize this complication may lead to misguided interventions for treatment of hydrocephalus and other complications, as well as ongoing risks related to venous hypertension and intracranial hemorrhage. As this condition is generally curable with neurointerventional and/or surgical methods, timely diagnosis and treatment are essential. PMID:23984203

  6. Epidermoid cyst in Meckel's cave with unusual computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Case report.

    PubMed

    Arai, Atsushi; Sasayama, Takashi; Koyama, Junji; Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman presented with headache and occasional numbness over her right face. Computed tomography revealed a hypodense mass in the middle cranial fossa and another adjacent hyperdense mass in the posterior fossa with erosion of the right petrous apex. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the lesion in the middle cranial fossa as iso- to hypointense on T(1)-weighted and hyperintense on T(2)-weighted imaging, with peripheral enhancement after gadolinium administration, and the adjacent lesion in the posterior fossa as hyperintense on T(1)-weighted and hypointense on T(2)-weighted imaging. During surgery, these lesions mimicking two adjacent distinct tumors were revealed to connect through Meckel's cave. The hypodense lesion in the middle cranial fossa consisted of pearly-like solid contents, and the hyperdense lesion in the posterior cranial fossa consisted of viscid dark-green materials. The tumors were gross totally resected with endoscopic assistance. Histological examination confirmed that the tumor was an epidermoid cyst. The present case cyst indicates that although the diffusion-weighted imaging sequence is useful for detection of intracranial epidermoid cysts, epidermoid cysts including viscous materials with unusual radiological findings could complicate the preoperative diagnosis.

  7. The Vidian Canal: Radiological Features in Japanese Population and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    MATO, David; YOKOTA, Hajime; HIRONO, Seiichiro; MARTINO, Juan; SAEKI, Naokatsu

    2015-01-01

    The vidian canal (VC), a bony tunnel in which the vidian artery and nerve pass, has been widely known as an important landmark to identify the anterior genu of the petrous carotid artery (AGPCA) especially during lateral extended endoscopic endonasal approachs (LEEEAs). The objectives of this study in the Japanese population are to describe the radiological anatomic features and relationships between VC and its surrounding structures, and discuss the clinical implications. We studied 231 high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scans with a slice thickness of 0.5 mm. All the patients had known sellar or parasellar pathologies but without any involvement of VC. The following VC-related parameters were examined: its length, relationship to AGPCA, course from the pterygopalatine fossa to the carotid canal, its position relative to the medial pterygoid plate and pneumatization pattern of the sphenoid sinus. Mean length of VC is 14.6 mm. There is more tendency of straight-running VC compared to other populations. VC locates infero-lateral to AGPCA in all the cases. The protrusion of VC and the paraclival carotid artery to the sphenoid sinus, as well as well-pneumatization of the sinus is also observed more frequently in almost a half of the population. Surgeons who perform LEEEAs in Japanese patients must know these anatomical features. The characteristics particular to Japanese populations may facilitate better identification of VC and exposure to AGPCA intraoperatively. PMID:25744352

  8. Rectal carcinoid tumor metastasis to a skull base meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jennifer; Gupta, Amit; Badve, Chaitra; Cohen, Mark L; Wolansky, Leo J

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors that most frequently develop in the gastrointestinal tract or lungs and have high potential for metastasis. Metastasis to the brain is rare, but to another intracranial tumor is extremely rare. Of the intracranial tumors, meningiomas are the most common to host metastases, which may be related to its rich vascularity and E-cadherin expression. We describe the case of a 65-year-old female with active chemotherapy-treated neuroendocrine carcinoma who presented with left-sided facial numbness, headaches, and blurry vision. Initial imaging revealed a 1 cm irregular dural-based left petrous apex mass suggestive of a meningioma that was re-imaged four months later as a rapidly enlarging, extra-axial, mass extending into the cavernous sinus, effacing Meckel’s cave that resembled a trigeminal schwannoma. Pathology revealed a carcinoid tumor metastatic to meningioma. While the mass displayed characteristic imaging findings of a schwannoma, rapid growth in the setting of known active malignancy should prompt the clinician to consider mixed pathology from metastatic disease or a more aggressive meningioma. PMID:26825133

  9. Laser tissue interaction in the porcine otic capsule tissue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Brian J.; Lee, Jon P.; Berns, Michael W.; White, Joel M.; Neev, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    The absence of a hard tissue model reflecting the properties of the inner and middle ear has made it difficult to draw consistent conclusions on the many experimental laser studies in ear surgery. Porcine otic capsule tissue has been studied by our group extensively in a wide variety of laser-tissue interaction studies and is an economically attractive and simple to use hard tissue source. Porcine otic capsule was harvested from the temporal bone of freshly sacrificed domestic pigs via a craniotomy approach. The technique when performed with power instruments takes less than 5 minutes and the entire otic capsule bone is removed intact as the suture line is not fused to the remaining petrous apex. The tissue specimen contains a vestibule, cochlea, oval and round windows, and internal auditory canals which can be used as an intact middle ear/inner ear system. The tissue can also be micromachined into thin slabs of bone varying for 100 - 1000 micrometers in thickness. In order to quantify more precisely the laser-tissue interactions in otic capsule, optical properties (absorption and scattering) and physical properties were determined (acoustic impedance). The tissue has been used in a wide variety of basic studies investigating the laser-tissue interactions with argon, KTP, (Nd:YAG), carbon dioxide, Ho:YAG, Er:YAG, and XeCl lasers. Porcine otic capsule is an ideal tissue on which standardized test can be performed to compare the relative effects of various laser in otosurgical models.

  10. Ardipithecus ramidus and the evolution of the human cranial base

    PubMed Central

    Kimbel, William H.; Suwa, Gen; Asfaw, Berhane; Rak, Yoel; White, Tim D.

    2014-01-01

    The early Pliocene African hominoid Ardipithecus ramidus was diagnosed as a having a unique phylogenetic relationship with the Australopithecus + Homo clade based on nonhoning canine teeth, a foreshortened cranial base, and postcranial characters related to facultative bipedality. However, pedal and pelvic traits indicating substantial arboreality have raised arguments that this taxon may instead be an example of parallel evolution of human-like traits among apes around the time of the chimpanzee–human split. Here we investigated the basicranial morphology of Ar. ramidus for additional clues to its phylogenetic position with reference to African apes, humans, and Australopithecus. Besides a relatively anterior foramen magnum, humans differ from apes in the lateral shift of the carotid foramina, mediolateral abbreviation of the lateral tympanic, and a shortened, trapezoidal basioccipital element. These traits reflect a relative broadening of the central basicranium, a derived condition associated with changes in tympanic shape and the extent of its contact with the petrous. Ar. ramidus shares with Australopithecus each of these human-like modifications. We used the preserved morphology of ARA-VP 1/500 to estimate the missing basicranial length, drawing on consistent proportional relationships in apes and humans. Ar. ramidus is confirmed to have a relatively short basicranium, as in Australopithecus and Homo. Reorganization of the central cranial base is among the earliest morphological markers of the Ardipithecus + Australopithecus + Homo clade. PMID:24395771

  11. Rerouting of the intratemporal facial nerve: an analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, S H; Abraham, M T; Carew, J F

    1996-09-01

    Anterior rerouting of the intratemporal facial nerve in the infratemporal fossa approach is employed to access to the jugular bulb, hypotympanum, and lateral skull base, whereas posterior rerouting of the facial nerve, as employed in the transcochlear craniotomy, is most frequently used for surgery of the posterior fossa, cerebellopontine angle, prepontine region, and petrous apex. Facial nerve rerouting may lead to facial paresis or paralysis. This review of the literature is intended to define the physiologic "cost" of these procedures, so that the neurotologic surgeon can determine if the morbidity incurred in these techniques is worth the resultant exposure. Inconsistencies in reporting facial function places into question the validity of some of the cumulative data reported. Postoperatively, grades I-II facial nerve function was seen in 91% of patients undergoing short anterior rerouting, 74% of patients undergoing long anterior rerouting, and 26% of patients undergoing posterior complete rerouting. Although facial nerve rerouting allows unhindered exposure to previously inaccessible regions, it is achieved at the cost of facial nerve function. Facial nerve dysfunction increases with the length of facial nerve rerouted.

  12. Survival and Recurrence for Patients Undergoing Surgery of Skull Base Intracranial Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Chaichana, Kaisorn L.; Flores, Mariana; Acharya, Shami; Sampognaro, Paul; Bettegowda, Chetan; Rigamonti, Daniele; Weingart, Jon D.; Olivi, Alessandro; Gallia, Gary L.; Brem, Henry; Lim, Michael; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Skull base metastases (SBMs) are rare lesions in close proximity to critical neural and vasculature structures. This rarity and complexity have led many to only offer nonsurgical therapies. The surgical outcomes for patients with SBM therefore remain unknown. Design Retrospective, comparison analyses. Setting Johns Hopkins Hospital. Participants All patients who underwent intracranial metastatic tumor surgery. Main Outcome Measure Survival and recurrence. Results Of the 708 patients who underwent intracranial metastatic tumor surgery, 29 (4%) had SBM: 3 (10%) involved the anterior skull base, 7 (24%) the sella, 6 (21%) the orbit, 2 (7%) the sphenoid wing, 3 (10%) the clivus, 4 (14%) the petrous bone, and 4 (14%) the paranasal sinuses. Following surgery, 6 (50%) had improvements in vision and 14 (88%) had improvement and/or maintenance of their cranial nerve symptoms. Three (10%), 0(0%), and 1(3%) developed a new motor, language, and vision deficit, respectively. There were no differences in median survival (10.0 versus 9.2 months, p = 0.48) and local progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.52), but there was improved distal PFS (p = 0.04) between patients with and without SBM. Conclusions Patients with SBM are relatively rare. These patients can tolerate surgery with minimal morbidity and mortality, and they have similar prognoses to patients without SBM. PMID:24436917

  13. Severe skull base osteomyelitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with successful outcome after prolonged outpatient therapy with continuous infusion of ceftazidime and oral ciprofloxacin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Conde-Díaz, Cristina; Llenas-García, Jara; Parra Grande, Mónica; Terol Esclapez, Gertrudis; Masiá, Mar; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2017-02-21

    Skull base osteomyelitis is an uncommon disease that usually complicates a malignant external otitis with temporal bone involvement. It affects predominantly diabetic and immunocompromised males and has a high mortality rate. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common causative organism. Currently, there is no consensus about the best therapeutic option. Here we describe a case of severe skull base osteomyelitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with progressive palsy of cranial nerves that was successfully managed with prolonged outpatient continuous infusion of ceftazidime plus oral ciprofloxacin. A 69-year-old Caucasian man presented with dysphagia, headache, and weight loss. He complained of left earache and purulent otorrhea. Over the following weeks he developed progressive palsy of IX, X, VI, and XII cranial nerves and papilledema. A petrous bone computed tomography scan showed a mass in the left jugular foramen with a strong lytic component that expanded to the cavum. A biopsy was then performed and microbiological cultures grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After 6 weeks of parenteral antibiotic treatment, our patient was discharged and treatment was continued with a domiciliary continuous infusion of a beta-lactam through a peripherally inserted central catheter, along with an oral fluoroquinolone for 10 months. Both radiological and clinical responses were excellent. Skull base osteomyelitis is a life-threating condition; clinical suspicion and correct microbiological identification are key to achieve an accurate and timely diagnosis. Due to the poor outcome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa skull base osteomyelitis, prolonged outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy administered by continuous infusion could be a valuable option for these patients.

  14. Dangerous extracranial-intracranial anastomoses and supply to the cranial nerves: vessels the neurointerventionalist needs to know.

    PubMed

    Geibprasert, S; Pongpech, S; Armstrong, D; Krings, T

    2009-09-01

    Transarterial embolization in the external carotid artery (ECA) territory has a major role in the endovascular management of epistaxis, skull base tumors, and dural arteriovenous fistulas. Knowledge of the potential anastomotic routes, identification of the cranial nerve supply from the ECA, and the proper choice of embolic material are crucial to help the interventionalist avoid neurologic complications during the procedure. Three regions along the skull base constitute potential anastomotic routes between the extracranial and intracranial arteries: the orbital, the petrocavernous, and the upper cervical regions. Branches of the internal maxillary artery have anastomoses with the ophthalmic artery and petrocavernous internal carotid artery (ICA), whereas the branches of the ascending pharyngeal artery are connected to the petrocavernous ICA. Branches of both the ascending pharyngeal artery and the occipital artery have anastomoses with the vertebral artery. To avoid cranial nerve palsy, one must have knowledge of the supply to the lower cranial nerves: The petrous branch of the middle meningeal artery and the stylomastoid branch of the posterior auricular artery form the facial arcade as the major supply to the facial nerve, and the neuromeningeal trunk of the ascending pharyngeal artery supplies the lower cranial nerves (CN IX-XII).

  15. Schwannoma originating from lower cranial nerves: report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Noda, Tomoyuki; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    Four cases of schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves are presented. Case 1 is a schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the parapharyngeal space. The operation was performed by the transcervical approach. Although the tumor capsule was not dissected from the vagus nerve, hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Case 2 is a schwannoma in the jugular foramen. The operation was performed by the infralabyrinthine approach. Although only the intracapsular tumor was enucleated, facial palsy, hoarseness, dysphagia and paresis of the deltoid muscle occurred transiently after the operation. The patient's hearing had also slightly deteriorated. Case 3 is a dumbbell-typed schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal canal was markedly enlarged by the tumor. As the hypoglossal nerves were embedded in the tumor, the tumor around the hypoglossal nerves was not resected. The tumor was significantly enlarged for a while after stereotactic irradiation. Case 4 is an intracranial cystic schwannoma originating from the IXth or Xth cranial nerves. The tumor was resected through the cerebello-medullary fissure. The tumor capsule attached to the brain stem was not removed. Hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Cranial nerve palsy readily occurs after the removal of the schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves. Mechanical injury caused by retraction, extension and compression of the nerve and heat injury during the drilling of the petrous bone should be cautiously avoided.

  16. Changes of Root Length and Root-to-Crown Ratio after Apical Surgery: An Analysis by Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Thomas; Jensen, Simon S; Bornstein, Michael M

    2015-09-01

    Apical surgery is an important treatment option for teeth with post-treatment periodontitis. Although apical surgery involves root-end resection, no morphometric data are yet available about root-end resection and its impact on the root-to-crown ratio (RCR). The present study assessed the length of apicectomy and calculated the loss of root length and changes of RCR after apical surgery. In a prospective clinical study, cone-beam computed tomography scans were taken preoperatively and postoperatively. From these images, the crown and root lengths of 61 roots (54 teeth in 47 patients) were measured before and after apical surgery. Data were collected relative to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) as well as to the crestal bone level (CBL). One observer took all measurements twice (to calculate the intraobserver variability), and the means were used for further analysis. The following parameters were assessed for all treated teeth as well as for specific tooth groups: length of root-end resection and percentage change of root length, preoperative and postoperative RCRs, and percentage change of RCR after apical surgery. The mean length of root-end resection was 3.58 ± 1.43 mm (relative to the CBL). This amounted to a loss of 33.2% of clinical and 26% of anatomic root length. There was an overall significant difference between the tooth groups (P < .05). There was also a statistically significant difference comparing mandibular and maxillary teeth (P < .05), but not for incisors/canines versus premolars/molars (P = .125). The mean preoperative and postoperative RCRs (relative to CEJ) were 1.83 and 1.35, respectively (P < .001). With regard to the CBL reference, the mean preoperative and postoperative RCRs were 1.08 and 0.71 (CBL), respectively (P < .001). The calculated changes of RCR after apical surgery were 24.8% relative to CEJ and 33.3% relative to CBL (P < .001). Across the different tooth groups, the mean RCR was not significantly different (P = .244 for

  17. Endodontic surgery prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Azarpazhooh, Amir; Shah, Prakesh S

    2011-01-01

    Medline, (PubMed) and the Cochrane databases together with hand searching of the following journals: Journal of Endodontics, International Endodontic Journal, Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology (name changed to Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontics in 1995), Endodontics and Dental Traumatology (name changed to Dental Traumatology in 2001), Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Clinical studies evaluating apical surgery with placement of a root-end filling were included. Studies on apical surgery with orthograde root canal filling or about apicectomy alone without root-end filling were excluded, as were experimental and animal studies. Only studies with ≥ ten patients with a minimum six month follow-up period and clearly defined radiographic and clinical healing criteria, with healing reported for at least two categories of a specific prognostic factor were accepted. Studies reporting in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Scandinavian languages were included. All studies were assessed separately by two of the three authors, with disagreements resolved by discussion. Prognostic factors were divided into patient related, tooth-related or treatment-related factors. The reported percentages of healed teeth were pooled per category. The statistical method of Mantel-Haenszel was applied to estimate the odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. Homogeneity was assessed using Woolf's test. With regard to tooth-related factors, the following were identified as predictors of healing: absence of preoperative pain or signs, good density of the root canal filling and a periapical lesion size of ≤ 5 mm. With regard to treatment-related factors, teeth treated with the use of an endoscope tended to have higher healed rates than teeth treated without the use of an endoscope. Although the clinician may be able to control treatment

  18. [Skull vibration induced nystagmus test].

    PubMed

    Dumas, G; De Waele, C; Hamann, K F; Cohen, B; Negrevergne, M; Ulmer, E; Schmerber, S

    2007-09-01

    To establish during a consensus meeting the fundamental basis, the validity criteria, the main indications and results of the skull vibration induced nystagmus test (SVINT) which explores the vestibule high frequencies. The SVINT is applied on the mastoid process (right and left sides) at 100 Hz during 10 seconds on a sitting upright subject. Total unilateral peripheral lesions (tUVL: operated vestibular shwannomas, vestibular neurectomies) and partial unilateral peripheral lesions (pUVL: preoperative neuromas, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuritis, chemical labyrinthectomies) were studied. Thirty-six patients had brainstem lesions and 173 normal subjects were used as controls. The SVINT is considered positive when the application of the vibrator produces a reproducible sustained nystagmus always beating in the same direction following several trials in various stimulation topographies (on the right and left mastoid). The skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) begins and ends with the stimulation; the direction of the nystagmus has no secondary reversal. The slow phase velocity (SPV) is>2 degrees /second. In tUVL the SVINT always reveals a lesional nystagmus beating toward the safe side at all frequencies. The mean SVN SPV is 10.8 degrees /s+/-7.5 SD (N=45). The mastoid site was more efficient than the cervical or vertex sites. Mastoïd stimulation efficiency is not correlated with the side of stimulation. The SVN SPV is correlated with the total caloric efficiency on the healthy ear. In pUVL the SVINT is positive in 71 to 76% of cases; the mean SVN. SPV (6.7 degrees /s+/-4.7 SD)(N=30) is significantly lower than in tUVL (P=0.0004). SVINT is positive in 6 to 10% of the normal population, 31% of brain stem lesions and negative in total bilateral vestibular peripheral lesions. SVINT is an effective, rapid and non invasive test used to detect vestibular asymmetry between 20 to 150 Hz stimulation. This test used in important cohorts of patients during the ten last years has

  19. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. I. Normal responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.; Lasker, D. M.; Backous, D. D.; Hullar, T. E.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in five squirrel monkeys with intact vestibular function. The VOR evoked by steps of acceleration in darkness (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) began after a latency of 7.3 +/- 1.5 ms (mean +/- SD). Gain of the reflex during the acceleration was 14.2 +/- 5.2% greater than that measured once the plateau head velocity had been reached. A polynomial regression was used to analyze the trajectory of the responses to steps of acceleration. A better representation of the data was obtained from a polynomial that included a cubic term in contrast to an exclusively linear fit. For sinusoidal rotations of 0.5-15 Hz with a peak velocity of 20 degrees /s, the VOR gain measured 0.83 +/- 0.06 and did not vary across frequencies or animals. The phase of these responses was close to compensatory except at 15 Hz where a lag of 5.0 +/- 0.9 degrees was noted. The VOR gain did not vary with head velocity at 0.5 Hz but increased with velocity for rotations at frequencies of >/=4 Hz (0. 85 +/- 0.04 at 4 Hz, 20 degrees /s; 1.01 +/- 0.05 at 100 degrees /s, P < 0.0001). No responses to these rotations were noted in two animals that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy indicating that inertia of the eye had a negligible effect for these stimuli. We developed a mathematical model of VOR dynamics to account for these findings. The inputs to the reflex come from linear and nonlinear pathways. The linear pathway is responsible for the constant gain across frequencies at peak head velocity of 20 degrees /s and also for the phase lag at higher frequencies being less than that expected based on the reflex delay. The frequency- and velocity-dependent nonlinearity in VOR gain is accounted for by the dynamics of the nonlinear pathway. A transfer function that increases the gain of this pathway with frequency and a term related to the third power of head

  20. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. I. Normal responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.; Lasker, D. M.; Backous, D. D.; Hullar, T. E.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in five squirrel monkeys with intact vestibular function. The VOR evoked by steps of acceleration in darkness (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) began after a latency of 7.3 +/- 1.5 ms (mean +/- SD). Gain of the reflex during the acceleration was 14.2 +/- 5.2% greater than that measured once the plateau head velocity had been reached. A polynomial regression was used to analyze the trajectory of the responses to steps of acceleration. A better representation of the data was obtained from a polynomial that included a cubic term in contrast to an exclusively linear fit. For sinusoidal rotations of 0.5-15 Hz with a peak velocity of 20 degrees /s, the VOR gain measured 0.83 +/- 0.06 and did not vary across frequencies or animals. The phase of these responses was close to compensatory except at 15 Hz where a lag of 5.0 +/- 0.9 degrees was noted. The VOR gain did not vary with head velocity at 0.5 Hz but increased with velocity for rotations at frequencies of >/=4 Hz (0. 85 +/- 0.04 at 4 Hz, 20 degrees /s; 1.01 +/- 0.05 at 100 degrees /s, P < 0.0001). No responses to these rotations were noted in two animals that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy indicating that inertia of the eye had a negligible effect for these stimuli. We developed a mathematical model of VOR dynamics to account for these findings. The inputs to the reflex come from linear and nonlinear pathways. The linear pathway is responsible for the constant gain across frequencies at peak head velocity of 20 degrees /s and also for the phase lag at higher frequencies being less than that expected based on the reflex delay. The frequency- and velocity-dependent nonlinearity in VOR gain is accounted for by the dynamics of the nonlinear pathway. A transfer function that increases the gain of this pathway with frequency and a term related to the third power of head

  1. Changes in TNFα, NFκB and MnSOD protein in the vestibular nuclei after unilateral vestibular deafferentation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Unilateral vestibular deafferentation results in strong microglial and astroglial activation in the vestibular nuclei (VN) that could be due to an inflammatory response. This study was aimed at determining if markers of inflammation are upregulated in the VN after chemical unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) in the rat, and if the inflammatory response, if any, induces the expression of neuroprotective factors that could promote the plasticity mechanisms involved in the vestibular compensation process. The expressions of inflammatory and neuroprotective factors after chemical or mechanical UL were also compared to verify that the inflammatory response was not due to the toxicity of sodium arsanilate. Methods Immunohistological investigations combined the labeling of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), as a marker of the VN inflammatory response, and of nuclear transcription factor κB (NFκB) and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), as markers of neuroprotection that could be expressed in the VN because of inflammation. Immunoreactivity (Ir) of the VN cells was quantified in the VN complex of rats. Behavioral investigations were performed to assess the functional recovery process, including both static (support surface) and dynamic (air-righting and landing reflexes) postural tests. Results Chemical UL (arsanilate transtympanic injection) induced a significant increase in the number of TNFα-Ir cells in the medial and inferior VN on both sides. These changes were detectable as early as 4 h after vestibular lesion, persisted at 1 day, and regained nearly normal values at 3 days. The early increase in TNFα expression was followed by a slightly delayed upregulation of NFκB 8 h after chemical UL, peaking at 1 day, and regaining control values 3 days later. By contrast, upregulation of MnSOD was more strongly delayed (1 day), with a peak at 3 days, and a return to control values at 15 days. Similar changes of TNFα, NFκB, and MnSOD expression were found in

  2. Comparison of virtual monoenergetic and polyenergetic images reconstructed from dual-layer detector CT angiography of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Victor; Große Hokamp, Nils; Abdullayev, Nuran; Maus, Volker; Kabbasch, Christoph; Mpotsaris, Anastasios; Maintz, David; Borggrefe, Jan

    2017-10-10

    To compare the image quality of virtual monoenergetic images and polyenergetic images reconstructed from dual-layer detector CT angiography (DLCTA). Thirty patients who underwent DLCTA of the head and neck were retrospectively identified and polyenergetic as well as virtual monoenergetic images (40 to 120 keV) were reconstructed. Signals (± SD) of the cervical and cerebral vessels as well as lateral pterygoid muscle and the air surrounding the head were measured to calculate the CNR and SNR. In addition, subjective image quality was assessed using a 5-point Likert scale. Student's t-test and Wilcoxon test were used to determine statistical significance. Compared to polyenergetic images, although noise increased with lower keV, CNR (p < 0.02) and SNR (p > 0.05) of the cervical, petrous and intracranial vessels were improved in virtual monoenergetic images at 40 keV and virtual monoenergetic images at 45 keV were also rated superior regarding vascular contrast, assessment of arteries close to the skull base and small arterial branches (p < 0.0001 each). Compared to polyenergetic images, virtual monoenergetic images reconstructed from DLCTA at low keV ranging from 40 to 45 keV improve the objective and subjective image quality of extra- and intracranial vessels and facilitate assessment of vessels close to the skull base and of small arterial branches. • Virtual monoenergetic images greatly improve attenuation, while noise only slightly increases. • Virtual monoenergetic images show superior contrast-to-noise ratios compared to polyenergetic images. • Virtual monoenergetic images significantly improve image quality at low keV.

  3. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting for severe stenosis of the intracranial extradural internal carotid artery causing transient ischemic attack or minor stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Choi, Chang Hwa; Cha, Seung Heon; Choi, Byung Kwan; Cho, Won Ho; Kang, Tae Ho; Sung, Sang Min; Cho, Han Jin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) for symptomatic stenosis of the intracranial extradural (petrous and cavernous) internal carotid artery (ICA). Review of medical records identified 26 consecutive patients who underwent PTAS using a balloon-expandable coronary stent (n = 15, 57.7%) or a Wingspan self-expandable stent (n = 11, 42.3%) for treatment of severe stenosis (>70%) involving the intracranial extradural ICA. The inclusion criteria were transient ischemic attack with an ABCD2 score of ≥3 (n = 12, 46.2%) or minor stroke with an NIHSS score of ≤4 (n = 14, 53.8%). Technical success rates, complications, and angiographic and clinical outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. PTAS was technically successful in all patients. The mean stenosis ratio decreased from 77.1% to 10.0% immediately after PTAS. The overall incidence of procedural complications was 23.1%, and the postoperative permanent morbidity/mortality rate was 7.7%. A total of 22 patients were tracked over an average period of 29.9 months. During the observation period, 20 patients (90.9%) had no further cerebrovascular events and stroke recurrence occurred in two patients (9.1%), resulting in an annual stroke risk of 3.7%. Two cases (11.1%) of significant in-stent restenosis (>50%) were found on follow-up angiography (n = 18). PTAS for severe stenosis (>70%) involving the intracranial extradural ICA showed a good technical feasibility and favorable clinical outcome in patients with transient ischemic attack or minor stroke. PMID:26063697

  4. CT Scan of Thirteen Natural Mummies Dating Back to the XVI-XVIII Centuries: An Emerging Tool to Investigate Living Conditions and Diseases in History

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Enrico; Piciucchi, Sara; Feletti, Francesco; Barone, Domenico; Piraccini, Antonella; Minghetti, Caterina; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Poletti, Venerino; Bertocco, Mauro; Traversari, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To correlate the radiologic findings detected with computed tomography scan with anthropological data in 13 naturally mummified bodies discovered during works of recovery of an ancient church in a crypt in Roccapelago, in the Italian Apennines. Methods From a group of about sixty not-intentionally mummified bodies, thirteen were selected to be investigated with volumetric computed tomography (CT). Once CT scan was performed, axial images were processed to gather MPR and Volume Rendering reconstructions. Elaborations of these images provided anthropometric measurements and a non-invasive analysis of the residual anatomical structures. For each body the grade of preservation and the eventual pathological changes were recorded. Furthermore, in order to identify nutritional and occupational markers, radiologic signs of bone tropism and degenerative changes were analysed and graded. Results Mummies included seven females and six males, with an estimated age ranging from 20 to 60 years. The first relevant finding identified was a general low grade of preservation, due to the lack of anatomic tissues different from bones, tendons and dehydrated skin. The low grade of preservation was related to the natural process of mummification. Analysing bone degenerative changes on CT scan, the majority of the bodies had significant occupational markers consisting of arthritis in the spine, lower limbs and shoulders even in young age. Few were the pathological findings identified. Among these, the most relevant included a severe bilateral congenital hip dysplasia and a wide osteolytic lesion involving left orbit and petrous bone that was likely the cause of death. Conclusions Although the low grade of preservation of these mummies, the multidisciplinary approach of anthropologists and radiologists allowed several important advances in knowledge for the epidemiology of Roccapelago. First of all, a profile of living conditions was delineated. It included occupational and

  5. Transarterial Onyx embolization of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chao-Bao; Chang, Feng-Chi; Mu-Huo Teng, Michael; Lin, Chung-Jung; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2014-04-01

    Transarterial embolization of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) is usually associated with inadequate embolization. The purpose of this study was to report our experience of transarterial Onyx embolization of intracranial DAVFs with an emphasis on treatment outcome with this new embolic agent in different types of DAVFs. In the past 3 years, a total of 14 intracranial DAVFs have been treated by transarterial Onyx embolization. Among these, there were nine males and five females, aged from 30 years to 82 years (mean = 62 years). We retrospectively analyzed the injection volume and time of Onyx embolization as well as outcomes in different types of DAVFs. The locations of the DAVFs were sigmoid sinus (n = 6), tentorium (n = 3), sinus confluence (n = 2), transverse-sigmoid sinus (n = 1), sigmoid sinus-jugular bulb (n = 1) and the superior petrous sinus (n = 1). The mean volume and time of Onyx injection were 3.4 mL and 28 minutes, respectively (Cognard type I: 4.9 mL, 40 minutes; type II: 4.5 mL, 34 minutes; type III: 2.2 mL, 21 minutes; type IV: 2 mL, 22 minutes). Total fistula occlusion was achieved in six out of seven patients of type III and type IV DAVFs, and in four out of seven patients of type I and type II DAVFs. Nine patients had total resolution of their symptoms, whereas partial regression occurred in five patients. No significant periprocedural complication was found. Mean clinical follow-up period was 16 months. Transarterial Onyx embolization of intracranial DAVFs is safe and effective. This technique is particularly useful in type III and type IV DAVFs with a high cure rate, and lower volume of Onyx as well as a short injection time. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Carotid and cranial nerve reconstruction after removal of cavernous sinus lesions.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, L N; Sen, C N; Lanzino, G; Pomonis, S

    1991-12-01

    During the last 7 years, approximately 170 neoplasms, and 35 vascular lesions involving the cavernous sinus were treated by the first two authors. During the treatment of such lesions, the direct vein graft reconstruction of the internal carotid artery from the petrous to the supraclinoid or infraclinoid ICA was performed in 23 patients. Graft occlusion occurred in 3 patients and in one of these, it was successfully salvaged by placing a long venous graft from the extracranial ICA to the M3 segment of the middle cerebral artery. The latter 3 patients were neurologically normal. One patient with significant atherosclerotic disease suffered the dissection of the distal internal carotid artery with the graft being patent. The suturing technique. This patient eventually died. Two patients with severely compromised collateral circulation suffered minor strokes due to the temporary occlusion of the ICA. This has been avoided in the more recent patients by the adoption of brain protection techniques such as moderate hypothermia, induced hypertension, and barbiturate coma. Low dose heparin therapy during grafting and high dose intravenous steroids prior to the grafting also appear to be beneficial. Direct vein graft reconstruction of the intracavernous carotid artery is a valuable tool during the management of cavernous sinus lesions. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique as well as the pros and cons of other revascularization techniques will be discussed. During microsurgical removal of cavernous sinus lesions, the cranial nerves III-VI were reconstructed by direct resuture or by nerve grafting in 16 patients. In the majority of these patients, recovery of cranial nerve function was observed, which was very encouraging.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for atherosclerotic stenosis of the intracranial cerebral arteries. initial results and long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, A; Kato, N; Nakai, Y; Anno, I; Sato, H; Okazaki, M; Matsumaru, Y; Nose, T

    1999-11-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was carried out 52 times for 49 lesions in 47 cases of atheroscrelotic stenosis of the intracranial or skull base cerebral arteries. The stenotic lesions involved the middle cerebral artery in 21 cases, the basilar artery in eight cases, the internal carotid artery (petrous-supraclinoid portion) in 15 cases, and the intracranial vertebral artery in five cases. Nearly all cases were symptomatic, such as TIA or stroke, and the degree of stenosis ranged from 70 to 99 percent, with a mean of 80 percent. PTA was performed using a STEALTH balloon angioplasty catheter. In these trials, PTA was successfully performed (as indicated by a residual stenosis under 50%) 41 times. The initial success rate was 79% and stenosis was reduced from 80% to 25%. Clinical follow-up was performed from 7 to 84 months with a mean of 44 months. During this period, death due to myocardial infarction or pneumonia occurred in five cases, stroke related to previous PTA occurred ih one case (due to re-stenosis) and stroke unrelated tl? previous PTA occurred in two cases. Angiographic follow-up was performed in 31 cases after 41 successful PTA procedures. Re-stenosis was seen in 20% of the cases, symptomrltic complications occurred in 6%, and asymptomatic complications occurred in 6% of the cases. One case suffered severe subarachnoid hemorrhage just after the PTA due to preexisting aneurysm rupture and he died a week after the PTA. So mortality in this series was 2%. From the results described here, we may conclude that PTA of the intracranial or skull base cerebral artery is technically feasible, and it can be performed with relatively low risk. From our results, it may be a useful method and effective for long-term survival of patients. But results from a larger number of patients and more long-term follow-up data are still necessary in order to evaluate the safety and usefulness of this method.

  8. Operative management of tumors involving the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, L N; Møller, A R

    1986-06-01

    In the past, neurosurgeons have been reluctant to operate on tumors involving the cavernous sinus because of the possibility of bleeding from the venous plexus or injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) or the third, fourth, or sixth cranial nerves. The authors describe techniques for a more aggressive surgical approach to neoplasms in this area that are either benign or locally confined malignant lesions. During the last 2 years, seven tumors involving the cavernous sinus have been resected: six totally and one subtotally. The preoperative evaluation included axial and coronal computerized tomography, cerebral angiography, and a balloon-occlusion test of the ICA. Intraoperative monitoring of the third, fourth, sixth, and seventh cranial nerves was used to assist in locating the nerves and in avoiding injury to them. The first major step in the operative procedure was to obtain proximal control of the ICA at the petrous apex and distal control in the supraclinoid segment. The cavernous sinus was then opened by a lateral, superior, or inferior approach for tumor resection. Temporary clipping and suture of the ICA was necessary in one patient. None of the patients died or suffered a stroke postoperatively. Permanent trigeminal nerve injury occurred in three patients; in two, this was the result of tumor invasion. One patient suffered temporary paralysis of the third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerves, and in another the sixth cranial nerve was temporarily paralyzed. Preoperative cranial nerve deficits were improved postoperatively in three patients. Radiation therapy was administered postoperatively to four patients. These seven patients have been followed for 6 to 18 months to date and none has shown evidence of recurrence of the intracavernous tumor.

  9. Radiation dose analysis of large and giant internal carotid artery aneurysm treatment with the pipeline embolization device versus traditional coiling techniques.

    PubMed

    Colby, Geoffrey P; Lin, Li-Mei; Nundkumar, Neelesh; Jiang, Bowen; Huang, Judy; Tamargo, Rafael J; Coon, Alexander L

    2015-05-01

    Flow diversion is an effective and increasingly accepted method for endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Additionally, the public has heightened concerns regarding radiation exposure from medical procedures. This study analyzes radiation dose and fluoroscopy time during treatment of large and giant proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms with the pipeline embolization device (PED) versus traditional coiling techniques. Radiation dose, fluoroscopy time, and contrast dye administration were retrospectively analyzed in 55 patients undergoing endovascular treatment of aneurysms ≥ 10 mm from petrous to superior hypophyseal ICA segments. Patients were treated by either PED (37 patients) or traditional coiling techniques (18 patients). Aortic arch type and proximal ICA tortuosity were also assessed as markers of access difficulty. Average radiation dose with PED treatment was 2840 ± 213 mGy and 4010 ± 708 mGy with traditional coiling techniques (p=0.048; 29% decrease with PED). Mean fluoroscopy time for PED was 56.1 ± 5.0 min and 85.9 ± 11.9 min for coiling cases (p=0.0087; 35% decrease with PED). These benefits existed despite more difficult arch anatomy and a trend towards greater proximal vessel tortuosity in PED cases. Contrast dye amounts were also reduced by 37.5% in PED cases (75 ± 6 mL) versus coiling cases (120 ± 13 mL, p=0.0008). Treatment of large and giant proximal ICA aneurysms using PED requires less radiation, less fluoroscopy time, and less contrast administration than standard coiling techniques. This further demonstrates the benefits of flow diversion for treatment of these aneurysms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Degradation of the Bragg peak due to inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Urie, M; Goitein, M; Holley, W R; Chen, G T

    1986-01-01

    The rapid fall-off of dose at the end of range of heavy charged particle beams has the potential in therapeutic applications of sparing critical structures just distal to the target volume. Here we explored the effects of highly inhomogeneous regions on this desirable depth-dose characteristic. The proton depth-dose distribution behind a lucite-air interface parallel to the beam was bimodal, indicating the presence of two groups of protons with different residual ranges, creating a step-like depth-dose distribution at the end of range. The residual ranges became more spread out as the interface was angled at 3 degrees, and still more at 6 degrees, to the direction of the beam. A second experiment showed little significant effect on the distal depth-dose of protons having passed through a mosaic of teflon and lucite. Anatomic studies demonstrated significant effects of complex fine inhomogeneities on the end of range characteristics. Monoenergetic protons passing through the petrous ridges and mastoid air cells in the base of skull showed a dramatic degradation of the distal Bragg peak. In beams with spread out Bragg peaks passing through regions of the base of skull, the distal fall-off from 90 to 20% dose was increased from its nominal 6 to well over 32 mm. Heavy ions showed a corresponding degradation in their ends of range. In the worst case in the base of skull region, a monoenergetic neon beam showed a broadening of the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak to over 15 mm (compared with 4 mm in a homogeneous unit density medium). A similar effect was found with carbon ions in the abdomen, where the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak (nominally 5.5 mm) was found to be greater than 25 mm behind gas-soft-tissue interfaces. We address the implications of these data for dose computation with heavy charged particles.

  11. Serous otitis media revealing temporal en plaque meningioma.

    PubMed

    Ayache, Denis; Trabalzini, Franco; Bordure, Philippe; Gratacap, Benoit; Darrouzet, Vincent; Schmerber, Sébastien; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre; Williams, Marc; Lescanne, Emmanuel

    2006-10-01

    To present a series of temporal en plaque meningiomas involving the middle ear or mastoid, whose main symptoms suggested a serous otitis media. Multicentric retrospective study reviewing clinical records originating from eight tertiary referral centers. The clinical records of 10 patients presenting with signs and symptoms suggesting serous otitis media and whose neuroimaging studies revealed a temporal en plaque meningioma involving the middle ear or mastoid are reported. All the patients were women, ranging from 49 to 71 years old. The delay between the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis of meningioma varied from 1 to 10 years. All the patients underwent various procedures usually applied for the treatment of serous otitis media, which failed in all the cases, particularly ventilating tube placement, which was followed by severe episodes of discharge. In all cases, the computed tomographic scans showed three imaging signs: soft tissue mass filling the middle ear or mastoid, hyperostosis of the petrous bone, and hairy aspect of the intracranial margins of the affected bone. This imaging triad must alert the otologist of the possibility of intracranial meningioma. Magnetic resonance imaging was the method of choice to assess the diagnosis of intracranial meningioma involving the middle ear or mastoid. When analyzing management options, it appeared that conventional middle ear procedures were inefficient. Temporal en plaque meningioma involving the middle ear or mastoid can mimic a serous otitis media. A computed tomographic scan is recommended for cases of atypical or prolonged unilateral serous otitis media to investigate indirect signs of a meningioma, which has to be confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. CT Scan of Thirteen Natural Mummies Dating Back to the XVI-XVIII Centuries: An Emerging Tool to Investigate Living Conditions and Diseases in History.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Enrico; Piciucchi, Sara; Feletti, Francesco; Barone, Domenico; Piraccini, Antonella; Minghetti, Caterina; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Poletti, Venerino; Bertocco, Mauro; Traversari, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    To correlate the radiologic findings detected with computed tomography scan with anthropological data in 13 naturally mummified bodies discovered during works of recovery of an ancient church in a crypt in Roccapelago, in the Italian Apennines. From a group of about sixty not-intentionally mummified bodies, thirteen were selected to be investigated with volumetric computed tomography (CT). Once CT scan was performed, axial images were processed to gather MPR and Volume Rendering reconstructions. Elaborations of these images provided anthropometric measurements and a non-invasive analysis of the residual anatomical structures. For each body the grade of preservation and the eventual pathological changes were recorded. Furthermore, in order to identify nutritional and occupational markers, radiologic signs of bone tropism and degenerative changes were analysed and graded. Mummies included seven females and six males, with an estimated age ranging from 20 to 60 years. The first relevant finding identified was a general low grade of preservation, due to the lack of anatomic tissues different from bones, tendons and dehydrated skin. The low grade of preservation was related to the natural process of mummification. Analysing bone degenerative changes on CT scan, the majority of the bodies had significant occupational markers consisting of arthritis in the spine, lower limbs and shoulders even in young age. Few were the pathological findings identified. Among these, the most relevant included a severe bilateral congenital hip dysplasia and a wide osteolytic lesion involving left orbit and petrous bone that was likely the cause of death. Although the low grade of preservation of these mummies, the multidisciplinary approach of anthropologists and radiologists allowed several important advances in knowledge for the epidemiology of Roccapelago. First of all, a profile of living conditions was delineated. It included occupational and nutritional conditions. Moreover

  13. Cladistic analysis of extant and fossil African papionins using craniodental data.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Christopher C

    2013-05-01

    This study examines African papionin phylogenetic history through a comprehensive cladistic analysis of extant and fossil craniodental morphology using both quantitative and qualitative characters. To account for the well-documented influence of allometry on the papionin skull, the general allometric coding method was applied to characters determined to be significantly affected by allometry. Results of the analyses suggest that Parapapio, Pliopapio, and Papio izodi are stem African papionin taxa. Crown Plio-Pleistocene African papionin taxa include Gorgopithecus, Lophocebus cf. albigena, Procercocebus, Soromandrillus (new genus defined herein) quadratirostris, and, most likely, Dinopithecus. Furthermore, S. quadratirostris is a member of a clade also containing Mandrillus, Cercocebus, and Procercocebus; ?Theropithecus baringensis is strongly supported as a primitive member of the genus Theropithecus; Gorgopithecus is closely related to Papio and Lophocebus; and Theropithecus is possibly the most primitive crown African papionin taxon. Finally, character transformation analyses identify a series of morphological transformations during the course of papionin evolution. The origin of crown African papionins is diagnosed, at least in part, by the appearance of definitive and well-developed male maxillary ridges and maxillary fossae. Among crown African papionins, Papio, Lophocebus, and Gorgopithecus are further united by the most extensive development of the maxillary fossae. The Soromandrillus/Mandrillus/Cercocebus/Procercocebus clade is diagnosed by upturned nuchal crests (especially in males), widely divergent temporal lines (especially in males), medially oriented maxillary ridges in males, medially oriented inferior petrous processes, and a tendency to enlarge the premolars as an adaptation for hard-object food processing. The adaptive origins of the genus Theropithecus appear associated with a diet requiring an increase in size of the temporalis, the optimal

  14. Pathological Location of Cranial Nerves in Petroclival Lesions: How to Avoid Their Injury during Anterior Petrosal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Numerous surgical approaches have been developed to access the petroclival region. The Kawase approach, through the middle fossa, is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. Our aim was to gather data about the variation of cranial nerve locations in diverse petroclival pathologies and clarify the most common pathologic variations confirmed during the anterior petrosal approach. Method A retrospective analysis was made of both videos and operative and histologic records of 40 petroclival tumors from January 2009 to September 2013 in which the Kawase approach was used. The anatomical variations of cranial nerves IV–VI related to the tumor were divided into several location categories: superior lateral (SL), inferior lateral (IL), superior medial (SM), inferior medial (IM), and encased (E). These data were then analyzed taking into consideration pathologic subgroups of meningioma, epidermoid, and schwannoma. Results In 41% of meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is encased by the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is in the SL part of the tumor, and it is in 20% of the IL portion of the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trochlear nerve is encased by the tumor. The abducens nerve is not always visible (35%). The pathologic nerve pattern differs from that of meningiomas for epidermoid and trigeminal schwannomas. Conclusion The pattern of cranial nerves IV–VI is linked to the type of petroclival tumor. In a meningioma, tumor origin (cavernous, upper clival, tentorial, and petrous apex) is the most important predictor of the location of cranial nerves IV–VI. Classification of four subtypes of petroclival meningiomas using magnetic resonance imaging is very useful to predict the location of deviated cranial nerves IV–VI intraoperatively. PMID:28035290

  15. Video Telescope Operating Monitor (VITOM) 3D: preliminary experience in cranial surgery. Technical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Zefferino; Cardia, Andrea; Milani, Davide; Lasio, Giovanni Battista; Fornari, Maurizio; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    2017-08-23

    Optimal vision and ergonomics are important factors contributing to achieve good results during neurosurgical interventions. The operating microscope and the endoscope have partially filled the gap between the need for good surgical vision and maintenance of a comfortable posture during surgery. Recently, a new technology called video assisted telescope operating monitor (VITOM) or exoscope has been used in cranial surgery. The main drawback with previous prototypes was lack of stereopsis. We present the first case report of cranial surgery performed using the VITOM 3D, an exoscope conjugating 4K view and 3D technology, and discuss about advantages and disadvantages compared with the operating microscope. A 50-years-old patient with vertigo and headache linked to a petrous ridge meningioma was operated using the VITOM 3D. Complete removal of the tumor and resolution of symptoms were achieved. The telescope was maintained over the surgical field for all the duration of the procedure, a video monitor was placed at 2 meters from the surgeons and a Control Unit allowed focusing, magnification and repositioning of the camera. VITOM 3D is a video system that has overcome the lack of stereopsis, a major drawback of the previous exoscope models. It has many advantages regarding ergonomics, versatility and depth of field compared with the operating microscope, but the Holder Arm and the mechanism of repositioning, refocusing and magnification need to be ameliorated. Therefore, surgeons should continue to use the technology they feel confident with, unless a distinct advantage with newer technologies can be demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. HASTE diffusion-weighted 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of primary and relapsing cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Barbieri, Franco; Beltramello, Alberto; Alessandrini, Franco; Fiorino, Francesco

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the value of half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (HASTE DW MRI) using a 3-Tesla (3T) unit in the diagnosis of primary and relapsing cholesteatoma. Retrospective observational investigation. Tertiary referral center. Seventeen patients suspected of having a primary cholesteatoma without clear clinical evidence of the lesion, and 13 patients who were candidates to a second-stage tympanoplasty to rule out a relapsing cholesteatoma or reconstruct the ossicular chain were investigated. All patients were scanned in a 3T scanner with a 4-channel head coil using T2 HASTE DW MRI technique sequences in axial and coronal planes covering the middle ear and mastoid regions. Images were considered positive for cholesteatoma in the presence of a hyperintense, patchy-like lesion in the petrous bone. Images showed a high signal intensity suggestive of primary cholesteatoma in 10 of 17 patients and of relapsing cholesteatoma in 7 of 13 patients. Of the 17 subjects, 15 with positive MRI findings were operated on, and the presence of cholesteatoma (ranging from 2 to 20 mm in size) was confirmed at surgery. Of the 13 subjects shown to be negative on HASTE DW MRI for cholesteatoma, 11 were operated on and were all confirmed to be cholesteatoma-free. Half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique, using a 3T unit, may be a diagnostic tool for a rapid and highly reliable discrimination between cholesteatomatous and noncholesteatomatous tissue in the middle ear, with 100% of positive and negative predictive values.

  17. Balloon-assisted guide catheter positioning to overcome extreme cervical carotid tortuosity: technique and case experience

    PubMed Central

    Peeling, Lissa; Fiorella, David

    2014-01-01

    Background and significance We describe a method by which to efficiently and atraumatically achieve distal positioning of a flexible guiding catheter beyond extreme cervical tortuosity using a hypercompliant temporary occlusion balloon. Methods A retrospective review of a prospective neuroendovascular database was used to identify cases in which a hypercompliant balloon catheter (Hyperform or Hyperglide, ev3/Covidien, Irvine, California, USA; Scepter or Scepter XC, Alisa Viejo, California, USA) was used to achieve distal positioning of a flexible guiding catheter (Navion, ev3/Covidien, Irvine, California, USA; Neuron, Penumbra Inc, Alameda, California, USA). After achieving a stable guiding sheath position within the proximal cervical carotid artery, a hypercompliant balloon catheter was manipulated beyond the tortuous cervical internal carotid segment into the distal carotid artery. The balloon was then inflated to anchor it distally within an intracranial (cavernous or petrous) segment of the internal carotid artery. The guiding catheter was then advanced beyond the tortuous cervical segment, over the balloon catheter, as gentle counter traction was applied to the balloon. Results Balloon-assisted guiding catheter placement was used to perform endovascular treatments of 12 anterior circulation aneurysms. One patient underwent coiling alone. Five patients underwent balloon-assisted coiling. One patient underwent balloon and stent assisted coil embolization. Four patients with five carotid aneurysms (one with bilateral carotid aneurysms) underwent vascular reconstruction with the pipeline embolization device. All patients had severe tortuosity of the extracranial carotid system. Three patients had findings consistent with cervical carotid fibromuscular dysplasia. The technique was successful each time it was attempted. No parent artery dissections or catheter induced vasospam were noted in any case. Discussion Hypercompliant balloon catheters can be reliably used

  18. Epidural application of ionomeric cement implants. Experimental and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Geyer, G; Baier, G; Helms, J

    1998-04-01

    During setting and hardening, the hybrid bone substitute ionomeric cement (Ionocem) achieves a stable and durable bond with the apatite of the adjacent bone without interpository soft tissue. Fluid contact during setting results in the release of aluminium ions which may reach critical levels as high as 3000 micrograms/l. On epidural application it is, therefore, essential to prevent cement constituents from gaining access to the intradural space. After the cement has hardened, the presence of aluminium is demonstrable in the adjacent bone to a maximum depth of 20 microns (EDX microanalysis). In rabbits, epidural placement of freshly mixed cement causes slight thickening of the dura. There is reason to believe that human dura, with a thickness 10 times greater, is impermeable to components of the cement. After epidural application of the freshly mixed cement in the frontobasal and laterobasal regions and at the skull cap and petrous apex, 76 patients in all have been followed for up to 6.5 years. During this period no complications have arisen and functional (and cosmetic) results are promising. The availability of preformed implants (Ionoroc, Ionocast) permitted the peridural placement of minimal quantities of freshly mixed cement. These implants were fixed to localized sites on the adjacent calvarial bone by use of Ionocem. Notwithstanding the stringent manufacturer guidelines, there have been reports in the literature that during the vulnerable stage of setting neurotoxic aluminium ions were released into the dural space with a fatal outcome in two cases. In view of potential intradural complications, such as may occur in case of dural leaks, it was considered that further application of the material adjacent to the dura was no longer warranted. The production of Ionocem was discontinued in May 1995.

  19. [Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of congenital abnormalities of the temporal bone].

    PubMed

    Czerny, C; Gstöttner, W; Imhof, H

    2003-03-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the temporal bone are mostly accompanied by conductive or sensori-neural hearing loss. Before any therapeutic procedures are done high resolution CT (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be performed to establish the correct diagnosis and to plan the potentially surgical intervention. HRCT best depicts osseous changes especially those of the external auditory canal and the middle ear containing the ossicles and the osseous structures of the temporal bone and the petrous bone containing the inner ear. MRI excellently shows soft tissue changes of the inner ear especially on the high resolution 3DT2-weighted sequences which give a superb contrast between the nerves and the cerebro-spinal fluid. Malformations of the external auditory canal consists of aplasia or hypoplasia and those of the middle ear range form extreme hypoplasia or aplasia to very mild deformations of the ossicles. Malformations of the inner ear also range form complete aplasia to very mild hypoplasia of the organs of the inner ear as well as malformations concerning the nerves in the internal auditory canal range from aplasia to hypoplasia. Malformations of the temporal bone can either occur isolated or in combination in which malformations of the external and middle ear may be accompanied by those of the inner ear. Furthermore, malformations of the temporal bone may also occur in otofacial, otocervical or otoskeletal syndromes. These syndromes may be accompanied by certain malformations of the temporal bone. HRCT and MRI are both excellent methods to depict congenital abnormalities of the temporal bone and of the inner ear and should be used as complementary methods because HRCT best depicts osseous changes and MRI superbly depicts soft tissue changes. Both methods are important to establish the correct diagnosis to plan the therapeutic procedures.

  20. The systematic classification of urinary stones combine-using FTIR and SEM-EDAX.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui-Hong; Luo, Xiao-Bing; Li, Qin; Zhong, Hai-Qiang

    2017-05-01

    To explore underlying mechanism of urinary stones formation, the composition and microstructure of urinary stones were analyzed systematically with a large sample study from China. A total of 2437 urinary stones were obtained from the urology department at our Hospital. The composition of the stones was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Meanwhile, the microstructure and element distribution were observed with scanning electron microscopy combined with element distribution analysis (SEM-EDAX). Urinary stones were classified into eight types, that were consisted of calcium oxalate stones (1301/2437, 53.39%), calcium phosphate stones (131/2437, 5.38%), anhydrous uric acid stones (434/2437, 17.81%), magnesium ammonium phosphate stones (12/2437, 0.49%), sodium urate stones (5/2437, 0.21%), brushite stones (4/2437, 0.16%), cystine stones (3/2437, 0.12%) and mixed stones (547/2437, 22.45%, ten subtypes were included). Under SEM, they displayed distinct microstructures: plank-like, brick-like, polyhedron or paliform crystals for calcium oxalate stones, similar sized echin-sphere or rough bulbiform or tree bark-like crystals for calcium phosphate stones, rotten-wood-like or petrous crystals for anhydrous uric acid stones, globular or gallet-like crystals for magnesium ammonium phosphate stones, sawdust-like crystals for sodium urate stones, broken-wood-like crystals for brushite stones, stacking hexagonal cystine crystals for cystine stones, and two or more of the above crystals for mixed stones. Meanwhile, they also presented distinct elemental composition and distribution by EDAX. Urinary stones can be classified into eight types, and exhibit a diversity of microstructure and elemental compositions in China. The formation process of different types of urinary stones may be diverse. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Role of skeletal muscle in ear development.

    PubMed

    Rot, Irena; Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; Costain, Willard J; Hong, Paul; Tafra, Robert; Mardesic-Brakus, Snjezana; Mrduljas-Djujic, Natasa; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Kablar, Boris

    2017-03-08

    The current paper is a continuation of our work described in Rot and Kablar, 2010. Here, we show lists of 10 up- and 87 down-regulated genes obtained by a cDNA microarray analysis that compared developing Myf5-/-:Myod-/- (and Mrf4-/-) petrous part of the temporal bone, containing middle and inner ear, to the control, at embryonic day 18.5. Myf5-/-:Myod-/- fetuses entirely lack skeletal myoblasts and muscles. They are unable to move their head, which interferes with the perception of angular acceleration. Previously, we showed that the inner ear areas most affected in Myf5-/-:Myod-/- fetuses were the vestibular cristae ampullaris, sensitive to angular acceleration. Our finding that the type I hair cells were absent in the mutants' cristae was further used here to identify a profile of genes specific to the lacking cell type. Microarrays followed by a detailed consultation of web-accessible mouse databases allowed us to identify 6 candidate genes with a possible role in the development of the inner ear sensory organs: Actc1, Pgam2, Ldb3, Eno3, Hspb7 and Smpx. Additionally, we searched for human homologues of the candidate genes since a number of syndromes in humans have associated inner ear abnormalities. Mutations in one of our candidate genes, Smpx, have been reported as the cause of X-linked deafness in humans. Our current study suggests an epigenetic role that mechanical, and potentially other, stimuli originating from muscle, play in organogenesis, and offers an approach to finding novel genes responsible for altered inner ear phenotypes.

  2. The cranial base of Australopithecus afarensis: new insights from the female skull.

    PubMed

    Kimbel, William H; Rak, Yoel

    2010-10-27

    Cranial base morphology differs among hominoids in ways that are usually attributed to some combination of an enlarged brain, retracted face and upright locomotion in humans. The human foramen magnum is anteriorly inclined and, with the occipital condyles, is forwardly located on a broad, short and flexed basicranium; the petrous elements are coronally rotated; the glenoid region is topographically complex; the nuchal lines are low; and the nuchal plane is horizontal. Australopithecus afarensis (3.7-3.0 Ma) is the earliest known species of the australopith grade in which the adult cranial base can be assessed comprehensively. This region of the adult skull was known from fragments in the 1970s, but renewed fieldwork beginning in the 1990s at the Hadar site, Ethiopia (3.4-3.0 Ma), recovered two nearly complete crania and major portions of a third, each associated with a mandible. These new specimens confirm that in small-brained, bipedal Australopithecus the foramen magnum and occipital condyles were anteriorly sited, as in humans, but without the foramen's forward inclination. In the large male A.L. 444-2 this is associated with a short basal axis, a bilateral expansion of the base, and an inferiorly rotated, flexed occipital squama--all derived characters shared by later australopiths and humans. However, in A.L. 822-1 (a female) a more primitive morphology is present: although the foramen and condyles reside anteriorly on a short base, the nuchal lines are very high, the nuchal plane is very steep, and the base is as relatively narrow centrally. A.L. 822-1 illuminates fragmentary specimens in the 1970s Hadar collection that hint at aspects of this primitive suite, suggesting that it is a common pattern in the A. afarensis hypodigm. We explore the implications of these specimens for sexual dimorphism and evolutionary scenarios of functional integration in the hominin cranial base.

  3. Surgical considerations and safety of cochlear implantation in otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Cevizci, Rasit; Dilci, Alper; Celenk, Fatih; Karamert, Recep; Bayazit, Yildirim

    2017-07-26

    To evaluate the effects of otitis media with effusion on surgical parameters, patient safety, perioperative and postoperative complications. Total 890 children who underwent cochlear implantation between 2006 and 2015 were included. The ages ranged from 12 months to 63 months (mean: 32 months). The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of otitis media with effusion; otitis media with effusion group and non-otitis media group. Of 890 children, 105 had otitis media with effusion prior to surgery. In non-otitis media with group, there were 785 children. The average duration of surgery was 60min (ranged from 28 to 75min) in non-otitis media group, and 90min (ranged from 50 to 135min) in otitis media with effusion group (p<0.05). Granulation tissue and edematous middle ear and mastoid mucosa were observed in all cases of otitis media with effusion during the surgery. There was no significant difference between the complications of groups with or without otitis media with effusion (p>0.05). In 5 of 105 patients, there was a ventilation tube inserted before cochlear implantation, which did not change the outcome of implantation. There is no need for surgical treatment for otitis media with effusion before implantation since otitis media with effusion does not increase the risks associated with cochlear implantation. Operation duration is longer in the presence of otitis media with effusion. However, otitis media with effusion leads to intraoperative difficulties like longer operation duration, bleeding, visualization of the round window membrane, cleansing the middle ear granulations as well as mastoid and petrous air cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gradenigo Syndrome: Unusual Consequence of Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Valles, Jennie M.; Fekete, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In 1904, Giuseppe Gradenigo published his case series on the triad of ipsilateral abducens nerve palsy, facial pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution, and suppurative otitis media, which would subsequently be referred to as Gradenigo syndrome. Case Report Our patient was a 36-year-old female, 23 weeks pregnant, with a 6-day history of right-sided otalgia and hearing loss and a 4-day history of purulent otorrhea, who presented with severe, holocephalic headache, meningeal signs, fever, photophobia, and mental status decline. Lumbar puncture yielded a white blood cell count of 1,559 cells/mm3 with 95% polymorphonuclear leukocytes, a red blood cell count of 111 cells/mm3, a protein level of 61 mg/dl, and a glucose level of <40 mg/dl. Cerebrospinal fluid Gram stain showed Gram-positive diplococci, which were subsequently identified as Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with ceftriaxone. On the second hospital day, she developed horizontal diplopia due to right abducens nerve palsy and right mydriasis. Both symptoms resolved on the third hospital day. Erosion of temporal bone and opacification of mastoid air cells was shown on CT scan. A CT venogram showed an irregularity of the left transverse and superior sagittal sinuses. She was treated with enoxaparin for possible sinus thrombosis. Discussion This case demonstrates rare but serious sequelae of otitis media and Gradenigo syndrome. Holocephalic headache from meningitis masked trigeminal pain. Involvement of the ipsilateral petrous apex and surrounding structures on imaging and clinical improvement with antibiotic treatment supports Gradenigo syndrome over intracranial hypertension due to venous sinus thrombosis as the cause of the abducens nerve palsy. PMID:25232331

  5. Pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus in Chinese: the differences from Caucasian and its application in the extended transsphenoidal approach.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuntao; Pan, Jun; Qi, Songtao; Shi, Jin; Zhang, Xi'an; Wu, Kuncheng

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, the transsphenoidal approach has been extensively used surgically to treat parasellar, suprasellar, clival, and even petrous lesions. Extended pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus (SS) is considered an indispensable element for the extended transsphenoidal (ETS) approach. Because most anatomical studies of the ETS approach use Caucasian subjects, the present study aims to clarify the pneumatic extension types in Chinese individuals as well as any differences from those in Caucasians and analyze these differences with respect to the application of the ETS approach. A total of 200 computed tomography (CT) images of SSs and 18 adult cadaveric heads were selected for observation and measurement. The conchal, presellar, and sellar types comprised 6, 28.5, and 65.5% of subjects, respectively; according to the extra extension, the prevalence of the lateral, clival, lesser wing, and combined extension sinus types was 11.4, 21.4, 0.8, and 48.1% of subjects, respectively. The percentages of pneumatization of the anterior and posterior clinoid processes, pterygoid process, and optic strut were 5.0, 1.0, 22.3, and 7.0%, respectively. Onodi cells were observed in 61.1% of the sides of the cadaveric heads, including 30.6% with good pneumatization with identifiable optical or ICA bulges. These features were related to poor lateral and clival gasification in Chinese compared with Caucasians, which might make extended surgery more dangerous. However, the anterior pneumatization, especially the higher presentation of Onodi cells, ensures that the anterior ETS approach can be performed safely in Chinese patients. In general, measurements showing smaller sinus volumes and thicker bones with identifiable bone landmarks that are hard to find compared with those in Caucasians suggest increased surgical risks in the Chinese population. In this situation, carefully analysis of presurgical CT and magnetic resonance imaging scans is important. Furthermore, in the ETS

  6. Cost effective use of audiograms after pediatric temporal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Frisenda, Julia L; Schroeder, James W; Ryan, Maura E; Valika, Taher S; Billings, Kathleen R

    2015-11-01

    To identify the relationship of pediatric temporal fractures to the incidence and type of hearing loss present. To analyze the timing and utility of audiometric testing in children with temporal bone fractures. Retrospective case series of 50 pediatric patients with temporal bone fractures who were treated at an urban, tertiary care children's hospital from 2008 to 2014. A statistical analysis of predictors of hearing loss after temporal bone fracture was performed. Fifty-three fractures (69.7%) in 50 patients involved the petrous portion of the temporal bone. The mean age of patients was 7.13 years, and 39 (73.6%) were male. A fall was the most common mechanism of injury in 28 (52.8%) patients, followed by crush injury (n=14, 26.2%), and vehicular trauma (n=10, 18.9%). All otic capsule violating fractures were associated with a sensorineural hearing loss (n=4, 7.5%, p=0.002). Three of four otic capsule sparing fractures were associated with ossicular dislocation, with a corresponding mixed or conductive hearing loss on follow up audiometric testing. The majority of otic capsule sparing fracture patients (n=19/43, 44.2%) who had follow up audiograms had normal hearing, and those with otic capsule violating fractures were statistically more likely to have persistent hearing loss than those with otic capsule sparing fractures (p=0.01). Patients with otic capsule violating fractures or those with ossicular disruption are at higher risk for persistent hearing loss. Cost-saving may be accrued by selecting only those patients at high risk for persistent hearing loss for audiometric testing after temporal bone fractures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Maximizing the petroclival region exposure via a suboccipital retrosigmoid approach: where is the intrapetrous internal carotid artery?

    PubMed

    Colasanti, Roberto; Tailor, Al-Rahim A; Lamki, Tariq; Zhang, Jun; Ammirati, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Recent reports have validated the use of retrosigmoid approach extensions to deal with petroclival lesions. To describe the topographic retrosigmoid anatomy of the intrapetrous internal carotid artery (IICA), providing guidelines for maximizing the petroclival region exposure via this route. The IICA was exposed bilaterally in 6 specimens via a retrosigmoid approach in the semisitting position. Its topographic relationship with pertinent posterolateral cranial base landmarks was quantified with neuronavigation. Safe exposure of the IICA and the surrounding inframeatal/petroclival regions was accomplished in all specimens. On average, the IICA genu was 15.08 mm anterolateral to the XI nerve in the jugular foramen, 16.18 mm anteroinferolateral to the endolymphatic sac, and 10.63 mm anteroinferolateral to the internal acoustic meatus. On average, the IICA horizontal segment was 9.92 mm inferolateral to the Meckel cave, and its midpoint was 19.96 mm anterolateral to the XI nerve in the jugular foramen. The mean distance from the IICA genu to the cochlea was 1.96 mm. The genu and the midpoint of the horizontal segment of the IICA were exposed at a depth of approximately 14.50 mm from the posterior pyramidal wall with the use of different drilling angles (49.74° vs 39.54°, respectively). Knowledge of the IICA general relationship with these landmarks (combined with a careful assessment of the preoperative imaging and with the use of intraoperative navigation and micro-Doppler) may help to enhance the inframeatal/petroclival region exposure via a retrosigmoid route, maximizing safe inframeatal and suprameatal petrous bone removal while minimizing neurovascular complications.

  8. The cranial base of Australopithecus afarensis: new insights from the female skull

    PubMed Central

    Kimbel, William H.; Rak, Yoel

    2010-01-01

    Cranial base morphology differs among hominoids in ways that are usually attributed to some combination of an enlarged brain, retracted face and upright locomotion in humans. The human foramen magnum is anteriorly inclined and, with the occipital condyles, is forwardly located on a broad, short and flexed basicranium; the petrous elements are coronally rotated; the glenoid region is topographically complex; the nuchal lines are low; and the nuchal plane is horizontal. Australopithecus afarensis (3.7–3.0 Ma) is the earliest known species of the australopith grade in which the adult cranial base can be assessed comprehensively. This region of the adult skull was known from fragments in the 1970s, but renewed fieldwork beginning in the 1990s at the Hadar site, Ethiopia (3.4–3.0 Ma), recovered two nearly complete crania and major portions of a third, each associated with a mandible. These new specimens confirm that in small-brained, bipedal Australopithecus the foramen magnum and occipital condyles were anteriorly sited, as in humans, but without the foramen's forward inclination. In the large male A.L. 444-2 this is associated with a short basal axis, a bilateral expansion of the base, and an inferiorly rotated, flexed occipital squama—all derived characters shared by later australopiths and humans. However, in A.L. 822-1 (a female) a more primitive morphology is present: although the foramen and condyles reside anteriorly on a short base, the nuchal lines are very high, the nuchal plane is very steep, and the base is as relatively narrow centrally. A.L. 822-1 illuminates fragmentary specimens in the 1970s Hadar collection that hint at aspects of this primitive suite, suggesting that it is a common pattern in the A. afarensis hypodigm. We explore the implications of these specimens for sexual dimorphism and evolutionary scenarios of functional integration in the hominin cranial base. PMID:20855310

  9. Transnasal Penetration of a Ballpoint Pen: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Oni-Orisan, Akinwunmi; Doan, Ninh; Mueller, Wade

    2016-12-01

    Transnasal penetration by a nonmissile foreign body is a rare injury. Consequently, appropriate management remains controversial. We report a case of transnasal penetration by a ballpoint pen and review the literature. To our knowledge, this is the first living patient who sustained carotid artery damage from a transnasal penetrating intracranial injury. A 56-year-old female presented with a ballpoint pen lodged through her left nostril. She exhibited right cranial nerve palsies (III, IV, VI, and V1). A computed tomography (CT) scan of the head revealed a foreign body in the left nasal cavity traversing the ethmoid/sphenoid and likely through the right superior orbital fissure and cavernous sinus, with the distal tip adjacent to the right atrium. CT angiography revealed nonopacification of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) from the mid-petrous segment to the ophthalmic segment. Subsequently, she underwent coil embolization of the proximal right ICA, followed by a right frontotemporal craniotomy with anterior temporal lobectomy to skeletonize the pen and right distal ICA, and finally clipping of the ICA distal to the pen and prompt transnasal endoscopic removal of the pen. There were no hemorrhagic complications. She awoke at her neurologic preoperative baseline. Injuries such as the one described here should be managed through a multidisciplinary approach. The trajectory of the foreign body should be delineated through CT imaging, along with vascular imaging if appropriate. If there are signs of vascular injury, then attempts to maintain proximal and distal control are prudent to avoid hemorrhagic complications. This combined endovascular-endoscopic-open craniotomy approach has not been reported previously in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Access to the parapharyngeal space: an anatomical study comparing the endoscopic and open approaches.

    PubMed

    Van Rompaey, Jason; Suruliraj, Anand; Carrau, Ricardo; Panizza, Benedict; Solares, C Arturo

    2013-10-01

    A subtemporal preauricular approach to the infratemporal fossa and parapharyngeal space has been the traditional path to tumors of this region. The morbidity associated with this procedure has lead to the pursuit of less invasive techniques. Endoscopic access using a minimally invasive transmaxillary/transpterygoid approach potentially may obviate the drawbacks associated with open surgery. The anatomy of the parapharyngeal space is complex and critical; therefore, a comparison of the anatomy exposed by these different approaches could aid in the decision making toward a minimally invasive surgical corridor. Technical Note. The parapharyngeal space was accessed endonasally by removal of the medial and posterior walls of the maxillary sinus. To allow better visualization and increased triangulation of a bimanual dissection technique, a sublabial canine fossa antrostomy was created. The medial and lateral pterygoid plates were removed. Further lateral dissection exposed the relevant anatomy of the parapharyngeal space. A subtemporal preauricular infratemporal approach was also completed. The endoscopic approach provided sufficient access to the superior portion of the parapharyngeal space. The open approach also provided adequate access; however, it required a larger surgical window, causing greater injury. A significant advantage of the subtemporal approach is the improved access to the petrous portion of the internal carotid artery. Conversely, the endonasal approach provided improved access to the anterior and medial portions of the superior parapharyngeal space. Endoscopic endonasal access utilizing a transmaxillary/transpterygoid approach provides a sufficient surgical window for tumor extirpation. Utilization of this approach obviates some of the morbidity associated with an open procedure. 5. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. [A case of trigeminal neurinoma with marked extracranial extension].

    PubMed

    Fushimi, S; Miura, S; Suda, Y; Fujii, S; Kowada, M

    1987-10-01

    A case of trigeminal neurinoma with marked extracranial extension is reported with a review of the literature. A 60-year-old female noticed numbness over the left side of the face during the proceeding 15 years. Two years prior to admission, she began to complain of itching and lancinating pain at the left lateral aspect of the nose. Neurologic examination on admission revealed diminished corneal reflex on the left side and hypesthesia in the distribution of the left trigeminal nerve. There was no weakness or atrophy of the ipsilateral masticatory muscles. The remaining cranial nerves and cerebellar functions were normal. Craniograms showed destruction of the left petrous apex, enlargement of the left superior orbital fissure and an extensive bone defect in the floor of the left middle cranial fossa. CT disclosed a huge heterogeneously enhancing mass lesion in the left middle cranial fossa, which extended posteriorly into the left cerebellopontine angle and inferiorly into the pterygoid and infratemporal fossae. Cerebral angiograms revealed medial displacement of the left internal cerebral artery in the ganglionic, cavernous and supraclinoid portions, and elevation of the left middle cerebral artery in the sphenoidal portion. Although the left meningohypophyseal trunk was dilated, no tumor stain was observed. A transantral biopsy specimen provided the diagnosis of neurinoma with Antoni type A tissue. The patient was followed up at the outpatient clinic as radical operations were not agreed upon. Eight cases of trigeminal neurinoma with extracranial extension are reviewed including the presented case. There were two males and six females, and the age varied from 16 to 65 years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The accuracy of an electromagnetic navigation system in lateral skull base approaches.

    PubMed

    Komune, Noritaka; Matsushima, Ken; Matsuo, Satoshi; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Matsumoto, Nozomu; Rhoton, Albert L

    2017-02-01

    Image-guided optical tracking systems are being used with increased frequency in lateral skull base surgery. Recently, electromagnetic tracking systems have become available for use in this region. However, the clinical accuracy of the electromagnetic tracking system has not been examined in lateral skull base surgery. This study evaluates the accuracy of electromagnetic navigation in lateral skull base surgery. Cadaveric and radiographic study. Twenty cadaveric temporal bones were dissected in a surgical setting under a commercially available, electromagnetic surgical navigation system. The target registration error (TRE) was measured at 28 surgical landmarks during and after performing the standard translabyrinthine and middle cranial fossa surgical approaches to the internal acoustic canal. In addition, three demonstrative procedures that necessitate navigation with high accuracy were performed; that is, canalostomy of the superior semicircular canal from the middle cranial fossa,(1) cochleostomy from the middle cranial fossa,(2) and infralabyrinthine approach to the petrous apex.(3) RESULTS: Eleven of 17 (65%) of the targets in the translabyrinthine approach and five of 11 (45%) of the targets in the middle fossa approach could be identified in the navigation system with TRE of less than 0.5 mm. Three accuracy-dependent procedures were completed without anatomical injury of important anatomical structures. The electromagnetic navigation system had sufficient accuracy to be used in the surgical setting. It was possible to perform complex procedures in the lateral skull base under the guidance of the electromagnetically tracked navigation system. N/A. Laryngoscope, 2016 127:450-459, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Pathological Location of Cranial Nerves in Petroclival Lesions: How to Avoid Their Injury during Anterior Petrosal Approach.

    PubMed

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Objectives Numerous surgical approaches have been developed to access the petroclival region. The Kawase approach, through the middle fossa, is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. Our aim was to gather data about the variation of cranial nerve locations in diverse petroclival pathologies and clarify the most common pathologic variations confirmed during the anterior petrosal approach. Method A retrospective analysis was made of both videos and operative and histologic records of 40 petroclival tumors from January 2009 to September 2013 in which the Kawase approach was used. The anatomical variations of cranial nerves IV-VI related to the tumor were divided into several location categories: superior lateral (SL), inferior lateral (IL), superior medial (SM), inferior medial (IM), and encased (E). These data were then analyzed taking into consideration pathologic subgroups of meningioma, epidermoid, and schwannoma. Results In 41% of meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is encased by the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is in the SL part of the tumor, and it is in 20% of the IL portion of the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trochlear nerve is encased by the tumor. The abducens nerve is not always visible (35%). The pathologic nerve pattern differs from that of meningiomas for epidermoid and trigeminal schwannomas. Conclusion The pattern of cranial nerves IV-VI is linked to the type of petroclival tumor. In a meningioma, tumor origin (cavernous, upper clival, tentorial, and petrous apex) is the most important predictor of the location of cranial nerves IV-VI. Classification of four subtypes of petroclival meningiomas using magnetic resonance imaging is very useful to predict the location of deviated cranial nerves IV-VI intraoperatively.

  14. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 (Tab. 1) and 2 (Tab. 2)). Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease). Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely. In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine). In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy) as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve). In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers). In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of

  15. Adaptive Changes In Postural Equilibrium And Motion Sickness Following Repeated Exposures To Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, D. L.; Taylor, L. C.

    2006-01-01

    Virtual environments offer unique training opportunities, particularly for training astronauts and preadapting them to the novel sensory conditions of microgravity. Two unresolved human factors issues in virtual reality (VR) systems are: 1) potential "cybersickness", and 2) maladaptive sensorimotor performance following exposure to VR systems. Interestingly, these aftereffects are often quite similar to adaptive sensorimotor responses observed in astronauts during and/or following space flight. Changes in the environmental sensory stimulus conditions and the way we interact with the new stimuli may result in motion sickness, and perceptual, spatial orientation and sensorimotor disturbances. Initial interpretation of novel sensory information may be inappropriate and result in perceptual errors. Active exploratory behavior in a new environment, with resulting feedback and the formation of new associations between sensory inputs and response outputs, promotes appropriate perception and motor control in the new environment. Thus, people adapt to consistent, sustained alterations of sensory input such as those produced by microgravity, unilateral labyrinthectomy and experimentally produced stimulus rearrangements. Adaptation is revealed by aftereffects including perceptual disturbances and sensorimotor control disturbances. The purpose of the current study was to compare disturbances in postural control produced by dome and head-mounted virtual environment displays, and to examine the effects of exposure duration, and repeated exposures to VR systems. Forty-one subjects (21 men, 20 women) participated in the study with an age range of 21-49 years old. One training session was completed in order to achieve stable performance on the posture and VR tasks before participating in the experimental sessions. Three experimental sessions were performed each separated by one day. The subjects performed a navigation and pick and place task in either a dome or head-mounted display

  16. [Squirrel monkey--an ideal primate (correction of prmate) model of space physiology].

    PubMed

    Matsunami, K

    1997-06-01

    to elucidate functions of the peripheral vestibular system. A transfer function was proposed to explain the behaviors of regular and irregular unit activity of vestibular nerve fibers. The physiologic characteristics of the second order vestibular neuron was investigated in combination of electrophysiological and micro-morphological way, with using WGA-HRP methods, in relation to somato-motor and eye movements. Interconnections between vestibular neurons and cerebellum, interstitial nucleus of Cajal, oculomotor nuclear complex, superior colliculus and cervical spinal cord were elucidated. In physiological field of the vestibular system, the vestibulo-ocular reflex is well studied and results obtained from the squirrel monkey experiments were reviewed. The squirrel monkey, particularly the Bolivian, is a unique animal in that it is vulnerable to motion sickness induced by visual-motion stimulation with phase mismatch of the two stimuli. Experimental results of labyrinthectomy or bilateral ablation of the maculae staticae led to the conclusion that both semicircular and otolith organs are involved in the genesis of space motion sickness. On the other hand, destruction of the area postrema, acknowledged as the vomiting center to chemical stimulants, produced controversial results. However, it must be pointed out that the a human subject underwent to resection of the area postrema, became insensitive to administration of apomorphine, a well known chemical stimulant of vomiting. Finally the experiments in space revealed the presence of at least two origins of caloric nystagmus, that is, attributable to convection and non-convection current of the endolymphatic fluid.

  17. MS Non-Pharmacological Countermeasure to Decrease Landing Sickness and Improve Functional Performance While Disorientad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Kreutzberg, G. A.; Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Mulavara, A. P.; Reschke, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Upon return from spaceflight, a majority of crewmembers experience motion sickness (MS) symptoms. The interactions between crewmembers' adaptation to a gravitational transition, the performance decrements resulting from MS and/or use of promethazine (PMZ), and the constraints imposed by mission task demands could significantly challenge and limit an astronaut's ability to perform functional tasks during gravitational transitions. No operational countermeasure currently exists to mitigate the risks associated with these sensorimotor disturbances. Stochastic resonance (SR) can be thought of simply as "noise benefit" or an increase in information transfer by a system when in the presence of a non-zero level of noise. We have shown that low levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) improve balance and locomotor performance due to SR (Goel et al. 2015, Mulavara et al. 2011, 2015). Additionally, a study in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) hemi-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease demonstrated improvements in locomotor activity after low-level SVS delivery possibly due to an increase in nigral gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release in a dopamine independent way (Samoudi et al. 2012). SVS specifically increased GABA release on the lesioned, but not the intact side. These results suggest that SVS can cause targeted alterations of GABA release to affect performance of functional tasks. Activation of the GABA pathway is important in modulating MS and promoting adaptability (Cohen 2008). Magnusson et al. (2000) supported this finding by showing that the administration of a GABAB agonist caused a reversal of the symptoms that is normally seen after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Thus, GABA could play a significant role in reducing MS and promoting adaptability. We have taken advantage of the SR mechanism as a modulator of neurotransmitters to develop a unique SVS countermeasure system to mitigate MS symptoms and improve functional performance after landing. Healthy

  18. Dopamine Modulates Motor Control in a Specific Plane Related to Support

    PubMed Central

    Herbin, Marc; Simonis, Caroline; Revéret, Lionel; Hackert, Rémi; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Eugène, Daniel; Diaz, Jorge; de Waele, Catherine; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2016-01-01

    At the acute stage following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL), rats, mice or guinea pigs exhibit a complex motor syndrome combining circling (HSCC lesion) and rolling (utricular lesion). At the chronic stage, they only display circling, because proprioceptive information related to the plane of support substitutes the missing utricular information to control posture in the frontal plane. Circling is also observed following unilateral lesion of the mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by 6- hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA rats) and systemic injection of apomorphine (APO rats). The resemblance of behavior induced by unilateral vestibular and dopaminergic lesions at the chronic stage can be interpreted in two ways. One hypothesis is that the dopaminergic system exerts three-dimensional control over motricity, as the vestibular system does. If this hypothesis is correct, then a unilateral lesion of the nigro-striatal pathway should induce three-dimensional motor deficits, i.e., circling and at least some sort of barrel rolling at the acute stage of the lesion. Then, compensation could also take place very rapidly based on proprioception, which would explain the prevalence of circling. In addition, barrel rolling should reappear when the rodent is placed in water, as it occurs in UL vertebrates. Alternatively, the dopaminergic network, together with neurons processing the horizontal canal information, could control the homeostasis of posture and locomotion specifically in one and only one plane of space, i.e. the plane related to the basis of support. In that case, barrel rolling should never occur, whether at the acute or chronic stage on firm ground or in water. Moreover, circling should have the same characteristics following both types of lesions. Clearly, 6-OHDA and APO-rats never exhibited barrel rolling at the acute stage. They circled at the acute stage of the lesion and continued to do so three weeks later, including in water. In contrast, UL-rats, exhibited

  19. Hereditary deafness and phenotyping in humans.

    PubMed

    Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Hereditary deafness has proved to be extremely heterogeneous genetically with more than 40 genes mapped or cloned for non-syndromic dominant deafness and 30 for autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness. In spite of significant advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of hearing loss, identifying the precise genetic cause in an individual remains difficult. Consequently, it is important to exclude syndromic causes of deafness by clinical and special investigation and to use all available phenotypic clues for diagnosis. A clinical approach to the aetiological investigation of individuals with hearing loss is suggested, which includes ophthalmology review, renal ultrasound scan and neuro-imaging of petrous temporal bone. Molecular screening of the GJB2 (Connexin 26) gene should be undertaken in all cases of non-syndromic deafness where the cause cannot be identified, since it is a common cause of recessive hearing impairment, the screening is straightforward, and the phenotype unremarkable. By the same token, mitochondrial inheritance of hearing loss should be considered in all multigeneration families, particularly if there is a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics, since genetic testing of specific mitochondrial genes is technically feasible. Most forms of non-syndromic autosomal recessive hearing impairment cause a prelingual hearing loss, which is generally severe to profound and not associated with abnormal radiology. Exceptions to this include DFNB2 (MYO7A), DFNB8/10 (TMPRSS3) and DFNB16 (STRC) where age of onset may sometimes be later on in childhood, DFNB4 (SLC26A4) where there may be dilated vestibular aqueducts and endolymphatic sacs, and DFNB9 (OTOF) where there may also be an associated auditory neuropathy. Unusual phenotypes in autosomal dominant forms of deafness, include low frequency hearing loss in DFNA1 (HDIA1) and DFNA6/14/38 (WFS1), mid-frequency hearing loss in DFNA8/12 (TECTA), DFNA13 (COL11A2) and vestibular symptoms

  20. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT).

    PubMed

    Stieler, F; Wenz, F; Abo-Madyan, Y; Schweizer, B; Polednik, M; Herskind, C; Giordano, F A; Mai, S

    2016-11-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49°/0.18 ± 0.20°/0.05 ± 0.36° and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT.

  1. Neuroimaging Evidence of a Bilateral Representation for Visually Presented Numbers.

    PubMed

    Grotheer, Mareike; Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Kovács, Gyula

    2016-01-06

    The clustered architecture of the brain for different visual stimulus categories is one of the most fascinating topics in the cognitive neurosciences. Interestingly, recent research suggests the existence of additional regions for newly acquired stimuli such as letters (letter form area; LFA; Thesen et al., 2012) and numbers (visual number form area; NFA; Shum et al., 2013). However, neuroimaging methods thus far have failed to visualize the NFA in healthy participants, likely due to fMRI signal dropout caused by the air/bone interface of the petrous bone (Shum et al., 2013). In the current study, we combined a 64-channel head coil with high spatial resolution, localized shimming, and liberal smoothing, thereby decreasing the signal dropout and increasing the temporal signal-to-noise ratio in the neighborhood of the NFA. We presented subjects with numbers, letters, false numbers, false letters, objects and their Fourier randomized versions. A group analysis showed significant activations in the inferior temporal gyrus at the previously proposed location of the NFA. Crucially, we found the NFA to be present in both hemispheres. Further, we could identify the NFA on the single-subject level in most of our participants. A detailed analysis of the response profile of the NFA in two separate experiments confirmed the whole-brain results since responses to numbers were significantly higher than to any other presented stimulus in both hemispheres. Our results show for the first time the existence and stimulus selectivity of the NFA in the healthy human brain. This fMRI study shows for the first time a cluster of neurons selective for visually presented numbers in healthy human adults. This visual number form area (NFA) was found in both hemispheres. Crucially, numbers have gained importance for humans too recently for neuronal specialization to be established by evolution. Therefore, investigations of this region will greatly advance our understanding of learning and

  2. Proposed clinical internal carotid artery classification system

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrauf, Saleem I; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Coppens, Jeroen; Kang, Brian; Hsieh, Tze Yu Yeh; Nery, Breno; Penanes, Juan R; Alsahlawi, Aysha K; Moore, Shawn; Al-Shaar, Hussam Abou; Kemp, Joanna; Chawla, Kanika; Sujijantarat, Nanthiya; Najeeb, Alaa; Parkar, Nadeem; Shetty, Vilaas; Vafaie, Tina; Antisdel, Jastin; Mikulec, Tony A; Edgell, Randall; Lebovitz, Jonathan; Pierson, Matt; Pires de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Buchanan, Paula; Di Cosola, Angela; Stevens, George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Numerical classification systems for the internal carotid artery (ICA) are available, but modifications have added confusion to the numerical systems. Furthermore, previous classifications may not be applicable uniformly to microsurgical and endoscopic procedures. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically useful classification system. Materials and Methods: We performed cadaver dissections of the ICA in 5 heads (10 sides) and evaluated 648 internal carotid arteries with computed tomography angiography. We identified specific anatomic landmarks to define the beginning and end of each ICA segment. Results: The ICA was classified into eight segments based on the cadaver and imaging findings: (1) Cervical segment; (2) cochlear segment (ascending segment of the ICA in the temporal bone) (relation of the start of this segment to the base of the styloid process: Above, 425 sides [80%]; below, 2 sides [0.4%]; at same level, 107 sides [20%]; P < 0.0001) (relation of cochlea to ICA: Posterior, 501 sides [85%]; posteromedial, 84 sides [14%]; P < 0.0001); (3) petrous segment (horizontal segment of ICA in the temporal bone) starting at the crossing of the eustachian tube superolateral to the ICA turn in all 10 samples; (4) Gasserian-Clival segment (ascending segment of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the petrolingual ligament (PLL) (relation to vidian canal on imaging: At same level, 360 sides [63%]; below, 154 sides [27%]; above, 53 sides [9%]; P < 0.0001); in this segment, the ICA projected medially toward the clivus in 275 sides (52%) or parallel to the clivus with no deviation in 256 sides (48%; P < 0.0001); (5) sellar segment (medial loop of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the takeoff of the meningeal hypophyseal trunk (ICA was medial into the sella in 271 cases [46%], lateral without touching the sella in 127 cases [23%], and abutting the sella in 182 cases [31%]; P < 0.0001); (6) sphenoid segment (lateral loop of ICA within the

  3. A comparison of concentrations of lead in human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, P S

    1975-01-01

    This postmortem study of lead concentrations in the tissues of 129 subjects is an extension to a report by Barry and Mossman (1970). Lead concentrations in bone greatly exceeded the concentrations in soft tissues and were highest in the dense bones. Bone lead concentrations increased with age in both sexes, more especially in male subjects and in dense bone, varying between mean values of 2-16 ppm in the ribs of children to over 50 ppm in the dense petrous temporal bones of elderly male adults. Male adults contained over 30% more lead in their bones than females. Mean concentrations of lead in the soft tissues varied from less than 0-1 ppm in organs such as muscle and heart to over 2 ppm in the aorta. In most tissues with lead values in excess of 0-2 ppm the male concentrations exceeded female values by about 30%. With the exception of the aorta, spleen, lung, and prostate, lead concentrations did not increase with age in the soft tissues of either sex after about the second decade of life. Children showed concentrations of lead in their soft tissues comparable to female adults, but the concentrations in bone were much lower. It is suggested that children do not possess the same capacity as adults to retain lead in bone. In male adults occupationally exposed to lead the concentrations of lead in bone exceeded the concentrations in unexposed male adults within the same age group by two-to three-fold. Soft tissue lead concentrations between the two groups were less divergent. An assessment of the total body burden of lead revealed higher levels in adult male subjects than in females at mean values of 164-8 mg compared to 103-6 mg, respectively. Over 90% of the total body burden of lead in adults was in bone, of which over 70% was in dense bone. Male adults occupationally exposed to lead had mean total body burdens of 566-4 mg Pb, of which 97% was in bone. The release of lead from bone in conjunction with calcium was not considered to be of physiological significance

  4. "Birdlime" technique using TachoSil tissue sealing sheet soaked with fibrin glue for sutureless vessel transposition in microvascular decompression: operative technique and nuances.

    PubMed

    Otani, Naoki; Toyooka, Terushige; Fujii, Kazuya; Kumagai, Kosuke; Takeuchi, Satoru; Tomiyama, Arata; Nakao, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takuji; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2017-08-11

    OBJECTIVE Microvascular decompression (MVD) is effective for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), hemifacial spasm (HFS), and glossopharyngeal neuralgia. The transposition technique is the standard procedure to avoid adhesions and granuloma around the decompression site but is more complex and difficult to perform than the interposition technique. The authors describe a simple and safe MVD transposition procedure they call the "birdlime" technique, which uses a tissue glue-coated collagen sponge soaked with fibrin glue, and the results of this technique. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical charts and radiographic findings of 27 consecutive patients with TN (8 patients) and HFS (19 patients) who, between January 2012 and December 2015, had undergone an MVD transposition procedure utilizing a tissue glue-coated collagen sponge (TachoSil tissue sealing sheet) soaked with fibrin glue (Tisseel 2-component fibrin sealant, vapor heated). Offending arteries among the patients with TN were the superior cerebellar artery (SCA) in 5 patients, the SCA and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in 2, and the AICA in 1. Those among the patients with HFS were the vertebral artery (VA) in 3 patients, the VA and AICA in 4, the VA and posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) in 3, the PICA in 4, the AICA in 1, the AICA-PICA in 3, and the PICA and AICA in 1. Operations were performed according to the Jannetta procedure. The offending artery was transposed and fixed to the dura mater of the petrous bone using TachoSil pieces soaked with fibrin glue. Postoperative constructive interference in steady-state MRI was performed to evaluate the change in the position of the offending artery. RESULTS Transposition of the offending artery was easily and safely performed in all patients. All patients had total remission of symptoms directly after the procedure. No severe complications occurred. The postoperative course was uneventful. No recurrences, adhesions

  5. Decompression of the tympanic and labyrinthine segments of the facial nerve by middle cranial fossa approach: an anatomic study.

    PubMed

    da Franca Pereira, Marcos Alexandre; Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; de Andrade, Emerson Magno; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Brito, Rubens

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral facial palsy is characterized by the permanent or temporary interruption of facial muscle function. The middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach has been used to decompress the facial nerve (FN) when hearing needs to be preserved. In this work, we describe a technique for decompressing the FN through the MCF approach, which allows the direct exposure of the labyrinthine and entire tympanic segment of the FN, with preservation of inner ear function. Twenty cadavers heads were used in this study. The reference landmarks used were the middle meningeal artery, greater superficial petrosal nerve, arcuate eminence, inferior petrosal sinus and meatal plane following the petrous apex from its most anterior and medial portion. The tympanic segment of the FN presented, on average, a total length of 11 ± 0.67 mm to the right and 11.5 ± 0.60 mm to the left. The longitudinal lengths of the bone window in the tegmen tympani were 16.8 ± 1.67 mm to the right and 16.8 ± 1.20 mm to the left. The cross-sectional lengths of the bone window in the tegmen tympani were 5.5 ± 1.20 mm and 5.0 ± 1.75 mm to the right and left sides, respectively. The average value of the elliptical area formed by the longitudinal and transversal lengths of the bone window made in the tegmen tympani was 72.5 ± 22.5 mm(2) to the right and 65.9 ± 30.3 mm(2) to the left. The proposed technique can be used for the surgical decompression of the tympanic, labyrinthine and meatal segments of the FN through the MCF in addition to reducing the surgical time and the risk to patients.

  6. Distinctive patterns on CT angiography characterize acute internal carotid artery occlusion subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Man; Lee, Sung Eun; Lee, Seong-Joon; Lee, Jin Soo; Demchuk, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Noninvasive computed tomography angiography (CTA) is widely used in acute ischemic stroke, even for diagnosing various internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion sites, which often need cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA) confirmation. We evaluated whether clinical outcomes vary depending on the DSA-based occlusion sites and explored correlating features on baseline CTA that predict DSA-based occlusion site. We analyzed consecutive patients with acute ICA occlusion who underwent DSA and CTA. Occlusion site was classified into cervical, cavernous, petrous, and carotid terminus segments by DSA confirmation. Clinical and radiological features associated with poor outcome at 3 months (3–6 of modified Rankin scale) were analyzed. Baseline CTA findings were categorized according to carotid occlusive shape (stump, spearhead, and streak), presence of cervical calcification, Willisian occlusive patterns (T-type, L-type, and I-type), and status of leptomeningeal collaterals (LMC). We identified 49 patients with occlusions in the cervical (n = 17), cavernous (n = 22), and carotid terminus (n = 10) portions: initial NIH Stroke Scale (11.4 ± 4.2 vs 16.1 ± 3.7 vs 18.2 ± 5.1; P < 0.001), stroke volume (27.9 ± 29.6 vs 127.4 ± 112.6 vs 260.3 ± 151.8 mL; P < 0.001), and poor outcome (23.5 vs 77.3 vs 90.0%; P < 0.001). Cervical portion occlusion was characterized as rounded stump (82.4%) with calcification (52.9%) and fair LMC (94.1%); cavernous as spearhead occlusion (68.2%) with fair LMC (86.3%) and no calcification (95.5%); and terminus as streak-like occlusive pattern (60.0%) with poor LMC (60.0%), and no calcification (100%) on CTA. Our study indicates that acute ICA occlusion can be subtyped into cervical, cavernous, and terminus. Distinctive findings on initial CTA can help differentiate ICA-occlusion subtypes with specific characteristics. PMID:28151850

  7. Postauricular, transpetrous, presigmoid approach for extensive skull base tumors in the petroclival region: the successes and the travails.

    PubMed

    Behari, Sanjay; Tyagi, Isha; Banerji, Deepu; Kumar, Vijendra; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K; Phadke, Rajendra V; Jain, Vijendra K

    2010-10-01

    Postauricular, transpetrous, presigmoid approach combines a supra/infratentorial exposure with partial petrosectomy to access third to the twelfth cranial nerves and extraaxial lesions situated anterolateral to brainstem. It provides a shorter working distance to large petrosal, petroclival, cerebellopontine, and cerebellomedullary cisternal lesions and their extensions to the subtemporal-infratemporal areas. This study reviews the surgical technique, corridors of extension, and complications encountered utilizing this approach for excising extensive lesions in these locations. The lesions (n = 14) included petroclival meningiomas [(n = 5), including three recurrent lesions], dumbbell lower cranial nerve schwannomas (n = 2), giant acoustic schwannomas (n = 2), recurrent giant trigeminal nerve schwannoma (n = 1), glomus jugulare (n = 3), and recurrent petrous aneurysmal bone cyst (n = 1). The approach was combined with a retrosigmoid suboccipital craniectomy (n = 3), with an infratemporal approach (n = 2), and with an extreme lateral transcondylar approach and a translabyrinthine approach in one patient each, respectively. External auditory canal was not ligated in nine patients, superior petrosal sinus and tentorial division was performed in all patients, and sigmoid sinus-internal jugular vein was excised in three patients (with a glomus jugulare (n = 1) and petroclival meningioma (n = 2), respectively). Repair was performed with fat-fascia, pedicled pericranium, and temporalis muscle. Lumbar drain was placed for three to five postoperative days. Total excision was performed in nine patients. Small tumor remnants were left attached to the brainstem (n = 3, petroclival meningioma), carotid canal and cavernous sinus (n = 1, glomus jugulare), and sigmoid sinus-jugular bulb (n = 1, recurrent trigeminal schwannoma). A two-staged procedure was performed in three patients. Two patients with recurrent giant

  8. [Paratrigeminal epidermoid originated in the meckel's cave (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Y; Morii, S; Tachibana, S; Saito, T; Ohwada, T

    1976-05-01

    We have reported a case of paratrigeminal epidermoid originated in the Meckel's cave. A 30 years old man was admitted to the department of neurosurgery with chief complaints of continuous right facial pain and numbness of entire right side of the face of three years duration. The positive neurological findings were hypesthesia over the distribution of the right trigeminal nerve, absence of the right corneal reflex and nystagmus on left lateral gaze. Caloric response was absent on the right side, however the audiogram showed normal. Cerebrospinal fluid examination was within normal limit. Electromyography showed giant spike in the right masseter and temporal muscles. Radiogram of the skull revealed a bone-destroying lesion over the medial florr of the right middle fossa involving the apex of the petrous bone (Fig 1). Right carotid angiography showed straightening and forward displacement of C4- C5 portion of the carotid siphon in the lateral view, and vertebral angiography showed displacement of basilar artery to the left side, upward displacement of the right posterior cerebral and superior cerebellar artery in the frontal view (Fig. 2, 3). At the time of operation, an epidermoid was identified in the Meckel's cave and totally removed microsurgically. Small amount of the tumor extending into the posterior fossa was also removed (Fig. 4, 5, 6, 7). Postoperative course was uneventfull except for an episode of headache and high fever of short duration, suggesting the signs of meningial irritation. Two months postoperativelly patient was relived of facial pain and was discharged with sensory impairment of the right trigeminal nerve distribution. Only 11 cases of paratrigeminal epidermoid, including the cases localized in the Meckel's cave have been reported in the past literatures (Table 1). In this paper we have discussed about the symptomatology and clinical data of paratrigeminal epidermoid and compared with those of trigeminal neurinoma, and meningioma originated

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear by using a hybrid radiofrequency coil at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Heo, Phil; Kim, Young-Bo; Han, Gyu-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of the membranous structures of the inner ear has been limited to the detection of the normal fluid signal intensity within the bony labyrinth by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipped with a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnet. High-field (HF) MRI has been available for more than a decade, and numerous studies have documented its significant advantages over conventional MRI with regards to its use in basic scientific research and routine clinical assessments. No previous studies of the inner ear by using HF MRI have been reported, in part because high-quality resolution of mastoid pneumatization is challenging due to artifacts generated in the HF environment and insufficient performance of radiofrequency (RF) coils. Therefore, a hybrid RF coil with integrated circuitry was developed at 7 T and was targeted for anatomical imaging to achieve a high resolution image of the structure of the human inner ear, excluding the bony portion. The inner-ear's structure is composed of soft tissues containing hydrogen ions and includes the membranous labyrinth, endolymphatic space, perilymphatic space, and cochlear-vestibular nerves. Visualization of the inner-ear's anatomy was performed in-vivo with a custom-designed hybrid RF coil and a specific imaging protocol based on an interpolated breath-held examination sequence. The comparative signal intensity value at 30-mm away from the phantom side was 88% higher for the hybrid RF coil and 24% higher for the 8-channel transmit/receive (Tx/Rx) coil than for the commercial birdcage coil. The optimized MRI protocol employed a hybrid RF coil because it enabled high-resolution imaging of the inner-ear's anatomy and accurate mapping of structures including the cochlea and the semicircular canals. These results indicate that 7 T MRI achieves high spatial resolution visualization of the inner-ear's anatomy. Therefore, MRI imaging using a hybrid RF coil at 7 T could provide a powerful tool for clinical investigations of petrous

  10. The bony labyrinth of the middle Pleistocene Sima de los Huesos hominins (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    PubMed

    Quam, Rolf; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    We performed 3D virtual reconstructions based on CT scans to study the bony labyrinth morphology in 14 individuals from the large middle Pleistocene hominin sample from the site of the Sima de los Huesos (SH) in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain. The Atapuerca (SH) hominins represent early members of the Neandertal clade and provide an opportunity to compare the data with the later in time Neandertals, as well as Pleistocene and recent humans more broadly. The Atapuerca (SH) hominins do not differ from the Neandertals in any of the variables related to the absolute and relative sizes and shape of the semicircular canals. Indeed, the entire Neandertal clade seems to be characterized by a derived pattern of canal proportions, including a relatively small posterior canal and a relatively large lateral canal. In contrast, one of the most distinctive features observed in Neandertals, the low placement of the posterior canal (i.e., high sagittal labyrinthine index), is generally not present in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins. This low placement is considered a derived feature in Neandertals and is correlated with a more vertical orientation of the ampullar line (LSCm < APA), posterior surface of the petrous pyramid (LSCm > PPp), and third part of the facial canal (LSCm < FC3). Some variation is present within the Atapuerca (SH) sample, however, with a few individuals approaching the Neandertal condition more closely. In addition, the cochlear shape index in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins is low, indicating a reduction in the height of the cochlea. Although the phylogenetic polarity of this feature is less clear, the low shape index in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins may be a derived feature. Regardless, cochlear height subsequently increased in Neandertals. In contrast to previous suggestions, the expanded data in the present study indicate no difference across the genus Homo in the angle of inclination of the cochlear basal turn (COs < LSCm). Principal components

  11. Semicircular canals and agility: the influence of size and shape measures

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Philip G; Jeffery, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    The semicircular canals of the inner ear sense angular accelerations and decelerations of the head and enable co-ordination of posture and body movement, as well as visual stability. Differences of agility and spatial sensitivity among species have been linked to interspecific differences in the relative size of the canals, particularly the radius of curvature (R) and the ratio of the canal plane area to streamline length (P/L). Here we investigate the scaling relationships of these two size variables and also out-of-plane torsion in the three semicircular canals (anterior, posterior and lateral), in order to assess which is more closely correlated with body size and locomotor agility. Measurements were computed from 3D landmarks taken from magnetic resonance images of a diverse sample of placental mammals encompassing 16 eutherian orders. Body masses were collected from the literature and an agility score was assigned to each species. The R and P/L of all three semicircular canals were found to have highly significant positive correlations with each other and no statistical difference was found between the slope of 2P/L against R and 1. This indicated that, contrary to initial hypotheses, there is little difference between 2P/L and R as measures of semicircular canal size. A measure of the in-plane circularity of the canal was obtained by dividing 2P/L by R and out-of-plane torsion was measured as angular deviation from a plane of best fit. It was predicted that deviations from in-plane and out-of-plane circularity would increase at small body size due to the constraints of fitting a proportionately larger canal into a smaller petrous bone. However, neither measurement was found to have a significant correlation with body mass, indicating that deviations from circularity (both in-plane and out-of-plane) are not sufficient to alter P/L to an extent that would impact the sensitivity of the canals. 2P/L and R were both shown to be significantly correlated with

  12. Surgical management of jugular foramen meningiomas: a series of 13 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Mario; Bacciu, Andrea; Falcioni, Maurizio; Taibah, Abdelkader; Piazza, Paolo

    2007-10-01

    Primary meningiomas occurring within the jugular foramen are exceedingly rare lesions presumed to originate from arachnoid-lining cells situated within the jugular foramen. The objective of this study is to analyze the management and outcome in a series of 13 primary jugular foramen meningiomas collected at a single center. Retrospective study. Quaternary referral otology and skull base private center. Charts belonging to 13 consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed jugular foramen meningioma surgically treated between September 1991 and May 2005 were examined retrospectively. The follow-up of the series ranged from 12 to 120 (mean, 42.8 +/- 27.5) months. Four (28.5%) patients underwent single-stage tumor removal through the petro-occipital transigmoid (POTS) approach. In two patients with preoperative unserviceable hearing, a combined POTS-translabyrinthine approach was adopted. Two patients underwent a combined POTS-transotic approach because of massive erosion of the carotid canal. A modified transcochlear approach type D with posterior rerouting of the facial nerve and transection of the sigmoid sinus and jugular bulb was performed in two patients with a huge cerebellopontine angle tumor component with extension to the prepontine cistern together with massive involvement of the petrous bone and middle ear and encasement of the vertical and horizontal segments of the intrapetrous carotid artery. In one patient with evidence of a dominant sinus on the site of the tumor, a subtotal tumor removal via an enlarged translabyrinthine approach (ETLA) was planned to resect the intradural component of the tumor. Two patients in our series underwent a planned staged procedure on account of a huge tumor component in the neck. One of these patients underwent a first-stage infratemporal fossa approach type A to remove the tumor component in the neck; the second-stage intradural removal of the tumor was accomplished via an ETLA. The last patient underwent a first

  13. Adaptive Changes In Postural Equilibrium And Motion Sickness Following Repeated Exposures To Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, D. L.; Taylor, L. C.

    2006-01-01

    Virtual environments offer unique training opportunities, particularly for training astronauts and preadapting them to the novel sensory conditions of microgravity. Two unresolved human factors issues in virtual reality (VR) systems are: 1) potential "cybersickness", and 2) maladaptive sensorimotor performance following exposure to VR systems. Interestingly, these aftereffects are often quite similar to adaptive sensorimotor responses observed in astronauts during and/or following space flight. Changes in the environmental sensory stimulus conditions and the way we interact with the new stimuli may result in motion sickness, and perceptual, spatial orientation and sensorimotor disturbances. Initial interpretation of novel sensory information may be inappropriate and result in perceptual errors. Active exploratory behavior in a new environment, with resulting feedback and the formation of new associations between sensory inputs and response outputs, promotes appropriate perception and motor control in the new environment. Thus, people adapt to consistent, sustained alterations of sensory input such as those produced by microgravity, unilateral labyrinthectomy and experimentally produced stimulus rearrangements. Adaptation is revealed by aftereffects including perceptual disturbances and sensorimotor control disturbances. The purpose of the current study was to compare disturbances in postural control produced by dome and head-mounted virtual environment displays, and to examine the effects of exposure duration, and repeated exposures to VR systems. Forty-one subjects (21 men, 20 women) participated in the study with an age range of 21-49 years old. One training session was completed in order to achieve stable performance on the posture and VR tasks before participating in the experimental sessions. Three experimental sessions were performed each separated by one day. The subjects performed a navigation and pick and place task in either a dome or head-mounted display

  14. Adaptive Changes In Postural Equilibrium And Motion Sickness Following Repeated Exposures To Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, D. L.; Taylor, L. C.

    2006-01-01

    Virtual environments offer unique training opportunities, particularly for training astronauts and preadapting them to the novel sensory conditions of microgravity. Two unresolved human factors issues in virtual reality (VR) systems are: 1) potential "cybersickness", and 2) maladaptive sensorimotor performance following exposure to VR systems. Interestingly, these aftereffects are often quite similar to adaptive sensorimotor responses observed in astronauts during and/or following space flight. Changes in the environmental sensory stimulus conditions and the way we interact with the new stimuli may result in motion sickness, and perceptual, spatial orientation and sensorimotor disturbances. Initial interpretation of novel sensory information may be inappropriate and result in perceptual errors. Active exploratory behavior in a new environment, with resulting feedback and the formation of new associations between sensory inputs and response outputs, promotes appropriate perception and motor control in the new environment. Thus, people adapt to consistent, sustained alterations of sensory input such as those produced by microgravity, unilateral labyrinthectomy and experimentally produced stimulus rearrangements. Adaptation is revealed by aftereffects including perceptual disturbances and sensorimotor control disturbances. The purpose of the current study was to compare disturbances in postural control produced by dome and head-mounted virtual environment displays, and to examine the effects of exposure duration, and repeated exposures to VR systems. Forty-one subjects (21 men, 20 women) participated in the study with an age range of 21-49 years old. One training session was completed in order to achieve stable performance on the posture and VR tasks before participating in the experimental sessions. Three experimental sessions were performed each separated by one day. The subjects performed a navigation and pick and place task in either a dome or head-mounted display

  15. Sydenham's chorea in western Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Zomorrodi, Arezoo; Wald, Ellen R

    2006-04-01

    mean age of presentation was 9.8 years (range: 5-14.5 years). Chorea was unilateral in 23 (30%) patients. Family history of ARF existed in 30% of patients. Neurologic symptoms of SC included behavior change (46%), dysarthria (67%), gait change (51%), deterioration of handwriting (29%), and headache (11%). Nonneurologic manifestations of ARF were carditis (44%), arthritis (11%), erythema marginatum (3%), and subcutaneous nodules (0%). Antecedent group A streptococcal infection was documented in 99% of patients who were tested by an elevated antistreptolysin O titer (n = 53), an elevated anti-deoxyribonuclease B titer (n = 7), a positive streptozyme (n = 53), or acute throat infection with Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 19). A total of 52 neuroimaging tests were obtained from 46 patients with SC. In patients with SC, brain MRI was abnormal in 8 of 32 patients, and brain computed tomography was abnormal in 1 of 20 patients. Abnormalities did not aid in diagnosis and included nonspecific increased signal (n = 2), nonspecific punctate lesions (n = 2), asymmetry of the hippocampal fissures, unrelated petrous bone anomaly, Arnold Chiari malformation, and medulloblastoma in a macrocephalic patient. Three patients with chorea that was not attributed to ARF had atypical presentations: 1 developed chorea after a perioperative hypoxic/ischemic central nervous system insult; 1 had an episode of disorientation, aphasia, and transient facial droop (angiography showed basal ganglia infarct); and 1 with hemichorea had basal ganglion infarct seen on MRI. Ninety-six percent of children who had acute chorea and presented to a large children's hospital in an area that is endemic for ARF had SC. These patients had characteristic demographic and clinical features of SC. The most common concurrent major Jones criterion was carditis. Arthritis, erythema marginatum, and subcutaneous nodules were uncommon in this population. Neuroimaging was obtained in 58% of patients with SC and did not aid in