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Sample records for lacking asparaginyl endopeptidase

  1. Activation of asparaginyl endopeptidase leads to Tau hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Tung, Yunn Chyn; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-06-14

    Neurofibrillary pathology of abnormally hyperphosphorylated Tau is a key lesion of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, and its density in the brain directly correlates with dementia. The phosphorylation of Tau is regulated by protein phosphatase 2A, which in turn is regulated by inhibitor 2, I2(PP2A). In acidic conditions such as generated by brain ischemia and hypoxia, especially in association with hyperglycemia as in diabetes, I2(PP2A) is cleaved by asparaginyl endopeptidase at Asn-175 into the N-terminal fragment (I2NTF) and the C-terminal fragment (I2CTF). Both I2NTF and I2CTF are known to bind to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A and inhibit its activity. Here we show that the level of activated asparaginyl endopeptidase is significantly increased, and this enzyme and I2(PP2A) translocate, respectively, from neuronal lysosomes and nucleus to the cytoplasm where they interact and are associated with hyperphosphorylated Tau in Alzheimer disease brain. Asparaginyl endopeptidase from Alzheimer disease brain could cleave GST-I2(PP2A), except when I2(PP2A) was mutated at the cleavage site Asn-175 to Gln. Finally, an induction of acidosis by treatment with kainic acid or pH 6.0 medium activated asparaginyl endopeptidase and consequently produced the cleavage of I2(PP2A), inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A, and hyperphosphorylation of Tau, and the knockdown of asparaginyl endopeptidase with siRNA abolished this pathway in SH-SY5Y cells. These findings suggest the involvement of brain acidosis in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, and asparaginyl endopeptidase-I2(PP2A)-protein phosphatase 2A-Tau hyperphosphorylation pathway as a therapeutic target.

  2. Asparaginyl endopeptidase from the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, and its potential for serodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Jittiyawadee; Sripa, Banchob; Pearson, Mark; Tribolet, Leon; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Brindley, Paul J.; Loukas, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objectives To isolate and characterize an asparaginyl endopeptidase from the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, and evaluate its expression profile, biochemical activity, and potential as an immunodiagnostic antigen. Methods The full length mRNA encoding an asparaginyl endopeptidase (family C13), Ov-aep-1, was isolated by immunoscreening of a cDNA bacteriophage library of adult O. viverrini using sera from patients infected with O. viverrini. Investigation of Ov-aep-1 transcripts in developmental stages of the parasite, and phylogenetic analysis, immunohistochemical localization, and recombinant protein expression and enzymology were employed to characterize the Ov-AEP-1 protein. Immunoblotting was used to assess the potential of this enzyme for immunodiagnosis of human opisthorchiasis. Results Ov-AEP-1 is characteristic of the C13 cysteine protease family. Ov-aep-1 transcripts were detected in adult and juvenile worms, eggs, and metacercariae. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Ov-AEP-1 is closely related to homologous proteins in other trematodes. Recombinant Ov-AEP-1 was expressed in bacteria in inclusion bodies and refolded to a soluble form. Excretory–secretory (ES) products derived from adult O. viverrini and refolded recombinant Ov-AEP-1 both displayed catalytic activity against the diagnostic tripeptide substrate, Ala–Ala–Asn-aminomethylcoumarin. Rabbit antiserum raised to recombinant Ov-AEP-1 identified the native AEP-1 protease in both somatic extract and ES products of adult worms. Anti-Ov-AEP-1 IgG immunolocalized the anatomical site of expression to the gut of the fluke, implying a physiological role in digestion of food or activation of other digestive enzymes. Recombinant Ov-AEP-1 was recognized by serum antibodies from patients with opisthorchiasis but not other helminth infections, with a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values are 100% and 67

  3. Development of a selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry-based assay to detect asparaginyl endopeptidase activity in biological fluids

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Michael J.; Gray, Oliver J.; Parker, Catriona; Holland, Mark; Williamson, Andrew J.K.; Pierce, Andrew; Unwin, Richard D.; Krishnan, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Cancer Biomarkers have the capability to improve patient outcomes. They have potential applications in diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring of disease progression and measuring response to treatment. This type of information is particularly useful in the individualisation of treatment regimens. Biomarkers may take many forms but considerable effort has been made to identify and quantify proteins in biological fluids. However, a major challenge in measuring protein in biological fluids, such as plasma, is the sensitivity of the assay and the complex matrix of proteins present. Furthermore, determining the effect of proteases in disease requires measurement of their activity in biological fluids as quantification of the protein itself may not provide sufficient information. To date little progress has been made towards monitoring activity of proteases in plasma. The protease asparaginyl endopeptidase has been implicated in diseases such as breast cancer, leukaemia and dementia. Here we describe a new approach to sensitively and in a targeted fashion quantify asparaginyl endopeptidase activity in plasma using a synthetic substrate peptide protected from nonspecific hydrolysis using D-amino acids within the structure. Our selected reaction monitoring approach enabled asparaginyl endopeptidase activity to be measured in human plasma with both a high dynamic range and sensitivity. This manuscript describes a paradigm for future development of assays to measure protease activities in biological fluids as biomarkers of disease. PMID:27683124

  4. Efficient backbone cyclization of linear peptides by a recombinant asparaginyl endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Karen S.; Durek, Thomas; Kaas, Quentin; Poth, Aaron G.; Gilding, Edward K.; Conlan, Brendon F.; Saska, Ivana; Daly, Norelle L.; van der Weerden, Nicole L.; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclotides are diverse plant backbone cyclized peptides that have attracted interest as pharmaceutical scaffolds, but fundamentals of their biosynthetic origin remain elusive. Backbone cyclization is a key enzyme-mediated step of cyclotide biosynthesis and confers a measure of stability on the resultant cyclotide. Furthermore, cyclization would be desirable for engineered peptides. Here we report the identification of four asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEPs), proteases implicated in cyclization, from the cyclotide-producing plant Oldenlandia affinis. We recombinantly express OaAEP1b and find it functions preferably as a cyclase by coupling C-terminal cleavage of propeptide substrates with backbone cyclization. Interestingly, OaAEP1b cannot cleave at the N-terminal site of O. affinis cyclotide precursors, implicating additional proteases in cyclotide biosynthesis. Finally, we demonstrate the broad utility of this enzyme by cyclization of peptides unrelated to cyclotides. We propose that recombinant OaAEP1b is a powerful tool for use in peptide engineering applications where increased stability of peptide products is desired. PMID:26680698

  5. Schistosome asparaginyl endopeptidase (legumain) is not essential for cathepsin B1 activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Krautz-Peterson, Greice; Skelly, Patrick J

    2008-05-01

    Schistosomes are parasitic platyhelminths that constitute an important public health problem. Adult parasites live in the vasculature of their vertebrate hosts where they consume blood. Ingested blood proteins are degraded by a proteolytic cascade. One of the best characterized schistosome proteases is cathepsin B1 (SmCB1 or Sm31). This protein is synthesized as a large 38 kDa precursor form which is proteolytically cleaved to yield a mature, active 31 kDa enzyme. A second schistosome protease--the asparaginyl endopeptidase SmAE (also known as Sm32, or schistosome legumain), has been proposed to proteolytically convert the 38 kDa precursor SmCB1 into its mature form. Recombinant activated SmAE has been shown to trans-process SmCB1 into the mature, catalytic form in vitro. In the present study, our aim was to test the hypothesis that in vivo SmAE likewise processes SmCB1 into its active form. To do this, expression of the SmAE gene was suppressed in adult Schistosoma mansoni using RNA interference (RNAi). The results of these experiments show that, even in the absence of detectable SmAE protein, SmCB1 is fully processed and active and support the assertion that SmAE is not essential to activate SmCB1 in vivo. The data indicate that our original hypothesis is incorrect and that SmAE is not pivotal in the in vivo conversion of cathepsin B1 into its mature, active form.

  6. Asparaginyl endopeptidase promotes the invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer through modulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Li, Qian; Yu, Yiyi; Xu, Xiaojing; Xu, Bei; Liu, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP) is a lysosomal protease often overexpressed in gastric cancer. AEP was expressed higher in peritoneal metastatic loci than in primary gastric cancer. Then we overexpressed AEP or knocked it down with a lentiviral vector in gastric cancer cell lines and detected the cell cycle arrest and the changes of the invasive and metastatic ability in vitro and in vivo. When AEP was knocked-down, the proliferative, invasive and metastatic capacity of gastric cancer cells were inhibited, and the population of sub-G1 cells increased. AEP knockdown led to significant decrease of expression of transcription factor Twist and the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, ß-catenin and Vimentin and to increased expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin. These results showed that AEP could promote invasion and metastasis by modulating EMT. We used phosphorylation-specific antibody microarrays to investigate the mechanism how AEP promotes gastric cancer invasion and metastasis, and found that the phosphorylation level of AKT and MAPK signaling pathways was decreased significantly if AEP was knocked-down. Therefore, AKT and MAPK signaling pathways took part in the modulation. PMID:27102302

  7. IrAE – an asparaginyl endopeptidase (legumain) in the gut of the hard tick Ixodes ricinus

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Daniel; Hajdušek, Ondřej; Dvořák, Jan; Sajid, Mohammed; Franta, Zdeněk; Schneider, Eric L.; Craik, Charles S.; Vancová, Marie; Burešová, Veronika; Bogyo, Matthew; Sexton, Kelly B.; McKerrow, James H.; Caffrey, Conor R.; Kopáček, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Ticks are ectoparasitic blood-feeders and important vectors for pathogens including arboviruses, rickettsiae, spirochetes and protozoa. As obligate blood-feeders, one possible strategy to retard disease transmission is disruption of the parasite’s ability to digest host proteins. However, the constituent peptidases in the parasite gut and their potential interplay in the digestion of the blood meal are poorly understood. We have characterized a novel asparaginyl endopeptidase (legumain) from the hard tick Ixodes ricinus (termed IrAE), which is the first such characterization of a clan CD family C13 cysteine peptidase (protease) in arthropods. By RT-PCR of different tissues, IrAE mRNA was only expressed in the tick gut. Indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy localized IrAE in the digestive vesicles of gut cells and within the peritrophic matrix. IrAE was functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris and reacted with a specific peptidyl fluorogenic substrate, and acyloxymethyl ketone and aza-asparagine Michael acceptor inhibitors. IrAE activity was unstable at pH ≥ 6.0 and was shown to have a strict specificity for asparagine at P1 using a positional scanning synthetic combinatorial library. The enzyme hydrolyzed protein substrates with a pH optimum of 4.5, consistent with the pH of gut cell digestive vesicles. Thus, IrAE cleaved the major protein of the blood meal, hemoglobin, to a predominant peptide of 4 kDa. Also, IrAE trans-processed and activated the zymogen form of Schistosoma mansoni cathepsin B1 – an enzyme contributing to hemoglobin digestion in the gut of that bloodfluke. The possible functions of IrAE in the gut digestive processes of I. ricinus are compared with those suggested for other hematophagous parasites. PMID:17336985

  8. Functional expression and characterization of Schistosoma mansoni cathepsin B and its trans-activation by an endogenous asparaginyl endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Mohammed; McKerrow, James H; Hansell, Elizabeth; Mathieu, Mary A; Lucas, Kimberley D; Hsieh, Ivy; Greenbaum, Doron; Bogyo, Matthew; Salter, Jason P; Lim, Kee C; Franklin, Christopher; Kim, Jea-Hyoun; Caffrey, Conor R

    2003-09-01

    Peptidases are essential for the establishment and survival of the medically important parasite, Schistosoma mansoni. This helminth expresses a number of gut-associated peptidases that degrade host blood proteins, including hemoglobin, as a means of nutrition. Using irreversible affinity probes, we demonstrate that S. mansoni cathepsin B-like endopeptidase 1 (SmCB1) is the most abundant papain family cysteine peptidase in both the parasite gut and somatic extracts. SmCB1 zymogen (SmCB1pm) was functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris (4-11mgl(-1)). Monospecific and immunoselected antibodies raised against SmCB1pm localized the enzyme exclusively to the gut lumen and surrounding gastrodermis of adult worms. Recombinant SmCB1pm was unable to catalyze its activation, even at low pH. However, recombinant S. mansoni asparaginyl endopeptidase (SmAE), another gut-associated cysteine peptidase, processed and activated SmCB1pm in trans. Consistent with the known specificity of AEs, processing occurred on the carboxyl side of an asparagine residue, two residues upstream of the start of the mature SmCB1 sequence. The remaining pro-region dipeptide was removed by rat cathepsin C (dipeptidyl-peptidase I)-an action conceivably performed by an endogenous cathepsin C in vivo. The activated recombinant SmCB1 is biochemically identical to the native enzyme with respect to dipeptidyl substrate kinetics and pH profiles. Also, the serum proteins, hemoglobin, serum albumin, IgG, and alpha-2 macroglobulin were efficiently degraded. Further, a novel application of an assay to measure the peptidyl carboxypeptidase activity of SmCB1 and other cathepsins B was developed using the synthetic substrate benzoyl-glycinyl-histidinyl-leucine (Bz-Gly-His-Leu). This study characterizes the major digestive cysteine peptidase in schistosomes and defines novel trans-processing events required to activate the SmCB1 zymogen in vitro which may facilitate the digestive process in vivo.

  9. Aza-peptidyl Michael acceptor and epoxide inhibitors--potent and selective inhibitors of Schistosoma mansoni and Ixodes ricinus legumains (asparaginyl endopeptidases).

    PubMed

    Ovat, Asli; Muindi, Fanuel; Fagan, Crystal; Brouner, Michelle; Hansell, Elizabeth; Dvorák, Jan; Sojka, Daniel; Kopácek, Petr; McKerrow, James H; Caffrey, Conor R; Powers, James C

    2009-11-26

    Aza-peptide Michael acceptors and epoxides with the general structure of YCO-Ala-Ala-AAsn-trans-CH horizontal lineCHCOR and YCO-Ala-Ala-AAsn-EP-COR, respectively, are shown to be potent inhibitors of asparaginyl endopeptidases (legumains) from the bloodfluke, Schistosoma mansoni (SmAE), and the hard tick, Ixodes ricinus (IrAE). Structure-activity relationships (SARs) were determined for a set of 41 aza-peptide Michael acceptors and eight aza-peptide epoxides. Both enzymes prefer disubstituted amides to monosubstituted amides in the P1' position, and potency increased as we increased the hydrophobicity of the inhibitor in this position. Extending the inhibitor to P5 resulted in increased potency, especially against IrAE, and both enzymes prefer small over large hydrophobic residues at P2. Aza-peptide Michael acceptor inhibitors are more potent than aza-peptide epoxide inhibitors, and for some of these compounds, second-order inhibiton rate constants are the fastest yet discovered. Given the central functions of these enzymes in both parasites, the data presented here may facilitate the eventual design of selective antiparasitic drugs.

  10. Asparaginyl endopeptidase improves the resistance of microtubule-targeting drugs in gastric cancer through IQGAP1 modulating the EGFR/JNK/ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuehong; Li, Qian; Li, Hong; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hongshan; Chen, Weidong; Zhang, Shangmin; Cao, Jian; Liu, Tianshu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In recent years, understanding of the role of asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP) in tumorigenesis has steadily increased. In this study, we investigated whether AEP expression correlates with sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs in gastric cancer and explored the mechanism. Patients and methods AEP expression in the serum of patients’ peripheral blood was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patient survival time was evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation assays were utilized to discover proteins that interact with AEP. Gastric cancer cell lines were established, in which AEP was overexpressed or knocked out using lentiviral CRISPR. The proliferative abilities of these cell lines in response to chemotherapy agents were evaluated using the Cell Counting Kit-8 method. Gene expression changes in these lines were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Results Patients with low expression of AEP were significantly more likely to have a good prognosis and experience complete response or partial response after treatment with docetaxel/S-1 regimen. Mass spectrum analysis showed that several proteins in the focal adhesion and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways interacted with AEP. IQGAP1 was confirmed to be one of the proteins interacting with AEP, and its protein level increased when AEP was knocked out. AEP knockout decreased resistance to microtubule inhibitors, including paclitaxel, docetaxel, and T-DM1. The expression levels of MDR1, p-EGFR, p-JNK, p-ERK, and p-Rac1/cdc42 were decreased in AEP knockout gastric cancer cell lines, and inhibitors of both JNK and ERK could block AEP-induced expression of MDR1. Conclusion AEP was not only a prognostic factor but also a predictive marker. AEP knockout could inhibit the activity of the EGFR/JNK/ERK signaling pathway and improve sensitivity to microtubule inhibitors through interacting with IQGAP1. PMID

  11. Cyclic Peptides Arising by Evolutionary Parallelism via Asparaginyl-Endopeptidase–Mediated Biosynthesis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Mylne, Joshua S.; Chan, Lai Yue; Chanson, Aurelie H.; Daly, Norelle L.; Schaefer, Hanno; Bailey, Timothy L.; Nguyencong, Philip; Cascales, Laura; Craik, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic miniprotein Momordica cochinchinensis Trypsin Inhibitor II (MCoTI-II) (34 amino acids) is a potent trypsin inhibitor (TI) and a favored scaffold for drug design. We have cloned the corresponding genes and determined that each precursor protein contains a tandem series of cyclic TIs terminating with the more commonly known, and potentially ancestral, acyclic TI. Expression of the precursor protein in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that production of the cyclic TIs, but not the terminal acyclic TI, depends on asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP) for maturation. The nature of their repetitive sequences and the almost identical structures of emerging TIs suggest these cyclic peptides evolved by internal gene amplification associated with recruitment of AEP for processing between domain repeats. This is the third example of similar AEP-mediated processing of a class of cyclic peptides from unrelated precursor proteins in phylogenetically distant plant families. This suggests that production of cyclic peptides in angiosperms has evolved in parallel using AEP as a constraining evolutionary channel. We believe this is evolutionary evidence that, in addition to its known roles in proteolysis, AEP is especially suited to performing protein cyclization. PMID:22822203

  12. Asparaginyl deamidation in two glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    DeLuna, Alexander; Quezada, Héctor; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; González, Alicia

    2005-03-25

    The non-enzymatic deamidation of asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous damage of several proteins under physiological conditions. In many cases, deamidation and isoaspartyl formation alters the biological activity or stability of the native polypeptide. Rates of deamidation of particular residues depend on many factors including protein structure and solvent exposure. Here, we investigated the spontaneous deamidation of the two NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which have different kinetic properties and are differentially expressed in this yeast. Our results show that Asn54, present in Gdh3p but missing in the GDH1-encoded homologue, is readily deamidated in vitro under alkaline conditions. Relative to the native enzyme, deamidated Gdh3p shows reduced protein stability. The different deamidation rates of the two isoenzymes could explain to some extent, the relative in vivo instability of the allosteric Gdh3p enzyme, compared to that of Gdh1p. It is thus possible that spontaneous asparaginyl modification could play a role in the metabolic regulation of ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis.

  13. cDNA cloning of porcine brain prolyl endopeptidase and identification of the active-site seryl residue

    SciTech Connect

    Rennex, D.; Hemmings, B.A.; Hofsteenge, J.; Stone, S.R. )

    1991-02-26

    Prolyl endopeptidase is a cytoplasmic serine protease. The enzyme was purified from porcine kidney, and oligonucleotides based on peptide sequences from this protein were used to isolate a cDNA clone from a porcine brain library. This clone contained the complete coding sequence of prolyl endopeptidase and encoded a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 80751 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of prolyl endopeptidase showed no sequence homology with other known serine proteases. ({sup 3}H)Diisopropyl fluorophosphate was used to identify the active-site serine of prolyl endopeptidase. One labeled peptide was isolated and sequenced. The sequence surrounding the active-site serine was Asn-Gly-Gly-Ser-Asn-Gly-Gly. This sequence is different from the active-site sequences of other known serine proteases. This difference and the lack of overall homology with the known families of serine proteases suggest that prolyl endopeptidase represents a new type of serine protease.

  14. Endopeptidase 24.16B. A new variant of endopeptidase 24.16.

    PubMed

    Rodd, D; Hersh, L B

    1995-04-28

    A peptidase, isolated from rat testes, is inhibited by 1 mM o-phenanthroline, 1 microM N-(1-(R,S)-carboxyl-3-phenylpropyl)-Ala-Ala-Phe-p-aminobenzoate, and 6 mM Pro-Ile, properties similar to those ascribed to endopeptidase 24.16. The enzyme hydrolyzes dynorphin A-8, neurotensin 1-13, angiotensin I, and substance P. Kinetic analysis of a series of angiotensin I analogs showed that substitutions at P-1, P-1', or P-2' had little effect on Km or Kcat. Variation of peptide size with a series of dynorphin A peptides showed chain length to be significant. The peptidase cleaved dynorphin A-8 at both Leu5-Arg6 and Arg6-Arg7, and neurotensin 1-13 at Pro10-Tyr11 and Arg8-Arg9. In contrast, rat endopeptidase 24.16 cleaves dynorphin A-8 at Gly4-Leu5 and Leu5-Arg6, and neurotensin 1-13 only at Pro10-Tyr11. These findings, as well as the observation that endopeptidase 24.16 exhibits a considerably higher affinity for Pro-Ile, Ki = 90 microM, indicates the peptidase isolated in this study is related to, but distinct from, rat endopeptidase 24.16. We propose that this new endopeptidase be referred to as endopeptidase 24.16B, while the originally described enzyme be referred to as endopeptidase 24.16A.

  15. Distinct properties of neuronal and astrocytic endopeptidase 3.4.24.16: a study on differentiation, subcellular distribution, and secretion processes.

    PubMed

    Vincent, B; Beaudet, A; Dauch, P; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1996-08-15

    Endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 belongs to the zinc-containing metalloprotease family and likely participates in the physiological inactivation of neurotensin. The peptidase displays distinct features in pure primary cultured neurons and astrocytes. Neuronal maturation leads to a decrease in the proportion of endopeptidase 3.4.24.16-bearing neurons and to a concomitant increase in endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 activity and mRNA content. By contrast, there is no change with time in endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 activity or content in astrocytes. Primary cultured neurons exhibit both soluble and membrane-associated endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 activity. The latter behaves as an ectopeptidase on intact plated neurons and resists treatments with 0.2% digitonin and Na2CO3. Further evidence for an association of the enzyme with plasma membranes was provided by cryoprotection experiments and electron microscopic analysis. The membrane-associated form of endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 increased during neuronal differentiation and appears to be mainly responsible for the overall augmentation of endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 activity observed during neuronal maturation. Unlike neurons, astrocytes only contain soluble endopeptidase 3.4.24.16. Astrocytes secrete the enzyme through monensin, brefeldin A, and forskolin-independent mechanisms. This indicates that endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 is not released by classical regulated or constitutive secreting processes. However, secretion is blocked at 4 degrees C and by 8 bromo cAMP and is enhanced at 42 degrees C, two properties reminiscent of that of other secreted proteins lacking a classical signal peptide. By contrast, neurons appear unable to secrete endopeptidase 3.4.24.16.

  16. The crystal structure of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus and its complexes with ATP and asparaginyl-adenylate: the mechanism of discrimination between asparagine and aspartic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Berthet-Colominas, C; Seignovert, L; Härtlein, M; Grotli, M; Cusack, S; Leberman, R

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structure of Thermus thermophilus asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase has been solved by multiple isomorphous replacement and refined at 2.6 A resolution. This is the last of the three class IIb aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase structures to be determined. As expected from primary sequence comparisons, there are remarkable similarities between the tertiary structures of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase and aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, and most of the active site residues are identical except for three key differences. The structure at 2.65 A of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase complexed with a non-hydrolysable analogue of asparaginyl-adenylate permits a detailed explanation of how these three differences allow each enzyme to discriminate between their respective and very similar amino acid substrates, asparagine and aspartic acid. In addition, a structure of the complex of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase with ATP shows exactly the same configuration of three divalent cations as previously observed in the seryl-tRNA synthetase-ATP complex, showing that this a general feature of class II synthetases. The structural similarity of asparaginyl- and aspartyl-tRNA synthetases as well as that of both enzymes to the ammonia-dependent asparagine synthetase suggests that these three enzymes have evolved relatively recently from a common ancestor. PMID:9582288

  17. Anti-Angiogenic Action of Neutral Endopeptidase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-30

    production (this is more of an in vitro phenomenon). A number of studies both in vitro and in patient specimens suggest that enhanced expression of...enzymatic site exposed to the external cell surface, Neutral endopeptidase (NEP) is a cell-surface peptidase normally expressed by prostatic epithelial...cells, whose expression is lost in over half of prostate cancers. NEP substrates include small peptides that have been implicated in prostate

  18. Host FIH-Mediated Asparaginyl Hydroxylation of Translocated Legionella pneumophila Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Price, Christopher; Merchant, Michael; Jones, Snake; Best, Ashley; Von Dwingelo, Juanita; Lawrenz, Matthew B.; Alam, Nawsad; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Kwaik, Yousef A.

    2017-01-01

    FIH-mediated post-translational modification through asparaginyl hydroxylation of eukaryotic proteins impacts regulation of protein-protein interaction. We have identified the FIH recognition motif in 11 Legionella pneumophila translocated effectors, YopM of Yersinia, IpaH4.5 of Shigella and an ankyrin protein of Rickettsia. Mass spectrometry analyses of the AnkB and AnkH effectors of L. pneumophila confirm their asparaginyl hydroxylation. Consistent with localization of the AnkB effector to the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) membrane and its modification by FIH, our data show that FIH and its two interacting proteins, Mint3 and MT1-MMP are acquired by the LCV in a Dot/Icm type IV secretion-dependent manner. Chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of FIH promotes LCV-lysosomes fusion, diminishes decoration of the LCV with polyubiquitinated proteins, and abolishes intra-vacuolar replication of L. pneumophila. These data show acquisition of the host FIH by a pathogen-containing vacuole and that asparaginyl-hydroxylation of translocated effectors is indispensable for their function. PMID:28321389

  19. Specific inhibition of endopeptidase 24.16 by dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Dauch, P; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1991-12-05

    The inhibitory effect of various dipeptides on the neurotensin-degrading metallopeptidase, endopeptidase 24.16, was examined. These dipeptides mimick the Pro10-Tyr11 bond of neurotensin that is hydrolyzed by endopeptidase 24.16. Among a series of Pro-Xaa dipeptides, the most potent inhibitory effect was elicited by Pro-Ile (Ki approximately 90 microM) with Pro-Ile greater than Pro-Met greater than Pro-Phe. All the Xaa-Tyr dipeptides were unable to inhibit endopeptidase 24.16. The effect of Pro-Ile on several purified peptidases was assessed by means of fluorigenic assays and HPLC analysis. A 5 mM concentration of Pro-Ile does not inhibit endopeptidase 24.11, endopeptidase 24.15, angiotensin-converting enzyme, proline endopeptidase, trypsin, leucine aminopeptidase, pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase I and carboxypeptidase B. The only enzyme that was affected by Pro-Ile was carboxypeptidase A, although it was with a 50-fold lower potency (Ki approximately 5 mM) than for endopeptidase 24.16. By means of fluorimetric substrates with a series of hydrolysing activities, we demonstrate that Pro-Ile can be used as a specific inhibitor of endopeptidase 24.16, even in a complex mixture of peptidase activities such as found in whole rat brain homogenate.

  20. Neutral endopeptidase inhibition: could it have a role in the treatment of female sexual arousal disorder?

    PubMed

    Angulo, Javier

    2010-05-01

    Female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD) is the inability to attain or maintain an adequate lubrication-swelling response of sexual excitement. The potentiation of vascular responses leading to increased blood flow in clitoris and vagina has represented the main focus in the pharmacological treatment of FSAD, including the evaluation of the type 5 phosphodiesterase (PDE5) inhibitors. However, due to a lack of clear efficacy, there is no approved pharmacotherapy for FSAD to date. In the present issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology, Wayman et al. show that the administration by intravenous or intravaginal routes of a novel neutral endopeptidase inhibitor, UK-414,445, results in enhanced genital blood flow responses to pelvic nerve stimulation in female rabbits, without significantly affecting blood pressure. Neutral endopeptidase inhibition, by preserving vasoactive peptides such as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, raises the possibility of a new pharmacological approach to the treatment of FSAD.

  1. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J.; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  2. Induced-fit Mechanism for Prolyl Endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Min; Chen, Changqing; Davies, David R.; Chiu, Thang K.

    2010-11-15

    Prolyl peptidases cleave proteins at proline residues and are of importance for cancer, neurological function, and type II diabetes. Prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) cleaves neuropeptides and is a drug target for neuropsychiatric diseases such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and schizophrenia. Previous structural analyses showing little differences between native and substrate-bound structures have suggested a lock-and-key catalytic mechanism. We now directly demonstrate from seven structures of Aeromonus punctata PEP that the mechanism is instead induced fit: the native enzyme exists in a conformationally flexible opened state with a large interdomain opening between the {beta}-propeller and {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase domains; addition of substrate to preformed native crystals induces a large scale conformational change into a closed state with induced-fit adjustments of the active site, and inhibition of this conformational change prevents substrate binding. Absolute sequence conservation among 28 orthologs of residues at the active site and critical residues at the interdomain interface indicates that this mechanism is conserved in all PEPs. This finding has immediate implications for the use of conformationally targeted drug design to improve specificity of inhibition against this family of proline-specific serine proteases.

  3. Serotype-Selective, Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Zinc Endopeptidase of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    domain lacks a deep pocket at the interface of its complex .5,9 Third, the four-ligand coordination of the zinc ion embedded in the active site of the... complex with a substrate has been reported.25 In addition to the use of the active site of the endopeptidase as a target described above, the X- ray...simulations were carried out for each of the eight com- puter-identified compounds in complex with the endo- peptidase. Each of these simulations was

  4. Potent inhibition of endopeptidase 24.16 and endopeptidase 24.15 by the phosphonamide peptide N-(phenylethylphosphonyl)-Gly-L-Pro-L-aminohexanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Barelli, H; Dive, V; Yiotakis, A; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1992-10-15

    A phosphonamide peptide, N-(phenylethylphosphonyl)-Gly-L-Pro-L-aminohexanoic acid, previously shown to block Clostridium histolyticum collagenases, was examined as a putative inhibitor of endopeptidase 24.16 and endopeptidase 24.15. Hydrolysis of two endopeptidase 24.16 substrates, i.e. 3-carboxy-7-methoxycoumarin (Mcc)-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-D-Lys-dinitrophenyl (Dnp) and neurotensin, were completely and dose-dependently inhibited by the phosphonamide inhibitor with KI values of 0.3 and 0.9 nM respectively. In addition, the phosphonamide peptide inhibited the hydrolysis of benzoyl (Bz)-Gly-Ala-Ala-Phe-(pAB) p-aminobenzoate and neurotensin by endopeptidase 24.15 with about a 10-fold lower potency (KI values of 5 and 7.5 nM respectively). The selectivity of this inhibitor towards several exo- and endo-peptidases belonging to the zinc-containing metallopeptidase family established that a 1 microM concentration of this inhibitor was unable to affect leucine aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase A, angiotensin-converting enzyme and endopeptidase 24.11. The present paper therefore reports on the first hydrophilic highly potent endopeptidase 24.16 inhibitor and describes the most potent inhibitory agent directed towards endopeptidase 24.15 developed to date. These tools should allow one to assess the contribution of endopeptidase 24.16 and endopeptidase 24.15 to the physiological inactivation of neurotensin as well as other neuropeptides.

  5. Expression of Barley Endopeptidase B in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Saarelainen, R.; Mantyla, A.; Nevalainen, H.; Suominen, P.

    1997-01-01

    The gene for barley endopeptidase B (EPB) has been expressed in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei from the cbh1 promoter. The EPB signal sequence allowed secretion of over 90% of the recombinant protein. Yields reached about 500 mg of immunoreactive protein per liter and exceeded values for any other protein derived from a higher eukaryotic organism produced in T. reesei. PMID:16535756

  6. A novel peptidoglycan D,L-endopeptidase induced by Salmonella inside eukaryotic cells contributes to virulence.

    PubMed

    Rico-Pérez, Gadea; Pezza, Alejandro; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; de Pedro, Miguel A; Soncini, Fernando C; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria remodel peptidoglycan structure in response to environmental changes. Many enzymes are involved in peptidoglycan metabolism; however, little is known about their responsiveness in a defined environment or the modes they assist bacteria to adapt to new niches. Here, we focused in peptidoglycan enzymes that intracellular bacterial pathogens use inside eukaryotic cells. We identified a peptidoglycan enzyme induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in fibroblasts and epithelial cells. This enzyme, which shows γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid D,L-endopeptidase activity, is also produced by the pathogen in media with limited nutrients and in resting conditions. The enzyme, termed EcgA for endopeptidase responding to cessation of growth', is encoded in a S. Typhimurium genomic island absent in Escherichia coli. EcgA production is strictly dependent on the virulence regulator PhoP in extra- and intracellular environments. Consistent to this regulation, a mutant lacking EcgA is attenuated in the mouse typhoid model. These findings suggest that specialised peptidoglycan enzymes, such as EcgA, might facilitate Salmonella adaptation to the intracellular lifestyle. Moreover, they indicate that readjustment of peptidoglycan metabolism inside the eukaryotic cell is essential for host colonisation.

  7. Human cathepsin H: deletion of the mini-chain switches substrate specificity from aminopeptidase to endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Dodt, Johannes; Reichwein, Jörg

    2003-09-01

    The mini-chain of human cathepsin H has been identified as the major structural element determining the protease's substrate specificity. A genetically engineered mutant of human cathepsin H lacking the mini-chain, des[Glu(-18)-Thr(-11)]-cathepsin H, exhibits endopeptidase activity towards the synthetic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-NH-Mec (kcat = 0.4 s(-1), Km = 92 microM, kcat/Km = 4348 M(-1) s(-1)) which is not cleaved by r-wt cathepsin H. However, the mutant enzyme shows only minimal aminopeptidase activity for H-Arg-NH-Mec (kcat = 0.8 s(-1), Km = 3.6 mM, kcat/Km = 222 M(-1) s(-1)) which is one of the best known substrates for native human cathepsin H (kcat = 2.5 s(-1), Km = 150 microM, kcat/Km = 16666 M(-1) s(-1)). Inhibition studies with chicken egg white cystatin and E-64 suggest that the mini-chain normally restricts access of inhibitors to the active site. The kinetic data on substrates hydrolysis and enzyme inhibition point out the role of the mini-chain as a structural framework for transition state stabilization of free alpha-amino groups of substrates and as a structural barrier for endopeptidase-like substrate cleavage.

  8. Brugia malayi Asparaginyl - tRNA Synthetase Stimulates Endothelial Cell Proliferation, Vasodilation and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    D, Jeeva Jothi; Dhanraj, Muthu; Solaiappan, Shanmugam; Sivanesan, Sanjana; Kron, Michael; Dhanasekaran, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of chronic infection with lymphatic filarial parasites is the development of lymphatic disease which often results in permanent vasodilation and lymphedema, but all of the mechanisms by which filarial parasites induce pathology are not known. Prior work showed that the asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (BmAsnRS) of Brugia malayi, an etiological agent of lymphatic filariasis, acts as a physiocrine that binds specifically to interleukin-8 (IL-8) chemokine receptors. Endothelial cells are one of the many cell types that express IL-8 receptors. IL-8 also has been reported previously to induce angiogenesis and vasodilation, however, the effect of BmAsnRS on endothelial cells has not been reported. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that BmAsnRS might produce physiological changes in endothelial by studying the in vitro effects of BmAsnRS using a human umbilical vein cell line EA.hy926 and six different endothelial cell assays. Our results demonstrated that BmAsnRS produces consistent and statistically significant effects on endothelial cells that are identical to the effects of VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor. This study supports the idea that new drugs or immunotherapies that counteract the adverse effects of parasite-derived physiocrines may prevent or ameliorate the vascular pathology observed in patients with lymphatic filariasis. PMID:26751209

  9. Stably transfected human cells overexpressing rat brain endopeptidase 3.4.24.16: biochemical characterization of the activity and expression of soluble and membrane-associated counterparts.

    PubMed

    Vincent, B; Dauch, P; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1997-02-01

    We recently cloned endopeptidase-24.16 (neurolysin; EC 3.4.24.16), a neurotensin-degrading peptidase likely involved in the physiological termination of the neurotensinergic signal in the central nervous system and in the gastrointestinal tract. We stably transfected human kidney cells with the pcDNA3-lambda 7aB1 construction bearing the whole open reading frame encoding the rat brain peptidase. Transfectants displayed endopeptidase-24.16 immunoreactivity and exhibited QFS- and neurotensin-hydrolyzing activities, the biochemical and specificity properties of which fully matched those observed with the purified murine enzyme. Cryoprotection experiments and substrate degradation by intact plated cells indicated that transfectants exhibited a membrane-associated form of endopeptidase-24.16, the catalytic site of which clearly faced the extracellular domain. Transfected cells were unable to secrete the enzyme. Overall, our experiments indicate that we have obtained stably transfectant cells that overexpress an enzymatic activity displaying biochemical properties identical to those of purified endopeptidase-24.16. The membrane-associated counterpart and lack of secretion of the enzyme were clearly reminiscent of what was observed with pure cultured neurons, but not with astrocytes. Therefore, the transfected cell model described here could prove useful for establishing, by a mutagenesis approach, the structural elements responsible for the "neuronal" phenotype exhibited by the enzyme in transfected cells.

  10. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-10-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain.

  11. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-01-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain. PMID:9742219

  12. Targeting of endopeptidase 24.16 to different subcellular compartments by alternative promoter usage.

    PubMed

    Kato, A; Sugiura, N; Saruta, Y; Hosoiri, T; Yasue, H; Hirose, S

    1997-06-13

    Endopeptidase 24.16 or mitochondrial oligopeptidase, abbreviated here as EP 24.16 (MOP), is a thiol- and metal-dependent oligopeptidase that is found in multiple intracellular compartments in mammalian cells. From an analysis of the corresponding gene, we found that the distribution of the enzyme to appropriate subcellular locations is achieved by the use of alternative sites for the initiation of transcription. The pig EP 24.16 (MOP) gene spans over 100 kilobases and is organized into 16 exons. The core protein sequence is encoded by exons 5-16 which match perfectly with exons 2-13 of the gene for endopeptidase 24.15, another member of the thimet oligopeptidase family. These two sets of 11 exons share the same splice sites, suggesting a common ancestor. Multiple species of mRNA for EP 24.16 (MOP) were detected by the 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends and they were shown to have been generated from a single gene by alternative choices of sites for the initiation of transcription and splicing. Two types of transcript were prepared, corresponding to transcription from distal and proximal sites. Their expression in vitro in COS-1 cells indicated that they encoded two isoforms (long and short) which differed only at their amino termini: the long form contained a cleavable mitochondrial targeting sequence and was directed to mitochondria; the short form, lacking such a signal sequence, remained in the cytosol. The complex structure of the EP 24.16 (MOP) gene thus allows, by alternative promoter usage, a fine transcriptional regulation of coordinate expression, in the different subcellular compartments, of the two isoforms arising from a single gene.

  13. Specific catalysis of asparaginyl deamidation by carboxylic acids: kinetic, thermodynamic, and quantitative structure-property relationship analyses.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Brian D; Tran, Benjamin; Moore, Jamie M R; Sharma, Vikas K; Kosky, Andrew

    2014-04-07

    Asparaginyl (Asn) deamidation could lead to altered potency, safety, and/or pharmacokinetics of therapeutic protein drugs. In this study, we investigated the effects of several different carboxylic acids on Asn deamidation rates using an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb1*) and a model hexapeptide (peptide1) with the sequence YGKNGG. Thermodynamic analyses of the kinetics data revealed that higher deamidation rates are associated with predominantly more negative ΔS and, to a lesser extent, more positive ΔH. The observed differences in deamidation rates were attributed to the unique ability of each type of carboxylic acid to stabilize the energetically unfavorable transition-state conformations required for imide formation. Quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) analysis using kinetic data demonstrated that molecular descriptors encoding for the geometric spatial distribution of atomic properties on various carboxylic acids are effective determinants for the deamidation reaction. Specifically, the number of O-O and O-H atom pairs on carboxyl and hydroxyl groups with interatomic distances of 4-5 Å on a carboxylic acid buffer appears to determine the rate of deamidation. Collectively, the results from structural and thermodynamic analyses indicate that carboxylic acids presumably form multiple hydrogen bonds and charge-charge interactions with the relevant deamidation site and provide alignment between the reactive atoms on the side chain and backbone. We propose that carboxylic acids catalyze deamidation by stabilizing a specific, energetically unfavorable transition-state conformation of l-asparaginyl intermediate II that readily facilitates bond formation between the γ-carbonyl carbon and the deprotonated backbone nitrogen for cyclic imide formation.

  14. Tuning the Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia by Inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF) Prolyl and Asparaginyl Hydroxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Mun Chiang; Ilott, Nicholas E.; Schödel, Johannes; Sims, David; Tumber, Anthony; Lippl, Kerstin; Mole, David R.; Pugh, Christopher W.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Ponting, Chris P.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) system orchestrates cellular responses to hypoxia in animals. HIF is an α/β-heterodimeric transcription factor that regulates the expression of hundreds of genes in a tissue context-dependent manner. The major hypoxia-sensing component of the HIF system involves oxygen-dependent catalysis by the HIF hydroxylases; in humans there are three HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1–3) and an asparaginyl hydroxylase (factor-inhibiting HIF (FIH)). PHD catalysis regulates HIFα levels, and FIH catalysis regulates HIF activity. How differences in HIFα hydroxylation status relate to variations in the induction of specific HIF target gene transcription is unknown. We report studies using small molecule HIF hydroxylase inhibitors that investigate the extent to which HIF target gene expression is induced by PHD or FIH inhibition. The results reveal substantial differences in the role of prolyl and asparaginyl hydroxylation in regulating hypoxia-responsive genes in cells. PHD inhibitors with different structural scaffolds behave similarly. Under the tested conditions, a broad-spectrum 2-oxoglutarate dioxygenase inhibitor is a better mimic of the overall transcriptional response to hypoxia than the selective PHD inhibitors, consistent with an important role for FIH in the hypoxic transcriptional response. Indeed, combined application of selective PHD and FIH inhibitors resulted in the transcriptional induction of a subset of genes not fully responsive to PHD inhibition alone. Thus, for the therapeutic regulation of HIF target genes, it is important to consider both PHD and FIH activity, and in the case of some sets of target genes, simultaneous inhibition of the PHDs and FIH catalysis may be preferable. PMID:27502280

  15. Preparation of specifically activatable endopeptidase derivatives of Clostridium botulinum toxins type A, B, and C and their applications.

    PubMed

    Sutton, J Mark; Wayne, Jonathan; Scott-Tucker, Anthony; O'Brien, Susan M; Marks, Philip M H; Alexander, Frances C G; Shone, Clifford C; Chaddock, John A

    2005-03-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are potently toxic proteins of 150 kDa with specific endopeptidase activity for SNARE proteins involved in vesicle docking and release. Following treatment with trypsin, a fragment of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A that lacks the C-terminal domain responsible for neuronal cell binding, but retains full catalytic activity, can be obtained. Known as the LH(N) fragment, we report the development of a recombinant expression and purification scheme for the isolation of comparable fragments of neurotoxin serotypes B and C. Expressed as maltose-binding protein fusions, both have specific proteolytic sites present between the fusion tag and the light chain to facilitate removal of the fusion, and between the light chain endopeptidase and the H(N) translocation domains to facilitate activation of the single polypeptide. We have also used this approach to prepare a new variant of LH(N)/A with a specific activation site that avoids the need to use trypsin. All three LH(N)s are enzymatically active and are of low toxicity. The production of specifically activatable LH(N)/A, LH(N)/B, and LH(N)/C extends the opportunities for exploitation of neurotoxin fragments. The potential utility of these fragments is discussed.

  16. Determination of fluorescence-labeled asparaginyl-oligosaccharide in glycoprotein by reversed-phase ultraperformance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Takamasa; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa; Fukushima, Takeshi; Inagaki, Shinsuke

    2007-11-15

    Eight fluorescence reagents, i.e., DBD-F, NBD-F, DNS-Cl, NDA, PSC, FITC, Fmoc-Cl, and DMEQ-COCl, which are reactive to an amino functional group, were tested for the labeling of asparaginyl-oligosaccharides in a glycoprotein. Although the optimal reaction conditions and the fluorescence maximal wavelengths were different for each reagent, the highly sensitive fluorescence detection at the femtomole level of Disialo-Asn (a representative asparaginyl-oligosaccharide) was obtained from the labeling utilizing these reagents. Among them, PSC was the most reliable reagent in terms of detection sensitivity (approximately 3 fmol, signal-to-noise ratio of 5 (S/N = 5) on the chromatogram). However, the structural information could not be obtained from the fluorescence detection. Thus, the on-line determination of a real sample was carried out by UPLC-ESI-TOF-MS. The detection limit of the PSC-labeled Disialo-Asn by selected-ion chromatography was 58 fmol (S/N = 5). When the proposed procedure was applied to the determination of oligosaccharides in ovalbumin, 15 species of PSC-labeled oligosaccharides possessing Man, GlcNAc, and Gal units were identified from the UPLC-ESI-TOF-MS. The number of identified oligosaccharides was relatively greater than the method using Fmoc-Cl. Based on the ovalbumin results, the proposed labeling with PSC followed by UPLC-ESI-TOF-MS detection seems to be useful for the on-line asparaginyl-oligosaccharide analysis.

  17. Molecular cloning and expression of rat brain endopeptidase 3.4.24.16.

    PubMed

    Dauch, P; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1995-11-10

    We have isolated by immunological screening of a lambda ZAPII cDNA library constructed from rat brain mRNAs a cDNA clone encoding endopeptidase 3.4.24.16. The longest open reading frame encodes a 704-amino acid protein with a theoretical molecular mass of 80,202 daltons and bears the consensus sequence of the zinc metalloprotease family. The sequence exhibits a 60.2% homology with those of another zinc metallopeptidase, endopeptidase 3.4.24.15. Northern blot analysis reveals two mRNA species of about 3 and 5 kilobases in rat brain, ileum, kidney, and testis. We have transiently transfected COS-7 cells with pcDNA3 containing the cloned cDNA and established the overexpression of a 70-75-kDa immunoreactive protein. This protein hydrolyzes QFS, a quenched fluorimetric substrate of endopeptidase 3.4.24.16, and cleaves neurotensin at a single peptide bond, leading to the formation of neurotensin (1-10) and neurotensin (11-13). QFS and neurotensin hydrolysis are potently inhibited by the selective endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 dipeptide blocker Pro-Ile and by dithiothreitol, while the enzymatic activity remains unaffected by phosphoramidon and captopril, the specific inhibitors of endopeptidase 3.4.24.11 and angiotensin-converting enzyme, respectively. Altogether, these physicochemical, biochemical, and immunological properties unambiguously identify endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 as the protein encoded by the isolated cDNA clone.

  18. Purification and partial characterization of a 31-kDa cysteine endopeptidase from germinated barley.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Jones, B L

    1996-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes hydrolyze cereal seed storage proteins into small peptides and amino acids, which are very important for seed germination and the malting process. A cysteine-class endopeptidase was purified from 4-d-germinated barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Morex). Four purification steps were used, carboxymethyl cellulose cation-exchange chromatography, chromatofocusing, size-exclusion chromatography, and electroelution from a polyacrylamide gel. The endopeptidase was most active at pH 4.5. It's isoelectric point (pI) was 4.4, as determined by isoelectric focusing, and it's SDS-PAGE molecular size was 31 kDa. The enzyme specifically hydrolyzed peptide bonds when the S2 site contained relatively large hydrophobic amino acids. The N-terminal amino acid sequence residues (1-9) of the 31-kDa endopeptidase had high homology to those of the EP-A and EP-B cysteine proteinases reported previously. The 31-kDa endopeptidase had a hydrolytic specificity similar to that of the Morex green malt 30-kDa endopeptidase we characterized previously, and also reacted with the antibody raised against the purified 30-kDa proteinase, but the two had different mobilities on non-denaturing PAGE. The hydrolytic specificities of both 30- and 31-kDa endopeptidases are such that both would very quickly cleave hordein (barley storage) proteins to small glutamine- and proline-rich peptides that could be quickly degraded to amino acids by barley exopeptidases.

  19. Two siblings with homozygous pathogenic splice-site variant in mitochondrial asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (NARS2).

    PubMed

    Vanlander, Arnaud V; Menten, Björn; Smet, Joél; De Meirleir, Linda; Sante, Tom; De Paepe, Boel; Seneca, Sara; Pearce, Sarah F; Powell, Christopher A; Vergult, Sarah; Michotte, Alex; De Latter, Elien; Vantomme, Lies; Minczuk, Michal; Van Coster, Rudy

    2015-02-01

    A homozygous missense mutation (c.822G>C) was found in the gene encoding the mitochondrial asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (NARS2) in two siblings born to consanguineous parents. These siblings presented with different phenotypes: one had mild intellectual disability and epilepsy in childhood, whereas the other had severe myopathy. Biochemical analysis of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes in both siblings revealed a combined complex I and IV deficiency in skeletal muscle. In-gel activity staining after blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed the decreased activity of complex I and IV, and, in addition, showed the presence of complex V subcomplexes. Considering the consanguineous descent, homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were combined revealing the presence of one single missense mutation in the shared homozygous region. The c.822G>C variant affects the 3' splice site of exon 7, leading to skipping of the whole exon 7 and a part of exon 8 in the NARS2 mRNA. In EBV-transformed lymphoblasts, a specific decrease in the amount of charged mt-tRNA(Asn) was demonstrated as compared with controls. This confirmed the pathogenic nature of the variant. To conclude, the reported variant in NARS2 results in a combined OXPHOS complex deficiency involving complex I and IV, making NARS2 a new member of disease-associated aaRS2.

  20. Endopeptidase 24-16 in murines: tissue distribution, cerebral regionalization, and ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Dauch, P; Masuo, Y; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1992-11-01

    The tissue distribution, cerebral regionalization, and ontogeny of endopeptidase 24-16 were established in murines by means of its quenched fluorimetric substrate, Mcc-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-D-Lys-Dnp, and its selective dipeptide blocker, Pro-Ile. Endopeptidase 24-16 was particularly abundant in the liver and kidney, and the lowest specific activity was detected in the heart. In the brain, a 16-fold difference in specific activity was observed between the poorest and the richest cerebral areas. Endopeptidase 24-16 appeared in high concentrations in the olfactory bulb and tubercule, cingulate cortex, medial striatum, and globus pallidus, and was particularly weak in the CA1, CA2, and CA3 parts of the hippocampal formation and in the cerebellum. Endopeptidase 24-16 content in thirteen thalamic nuclei indicated a rather homogeneous distribution. This homogeneity was not observed in the hypothalamus, where pronounced variations occurred between enriched zones such as suprachiasmatic and arcuate nuclei and relatively poor areas such as periventricular and supraoptic nuclei. Endopeptidase 24-16 appeared to be developmentally regulated in the mouse brain; it was already detected at the fetal stage, increased transiently after birth, then regularly declined until adulthood.

  1. Characterization of neutral endopeptidase 24.11 in dog glomeruli.

    PubMed Central

    Landry, C; Santagata, P; Bawab, W; Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B P; Vinay, P; Crine, P

    1993-01-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (NEP; also known as neprilysin and enkephalinase; EC 3.4.24.11) is a cell-surface metallopeptidase that is present in many mammalian tissues. It is particularly abundant on the brush-border membranes of the kidney proximal tubule. In this paper, the presence of NEP in purified glomeruli from dog kidney was assessed by measuring phosphoramidon- and thiorphan-sensitive [D-Ala2,Leu5]enkephalin-degrading activity. Using this assay, the Km and kcat. of the glomerular enzyme were found to be identical to those of the tubular enzyme. By Western blotting the apparent M(r) of the glomerular enzyme was found to be 104,000, compared with 94,000 for the tubular enzyme. This might be due to a different glycosylation pattern, since endoglycosidase F treatment of NEP obtained from both tissues yielded deglycosylated enzymes with similar electrophoretic mobilities. The glomerular enzyme also appears to be membrane-bound, since it was retained in the detergent-rich phase after phase separation with Triton X-114. Autoradiography experiments performed with RB104, a new highly selective and potent NEP inhibitor, showed that NEP was expressed in both glomeruli and proximal tubules. The presence in glomeruli of NEP and some other brush-border peptidases (dipeptidyl-dipeptidase IV, aminopeptidase N and angiotensin I-converting enzyme) suggests that cell-surface peptidases might play an important role as regulators of plasma-derived peptides in this part of the nephron. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8489505

  2. Mutations of Human NARS2, Encoding the Mitochondrial Asparaginyl-tRNA Synthetase, Cause Nonsyndromic Deafness and Leigh Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Mohsin; Huang, Vincent H.; Qaiser, Tanveer A.; Potluri, Prasanth; Mahl, Sarah E.; Davila, Antonio; Nazli, Sabiha; Hancock, Saege; Yu, Margret; Gargus, Jay; Chang, Richard; Al-sheqaih, Nada; Newman, William G.; Abdenur, Jose; Starr, Arnold; Hegde, Rashmi; Dorn, Thomas; Busch, Anke; Park, Eddie; Wu, Jie; Schwenzer, Hagen; Flierl, Adrian; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie; Khan, Shaheen N.; Li, Ronghua; Guan, Min-Xin; Friedman, Thomas B.; Wu, Doris K.; Procaccio, Vincent; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Wallace, Douglas C.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Huang, Taosheng; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate association of variants in the mitochondrial asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase NARS2 with human hearing loss and Leigh syndrome. A homozygous missense mutation ([c.637G>T; p.Val213Phe]) is the underlying cause of nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB94) and compound heterozygous mutations ([c.969T>A; p.Tyr323*] + [c.1142A>G; p.Asn381Ser]) result in mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency and Leigh syndrome, which is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by symmetric, bilateral lesions in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. The severity of the genetic lesions and their effects on NARS2 protein structure cosegregate with the phenotype. A hypothetical truncated NARS2 protein, secondary to the Leigh syndrome mutation p.Tyr323* is not detectable and p.Asn381Ser further decreases NARS2 protein levels in patient fibroblasts. p.Asn381Ser also disrupts dimerization of NARS2, while the hearing loss p.Val213Phe variant has no effect on NARS2 oligomerization. Additionally we demonstrate decreased steady-state levels of mt-tRNAAsn in fibroblasts from the Leigh syndrome patients. In these cells we show that a decrease in oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and electron transport chain (ETC) activity can be rescued by overexpression of wild type NARS2. However, overexpression of the hearing loss associated p.Val213Phe mutant protein in these fibroblasts cannot complement the OCR and ETC defects. Our findings establish lesions in NARS2 as a new cause for nonsyndromic hearing loss and Leigh syndrome. PMID:25807530

  3. Mutations of human NARS2, encoding the mitochondrial asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase, cause nonsyndromic deafness and Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simon, Mariella; Richard, Elodie M; Wang, Xinjian; Shahzad, Mohsin; Huang, Vincent H; Qaiser, Tanveer A; Potluri, Prasanth; Mahl, Sarah E; Davila, Antonio; Nazli, Sabiha; Hancock, Saege; Yu, Margret; Gargus, Jay; Chang, Richard; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Newman, William G; Abdenur, Jose; Starr, Arnold; Hegde, Rashmi; Dorn, Thomas; Busch, Anke; Park, Eddie; Wu, Jie; Schwenzer, Hagen; Flierl, Adrian; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie; Khan, Shaheen N; Li, Ronghua; Guan, Min-Xin; Friedman, Thomas B; Wu, Doris K; Procaccio, Vincent; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Wallace, Douglas C; Ahmed, Zubair M; Huang, Taosheng; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-03-01

    Here we demonstrate association of variants in the mitochondrial asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase NARS2 with human hearing loss and Leigh syndrome. A homozygous missense mutation ([c.637G>T; p.Val213Phe]) is the underlying cause of nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB94) and compound heterozygous mutations ([c.969T>A; p.Tyr323*] + [c.1142A>G; p.Asn381Ser]) result in mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency and Leigh syndrome, which is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by symmetric, bilateral lesions in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. The severity of the genetic lesions and their effects on NARS2 protein structure cosegregate with the phenotype. A hypothetical truncated NARS2 protein, secondary to the Leigh syndrome mutation p.Tyr323* is not detectable and p.Asn381Ser further decreases NARS2 protein levels in patient fibroblasts. p.Asn381Ser also disrupts dimerization of NARS2, while the hearing loss p.Val213Phe variant has no effect on NARS2 oligomerization. Additionally we demonstrate decreased steady-state levels of mt-tRNAAsn in fibroblasts from the Leigh syndrome patients. In these cells we show that a decrease in oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and electron transport chain (ETC) activity can be rescued by overexpression of wild type NARS2. However, overexpression of the hearing loss associated p.Val213Phe mutant protein in these fibroblasts cannot complement the OCR and ETC defects. Our findings establish lesions in NARS2 as a new cause for nonsyndromic hearing loss and Leigh syndrome.

  4. Neuropeptide specificity and inhibition of recombinant isoforms of the endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 family: comparison with the related recombinant endopeptidase 3.4.24.15.

    PubMed

    Rioli, V; Kato, A; Portaro, F C; Cury, G K; te Kaat, K; Vincent, B; Checler, F; Camargo, A C; Glucksman, M J; Roberts, J L; Hirose, S; Ferro, E S

    1998-09-08

    Endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.16 (EP24.16c, neurolysin) and thimet oligopeptidase EC 3.4.24.15 are close related members of a large family of metalloproteases. Besides their cytosolic and membrane bound form, endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.16 appears to be present in the inner membrane of the mitochondria (EP24.16m). We have overexpressed two porcine EP24.16 isoforms in E. coli and purified the recombinant proteins to homogeneity. We show here that these peptidases hydrolyse a series of neuropeptides with similar rates and at sites reminiscent of those elicited by classically purified human brain EP24.16c. All neuropeptides, except neurotensin, were similarly cleaved by recombinant endopeptidase 3.4.24.15 (EP24.15, thimet oligopeptidase), another zinc-containing metalloenzyme structurally related to EP24.16. These two EP24.16 isoforms were drastically inhibited by Pro-Ile and dithiothreitol and remained unaffected by a specific carboalkyl inhibitor (CFP-AAY-pAb) directed toward the related EP24.15. The present purification procedure of EP24.16 should allow to establish, by mutagenesis analysis, the mechanistic properties of the enzyme.

  5. Purification and characterization of an endopeptidase from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, P S; Pos, K M; Konings, W N

    1991-01-01

    An endopeptidase has been purified to homogeneity from a crude cell extract of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2 by a procedure that includes diethyl-aminoethane-Sephacel chromatography, phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, hydroxylapatite chromatography, and fast protein liquid chromatography over an anion-exchange column and a hydrophobic-interaction column. Gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated a molecular mass of the purified enzyme of 70,000 Da. The endopeptidase can degrade several oligopeptides into various tetra-, tri-, and dipeptides. The endopeptidase has no aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, dipeptidase, or tripeptidase activity. It is optimally active at pH 6.0 to 6.5 and in the temperature range of 30 to 38 degrees C. The enzyme is inactivated by the chemical agents 1,10-phenanthroline, ethylenedinitrilotetraacetate, beta-mercaptoethanol, and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and is inhibited by Cu2+ and Zn2+. The ethylenedinitrilotetraacetate- or 1,10-phenanthroline-treated enzyme can be reactivated by Co2+. Immunoblotting with specific antibodies raised against the purified endopeptidase indicated that the enzyme is also present in other Lactococcus spp., as well as in Lactobacillus spp. and Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus. Images PMID:1785932

  6. Early, Real-Time Medical Diagnosis of Botulism by Endopeptidase-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Osnat; Feldberg, Liron; Gura, Sigalit; Brosh-Nissimov, Tal; Guri, Alex; Zimhony, Oren; Shapiro, Eli; Beth-Din, Adi; Stein, Dana; Ozeri, Eyal; Barnea, Ada; Turgeman, Amram; Ben David, Alon; Schwartz, Arieh; Elhanany, Eytan; Diamant, Eran; Yitzhaki, Shmuel; Zichel, Ran

    2015-12-15

    Botulinum toxin was detected in patient serum using Endopeptidase-mass-spectrometry assay, although all conventional tests provided negative results. Antitoxin was administered, resulting in patient improvement. Implementing this highly sensitive and rapid assay will improve preparedness for foodborne botulism and deliberate exposure.

  7. LysK CHAP endopeptidase domain is required for lysis of live staphylococcal cells.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    LysK is a staphylococcal bacteriophage endolysin composed of three domains, an N-terminal cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases (CHAP) endopeptidase domain (cleaves between D-alanine of the stem peptide and glycine of the cross-bridge peptide) a mid-protein amidase 2 domain (N-ace...

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of heteroarylalanine diacids as potent and selective neutral endopeptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Glossop, Melanie S; Bazin, Richard J; Dack, Kevin N; Fox, David N A; MacDonald, Graeme A; Mills, Mark; Owen, Dafydd R; Phillips, Chris; Reeves, Keith A; Ringer, Tracy J; Strang, Ross S; Watson, Christine A L

    2011-06-01

    Heteroarylalanine derivatives 4 were designed as potential inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP EC 3.4.24.11). Selectivity over other zinc metalloproteinases was explored through occupation of the S2' subsite within NEP. Structural optimisation led to the identification of 5-phenyl oxazole 4f, a potent and selective NEP inhibitor. A crystal structure of the inhibitor bound complex is reported.

  9. Decreased expression of messenger RNAs encoding endothelin receptors and neutral endopeptidase 24.11 in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pekonen, F.; Nyman, T.; Ammälä, M.; Rutanen, E. M.

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to compare the expression of mRNAs encoding endothelin-1 (ET-1), endothelin receptors type A (ETA-R) and type B (ETB-R) and ET-1-degrading enzyme neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) in 15 endometrial cancer tissues and 13 normal endometrial tissues. The relative levels of ET-1 mRNA in endometrial cancer tissues did not differ from those in normal endometrium. Both ETA-R and ETB-R mRNA levels were significantly lower in endometrial cancer tissue than in normal endometrium (P < 0.001). The complete lack of NEP mRNA in endometrial cancer tissues was in marked contrast to results from normal endometrium (P < 0.001). In conclusion, differential expression of mRNAs encoding ET-R and NEP in normal endometrium and endometrial cancer suggests that ET action is altered in endometrial cancer compared with normal endometrium. Images Figure 2 PMID:7819049

  10. Glycyl endopeptidase from papaya latex: partial purification and use for production of fish gelatin hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Karnjanapratum, Supatra; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2014-12-15

    An aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) in combination with ammonium sulphate ((NH4)2SO4) precipitation was applied to fractionate glycyl endopeptidase from the papaya latex of Red Lady and Khack Dum cultivars. ATPS containing polyethylene glycol (PEG 2000 and 6000) and salts ((NH4)2SO4 and MgSO4) at different concentrations were used. Glycyl endopeptidase with high purification fold (PF) and yield was found in the salt-rich bottom phase of ATPS with 10%PEG 6000-10% (NH4)2SO4. When ATPS fraction from Red Lady cultivar was further precipitated with 40-60% saturation of (NH4)2SO4, PF of 2.1-fold with 80.23% yield was obtained. Almost all offensive odorous compounds, particularly benzyl isothiocyanate, were removed from partially purified glycyl endopeptidase (PPGE). The fish gelatin hydrolysates prepared using PPGE showed higher ABTS radical scavenging activity and less odour, compared with those of crude extract (CE). Thus antioxidative gelatin hydrolysate with negligible undesirable odour could be prepared with the aid of PPGE.

  11. Cloning of human PEX cDNA. Expression, subcellular localization, and endopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Lipman, M L; Panda, D; Bennett, H P; Henderson, J E; Shane, E; Shen, Y; Goltzman, D; Karaplis, A C

    1998-05-29

    Mutations in the PEX gene are responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. To gain insight into the role of PEX in normal physiology we have cloned the human full-length cDNA and studied its tissue expression, subcellular localization, and peptidase activity. We show that the cDNA encodes a 749-amino acid protein structurally related to a family of neutral endopeptidases that include neprilysin as prototype. By Northern blot analysis, the size of the full-length PEX transcript is 6.5 kilobases. PEX expression, as determined by semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, is high in bone and in tumor tissue associated with the paraneoplastic syndrome of renal phosphate wasting. PEX is glycosylated in the presence of canine microsomal membranes and partitions exclusively in the detergent phase from Triton X-114 extractions of transiently transfected COS cells. Immunofluorescence studies in A293 cells expressing PEX tagged with a c-myc epitope show a predominant cell-surface location for the protein with its COOH-terminal domain in the extracellular compartment, substantiating the assumption that PEX, like other members of the neutral endopeptidase family, is a type II integral membrane glycoprotein. Cell membranes from cultured COS cells transiently expressing PEX efficiently degrade exogenously added parathyroid hormone-derived peptides, demonstrating for the first time that recombinant PEX can function as an endopeptidase. PEX peptidase activity may provide a convenient target for pharmacological intervention in states of altered phosphate homeostasis and in metabolic bone diseases.

  12. Rat kidney endopeptidase 24.16. Purification, physico-chemical characteristics and differential specificity towards opiates, tachykinins and neurotensin-related peptides.

    PubMed

    Barelli, H; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1993-01-15

    Endopeptidase 24.16 was purified from rat kidney homogenate on the basis of its ability to generate the biologically inactive degradation products neurotensin (1-10) and neurotensin (11-13). On SDS gels of the proteins pooled after the last purification step, the enzyme appeared homogeneous and behaved as a 70-kDa monomer. The peptidase was not sensitive to specific inhibitors of aminopeptidases, pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase I, endopeptidase 24.11, endopeptidase 24.15, proline endopeptidase and angiotensin-converting enzyme but was potently inhibited by several metal chelators such as o-phenanthroline and EDTA and was blocked by divalent cations. The specificity of endopeptidase 24.16 towards peptides of the tachykinin, opioid and neurotensin families was examined by competition experiments of tritiated neurotensin hydrolysis as well as HPLC analysis. These results indicated that endopeptidase 24.16 could discriminate between peptides belonging to the same family. Neurotensin, Lys8-Asn9-neurotensin(8-13) and xenopsin were efficiently hydrolysed while neuromedin N and kinetensin underwent little if any proteolysis by the peptidase. Analogously, substance P and dynorphins (1-7) and (1-8) were readily proteolysed by endopeptidase 24.16 while neurokinin A, amphibian tachykinins and leucine or methionine enkephalins totally resisted degradation. By Triton X-114 phase separation, 15-20% of endopeptidase 24.16 partitioned in the detergent phase, indicating that renal endopeptidase 24.16 might exist in a genuine membrane-bound form. The equipotent solubilization of the enzyme by seven detergents of various critical miscellar concentrations confirmed the occurrence of a membrane-bound counterpart of endopeptidase 24.16. Furthermore, the absence of release elicited by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C suggested that the enzyme was not attached by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor in the membrane of renal microvilli. Finally, endopeptidase 24.16 could not be

  13. Major increase in endopeptidase activity of human cathepsin B upon removal of occluding loop contacts.

    PubMed

    Nägler, D K; Storer, A C; Portaro, F C; Carmona, E; Juliano, L; Ménard, R

    1997-10-14

    The main feature distinguishing cathepsin B from other cysteine proteases of the papain family is the presence of a large insertion loop, termed the occluding loop, which occupies the S' subsites of the enzyme. The loop is held in place mainly by two contacts with the rest of the enzyme, involving residues His110 and Arg116 on the loop that form salt bridges with Asp22 and Asp224, respectively. The influence of this loop on the endopeptidase activity of cathepsin B has been investigated using site-directed mutagenesis and internally quenched fluorogenic (IQF) substrates. Wild-type cathepsin B displays poor activity against the substrates Abz-AFRSAAQ-EDDnp and Abz-QVVAGA-EDDnp as compared to cathepsin L and papain. Appreciable increases in kcat/KM were observed for cathepsin B containing the single mutations D22A, H110A, R116A, and D224A. The highest activity however is observed for mutants where both loop to enzyme contacts are disrupted. For the triple-mutant D22A/H110A/R116A, an optimum kcat/KM value of 12 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 was obtained for hydrolysis of Abz-AFRSAAQ-EDDnp, which corresponds to a 600-fold increase relative to wild-type cathepsin B and approaches the level of activity observed with cathepsin L or papain. By comparison, the mutations have little effect on the hydrolysis of Cbz-FR-MCA. The influence of the mutations on the pH dependency of activity also indicates that the complexity of pH activity profiles normally observed for cathepsin B is related to the presence of the occluding loop. The major increase in endopeptidase activity is attributed to an increase in loop "flexibility" and suggests that the occluding loop might move when an endopeptidase substrate binds to the enzyme. The possible contribution of these interactions in regulating endopeptidase activity and the implications for cathepsin B activity in physiological or pathological conditions are discussed.

  14. Escherichia coli murein-DD-endopeptidase insensitive to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Keck, W; Schwarz, U

    1979-01-01

    A novel endopeptidase degrading the peptide cross-links in sacculi has been isolated from Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme has a molecular weight of 30,000 and, in contrast to already known enzymes of similar specificity, remains fully active in the presence of beta-lactam antibiotics. In addition, it is exceptional in being inhibited by single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid and by some polynucleotides. The possible role of the enzyme in cell division is discussed. Images PMID:383691

  15. A Radiolabeled Fully Human Antibody to Human Aspartyl (Asparaginyl) β-Hydroxylase Is a Promising Agent for Imaging and Therapy of Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Revskaya, Ekaterina; Jiang, Zewei; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Sesay, Muctarr; Walker, Susan; Fuller, Steven; Lebowitz, Michael S; Gravekamp, Claudia; Ghanbari, Hossein A; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2017-03-01

    There is a need for novel effective and safe therapies for metastatic breast cancer based on targeting tumor-specific molecular markers of cancer. Human aspartyl (asparaginyl) β-hydroxylase (HAAH) is a highly conserved enzyme that hydroxylates epidermal growth factor-like domains in transformation-associated proteins and is overexpressed in a variety of cancers, including breast cancer. A fully human monoclonal antibody (mAb) PAN-622 has been developed to HAAH. In this study, they describe the development of PAN-622 mAb as an agent for imaging and radioimmunotherapy of metastatic breast cancer. PAN-622 was conjugated to several ligands such as DOTA, CHXA″, and DTPA to enable subsequent radiolabeling and its immunoreactivity was evaluated by an HAAH-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and binding to the HAAH-positive cells. As a result, DTPA-PAN-622 was chosen to investigate biodistribution in healthy CD-1 female mice and 4T1 mammary tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. The (111)In-DTPA-pan622 mAb concentrated in the primary tumors and to some degree in lung metastases as shown by SPECT/CT and Cherenkov imaging. A pilot therapy study with (213)Bi-DTPA-PAN-622 demonstrated a significant effect on the primary tumor. The authors concluded that human mAb PAN-622 to HAAH is a promising reagent for development of imaging and possible therapeutic agents for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  16. Opioids, Neutral Endopeptidase, its Inhibitors and Cancer: Is There a Relationship among them?

    PubMed

    Mizerska-Dudka, Magdalena; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna

    2015-06-01

    The role of endogenous animal opioids in the biology of cancer is widely recognized but poorly understood. This is, among others, because of the short half-life of these peptides, which are quickly inactivated by endopeptidases, e.g., neutral endopeptidase (NEP, CD10). It has been established that NEP is engaged in the modulation of the tumor microenvironment, among others that of colon cancer, by exerting influence on cell growth factors, the extracellular matrix and other biologically active substances. Although there are some discrepancies among the findings on the role of both opioids and NEP in cancer development, authors agree that their role seems to depend on the origin, stage and grade of tumor, and even on the method of examination. Moreover, recently, natural inhibitors of NEP, such as sialorphin, opiorphin and spinorphin have been detected. Their analgesic activity has been established. It is interesting to ask whether there is a relationship among opioid peptides, tumor-associated NEP and its inhibitors.

  17. Purification of balansain I, an endopeptidase from unripe fruits of Bromelia balansae Mez (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Pardo, M F; López, L M; Canals, F; Avilés, F X; Natalucci, C L; Caffini, N O

    2000-09-01

    A new plant endopeptidase was obtained from unripe fruits of Bromelia balansae Mez (Bromeliaceae). Crude extracts were partially purified by ethanol fractionation. This preparation (redissolved ethanol precipitate, REP) showed maximum activity at pH 8.8-9.2, was very stable even at high ionic strength values (no appreciable decrease in proteolytic activity could be detected after 24 h in 1 M sodium chloride solution at 37 degrees C), and exhibited high thermal stability (inactivation required heating for 60 min at 75 degrees C). Anion exchange chromatography allowed the isolation of a fraction purified to mass spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and IEF homogeneity, named balansain I, with pI = 5.45 and molecular mass = 23192 (mass spectrometry). The purification factor is low (2.9-fold), but the yield is high (48.3%), a common occurrence in plant organs with high proteolytic activity, where proteases represent the bulk of protein content of crude extracts. Balansain I exhibits a similar but narrower pH profile than that obtained for REP, with a maximum pH value approximately 9.0 and was inhibited by E-64 and other cysteine peptidases inhibitors but not affected by inhibitors of the other catalytic types of peptidases. The alanine and glutamine derivatives of N-alpha-carbobenzoxy-L-amino acid p-nitrophenyl esters was strongly preferred by the enzyme. The N-terminal sequence of balansain I showed a very high homology (85-90%) with other known Bromeliaceae endopeptidases.

  18. Characterization of the glutamate-specific endopeptidase from Bacillus licheniformis expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Wang, Haiying; Ma, Yi; Luo, Xiaochun; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Jufang; Wang, Xiaoning

    2013-10-10

    Glutamate-specific endopeptidase from Bacillus licheniformis (GSE-BL) is widely used in peptide recovery and synthesis because of its unique substrate specificity. However, the mechanism underlying its specificity is still not thoroughly understood. In this study, the roles of the prosegment and key amino acids involved in the proteolytic activity of GSE-BL were investigated. Loss of the GSE-BL prosegment severely restricted enzymatic activity toward Z-Phe-Leu-Glu-pNA. A homologous model of GSE-BL revealed that it contains the catalytic triad "His47, Asp96 and Ser 167", which was further confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. In vitro mutagenesis further indicated that Val2, Arg89 and His190 are essential for enzymatic activity toward Z-Phe-Leu-Glu-pNA. Moreover, the catalytic efficiency of Phe57Ala GSE-BL toward Z-Phe-Leu-Glu-pNA was 50% higher than that of the native mature GSE-BL. This is the first study to fully elucidate the key amino acids for proteolytic activity of GSE-BL. Mature GSE-BL could be obtained through self-cleavage alone when Lys at -1 position was replaced by Glu, providing a new strategy for the preparation of mature GSE-BL. This study yielded some valuable insights into the substrate specificity of glutamate-specific endopeptidase, establishing a foundation for broadening the applications of GSE-BL.

  19. Characterization of excretory/secretory endopeptidase and metallo-aminopeptidases from Taenia crassiceps metacestodes.

    PubMed

    Baig, Salman; Damian, Raymond T; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Olecki, Paula; Talhouk, Jamil; Hashmey, Rayhan; White, A Clinton

    2005-10-01

    Cysticercosis is caused by Taenia spp. metacestodes, which must survive in the host tissues to complete their life cycle. Their survival depends on their control of host immune responses. Because many parasites use proteases to modulate host responses, we examined culture media from Taenia crassiceps metacestodes for protease activity using peptide substrates. We identified prominent aminopeptidase activity at neutral pH, which was inhibited by chelating agents and partially inhibited by the aminopeptidase inhibitor, bestatin. Endopeptidase substrates were optimally cleaved at slightly acidic pH and endopeptidase activity was inhibited by cysteine protease inhibitors. Gel filtration FPLC and subsequent visualization by silver staining revealed a metallo-aminopeptidase of molecular weight 21 kDa and cysteine proteases of Mr 70 and 64 kDA. Recombinant IL-2 was digested when incubated with parasite culture supernatants, but not with control media. IL-2 degradation was completely inhibited by 1,10 phenanthroline and partially inhibited by bestatin, suggesting that a metallo-aminopeptidase was responsible. Incubation of human IgG with culture supernatants resulted in complete degradation of IgG, which was blocked by cysteine protease inhibitors. These observations demonstrate that Taenia spp. metacestodes secrete a number of proteolytic enzymes, which may target molecules from the host immune system and assist in evasion of the host immune response.

  20. Occurrence of neutral endopeptidase activity in the cat carotid body and its significance in chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G K; Runold, M; Ghai, R D; Cherniack, N S; Prabhakar, N R

    1990-05-28

    The carotid body contains both tachykinins and enkephalins. Neutral endopeptidase (NEP, E.C. 3.4.24.11), has been suggested to involve in the metabolism of these neuropeptides in several organs. In the present study we determined neutral endopeptidase activity of the cat carotid body and assessed its significance in chemoreception. The cytosolic and membrane fractions of the carotid body contained NEP-like activity whereas it occurred only in the membrane fractions of the superior cervical and the nodose ganglia. Phosphoramidon, thiorphan and metal ion chelators inhibited NEP-like activity of all the 3 tissues studied; other protease inhibitors, however, were ineffective. Close carotid body administration of phosphoramidon significantly potentiated the carotid body response to low PO2 but not to hypercapnia. The enhanced response to hypoxia following phosphoramidon was further augmented by naloxone, an enkephalin antagonist. These results demonstrate that the glomus tissue contains detectable amounts of NEP-like activity and its inhibition selectively affects the hypoxic response of the carotid body.

  1. Control of Storage Protein Metabolism in the Cotyledons of Germinating Mung Beans: Role of Endopeptidase 12

    PubMed Central

    Chrispeels, Maarten J.; Boulter, D.

    1975-01-01

    The autodigestive proteolytic activity of extracts of cotyledons of mung beans (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) increased 4- to 5-fold during germination. A similar increase was found in the ability of these extracts to digest added casein or mung bean globulins. The increase occurred after a 2-day lag during the next 2 to 3 days of germination and coincided with the period of rapid storage protein breakdown. To understand which enzyme(s) may be responsible for this increase in proteolytic activity, the hydrolytic activity of cotyledon extracts toward a number of synthetic substrates and proteins was measured. Germination was accompanied by a marked decline in leucine aminopeptidase, while carboxypeptidase increased about 50%. There were no dramatic changes in either α-mannosidase or N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, enzymes which may be involved in the metabolism of the carbohydrate moieties of the reserve glycoproteins. The increase in general proteolytic activity was closely paralleled by a 10-fold increase in endopeptidase activity. This activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide. Studies with inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes showed that reagents which blocked sulfhydryl groups also inhibited the rise in general proteolytic activity. Our results suggest that the appearance of a sulfhydryl-type endopeptidase activity is a necessary prerequisite for the rapid metabolism of the reserve proteins which accompanies germination. PMID:16659204

  2. Major acid endopeptidases of the blood-feeding monogenean Eudiplozoon nipponicum (Heteronchoinea: Diplozoidae).

    PubMed

    Jedličková, Lucie; Dvořáková, Hana; Kašný, Martin; Ilgová, Jana; Potěšil, David; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Mikeš, Libor

    2016-04-01

    In parasitic flatworms, acid endopeptidases are involved in crucial processes, including digestion, invasion, interactions with the host immune system, etc. In haematophagous monogeneans, however, no solid information has been available about the occurrence of these enzymes. Here we aimed to identify major cysteine and aspartic endopeptidase activities in Eudiplozoon nipponicum, an invasive haematophagous parasite of common carp. Employing biochemical, proteomic and molecular tools, we found that cysteine peptidase activities prevailed in soluble protein extracts and excretory/secretory products (ESP) of E. nipponicum; the major part was cathepsin L-like in nature supplemented with cathepsin B-like activity. Significant activity of the aspartic cathepsin D also occurred in soluble protein extracts. The degradation of haemoglobin in the presence of ESP and worm protein extracts was completely inhibited by a combination of cysteine and aspartic peptidase inhibitors, and diminished by particular cathepsin L, B and D inhibitors. Mass spectrometry revealed several tryptic peptides in ESP matching to two translated sequences of cathepsin L genes, which were amplified from cDNA of E. nipponicum and bioinformatically annotated. The dominance of cysteine peptidases of cathepsin L type in E. nipponicum resembles the situation in, e.g. fasciolid trematodes.

  3. Lacking "Lack": A Reply to Joldersma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, James D.

    2007-01-01

    First I would like to thank Clarence Joldersma for his review of our "Poststructuralism, Philosophy, Pedagogy" (Marshall, 2004-PPP). In particular, I would thank him for his opening sentence: "[t]his book is a response to a lack." It is the notion of a lack, noted again later in his review, which I wish to take up mainly in this response. Rather…

  4. A cysteine endopeptidase ("dionain") is involved in the digestive fluid of Dionaea muscipula (Venus's fly-trap).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Suzuki, Takehiro; Nishii, Wataru; Kubota, Keiko; Shibata, Chiaki; Isobe, Toshiaki; Dohmae, Naoshi

    2011-01-01

    The carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula (Venus's flytrap) secretes proteinases into the digestive fluid to digest prey proteins. In this study, we obtained evidence that the digestive fluid contains a cysteine endopeptidase, presumably belonging to the papain family, through inhibitor studies and partial amino acid sequencing of the major SDS-PAGE band protein. The name "dionain" is proposed for the enzyme.

  5. Amino acid sequence of rabbit kidney neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) deduced from a complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Devault, A; Lazure, C; Nault, C; Le Moual, H; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M; Kahn, P; Powell, J; Mallet, J; Beaumont, A

    1987-01-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) is a major constituent of kidney brush border membranes. It is also present in the brain where it has been shown to be involved in the inactivation of opioid peptides, methionine- and leucine-enkephalins. For this reason this enzyme is often called 'enkephalinase'. In order to characterize the primary structure of the enzyme, oligonucleotide probes were designed from partial amino acid sequences and used to isolate clones from kidney cDNA libraries. Sequencing of the cDNA inserts revealed the complete primary structure of the enzyme. Neutral endopeptidase consists of 750 amino acids. It contains a short N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (27 amino acids), a single membrane-spanning segment (23 amino acids) and an extracellular domain that comprises most of the protein mass. The comparison of the primary structure of neutral endopeptidase with that of thermolysin, a bacterial Zn-metallopeptidase, indicates that most of the amino acid residues involved in Zn coordination and catalytic activity in thermolysin are found within highly honmologous sequences in neutral endopeptidase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2440677

  6. Effects of endopeptidase inhibition on the contraction-relaxation response of isolated human vaginal tissue.

    PubMed

    Rahardjo, Harrina E; Uckert, Stefan; Taher, Akmal; Sonnenberg, Joachim E; Kauffels, Wolfgang; Rahardjo, Djoko; Kuczyk, Markus A

    2013-04-01

    INTRODUCTION.: Vasoactive peptides, such as bradykinin, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and endothelin 1 (ET-1), are assumed to be involved in the control of female genital vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle. Tissue levels of said peptides are controlled by the activity of endopeptidase enzymes. Theoretically, in female genital tissues, inhibiting the degradation of bradykinin, CNP, and VIP, or the conversion of Big ET-1 into ET-1 should result in an enhancement in smooth muscle relaxation and, thus, an improvement in sexual response. AIM.: Elucidate the effects of the endopeptidase inhibitor KC 12615 on the contraction/relaxation response of isolated human vaginal smooth muscle to Big ET-1, bradykinin, CNP, or VIP. METHODS.: Tissue bath experiments were carried out to ascertain the responses of human vaginal tissue challenged by ET-1 (0.1 μM) to increasing concentrations of bradykinin, CNP, and VIP (0.01 μM, 0.1 μM, and 1 μM, respectively). The effects were also evaluated following preexposure to KC 12615 (10 μM, for 20 minutes). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES.: Measure the effects of KC 12615 on the relaxation of isolated human vaginal smooth muscle brought about by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP and the contraction mediated by Big ET-1. RESULTS.: The tension induced by ET-1 was reversed by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP (-25 ± 6.6%, -13.3 ± 2.2%, and -17.6 ± 10%, respectively). Big ET-1 induced contraction of the vaginal tissue. Preexposure of the tissue to KC 12615 increased the relaxation exerted by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP (to -39.2 ± 5.8%, -40.7 ± 7.3%, and -44.6 ± 19%, respectively). The contraction induced by Big ET-1 was attenuated in the presence of KC 12615 (to approximately 25% of the initial response). CONCLUSION.: Inhibition of endopeptidase activity can antagonize the contraction of human vaginal tissue induced by Big ET-1 and increase the relaxation induced by vasoactive endogenous

  7. A new fluorometric assay for neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11).

    PubMed

    Carvalho, K M; Boileau, G; França, M S; Medeiros, M A; Camargo, A C; Juliano, L

    1995-10-01

    An intramolecularly quenched fluorogenic peptide structurally related to Leu-enkephalin, Abz-GGDFLRRV-EDDnp, was selectively hydrolyzed at the R-V bond by neutral endopeptidase (NEP, enkephalinase, neprilysin, EC 3.4.24.11) with kinetic parameters (Km = 3 microM, kcat = 127/min and kcat/Km = 42/min microM) similar to those of Leu-enkephalin. The specificity of the assay for NEP was demonstrated by incubating Abz-GGDFLRRV-EDDnp with a kidney homogenate and with crude membrane preparations of brain and lung. For all three homogenates the complementary fragment Abz-GGDFLRR and V-EDDnp accounted for more than 95% of the products which are totally inhibited by 1 microM thiorphan, a highly specific NEP inhibitor. A continuous fluorometric assay for only 15 min was sufficient to quantify the NEP activity with a minimum sensitivity of 5 ng of purified NEP or the equivalent enzymatic activity in crude tissue preparations.

  8. Immobilization of Procerain B, a Cysteine Endopeptidase, on Amberlite MB-150 Beads

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhay Narayan; Singh, Sushant; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Proteases are involved in several crucial biological processes and reported to have important physiological functions. They also have multifarious applications in different industries. The immobilized form of the enzyme further improves its industrial applicability. Here, we report covalent immobilization of a novel cysteine endopeptidase (procerain B) on amberlite MB-150 beads through glutaraldehyde by Schiff base linkage. The immobilized product was examined extensively by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The characterization of the immobilized product showed broader pH and thermal optima compared to the soluble form of the enzyme. The immobilized form of procerain B also showed lower Km (180.27±6 µM) compared to the soluble enzyme using azocasein as substrate. Further, immobilized procerain B retains 38.6% activity till the 10th use, which strongly represents its industrial candidature. PMID:23776589

  9. AmpH, a Bifunctional dd-Endopeptidase and dd-Carboxypeptidase of Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    González-Leiza, Silvia M.; de Pedro, Miguel A.; Ayala, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, low-molecular-mass penicillin-binding proteins (LMM PBPs) are important for correct cell morphogenesis. These enzymes display dd-carboxypeptidase and/or dd-endopeptidase activities associated with maturation and remodeling of peptidoglycan (PG). AmpH has been classified as an AmpH-type class C LMM PBP, a group closely related to AmpC β-lactamases. AmpH has been associated with PG recycling, although its enzymatic activity remained uncharacterized until now. Construction and purification of His-tagged AmpH from E. coli permitted a detailed study of its enzymatic properties. The N-terminal export signal of AmpH is processed, but the protein remains membrane associated. The PBP nature of AmpH was demonstrated by its ability to bind the β-lactams Bocillin FL (a fluorescent penicillin) and cefmetazole. In vitro assays with AmpH and specific muropeptides demonstrated that AmpH is a bifunctional dd–endopeptidase and dd-carboxypeptidase. Indeed, the enzyme cleaved the cross-linked dimers tetrapentapeptide (D45) and tetratetrapeptide (D44) with efficiencies (kcat/Km) of 1,200 M−1 s−1 and 670 M−1 s−1, respectively, and removed the terminal d-alanine from muropeptides with a C-terminal d-Ala-d-Ala dipeptide. Both dd-peptidase activities were inhibited by 40 μM cefmetazole. AmpH also displayed a weak β-lactamase activity for nitrocefin of 1.4 × 10−3 nmol/μg protein/min, 1/1,000 the rate obtained for AmpC under the same conditions. AmpH was also active on purified sacculi, exhibiting the bifunctional character that was seen with pure muropeptides. The wide substrate spectrum of the dd-peptidase activities associated with AmpH supports a role for this protein in PG remodeling or recycling. PMID:22001512

  10. Structural basis for type VI secreted peptidoglycan dl-endopeptidase function, specificity and neutralization in Serratia marcescens

    SciTech Connect

    Srikannathasan, Velupillai; English, Grant; Bui, Nhat Khai; Trunk, Katharina; O’Rourke, Patrick E. F.; Rao, Vincenzo A.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Coulthurst, Sarah J. Hunter, William N.

    2013-12-01

    Crystal structures of type VI secretion system-associated immunity proteins, a peptidoglycan endopeptidase and a complex of the endopeptidase and its cognate immunity protein are reported together with assays of endopeptidase activity and functional assessment. Some Gram-negative bacteria target their competitors by exploiting the type VI secretion system to extrude toxic effector proteins. To prevent self-harm, these bacteria also produce highly specific immunity proteins that neutralize these antagonistic effectors. Here, the peptidoglycan endopeptidase specificity of two type VI secretion-system-associated effectors from Serratia marcescens is characterized. These small secreted proteins, Ssp1 and Ssp2, cleave between γ-d-glutamic acid and l-meso-diaminopimelic acid with different specificities. Ssp2 degrades the acceptor part of cross-linked tetratetrapeptides. Ssp1 displays greater promiscuity and cleaves monomeric tripeptides, tetrapeptides and pentapeptides and dimeric tetratetra and tetrapenta muropeptides on both the acceptor and donor strands. Functional assays confirm the identity of a catalytic cysteine in these endopeptidases and crystal structures provide information on the structure–activity relationships of Ssp1 and, by comparison, of related effectors. Functional assays also reveal that neutralization of these effectors by their cognate immunity proteins, which are called resistance-associated proteins (Raps), contributes an essential role to cell fitness. The structures of two immunity proteins, Rap1a and Rap2a, responsible for the neutralization of Ssp1 and Ssp2-like endopeptidases, respectively, revealed two distinct folds, with that of Rap1a not having previously been observed. The structure of the Ssp1–Rap1a complex revealed a tightly bound heteromeric assembly with two effector molecules flanking a Rap1a dimer. A highly effective steric block of the Ssp1 active site forms the basis of effector neutralization. Comparisons with Ssp2–Rap2

  11. Purification and characterization of human endopeptidase 3.4.24.16. Comparison with the porcine counterpart indicates a unique cleavage site on neurotensin.

    PubMed

    Vincent, B; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1996-02-12

    We have purified and characterized human brain endopeptidase 3.4.24.16. The enzyme behaved as a 72 kDa protein and belonged to the metalloprotease family. Human endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 cleaved neurotensin at a unique site at the Pro10-Tyr11 bond, leading to the formation of neurotensin(1-10) and neurotensin(11-13). The kinetic parameters displayed by human endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 towards a series of natural neuropeptides indicated that bradykinin was the most efficiently proteolysed. Angiotensin I, dynorphins 1-8 and 1-9 and substance P also behaved as good substrates while neuromedin N, angiotensin II, leucine and methionine enkephalin and neurokinin A resisted degradation by human endopeptidase 3.4.24.16. We have purified the porcine counterpart of endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 and compared its ability to cleave neurotensin with that of the enzyme from human origin. It appeared that, besides a major production of neurotensin(1-10), an additional formation of neurotensin(1-8) was observed with the pig enzyme, suggesting a cleavage of neurotensin not only at the Pro10-Tyr11 bond but also at the Arg8-Arg9 peptidyl bond. The latter cleavage appeared reminiscent of endopeptidase 3.4.24.15 since this peptidase was reported to cleave neurotensin at the Arg8-Arg9 bond. Our study indicated that neurotensin(1-10) formation by porcine endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 could be potently blocked with the selective endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 dipeptide inhibitor Pro-Ile without interfering with neurotensin(1-8) formation. By contrast, the formation of the latter product was highly potentiated by dithiothreitol and inhibited by the endopeptidase 3.4.24.15 inhibitor Cpp-Ala-Ala-Tyr-pAB, two effects that were not observed for neurotensin(1-10) production. Altogether, our results indicate that porcine endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 cleaves neurotensin at a unique site, leading to the formation of neurotensin(1-10) and that the production of neurotensin(1-8) is due to contaminating endopeptidase 3.4.24.15.

  12. Human endopeptidase (THOP1) is localized on chromosome 19 within the linkage region for the late-onset Alzheimer disease AD2 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Meckelein, B.; Abraham, C.R.; De Silva, H.A.R.

    1996-01-15

    A cDNA encoding the rat endopeptidase 24.15 was used to determine the chromosomal localization of the respective human gene. Hybridization to DNA from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids assigned the human gene to chromosome 19. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes localized the human endopeptidase 24.15 to 19q13.3. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Purification and characterization of four new cysteine endopeptidases from fruits of Bromelia pinguin L. grown in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Payrol, Juan Abreu; Obregón, Walter D; Trejo, Sebastián A; Caffini, Néstor O

    2008-02-01

    Bromelia pinguin L. is a plant broadly distributed in Central America and Caribbean islands. The fruits have been used in traditional medicine as anthelmintic, probably owed to the presence of a mixture of cysteine endopeptidases, initially termed pinguinain. This work deals with the purification and characterization of the four main components of that mixture, two of them showing acid pI and the other two alkaline pI. Molecular masses (SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF), N-terminal sequence and the reactivity and kinetic parameters versus synthetic substrates (p-nitrophenyl-N-alpha-CBZ-amino acid esters, PFLNA, Z-Arg-Arg-p-NA, and Z-Phe-Arg-p-NA) of the studied peptidases are given, as well as the N-terminal sequences of the enzymes and the homology degree with other plant endopeptidases.

  14. A Comprehensive Review of the Pharmacodynamics, Pharmacokinetics, and Clinical Effects of the Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitor Racecadotril

    PubMed Central

    Eberlin, Marion; Mück, Tobias; Michel, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    Racecadotril, via its active metabolite thiorphan, is an inhibitor of the enzyme neutral endopeptidase (NEP, EC 3.4.24.11), thereby increasing exposure to NEP substrates including enkephalins and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Upon oral administration racecadotril is rapidly and effectively converted into the active metabolite thiorphan, which does not cross the blood–brain-barrier. Racecadotril has mainly been tested in animal models and patients of three therapeutic areas. As an analgesic the effects of racecadotril across animal models were inconsistent. In cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension or congestive heart failure results from animal studies were promising, probably related to increased exposure to ANP, but clinical results have not shown substantial therapeutic benefit over existing treatment options in cardiovascular disease. In contrast, racecadotril was consistently effective in animal models and patients with various forms of acute diarrhea by inhibiting pathologic (but not basal) secretion from the gut without changing gastro-intestinal transit time or motility. This included studies in both adults and children. In direct comparative studies with loperamide in adults and children, racecadotril was at least as effective but exhibited fewer adverse events in most studies, particularly less rebound constipation. Several guidelines recommend the use of racecadotril as addition to oral rehydration treatment in children with acute diarrhea. PMID:22661949

  15. Novel natural peptide substrates for endopeptidase 24.15, neurolysin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Rioli, Vanessa; Gozzo, Fabio C; Heimann, Andrea S; Linardi, Alessandra; Krieger, José E; Shida, Cláudio S; Almeida, Paulo C; Hyslop, Stephen; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ferro, Emer S

    2003-03-07

    Endopeptidase 24.15 (EC; ep24.15), neurolysin (EC; ep24.16), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC; ACE) are metallopeptidases involved in neuropeptide metabolism in vertebrates. Using catalytically inactive forms of ep24.15 and ep24.16, we have identified new peptide substrates for these enzymes. The enzymatic activity of ep24.15 and ep24.16 was inactivated by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues within their conserved HEXXH motifs, without disturbing their secondary structure or peptide binding ability, as shown by circular dichroism and binding assays. Fifteen of the peptides isolated were sequenced by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and shared homology with fragments of intracellular proteins such as hemoglobin. Three of these peptides (PVNFKFLSH, VVYPWTQRY, and LVVYPWTQRY) were synthesized and shown to interact with ep24.15, ep24.16, and ACE, with K(i) values ranging from 1.86 to 27.76 microm. The hemoglobin alpha-chain fragment PVNFKFLSH, which we have named hemopressin, produced dose-dependent hypotension in anesthetized rats, starting at 0.001 microg/kg. The hypotensive effect of the peptide was potentiated by enalapril only at the lowest peptide dose. These results suggest a role for hemopressin as a vasoactive substance in vivo. The identification of these putative intracellular substrates for ep24.15 and ep24.16 is an important step toward the elucidation of the role of these enzymes within cells.

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Engagement Mediates Prolyl Endopeptidase Release from Airway Epithelia via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Szul, Tomasz; Bratcher, Preston E; Fraser, Kyle B; Kong, Michele; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Ingersoll, Sarah; Sztul, Elizabeth; Rangarajan, Sunil; Blalock, J Edwin; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Proteases are important regulators of pulmonary remodeling and airway inflammation. Recently, we have characterized the enzyme prolyl endopeptidase (PE), a serine peptidase, as a critical protease in the generation of the neutrophil chemoattractant tripeptide Pro-Gly-Pro (PGP) from collagen. However, PE has been characterized as a cytosolic enzyme, and the mechanism mediating PE release extracellularly remains unknown. We examined the role of exosomes derived from airway epithelia as a mechanism for PE release and the potential extracellular signals that regulate the release of these exosomes. We demonstrate a specific regulatory pathway of exosome release from airway epithelia and identify PE as novel exosome cargo. LPS stimulation of airway epithelial cells induces release of PE-containing exosomes, which is significantly attenuated by small interfering RNA depletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). These differences were recapitulated upon intratracheal LPS administration in mice competent versus deficient for TLR4 signaling. Finally, sputum samples from subjects with cystic fibrosis colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrate elevated exosome content and increased PE levels. This TLR4-based mechanism highlights the first report of nonstochastic release of exosomes in the lung and couples TLR4 activation with matrikine generation. The increased quantity of these proteolytic exosomes in the airways of subjects with chronic lung disease highlights a new mechanism of injury and inflammation in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders.

  17. Enzymatic and Structural Characterization of the Major Endopeptidase in the Venus Flytrap Digestion Fluid.

    PubMed

    Risør, Michael W; Thomsen, Line R; Sanggaard, Kristian W; Nielsen, Tania A; Thøgersen, Ida B; Lukassen, Marie V; Rossen, Litten; Garcia-Ferrer, Irene; Guevara, Tibisay; Scavenius, Carsten; Meinjohanns, Ernst; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Enghild, Jan J

    2016-01-29

    Carnivorous plants primarily use aspartic proteases during digestion of captured prey. In contrast, the major endopeptidases in the digestive fluid of the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) are cysteine proteases (dionain-1 to -4). Here, we present the crystal structure of mature dionain-1 in covalent complex with inhibitor E-64 at 1.5 Å resolution. The enzyme exhibits an overall protein fold reminiscent of other plant cysteine proteases. The inactive glycosylated pro-form undergoes autoprocessing and self-activation, optimally at the physiologically relevant pH value of 3.6, at which the protective effect of the pro-domain is lost. The mature enzyme was able to efficiently degrade a Drosophila fly protein extract at pH 4 showing high activity against the abundant Lys- and Arg-rich protein, myosin. The substrate specificity of dionain-1 was largely similar to that of papain with a preference for hydrophobic and aliphatic residues in subsite S2 and for positively charged residues in S1. A tentative structure of the pro-domain was obtained by homology modeling and suggested that a pro-peptide Lys residue intrudes into the S2 pocket, which is more spacious than in papain. This study provides the first analysis of a cysteine protease from the digestive fluid of a carnivorous plant and confirms the close relationship between carnivorous action and plant defense mechanisms.

  18. Enzymatic and Structural Characterization of the Major Endopeptidase in the Venus Flytrap Digestion Fluid*

    PubMed Central

    Risør, Michael W.; Thomsen, Line R.; Sanggaard, Kristian W.; Nielsen, Tania A.; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Lukassen, Marie V.; Rossen, Litten; Garcia-Ferrer, Irene; Guevara, Tibisay; Scavenius, Carsten; Meinjohanns, Ernst; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Enghild, Jan J.

    2016-01-01

    Carnivorous plants primarily use aspartic proteases during digestion of captured prey. In contrast, the major endopeptidases in the digestive fluid of the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) are cysteine proteases (dionain-1 to -4). Here, we present the crystal structure of mature dionain-1 in covalent complex with inhibitor E-64 at 1.5 Å resolution. The enzyme exhibits an overall protein fold reminiscent of other plant cysteine proteases. The inactive glycosylated pro-form undergoes autoprocessing and self-activation, optimally at the physiologically relevant pH value of 3.6, at which the protective effect of the pro-domain is lost. The mature enzyme was able to efficiently degrade a Drosophila fly protein extract at pH 4 showing high activity against the abundant Lys- and Arg-rich protein, myosin. The substrate specificity of dionain-1 was largely similar to that of papain with a preference for hydrophobic and aliphatic residues in subsite S2 and for positively charged residues in S1. A tentative structure of the pro-domain was obtained by homology modeling and suggested that a pro-peptide Lys residue intrudes into the S2 pocket, which is more spacious than in papain. This study provides the first analysis of a cysteine protease from the digestive fluid of a carnivorous plant and confirms the close relationship between carnivorous action and plant defense mechanisms. PMID:26627834

  19. Endothelins are more sensitive than sarafotoxins to neutral endopeptidase: possible physiological significance.

    PubMed Central

    Skolovsky, M; Galron, R; Kloog, Y; Bdolah, A; Indig, F E; Blumberg, S; Fleminger, G

    1990-01-01

    Incubation of endothelins (ETs) with bovine kidney neutral endopeptidase (NEP) resulted in a selective two-step degradation with loss of biochemical activity. The Km of the enzyme indicated high-affinity binding, and hydrolysis was completely inhibited by phosphoramidon. The first step was nicking of the Ser5-Leu6 bond, followed by cleavage at the amino side of Ile19. The nicked peptide exhibited biochemical activities comparable to those of the intact peptide--i.e., binding to the ET receptor, induction of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis, and toxicity. The twice-cleaved product was inactive. The sarafotoxins (SRTXs) were more resistant than the ETs to NEP: for example, the half-time for ET-1 was approximately 1 hr, while it was approximately 4 hr for SRTX-b and even higher for SRTX-c. These in vitro findings may indicate a regulatory role of NEP (or similar enzymes) in the physiological inactivation of ETs. They might also help to explain why under certain physiological conditions ETs may be less toxic than SRTXs. Images PMID:2191299

  20. Endothelins are more sensitive than sarafotoxins to neutral endopeptidase: possible physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Skolovsky, M; Galron, R; Kloog, Y; Bdolah, A; Indig, F E; Blumberg, S; Fleminger, G

    1990-06-01

    Incubation of endothelins (ETs) with bovine kidney neutral endopeptidase (NEP) resulted in a selective two-step degradation with loss of biochemical activity. The Km of the enzyme indicated high-affinity binding, and hydrolysis was completely inhibited by phosphoramidon. The first step was nicking of the Ser5-Leu6 bond, followed by cleavage at the amino side of Ile19. The nicked peptide exhibited biochemical activities comparable to those of the intact peptide--i.e., binding to the ET receptor, induction of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis, and toxicity. The twice-cleaved product was inactive. The sarafotoxins (SRTXs) were more resistant than the ETs to NEP: for example, the half-time for ET-1 was approximately 1 hr, while it was approximately 4 hr for SRTX-b and even higher for SRTX-c. These in vitro findings may indicate a regulatory role of NEP (or similar enzymes) in the physiological inactivation of ETs. They might also help to explain why under certain physiological conditions ETs may be less toxic than SRTXs.

  1. Structural Basis of Murein Peptide Specificity of a γ-D-glutamyl-L-diamino Acid Endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Sudek, Sebastian; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Geierstanger, Bernhard; Jones, David H.; Sri Krishna, S.; Spraggon, Glen; Bursalay, Badry; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Haugen, Justin; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-01-01

    Crystal structures of two homologous peptidases from cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis and Nostoc punctiforme at 1.05 Å and 1.60 Å resolution represent the first structures of a large class of cell-wall, cysteine peptidases that contain an N-terminal bacterial SH3-like domain (SH3b) and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 cysteine peptidase domain. The NlpC/P60 domain is a primitive, papain-like peptidase in the CA clan of cysteine peptidases with a Cys126/His176/His188 catalytic triad and a conserved catalytic core. We deduced from structure and sequence analysis, and then experimentally, that that these two proteins act as γ-D-glutamyl-L-diamino acid endopeptidases (EC 3.4.22.-). The active site is located near the interface between the SH3b and NlpC/P60 domains, where the SH3b domain may help define substrate specificity, instead of functioning as a targeting domain, so that only muropeptides with an N-terminal L-alanine can bind to the active site. PMID:19217401

  2. Improved Learning and Memory in Aged Mice Deficient in Amyloid β-Degrading Neutral Endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Thomas; Albrecht, Doris; Becker, Matthias; Schubert, Manja; Kouznetsova, Elena; Wiesner, Burkard; Maul, Björn; Schliebs, Reinhard; Grecksch, Gisela; Furkert, Jens; Sterner-Kock, Anja; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Becker, Axel; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard

    2009-01-01

    Background Neutral endopeptidase, also known as neprilysin and abbreviated NEP, is considered to be one of the key enzymes in initial human amyloid-β (Aβ) degradation. The aim of our study was to explore the impact of NEP deficiency on the initial development of dementia-like symptoms in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that while endogenous Aβ concentrations were elevated in the brains of NEP-knockout mice at all investigated age groups, immunohistochemical analysis using monoclonal antibodies did not detect any Aβ deposits even in old NEP knockout mice. Surprisingly, tests of learning and memory revealed that the ability to learn was not reduced in old NEP-deficient mice but instead had significantly improved, and sustained learning and memory in the aged mice was congruent with improved long-term potentiation (LTP) in brain slices of the hippocampus and lateral amygdala. Our data suggests a beneficial effect of pharmacological inhibition of cerebral NEP on learning and memory in mice due to the accumulation of peptides other than Aβ degradable by NEP. By conducting degradation studies and peptide measurements in the brain of both genotypes, we identified two neuropeptide candidates, glucagon-like peptide 1 and galanin, as first potential candidates to be involved in the improved learning in aged NEP-deficient mice. Conclusions/Significance Thus, the existence of peptides targeted by NEP that improve learning and memory in older individuals may represent a promising avenue for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19240795

  3. Hypothalamic prolyl endopeptidase (PREP) regulates pancreatic insulin and glucagon secretion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Dae; Toda, Chitoku; D’Agostino, Giuseppe; Zeiss, Caroline J.; DiLeone, Ralph J.; Elsworth, John D.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Chan, Owen; Harvey, Brandon K.; Richie, Christopher T.; Savolainen, Mari; Myöhänen, Timo; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Prolyl endopeptidase (PREP) has been implicated in neuronal functions. Here we report that hypothalamic PREP is predominantly expressed in the ventromedial nucleus (VMH), where it regulates glucose-induced neuronal activation. PREP knockdown mice (Prepgt/gt) exhibited glucose intolerance, decreased fasting insulin, increased fasting glucagon levels, and reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion compared with wild-type controls. Consistent with this, central infusion of a specific PREP inhibitor, S17092, impaired glucose tolerance and decreased insulin levels in wild-type mice. Arguing further for a central mode of action of PREP, isolated pancreatic islets showed no difference in glucose-induced insulin release between Prepgt/gt and wild-type mice. Furthermore, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies showed no difference between Prepgt/gt and wild-type control mice. Central PREP regulation of insulin and glucagon secretion appears to be mediated by the autonomic nervous system because Prepgt/gt mice have elevated sympathetic outflow and norepinephrine levels in the pancreas, and propranolol treatment reversed glucose intolerance in these mice. Finally, re-expression of PREP by bilateral VMH injection of adeno-associated virus–PREP reversed the glucose-intolerant phenotype of the Prepgt/gt mice. Taken together, our results unmask a previously unknown player in central regulation of glucose metabolism and pancreatic function. PMID:25071172

  4. The role of neutral endopeptidase in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bhatia, Madhav

    2011-11-15

    Substance P (SP) is well known to promote inflammation in acute pancreatitis (AP) by interacting with neurokinin-1 receptor. However, mechanisms that terminate SP-mediated responses are unclear. Neutral endopeptidase (NEP) is a cell-surface enzyme that degrades SP in the extracellular fluid. In this study, we examined the expression and the role of NEP in caerulein-induced AP. Male BALB/c mice (20-25 g) subjected to 3-10 hourly injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg) exhibited reduced NEP activity and protein expression in the pancreas and lungs. Additionally, caerulein (10(-7) M) also downregulated NEP activity and mRNA expression in isolated pancreatic acinar cells. The role of NEP in AP was examined in two opposite ways: inhibition of NEP (phosphoramidon [5 mg/kg] or thiorphan [10 mg/kg]) followed by 6 hourly caerulein injections) or supplementation with exogenous NEP (10 hourly caerulein injections, treatment of recombinant mouse NEP [1 mg/kg] during second caerulein injection). Inhibition of NEP raised SP levels and exacerbated inflammatory conditions in mice. Meanwhile, the severity of AP, determined by histological examination, tissue water content, myeloperoxidase activity, and plasma amylase activity, was markedly better in mice that received exogenous NEP treatment. Our results suggest that NEP is anti-inflammatory in caerulein-induced AP. Acute inhibition of NEP contributes to increased SP levels in caerulein-induced AP, which leads to augmented inflammatory responses in the pancreas and associated lung injury.

  5. Generation of food-grade recombinant Lactobacillus casei delivering Myxococcus xanthus prolyl endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Martin, Maria Cruz; Redruello, Begoña; del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Palanski, Brad A.; Khosla, Chaitan; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Prolyl endopeptidases (PEP), a family of serine proteases with the ability to hydrolyze the peptide bond on the carboxyl side of an internal proline residue, are able to degrade immunotoxic peptides responsible for celiac disease (CD), such as a 33-residue gluten peptide (33-mer). Oral administration of PEP has been suggested as a potential therapeutic approach for CD, although delivery of the enzyme to the small intestine requires intrinsic gastric stability or advanced formulation technologies. We have engineered two food-grade Lactobacillus casei strains to deliver PEP in an in vitro model of small intestine environment. One strain secretes PEP into the extracellular medium, whereas the other retains PEP in the intracellular environment. The strain that secretes PEP into the extracellular medium is the most effective to degrade the 33-mer and is resistant to simulated gastrointestinal stress. Our results suggest that in a future, after more studies and clinical trials, an engineered food-grade Lactobacillus strain may be useful as a vector for in situ production of PEP in the upper small intestine of CD patients. PMID:24752841

  6. PepO, a CovRS-controlled endopeptidase, disrupts Streptococcus pyogenes quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wilkening, Reid V.; Chang, Jennifer C.; Federle, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is a human-restricted pathogen with a capacity to both colonize asymptomatically and cause illnesses ranging from pharyngitis to necrotizing fasciitis. An understanding of how and when GAS switches between genetic programs governing these different lifestyles has remained an enduring mystery and likely requires carefully tuned environmental sensors to activate and silence genetic schemes when appropriate. Herein, we describe the relationship between the Control of Virulence (CovRS, CsrRS) two-component system and the Rgg2/3 quorum-sensing pathway. We demonstrate that responses of CovRS to the stress signals Mg2+ and a fragment of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 result in modulated activity of pheromone signaling of the Rgg2/3 pathway through a means of proteolysis of SHP peptide pheromones. This degradation is mediated by the cytoplasmic endopeptidase PepO, which is the first identified enzymatic silencer of an RRNPP-type quorum-sensing pathway. These results suggest that under conditions in which the virulence potential of GAS is elevated (i.e. enhanced virulence gene expression), cellular responses mediated by the Rgg2/3 pathway are abrogated and allow individuals to escape from group behavior. These results also indicate that Rgg2/3 signaling is instead functional during non-virulent GAS lifestyles. PMID:26418177

  7. Breast cancer cell-associated endopeptidase EC 24.11 modulates proliferative response to bombesin

    PubMed Central

    Burns, D M; Walker, B; Gray, J; Nelson, J

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the production, growth and inactivation of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP)-like peptides in human breast cancer cell lines. Radioimmunoassay detected GRP-like immunoreactivity (GRP-LI) in T47D breast cancer cells but not in the conditioned medium, indicating rapid clearance. No GRP-LI was found in the ZR-75-1 or MDA-MB-436 cells or their conditioned medium. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the GRP-LI in the T47D cells revealed a major peak, which co-eluted with GRP18–27, and a minor more hydrophilic peak. In vitro stimulation of T47D cell growth by bombesin (BN) was enhanced to 138% of control levels (bombesin alone) by the addition of the selective endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.11 inhibitor phosphoramidon (0.1 ng ml−;1). Fluorogenic analysis using whole cells confirmed low levels of this phosphoramidon-sensitive enzyme on the T47D cells. This enzyme, previously unreported in human breast cancer cells, significantly modulates both T47D growth and its response to BN-induced growth. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888460

  8. ADAMTS13 Endopeptidase Protects against Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitor-Induced Thrombotic Microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, Luise; Demers, Melanie; Zsengellér, Zsuzsanna K; Gallant, Maureen; Cifuni, Stephen M; Stillman, Isaac E; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Wagner, Denisa D

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a life-threatening condition that affects some, but not all, recipients of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors given as part of chemotherapy. TMA is also a complication of preeclampsia, a disease characterized by excess production of the VEGF-scavenging soluble VEGF receptor 1 (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1; sFlt-1). Risk factors for VEGF inhibitor-related TMA remain unknown. We hypothesized that deficiency of the VWF-cleaving ADAMTS13 endopeptidase contributes to the development of VEGF inhibitor-related TMA. ADAMTS13(-/-) mice overexpressing sFlt-1 presented all hallmarks of TMA, including thrombocytopenia, schistocytosis, anemia, and VWF-positive microthrombi in multiple organs. Similar to VEGF inhibitor-related TMA in humans, these mice exhibited severely impaired kidney function and hypertension. In contrast, wild-type mice overexpressing sFlt-1 developed modest hypertension but no other features of TMA. Recombinant ADAMTS13 therapy ameliorated all symptoms of TMA in ADAMTS13(-/-) mice overexpressing sFlt-1 and normalized BP in wild-type mice. ADAMTS13 activity may thus be a critical determinant for the development of TMA secondary to VEGF inhibition. Administration of recombinant ADAMTS13 may serve as a therapeutic approach to treat or prevent thrombotic complications of VEGF inhibition.

  9. Internally quenched fluorescent peptide libraries with randomized sequences designed to detect endopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lilian C G; Silva, Vinícius O; Okamoto, Debora N; Kondo, Marcia Y; Santos, Saara M B; Hirata, Isaura Y; Vallim, Marcelo A; Pascon, Renata C; Gouvea, Iuri E; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz

    2012-02-01

    Identification of synthetic peptide substrates for novel peptidases is an essential step for their study. With this purpose we synthesized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptide libraries Abz (or MCA)-GXXXXXQ-EDDnp and Abz (or MCA)-GXXZXXQ-EDDnp, where X consists of an equimolar mixture of all amino acids, the Z position is fixed with one of the proteinogenic amino acids (cysteine was excluded), Abz (ortho-aminobenzoic acid) or MCA ([7-amino-4-methyl]coumarin) is the fluorescence donor and Q-EDDnp (glutamine-[N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-ethylenediamine]) is the fluorescence acceptor. The peptide libraries MCA-GXXX↓XXQ-EDDnp and MCA-GXXZ↓XXQ-EDDnp were cleaved as indicated (↓) by trypsin, chymotrypsin, cathepsin L, pepsin A, and Eqolisin as confirmed by Edman degradation of the products derived from the digestion of these libraries. The best hydrolyzed Abz-GXXZXXQ-EDDnp sublibraries by these proteases, including Dengue 2 virus NS2B-NS3 protease, contained amino acids at the Z position that are reported to be well accepted by their S(1) subsite. The pH profiles of the hydrolytic activities of these canonical proteases on the libraries were similar to those reported for typical substrates. The FRET peptide libraries provide an efficient and simple approach for detecting nanomolar concentrations of endopeptidases and are useful for initial specificity characterization as performed for two proteases secreted by a Bacillus subtilis.

  10. Expression and Secretion of Barley Cysteine Endopeptidase B and Cellobiohydrolase I in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Nykanen, M.; Saarelainen, R.; Raudaskoski, M.; Nevalainen, K.; Mikkonen, A.

    1997-01-01

    Localization of expression and secretion of a heterologous barley cysteine endopeptidase (EPB) and the homologous main cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) in a Trichoderma reesei transformant expressing both proteins were studied. The transformant was grown on solid medium with Avicel cellulose and lactose to induce the cbh1 promoter for the synthesis of the native CBHI and the recombinant barley protein linked to a cbh1 expression cassette. Differences in localization of expression between the two proteins were clearly indicated by in situ hybridization, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopy. In young hyphae, native-size recombinant epb mRNA was localized to apical compartments. In older cultures, it was also seen in subapical compartments but not in hyphae from the colony center. The recombinant EPB had a higher molecular weight than the native barley protein, probably due to glycosylation and differential processing in the fungal host. As was found with its transcripts, recombinant EPB was localized in apical and subapical compartments of hyphae. The cbh1 mRNA and CBHI were both localized to all hyphae of a colony, which suggests that the endogenous CBHI was also secreted from these. In immunoelectron microscopy, the endoplasmic reticulum and spherical vesicles assumed to contribute to secretion were labeled by both CBHI and EPB antibodies while only CBHI was localized in elongated vesicles close to the plasma membrane and in hyphal walls. The results indicate that in addition to young apical cells, more mature hyphae in a colony may secrete proteins. PMID:16535755

  11. Funastrain c II: a cysteine endopeptidase purified from the latex of Funastrum clausum.

    PubMed

    Morcelle, Susana R; Trejo, Sebastián A; Canals, Francesc; Avilés, Francesc X; Priolo, Nora S

    2004-04-01

    A cysteine endopeptidase, named funastrain c II, was isolated and characterized from the latex of Funastrum clausum (Asclepiadaceae). The molecular mass (mass spectrometry) of the protease was 23.636 kDa. The analysis of funastrain c II by SDS-PAGE revealed a single polypeptide chain. The enzyme showed a remarkable stability of its caseinolytic activity after incubation at temperatures as high as 70 degrees C. Inhibition and activation assays indicated the cysteinic nature of the funastrain c II catalytic site. The optimum pH of funastrain c II enzymatic activity varied according to the substrate used (9.0-10.0 for casein and 6.2-6.8 for PFLNA). Kinetic parameters were determined for N-alpha-CBZ-Ala p-nitrophenyl ester (Km = 0.0243 mM, kcat = 1.5 s(-1)) and L-pyroglutamyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine-p-nitroanilide (PFLNA; KM = 0.1011 mM, kcat = 0.9 s(-1)). The N-terminal sequence of funastrain c II showed considerable similarity to other proteases isolated from latex of different Asclepiadaceae species as well as to other cysteine proteinases belonging to the papain family.

  12. Role of endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 in the catabolism of neurotensin, in vivo, in the vascularly perfused dog ileum.

    PubMed

    Barelli, H; Fox-Threlkeld, J E; Dive, V; Daniel, E E; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1994-05-01

    1. The degradation of tritiated and unlabelled neurotensin (NT) following close intra-arterial infusion of the peptides in ileal segments of anaesthetized dogs was examined. 2. Intact NT and its catabolites recovered in the venous effluents were purified by chromatography on Sep-Pak columns followed by reverse-phase h.p.l.c. and identified by their retention times or by radioimmunoassay. 3. The half-life of neurotensin was estimated to be between 2 and 6 min. Four labelled catabolites, corresponding to free tyrosine, neurotensin (1-8), neurotensin (1-10) and neurotensin (1-11), were detected. 4. Neurotensin (1-11) was mainly generated by a phosphoramidon-sensitive cleavage, probably elicited by endopeptidase 24-11. 5. Two endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 inhibitors, phosphodiepryl 03 and the dipeptide Pro-Ile, dose-dependently potentiated the recovery of intact neurotensin. Furthermore, both agents inhibited the formation of neurotensin (1-10), the product that results from the hydrolysis of neurotensin by purified endopeptidase 3.4.24.16. In contrast, the endopeptidase 3.4.24.15 inhibitor Cpp-AAY-pAB neither protected neurotensin from degradation nor modified the production of neurotensin (1-10). 6. Our study is the first evidence to indicate that endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 contributes to the catabolism of neurotensin, in vivo, in the dog intestine.

  13. The Role of Opiorphins (Endogenous Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors) in Urogenital Smooth Muscle Biology

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kelvin Paul

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The opiorphins are a newly characterized class of peptides that act as potent endogenous neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitors. Recent reports have suggested that they play an important role in erectile physiology. Aim This article reviews recent developments that increase our understanding of the role of the opiorphin family of peptides in erectile physiology. Methods During a microarray screen of gene changes that occur in a rat diabetic model of erectile dysfunction (ED), Vcsa1 was one of the most down-regulated genes in the rat corpora. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that in at least three models of diseases that result in ED (diabetes, aging, and cavernous nerve [CN] transection), Vcsa1 was down-regulated in the rat corpora. The human opiorphin family of genes (hSMR3A/B and ProL1) also acts as markers of erectile function in patients with ED. Main Outcome Measures The reader will be informed of the most current research regarding the role of opiorphins in urogenital smooth muscle biology. Results These observations led to the suggestion that genes encoding opiorphins (and potentially their peptide products) can act as markers of ED. Gene transfer of plasmids overexpressing Vcsa1 in aging rats, as well as intracorporal injection of sialorphin, led to an improvement in erectile function. In organ bath studies, we demonstrated that sialorphin can cause increased rates of relaxation of corporal smooth muscle (CSM). We have also demonstrated that in vitro, Vcsa1 causes changes in the expression of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This has led us to suggest that the action of Vcsa1 on erectile physiology may act through relaxation of CSM by its ability to act as an inhibitor of NEP, therefore prolonging the action of peptide agonists at their GPCRs. Conclusions Overall, there is a growing body of evidence that the opiorphins play a role in regulating CSM tone and thereby erectile function. PMID:19267851

  14. Substance P and neutral endopeptidase in development of acute respiratory distress syndrome following fire smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Simon S; Sun, Nina N; Lantz, R Clark; Witten, Mark L

    2004-10-01

    To characterize the tachykininergic effects in fire smoke (FS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we designed a series of studies in rats. Initially, 20 min of FS inhalation induced a significant increase of substance P (SP) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) at 1 h and persisted for 24 h after insult. Conversely, FS disrupted 51.4, 55.6, 46.3, and 43.0% enzymatic activity of neutral endopeptidase (NEP, a primary hydrolyzing enzyme for SP) 1, 6, 12, and 24 h after insult, respectively. Immunolabeling density of NEP in the airway epithelium largely disappeared 1 h after insult due to acute cell damage and shedding. These changes were also accompanied by extensive influx of albumin and granulocytes/lymphocytes in BALF. Furthermore, levels of BALF SP and tissue NEP activity dose dependently increased and decreased, respectively, following 0, low (10 min), and high (20 min) levels of FS inhalation. However, neither the time-course nor the dose-response study observed a significant change in the highest affinity neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) for SP. Finally, treatment (10 mg/kg im) with SR-140333B, an NK-1R antagonist, significantly prevented 20-min FS-induced hypoxemia and pulmonary edema 24 h after insult. Further examination indicated that SR-140333B (1.0 or 10.0 mg/kg im) fully abolished early (1 h) plasma extravasation following FS. Collectively, these findings suggest that a combination of sustained SP and NEP inactivity induces an exaggerated neurogenic inflammation mediated by NK-1R, which may lead to an uncontrolled influx of protein-rich edema fluid and cells into the alveoli as a consequence of increased vascular permeability.

  15. Rational redesign of neutral endopeptidase binding to merlin and moesin proteins.

    PubMed

    Niv, Masha Y; Iida, Katsuyuki; Zheng, Rong; Horiguchi, Akio; Shen, Ruoqian; Nanus, David M

    2009-05-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (NEP) is a 90- to 110-kDa cell-surface peptidase that is normally expressed by numerous tissues but whose expression is lost or reduced in a variety of malignancies. The anti-tumorigenic function of NEP is mediated not only by its catalytic activity but also through direct protein-protein interactions of its cytosolic region with several binding partners, including Lyn kinase, PTEN, and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins. We have previously shown that mutation of the K(19)K(20)K(21) basic cluster in NEPs' cytosolic region to residues QNI disrupts binding to the ERM proteins. Here we show that the ERM-related protein merlin (NF2) does not bind NEP or its cytosolic region. Using experimental data, threading, and sequence analysis, we predicted the involvement of moesin residues E(159)Q(160) in binding to the NEP cytosolic domain. Mutation of these residues to NL (to mimic the corresponding N(159)L(160) residues in the nonbinder merlin) disrupted moesin binding to NEP. Mutation of residues N(159)L(160)Y(161)K(162)M(163) in merlin to the corresponding moesin residues resulted in NEP binding to merlin. This engineered NEP peptide-merlin interaction was diminished by the QNI mutation in NEP, supporting the role of the NEP basic cluster in binding. We thus identified the region of interaction between NEP and moesin, and engineered merlin into a NEP-binding protein. These data form the basis for further exploration of the details of NEP-ERM binding and function.

  16. A neuroprotective brain-penetrating endopeptidase fusion protein ameliorates Alzheimer disease pathology and restores neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Brian; Verma, Inder; Desplats, Paula; Morvinski, Dinorah; Rockenstein, Ed; Adame, Anthony; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-06-20

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by widespread neurodegeneration throughout the association cortex and limbic system, deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the neuropil and around the blood vessels, and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. The endopeptidase neprilysin has been successfully used to reduce the accumulation of Aβ following intracranial viral vector delivery or ex vivo manipulated intracranial delivery. These therapies have relied on direct injections into the brain, whereas a clinically desirable therapy would involve i.v. infusion of a recombinant enzyme. We previously characterized a recombinant neprilysin that contained a 38-amino acid brain-targeting domain. Recombinant cell lines have been generated expressing this brain-targeted enzyme (ASN12). In this report, we characterize the ASN12 recombinant protein for pharmacology in a mouse as well as efficacy in two APPtg mouse models of AD. The recombinant ASN12 transited to the brain with a t½ of 24 h and accumulated to 1.7% of injected dose at 24 h following i.v. delivery. We examined pharmacodynamics in the tg2576 APPtg mouse with the prion promoter APP695 SWE mutation and in the Line41 mThy1 APP751 mutation mouse. Treatment of either APPtg mouse resulted in reduced Aβ, increased neuronal synapses, and improved learning and memory. In addition, the Line41 APPtg mice showed increased levels of C-terminal neuropeptide Y fragments and increased neurogenesis. These results suggest that the recombinant brain-targeted neprilysin, ASN12, may be an effective treatment for AD and warrant further investigation in clinical trials.

  17. The neuronal endopeptidase ECEL1 is associated with a distinct form of recessive distal arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Klaus; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Monnier, Nicole; Zhou, Jie; Fauré, Julien; Smirnow, Daniela Avila; Carlier, Robert; Laroche, Cécile; Marcorelles, Pascale; Mercier, Sandra; Mégarbané, André; Odent, Sylvie; Romero, Norma; Sternberg, Damien; Marty, Isabelle; Estournet, Brigitte; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Melki, Judith; Lunardi, Joël

    2013-04-15

    Distal arthrogryposis (DA) is a heterogeneous subgroup of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), a large family of disorders characterized by multiple congenital joint limitations due to reduced fetal movements. DA is mainly characterized by contractures afflicting especially the distal extremities without overt muscular or neurological signs. Although a limited number of genes mostly implicated in the contractile apparatus have been identified in DA, most patients failed to show mutations in currently known genes. Using a pangenomic approach, we demonstrated linkage of DA to chromosome 2q37 in two consanguineous families and the endothelin-converting enzyme like 1 (ECEL1) gene present in this region was associated with DA. Screening of a panel of 20 families with non-specific DA identified seven homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations of ECEL1 in a total of six families. Mutations resulted mostly in the absence of protein. ECEL1 is a neuronal endopeptidase predominantly expressed in the central nervous system and brain structures during fetal life in mice and human. ECEL1 plays a major role in intramuscular axonal branching of motor neurons in skeletal muscle during embryogenesis. A detailed review of clinical findings of DA patients with ECEL1 mutations revealed a homogeneous and recognizable phenotype characterized by limited knee flexion, flexed third to fifth fingers and severe muscle atrophy predominant on lower limbs and tongue that suggested a common pathogenic mechanism. We described a new and homogenous phenotype of DA associated with ECEL1 that resulted in symptoms involving rather the peripheral than the central nervous system and suggesting a developmental dysfunction.

  18. Pharmacologic Comparison of Clinical Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors in a Rat Model of Acute Secretory Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Prinsen, Michael J.; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A.; Arnett, Stacy D.; Tajfirouz, Deena; Ruminski, Peter G.; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R.; Ji, Yuhua; Neckermann, Georg; Choy, Robert K. M.; de Hostos, Eugenio; Meyers, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan) is a neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor with known antidiarrheal activity in animals and humans; however, in humans, it suffers from shortcomings that might be improved with newer drugs in this class that have progressed to the clinic for nonenteric disease indications. To identify potentially superior NEP inhibitors with immediate clinical utility for diarrhea treatment, we compared their efficacy and pharmacologic properties in a rat intestinal hypersecretion model. Racecadotril and seven other clinical-stage inhibitors of NEP were obtained or synthesized. Enzyme potency and specificity were compared using purified peptidases. Compounds were orally administered to rats before administration of castor oil to induce diarrhea. Stool weight was recorded over 4 hours. To assess other pharmacologic properties, select compounds were orally administered to normal or castor oil–treated rats, blood and tissue samples collected at multiple time points, and active compound concentrations determined by mass spectroscopy. NEP enzyme activity was measured in tissue homogenates. Three previously untested clinical NEP inhibitors delayed diarrhea onset and reduced total stool output, with little or no effect on intestinal motility assessed by the charcoal meal test. Each was shown to be a potent, highly specific inhibitor of NEP. Each exhibited greater suppression of NEP activity in intestinal and nonintestinal tissues than did racecadotril and sustained this inhibition longer. These results suggest that newer clinical-stage NEP inhibitors originally developed for other indications may be directly repositioned for treatment of acute secretory diarrhea and offer advantages over racecadotril, such as less frequent dosing and potentially improved efficacy. PMID:26907621

  19. Effect of a novel selective and potent phosphinic peptide inhibitor of endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 on neurotensin-induced analgesia and neuronal inactivation.

    PubMed

    Vincent, B; Jiracek, J; Noble, F; Loog, M; Roques, B; Dive, V; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1997-06-01

    1. We have examined a series of novel phosphinic peptides as putative potent and selective inhibitors of endopeptidase 3.4.24.16. 2. The most selective inhibitor, Pro-Phe-psi(PO2CH2)-Leu-Pro-NH2 displayed a Ki value of 12 nM towards endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 and was 5540 fold less potent on its related peptidase endopeptidase 3.4.24.15. Furthermore, this inhibitor was 12.5 less potent on angiotensin-converting enzyme and was unable to block endopeptidase 3.4.24.11, aminopeptidases B and M, dipeptidylaminopeptidase IV and proline endopeptidase. 3. The effect of Pro-Phe-psi(PO2CH2)-Leu-Pro-NH2, in vitro and in vivo, on neurotensin metabolism in the central nervous system was examined. 4. Pro-Phe-psi(PO2CHH2)-Leu-Pro-NH2 dose-dependently inhibited the formation of neurotensin 1-10 and concomittantly protected neurotensin from degradation by primary cultured neurones from mouse embryos. 5. Intracerebroventricular administration of Pro-Phe-psi(PO2CH2)-Leu-Pro-NH2 significantly potentiated the neurotensin-induced antinociception of mice in the hot plate test. 6. Altogether, our study has established Pro-Phe-psi(PO2CH2)-Leu-Pro-NH2 as a fully selective and highly potent inhibitor of endopeptidase 3.4.24.16 and demonstrates, for the first time, the contribution of this enzyme in the central metabolism of neurotensin.

  20. The intracellular distribution and secretion of endopeptidases 24.15 (EC 3.4.24.15) and 24.16 (EC 3.4.24.16).

    PubMed

    Ferro, Emer S; Carreno, Flávia R; Goni, Camila; Garrido, Paula A G; Guimaraes, Alessander O; Castro, Leandro M; Oliveira, Vitor; Araujo, Maurício C; Rioli, Vanessa; Gomes, Marcelo D; Fontenele-Neto, José Domingues; Hyslop, Stephen

    2004-10-01

    Endopeptidase 24.15 (EC 3.4.24.15; EP24.15) and endopeptidase 24.16 (EC 3.4.24.16; EP24.16) are enzymes involved in general peptide metabolism in mammalian cells and tissues. This review will focus on morphological and biochemical aspects related to the subcellular distribution and secretion of these homologous enzymes in the central nervous system. These are important issues for a better understanding of the functions of EP24.15 and EP24.16 within neuroendocrine systems.

  1. Role of angiotensin converting enzyme in the vascular effects of an endopeptidase 24.15 inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Telford, S E; Smith, A I; Lew, R A; Perich, R B; Madden, A C; Evans, R G

    1995-01-01

    1. We investigated the role of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the cardiovascular effects of N-[1-(R,S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Ala-Ala-Tyr-p-aminobenzoate (cFP), a peptidase inhibitor selective for metalloendopeptidase (EP) E.C. 3.4.24.15. 2. In conscious rabbits, cFP (5 mg kg-1, i.v.) markedly slowed the degradation of [3H]-bradykinin, potentiated the depressor response to right atrial administration of bradykinin (10-1000 ng kg-1), and inhibited the pressor response to right atrial angiotensin I (10-100 ng kg-1). In each of these respects, the effects of cFP were indistinguishable from those of the ACE inhibitor, captopril (0.5 mg plus 10 mg kg-1h-1 i.v.). Furthermore, the effects of combined administration of cFP and captopril were indistinguishable from those of captopril alone. 3. In experimentally naive anaesthetized rats, cFP administration (9.3 mg kg-1, i.v.) was followed by a moderate but sustained fall in arterial pressure of 13 mmHg. However, in rats pretreated with bradykinin (50 micrograms kg-1) a more pronounced fall of 30 mmHg was observed. Captopril (5 mg kg-1) had similar hypotensive effects to those of cFP, and cFP had no effect when it was administered after captopril. 4. CFP displaced the binding of [125I]-351A (the p-hydroxybenzamidine derivative of lisinopril) from preparations of rat plasma ACE and solubilized lung membrane ACE (KD = 1.2 and 0.14 microM respectively), and inhibited rat plasma ACE activity (KI = 2.4 microM). Addition of phosphoramidon (10 microM), an inhibitor of a range of metalloendopeptidases, including neutral endopeptidase (E.C.3.4.24.11), markedly reduced the potency of cFP in these systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7620708

  2. Dual ACE and neutral endopeptidase inhibitors: novel therapy for patients with cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Tabrizchi, Reza

    2003-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure is a risk factor for a variety of cardiovascular disorders, including coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, cardiac failure and cerebrovascular disease. The prevailing view is that an elevated systolic rather than diastolic blood pressure is the major contributor in mortality and morbidity attributed to cardiovascular disorders. Isolated high systolic blood pressure, especially in the elderly, is a major risk factor and should undoubtedly be a target for drug treatment. In the general population, systolic and diastolic blood pressure are highly correlated, and thus it is difficult to dissociate the effects of these two components of the blood pressure and specifically ascribe cardiovascular risk factors to just elevated systolic blood pressure. Therefore, the goal in therapy of an individual with hypertension must be to reduce elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure in order to reduce mortality and morbidity. ACE and neutral peptidase inhibitors are a new class of drugs that may be beneficial in the treatment of patients with hypertension and heart failure. They may also be useful in the treatment of diabetic patients with hypertension and/or heart failure. Drugs of this class are dual inhibitors of ACE and neutral endopeptidase, and are capable of affecting vascular tone and fluid balance. They are capable of producing vasodilatation by virtue of inhibiting the production of angiotensin II, degradation of natriuretic peptides and bradykinin. They also appear to promote natriuresis and diuresis by amplifying the actions of natriuretic peptidase and reducing aldosterone effects. In addition, they should also attenuate trophogenic actions of the renin angiotensin system and the sympathetic nervous system. Omapatrilat is one drug that appears to be at the advanced stages of clinical development. This drug has been shown to be quite effective in the treatment of hypertension. Evidence also seems to indicate that treatment

  3. Cloning and expression of a novel prolyl endopeptidase from Aspergillus oryzae and its application in beer stabilization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chao; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Xu, Yan

    2015-02-01

    A novel prolyl endopeptidase gene from Aspergillus oryzae was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris. Amino acid sequence analysis of the prolyl endopeptidase from Aspergillus oryzae (AO-PEP) showed that this enzyme belongs to a class serine peptide S28 family. Expression, purification and characterization of AO-PEP were analyzed. The optimum pH and temperature were pH 5.0 and 40 °C, respectively. The enzyme was activated and stabilized by metal ion Ca(2+) and inhibited by Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Al(3+), and Cu(2+). The K m and k cat values of the purified enzyme for different substrates were evaluated. The results implied that the recombinant AO-PEP possessed higher affinity for the larger substrate. A fed-batch strategy was developed for the high-cell-density fermentation and the enzyme activity reached 1,130 U/l after cultivation in 7 l fermentor. After addition of AO-PEP during the fermentation phase of beer brewing, demonstrated the potential application of AO-PEP in the non-biological stability of beer, which favor further industrial development of this new enzyme in beer stabilization, due to its reducing operational costs, as well as no beer losses unlike regeneration process and beer lost with regenerated polyvinylpolypyrrolidone system.

  4. VAN method lacks validity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David D.; Kagan, Yan Y.

    Varotsos and colleagues (the VAN group) claim to have successfully predicted many earthquakes in Greece. Several authors have refuted these claims, as reported in the May 27,1996, special issue of Geophysical Research Letters and a recent book, A Critical Review of VAN [Lighthill 1996]. Nevertheless, the myth persists. Here we summarize why the VAN group's claims lack validity.The VAN group observes electrical potential differences that they call “seismic electric signals” (SES) weeks before and hundreds of kilometers away from some earthquakes, claiming that SES are somehow premonitory. This would require that increases in stress or decreases in strength cause the electrical variations, or that some regional process first causes the electrical signals and then helps trigger the earthquakes. Here we adopt their notation SES to refer to the electrical variations, without accepting any link to the quakes.

  5. Endopeptidases 24.16 and 24.15 are responsible for the degradation of somatostatin, neurotensin, and other neuropeptides by cultivated rat cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mentlein, R; Dahms, P

    1994-01-01

    Several neuropeptides, including neurotensin, somatostatin, bradykinin, angiotensin II, substance P, and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone but not vasopressin and oxytocin, were actively metabolized through proteolytic degradation by cultivated astrocytes obtained from rat cerebral cortex. Because phenanthroline was an effective degradation inhibitor, metalloproteases were responsible for neuropeptide fragmentation. Neurotensin was cleaved by astrocytes at the Pro10-Tyr11 and Arg8-Arg9 bonds, whereas somatostatin was cleaved at the Phe6-Phe7 and Thr10-Phe11 bonds. These cleavage sites have been found previously with endopeptidases 24.16 and 24.15 purified from rat brain. Addition of specific inhibitors of these proteases, the dipeptide Pro-Ile and N-[1-(RS)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Ala-Ala-Phe-4-aminobenzoate, significantly reduced the generation of the above neuropeptide fragments by astrocytes. The presence of endopeptidases 24.16 and 24.15 in homogenates of astrocytes could also be demonstrated by chromatographic separations of supernatant solubilized cell preparations. Proteolytic activity for neurotensin eluted after both gel and hydroxyapatite chromatography at the same positions as found for purified endopeptidase 24.16 or 24.15. In incubation experiments or in chromatographic separations no phosphoramidon-sensitive endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) or captopril-sensitive peptidyl dipeptidase A (angiotensin-converting enzyme) could be detected in cultivated astrocytes. Because astrocytes embrace the neuronal synapses where neuropeptides are released, we presume that the endopeptidases 24.16 and 24.15 on astrocytes are strategically located to contribute significantly to the inactivation of neurotensin, somatostatin, and other neuropeptides in the brain.

  6. [Detection of AlpA and AlpB lytic endopeptidase propeptides of Lysobacter sp. XL1 by sandwich-enzyme immunoassay based on monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, N V; Tsfasman, I M; Latypov, O R; Ledova, L A; Krasovskaia, L A; Karatovskaia, A P; Brovko, F A; Vasil'eva, N V; Stepnaia, O A

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular lytic endopeptidases AlpA and AlpB of the bacterium Lysobacter sp. XL1 are highly homologous and synthesized as precursors consisting of signal peptide, propeptide and mature form. In this work, two monoclonal antibodies against propeptide endopeptidase AlpA (ProA) and eleven against propeptide endopeptidase AlpB (ProB) were obtained to study the AlpA and AlpB endopeptidases secretion. The affinity constants of the antibodies against ProA were 2.9 x 10(9) and 3.5 x 10(9) M(-1), and the affinity constants of the antibodies against ProB were from 1.5 x 10(8) to 2.2 x 10(9) M(-1). The obtained antibodies did not have cross-reactivity between themselves, as well as mature forms of the enzymes. The monoclonal antibodies based sandwich-type enzyme immunoassay has been developed for measuring the propeptide in a native form. The linear range of determination ProA was 1.5-100 ng/mL with 6% error of measurement, and for determining ProB 0.2-6.25 ng/mL with 6% error. Using the developed assay, ProA and ProB propeptides have been detected in cell lysates of Lysobacter sp. XL1 in an amount 1.18 ± 0.03 ng and 0.096 ± 0.002 ng per 1 OD540 of the bacterial culture, respectively. The immunochemical assay for detection various forms of AlpA and AlpB lytic endopeptidases can be useful when dealing with issues related to their secretion into the environment.

  7. A gene (PEX) with homologies to endopeptidases is mutated in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. The HYP Consortium.

    PubMed

    1995-10-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) is a dominant disorder characterised by impaired phosphate uptake in the kidney, which is likely to be caused by abnormal regulation of sodium phosphate cotransport in the proximal tubules. By positional cloning, we have isolated a candidate gene from the HYP region in Xp22.1. This gene exhibits homology to a family of endopeptidase genes, members of which are involved in the degradation or activation of a variety of peptide hormones. This gene (which we have called PEX) is composed of multiple exons which span at least five cosmids. Intragenic non-overlapping deletions from four different families and three mutations (two splice sites and one frameshift) have been detected in HYP patients, which suggest that the PEX gene is involved in the HYP disorder.

  8. Substrate phosphorylation affects degradation and interaction to endopeptidase 24.15, neurolysin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Machado, M F M; Cunha, F M; Berti, D A; Heimann, A S; Klitzke, C F; Rioli, V; Oliveira, V; Ferro, E S

    2006-01-13

    Recent findings from our laboratory suggest that intracellular peptides containing putative post-translational modification sites (i.e., phosphorylation) could regulate specific protein interactions. Here, we extend our previous observations showing that peptide phosphorylation changes the kinetic parameters of structurally related endopeptidase EP24.15 (EC 3.4.24.15), neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1). Phosphorylation of peptides that are degraded by these enzymes leads to reduced degradation, whereas phosphorylation of peptides that interacted as competitive inhibitors of these enzymes alters only the K(i)'s. These data suggest that substrate phosphorylation could be one of the mechanisms whereby some intracellular peptides would escape degradation and could be regulating protein interactions within cells.

  9. Development of the first potent and selective inhibitor of the zinc endopeptidase neurolysin using a systematic approach based on combinatorial chemistry of phosphinic peptides.

    PubMed

    Jirácek, J; Yiotakis, A; Vincent, B; Checler, F; Dive, V

    1996-08-09

    A new systematic approach, based on combinatorial chemistry of phosphinic peptides, is proposed for rapid development of highly potent and selective inhibitors of zinc metalloproteases. This strategy first evaluates the effects on the inhibitory potency and selectivity of the following parameters: 1) size of the phosphinic peptides, 2) position of the phosphinic bond in the sequence, and 3) the state (free or blocked) of the peptide extremities. After this selection step, the influence of the inhibitor sequence is analyzed in order to determine the identity of the residues that optimized both the potency and the selectivity. We demonstrate the efficiency of this novel approach in rapid identification of the first potent inhibitor of the mammalian zinc endopeptidase neurolysin(24-16), able to discriminate between this enzyme and the related zinc endopeptidase thimet oligopeptidase(24-15). The most potent and selective inhibitor developed in this study, Pro-LPhePsi(PO2CH2)Gly-Pro, displays a Ki value of 4 nM for 24-16 and is 2000 times less potent on 24-15. The specific recognition of such a free phosphinic tetrapeptide by 24-16, as well as the unique specificity of the 24-16 S2 and S2' subsites for proline, unveiled by this study, are discussed in terms of their possible significance for the function of this enzyme and its related zinc endopeptidase activities.

  10. Histidine and Aspartic Acid Residues Important for Immunoglobulin G Endopeptidase Activity of the Group A Streptococcus Opsonophagocytosis-Inhibiting Mac Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Benfang; Liu, Mengyao; Meyers, Elishia G.; Manning, Heather M.; Nagiec, Michael J.; Musser, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The secreted Mac protein made by serotype M1 group A Streptococcus (GAS) (designated Mac5005) inhibits opsonophagocytosis and killing of GAS by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. This protein also has cysteine endopeptidase activity against human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify histidine and aspartic acid residues important for Mac IgG endopeptidase activity. Replacement of His262 with Ala abolished Mac5005 IgG endopeptidase activity. Asp284Ala and Asp286Ala mutant proteins had compromised enzymatic activity, whereas 21 other Asp-to-Ala mutant proteins cleaved human IgG at the apparent wild-type level. The results suggest that His262 is an active-site residue and that Asp284 and Asp286 are important for the enzymatic activity or structure of Mac protein. These Mac mutants provide new information about structure-activity relationships in this protein and will assist study of the mechanism of inhibition of opsonophagocytosis and killing of GAS by Mac. PMID:12704162

  11. When Lack of Evidence Is Evidence of Lack.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Neil

    2015-12-01

    In their recent article "A Gentle Ethical Defence of Homeopathy," Levy, Gadd, Kerridge, and Komesaroff use the claim that "lack of evidence is not equivalent to evidence of lack" as a component of their ethical defence of homeopathy. In response, this article argues that they cannot use this claim to shore up their ethical arguments. This is because it is false.

  12. High levels of functional endopeptidase 24.11 (CD10) activity on human thymocytes: preferential expression on immature subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Mari, B; Breittmayer, J P; Guerin, S; Belhacene, N; Peyron, J F; Deckert, M; Rossi, B; Auberger, P

    1994-01-01

    Although it is now well established that cells of the immune system express most of the exopeptidases described so far, little information is available concerning the identification and the characterization of the peptidases associated with the surface of human thymocytes. In the present study we have focused on CD10 expression on thymocytes using both FACS and enzymatic analysis. Unfractionated intact human thymocytes were shown to express significant levels of CD10-specific enzymatic activity, as assessed by the hydrolysis of the neutral endopeptidase (NEP) substrate Suc-Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA and of D-Ala2-Leu-enkephalin, a typical NEP substrate. CD10 activity was abolished by specific NEP inhibitors, including thiorphan, retrothiorphan and phosphoramidon. Moreover, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that intact thymocytes and purified NEP hydrolysed thymopentin, a thymic factor known to induce the maturation of prothymocytes into thymocytes. Finally, CD 10/NEP was preferentially associated with CD3- CD3low and immature CD4- CD8- thymocytes. The data demonstrate for the first time that human thymocytes express functional NEP and suggest a role for this enzyme in the maturation of human thymocytes. PMID:7959879

  13. Prolyl endopeptidase is revealed following SILAC analysis to be a novel mediator of human microglial and THP-1 cell neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Klegeris, Andis; Li, Jane; Bammler, Theo K; Jin, Jinghua; Zhu, David; Kashima, Daniel T; Pan, Sheng; Hashioka, Sadayuki; Maguire, John; McGeer, Patrick L; Zhang, Jing

    2008-04-15

    Reactive microglial cells may exacerbate the pathology in some neurodegenerative disorders. Supernatants of stimulated human microglial cells, or their surrogate THP-1 cells, are lethal to cultured human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. To explore this neurotoxicity, we examined the spectrum of proteins generated by THP-1 cells using the technique of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Unstimulated cells were grown in medium with light L-[(12)C(6)] arginine while cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were grown in medium with heavy L-[(13)C(6)] arginine. Proteins isolated from the media were digested with trypsin, and relative concentrations of generated peptides determined by mass spectrometry. More than 1,500 proteins or putative proteins were identified. Of these, 174 were increased and 189 decreased by more than twofold in the stimulated cell supernatant. We selected one upregulated protein, prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), for further investigation of its potential contribution to neurotoxicity. We first confirmed its upregulation by comparing its enzymatic activity in stimulated and unstimulated cell supernatants. We then evaluated two specific PEP inhibitors, Boc-Asn-Phe-Pro-aldehyde and Z-Pro-Pro-aldehyde-dimethyl acetal, for their potential to reduce toxicity of stimulated THP-1 cell and human microglia supernatants towards SH-SY5Y cells. We found both to be partially protective in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of PEP may be a therapeutic approach to neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases.

  14. Endopeptidases 3.4.24.15 and 24.16 in endothelial cells: potential role in vasoactive peptide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Norman, M Ursula; Reeve, Shane B; Dive, Vincent; Smith, A Ian; Lew, Rebecca A

    2003-06-01

    The closely related metalloendopeptidases EC (EP24.15; thimet oligopeptidase) and 24.16 (EP24.16; neurolysin) cleave a number of vasoactive peptides such as bradykinin and neurotensin in vitro. We have previously shown that hypotensive responses to bradykinin are potentiated by an inhibitor of EP24.15 and EP24.16 (26), suggesting a role for one or both enzymes in bradykinin metabolism in vivo. In this study, we have used selective inhibitors that can distinguish between EP24.15 and EP24.16 to determine their activity in cultured endothelial cells (the transformed human umbilical vein endothelial hybrid cell line EA.hy926 or ovine aortic endothelial cells). Endopeptidase activity was assessed using a specific quenched fluorescent substrate [7-methoxycoumarin-4-acetyl-Pro-Leu-Gly-d-Lys(2,4-dinitrophenyl)], as well as the peptide substrates bradykinin and neurotensin (assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectroscopic detection). Our results indicate that both peptidases are present in endothelial cells; however, EP24.16 contributes significantly more to substrate cleavage by both cytosolic and membrane preparations, as well as intact cells, than EP24.15. These findings, when coupled with previous observations in vivo, suggest that EP24.16 activity in vascular endothelial cells may play an important role in the degradation of bradykinin and/or other peptides in the circulation.

  15. A Highly Unstable Transcript Makes CwlO d,l-Endopeptidase Expression Responsive to Growth Conditions in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, Letal I.; Botella, Eric; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Antelmann, Haike; Devine, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis cell wall is a dynamic structure, composed of peptidoglycan and teichoic acid, that is continually remodeled during growth. Remodeling is effected by the combined activities of penicillin binding proteins and autolysins that participate in the synthesis and turnover of peptidoglycan, respectively. It has been established that one or the other of the CwlO and LytE d,l-endopeptidase-type autolysins is essential for cell viability, a requirement that is fulfilled by coordinate control of their expression by WalRK and SigI RsgI. Here we report on the regulation of cwlO expression. The cwlO transcript is very unstable, with its degradation initiated by RNase Y cleavage within the 187-nucleotide leader sequence. An antisense cwlO transcript of heterogeneous length is expressed from a SigB promoter that has the potential to control cellular levels of cwlO RNA and protein under stress conditions. We discuss how a multiplicity of regulatory mechanisms makes CwlO expression and activity responsive to the prevailing growth conditions. PMID:24163346

  16. Structural and Functional Analyses Reveal That Staphylococcus aureus Antibiotic Resistance Factor HmrA Is a Zinc-dependent Endopeptidase*

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Tiago O.; Guevara, Tibisay; Marrero, Aniebrys; Arêde, Pedro; Fluxà, Viviana S.; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Oliveira, Duarte C.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2011-01-01

    HmrA is an antibiotic resistance factor of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Molecular analysis of this protein revealed that it is not a muramidase or β-lactamase but a nonspecific double-zinc endopeptidase consisting of a catalytic domain and an inserted oligomerization domain, which probably undergo a relative interdomain hinge rotation upon substrate binding. The active-site cleft is located at the domain interface. Four HmrA protomers assemble to a large ∼170-kDa homotetrameric complex of 125 Å. All four active sites are fully accessible and ∼50–70 Å apart, far enough apart to act on a large meshwork substrate independently but simultaneously. In vivo studies with four S. aureus strains of variable resistance levels revealed that the extracellular addition of HmrA protects against loss of viability in the presence of oxacillin and that this protection depends on proteolytic activity. All of these results indicate that HmrA is a peptidase that participates in resistance mechanisms in vivo in the presence of β-lactams. Furthermore, our results have implications for most S. aureus strains of known genomic sequences and several other cocci and bacilli, which harbor close orthologs. This suggests that HmrA may be a new widespread antibiotic resistance factor in bacteria. PMID:21622555

  17. Escherichia coli prlC encodes an endopeptidase and is homologous to the Salmonella typhimurium opdA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Conlin, C A; Trun, N J; Silhavy, T J; Miller, C G

    1992-01-01

    Mutations at the Escherichia coli prlC locus suppress the export defect of certain lamB signal sequence mutations. The Salmonella typhimurium opdA gene encodes an endoprotease that can participate in the catabolism of certain peptides and is required for normal development of phage P22. Plasmids carrying either the wild-type (pTC100 prlC+) or suppressor alleles of prlC complemented all phenotypes associated with an S. typhimurium opdA mutation. A plasmid carrying an amber mutation in prlC [prlC31(AM)] was unable to complement except in an amber suppressor background. Tn1000 insertions which eliminated the ability of pTC100 (prlC+) to complement opdA mapped to the region of the plasmid shown by deletion analysis and subcloning to contain prlC. The nucleotide sequence of a 2.7-kb fragment including this region was determined, revealing an open reading frame encoding a 77-kDa protein. The sequences of this open reading frame and its putative promoter region were very similar (84% nucleotide sequence identity and 95% amino acid identity) to those of S. typhimurium opdA, showing that these genes are homologs. The nucleotide sequence of the prlC1 suppressor allele was determined and predicts an in-frame duplication of seven amino acids, providing further confirmation that the prlC suppressor phenotype results from changes in the endopeptidase OpdA. PMID:1325967

  18. Bacteriocin protein BacL1 of Enterococcus faecalis is a peptidoglycan D-isoglutamyl-L-lysine endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Kurushima, Jun; Hayashi, Ikue; Sugai, Motoyuki; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2013-12-27

    Enterococcus faecalis strains are commensal bacteria in humans and other animals, and they are also the causative agent of opportunistic infectious diseases. Bacteriocin 41 (Bac41) is produced by certain E. faecalis clinical isolates, and it is active against other E. faecalis strains. Our genetic analyses demonstrated that the extracellular products of the bacL1 and bacA genes, which are encoded in the Bac41 operon, coordinately express the bacteriocin activity against E. faecalis. In this study, we investigated the molecular functions of the BacL1 and BacA proteins. Immunoblotting and N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis revealed that BacL1 and BacA are secreted without any processing. The coincidental treatment with the recombinant BacL1 and BacA showed complete bacteriocin activity against E. faecalis, but neither BacL1 nor BacA protein alone showed the bacteriocin activity. Interestingly, BacL1 alone demonstrated substantial degrading activity against the cell wall fraction of E. faecalis in the absence of BacA. Furthermore, MALDI-TOF MS analysis revealed that BacL1 has a peptidoglycan D-isoglutamyl-L-lysine endopeptidase activity via a NlpC/P60 homology domain. These results collectively suggest that BacL1 serves as a peptidoglycan hydrolase and, when BacA is present, results in the lysis of viable E. faecalis cells.

  19. Alterations in plasma prolyl endopeptidase activity in depression, mania, and schizophrenia: effects of antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; Goossens, F; Scharpé, S; Calabrese, J; Desnyder, R; Meltzer, H Y

    1995-10-16

    The activity of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), a serine proteinase, has been found to be significantly lower in the blood of patients with major depression than in normal volunteers. The present study investigates plasma PEP activity in 25 major depressed, 10 manic, and 14 schizophrenic subjects versus 30 normal volunteers. It also examines the effects of antidepressants, valproate, and neuroleptic drugs on plasma PEP activity. PEP activity was significantly lower in major depressed subjects than in normal volunteers and in patients with mania and schizophrenia. In depressed subjects, plasma PEP activity was significantly increased during treatment with antidepressant drugs, such as fluoxetine. Plasma PEP activity was significantly increased in manic and schizophrenic subjects compared with normal volunteers. In manic subjects, short-term treatment with valproate had a significant suppressive effect on PEP activity. No significant effects of neuroleptics on PEP activity could be found in the schizophrenic patients. The results support the hypothesis that lower PEP activity could play a role in the pathophysiology of major depression, while increased PEP activity may be related to psychotic conditions, such as mania and schizophrenia.

  20. Transcription of G-protein coupled receptors in corporal smooth muscle is regulated by sialorphin (an endogenous neutral endopeptidase inhibitor)

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yuehong; Tiplitsky, Scott I.; Tar, Moses; Melman, Arnold; Davies, Kelvin P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Several reports have suggested the rat Vcsa1 gene is down-regulated in models of erectile dysfunction (ED). Vcsa’s protein product, sialorphin, is an endogenous neutral endopeptidase (NEP), and its down-regulation could result in prolonged activation of G-protein activated signaling pathways by their peptide agonists. We investigated if down- regulation of Vcsa1 could result in adaptive change in the expression of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). Materials and Methods Gene expression in cultured rat corporal smooth muscle cells (CSM) following treatment with siRNA directed against Vcsa1 or the NEP gene was analyzed using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. In rats Vcsa1 is one of the most down-regulated genes following bilateral transection of the cavernosal nerves. Using that animal model, we also investigated whether the down-regulation of Vcsa1 is accompanied by similar changes in gene expression observed in the CSM cells where Vcsa1 was knocked-down in vitro. Results Microarray analysis and quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that CSM cells treated in vitro with siRNA against Vcsa1 resulted in up-regulation of GPCR as a functional group. In contrast, treatment of CSM cells that lowered NEP activity resulted in decreases in GPCR expression. These results suggest that the peptide product of Vcsa1, sialorphin, can effect GPCR expression by acting on NEP. In animals with bilaterally transected cavernous nerves the reduced expression of Vcsa1 is accompanied by increased GPCR expression in cavernosal tissue. Conclusions These experiments suggest that the mechanism by which Vcsa1 modulates erectile function is partly mediated through changes in GPCR expression. PMID:18554633

  1. Expression of Chironomus riparius serine-type endopeptidase gene under di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) exposure.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiyun; Kwak, Inn-Sil

    2008-11-01

    Environmental stressors can induce changes in gene expression that can be useful as biomarkers. To identify potential biomarkers of water quality, we characterized full-length cDNA sequences of the serine-type endopeptidase (SP) gene from Chironomus riparius. Their expression was analyzed during different life-history stages and in response to treatment with various concentrations of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) for short and long periods of time. A comparative molecular and phylogenetic investigation was then conducted among different orders of insects using sequence database analysis. The sequence of the C. riparius SP gene was found to be most closely related to the sequence of SPs isolated from Aedes aegypti. In addition, the basal level of C. riparius SP mRNA was more highly expressed in larvae than in other life-history stages. However, the expression of C. riparius SP was primarily limited to the gut in larvae. When the effects of short-term exposure to DEHP were evaluated, C. riparius SP gene expression decreased within 1 h of treatment, regardless of dose. We also investigated expression of the C. riparius SP gene following long-term DEHP exposure (10 days) and found that it decreased significantly across all DEHP dosages. Finally, the response of the SP gene was more sensitive in C. riparius that were exposed to low concentrations of DEHP than in those that were exposed to high concentrations. These results show that suppression of the C. riparius SP gene by DEHP is as a potential biomarker that could be useful for monitoring aquatic quality.

  2. CD10/neutral endopeptidase inhibition augments pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia in hamsters treated with diethylnitrosamine and hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Willett, C G; Shahsafei, A; Graham, S A; Sunday, M E

    1999-07-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated that pulmonary neuroendocrine cell (PNEC) hyperplasia in hamsters treated with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) plus 65% hyperoxia (DEN/O2) reflects predominantly neuroendocrine cell differentiation. Several peptides implicated in non-neoplastic PNEC hyperplasia are hydrolyzed by CD10/neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (CD10/NEP), an enzyme known to downregulate neurogenic inflammation of the lung by modulating locally effective concentrations of multiple bioactive peptides. In fetal mice, we observed that CD10/NEP inhibition by SCH32615 potentiates cell proliferation and type II cell differentiation in the lung in utero. Further, CD10/NEP messenger RNA levels parallelled relative PNEC numbers in DEN/O2-treated hamster lung, suggesting that the enzyme might mediate spontaneous regression of PNEC hyperplasia. The goals of the present study were: (1) to determine whether CD10/NEP inhibition would alter the extent of PNEC hyperplasia occurring in these hamsters, and (2) to analyze cellular mechanisms potentially involved in altering numbers of PNECs in this model. We administered SCH32615 chronically to a subset of DEN/O2-treated hamsters. Immunostaining of lungs from the CD10/ NEP-inhibited subset demonstrated significant acceleration of the development of PNEC hyperplasia, increased PNEC proliferation, and diminished PNEC apoptosis as compared with animals receiving no SCH32615. These observations indicate that PNEC hyperplasia can occur as a result of multiple cellular processes, including increased neuroendocrine cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. CD10/NEP modulates PNEC numbers primarily by promoting cell differentiation and proliferation during lung injury, probably via increasing the half-life of bioactive peptides in the lung.

  3. Mechanisms of toxic smoke inhalation and burn injury: role of neutral endopeptidase and vascular leakage in mice.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sam; Deyo, Donald J; Cox, Robert A; Traber, Daniel L; Herndon, David N; Hawkins, Hal K

    2009-03-01

    The effects of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) in acute inflammation in the lung were studied using a newly developed murine model of smoke and burn (SB) injury. C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with an i.v. dose of a specific NEP antagonist CGS-24592 (10 mg/Kg) 1 h prior to SB injury (n = 5-8/group). Mice were anesthetized with i.p. ketamine/xylazine, intubated, and exposed to cooled cotton smoke (2 x 30 s). After s.c. injection of 1 ml 0.9% saline, each received a 40% total body surface area (TBSA) flame burn. Buprenorphene (2 mg/kg) was given i.p. and resuscitated by saline. Evans Blue dye (EB) was injected i.v. 15 min before sacrifice. Lung wet/dry weight ratio was measured. After vascular perfusion, lungs were analyzed for their levels of EB dye and myeloperoxidase (MPO). In mice pretreated with CGS-24592 followed by SB injury the EB levels were significantly higher (61%, p = 0.043) than those with SB injury alone. There was a significant increase (144%, p = 0.035) in EB dye in animals with SB injury alone as compared to shams. In mice pretreated with CGS-24592 prior to SB injury wet/dry weight ratios were significantly (27%, p = 0.042) higher compared to animals with SB injury alone. CGS-24592 pretreatment also caused a significant increase in MPO (29%, p = 0.026) as compared to mice with SB injury alone. In conclusion the current study indicates that specific NEP inhibitor CGS 24592 exacerbates the SB-induced lung injury and inflammation in mice.

  4. Cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema in mice is associated with prolyl endopeptidase, an enzyme involved in collagen breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Koelink, Pim J.; Henricks, Paul A. J.; Jackson, Patricia L.; Nijkamp, Frans P.; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Folkerts, Gert

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the neutrophil chemoattractant proline-glycine-proline (PGP), derived from the breakdown of the extracellular matrix, plays an important role in neutrophil recruitment to the lung. PGP formation is a multistep process involving neutrophils, metalloproteinases (MMPs), and prolyl endopeptidase (PE). This cascade of events is now investigated in the development of lung emphysema. A/J mice were whole body exposed to cigarette smoke for 20 wk. After 20 wk or 8 wk after smoking cessation, animals were killed, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were collected to analyze the neutrophilic airway inflammation, the MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, the PE activity, and the PGP levels. Lung tissue degradation was assessed by measuring the mean linear intercept. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the peptide l-arginine-threonine-arginine (RTR), which binds to PGP sequences, on the smoke-induced neutrophil influx in the lung after 5 days of smoke exposure. Neutrophilic airway inflammation was induced by cigarette smoke exposure. MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, PE activity, and PGP levels were elevated in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. PE was highly expressed in epithelial and inflammatory cells (macrophages and neutrophils) in lung tissue of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. After smoking cessation, the neutrophil influx, the MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, the PE activity, and the PGP levels were decreased or reduced to normal levels. Moreover, RTR inhibited the smoke-induced neutrophil influx in the lung after 5 days' smoke exposure. In the present murine model of cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema, it is demonstrated for the first time that all relevant components (neutrophils, MMP-8, MMP-9, PE) involved in PGP formation from collagen are upregulated in the airways. Together with MMPs, PE may play an important role in the formation of PGP and thus in the pathophysiology of lung emphysema. PMID:21112944

  5. Fermentation, purification, formulation, and pharmacological evaluation of a prolyl endopeptidase from Myxococcus xanthus: implications for Celiac Sprue therapy.

    PubMed

    Gass, Jonathan; Ehren, Jennifer; Strohmeier, Gregg; Isaacs, Indu; Khosla, Chaitan

    2005-12-20

    Celiac Sprue is a multi-factorial disease characterized by an inflammatory response to ingested wheat gluten and similar proteins in rye and barley. Proline-rich gluten peptides from wheat, rye, and barley are relatively resistant to gastrointestinal digestion, and therefore persist in the intestinal lumen to elicit immunopathology in genetically susceptible individuals. In this study, we characterize the in vitro gluten detoxifying properties of a therapeutically promising prolyl endopeptidase from Myxococcus xanthus (MX PEP), and describe the development of a prototypical enteric-coated capsule containing a pharmacologically useful dose of this enzyme. A high-cell density fed-batch fermentation process was developed for overproduction of recombinant MX PEP in E. coli, yielding 0.25-0.4 g/L purified protein. A simple, scalable purification and lyophilization procedure was established that yields >95% pure, highly active and stable enzyme as a dry powder. The dry powder was blended with excipients and encapsulated in a hard gelatin capsule. The resulting capsule was enteric coated using Eudragit L30-D55 polymer coat, which provided sufficient resistance to gastric conditions (> 1 h in 0.01 M HCl, pH 2 with pepsin) and rapid release under duodenal conditions (15-30 min release in pH 6.0 in the presence of trypsin and chymotrypsin). In conjunction with pancreatic enzymes, MX PEP breaks down whole gluten into a product mixture that is virtually indistinguishable from that generated by the Flavobacterium meningosepticum (FM) PEP as judged by chromatographic assays. Competitive studies involving selected immunogenic peptides mixed with whole gluten reveal that both PEPs have a wide range of substrate specificity. Our results support further in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the MX PEP capsule as an oral therapeutic agent for Celiac Sprue patients.

  6. Proteinase A, a storage-globulin-degrading endopeptidase of vetch (Vicia sativa L.) seeds, is not involved in early steps of storage-protein mobilization.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Senyuk, V I; Shutov, A D; Nong, V H; Fischer, J; Horstmann, C; Müntz, K

    1997-09-01

    Proteinase A is a papain-like cysteine endopeptidase of vetch (Vicia sativa L.) which was assumed to initiate storage-globulin breakdown just after the onset of seed germination. This enzyme was purified from cotyledons of vetch seedlings. On gelatin-containg SDS gels, active proteinase A migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 21 kDa, whereas after heat denaturation its molecular size on SDS/PAGE was 29 kDa. Although proteinase A is capable of hydrolyzing storage globulins in vitro it could not be localized in the protein-body fraction of cotyledons from germinating seeds. cDNA clones encoding proteinase A precursor have been obtained by PCR. The precursor is composed of an N-terminal signal sequence followed by a propeptide, the region encoding mature proteinase A, and a C-terminal KDEL sequence. Mature proteinase A with a derived molecular mass of 25,244 Da does not have the KDEL sequence. The derived amino acid sequence of the proteinase A precursor is 78.2% identical to sulfhydryl-endopeptidase (SH-EP), a cysteine endopeptidase from germinating Vigna mungo seedlings. Northern blot analysis indicated that proteinase A mRNA appears de novo in cotyledons of 1-day-germinated vetch seeds, where its amount increases up to day 6. No proteinase A mRNA was detected in other vetch organs, not even in the embryo axis, which contains stored globulins. By means of antibodies raised against the purified and against recombinantly produced proteinase A, the 29-kDa bands of mature proteinase A were detected in cotyledon extracts of 6-day-germinated seeds when globulin degradation has already far proceeded. The reported data do not agree with the proposed triggering role of proteinase A in storage-globulin breakdown during germination.

  7. Procollagen C-endopeptidase Enhancer Protein 2 (PCPE2) Reduces Atherosclerosis in Mice by Enhancing Scavenger Receptor Class B1 (SR-BI)-mediated High-density Lipoprotein (HDL)-Cholesteryl Ester Uptake.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Ricquita D; Blesso, Christopher N; Zabalawi, Manal; Fulp, Brian; Gerelus, Mark; Zhu, Xuewei; Lyons, Erica W; Nuradin, Nebil; Francone, Omar L; Li, Xiang-An; Sahoo, Daisy; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G

    2015-06-19

    Studies in human populations have shown a significant correlation between procollagen C-endopeptidase enhancer protein 2 (PCPE2) single nucleotide polymorphisms and plasma HDL cholesterol concentrations. PCPE2, a 52-kDa glycoprotein located in the extracellular matrix, enhances the cleavage of C-terminal procollagen by bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1). Our studies here focused on investigating the basis for the elevated concentration of enlarged plasma HDL in PCPE2-deficient mice to determine whether they protected against diet-induced atherosclerosis. PCPE2-deficient mice were crossed with LDL receptor-deficient mice to obtain LDLr(-/-), PCPE2(-/-) mice, which had elevated HDL levels compared with LDLr(-/-) mice with similar LDL concentrations. We found that LDLr(-/-), PCPE2(-/-) mice had significantly more neutral lipid and CD68+ infiltration in the aortic root than LDLr(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, in light of their elevated HDL levels, the extent of aortic lipid deposition in LDLr(-/-), PCPE2(-/-) mice was similar to that reported for LDLr(-/-), apoA-I(-/-) mice, which lack any apoA-I/HDL. Furthermore, LDLr(-/-), PCPE2(-/-) mice had reduced HDL apoA-I fractional clearance and macrophage to fecal reverse cholesterol transport rates compared with LDLr(-/-) mice, despite a 2-fold increase in liver SR-BI expression. PCPE2 was shown to enhance SR-BI function by increasing the rate of HDL-associated cholesteryl ester uptake, possibly by optimizing SR-BI localization and/or conformation. We conclude that PCPE2 is atheroprotective and an important component of the reverse cholesterol transport HDL system.

  8. Effect of an inhaled neutral endopeptidase inhibitor, phosphoramidon, on baseline airway calibre and bronchial responsiveness to bradykinin in asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Crimi, N.; Polosa, R.; Pulvirenti, G.; Magrì, S.; Santonocito, G.; Prosperini, G.; Mastruzzo, C.; Mistretta, A.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Bradykinin is a potent vasoactive peptide which has been proposed as an important inflammatory mediator in asthma since it provokes potent bronchoconstriction in asthmatic subjects. Little is known at present about the potential role of lung peptidases in modulating bradykinin-induced airway dysfunction in vivo in man. The change in bronchial reactivity to bradykinin was therefore investigated after treatment with inhaled phosphoramidon, a potent neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor, in a double blind, placebo controlled, randomised study of 10 asthmatic subjects. METHODS--Subjects attended on six separate occasions at the same time of day during which concentration-response studies with inhaled bradykinin and histamine were carried out, without treatment and after each test drug. Subjects received nebulised phosphoramidon sodium salt (10(-5) M, 3 ml) or matched placebo for 5-7 minutes using an Inspiron Mini-neb nebuliser 5 minutes before the bronchoprovocation test with bradykinin or histamine. Agonists were administered in increasing concentrations as an aerosol generated from a starting volume of 3 ml in a nebuliser driven by compressed air at 8 1/min. Changes in airway calibre were measured as forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and responsiveness as the provocative concentration causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20). RESULTS--Phosphoramidon administration caused a transient fall in FEV1 from baseline, FEV1 values decreasing 6.3% and 5.3% on the bradykinin and histamine study days, respectively. When compared with placebo, phosphoramidon elicited a small enhancement of the airways response to bradykinin, the geometric mean PC20 value (range) decreasing from 0.281 (0.015-5.575) to 0.136 (0.006-2.061) mg/ml. In contrast, NEP blockade failed to alter the airways response to a subsequent inhalation with histamine, the geometric mean (range) PC20 histamine value of 1.65 (0.17-10.52) mg/ml after placebo being no different from that of 1.58 (0

  9. Peptides in Seminal Fluid and Their Role in Infertility: A Potential Role for Opiorphin Inhibition of Neutral Endopeptidase Activity as a Clinically Relevant Modulator of Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kelvin P.; Neal-Perry, Genevieve S.

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a devastating medical condition that adversely affects emotional health and well-being of couples who desire pregnancy and parenthood. The overall demographic data suggest that the indication for more than one-third of assisted reproductive technology cycles performed in the United States includes male factor infertility. There is increasing recognition of the role that peptides present in seminal plasma have in determining sperm motility. Several recent studies suggest that peptidases, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and aminopeptidase N (APN), impose significant adverse effects on sperm motility. Interestingly, several recent studies demonstrate that there is an endogenous NEP/APN inhibitor peptide called opiorphin in human seminal plasma. Our pilot studies suggest opiorphin promotes sperm motility and may positively influence sperm motility parameters in some cases of males infertility characterized by asthenozoospermia. PMID:24855109

  10. Effects of a Proline Endopeptidase on the Detection and Quantitation of Gluten by Antibody-Based Methods during the Fermentation of a Model Sorghum Beer.

    PubMed

    Panda, Rakhi; Fiedler, Katherine L; Cho, Chung Y; Cheng, Raymond; Stutts, Whitney L; Jackson, Lauren S; Garber, Eric A E

    2015-12-09

    The effectiveness of a proline endopeptidase (PEP) in hydrolyzing gluten and its putative immunopathogenic sequences was examined using antibody-based methods and mass spectrometry (MS). Based on the results of the antibody-based methods, fermentation of wheat gluten containing sorghum beer resulted in a reduction in the detectable gluten concentration. The addition of PEP further reduced the gluten concentration. Only one sandwich ELISA was able to detect the apparent low levels of gluten present in the beers. A competitive ELISA using a pepsin-trypsin hydrolysate calibrant was unreliable because the peptide profiles of the beers were inconsistent with that of the hydrolysate calibrant. Analysis by MS indicated that PEP enhanced the loss of a fragment of an immunopathogenic 33-mer peptide in the beer. However, Western blot results indicated partial resistance of the high molecular weight (HMW) glutenins to the action of PEP, questioning the ability of PEP in digesting all immunopathogenic sequences present in gluten.

  11. Conjugative type IV secretion in Gram-positive pathogens: TraG, a lytic transglycosylase and endopeptidase, interacts with translocation channel protein TraM.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Verena; Probst, Ines; Aufschnaiter, Andreas; Büttner, Sabrina; Schaden, Lisa; Rechberger, Gerald N; Koraimann, Günther; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Keller, Walter

    2017-02-17

    Conjugative transfer plays a major role in the transmission of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. pIP501 is a Gram-positive conjugative model plasmid with the broadest transfer host-range known so far and is frequently found in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates. The pIP501 type IV secretion system is encoded by 15 transfer genes. In this work, we focus on the VirB1-like protein TraG, a modular peptidoglycan metabolizing enzyme, and the VirB8-homolog TraM, a potential member of the translocation channel. By providing full-length traG in trans, but not with a truncated variant, we achieved full recovery of wild type transfer efficiency in the traG-knockout mutant E. faecalis pIP501ΔtraG. With peptidoglycan digestion experiments and tandem mass spectrometry we could assign lytic transglycosylase and endopeptidase activity to TraG, with the CHAP domain alone displaying endopeptidase activity. We identified a novel interaction between TraG and TraM in a bacterial-2-hybrid assay. In addition we found that both proteins localize in focal spots at the E. faecalis cell membrane using immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy. Extracellular protease digestion to evaluate protein cell surface exposure revealed that correct membrane localization of TraM requires the transmembrane helix of TraG. Thus, we suggest an essential role for TraG in the assembly of the pIP501 type IV secretion system.

  12. Purification of the main somatostatin-degrading proteases from rat and pig brains, their action on other neuropeptides, and their identification as endopeptidases 24.15 and 24.16.

    PubMed

    Dahms, P; Mentlein, R

    1992-08-15

    The main somatostatin-degrading proteases were purified from rat and pig brain homogenates and characterized as thiol- and metal-dependent endoproteases. Two types of proteases with apparent native and subunit molecular masses of 70 kDa and 68 kDa could be differentiated in both species. Beside somatostatin, both hydrolyzed several other neuropeptides with chain lengths between 8 and 30 amino acid residues. Cleavage sites were generally similar or identical, but some clear exceptions were observed for enzymes from both species which could be used to differentiate between the two proteases. The 68-kDa protease cleaved somatostatin at three bonds (Asn5-Phe6, Phe6-Phe7 and Thr10-Phe11) and neurotensin only at the Arg8-Arg9 bond, whereas the 70-kDa protease digested somatostatin at only two bonds (Phe6-Phe7 and Thr10-Phe11) and neurotensin as well as acetylneurotensin-(8-13) additionally (pig protease) or almost exclusively (rat protease) at the Pro10-Tyr11 bond. Relative rates for the digestions of various peptides were, however, more dependent on the species than on the type of protease. Cleavage sites for angiotensin II, bradykinin, dynorphin, gonadoliberin and substance P were, apart from different rates, identical for both proteases. In both species the 68-kDa protease was found to be mainly, but not exclusively, soluble and not membrane-associated, whereas the inverse was detected for the 70-kDa protease. Based on distinct molecular and catalytic properties, the 68-kDa protease is supposed to be congruent with the endopeptidase 24.15 (EC 3.4.24.15), the 70-kDa protease with endopeptidase 24.16 (EC 3.4.24.16, neurotensin-degrading endopeptidase). This investigation demonstrates that both proteases hydrolyze various neuropeptides with similar cleavage sites, but with species-dependent activity. Species-independent distinctions are the exclusive action of endopeptidase 24.16 on acetylneurotensin-(8-13) and liberation of free Phe from somatostatin only by

  13. Functional up-regulation of endopeptidase neurolysin during post-acute and early recovery phases of experimental stroke in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamoon; Wangler, Naomi J; Yang, Li; Shah, Kaushik; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Abbruscato, Thomas J; Karamyan, Vardan T

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we provide evidence for the first time that membrane-bound endopeptidase neurolysin is up-regulated in different parts of mouse brain affected by focal ischemia-reperfusion in a middle cerebral artery occlusion model of stroke. Radioligand binding, enzymatic and immunoblotting experiments in membrane preparations of frontoparietal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus isolated from the ischemic hemisphere of mouse brain 24 h after reperfusion revealed statistically significant increase (≥ twofold) in quantity and activity of neurolysin compared with sham-operated controls. Cerebellar membranes isolated from the ischemic hemisphere served as negative control supporting the observations that up-regulation of neurolysin occurs in post-ischemic brain regions. This study also documents sustained functional up-regulation of neurolysin in frontoparietal cortical membranes for at least 7 days after stroke, which appears not to be transcriptionally or translationally regulated, but rather depends on translocation of cytosolic neurolysin to the membranes and mitochondria. Considering diversity of endogenous neurolysin substrates (neurotensin, bradykinin, angiotensins I/II, substance P, hemopressin, dynorphin A(1-8), metorphamide, somatostatin) and the well-documented role of these peptidergic systems in pathogenesis of stroke, resistance to ischemic injury and/or post-stroke brain recovery, our findings suggest that neurolysin may play a role in processes modulating the brain's response to stroke and its recovery after stroke.

  14. Cytoplasmic expression of mature glycylglycine endopeptidase lysostaphin with an amino terminal hexa-histidine in a soluble and catalytically active form in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Sharma, Poonam R; Choudhary, Manohar L; Pande, Amit; Khatri, Ghan Shyam

    2006-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a major problem in the world, causing hospital acquired infections and the infections/pathogenesis in community. Lysostaphin is a novel therapeutic molecule to kill the multidrug-resistant S. aureus. Mature lysostaphin is a single polypeptide (approximately 27 kDa) chain metalloprotease glycylglycine endopeptidase, capable of specifically hydrolyzing penta-glycine crosslinks present in the peptidoglycan of the S. aureus cell wall. The mature lysostaphin gene of Staphylococcus simulans has been cloned and overexpressed in the cytoplasm of E. coli with amino terminal hexa-histidine as a fusion partner under the transcriptional control of bacteriophage T7 phi 10 promoter/lac operator and ribosome binding site. The transformed E. coli BL21 (lambdaDE3) cells produced catalytically active soluble (His)6-lysostaphin fusion protein in the cytoplasm representing approximately 20% of the total cellular proteins. The fusion protein was purified to homogeneity using a single chromatographic step of IMAC on Ni-NTA agarose. The present cloning, expression, and purification procedure of recombinant lysostaphin from a non-pathogenic organism E. coli enables preparation of large quantity of r-lysostaphin for structure function studies and evaluation of its clinical potential in therapy and prophylaxis of staphylococcal infections.

  15. Neutral endopeptidase-resistant C-type natriuretic peptide variant represents a new therapeutic approach for treatment of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-related dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Daniel J; Dvorak-Ewell, Melita; Bullens, Sherry; Lorget, Florence; Bell, Sean M; Peng, Jeff; Castillo, Sianna; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; O'Neill, Charles A; Krejci, Pavel; Wilcox, William R; Rimoin, David L; Bunting, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of human dwarfism, is caused by an activating autosomal dominant mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 gene. Genetic overexpression of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), a positive regulator of endochondral bone growth, prevents dwarfism in mouse models of ACH. However, administration of exogenous CNP is compromised by its rapid clearance in vivo through receptor-mediated and proteolytic pathways. Using in vitro approaches, we developed modified variants of human CNP, resistant to proteolytic degradation by neutral endopeptidase, that retain the ability to stimulate signaling downstream of the CNP receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor B. The variants tested in vivo demonstrated significantly longer serum half-lives than native CNP. Subcutaneous administration of one of these CNP variants (BMN 111) resulted in correction of the dwarfism phenotype in a mouse model of ACH and overgrowth of the axial and appendicular skeletons in wild-type mice without observable changes in trabecular and cortical bone architecture. Moreover, significant growth plate widening that translated into accelerated bone growth, at hemodynamically tolerable doses, was observed in juvenile cynomolgus monkeys that had received daily subcutaneous administrations of BMN 111. BMN 111 was well tolerated and represents a promising new approach for treatment of patients with ACH.

  16. Purification, cDNA cloning and characterization of proteinase B, an asparagine-specific endopeptidase from germinating vetch (Vicia sativa L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Shutov, A D; Nong, V H; Senyuk, V I; Jung, R; Horstmann, C; Fischer, J; Nielsen, N C; Müntz, K

    1995-03-01

    Proteinase B, an asparagine-specific endopeptidase, has been purified from germinating vetch (Vicia sativa L.) seeds. The final preparation consists of two enzymically active proteins with molecular masses of approximately 39 kDa and 37 kDa. Synthetic substrates were used to confirm cleavage specificity of the proteinase B preparation. As expected, the enzyme cleaves the substrates at the C-terminal side of Asn residues. The octapeptide ETRNGVEE was digested most efficiently. When Gly was replaced by Ile or Glu, cleavage took place with lower efficiency. Polyclonal antibodies displayed both proteins in cotyledon extracts of germinated vetch seeds. In addition, a strong cross-reacting protein band was found in cotyledon extracts of developing seeds, indicating the presence of a very similar enzyme during seed development. cDNA clones encoding proteinase B precursor have been obtained on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequence DDDFEGTRWAILLAGS, by means of the polymerase chain reaction. The cDNA clones contain an open reading frame of 1479 bp encoding a polypeptide of 493 amino acids. The precursor displayed 59% sequence identity to the cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of a vacuolar Asn-specific enzyme from the developing castor beam endosperm which is thought to catalyze the post-translational processing of pro-proteins into the mature forms. Proteinase B is synthesized de novo during seed germination. The results of Southern-blot analyses suggested that there are at least two genes for proteinase B.

  17. Multifunctional amaranth cystatin inhibits endogenous and digestive insect cysteine endopeptidases: A potential tool to prevent proteolysis and for the control of insect pests.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Silvia; Galván-Ramírez, Juan Pablo; Guerrero-Rangel, Armando; Cedro-Tanda, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, the amaranth cystatin was characterized. This cystatin is believed to provide protection from abiotic stress because its transcription is induced in response to heat, drought, and salinity. It has also been shown that recombinant amaranth cystatin inhibits bromelain, ficin, and cysteine endopeptidases from fungal sources and also inhibits the growth of phytopathogenic fungi. In the present study, evidence is presented regarding the potential function of amaranth cystatin as a regulator of endogenous proteinases and insect digestive proteinases. During amaranth germination and seedling growth, different proteolytic profiles were observed at different pH levels in gelatin-containing SDS-PAGE. Most of the proteolytic enzymes detected at pH 4.5 were mainly inhibited by trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucyl amido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) and the purified recombinant amaranth cystatin. Furthermore, the recombinant amaranth cystatin was active against insect proteinases. In particular, the E-64-sensitive proteolytic digestive enzymes from Callosobruchus maculatus, Zabrotes subfasciatus, and Acanthoscelides obtectus were inhibited by the amaranth cystatin. Taken together, these results suggest multiple roles for cystatin in amaranth, specifically during germination and seedling growth and in the protection of A. hypochondriacus against insect predation. Amaranth cystatin represents a promising tool for diverse applications in the control of insect pest and for preventing undesirable proteolytic activity.

  18. Lack of Set Theory Relevant Prerequisite Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan-Dunlap, Hamide

    2006-01-01

    Many students struggle with college mathematics topics due to a lack of mastery of prerequisite knowledge. Set theory language is one such prerequisite for linear algebra courses. Many students' mistakes on linear algebra questions reveal a lack of mastery of set theory knowledge. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative analysis of a…

  19. A Systematic Approach to the Comparison of Cost Efficiency of Endopeptidases for the Hydrolysis of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) By-Products

    PubMed Central

    Egede-Nissen, Henning; Oterhals, Ĺge

    2016-01-01

    Summary The hydrolytic and cost efficiencies of five endopeptidases (Alcalase 2.4L, Corolase 7089, Neutrase 0.8L, Promod 671L and Protex 7L) to hydrolyze Atlantic salmon by-products were compared at standardized activity levels based on a casein assay. The substrate was characterized prior to the hydrolytic experiments (pH=6.5, t=50 °C) to obtain substrate--specific constants for nitrogen to protein mass (in g) ratio, i.e. conversion factor fN=5.23 and total amount of peptide bonds (htot)=9.3 mmol per g of protein. At low enzyme activity to substrate ratio, all enzymes were equally efficient in hydrolyzing the substrate. At highest enzyme activity to substrate ratio, Protex 7L, Alcalase 2.4L and Promod 671L gave higher degree of hydrolysis (DH=14.2–14.6%) than Corolase 7089 (13.2%) and Neutrase 0.8L (11.6%) after 120 min of hydrolysis. No differences were observed in protein recovery (yield of solubilized protein) relative to DH. Determination of DH was followed by the pH-STAT and o-phthaldialdehyde methods. Based on pH-STAT data, response surface regression models were established based on the combined effects of hydrolysis time and enzyme activity to substrate ratio on DH and protein recovery. The modelling approach was combined with enzyme cost to identify the most cost-efficient enzyme (Protex 7L). PMID:28115899

  20. Comparative fine structural distribution of endopeptidase 24.15 (EC3.4.24.15) and 24.16 (EC3.4.24.16) in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fontenele-Neto, J D; Massarelli, E E; Gurgel Garrido, P A; Beaudet, A; Ferro, E S

    2001-10-01

    Endopeptidase 24.15 (EP24.15) and 24.16 (EP24.16) are closely related metalloendopeptidases implicated in the metabolism of several neuropeptides and widely expressed in mammalian brain. To gain insight into the functional role of these two enzymes in the central nervous system, we examined their cellular and subcellular distribution in rat brain by using electron microscopic immunogold labeling. In all areas examined, EP24.15 and EP24.16 immunoreactivity were observed in selective subpopulations of neuronal and glial cells. Subcellular localization of EP24.15 in neurons revealed that this enzyme was predominantly concentrated in the nucleus, whereas EP24.16 was almost exclusively cytoplasmic. The amount of EP24.15 found in the nucleus was inversely correlated with that found in the cytoplasm, suggesting that the enzyme could be mobilized from one compartment to the other. Within the cytoplasm, EP24.15 and EP24.16 immunoreactivity showed comparable distributional patterns. Both enzymes were detected throughout perikarya and dendrites, as well as within axons and axon terminals. In all neuronal compartments, EP24.15 and EP24.16 showed a major association with membranes of neurosecretory elements, including Golgi cisternae, tubulovesicular organelles, synaptic vesicles, and endosomes. However, whereas EP24.15 always faced the cytoplasmic face of the membranes, EP24.16 was observed on both cytoplasmic and luminal sides, suggesting that the latter was more likely to contribute to the processing of peptides or to the degradation of internalized ligands. Taken together, the present results suggest that EP24.15 could play a major role in the hydrolysis of intranuclear substrates, whereas EP24.16 would be predominantly involved in the processing and inactivation of signaling peptides.

  1. Genetic homogeneity but IgG subclass-dependent clinical variability of alloimmune membranous nephropathy with anti-neutral endopeptidase antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vivarelli, Marina; Emma, Francesco; Pellé, Thimothée; Gerken, Christopher; Pedicelli, Stefania; Diomedi-Camassei, Francesca; Klaus, Günter; Waldegger, Siegfried; Ronco, Pierre; Debiec, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Alloimmune antenatal membranous nephropathy (MN) during pregnancy results from antibodies produced by a neutral endopeptidase (NEP)-deficient mother. Here we report two recent cases that provide clues to the severity of renal disease. Mothers of the two children had circulating antibodies against NEP showing the characteristic species-dependent pattern by immunofluorescence on kidney slices. A German mother produced predominantly anti-NEP IgG4 accompanied by a low amount of IgG1. Her child recovered renal function within a few weeks. In sharp contrast, an Italian mother mainly produced complement-fixing anti-NEP IgG1, which also inhibits NEP enzymatic activity, whereas anti-NEP IgG4 has a weak inhibitory potency. Her child was dialyzed for several weeks. A kidney biopsy performed at 12 days of age showed MN, ischemic glomeruli, and arteriolar and tubular lesions. A second biopsy performed at 12 weeks of age showed aggravation with an increased number of collapsed capillary tufts. Both mothers were homozygous for the truncating deletion mutation 466delC and were thus NEP deficient. The 466delC mutation, identified in three previously described families, suggests a founder effect. Because of the potential severity of alloimmune antenatal MN, it is essential to identify families at risk by the detection of anti-NEP antibodies and NEP antigen in urine. On the basis of the five families identified to date, we propose an algorithm for the diagnosis of the disease and the prevention of complications.

  2. Abundance of cysteine endopeptidase dionain in digestive fluid of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis) is regulated by different stimuli from prey through jasmonates.

    PubMed

    Libiaková, Michaela; Floková, Kristýna; Novák, Ondřej; Slováková, L'udmila; Pavlovič, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The trap of the carnivorous plant Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) catches prey by very rapid closure of its modified leaves. After the rapid closure secures the prey, repeated mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs by struggling prey and the generation of action potentials (APs) result in secretion of digestive fluid. Once the prey's movement stops, the secretion is maintained by chemical stimuli released from digested prey. We investigated the effect of mechanical and chemical stimulation (NH4Cl, KH2PO4, further N(Cl) and P(K) stimulation) on enzyme activities in digestive fluid. Activities of β-D-glucosidases and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidases were not detected. Acid phosphatase activity was higher in N(Cl) stimulated traps while proteolytic activity was higher in both chemically induced traps in comparison to mechanical stimulation. This is in accordance with higher abundance of recently described enzyme cysteine endopeptidase dionain in digestive fluid of chemically induced traps. Mechanical stimulation induced high levels of cis-12-oxophytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA) but jasmonic acid (JA) and its isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile) accumulated to higher level after chemical stimulation. The concentration of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA) did not change significantly. The external application of JA bypassed the mechanical and chemical stimulation and induced a high abundance of dionain and proteolytic activity in digestive fluid. These results document the role of jasmonates in regulation of proteolytic activity in response to different stimuli from captured prey. The double trigger mechanism in protein digestion is proposed.

  3. Abundance of Cysteine Endopeptidase Dionain in Digestive Fluid of Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis) Is Regulated by Different Stimuli from Prey through Jasmonates

    PubMed Central

    Libiaková, Michaela; Floková, Kristýna; Novák, Ondřej; Slováková, L'udmila; Pavlovič, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The trap of the carnivorous plant Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) catches prey by very rapid closure of its modified leaves. After the rapid closure secures the prey, repeated mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs by struggling prey and the generation of action potentials (APs) result in secretion of digestive fluid. Once the prey's movement stops, the secretion is maintained by chemical stimuli released from digested prey. We investigated the effect of mechanical and chemical stimulation (NH4Cl, KH2PO4, further N(Cl) and P(K) stimulation) on enzyme activities in digestive fluid. Activities of β-D-glucosidases and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidases were not detected. Acid phosphatase activity was higher in N(Cl) stimulated traps while proteolytic activity was higher in both chemically induced traps in comparison to mechanical stimulation. This is in accordance with higher abundance of recently described enzyme cysteine endopeptidase dionain in digestive fluid of chemically induced traps. Mechanical stimulation induced high levels of cis-12-oxophytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA) but jasmonic acid (JA) and its isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile) accumulated to higher level after chemical stimulation. The concentration of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA) did not change significantly. The external application of JA bypassed the mechanical and chemical stimulation and induced a high abundance of dionain and proteolytic activity in digestive fluid. These results document the role of jasmonates in regulation of proteolytic activity in response to different stimuli from captured prey. The double trigger mechanism in protein digestion is proposed. PMID:25153528

  4. Structures of a bifunctional cell-wall hydrolase CwlT containing a novel bacterial lysozyme and an NlpC/P60 dl-endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Lesley, Scott A.; Godzik, Adam; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Tn916-like conjugative transposons carrying antibiotic resistance genes are found in a diverse range of bacteria. Orf14 within the conjugation module encodes a bifunctional cell-wall hydrolase CwlT that consists of an N-terminal bacterial lysozyme domain (N-acetylmuramidase, bLysG) and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 domain (γ-d-glutamyl-l-diamino acid endopeptidase) and is expected to play an important role in the spread of the transposons. We determined the crystal structures of two CwlT from pathogens Staphylococcus aureus mu50 (SaCwlT) and Clostridium difficile 630 (CdCwlT). These structures reveal that NlpC/P60 and LysG domains are compact and conserved modules, connected by a short flexible linker. The LysG domain represents a novel family of widely distributed bacterial lysozymes. The overall structure and the active site of bLysG bear significant similarity to other members of the glycoside hydrolase family 23 (GH23), such as the g-type lysozyme (LysG) and Escherichia coli lytic transglycosylase MltE. The active site of bLysG contains a unique structural and sequence signature (DxxQSSES+S) that is important for coordinating a catalytic water. Molecular modeling suggests that the bLysG domain may recognize glycan in a similar manner to MltE. The C-terminal NlpC/P60 domain contains a conserved active site (Cys-His-His-Tyr) that appears to be specific for tetrapeptide. Access to the active site is likely regulated by isomerism of a side chain atop the catalytic cysteine, allowing substrate entry or product release, or closing during catalysis. PMID:24051416

  5. Structures of a bifunctional cell wall hydrolase CwlT containing a novel bacterial lysozyme and an NlpC/P60 DL-endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Miller, Mitchell D; Lesley, Scott A; Godzik, Adam; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M; Wilson, Ian A

    2014-01-09

    Tn916-like conjugative transposons carrying antibiotic resistance genes are found in a diverse range of bacteria. Orf14 within the conjugation module encodes a bifunctional cell wall hydrolase CwlT that consists of an N-terminal bacterial lysozyme domain (N-acetylmuramidase, bLysG) and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 domain (γ-d-glutamyl-l-diamino acid endopeptidase) and is expected to play an important role in the spread of the transposons. We determined the crystal structures of CwlT from two pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus Mu50 (SaCwlT) and Clostridium difficile 630 (CdCwlT). These structures reveal that NlpC/P60 and LysG domains are compact and conserved modules, connected by a short flexible linker. The LysG domain represents a novel family of widely distributed bacterial lysozymes. The overall structure and the active site of bLysG bear significant similarity to other members of the glycoside hydrolase family 23 (GH23), such as the g-type lysozyme (LysG) and Escherichia coli lytic transglycosylase MltE. The active site of bLysG contains a unique structural and sequence signature (DxxQSSES+S) that is important for coordinating a catalytic water. Molecular modeling suggests that the bLysG domain may recognize glycan in a similar manner to MltE. The C-terminal NlpC/P60 domain contains a conserved active site (Cys-His-His-Tyr) that appears to be specific to murein tetrapeptide. Access to the active site is likely regulated by isomerism of a side chain atop the catalytic cysteine, allowing substrate entry or product release (open state), or catalysis (closed state).

  6. The Inhibitory Effects of Anti-Oxidants on Ultraviolet-Induced Up-Regulation of the Wrinkling-Inducing Enzyme Neutral Endopeptidase in Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hiroaki; Terazawa, Shuko; Niwano, Takao; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Imokawa, Genji

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that the over-expression of skin fibroblast-derived neutral endopeptidase (NEP) plays a pivotal role in impairing the three-dimensional architecture of dermal elastic fibers during the biological mechanism of ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin wrinkling. In that process, a UVB-associated epithelial-mesenchymal cytokine interaction as well as a direct UVA-induced cellular stimulation are associated with the up-regulation of NEP in human fibroblasts. In this study, we characterized the mode of action of ubiquinol10 which may abrogate the up-regulation of NEP by dermal fibroblasts, resulting in a reported in vivo anti-wrinkling action, and compared that with 3 other anti-oxidants, astaxanthin (AX), riboflavin (RF) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Post-irradiation treatment with all 4 of those anti-oxidants elicited an interrupting effect on the UVB-associated epithelial-mesenchymal cytokine interaction leading to the up-regulation of NEP in human fibroblasts but with different modes of action. While AX mainly served as an inhibitor of the secretion of wrinkle-inducing cytokines, such as interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulatory factor (GM-CSF) in UVB-exposed epidermal keratinocytes, ubiquinol10, RF and FMN predominantly interrupted the IL-1α and GM-CSF-stimulated expression of NEP in dermal fibroblasts. On the other hand, as for the UVA-associated mechanism, similar to the abrogating effects reported for AX and FMN, ubiquinol10 but not RF had the potential to abrogate the increased expression of NEP and matrix-metalloproteinase-1 in UVA-exposed human fibroblasts. Our findings strongly support the in vivo anti-wrinkling effects of ubiquinol10 and AX on human and animal skin and provide convincing proof of the UV-induced wrinkling mechanism that essentially focuses on the over-expression of NEP by dermal fibroblasts as an intrinsic causative factor. PMID:27648570

  7. Neurotensin high affinity binding sites and endopeptidase 24. 11 are present respectively in the meningothelial and in the fibroblastic components of human meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Mailleux, P.; Przedborski, S.; Beaumont, A.; Verslijpe, M.; Depierreux, M.; Levivier, M.; Kitabgi, P.; Roques, B.P.; Vanderhaeghen, J.J. )

    1990-11-01

    The presence of neurotensin receptors and endopeptidase 24.11 (E-24.11) in 16 human meningioma specimens, obtained at surgery, was assessed by measuring the binding of {sup 125}I-(tyrosyl3)neurotensin(1-13) ({sup 125}I-NT) and the inhibitor {sup 3}H-N(2RS)-3-hydroxyaminocarbonyl-2-benzyl-1-(oxopropyl)glycine ({sup 3}H-HACBO-Gly), for the receptor and enzyme, respectively. E-24.11 activity was also measured. Autoradiography, on the 16 meningiomas, showed that specific {sup 125}I-NT labeling (nonspecific labeling was assessed in the presence of excess NT) was exclusively located in the meningothelial regions. In contrast, specific {sup 3}H-HACBO-Gly labeling (nonspecific labeling was assessed in the presence of an excess of the E-24.11 inhibitor thiorphan) was exclusively found in fibroblastic regions. No specific labeling of either ligand was found on collagen or blood vessels. In vitro binding assays were performed on membranes of 10 of the 16 meningiomas. In the 4 meningiomas rich in meningothelial cells, {sup 125}I-NT specifically bound to one population of sites with Bmax ranging from 57 to 405 fmol/mg protein and Kd around 0.3 nM. These sites share common properties with the brain NT receptor, since the carboxy terminal acetyl NT(8-13) fragment bound to the same sites but with a higher affinity. The carboxy terminal analogue of NT, neuromedin N, also bound to the same sites with a 10-fold lower affinity and the sites were bradykinin and levocabastine insensitive. In the 4 meningiomas rich in fibroblastic cells, {sup 3}H-HACBO-Gly specifically bound to one population of sites with Bmax ranging from 251 to 739 fmol/mg protein and Kd around 2.8 nM.

  8. Report: EPA Travel Program Lacks Necessary Controls

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #10-P-0078, March 9, 2010. The EPA travel program, which comprises EPA policies and GovTrip, lacks necessary control procedures to assure all travel authorizations were necessary and in the best interest of the government.

  9. Teichoic Acid Polymers Affect Expression and Localization of dl-Endopeptidase LytE Required for Lateral Cell Wall Hydrolysis in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Jun; Kiriyama, Yuuka; Miyashita, Mari; Kondo, Takuma; Yamada, Takeshi; Yazawa, Kazuya; Yoshikawa, Ritsuko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Bacillus subtilis, the dl-endopeptidase LytE is responsible for lateral peptidoglycan hydrolysis during cell elongation. We found that σI-dependent transcription of lytE is considerably enhanced in a strain with a mutation in ltaS, which encodes a major lipoteichoic acid (LTA) synthase. Similar enhancements were observed in mutants that affect the glycolipid anchor and wall teichoic acid (WTA) synthetic pathways. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the LytE foci were considerably increased in these mutants. The localization patterns of LytE on the sidewalls appeared to be helix-like in LTA-defective or WTA-reduced cells and evenly distributed on WTA-depleted or -defective cell surfaces. These results strongly suggested that LTA and WTA affect both σI-dependent expression and localization of LytE. Interestingly, increased LytE localization along the sidewall in the ltaS mutant largely occurred in an MreBH-independent manner. Moreover, we found that cell surface decorations with LTA and WTA are gradually reduced at increased culture temperatures and that LTA rather than WTA on the cell surface is reduced at high temperatures. In contrast, the amount of LytE on the cell surface gradually increased under heat stress conditions. Taken together, these results indicated that reductions in these anionic polymers at high temperatures might give rise to increases in SigI-dependent expression and cell surface localization of LytE at high temperatures. IMPORTANCE The bacterial cell wall is required for maintaining cell shape and bearing environmental stresses. The Gram-positive cell wall consists of mesh-like peptidoglycan and covalently linked wall teichoic acid and lipoteichoic acid polymers. It is important to determine if these anionic polymers are required for proliferation and environmental adaptation. Here, we demonstrated that these polymers affect the expression and localization of a peptidoglycan hydrolase LytE required for lateral cell wall

  10. Pharmacokinetics of M100240 and MDL 100,173, a dual angiotensin-converting enzyme/neutral endopeptidase inhibitor, in healthy young and elderly volunteers.

    PubMed

    Emmons, Gary T; Argenti, Rick; Martin, Louis L; Martin, Nancy E; Jensen, Bradford K

    2004-08-01

    M100240 is an acetate thioester of MDL 100,173-a dual angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor-in phase II development. The pharmacokinetics of M100240 and MDL 100,173 were compared in young and elderly subjects. Pharmacokinetic data were obtained from 12 young (ages 18-45 years, 10 male, 2 female) and 12 elderly (ages 65-85 years, 7 male, 5 female) healthy subjects in a parallel-group, open-label study. Following an overnight fast, subjects received a single 25-mg oral dose of M100240. Serial plasma concentrations of M100240 and MDL 100,173 were determined using a validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated with noncompartmental methods. Single-dose treatment with M100240 was well tolerated in both groups of subjects, with no clinically significant changes in vital signs, ECG recordings, or laboratory safety parameters. M100240 was rapidly absorbed and converted to MDL 100,173, with M100240 concentrations no longer detectable at 3 to 4 hours postdose in both groups. The pharmacokinetics of the pharmacologically active MDL 100,173 were similar for both groups. Although maximum concentrations of M100240 were generally higher in elderly versus young subjects (C(max) 0.48 ng/mL vs. 0.17 ng/mL), systemic availability of M100240 was quite low and variable with plasma, and this apparent difference in parent drug exposure is unlikely to have important clinical implications. No age-related differences in the pharmacokinetic parameters of MDL 100,173 (C(max) 8.16 vs. 9.62 ng/mL, t(max) 1.25 vs. 1.5 h, AUC((0-last)) 81.6 vs. 72.2 ng x h/mL) were observed between young and elderly subjects, respectively. In conclusion, there are no age-related differences in the pharmacokinetics of MDL 100,173 between young and elderly subjects.

  11. Kid's Green Movement Lacks Basis in Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Discussed is the idea that kids are highly politically correct environmentalists on the surface, but underneath they seem to be missing the connection with nature. The author attributes this ignorance of all things natural to things such as kid's preference for video games, television, and lack of access and time. The importance of parental…

  12. Lack of Communications: The Most Common Deficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Thomas R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A survey with employers and teacher-coordinators of cooperative education programs showed that young employees' most common deficiencies are in communication skills, both written and oral. Poor handwriting was the leading complaint, followed by misspelling, ignorance of grammar and rhetoric, poor customer relations, and lack of comprehension and…

  13. Apathy in aging: are lack of interest and lack of initiative dissociable?

    PubMed

    Esposito, Fabienne; Rochat, Lucien; Juillerat Van der Linden, Anne-Claude; Lekeu, Françoise; Charnallet, Annik; Van der Linden, Martial

    2014-01-01

    Apathy is common in aging and generally defined on the basis of three dimensions: lack of initiative, lack of interest and emotional blunting. Curiously, no study until now has examined the associations and dissociations between these dimensions in elderly people (with or without dementia). These questions were addressed in two studies. In the first study, we explored the distribution of scores and the relationships between the three dimensions of apathy in 56 patients with dementia, focusing mainly on lack of initiative and lack of interest. Apathy was hetero-evaluated with the Apathy Inventory (AI), a scale widely used to assess the apathy dimensions in aging. In the second study, given the AI's limitations, we investigated in more detail the relationship between lack of initiative and interest in 115 elderly people using a new questionnaire specifically designed to assess these two dimensions. Results showed that lack of initiative was closely related to lack of interest (Study 1). Although we used a more specific questionnaire, these facets of apathy did not constitute two separable dimensions, but reflected a common main factor of apathy in aging (Study 2). Thus, the distinction between lack of initiative and lack of interest seems questionable. Only a multifactorial approach that includes the various psychological factors involved in apathy would enable one to gain a better understanding of the different manifestations of apathy and to highlight possible dissociations between them.

  14. Salmonella typhimurium mutants lacking NAD pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Park, U E; Roth, J R; Olivera, B M

    1988-01-01

    NAD can serve as both a purine and a pyridine source for Salmonella typhimurium. Exogenous NAD is rapidly broken down into nicotinamide mononucleotide and AMP by an NAD pyrophosphatase, the first step in the pathway for the assimilation of exogenous NAD. We isolated and characterized mutants of S. typhimurium lacking NAD pyrophosphatase activity; such mutants were identified by their failure to use exogenous NAD as a purine source. These mutants carry mutations that map at a new locus, designated pnuE, between 86 and 87 min on the Salmonella chromosome. PMID:2841298

  15. Does the Autistic Brain Lack Core Modules?

    PubMed Central

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Frymiare, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that autistics are missing core modules of the brain, critical neural tissue necessary for accomplishing various processes. In this article, we critically review the evidence supporting two such hypothesized deficits. We ask whether autistic brains lack a module for understanding the behavior of others (i.e., theory of mind) and whether they lack a module for processing faces. We illustrate that successful performance on theory of mind tasks depends on linguistic ability; therefore, it is not surprising that autistics are more likely to fail theory of mind tasks because a qualitative impairment in communication is one of the primary diagnostic criteria for autism. Similarly, we illustrate that autistics are less likely to fixate the eye region of facial photographs and that the amount of time spent fixating the eye region correlates with activation in the face processing “module”; therefore, it is not surprising that autistics are less likely to activate the putative face processing area. These illustrations cast doubt on the arguments that the autistic brain is missing the core modules responsible for understanding theory of mind and for processing faces. PMID:25520587

  16. Analysing the lack of Demand Organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxer, Philip; Cohen, Bernard

    1998-07-01

    We seek to develop means of intervention in Enterprises that will enable them to react in an effective, sustainable and timely fashion to changes in the ways that markets and demand are organized; that is, to act strategically. We take an enterprise to be some entity that seeks to provide its clients with services that they value while maintaining its ability to do so in the face of changes in the demands of its clients and in the resources at its disposal. The services that clients value form around what the organization of their demands lack. The concept of strategy therefore rests on critically evaluating the ontology and semantics of the Enterprise in relation to these holes in demand organization. We access ontology and semantics by constructing and manipulating hypothetical, first-order, mathematical models of the Enterprise's services and of its value-adding processes. Because an enterprise is an anticipatory system, its semantic domain must include representations of the enterprise's model of itself and of the market and demand organizations within which it competes. First-order (set) theory provides adequate expressive power here, but alternative, higher order, mathematical frameworks, such as Dubois' hyperincursion, provide inadequate power, particularly in relation to the analysis of the properties of emergence. Knowing exactly why and where this mathematical lack manifests in the analysis process enables effective collaboration between systems analysts and psychoanalysts, and suggest directions for mathematical research.

  17. Quantum preparation uncertainty and lack of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozpędek, Filip; Kaniewski, Jędrzej; Coles, Patrick J.; Wehner, Stephanie

    2017-02-01

    The quantum uncertainty principle famously predicts that there exist measurements that are inherently incompatible, in the sense that their outcomes cannot be predicted simultaneously. In contrast, no such uncertainty exists in the classical domain, where all uncertainty results from ignorance about the exact state of the physical system. Here, we critically examine the concept of preparation uncertainty and ask whether similarly in the quantum regime, some of the uncertainty that we observe can actually also be understood as a lack of information (LOI), albeit a lack of quantum information. We answer this question affirmatively by showing that for the well known measurements employed in BB84 quantum key distribution (Bennett and Brassard 1984 Int. Conf. on Computer System and Signal Processing), the amount of uncertainty can indeed be related to the amount of available information about additional registers determining the choice of the measurement. We proceed to show that also for other measurements the amount of uncertainty is in part connected to a LOI. Finally, we discuss the conceptual implications of our observation to the security of cryptographic protocols that make use of BB84 states.

  18. Peptides in seminal fluid and their role in infertility: a potential role for opiorphin inhibition of neutral endopeptidase activity as a clinically relevant modulator of sperm motility: a review.

    PubMed

    Bosler, Jayme S; Davies, Kelvin P; Neal-Perry, Genevieve S

    2014-11-01

    Infertility is a devastating medical condition that adversely affects emotional health and well-being of couples who desire pregnancy and parenthood. The overall demographic data suggest that the indication for more than one-third of assisted reproductive technology cycles performed in the United States includes male factor infertility. There is increasing recognition of the role that peptides present in seminal plasma have in determining sperm motility. Several recent studies suggest that peptidases, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and aminopeptidase N (APN), impose significant adverse effects on sperm motility. Interestingly, several recent studies demonstrate that there is an endogenous NEP/APN inhibitor peptide called opiorphin in human seminal plasma. Our pilot studies suggest opiorphin promotes sperm motility and may positively influence sperm motility parameters in some cases of males infertility characterized by asthenozoospermia.

  19. Lack of belowground mutualisms hinders Pinaceae invasions.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Martin A; Horton, Thomas R; Simberloff, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Why particular invasions succeed and others fail is not well understood. The role of soil biota has been proposed as important. However, the role of mutualists has received much less attention than that of pathogens. Here we report that lack of adequate ectomycorrhizal fungi hinders invasion by exotic Pinaceae on Isla Victoria, Argentina, by reducing both the probability of establishment and growth of invading individuals. More than one hundred exotic tree species were introduced to this island ca. 80 years ago, but invasive trees are found in high densities only in areas adjacent to plantations. With a series of greenhouse and field experiments we found lower mycorrhizal colonization levels and few fungal species far from original plantings, and key fungal mutualists are confined to areas near plantations, probably owing to dispersal limitations. Low inoculum levels far from the plantations are retarding the invasion. Our experiments indicate that positive interactions belowground can play a key but underappreciated role in invasion dynamics.

  20. Lack of transplacental transmission of Bartonella bovis.

    PubMed

    Chastant-Maillard, S; Boulouis, H-J; Reynaud, K; Thoumire, S; Gandoin, C; Bouillin, C; Cordonnier, N; Maillard, R

    2015-02-01

    Transplacental transmission of Bartonella spp. has been reported for rodents, but not for cats and has never been investigated in cattle. The objective of this study was to assess vertical transmission of Bartonella in cattle. Fifty-six cow-calf pairs were tested before (cows) and after (calves) caesarean section for Bartonella bacteremia and/or serology, and the cotyledons were checked for gross lesions and presence of the bacteria. None of the 29 (52%) bacteremic cows gave birth to bacteremic calves, and all calves were seronegative at birth. Neither placentitis nor vasculitis were observed in all collected cotyledons. Bartonella bovis was not detected in placental cotyledons. Therefore, transplacental transmission of B. bovis and multiplication of the bacteria in the placenta do not seem likely. The lack of transplacental transmission may be associated with the particular structure of the placenta in ruminants or to a poor affinity/agressiveness of B. bovis for this tissue.

  1. Structure of the γ-d-glutamyl-l-diamino acid endopeptidase YkfC from Bacillus cereus in complex with l-Ala-γ-d-Glu: insights into substrate recognition by NlpC/P60 cysteine peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Yeh, Andrew; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Dipeptidyl-peptidase VI from Bacillus sphaericus and YkfC from Bacillus subtilis have both previously been characterized as highly specific γ-d-glutamyl-l-­diamino acid endopeptidases. The crystal structure of a YkfC ortholog from Bacillus cereus (BcYkfC) at 1.8 Å resolution revealed that it contains two N-terminal bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains in addition to the C-terminal catalytic NlpC/P60 domain that is ubiquitous in the very large family of cell-wall-related cysteine peptidases. A bound reaction product (l-Ala-γ-d-Glu) enabled the identification of conserved sequence and structural signatures for recognition of l-Ala and γ-d-Glu and, therefore, provides a clear framework for understanding the substrate specificity observed in dipeptidyl-peptidase VI, YkfC and other NlpC/P60 domains in general. The first SH3b domain plays an important role in defining substrate specificity by contributing to the formation of the active site, such that only murein peptides with a free N-terminal alanine are allowed. A conserved tyrosine in the SH3b domain of the YkfC subfamily is correlated with the presence of a conserved acidic residue in the NlpC/P60 domain and both residues interact with the free amine group of the alanine. This structural feature allows the definition of a subfamily of NlpC/P60 enzymes with the same N-terminal substrate requirements, including a previously characterized cyanobacterial l-­alanine-γ-d-glutamate endopeptidase that contains the two key components (an NlpC/P60 domain attached to an SH3b domain) for assembly of a YkfC-like active site. PMID:20944232

  2. The lack of large compact symmetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, P.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, `baby' (< 103 yr) and `young' (103-105 yr) radio galaxies have been found and classified, although their numbers are still small (tens). Also, they have many different names, depending on the type of survey and scientific context in which they were found: compact steep spectrum sources (CSS), giga-Hertz peaked spectrum sources (GPS) and compact-medium symmetric objects (C-MSO). The latter have the radio galaxy structure more obvious and correspond to the `babies' (CSOs; < 1 kpc) and `young' (MSOs; 1-15 kpc) radio galaxies. The log-size distribution of CSOs shows a sharp drop at 0.3 kpc. This trend continues through flat-spectrum MSOs (over the full 1-15 kpc size range). In order to find out if this lack of large CSOs and flat-spectrum MSOs is due to poor sampling (lack of surveys that probe efficiently the 0.3-15 kpc size range) and/or has physical meaning (e.g. if the lobes of CSOs expand as they grow and age, they might become CSSs, `disappearing' from the flat-spectrum MSO statistics), we have built a sample of 157 flat-spectrum radio sources with structure on ˜0.3-15 kpc scales. We are using new, archived and published data to produce and inspect hundreds of multi-frequency multi-instrument maps and models. We have already found 13 new secure CSO/MSOs. We expect to uncover ˜30-40 new CSOs and MSOs, most on the 0.3-15 kpc size range, when our project is complete.

  3. A chenopod extensin lacks repetitive tetrahydroxyproline blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiongbiao; Kieliszewski, M.; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1990-02-01

    An extensin isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) cell suspension cultures fulfills all criteria for membership of the extensin family save one, notably, lack of the diagnostic pentamer Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp. However, sequence analysis of the major tryptic peptides shows that sugar beet extensin shares a motif in common with tomato extensin P1 but differs by the position of an insertion sequence (X) or (Y) which, in sugar beet, splits the tetrahydroxyproline block: Ser-Hyp-Hyp-(X)-Hyp-Hyp-Thr-Hyp-Val-Tyr-Lys, where (X) is (Val-His-Glu/Lys-Tyr-Pro), while in tomato the insertion sequence (Y) = (Val-Lys-Pro-Tyr-His-Pro) and, when it occurs, immediately follows the tetrahydroxyproline block: Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-(Y)-Thr-Hyp-Val-Tyr-Lys. Based on these data were reinterpret three highly repetitive cDNA sequences, including nodulin N75 from soybean and wound-induced P33 of carrot, as extensins with split tetra(hydroxy)proline blocks.

  4. Lack of RNase L Attenuates Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xin; Zeng, Chun; Liu, Hongli; Chen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Ping; Yun, Boo Seok; Jin, Ge; Zhou, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Background Macrophages are one of the major cell types in innate immunity against microbial infection. It is believed that the expression of proinflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL–6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by macrophages is also crucial for activation of both innate and adaptive immunities. RNase L is an interferon (IFN) inducible enzyme which is highly expressed in macrophages. It has been demonstrated that RNase L regulates the expression of certain inflammatory genes. However, its role in macrophage function is largely unknown. Methodology Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were generated from RNase L+/+and −/− mice. The migration of BMMs was analyzed by using Transwell migration assays. Endocytosis and phagocytosis of macrophages were assessed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-Dextran 40,000 and FITC-E. coli bacteria, respectively. The expression of inflammatory genes was determined by Western Blot and ELISA. The promoter activity of Cox-2 was measured by luciferase reporter assays. Conclusions/Findings Lack of RNase L significantly decreased the migration of BMMs induced by M-CSF, but at a less extent by GM-CSF and chemokine C-C motif ligand-2 (CCL2). Interestingly, RNase L deficient BMMs showed a significant reduction of endocytic activity to FITC-Dextran 40,000, but no any obvious effect on their phagocytic activity to FITC-bacteria under the same condition. RNase L impacts the expression of certain genes related to cell migration and inflammation such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, IL-1β, IL-10, CCL2 and Cox-2. Furthermore, the functional analysis of the Cox-2 promoter revealed that RNase L regulated the expression of Cox-2 in macrophages at its transcriptional level. Taken together, our findings provide direct evidence showing that RNase L contributes to innate immunity through regulating macrophage functions. PMID:24324683

  5. INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS LACKING TYPE II RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Xie, H.; Maekelae, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-02-20

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks ({approx}34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed {approx}535 km s{sup -1}) and only {approx}40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km s{sup -1} and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration {approx}+6.8 m s{sup -2}), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration {approx}-3.5 m s{sup -2}). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is predominant

  6. Interplanetary Shocks Lacking Type 2 Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Maekela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks (approximately 34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed approximately 535 km/s) and only approximately 40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km/s and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration approximately +6.8 m/s (exp 2)), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration approximately 3.5 m/s (exp 2)). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is

  7. Epigenetic Control of Prolyl and Asparaginyl Hydroxylases in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14 . ABSTRACT In many solid tumors, including prostate cancer, hypoxia...7 The HIF-1α promoter construct will allow for identification of proper HIF transactivation within a cell population to aid in ruling out HIF...Figure 6. All low PHD3 expressing cell lines show reactivation with 5-aza-dC. Cells were treated with 5µM 5-aza-dC every other day for 7 days

  8. Epigenetic Control of Prolyl and Asparaginyl Hydroxylases in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    containing proteins (PHD/EGLN/HPH) which utilize iron , oxygen and 2-oxoglutarate as co-factors to enzymatically catalyze hydroxylation on the oxygen-dependent...proteosome [6]. Under hypoxic conditions, HIF prolyl hydroxylase activity is decreased and HIF-1a protein accumulates . HIF-a subunits translocate to the...mechanism might be responsible for their silencing. Unlike genetic mutations that accumulate in cancer, epigenetic modifications are reversible [20]. We

  9. Lack of Sleep Takes Big Bite Out of World Economies

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162298.html Lack of Sleep Takes Big Bite Out of World Economies More ... increased risk of death linked to lack of sleep among U.S. workers cost the nation's economy as ...

  10. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina S; Staal, Anne; Roggen, Erwin L; Sollid, Ludvig M; Lillevang, Søren T; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent the proliferative response by a gluten-specific CD4+ T cell clone and seven gluten-reactive T cell lines to protease-digested gluten peptides. A proline-specific endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger (AnP2) was particularly efficient at diminishing proliferation after stimulation with cleaved antigen, and could completely block the response against both native and deamidated gluten peptides. We found that AnP2 was efficient down to a 1:64 protease:substrate ratio (w:w). When AnP2 was tested in assays using seven gluten-reactive T cell lines from individual CD patients (three adults and four children), the response to gluten was diminished in all cases. Our study indicates a therapeutic benefit of AnP2 to CD patients.

  11. The endopeptidase activity and the activation by Cl- of angiotensin-converting enzyme is evolutionarily conserved: purification and properties of an an angiotensin-converting enzyme from the housefly, Musca domestica.

    PubMed Central

    Lamango, N S; Sajid, M; Isaac, R E

    1996-01-01

    A soluble 67 kDa angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been purified by lisinopril-Sepharose affinity column chromatography from adult houseflies, Musca domestica. The dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase activity towards benzoyl-Gly-His-Leu was inhibited by captopril (IC50 50 nM) and fosinoprilat (IC50 251 nM), two inhibitors of mammalian ACE, and was activated by Cl- (optimal Cl- concentration 600 mM). Musca ACE removed C-terminal dipeptides from angiotensin I, bradykinin [Leu5]enkephalin and [Met5]enkephalin and also functioned as an endopeptidase by hydrolysing dipeptideamides from [Leu5]enkephalinamide and [Met5]enkephalinamide, and a dipeptideamide and a tripeptideamide from substance P. Musca ACE was also able to cleave a tripeptide from both the N-terminus and C-terminus of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, with C-terminal hydrolysis predominating. Maximal N-terminal tripeptidase activity occurred at 150 mM NaCl, whereas the C-terminal tripeptidase activity continued to rise with increasing concentration of Cl- (0-0.5 M). Musca ACE displays properties of both the N- and C-domains of human ACE, indicating a high degree of conservation during evolution of the substrate specificity of ACE and its response to Cl-. PMID:8670080

  12. Endopeptidase Cleavage Generates a Functionally Distinct Isoform of C1q/Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Protein-12 (CTRP12) with an Altered Oligomeric State and Signaling Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhikui; Lei, Xia; Seldin, Marcus M.; Wong, G. William

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived adipokines are an important class of secreted metabolic regulators that mediate tissue cross-talk to control systemic energy balance. We recently described C1q/TNF-related protein-12 (CTRP12), a novel insulin-sensitizing adipokine that regulates glucose metabolism in liver and adipose tissue. However, the biochemical properties of CTRP12 and its naturally occurring cleaved isoform have not been characterized. Here, we show that CTRP12 is a secreted hormone subjected to multiple functionally relevant posttranslational modifications at highly conserved residues. For example, Asn39 is glycosylated, whereas Cys85 mediates the assembly of higher order oligomeric structure. Endopeptidase cleavage at Lys91 generates a cleaved globular gCTRP12 isoform, the expression of which is increased by insulin. PCSK3/furin was identified as the major proprotein convertase expressed by adipocytes that mediates the endogenous cleavage of CTRP12. Cleavage at Lys91 is context-dependent: mutation of the charged Arg93 to Ala on the P2′ position enhanced cleavage, and triple mutations (K90A/K91A/R93A) abolished cleavage. Importantly, the two isoforms of CTRP12 differ in oligomeric structures and are functionally distinct. The full-length protein forms trimers and larger complexes, and the cleaved isoform consisted of predominantly dimers. Whereas full-length fCTRP12 strongly activated Akt signaling in H4IIE hepatocytes and 3T3-L1 adipocytes, gCTRP12 preferentially activated MAP kinase (ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK) signaling. Further, only fCTRP12 improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. These results reveal a novel mechanism controlling signaling specificity and function of a hormone via cleavage-dependent alteration in oligomeric state. PMID:22942287

  13. 29 CFR 18.602 - Lack of personal knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Lack of personal knowledge. 18.602 Section 18.602 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.602 Lack of personal knowledge. A... witness has personal knowledge of the matter. Evidence to prove personal knowledge may, but need...

  14. Many College Football Players Lack Vitamin D: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164139.html Many College Football Players Lack Vitamin D: Study Deficiency could put them at risk for muscle injuries ... vitamin D. Supplements are usually prescribed for a vitamin D deficiency, the researchers said. The study was to be ...

  15. Evidence for Golgi bodies in proposed 'Golgi-lacking' lineages.

    PubMed Central

    Dacks, Joel B; Davis, Lesley A M; Sjögren, Asa M; Andersson, Jan O; Roger, Andrew J; Doolittle, W Ford

    2003-01-01

    Golgi bodies are nearly ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells. The apparent lack of such structures in certain eukaryotic lineages might be taken to mean that these protists evolved prior to the acquisition of the Golgi, and it raises questions of how these organisms function in the absence of this crucial organelle. Here, we report gene sequences from five proposed 'Golgi-lacking' organisms (Giardia intestinalis, Spironucleus barkhanus, Entamoeba histolytica, Naegleria gruberi and Mastigamoeba balamuthi). BLAST and phylogenetic analyses show these genes to be homologous to those encoding components of the retromer, coatomer and adaptin complexes, all of which have Golgi-related functions in mammals and yeast. This is, to our knowledge, the first molecular evidence for Golgi bodies in two major eukaryotic lineages (the pelobionts and heteroloboseids). This substantiates the suggestion that there are no extant primitively 'Golgi-lacking' lineages, and that this apparatus was present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor, but has been altered beyond recognition several times. PMID:14667372

  16. Garlic exhibits lack of control over gastrointestinal nematodes in goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) continue to hinder small ruminant production because of anthelmintic resistance and lack of effective products for GIN control in organic production. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a commercially available certified organic garlic pr...

  17. Lack of Clarity in University Teaching: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira

    1998-01-01

    A study used qualitative methods to examine lack of clarity and need for inference in teaching of an undergraduate physics course for nonscience majors. Evidence from several data sources converge, revealing very low levels of student understanding of material presented and strong dissatisfaction with instruction, and also insights into teacher…

  18. Domestic properties in the UK and a lack of sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugochukwu, Nnadozie

    This research aims to provide sufficient insight into the lack of sustainable domestic properties in the UK. The paper reviewed relevant theories of sustainability, with respect to energy performance and environmental friendliness of the built environment. The research also studied the efforts made by the UK Government and other Stakeholders to ensure availability of sustainable domestic properties in the UK, by introducing the Code for Sustainable Homes. The research identified constraints that cause the lack of sustainable domestic properties in the UK, they are: The extra costs associated with building homes to sustainable standards, flexible government legislation, lack of information of the benefits of owning a home built to sustainable standards, and lack of community participation in the formulation of sustainable policies. Recommendations for the availability of more homes built to sustainable standards include the need for mandatory government legislation, making the formulation of policies more participatory amongst the communities where they will be implemented, creating public awareness about the benefits of owning a home built to sustainable standards and the fact that the costs associated with owning such a home is recoverable through savings made in energy costs.

  19. Barriers to College: Lack of Preparation vs. Financial Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2004-01-01

    As politicians, academic leaders, and researchers decry the impact of college tuition fee increases for needy students, others say such concerns mask a more serious barrier for college aspirants: lack of academic preparation. The debate was renewed last week with the publication of a book from the Century Foundation analyzing the reasons…

  20. 7 CFR 760.614 - Lack of access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lack of access. 760.614 Section 760.614 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... authority, will be considered to be a determination of general effect, not a “relief” determination,...

  1. 7 CFR 760.614 - Lack of access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lack of access. 760.614 Section 760.614 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... authority, will be considered to be a determination of general effect, not a “relief” determination,...

  2. Lack of Emphasis on Nutrition in Medical School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Suanne

    The need and concern for the apparent lack of nutrition education provided in training programs for physicians was the impetus for begining a 10-session nutrition lecture series program. The program was developed and implemented in a large teaching medical center hospital and given to 16 third-year medical students. The program's purpose was to…

  3. 10 CFR 503.21 - Lack of alternate fuel supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... substantially exceed the cost of using imported petroleum as a primary energy source as defined in § 503.6 (Cost... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lack of alternate fuel supply. 503.21 Section 503.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Temporary Exemptions for...

  4. 10 CFR 503.21 - Lack of alternate fuel supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... substantially exceed the cost of using imported petroleum as a primary energy source as defined in § 503.6 (Cost... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lack of alternate fuel supply. 503.21 Section 503.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Temporary Exemptions for...

  5. 10 CFR 503.21 - Lack of alternate fuel supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... substantially exceed the cost of using imported petroleum as a primary energy source as defined in § 503.6 (Cost... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lack of alternate fuel supply. 503.21 Section 503.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Temporary Exemptions for...

  6. 10 CFR 503.21 - Lack of alternate fuel supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... substantially exceed the cost of using imported petroleum as a primary energy source as defined in § 503.6 (Cost... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lack of alternate fuel supply. 503.21 Section 503.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Temporary Exemptions for...

  7. 10 CFR 503.21 - Lack of alternate fuel supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... substantially exceed the cost of using imported petroleum as a primary energy source as defined in § 503.6 (Cost... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lack of alternate fuel supply. 503.21 Section 503.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Temporary Exemptions for...

  8. Bordetella pertussis Strain Lacking Pertactin and Pertussis Toxin.

    PubMed

    Williams, Margaret M; Sen, Kathryn; Weigand, Michael R; Skoff, Tami H; Cunningham, Victoria A; Halse, Tanya A; Tondella, M Lucia

    2016-02-01

    A Bordetella pertussis strain lacking 2 acellular vaccine immunogens, pertussis toxin and pertactin, was isolated from an unvaccinated infant in New York State in 2013. Comparison with a French strain that was pertussis toxin-deficient, pertactin wild-type showed that the strains carry the same 28-kb deletion in similar genomes.

  9. Loneliness and Lack of Social Support: Same or Different Phenomena?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rook, Karen

    Research on loneliness and research on social support offer complementary perspectives on how social relationships affect health and well being. However, despite considerable overlap, loneliness and lack of social support reflect deficits of different kinds of social exchanges and these deficits have distinct consequences for well being. Social…

  10. Special Relativity in Week One: 4) Lack of Simultaneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    This is our final article on teaching special relativity in the first week of an introductory physics course. One of the profound changes in our view of the world was Einstein's discovery of the lack of simultaneity. He illustrated this result with a thought experiment in which we observe a railroad car passing by us. We see the two ends of the…

  11. Understanding the Lack of Female Leadership in Collegiate Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camarco, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This study sought an understanding of the current trends in the lack of females in leadership positions within collegiate athletic departments amongst California Community Colleges. The passage of Title IX created a new funding stream for women's athletics, resulting in male coaches and administrators entering into the female realm, therefore…

  12. Early Neurobehavioral Development of Mice Lacking Endogenous PACAP.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Jozsef; Sandor, Balazs; Tamas, Andrea; Kiss, Peter; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Nagy, Andras D; Fulop, Balazs D; Juhasz, Tamas; Manavalan, Sridharan; Reglodi, Dora

    2017-04-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a multifunctional neuropeptide. In addition to its diverse physiological roles, PACAP has important functions in the embryonic development of various tissues, and it is also considered as a trophic factor during development and in the case of neuronal injuries. Data suggest that the development of the nervous system is severely affected by the lack of endogenous PACAP. Short-term neurofunctional outcome correlates with long-term functional deficits; however, the early neurobehavioral development of PACAP-deficient mice has not yet been evaluated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to describe the postnatal development of physical signs and neurological reflexes in mice partially or completely lacking PACAP. We examined developmental hallmarks during the first 3 weeks of the postnatal period, during which period most neurological reflexes and motor coordination show most intensive development, and we describe the neurobehavioral development using a complex battery of tests. In the present study, we found that PACAP-deficient mice had slower weight gain throughout the observation period. Interestingly, mice partially lacking PACAP weighed significantly less than homozygous mice. There was no difference between male and female mice during the first 3 weeks. Some other signs were also more severely affected in the heterozygous mice than in the homozygous mice, such as air righting, grasp, and gait initiation reflexes. Interestingly, incisor teeth erupted earlier in mice lacking PACAP. Motor coordination, shown by the number of foot-faults on an elevated grid, was also less developed in PACAP-deficient mice. In summary, our results show that mice lacking endogenous PACAP have slower weight gain during the first weeks of development and slower neurobehavioral development regarding a few developmental hallmarks.

  13. Anti-Angiogenic Action of Neutral Endopeptidase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    antagonist of angiogenesis. We report that NEP is indeed antiangiogenic in vivo, significantly inhibiting angiogenesis. Surprisingly, we...Figure 6. Quantitative real time PCR analysis NEP transcripts as a function of oxygen tension in C42 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines cultured

  14. Anti-Angiogenic Action of Neutral Endopeptidase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    FGF-2 and Maltose -binding Protein-FGF-2 Fusion Proteins—Full-length human FGF-2 cDNA (kindly provided by Dr. Daniel Rifkin, New York University Medical...GAGCATC-3 (sense) and 5-CCCCAAGCTTTTAGCTCT- TAGCAGACAT-3 (antisense) for maltose -binding protein fusion proteins, as previously described (13...terminal neprilysin cleavage product), and DNA sequencing was performed to confirm their accuracy. For maltose -binding protein constructs, the PCR product

  15. Female Migraineurs Show Lack of Insular Thinning with Age

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Nasim; Barmettler, Gabi; Moulton, Eric A.; Scrivani, Steven; Veggeberg, Rosanna; Spierings, Egilius L.H.; Burstein, Rami; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2015-01-01

    Gray matter loss in cortical regions is a normal ageing process for the healthy brain. There have been few studies on the process of ageing of the brain in chronic neurological disorders. In this study, we evaluated changes in the cortical thickness by age in 92 female subjects (46 migraine patients, and 46 healthy controls) using high field MRI. The results indicate that in contrast to healthy subjects migraineurs show lack of thinning in the insula by age. The functional significance of the lack of thinning is unknown, but may contribute to the overall cortical hyperexcitability of the migraine brain since the region is tightly involved in a number of majo brain networks involved in interoception, salience, nociception, and autonomic function, including the default mode network. PMID:25775358

  16. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction as an equivalence problem.

    PubMed

    Steinijans, V W; Hartmann, M; Huber, R; Radtke, H W

    1991-08-01

    The demonstration that concomitant administration of drug B does not affect the pharmacokinetics of drug A can be adequately handled as an equivalence problem. Administration of drug A alone serves as reference and simultaneous administration of drugs A and B as test situation. The range of clinically acceptable variation in the pharmacokinetic characteristics of drug A defines the equivalence range. This will usually correspond to the bioequivalence range accepted for the comparison of different formulations of drug A. Equivalence, i.e. lack of pharmacokinetic interaction, is concluded if the 90%-confidence interval for the ratio (difference) of the expected medians for test and reference is entirely within the equivalence range. This decision procedure ensures that the consumer risk of incorrectly concluding "lack of interaction" is limited to 5%. Moreover, the producer risk of incorrectly concluding "interaction" can be controlled by appropriate sample sizes.

  17. Sewer deterioration modeling with condition data lacking historical records.

    PubMed

    Egger, C; Scheidegger, A; Reichert, P; Maurer, M

    2013-11-01

    Accurate predictions of future conditions of sewer systems are needed for efficient rehabilitation planning. For this purpose, a range of sewer deterioration models has been proposed which can be improved by calibration with observed sewer condition data. However, if datasets lack historical records, calibration requires a combination of deterioration and sewer rehabilitation models, as the current state of the sewer network reflects the combined effect of both processes. Otherwise, physical sewer lifespans are overestimated as pipes in poor condition that were rehabilitated are no longer represented in the dataset. We therefore propose the combination of a sewer deterioration model with a simple rehabilitation model which can be calibrated with datasets lacking historical information. We use Bayesian inference for parameter estimation due to the limited information content of the data and limited identifiability of the model parameters. A sensitivity analysis gives an insight into the model's robustness against the uncertainty of the prior. The analysis reveals that the model results are principally sensitive to the means of the priors of specific model parameters, which should therefore be elicited with care. The importance sampling technique applied for the sensitivity analysis permitted efficient implementation for regional sensitivity analysis with reasonable computational outlay. Application of the combined model with both simulated and real data shows that it effectively compensates for the bias induced by a lack of historical data. Thus, the novel approach makes it possible to calibrate sewer pipe deterioration models even when historical condition records are lacking. Since at least some prior knowledge of the model parameters is available, the strength of Bayesian inference is particularly evident in the case of small datasets.

  18. Internal epitope tagging informed by relative lack of sequence conservation

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Leonard; Zhang, Karen; Bonawitz, Tristan; Grajevskaja, Viktorija; Bellipanni, Gianfranco; Waring, Richard; Balciunas, Darius

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental techniques rely on specific recognition and stringent binding of proteins by antibodies. This can readily be achieved by introducing an epitope tag. We employed an approach that uses a relative lack of evolutionary conservation to inform epitope tag site selection, followed by integration of the tag-coding sequence into the endogenous locus in zebrafish. We demonstrate that an internal epitope tag is accessible for antibody binding, and that tagged proteins retain wild type function. PMID:27892520

  19. Microstructure of iridescence-lacking pearl formed in Pinctada fucata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Michio; Mukai, Hiroki; Aoki, Hideo; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Sakuda, Shohei; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The iridescence-lacking pearl is regarded as a low-quality product because it shows no iridescent color which is generated by the interference of the light reflected at the organic-inorganic boundaries in the regulated interstratification of organic sheets and thin aragonite tablets. In this study, we investigated the microstructural difference between normal and iridescence-lacking pearls, as well as original nacreous layers in the shell of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. Cross-sectional observation by scanning electron microscopy revealed abundant organic spherules of a few hundred nanometers in diameter attached to the inter-crystalline organic sheets in the iridescence-lacking pearl. The incoherent light scattered by the spherules inhibit the formation or emission of the iridescent color. The same spherules were also observed in hazy nacreous layers of the shell. The organic spherules often connected to the gap of inter-crystalline organic sheets implying that the spherules consist of same components of the organic sheets. Their abundance varies along the thickness of nacre, suggesting that their formation is determined by environmental factors, as well as genetic ones.

  20. Pig lacks functional NLRC4 and NAIP genes.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chisato; Toki, Daisuke; Shinkai, Hiroki; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Kitani, Hiroshi; Uenishi, Hirohide

    2017-02-01

    The NLRC4 inflammasome, which recognizes flagellin and components of the type III secretion system, plays an important role in the clearance of intracellular bacteria. Here, we examined the genomic sequences carrying two genes encoding key components of the NLRC4 inflammasome-NLR family, CARD-containing 4 (NLRC4), and NLR apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP)-in pigs. Pigs have a single locus encoding NLRC4 and NAIP. Comparison of the sequences thus obtained with the corresponding regions in humans revealed the deletion of intermediate exons in both pig genes. In addition, the genomic sequences of both pig genes lacked valid open reading frames encoding functional NLRC4 or NAIP protein. Additional pigs representing multiple breeds and wild boars also lacked the exons that we failed to find through genome sequencing. Furthermore, neither the NLRC4 nor the NAIP gene was expressed in pigs. These findings indicate that pigs lack the NLRC4 inflammasome, an important factor involved in monitoring bacterial proteins and contributing to the clearance of intracellular pathogens. These results also suggest that genetic polymorphisms affecting the molecular functions of TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and other pattern recognition receptors associated with the recognition of bacteria have a more profound influence on disease resistance in pigs than in other species.

  1. Reduced passive force in skeletal muscles lacking protein arginylation

    PubMed Central

    Minozzo, Fábio C.; Kalganov, Albert; Cornachione, Anabelle S.; Cheng, Yu-Shu; Leu, Nicolae A.; Han, Xuemei; Saripalli, Chandra; Yates, John R.; Granzier, Henk; Kashina, Anna S.

    2015-01-01

    Arginylation is a posttranslational modification that plays a global role in mammals. Mice lacking the enzyme arginyltransferase in skeletal muscles exhibit reduced contractile forces that have been linked to a reduction in myosin cross-bridge formation. The role of arginylation in passive skeletal myofibril forces has never been investigated. In this study, we used single sarcomere and myofibril measurements and observed that lack of arginylation leads to a pronounced reduction in passive forces in skeletal muscles. Mass spectrometry indicated that skeletal muscle titin, the protein primarily linked to passive force generation, is arginylated on five sites located within the A band, an important area for protein-protein interactions. We propose a mechanism for passive force regulation by arginylation through modulation of protein-protein binding between the titin molecule and the thick filament. Key points are as follows: 1) active and passive forces were decreased in myofibrils and single sarcomeres isolated from muscles lacking arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase (ATE1). 2) Mass spectrometry revealed five sites for arginylation within titin molecules. All sites are located within the A-band portion of titin, an important region for protein-protein interactions. 3) Our data suggest that arginylation of titin is required for proper passive force development in skeletal muscles. PMID:26511365

  2. Lack of oblique astigmatism in the chicken eye.

    PubMed

    Maier, Felix M; Howland, Howard C; Ohlendorf, Arne; Wahl, Siegfried; Schaeffel, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Primate eyes display considerable oblique off-axis astigmatism which could provide information on the sign of defocus that is needed for emmetropization. The pattern of peripheral astigmatism is not known in the chicken eye, a common model of myopia. Peripheral astigmatism was mapped out over the horizontal visual field in three chickens, 43 days old, and in three near emmetropic human subjects, average age 34.7years, using infrared photoretinoscopy. There were no differences in astigmatism between humans and chickens in the central visual field (chicks -0.35D, humans -0.65D, n.s.) but large differences in the periphery (i.e. astigmatism at 40° in the temporal visual field: humans -4.21D, chicks -0.63D, p<0.001, unpaired t-test). The lack of peripheral astigmatism in chicks was not due to differences in corneal shape. Perhaps related to their superior peripheral optics, we found that chickens had excellent visual performance also in the far periphery. Using an automated optokinetic nystagmus paradigm, no difference was observed in spatial visual performance with vision restricted to either the central 67° of the visual field or to the periphery beyond 67°. Accommodation was elicited by stimuli presented far out in the visual field. Transscleral images of single infrared LEDs showed no sign of peripheral astigmatism. The chick may be the first terrestrial vertebrate described to lack oblique astigmatism. Since corneal shape cannot account for the difference in astigmatism in humans and chicks, it must trace back to the design of the crystalline lens. The lack of peripheral astigmatism in chicks also excludes a role in emmetropization.

  3. Transcriptional changes associated with lack of lipid synthesis in parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Visser, Bertanne; Roelofs, Dick; Hahn, Daniel A; Teal, Peter E A; Mariën, Janine; Ellers, Jacintha

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic regression of morphological, behavioral, or physiological traits can evolve when reduced trait expression has neutral or beneficial effects on overall performance. Studies on the evolution of phenotypic degradation in animals have concentrated mostly on the evaluation of resulting phenotypes, whereas much less research has been dedicated to uncovering the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic regression. The majority of parasitoids (i.e., insects that develop on or inside other arthropods), do not accumulate lipid reserves during their free-living adult life-stage and represent an excellent system to study phenotypic regression in animals. Here, we study transcriptional patterns associated with lack of lipogenesis in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis. We first confirmed that N. vitripennis does not synthesize lipids by showing a reduction in lipid reserves despite ingestion of dietary sugar, and a lack of incorporation of isotopic labels into lipid reserves when fed deuterated sugar solution. Second, we investigated transcriptional responses of 28 genes involved in lipid and sugar metabolism in short- and long-term sugar-fed females relative to starved females of N. vitripennis. Sugar feeding did not induce transcription of fatty acid synthase (fas) or other key genes involved in the lipid biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, several genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism had a lower transcription in fed than in starved females. Our results reveal that N. vitripennis gene transcription in response to dietary sugar deviates markedly from patterns typically observed in other organisms. This study is the first to identify differential gene transcription associated with lack of lipogenesis in parasitoids and provides new insights into the molecular mechanism that underlies phenotypic regression of this trait.

  4. Transcriptional Changes Associated with Lack of Lipid Synthesis in Parasitoids

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Bertanne; Roelofs, Dick; Hahn, Daniel A.; Teal, Peter E. A.; Mariën, Janine; Ellers, Jacintha

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic regression of morphological, behavioral, or physiological traits can evolve when reduced trait expression has neutral or beneficial effects on overall performance. Studies on the evolution of phenotypic degradation in animals have concentrated mostly on the evaluation of resulting phenotypes, whereas much less research has been dedicated to uncovering the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic regression. The majority of parasitoids (i.e., insects that develop on or inside other arthropods), do not accumulate lipid reserves during their free-living adult life-stage and represent an excellent system to study phenotypic regression in animals. Here, we study transcriptional patterns associated with lack of lipogenesis in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis. We first confirmed that N. vitripennis does not synthesize lipids by showing a reduction in lipid reserves despite ingestion of dietary sugar, and a lack of incorporation of isotopic labels into lipid reserves when fed deuterated sugar solution. Second, we investigated transcriptional responses of 28 genes involved in lipid and sugar metabolism in short- and long-term sugar-fed females relative to starved females of N. vitripennis. Sugar feeding did not induce transcription of fatty acid synthase (fas) or other key genes involved in the lipid biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, several genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism had a lower transcription in fed than in starved females. Our results reveal that N. vitripennis gene transcription in response to dietary sugar deviates markedly from patterns typically observed in other organisms. This study is the first to identify differential gene transcription associated with lack of lipogenesis in parasitoids and provides new insights into the molecular mechanism that underlies phenotypic regression of this trait. PMID:22820524

  5. No pain, no gain: lack of exercise obstructs neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Nate; Ji, Xunming; Yasuhara, Takao; Date, Isao; Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    Bedridden patients develop atrophied muscles, their daily activities greatly reduced, and some display a depressive mood. Patients who are able to receive physical rehabilitation sometimes show surprising clinical improvements, including reduced depression and attenuation of other stress-related behaviors. Regenerative medicine has advanced two major stem cell-based therapies for CNS disorders, namely, transplantation of exogenous stem cells and amplification of endogenous neurogenesis. The latter strategy embraces a natural way of reinnervating the damaged brain and correcting the neurological impairments. In this study, we discussed how immobilization-induced disuse atrophy, using the hindlimb suspension model, affects neurogenesis in rats. The overarching hypothesis is that immobilization suppresses neurogenesis by reducing the circulating growth or trophic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor or brain-derived neurotrophic factor. That immobilization alters neurogenesis and stem cell differentiation in the CNS requires characterization of the stem cell microenvironment by examining the trophic and growth factors, as well as stress-related proteins that have been implicated in exercise-induced neurogenesis. Although accumulating evidence has revealed the contribution of "increased" exercise on neurogenesis, the reverse paradigm involving "lack of exercise," which mimics pathological states (e.g., stroke patients are often immobile), remains underexplored. This novel paradigm will enable us to examine the effects on neurogenesis by a nonpermissive stem cell microenvironment likely produced by lack of exercise. BrdU labeling of proliferative cells, biochemical assays of serum, cerebrospinal fluid and brain levels of trophic factors, growth factors, and stress-related proteins are proposed as indices of neurogenesis, while quantitative measurements of spontaneous movements will reveal psychomotor components of immobilization. Studies designed to

  6. Individuals With OCD Lack Unrealistic Optimism Bias in Threat Estimation.

    PubMed

    Zetsche, Ulrike; Rief, Winfried; Exner, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    Overestimating the occurrence of threatening events has been highlighted as a central cognitive factor in the maintenance of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The present study examined the different facets of this cognitive bias, its underlying mechanisms, and its specificity to OCD. For this purpose, threat estimation, probabilistic classification learning (PCL) and psychopathological measures were assessed in 23 participants with OCD, 30 participants with social phobia, and 31 healthy controls. Whereas healthy participants showed an optimistic expectation bias regarding positive and negative future events, OCD participants lacked such a bias. This lack of an optimistic expectation bias was not specific to OCD. Compared to healthy controls, OCD participants overestimated their personal risk for experiencing negative events, but did not differ from controls in their risk estimation regarding other people. Finally, OCD participants' biases in the prediction of checking-related events were associated with their impairments in learning probabilistic cue-outcome associations in a disorder-relevant context. In sum, the present results add to a growing body of research demonstrating that cognitive biases in OCD are context-dependent.

  7. Lack of semantic parafoveal preview benefit in reading revisited

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Keith; Schotter, Elizabeth R.; Drieghe, Denis

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to earlier research, evidence for semantic preview benefit in reading has been reported by Hohenstein and Kliegl (2013) in an alphabetic writing system; they also implied that prior demonstrations of a lack of semantic preview benefit needed to be re-examined. In the present article we report a rather direct replication of an experiment reported by Rayner, Balota, and Pollatsek (1986). Using the gaze-contingent boundary paradigm, subjects read sentences that contained a target word (razor), but different preview words were initially presented in the sentence. The preview was either identical to the target word (i.e., razor), semantically related to the target word (i.e., blade), semantically unrelated to the target word (i.e., sweet), or a visually similar non-word (i.e., razar). When the reader's eyes crossed an invisible boundary location just to the left of the target word location, the preview changed to the target word. Like Rayner et al. (1986), we found that fixations on the target word were significantly shorter in the identical condition than in the unrelated condition, which did not differ from the semantically related condition; when an orthographically similar preview had been initially present in the sentence fixations were shorter than when a semantically unrelated preview had been present. Thus, the present experiment replicates the earlier data reported by Rayner et al. (1986) indicating evidence for orthographic preview benefit, but a lack of semantic preview benefit in reading English. PMID:24496738

  8. Sensory quality of soymilk and tofu from soybeans lacking lipoxygenases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aijun; Smyth, Heather; Chaliha, Mridusmita; James, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation of unsaturated lipids by lipoxygenases in soybeans causes undesirable flavors in soy foods. Using a traditional and a nontraditional soy food user group, we examined the cultural difference in perceiving the sensory characteristics of soymilk and tofu produced from soybeans with or without lipoxygenases (Lx123). The two groups described the samples using similar terms. The traditional users preferred the control soy milk and lipoxygenase-free tofu while the nontraditional users preferred the lipoxygenase-free soymilk with no preference for tofu. In a separate study, a trained descriptive taste panel compared the odor of soymilk and tofu from control soybeans or those lacking lipoxygenase-1 and lipoxygenase-2 (Lx12) or all three isomers (Lx123). The rancid/grassy odor was rated the lowest in Lx123 products, followed by Lx12 products with the control products given the highest rating. The Lx12 and Lx123 products were also sweeter and less bitter than the controls. Taken together, our results demonstrated that soybeans lacking lipoxygenases can produce soy foods with less undesirable aromas and are therefore likely more acceptable to the consumers.

  9. Lethal Cardiomyopathy in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjing; Barrientos, Tomasa; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Sauve, Anthony A; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-10-20

    Both iron overload and iron deficiency have been associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, but cardiac iron utilization is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the transferrin receptor (Tfr1) might play a role in cardiac iron uptake and used gene targeting to examine the role of Tfr1 in vivo. Surprisingly, we found that decreased iron, due to inactivation of Tfr1, was associated with severe cardiac consequences. Mice lacking Tfr1 in the heart died in the second week of life and had cardiomegaly, poor cardiac function, failure of mitochondrial respiration, and ineffective mitophagy. The phenotype could only be rescued by aggressive iron therapy, but it was ameliorated by administration of nicotinamide riboside, an NAD precursor. Our findings underscore the importance of both Tfr1 and iron in the heart, and may inform therapy for patients with heart failure.

  10. Lack of production sharing laws slows joint ventures in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.

    1995-10-30

    When Russia opened its doors to foreign oil companies in 1990, there was a rush to secure a piece of the country`s potentially vast oil wealth. Since then, many of the ventures between Russian and non-Russian partners have become bogged down with operational problems and an ever changing tax and legal regime. There is a stockpile of massive developments building, while government grinds with seeming reluctance toward passing laws that will allow outside firms to do big business. For major development projects the main stumbling block is the lack of production sharing contract legislation. The paper describes the problems, the current legislation, and operating problems, then highlights several joint ventures that have been successful and several that have ended in pullouts of the foreign investor.

  11. Optical stimulation in mice lacking the TRPV1 channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Eul; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Otting, Margarete; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    Lasers can be used to stimulate neural tissue, including the sciatic nerve or auditory neurons. Wells and coworkers suggested that neural tissue is likely stimulated by heat.[1,2] Ion channels that can be activated by heat are the TRPV channels, a subfamily of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels. TRPV channels are nonselective cation channels found in sensory neurons involved in nociception. In addition to various chemicals, TRPV channels can also be thermally stimulated. The activation temperature for the different TRPV channels varies and is 43°C for TRPV1 and 39°C for TRPV3. By performing an immunohistochemical staining procedure on frozen 20 μm cochlear slices using a primary TRPV1 antibody, we observed specific immunostaining of the spiral ganglion cells. Here we show that in mice that lack the gene for the TRPV1 channel optical radiation cannot evoke action potentials on the auditory nerve.

  12. Lack of size selectivity for paddlefish captured in hobbled gillnets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholten, G.D.; Bettoli, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    A commercial fishery for paddlefish Polyodon spathula caviar exists in Kentucky Lake, a reservoir on the lower Tennessee River. A 152-mm (bar-measure) minimum mesh size restriction on entanglement gear was enacted in 2002 and the minimum size limit was increased to 864 mm eye-fork length to reduce the possibility of recruitment overfishing. Paddlefish were sampled in 2003-2004 using experimental monofilament gillnets with panels of 89, 102, 127, 152, 178, and 203-mm meshes and the efficacy of the mesh size restriction was evaluated. Following the standards of commercial gear used in that fishery, nets were "hobbled" (i.e., 128 m ?? 3.6 m nets were tied down to 2.4 m; 91 m ?? 9.1 m nets were tied down to 7.6 m). The mean lengths of paddlefish (Ntotal = 576 fish) captured in each mesh were similar among most meshes and bycatch rates of sublegal fish did not vary with mesh size. Selectivity curves could not be modeled because the mean and modal lengths of fish captured in each mesh did not increase with mesh size. Ratios of fish girth to mesh perimeter (G:P) for individual fish were often less than 1.0 as a result of the largest meshes capturing small paddlefish. It is unclear whether lack of size selectivity for paddlefish was because the gillnets were hobbled, the unique morphology of paddlefish, or the fact that they swim with their mouths agape when filter feeding. The lack of size selectivity by hobbled gillnets fished in Kentucky Lake means that managers cannot influence the size of paddlefish captured by commercial gillnet gear by changing minimum mesh size regulations. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Increased Bone Mass in Female Mice Lacking Mast Cell Chymase

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Thomas; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Calounova, Gabriela; Hu, Lijuan; Rasmusson, Annica; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Wernersson, Sara; Åbrink, Magnus; Andersson, Göran; Larsson, Sune; Melhus, Håkan; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Here we addressed the potential impact of chymase, a mast-cell restricted protease, on mouse bone phenotype. We show that female mice lacking the chymase Mcpt4 acquired a persistent expansion of diaphyseal bone in comparison with wild type controls, reaching a 15% larger diaphyseal cross sectional area at 12 months of age. Mcpt4-/- mice also showed increased levels of a bone anabolic serum marker and higher periosteal bone formation rate. However, they were not protected from experimental osteoporosis, suggesting that chymase regulates normal bone homeostasis rather than the course of osteoporosis. Further, the absence of Mcpt4 resulted in age-dependent upregulation of numerous genes important for bone formation but no effects on osteoclast activity. In spite of the latter, Mcpt4-/- bones had increased cortical porosity and reduced endocortical mineralization. Mast cells were found periosteally and, notably, bone-proximal mast cells in Mcpt4-/- mice were degranulated to a larger extent than in wild type mice. Hence, chymase regulates degranulation of bone mast cells, which could affect the release of mast cell-derived factors influencing bone remodelling. Together, these findings reveal a functional impact of mast cell chymase on bone. Further studies exploring the possibility of using chymase inhibitors as a strategy to increase bone volume may be warranted. PMID:27936149

  14. Lack of Accessible Data on Prosthetic Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Frank, Michelle; Ganzoni, Giulia; Starck, Christoph; Grünenfelder, Jürg; Corti, Roberto; Gruner, Christiane; Hürlimann, David; Tanner, Felix C; Jenni, Rolf; Greutmann, Matthias; Biaggi, Patric

    2016-03-01

    Incomplete information on characteristics of prosthetic heart valves (PHV) may lead to inappropriate choices for PHV implantation (patient-prosthesis-mismatch) or erroneous interpretation of PHV function after implantation. No single and easy accessible source provides all relevant information on PHV. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview of available data for the majority of PHVs and annuloplasty rings. Information was collected by reviewing articles published on www.pubmed.org up to December 2014 and by written contact to all PHV manufacturers. Four areas of interest were defined: (1) PHV image, (2) in vivo transvalvular gradients, (3) effective orifice area (EOA) calculators and (4) PHV dimensions. Available information was classified as complete (all categories), partial (two or three categories) or minimal (one category). 108 PHV (including homografts) and 34 annuloplasty rings systems were identified. The information on PHV was complete, partial or minimal in 19.5, 61.0 and 19.5% of PHV, respectively. In 91.6% a picture of the valve could be obtained, whereas normative data for transvalvular gradients and EOA calculators were available in 63.0 and 25.0% of all PHV, respectively. The available data was summarized on a new open access webpage ( www.valveguide.ch ). There is a lack of accessible data on PHV dimensions, normal transvalvular gradients and effective orifice area calculators, although such information is of crucial importance for proper PHV assessment.

  15. Lack of immunoediting in murine pancreatic cancer reversed with neoantigen

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rebecca A.; Diamond, Mark S.; Rech, Andrew J.; Chao, Timothy; Richardson, Max W.; Lin, Jeffrey H.; Bajor, David L.; Byrne, Katelyn T.; Stanger, Ben Z.; Riley, James L.; Markosyan, Nune; Winograd, Rafael; Vonderheide, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    In carcinogen-driven cancers, a high mutational burden results in neoepitopes that can be recognized immunologically. Such carcinogen-induced tumors may evade this immune response through “immunoediting,” whereby tumors adapt to immune pressure and escape T cell–mediated killing. Many tumors lack a high neoepitope burden, and it remains unclear whether immunoediting occurs in such cases. Here, we evaluated T cell immunity in an autochthonous mouse model of pancreatic cancer and found a low mutational burden, absence of predicted neoepitopes derived from tumor mutations, and resistance to checkpoint immunotherapy. Spontaneous tumor progression was identical in the presence or absence of T cells. Moreover, tumors arising in T cell–depleted mice grew unchecked in immune-competent hosts. However, introduction of the neoantigen ovalbumin (OVA) led to tumor rejection and T cell memory, but this did not occur in OVA immune-tolerant mice. Thus, immunoediting does not occur in this mouse model — a likely consequence, not a cause, of absent neoepitopes. Because many human tumors also have a low missense mutational load and minimal neoepitope burden, our findings have clinical implications for the design of immunotherapy for patients with such tumors. PMID:27642636

  16. Lack of testicular seipin causes teratozoospermia syndrome in men

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Min; Gao, Mingming; Wu, Chaoming; He, Hui; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Yang, Hongyuan; Xiao, Xinhua; Liu, George; Sha, Jiahao

    2014-01-01

    Obesity impairs male fertility, providing evidence for a link between adipose tissue and reproductive function; however, potential consequences of adipose tissue paucity on fertility remain unknown. Lack of s.c. fat is a hallmark of Berardinelli–Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 2 (BSCL2), which is caused by mutations in BSCL2-encoding seipin. Mice with a targeted deletion of murine seipin model BSCL2 with severe lipodystrophy, insulin resistance, and fatty liver but also exhibit male sterility. Here, we report teratozoospermia syndrome in a lipodystrophic patient with compound BSCL2 mutations, with sperm defects resembling the defects of infertile seipin null mutant mice. Analysis of conditional mouse mutants revealed that adipocyte-specific loss of seipin causes progressive lipodystrophy without affecting fertility, whereas loss of seipin in germ cells results in complete male infertility and teratozoospermia. Spermatids of the human patient and mice devoid of seipin in germ cells are morphologically abnormal with large ectopic lipid droplets and aggregate in dysfunctional clusters. Elevated levels of phosphatidic acid accompanied with an altered ratio of polyunsaturated to monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids in mutant mouse testes indicate impaired phospholipid homeostasis during spermiogenesis. We conclude that testicular but not adipose tissue-derived seipin is essential for male fertility by modulating testicular phospholipid homeostasis. PMID:24778225

  17. Lack of a Benign Interpretation Bias in Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Nader; Prouvost, Caroline; Kuckertz, Jennie M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive models of social anxiety posit that recurrent interpretation of ambiguous information as threatening maintains symptoms (e.g. Clark & Wells, 1995, pp. 69–93, Social phobia: Diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. New York: Guilford Press; Rapee & Heimberg, 1997, pp. 741–756, Behavior Research and Therapy, 35). However, biased interpretation may also be represented as a failure to make a benign interpretation of the ambiguous event. Furthermore, interpretation bias can be characterized by both an online (automatic) component and an offline (effortful) component (Hirsch & Clark, 2004, pp. 799–825, Clinical Psychology Review, 24). To measure both benign and threat biases, as well as examine the effect of social anxiety on offline versus online interpretations, Beard and Amir (2009, pp. 1135–1141, Behaviour Research and Therapy, 46) developed the Word Sentence Association Paradigm (WSAP). In the current study, we administered the WSAP to a group of participants diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (SAD) as well as to a group of non-anxious control (NAC) participants. We found that participants with SAD demonstrated a lack of benign online bias, but not an online threat bias when compared to NACs. However, when examining offline biases, SAD patients endorsed social threat interpretations and rejected benign social interpretations to a greater degree than non-anxious individuals. Our results, when taken together, clearly implicate the role of reduced bias toward benign information in SAD. PMID:22545788

  18. New graduate nurses' experiences about lack of professional confidence.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    Professional confidence is an essential trait for new graduate nurses to possess in order to provide quality patient care in today's complex hospital setting. However, many new graduates are entering the workforce without it and this remains to be explored. This study describes how new graduate nurses accounted for their lack of professional confidence upon entry into professional practice and how it developed during their first year of practice in the hospital setting. Two face-to-face, individual interviews of 12 participants were utilized to capture the lived experiences of new graduate nurses to gain an understanding of this phenomenon. After manual content analysis seven themes emerged: communication is huge, making mistakes, disconnect between school and practice, independence, relationship building, positive feedback is important, and gaining experience. The findings indicate that the development of professional confidence is a dynamic process that occurs throughout the first year of practice. New graduate nurses must experience both positive and negative circumstances in order to move toward the attainment of professional confidence. Knowing this, nurse educators in academia as well as in the hospital setting may better support the development of professional confidence both before and during the first year of practice.

  19. Lack of global epigenetic methylation defects in CBS deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Ok; Wang, Liqun; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Gupta, Sapna; Slifker, Michael J; Li, Yue-Sheng; Andrews, Andrew J; Kruger, Warren D

    2017-01-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency is a recessive inborn error of metabolism in which patients have extremely elevated plasma total homocysteine and have clinical manifestations in the vascular, visual, skeletal, and nervous systems. Homocysteine is an intermediary metabolite produced from the hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), which is a by-product of methylation reactions involving the methyl-donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Here, we have measured SAM, SAH, DNA and histone methylation status in an inducible mouse model of CBS deficiency to test the hypothesis that homocysteine-related phenotypes are caused by inhibition of methylation due to elevated SAH and reduced SAM/SAH ratio. We found that mice lacking CBS have elevated cellular SAH and reduced SAM/SAH ratios in both liver and kidney, but this was not associated with alterations in the level of 5-methylcytosine or various histone modifications. Using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation in combination with microarray, we found that of the 241 most differentially methylated promoter probes, 89 % were actually hypermethylated in CBS deficient mice. In addition, we did not find that changes in DNA methylation correlated well with changes in RNA expression in the livers of induced and uninduced CBS mice. Our data indicates that reduction in the SAM/SAH ratio, due to loss of CBS activity, does not result in overall hypomethylation of either DNA or histones.

  20. A mutant of barley lacking NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, R.; Lea, P. )

    1989-04-01

    A mutant of barley, LaPr 88/29, deficient in peroxisomal NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been identified. Compared to the wild type the activities of NADH-HPR and NADPH-HPR were severely reduced but the mutant was still capable of fixing CO{sub 2} at rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type in air. Although lacking an enzyme in the main photorespiratory pathway, there appeared to be little disruption to photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{sup 14}C) serine were similar in both mutant and wild type. LaPr 88/29 has been used to show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase (GR) and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-HPR activity is due to the NADH-HPR enzyme. Immunological studies, using antibodies raised against spinach HPR, have shown that the NADH-dependent enzyme protein is absent in LaPr 88/29 but there appears to be enhanced synthesis of the NADPH-dependent enzyme protein.

  1. Gregarina niphandrodes may lack both a plastid genome and organelle.

    PubMed

    Toso, Marc A; Omoto, Charlotte K

    2007-01-01

    Gregarines are early diverging apicomplexans that appear to be closely related to Cryptosporidium. Most apicomplexans, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Eimeria, possess both plastids and corresponding plastid genomes. Cryptosporidium lacks both the organelle and the genome. To investigate the evolutionary history of plastids in the Apicomplexa, we tried to determine whether gregarines possess a plastid and/or its genome. We used PCR and dot-blot hybridization to determine whether the gregarine Gregarina niphandrodes possesses a plastid genome. We used an inhibitor of plastid function for any reduction in gregarine infection, and transmission electron microscopy to search for plastid ultrastructure. Despite an extensive search, an organelle of the appropriate ultrastructure in transmission electron microscopy, was not observed. Triclosan, an inhibitor of the plastid-specific enoyl-acyl carrier reductase enzyme, did not reduce host infection by G. niphandrodes. Plastid-specific primers produced amplicons with the DNA of Babesia equi, Plasmodium falciparum, and Toxoplasma gondii as templates, but not with G. niphandrodes DNA. Plastid-specific DNA probes, which hybridized to Babesia equi, failed to hybridize to G. niphandrodes DNA. This evidence indicates that G. niphandrodes is not likely to possess either a plastid organelle or its genome. This raises the possibility that the plastid was lost in the Apicomplexan following the divergence of gregarines and Cryptosporidium.

  2. [Evidence and Lack of Evidence in the Treatment of Tinnitus].

    PubMed

    Hesse, G

    2016-04-01

    A broad variety of therapeutic regimen is proposed, introduced and sold against tinnitus, but most of these approaches lack scientific validation and evidence. Up to date a causal, tinnitus eliminating therapy is not available. Most probably this will not be possible at all, as the mechanism of tinnitus generation are multiple and include peripheral as well as central or cortical reactions. Like in fashion and design however, therapeutic medical interventions against tinnitus come in waves again and again over the last decades, without being able to prove lasting and scientifically evident effects.This review presents, discusses and assesses almost all available therapies regarding their evidence. Evidence should include besides external evidence through publications and available data also internal evidence, e.g. including experience of the therapist and needs of the patients.Almost all interventions that try to influence the inner ear or the auditory cortex either pharmaceutically or by direct stimulation or modulation do not reach evidence. However, there are procedures that have proven to be effective and show at least certain degrees of evidence with proven strength of effect. These are habituation therapies and psychotherapeutic interventions like cognitive behavioural therapy, especially when they are combined with concrete measures to improve auditory perception like hearing-aids, cochlear implants or hearing-therapy.

  3. New constitutive latex osmotin-like proteins lacking antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Cleverson D T; Silva, Maria Z R; Bruno-Moreno, Frederico; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C O; Moreira, Renato A; Ramos, Márcio V

    2015-11-01

    Proteins that share similar primary sequences to the protein originally described in salt-stressed tobacco cells have been named osmotins. So far, only two osmotin-like proteins were purified and characterized of latex fluids. Osmotin from Carica papaya latex is an inducible protein lacking antifungal activity, whereas the Calotropis procera latex osmotin is a constitutive antifungal protein. To get additional insights into this subject, we investigated osmotins in latex fluids of five species. Two potential osmotin-like proteins in Cryptostegia grandiflora and Plumeria rubra latex were detected by immunological cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibodies produced against the C. procera latex osmotin (CpOsm) by ELISA, Dot Blot and Western Blot assays. Osmotin-like proteins were not detected in the latex of Thevetia peruviana, Himatanthus drasticus and healthy Carica papaya fruits. Later, the two new osmotin-like proteins were purified through immunoaffinity chromatography with anti-CpOsm immobilized antibodies. Worth noting the chromatographic efficiency allowed for the purification of the osmotin-like protein belonging to H. drasticus latex, which was not detectable by immunoassays. The identification of the purified proteins was confirmed after MS/MS analyses of their tryptic digests. It is concluded that the constitutive osmotin-like proteins reported here share structural similarities to CpOsm. However, unlike CpOsm, they did not exhibit antifungal activity against Fusarium solani and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. These results suggest that osmotins of different latex sources may be involved in distinct physiological or defensive events.

  4. A Chenopod Extensin Lacks Repetitive Tetrahydroxyproline Blocks 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiong-biao; Kieliszewski, Marcia; Lamport, Derek T. A.

    1990-01-01

    An extensin isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) cell suspension cultures fulfills all criteria for membership of the extensin family save one, notably, lack of the `diagnostic' pentamer Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp. However, sequence analysis of the major tryptic peptides shows that sugar beet extensin shares a motif in common with tomato extensin P1 but differs by the position of an insertion sequence [X] or [Y] which, in sugar beet, splits the tetrahydroxyproline block: Ser-Hyp-Hyp-[X]-Hyp-Hyp-Thr-Hyp-Val-Tyr-Lys, where [X] is [Val-His-Glu/Lys-Tyr-Pro], while in tomato the insertion sequence [Y] = [Val-Lys-Pro-Tyr-His-Pro] and, when it occurs, immediately follows the tetrahydroxyproline block: Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-[Y]-Thr-Hyp-Val-Tyr-Lys. Based on these data we reinterpret three highly repetitive cDNA sequences, including nodulin N75 from soybean and wound-induced P33 of carrot, as extensins with split tetra(hydroxy)proline blocks. Images Figure 4 PMID:16667277

  5. Lack of non-voluntary stepping responses in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Selionov, V A; Solopova, I A; Zhvansky, D S; Karabanov, A V; Chernikova, L A; Gurfinkel, V S; Ivanenko, Y P

    2013-04-03

    The majority of research and therapeutic actions in Parkinson's disease (PD) focus on the encephalic areas, however, the potential involvement of the spinal cord in its genesis has received little attention. Here we examined spinal locomotor circuitry activation in patients with PD using various types of central and peripheral tonic stimulation and compared results to those of age-matched controls. Subjects lay on their sides with both legs suspended, allowing low-friction horizontal rotation of the limb joints. Air-stepping can be used as a unique and important model for investigating human rhythmogenesis since its manifestation is largely facilitated by the absence of external resistance. In contrast to the frequent occurrence of non-voluntary stepping responses in healthy subjects, both peripheral (muscle vibration) and central (Jendrassik maneuver, mental task, Kohnstamm phenomenon) tonic influences had little if any effect on rhythmic leg responses in PD. On the other hand, a remarkable feature of voluntary air-stepping movements in patients was a significantly higher frequency of leg oscillations than in age-matched controls. A lack of non-voluntary stepping responses was also observed after dopaminergic treatment despite the presence of prominent shortening reactions (SRs) to passive movements. We argue that the state and the rhythmogenesis capacity of the spinal circuitry are impaired in patients with PD. In particular, the results suggest impaired central pattern generator (CPG) access by sensory and central activations.

  6. Lack of Galanin 3 Receptor Aggravates Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Botz, Bálint; Kemény, Ágnes; Brunner, Susanne M; Locker, Felix; Csepregi, Janka; Mócsai, Attila; Pintér, Erika; McDougall, Jason J; Kofler, Barbara; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-06-01

    Neurogenic inflammation mediated by peptidergic sensory nerves has a crucial impact on the pathogenesis of various joint diseases. Galanin is a regulatory sensory neuropeptide, which has been shown to attenuate neurogenic inflammation, modulate neutrophil activation, and be involved in the development of adjuvant arthritis, but our current understanding about its targets and physiological importance is incomplete. Among the receptors of galanin (GAL1-3), GAL3 has been found to be the most abundantly expressed in the vasculature and on the surface of some immune cells. However, since there are minimal in vivo data on the role of GAL3 in joint diseases, we analyzed its involvement in different inflammatory mechanisms of the K/BxN serum transfer-model of autoimmune arthritis employing GAL 3 gene-deficient mice. After arthritis induction, GAL3 knockouts demonstrated increased clinical disease severity and earlier hindlimb edema than wild types. Vascular hyperpermeability determined by in vivo fluorescence imaging was also elevated compared to the wild-type controls. However, neutrophil accumulation detected by in vivo luminescence imaging or arthritic mechanical hyperalgesia was not altered by the lack of the GAL3 receptor. Our findings suggest that GAL3 has anti-inflammatory properties in joints by inhibiting vascular hyperpermeability and consequent edema formation.

  7. Altered food consumption in mice lacking lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Dusaulcy, R; Daviaud, D; Pradère, J P; Grès, S; Valet, Ph; Saulnier-Blache, J S

    2009-12-01

    The release of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) by adipocytes has previously been proposed to play a role in obesity and associated pathologies such as insulin resistance and diabetes. In the present work, the sensitivity to diet-induced obesity was studied in mice lacking one of the LPA receptor subtype (LPA1R). Conversely to what was observed in wild type (WT) mice, LPA1R-KO-mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) showed no significant increase in body weight or fat mass when compared to low fat diet (LFD). In addition, in contrast to what was observed in WT mice, LPA1R-KO mice did not exhibit over-consumption of food associated with HFD. Surprisingly, when fed a LFD, LPA1R-KO mice exhibited significant higher plasma leptin concentration and higher level of adipocyte leptin mRNA than WT mice. In conclusion, LPA1R-KO mice were found to be resistant to diet-induced obesity consecutive to a resistance to fat-induced over-consumption of food that may result at least in part from alterations in leptin expression and production.

  8. Lack of eyeblink entrainments in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tamami; Kato, Nobumasa; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2011-07-01

    Interpersonal synchrony is the temporal coordination of movements between individuals during social interactions. For example, it has been shown that listeners synchronize their eyeblinks to a speaker's eyeblinks, especially at breakpoints of speech, when viewing a close-up video clip of the speaker's face. We hypothesized that this interpersonal synchronous behavior would not be observed in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which are characterized by impaired social communication. To test this hypothesis, we examined eyeblink entrainments in adults with ASD. As we reported previously, the eyeblinks of adults without ASD were significantly synchronized with the speaker's eyeblinks at pauses in his speech when they viewed the speaker's entire face. However, the significant eyeblink synchronization disappeared when adults without ASD viewed only the speaker's eyes or mouth, suggesting that information from the whole face, including information from both the eyes and the mouth, was necessary for eyeblink entrainment. By contrast, the ASD participants did not show any eyeblink synchronization with the speaker, even when viewing the speaker's eyes and mouth simultaneously. The lack of eyeblink entrainment to the speaker in individuals with ASD suggests that they are not able to temporally attune themselves to others' behaviors. The deficits in temporal coordination may impair effective social communication with others.

  9. Characterization of nonconventional hepatitis B viruses lacking the core promoter.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shau-Feng; Chang, Shih-Hsuan; Li, Bi-Chen; Will, Hans; Netter, Hans Jürgen

    2004-12-20

    The core gene (C-gene) promoter and regulatory sequences play a central role in the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle. They are essential for the synthesis of the pregenomic and precore mRNA. The pregenomic RNA is the template required for replication and also the template for the synthesis of the core protein and polymerase. Here, we report the in vivo existence and functional characterization of HBV variants that lack the C-gene promoter region and the regulatory sequences located therein. HBV promoter fragments were isolated by PCR from sera of chronic carriers and characterized. Truncated promoter elements were identified, and then tested in the context of wild-type genomes in the HuH-7 cell line. The expression of the recombinant HBV genome resulted in the synthesis of surface proteins, and low level of core protein as well as a transcript pattern similar to, but smaller in size to wild-type virus. The recombinant HBV genome with the truncated promoter region produced pregenomic RNA-like transcripts. These transcripts were encapsidated and reverse transcribed when complemented by sufficient core and polymerase protein. These date provide an explanation as to why such deletion mutants of HBV can be produced at all, they highlight the functional potentials of viral sequences activated by mutations and may be of relevance for viral evolution and persistence.

  10. Special Relativity in Week One: 4) Lack of Simultaneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-09-01

    This is our final article on teaching special relativity in the first week of an introductory physics course.1-3 One of the profound changes in our view of the world was Einstein's discovery of the lack of simultaneity. He illustrated this result with a thought experiment in which we observe a railroad car passing by us. We see the two ends of the car struck simultaneously by lightning bolts, but to someone riding inside the car, the lightning strikes were not simultaneous. My difficulty with this thought experiment is that while doing calculations, I have to go back and forth between two imagined points of view. To avoid this, I actually perform an experiment that involves two simultaneous events. then all we have to imagine is how the experiment looks to someone moving by us. Not only does the order of the two events depend on the direction of motion of the observer, but we can demonstrate that if information could travel faster than the speed of light, we could get answers to questions that have not yet been thought of.

  11. European Ozone Trends: Why the Lack of Decrease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schneidemesser, E.; Colette, A.; Monks, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a secondary air pollutant of concern for its adverse affects on human health and agricultural crops, as well as its climate impact. Formed primarily from photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), and carbon monoxide (CO), emission control measures have targeted significant emission sources of these compounds for reduction. While reductions of these ozone precursors are generally observed across Europe over the past one to two decades, trends in ground-level ozone have not followed the same trajectory. Here trends are extracted from up to 15 years of data from over 600 urban, suburban, and rural sites across Europe for ozone and nitrogen dioxide. While long-term records of NMVOCs are sparse, data from London sites are included and allow for an evaluation of how the atmospheric reactivity regime has changed over the past decade. Model results based on and used in conjunction with the observed trends are used to yield insight into the reasons for the lack of decrease in surface ozone. Trends in observed data are also compared to country's emission inventory data.

  12. Multiple sleep alterations in mice lacking cannabinoid type 1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Silvani, Alessandro; Berteotti, Chiara; Bastianini, Stefano; Lo Martire, Viviana; Mazza, Roberta; Pagotto, Uberto; Quarta, Carmelo; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors are highly expressed in the brain and play a role in behavior control. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling is modulated by high-fat diet (HFD). We investigated the consequences of congenital lack of CB1 receptors on sleep in mice fed standard diet (SD) and HFD. CB1 cannabinoid receptor knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed SD or HFD for 4 months (n = 9-10 per group). Mice were instrumented with electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic electrodes. Recordings were performed during baseline (48 hours), sleep deprivation (gentle handling, 6 hours), sleep recovery (18 hours), and after cage switch (insomnia model paradigm, 6 hours). We found multiple significant effects of genotype on sleep. In particular, KO spent more time awake and less time in non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS) and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) than WT during the dark (active) period but not during the light (rest) period, enhancing the day-night variation of wake-sleep amounts. KO had slower EEG theta rhythm during REMS. REMS homeostasis after sleep deprivation was less effective in KO than in WT. Finally, KO habituated more rapidly to the arousing effect of the cage-switch test than WT. We did not find any significant effects of diet or of diet x genotype interaction on sleep. The occurrence of multiple sleep alterations in KO indicates important roles of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in limiting arousal during the active period of the day, in sleep regulation, and in sleep EEG in mice.

  13. Natural history of amblyopia untreated owing to lack of compliance

    PubMed Central

    Simons, K.; Preslan, M.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—A prospective study of the efficacy of amblyopia treatment in preschool children has recently been called for, requiring an untreated control group. The present study assessed data from patients with amblyopia untreated owing to lack of compliance, or with amblyopia risk factors, to determine outcome.
METHODS—Longitudinal data were obtained from 18 4-6 year old patients who had initially been screened for amblyopia, strabismus, and/or bilateral refractive error, failed to comply with prescribed treatment, and in whom amblyopia was detected at a rescreening approximately a year later. The data from three previous studies comparing outcome of patients compliant and non-compliant with amblyopia treatment were also reanalysed.
RESULTS—One child of the 18, who wore glasses sporadically, showed some improvement in visual acuity in the amblyopic eye. Otherwise, no child showed an improvement, and seven of the 17 (41%) for whom visual acuities were available at both screenings showed a deterioration of visual acuity in the amblyopic eye, including three who apparently developed amblyopia for the first time. A child with an ametropic risk factor for amblyopia whose visual acuity was not obtained at the first screening and who was largely non-compliant presented with amblyopia at the second screening. The reanalysed data from the three previous studies demonstrated a significantly poorer visual acuity outcome in the amblyopic eye in the non-compliant patient groups than in the compliant groups in each study.
CONCLUSION—Preschool children with amblyopia or its risk factors are at risk of having the current amblyopia deteriorate, or of developing amblyopia, if not treated. These results raise questions about the ethical acceptability of a prospective study of amblyopia treatment at these ages.

 PMID:10216059

  14. Mice Lacking Hbp1 Function Are Viable and Fertile

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Dagmar; Jans, David A.; Bowles, Josephine; Koopman, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Fetal germ cell development is tightly regulated by the somatic cell environment, and is characterised by cell cycle states that differ between XY and XX gonads. In the testis, gonocytes enter G1/G0 arrest from 12.5 days post coitum (dpc) in mice and maintain cell cycle arrest until after birth. Failure to correctly maintain G1/G0 arrest can result in loss of germ cells or, conversely, germ cell tumours. High mobility group box containing transcription factor 1 (HBP1) is a transcription factor that was previously identified in fetal male germ cells at the time of embryonic cell cycle arrest. In somatic cells, HBP1 is classified as a tumour suppressor protein, known to regulate proliferation and senescence. We therefore investigated the possible role of HBP1 in the initiation and maintenance of fetal germ cell G1/G0 arrest using the mouse model. We identified two splice variants of Hbp1, both of which are expressed in XY and XX fetal gonads, but only one of which is localised to the nucleus in in vitro assays. To investigate Hbp1 loss of function, we used embryonic stem (ES) cells carrying a Genetrap mutation for Hbp1 to generate mice lacking Hbp1 function. We found that Hbp1-genetrap mouse mutant germ cells proliferated correctly throughout development, and adult males were viable and fertile. Multiple Hbp1-LacZ reporter mouse lines were generated, unexpectedly revealing Hbp1 embryonic expression in hair follicles, eye and limbs. Lastly, in a model of defective germ cell G1/G0 arrest, the Rb1-knockout model, we found no evidence for Hbp1 mis-regulation, suggesting that the reported RB1-HBP1 interaction is not critical in the germline, despite co-expression. PMID:28107452

  15. Respondent driven sampling of wheelchair users: A lack of traction?

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, John A.; Schluter, Philip J.; Hay-Smith, E. Jean C.; Snell, Deborah L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Internationally, wheelchair users are an emerging demographic phenomenon, due to their increased prevalence and rapidly increasing life-span. While having significant healthcare implications, basic robust epidemiological information about wheelchair users is often lacking due, in part, to this population’s ‘hidden’ nature. Increasingly popular in epidemiological research, Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) provides a mechanism for generating unbiased population-based estimates for hard-to-reach populations, overcoming biases inherent within other sampling methods. This paper reports the first published study to employ RDS amongst wheelchair users. Methods: Between October 2015 and January 2016, a short, successfully piloted, internet-based national survey was initiated. Twenty seeds from diverse organisations were invited to complete the survey then circulate it to peers within their networks following a well-defined protocol. A predetermined reminder protocol was triggered when seeds or their peers failed to respond. All participants were entered into a draw for an iPad. Results: Overall, 19 people participated (nine women); 12 initial seeds, followed by seven second-wave participants arising from four seeds . Completion time for the survey ranged between 7 and 36 minutes. Despite repeated reminders, no further people were recruited. Discussion: While New Zealand wheelchair user numbers are unknown, an estimated 14% of people have physical impairments that limited mobility. The 19 respondents generated from adopting the RDS methodology here thus represents a negligible fraction of wheelchair users in New Zealand, and an insufficient number to ensure equilibrium required for unbiased analyses. While successful in other hard-to-reach populations, applying RDS methodology to wheelchair users requires further consideration. Formative research exploring areas of network characteristics, acceptability of RDS, appropriate incentive options, and seed

  16. Lack of association between postactivation potentiation and subsequent jump performance.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Stephen John; Hussain, Syed Robiul

    2014-01-01

    Postactivation potentiation (PAP) is a strategy that has been used to acutely enhance the performance of explosive activities. Although, isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) have previously been shown to enhance subsequent explosive performance, no information currently exists regarding (1) the optimal variables (intensity/volume) of a MVC that best elicits a PAP response, and (2) the utilisation of evoked isometric twitch contractions in combination with performance measures to directly ascertain the presence of PAP following a MVC, and its relationship to performance. Thus, the purpose of this study was to (1) investigate the influence of isometric contraction duration on the PAP response, and (2) to determine the relationship between PAP, indicated as potentiation of muscle twitch force and subsequent jump performance following different-duration MVCs. Eight males (age: 21 ± 0.99) were assessed using performance measures [countermovement jumps] and evoked twitch contractions, before and 4 minutes after three different conditioning contractions (CCs), (1) a 3-second MVC (MVC3), (2) a 5-second MVC (MVC5) and (3) a 7-second MVC (MVC7). Following all CCs, peak twitch torque of the knee extensor muscles was found to increase (MVC3, + 3.9%; MVC5, + 9.6%; MVC7, + 5.2%), although not significantly (P > 0.05). No significant increases in jump height, jump power, rate of force development or takeoff velocity were observed following any of the CCs (P > 0.05). There was also a lack of association between the changes in PAP (twitch torque) and jump height following all CCs (MVC3, r = 0.25; MVC5, r = 0.28; MVC7, r = -0.47). These data indicate that PAP as assessed via twitch contractions is not associated with performance measures subsequent to single-set isometric CCs of varying durations.

  17. Lack of conventional ATPase properties in CFTR chloride channel gating.

    PubMed

    Schultz, B D; Bridges, R J; Frizzell, R A

    1996-05-01

    CFTR shares structural homology with the ABC transporter superfamily of proteins which hydrolyze ATP to effect the transport of compounds across cell membranes. Some superfamily members are characterized as P-type ATPases because ATP-dependent transport is sensitive to the presence of vanadate. It has been widely postulated that CFTR hydrolyzes ATP to gate its chloride channel. However, direct evidence of CFTR hydrolytic activity in channel gating is lacking and existing circumstantial evidence is contradictory. Therefore, we evaluated CFTR chloride channel activity under conditions known to inhibit the activity of ATPases; i.e., in the absence of divalent cations and in the presence of a variety of ATPase inhibitors. Removal of the cytosolic cofactor, Mg2+, reduced both the opening and closing rates of CFTR suggesting that Mg2+ plays a modulatory role in channel gating. However, channels continued to both open and close showing that Mg2+ is not an absolute requirement for channel activity. The nonselective P-type ATPase inhibitor, vanadate, did not alter the gating of CFTR when used at concentrations which completely inhibit the activity of other ABC transporters (1 mM). Higher concentrations of vanadate (10 mM) blocked the closing of CFTR, but did not affect the opening of the channel. As expected, more selective P-type (Sch28080, ouabain), V-type (bafilomycin A1, SCN-) and F-type (oligomycin) ATPase inhibitors did not affect either the opening or closing of CFTR. Thus, CFTR does not share a pharmacological inhibition profile with other ATPases and channel gating occurs in the apparent absence of hydrolysis, although with altered kinetics. Vanadate inhibition of channel closure might suggest that a hydrolytic step is involved although the requirement for a high concentration raises the possibility of previously uncharacterized effects of this compound. Most conservatively, the requirement for high concentrations of vanadate demonstrates that the binding site for

  18. Thermal ablation in colorectal liver metastases: Lack of evidence or lack of capability to prove the evidence?

    PubMed

    Sartori, Sergio; Tombesi, Paola; Di Vece, Francesca

    2016-04-07

    Many studies suggest that combined multimodality treatments including ablative therapies may achieve better outcomes than systemic chemotherapy alone in patients with colorectal liver metastases. Nevertheless, ablative therapies are not yet considered as effective options because their efficacy has never been proved by randomized controlled trials (RCT). However, there are in literature no trials that failed in demonstrating the effectiveness of ablative treatments: what are lacking, are the trials. All the attempts to organize phase III studies on this topic failed as a result of non accrual. Just one prospective RCT comparing radiofrequency ablation combined with systemic chemotherapy vs chemotherapy alone has been published. It was designed as a phase III study, but it was closed early because of slow accrual, and was downscaled to phase II study, with the consequent limits in drawing definite conclusions on the benefit of combined treatment. However, the combination treatment met the primary end point of the study and obtained a significantly higher 3-year progression-free survival than systemic chemotherapy alone. It is very unlikely that ultimate efficacy of ablation treatments will ever be tested again, and the best available evidence points toward a benefit for the combination strategy using ablative treatments and chemotherapy.

  19. Thermal ablation in colorectal liver metastases: Lack of evidence or lack of capability to prove the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Sergio; Tombesi, Paola; Di Vece, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Many studies suggest that combined multimodality treatments including ablative therapies may achieve better outcomes than systemic chemotherapy alone in patients with colorectal liver metastases. Nevertheless, ablative therapies are not yet considered as effective options because their efficacy has never been proved by randomized controlled trials (RCT). However, there are in literature no trials that failed in demonstrating the effectiveness of ablative treatments: what are lacking, are the trials. All the attempts to organize phase III studies on this topic failed as a result of non accrual. Just one prospective RCT comparing radiofrequency ablation combined with systemic chemotherapy vs chemotherapy alone has been published. It was designed as a phase III study, but it was closed early because of slow accrual, and was downscaled to phase II study, with the consequent limits in drawing definite conclusions on the benefit of combined treatment. However, the combination treatment met the primary end point of the study and obtained a significantly higher 3-year progression-free survival than systemic chemotherapy alone. It is very unlikely that ultimate efficacy of ablation treatments will ever be tested again, and the best available evidence points toward a benefit for the combination strategy using ablative treatments and chemotherapy. PMID:27053843

  20. Albumins and their processing machinery are hijacked for cyclic peptides in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Mylne, Joshua S; Colgrave, Michelle L; Daly, Norelle L; Chanson, Aurelie H; Elliott, Alysha G; McCallum, Emily J; Jones, Alun; Craik, David J

    2011-05-01

    The cyclic peptide sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1) blocks trypsin and is a promising drug lead and protein engineering scaffold. We show that SFTI-1 and the newfound SFT-L1 are buried within PawS1 and PawS2, precursors for seed storage protein albumins. Proalbumins are matured by asparaginyl endopeptidase, which we show is required to liberate both ends of SFTI-1 as well as to mature PawS1 albumin. Thus, these peptides emerge from within an albumin precursor by the action of albumin's own processing enzyme.

  1. Do some AGN lack X-ray emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmonds, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Thuan, T. X.; Izotov, Y. I.; Stern, D.; Harrison, F. A.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) are thought to be the seeds of early supermassive black holes (SMBHs). While ≳100 IMBH and small SMBH candidates have been identified in recent years, few have been robustly confirmed to date, leaving their number density in considerable doubt. Placing firmer constraints both on the methods used to identify and confirm IMBHs/SMBHs, as well as characterizing the range of host environments that IMBHs/SMBHs likely inhabit is therefore of considerable interest and importance. Additionally, finding significant numbers of IMBHs in metal-poor systems would be particularly intriguing, since such systems may represent local analogs of primordial galaxies, and therefore could provide clues of early accretion processes. Aims: Here we study in detail several candidate active galactic nuclei (AGN) found in metal-poor hosts. Methods: We utilize new X-ray and optical observations to characterize these metal-poor AGN candidates and compare them against known AGN luminosity relations and well-characterized IMBH/SMBH samples. Results: Despite having clear broad optical emission lines that are long-lived (≳10-13 yr), these candidate AGN appear to lack associated strong X-ray and hard UV emission, lying at least 1-2 dex off the known AGN correlations. If they are IMBHs/SMBHs, our constraints imply that they either are not actively accreting, their accretion disks are fully obscured along our line-of-sight, or their accretion disks are not producing characteristic high energy emission. Alternatively, if they are not AGN, then their luminous broad emission lines imply production by extreme stellar processes. The latter would have profound implications on the applicability of broad lines for mass estimates of massive black holes. The reduced spectra (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A64

  2. Chronic exposure to ozone causes tolerance to airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs: lack of SOD role.

    PubMed

    Vargas, M H; Romero, L; Sommer, B; Zamudio, P; Gustin, P; Montaño, L M

    1998-05-01

    Tolerance to respiratory effects of O3 has been demonstrated for anatomic and functional changes, but information about tolerance to O3-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is scarce. In guinea pigs exposed to air or O3 (0.3 parts/million, 4 h/day, for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 days, studied 16-18 h later), pulmonary insufflation pressure changes induced by intravenous substance P (SP, 0.032-3.2 micro ug/kg) were measured, then the animals were subjected to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Bronchial rings with or without phosphoramidon were also evaluated 3 h after air or a single O3 exposure. O3 caused in vivo AHR (increased sensitivity) to SP after 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 days of exposure compared with control. However, after 48 days of exposure, O3 no longer caused AHR. Total cell, macrophage, neutrophil, and eosinophil counts in BAL were increased in most O3-exposed groups. When data from all animals were pooled, we found a highly significant correlation between degree of airway responsiveness and total cells (r = 0.55), macrophages (r = 0.54), neutrophils (r = 0.47), and eosinophils (r = 0.53), suggesting that airway inflammation is involved in development of AHR to SP. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in BAL fluids were increased (P < 0.05) after 1, 3, 6, and 12 days of O3 exposure and returned to basal levels after 24 and 48 days of exposure. O3 failed to induce hyperresponsiveness to SP in bronchial rings, and phosphoramidon increased responses to SP in air- and O3-exposed groups, suggesting that neutral endopeptidase inactivation was not involved in O3-induced AHR to SP in vivo. We conclude that chronic exposure to 0. 3 ppm O3, a concentration found in highly polluted cities, resulted in tolerance to AHR to SP in guinea pigs by an SOD-independent mechanism.

  3. Proteomics and phylogenetic analysis of the cathepsin L protease family of the helminth pathogen Fasciola hepatica: expansion of a repertoire of virulence-associated factors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark W; Tort, Jose F; Lowther, Jonathan; Donnelly, Sheila M; Wong, Emily; Xu, Weibo; Stack, Colin M; Padula, Matthew; Herbert, Ben; Dalton, John P

    2008-06-01

    Cathepsin L proteases secreted by the helminth pathogen Fasciola hepatica have functions in parasite virulence including tissue invasion and suppression of host immune responses. Using proteomics methods alongside phylogenetic studies we characterized the profile of cathepsin L proteases secreted by adult F. hepatica and hence identified those involved in host-pathogen interaction. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the Fasciola cathepsin L gene family expanded by a series of gene duplications followed by divergence that gave rise to three clades associated with mature adult worms (Clades 1, 2, and 5) and two clades specific to infective juvenile stages (Clades 3 and 4). Consistent with these observations our proteomics studies identified representatives from Clades 1, 2, and 5 but not from Clades 3 and 4 in adult F. hepatica secretory products. Clades 1 and 2 account for 67.39 and 27.63% of total secreted cathepsin Ls, respectively, suggesting that their expansion was positively driven and that these proteases are most critical for parasite survival and adaptation. Sequence comparison studies revealed that the expansion of cathepsin Ls by gene duplication was followed by residue changes in the S2 pocket of the active site. Our biochemical studies showed that these changes result in alterations in substrate binding and suggested that the divergence of the cathepsin L family produced a repertoire of enzymes with overlapping and complementary substrate specificities that could cleave host macromolecules more efficiently. Although the cathepsin Ls are produced as zymogens containing a prosegment and mature domain, all secreted enzymes identified by MS were processed to mature active enzymes. The prosegment region was highly conserved between the clades except at the boundary of prosegment and mature enzyme. Despite the lack of conservation at this section, sites for exogenous cleavage by asparaginyl endopeptidases and a Leu-Ser[downward arrow]His motif for

  4. Enzymatic methylation at specific altered aspartyl and asparaginyl residues in glucagon

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, I.M.; Ding, L.; Clarke, S.

    1986-05-01

    Protein carboxyl methyltransferases from erythrocytes and brain appear to catalyze the esterification of L-isoasparty 1 and/or D-aspartyl residues. In order to identify the origin of these unusual residues, they studied the methylation of glucagon, a peptide hormone of 29 amino acids containing 3 aspartyl residues and a single asparagine residue. They found that glucagon could be methylated with the erythrocyte enzyme and S-adenosyl(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine to a maximum extent of 0.004 mol methyl groups/mol glucagon. After digestion with either trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, or endoproteinase Arg c, the labelled fragments were separated by HPLC and identified. Additionally, peptides produced by protease digestions were assayed directly for methyl-acceptor activity. They found that the major site of methylation, accounting for 60% of the total, was at Asp-9. Further analysis indicated that this site probably represents an L-isoaspartyl residue. A second site of methylation, representing 23% of the total, was detected at Asn-28. Neither Asp-15 nor Asp-21 could be identified as a methyl-acceptor site. Base treatment of glucagon (0.1 M NH/sub 4/OH, 3 h, 37/sup 0/C) increased methylation at the Asn-28 site by 4 to 8 fold while methylation at the Asp-9 site remained unchanged. These studies suggest that base treatment enhances methylation at asparagine residues but not at aspartyl residues.

  5. The Lack of Motivation to Pursue Postsecondary Education among Hmong Students: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Xang

    2015-01-01

    In rural areas, a lack of motivation to pursue a postsecondary degree continues to affect Hmong students at the postsecondary education level. The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory research was to create a model based on the exploration of the lack of motivation to pursue postsecondary education among Hmong high school students.…

  6. 42 CFR 476.90 - Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or...) Qio Review Functions § 476.90 Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner. (a) If a health care facility or practitioner refuses to allow a QIO to enter and perform the duties and...

  7. 49 CFR 11.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 11.118 Section 11.118 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 11.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans...

  8. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  9. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  10. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  11. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  12. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  13. Teacher Resistance to Frequent Rewards and Praise: Lack of Skill or a Wise Decision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bear, George G.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance and the lack of fidelity or integrity in the use of rewards and praise are commonly cited in the behavioral consultation literature, particularly when teachers are asked to manage student behavior using frequent rewards and praise in a systematic manner. There are multiple potential reasons for resistance and lack of implementation…

  14. Toward a Deeper Understanding of Student Interest or Lack of Interest in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Li-Hsuan

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the nature of college students' interest or lack of interest in science and the factors to which they attributed their interest or lack of interest. Twenty-four college students were interviewed to gain an understanding of their ideas and experiences of science; their overall interest in science; their interest levels in four…

  15. Why does the immune system of Atlantic cod lack MHC II?

    PubMed

    Star, Bastiaan; Jentoft, Sissel

    2012-08-01

    MHC II, a major feature of the adaptive immune system, is lacking in Atlantic cod, and there are different scenarios (metabolic cost hypothesis or functional shift hypothesis) that might explain this loss. The lack of MHC II coincides with an increased number of genes for MHC I and Toll-like receptors (TLRs).

  16. Report: Lack of Final Guidance on Vapor Intrusion Impedes Efforts to Address Indoor Air Risks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #10-P-0042, December 14, 2009. EPA’s efforts to protect human health at sites where vapor intrusion risks may occur have been impeded by the lack of final Agency guidance on vapor intrusion risks.

  17. Relation Between Lack of Forgiveness and Depression: The Moderating Effect of Self-Compassion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung-Sun

    2016-12-01

    Although an association between lack of forgiveness and poor mental health is known, prior studies have reported mixed findings of the relationship between lack of forgiveness and depressive symptoms. In an attempt to explain the strength differences between lack of forgiveness and depressive symptoms, this study examined the moderating effect of self-compassion. A total of 311 Korean teachers (89 men, 222 women; M age = 39.3 year, SD = 9.1) were asked to complete self-report questionnaires, including the Korean versions of the Trait Forgivingness Scale, the Self-Compassion Scale, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Moderated multiple regression was used for analysis, and a buffering interaction of self-compassion was discovered. Specifically, self-compassion moderated the relationship between lack of forgiveness and depression; the relationship was stronger for those low on self-compassion.

  18. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of PL-3994, a novel cyclic peptide (Hept-cyclo(Cys-His-Phe-d-Ala-Gly-Arg-d-Nle-Asp-Arg-Ile-Ser-Cys)-Tyr-[Arg mimetic]-NH(2)) natriuretic peptide receptor-A agonist that is resistant to neutral endopeptidase and acts as a bronchodilator.

    PubMed

    Edelson, Jeffrey D; Makhlina, Marie; Silvester, Kevin R; Vengurlekar, Shailesh S; Chen, Xiaomei; Zhang, Jie; Koziol-White, Cynthia J; Cooper, Philip R; Hallam, Trevor J; Hay, Douglas W P; Panettieri, Reynold A

    2013-04-01

    The pharmacological and airways relaxant profiles of PL-3994 (Hept-cyclo(Cys-His-Phe-d-Ala-Gly-Arg-d-Nle-Asp-Arg-Ile-Ser-Cys)-Tyr-[Arg mimetic]-NH(2)), a novel natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) agonist, were evaluated. PL-3994, a full agonist, has high affinity for recombinant human (h), dog, or rat NPR-As (K(i)s of 1, 41, and 10 nm, respectively), and produced concentration-dependent cGMP generation in human, dog and rat NPR-As (respective EC(50)s of 2, 3 and 14 nm). PL-3994 has a K(i) of 7 nm for hNPR-C but was without effect on cGMP generation in hNPR-B. PL-3994 (1 μm) was without significant effect against 75 diverse molecular targets. PL-3994 or BNP, a natural NPR ligand, produced concentration-dependent relaxation of pre-contracted guinea-pig trachea (IC(50)s of 42.7 and 10.7 nm, respectively). PL-3994, and also BNP, (0.1 nm-100 μm) elicited a potent, concentration-dependent but small relaxation of pre-contracted human precision-cut lung slices (hPCLS). Intratracheal PL-3994 (1-1000 μg/kg) produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the bronchoconstrictor response evoked by aerosolized methacholine, but was without significant effect on cardiovascular parameters. PL-3994 was resistant to degradation by human neutral endopeptidase (hNEP) (92% remaining after 2 h), whereas the natural ligands, ANP and CNP, were rapidly metabolized (≤1% remaining after 2 h). PL-3994 is a potent, selective NPR agonist, resistant to NEP, with relaxant effects in guinea-pig and human airway smooth muscle systems. PL-3994 has the profile predictive of longer clinical bronchodilator activity than observed previously with ANP, and suggests its potential utility in the treatment of asthma, in addition to being a useful research tool to evaluate NPR biology.

  19. Experimental research of fluorescence spectra of watercress stressed by lack or excess of watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullo, O. A.; Fedotov, Yu. V.; Belov, M. L.; Gorodnichev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental laboratory investigations of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of watercress were conducted. The fluorescence spectra were excited by a YAG:Nd laser emitting at 532 nm. The laboratory setup was described and fluorescence spectra of watercress in stressed states caused by lack and excess of water were presented. It was established that the influence of stress caused by lack and excess of watering is manifested in changes of fluorescence spectra.

  20. The use of suicide substrates to select mutants of Escherichia coli lacking enzymes of alcohol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, P R; Clark, D P

    1986-12-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to chloroethanol or to chloroacetaldehyde were selected. Such mutants were found to lack the fermentative coenzyme A (CoA) linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. Most also lacked the associated fermentative enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase. Both types of mutants, those lacking acetaldehyde dehydrogenase alone or lacking both enzymes, mapped close to the regulatory adhC gene at 27 min on the E. coli genetic map. The previously described acd mutants which lack acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and which map at 63 min were shown to be pleiotropic, affecting respiration and growth on a variety of substrates. It therefore seems likely that the structural genes for both the acetaldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenases lie in the adhCE operon. This interpretation was confirmed by the isolation of temperature sensitive chloracetaldehyde-resistant mutants, some of which produced thermolabile acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and were also found to map at the adh locus. Reversion analysis indicated that mutants lacking one or both enzymes carried single mutations. The gene order in the adh region was determined by three point crosses to be trp-zch::Tn10-adh-galU-bglY-tyrT-chlC.

  1. Millions of mothers lack health insurance coverage in the United States. Most uninsured mothers lack access both to employer-based coverage and to publicly subsidized health insurance.

    PubMed

    Guyer, Jocelyn; Broaddus, Matthew; Dude, Annie

    2002-01-01

    Some 5.9 million American mothers caring for young or school-aged children lack health insurance. Although nearly nine in ten uninsured mothers are members of working families, most lack access to affordable coverage through their job or a spouse's job. Most are ineligible for publicly subsidized coverage unless their incomes are far below the poverty line. The millions of uninsured mothers are at high risk of going without needed preventive and primary care. If they become seriously ill, their families can face the prospect of a financial crisis. The nation has made significant progress in extending health care coverage to children in low-income families through Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), but no comparable effort has been made to insure the mothers of these children. A few states have started to address the problem by transforming their SCHIPs into family-based programs that also cover low-income parents. Bipartisan legislation under consideration, known as FamilyCare, would encourage this trend by providing more federal funding to states that could be used to extend health insurance to the parents of children already covered by publicly funded programs.

  2. Increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein concentrations in mice lacking brain serotonin.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Golo; Mosienko, Valentina; Gertz, Karen; Alenina, Natalia; Hellweg, Rainer; Klempin, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between BDNF signaling and the serotonergic system remains incompletely understood. Using a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we studied BDNF concentrations in hippocampus and cortex of two mouse models of altered serotonin signaling: tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)2-deficient (Tph2 (-/-)) mice lacking brain serotonin and serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient (SERT(-/-)) mice lacking serotonin re-uptake. Surprisingly, hippocampal BDNF was significantly elevated in Tph2 (-/-) mice, whereas no significant changes were observed in SERT(-/-) mice. Furthermore, BDNF levels were increased in the prefrontal cortex of Tph2 (-/-) but not of SERT(-/-) mice. Our results emphasize the interaction between serotonin signaling and BDNF. Complete lack of brain serotonin induces BDNF expression.

  3. Desert Emergency of Lack of Water; How to Find and Collect Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    D-ie991 DESERT EMERGENCY OF LACK OF WATER; HOW TO FIND AND 1 COLLECT WATER(U) BEN-GURION UNIY’ OF THE NEGEV SEDE ROOER (ISRAEL) JACOB BLAUST. . Y...Desert Emergency - Lack of Water - How to Find and Collect Water. Plants and Human Survival In the Desert 00 The Principal Investigator and Contractor0...desert conditions. The alms of the second part of S this study were 1) to find out if there is, and If so, what is, the "" connection between the

  4. Special Deliveries: Certified Nurse-Midwifery Programs Lacking in New England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzosa, Alyssa

    2012-01-01

    With Boston serving as a hub of both educational and medical excellence, it's no wonder that New England has a high reputation to uphold in both of these areas. However, Boston and the rest of the region lack a specific degree program that is putting New England below the radars of potential midwives. Certified nurse-midwifery is a popular field…

  5. 14 CFR 1230.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 1230.118 Section 1230.118 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.118 Applications and...

  6. 14 CFR 1230.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 1230.118 Section 1230.118 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.118 Applications and...

  7. When the YA Authors Are the Students: Learning from Cissy Lacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Nancy

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the case of Cissy Lacks, who was summarily dismissed from her teaching job after her principal went into a locked closet and found a videotape of students reading their creative compositions, which contained profanity. Discusses the effect of censorship on teaching. (TB)

  8. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  9. 14 CFR 1230.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 1230.118 Section 1230.118 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.118 Applications and...

  10. 14 CFR 1230.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 1230.118 Section 1230.118 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.118 Applications and...

  11. Non-Native Student's Communication Is Affected Due to the Lack of Pragmatic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latha, V. G.; Rajan, Premalatha

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at focusing how the lack of pragmatic competence affects student's communication in L2 (Second language) at tertiary level. The city based Indian students learn English which is their second language from 3 years onwards whereas the rural based students learn English only from 6 years onwards. This exposure of the L2 shows the…

  12. Mind Maps to Modify Lack of Attention among Saudi Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daghistan, Bulquees Ismail Abdul Majid

    2016-01-01

    This research study aims at investigating the impact of Mind Maps on modifying the lack of attention in Arabic language class among Saudi Kindergarten children. To achieve the goals of this study the researcher used an experimental design with a random sample from AlRae'd Kindergarten's children in Riyadh -Saudi Arabia for the academic year…

  13. Relation of Neuroticism and Negative Career Thoughts and Feelings to Lack of Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kevin R.; Shin, Yun-Jeong

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore correlates of chronic career indecision with multivariate modeling. We examined the effects of neuroticism and negative career thoughts and feelings on lack of information, which is one of the core elements of chronic career indecision. The sample included 310 first-semester students who had entered…

  14. Quantitative trait loci for a neurocranium deformity, lack of operculum, in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.).

    PubMed

    Negrín-Báez, D; Navarro, A; Afonso, J M; Toro, M A; Zamorano, M J

    2016-04-01

    Lack of operculum, a neurocranial deformity, is the most common external abnormality to be found among industrially produced gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.), and this entails significant financial losses. This study conducts, for the first time in this species, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of the lack of operculum. A total of 142 individuals from a paternal half-sibling family (six full-sibling families) were selected for QTL mapping. They had previously shown a highly significant association with the prevalence of lack of operculum in a segregation analysis. All the fish were genotyped for 106 microsatellite markers using a set of multiplex PCRs (ReMsa1-ReMsa13). A linear regression methodology was used for the QTL analysis. Four QTL were detected for this deformity, two of which (QTLOP1 and QTLOP2) were significant. They were located at LG (linkage group) nine and LG10 respectively. Both QTL showed a large effect (about 27%), and furthermore, the association between lack of operculum and sire allelic segregation observed was statistically significant in the QTLOP1 analysis. These results represent a significant step towards including marker-assisted selection for this deformity in genetic breeding programmes to reduce the incidence of the deformity in the species.

  15. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy for Protection of...

  16. Lack of lipogenesis in parasitoids: a review of physiological mechanisms and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Visser, Bertanne; Ellers, Jacintha

    2008-09-01

    The ability of organisms to adapt to fluctuating food conditions is essential for their survival and reproduction. Accumulating energy reserves, such as lipids, in anticipation of harsh conditions, will reduce negative effects of a low food supply. For Hymenoptera and Diptera, several parasitoid species lack adult lipogenesis, and are unable to store excess energy in the form of lipid reserves. The aim of this review is to provide a synthesis of current knowledge regarding the inability to accumulate lipids in parasitoids, leading to new insights and prospects for further research. We will emphasize physiological mechanisms underlying lack of lipogenesis, the evolution of this adaptation in parasitoids and its biological implications with regard to life history traits. We suggest the occurrence of lack of lipogenesis in parasitoids to be dependent on the extent of host exploitation through metabolic manipulation. Currently available data shows lack of lipogenesis to have evolved independently at least twice, in parasitic Hymenoptera and Diptera. The underlying genetic mechanism, however, remains to be solved. Furthermore, due to the inability to replenish adult fat reserves, parasitoids are severely constrained in resource allocation strategies, in particular the trade-off between survival and reproduction.

  17. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED...

  18. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED...

  19. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED...

  20. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED...

  1. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED...

  2. Lack of Emotional Support from Parents Early in Life and Alcohol Abuse Later in Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Benjamin A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between lacking emotional support from parents early in life and adult alcohol abuse. A series of logistic regression models were run with data collected from a nationally representative sample of over 2,500 adults ages 25-74. The findings reveal a linear relationship between level of…

  3. Best interests of adults who lack capacity part 2: key considerations.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    Last month's article discussed the key concepts underpinning the notion of best interests. In this article the author discusses the requirements for determining the best interests of an adult who lacks capacity under the provisions of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and its code of practice (Department for Constitutional Affairs 2007).

  4. Private Pre-University Education in Romania: Mixing Control with Lack of Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanus, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This paper approaches private provision of pre-university education in Romania, exploring available data on the sector's size and main characteristics and evaluating the extent to which the current regulatory framework enables positive effects in terms of freedom of choice, quality, equity, and social cohesion. The paper argues that the lack of a…

  5. The Lack of Political Cartoons in the People's Republic of China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnell, Jim

    Political cartoons do not appear in the government-controlled press in the People's Republic of China. The cartoons that do appear in newspapers are good-natured and lacking in any type of political message. Chinese civilization has a 5,000-year history that is grounded in feudalism and must be considered in any analysis of Chinese society. Since…

  6. Resident Characteristics Related to the Lack of Morning Care Provision in Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Durkin, Daniel W.; Rahman, Anna N.; Choi, Leena; Beuscher, Linda; Schnelle, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine usual long-term care (LTC) practices related to 3 aspects of morning care and determine if there were resident characteristics related to the lack of care. Design and Methods: Participants were 169 long-stay residents in 4 community LTC facilities who required staff assistance with either transfer…

  7. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 690.118 Section 690.118 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  8. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... institutional type grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility;...

  9. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  10. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  11. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... institutional type grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility;...

  12. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  13. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 26.118 Section 26.118 Protection of Environment... in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  14. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 690.118 Section 690.118 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  15. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 690.118 Section 690.118 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  16. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 690.118 Section 690.118 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  17. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Research Subjects § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human... for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  18. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Research Subjects § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human... for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  19. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... institutional type grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility;...

  20. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Research Subjects § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human... for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  1. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  2. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 26.118 Section 26.118 Protection of Environment... in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  3. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... institutional type grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility;...

  4. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 26.118 Section 26.118 Protection of Environment... in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  5. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  6. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  7. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 26.118 Section 26.118 Protection of Environment... in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  8. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  9. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Research Subjects § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human... for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  10. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  11. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... institutional type grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility;...

  12. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 690.118 Section 690.118 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  13. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  14. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  15. Barriers to Faculty Pedagogical Change: Lack of Training, Time, Incentives, and. . .Tensions with Professional Identity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Sara E.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2012-01-01

    A substantial body of literature has highlighted many factors that impede faculty change, the most common of which are a lack of training, time, and incentives. However, there may be other barriers--unacknowledged and unexamined barriers--that might prove to be equally important. In particular, the tensions between a scientist's professional…

  16. 30 CFR 721.14 - Failure to give notice and lack of reasonable belief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... belief. 721.14 Section 721.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... and lack of reasonable belief. No notice of violation or cessation order may be vacated by reason of... create a reasonable belief that a violation had occurred....

  17. Who Lacks Support and Why? An Examination of Mothers' Personal Safety Nets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harknett, Kristen S.; Hartnett, Caroline Sten

    2011-01-01

    We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 12,140 person-waves) to identify characteristics associated with mothers' having or lacking "personal safety net" support from family and friends. We focus on characteristics that are likely to increase the importance of having support available but may also interfere with the…

  18. 42 CFR 476.90 - Lack of cooperation by a provider or practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lack of cooperation by a provider or practitioner. 476.90 Section 476.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... cooperation by a provider or practitioner. (a) If a provider or practitioner refuses to allow a QIO to...

  19. 37 CFR 1.477 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Searching Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protest to lack of unity of... PATENT CASES International Processing Provisions Unity of Invention § 1.477 Protest to lack of unity of... lack of unity of invention by the International Searching Authority, additional fees may be paid...

  20. 37 CFR 1.489 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protest to lack of unity of... Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority. (a) If the applicant disagrees with the holding of lack of unity of invention by the International...

  1. 37 CFR 1.489 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protest to lack of unity of... Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority. (a) If the applicant disagrees with the holding of lack of unity of invention by the International...

  2. 37 CFR 1.477 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Searching Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protest to lack of unity of... PATENT CASES International Processing Provisions Unity of Invention § 1.477 Protest to lack of unity of... lack of unity of invention by the International Searching Authority, additional fees may be paid...

  3. 37 CFR 1.489 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protest to lack of unity of... Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority. (a) If the applicant disagrees with the holding of lack of unity of invention by the International...

  4. 37 CFR 1.477 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Searching Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protest to lack of unity of... PATENT CASES International Processing Provisions Unity of Invention § 1.477 Protest to lack of unity of... lack of unity of invention by the International Searching Authority, additional fees may be paid...

  5. 37 CFR 1.489 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protest to lack of unity of... Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority. (a) If the applicant disagrees with the holding of lack of unity of invention by the International...

  6. 37 CFR 1.477 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Searching Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protest to lack of unity of... PATENT CASES International Processing Provisions Unity of Invention § 1.477 Protest to lack of unity of... lack of unity of invention by the International Searching Authority, additional fees may be paid...

  7. Development of speech services for people with cleft palate in Thailand: lack of professionals.

    PubMed

    Prathanee, Benjamas

    2012-11-01

    Cleft lip/palate is one of the most common birth defects and has a high incidence in Thailand. Most children with cleft still have social stigma from speech and language defects after surgical treatment. Speech and language therapies are required at an early age and require long-term care until teenager or adult. Unfortunately, there are insufficient speech services for cleft because of a lack of qualified speech and language pathologists in Thailand. Development consisted of two remedy modalities of bottom-up and top-down models, Community-Based Speech Therapy Model for people with Cleft Lip Cleft Palate including networking and standard assessments of both subjective and objective measurements. That might be the best and most suitable way to solve problems of lacking speech services in Thailand or developing countries which have similar contexts.

  8. Lack of Penetration in Friction Stir Welds: Effects on Mechanical Properties and NDE Feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinchen, David G.; Adams, Glynn P.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews the issue of lack of penetration (LOP) in Friction Stir Welding and the feasibility of using non-destructive tests to detect . Friction Stir Welding takes place in the solid phase below the melting point of the materials to be joined. It thus gives the ability to join materials which are difficult to fusion weld, for example 2000 and 7000 aluminium alloys. This process though can result in a lack of penetration, due to an incomplete penetration of the DXZ. This is frequently referred to as a "kissing bond", which requires micro examination to detect. The presentation then discusses the surface crack tension tests. It then reviews the simulated service test and results. It then discusses the feasibility of using non-destructive examination to detect LOP, the forms of test which can be used, and the results the tests.

  9. Complete lack of mitochondrial divergence between two species of NE Atlantic marine intertidal gastropods.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, P; Panova, M; Hollander, J; Johannesson, K

    2009-10-01

    Some mitochondrial introgression is common between closely related species, but distinct species rarely show substantial introgression in their entire distribution range. In this study, however, we report a complete lack of mitochondrial divergence between two sympatric species of flat periwinkles (Littorina fabalis and Littorina obtusata) which, based on previous allozyme studies, diverged approximately 1 Ma. We re-examined their species status using both morphology (morphometric analysis) and neutral genetic markers (microsatellites) and our results confirmed that these species are well separated. Despite this, the two species shared all common cytochrome-b haplotypes throughout their NE Atlantic distribution and no deep split between typical L. fabalis and L. obtusata haplotypes could be found. We suggest that incomplete lineage sorting explains most of the lack of mitochondrial divergence between these species. However, coalescent-based analyses and the sympatric sharing of unique haplotypes suggest that introgressive hybridization also has occurred.

  10. Involvement of alanine racemase in germination of Bacillus cereus spores lacking an intact exosporium.

    PubMed

    Venir, Elena; Del Torre, Manuela; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Musetti, Rita; Stecchini, Mara Lucia

    2014-02-01

    The L-alanine mediated germination of food isolated Bacillus cereus DSA 1 spores, which lacked an intact exosporium, increased in the presence of D-cycloserine (DCS), which is an alanine racemase (Alr) inhibitor, reflecting the activity of the Alr enzyme, capable of converting L-alanine to the germination inhibitor D-alanine. Proteomic analysis of the alkaline extracts of the spore proteins, which include exosporium and coat proteins, confirmed that Alr was present in the B. cereus DSA 1 spores and matched to that encoded by B. cereus ATCC 14579, whose spore germination was strongly affected by the block of conversion of L- to D-alanine. Unlike ATCC 14579 spores, L-alanine germination of B. cereus DSA 1 spores was not affected by the preincubation with DCS, suggesting a lack of restriction in the reactant accessibility.

  11. Scaffold proteins LACK and TRACK as potential drug targets in kinetoplastid parasites: Development of inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qvit, Nir; Schechtman, Deborah; Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Berti, Denise Aparecida; Soares, Chrislaine Oliveira; Miao, Qianqian; Liang, Liying (Annie); Baron, Lauren A.; Teh-Poot, Christian; Martínez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Churchill, Eric; Cunningham, Anna D.; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Federspiel, Nancy A.; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Manso Alves, Maria Julia; Jardim, Armando; Momar, Ndao; Dumonteil, Eric; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases cause ∼500,000 deaths annually and remain a major challenge for therapeutic development. Using a rational design based approach, we developed peptide inhibitors with anti-parasitic activity that were derived from the sequences of parasite scaffold proteins LACK (Leishmania's receptor for activated C-kinase) and TRACK (Trypanosomareceptor for activated C-kinase). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK and TRACK that are conserved in the parasites, but not in the mammalian ortholog, RACK (Receptor for activated C-kinase), may be interaction sites for signaling proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. One of these peptides exhibited leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activity in culture. Moreover, in infected mice, this peptide was also effective in reducing parasitemia and increasing survival without toxic effects. The identified peptide is a promising new anti-parasitic drug lead, as its unique features may limit toxicity and drug-resistance, thus overcoming central limitations of most anti-parasitic drugs. PMID:27054066

  12. The Effects of Lack of Joint Goal Planning on Divorce over 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Gere, Judith; Almeida, David M.; Martire, Lynn M.

    2016-01-01

    Given the negative consequences of divorce on health and well-being, it is important to try to identify its predictors. In the current study we used data from the National Survey of Midlife Development (N = 2801) to examine the longitudinal effects of lack of joint goal planning with a romantic relationship partner on divorce over a 10-year period. Multilevel regression analyses showed that lack of joint planning with the relationship partner was associated with a 19% increase in the odds of divorce, even when controlling for various demographic (i.e., age, gender, relationship length, number of children in the household), individual (i.e., neuroticism, positive affect, negative affect, physical symptoms, planning), and relationship (i.e., marital empathy, partner strain, partner disagreement, marital satisfaction, commitment). These results demonstrate the importance of considering one’s partner when making decisions and plans for the future, given that it has clear implications for relationship dissolution. PMID:27668863

  13. Nutrient restriction enhances the proliferative potential of cells lacking the tumor suppressor PTEN in mitotic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Seisenbacher, Gerhard; Hafen, Ernst; Stocker, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    How single cells in a mitotic tissue progressively acquire hallmarks of cancer is poorly understood. We exploited mitotic recombination in developing Drosophila imaginal tissues to analyze the behavior of cells devoid of the tumor suppressor PTEN, a negative regulator of PI3K signaling, under varying nutritional conditions. Cells lacking PTEN strongly overproliferated specifically in nutrient restricted larvae. Although the PTEN mutant cells were sensitive to starvation, they successfully competed with neighboring cells by autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms distinct from cell competition. The overgrowth was strictly dependent on the activity of the downstream components Akt/PKB and TORC1, and a reduction in amino acid uptake by reducing the levels of the amino acid transporter Slimfast caused clones of PTEN mutant cells to collapse. Our findings demonstrate how limiting nutritional conditions impact on cells lacking the tumor suppressor PTEN to cause hyperplastic overgrowth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00380.001 PMID:23853709

  14. How slow breeding can be selected in seabirds: testing Lack's hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, F. Stephen; Jouventin, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The historical debate of the 1960s between group and individual selection hinged on how the slow breeding of seabirds could be explained. While this debate was settled by the ascendance of individual selection, championed by David Lack, explanations for slow breeding in seabirds remain to be tested. We examined the slowest breeding of these birds, the albatrosses and petrels (order Procellariiformes), using analyses that statistically controlled for variations in body size and phylogeny. Incubation and fledging periods appeared strongly correlated, but this turned out to be largely explained by phylogeny. Nonetheless, developmental and reproductive rates were associated with the distance to the foraging range, as predicted under the hypothesis of ecological constraints on breeding pairs, and these results were independent of body size and phylogeny. Slower breeding in these seabirds appeared associated with the rigors of farther pelagic feeding, as Lack originally hypothesized. PMID:17148257

  15. The Effects of Lack of Joint Goal Planning on Divorce over 10 Years.

    PubMed

    Gere, Judith; Almeida, David M; Martire, Lynn M

    Given the negative consequences of divorce on health and well-being, it is important to try to identify its predictors. In the current study we used data from the National Survey of Midlife Development (N = 2801) to examine the longitudinal effects of lack of joint goal planning with a romantic relationship partner on divorce over a 10-year period. Multilevel regression analyses showed that lack of joint planning with the relationship partner was associated with a 19% increase in the odds of divorce, even when controlling for various demographic (i.e., age, gender, relationship length, number of children in the household), individual (i.e., neuroticism, positive affect, negative affect, physical symptoms, planning), and relationship (i.e., marital empathy, partner strain, partner disagreement, marital satisfaction, commitment). These results demonstrate the importance of considering one's partner when making decisions and plans for the future, given that it has clear implications for relationship dissolution.

  16. NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity is impaired in mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lack aconitase.

    PubMed

    González, A; Rodríguez, L; Olivera, H; Soberón, M

    1985-10-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking aconitase did not grow on minimal medium (MM) and had five- to tenfold less NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity than the wild-type, although its glutamine synthetase (GS) activity was still inducible. When this mutant was incubated with glutamate as the sole nitrogen source, the 2-oxoglutarate content rose, and the NADP+-dependent GDH activity increased. Furthermore, carbon-limited cultures showed a direct relation between NADP+-dependent GDH activity and the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate content. We propose that the low NADP+-dependent GDH activity found in the mutant was due to the lack of 2-oxoglutarate or some other intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

  17. Mice lacking functional STAT1 are highly susceptible to lethal infection with Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Seregin, Alexey V; Walker, David H; Popov, Vsevolod L; Walker, Aida G; Smith, Jeanon N; Miller, Milagros; de la Torre, Juan C; Smith, Jennifer K; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Fair, Joseph N; Wauquier, Nadia; Grant, Donald S; Bockarie, Bayon; Bente, Dennis; Paessler, Slobodan

    2013-10-01

    Lassa fever (LF) is a potentially lethal human disease that is caused by the arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV). Annually, around 300,000 infections with up to 10,000 deaths occur in regions of Lassa fever endemicity in West Africa. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking a functional STAT1 pathway are highly susceptible to infection with LASV and develop lethal disease with pathology similar to that reported in humans.

  18. Embryos generated from oocytes lacking complex N- and O-glycans have compromised development and implantation

    PubMed Central

    Grasa, Patricia; Kaune, Heidy; Williams, Suzannah A

    2012-01-01

    Female mice generating oocytes lacking complex N- and O-glycans (double mutants (DM)) produce only one small litter before undergoing premature ovarian failure (POF) by 3 months. Here we investigate the basis of the small litter by evaluating ovulation rate and embryo development in DM (Mgat1F/FC1galt1F/F:ZP3Cre) and Control (Mgat1F/FC1galt1F/F) females. Surprisingly, DM ovulation rate was normal at 6 weeks, but declined dramatically by 9 weeks. In vitro development of zygotes to blastocysts was equivalent to Controls although all embryos from DM females lacked a normal zona pellucida (ZP) and ∼30% lacked a ZP entirely. In contrast, in vivo preimplantation development resulted in less embryos recovered from DM females compared with Controls at 3.5 days post coitum (dpc) (3.2±1.3 vs 7.0±0.6). Furthermore, only 45% of mated DM females contained embryos at 3.5 dpc. Of the preimplantation embryos collected from DM females, approximately half were morulae unlike Controls where the majority were blastocysts, indicating delayed embryo development in DM females. Post-implantation development in DM females was analysed to determine whether delayed preimplantation development affected subsequent development. In DM females at 5.5 dpc, only ∼40% of embryos found at 3.5 dpc had implanted. However, at 6.5 dpc, implantation sites in DM females corresponded to embryo numbers at 3.5 dpc indicating delayed implantation. At 9.5 dpc, the number of decidua corresponded to embryo numbers 6 days earlier indicating that all implanted embryos progress to midgestation. Therefore, a lack of complex N- and O-glycans in oocytes during development impairs early embryo development and viability in vivo leading to delayed implantation and a small litter. PMID:22919046

  19. Lack of recent condom use among detained adolescent males: a multilevel investigation

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, R; Salazar, L; DiClemente, R

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate multiple levels of influence with respect to the lack of recent condom use among a high risk sample of adolescent males recruited from short term detention facilities. Methods: A cross sectional survey of 231 adolescent males serving, predominantly, short term detention sentences. Assessments were conducted using audiocomputer assisted self interviewing. Condom use during the most recent sexual event was assessed as well as 20 potential correlates of not using condoms. Correlates were assessed within five levels of causation: personal, relational, peer affiliation, family, and societal. Results: Nine correlates achieved bivariate significance (p<0.05). Of these, the personal level correlates were particularly important in a multivariate model. The motivation subscale from the Condom Barriers Scale was the strongest multivariate correlate of recent condom use. Adolescents scoring below the median were about 3.4 times more likely to report lack of recent condom use (p = 0.0006). Adolescents indicating they had ever caused a pregnancy were about 2.5 times more likely to report lack of condom use (p = 0.02). Finally, those reporting their peers did not use condoms were about twice as likely to report lack of use (p = 0.048). Conclusion: Upon investigating multiple levels of potential influence on condom use, the multivariate findings suggest that personal level factors may be the most important determinant of non-use among adolescent males in short term detention facilities. Although structural changes may be needed to influence some forms of safer sex behaviour, direct intervention with adolescent males may be justified to favourably alter determinants of condom use. PMID:15572607

  20. Uncertainties associated with lacking data for predictions of solid-solution partitioning of metals in soil.

    PubMed

    Le, T T Yen; Hendriks, A Jan

    2014-08-15

    Soil properties, i.e., pH and contents of soil organic matter (SOM), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), clay, oxides, and reactive metals, are required inputs to both mechanistic and empirical modeling in assessing metal solid-solution partitioning. Several of these properties are rarely measured in site-specific risk assessment. We compared the uncertainties induced by lacking data on these soil properties in estimating metal soil solution concentrations. The predictions by the Orchestra framework were more sensitive to lacking soil property data than the predictions by the transfer functions. The deviations between soil solution concentrations of Cd, Ni, Zn, Ba, and Co estimated with measured SOM and those estimated with generic SOM by the Orchestra framework were about 10 times larger than the deviations in the predictions by the transfer functions. High uncertainties were induced by lacking data in assessing solid-solution partitioning of oxy-anions like As, Mo, Sb, Se, and V. Deviations associated with lacking data in predicting soil solution concentrations of these metals by the Orchestra framework reached three-to-six orders of magnitude. The solid-solution partitioning of metal cations was strongly influenced by pH and contents of organic matter, oxides, and reactive metals. Deviations of more than two orders of magnitude were frequently observed between the estimates of soil solution concentrations with the generic values of these properties and the estimates based on the measured data. Reliable information on these properties is preferred to be included in the assessment by either the Orchestra framework or transfer functions.

  1. Lack of Association between Human Plasma Oxytocin and Interpersonal Trust in a Prisoners Dilemma Paradigm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-30

    induce anxiolytic effects [2], to reduce food intake and adiposity [3], to facilitate social interaction , bonding, and trust [4–6], to ameliorate...was driven by the lack of data regarding release and clearance patterns for endogenous oxytocin, particularly in response to social interaction . This... defections (mistrusting/untrustworthy behavior) in familiar pairs, the familiar partner interaction was replaced with a second unfamiliar partner interaction

  2. Lack of reproduction in muskoxen and arctic hares caused by early winter?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David

    2000-01-01

    A lack of young muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) and arctic hares (Lepus arcticus) in the Eureka area of Ellesmere Island, Northwest Territories (now Nunavut), Canada, was observed during summer 1998, in contrast to most other years since 1986. Evidence of malnourished muskoxen was also found. Early winter weather and a consequent 50% reduction of the 1997 summer replenishment period appeared to be the most likely cause, giving rise to a new hypothesis about conditions that might cause adverse demographic effects in arctic herbivores.

  3. Lack of access and continuity of adult health care: a national population-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Dilélio, Alitéia Santiago; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; da Silveira, Denise Silva; Siqueira, Fernando Carlos Vinholes; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Silva, Suele Manjourany; Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the lack of access and continuity of health care in adults. METHODS A cross-sectional population-based study was performed on a sample of 12,402 adults aged 20 to 59 years in urban areas of 100 municipalities of 23 states in the five Brazilian geopolitical regions. Barriers to the access and continuity of health care and were investigated based on receiving, needing and seeking health care (hospitalization and accident/emergency care in the last 12 months; care provided by a doctor, by other health professional or home care in the last three months). Based on the results obtained by the description of the sample, a projection is provided for adults living in Brazilian urban areas. RESULTS The highest prevalence of lack of access to health services and to provision of care by health professionals was for hospitalization (3.0%), whilst the lowest prevalence was for care provided by a doctor (1.1%). The lack of access to care provided by other health professionals was 2.0%; to accident and emergency services, 2.1%; and to home care, 2.9%. As for prevalences, the greatest absolute lack of access occurred in emergency care (more than 360,000 adults). The main reasons were structural and organizational problems, such as unavailability of hospital beds, of health professionals, of appointments for the type of care needed and charges made for care. CONCLUSIONS The universal right to health care in Brazil has not yet been achieved. These projections can help health care management in scaling the efforts needed to overcome this problem, such as expanding the infrastructure of health services and the workforce. PMID:26061454

  4. Lack of Lipid A Pyrophosphorylation and Functional lptA Reduces Inflammation by Neisseria Commensals

    PubMed Central

    John, Constance M.; Liu, Mingfeng; Phillips, Nancy J.; Yang, Zhijie; Funk, Courtney R.; Zimmerman, Lindsey I.; Griffiss, J. McLeod; Stein, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of the immune system with Neisseria commensals remains poorly understood. We have previously shown that phosphoethanolamine on the lipid A portion of lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an important role in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. For pathogenic Neisseria, phosphoethanolamine is added to lipid A by the phosphoethanolamine transferase specific for lipid A, which is encoded by lptA. Here, we report that Southern hybridizations and bioinformatics analyses of genomic sequences from all eight commensal Neisseria species confirmed that lptA was absent in 15 of 17 strains examined but was present in N. lactamica. Mass spectrometry of lipid A and intact LOS revealed the lack of both pyrophosphorylation and phosphoethanolaminylation in lipid A of commensal species lacking lptA. Inflammatory signaling in human THP-1 monocytic cells was much greater with pathogenic than with commensal Neisseria strains that lacked lptA, and greater sensitivity to polymyxin B was consistent with the absence of phosphoethanolamine. Unlike the other commensals, whole bacteria of two N. lactamica commensal strains had low inflammatory potential, whereas their lipid A had high-level pyrophosphorylation and phosphoethanolaminylation and induced high-level inflammatory signaling, supporting previous studies indicating that this species uses mechanisms other than altering lipid A to support commensalism. A meningococcal lptA deletion mutant had reduced inflammatory potential, further illustrating the importance of lipid A pyrophosphorylation and phosphoethanolaminylation in the bioactivity of LOS. Overall, our results indicate that lack of pyrophosphorylation and phosphoethanolaminylation of lipid A contributes to the immune privilege of most commensal Neisseria strains by reducing the inflammatory potential of LOS. PMID:22949553

  5. Chemical composition of saccular endolymph and otolith in fish inner ear: lack of spatial uniformity.

    PubMed

    Payan, P; Edeyer, A; de Pontual, H; Borelli, G; Boeuf, G; Mayer-Gostan, N

    1999-07-01

    Fish otoliths provide a record of age, growth, and environmental influences. In both trout and turbot, spatial chemical investigation of the endolymph surrounding the otolith (sagitta) showed a lack of uniformity. Proteins, PO(3-)(4), and Mg(2+) were significantly more concentrated in the proximal (facing the macula) than distal zone, whereas the opposite was observed for K(+) and total CO(2) (totCO(2)). Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]) was 20% higher in the proximal zone in trout but not in turbot. Total Ca and Cl(-) contents were uniformly distributed in both species. We propose that the endolymphatic gradients of protein and totCO(2) concentration within the endolymph are involved in the otolithic biocalcification process. Microchemical analyses of otolith sections by wavelength dispersive spectrometry showed a lack of spatial uniformity in the K/Ca and Na/Ca ratios, whereas the Sr/Ca ratio was uniform. There is a clear relationship between endolymph and otolith [K(+)], but the interpretation of the results for [Na(+)] needs further investigation. Thus the lack of uniformity in the otolith composition must be taken into account when investigating otolith microchemistry.

  6. Lack of Young Subsidence in the East Tibetan Foreland: Implications for Crustal Thickening Processes at Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royden, L. H.; Burchfiel, B. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Wenchuan earthquake of May 12, 2008 occurred on a west-dipping reverse fault (with a pronounced right-slip component) located along the steep eastern edge of the Tibetan plateau. It has been suggested that thrust faulting here may not be indicative of large-scale shortening and thickening of the upper crust, but may rather be an expression of vertical uplift of the upper crust, with minor shortening. This interpretation is compatible with the lack of young flexural subsidence in the Sichuan foreland provided that the flexurally competent layers of the Sichuan foreland lithosphere are loaded from below, or internally, by thickening crustal domains deep within the mid or lower crust of the eastern plateau, rather than from above, by emplacement of thrust sheets at shallow crustal levels onto the flexurally competent layer of the foreland. This interpretation reconciles gravity anomalies across the plateau margin, the young age of the high topography of eastern Tibet, and the old age of the Sichuan basin with the lack of Cenozoic flexural subsidence in the Sichuan foreland. A similar lack of asymmetric foreland subsidence is also present along the northeastern margin of the Tibetan plateau where it abuts the (southeastern) Tarim Basin, suggesting that a similar mechanism may operate here.

  7. Lack of habituation of evoked visual potentials in analytic information processing style: evidence in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Buonfiglio, Marzia; Toscano, M; Puledda, F; Avanzini, G; Di Clemente, L; Di Sabato, F; Di Piero, V

    2015-03-01

    Habituation is considered one of the most basic mechanisms of learning. Habituation deficit to several sensory stimulations has been defined as a trait of migraine brain and also observed in other disorders. On the other hand, analytic information processing style is characterized by the habit of continually evaluating stimuli and it has been associated with migraine. We investigated a possible correlation between lack of habituation of evoked visual potentials and analytic cognitive style in healthy subjects. According to Sternberg-Wagner self-assessment inventory, 15 healthy volunteers (HV) with high analytic score and 15 HV with high global score were recruited. Both groups underwent visual evoked potentials recordings after psychological evaluation. We observed significant lack of habituation in analytical individuals compared to global group. In conclusion, a reduced habituation of visual evoked potentials has been observed in analytic subjects. Our results suggest that further research should be undertaken regarding the relationship between analytic cognitive style and lack of habituation in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  8. Lack of genetic polymorphism among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus of Fiji

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, S.L.; Palmer, A.G.; Sage, G.K.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Swem, T.; Brimm, D.J.; White, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    We compared levels of genetic diversity and isolation among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus from two South Pacific island complexes (Fiji and Vanuatu: F. p. nesiotes), relative to other island and mainland populations. Fragment data from 12 microsatellite loci and sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial DNA indicated levels of genetic variation in the South Pacific populations were lower than other island and mainland populations. Indeed, diversity varied from extremely low (Vanuatu) to completely absent (Fiji). We find little support for a hypothesis that populations on Fiji or Vanuatu were colonized via Australia. The complete lack of polymorphism in peregrine falcons of Fiji is remarkable, and to our knowledge has not been observed in a natural avian population. This lack of polymorphism, and the inability to test for decrease in polymorphism using museum samples, precludes testing whether the lack of genetic diversity in the population on Fiji is due to a recent bottleneck, or sustained isolation over evolutionary time. Increased fertility in eggs of Fiji peregrines upon outbreeding with males from other areas is consistent with inbreeding depression within a population typified by heterozygote deficiency. ?? 2011 The Authors.

  9. Lack of the scavenger receptor CD36 alters microglial phenotypes after neonatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Faustino, Joel; Woo, Moon-Sook; Derugin, Nikita; Vexler, Zinaida S

    2016-01-01

    The stage of brain development at the time of stroke has a major impact on the pathophysiological mechanisms of ischemic damage, including the neuroinflammatory response. Microglial cells have been shown to contribute to acute and sub-chronic injury in adult stroke models, whereas in neonatal rodents we showed that microglial cells serve as endogenous neuroprotectants early following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), limiting neuroinflammation and injury. In the neonate, microglial depletion or lack of the scavenger receptor CD36 exacerbates injury. In this study we asked if lack of CD36 affects microglial phenotypes after neonatal stroke. Using RT-PCR we characterized the patterns of gene expression in microglia isolated from injured regions following acute tMCAO in postnatal day 10 mice and showed that expression of several pro-inflammatory genes, including Toll-like receptors (TLR), remains largely unaffected in activated microglia in injured regions. Using multiple biochemical assays we demonstrated that lack of CD36 alters several functions of microglia in acutely injured neonatal brain: it further enhances accumulation of the chemokine MCP-1, affects the number of CD11b+/CD45+ cells, along with protein expression of its co-receptor, TLR2, but does not affect accumulation of superoxide in microglia or the cytokines TNFα and IL-1β in injured regions. PMID:26223273

  10. Lack of large-angle TT correlations persists in WMAP and Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2015-08-01

    The lack of large-angle correlations in the observed microwave background temperature fluctuations persists in the final-year maps from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and the first cosmological data release from Planck. We find a statistically robust and significant result: p-values for the missing correlations lying below 0.24 per cent (i.e. evidence at more than 3σ) for foreground cleaned maps, in complete agreement with previous analyses based upon earlier WMAP data. A cut-sky analysis of the Planck HFI 100 GHz frequency band, the `cleanest CMB channel' of this instrument, returns a p-value as small as 0.03 per cent, based on the conservative mask defined by WMAP. These findings are in stark contrast to expectations from the inflationary Lambda cold dark matter model and still lack a convincing explanation. If this lack of large-angle correlations is a true feature of our Universe, and not just a statistical fluke, then the cosmological dipole must be considerably smaller than that predicted in the best-fitting model.

  11. Beyond Sexual Partnerships: The Lack of Condom Use during Vaginal Sex with Steady Partners

    PubMed Central

    DePadilla, Lara; Elifson, Kirk W.; Sterk, Claire E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify independent correlates of the lack of condom use when engaging in vaginal sex with steady partners among HIV-negative African American adults. The conceptual model includes proximal as well as more distal domains. Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected between May 2009 and August 2011. Recruitment involved active and passive recruitment strategies. Computer-assisted, individual interviews were conducted with 1,050 African American adults. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of a lack of condom use with steady partners in the past 30 days. Results: In multivariate analysis, being older than 35, being partnered, perceiving having a steady partner as important, and ever having been homeless were associated positively with the odds of a lack of condom use during vaginal sex with steady partners in the past 30 days. On the other hand, reporting more than one steady partner in the past 30 days, having health insurance during the past 12 months, and perceived neighborhood social cohesion were negatively associated. Conclusions: These findings highlight the need for HIV risk-reduction prevention and intervention efforts that consider distal as well as proximal domains. Such a perspective allows for a broader sociological inquiry into health disparities that moves beyond epidemiological factors that commonly guide public health research. PMID:24634708

  12. Mice lacking inducible nitric oxide synthase are not resistant to lipopolysaccharide-induced death.

    PubMed Central

    Laubach, V E; Shesely, E G; Smithies, O; Sherman, P A

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide produced by cytokine-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of septic shock. To further our understanding of the role of iNOS in normal biology and in a variety of inflammatory disorders, including septic shock, we have used gene targeting to generate a mouse strain that lacks iNOS. Mice lacking iNOS were indistinguishable from wild-type mice in appearance and histology. Upon treatment with lipopolysaccharide and interferon gamma, peritoneal macrophages from the mutant mice did not produce nitric oxide measured as nitrite in the culture medium. In addition, lysates of these cells did not contain iNOS protein by immunoblot analysis or iNOS enzyme activity. In a Northern analysis of total RNA, no iNOS transcript of the correct size was detected. No increases in serum nitrite plus nitrate levels were observed in homozygous mutant mice treated with a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide, but the mutant mice exhibited no significant survival advantage over wild-type mice. These results show that lack of iNOS activity does not prevent mortality in this murine model for septic shock. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479866

  13. Lack of genetic polymorphism among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus of Fiji

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, Sandra; Palmer, A.G.; Sage, G.K.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Swem, T.; Brimm, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    We compared levels of genetic diversity and isolation among peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus from two South Pacific island complexes (Fiji and Vanuatu: F. p. nesiotes), relative to other island and mainland populations. Fragment data from 12 microsatellite loci and sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial DNA indicated levels of genetic variation in the South Pacific populations were lower than other island and mainland populations. Indeed, diversity varied from extremely low (Vanuatu) to completely absent (Fiji). We find little support for a hypothesis that populations on Fiji or Vanuatu were colonized via Australia. The complete lack of polymorphism in peregrine falcons of Fiji is remarkable, and to our knowledge has not been observed in a natural avian population. This lack of polymorphism, and the inability to test for decrease in polymorphism using museum samples, precludes testing whether the lack of genetic diversity in the population on Fiji is due to a recent bottleneck, or sustained isolation over evolutionary time. Increased fertility in eggs of Fiji peregrines upon outbreeding with males from other areas is consistent with inbreeding depression within a population typified by heterozygote deficiency.

  14. Assessment of NDE Methods to Detect Lack of Fusion in HDPE Butt Fusion Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Doctor, Steven R.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Watts, Michael W.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2011-07-31

    Studies at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, were conducted to evaluate nondestructive examinations (NDE) coupled with mechanical testing of butt fusion joints in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe for assessing lack of fusion. The work provided information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of volumetric inspection techniques of HDPE butt fusion joints in Section III, Division 1, Class 3, buried piping systems in nuclear power plants. This paper describes results from assessments using ultrasonic and microwave nondestructive techniques and mechanical testing with the high-speed tensile impact test and the side-bend test for determining joint integrity. A series of butt joints were fabricated in 3408, 12-inch (30.5-cm) IPS DR-11 HDPE material by varying the fusion parameters to create good joints and joints containing a range of lack-of-fusion conditions. Six of these butt joints were volumetrically examined with time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD), phased-array (PA) ultrasound, and the Evisive microwave system. The outer diameter (OD) weld beads were removed for microwave evaluation and the pipes ultrasonically re-evaluated. In two of the six pipes, both the outer and inner diameter (ID) weld beads were removed and the pipe joints re-evaluated. Some of the pipes were sectioned and the joints destructively evaluated with the high-speed tensile test and the side-bend test. The fusion parameters, nondestructive and destructive evaluation results have been correlated to validate the effectiveness of what each NDE technology detects and what each does not detect. There was no single NDE method that detected all of the lack-of-fusion flaws but a combination of NDE methods did detect most of the flaws.

  15. Leishmania pifanoi pathogenesis: selective lack of a local cutaneous response in the absence of circulating antibody.

    PubMed

    Colmenares, María; Constant, Stephanie L; Kima, Peter E; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2002-12-01

    Recently, a role for B cells in the pathogenesis associated with infection by Leishmania (Leishmania mexicana complex and L. donovani) has been established. In the case of L. mexicana complex parasites (L. mexicana, L. pifanoi, and L. amazonensis), a critical role for immunoglobulin G-mediated mechanisms for the amastigote stage in the host is evident; however, the immunological mechanisms involved remain to be established. In vitro analysis of the kinetics of parasite uptake by macrophages failed to indicate a major effect of antibody opsonization. Given the importance of CD4(+) T cells in the development of disease caused by these parasites, the possibility that the lack of pathogenesis was due to the lack of development of an immune response at the local site (draining lymph node and/or cutaneous site) was explored. Interestingly, the level of CD4(+)-T-cell activation (proliferation and cytokine) in draining lymph nodes from mice lacking circulating antibody (resistant) was found to be comparable to that in nodes from wild-type mice (susceptible) at 2, 5, and 10 weeks postinfection. However, antibody-deficient animals had markedly reduced numbers of monocytes and lymphocytes recruited or retained at the site of cutaneous infection in comparison to wild-type mice, indicating a selective impairment in the local cutaneous immune response. In vitro antigen presentation studies employing tissue-derived (opsonized) amastigotes demonstrated that L. pifanoi-infected FcR(-/-) macrophages, in contrast to comparably infected wild-type cells, failed to activate Leishmania antigen-specific T lymphocytes. These data, taken together, suggest that one possible mechanism for the role of antibody in pathogenesis may be to mediate parasite uptake and regulate the immune response at the local cutaneous site of infection.

  16. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific 'carbonic anhydrase domain' of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe 'life without complex I'.

  17. Alteration in plasma testosterone levels in male mice lacking soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Luria, Ayala; Morisseau, Christophe; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; De Taeye, Bart; Watkins, Steven M; Wiest, Michelle M; German, J Bruce; Hammock, Bruce D

    2009-08-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2, sEH) is a bifunctional enzyme with COOH-terminal hydrolase and NH(2)-terminal phosphatase activities. sEH converts epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), and the phosphatase activity is suggested to be involved in cholesterol metabolism. EETs participate in a wide range of biological functions, including regulation of vascular tone, renal tubular transport, cardiac contractility, and inflammation. Inhibition of sEH is a potential approach for enhancing the biological activity of EETs. Therefore, disruption of sEH activity is becoming an attractive therapeutic target for both cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. To define the physiological role of sEH, we characterized a knockout mouse colony lacking expression of the Ephx2 gene. Lack of sEH enzyme is characterized by elevation of EET to DHET ratios in both the linoleate and arachidonate series in plasma and tissues of both female and male mice. In male mice, this lack of expression was also associated with decreased plasma testosterone levels, sperm count, and testicular size. However, this genotype was still able to sire litters. Plasma cholesterol levels also declined in this genotype. Behavior tests such as anxiety-like behavior and hedonic response were also examined in Ephx2-null and WT mice, as all can be related to hormonal changes. Null mice showed a level of anxiety with a decreased hedonic response. In conclusion, this study provides a broad biochemical, physiological, and behavioral characterization of the Ephx2-null mouse colony and suggests a mechanism by which sEH and its substrates may regulate circulating levels of testosterone through cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism.

  18. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific ‘carbonic anhydrase domain’ of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe ‘life without complex I’. PMID:27122571

  19. Lack of surface-associated microorganisms in a mixed species community of freshwater Unionidae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Allen, J.; Walker, G.; Yokoyama, M.; Garling, D.

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether unionids contain surface-attached endosymbiotic bacteria, ciliates, or fungi, we used scanning electron microscopy to examine the epithelial surface of various organs within the digestive systems and mantle cavity of temperate river and lake unionids on a seasonal basis. We also cultured material removed from the lumen of these same organs and from the mantle cavity to detect cellobiose-, cellulose-, and chitin- degrading microbes. No true endosymbiotic fauna were observed attached to the surface of the digestive or mantle tissues of any species of unionid. Microbial growth on cellulose or chitin bacteriological media varied by season and habitat, but not by unionid species or source of the isolate. Lake unionids did not contain microbes capable of digesting cellulose or chitin, whereas unionids from the river site did in March and August, but not in December. Since these cultured cellulose- and chitin-degrading bacteria were never found attached to any unionid tissues, they appeared to be transient forms, not true endosymbionts. Microbes capable of digesting cellobiose were found in every unionid collected in all seasons and habitats, but again, no microbes were directly observed attached to unionid tissues. If unionids, like most other vertebrates, lack digestive enzymes required to initiate primary bond breakage, then the lack of cellulolytic and chitinolytic endosymbionts would affect the ability to utilize cellulose or chitin foods. Thus, in captivity dry feeds based on corn, soybeans, or nauplii should be pre-digested to ensure maximum absorption of nutrients by unionids. The lack of celluloytic or chitinolytic endosymbionts should not affect relocation success, though the seasonal role of transient microbes in unionid nutrition requires further investigation.

  20. Factors associated with lack of prenatal care in a large municipality

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa, Cristiane Quadrado; da Silveira, Denise Silva; da Costa, Juvenal Soares Dias

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the factors associated with a lack of prenatal care in a large municipality in southern Brazil. METHODS In this case-control age-matched study, 716 women were evaluated; of these, 179 did not receive prenatal care and 537 received prenatal care (controls). These women were identified using the Sistema Nacional de Informação sobre Nascidos Vivos (Live Birth Information System) of Pelotas, RS, Southern Brazil, between 2009 and 2010. Multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression to estimate the odds ratios (OR). RESULTS In the final model, the variables associated with a lack of prenatal care were the level of education, particularly when it was lesser than four years [OR 4.46; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.92;10.36], being single (OR 3.61; 95%CI 1.85;7.04), and multiparity (OR 2.89; 95%CI 1.72;4.85). The prevalence of a lack of prenatal care among administrative regions varied between 0.7% and 3.9%. CONCLUSIONS The risk factors identified must be considered when planning actions for the inclusion of women in prenatal care by both the central management and healthcare teams. These indicated the municipal areas with greater deficits in prenatal care. The reorganization of the actions to identify women with risk factors in the community can be considered to be a starting point of this process. In addition, the integration of the activities of local programs that target the mother and child is essential to constantly identify pregnant women without prenatal care. PMID:26039401

  1. Defects in succinate dehydrogenase in gastrointestinal stromal tumors lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Janeway, Katherine A.; Kim, Su Young; Lodish, Maya; Nosé, Vânia; Rustin, Pierre; Gaal, José; Dahia, Patricia L. M.; Liegl, Bernadette; Ball, Evan R.; Raygada, Margarita; Lai, Angela H.; Kelly, Lorna; Hornick, Jason L.; O'Sullivan, Maureen; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Dinjens, Winand N. M.; Demetri, George D.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Helman, Lee; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2011-01-01

    Carney-Stratakis syndrome, an inherited condition predisposing affected individuals to gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and paraganglioma, is caused by germline mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits B, C, or D, leading to dysfunction of complex II of the electron transport chain. We evaluated the role of defective cellular respiration in sporadic GIST lacking mutations in KIT or PDGFRA (WT). Thirty-four patients with WT GIST without a personal or family history of paraganglioma were tested for SDH germline mutations. WT GISTs lacking demonstrable SDH genetic inactivation were evaluated for SDHB expression by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting and for complex II activity. For comparison, SDHB expression was also determined in KIT mutant and neurofibromatosis-1–associated GIST, and complex II activity was also measured in SDH-deficient paraganglioma and KIT mutant GIST; 4 of 34 patients (12%) with WT GIST without a personal or family history of paraganglioma had germline mutations in SDHB or SDHC. WT GISTs lacking somatic mutations or deletions in SDH subunits had either complete loss of or substantial reduction in SDHB protein expression, whereas most KIT mutant GISTs had strong SDHB expression. Complex II activity was substantially decreased in WT GISTs. WT GISTs, particularly those in younger patients, have defects in SDH mitochondrial complex II, and in a subset of these patients, GIST seems to arise from germline-inactivating SDH mutations. Testing for germline mutations in SDH is recommended in patients with WT GIST. These findings highlight a potential central role of SDH dysregulation in WT GIST oncogenesis. PMID:21173220

  2. Reticulated acanthoma with sebaceous differentiation. Lack of association with Muir-Torre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haake, Dana L; Minni, John P; Nowak, Michael; Abenoza, Pascual; Nousari, Carlos H

    2009-06-01

    We hereby report a case of a reticulated acanthoma with sebaceous differentiation (RASD), a rare and often mislabeled benign lesion that is characterized by epidermal acanthosis and clusters of sebocytes in a reticulated seborrheic keratosis-like pattern. The presence of multiple sebaceous tumors, most notably cystic sebaceous adenomas and keratoacanthomas, has been associated with Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS). Although very rare, cases of RASD have been reported with MTS, which potentially offers profound clinical significance to this neoplasm. This case further supports the lack of association of MTS with RASD.

  3. Automated Analysis of Radar Imagery of Venus: Handling Lack of Ground Truth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, M.; Fayyad, U.; Perona, P.; Smyth, P.

    1994-01-01

    Lack of verifiable ground truth is a common problem in remote sensing image analysis. For example, consider the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image data of Venus obtained by the Magellan spacecraft. Planetary scientists are interested in automatically cataloging the locations of all the small volcanoes in this data set; however, the problem is very difficult and cannot be performed with perfect reliability even by human experts. Thus, training and evaluating the performance of an automatic algorithm on this data set must be handled carefully. We discuss the use of weighted free-response receiver-operating characteristics (wFROC) for evaluating detection performance when the ground truth is subjective.

  4. Lack of acute toxicity associated with a multimodality treatment of stage III ovarian epithelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Belch, R.Z.; Coughlin, C.T.; Cooney, L.C.; Forcier, R.J.; Maurer, L.H. )

    1990-04-01

    Eleven patients with advanced stage III ovarian epithelial carcinoma were treated primarily according to an aggressive multimodality plan utilizing cytoreductive surgery, chemotherapy (high-dose cisplatin and Cytoxan), and consolidative radiation therapy (abdominopelvic bath plus pelvic boost). The treatment was tolerated remarkably well. There was no evidence of progressive disease during treatment, and all patients showed a positive response. There was a notable lack of significant acute morbidity, with the exception of a severe symptomatic peripheral neuropathy associated with cisplatin doses of 200 mg/m2. This was not evident with doses of cisplatin up to 150 mg/m2.

  5. The elusiveness of masculinity: primordial vulnerability, lack, and the challenges of male development.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Reaching beyond the Oedipus prototype to address the unrepresentable vulnerability founded on the boy's infantile helplessness in contact with the mother's body, the author aims to identify the inherent tensions and enigmas of being male. He proposes that both the repudiation of femininity and the overvaluation of phallicity are unconsciously constructed to withstand the fundamental deficiency grounded in the asymmetry of the boy's prephallic relation with his primary object. This bodily based primordial vulnerability, marked by absence and lack, remains elusive-an unsymbolizable experience that provides the archaic matrix for adaptive and defensive phallicism, the oedipal complex, and genital progression. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate these concepts.

  6. Lack of shunt response in suspected idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus with Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Roy; Patel, Sunil; Lee, Edward B; Jackson, Eric M; Lopinto, Joanna; Arnold, Steven E; Clark, Christopher M; Basil, Anuj; Shaw, Leslie M; Xie, Sharon X; Grady, M Sean; Trojanowski, John Q

    2010-10-01

    To determine the impact of cortical Alzheimer disease pathology on shunt responsiveness in individuals treated for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH), 37 patients clinically diagnosed with iNPH participated in a prospective study in which performance on neurologic, psychometric, and gait measures before and 4 months after shunting was correlated with amyloid β plaques, neuritic plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles observed in cortical biopsies obtained during shunt insertion. No complications resulted from biopsy acquisition. Moderate to severe pathology was associated with worse baseline cognitive performance and diminished postoperative improvement on NPH symptom severity scales, gait measures, and cognitive instruments compared to patients lacking pathology.

  7. Isolation and characterization of an Escherichia coli mutant lacking cytochrome d terminal oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Green, G N; Gennis, R B

    1983-01-01

    A screening procedure was devised which permitted the isolation of a cytochrome d-deficient mutant by its failure to oxidize the artificial electron donor N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine. Cytochrome a1 and probably cytochrome b558 were also missing in the mutant. Growth and oxygen uptake rates were similar for both parent and mutant strains. However, the strain lacking cytochrome d had an increased sensitivity to cyanide, indicating that cytochrome d confers some resistance to this respiratory inhibitor. The gene responsible for these phenotypes has been named cyd and maps between tolA and sucB. PMID:6304009

  8. Contribution to hospital performance: market orientation vs. marketing effort and lack of competition.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Marketing is still viewed with some skepticism by some hospital administrators who wonder if marketing is needed when the hospital is in a benign competitive environment. This research seeks to investigate the contribution of a marketing orientation to hospital performance beyond what can be achieved by merely spending money on promotion or not facing stiff competition. Findings reveal that having an authentic market orientation makes a significant contribution to a hospital's success above what can be achieved through promotional budgets and lack of competition.

  9. Lack of Arg972 polymorphism in the IRS1 gene in Parakanã Brazilian Indians.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Rosângela M N; Chadid, Thiago T; Altemani, Claúdia M; Sales, Teresa S I; Menezes, Raimundo; Soares, Manoel C P; Saad, Sara T O; Saad, Mario J A

    2004-02-01

    Several polymorphisms in the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) gene have been reported in the last years. The most common IRS1 variant, a Gly --> Arg substitution at codon 972 (Arg972 IRS1), is more prevalent among subjects who have features of insulin resistance syndrome associated, or not, with type 2 diabetes in European populations. To determine whether the absence of IRS1 polymorphism is a more general characteristic of Paleo-Indian-derived populations, we examined the Arg972 IRS1 polymorphism in Parakanã Indians and found a lack of this polymorphism in the Parakanã population.

  10. Lack of association between schizophrenia and the CYP2D6 gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pirmohamed, M.; Wild, M.J.; Kitteringham, N.R.

    1996-04-09

    Approximately 5-10% of the Caucasian population lack the P450 isoform, CYP2D6. This polymorphism may be of importance in determining individual susceptibility to Parkinson`s disease. In this journal, Daniels et al. recently reported a negative association between the CYP2D6 gene locus and schizophrenia, a disease characterized by dopamine overactivity. It is important to exclude such an association because CYP2D6 is expressed in the brain and it is involved in dopamine catabolism. Between 1992 and 1993, we also performed a study similar to that, and reached the same conclusion. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Petrogenesis of lunar rocks: Rb-Sr constraints and lack of H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Gancarz, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Rb and Sr isotopic data and other chemical data indicate major lunar differentiation at about 4.6 AE and very limited subsequent differentiation. The constraints of limited differentiation post 4.6 AE and the apparent lack of H2O on the moon, when applied to the derivation and petrogenesis of lunar samples, suggest the following: (1) soil samples, breccias, metaclastic rocks, and feldspathic basalts represent mixtures of repeatedly-modified clastic material, which was ultimately derived from materials formed during the about 4.6 AE differentiation; and (2) mare basalts crystallized from melts which formed by partial melting and, which developed without equilibration between the melt and crystalline residuum.

  12. An analysis of the lack of donor pancreas utilization from younger adult organ donors.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Alexander C; Wainright, Jennifer L; Sleeman, Elizabeth; McBride, Maureen A; Baker, Tim; Samana, Ciara; Stock, Peter

    2010-09-15

    Donor pancreas utilization rates for whole organ transplant have remained low and have decreased over time. To identify the reasons for nonuse of pancreas from donors who meet common baseline acceptance criteria, we examined Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network data from 2005 to 2007 and identified a subgroup of 1763 "potential pancreas donors" defined by age (19-40 years), body mass index (<30 kg/m), successful liver donation, and negative viral serology testing, which were not used. We characterize this cohort of potential donors including reasons for refusal, factors that may contribute to pancreas acceptance and function, and potential explanations for the lack of growth in pancreas organ utilization.

  13. High Quality Long-Term CD4+ and CD8+ Effector Memory Populations Stimulated by DNA-LACK/MVA-LACK Regimen in Leishmania major BALB/c Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; S. Sorzano, Carlos Oscar; Esteban, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Heterologous vaccination based on priming with a plasmid DNA vector and boosting with an attenuated vaccinia virus MVA recombinant, with both vectors expressing the Leishmania infantum LACK antigen (DNA-LACK and MVA-LACK), has shown efficacy conferring protection in murine and canine models against cutaneus and visceral leishmaniasis, but the immune parameters of protection remain ill defined. Here we performed by flow cytometry an in depth analysis of the T cell populations induced in BALB/c mice during the vaccination protocol DNA-LACK/MVA-LACK, as well as after challenge with L. major parasites. In the adaptive response, there is a polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation against LACK antigen. At the memory phase the heterologous vaccination induces high quality LACK-specific long-term CD4+ and CD8+ effector memory cells. After parasite challenge, there is a moderate boosting of LACK-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Anti-vector responses were largely CD8+-mediated. The immune parameters induced against LACK and triggered by the combined vaccination DNA/MVA protocol, like polyfunctionality of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with an effector phenotype, could be relevant in protection against leishmaniasis. PMID:22715418

  14. Lack of genetic interaction between Tbx20 and Tbx3 in early mouse heart development.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, Svetlana; Harvey, Richard P; Papaioannou, Virginia E

    2013-01-01

    Members of the T-box family of transcription factors are important regulators orchestrating the complex regionalization of the developing mammalian heart. Individual mutations in Tbx20 and Tbx3 cause distinct congenital heart abnormalities in the mouse: Tbx20 mutations result in failure of heart looping, developmental arrest and lack of chamber differentiation, while hearts of Tbx3 mutants progress further, loop normally but show atrioventricular convergence and outflow tract defects. The two genes have overlapping areas of expression in the atrioventricular canal and outflow tract of the heart but their potential genetic interaction has not been previously investigated. In this study we produced compound mutants to investigate potential genetic interactions at the earliest stages of heart development. We find that Tbx20; Tbx3 double heterozygous mice are viable and fertile with no apparent abnormalities, while double homozygous mutants are embryonic lethal by midgestation. Double homozygous mutant embryos display abnormal cardiac morphogenesis, lack of heart looping, expression patterns of cardiac genes and time of death that are indistinguishable from Tbx20 homozygous mutants. Prior to death, the double homozygotes show an overall developmental delay similar to Tbx3 homozygous mutants. Thus the effects of Tbx20 are epistatic to Tbx3 in the heart but Tbx3 is epistatic to Tbx20 with respect to developmental delay.

  15. Predicting aggression in adolescence: The interrelation between (a lack of) empathy and social goals.

    PubMed

    van Hazebroek, Babette C M; Olthof, Tjeert; Goossens, Frits A

    2017-04-01

    In an attempt to explain the inconsistent findings and overall weak relation between empathy and aggression, we focused on the role of emotional empathy (emotions of concern, compassion or sympathy toward a (potential) victim), agentic goals (the desire to be dominant during social interaction with peers) and their interplay (mediation or moderation) in the prediction of proactive aggression (learned instrumental behavior) in adolescence. Data were collected from 550 young Dutch adolescents, who filled out multiple questionnaires. Findings showed that the link between a lack of empathic concern and proactive aggression is partly mediated and moderated by agentic goals. The moderation analyses showed that the predictive value of a lack of empathic concern with regard to proactive aggression was greater when adolescents reported a stronger desire to be dominant in social situations with peers. In addition, the findings supported the assumption that the relation between empathic concern and reactive aggression (a hostile and angry response to perceived provocation) is not mediated or moderated by agentic goals. Findings were discussed in terms of their implications for future research. Aggr. Behav. 43:204-214, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Bone architecture and disc degeneration in the lumbar spine of mice lacking GDF-8 (myostatin).

    PubMed

    Hamrick, Mark W; Pennington, Catherine; Byron, Craig D

    2003-11-01

    GDF-8, also known as myostatin, is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of secreted growth and differentiation factors that is expressed in vertebrate skeletal muscle. Myostatin functions as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and myostatin null mice show a doubling of muscle mass compared to normal mice. We describe here morphology of the lumbar spine in myostatin knockout (Mstn(-/-)) mice using histological and densitometric techniques. The Mstn(-/-) mice examined in this study weigh approximately 10% more than controls (p<0.001) but the iliopsoas muscle is over 50% larger in the knockout mice than in wild-type mice (p<0.001). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) data from the fifth lumbar vertebra show that mice lacking myostatin have approximately 50% greater trabecular bone mineral density (p=0.001) and significantly greater cortical bone mineral content than normal mice. Toluidine blue staining of the intervertebral disc between L4-L5 reveals loss of proteoglycan staining in the hyaline end plates and inner annulus fibrosus of the knockout mice. Loss of cartilage staining in the caudal end plate of L4 is due to ossification of the end plate in the myostatin-deficient animals. Results from this study suggest that increased muscle mass in mice lacking myostatin is associated with increased bone mass as well as degenerative changes in the intervertebral disc.

  17. Repeated or long-duration TASER electronic control device exposures: acidemia and lack of respiration.

    PubMed

    Jauchem, James R

    2010-03-01

    Conducted energy weapons (CEWs), such as TASER devices, may be applied to subjects in repeated or long-duration modes. Such applications may result in more potentially harmful effects (as reflected in blood factor changes) than shorter exposures. In this review, results from a number of studies of repeated and long-duration CEW exposures in an animal model are examined. Additionally, a few limited investigations of shorter CEW applications to human subjects are considered. Specifically, in anesthetized swine, increased blood acidity (acidemia) and lack of effective respiration were found to be common during or immediately after CEW exposure. The acidemia could have been due to both metabolic and respiratory acidosis. A relatively rapid recovery toward baseline pH levels occurred. The lack of effective respiration has not been verified in experiments of CEW applications to human subjects; however, in some incidents of human deaths after CEW exposures subjects have been reported to stop breathing immediately after the exposure. It is not known if all human subjects exposed to CEW applications in the field (often "on drugs" or "in excited delirium") would be able to maintain adequate breathing. Since a limited number of short CEW applications would be less likely to cause adverse effects, however, CEWs can still be a valuable tool for law enforcement activities.

  18. On the Lack of Consensus over the Meaning of Openness: An Empirical Study

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Alicia M.; Easterbrook, Steve M.

    2011-01-01

    This study set out to explore the views and motivations of those involved in a number of recent and current advocacy efforts (such as open science, computational provenance, and reproducible research) aimed at making science and scientific artifacts accessible to a wider audience. Using a exploratory approach, the study tested whether a consensus exists among advocates of these initiatives about the key concepts, exploring the meanings that scientists attach to the various mechanisms for sharing their work, and the social context in which this takes place. The study used a purposive sampling strategy to target scientists who have been active participants in these advocacy efforts, and an open-ended questionnaire to collect detailed opinions on the topics of reproducibility, credibility, scooping, data sharing, results sharing, and the effectiveness of the peer review process. We found evidence of a lack of agreement on the meaning of key terminology, and a lack of consensus on some of the broader goals of these advocacy efforts. These results can be explained through a closer examination of the divergent goals and approaches adopted by different advocacy efforts. We suggest that the scientific community could benefit from a broader discussion of what it means to make scientific research more accessible and how this might best be achieved. PMID:21858110

  19. Lack of “Hemichannel” Activity in Insulin-Producing Cells

    PubMed Central

    SCEMES, ELIANA; BAVAMIAN, SABINE; CHAROLLAIS, ANNE; SPRAY, DAVID C.; MEDA, PAOLO

    2008-01-01

    Connexins and pannexins have been implicated in the formation of “hemichannels,” which may account for the uptake and release of membrane-impermeant molecules in single cells. The in vivo existence of “hemichannels” and their protein composition is still debated. Investigations on these matters are complicated by the lack of adequate negative controls. In search for such essential controls, the authors have investigated transformed (MIN6 line) and primary insulin-producing cells. Here, the authors report that these cells, which express Cx36 and pannexin1, cannot be shown to display functional “hemichannels,” as evaluated by (1) uptake of the membrane-impermeant tracer ethidium bromide, whether in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, following stimulation of P2X7 receptors, and after exposure to hypotonic medium; and (2) lack of exocytosis-independent release of endogenous ATP. Moreover, electrophysiological recordings indicated the absence of carbenoxolone-sensitive pannexin1 currents evoked by membrane potentials above +30 mV. Thus, insulin-producing cells are expected to provide a useful tool in the further characterization of hemichannel composition, properties, and physiological relevance. PMID:18649186

  20. Lack of DNA helicase Pif1 disrupts zinc and iron homoeostasis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Guirola, María; Barreto, Lina; Pagani, Ayelen; Romagosa, Miriam; Casamayor, Antonio; Atrian, Silvia; Ariño, Joaquín

    2010-12-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene PIF1 encodes a conserved eukaryotic DNA helicase required for both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity. Our previous work revealed that a pif1Δ strain is tolerant to zinc overload. In the present study we demonstrate that this effect is independent of the Pif1 helicase activity and is only observed when the protein is absent from the mitochondria. pif1Δ cells accumulate abnormal amounts of mitochondrial zinc and iron. Transcriptional profiling reveals that pif1Δ cells under standard growth conditions overexpress aconitase-related genes. When exposed to zinc, pif1Δ cells show lower induction of genes encoding iron (siderophores) transporters and higher expression of genes related to oxidative stress responses than wild-type cells. Coincidently, pif1Δ mutants are less prone to zinc-induced oxidative stress and display a higher reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. Strikingly, although pif1Δ cells contain normal amounts of the Aco1 (yeast aconitase) protein, they completely lack aconitase activity. Loss of Aco1 activity is also observed when the cell expresses a non-mitochondrially targeted form of Pif1. We postulate that lack of Pif1 forces aconitase to play its DNA protective role as a nucleoid protein and that this triggers a domino effect on iron homoeostasis resulting in increased zinc tolerance.

  1. Lack of endothelial cell survivin causes embryonic defects in angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, and neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Zwerts, Femke; Lupu, Florea; De Vriese, Astrid; Pollefeyt, Saskia; Moons, Lieve; Altura, Rachel A; Jiang, Yuying; Maxwell, Patrick H; Hill, Peter; Oh, Hideyasu; Rieker, Claus; Collen, Désiré; Conway, Simon J; Conway, Edward M

    2007-06-01

    We explored the physiologic role of endothelial cell apoptosis during development by generating mouse embryos lacking the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) survivin in endothelium. This was accomplished by intercrossing survivin(lox/lox) mice with mice expressing cre recombinase under the control of the endothelial cell specific tie1 promoter (tie1-cre mice). Lack of endothelial cell survivin resulted in embryonic lethality. Mutant embryos had prominent and diffuse hemorrhages from embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) and died before E13.5. Heart development was strikingly abnormal. Survivin-null endocardial lineage cells could not support normal epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT), resulting in hypoplastic endocardial cushions and in utero heart failure. In addition, 30% of mutant embryos had neural tube closure defects (NTDs) that were not caused by bleeding or growth retardation, but were likely due to alterations in the release of soluble factors from endothelial cells that otherwise support neural stem cell proliferation and neurulation. Thus, regulation of endothelial cell survival, and maintenance of vascular integrity by survivin are crucial for normal embryonic angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, and neurogenesis.

  2. Identification and characterization of barley mutants lacking glycine decarboxylase and carboxyl esterase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, R.; Lewis, K.; Lea, P. )

    1990-05-01

    A barley mutant has been isolated, from a selection of fifty air-sensitive seed-lines, using a standard gel stain technique which lacks carboxyl esterase activity, but has normal levels of carbonic anhydrase. In addition, two barley mutants lacking the ability to convert glycine to serine in the mitochondria, have been characterized. Both plants accumulate glycine in air and are unable to metabolize ({sup 14}C)glycine in the short-term. When ({sup 14}C)glycine was supplied over 2h LaPr 85/55 metabolized 90%, whereas the second mutant (LaPr 87/30) metabolized 10%. Results indicate that the mutation in LaPr 85/55 is almost certainly in the glycine transporter into the mitochondrion. The mutation in LaPr 87/30 has been shown, using western blotting, to be in both the P and H proteins, two of four proteins which comprise glycine decarboxylase (P, H, T and L).

  3. Factors contributing to lack of interest in research among medical students

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Ali Sibtain Farooq; Sheikh, Saman Ali; Kaleem, Ahmad; Waqas, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Background Research experiences early in the medical student’s education are an important factor for attracting a greater number of doctors to careers with a research component. Objective To determine the factors contributing to a lack of enthusiasm about research activities among medical students, and to suggest ways to help students develop an interest in research. Design A medical institution-based, case-control study was conducted. A case was defined as any fourth year medical student who believed that undertaking research was not interesting; controls were matched for age and sex. A pretested, structured, and self-administered questionnaire was used; the data were analyzed using statistical methods. Results In all, 122 students (54% male, 46% female) were recruited to the study. Factors found to be significant were lack of Internet facilities (odds ratio 0.218) and considering research useless (odds ratio 4.570). Conclusion Measures should be taken at undergraduate level to involve students in research activities. Ensuring easy access to Internet facilities could be one positive step. Further research should be done to explore the reasons why some medical students consider research useless. PMID:24235856

  4. The importance of imagination (or lack thereof) in artificial, human and quantum decision making.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Karl

    2016-01-13

    Enlarging upon experiments and analysis that I did jointly some years ago, in which artificial (symbolic, neural-net and pattern) learning and generalization were compared with that of humans, I will emphasize the role of imagination (or lack thereof) in artificial, human and quantum cognition and decision-making processes. Then I will look in more detail at some of the 'engineering details' of its implementation (or lack thereof) in each of these settings. In other words, the question posed is: What is actually happening? For example, we previously found that humans overwhelmingly seek, create or imagine context in order to provide meaning when presented with abstract, apparently incomplete, contradictory or otherwise untenable decision-making situations. Humans are intolerant of contradiction and will greatly simplify to avoid it. They can partially correlate but do not average. Human learning is not Boolean. These and other human reasoning properties will then be taken to critique how well artificial intelligence methods and quantum mechanical modelling might compete with them in decision-making tasks within psychology and economics.

  5. A mutant of Arabidopsis lacking a chloroplastic isoamylase accumulates both starch and phytoglycogen.

    PubMed Central

    Zeeman, S C; Umemoto, T; Lue, W L; Au-Yeung, P; Martin, C; Smith, A M; Chen, J

    1998-01-01

    In this study, our goal was to evaluate the role of starch debranching enzymes in the determination of the structure of amylopectin. We screened mutant populations of Arabidopsis for plants with alterations in the structure of leaf starch by using iodine staining. The leaves of two mutant lines stained reddish brown, whereas wild-type leaves stained brownish black, indicating that a more highly branched polyglucan than amylopectin was present. The mutants were allelic, and the mutation mapped to position 18.8 on chromosome 1. One mutant line lacked the transcript for a gene with sequence similarity to higher plant debranching enzymes, and both mutants lacked a chloroplastic starch-hydrolyzing enzyme. This enzyme was identified as a debranching enzyme of the isoamylase type. The loss of this isoamylase resulted in a 90% reduction in the accumulation of starch in this mutant line when compared with the wild type and in the accumulation of the highly branched water-soluble polysaccharide phytoglycogen. Both normal starch and phytoglycogen accumulated simultaneously in the same chloroplasts in the mutant lines, suggesting that isoamylase has an indirect rather than a direct role in determining amylopectin structure. PMID:9761796

  6. Loneliness in patients with rheumatic diseases: the significance of invalidation and lack of social support.

    PubMed

    Kool, Marianne B; Geenen, Rinie

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases affect about 20% of the population, leading to common symptoms such as joint problems, pain, fatigue, and stiffness. Loneliness is prevalent in individuals with rheumatic diseases. This could be due to not receiving social support and being stigmatized and invalidated, which might be most common in fibromyalgia, a rheumatic disease that lacks medical evidence. The aim of this study was to compare loneliness in distinct rheumatic diseases and to examine the association of loneliness with social support and invalidation. Participants were 927 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (n = 152), fibromyalgia (n = 341), osteoarthritis (n = 150), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 171), or systemic diseases (n = 113). They completed online questionnaires including an 11-point Likert scale assessing loneliness, the Illness Invalidation Inventory (3*1; Kool et al., 2010), and the Social Support Survey (SSS; De Boer, Wijker, Speelman, & De Haes, 1996; Sherbourne & Stewart, 1991). Patients with fibromyalgia experienced significantly more loneliness than patients with ankylosing spondylitis and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Besides being younger, having lower education, and not working, in multiple regression analyses both lack of social support and invalidation were independently correlated with loneliness. This suggests that to decrease loneliness, therapeutic attention should be given to both increasing social support as well as decreasing invalidation in patients with rheumatic diseases, especially in patients with fibromyalgia.

  7. Golgi Disruption and Early Embryonic Lethality in Mice Lacking USO1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Susie; Hill, Adele; Warman, Matthew L.; Smits, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Golgins are a family of long rod-like proteins characterized by the presence of central coiled-coil domains. Members of the golgin family have important roles in membrane trafficking, where they function as tethering factors that capture transport vesicles and facilitate membrane fusion. Golgin family members also have essential roles in maintaining the organization of the Golgi apparatus. Knockdown of individual golgins in cultured cells resulted in the disruption of the Golgi structure and the dispersal of Golgi marker proteins throughout the cytoplasm. However, these cellular phenotypes have not always been recapitulated in vivo. For example, embryonic development proceeds much further than expected and Golgi disruption was observed in only a subset of cell types in mice lacking the ubiquitously expressed golgin GMAP-210. Cell-type specific functional compensation among golgins may explain the absence of global cell lethality when a ubiquitously expressed golgin is missing. In this study we show that functional compensation does not occur for the golgin USO1. Mice lacking this ubiquitously expressed protein exhibit disruption of Golgi structure and early embryonic lethality, indicating that USO1 is indispensable for early embryonic development. PMID:23185636

  8. Guyon Canal Syndrome: lack of management in a case of unresolved handlebar palsy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Courtney K.; Stainsby, Brynne; Sovak, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present the clinical diagnostic features including management of Guyon canal syndrome in a case with unresolved sensory deficits in a young female cyclist. Clinical Presentation: After 14 days of cycling across Canada, a 23-year old female experienced sensory loss, followed by atrophy and a “claw” hand appearance of her left hand. Intervention and Outcome: Treatment included cervical chiropractic manipulation, soft tissue therapy and the use of cycling gloves. Seven years after the initial injury a lack of sensation in the ulnar nerve distribution of her left hand has persisted. Discussion: This case demonstrates that a lack of proper management can lead to permanent sensory loss and is worth highlighting. Various therapists evaluated the patient’s symptoms and provided minimal care. No diagnosis was given, nor were appropriate measures taken for her to understand the risks of continuing to ride. Summary: Although treatment for Guyon Canal Syndrome can be as easy as cessation from cycling until symptoms subside, other treatment options could be utilized to help manage ulnar nerve compression injuries in cyclists. PMID:25550666

  9. Genome sequencing analysis of Brazilian chicken anemia virus isolates that lack MSB-1 cell culture tropism.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eliana Ottati; J Piantino Ferreira, Antonio; Martins Soares, Rodrigo; Luiz Durigon, Edison; Lazzarin, Simaia; Brentano, Liana

    2007-03-01

    Specific amino acid (aa) substitutions in VP1, VP2 and VP3 genes were reported as a distinctive feature of the American CIA-1 strain, characterized as having a variable rate of growth and tropism for different MSB-1 cell sublines [Renshaw RW, Soiné C, Weinkle T, O'Connell PH, Ohashi K, Watson S, et al. A hypervariable region in VP1 of chicken anemia virus mediates rate of spread and cell tropism in tissue culture. J Virol 1996;70(12):8872-8]. DNA sequencing of 878 nucleotides from twelve Brazilian CAV, eight of which tested for in vitro isolation in three different sources of MDCC-MSB1 cell line and identified as lacking capacity to propagate in any of these cells, were compared to sequence data available for CAV strains propagated or not in cell culture. Alignment of the deduced aa resulted in a lack of singled out amino acid substitutions in the partial genomic sequences of Brazilian isolates that would entirely contrast them to viruses propagated in MSB-1 cells, indicating that the combined VP1, VP2 and VP3 substitutions observed may not entirely account as sole determinants of CAV isolation and propagation in MDCC-MSB-1 cells.

  10. 'Pure' spindle cell variant of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma, lacking classic histologic features.

    PubMed

    Thway, Khin; Strauss, Dirk C; Wren, Dorte; Fisher, Cyril

    2016-11-01

    Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma (AFH) is a soft tissue tumor of intermediate biologic potential and uncertain differentiation that most frequently occurs in the superficial extremities of children and young adults. It is histologically typified by nodules of ovoid to spindle cells with pseudoangiomatoid spaces and a surrounding dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, desmin expression in about 50%, and association with EWSR1-CREB1, EWSR1-ATF1 or FUS-ATF1 gene fusions. The diagnosis still poses a challenge because AFH may not display all classic features, can show a variety of unusual histologic findings and lacks a specific immunoprofile. We describe a case of 'pure' spindle cell AFH arising in the forearm musculature of a 19 year-old female, which harbored EWSR1-CREB1 fusion transcripts by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The neoplasm was composed entirely of highly cellular fascicles of spindled cells architecturally resembling spindle cell sarcoma, and lacked obvious pseudoangiomatoid spaces or a lymphoid cuff. This purely spindle cell variant adds to the significant morphologic spectrum of AFH, and emphasizes that even when occuring at a typical site, AFH may be difficult to recognize when showing non-classical morphology. This is of clinical relevance, as AFH with this morphology could be potentially misdiagnosed as a high-grade sarcoma, with the patient subject to more radical therapeutic approaches.

  11. Retinal waves in mice lacking the beta2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Warland, David K; Ballesteros, Jose M; van der List, Deborah; Chalupa, Leo M

    2008-09-09

    The structural and functional properties of the visual system are disrupted in mutant animals lacking the beta2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In particular, eye-specific retinogeniculate projections do not develop normally in these mutants. It is widely thought that the developing retinas of beta2(-/-) mutants do not manifest correlated activity, leading to the notion that retinal waves play an instructional role in the formation of eye-specific retinogeniculate projections. By multielectrode array recordings, we show here that the beta2(-/-) mutants have robust retinal waves during the formation of eye-specific projections. Unlike in WT animals, however, the mutant retinal waves are propagated by gap junctions rather than cholinergic circuitry. These results indicate that lack of retinal waves cannot account for the abnormalities that have been documented in the retinogeniculate pathway of the beta2(-/-) mutants and suggest that other factors must contribute to the deficits in the visual system that have been noted in these animals.

  12. Lack of fibroblast growth factor 21 accelerates metabolic liver injury characterized by steatohepatities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingkai; Zhang, Ping; Martin, Robert C; Cui, Guozhen; Wang, Guangyi; Tan, Yi; Cai, Lu; Lv, Guoyue; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) concentrations are increased in human subjects who either have type 2 diabetes or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). While excessive fat in the liver promotes the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, NAFLD progresses from steatosis to non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more aggressive form of hepatic damage, and lastly toward cirrhosis and HCC. In our previous study, loss of FGF21 is associated with hyper-proliferation, aberrant p53, and HCC development in diabetes mice. In this study, we proposed to investigate the liver metabolic disorders by diabetes and the potential roles of FGF21 played in NASH and potential carcinogenetic transformation of HCC. NASH was induced in FGF21 knockout (FGF21KO) mice by streptozotocin administration or fed with high fat diet (HFD). The pathological transformation of steatohepatities as well as parameters of inflammation, lipid metabolism, cellular events, mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling was determined in the FGF21 KO diabetic mice and HFD fed mice. We found that mice lacking the FGF21 gene are more prone to develop NASH. A compromised microenvironment of NASH, which could facilitate the HCC carcinogenetic transformation, was found in FGF21 KO mice under metabolic disorders by diabetes and HFD feeding. This study provided further evidence that lack of FGF21 worsened the metabolic disorders in NASH and could render a tumor microenvironment for HCC initiation and progression in the liver of diabetes mice. PMID:27293995

  13. Lack of ADAM10 in endothelial cells affects osteoclasts at the chondro-osseus junction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ren; Wang, Aimin; Hall, Katherine C; Otero, Miguel; Weskamp, Gisela; Zhao, Baohong; Hill, Daniel; Goldring, Mary B; Glomski, Krzysztof; Blobel, Carl P

    2014-02-01

    Mice lacking ADAM10 in endothelial cells (Adam10ΔEC mice) have shorter femurs, tibiae, and humeri than controls, raising questions about how endothelial cells could control long bone growth. We performed a histopathological evaluation of the femur and tibia growth plates at different postnatal stages, and assessed the distribution of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and endothelial cells at the growth plate. The growth plates in Adam10ΔEC mice appeared normal at P7 and P14, but a thickened zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes and increased trabecular bone density were apparent by P21 and later. The number of TRAP+ cells at the COJ was normal at P7 and P14, but was strongly reduced at P21 and later. Moreover, the density of endomucin-stained endothelial cells at the COJ was increased starting at P7. The defects in long bone growth in Adam10ΔEC mice could be caused by a lack of osteoclastogenesis at the COJ. Moreover, ADAM10 appears to regulate endothelial cell organization in the developing bone vasculature, perhaps in a similar manner as in the developing retinal vascular tree, where ADAM10 is thought to control Notch-dependent endothelial cell fate decisions. This study provides evidence for the regulation of osteoclast function by endothelial cells in vivo.

  14. Nicotine anxiogenic and rewarding effects are decreased in mice lacking β-endorphin

    PubMed Central

    Trigo, José M.; Zimmer, Andreas; Maldonado, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system plays an important role in the behavioral effects of nicotine. Thus, μ-opioid receptor and the endogenous opioids derived from proenkephalin are involved in the central effects of nicotine. However, the role played by the different endogenous opioid peptides in the acute and chronic effects of nicotine remains to be fully established. Mice lacking β-endorphin were acutely injected with nicotine at different doses to evaluate locomotor, anxiogenic and antinociceptive responses. The rewarding properties of nicotine were evaluated by using the conditioned place-preference paradigm. Mice chronically treated with nicotine were acutely injected with mecamylamine to study the behavioral expression of nicotine withdrawal. Mice lacking β-endorphin exhibited a spontaneous hypoalgesia and hyperlocomotion and a reduction on the anxiogenic and rewarding effects induced by nicotine. Nicotine induced similar antinociception and hypolocomotion in both genotypes and no differences were found in the development of physical dependence. The dissociation between nicotine rewarding properties and physical dependence suggests a differential implication of β-endorphin in these addictive related responses. PMID:19376143

  15. Dopamine pathway imbalance in mice lacking Magel2, a Prader-Willi syndrome candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Luck, Chloe; Vitaterna, Martha H; Wevrick, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    The etiology of abnormal eating behaviors, including binge-eating disorder, is poorly understood. The neural circuits modulating the activities of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin are proposed to be dysfunctional in individuals suffering from eating disorders. Prader-Willi syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that causes extreme food seeking and binge-eating behaviors together with reduced satiety. One of the genes implicated in Prader-Willi syndrome, Magel2, is highly expressed in the regions of the brain that control appetite. Our objective was to examine behaviors relevant to feeding and the neural circuits controlling feeding in a mouse model of Prader-Willi syndrome that lacks expression of the Magel2 gene. We performed behavioral tests related to dopaminergic function, measuring cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion, binge eating, and saccharin-induced anhedonia in Magel2-deficient mice. Next, we analyzed dopaminergic neurons in various brain regions and compared these findings between genotypes. Finally, we examined biochemical markers in the brain under standard diet, high-fat diet, and withdrawal from a high-fat diet conditions. We identified abnormal behaviors and biomarkers reflecting dopaminergic dysfunction in mice lacking Magel2. Our results provide a biological framework for clinical studies of dopaminergic function in children with Prader-Willi syndrome, and may also provide insight into binge-eating disorders that occur in the general population. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Marines, medics, and machismo: lack of fit with masculine occupational stereotypes discourages men's participation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kim; Ryan, Michelle K; Haslam, S Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Women have made substantial inroads into some traditionally masculine occupations (e.g., accounting, journalism) but not into others (e.g., military, surgery). Evidence suggests the latter group of occupations is characterized by hyper-masculine 'macho' stereotypes that are especially disadvantageous to women. Here, we explore whether such macho occupational stereotypes may be especially tenacious, not just because of their impact on women, but also because of their impact on men. We examined whether macho stereotypes associated with marine commandos and surgeons discourage men who feel that they are 'not man enough'. Study 1 demonstrates that male new recruits' (N = 218) perceived lack of fit with masculine commandos was associated with reduced occupational identification and motivation. Study 2 demonstrates that male surgical trainees' (N = 117) perceived lack of fit with masculine surgeons was associated with reduced identification and increased psychological exit a year later. Together, this suggests that macho occupational stereotypes may discourage the very men who may challenge them.

  17. Sequence and structure of VH domain from naturally occurring camel heavy chain immunoglobulins lacking light chains.

    PubMed

    Muyldermans, S; Atarhouch, T; Saldanha, J; Barbosa, J A; Hamers, R

    1994-09-01

    We cloned 17 different PCR fragments encoding VH genes of camel (Camelus dromedarius). These clones were derived from the camel heavy chain immunoglobulins lacking the light chain counterpart of normal immunoglobulins. Insight into the camel VH sequences and structure may help the development of single domain antibodies. The most remarkable difference in the camel VH, consistent with the absence of the VL interaction, is the substitution of the conserved Leu45 by an Arg or Cys. Another noteworthy substitution is the Leu11 to Ser. This amino acid normally interacts with the CH1 domain, a domain missing in the camel heavy chain immunoglobulins. The nature of these substitutions agrees with the increased solubility behavior of an isolated camel VH domain. The VH domains of the camels are also characterized by a long CDR3, possibly compensating for the absence of the VL contacts with the antigen. The CDR3 lacks the salt bridge between Arg94 and Asp101. However, the frequent occurrence of additional Cys residues in both the CDR1 and CDR3 might lead to the formation of a second internal disulfide bridge, thereby stabilizing the CDR structure as in the DAW antibody. Within CDRs of the camel VH domains we observe a broad size distribution and a different amino acid pattern compared with the mouse or human VH. Therefore the camel hypervariable regions might adopt structures which differ substantially from the known canonical structures, thereby increasing the repertoire of the camel antigen binding sites within a VH.

  18. Isolation and characterization of mutant strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica lacking dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability.

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, H; Nakai, T; Horiguchi, Y; Kume, K

    1988-01-01

    Mutant strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica, named B-42, B-76, B-84, and B-119, were obtained after serial passages of a parent strain, L3, on Bordet-Gengou agar plates containing 20% horse blood and 200 micrograms of nalidixic acid per ml (BGN-20 agar plates) at 42 degrees C. Mutant strains completely lacked dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability, and lethal activity of the strains for mice was apparently reduced compared with that of strain L3. Mutant strains were able to grow at 42 degrees C, and the strains were nalidixic acid resistant. The mutant strains showed domed (Dom+) colony morphology with smooth texture (Scs+) and no production of zone of hemolysis (Hly-), but the agglutinability of these strains to antiserum prepared with Dom+ Scs+ Hly+ organisms of strain L3 was the same as that of strain L3. When strain B-42 was inoculated intramuscularly or intranasally into guinea pigs, all the animals survived without manifesting clinical signs and produced a high-level of serum agglutination antibodies against strain L3. These inoculated animals were protected against intranasal challenge with strain L3. These properties of mutant strains are hereditarily stable after 50 subcultures on BGN-20 agar plates or 20 passages in mice. These data suggest that the mutant strains lacking dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability can be used as a live attenuated vaccine against swine atrophic rhinitis. PMID:3182989

  19. Nicotine anxiogenic and rewarding effects are decreased in mice lacking beta-endorphin.

    PubMed

    Trigo, José M; Zimmer, Andreas; Maldonado, Rafael

    2009-06-01

    The endogenous opioid system plays an important role in the behavioral effects of nicotine. Thus, micro-opioid receptor and the endogenous opioids derived from proenkephalin are involved in the central effects of nicotine. However, the role played by the different endogenous opioid peptides in the acute and chronic effects of nicotine remains to be fully established. Mice lacking beta-endorphin were acutely injected with nicotine at different doses to evaluate locomotor, anxiogenic and antinociceptive responses. The rewarding properties of nicotine were evaluated by using the conditioned place-preference paradigm. Mice chronically treated with nicotine were acutely injected with mecamylamine to study the behavioral expression of nicotine withdrawal. Mice lacking beta-endorphin exhibited a spontaneous hypoalgesia and hyperlocomotion and a reduction on the anxiogenic and rewarding effects induced by nicotine. Nicotine induced similar antinociception and hypolocomotion in both genotypes and no differences were found in the development of physical dependence. The dissociation between nicotine rewarding properties and physical dependence suggests a differential implication of beta-endorphin in these addictive related responses.

  20. Contractile function is unaltered in diaphragm from mice lacking calcium release channel isoform 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, J. S.; Takeshima, H.; Hamilton, S. L.; Reid, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses at least two isoforms of the calcium release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1 and RyR3). Whereas the function of RyR1 is well defined, the physiological significance of RyR3 is unclear. Some authors have suggested that RyR3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling and that RyR3 may specifically confer resistance to fatigue. To test this hypothesis, we measured contractile function of diaphragm strips from adult RyR3-deficient mice (exon 2-targeted mutation) and their heterozygous and wild-type littermates. In unfatigued diaphragm, there were no differences in isometric contractile properties (twitch characteristics, force-frequency relationships, maximal force) among the three groups. Our fatigue protocol (30 Hz, 0.25 duty cycle, 37 degrees C) depressed force to 25% of the initial force; however, lack of RyR3 did not accelerate the decline in force production. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to higher frequencies and was depressed in fatigued diaphragm; lack of RyR3 did not exaggerate these changes. We therefore provide evidence that RyR3 deficiency does not alter contractile function of adult muscle before, during, or after fatigue.

  1. Lack of Association between Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression and Clinically Relevant Molecular or Morphologic Tumor Characteristics at the Leading Edge of Invasive Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Annette; Kraft, Klaus; Wardelmann, Eva; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of death from cancer in the western world, but tumor biology and clinical course show great interindividual variation. Molecular and morphologic tumor characteristics, such as KRAS/BRAF mutation status, mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression, tumor growth pattern, and tumor cell budding, have been shown to be of key therapeutic and/or prognostic relevance in CRC. Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-anchored zinc-binding endopeptidase that is expressed at the leading edge of various invasive carcinomas and promotes tumor cell invasion through degradation of the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between MT1-MMP expression and molecular tumor characteristics as well as morphologic features of tumor aggressiveness in a consecutive series of 79 CRC tissue samples. However, although MT1-MMP was expressed in 41/79 samples (52%), there was no significant association between MT1-MMP expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation status, MMR protein expression, presence of lymphovascular invasion, tumor growth pattern, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or tumor cell budding in our sample cohort (P > 0.05). Thus, we conclude that although MT1-MMP may play a role in CRC invasion, it is not of key relevance to the current models of CRC invasion and aggressiveness. PMID:26106602

  2. Telemedicine: The legal framework (or the lack of it) in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Vera Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of European law telemedicine is, simultaneously, a health service and an information service, therefore, both regulations apply. In what concerns healthcare and the practice of medicine there are no uniform regulations at the European level. Concerning health services the most relevant achievement to regulate this domain is Directive 2011/24/EU. In what regards information and telecommunications we must have in consideration Directive 95/46/EU, Directive 2000/31/EC and Directive 2002/58/EC. However, many issues still lack uniform regulation, mainly the domain of medical liability and of medical leges artis. Probably such standardization will never take place, since the European Union does not have, until now, a common set of norms regarding tort and criminal liability, much less specific legal norms on medical liability. These gaps may jeopardize a truly European internal market in health services and hamper the development of telemedicine in the European zone. PMID:27579146

  3. Tyrosine fluorescence probing of conformational changes in tryptophan-lacking domain of albumins.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, N G; Maksimov, E G; Arutyunyan, A M; Fadeev, V V; Shirshin, E A

    2017-03-05

    We addressed the possibility of using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence for monitoring conformational changes of proteins which are undetectable via tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence. The model objects, human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, contain one and two Trp residues, respectively, while Tyr is more uniformly distributed over their structure. The results of the investigation of albumins interaction with ethanol using intrinsic Trp and Tyr steady-state and time-resolved picosecond fluorescence indicated the presence of an intermediate at 10% (v/v) of ethanol in solution, that was supported by the results of extrinsic fluorescence measurements with the Nile Red dye. Based on the comparison of HSA and BSA Trp and Tyr fluorescence, it was suggested that conformational changes at low ethanol concentration are located in the domain III of albumins, which lacks tryptophan residues. The sensitivity of Tyr fluorescence to domain III alterations was further verified by studying albumins interaction with GdnHCl.

  4. Behavior of DNA-lacking mitochondria in Entamoeba histolytica revealed by organelle transplant

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Makoto; Ogiwara, Sanae; Makiuchi, Takashi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica has mitosomes that are mitochondria lacking some canonical functions and organelle DNA. Mitosomes play an important role in the life cycle of the parasite. The distribution of proteins in mitosomes is not uniform, and how mitosomes are maintained and retained is unknown. To answer these questions, we developed a transplant method for mitosomes with hemagglutinin-tagged protein into recipient cells containing mitosomes with Myc-tagged protein. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the two protein tags colocalized in single mitosomes in some recipient cells. These results suggest that our transplant method can be used in anaerobic protozoa and that donor mitosomes may obtain recipient proteins through fusion with other mitosomes or through de novo synthesis of proteins in recipient cells. PMID:28287148

  5. Altered cognitive performance and synaptic function in the hippocampus of mice lacking C3.

    PubMed

    Perez-Alcazar, Marta; Daborg, Jonny; Stokowska, Anna; Wasling, Pontus; Björefeldt, Andreas; Kalm, Marie; Zetterberg, Henrik; Carlström, Karl E; Blomgren, Klas; Ekdahl, Christine T; Hanse, Eric; Pekna, Marcela

    2014-03-01

    Previous work implicated the complement system in adult neurogenesis as well as elimination of synapses in the developing and injured CNS. In the present study, we used mice lacking the third complement component (C3) to elucidate the role the complement system plays in hippocampus-dependent learning and synaptic function. We found that the constitutive absence of C3 is associated with enhanced place and reversal learning in adult mice. Our findings of lower release probability at CA3-CA1 glutamatergic synapses in combination with unaltered overall efficacy of these synapses in C3 deficient mice implicate C3 as a negative regulator of the number of functional glutamatergic synapses in the hippocampus. The C3 deficient mice showed no signs of spontaneous epileptiform activity in the hippocampus. We conclude that C3 plays a role in the regulation of the number and function of glutamatergic synapses in the hippocampus and exerts negative effects on hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance.

  6. Spirulina platensis Lacks Antitumor Effect against Solid Ehrlich Carcinoma in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Waleed; Elshazly, Shimaa M; Mahmoud, Amr A A

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina is a blue-green alga used as a dietary supplement. It has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and hepatoprotective properties. This study was designed to evaluate the antitumor effect of spirulina (200 and 800 mg/kg) against a murine model of solid Ehrlich carcinoma compared to a standard chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil (20 mg/kg). Untreated mice developed a palpable solid tumor after 13 days. Unlike fluorouracil, spirulina at the investigated two dose levels failed to exert any protective effect. In addition, spirulina did not potentiate the antitumor effect of fluorouracil when they were administered concurrently. Interestingly, their combined administration resulted in a dose-dependent increase in mortality. The present study demonstrates that spirulina lacks antitumor effect against this model of solid Ehrlich carcinoma and increased mortality when combined with fluorouracil. However, the implicated mechanism is still elusive.

  7. Why are low-income teens more likely to lack health insurance than their younger peers?

    PubMed

    Leininger, Lindsey Jeanne; Burns, Marguerite E

    2011-01-01

    Low-income teenagers are more likely to lack health insurance than younger children. Using data from the 2006, 2007, and 2008 rounds of the National Health Interview Survey, we examine whether differences between teens and younger children in socioeconomic factors, public health insurance eligibility, and observable family characteristics explain this apparent age-related coverage gap. Somewhat surprisingly, they do not. We find a highly robust age-coverage gradient among poor and near-poor children. Our results suggest the need to examine teen-specific insurance enrollment dynamics, particularly in families with no younger siblings, to optimize the effect of the newly enacted Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on teens' insurance coverage.

  8. Failure to activate the IFN-β promoter by a paramyxovirus lacking an interferon antagonist.

    PubMed

    Killip, M J; Young, D F; Ross, C S; Chen, S; Goodbourn, S; Randall, R E

    2011-06-20

    It is generally thought that pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) responsible for triggering interferon (IFN) induction are produced during virus replication and, to limit the activation of the IFN response by these PAMPs, viruses encode antagonists of IFN induction. Here we have studied the induction of IFN by parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV5) at the single-cell level, using a cell line expressing GFP under the control of the IFN-β promoter. We demonstrate that a recombinant PIV5 (termed PIV5-VΔC) that lacks a functional V protein (the viral IFN antagonist) does not activate the IFN-β promoter in the majority of infected cells. We conclude that viral PAMPs capable of activating the IFN induction cascade are not produced or exposed during the normal replication cycle of PIV5, and suggest instead that defective viruses are primarily responsible for inducing IFN during PIV5 infection in this system.

  9. Dangerous demographics: the lack of juvenile humphead parrotfishes Bolbometopon muricatum on the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellwood, D. R.; Choat, J. H.

    2011-06-01

    The humphead parrotfish, Bolbometopon muricatum, the largest of all parrotfish species, is heavily fished throughout most of its range. In remote and heavily protected locations, such as the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), it is a major component of parrotfish biomass and plays a critical role in ecosystem processes. However, extensive surveys of GBR populations have revealed a striking lack of juveniles. Of 633 individuals censused, just four were juveniles. This represents 0.6% juveniles and contrasts markedly with the 20.2-40.2% juveniles recorded in eight other medium to large parrotfish species. These low values in Bolbometopon are corroborated by over 5,000 h of independent observations and extensive museum collections. Whilst there is no evidence to suggest that this is an extraordinary new condition for GBR Bolbometopon, it may nevertheless expose them to special risks in a changing and unpredictable world. Despite excellent management on the GBR, Bolbometopon populations may be more vulnerable than previously thought.

  10. A Spline-Based Lack-Of-Fit Test for Independent Variable Effect in Poisson Regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Chin-Shang; Tu, Wanzhu

    2007-05-01

    In regression analysis of count data, independent variables are often modeled by their linear effects under the assumption of log-linearity. In reality, the validity of such an assumption is rarely tested, and its use is at times unjustifiable. A lack-of-fit test is proposed for the adequacy of a postulated functional form of an independent variable within the framework of semiparametric Poisson regression models based on penalized splines. It offers added flexibility in accommodating the potentially non-loglinear effect of the independent variable. A likelihood ratio test is constructed for the adequacy of the postulated parametric form, for example log-linearity, of the independent variable effect. Simulations indicate that the proposed model performs well, and misspecified parametric model has much reduced power. An example is given.

  11. Custodial grandparents raising grandchildren: lack of legal relationship is a barrier for services.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, Deborah; Gautam, Ramraj

    2012-06-01

    In the United States, the majority of custodial grandparents are raising their grandchildren without a legal relationship. The lack of a legal relationship (i.e., foster care, custody, adoption) is a barrier for obtaining services and has resulted in limited access to information and public services, inadequate financial assistance, and difficulty providing medical and educational consent. This situation arises not only as a consequence of eligibility criteria, but also because children being raised by custodial grandparents remain outside the child welfare system. Federal and state policies were not designed for this population; subsequently, the majority of grandparent caregivers remain without access to services and support. In this article, perceptions of custodial grandparents concerning family obligations and the child welfare system as a barrier to pursuing a legal relationship are reviewed. Challenges with existing financial and health services, educational needs of grandparents and providers, and suggestions for policy changes are presented.

  12. Spatial language facilitates spatial cognition: evidence from children who lack language input.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Dedre; Ozyürek, Asli; Gürcanli, Ozge; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2013-06-01

    Does spatial language influence how people think about space? To address this question, we observed children who did not know a conventional language, and tested their performance on nonlinguistic spatial tasks. We studied deaf children living in Istanbul whose hearing losses prevented them from acquiring speech and whose hearing parents had not exposed them to sign. Lacking a conventional language, the children used gestures, called homesigns, to communicate. In Study 1, we asked whether homesigners used gesture to convey spatial relations, and found that they did not. In Study 2, we tested a new group of homesigners on a Spatial Mapping Task, and found that they performed significantly worse than hearing Turkish children who were matched to the deaf children on another cognitive task. The absence of spatial language thus went hand-in-hand with poor performance on the nonlinguistic spatial task, pointing to the importance of spatial language in thinking about space.

  13. Lack of evidence for perinatal transmission of canine granulocytic anaplasmosis from a bitch to her offspring.

    PubMed

    Plier, Michelle L; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Hegarty, Barbara C; Kidd, Linda B

    2009-01-01

    Granulocytic anaplasmosis is an emerging infectious disease affecting dogs and humans in the United States and other regions of the world. Relatively few cases have been described in pregnant women, and perinatal transmission appears to occur infrequently in humans. Infection in pregnant dogs has not been reported. Diagnosis of infection during pregnancy poses therapeutic challenges, because doxycycline, the treatment of choice, is teratogenic. Also, infection during pregnancy may result in more severe disease. When infection is diagnosed after parturition, knowledge of the risk of perinatal transmission to offspring is important, because prophylactic therapy in neonates is also not without risk. In this report, we describe relatively severe clinical manifestations of Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection in a postpartum bitch and a lack of perinatal transmission to her puppies.

  14. Tyrosine fluorescence probing of conformational changes in tryptophan-lacking domain of albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanova, N. G.; Maksimov, E. G.; Arutyunyan, A. M.; Fadeev, V. V.; Shirshin, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    We addressed the possibility of using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence for monitoring conformational changes of proteins which are undetectable via tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence. The model objects, human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, contain one and two Trp residues, respectively, while Tyr is more uniformly distributed over their structure. The results of the investigation of albumins interaction with ethanol using intrinsic Trp and Tyr steady-state and time-resolved picosecond fluorescence indicated the presence of an intermediate at 10% (v/v) of ethanol in solution, that was supported by the results of extrinsic fluorescence measurements with the Nile Red dye. Based on the comparison of HSA and BSA Trp and Tyr fluorescence, it was suggested that conformational changes at low ethanol concentration are located in the domain III of albumins, which lacks tryptophan residues. The sensitivity of Tyr fluorescence to domain III alterations was further verified by studying albumins interaction with GdnHCl.

  15. Spirulina platensis Lacks Antitumor Effect against Solid Ehrlich Carcinoma in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Waleed; Elshazly, Shimaa M.; Mahmoud, Amr A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina is a blue-green alga used as a dietary supplement. It has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and hepatoprotective properties. This study was designed to evaluate the antitumor effect of spirulina (200 and 800 mg/kg) against a murine model of solid Ehrlich carcinoma compared to a standard chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil (20 mg/kg). Untreated mice developed a palpable solid tumor after 13 days. Unlike fluorouracil, spirulina at the investigated two dose levels failed to exert any protective effect. In addition, spirulina did not potentiate the antitumor effect of fluorouracil when they were administered concurrently. Interestingly, their combined administration resulted in a dose-dependent increase in mortality. The present study demonstrates that spirulina lacks antitumor effect against this model of solid Ehrlich carcinoma and increased mortality when combined with fluorouracil. However, the implicated mechanism is still elusive. PMID:26366170

  16. Increased response to morphine in mice lacking protein kinase C epsilon

    PubMed Central

    Newton, P. M.; Kim, J. A.; McGeehan, A. J.; Paredes, J. P.; Chu, K.; Wallace, M. J.; Roberts, A. J.; Hodge, C. W.; Messing, R. O.

    2014-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine–threonine kinases has been implicated in behavioral responses to opiates, but little is known about the individual PKC isozymes involved. Here, we show that mice lacking PKCε have increased sensitivity to the rewarding effects of morphine, revealed as the expression of place preference and intravenous self-administration at very low doses of morphine that do not evoke place preference or self-administration in wild-type mice. The PKCε null mice also show prolonged maintenance of morphine place preference in response to repeated testing when compared with wild-type mice. The supraspinal analgesic effects of morphine are enhanced in PKCε null mice, and the development of tolerance to the spinal analgesic effects of morphine is delayed. The density of μ-opioid receptors and their coupling to G-proteins are normal. These studies identify PKCε as a key regulator of opiate sensitivity in mice. PMID:16899053

  17. Rapid Inflammation in Mice Lacking Both SOCS1 and SOCS3 in Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ushiki, Takashi; Huntington, Nicholas D.; Glaser, Stefan P.; Kiu, Hiu; Georgiou, Angela; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A.; Roberts, Andrew W.; Alexander, Warren S.

    2016-01-01

    The Suppressors of Cytokine Signalling (SOCS) proteins are negative regulators of cytokine signalling required to prevent excess cellular responses. SOCS1 and SOCS3 are essential to prevent inflammatory disease, SOCS1 by attenuating responses to IFNγ and gamma-common (γc) cytokines, and SOCS3 via regulation of G-CSF and IL-6 signalling. SOCS1 and SOCS3 show significant sequence homology and are the only SOCS proteins to possess a KIR domain. The possibility of overlapping or redundant functions was investigated in inflammatory disease via generation of mice lacking both SOCS1 and SOCS3 in hematopoietic cells. Loss of SOCS3 significantly accelerated the pathology and inflammatory disease characteristic of SOCS1 deficiency. We propose a model in which SOCS1 and SOCS3 operate independently to control specific cytokine responses and together modulate the proliferation and activation of lymphoid and myeloid cells to prevent rapid inflammatory disease. PMID:27583437

  18. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiuqiang; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Bao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-01-01

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ0). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ0 cells to SDS after salt treatment, while overexpression of SCW11 results in higher sensitivity. In addition, salt stress in ρ0 cells induces high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further damages the cell wall, causing cells to become more sensitive towards the cell wall-perturbing agent. PMID:28357227

  19. Walk-based measure of balance in signed networks: Detecting lack of balance in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Benzi, Michele

    2014-10-01

    There is a longstanding belief that in social networks with simultaneous friendly and hostile interactions (signed networks) there is a general tendency to a global balance. Balance represents a state of the network with a lack of contentious situations. Here we introduce a method to quantify the degree of balance of any signed (social) network. It accounts for the contribution of all signed cycles in the network and gives, in agreement with empirical evidence, more weight to the shorter cycles than to the longer ones. We found that, contrary to what is generally believed, many signed social networks, in particular very large directed online social networks, are in general very poorly balanced. We also show that unbalanced states can be changed by tuning the weights of the social interactions among the agents in the network.

  20. Escherichia coli derivatives lacking both alcohol dehydrogenase and phosphotransacetylase grow anaerobically by lactate fermentation.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S; Clark, D P

    1989-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants lacking alcohol dehydrogenase (adh mutants) cannot synthesize the fermentation product ethanol and are unable to grow anaerobically on glucose and other hexoses. Similarly, phosphotransacetylase-negative mutants (pta mutants) neither excrete acetate nor grow anaerobically. However, when a strain carrying an adh deletion was selected for anaerobic growth on glucose, spontaneous pta mutants were isolated. Strains carrying both adh and pta mutations were observed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to produce lactic acid as the major fermentation product. Various combinations of adh pta double mutants regained the ability to grow anaerobically on hexoses, by what amounts to a homolactic fermentation. Unlike wild-type strains, such adh pta double mutants were unable to grow anaerobically on sorbitol or on glucuronic acid. The growth properties of strains carrying various mutations affecting the enzymes of fermentation are discussed in terms of redox balance. PMID:2661531

  1. Escherichia coli derivatives lacking both alcohol dehydrogenase and phosphotransacetylase grow anaerobically by lactate fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Clark, D P

    1989-07-01

    Escherichia coli mutants lacking alcohol dehydrogenase (adh mutants) cannot synthesize the fermentation product ethanol and are unable to grow anaerobically on glucose and other hexoses. Similarly, phosphotransacetylase-negative mutants (pta mutants) neither excrete acetate nor grow anaerobically. However, when a strain carrying an adh deletion was selected for anaerobic growth on glucose, spontaneous pta mutants were isolated. Strains carrying both adh and pta mutations were observed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to produce lactic acid as the major fermentation product. Various combinations of adh pta double mutants regained the ability to grow anaerobically on hexoses, by what amounts to a homolactic fermentation. Unlike wild-type strains, such adh pta double mutants were unable to grow anaerobically on sorbitol or on glucuronic acid. The growth properties of strains carrying various mutations affecting the enzymes of fermentation are discussed in terms of redox balance.

  2. Escherichia coli derivatives lacking both alcohol dehydrogenase and phosphotransacetylase grow anaerobically by lactate fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Clark, D.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Escherichia coli mutants lacking alcohol dehydrogenase (adh mutants) cannot synthesize the fermentation product ethanol and are unable to grow anaerobically on glucose and other hexoses. Similarly, phosphotransacetylase-negative mutants (pta mutants) neither excrete acetate nor grow anaerobically. However, when a strain carrying an adh deletion was selected for anaerobic growth on glucose, spontaneous pta mutants were isolated. Strains carrying both adh and pta mutations were observed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to produce lactic acid as the major fermentation product. Various combinations of adh pta double mutants regained the ability to grow anaerobically on hexoses, by what amounts to a homolactic fermentation. Unlike wild-type strains, such adh pta double mutants were unable to grow anaerobically on sorbitol or on glucuronic acid. The growth properties of strains carrying various mutations affecting the enzymes of fermentation are discussed terms of redox balance.

  3. Sensorineural deafness and seizures in mice lacking vesicular glutamate transporter 3.

    PubMed

    Seal, Rebecca P; Akil, Omar; Yi, Eunyoung; Weber, Christopher M; Grant, Lisa; Yoo, Jong; Clause, Amanda; Kandler, Karl; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Glowatzki, Elisabeth; Lustig, Lawrence R; Edwards, Robert H

    2008-01-24

    The expression of unconventional vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT3 by neurons known to release a different classical transmitter has suggested novel roles for signaling by glutamate, but this distribution has raised questions about whether the protein actually contributes to glutamate release. We now report that mice lacking VGLUT3 are profoundly deaf due to the absence of glutamate release from hair cells at the first synapse in the auditory pathway. The early degeneration of some cochlear ganglion neurons in knockout mice also indicates an important developmental role for the glutamate released by hair cells before the onset of hearing. In addition, the mice exhibit primary, generalized epilepsy that is accompanied by remarkably little change in ongoing motor behavior. The glutamate release conferred by expression of VGLUT3 thus has an essential role in both function and development of the auditory pathway, as well as in the control of cortical excitability.

  4. Lack of fitness costs of insecticide resistance in the western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    PubMed

    Bielza, P; Quinto, V; Grávalos, C; Abellán, J; Fernández, E

    2008-04-01

    The fitness costs of spinosad and acrinathrin resistance was investigated in the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Fitness studies were conducted on susceptible and resistant strains of F. occidentalis. Resistant females were significantly more fecund (number of eggs per female) than susceptible females. The hatching rate (fertility) for both susceptible and acrinathrin-resistant strains was significantly lower than in the spinosad-resistant strain. Mean developmental time from egg to adult did not differ between thrips populations. Similarly, female longevity did not differ between populations. These data suggest that lack of fitness costs related to insecticide resistance may accelerate the development of insecticide resistance in populations of F. occidentalis from southeastern Spain.

  5. Behavior of DNA-lacking mitochondria in Entamoeba histolytica revealed by organelle transplant.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Makoto; Ogiwara, Sanae; Makiuchi, Takashi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2017-03-13

    The anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica has mitosomes that are mitochondria lacking some canonical functions and organelle DNA. Mitosomes play an important role in the life cycle of the parasite. The distribution of proteins in mitosomes is not uniform, and how mitosomes are maintained and retained is unknown. To answer these questions, we developed a transplant method for mitosomes with hemagglutinin-tagged protein into recipient cells containing mitosomes with Myc-tagged protein. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the two protein tags colocalized in single mitosomes in some recipient cells. These results suggest that our transplant method can be used in anaerobic protozoa and that donor mitosomes may obtain recipient proteins through fusion with other mitosomes or through de novo synthesis of proteins in recipient cells.

  6. Telemedicine: The legal framework (or the lack of it) in Europe.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Vera Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of European law telemedicine is, simultaneously, a health service and an information service, therefore, both regulations apply. In what concerns healthcare and the practice of medicine there are no uniform regulations at the European level. Concerning health services the most relevant achievement to regulate this domain is Directive 2011/24/EU. In what regards information and telecommunications we must have in consideration Directive 95/46/EU, Directive 2000/31/EC and Directive 2002/58/EC. However, many issues still lack uniform regulation, mainly the domain of medical liability and of medical leges artis. Probably such standardization will never take place, since the European Union does not have, until now, a common set of norms regarding tort and criminal liability, much less specific legal norms on medical liability. These gaps may jeopardize a truly European internal market in health services and hamper the development of telemedicine in the European zone.

  7. Lack of in Vivo Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity with Antibody Containing Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a cytolytic mechanism that can elicit in vivo antitumor effects and can play a significant role in the efficacy of antibody treatments for cancer. Here, we prepared cetuximab, panitumumab, and rituximab containing gold nanoparticles and investigated their ability to produce an ADCC effect in vivo. Cetuximab treatment of EGFR-expressing H1975 tumor xenografts showed significant tumor regression due to the ADCC activity of the antibody in vivo, while the control antibody, panitumumab, did not. However, all three antibody containing nanoparticles are not able to suppress tumor growth in the same in vivo mouse model. The antibody containing nanoparticles localized in the tumors and did not suppress the immune function of the animals, so the lack of tumor growth suppression of the cetuximab containing nanoparticle suggests that immobilizing antibodies onto a nanoparticle significantly decreases the ability of the antibody to promote an ADCC response. PMID:25879583

  8. The Lack of Torus Emission from BL Lacertae Objects: An Infrared View of Unification with WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Markoff, Sera; Shemmer, Ohad; Wu, Jianfeng

    2012-02-01

    We use data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to perform a statistical study on the mid-infrared (IR) properties of a large number (~102) of BL Lac objects—low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with a jet beamed toward the Earth. As expected, many BL Lac objects are so highly beamed that their jet synchrotron emission dominates their IR spectral energy distributions. In other BL Lac objects, however, the jet is not strong enough to completely dilute the rest of the AGN emission. We do not see observational signatures of the dusty torus from these weakly beamed BL Lac objects. The lack of observable torus emission is consistent with suggestions that BL Lac objects are fed by radiatively inefficient accretion disks. Implications for the "nature versus nurture" debate for FR I and FR II radio galaxies are briefly discussed. Our study supports the notion that, beyond orientation, accretion rate plays an important role in AGN unification.

  9. A Study of the Impact of the Lack of a Cost Accounting Standards Board.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    California 00 ,: SE P 9 7 THESIS SE& A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THE LACK OF A COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD by James F. Sumner, III June 1987 Thesis...O’ATON COSA1. CODES 16 SuB,*CT j’J.45 Comr~nue n- p.ono ol neeeterV ani denltiy by flO(k f1LrmbCr) E,) ROUP StA IRucost accounting , cost accounting ...standards, CostJ GR~uP Accounting Standards Board, Procurement, Pensions 3 48srR Cont’lut o revrs ’CV𔃻 Motur anCC d de~ntilv by booch nuP"OterJ -This

  10. Petrogenesis of lunar rocks: Rb-Sr constraints and lack of H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Gancarz, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    Rb and Sr isotopic data and other chemical data indicate major lunar differentiation at about 4.6 AE (AE = 10 to the 9th power years) and very limited subsequent differentiation. The constraints of limited differentiation after 4.6 AE and the apparent lack of H2O on the moon, when applied to the derivation and petrogenesis of lunar samples, suggest the following: (1) soil samples, breccias, metaclastic rocks, and feldspathic basalts represent mixtures of repeatedly modified clastic material, which was utimately derived from materials formed during the 4.6 AE differentiation; and (2) mare basalts crystallized from melts which formed by partial melting, and which developed without equilibrium between the melt and crystalline residuum.

  11. The diageotropica mutant of tomato lacks high specific activity auxin sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, G.R.; Lomax, T.L. ); Rayle, D.L. )

    1989-04-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum, Mill) plants homozygous for the single gene diageotropica (dgt) mutation have reduced shoot growth, abnormal vascular tissue, altered leaf morphology, and lack of lateral root branching. These and other morphological and physiological abnormalities suggest that dgt plants are unable to respond to the plant growth hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA). The photoaffinity auxin analogue {sup 3}H-5N{sub 3}-IAA specifically labels a polypeptide doublet of 40 ad 42 kD in membrane preparations from stems of the parental variety VFN8, but not from stems of dgt. In elongation tests, excised dgt roots respond in the same manner to IAA an VFN8 roots. These data suggest that the two polypeptides are part of a physiologically important auxin receptor system which is altered in a tissue-specific manner in the mutant.

  12. Lack of founding Amerindian mitochondrial DNA lineages in extinct aborigines from Tierra del Fuego-Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Lalueza, C; Pérez-Pérez, A; Prats, E; Cornudella, L; Turbón, D

    1997-01-01

    Ancient DNA from bones and teeth of 60 individuals from four extinct human populations from Tierra del Fuego-Patagonia (Selknam, Yamana, Kaweskar and Aonikenk) has been extracted and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) amplified by using the polymerase chain reaction. High-resolution analysis of endonuclease restriction site variation in the mtDNA and sequencing of its hypervariable non-coding control region, revealed complete absence of two of the four primary mitochondrial haplotype groups present in contemporary Amerinds, namely A and B. In contrast, haplogroups C and D were found in all but one sample with frequencies of approximately 38% and 60%. These results, together with the decreasing incidence of group A in more southerly latitudes in the American continent and the absence of cluster B above 55 degrees North in America and Asia, argue that the first settlers entering America 21000-14000 years ago already lacked both mtDNA lineages.

  13. Defective insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells lacking type 1 IGF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Shouhong; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Nakae, Jun; Politi, Katerina; Kido, Yoshiaki; Fisher, Peter E.; Morroni, Manrico; Cinti, Saverio; White, Morris F.; Herrera, Pedro L.; Accili, Domenico; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2002-01-01

    Defective insulin secretion is a feature of type 2 diabetes that results from inadequate compensatory increase of β cell mass and impaired glucose-dependent insulin release. β cell proliferation and secretion are thought to be regulated by signaling through receptor tyrosine kinases. In this regard, we sought to examine the potential proliferative and/or antiapoptotic role of IGFs in β cells by tissue-specific conditional mutagenesis ablating type 1 IGF receptor (IGF1R) signaling. Unexpectedly, lack of functional IGF1R did not affect β cell mass, but resulted in age-dependent impairment of glucose tolerance, associated with a decrease of glucose- and arginine-dependent insulin release. These observations reveal a requirement of IGF1R-mediated signaling for insulin secretion. PMID:12370279

  14. Schizencephaly: association with young maternal age, alcohol use, and lack of prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Dies, Kira A; Bodell, Adria; Hisama, Fuki M; Guo, Chao-Yu; Barry, Brenda; Chang, Bernard S; Barkovich, A James; Walsh, Christopher A

    2013-02-01

    Schizencephaly is a rare malformation of cortical development characterized by congenital clefts extending from the pial surface to the lateral ventricle that are lined by heterotopic gray matter. The clinical presentation is variable and can include motor or cognitive impairment and epilepsy. The causes of schizencephaly are heterogeneous and can include teratogens, prenatal infection, or maternal trauma. Reported genetic causes include chromosomal aneuploidy, EMX2 mutations, and possible autosomal recessive familial cases based on recurrence in siblings. In an effort to identify risk factors for schizencephaly, we conducted a survey of 48 parents or primary caretakers of patients with schizencephaly born between 1983 and 2004. We discovered that young maternal age, lack of prenatal care, and alcohol use were all significantly associated with risk of schizencephaly. Our results suggest that there are important nongenetic, intrauterine events that predispose to schizencephaly.

  15. Cell cycle regulation of embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking functional Pax7

    PubMed Central

    Czerwinska, Areta M.; Nowacka, Joanna; Aszer, Magdalena; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Jańczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Ciemerych, Maria A.; Grabowska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transcription factor Pax7 plays a key role during embryonic myogenesis and in adult organisms in that it sustains the proper function of satellite cells, which serve as adult skeletal muscle stem cells. Recently we have shown that lack of Pax7 does not prevent the myogenic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. In the current work we show that the absence of functional Pax7 in differentiating embryonic stem cells modulates cell cycle facilitating their proliferation. Surprisingly, deregulation of Pax7 function also positively impacts at the proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Such phenotypes seem to be executed by modulating the expression of positive cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin E. PMID:27610933

  16. Lack of association between Y-chromosomal haplogroups and prostate cancer in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wook; Yoo, Tag-Keun; Kim, Sung-Joo; Shin, Dong-Jik; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jin, Han-Jun; Kwak, Kyoung-Don; Kim, Eun-Tak; Bae, Yoon-Sun

    2007-01-24

    The Y chromosome has recently been suggested to have an association with prostate cancer risk in human populations. Since this chromosome is haploid and lacks recombination over most of its length, haplotypes constructed from binary markers throughout the chromosome can be used for association studies. To assess the possible Y-chromosomal contribution to prostate cancer risk, we have therefore analyzed 14 Y-chromosomal binary markers in 106 prostate cancer cases and 110 controls from the Korean population. In contrast to previous findings in the Japanese population, no statistically significant difference in the distribution of Y-chromosomal haplogroup frequencies was observed between the case and control groups of Koreans. Thus, our data imply that the previously reported associations between Y-chromosomal lineages and a predisposition to, or protection against, prostate cancer might be explained by statistical fluctuations, or by genetic effects that are seen only in some environments.

  17. Doing many things at a time: Lack of power decreases the ability to multitask.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ran Alice; Guinote, Ana

    2017-03-06

    Three studies investigated the effects of power on the ability to pursue multiple, concomitant goals, also known as multitasking. It was predicted that powerless participants will show lower multitasking ability than control and powerful participants. Study 1 focused on self-reported ability to multitask in a sample of executives and subordinate employees. Studies 2 and 3 investigated the ability to dual-task and to switch between tasks, respectively, using dual-task and task-switching paradigms. Across the studies, powerless individuals were less able to effectively multitask compared with control and powerful participants, suggesting that the detrimental effects of lack of power extend beyond single-task environments, shown in past research, into multitasking environments. Underlying mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Growth characteristics underlying lack of a chin in pigs: a histomorphometric study

    PubMed Central

    Price, J.; Tee, B. C.; Vig, K.; Shanker, S.; Kennedy, K.; Sun, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Despite similar mandibular growth to that of humans, pigs lack a chin projection as shown in most humans. To understand whether this divergence is contributed to differences in local symphyseal growth, this project characterized bone modeling activities at the symphyseal surfaces of juvenile pigs. Material and Methods Symphyseal specimens from 2 age groups (4- and 6-month-old, n=10) were processed into histological sections with and without decalcification, which were assessed for surface mineral apposition and bone resorption, respectively. In a blinded fashion, measurements of four parameters (MAR: mineral apposition rate, MAZ: mineral apposition zone; ES/BS: eroded surface; OC.N/BS: osteoclast number) were obtained and tested by a multivariate two-way mixed-model analyses of variance (MANOVA) for the differences between symphyseal regions and ages. Results Qualitatively, pig symphyseal labial and lingual surfaces were horizontally oriented and characterized by mineral apposition and bone resorption, respectively. Quantitatively, labial mineral apposition tended to be greater rostrally than caudally at 4 months, which became greater caudally than rostrally at 6 months (region/age interactions: p=0.127 for MAR, p=0.012 for MAZ). Lingual bone resorption tended to be greater caudally than rostrally, but only ES/BS measurements was significant (p=0.039) regardless of age while OC.N/BS measurements varied with ages and regions (age/region interaction, p=0.087). Conclusions Insufficient differential in symphyseal surface modeling between the labial-caudal and labial-rostral regions contributes to the lack of chin projection in the pig. PMID:26250613

  19. Lack of recruitment in Lavandula stoechas subsp. pedunculata: a case of safe-site limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Ana M.; Peco, Begoña

    2007-01-01

    Lavandula stoechas subsp. pedunculata regeneration depends exclusively on the establishment of new individuals. Seed availability and seedling emergence and survival are therefore critical life stages and processes for species regeneration. In this study, seedling emergence and survival was monitored for two years in the scrub, both in clearings and adjacent to adult plants, and the surrounding perennial grassland, at 1, 3 and 5 m from the scrub. Soil seed bank spatial distribution was also studied for one year in the same two habitats, using the same sampling design. Soil seed availability in the scrub is high regardless of the distance from the adult individuals. On the contrary, the adjacent grassland shows a drastic fall in seed density, and almost no seedlings were observed there. In the scrub, seedling density was negatively related to distance from the three nearest adult plants in the clearings, and positively related to adult plant size beneath the adult Lavandula plants. There was also a negative relationship between seedling density and the percentage of bare soil. Only one seedling survived the first drought period, with no detection of effects of either position with respect to adult individuals or seedling density. We hypothesized that the study populations suffer a lack of appropriate safe sites within the scrubland while in the adjacent perennial grassland, observed low seed availability was added to safe-site limitation. That results in a lack of successful seedling establishments and a poor expansion potential of Lavandula scrublands, whose edges remain static in the short and medium term. As found in other Mediterranean scrubland, recruitment may only occur in years with particularly favourable weather, under disturbance regimes that increase seedling survival probability or when external dispersal agents increased seed availability in adequate places for Lavandula establishment.

  20. A stop codon mutation in SCN9A causes lack of pain sensation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sultan; Dahllund, Leif; Eriksson, Anders B; Hellgren, Dennis; Karlsson, Urban; Lund, Per-Eric; Meijer, Inge A; Meury, Luc; Mills, Tracy; Moody, Adrian; Morinville, Anne; Morten, John; O'donnell, Dajan; Raynoschek, Carina; Salter, Hugh; Rouleau, Guy A; Krupp, Johannes J

    2007-09-01

    The general lack of pain experience is a rare occurrence in humans, and the molecular causes for this phenotype are not well understood. Here we have studied a Canadian family from Newfoundland with members who exhibit a congenital inability to experience pain. We have mapped the locus to a 13.7 Mb region on chromosome 2q (2q24.3-2q31.1). Screening of candidate genes in this region identified a protein-truncating mutation in SCN9A, which encodes for the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.7. The mutation is a C-A transversion at nucleotide 984 transforming the codon for tyrosine 328 to a stop codon. The predicted product lacks all pore-forming regions of Na(v)1.7. Indeed, expression of this altered gene in a cell line did not produce functional responses, nor did it cause compensatory effects on endogenous voltage-gated sodium currents when expressed in ND7/23 cells. Because a homozygous knockout of Na(v)1.7 in mice has been shown to be lethal, we explored why a deficiency of Na(v)1.7 is non-lethal in humans. Expression studies in monkey, human, mouse and rat tissue indicated species-differences in the Na(v)1.7 expression profile. Whereas in rodents the channel was strongly expressed in hypothalamic nuclei, only weak mRNA levels were detected in this area in primates. Furthermore, primate pituitary and adrenal glands were devoid of signal, whereas these two glands were mRNA-positive in rodents. This species difference may explain the non-lethality of the observed mutation in humans. Our data further establish Na(v)1.7 as a critical element of peripheral nociception in humans.

  1. Lack of access to health care for African indigents: a social exclusion perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lack of access to health care is a persistent condition for most African indigents, to which the common technical approach of targeting initiatives is an insufficient antidote. To overcome the standstill, an integrated technical and political approach is needed. Such policy shift is dependent on political support, and on alignment of international and national actors. We explore if the analytical framework of social exclusion can contribute to the latter. Methods We produce a critical and evaluative account of the literature on three themes: social exclusion, development policy, and indigence in Africa–and their interface. First, we trace the concept of social exclusion as it evolved over time and space in policy circles. We then discuss the relevance of a social exclusion perspective in developing countries. Finally, we apply this perspective to Africa, its indigents, and their lack of access to health care. Results The concept of social exclusion as an underlying process of structural inequalities has needed two decades to find acceptance in international policy circles. Initial scepticism about the relevance of the concept in developing countries is now giving way to recognition of its universality. For a variety of reasons however, the uptake of a social exclusion perspective in Africa has been limited. Nevertheless, social exclusion as a driver of poverty and inequity in Africa is evident, and manifestly so in the case of the African indigents. Conclusion The concept of social exclusion provides a useful framework for improved understanding of origins and persistence of the access problem that African indigents face, and for generating political space for an integrated approach. PMID:24238000

  2. Characterization of the serum and liver proteomes in gut-microbiota-lacking mice

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Yu-Tang; Chen, Ying-Ju; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Huang, Wen-Ching; Lo, Chun-Tsung; Liao, Chen-Chung; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Current nutrition research is focusing on health promotion, disease prevention, and performance improvement for individuals and communities around the world. The humans with required nutritional ingredients depend on both how well the individual is provided with balanced foods and what state of gut microbiota the host has. Studying the mutually beneficial relationships between gut microbiome and host is an increasing attention in biomedical science. The purpose of this study is to understand the role of gut microbiota and to study interactions between gut microbiota and host. In this study, we used a shotgun proteomic approach to reveal the serum and liver proteomes in gut-microbiota-lacking mice. For serum, 15 and 8 proteins were uniquely detected in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) and germ-free (GF) mice, respectively, as well as the 3 and 20 proteins were significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in GF mice compared to SPF mice. Among the proteins of the serum, major urinary protein 1 (MUP-1) of GF mice was significantly decreased compared to SPF mice. In addition, MUP-1 expression is primarily regulated by testosterone. Lacking in gut flora has been implicated in many adverse effects, and now we have found its pathogenic root maybe gut bacteria can regulate the sex-hormone testosterone levels. In the liver, 8 and 22 proteins were uniquely detected in GF mice and SPF mice, respectively, as well as the 14 and 30 proteins were significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in GF mice compared to SPF mice. Furthermore, ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) indicated that gut microbiota influence the host in cancer, organismal injury and abnormalities, respiratory disease; cell cycle, cellular movement and tissue development; cardiovascular disease, reproductive system disease; and lipid metabolism, molecular transport and small molecule biochemistry. Our findings provide more detailed information of the role of gut microbiota and will be useful to help

  3. A very early-branching Staphylococcus aureus lineage lacking the carotenoid pigment staphyloxanthin.

    PubMed

    Holt, Deborah C; Holden, Matthew T G; Tong, Steven Y C; Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Clarke, Louise; Quail, Michael A; Currie, Bart J; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Feil, Edward J; Giffard, Philip M

    2011-01-01

    Here we discuss the evolution of the northern Australian Staphylococcus aureus isolate MSHR1132 genome. MSHR1132 belongs to the divergent clonal complex 75 lineage. The average nucleotide divergence between orthologous genes in MSHR1132 and typical S. aureus is approximately sevenfold greater than the maximum divergence observed in this species to date. MSHR1132 has a small accessory genome, which includes the well-characterized genomic islands, νSAα and νSaβ, suggesting that these elements were acquired well before the expansion of the typical S. aureus population. Other mobile elements show mosaic structure (the prophage ϕSa3) or evidence of recent acquisition from a typical S. aureus lineage (SCCmec, ICE6013 and plasmid pMSHR1132). There are two differences in gene repertoire compared with typical S. aureus that may be significant clues as to the genetic basis underlying the successful emergence of S. aureus as a pathogen. First, MSHR1132 lacks the genes for production of staphyloxanthin, the carotenoid pigment that confers upon S. aureus its characteristic golden color and protects against oxidative stress. The lack of pigment was demonstrated in 126 of 126 CC75 isolates. Second, a mobile clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) element is inserted into orfX of MSHR1132. Although common in other staphylococcal species, these elements are very rare within S. aureus and may impact accessory genome acquisition. The CRISPR spacer sequences reveal a history of attempted invasion by known S. aureus mobile elements. There is a case for the creation of a new taxon to accommodate this and related isolates.

  4. Rheumatologists lack confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoids pertaining to the management of rheumatic complaints

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthritis pain is reported as one of the most common reasons for persons using medical herbal cannabis in North America. “Severe arthritis” is the condition justifying legal use of cannabis in over half of all authorizations in Canada, where cannabis remains a controlled substance. As champions for the care of persons with arthritis, rheumatologists must be knowledgeable of treatment modalities both traditional and non-traditional, used by their patients. As study of cannabinoid molecules in medicine is recent, we have examined the confidence in the knowledge of cannabinoids expressed by Canadian rheumatologists. Methods The confidence of rheumatologists in their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules and mechanisms relevant to rheumatology, and their ability to advise patients about cannabinoid treatments was recorded by an online questionnaire circulated via email to the entire Canadian Rheumatology Association membership. Results Over three quarters of the 128 respondents lacked confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules. While 45% of respondents believed there was no current role for cannabinoids in rheumatology patient care, only 25% supported any use of herbal cannabis. With 70% never having previously prescribed or recommended any cannabinoid treatment, uncertainty regarding good prescribing practices was prevalent. Concerns about risks of cannabis use were in line with the current literature. Conclusions Rheumatologists lacked confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules in general and in their competence to prescribe any cannabinoid for rheumatic complaints. In line with this uncertainty, there is reticence to prescribe cannabinoid preparations for rheumatology patients. Guidance is required to inform rheumatologists on the evidence regarding cannabinoids. PMID:25080153

  5. A cytotoxic type-2 ribosome inactivating protein (from leafless mistletoe) lacking sugar binding activity.

    PubMed

    Das, Mrinal Kumar; Sharma, Radhey Shyam; Mishra, Vandana

    2011-12-01

    Articulatin-D, a 66 kDa ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) comprised of 29 kDa A-chain linked to 35 kDa B-chain, is purified from leafless mistletoe (Viscum articulatum) parasitic on Dalbergia sp. from Western Ghats (India). N-terminal sequence and LC-MS/MS analyses of A- and B-chain confirmed that articulatin-D is a type-2 RIP having high homology with other mistletoe lectins. Translation inhibition and diagnostic N-glycosidase activity of articulatin-D illustrate the presence of catalytically active A-chain. Its inability to: (i) bind to acid treated Sepharose CL-6B column, (ii) agglutinate trypsin-treated and untreated RBCs of human (A, B, O, AB), mice, rat, rabbit, buffalo, porcine, pigeon, cock, fish, sheep and goat even with 10mg/ml of purified articulatin-D, (iii) show change in circular dichroism spectra after addition of sugar to the native protein, (iv) bind to different sugars (galactose, lactose, gal-NAc, rhamnose, arabinose, fucose and mannose) immobilized on Sepharose 4B matrix, and (v) show change in enthalpy during titration with galactose confirm that the B-chain of articulatin-D lacks sugar binding activity. Despite this, articulatin-D is highly toxic as characterized with low IC(50) against different cancer cell lines (Jurkat: 0.31 ± 0.02 nM, MOLT-4: 0.51 ± 0.03 nM, U-937: 0.64 ± 0.07 nM, HL-60: 0.79 ± 0.11 nM, Raji: 1.45 ± 0.09 nM). Toxicity of RIPs has been ascribed to the absence/presence of B-chain with sugar binding activity. Identification of articulatin-D, the first cytotoxic RIP with B-chain lacking sugar binding activity opens new vistas in understanding cytotoxic action of RIPs.

  6. Improved glycemic control in mice lacking Sglt1 and Sglt2.

    PubMed

    Powell, David R; DaCosta, Christopher M; Gay, Jason; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Smith, Melinda; Greer, Jennifer; Doree, Deon; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Mseeh, Faika; Rodriguez, Lawrence A; Harris, Angela; Buhring, Lindsey; Platt, Kenneth A; Vogel, Peter; Brommage, Robert; Shadoan, Melanie K; Sands, Arthur T; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2013-01-15

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) is the major, and SGLT1 the minor, transporter responsible for renal glucose reabsorption. Increasing urinary glucose excretion (UGE) by selectively inhibiting SGLT2 improves glycemic control in diabetic patients. We generated Sglt1 and Sglt2 knockout (KO) mice, Sglt1/Sglt2 double-KO (DKO) mice, and wild-type (WT) littermates to study their relative glycemic control and to determine contributions of SGLT1 and SGLT2 to UGE. Relative to WTs, Sglt2 KOs had improved oral glucose tolerance and were resistant to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Sglt1 KOs fed glucose-free high-fat diet (G-free HFD) had improved oral glucose tolerance accompanied by delayed intestinal glucose absorption and increased circulating glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), but had normal intraperitoneal glucose tolerance. On G-free HFD, Sglt2 KOs had 30%, Sglt1 KOs 2%, and WTs <1% of the UGE of DKOs. Consistent with their increased UGE, DKOs had lower fasting blood glucose and improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance than Sglt2 KOs. In conclusion, 1) Sglt2 is the major renal glucose transporter, but Sglt1 reabsorbs 70% of filtered glucose if Sglt2 is absent; 2) mice lacking Sglt2 display improved glucose tolerance despite UGE that is 30% of maximum; 3) Sglt1 KO mice respond to oral glucose with increased circulating GLP-1; and 4) DKO mice have improved glycemic control over mice lacking Sglt2 alone. These data suggest that, in patients with type 2 diabetes, combining pharmacological SGLT2 inhibition with complete renal and/or partial intestinal SGLT1 inhibition may improve glycemic control over that achieved by SGLT2 inhibition alone.

  7. Advanced Age and Disease Predict Lack of Symptomatic Improvement after Endovascular Iliac Treatment in Male Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Roland; Brownson, Kirstyn E.; Hall, Michael R.; Kuwahara, Go; Vasilas, Penny; Dardik, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endovascular angioplasty and stent placement is currently the most frequent treatment for iliac artery occlusive disease. However, despite a successful endovascular procedure, some patients do not experience symptomatic improvement and satisfaction with their care. This study seeks to identify patient-related factors associated with lack of symptomatic improvement after endovascular iliac artery treatment in male veterans. Methods: Retrospective review of patients treated with endovascular methods for iliac artery occlusive disease between January 2008 and July 2012 at VA Connecticut Healthcare System. Symptomatic improvement on the first post-operative visit was evaluated, with bilateral treatments counted separately. Results: Sixty-two patients had 91 iliac arteries treated with angioplasty and stent placement. Forty-seven (52 percent) legs had critical limb ischemia, and 77 (85 percent) had at least two-vessel distal runoff. Angiographic success was 100 percent. Patient-reported symptomatic improvement at the first post-operative visit was 55 percent (50/91). Lack of symptomatic improvement correlated with older age (OR 1.09 [1.03-1.17], p = 0.008), presence of critical limb ischemia (OR 3.03 [1.09-8.65], p = 0.034), and need for additional surgical intervention (OR 5.61 [1.65-17.36], p = 0.006). Survival, primary and secondary patency, and freedom from restenosis were comparable between patients who reported symptomatic improvement and those who did not. Conclusions: Despite angiographically successful revascularization, patients who are older or have critical limb ischemia who are treated with isolated endovascular iliac artery intervention are more likely to require additional interventions and less likely to experience symptomatic improvement. These patients may need more extensive infra-inguinal revascularization than isolated iliac angioplasty and stent placement, despite a preserved ankle-brachial index. Quality of life needs to be measured

  8. Can Species Distribution Models Aid Bioassessment when Reference Sites are Lacking? Tests Based on Freshwater Fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labay, Ben J.; Hendrickson, Dean A.; Cohen, Adam E.; Bonner, Timothy H.; King, Ryan S.; Kleinsasser, Leroy J.; Linam, Gordon W.; Winemiller, Kirk O.

    2015-10-01

    Recent literature reviews of bioassessment methods raise questions about use of least-impacted reference sites to characterize natural conditions that no longer exist within contemporary landscapes. We explore an alternate approach for bioassessment that uses species site occupancy data from museum archives as input for species distribution models (SDMs) stacked to predict species assemblages of freshwater fishes in Texas. When data for estimating reference conditions are lacking, deviation between richness of contemporary versus modeled species assemblages could provide a means to infer relative biological integrity at appropriate spatial scales. We constructed SDMs for 100 freshwater fish species to compare predicted species assemblages to data on contemporary assemblages acquired by four independent surveys that sampled 269 sites. We then compared site-specific observed/predicted ratios of the number of species at sites to scores from a multimetric index of biotic integrity (IBI). Predicted numbers of species were moderately to strongly correlated with the numbers observed by the four surveys. We found significant, though weak, relationships between observed/predicted ratios and IBI scores. SDM-based assessments identified patterns of local assemblage change that were congruent with IBI inferences; however, modeling artifacts that likely contributed to over-prediction of species presence may restrict the stand-alone use of SDM-derived patterns for bioassessment and therefore warrant examination. Our results suggest that when extensive standardized survey data that include reference sites are lacking, as is commonly the case, SDMs derived from generally much more readily available species site occupancy data could be used to provide a complementary tool for bioassessment.

  9. Getting what we pay for: innovations lacking in provider payment reform for chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Tynan, Ann; Draper, Debra A

    2008-06-01

    Despite wide recognition that existing physician and hospital payment methods used by health plans and other payers do not foster high-quality and efficient care for people with chronic conditions, little innovation in provider payment strategies is occurring, according to a new study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) commissioned by the California HealthCare Foundation. This is particularly disconcerting because the nation faces an increasing prevalence of chronic disease, resulting in continued escalation of related health care costs and diminished quality of life for more Americans. To date, most efforts to improve care of patients with chronic conditions have focused on paying vendors, such as disease management firms, to intervene with patients or redesigning care delivery without reforming underlying physician and hospital payment methods. While there is active discussion and anticipation of physician and hospital payment reform, current efforts are limited largely to experimental or small-scale pilot programs. More fundamental payment reform efforts in practice are virtually nonexistent. Existing payment systems, primarily fee for service, encourage a piecemeal approach to care delivery rather than a coordinated approach appropriate for patients with chronic conditions. While there is broad agreement that existing provider payment methods are not well aligned with optimal chronic disease care, there are significant barriers to reforming payment for chronic disease care, including: (1) fragmented care delivery; (2) lack of payment for non-physician providers and services supportive of chronic disease care; (3) potential for revenue reductions for some providers; and (4) lack of a viable reform champion. Absent such reform, however, efforts to improve the quality and efficiency of care for chronically ill patients are likely to be of limited success.

  10. Predicting Effects of Ocean Acidification and Warming on Algae Lacking Carbon Concentrating Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Janet E; Dudgeon, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Seaweeds that lack carbon-concentrating mechanisms are potentially inorganic carbon-limited under current air equilibrium conditions. To estimate effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and ocean acidification on photosynthetic rates, we modeled rates of photosynthesis in response to pCO2, temperature, and their interaction under limiting and saturating photon flux densities. We synthesized the available data for photosynthetic responses of red seaweeds lacking carbon-concentrating mechanisms to light and temperature. The model was parameterized with published data and known carbonate system dynamics. The model predicts that direction and magnitude of response to pCO2 and temperature, depend on photon flux density. At sub-saturating light intensities, photosynthetic rates are predicted to be low and respond positively to increasing pCO2, and negatively to increasing temperature. Consequently, pCO2 and temperature are predicted to interact antagonistically to influence photosynthetic rates at low PFD. The model predicts that pCO2 will have a much larger effect than temperature at sub-saturating light intensities. However, photosynthetic rates under low light will not increase proportionately as pCO2 in seawater continues to rise. In the range of light saturation (Ik), both CO2 and temperature have positive effects on photosynthetic rate and correspondingly strong predicted synergistic effects. At saturating light intensities, the response of photosynthetic rates to increasing pCO2 approaches linearity, but the model also predicts increased importance of thermal over pCO2 effects, with effects acting additively. Increasing boundary layer thickness decreased the effect of added pCO2 and, for very thick boundary layers, overwhelmed the effect of temperature on photosynthetic rates. The maximum photosynthetic rates of strictly CO2-using algae are low, so even large percentage increases in rates with climate change will not contribute much to

  11. Mice lacking Mrp1 have reduced testicular steroid hormone levels and alterations in steroid biosynthetic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    SIVILS, JEFFREY C.; GONZALEZ, IVEN; BAIN, LISA J.

    2010-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a member of the ABC active transporter family that can transport several steroid hormone conjugates, including 17β-estradiol glucuronide, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and estrone 3-sulfate. The present study investigated the role that MRP1 plays in maintaining proper hormone levels in the serum and testes. Serum and testicular steroid hormone levels were examined in both wild-type mice and Mrp1 null mice. Serum testosterone levels were reduced 5-fold in mice lacking Mrp1, while testicular androstenedione, testosterone, estradiol, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were significantly reduced by 1.7- to 4.5-fold in Mrp1 knockout mice. Investigating the mechanisms responsible for the reduction in steroid hormones in Mrp1-/- mice revealed no differences in the expression or activity of enzymes that inactivate steroids, the sulfotransferases or glucuronosyltransferases. However, steroid biosynthetic enzyme levels in the testes were altered. Cyp17 protein levels were increased by 1.6-fold, while Cyp17 activity using progesterone as a substrate was also increased by 1.4-2.0-fold in mice lacking Mrp1. Additionally, the ratio of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase to 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and steroidogenic factor 1 to 3βhydroxysteroid dehydrogenase were significantly increased in the testes of Mrp1-/- mice. These results indicate that Mrp1-/- mice have lowered steroid hormones levels, and suggests that upregulation of steroid biosynthetic enzymes may be an attempt to maintain proper steroid hormone homeostasis. PMID:20178799

  12. The lack of autophagy triggers precocious activation of Notch signaling during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The proper balance of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradation process, is indispensable for oogenesis in Drosophila. We recently demonstrated that egg development depends on autophagy in the somatic follicle cells (FC), but not in the germline cells (GCs). However, the lack of autophagy only affects oogenesis when FCs are autophagy-deficient but GCs are wild type, indicating that a dysfunctional signaling between soma and germline may be responsible for the oogenesis defects. Thus, autophagy could play an essential role in modulating signal transduction pathways during egg development. Results Here, we provide further evidence for the necessity of autophagy during oogenesis and demonstrate that autophagy is especially required in subsets of FCs. Generation of autophagy-deficient FCs leads to a wide range of phenotypes that are similar to mutants with defects in the classical cell-cell signaling pathways in the ovary. Interestingly, we observe that loss of autophagy leads to a precocious activation of the Notch pathway in the FCs as monitored by the expression of Cut and Hindsight, two downstream effectors of Notch signaling. Conclusion Our findings point to an unexpected function for autophagy in the modulation of the Notch signaling pathway during Drosophila oogenesis and suggest a function for autophagy in proper receptor activation. Egg development is affected by an imbalance of autophagy between signal sending (germline) and signal receiving cell (FC), thus the lack of autophagy in the germline is likely to decrease the amount of active ligand and accordingly compensates for increased signaling in autophagy-defective follicle cells. PMID:23217079

  13. Lack of usefulness of ureteral reconstruction with free bladder mucosa flap in dogs confirmed by microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Kuzaka, Bolesław; Borkowski, Tomasz; Kuzaka, Piotr; Szostek, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data addressing the blood supply in the surgically reconstructed ureter, and complete lack of microangiographic studies of the reconstructed ureter with the use of a free bladder mucosa flap. The present study evaluated the blood supply in the reconstructed dog ureter after a 5-centimeter segment resection, supplemented by a tube constructed from a free bladder mucosa flap. Material/Methods Female mongrel dogs (n=29) were used in this study. Under general anaesthesia, a 5-centimeter autologous free bladder mucosa flap was used to construct a tube, which was afterwards grafted to replace a 5-centimeter ureter resection. After a period of 3 months (n=2) and after 1 year (n=2), microangiography was performed to assess the revascularization of the grafted ureter. Results In our study, we observed the continuity of the ureter, but the grafted reconstruction was narrowed by the cicatrization in about 86% (n=25) of cases. This resulted in the development of hydronephrosis, as described in previous publications. The ureteral wall was covered by a normal urothelium, but consisted of fibrous connective tissue, which failed to restore a regular (normal) coat. The reconstructed segment showed no smooth muscle cells. A few smooth monocytes were found only at the border with intact portions of the ureter. The microangiography performed at the end of the experiments showed no vascularization of the restored segment of the ureter. Conclusions The experiments showed a whole regeneration of urothelium in the transected and reanastomosed ureters. However, there was no regeneration of the muscular coat and a complete lack of revascularization. PMID:24980521

  14. Canid progesterone receptors lack activation function 3 domain-dependent activity.

    PubMed

    Gracanin, Ana; van Wolferen, Monique E; Sartorius, Carol A; Brenkman, Arjan B; Schoonen, Willem G; Mol, Jan A

    2012-12-01

    Progesterone regulates multiple behavioral, physiological, and pathological aspects of female reproductive biology through its two progesterone receptors (PRs), PR-B and the truncated PR-A. PR-B is necessary for mammary gland development in mice and, compared with PR-A, is overall a stronger transactivator of target genes due to an additional activation function 3 (AF3) domain. In dogs, known for their high sensitivity to progesterone-induced mammary cancer, the PR-B function was studied. Canine PR (cPR)-B appeared to contain multiple mutations within AF3 core sequence motifs and lacks N-terminal ligand-independent posttranslational modifications. Consequently, cPR-B has a weak transactivation potential on progesterone-responsive mouse mammary tumor virus-luc and progesterone response element 2-luc reporters transiently transfected in hamster, human, or canine cells and also on known target genes FKBP5 and SGK in doxycycline-inducible, stable transfected cPR-B in canine mammary cells. The cPR-B function was restored to the level of human PR-B by the replacement of canine AF3 domain with the human one. The lack of AF3 domain-dependent transcriptional activity was unique for canids (gray wolf, red fox, and raccoon dog) and not present in closely related caniform species (brown bear, gray seal, and domestic ferret). Despite the limited transactivation potential, canids develop normal mammary glands and frequently mammary tumors. Therefore, these results question the role of PR-B in breast cancer development and may explain unique features of canid reproduction.

  15. Lack of innate interferon responses during SARS coronavirus infection in a vaccination and reinfection ferret model.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Mark J; Kelvin, Alyson A; Leon, Alberto J; Cameron, Cheryl M; Ran, Longsi; Xu, Luoling; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Danesh, Ali; Fang, Yuan; Li, Qianjun; Anderson, Austin; Couch, Ronald C; Paquette, Stephane G; Fomukong, Ndingsa G; Kistner, Otfried; Lauchart, Manfred; Rowe, Thomas; Harrod, Kevin S; Jonsson, Colleen B; Kelvin, David J

    2012-01-01

    In terms of its highly pathogenic nature, there remains a significant need to further define the immune pathology of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection, as well as identify correlates of immunity to help develop vaccines for severe coronaviral infections. Here we use a SARS-CoV infection-reinfection ferret model and a functional genomics approach to gain insight into SARS immunopathogenesis and to identify correlates of immune protection during SARS-CoV-challenge in ferrets previously infected with SARS-CoV or immunized with a SARS virus vaccine. We identified gene expression signatures in the lungs of ferrets associated with primary immune responses to SARS-CoV infection and in ferrets that received an identical second inoculum. Acute SARS-CoV infection prompted coordinated innate immune responses that were dominated by antiviral IFN response gene (IRG) expression. Reinfected ferrets, however, lacked the integrated expression of IRGs that was prevalent during acute infection. The expression of specific IRGs was also absent upon challenge in ferrets immunized with an inactivated, Al(OH)(3)-adjuvanted whole virus SARS vaccine candidate that protected them against SARS-CoV infection in the lungs. Lack of IFN-mediated immune enhancement in infected ferrets that were previously inoculated with, or vaccinated against, SARS-CoV revealed 9 IRG correlates of protective immunity. This data provides insight into the molecular pathogenesis of SARS-CoV and SARS-like-CoV infections and is an important resource for the development of CoV antiviral therapeutics and vaccines.

  16. Decreased tumorigenesis and mortality from bladder cancer in mice lacking urothelial androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jong-Wei; Hsu, Iawen; Xu, Defeng; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Liang, Liang; Wu, Xue-Ru; Shyr, Chih-Rong; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-05-01

    Much fewer mice lacking androgen receptor (AR) in the entire body develop bladder cancer (BCa). However, the role of urothelial AR (Uro-AR) in BCa development remains unclear. In the present study, we generated mice that lacked only Uro-AR (Uro-AR(-/y)) to develop BCa by using the carcinogen BBN [N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine] and found that Uro-AR(-/y) mice had a lower incidence of BCa and a higher survival rate than did their wild-type (WT; Uro-AR(+/y)) littermates. In vitro assay also demonstrated that Uro-AR facilitates the neoplastic transformation of normal urothelial cells to carcinoma. IHC staining exhibited less DNA damage, with much higher expression of p53 and its downstream target protein PNCA in Uro-AR(-/y) than that found in WT urothelium, which suggests that Uro-AR may modulate bladder tumorigenesis through p53-PCNA DNA repair signaling. Indeed, Uro-AR(-/y) mice with the transgene, simian vacuolating virus 40 T (SV40T), in the urothelium (Uro-SV40T-AR(-/y)) had a similar incidence of BCa as did their WT littermates (Uro-SV40T-AR(+/y)), and p53 was inactivated by SV40T in both genotypes. Use of the AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9 led to suppression of bladder tumorigenesis, with few adverse effects in the BBN-induced BCa mouse model. Together, these results provide the first direct in vivo evidence that Uro-AR has an important role in promoting bladder tumorigenesis and BCa progression. Targeting AR with ASC-J9 may provide a novel approach to suppress BCa initiation.

  17. Lack of Phylogeographic Structure in the Freshwater Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Suggests Global Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    van Gremberghe, Ineke; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Van der Gucht, Katleen; Debeer, Ann-Eline; Lacerot, Gissell; De Meester, Luc; Vyverman, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Background Free-living microorganisms have long been assumed to have ubiquitous distributions with little biogeographic signature because they typically exhibit high dispersal potential and large population sizes. However, molecular data provide contrasting results and it is far from clear to what extent dispersal limitation determines geographic structuring of microbial populations. We aimed to determine biogeographical patterns of the bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. Being widely distributed on a global scale but patchily on a regional scale, this prokaryote is an ideal model organism to study microbial dispersal and biogeography. Methodology/Principal Findings The phylogeography of M. aeruginosa was studied based on a dataset of 311 rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences sampled from six continents. Richness of ITS sequences was high (239 ITS types were detected). Genetic divergence among ITS types averaged 4% (maximum pairwise divergence was 13%). Preliminary analyses revealed nearly completely unresolved phylogenetic relationships and a lack of genetic structure among all sequences due to extensive homoplasy at multiple hypervariable sites. After correcting for this, still no clear phylogeographic structure was detected, and no pattern of isolation by distance was found on a global scale. Concomitantly, genetic differentiation among continents was marginal, whereas variation within continents was high and was mostly shared with all other continents. Similarly, no genetic structure across climate zones was detected. Conclusions/Significance The high overall diversity and wide global distribution of common ITS types in combination with the lack of phylogeographic structure suggest that intercontinental dispersal of M. aeruginosa ITS types is not rare, and that this species might have a truly cosmopolitan distribution. PMID:21573169

  18. Increased consumption of ethanol and sugar water in mice lacking the dopamine D2 long receptor.

    PubMed

    Bulwa, Zachary B; Sharlin, Jordan A; Clark, Peter J; Bhattacharya, Tushar K; Kilby, Chessa N; Wang, Yanyan; Rhodes, Justin S

    2011-11-01

    Individual differences in dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) expression in the brain are thought to influence motivation and reinforcement for ethanol and other rewards. D2R exists in two isoforms, D2 long (D2LR) and D2 short (D2SR), produced by alternative splicing of the same gene. The relative contributions of D2LR versus D2SR to ethanol and sugar water drinking are not known. Genetic engineering was used to produce a line of knockout (KO) mice that lack D2LR and consequently have increased expression of D2SR. KO and wild-type (WT) mice of both sexes were tested for intake of 20% ethanol, 10% sugar water and plain tap water using established drinking-in-the-dark procedures. Mice were also tested for effects of the D2 antagonist eticlopride on intake of ethanol to determine whether KO responses were caused by lack of D2LR or overrepresentation of D2SR. Locomotor activity on running wheels and in cages without wheels was also measured for comparison. D2L KO mice drank significantly more ethanol than WT in both sexes. KO mice drank more sugar water than WT in females but not in males. Eticlopride dose dependently decreased ethanol intake in all groups except male KO. KO mice were less physically active than WT in cages with or without running wheels. Results suggest that overrepresentation of D2SR contributes to increased intake of ethanol in the KO mice. Decreasing wheel running and general levels of physical activity in the KO mice rules out the possibility that higher intake results from higher motor activity. Results extend the literature implicating altered expression of D2R in risk for addiction by delineating the contribution of individual D2R isoforms. These findings suggest that D2LR and D2SR play differential roles in consumption of alcohol and sugar rewards.

  19. 37 CFR 1.489 - Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority. 1.489 Section 1.489 Patents, Trademarks... Protest to lack of unity of invention before the International Preliminary Examining Authority. (a) If the applicant disagrees with the holding of lack of unity of invention by the International...

  20. The Impact of Lack of Resources on Declining Students' Enrolments in Design and Technology in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaotlhobogwe, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Lack of resources has resulted in declining students' enrolment in design and technology in Botswana junior secondary schools by up to 6% per year over 10 years, despite positive encouragement by the government. Based on the PATT (pupils' attitude towards technology) theoretical framework this study indicated how a lack of resources in Botswana…

  1. Replication of Human Norovirus RNA in Mammalian Cells Reveals Lack of Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Lin; Murakami, Kosuke; Broughman, James R.; Lay, Margarita K.; Guix, Susana; Tenge, Victoria R.; Atmar, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (HuNoVs), named after the prototype strain Norwalk virus (NV), are a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. Studies on the related murine norovirus (MNV) have demonstrated the importance of an interferon (IFN) response in host control of virus replication, but this remains unclear for HuNoVs. Despite the lack of an efficient cell culture infection system, transfection of stool-isolated NV RNA into mammalian cells leads to viral RNA replication and virus production. Using this system, we show here that NV RNA replication is sensitive to type I (α/β) and III (interleukin-29 [IL-29]) IFN treatment. However, in cells capable of a strong IFN response to Sendai virus (SeV) and poly(I·C), NV RNA replicates efficiently and generates double-stranded RNA without inducing a detectable IFN response. Replication of HuNoV genogroup GII.3 strain U201 RNA, generated from a reverse genetics system, also does not induce an IFN response. Consistent with a lack of IFN induction, NV RNA replication is enhanced neither by neutralization of type I/III IFNs through neutralizing antibodies or the soluble IFN decoy receptor B18R nor by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) or interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in the IFN induction pathways. In contrast to other positive-strand RNA viruses that block IFN induction by targeting MAVS for degradation, MAVS is not degraded in NV RNA-replicating cells, and an SeV-induced IFN response is not blocked. Together, these results indicate that HuNoV RNA replication in mammalian cells does not induce an IFN response, suggesting that the epithelial IFN response may play a limited role in host restriction of HuNoV replication. IMPORTANCE Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to lack of an efficient cell culture system and robust small-animal model, little is known about the innate host defense to these

  2. Profiling of proteolytic enzymes in the gut of the tick Ixodes ricinus reveals an evolutionarily conserved network of aspartic and cysteine peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Daniel; Franta, Zdeněk; Horn, Martin; Hajdušek, Ondřej; Caffrey, Conor R; Mareš, Michael; Kopáček, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Background Ticks are vectors for a variety of viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases in human and domestic animals. To survive and reproduce ticks feed on host blood, yet our understanding of the intestinal proteolytic machinery used to derive absorbable nutrients from the blood meal is poor. Intestinal digestive processes are limiting factors for pathogen transmission since the tick gut presents the primary site of infection. Moreover, digestive enzymes may find practical application as anti-tick vaccine targets. Results Using the hard tick, Ixodes ricinus, we performed a functional activity scan of the peptidase complement in gut tissue extracts that demonstrated the presence of five types of peptidases of the cysteine and aspartic classes. We followed up with genetic screens of gut-derived cDNA to identify and clone genes encoding the cysteine peptidases cathepsins B, L and C, an asparaginyl endopeptidase (legumain), and the aspartic peptidase, cathepsin D. By RT-PCR, expression of asparaginyl endopeptidase and cathepsins B and D was restricted to gut tissue and to those developmental stages feeding on blood. Conclusion Overall, our results demonstrate the presence of a network of cysteine and aspartic peptidases that conceivably operates to digest host blood proteins in a concerted manner. Significantly, the peptidase components of this digestive network are orthologous to those described in other parasites, including nematodes and flatworms. Accordingly, the present data and those available for other tick species support the notion of an evolutionary conservation of a cysteine/aspartic peptidase system for digestion that includes ticks, but differs from that of insects relying on serine peptidases. PMID:18348719

  3. Synthesis of a novel legumain-cleavable colchicine prodrug with cell-specific toxicity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert Løvsletten; Åstrand, Ove Alexander Høgmoen; Nguyen, Luan Minh; Elvestrand, Tina; Hagelin, Gunnar; Solberg, Rigmor; Johansen, Harald Thidemann; Rongved, Pål

    2014-07-01

    Conventional chemotherapy has undesirable toxic side-effects to healthy tissues due to low cell selectivity of cytotoxic drugs. One approach to increase the specificity of a cytotoxic drug is to make a less toxic prodrug which becomes activated at the tumour site. The cysteine protease legumain have remarkable restricted substrate specificity and is the only known mammalian asparaginyl (Asn) endopeptidase. Over-expression of legumain is reported in cancers and unstable atherosclerotic plaques, and utilizing legumain is a promising approach to activate prodrugs. In this study we have synthesized the legumain-cleavable peptide sequence N-Boc-Ala-Ala-Asn-Val-OH. The peptide was subsequently conjugated to deacetyl colchicine during three steps to produce Suc-Ala-Ala-Asn-Val-colchicine (prodrug) with >90% chemical purity. Several cell lines with different expressions and activities of legumain were used to evaluate the general toxicity, specificity and efficacy of the microtubule inhibitor colchicine, valyl colchicine and the legumain-cleavable colchicine prodrug. The prodrug was more toxic to the colorectal cancer HCT116 cells (expressing both the 36kDa active and 56kDa proform of legumain) than SW620 cells (only expressing the 56kDa prolegumain) indicating a relationship between toxicity of the prodrug and activity of legumain in the cells. Also, in monoclonal legumain over-expressing HEK293 cells the prodrug toxicity was higher compared to native HEK293 cells. Furthermore, co-administration of the prodrug either with the potent legumain inhibitor cystatin E/M or the endocytosis inhibitor Dyngo-4a inhibited cell death, indicating that the prodrug toxicity was dependent on both asparaginyl endopeptidase activity and endocytosis. This colchicine prodrug adds to a legumain-activated prodrug strategy approach and could possibly be of use both in targeted anticancer and anti-inflammatory therapy.

  4. Sweet potato cysteine proteases SPAE and SPCP2 participate in sporamin degradation during storage root sprouting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsien-Jung; Liang, Shu-Hao; Huang, Guan-Jhong; Lin, Yaw-Huei

    2015-08-15

    Sweet potato sporamins are trypsin inhibitors and exhibit strong resistance to digestion by pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin. In addition, they constitute the major storage proteins in the sweet potato and, after degradation, provide nitrogen as a nutrient for seedling regrowth in sprouting storage roots. In this report, four cysteine proteases-one asparaginyl endopeptidase (SPAE), two papain-like cysteine proteases (SPCP1 and SPCP2), and one granulin-containing cysteine protease (SPCP3)-were studied to determine their association with sporamin degradation in sprouting storage roots. Sporamin degradation became significant in the flesh of storage roots starting from week 4 after sprouting and this correlated with expression levels of SPAE and SPCP2, but not of SPCP1 and SPCP3. In the outer flesh near the skin, sporamin degradation was more evident and occurred earlier than in the inner flesh of storage roots. Degradation of sporamins in the outer flesh was inversely correlated with the distance of the storage root from the sprout. Exogenous application of SPAE and SPCP2, but not SPCP3, fusion proteins to crude extracts of the outer flesh (i.e., extracted from a depth of 0.3cm and within 2cm of one-week-old sprouts) promoted in vitro sporamin degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of SPAE and SPCP2 fusion proteins at 95°C for 5min prior to their application to the crude extracts reduced sporamin degradation. These data show that sweet potato asparaginyl endopeptidase SPAE and papain-like cysteine protease SPCP2 participate in sporamin degradation during storage root sprouting.

  5. Investigation of the Lack of Angiogenesis in the Formation of Lymph Node Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Han-Sin; Jones, Dennis; Liao, Shan; Wattson, Daniel A.; Cui, Cheryl H.; Duda, Dan G.; Willett, Christopher G.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To date, antiangiogenic therapy has failed to improve overall survival in cancer patients when used in the adjuvant setting (local-regional disease with no detectable systemic metastasis). The presence of lymph node metastases worsens prognosis, however their reliance on angiogenesis for growth has not been reported. Methods: Here, we introduce a novel chronic lymph node window (CLNW) model to facilitate new discoveries in the growth and spread of lymph node metastases. We use the CLNW in multiple models of spontaneous lymphatic metastases in mice to study the vasculature of metastatic lymph nodes (n = 9–12). We further test our results in patient samples (n = 20 colon cancer patients; n = 20 head and neck cancer patients). Finally, we test the ability of antiangiogenic therapy to inhibit metastatic growth in the CLNW. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Using the CLNW, we reveal the surprising lack of sprouting angiogenesis during metastatic growth, despite the presence of hypoxia in some lesions. Treatment with two different antiangiogenic therapies showed no effect on the growth or vascular density of lymph node metastases (day 10: untreated mean = 1.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.7% to 1.7%; control mean = 0.7%, 95% CI = 0.1% to 1.3%; DC101 mean = 0.4%, 95% CI = 0.0% to 3.3%; sunitinib mean = 0.5%, 95% CI = 0.0% to 1.0%, analysis of variance P = .34). We confirmed these findings in clinical specimens, including the lack of reduction in blood vessel density in lymph node metastases in patients treated with bevacizumab (no bevacizumab group mean = 257 vessels/mm2, 95% CI = 149 to 365 vessels/mm2; bevacizumab group mean = 327 vessels/mm2, 95% CI = 140 to 514 vessels/mm2, P = .78). Conclusion: We provide preclinical and clinical evidence that sprouting angiogenesis does not occur during the growth of lymph node metastases, and thus reveals a new mechanism of treatment resistance to antiangiogenic therapy in adjuvant settings. The

  6. Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice Lacking the Tas1r3 Taste Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled sweet taste receptor dimer T1R2/T1R3 is expressed in taste bud cells in the oral cavity. In recent years, its involvement in membrane glucose sensing was discovered in endocrine cells regulating glucose homeostasis. We investigated importance of extraorally expressed T1R3 taste receptor protein in age-dependent control of blood glucose homeostasis in vivo, using nonfasted mice with a targeted mutation of the Tas1r3 gene that encodes the T1R3 protein. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as behavioral tests measuring taste responses to sucrose solutions, were performed with C57BL/6ByJ (Tas1r3+/+) inbred mice bearing the wild-type allele and C57BL/6J-Tas1r3tm1Rfm mice lacking the entire Tas1r3 coding region and devoid of the T1R3 protein (Tas1r3-/-). Compared with Tas1r3+/+ mice, Tas1r3-/- mice lacked attraction to sucrose in brief-access licking tests, had diminished taste preferences for sucrose solutions in the two-bottle tests, and had reduced insulin sensitivity and tolerance to glucose administered intraperitoneally or intragastrically, which suggests that these effects are due to absence of T1R3. Impairment of glucose clearance in Tas1r3-/- mice was exacerbated with age after intraperitoneal but not intragastric administration of glucose, pointing to a compensatory role of extraoral T1R3-dependent mechanisms in offsetting age-dependent decline in regulation of glucose homeostasis. Incretin effects were similar in Tas1r3+/+ and Tas1r3-/- mice, which suggests that control of blood glucose clearance is associated with effects of extraoral T1R3 in tissues other than the gastrointestinal tract. Collectively, the obtained data demonstrate that the T1R3 receptor protein plays an important role in control of glucose homeostasis not only by regulating sugar intake but also via its extraoral function, probably in the pancreas and brain. PMID:26107521

  7. Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice Lacking the Tas1r3 Taste Receptor Gene.

    PubMed

    Murovets, Vladimir O; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Zolotarev, Vasiliy A

    2015-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled sweet taste receptor dimer T1R2/T1R3 is expressed in taste bud cells in the oral cavity. In recent years, its involvement in membrane glucose sensing was discovered in endocrine cells regulating glucose homeostasis. We investigated importance of extraorally expressed T1R3 taste receptor protein in age-dependent control of blood glucose homeostasis in vivo, using nonfasted mice with a targeted mutation of the Tas1r3 gene that encodes the T1R3 protein. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as behavioral tests measuring taste responses to sucrose solutions, were performed with C57BL/6ByJ (Tas1r3+/+) inbred mice bearing the wild-type allele and C57BL/6J-Tas1r3tm1Rfm mice lacking the entire Tas1r3 coding region and devoid of the T1R3 protein (Tas1r3-/-). Compared with Tas1r3+/+ mice, Tas1r3-/- mice lacked attraction to sucrose in brief-access licking tests, had diminished taste preferences for sucrose solutions in the two-bottle tests, and had reduced insulin sensitivity and tolerance to glucose administered intraperitoneally or intragastrically, which suggests that these effects are due to absence of T1R3. Impairment of glucose clearance in Tas1r3-/- mice was exacerbated with age after intraperitoneal but not intragastric administration of glucose, pointing to a compensatory role of extraoral T1R3-dependent mechanisms in offsetting age-dependent decline in regulation of glucose homeostasis. Incretin effects were similar in Tas1r3+/+ and Tas1r3-/- mice, which suggests that control of blood glucose clearance is associated with effects of extraoral T1R3 in tissues other than the gastrointestinal tract. Collectively, the obtained data demonstrate that the T1R3 receptor protein plays an important role in control of glucose homeostasis not only by regulating sugar intake but also via its extraoral function, probably in the pancreas and brain.

  8. Generation of Recombinant Oropouche Viruses Lacking the Nonstructural Protein NSm or NSs

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Richard E.; Elliott, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oropouche virus (OROV) is a midge-borne human pathogen with a geographic distribution in South America. OROV was first isolated in 1955, and since then, it has been known to cause recurring outbreaks of a dengue-like illness in the Amazonian regions of Brazil. OROV, however, remains one of the most poorly understood emerging viral zoonoses. Here we describe the successful recovery of infectious OROV entirely from cDNA copies of its genome and generation of OROV mutant viruses lacking either the NSm or the NSs coding region. Characterization of the recombinant viruses carried out in vitro demonstrated that the NSs protein of OROV is an interferon (IFN) antagonist as in other NSs-encoding bunyaviruses. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of the nine C-terminal amino acids of OROV NSs in IFN antagonistic activity. OROV was also found to be sensitive to IFN-α when cells were pretreated; however, the virus was still capable of replicating at doses as high as 10,000 U/ml of IFN-α, in contrast to the family prototype BUNV. We found that OROV lacking the NSm protein displayed characteristics similar to those of the wild-type virus, suggesting that the NSm protein is dispensable for virus replication in the mammalian and mosquito cell lines that were tested. IMPORTANCE Oropouche virus (OROV) is a public health threat in Central and South America, where it causes periodic outbreaks of dengue-like illness. In Brazil, OROV is the second most frequent cause of arboviral febrile illness after dengue virus, and with the current rates of urban expansion, more cases of this emerging viral zoonosis could occur. To better understand the molecular biology of OROV, we have successfully rescued the virus along with mutants. We have established that the C terminus of the NSs protein is important in interferon antagonism and that the NSm protein is dispensable for virus replication in cell culture. The tools described in this paper are important in terms of

  9. Evidence for a lack of biological P-cycling in a Cambrian soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Z.; Peng, Y.; Bao, H.

    2015-12-01

    The earliest fossil land plants are known to exist in the Mid-Ordovician at 472 to 468 Ma and protein sequence analyses suggest that the onset of land colonization may have begun at as early as ca. 700-1000 million years ago (Ma) . However, fully established soil ecosystem may not be in place until after the Devonian (ca. 400 Ma) or even later. Dearth of fossil record on possible fungi- and/or bacteria-dominated early land biota renders it difficult to establish the early history of land colonization on Earth. Here we present a proxy for soil biological P- cycling. Igneous rock contains typically 0.005-0.4% (wt) phosphate (PO4-3). In a biologically active soil weathering profile, phosphorus (P) is cycled by land biota including by those of the most primitive kingdoms. During, for example, pyrophosphate hydrolysis, the P-O bonds in PO4-3 breaks and exchange oxygen with ambient water. The biologically processed PO4-3 will have typically much higher δ18Ovalues (15-24‰ VSMOW) than the ones inherited from igneous sources (ca. 6‰). Therefore, an increase in the δ18OPO4 from pristine igneous rocks to the upper more weathered ones should be expected if there was an active soil biological P-cycling. An igneous-PO4 δ18O value in the more weathered rocks would otherwise indicate a lack of biologically-mediated P-cycling, thus a lack of or very limited land colonization. We examined a weathering profile in the Elk Point Formation (520-503Ma), South Dakota, a paleosol developed on a metagabbro in a subtropical climate of the Mid-Cambrian. Phosphate was extracted from a drill core of this profile and was analyzed for δ18OPO4. The δ18OPO4 for the weathered and un-weathered igneous rocks are all within a narrow range of 4.8-8.2‰, suggesting that biological P-cycling was insignificant during the weathering of Elk Point metagabbro at ca. 500 Ma. Subaerial, biologically mediated weathering probably did not play a role in geochemical cycling on Earth until much later in

  10. Increased renal renin content in mice lacking the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE2.

    PubMed

    Hanner, Fiona; Chambrey, Régine; Bourgeois, Soline; Meer, Elliott; Mucsi, István; Rosivall, László; Shull, Gary E; Lorenz, John N; Eladari, Dominique; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2008-04-01

    Macula densa (MD) cells express the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) isoform NHE2 at the apical membrane, which may play an important role in tubular salt sensing through the regulation of cell volume and intracellular pH. These studies aimed to determine whether NHE2 participates in the MD control of renin synthesis. Renal renin content and activity and elements of the MD signaling pathway were analyzed using wild-type (NHE2(+/+)) and NHE2 knockout (NHE2(-/-)) mice. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that NHE2(-/-) mice lack NHE3 at the MD apical membrane, so the other apical NHE isoform has not compensated for the lack of NHE2. Importantly, the number of renin-expressing cells in the afferent arteriole in NHE2(-/-) mice was increased approximately 2.5-fold using renin immunohistochemistry. Western blotting confirmed approximately 20% higher renal cortical renin content in NHE2(-/-) mice compared with wild type. No-salt diet for 1 wk significantly increased renin content and activity in NHE2(+/+) mice, but the response was blunted in NHE2(-/-) mice. Renal tissue renin activity and plasma renin concentration were elevated three- and twofold, respectively, in NHE2(-/-) mice compared with wild type. NHE2(-/-) mice also exhibited a significantly increased renal cortical cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES) expression, indicating MD-specific mechanisms responsible for the increased renin content. Significant and chronic activation of ERK1/2 was observed in MD cells of NHE2(-/-) kidneys. Removal of salt or addition of NHE inhibitors to cultured mouse MD-derived (MMDD1) cells caused a time-dependent activation of ERK1/2. In conclusion, the NHE2 isoform appears to be important in the MD feedback control of renin secretion, and the signaling pathway likely involves MD cell shrinkage and activation of ERK1/2, COX-2, and mPGES, all well-established elements of the MD-PGE(2)-renin release pathway.

  11. Lack of uniform trends but increasing spatial variability in observed Indian rainfall extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Subimal; Das, Debasish; Kao, Shih-Chieh; Ganguly, Auroop R

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies disagree on how rainfall extremes over India have changed in space and time over the past half century, as well as on whether the changes observed are due to global warming or regional urbanization. Although a uniform and consistent decrease in moderate rainfall has been reported, a lack of agreement about trends in heavy rainfall may be due in part to differences in the characterization and spatial averaging of extremes. Here we use extreme value theory to examine trends in Indian rainfall over the past half century in the context of long-term, low-frequency variability.We show that when generalized extreme value theory is applied to annual maximum rainfall over India, no statistically significant spatially uniform trends are observed, in agreement with previous studies using different approaches. Furthermore, our space time regression analysis of the return levels points to increasing spatial variability of rainfall extremes over India. Our findings highlight the need for systematic examination of global versus regional drivers of trends in Indian rainfall extremes, and may help to inform flood hazard preparedness and water resource management in the region.

  12. Remodeling of the cervix and parturition in mice lacking the progesterone receptor B isoform.

    PubMed

    Yellon, Steven M; Oshiro, Bryan T; Chhaya, Tejas Y; Lechuga, Thomas J; Dias, Rejane M; Burns, Alexandra E; Force, Lindsey; Apostolakis, Ede M

    2011-09-01

    Withdrawal of progestational support for pregnancy is part of the final common pathways for parturition, but the role of nuclear progesterone receptor (PGR) isoforms in this process is not known. To determine if the PGR-B isoform participates in cervical remodeling at term, cervices were obtained from mice lacking PGR-B (PGR-BKO) and from wild-type (WT) controls before or after birth. PGR-BKO mice gave birth to viable pups at the same time as WT controls during the early morning of Day 19 postbreeding. Morphological analyses indicated that by the day before birth, cervices from PGR-BKO and WT mice had increased in size, with fewer cell nuclei/area as well as diminished collagen content and structure, as evidenced by optical density of picrosirius red-stained sections, compared to cervices from nonpregnant mice. Moreover, increased numbers of resident macrophages, but not neutrophils, were found in the prepartum cervix of PGR-BKO compared to nonpregnant mice, parallel to findings in WT mice. These results suggest that PGR-B does not contribute to the growth or degradation of the extracellular matrix or proinflammatory processes associated with recruitment of macrophages in the cervix leading up to birth. Rather, other receptors may contribute to the progesterone-dependent mechanism that promotes remodeling of the cervix during pregnancy and in the proinflammatory process associated with ripening before parturition.

  13. Mutant huntingtin regulates EGF receptor fate in non-neuronal cells lacking wild-type protein.

    PubMed

    Melone, Mariarosa A B; Calarco, Anna; Petillo, Orsolina; Margarucci, Sabrina; Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Galderisi, Umberto; Koverech, Guido; Peluso, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Huntingtin (htt) is a scaffold protein localized at the subcellular level and is involved in coordinating the activity of several protein for signaling and intracellular transport. The emerging properties of htt in intracellular trafficking prompted us to study the role of mutant htt (polyQ-htt) in the intracellular fate of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), whose activity seems to be strictly regulated by htt. In particular, to evaluate whether protein trafficking dysfunction occurs in non-neuronal cells in the absence of functional htt, we monitored the EGFR protein in fibroblasts from homozygotic HD patients and their healthy counterpart. We found that polyQ-htt controls EGFR degradation and recycling. Lack of wild-type htt caused alteration of the ubiquitination cycle, formation of EGFR-incorporating high-molecular weight protein aggregates and abnormal EGFR distribution in endosomes of the degradation and recycling pathways after EGF stimulation. PolyQ-htt-induced alteration of EGFR trafficking affected cell migration and proliferation, at least in part, through inhibition of ERK signaling. To our knowledge the data here reported represent the first signaling and phenotypic characterization of polyQ-htt involvement in the modulation of growth factor stimulation in non-neuronal cells.

  14. Folate deficiency induces neurodegeneration and brain dysfunction in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Golo; Harms, Christoph; Sobol, Robert W; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Linhart, Heinz; Winter, Benjamin; Balkaya, Mustafa; Gertz, Karen; Gay, Shanna B; Cox, David; Eckart, Sarah; Ahmadi, Michael; Juckel, Georg; Kempermann, Gerd; Hellweg, Rainer; Sohr, Reinhard; Hörtnagl, Heide; Wilson, Samuel H; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Endres, Matthias

    2008-07-09

    Folate deficiency and resultant increased homocysteine levels have been linked experimentally and epidemiologically with neurodegenerative conditions like stroke and dementia. Moreover, folate deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, most notably depression. We hypothesized that the pathogenic mechanisms include uracil misincorporation and, therefore, analyzed the effects of folate deficiency in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung-/-) versus wild-type controls. Folate depletion increased nuclear mutation rates in Ung-/- embryonic fibroblasts, and conferred death of cultured Ung-/- hippocampal neurons. Feeding animals a folate-deficient diet (FD) for 3 months induced degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons in Ung-/- but not Ung+/+ mice along with decreased hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein and decreased brain levels of antioxidant glutathione. Furthermore, FD induced cognitive deficits and mood alterations such as anxious and despair-like behaviors that were aggravated in Ung-/- mice. Independent of Ung genotype, FD increased plasma homocysteine levels, altered brain monoamine metabolism, and inhibited adult hippocampal neurogenesis. These results indicate that impaired uracil repair is involved in neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric dysfunction induced by experimental folate deficiency.

  15. CHANGES IN DISULFIDE BOND CONTENT OF PROTEINS IN A YEAST STRAIN LACKING MAJOR SOURCES OF NADPH

    PubMed Central

    Minard, Karyl I.; Carroll, Christopher A.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Mc-Alister-Henn, Lee

    2006-01-01

    A yeast mutant lacking the two major cytosolic sources of NADPH, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Zwf1p) and NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (Idp2p), has been demonstrated to lose viability when shifted to medium with acetate or oleate as the carbon source. This loss in viability was found to correlate with an accumulation of endogenous oxidative byproducts of respiration and peroxisomal β-oxidation. To assess effects on cellular protein of endogenous versus exogenous oxidative stress, a proteomics approach was used to compare disulfide bond-containing proteins in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain following shifts to acetate and oleate media with those in the parental strain following similar shifts to media containing hydrogen peroxide. Among prominent disulfide bond-containing proteins were several with known antioxidant functions. These and several other proteins were detected as multiple electrophoretic isoforms, with some isoforms containing disulfide bonds under all conditions and other isoforms exhibiting a redox-sensitive content of disulfide bonds, i.e., in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain and in the hydrogen peroxide-challenged parental strain. The disulfide bond content of some isoforms of these proteins was also elevated in the parental strain grown on glucose, possibly suggesting a redirection of NADPH reducing equivalents to support rapid growth. Further examination of protein carbonylation in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain shifted to oleate medium also led to identification of common and unique protein targets of endogenous oxidative stress. PMID:17157197

  16. Characterization of Frog Virus 3 knockout mutants lacking putative virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Andino, Francisco De Jesús; Grayfer, Leon; Chen, Guangchun; Chinchar, V Gregory; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Robert, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    To identify ranavirus virulence genes, we engineered Frog Virus 3 (FV3) knockout (KO) mutants defective for a putative viral caspase activation and recruitment domain-containing (CARD) protein (Δ64R-FV3) and a β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase homolog (Δ52L-FV3). Compared to wild type (WT) FV3, infection of Xenopus tadpoles with Δ64R- or Δ52L-FV3 resulted in significantly lower levels of mortality and viral replication. We further characterized these and two earlier KO mutants lacking the immediate-early18kDa protein (FV3-Δ18K) or the truncated viral homolog of eIF-2α (FV3-ΔvIF-2α). All KO mutants replicated as well as WT-FV3 in non-amphibian cell lines, whereas in Xenopus A6 kidney cells replication of ΔvCARD-, ΔvβHSD- and ΔvIF-2α-FV3 was markedly reduced. Furthermore, Δ64R- and ΔvIF-2α-FV3 were more sensitive to interferon than WT and Δ18-FV3. Notably, Δ64R-, Δ18K- and ΔvIF-2α- but not Δ52L-FV3 triggered more apoptosis than WT FV3. These data suggest that vCARD (64R) and vβ-HSD (52L) genes contribute to viral pathogenesis.

  17. Lack of an effect of dietary fructose on severity of zinc deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Failla, M L; Fields, M; Rose, A; Seidel, K

    1987-08-01

    Because feeding rats diets containing fructose as the carbohydrate source reduces copper and selenium status, we investigated whether the type of dietary carbohydrate also affected indices of zinc status. The experimental design was a 2 X 2 factorial study with the source of dietary carbohydrate (cornstarch or fructose) and the level of dietary zinc (0.7 or 31 micrograms Zn/g) as the variables. The experiment utilized 76 weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats randomly assigned to one of four dietary groups. Animals fed a zinc-deficient fructose diet were allowed to consume the diet ad libitum; all other groups were pair-fed to that group to ensure equivalent nutrient and energy intake. The results of the 29-d study showed that the most sensitive indices of zinc status measured, including growth, survival and the zinc concentrations of plasma, femur and testes, were not affected by the type of dietary carbohydrate. This lack of an effect of fructose on the zinc status of the experimental animals indicates that the ability of fructose to exacerbate copper and selenium deficiencies is specific, rather than representing a generalized effect of this simple sugar on the requirements and/or metabolism of all essential trace elements.

  18. Lack of sex-linked differences in cerebral edema and aquaporin-4 expression after experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Wenri; Alkayed, Nabil J; Froehner, Stanley C; Adams, Marvin E; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Hurn, Patricia D; Bhardwaj, Anish

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) has been shown to be important in the evolution of stroke-associated cerebral edema. However, the role of AQP4 in stroke-associated cerebral edema as it pertains to sex has not been previously studied. The perivascular pool of AQP4 is important in the influx and efflux of water during focal cerebral ischemia. We used mice with targeted disruption of the gene encoding α-syntrophin (α-Syn−/−) that lack the perivascular AQP4 pool but retain the endothelial pool of this protein. Infarct volume at 72h after transient focal ischemia (90 mins) in isoflurane-anesthetized mice was attenuated in both sexes with α-Syn deletion as compared with their wild-type (WT) counterparts. There were no sex differences in hemispheric water content in WT and α-Syn−/− mice or regional AQP4 expression in WT mice. In neither sex did α-Syn deletion lead to alterations in end-ischemic regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). These data suggest that after experimental stroke: (1) there is no difference in stroke-associated cerebral edema based on sex, (2) AQP4 does not involve in sex-based differences in stroke volume, and (3) perivascular pool of AQP4 has no significant role in end-ischemic rCBF. PMID:18648381

  19. Compost Grown Agaricus bisporus Lacks the Ability to Degrade and Consume Highly Substituted Xylan Fragments.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Edita; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; de Vries, Ronald P; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Agaricus bisporus is commercially grown for the production of edible mushrooms. This cultivation occurs on compost, but not all of this substrate is consumed by the fungus. To determine why certain fractions remain unused, carbohydrate degrading enzymes, water-extracted from mushroom-grown compost at different stages of mycelium growth and fruiting body formation, were analyzed for their ability to degrade a range of polysaccharides. Mainly endo-xylanase, endo-glucanase, β-xylosidase and β-glucanase activities were determined in the compost extracts obtained during mushroom growth. Interestingly, arabinofuranosidase activity able to remove arabinosyl residues from doubly substituted xylose residues and α-glucuronidase activity were not detected in the compost enzyme extracts. This correlates with the observed accumulation of arabinosyl and glucuronic acid substituents on the xylan backbone in the compost towards the end of the cultivation. Hence, it was concluded that compost grown A. bisporus lacks the ability to degrade and consume highly substituted xylan fragments.

  20. Lack of interactions between fire ant control products and white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in turfgrass.

    PubMed

    Barden, S Addison; Held, David W; Graham, L C Fudd

    2011-12-01

    Insecticides are widely used to manage turfgrass pest such as white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta (Buren) are important predators and pests in managed turfgrass. We tested the susceptibility of white grub life stages (adults, egg, and larvae) to predation by S. invicta and determined if insecticides applied for control of S. invicta would result in locally greater white grub populations. Field trials over 2 yr evaluated bifenthrin, fipronil, and hydramethylnon applied to large and small scale turfgrass plots for impacts on fire ant foraging and white grub populations. Coincident with these trials, adults, larvae, and eggs of common scarab species were evaluated for susceptibility to predation by S. invicta under field conditions. Field trials with insecticides failed to show a significant increase in white grub populations resulting from treatment of turfgrass for fire ants. This, in part, may be because of a lack of predation of S. invicta on adult and larval scarabs. Egg predation was greatest at 70% but < 20% of adults and larvae were attacked in a 24 h test. Contrary to other studies, results presented here suggest that fire ants and fire ant control products applied to turfgrass have a minimal impact on white grub populations.

  1. Claudin-11 Tight Junctions in Myelin Are a Barrier to Diffusion and Lack Strong Adhesive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Denninger, Andrew R.; Breglio, Andrew; Maheras, Kathleen J.; LeDuc, Geraldine; Cristiglio, Viviana; Demé, Bruno; Gow, Alexander; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The radial component is a network of interlamellar tight junctions (TJs) unique to central nervous system myelin. Ablation of claudin-11, a TJ protein, results in the absence of the radial component and compromises the passive electrical properties of myelin. Although TJs are known to regulate paracellular diffusion, this barrier function has not been directly demonstrated for the radial component, and some evidence suggests that the radial component may also mediate adhesion between myelin membranes. To investigate the physical properties of claudin-11 TJs, we compared fresh, unfixed Claudin 11-null and control nerves using x-ray and neutron diffraction. In Claudin 11-null tissue, we detected no changes in myelin structure, stability, or membrane interactions, which argues against the notion that myelin TJs exhibit significant adhesive properties. Moreover, our osmotic stressing and D2O-H2O exchange experiments demonstrate that myelin lacking claudin-11 is more permeable to water and small osmolytes. Thus, our data indicate that the radial component serves primarily as a diffusion barrier and elucidate the mechanism by which TJs govern myelin function. PMID:26445439

  2. Mice lacking angiotensin-converting enzyme have low blood pressure, renal pathology, and reduced male fertility.

    PubMed

    Esther, C R; Howard, T E; Marino, E M; Goddard, J M; Capecchi, M R; Bernstein, K E

    1996-05-01

    Mammals produce two isozymes of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Somatic ACE plays an important role in the control of blood pressure. The function of testis ACE, produced by male and germ cells, is not known. To examine the roles of these isozymes, we used targeted homologous recombination to introduce a modified ACE allele into a mouse line. Mice homozygous for this mutant allele lack both ACE isozymes and have markedly reduced blood pressures. Contrary to a previous report, we found heterozygous male mice to have normal blood pressures. Homozygous mutant mice also have severe renal disease. The renal papilla is markedly reduced, and the intrarenal arteries exhibit vascular hyperplasia associated with a perivascular inflammatory infiltrate. These animals cannot effectively concentrate urine. They also have an abnormally low urinary sodium to potassium ratio despite reduced levels of aldosterone. Homozygous mutant male mice sire significantly smaller litters than wild-type male mice; however, no defect in sperm number, morphology, or motility was detected. ACE-deficient animals demonstrate the role of this enzyme in systemic blood pressure, renal development and function, and male fertility.

  3. Lack of post-exercise depression of corticospinal excitability in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Khedr, E M; Galal, O; Said, A; Abd-elsameea, M; Rothwell, J C

    2007-07-01

    There is lack of clarity in the literature over whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) show the same post-exercise depression of corticospinal excitability as is usually observed in healthy control. This study set out to resolve the problem. Ten patients with idiopathic PD and 10 age-matched controls were included in this study. Each subject performed a submaximal sustained voluntary contraction of the right first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) for 10 min or until force could no longer be sustained. Resting motor threshold, motor-evoked potential (MEP), input-output curve, cortical silent period duration, interference pattern (IP) and M/F ratio were recorded at baseline, immediately after fatigue and after 20 min rest. Immediately after exercise, decreased MEP amplitude and increased cortical SP duration were observed in the control group whilst no such changes were observed in PD patients. The input-output curve was also significantly suppressed only in controls, but not in patients. The amplitude of IP was significantly reduced immediately after exercise in both PD patients and controls. Almost all these changes returned nearly to baseline values after 20 min rest. The amount of exercise was approximately equal in both groups because the effect on M-waves and EMG amplitude was similar. However, the expected decline in corticospinal excitability was absent in PD patients. The absence of this effect in PD patients may reflect reorganization of motor commands in response to basal ganglia deficit.

  4. Lack of resistance development in Bemisia tabaci to Isaria fumosorosea after multiple generations of selection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tianni; Wang, Zhaolei; Huang, Yü; Keyhani, Nemat O; Huang, Zhen

    2017-02-23

    The emergence of insecticide resistant insect pests is of significant concern worldwide. The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, is an important agricultural pest and has shown incredible resilience developing resistance to a number of chemical pesticides. Entomopathogenic fungi such as Isaria fumosorosea offer an attractive alternative to chemical pesticides for insect control, and this fungus has been shown to be an effective pathogen of B. tabaci. Little is known concerning the potential for the development of resistance to I. fumosorosea by B. tabaci. Five generations of successive survivors of B. tabaci infected by I. fumosorosea were assayed with I. fumosorosea. No significant differences in susceptibility to I. fumosorosea, number of ovarioles, or ovipostioning were seen between any of the generations tested. Effects of I. fumosorosea and cell-free ethyl acetate fractions derived from the fungus on the B. tabaci fat body, ovary, and vitellogenin were also investigated. These data revealed significant deformation and degradation of ovary tissues and associated vitellogenin by the fungal mycelium as well as by cell-free ethyl acetate fungal extracts. These data indicate the lack of the emergence of resistance to I. fumosorosea under the conditions tested and demonstrate invasion of the insect reproductive tissues during fungal infection.

  5. Blue-light-receptive cryptochrome is expressed in a sponge eye lacking neurons and opsin.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Ajna S; Ozturk, Nuri; Fahey, Bryony; Plachetzki, David C; Degnan, Bernard M; Sancar, Aziz; Oakley, Todd H

    2012-04-15

    Many larval sponges possess pigment ring eyes that apparently mediate phototactic swimming. Yet sponges are not known to possess nervous systems or opsin genes, so the unknown molecular components of sponge phototaxis must differ fundamentally from those in other animals, inspiring questions about how this sensory system functions. Here we present molecular and biochemical data on cryptochrome, a candidate gene for functional involvement in sponge pigment ring eyes. We report that Amphimedon queenslandica, a demosponge, possesses two cryptochrome/photolyase genes, Aq-Cry1 and Aq-Cry2. The mRNA of one gene (Aq-Cry2) is expressed in situ at the pigment ring eye. Additionally, we report that Aq-Cry2 lacks photolyase activity and contains a flavin-based co-factor that is responsive to wavelengths of light that also mediate larval photic behavior. These results suggest that Aq-Cry2 may act in the aneural, opsin-less phototaxic behavior of a sponge.

  6. Neurobiology of addiction versus drug use driven by lack of choice.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Serge H; Lenoir, Magalie; Guillem, Karine

    2013-08-01

    Research on the neurobiology of addiction often involves nonhuman animals that are given ready access to drugs for self-administration but without other choices. Here we argue using cocaine as an example that this standard setting may no longer be sufficient and can even lead to the formulation of unrealistic views about the neurobiology of addiction. Addiction as a psychiatric disorder is defined as resulting from brain dysfunctions that affect normal choice-making, not as an expectable response to lack of alternative choices. We encourage neurobiologists involved in addiction research to increase animals' choice during drug access, preferably by supplying alternative rewarding pursuits. Only animals that continue to take and prefer drugs despite and at the expense of other available choices may be considered as having developed an addiction-like behavior in comparison to those that remain able to stop drug use for other pursuits, even after extended drug use. The systematic comparison of these two individual behaviors should reveal new insights about the neurobiology of drug choice and addiction. More generally, this research should also shed a unique light on how the brain 'chooses' among qualitatively different kinds of pursuits.

  7. Pharmaceutical companies and global lack of access to medicines: strengthening accountability under the right to health.

    PubMed

    Grover, Anand; Citro, Brian; Mankad, Mihir; Lander, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Many medicines currently available on the market are simply too expensive for millions around the world to afford. Many medicines available in the developing world are only available to a small percentage of the population due to economic inequities. The profit-seeking behavior of pharmaceutical companies exacerbates this problem. In most cases, the price reductions required to make drugs affordable to a broader class of people in the developing world are not offset by the resultant increase in sales volume. Simply stated, in most of the developing world, it is more profitable to sell drugs to the very wealthy at high prices than it is to sell cheaper drugs to a greater number of people. As a result, medicines remain unaffordable for the vast majority of people in many parts of the world. While this might be an acceptable outcome for certain commodities, such as luxury goods, it is completely unacceptable for life-saving medicines. Therefore, in order to effectively address the global lack of access to medicines, the role pharmaceutical companies play in the international intellectual property regime must be critically examined.

  8. Onset coding is degraded in auditory nerve fibers from mutant mice lacking synaptic ribbons.

    PubMed

    Buran, Bradley N; Strenzke, Nicola; Neef, Andreas; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Moser, Tobias; Liberman, M Charles

    2010-06-02

    Synaptic ribbons, found at the presynaptic membrane of sensory cells in both ear and eye, have been implicated in the vesicle-pool dynamics of synaptic transmission. To elucidate ribbon function, we characterized the response properties of single auditory nerve fibers in mice lacking Bassoon, a scaffolding protein involved in anchoring ribbons to the membrane. In bassoon mutants, immunohistochemistry showed that fewer than 3% of the hair cells' afferent synapses retained anchored ribbons. Auditory nerve fibers from mutants had normal threshold, dynamic range, and postonset adaptation in response to tone bursts, and they were able to phase lock with normal precision to amplitude-modulated tones. However, spontaneous and sound-evoked discharge rates were reduced, and the reliability of spikes, particularly at stimulus onset, was significantly degraded as shown by an increased variance of first-spike latencies. Modeling based on in vitro studies of normal and mutant hair cells links these findings to reduced release rates at the synapse. The degradation of response reliability in these mutants suggests that the ribbon and/or Bassoon normally facilitate high rates of exocytosis and that its absence significantly compromises the temporal resolving power of the auditory system.

  9. A unique hexokinase in Cryptosporidium parvum, an apicomplexan pathogen lacking the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yonglan; Zhang, Haili; Guo, Fengguang; Sun, Mingfei; Zhu, Guan

    2014-09-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum may cause virtually untreatable infections in AIDS patients, and is recently identified as one of the top four diarrheal pathogens in children in developing countries. Cryptosporidium differs from other apicomplexans (e.g., Plasmodium and Toxoplasma) by lacking many metabolic pathways including the Krebs cycle and cytochrome-based respiratory chain, thus relying mainly on glycolysis for ATP production. Here we report the molecular and biochemical characterizations of a hexokinase in C. parvum (CpHK). Our phylogenetic reconstructions indicated that apicomplexan hexokinases including CpHK were highly divergent from those of humans and animals (i.e., at the base of the eukaryotic clade). CpHK displays unique kinetic features that differ from those in mammals and Toxoplasma gondii (TgHK) in the preference towards various hexoses and its capacity to use ATP and other NTPs. CpHK also displays substrate inhibition by ATP. Moreover, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) could not only inhibit the CpHK activity, but also the parasite growth in vitro at concentrations nontoxic to host cells (IC(50) = 0.54 mM). While the exact action of 2-deoxy-D-glucose on the parasite is subject to further verification, our data suggest that CpHK and the glycolytic pathway may be explored for developing anti-cryptosporidial therapeutics.

  10. Lack of interaction between orexinergic and alpha2-adrenergic neuronal systems in rat cerebrocortical slices.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Kudo, Mihoko; Tose, Ryuji; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Kudo, Tsuyoshi; Kushikata, Tetsuya

    2005-10-14

    Orexinergic and norepinephrinergic alpha2-adrenoceptor expressing neurons contribute to the regulation of the sleep-wakefulness cycle. In the present study, we have examined a possible interaction between orexinergic and alpha2-adrenergic systems in orexin-A (100 nM)- and K+ (25 mM)-evoked norepinephrine release from slices of rat cerebrocortex. In this tissue norepinephrinergic neurons are predominantly innervated via the locus coeruleus. Clonidine concentration-dependently inhibited K+-evoked norepinephrine release with pIC50 (Imax) of 6.44+/-0.38 (48.8+/-6.9%). A selective orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB-334867 was ineffective. SB-334867 concentration-dependently inhibited orexin A-evoked norepinephrine release with pIC50 (Imax) of 6.05+/-0.14 (86.4+/-5.4%); clonidine (alpha2-agonist) was ineffective. In contrast, yohimbine reversed the inhibitory effects of clonidine (1 microM) on K+-evoked norepinephrine release with pIC50 (Imax) of 6.50+/-0.34 (77.6+/-10.9%); orexin A was ineffective. The present data suggest a lack of interaction between orexinergic and alpha2-adrenergic neurons in rat cerebral cortex.

  11. Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit.

    PubMed

    Kripke, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of hypnotic drug risks and benefits, reassessing and updating advice presented to the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (United States FDA). Almost every month, new information appears about the risks of hypnotics (sleeping pills). This review includes new information on the growing USA overdose epidemic, eight new epidemiologic studies of hypnotics' mortality not available for previous compilations, and new emphasis on risks of short-term hypnotic prescription. The most important risks of hypnotics include excess mortality, especially overdose deaths, quiet deaths at night, infections, cancer, depression and suicide, automobile crashes, falls, and other accidents, and hypnotic-withdrawal insomnia. The short-term use of one-two prescriptions is associated with greater risk per dose than long-term use. Hypnotics are usually prescribed without approved indication, most often with specific contraindications, but even when indicated, there is little or no benefit. The recommended doses objectively increase sleep little if at all, daytime performance is often made worse, not better, and the lack of general health benefits is commonly misrepresented in advertising. Treatments such as the cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia and bright light treatment of circadian rhythm disorders might offer safer and more effective alternative approaches to insomnia.

  12. Inherent directionality explains the lack of feedback loops in empirical networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Pigolotti, Simone; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the hypothesis that the relative abundance of feedback loops in many empirical complex networks is severely reduced owing to the presence of an inherent global directionality. Aimed at quantifying this idea, we propose a simple probabilistic model in which a free parameter γ controls the degree of inherent directionality. Upon strengthening such directionality, the model predicts a drastic reduction in the fraction of loops which are also feedback loops. To test this prediction, we extensively enumerated loops and feedback loops in many empirical biological, ecological and socio-technological directed networks. We show that, in almost all cases, empirical networks have a much smaller fraction of feedback loops than network randomizations. Quite remarkably, this empirical finding is quantitatively reproduced, for all loop lengths, by our model by fitting its only parameter γ. Moreover, the fitted value of γ correlates quite well with another direct measurement of network directionality, performed by means of a novel algorithm. We conclude that the existence of an inherent network directionality provides a parsimonious quantitative explanation for the observed lack of feedback loops in empirical networks. PMID:25531727

  13. Inherent directionality explains the lack of feedback loops in empirical networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Pigolotti, Simone; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2014-12-22

    We explore the hypothesis that the relative abundance of feedback loops in many empirical complex networks is severely reduced owing to the presence of an inherent global directionality. Aimed at quantifying this idea, we propose a simple probabilistic model in which a free parameter γ controls the degree of inherent directionality. Upon strengthening such directionality, the model predicts a drastic reduction in the fraction of loops which are also feedback loops. To test this prediction, we extensively enumerated loops and feedback loops in many empirical biological, ecological and socio-technological directed networks. We show that, in almost all cases, empirical networks have a much smaller fraction of feedback loops than network randomizations. Quite remarkably, this empirical finding is quantitatively reproduced, for all loop lengths, by our model by fitting its only parameter γ. Moreover, the fitted value of γ correlates quite well with another direct measurement of network directionality, performed by means of a novel algorithm. We conclude that the existence of an inherent network directionality provides a parsimonious quantitative explanation for the observed lack of feedback loops in empirical networks.

  14. Nodule-Specific Polypeptides from Effective Alfalfa Root Nodules and from Ineffective Nodules Lacking Nitrogenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Lang-Unnasch, Naomi; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to leghemoglobin, at least nine nodule-specific polypeptides from the alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)-Rhizobium meliloti symbiosis were identified by immune assay. Some of these polypeptides may be subunits of larger proteins but none appeared to be subunits of the same multimeric protein. All nine of the nodule-specific polypeptides were localized to within the plant cytosol; they were not found in extracts of bacteroids or in the peribacteroid space. At least one of these nodule-specific polypeptides was found to be antigenically related to nodule-specific polypeptides in pea and/or soybean. Ineffective nodules elicited by R. meliloti strains containing mutations in four different genes required for nitrogenase synthesis contained reduced concentrations of leghemoglobin and of several of the nodule-specific polypeptides. Other nodule-specific polypeptides were unaltered or actually enriched in the ineffective nodules. Many of the differences between the ineffective and effective nodules were apparent in nodules harvested shortly after the nodules became visible. These differences were greatly amplified in older nodules. When the four ineffective nodule types were compared to one another, there were clear quantitative differences in the concentrations of several of the nodule-specific polypeptides. These differences suggest that lack of a functional nitrogenase does not have a single direct effect on nodule development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:16664146

  15. Lack of a surface layer in Tannerella forsythia mutants deficient in the type IX secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Yuka; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Shoji, Mikio; Nakane, Daisuke; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Naito, Mariko

    2014-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, is an important pathogen in periodontal disease. This bacterium possesses genes encoding all known components of the type IX secretion system (T9SS). T. forsythia mutants deficient in genes orthologous to the T9SS-encoding genes porK, porT and sov were constructed. All porK, porT and sov single mutants lacked the surface layer (S-layer) and expressed less-glycosylated versions of the S-layer glycoproteins TfsA and TfsB. In addition, these mutants exhibited decreased haemagglutination and increased biofilm formation. Comparison of the proteins secreted by the porK and WT strains revealed that the secretion of several proteins containing C-terminal domain (CTD)-like sequences is dependent on the porK gene. These results indicate that the T9SS is functional in T. forsythia and contributes to the translocation of CTD proteins to the cell surface or into the extracellular milieu. PMID:25023245

  16. A Large and Phylogenetically Diverse Class of Type 1 Opsins Lacking a Canonical Retinal Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Becker, Erin A; Yao, Andrew I; Seitzer, Phillip M; Kind, Tobias; Wang, Ting; Eigenheer, Rich; Shao, Katie S Y; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Facciotti, Marc T

    2016-01-01

    Opsins are photosensitive proteins catalyzing light-dependent processes across the tree of life. For both microbial (type 1) and metazoan (type 2) opsins, photosensing depends upon covalent interaction between a retinal chromophore and a conserved lysine residue. Despite recent discoveries of potential opsin homologs lacking this residue, phylogenetic dispersal and functional significance of these abnormal sequences have not yet been investigated. We report discovery of a large group of putatively non-retinal binding opsins, present in a number of fungal and microbial genomes and comprising nearly 30% of opsins in the Halobacteriacea, a model clade for opsin photobiology. We report phylogenetic analyses, structural modeling, genomic context analysis and biochemistry, to describe the evolutionary relationship of these recently described proteins with other opsins, show that they are expressed and do not bind retinal in a canonical manner. Given these data, we propose a hypothesis that these abnormal opsin homologs may represent a novel family of sensory opsins which may be involved in taxis response to one or more non-light stimuli. If true, this finding would challenge our current understanding of microbial opsins as a light-specific sensory family, and provides a potential analogy with the highly diverse signaling capabilities of the eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), of which metazoan type 2 opsins are a light-specific sub-clade.

  17. Lack of Cultural Competency in International Aid Responses: The Ebola Outbreak in Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Southall, Hannah Grace; DeYoung, Sarah E.; Harris, Curt Andrew

    2017-01-01

    A cornerstone of effective disaster management is that response should always begin and end at the local level (1). The response to the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in Liberia, West Africa, was a combination of independent efforts by many nations and organizations. Many of these independent efforts ignored or were not able to work with the local levels of emergency management in Liberia. This oversight occurred because of the Liberian’s mistrust of both their government and foreign aid groups, as well as the lack of cultural competency demonstrated by the aid groups. The health-care and emergency management infrastructure in Liberia appeared to be non-existent at the beginning of the EVD outbreak. However, there were resources available at the community level: the Liberians and their culture. Although these resources were rarely used, there were some instances in which communities were included in response efforts. It was in these instances that possible improvements to international disaster response protocol were found. PMID:28197401

  18. nti glucocorticoid receptor transcripts lack sequences encoding the amino-terminal transcriptional modulatory domain.

    PubMed Central

    Dieken, E S; Meese, E U; Miesfeld, R L

    1990-01-01

    Glucocorticoid induction of cell death (apoptosis) in mouse lymphoma S49 cells has long been studied as a molecular genetic model of steroid hormone action. To better understand the transcriptional control of glucocorticoid-induced S49 cell death, we isolated and characterized glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cDNA from two steroid-resistant nti S49 mutant cell lines (S49.55R and S49.143R) and the wild-type parental line (S49.A2). Our data reveal that nti GR transcripts encode intact steroid- and DNA-binding domains but lack 404 amino-terminal residues as a result of aberrant RNA splicing between exons 1 and 3. Results from transient cotransfection experiments into CV1 cells using nti receptor expression plasmids and a glucocorticoid-responsive reporter gene demonstrated that the truncated nti receptor exhibits a reduced transcriptional regulatory activity. Gene fusions containing portions of both the wild-type and the nti GR-coding sequences were constructed and used to functionally map the nti receptor mutation. We found that the loss of the modulatory domain alone is sufficient to cause the observed defect in nti transcriptional transactivation. These results support the proposal that glucocorticoid-induced S49 cell death requires GR sequences which have previously been shown to be required for transcriptional regulation, suggesting that steroid-regulated apoptosis is controlled at the level of gene expression. Images PMID:2388618

  19. Dictyostelium mutants lacking the cytoskeletal protein coronin are defective in cytokinesis and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Coronin is an actin-binding protein in Dictyostelium discoideum that is enriched at the leading edge of the cells and in projections of the cell surface called crowns. The polypeptide sequence of coronin is distinguished by its similarities to the beta-subunits of trimeric G proteins (E. L. de Hostos, B. Bradtke, F. Lottspeich, R. Guggenheim, and G. Gerisch, 1991. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 10:4097-4104). To elucidate the in vivo function of coronin, null mutants have been generated by gene replacement. The mutant cells lacking coronin grow and migrate more slowly than wild-type cells. When these cor- cells grow in liquid medium they become multinucleate, indicating a role of coronin in cytokinesis. To explore this role, coronin has been localized in mitotic wild-type cells by immunofluorescence labeling. During separation of the daughter cells, coronin is strongly accumulated at their distal portions including the leading edges. This contrasts with the localization of myosin II in the cleavage furrow and suggests that coronin functions independently of the conventional myosin in facilitating cytokinesis. PMID:8380174

  20. Pituitary Phenotypes of Mice Lacking the Notch Signalling Ligand Delta-Like 1 Homologue

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, L Y M; Rizzoti, K; Lovell-Badge, R; Tissier, P R

    2013-01-01

    The Notch signalling pathway ligand delta-like 1 homologue (Dlk1, also named Pref1) is expressed throughout the developing pituitary and becomes restricted to mostly growth hormone (GH) cells within the adult gland. We have investigated the role of Dlk1 in pituitary development and function from late embryogenesis to adulthood using a mouse model completely lacking the expression of Dlk1. We confirm that Dlk1-null mice are shorter and weigh less than wild-type littermates from late gestation, at parturition and in adulthood. A loss of Dlk1 leads to significant reduction in GH content throughout life, whereas other pituitary hormones are reduced to varying degrees depending on sex and age. Both the size of the pituitary and the proportion of hormone-producing cell populations are unchanged, suggesting that there is a reduction in hormone content per cell. In vivo challenge of mutant and wild-type littermates with growth hormone-releasing hormone and growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide shows that reduced GH secretion is unlikely to account for the reduced growth of Dlk1 knockout animals. These data suggest that loss of Dlk1 gives rise to minor pituitary defects manifesting as an age- and sex-dependent reduction in pituitary hormone contents. However, Dlk1 expression in other tissue is most likely responsible for the weight and length differences observed in mutant animals. PMID:23279263