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Sample records for lactose intolerance

  1. Lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Swagerty, Daniel L; Walling, Anne D; Klein, Robert M

    2002-05-01

    Persons with lactose intolerance are unable to digest significant amounts of lactose because of a genetically inadequate amount of the enzyme lactase. Common symptoms include abdominal pain and bloating, excessive flatus, and watery stool following the ingestion of foods containing lactose. Lactase deficiency is present in up to 15 percent of persons of northern European descent, up to 80 percent of blacks and Latinos, and up to 100 percent of American Indians and Asians. A sizable number of adults believe they are lactose intolerant but do not actually have impaired lactose digestion, and some persons with lactase deficiency can tolerate moderate amounts of ingested lactose. A diagnosis of lactose intolerance can usually be made with a careful history supported by dietary manipulation. If necessary, diagnosis can be confirmed by using a breath hydrogen or lactose tolerance test. Treatment consists primarily of avoiding lactose-containing foods. Lactase enzyme supplements may be helpful. The degree of lactose malabsorption varies greatly among patients with lactose intolerance, but most of them can ingest up to 12 oz of milk daily without symptoms. Lactose-intolerant patients must ensure adequate calcium intake. PMID:12018807

  2. [Lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Rosado, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    The most common problem limiting milk consumption worldwide is lactose intolerance (LI), which is defined as the experience of gastrointestinal symptoms due to the intake of lactose-containing food. When symptoms ensue the intake of milk, the condition is referred as milk intolerance, and it may or may not be due to LI. The most common cause of LI is primary lactase deficiency which occurs in 30% of Mexican adults when one glass of milk is consumed (12-18 g of lactose). LI occurs in less than 15% of adults after the intake of this dose of lactose. Another cause of lactose intolerance is due to secondary lactase deficiency, which occurs because lactase is reduced due to diseases that affect the intestinal mucosa. Lactose intolerance can be eliminated or significantly reduced by elimination or reduction of the intake of milk and milk containing products. Recent studies demonstrate that when β-casein-A1 contained in milk is hydrolyzed it produces β-casomorphine-7 which is an opioid associated with milk intolerance.

  3. [Lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Rosado, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    The most common problem limiting milk consumption worldwide is lactose intolerance (LI), which is defined as the experience of gastrointestinal symptoms due to the intake of lactose-containing food. When symptoms ensue the intake of milk, the condition is referred as milk intolerance, and it may or may not be due to LI. The most common cause of LI is primary lactase deficiency which occurs in 30% of Mexican adults when one glass of milk is consumed (12-18 g of lactose). LI occurs in less than 15% of adults after the intake of this dose of lactose. Another cause of lactose intolerance is due to secondary lactase deficiency, which occurs because lactase is reduced due to diseases that affect the intestinal mucosa. Lactose intolerance can be eliminated or significantly reduced by elimination or reduction of the intake of milk and milk containing products. Recent studies demonstrate that when β-casein-A1 contained in milk is hydrolyzed it produces β-casomorphine-7 which is an opioid associated with milk intolerance. PMID:27603891

  4. Lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Lactose is the main carbohydrate in infant feeding, but its impact decreases as the child gets older and consumes less milk and dairy products. Congenital lactose intolerance is a very rare condition. However, lactase activity may be low and need to mature during the first weeks of life in many infants. However, the evidence that unabsorbed lactose is causing infantile crying and colic is contradictory. Unabsorbed lactose has a bifidogenic effect and improves calcium absorption. Lactose malabsorption may occur secondary and thus temporally to other etiologies such as infectious gastroenteritis, cow's milk allergy and celiac disease. One the cause is treated, lactase activity will gradually return to normal. The vast majority of Asian children will develop late onset congenital lactase deficiency. However, this entity only exceptionally causes symptoms before the age of 4-5 years. Symptoms are abdominal cramps, flatulence and watery, acid stools, and decrease the quality of life but lactose intolerance is not associated with "true disease". The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds and confirmed with a lactose breath test, if needed. These patients need to have a lifetime long reduced lactose intake to improve their quality of life.

  5. Lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Lactose is the main carbohydrate in infant feeding, but its impact decreases as the child gets older and consumes less milk and dairy products. Congenital lactose intolerance is a very rare condition. However, lactase activity may be low and need to mature during the first weeks of life in many infants. However, the evidence that unabsorbed lactose is causing infantile crying and colic is contradictory. Unabsorbed lactose has a bifidogenic effect and improves calcium absorption. Lactose malabsorption may occur secondary and thus temporally to other etiologies such as infectious gastroenteritis, cow's milk allergy and celiac disease. One the cause is treated, lactase activity will gradually return to normal. The vast majority of Asian children will develop late onset congenital lactase deficiency. However, this entity only exceptionally causes symptoms before the age of 4-5 years. Symptoms are abdominal cramps, flatulence and watery, acid stools, and decrease the quality of life but lactose intolerance is not associated with "true disease". The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds and confirmed with a lactose breath test, if needed. These patients need to have a lifetime long reduced lactose intake to improve their quality of life. PMID:26715083

  6. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... is lactose? Lactose is a sugar found in milk and milk products. The small intestine—the organ where most ... bloating, diarrhea, and gas—after eating or drinking milk or milk products. Lactase deficiency and lactose malabsorption ...

  7. Lactose intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Lactase deficiency; Milk intolerance; Disaccharidase deficiency; Dairy product intolerance ... make the lactase enzyme so they can digest milk, including breast milk. Babies born too early (premature) ...

  8. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... in them. Lactose is the sugar found in milk and foods made with milk. After eating foods with lactose in them, you ... get enough of it from your diet, since milk and foods made with milk are the most ...

  9. Lactose Intolerance (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctors usually diagnose lactose intolerance through a simple hydrogen breath test. A person blows into a tube ... there is a higher than average level of hydrogen and methane in the breath. That's because undigested ...

  10. Lactose intolerance: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Marchiondo, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Deficiency of intestinal lactase, the enzyme required for lactose digestion, can result in symptoms of gastrointestinal malabsorption, or lactose intolerance. The knowledge needed for accurate nursing assessment, diagnostic procedural care, teaching, and referral of affected patients is reviewed.

  11. How Is Lactose Intolerance Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... following tests also can help diagnose lactose intolerance: Hydrogen breath test. For this test, a person drinks ... beverage that has lactose in it. Then, the hydrogen level in the breath is measured at set ...

  12. Is it just lactose intolerance?

    PubMed

    Olivier, Celso Eduardo; Lorena, Sônia Letícia Silva; Pavan, Célia Regina; dos Santos, Raquel Acácia Pereira Gonçalves; dos Santos Lima, Regiane Patussi; Pinto, Daiana Guedes; da Silva, Mariana Dias; de Lima Zollner, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Acquired delayed-onset hypolactasia is a common autosomal recessive condition. Cow's milk allergies, conversely, are less common conditions that may manifest with equivalent symptoms and are able to simulate and/or aggravate lactose intolerance. This study was designed to evaluate the contribution of IgE-mediated cow's milk sensitization to the symptomatology of adult patients with lactose-free diet refractory lactose intolerance. Forty-six adult patients with lactose intolerance and persistent symptoms despite a lactose-free diet underwent skin-prick test to investigate cow's milk, goat's milk, and soy protein-specific-IgE. SDS-PAGE immunoblotting was used to investigate the presence of cow's milk protein-specific IgE. The percentage of patients who had skin reactions to whole cow's milk, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, caseins, goat's milk, and soy was 69.5, 36.9, 56.5, 56.5%, 54.3, and 50%, respectively. The percentage of patients with immunoblot-detected IgE specific for alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, caseins, and bovine serum albumin was 21.7, 63, 67.3, and 2.1%, respectively. IgE-mediated sensitization to cow's milk is a frequent comorbidity in subjects with lactose-free diet refractory lactose intolerance and is worth consideration in patients with this condition.

  13. From 'lactose intolerance' to 'lactose nutrition'.

    PubMed

    Lukito, Widjaja; Malik, Safarina G; Surono, Ingrid S; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The concept of lactose intolerance has become embedded in Western medicine and developing economy medicine. It is based on evidence that intestinal lactase activity persists into later childhood and throughout life in only a minority of the world's population, notably northern European-derived populations. These people have the T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the rs49882359 allele (C/T), also known as C/T-13910, the MCM6 gene which positively influences the lactase LCT gene. Other lactase persistent (LP) populations are found in Africa and the Middle East with different genetic variants. These SNPs represent co-evolution with dairying since the agricultural revolution and nutrient-dependent ecological adaptation. That said, gastrointestinal symptoms considered due to small intestinal lactose malabsorption are poorly correlated with lactase non-persistence (LNP), the situation for most people. With LNP, colonic microbiome lactase enables lactose fermentation to occur so that none is found in faeces. Whether the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane) produced cause symptoms is dose-dependent. Up to 25 g of lactose at any one time can usually be consumed by a LNP person, but its food and meal pattern context, the microbiomic characteristics, age and other factors may alter tolerance. Thus, the notion that lactose intolerance is a disorder or disease of LNP people is misplaced and has been one of cultural perspective. What actually matters is whether a particular dairy product as normally consumed give rise to symptoms. It is, therefore, proposed that lactose tolerance tests be replaced with dairy food tolerance tests.

  14. From 'lactose intolerance' to 'lactose nutrition'.

    PubMed

    Lukito, Widjaja; Malik, Safarina G; Surono, Ingrid S; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The concept of lactose intolerance has become embedded in Western medicine and developing economy medicine. It is based on evidence that intestinal lactase activity persists into later childhood and throughout life in only a minority of the world's population, notably northern European-derived populations. These people have the T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the rs49882359 allele (C/T), also known as C/T-13910, the MCM6 gene which positively influences the lactase LCT gene. Other lactase persistent (LP) populations are found in Africa and the Middle East with different genetic variants. These SNPs represent co-evolution with dairying since the agricultural revolution and nutrient-dependent ecological adaptation. That said, gastrointestinal symptoms considered due to small intestinal lactose malabsorption are poorly correlated with lactase non-persistence (LNP), the situation for most people. With LNP, colonic microbiome lactase enables lactose fermentation to occur so that none is found in faeces. Whether the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane) produced cause symptoms is dose-dependent. Up to 25 g of lactose at any one time can usually be consumed by a LNP person, but its food and meal pattern context, the microbiomic characteristics, age and other factors may alter tolerance. Thus, the notion that lactose intolerance is a disorder or disease of LNP people is misplaced and has been one of cultural perspective. What actually matters is whether a particular dairy product as normally consumed give rise to symptoms. It is, therefore, proposed that lactose tolerance tests be replaced with dairy food tolerance tests. PMID:26715078

  15. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ≈ 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance.

  16. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ≈ 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:24596060

  17. Lactose Intolerance (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... When you do eat dairy products, stick with foods that have smaller amounts of lactose in them, such as aged cheeses, including cheddar. Yogurt that contains live cultures is more easily digested because it contains healthy ...

  18. Lactose intolerance: from diagnosis to correct management.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, T; D'Angelo, G; D'Aversa, F; Campanale, M C; Cesario, V; Montalto, M; Gasbarrini, A; Ojetti, V

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses one of the most relevant problems in gastrointestinal clinical practice: lactose intolerance. The role of lactase-persistence alleles the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption the development of lactose intolerance symptoms and its management. Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately, 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. Symptoms of lactose intolerance include abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence and diarrhea with a considerable intraindividual and interindividual variability in the severity. Diagnosis is most commonly performed by the non invasive lactose hydrogen breath test. Management of lactose intolerance consists of two possible clinical choice not mutually exclusive: alimentary restriction and drug therapy.

  19. Lactose intolerance: from diagnosis to correct management.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, T; D'Angelo, G; D'Aversa, F; Campanale, M C; Cesario, V; Montalto, M; Gasbarrini, A; Ojetti, V

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses one of the most relevant problems in gastrointestinal clinical practice: lactose intolerance. The role of lactase-persistence alleles the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption the development of lactose intolerance symptoms and its management. Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately, 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. Symptoms of lactose intolerance include abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence and diarrhea with a considerable intraindividual and interindividual variability in the severity. Diagnosis is most commonly performed by the non invasive lactose hydrogen breath test. Management of lactose intolerance consists of two possible clinical choice not mutually exclusive: alimentary restriction and drug therapy. PMID:24443063

  20. Lactose intolerance in Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Badriul; Widodo, Ariani

    2015-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance (LI)" is considered a common problem in Asians, and in many parts of the world. Its prevalence and age of manifestation varies between by Asian country, for possible genetic or cultural reasons. Studies in Indonesian children 3-15 years old (y) are available within the past two decades, using a pure lactose tolerance test. The prevalences of lactose malabsorption (LM) in pre-elementary (3-5 y), elementary (6-11 y), and junior high (12-14 y) school-children were 21.3%, 57.8%, and 73%, respectively. An increasing trend for LM prevalence was seen within the pre-elementary group, from 9.1% at 3 y to 28.6% at 5 y. The most frequent symptoms of LI in junior high school (JHS) group were abdominal pain (64.1%), abdominal distention (22.6%), nausea (15.1%), flatulence (5.7%), and diarrhea (1.9%), mostly within one hour of lactose ingestion. In children with regular and irregular milk drinking, LM occurred in 81.2% and 69.6%; LI was found in 56.2% and 52.1%, respectively. Most JHS children with dairy-associated recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) symptoms proved to be malabsorbers. Dairy products most related to RAP were milk and yogurt. LI was found in 81% of RAP children with abdominal pain most frequently, followed by nausea, bloating, diarrhea, borborygmi, and flatulence. Symp-tom onset occurred 30 minutes after lactose ingestion, especially nausea, bloating, and abdominal pain. In RAP children LI symptoms mostly found in breath hydrogen concentration>20 ppm. More LI symptoms were found in lactose malabsorbers, but symptoms were mild and generally disappeared in 7 hours, and in most by 15 hours.

  1. Lactose intolerance in Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Badriul; Widodo, Ariani

    2015-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance (LI)" is considered a common problem in Asians, and in many parts of the world. Its prevalence and age of manifestation varies between by Asian country, for possible genetic or cultural reasons. Studies in Indonesian children 3-15 years old (y) are available within the past two decades, using a pure lactose tolerance test. The prevalences of lactose malabsorption (LM) in pre-elementary (3-5 y), elementary (6-11 y), and junior high (12-14 y) school-children were 21.3%, 57.8%, and 73%, respectively. An increasing trend for LM prevalence was seen within the pre-elementary group, from 9.1% at 3 y to 28.6% at 5 y. The most frequent symptoms of LI in junior high school (JHS) group were abdominal pain (64.1%), abdominal distention (22.6%), nausea (15.1%), flatulence (5.7%), and diarrhea (1.9%), mostly within one hour of lactose ingestion. In children with regular and irregular milk drinking, LM occurred in 81.2% and 69.6%; LI was found in 56.2% and 52.1%, respectively. Most JHS children with dairy-associated recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) symptoms proved to be malabsorbers. Dairy products most related to RAP were milk and yogurt. LI was found in 81% of RAP children with abdominal pain most frequently, followed by nausea, bloating, diarrhea, borborygmi, and flatulence. Symp-tom onset occurred 30 minutes after lactose ingestion, especially nausea, bloating, and abdominal pain. In RAP children LI symptoms mostly found in breath hydrogen concentration>20 ppm. More LI symptoms were found in lactose malabsorbers, but symptoms were mild and generally disappeared in 7 hours, and in most by 15 hours. PMID:26715082

  2. The molecular basis of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Waud, Jonathan P; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2009-01-01

    A staggering 4000 million people cannot digest lactose, the sugar in milk, properly. All mammals, apart from white Northern Europeans and few tribes in Africa and Asia, lose most of their lactase, the enzyme that cleaves lactose into galactose and glucose, after weaning. Lactose intolerance causes gut and a range of systemic symptoms, though the threshold to lactose varies considerably between ethnic groups and individuals within a group. The molecular basis of inherited hypolactasia has yet to be identified, though two polymorphisms in the introns of a helicase upstream from the lactase gene correlate closely with hypolactasia, and thus lactose intolerance. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by gases and toxins produced by anaerobic bacteria in the large intestine. Bacterial toxins may play a key role in several other diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. The problem of lactose intolerance has been exacerbated because of the addition of products containing lactose to various foods and drinks without being on the label. Lactose intolerance fits exactly the illness that Charles Darwin suffered from for over 40 years, and yet was never diagnosed. Darwin missed something else--the key to our own evolution--the Rubicon some 300 million years ago that produced lactose and lactase in sufficient amounts to be susceptible to natural selection.

  3. The molecular basis of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Waud, Jonathan P; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2005-01-01

    A staggering 4000 million people cannot digest lactose, the sugar in milk, properly. All mammals, apart from white Northern Europeans and few tribes in Africa and Asia, lose most of their lactase, the enzyme that cleaves lactose into galactose and glucose, after weaning. Lactose intolerance causes gut and a range of systemic symptoms, though the threshold to lactose varies considerably between ethnic groups and individuals within a group. The molecular basis of inherited hypolactasia has yet to be identified, though two polymorphisms in the introns of a helicase upstream from the lactase gene correlate closely with hypolactasia, and thus lactose intolerance. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by gases and toxins produced by anaerobic bacteria in the large intestine. Bacterial toxins may play a key role in several other diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. The problem of lactose intolerance has been exacerbated because of the addition of products containing lactose to various foods and drinks without being on the label. Lactose intolerance fits exactly the illness that Charles Darwin suffered from for over 40 years, and yet was never diagnosed. Darwin missed something else--the key to our own evolution--the Rubicon some 300 million years ago that produced lactose and lactase in sufficient amounts to be susceptible to natural selection.

  4. [Progress on the research of lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Sai, X Y

    2016-02-01

    Our group generalized the research development of lactose intolerance, both internationally and nationally. We systematically reviewed the pathogenesis, genetic polymorphisms of lactase deficiency, relevant progress of diagnostic methods and treatment. Through this systematic review, we undedrstood that there were insufficient research efforts made on understanding the epidemiological feature of lactose intolerance in this country. Relevant genetic mutations of people were also not clear, neither the development of simple and effective diagnosis method made. We should continue to extensively and deeply carry out the study regarding methods for early prevention and intervention on lactose intolerance.

  5. [Progress on the research of lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Sai, X Y

    2016-02-01

    Our group generalized the research development of lactose intolerance, both internationally and nationally. We systematically reviewed the pathogenesis, genetic polymorphisms of lactase deficiency, relevant progress of diagnostic methods and treatment. Through this systematic review, we undedrstood that there were insufficient research efforts made on understanding the epidemiological feature of lactose intolerance in this country. Relevant genetic mutations of people were also not clear, neither the development of simple and effective diagnosis method made. We should continue to extensively and deeply carry out the study regarding methods for early prevention and intervention on lactose intolerance. PMID:26917535

  6. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part 1].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-09-20

    Lactose intolerance is the most prevalent intestinal malabsorption disorder. After presentation of its history, the author describes the emergence of lactose intolerance during the evolution of species, and the biochemistry of lactose as well as features of human and bacterial lactase enzymes are then described. The unequal distribution of lactose intolerance in different continents and population is discussed, followed by presentation of past and present prevalence data in Hungary. Adult-type hypolactasia is caused by a polymorphism of the MCM6 gene located upstream from the lactase gene on the long arm of the chromosome 2. It can be determined with the polymerase chain reaction. The intestinal symptoms of lactose intolerance are well known, but its extra-intestinal manifestations are less recognised. Invasive diagnostic methods (determination of lactase activity from small intestinal biopsies, lactose tolerance test), are accurate, but have been replaced by the non-invasive methods; their gold standard is the H2 breath test. Genetic testing is being used more and more frequently in Hungary too, and, presumably, the methane breath test will be also available in the near future. Lactose intolerance can be accompanied by inflammatory bowel diseases, coeliac disease and irritable bowel syndrome; it could be established whether this association is causal or not in order to start a correct diet and therapy.

  7. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part 1].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-09-20

    Lactose intolerance is the most prevalent intestinal malabsorption disorder. After presentation of its history, the author describes the emergence of lactose intolerance during the evolution of species, and the biochemistry of lactose as well as features of human and bacterial lactase enzymes are then described. The unequal distribution of lactose intolerance in different continents and population is discussed, followed by presentation of past and present prevalence data in Hungary. Adult-type hypolactasia is caused by a polymorphism of the MCM6 gene located upstream from the lactase gene on the long arm of the chromosome 2. It can be determined with the polymerase chain reaction. The intestinal symptoms of lactose intolerance are well known, but its extra-intestinal manifestations are less recognised. Invasive diagnostic methods (determination of lactase activity from small intestinal biopsies, lactose tolerance test), are accurate, but have been replaced by the non-invasive methods; their gold standard is the H2 breath test. Genetic testing is being used more and more frequently in Hungary too, and, presumably, the methane breath test will be also available in the near future. Lactose intolerance can be accompanied by inflammatory bowel diseases, coeliac disease and irritable bowel syndrome; it could be established whether this association is causal or not in order to start a correct diet and therapy. PMID:26550699

  8. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  9. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world’s population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  10. [Lactose intolerance: pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Hutyra, Tomasz; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    Lactose malabsorption and milk products intolerance symptoms are the most common alimentary tract disorders. Lactose intolerance is a result of lactase deficiency or lack of lactase and lactose malabsorption. Three types of lactase deficiency were distinguished: congenital, late-onset lactase deficiency and secondary lactase deficiency. Lactose intolerance means the appearance of clinical gastrointestinal symptoms after ingestion of lactose. To the clinical symptoms of lactose intolerance belongs: nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, cramps, flatulence, flatus, diarrhea and abdominal pain. The diagnosis of lactose intolerance is based on the breath hydrogen test and analysis of lactase activity in the small intestine mucosa. Dietary treatment eliminates clinical symptoms.

  11. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part II].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-10-25

    The author summarises the interrelations between lactose intolerance, calcium and vitamin D metabolism and osteoporosis. Lactose intolerance enhances the risk of forearm and hip fractures in some patients. Lactase gene genotype and fracture risk are related in some populations. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation increase bone mineral content and they are justified in children, during pregnancy and lactation, and in postmenopausal women. The intake of milk and milk products could increase the risk of ovarian carcinoma. CC genotype of the lactase gene increased the risk of colorectal carcinoma in Finns; no such effect was observed in British, Spanish and Italian patients. Even small quantities of lactose in drugs (10-750 mg) could elicit intolerance symptoms due to individual susceptibility. In spite of public knowledge and advertising, controlled studies did not prove the beneficial effect of either a lactose-free diet, enzyme supplementation or probiotics in an evidence-based manner. While accepted guidelines are lacking, a personalised therapy is mandatory. In spite of increasing public interest in lactose intolerance, many unknown factors must still be studied.

  12. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part II].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-10-25

    The author summarises the interrelations between lactose intolerance, calcium and vitamin D metabolism and osteoporosis. Lactose intolerance enhances the risk of forearm and hip fractures in some patients. Lactase gene genotype and fracture risk are related in some populations. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation increase bone mineral content and they are justified in children, during pregnancy and lactation, and in postmenopausal women. The intake of milk and milk products could increase the risk of ovarian carcinoma. CC genotype of the lactase gene increased the risk of colorectal carcinoma in Finns; no such effect was observed in British, Spanish and Italian patients. Even small quantities of lactose in drugs (10-750 mg) could elicit intolerance symptoms due to individual susceptibility. In spite of public knowledge and advertising, controlled studies did not prove the beneficial effect of either a lactose-free diet, enzyme supplementation or probiotics in an evidence-based manner. While accepted guidelines are lacking, a personalised therapy is mandatory. In spite of increasing public interest in lactose intolerance, many unknown factors must still be studied. PMID:26477616

  13. Dairy intake, dietary adequacy, and lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Robert P

    2013-03-01

    Despite repeated emphasis in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans on the importance of calcium in the adult American diet and the recommendation to consume 3 dairy servings a day, dairy intake remains well below recommendations. Insufficient health professional awareness of the benefits of calcium and concern for lactose intolerance are among several possible reasons, This mini-review highlights both the role of calcium (and of dairy, its principal source in modern diets) in health maintenance and reviews the means for overcoming lactose intolerance (real or perceived).

  14. Genetics Home Reference: lactose intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... DM. Lactose digestion and the evolutionary genetics of lactase persistence. Hum Genet. 2009 Jan;124(6):579-91. ... Swallow DM, Thomas MG. A worldwide correlation of lactase persistence phenotype and genotypes. BMC Evol Biol. 2010 Feb ...

  15. [Calcium supplementation uncovering lactose intolerance - a case report].

    PubMed

    Trifina, Eva; Geissler, Dietmar; Zwettler, Elisabeth; Klaushofer, Klaus; Mikosch, Peter

    2012-03-01

    A 44 yr-old female with osteoporosis had no relevant gastrointestinal symptoms and did not avoid any specific food. However, after prescription of a lactose-rich calcium supplementation, clinical symptoms suspicious for lactose intolerance occurred, which were thereafter confirmed by a lactose tolerance test. Lactose intolerance may present with only slight or subtle symptoms. Drugs containing lactose may induce or increase gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with lactose intolerance. In case of gastrointestinal symptoms occurring after the initiation of drugs containing lactose, the possibility of lactose intolerance should be considered and tested by lactose tolerance test or genetic testing for the LCT (-13910) polymorphism. Due to the prevalence of about 15-25% lactose intolerance in the Austrian population, lactose free drugs should be prescribed as widely as possible.

  16. [Abdominal spasms, meteorism, diarrhea: fructose intolerance, lactose intolerance or IBS?].

    PubMed

    Litschauer-Poursadrollah, Margaritha; El-Sayad, Sabine; Wantke, Felix; Fellinger, Christina; Jarisch, Reinhart

    2012-12-01

    Meteorism, abdominal spasms, diarrhea, casually obstipation, flatulence and nausea are symptoms of fructose malabsorption (FIT) and/or lactose intolerance (LIT), but are also symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Therefore these diseases should be considered primarily in patients with digestive complaints. For diagnosis an H(2)-breath test is used.In 1,935 patients (526 m, 1,409 f) a fructose intolerance test and in 1,739 patients (518 m,1,221 f) a lactose intolerance test was done.FIT is found more frequently than LIT (57 versus 52 % in adults (p < 0,02) and in children 90 versus 62 % (p < 0,001)) and is in polyintolerances most frequently correlated to histamine intolerance (HIT). Headache (ca. 10 %), fatigue (ca. 5 %) and dizziness (ca. 3 %) may occur after the test, irrespective whether the test was positive or negative.In more than 2/3 of patients a diet reduced in fructose or lactose may lead to improvement or remission of these metabolic disorders. IBS, which is often correlated with FIT (183/221 patients = 83 %), can be improved by relevant but also not relevant diets indicating that irritable bowel disease seems to be caused primarily by psychological disorders.

  17. Lactose intolerance in systemic nickel allergy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, I A; Vadrucci, E; Cammarota, G; Minelli, M; Gasbarrini, A

    2011-01-01

    Some patients affected by nickel-contact allergy present digestive symptoms in addition to systemic cutaneous manifestations, falling under the condition known as systemic nickel allergy syndrome (SNAS). A nickel-related pro-inflammatory status has been documented at intestinal mucosal level. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of lactose intolerance in patients affected by SNAS compared to a healthy population. Consecutive patients affected by SNAS referring to our departments were enrolled. The control population consisted of healthy subjects without gastrointestinal symptoms. All subjects enrolled underwent lactose breath test under standard conditions. One hundred and seventy-eight SNAS patients and 60 healthy controls were enrolled. Positivity of lactose breath test occurred in 74.7% of the SNAS group compared to 6.6% of the control group. Lactose intolerance is highly prevalent in our series of patients affected by SNAS. Based on our preliminary results, we can hypothesize that in SNAS patients, the nickel-induced pro-inflammatory status could temporarily impair the brush border enzymatic functions, resulting in hypolactasia. Further trials evaluating the effect of a nickel-low diet regimen on lactase activity, histological features and immunological pattern are needed.

  18. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-09-01

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows' milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows' milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows' milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed.

  19. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-01-01

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows’ milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows’ milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows’ milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed. PMID:26404362

  20. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-09-01

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows' milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows' milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows' milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed. PMID:26404362

  1. Lactose intolerance: an unnecessary risk for low bone density.

    PubMed

    Savaiano, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    The potential for lactose intolerance causes 25-50 million Americans and an unknown number of people around the world to avoid milk. Milk avoidance is a significant risk factor for low bone density. Individuals who avoid milk, due to intolerance or learned aversion, consume significantly less calcium and have poorer bone health and probable higher risk of osteoporosis. Lactose intolerance is easily managed by: (1) regular consumption of milk that adapts the colon bacteria and facilitates digestion of lactose; (2) consumption of yogurts and cheeses and other dairy foods low in lactose; consumption of dairy foods with meals to slow transit and maximize digestion, and use of lactose-digestive aids. As dairying spreads around the world to new markets and dairy foods become the dominant source of calcium in these markets, the potential for lactose intolerance will grow. Management of lactose intolerance globally will require both education and product development.

  2. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Pohl, Daniel; Frühauf, Heiko; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fox, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a common condition caused by reduced expression or activity of lactase in the small intestine. In such patients, lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal symptoms (e.g. nausea, bloating, and pain) after ingestion of dairy products. The genetic basis of lactose malabsorption is established and several tests for this condition are available, including genetic, endoscopic, and H2-breath tests. In contrast, lactose intolerance is less well understood. Recent studies show that the risk of symptoms after lactose ingestion depends on the dose of lactose, lactase expression, intestinal flora, and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract. Lactose intolerance has recently been defined as symptoms developing after ingestion of lactose which do not develop after placebo challenge in a person with lactose maldigestion. Such blinded testing might be especially important in those with functional gastrointestinal diseases in whom self-reported lactose intolerance is common. However, placebo-controlled testing is not part of current clinical practice. Updated protocols and high-quality outcome studies are needed. Treatment options of lactose intolerance include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. Documenting the response to multiple doses can guide rational dietary management; however, the clinical utility of this strategy has not been tested. This review summarizes the genetic basis, diagnosis, and treatment of lactose malabsorption and intolerance.

  3. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Daniel; Frühauf, Heiko; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fox, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a common condition caused by reduced expression or activity of lactase in the small intestine. In such patients, lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal symptoms (e.g. nausea, bloating, and pain) after ingestion of dairy products. The genetic basis of lactose malabsorption is established and several tests for this condition are available, including genetic, endoscopic, and H2-breath tests. In contrast, lactose intolerance is less well understood. Recent studies show that the risk of symptoms after lactose ingestion depends on the dose of lactose, lactase expression, intestinal flora, and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract. Lactose intolerance has recently been defined as symptoms developing after ingestion of lactose which do not develop after placebo challenge in a person with lactose maldigestion. Such blinded testing might be especially important in those with functional gastrointestinal diseases in whom self-reported lactose intolerance is common. However, placebo-controlled testing is not part of current clinical practice. Updated protocols and high-quality outcome studies are needed. Treatment options of lactose intolerance include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. Documenting the response to multiple doses can guide rational dietary management; however, the clinical utility of this strategy has not been tested. This review summarizes the genetic basis, diagnosis, and treatment of lactose malabsorption and intolerance. PMID:24917953

  4. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Pohl, Daniel; Frühauf, Heiko; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fox, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a common condition caused by reduced expression or activity of lactase in the small intestine. In such patients, lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal symptoms (e.g. nausea, bloating, and pain) after ingestion of dairy products. The genetic basis of lactose malabsorption is established and several tests for this condition are available, including genetic, endoscopic, and H2-breath tests. In contrast, lactose intolerance is less well understood. Recent studies show that the risk of symptoms after lactose ingestion depends on the dose of lactose, lactase expression, intestinal flora, and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract. Lactose intolerance has recently been defined as symptoms developing after ingestion of lactose which do not develop after placebo challenge in a person with lactose maldigestion. Such blinded testing might be especially important in those with functional gastrointestinal diseases in whom self-reported lactose intolerance is common. However, placebo-controlled testing is not part of current clinical practice. Updated protocols and high-quality outcome studies are needed. Treatment options of lactose intolerance include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. Documenting the response to multiple doses can guide rational dietary management; however, the clinical utility of this strategy has not been tested. This review summarizes the genetic basis, diagnosis, and treatment of lactose malabsorption and intolerance. PMID:24917953

  5. Systemic lactose intolerance: a new perspective on an old problem

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, S; Waud, J; Roberts, A; Campbell, A

    2005-01-01

    Intolerance to certain foods can cause a range of gut and systemic symptoms. The possibility that these can be caused by lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose added to many foods and drinks inadequately labelled, confusing diagnosis based on dietary removal of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. This, with a 48 hour record of gut and systemic symptoms and a six hour breath hydrogen test, provides a new approach to the clinical management of lactose intolerance. The key is the prolonged effect of dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labelled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the wide range of systemic symptoms caused by lactose intolerance. This has important implications for the management of irritable bowel syndrome, and for doctors of many specialties. PMID:15749792

  6. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-09-18

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance.

  7. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance. PMID:26393648

  8. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance. PMID:26393648

  9. [Pharmaceutical drugs containing lactose can as a rule be used by persons with lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Vinther, Siri; Rumessen, Jöri Johannes; Christensen, Mikkel

    2015-03-01

    Lactose is often used as an excipient in pharmaceutical drugs. Current evidence indicates that the amount of lactose in most drugs is not sufficient to cause symptoms in persons with lactose intolerance, although interindividual differences in sensitivity probably exist. Patient preferences and/or suboptimal treatment adherence could be reasons for considering lactose-free drug alternatives.

  10. [Pharmaceutical drugs containing lactose can as a rule be used by persons with lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Vinther, Siri; Rumessen, Jöri Johannes; Christensen, Mikkel

    2015-03-01

    Lactose is often used as an excipient in pharmaceutical drugs. Current evidence indicates that the amount of lactose in most drugs is not sufficient to cause symptoms in persons with lactose intolerance, although interindividual differences in sensitivity probably exist. Patient preferences and/or suboptimal treatment adherence could be reasons for considering lactose-free drug alternatives. PMID:25786702

  11. The role of colonic metabolism in lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    He, T; Venema, K; Priebe, M G; Welling, G W; Brummer, R-J M; Vonk, R J

    2008-08-01

    Lactose maldigestion and intolerance affect a large part of the world population. The underlying factors of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. In this review, the role of colonic metabolism is discussed, i.e. fermentation of lactose by the colonic microbiota, colonic processing of the fermentation metabolites and how these processes would play a role in the pathophysiology of lactose intolerance. We suggest that the balance between the removal and production rate of osmotic-active components (lactose, and intermediate metabolites, e.g. lactate, succinate, etc.) in the colon is a key factor in the development of symptoms. The involvement of the colon may provide the basis for designing new targeted strategies for dietary and clinical management of lactose intolerance.

  12. Lactose Intolerance: Exploring Reaction Kinetics Governing Lactose Conversion of Dairy Products within the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Jimmy L.

    2008-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is a condition suffered by an estimated 50 million Americans. Certain ethnic and racial populations are more widely affected than others. As many as 75 percent of all African-American, Jewish, Native American, and Mexican-American adults, and 90 percent of Asian-American adults are lactose intolerant. Some populations in Africa…

  13. Improved clinical tolerance to chronic lactose ingestion in subjects with lactose intolerance: a placebo effect?

    PubMed Central

    Briet, F; Pochart, P; Marteau, P; Flourie, B; Arrigoni, E; Rambaud, J

    1997-01-01

    Background—Uncontrolled studies of lactose intolerant subjects have shown that symptom severity decreases after chronic lactose consumption. Adaptation of the colonic flora might explain this improvement. 
Aims—To compare the effects of regular administration of either lactose or sucrose on clinical tolerance and bacterial adaptation to lactose. 
Methods—Forty six lactose intolerant subjects underwent two 50 g lactose challenges on days 1 and 15. Between these days they were given 34 g of lactose or sucrose per day, in a double blind protocol. Stool samples were obtained on days 0 and 14, to measure faecal β-galactosidase and pH. Symptoms, breath H2 excretion, faecal weight and electrolytes, and orofaecal transit time were assessed. 
Results—Except for faecal weight, symptoms were significantly milder during the second challenge in both groups, and covariance analysis showed no statistical difference between them. In the lactose group, but not in the sucrose group, faecal β-galactosidase activity increased, pH dropped, and breath H2 excretion decreased. 
Conclusion—Bacterial adaptation occurred when lactose intolerant subjects ingested lactose for 13 days, and all symptoms except diarrhoea regressed. Clinical improvement was also observed in the control group which displayed no signs of metabolic adaptation. This suggests that improved clinical tolerance may be just a placebo effect. 

 Keywords: lactose; lactose intolerance; colonic adaptation; lactase deficiency PMID:9414969

  14. What I Need to Know about Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... and all foods made with milk, such as ice cream cream butter cheese cottage cheese yogurt Rarely, people ... lactose intolerance with a medical, family, and diet history; a physical exam; and medical tests. Most people ...

  15. [Lactose intolerance: changing paradigms due to molecular biology].

    PubMed

    Mattar, Rejane; Mazo, Daniel Ferraz de Campos

    2010-01-01

    In most mammals, lactase activity declines on the intestinal wall after weaning, characterizing primary hypolactasia that provokes symptoms of lactose intolerance. The intensity of symptoms of distention, flatulence, abdominal pain and diarrhea varies, according to the amount of ingested lactose, and increases with age. Hypolactasia is genetically determined; nonetheless, a mutation occurred that had made a part of mankind tolerate milk in adulthood. Diagnosis is made by a tolerance test, using the lactose challenge. With the discovery made by the Finns of polymorphism associated with lactase persistence, mainly, in Northern Europe, the genetic test was incorporated as a more comfortable diagnostic tool for the intolerant. In Brazil, 43% of Caucasian and Mulatto groups have lactase persistence allele, with hipolactasia more frequently found among Blacks and Japanese. However, in clinical practice people with hypolactasia may be advised to consume certain dairy products and food containing lactose without developing intolerance symptoms, whereas others will need a lactose restriction diet.

  16. Perceived lactose intolerance in adult Canadians: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Barr, Susan I

    2013-08-01

    Although double-blind studies show that lactose-intolerant individuals can consume moderate quantities of milk products without perceptible symptoms, many who perceive that they are lactose intolerant limit or avoid milk products, potentially compromising calcium and vitamin D intakes. Adult Canadians are at risk of inadequate intakes of these nutrients, but no data exist on the prevalence, correlates, and potential impact of perceived lactose intolerance among Canadians. To address this, a Web-based survey of a population-representative sample of 2251 Canadians aged ≥19 years was conducted. Overall, 16% self-reported lactose intolerance. This was more common in women (odds ratio (OR), 1.84; 95% CI, 1.46-2.33) and in nonwhites (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.24-2.58) and less common in those >50 years of age (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.56-0.90) and in those completing the survey in French (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.56-0.99). Those with self-reported lactose intolerance had lower covariate-adjusted milk product and alternative intakes (mean ± SE; 1.40 ± 0.08 servings·day(-1) vs. 2.33 ± 0.03 servings·day(-1), p < 0.001). A greater proportion used supplements containing calcium (52% vs. 37%, p < 0.001) and vitamin D (58% vs. 46%, p < 0.001), but calcium intakes from the combination of milk products, alternatives, and supplements were lower (739 ± 30 mg·day(-1) vs. 893 ± 13 mg·day(-1), p < 0.0001). Variation in self-reported lactose intolerance by sex, age, and language preference was unexpected and suggests that some groups may be more vulnerable to the perception that they are lactose intolerant. Regardless of whether lactose intolerance is physiologically based or perceptual, education is required to ensure that calcium intakes are not compromised. PMID:23855270

  17. Perceived lactose intolerance in adult Canadians: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Barr, Susan I

    2013-08-01

    Although double-blind studies show that lactose-intolerant individuals can consume moderate quantities of milk products without perceptible symptoms, many who perceive that they are lactose intolerant limit or avoid milk products, potentially compromising calcium and vitamin D intakes. Adult Canadians are at risk of inadequate intakes of these nutrients, but no data exist on the prevalence, correlates, and potential impact of perceived lactose intolerance among Canadians. To address this, a Web-based survey of a population-representative sample of 2251 Canadians aged ≥19 years was conducted. Overall, 16% self-reported lactose intolerance. This was more common in women (odds ratio (OR), 1.84; 95% CI, 1.46-2.33) and in nonwhites (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.24-2.58) and less common in those >50 years of age (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.56-0.90) and in those completing the survey in French (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.56-0.99). Those with self-reported lactose intolerance had lower covariate-adjusted milk product and alternative intakes (mean ± SE; 1.40 ± 0.08 servings·day(-1) vs. 2.33 ± 0.03 servings·day(-1), p < 0.001). A greater proportion used supplements containing calcium (52% vs. 37%, p < 0.001) and vitamin D (58% vs. 46%, p < 0.001), but calcium intakes from the combination of milk products, alternatives, and supplements were lower (739 ± 30 mg·day(-1) vs. 893 ± 13 mg·day(-1), p < 0.0001). Variation in self-reported lactose intolerance by sex, age, and language preference was unexpected and suggests that some groups may be more vulnerable to the perception that they are lactose intolerant. Regardless of whether lactose intolerance is physiologically based or perceptual, education is required to ensure that calcium intakes are not compromised.

  18. Clinical implications of lactose malabsorption versus lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Michael; Wilt, Timothy; Shaukat, Aasma

    2013-07-01

    The majority of the world's adult population and an estimated 80 million Americans are hypolactasic and hence malabsorb ingested lactose. Although lactose malabsorption is easily identified, less readily assessed is the clinically important question of how often does this malabsorption induce symptoms. This review summarizes: (1) knowledge concerning the etiology and diagnosis of hypolactasia and the pathophysiology of the symptoms of lactose malabsorption and (2) the results of well-controlled trials of the symptomatic response of lactose malabsorbers to varying dosages of lactose and the efficacy of therapeutic interventions to alleviate these symptoms. We conclude that the clinical significance of lactose malabsorption has been overestimated by both the lay public and physicians in that commonly ingested doses of lactose (ie, the quantity in a cup of milk) usually do not cause perceptible symptoms when ingested with a meal. Symptoms occur when the lactose dosage exceeds that in a cup of milk or when lactose is ingested without other nutrients. Simple dietary instruction, rather than the use of commercial products to reduce lactose intake, is recommended for the vast majority of lactose-malabsorbing subjects.

  19. Decrease in TSH levels after lactose restriction in Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients with lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Asik, Mehmet; Gunes, Fahri; Binnetoglu, Emine; Eroglu, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Neslihan; Sen, Hacer; Akbal, Erdem; Bakar, Coskum; Beyazit, Yavuz; Ukinc, Kubilay

    2014-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of lactose intolerance (LI) in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis(HT) and the effects of lactose restriction on thyroid function in these patients. Eighty-three HT patients taking L-thyroxine (LT4) were enrolled, and lactose tolerance tests were performed on all patients. Lactose intolerance was diagnosed in 75.9 % of the patients with HT. Thirty-eight patients with LI were started on a lactose-restricted diet for 8 weeks. Thirty-eight patients with LI (30 euthyroid and 8 with subclinical hypothyroidism), and 12 patients without LI were included in the final analysis. The level of TSH significantly decreased in the euthyroid and subclinical hypothyroid patients with LI [from 2.06 ± 1.02 to 1.51 ±1.1 IU/mL and from 5.45 ± 0.74 to 2.25 ± 1.88 IU/mL,respectively (both P<0.05)]. However, the level of TSH in patients without LI did not change significantly over the 8 weeks (P>0.05). Lactose intolerance occurs at a high frequency in HT patients. Lactose restriction leads to decreased levels of TSH, and LI should be considered in hypothyroid patients who require increasing LT4 doses,have irregular TSH levels and are resistant to LT4 treatment.

  20. Genetics of lactase persistence and lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Swallow, Dallas M

    2003-01-01

    The enzyme lactase that is located in the villus enterocytes of the small intestine is responsible for digestion of lactose in milk. Lactase activity is high and vital during infancy, but in most mammals, including most humans, lactase activity declines after the weaning phase. In other healthy humans, lactase activity persists at a high level throughout adult life, enabling them to digest lactose as adults. This dominantly inherited genetic trait is known as lactase persistence. The distribution of these different lactase phenotypes in human populations is highly variable and is controlled by a polymorphic element cis-acting to the lactase gene. A putative causal nucleotide change has been identified and occurs on the background of a very extended haplotype that is frequent in Northern Europeans, where lactase persistence is frequent. This single nucleotide polymorphism is located 14 kb upstream from the start of transcription of lactase in an intron of the adjacent gene MCM6. This change does not, however, explain all the variation in lactase expression.

  1. Nutritional support of malnourished lactose intolerant African patients.

    PubMed Central

    O'Keefe, S J; Adam, J K; Cakata, E; Epstein, S

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of two commonly available liquid diets was assessed in 40 severely malnourished black African patients. All patients were shown to have normal xylose absorption. The diets were given according to the manufacturer's recommendations. One diet was lactose containing (LC diet) (150 g/d) and high protein (112 g/d), the other normal protein and lactose free (LF diet) (protein 67 g/d), total energy content being similar. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups and allocated (blind) to one of the diets. Tolerance and nitrogen balance were assessed over two three day periods on half and then full strength formulations. Severe intolerant symptoms were observed in 50% of patients on half strength and 94% of patients on full strength lactose containing diet with evidence of malabsorption of fluid, nitrogen, and fat. Despite high stool nitrogen losses (3.75 +/- 1.04 g/d), however, positive nitrogen balance was achieved in most patients receiving the full strength LC formulation. On the other hand, the full strength LF diet was generally well tolerated and was associated with significantly lower faecal losses and positive nitrogen balance. The results indicate that high density lactose containing liquid formulae are poorly tolerated by severely malnourished black African patients, while lactose free formulae containing approximately 10 g nitrogen/d are well tolerated and result in positive nitrogen balance. PMID:6469079

  2. Overcoming the barrier of lactose intolerance to reduce health disparities.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Judith K; Miller, Gregory D

    2002-02-01

    Federal health goals for the public have focused on reducing health disparities that exist between whites and various racial and ethnic groups. Many of the chronic diseases for which African Americans are at greater risk- hypertension, stroke, colon cancer, and obesity-may be exacerbated by a low intake of calcium and/or other dairy-related nutrients. For example, a low intake of dairy food nutrients, such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium, may contribute to the high risk of hypertension seen in African Americans. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) study demonstrated that a low-fat diet rich in fruits and vegetables (8 to 10 servings) and low-fat dairy foods (3 servings) significantly reduced blood pressure-and was twice as effective in African-American participants. Calcium and dairy food consumption is particularly low among African-American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. Average intakes are near the threshold of 600 to 700 mg/day, below which bone loss and hypertension can result. Although lactose intolerance may be partly to blame for the low calcium intakes due to reduced dairy food consumption by minority populations, culturally determined food preferences and dietary practices learned early in life also play a role. The high incidence figures for primary lactose maldigestion among minority groups grossly overestimates the number who will experience intolerance symptoms after drinking a glass of milk with a meal. Randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials have demonstrated that by using a few simple dietary strategies, those who maldigest lactose (have low levels of the lactase enzyme) can easily tolerate a dairy-rich diet that meets calcium intake recommendations. Physicians and other health professionals can help their minority patients and the general public understand how to improve calcium nutrition by overcoming the surmountable barrier of lactose intolerance. At the same time they will be helping to reduce the incidence

  3. 75 FR 2551 - NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    .... Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest significant amounts of lactose, a sugar found in milk and.... Lactase breaks milk sugar down into two simpler forms of sugar called glucose and galactose, which...

  4. [Food intolerances caused by enzyme defects and carbohydrate malassimiliations : Lactose intolerance and Co].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    Apart from allergic conditions, carbohydrate malassimiliations (sugar metabolism disorders) are classified within the group of food intolerances. These dose-dependent, yet non-immunological reactions require gastroenterological or internal diagnosis following nutritional therapy. Intolerances to carbohydrates such as lactose (milk sugar) and fructose (fruit sugar) in addition to sugar alcohols (sorbitol, mannitol, lactitol etc.) have been gaining increasing attention in recent decades as they are the cause of a wide range of gastrointestinal symptoms. There are currently various options for both diagnosis and therapy that differ notably in terms of effort, costs, and efficiency. Nutritional change and patient education are the bases of therapy. Non-observance of the trigger will result in increasing complaints and possibly even more infections, e.g., diverticula, rectal disorders, bacterial miscolonization, bile acid malabsorption). For an optimal therapy, the following sugar metabolism disorders have to be differentiated: hypolactasia versus lactose maldigestion, fructose malabsorption versus fructose overload, combined lactose and fructose intolerance, and isolated adverse reactions against sorbitol.For the medical conditions listed above, a three- or four-stage treatment regimen is recommended. Extensive dietary restrictions with regard to the relevant sugar, except for lactose, should not be maintained over a longer period of time.

  5. [Food intolerances caused by enzyme defects and carbohydrate malassimiliations : Lactose intolerance and Co].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    Apart from allergic conditions, carbohydrate malassimiliations (sugar metabolism disorders) are classified within the group of food intolerances. These dose-dependent, yet non-immunological reactions require gastroenterological or internal diagnosis following nutritional therapy. Intolerances to carbohydrates such as lactose (milk sugar) and fructose (fruit sugar) in addition to sugar alcohols (sorbitol, mannitol, lactitol etc.) have been gaining increasing attention in recent decades as they are the cause of a wide range of gastrointestinal symptoms. There are currently various options for both diagnosis and therapy that differ notably in terms of effort, costs, and efficiency. Nutritional change and patient education are the bases of therapy. Non-observance of the trigger will result in increasing complaints and possibly even more infections, e.g., diverticula, rectal disorders, bacterial miscolonization, bile acid malabsorption). For an optimal therapy, the following sugar metabolism disorders have to be differentiated: hypolactasia versus lactose maldigestion, fructose malabsorption versus fructose overload, combined lactose and fructose intolerance, and isolated adverse reactions against sorbitol.For the medical conditions listed above, a three- or four-stage treatment regimen is recommended. Extensive dietary restrictions with regard to the relevant sugar, except for lactose, should not be maintained over a longer period of time. PMID:27188621

  6. Novel epoxy activated hydrogels for solving lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Elnashar, Magdy M M; Hassan, Mohamed E

    2014-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance" is a medical problem for almost 70% of the world population. Milk and dairy products contain 5-10% w/v lactose. Hydrolysis of lactose by immobilized lactase is an industrial solution. In this work, we succeeded to increase the lactase loading capacity to more than 3-fold to 36.3 U/g gel using epoxy activated hydrogels compared to 11 U/g gel using aldehyde activated carrageenan. The hydrogel's mode of interaction was proven by FTIR, DSC, and TGA. The high activity of the epoxy group was regarded to its ability to attach to the enzyme's -SH, -NH, and -OH groups, whereas the aldehyde group could only bind to the enzyme's -NH2 group. The optimum conditions for immobilization such as epoxy chain length and enzyme concentration have been studied. Furthermore, the optimum enzyme conditions were also deliberated and showed better stability for the immobilized enzyme and the Michaelis constants, K m and V max, were doubled. Results revealed also that both free and immobilized enzymes reached their maximum rate of lactose conversion after 2 h, albeit, the aldehyde activated hydrogel could only reach 63% of the free enzyme. In brief, the epoxy activated hydrogels are more efficient in immobilizing more enzymes than the aldehyde activated hydrogel.

  7. Novel epoxy activated hydrogels for solving lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Elnashar, Magdy M M; Hassan, Mohamed E

    2014-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance" is a medical problem for almost 70% of the world population. Milk and dairy products contain 5-10% w/v lactose. Hydrolysis of lactose by immobilized lactase is an industrial solution. In this work, we succeeded to increase the lactase loading capacity to more than 3-fold to 36.3 U/g gel using epoxy activated hydrogels compared to 11 U/g gel using aldehyde activated carrageenan. The hydrogel's mode of interaction was proven by FTIR, DSC, and TGA. The high activity of the epoxy group was regarded to its ability to attach to the enzyme's -SH, -NH, and -OH groups, whereas the aldehyde group could only bind to the enzyme's -NH2 group. The optimum conditions for immobilization such as epoxy chain length and enzyme concentration have been studied. Furthermore, the optimum enzyme conditions were also deliberated and showed better stability for the immobilized enzyme and the Michaelis constants, K m and V max, were doubled. Results revealed also that both free and immobilized enzymes reached their maximum rate of lactose conversion after 2 h, albeit, the aldehyde activated hydrogel could only reach 63% of the free enzyme. In brief, the epoxy activated hydrogels are more efficient in immobilizing more enzymes than the aldehyde activated hydrogel. PMID:25013804

  8. [Effect of exogenous lactase on the absorption of lactose and its intolerance symptoms].

    PubMed

    He, M; Yang, Y; Bian, L; Cui, H

    1999-09-30

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of lactase on lactose malabsorption and its intolerance symptoms, as well as the available way to improve lactose absorption. Healthy adults with a history of lactose intolerance were screened by 25 g lactose tolerance test. The individuals with higher H2 expired and/or lactose intolerance symptoms were selected as the subjects. Subjects were challenged twice with "400 ml low fat milk" and "400 ml low fat milk + 9000Fcc lactase" separately in 3 days interval. The breath H2 concentration and intolerance symptoms were tested in 4 hours after the challenge. The results showed that exogenous lactase can significantly decrease the incidence of lactose malabsorption (the abnormal expiration of H2 decreased from 100% to 48.9%) and milk intolerance symptoms(from 51.1% to 13.3%). The results from this study demonstrate that lactose malabsorption and intolerance symptoms are resulted from the reduced enzyme activities of individuals, and the exogenous lactase can improve lactose absorption and intolerance symptoms. Lactose supplementation may be an available way to increase the dairy consumption and promote health of people. PMID:12712706

  9. Prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance in multiethnic sample of adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, between 30 and 50 million Americans have the potential for lactose-intolerance symptoms. However, lactose-intolerance prevalence rates in practical life settings may be lower than originally suggested. The goal of thi...

  10. HRQoL questionnaire evaluation in lactose intolerant patients with adverse reactions to foods.

    PubMed

    Erminia, Ridolo; Ilaria, Baiardini; Tiziana, Meschi; Silvia, Peveri; Antonio, Nouvenne; Pierpaolo, Dall'Aglio; Loris, Borghi

    2013-09-01

    The occurrence of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms attributed either to food allergy or intolerance has significantly increased. Nevertheless, an accurate and detailed case history, a systematic evaluation and the outcomes of specific allergy tests to identify the offending foods, including "in vivo" and "in vitro" allergy tests, are often negative for food allergy and may indicate a lactose intolerance, which is a recurrent condition affecting about 50% of adults. The aims of our study were the following: (1) What is the real incidence of the food hypersensitivity and the primary lactose intolerance in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms, initially referred to allergy or food intolerance? (2) Does lactose intolerance affect the quality of life and compliance to the therapy program? We investigated 262 consecutive patients, 72 men and 190 women. An accurate and detailed history and clinical examination were completed to investigate the offending foods. The evaluation in each patient included: allergy tests, lactose H2 breath test (LHBT) and the HRQoL questionnaire. Five years after the diagnosis of lactose intolerance, a questionnaire on the persistence of gastrointestinal symptoms after lactose ingestion and the diet compliance was distributed. Our results demonstrate an high prevalence of lactose intolerance, more frequent in women; in these patients, bloating and diarrhea are the most reported symptoms. We observe only a significant positive correlation between adverse drug reaction (ADR) and LHBT+ patients, but not an augmented prevalence of food allergy and a negative impact on the HRQoL questionnaire of lactose intolerance. PMID:21614464

  11. Lactose intolerance and African Americans: implications for the consumption of appropriate intake levels of key nutrients.

    PubMed

    2009-10-01

    Lactose intolerance is a complex condition that is complicated by cultural beliefs and perceptions about the consumption of dairy products. These attitudes about dairy may contribute to inadequate intake of key nutrients that may impact conditions that contribute to health disparities in African Americans. While a complex health problem, lactose intolerance is easy to treat. However, no treatment can improve the body's ability to produce lactase. Yet, symptoms can be controlled through dietary strategies. This position paper emphasizes the importance of using patient and provider-level strategies in order to reduce the risks to the health of African Americans that may accrue as a result of dairy nutrient deficiency. Evaluation and assessment of interventions tested is critical so that evidence-based approaches to addressing dairy nutrient deficiency and lactose Intolerance can be created. Lastly, it is essential for physicians to communicate key messages to their patients. Since dairy nutrients address important health concerns, the amelioration of lactose intolerance is an investment in health. Lactose intolerance is common, is easy to treat, and can be managed. It is possible to consume dairy even in the face of a history of maldigestion or lactose intolerant issues. Gradually increasing lactose in the diet--drinking small milk portions with food, eating yogurt, and consuming cheese--are effective strategies for managing lactose intolerance and meeting optimal dairy needs.

  12. Lactose intolerance and African Americans: implications for the consumption of appropriate intake levels of key nutrients.

    PubMed

    2009-10-01

    Lactose intolerance is a complex condition that is complicated by cultural beliefs and perceptions about the consumption of dairy products. These attitudes about dairy may contribute to inadequate intake of key nutrients that may impact conditions that contribute to health disparities in African Americans. While a complex health problem, lactose intolerance is easy to treat. However, no treatment can improve the body's ability to produce lactase. Yet, symptoms can be controlled through dietary strategies. This position paper emphasizes the importance of using patient and provider-level strategies in order to reduce the risks to the health of African Americans that may accrue as a result of dairy nutrient deficiency. Evaluation and assessment of interventions tested is critical so that evidence-based approaches to addressing dairy nutrient deficiency and lactose Intolerance can be created. Lastly, it is essential for physicians to communicate key messages to their patients. Since dairy nutrients address important health concerns, the amelioration of lactose intolerance is an investment in health. Lactose intolerance is common, is easy to treat, and can be managed. It is possible to consume dairy even in the face of a history of maldigestion or lactose intolerant issues. Gradually increasing lactose in the diet--drinking small milk portions with food, eating yogurt, and consuming cheese--are effective strategies for managing lactose intolerance and meeting optimal dairy needs. PMID:19899495

  13. Lactose intolerance and health disparities among African Americans and Hispanic Americans: an updated consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Rahn K; Fileti, Cecelia Pozo; Keith, Jeanette; Tropez-Sims, Susanne; Price, Winston; Allison-Ottey, Sharon Denise

    2013-01-01

    Dairy foods contribute nine essential nutrients to the diet including calcium, potassium and vitamin D; nutrients identified by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as being "of public health concern" within the U.S. population. Milk and milk product intake is associated with better diet quality and has been associated with a reduced risk of chronic diseases or conditions including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and osteoporosis. Some research also indicates dairy food intake may be linked to reduced body fat, when accompanied by energy-restriction. On average, both African Americans and Hispanic Americans consume less than the recommended levels of dairy foods, and perceived or actual lactose intolerance can be a primary reason for limiting or avoiding dairy intake. True lactose intolerance prevalence is not known because healthcare providers do not routinely measure for it, and no standardized assessment method exists. Avoiding dairy may lead to shortfalls of essential nutrients and increased susceptibility to chronic disease. This updated Consensus Statement aims to provide the most current information about lactose intolerance and health, with specific relevance to the African American and Hispanic American communities. Topics covered include diagnostic considerations, actual and recommended dairy food intake and levels of consumption of key dairy nutrients among African Americans and Hispanic Americans; prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance among various racial/ethnic groups; the association between dairy food intake, lactose intolerance and chronic disease; and research-based management recommendations for those with lactose intolerance.

  14. Lactose intolerance among severely malnourished children with diarrhoea admitted to the nutrition unit, Mulago hospital, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lactose intolerance is a common complication of diarrhoea in infants with malnutrition and a cause of treatment failure. A combination of nutritional injury and infectious insults in severe protein energy malnutrition reduces the capacity of the intestinal mucosa to produce lactase enzyme necessary for the digestion of lactose. The standard management of severe malnutrition involves nutritional rehabilitation with lactose-based high energy formula milk. However, some of these children may be lactose intolerant, possibly contributing to the high rate of unfavorable treatment outcomes. This study was therefore designed to establish the prevalence of lactose intolerance and associated factors in this population. Methods A descriptive cross sectional study involving 196 severely malnourished children with diarrhoea aged 3-60 months was done in Mwanamugimu Nutrition Unit (MNU), Mulago hospital between October 2006 and February 2007. Results During the study period, 196 severely malnourished children with diarrhoea were recruited, 50 (25.5%) of whom had evidence of lactose intolerance (stool reducing substance ≥ 1 + [0.5%] and stool pH < 5.5) and it occurred more commonly in children with kwashiorkor 27/75 (36.0%) than marasmic-kwashiorkor 6/25 (24.0%) and marasmus 17/96 (17.7%). Oedematous malnutrition (p = 0.032), perianal skin erosion (p = 0.044), high mean stool frequency (p = < 0.001) and having ≥2 diarrhoea episodes in the previous 3 months (p = 0.007) were the independent predictors of lactose intolerance. Other factors that were significantly associated with lactose intolerance on bi-variate analysis included: young age of 3-12 months; lack of up to-date immunization; persistent diarrhoea; vomiting; dehydration, and abdominal distension. Exclusive breastfeeding for less than 4 months and worsening of diarrhoea on initiation of therapeutic milk were the other factors. Conclusions The prevalence of lactose intolerance in this study setting of 25

  15. Prevalence and Symptom Correlation of Lactose Intolerance in the North East Part of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Saha, M; Shil, B C; Saha, S K; Chowdhury, M; Perveen, I; Banik, R; Rahman, M H

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to see the prevalence of lactose intolerance and symptom correlation following oral lactose challenge in healthy volunteers in the north east part of Bangladesh. Symptoms of abdominal pain, nausea, borborygmi, flatulence, diarrhea and others were noted for 24 hours and blood glucose was estimated at 0 hour and 30 minutes after 50 gm oral lactose load to healthy volunteers. Failure to rise blood glucose level ≥1.1 mmol/l at 30 minutes after lactose intake from fasting level was taken as lactose malabsorption (LM) i.e., lactose intolerance. Sensitivity and specificity of different symptoms were then found out. A total of 171 volunteers (male 123, female 48) with a mean age 34.08 years participated in this study. Lactose intolerance was found among 82.5% (n=141, M=100, F=41) subjects. Symptoms mostly experience by the lactose malabsorbers were diarrhea 93(66.0%), borborygmi 80(56.7%), abdominal pain 31(22.0%) and flatulence 32(22.7%). LM prevalence was found to increase with increasing number of symptoms up to 3 symptoms. A week positive correlation (r=0.205, P=0.007) was found between the number of symptoms and proportion of subjects having positive lactose tolerance test. Lactose intolerance among healthy adults of North East part of our country is as common as in other Asian countries including China and Malaysia. But LM is higher than that of Europeans and south Indians. Diarrhea and borborygmi were mostly associated with LM. PMID:26931253

  16. Prevalence and Symptom Correlation of Lactose Intolerance in the North East Part of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Saha, M; Shil, B C; Saha, S K; Chowdhury, M; Perveen, I; Banik, R; Rahman, M H

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to see the prevalence of lactose intolerance and symptom correlation following oral lactose challenge in healthy volunteers in the north east part of Bangladesh. Symptoms of abdominal pain, nausea, borborygmi, flatulence, diarrhea and others were noted for 24 hours and blood glucose was estimated at 0 hour and 30 minutes after 50 gm oral lactose load to healthy volunteers. Failure to rise blood glucose level ≥1.1 mmol/l at 30 minutes after lactose intake from fasting level was taken as lactose malabsorption (LM) i.e., lactose intolerance. Sensitivity and specificity of different symptoms were then found out. A total of 171 volunteers (male 123, female 48) with a mean age 34.08 years participated in this study. Lactose intolerance was found among 82.5% (n=141, M=100, F=41) subjects. Symptoms mostly experience by the lactose malabsorbers were diarrhea 93(66.0%), borborygmi 80(56.7%), abdominal pain 31(22.0%) and flatulence 32(22.7%). LM prevalence was found to increase with increasing number of symptoms up to 3 symptoms. A week positive correlation (r=0.205, P=0.007) was found between the number of symptoms and proportion of subjects having positive lactose tolerance test. Lactose intolerance among healthy adults of North East part of our country is as common as in other Asian countries including China and Malaysia. But LM is higher than that of Europeans and south Indians. Diarrhea and borborygmi were mostly associated with LM.

  17. Effect of a single dose of lactase on symptoms and expired hydrogen after lactose challenge in lactose-intolerant subjects.

    PubMed

    Sanders, S W; Tolman, K G; Reitberg, D P

    1992-06-01

    The effect of a single dose or oral lactase on symptoms, breath hydrogen concentration, and glucose absorption in lactose-intolerant subjects challenged with lactose was studied. Volunteers underwent a lactose challenge test; those whose breath hydrogen concentrations increased 20 ppm or more and who met other criteria were admitted as subjects. After fasting, the subjects were given three chewable lactase tablets (total lactase dose, 9900 FCC units) or placebo tablets in a randomized, double-blind, crossover manner. The subjects also consumed 8 oz of whole milk in which 37.5 g of lactose powder was dissolved (total lactose content, 50 g). The washout period between lactose challenges was at least one week. Breath hydrogen and plasma glucose concentrations were measured before and at intervals after the challenges, and the subjects completed symptom-evaluation questionnaires every eight hours for four days. Twenty-four subjects completed the study. The maximum mean breath hydrogen concentration was significantly lower after lactase treatment than after placebo treatment. In 21 subjects, the area under the hydrogen concentration-time curve (AUC) was lower after lactase than after placebo; three subjects had hydrogen AUCs more than 300 ppm.hr lower. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose levels. Subjective ratings of the severity of abdominal cramping, belching, flatulence, and diarrhea were lower during the first eight hours after challenge in lactase-treated subjects; ratings for bloating were lower during the next eight hours. Single doses of a chewable lactase tablet reduced the concentration of expired hydrogen and symptoms of lactose intolerance after a lactose challenge.

  18. Effect of Raw Milk on Lactose Intolerance: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mummah, Sarah; Oelrich, Beibei; Hope, Jessica; Vu, Quyen; Gardner, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This pilot study aimed to determine whether raw milk reduces lactose malabsorption and/or lactose intolerance symptoms relative to pasteurized milk. METHODS We performed a crossover trial involving 16 adults with self-reported lactose intolerance and lactose malabsorption confirmed by hydrogen (H2) breath testing. Participants underwent 3, 8-day milk phases (raw vs 2 controls: pasteurized, soy) in randomized order separated by 1-week washout periods. On days 1 and 8 of each phase, milk consumption was 473 mL (16 oz); on days 2 to 7, milk dosage increased daily by 118 mL (4 oz), beginning with 118 mL (4 oz) on day 2 and reaching 710 mL (24 oz) on day 7. Outcomes were area under the breath H2 curve (AUC ∆H2) and self-reported symptom severity (visual analog scales: flatulence/gas, audible bowel sounds, abdominal cramping, diarrhea). RESULTS AUC ∆H2 (mean ± standard error of the mean) was higher for raw vs pasteurized on day 1 (113 ± 21 vs 71 ± 12 ppm·min·10−2, respectively, P = .01) but not day 8 (72 ± 14 vs 74 ± 15 ppm·min·10−2, respectively, P = .9). Symptom severities were not different for raw vs pasteurized on day 7 with the highest dosage (P >.7). AUC ∆H2 and symptom severities were higher for both dairy milks compared with soy milk. CONCLUSIONS Raw milk failed to reduce lactose malabsorption or lactose intolerance symptoms compared with pasteurized milk among adults positive for lactose malabsorption. These results do not support widespread anecdotal claims that raw milk reduces the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:24615309

  19. The Interrelationships between Lactose Intolerance and the Modern Dairy Industry: Global Perspectives in Evolutional and Historical Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Silanikove, Nissim; Leitner, Gabriel; Merin, Uzi

    2015-08-31

    Humans learned to exploit ruminants as a source of milk about 10,000 years ago. Since then, the use of domesticated ruminants as a source of milk and dairy products has expanded until today when the dairy industry has become one of the largest sectors in the modern food industry, including the spread at the present time to countries such as China and Japan. This review analyzes the reasons for this expansion and flourishing. As reviewed in detail, milk has numerous nutritional advantages, most important being almost an irreplaceable source of dietary calcium, hence justifying the effort required to increase its consumption. On the other hand, widespread lactose intolerance among the adult population is a considerable drawback to dairy-based foods consumption. Over the centuries, three factors allowed humans to overcome limitations imposed by lactose intolerance: (i) mutations, which occurred in particular populations, most notably in the north European Celtic societies and African nomads, in which carriers of the lactose intolerance gene converted from being lactose intolerant to lactose tolerant; (ii) the ability to develop low-lactose products such as cheese and yogurt; and (iii) colon microbiome adaptation, which allow lactose intolerant individuals to overcome its intolerance. However, in a few examples in the last decade, modern dairy products, such as the popular and widespread bio-cultured yogurts, were suspected to be unsuitable for lactose intolerant peoples. In addition, the use of lactose and milk-derived products containing lactose in non-dairy products has become widespread. For these reasons, it is concluded that it might be important and helpful to label food that may contain lactose because such information will allow lactose intolerant groups to control lactose intake within the physiological limitations of ~12 g per a single meal.

  20. The Interrelationships between Lactose Intolerance and the Modern Dairy Industry: Global Perspectives in Evolutional and Historical Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Silanikove, Nissim; Leitner, Gabriel; Merin, Uzi

    2015-09-01

    Humans learned to exploit ruminants as a source of milk about 10,000 years ago. Since then, the use of domesticated ruminants as a source of milk and dairy products has expanded until today when the dairy industry has become one of the largest sectors in the modern food industry, including the spread at the present time to countries such as China and Japan. This review analyzes the reasons for this expansion and flourishing. As reviewed in detail, milk has numerous nutritional advantages, most important being almost an irreplaceable source of dietary calcium, hence justifying the effort required to increase its consumption. On the other hand, widespread lactose intolerance among the adult population is a considerable drawback to dairy-based foods consumption. Over the centuries, three factors allowed humans to overcome limitations imposed by lactose intolerance: (i) mutations, which occurred in particular populations, most notably in the north European Celtic societies and African nomads, in which carriers of the lactose intolerance gene converted from being lactose intolerant to lactose tolerant; (ii) the ability to develop low-lactose products such as cheese and yogurt; and (iii) colon microbiome adaptation, which allow lactose intolerant individuals to overcome its intolerance. However, in a few examples in the last decade, modern dairy products, such as the popular and widespread bio-cultured yogurts, were suspected to be unsuitable for lactose intolerant peoples. In addition, the use of lactose and milk-derived products containing lactose in non-dairy products has become widespread. For these reasons, it is concluded that it might be important and helpful to label food that may contain lactose because such information will allow lactose intolerant groups to control lactose intake within the physiological limitations of ~12 g per a single meal. PMID:26404364

  1. The Interrelationships between Lactose Intolerance and the Modern Dairy Industry: Global Perspectives in Evolutional and Historical Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Silanikove, Nissim; Leitner, Gabriel; Merin, Uzi

    2015-01-01

    Humans learned to exploit ruminants as a source of milk about 10,000 years ago. Since then, the use of domesticated ruminants as a source of milk and dairy products has expanded until today when the dairy industry has become one of the largest sectors in the modern food industry, including the spread at the present time to countries such as China and Japan. This review analyzes the reasons for this expansion and flourishing. As reviewed in detail, milk has numerous nutritional advantages, most important being almost an irreplaceable source of dietary calcium, hence justifying the effort required to increase its consumption. On the other hand, widespread lactose intolerance among the adult population is a considerable drawback to dairy-based foods consumption. Over the centuries, three factors allowed humans to overcome limitations imposed by lactose intolerance: (i) mutations, which occurred in particular populations, most notably in the north European Celtic societies and African nomads, in which carriers of the lactose intolerance gene converted from being lactose intolerant to lactose tolerant; (ii) the ability to develop low-lactose products such as cheese and yogurt; and (iii) colon microbiome adaptation, which allow lactose intolerant individuals to overcome its intolerance. However, in a few examples in the last decade, modern dairy products, such as the popular and widespread bio-cultured yogurts, were suspected to be unsuitable for lactose intolerant peoples. In addition, the use of lactose and milk-derived products containing lactose in non-dairy products has become widespread. For these reasons, it is concluded that it might be important and helpful to label food that may contain lactose because such information will allow lactose intolerant groups to control lactose intake within the physiological limitations of ~12 g per a single meal. PMID:26404364

  2. What People with Lactose Intolerance Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine. Lactase is necessary to digest lactose—the natural sugar found in milk and other dairy products. In the intestines, undigested lactose leads to the buildup of gas. Within 30 minutes to 2 hours after eating ...

  3. The Diverse Forms of Lactose Intolerance and the Putative Linkage to Several Cancers.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mahdi; Diekmann, Lena; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Naim, Hassan Y

    2015-08-28

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) is a membrane glycoprotein and the only β-galactosidase of the brush border membrane of the intestinal epithelium. Besides active transcription, expression of the active LPH requires different maturation steps of the polypeptide through the secretory pathway, including N- and O-glycosylation, dimerization and proteolytic cleavage steps. The inability to digest lactose due to insufficient lactase activity results in gastrointestinal symptoms known as lactose intolerance. In this review, we will concentrate on the structural and functional features of LPH protein and summarize the cellular and molecular mechanism required for its maturation and trafficking. Then, different types of lactose intolerance are discussed, and the molecular aspects of lactase persistence/non-persistence phenotypes are investigated. Finally, we will review the literature focusing on the lactase persistence/non-persistence populations as a comparative model in order to determine the protective or adverse effects of milk and dairy foods on the incidence of colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancers.

  4. Lactose intolerance: a non-allergic disorder often managed by allergologists.

    PubMed

    Perino, A; Cabras, S; Obinu, D; Cavalli Sforza, L

    2009-02-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a very common condition characterized by intestinal lactase deficiency. Primary lactose malabsorption is an inherited deficit present in the majority of the world's population, while secondary bypolactasia can be the consequence of an intestinal disease. The presence of malabsorbed lactose in the colonic lumen may cause gastrointestinal symptoms. This condition is known as lactose intolerance. Lactase non-persistence is the ancestral state, whilst two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the lactase gene have been associated with lactase persistence. These are C/T 13910 and G/A 22018 substitutions. Lactase persistence, this Mendelian dominant trait, only became advantageous after the invention of agriculture, when milk from domesticated animals became available for adults to drink. Lactase persistence is then strongly correlated with the diary history of the population. Diagnosis is assessed clinically by elimination of dietary lactose or, better, by non-invasive tests including hydrogen breath test and genetic test. In patients with lactase non-persistence, treatment should be considered exclusively if intolerance symptoms are present. In the absence of guidelines, the common therapeutic approach tends to exclude milk and dairy products from the diet. However, this strategy may have serious nutritional disadvantages. Several studies have been carried out to find alternative approaches, such as exogenous beta-galactosidase, yogurt and probiotics for their bacterial lactase activity, strategies that can prolong contact time between enzyme and substrate delaying gastrointestinal transit time, and chronic lactose ingestion to enhance colonic adaptation.

  5. Lactose intolerance: a non-allergic disorder often managed by allergologists.

    PubMed

    Perino, A; Cabras, S; Obinu, D; Cavalli Sforza, L

    2009-02-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a very common condition characterized by intestinal lactase deficiency. Primary lactose malabsorption is an inherited deficit present in the majority of the world's population, while secondary bypolactasia can be the consequence of an intestinal disease. The presence of malabsorbed lactose in the colonic lumen may cause gastrointestinal symptoms. This condition is known as lactose intolerance. Lactase non-persistence is the ancestral state, whilst two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the lactase gene have been associated with lactase persistence. These are C/T 13910 and G/A 22018 substitutions. Lactase persistence, this Mendelian dominant trait, only became advantageous after the invention of agriculture, when milk from domesticated animals became available for adults to drink. Lactase persistence is then strongly correlated with the diary history of the population. Diagnosis is assessed clinically by elimination of dietary lactose or, better, by non-invasive tests including hydrogen breath test and genetic test. In patients with lactase non-persistence, treatment should be considered exclusively if intolerance symptoms are present. In the absence of guidelines, the common therapeutic approach tends to exclude milk and dairy products from the diet. However, this strategy may have serious nutritional disadvantages. Several studies have been carried out to find alternative approaches, such as exogenous beta-galactosidase, yogurt and probiotics for their bacterial lactase activity, strategies that can prolong contact time between enzyme and substrate delaying gastrointestinal transit time, and chronic lactose ingestion to enhance colonic adaptation. PMID:19496347

  6. Severe lactose intolerance in a patient with coronary artery disease and ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Craveiro Barra, Sérgio Nuno; Gomes, Pedro; Leitão Marques, António

    2012-12-01

    A 72-year-old man with severe lactose intolerance was admitted for non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. The coronary angiogram revealed occlusion of the distal third of the first diagonal artery and several non-significant lesions. The pre-discharge echocardiogram revealed moderate left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Discharged on dual antiplatelet therapy, rosuvastatin, perindopril and carvedilol, he was repeatedly readmitted in the following days for abdominal pain/bloating, diarrhea and nausea despite avoiding food products containing lactose. To date, there has been no comprehensive study on the relationship between lactose intolerance and coronary disease, nor has its impact on therapeutics been appropriately addressed. Intolerance to lactose-containing prescription medicines is an extremely rare phenomenon and few strategies are available to overcome this condition, as it has received little attention from the scientific community. Commercial forms of the lactase enzyme and probiotics can limit symptom severity, but different routes of administration, different brands of the same medicine or completely different medicines may be necessary. Some measures were proposed to our patient and, soon afterwards, he was completely asymptomatic in both gastrointestinal and cardiovascular terms.

  7. The acceptability of milk and milk products in populations with a high prevalence of lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S; Murray, E B

    1988-10-01

    result from the fermentation products. 6) Among individuals with incomplete lactose digestion, there is considerable variation in awareness of lactose intolerance and in the quantity of lactose that can be ingested without symptoms. A positive standard lactose test is not a reliable predictor of the ability of an individual to consume moderate amounts of milk and milk products without symptoms. In usual situations the quantity of lactose ingested at any one time is much less than in the lactose-tolerance test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3140651

  8. Do patients with lactose intolerance exhibit more frequent comorbidities than patients without lactose intolerance? An analysis of routine data from German medical practices

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner, Rebecca; Kostev, Karel; Gothe, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background The increase in food intolerances poses a burgeoning problem in our society. Food intolerances not only lead to physical impairment of the individual patient but also result in a high socio-economic burden due to factors such as the treatment required as well as absenteeism. The present study aimed to explore whether lactose intolerant (LI) patients exhibit more frequent comorbidities than non-LI patients. Methods The study was conducted on a case-control basis and the results were determined using routine data analysis. Routine data from the IMS Disease Analyzer database were used for this purpose. A total of 6,758 data records were processed and analyzed. Results There were significant correlations between LI and the incidence of osteoporosis, changes in mental status, and the presence of additional food intolerances. Comparing 3,379 LI vs. 3,379 non-LI patients, 34.5% vs. 17.7% (P<0.0001) suffered from abdominal pain; 30.6% vs. 17.2% (P<0.0001) from gastrointestinal infections; and 20.9% vs. 16.0% (P=0.0053) from depression. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were the highest for fructose intolerance (n=229 LI vs. n=7 non-LI; OR 31.06; P<0.0001), irritable bowel syndrome (n=247 LI vs. n=44 non-LI; OR 5.23; P<0.0001), and bloating (n=351 LI vs. n=68 non-LI; OR 4.94; P<0.0001). Conclusion The study confirms that LI should not be regarded as an isolated illness but considered a possible trigger for further diseases. Additional research is necessary to assert more precise statements. PMID:27065730

  9. Clinical evaluation, biochemistry and genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of lactose intolerance in a population from northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Paulo Roberto Lins; de Medeiros, Pedro Henrique Quintela Soares; Havt, Alexandre; Caetano, Joselany Afio; Cid, David A C; de Moura Gondim Prata, Mara; Soares, Alberto Melo; Guerrant, Richard L; Mychaleckyj, Josyf; Lima, Aldo Ângelo Moreira

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This work aimed to evaluate and correlate symptoms, biochemical blood test results and single nucleotide polymorphisms for lactose intolerance diagnosis. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, with a total of 119 patients, 54 of whom were lactose intolerant. Clinical evaluation and biochemical blood tests were conducted after lactose ingestion and blood samples were collected for genotyping evaluation. In particular, the single nucleotide polymorphisms C>T-13910 and G>A-22018 were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism/polymerase chain reaction and validated by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: Lactose-intolerant patients presented with more symptoms of flatulence (81.4%), bloating (68.5%), borborygmus (59.3%) and diarrhea (46.3%) compared with non-lactose-intolerant patients (p<0.05). We observed a significant association between the presence of the alleles T-13910 and A-22018 and the lactose-tolerant phenotype (p<0.05). After evaluation of the biochemical blood test results for lactose, we found that the most effective cutoff for glucose levels obtained for lactose malabsorbers was <15 mg/dL, presenting an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve greater than 80.3%, with satisfactory values for sensitivity and specificity. CONCLUSIONS: These data corroborate the association of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (C>T-13910 and G>A-22018) with lactose tolerance in this population and suggest clinical management for patients with lactose intolerance that considers single nucleotide polymorphism detection and a change in the biochemical blood test cutoff from <25 mg/dL to <15 mg/dL. PMID:26934237

  10. The Diverse Forms of Lactose Intolerance and the Putative Linkage to Several Cancers.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mahdi; Diekmann, Lena; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Naim, Hassan Y

    2015-09-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) is a membrane glycoprotein and the only β-galactosidase of the brush border membrane of the intestinal epithelium. Besides active transcription, expression of the active LPH requires different maturation steps of the polypeptide through the secretory pathway, including N- and O-glycosylation, dimerization and proteolytic cleavage steps. The inability to digest lactose due to insufficient lactase activity results in gastrointestinal symptoms known as lactose intolerance. In this review, we will concentrate on the structural and functional features of LPH protein and summarize the cellular and molecular mechanism required for its maturation and trafficking. Then, different types of lactose intolerance are discussed, and the molecular aspects of lactase persistence/non-persistence phenotypes are investigated. Finally, we will review the literature focusing on the lactase persistence/non-persistence populations as a comparative model in order to determine the protective or adverse effects of milk and dairy foods on the incidence of colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancers. PMID:26343715

  11. The Diverse Forms of Lactose Intolerance and the Putative Linkage to Several Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mahdi; Diekmann, Lena; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Naim, Hassan Y.

    2015-01-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) is a membrane glycoprotein and the only β-galactosidase of the brush border membrane of the intestinal epithelium. Besides active transcription, expression of the active LPH requires different maturation steps of the polypeptide through the secretory pathway, including N- and O-glycosylation, dimerization and proteolytic cleavage steps. The inability to digest lactose due to insufficient lactase activity results in gastrointestinal symptoms known as lactose intolerance. In this review, we will concentrate on the structural and functional features of LPH protein and summarize the cellular and molecular mechanism required for its maturation and trafficking. Then, different types of lactose intolerance are discussed, and the molecular aspects of lactase persistence/non-persistence phenotypes are investigated. Finally, we will review the literature focusing on the lactase persistence/non-persistence populations as a comparative model in order to determine the protective or adverse effects of milk and dairy foods on the incidence of colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancers. PMID:26343715

  12. Ultrasonic Monitoring of Enzyme Catalysis; Enzyme Activity in Formulations for Lactose-Intolerant Infants.

    PubMed

    Altas, Margarida C; Kudryashov, Evgeny; Buckin, Vitaly

    2016-05-01

    The paper introduces ultrasonic technology for real-time, nondestructive, precision monitoring of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in solutions and in complex opaque media. The capabilities of the technology are examined in a comprehensive analysis of the effects of a variety of diverse factors on the performance of enzyme β-galactosidase in formulations for reduction of levels of lactose in infant milks. These formulations are added to infant's milk bottles prior to feeding to overcome the frequently observed intolerance to lactose (a milk sugar), a serious issue in healthy development of infants. The results highlight important impediments in the development of these formulations and also illustrate the capability of the described ultrasonic tools in the assessment of the performance of enzymes in complex reaction media and in various environmental conditions. PMID:27018312

  13. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones, such as canned salmon and sardines, and dark green vegetables, such as spinach. Manufacturers may also ... To learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical ...

  14. Self-perceived lactose intolerance results in lower intakes of calcium and dairy foods and is associated with hypertension and diabetes in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Self-perceived lactose intolerance may result in adverse dietary modifications; thus, more studies are needed to understand the prevalence of self-perceived lactose intolerance and how it relates to calcium intake and selected health conditions. The objective was to examine the effects of self-perce...

  15. Bacterial metabolic 'toxins': a new mechanism for lactose and food intolerance, and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A K; Matthews, S B; Vassel, N; Cox, C D; Naseem, R; Chaichi, J; Holland, I B; Green, J; Wann, K T

    2010-12-30

    Lactose and food intolerance cause a wide range of gut and systemic symptoms, including gas, gut pain, diarrhoea or constipation, severe headaches, severe fatigue, loss of cognitive functions such as concentration, memory and reasoning, muscle and joint pain, heart palpitations, and a variety of allergies (Matthews and Campbell, 2000; Matthews et al., 2005; Waud et al., 2008). These can be explained by the production of toxic metabolites from gut bacteria, as a result of anaerobic digestion of carbohydrates and other foods, not absorbed in the small intestine. These metabolites include alcohols, diols such as butan 2,3 diol, ketones, acids, and aldehydes such as methylglyoxal (Campbell et al., 2005, 2009). These 'toxins' induce calcium signals in bacteria and affect their growth, thereby acting to modify the balance of microflora in the gut (Campbell et al., 2004, 2007a,b). These bacterial 'toxins' also affect signalling mechanisms in cells around the body, thereby explaining the wide range of symptoms in people with food intolerance. This new mechanism also explains the most common referral to gastroenterologists, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and the illness that afflicted Charles Darwin for 50 years (Campbell and Matthews, 2005a,b). We propose it will lead to a new understanding of the molecular mechanism of type 2 diabetes and some cancers. PMID:20851732

  16. Bacterial metabolic 'toxins': a new mechanism for lactose and food intolerance, and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A K; Matthews, S B; Vassel, N; Cox, C D; Naseem, R; Chaichi, J; Holland, I B; Green, J; Wann, K T

    2010-12-30

    Lactose and food intolerance cause a wide range of gut and systemic symptoms, including gas, gut pain, diarrhoea or constipation, severe headaches, severe fatigue, loss of cognitive functions such as concentration, memory and reasoning, muscle and joint pain, heart palpitations, and a variety of allergies (Matthews and Campbell, 2000; Matthews et al., 2005; Waud et al., 2008). These can be explained by the production of toxic metabolites from gut bacteria, as a result of anaerobic digestion of carbohydrates and other foods, not absorbed in the small intestine. These metabolites include alcohols, diols such as butan 2,3 diol, ketones, acids, and aldehydes such as methylglyoxal (Campbell et al., 2005, 2009). These 'toxins' induce calcium signals in bacteria and affect their growth, thereby acting to modify the balance of microflora in the gut (Campbell et al., 2004, 2007a,b). These bacterial 'toxins' also affect signalling mechanisms in cells around the body, thereby explaining the wide range of symptoms in people with food intolerance. This new mechanism also explains the most common referral to gastroenterologists, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and the illness that afflicted Charles Darwin for 50 years (Campbell and Matthews, 2005a,b). We propose it will lead to a new understanding of the molecular mechanism of type 2 diabetes and some cancers.

  17. Adaptation to Lactose in Lactase Non Persistent People: Effects on Intolerance and the Relationship between Dairy Food Consumption and Evalution of Diseases.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2015-08-13

    Dairy foods contain complex nutrients which interact with the host. Yet, evolution of lactase persistence has divided the human species into those that can or cannot digest lactose in adulthood. Such a ubiquitous trait has differential effects on humanity. The literature is reviewed to explore how the divide affects lactose handling by lactase non persistent persons. There are two basic differences in digesters. Firstly, maldigesters consume less dairy foods, and secondly, excess lactose is digested by colonic microflora. Lactose intolerance in maldigesters may occur with random lactose ingestion. However, lactose intolerance without maldigestion tends to detract from gaining a clear understanding of the mechanisms of symptoms formation and leads to confusion with regards to dairy food consumption. The main consequence of intolerance is withholding dairy foods. However, regular dairy food consumption by lactase non persistent people could lead to colonic adaptation by the microbiome. This process may mimic a prebiotic effect and allows lactase non persistent people to consume more dairy foods enhancing a favorable microbiome. This process then could lead to alterations in outcome of diseases in response to dairy foods in lactose maldigesters. The evidence that lactose is a selective human prebiotic is reviewed and current links between dairy foods and some diseases are discussed within this context. Colonic adaptation has not been adequately studied, especially with modern microbiological techniques.

  18. Adaptation to Lactose in Lactase Non Persistent People: Effects on Intolerance and the Relationship between Dairy Food Consumption and Evalution of Diseases.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Dairy foods contain complex nutrients which interact with the host. Yet, evolution of lactase persistence has divided the human species into those that can or cannot digest lactose in adulthood. Such a ubiquitous trait has differential effects on humanity. The literature is reviewed to explore how the divide affects lactose handling by lactase non persistent persons. There are two basic differences in digesters. Firstly, maldigesters consume less dairy foods, and secondly, excess lactose is digested by colonic microflora. Lactose intolerance in maldigesters may occur with random lactose ingestion. However, lactose intolerance without maldigestion tends to detract from gaining a clear understanding of the mechanisms of symptoms formation and leads to confusion with regards to dairy food consumption. The main consequence of intolerance is withholding dairy foods. However, regular dairy food consumption by lactase non persistent people could lead to colonic adaptation by the microbiome. This process may mimic a prebiotic effect and allows lactase non persistent people to consume more dairy foods enhancing a favorable microbiome. This process then could lead to alterations in outcome of diseases in response to dairy foods in lactose maldigesters. The evidence that lactose is a selective human prebiotic is reviewed and current links between dairy foods and some diseases are discussed within this context. Colonic adaptation has not been adequately studied, especially with modern microbiological techniques. PMID:26287234

  19. Adaptation to Lactose in Lactase Non Persistent People: Effects on Intolerance and the Relationship between Dairy Food Consumption and Evalution of Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Dairy foods contain complex nutrients which interact with the host. Yet, evolution of lactase persistence has divided the human species into those that can or cannot digest lactose in adulthood. Such a ubiquitous trait has differential effects on humanity. The literature is reviewed to explore how the divide affects lactose handling by lactase non persistent persons. There are two basic differences in digesters. Firstly, maldigesters consume less dairy foods, and secondly, excess lactose is digested by colonic microflora. Lactose intolerance in maldigesters may occur with random lactose ingestion. However, lactose intolerance without maldigestion tends to detract from gaining a clear understanding of the mechanisms of symptoms formation and leads to confusion with regards to dairy food consumption. The main consequence of intolerance is withholding dairy foods. However, regular dairy food consumption by lactase non persistent people could lead to colonic adaptation by the microbiome. This process may mimic a prebiotic effect and allows lactase non persistent people to consume more dairy foods enhancing a favorable microbiome. This process then could lead to alterations in outcome of diseases in response to dairy foods in lactose maldigesters. The evidence that lactose is a selective human prebiotic is reviewed and current links between dairy foods and some diseases are discussed within this context. Colonic adaptation has not been adequately studied, especially with modern microbiological techniques. PMID:26287234

  20. The influence of lactose intolerance and other gastro-intestinal tract disorders on L-thyroxine absorption.

    PubMed

    Ruchała, Marek; Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Zybek, Ariadna

    2012-01-01

    The preferred treatment for hypothyroidism is oral levothyroxine (LT4) ingestion, in doses that ensure a sustained state of hormonal balance. Many different factors may significantly influence the absorption of LT4, including: interval between the ingestion of the drug and the last meal, eating habits, and different functional and organic pathologies of the gastro-intestinal tract. The main purpose of this paper is to review and systematise the available literature on the subject of the influence of different malabsorption syndromes on the effectiveness of LT4 preparations. The need to use high LT4 doses in the substitutional treatment of hypothyroidism is often the very first sign of one of the pathologies that are connected with malabsorption syndrome, which might have been asymptomatic and undiagnosed previously. Patients who require more than 2 μg/kg body weight of LT4 per day, with constantly increased thyrotropin level, should be diagnosed with the suspicion of pseudomalabsorption or real absorption disorder. An LT4 absorption test, using high doses of LT4, may be useful in the diagnosis of pseudomalabsorption. After excluding non-compliance, the differential diagnosis should include such disorders as lactose intolerance, coeliac disease, atrophic gastritis, Helicobacter pylori infection, bowel resection, inflammatory bowel disease, and parasite infection. Where there is a diagnosis of lactose intolerance, both a low lactose diet and a lactose-free LT4 preparation should be administered to restore euthyroidism or make it possible to decrease the dose of the LT4 preparation. In coeliac disease, a gluten-free diet usually allows a normalisation of the need for LT4, as do eradication of the H. pylori infection or parasite colonisation. In cases of atrophic gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease, treating the underlying diseases and regaining the state of remission may improve the absorption of LT4. In patients after gastro-intestinal tract surgery, a dose of

  1. Lactococcus lactis expressing food-grade β-galactosidase alleviates lactose intolerance symptoms in post-weaning Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjie; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Chuan; Yu, Qian; Dai, Ruirui; Pei, Xiaofang

    2012-12-01

    The endogenous β-galactosidase expressed in intestinal microbes is demonstrated to help humans in lactose usage, and treatment associated with the promotion of beneficial microorganism in the gut is correlated with lactose tolerance. From this point, a kind of recombinant live β-galactosidase delivery system using food-grade protein expression techniques and selected probiotics as vehicle was promoted by us for the purpose of application in lactose intolerance subjects. Previously, a recombinant Lactococcus lactis MG1363 strain expressing food-grade β-galactosidase, the L. lactis MG1363/FGZW, was successfully constructed and evaluated in vitro. This study was conducted to in vivo evaluate its efficacy on alleviating lactose intolerance symptoms in post-weaning Balb/c mice, which were orally administered with 1 × 10⁶ CFU or 1 × 10⁸ CFU of L. lactis MG1363/FGZW daily for 4 weeks before lactose challenge. In comparison with naïve mice, the mice administered with L. lactis MG1363/FGZW showed significant alleviation of diarrhea symptoms in less total feces weight within 6 h post-challenge and suppressed intestinal motility after lactose challenge, although there was no significant increase of β-galactosidase activity in small intestine. The alleviation also correlated with higher species abundance, more Bifidobacterium colonization, and stronger colonization resistance in mice intestinal microflora. Therefore, this recombinant L. lactis strain effectively alleviated diarrhea symptom induced by lactose uptake in lactose intolerance model mice with the probable mechanism of promotion of lactic acid bacteria to differentiate and predominantly colonize in gut microbial community, thus making it a promising probiotic for lactose intolerance subjects.

  2. Contribution of Colonic Fermentation and Fecal Water Toxicity to the Pathophysiology of Lactose-Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Windey, Karen; Houben, Els; Deroover, Lise; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-08

    Whether or not abdominal symptoms occur in subjects with small intestinal lactose malabsorption might depend on differences in colonic fermentation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we collected fecal samples from subjects with lactose malabsorption with abdominal complaints (LM-IT, n = 11) and without abdominal complaints (LM-T, n = 8) and subjects with normal lactose digestion (NLD, n = 15). Lactose malabsorption was diagnosed using a (13)C-lactose breath test. Colonic fermentation was characterized in fecal samples at baseline and after incubation with lactose for 3 h, 6 h and 24 h through a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fecal water cytotoxicity was analyzed using a colorimetric assay. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not different between the three groups (Kruskall-Wallis p = 0.164). Cluster analysis of the metabolite patterns revealed separate clusters for NLD, LM-T and LM-IT samples at baseline and after 24 h incubation with lactose. Levels of 5-methyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD whereas those of an unidentified aldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT compared to LM-T and NLD. Incubation with lactose increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations more in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD. In conclusion, fermentation patterns were clearly different in NLD, LM-IT and LM-T, but not related to differences in fecal water cytotoxicity.

  3. Contribution of Colonic Fermentation and Fecal Water Toxicity to the Pathophysiology of Lactose-Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Windey, Karen; Houben, Els; Deroover, Lise; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-01

    Whether or not abdominal symptoms occur in subjects with small intestinal lactose malabsorption might depend on differences in colonic fermentation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we collected fecal samples from subjects with lactose malabsorption with abdominal complaints (LM-IT, n = 11) and without abdominal complaints (LM-T, n = 8) and subjects with normal lactose digestion (NLD, n = 15). Lactose malabsorption was diagnosed using a (13)C-lactose breath test. Colonic fermentation was characterized in fecal samples at baseline and after incubation with lactose for 3 h, 6 h and 24 h through a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fecal water cytotoxicity was analyzed using a colorimetric assay. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not different between the three groups (Kruskall-Wallis p = 0.164). Cluster analysis of the metabolite patterns revealed separate clusters for NLD, LM-T and LM-IT samples at baseline and after 24 h incubation with lactose. Levels of 5-methyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD whereas those of an unidentified aldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT compared to LM-T and NLD. Incubation with lactose increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations more in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD. In conclusion, fermentation patterns were clearly different in NLD, LM-IT and LM-T, but not related to differences in fecal water cytotoxicity. PMID:26371036

  4. Contribution of Colonic Fermentation and Fecal Water Toxicity to the Pathophysiology of Lactose-Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Windey, Karen; Houben, Els; Deroover, Lise; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not abdominal symptoms occur in subjects with small intestinal lactose malabsorption might depend on differences in colonic fermentation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we collected fecal samples from subjects with lactose malabsorption with abdominal complaints (LM-IT, n = 11) and without abdominal complaints (LM-T, n = 8) and subjects with normal lactose digestion (NLD, n = 15). Lactose malabsorption was diagnosed using a 13C-lactose breath test. Colonic fermentation was characterized in fecal samples at baseline and after incubation with lactose for 3 h, 6 h and 24 h through a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fecal water cytotoxicity was analyzed using a colorimetric assay. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not different between the three groups (Kruskall-Wallis p = 0.164). Cluster analysis of the metabolite patterns revealed separate clusters for NLD, LM-T and LM-IT samples at baseline and after 24 h incubation with lactose. Levels of 5-methyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD whereas those of an unidentified aldehyde were significantly higher in LM-IT compared to LM-T and NLD. Incubation with lactose increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations more in LM-IT and LM-T compared to NLD. In conclusion, fermentation patterns were clearly different in NLD, LM-IT and LM-T, but not related to differences in fecal water cytotoxicity. PMID:26371036

  5. A pilot trial on subjects with lactose and/or oligosaccharides intolerance treated with a fixed mixture of pure and enteric-coated α- and β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Bertuccioli, Alexander; Marini, Eleonora; Ivaldi, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Aim Lactose and complex carbohydrates maldigestion, common food intolerances due to low gut content of α- and β-galactosidase, lead to abdominal symptoms including pain, diarrhea, bloating, flatulence, and cramping. Commonly, intolerant patients are advised by physicians to avoid the offending foods (dairy foods, cereals, beans, etc). This food-limiting option, however, has possible nutritional risks. We have therefore evaluated the impact of using pure, enteric-coated α- plus β-galactosidase on gut symptoms in intolerant subjects instead of avoidance of the offending foods. Methods Sixteen subjects intolerant to lactose and/or complex carbohydrates were enrolled and evaluated in terms of gut symptoms with 1) uncontrolled diet, 2) diet devoid of offending foods, and 3) uncontrolled diet along with pure, enteric-coated α- and β-galactosidase (DDM Galactosidase®). Results Even with the uncontrolled diet, intolerant subjects treated with DDM Galactosidase® exhibited reduced gut symptoms (bloating, flatulence, diarrhea, and constipation) significantly better than the control treatment as well as having a diet devoid of offending foods. Conclusion DDM Galactosidase® is a valid and safe optional treatment to counteract lactose and complex carbohydrate intolerance in subjects who prefer not to avoid, at least partially, offending foods. PMID:25733920

  6. Lactose intolerance in persistent diarrhoea during childhood: the role of a traditional rice-lentil (Khitchri) and yogurt diet in nutritional management.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Z A; Nizami, S Q; Isani, Z

    1997-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is frequently encountered in children with persistent diarrhoea (PD). Selection of an appropriate milk-based formulation is a major management problem in the developing world. In a consecutive series of studies, we evaluated the role of feeding a traditional rice-lentil (khitchri) diet alone (KY) or in combination with either soy formula (KY-Soy) a dilute buffalo milk (KY-B), in children (age 6 months-3 years) with PD. Serial observations of stool output, caloric intake and weight gain of these children over a 14 day period indicated satisfactory tolerance of the KY diet with adequate weight gain. The weight gain and stool output was however higher in lactose intolerant children, with the worst results seen with K-Y and buffalo milk combination. While lactose intolerant children with PD do have higher. rates of therapeutic failure, our data indicates that a traditional diet and yogurt combination can be used satisfactorily for nutritional rehabilitation in over 80% of such children.

  7. What Is Lactose Intolerance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with questions about grants, contracts & research areas Training, Education & Career Development Support for Training at Universities & Other Institutions Extramural training, fellowships & career development opportunities Training at ...

  8. Lactose Intolerance (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

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  9. Effects of Exogenous Lactase Administration on Hydrogen Breath Excretion and Intestinal Symptoms in Patients Presenting Lactose Malabsorption and Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ibba, Ivan; Gilli, Agnese; Boi, Maria Francesca; Usai, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To establish whether supplementation with a standard oral dose of Beta-Galactosidase affects hydrogen breath excretion in patients presenting with lactose malabsorption. Methods. Ninety-six consecutive patients positive to H2 Lactose Breath Test were enrolled. Mean peak H2 levels, the time to reach the peak H2, the time to reach the cut-off value of 20 ppm, the cumulative breath H2 excretion, the areas under the curve, and a Visual Analogical 10-point Scale for symptoms were calculated. Genotyping of the C/T-13910 variant was carried out. Results. Following the oral administration of Beta-Galactosidase, in 21.88% of the cases, H2 Lactose Breath Test became negative (Group A), while mean peak H2 levels (74.95 ppm versus 7.85), P < 0.0000, in 17.71% (Group B) were still positive, with the H2 level 20 ppm above the baseline, but the peak H2 levels were significantly lower than those observed at the baseline test (186.7 ppm versus 66.64), P < 0.0000, while in 60.41% (Group C) they were still positive with the peak H2 levels similar to those observed at the baseline test (94.43 versus 81.60 ppm). All 96 individuals tested presented the C/C-13910 genotype nonpersistence. Conclusions. The response to oral administration of Beta-Galactosidase in patients with symptoms of lactose malabsorption presents a significant variability. PMID:24967391

  10. Lactose intolerance genetic testing: is it useful as routine screening? Results on 1426 south-central Italy patients.

    PubMed

    Santonocito, Concetta; Scapaticci, Margherita; Guarino, Donatella; Annicchiarico, Eleonora Brigida; Lisci, Rosalia; Penitente, Romina; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2015-01-15

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a widespread condition throughout the world, causing lactose malabsorption. Several studies suggested that the identification of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 mutations, located upstream the gene encoding the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH), is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of hypolactasia. We evaluated the frequencies of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 variants in a central-south Italian population and the usefulness of lactase deficiency genetic testing in the clinic practice. The genomic DNA of 1426 patients and 1000 healthy controls from central-south Italy was isolated from peripheral whole blood and genotyped for the C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms by high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) and sequencing. The frequencies of genotypes in the 1426 patients analysed were as follows: 1077 CC/GG (75.5%), 287 CT/GA (20.1%), 24 TT/AA (1.7%), 38 CC/GA (2.7%). Only 64 out of 1426 (4.5%) performed also L-BHT test, 29 of which were negative for L-BHT also in presence of different genotypes. Among the 35 individuals with L-BHT positive, 34 were CC/GG and only one CT/GA. Although lactose genetic test is a good predictor of persistence/non-persistence lactase in specific population, its use in the central-south Italy population should be limited given the high prevalence of the CCGG diplotype in normal individuals.

  11. Lactose intolerance genetic testing: is it useful as routine screening? Results on 1426 south-central Italy patients.

    PubMed

    Santonocito, Concetta; Scapaticci, Margherita; Guarino, Donatella; Annicchiarico, Eleonora Brigida; Lisci, Rosalia; Penitente, Romina; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2015-01-15

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a widespread condition throughout the world, causing lactose malabsorption. Several studies suggested that the identification of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 mutations, located upstream the gene encoding the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH), is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of hypolactasia. We evaluated the frequencies of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 variants in a central-south Italian population and the usefulness of lactase deficiency genetic testing in the clinic practice. The genomic DNA of 1426 patients and 1000 healthy controls from central-south Italy was isolated from peripheral whole blood and genotyped for the C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms by high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) and sequencing. The frequencies of genotypes in the 1426 patients analysed were as follows: 1077 CC/GG (75.5%), 287 CT/GA (20.1%), 24 TT/AA (1.7%), 38 CC/GA (2.7%). Only 64 out of 1426 (4.5%) performed also L-BHT test, 29 of which were negative for L-BHT also in presence of different genotypes. Among the 35 individuals with L-BHT positive, 34 were CC/GG and only one CT/GA. Although lactose genetic test is a good predictor of persistence/non-persistence lactase in specific population, its use in the central-south Italy population should be limited given the high prevalence of the CCGG diplotype in normal individuals. PMID:25281930

  12. How Is Lactose Intolerance Managed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... take steps to minimize symptoms without giving up milk and milk products completely. Studies show that the following strategies can help 2 : Drink low-fat milk or fat-free milk in servings of one ...

  13. Diagnosing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease or lactose intolerance in babies who cry a lot in the first few months overlooks feeding problems.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores two areas in which the translation of research into practice may be improved in the management of cry-fuss behaviours in the first few months of life. Firstly, babies who cry excessively are often prescribed proton pump inhibitors, despite evidence that gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is very rarely a cause. The inaccuracy of commonly used explanatory mechanisms, the side-effects of acid-suppressive medications, and the failure to identify treatable problems, including feeding difficulty when the diagnosis of 'reflux' is applied, are discussed. Secondly, crying breastfed babies are still prescribed lactase or lactose-free formula, despite evidence that the problem of functional lactose overload is one of breastfeeding management. The mechanisms and management of functional lactose overload are discussed. These two problems of research translation need to be addressed because failure to identify and manage other causes of cry-fuss problems, including feeding difficulty, may have adverse outcomes for a small but significant minority of families.

  14. Adult lactose digestion status and effects on disease

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adult assimilation of lactose divides humans into dominant lactase-persistent and recessive nonpersistent phenotypes. OBJECTIVES: To review three medical parameters of lactose digestion, namely: the changing concept of lactose intolerance; the possible impact on diseases of microbial adaptation in lactase-nonpersistent populations; and the possibility that the evolution of lactase has influenced some disease pattern distributions. METHODS: A PubMed, Google Scholar and manual review of articles were used to provide a narrative review of the topic. RESULTS: The concept of lactose intolerance is changing and merging with food intolerances. Microbial adaptation to regular lactose consumption in lactase-nonpersistent individuals is supported by limited evidence. There is evidence suggestive of a relationship among geographical distributions of latitude, sunhine exposure and lactase proportional distributions worldwide. DISCUSSION: The definition of lactose intolerance has shifted away from association with lactose maldigestion. Lactose sensitivity is described equally in lactose digesters and maldigesters. The important medical consequence of withholding dairy foods could have a detrimental impact on several diseases; in addition, microbial adaptation in lactase-nonpersistent populations may alter risk for some diseases. There is suggestive evidence that the emergence of lactase persistence, together with human migrations before and after the emergence of lactase persistence, have impacted modern-day diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Lactose maldigestion and lactose intolerance are not synonymous. Withholding dairy foods is a poor method to treat lactose intolerance. Further epidemiological work could shed light on the possible effects of microbial adaptation in lactose maldigesters. The evolutionary impact of lactase may be still ongoing. PMID:25855879

  15. Lactose and lactase--who is lactose intolerant and why?

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Robert K; Krasinski, Stephen D; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Grand, Richard J

    2007-12-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) is expressed only in the small intestine and is confined to absorptive enterocytes on the villi with a tightly controlled pattern of expression along the proximal to distal and crypt-villus axes of the intestine. LPH expression is regulated mainly at the level of lactase (LCT) gene transcription that directs 2 phenotypes: a decline in LCT activity (LCT nonpersistence) in mid-childhood in the majority of the world's population, and maintenance of the lactase levels found in infancy (LCT persistence) in people of northern European extraction and scattered populations elsewhere. The molecular mechanisms that regulate these phenotypes are not completely understood. A population genetic association of lactase persistence with 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the distal 5'-flanking region of LCT (-13.9T and -22A) has been confirmed in northern Europeans, but this fails to explain lactase persistence found in some African groups. Any hypothesis for the control of lactase expression must reconcile the presence of high levels of activity in early life in all humans and the characteristic loss of activity found subsequently in many but not all people.

  16. Lactose Intolerance: A Guide for Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms improve. You may also have a hydrogen breath test to confirm this diagnosis. A hydrogen breath test is done by breathing into a machine that measures the amount of hydrogen in your breath within 90 minutes of consuming ...

  17. Diagnosis and clinical observation of lactose-free milk powder on treatment of neonatal diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyan; Chang, Jing; Yao, Aimei; Hu, Yulian; Yuan, Yuxiao; Yu, Fengqin; Ma, Zhanmin; Wang, Guangzhou; Zhao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal lactose intolerance syndrome is a series of digestive system symptoms caused by the lack of lactase, and could not fully digest the lactose in breast milk or cow milk. Lactose is one of the disaccharides mainly existed in mammalian milk. Lactose content in breast milk is 7.2g/100ml, cow milk is 4.7g/100ml. Dairy products are the main energy sources for the newborn, and lactose provides 20% energy for infants. During the growth of the newborn, lactose not only play a significant role in energy supply, but also involve in the development of the brain growing. This study mainly studied the lactose development features, the reasons for lactose intolerance, and the measures to treat lactose deficiency.

  18. Diagnosis and clinical observation of lactose-free milk powder on treatment of neonatal diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyan; Chang, Jing; Yao, Aimei; Hu, Yulian; Yuan, Yuxiao; Yu, Fengqin; Ma, Zhanmin; Wang, Guangzhou; Zhao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal lactose intolerance syndrome is a series of digestive system symptoms caused by the lack of lactase, and could not fully digest the lactose in breast milk or cow milk. Lactose is one of the disaccharides mainly existed in mammalian milk. Lactose content in breast milk is 7.2g/100ml, cow milk is 4.7g/100ml. Dairy products are the main energy sources for the newborn, and lactose provides 20% energy for infants. During the growth of the newborn, lactose not only play a significant role in energy supply, but also involve in the development of the brain growing. This study mainly studied the lactose development features, the reasons for lactose intolerance, and the measures to treat lactose deficiency. PMID:27005497

  19. Lactose digestion from yogurt: mechanism and relevance.

    PubMed

    Savaiano, Dennis A

    2014-05-01

    Yogurt is traditionally consumed throughout the world among populations who are seemingly unable to digest lactose. This review provides a historical overview of the studies that show lactose digestion and tolerance from yogurt by lactose-intolerant people. The lactose in yogurt is digested more efficiently than other dairy sources of lactose because the bacteria inherent in yogurt assist with its digestion. The bacterial lactase survives the acidic conditions of the stomach, apparently being physically protected within the bacterial cells and facilitated by the buffering capacity of yogurt. The increasing pH as the yogurt enters the small intestine and a slower gastrointestinal transit time allow the bacterial lactase to be active, digesting lactose from yogurt sufficiently to prevent symptoms in lactose-intolerant people. There is little difference in the lactase capability of different commercial yogurts, because they apparently contain Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus in sufficient quantities (10(8) bacteria/mL). However, Lactobacillus acidophilus appears to require cell membrane disruption to physically release the lactase. Compared with unflavored yogurts, flavored yogurts appear to exhibit somewhat reduced lactase activity but are still well tolerated. PMID:24695892

  20. Lactose digestion from yogurt: mechanism and relevance.

    PubMed

    Savaiano, Dennis A

    2014-05-01

    Yogurt is traditionally consumed throughout the world among populations who are seemingly unable to digest lactose. This review provides a historical overview of the studies that show lactose digestion and tolerance from yogurt by lactose-intolerant people. The lactose in yogurt is digested more efficiently than other dairy sources of lactose because the bacteria inherent in yogurt assist with its digestion. The bacterial lactase survives the acidic conditions of the stomach, apparently being physically protected within the bacterial cells and facilitated by the buffering capacity of yogurt. The increasing pH as the yogurt enters the small intestine and a slower gastrointestinal transit time allow the bacterial lactase to be active, digesting lactose from yogurt sufficiently to prevent symptoms in lactose-intolerant people. There is little difference in the lactase capability of different commercial yogurts, because they apparently contain Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus in sufficient quantities (10(8) bacteria/mL). However, Lactobacillus acidophilus appears to require cell membrane disruption to physically release the lactase. Compared with unflavored yogurts, flavored yogurts appear to exhibit somewhat reduced lactase activity but are still well tolerated.

  1. Milk Intolerance and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Historian, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The intolerance of milk by American Indians and other groups (Thais, Chinese, Filipinos, Melonesians of New Guinea, Australian Aborigines, Black groups of Africa, American Blacks, and Eskimos) due to the lack of the lactose enzyme is discussed in this article. (FF)

  2. Heat intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003094.htm Heat intolerance To use the sharing features on this ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  3. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon Chronic severe illness General poor health Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Problem with the hypothalamus (a part ...

  4. Management and treatment of lactose malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Montalto, Massimo; Curigliano, Valentina; Santoro, Luca; Vastola, Monica; Cammarota, Giovanni; Manna, Raffaele; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Gasbarrini, Giovanni

    2006-01-14

    Lactose malabsorption is a very common condition characterized by intestinal lactase deficiency. Primary lactose malabsorption is an inherited deficit present in the majority of the world's population, while secondary hypolactasia can be the consequence of an intestinal disease. The presence of malabsorbed lactose in the colonic lumen causes gastrointestinal symptoms. The condition is known as lactose intolerance. In patients with lactase nonpersistence, treatment should be considered exclusively if intolerance symptoms are present. In the absence of guidelines, the common therapeutic approach tends to exclude milk and dairy products from the diet. However, this strategy may have serious nutritional disadvantages. Several studies have been carried out to find alternative approaches, such as exogenous beta-galactosidase, yogurt and probiotics for their bacterial lactase activity, pharmacological and non pharmacological strategies that can prolong contact time between enzyme and substrate delaying gastrointestinal transit time, and chronic lactose ingestion to enhance colonic adaptation. In this review the usefulness of these approaches is discussed and a therapeutic management with a flow chart is proposed.

  5. Food allergies and food intolerances.

    PubMed

    Ortolani, Claudio; Pastorello, Elide A

    2006-01-01

    Adverse reactions to foods, aside from those considered toxic, are caused by a particular individual intolerance towards commonly tolerated foods. Intolerance derived from an immunological mechanism is referred to as Food Allergy, the non-immunological form is called Food Intolerance. IgE-mediated food allergy is the most common and dangerous type of adverse food reaction. It is initiated by an impairment of normal Oral Tolerance to food in predisposed individuals (atopic). Food allergy produces respiratory, gastrointestinal, cutaneous and cardiovascular symptoms but often generalized, life-threatening symptoms manifest at a rapid rate-anaphylactic shock. Diagnosis is made using medical history and cutaneous and serological tests but to obtain final confirmation a Double Blind Controlled Food Challenge must be performed. Food intolerances are principally caused by enzymatic defects in the digestive system, as is the case with lactose intolerance, but may also result from pharmacological effects of vasoactive amines present in foods (e.g. Histamine). Prevention and treatment are based on the avoidance of the culprit food. PMID:16782524

  6. Statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zahid

    2014-05-15

    The term statin intolerance refers to an inability to use statins because of muscle symptoms or elevated creatine kinase, and the major diagnostic challenge is to unambiguously link these to statin use. Roughly 5% to 10% of statin users develop statin intolerance, and because statin use is expected to increase--especially after recent updated guidelines have expanded the statin benefit groups--adverse effects from statins will become a growing issue. Unfortunately, the pathophysiology--and even the terminology--of statin-related muscle injury lacks clarity. Several risk factors have been identified, including advanced age, family history of myopathy and statin dose; many cases manifest only after patients are administered an interacting medication (e.g., azole antifungals, cimetidine, clarithromycin, erythromycin and cyclosporine). The diagnosis of myopathy remains challenging, especially because some patients can have normal serum creatine kinase levels despite demonstrable weakness and muscle biopsy-proven statin-induced myopathy. A statin withdrawal and rechallenge helps patients distinguish whether their myalgia symptoms are because of statins, but, in at least 1 clinical trial, even 5% of placebo-treated patients developed myalgias during a controlled withdrawal and rechallenge. No consensus exists for management of patients with statin intolerance. Many patients can eventually tolerate a statin but often at suboptimal doses. A subset of patients do well with nondaily regimens such as every other day or once weekly dosing. Some patients cannot tolerate statins at all, requiring nonstatin lipid-lowering medications--the benefit of which remains unclear with regard to preventing atherosclerotic events. Ultimately, statin intolerance undermines the drug adherence that is critical for achieving the benefits of lifelong lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, statin myopathy is a common challenge in lipid management, and further work is needed to establish a

  7. Intolerant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights.

  8. Lactose tolerance tests

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen in the air you breathe out. ...

  9. Optimization and shelf life of a low-lactose yogurt with Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, A; Acha, R; Calleja, M-T; Chiralt-Boix, A; Wittig, E

    2012-07-01

    Lactose intolerance results in gastrointestinal discomfort and the malabsorption of certain nutrients, such as calcium. The replacement of milk with low-lactose and probiotic-enriched dairy products is an effective strategy of mitigating the symptoms of lactose intolerance. Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (HN001) is a safe, immunity-stimulating probiotic. We have developed a process to increase the hydrolysis of lactose and HN001 growth in yogurt versus β-galactosidase (βG) concentration and enzymatic hydrolysis time (EHT) before bacterial fermentation. The objective of this study was to optimize the conditions by which yogurt is processed as a function of βG and EHT using a multifactorial design, with lactose content, HN001 growth, process time, and sensory quality as dependent variables. Further, the shelf life of the optimized yogurt was evaluated. In the optimization study, polynomials explained the dependent variables. Based on Pearson correlation coefficients, HN001 growth correlated positively with the hydrolysis of lactose. However, low lactose content and high HN001 count increased the fermentation time and lowered the sensory quality. The optimized conditions-using polynomials to obtain yogurt with >1 × 10(7) cfu of HN001/mL, <10 g of lactose/L, and a minimum overall sensory quality of 7 on the Karlsruhe scale-yielded a theoretical value of 910 neutral lactose units/kg for βG and 2.3h for EHT, which were validated in an industrial-scale assay. Based on a shelf-life study at 3 temperatures, the hydrolysis of lactose and the growth of HN001 continue during storage. Arrhenius equations were developed for the variables in the shelf-life study. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to develop a low-lactose yogurt to which HN001 has been added for lactose-intolerant persons who wish to strengthen their immune system. PMID:22720912

  10. Optimization and shelf life of a low-lactose yogurt with Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, A; Acha, R; Calleja, M-T; Chiralt-Boix, A; Wittig, E

    2012-07-01

    Lactose intolerance results in gastrointestinal discomfort and the malabsorption of certain nutrients, such as calcium. The replacement of milk with low-lactose and probiotic-enriched dairy products is an effective strategy of mitigating the symptoms of lactose intolerance. Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (HN001) is a safe, immunity-stimulating probiotic. We have developed a process to increase the hydrolysis of lactose and HN001 growth in yogurt versus β-galactosidase (βG) concentration and enzymatic hydrolysis time (EHT) before bacterial fermentation. The objective of this study was to optimize the conditions by which yogurt is processed as a function of βG and EHT using a multifactorial design, with lactose content, HN001 growth, process time, and sensory quality as dependent variables. Further, the shelf life of the optimized yogurt was evaluated. In the optimization study, polynomials explained the dependent variables. Based on Pearson correlation coefficients, HN001 growth correlated positively with the hydrolysis of lactose. However, low lactose content and high HN001 count increased the fermentation time and lowered the sensory quality. The optimized conditions-using polynomials to obtain yogurt with >1 × 10(7) cfu of HN001/mL, <10 g of lactose/L, and a minimum overall sensory quality of 7 on the Karlsruhe scale-yielded a theoretical value of 910 neutral lactose units/kg for βG and 2.3h for EHT, which were validated in an industrial-scale assay. Based on a shelf-life study at 3 temperatures, the hydrolysis of lactose and the growth of HN001 continue during storage. Arrhenius equations were developed for the variables in the shelf-life study. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to develop a low-lactose yogurt to which HN001 has been added for lactose-intolerant persons who wish to strengthen their immune system.

  11. Lactose Tolerance Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... ongoing lack of hydrogen gas production suggests a false negative indicating the person may still be lactose ... bacteria in the large intestine and give a false negative hydrogen breath test. If food moves more ...

  12. The diagnosis and management of patients with lactose-intolerance.

    PubMed

    Carter, Sherry L; Attel, Susan

    2013-07-10

    Approximately 70% of the world's population is lactase deficient. This article reviews the evolutionary history of lactase deficiency, recent recommendations to establish screening, and clinical practice guidelines for increased diagnosis of this important, yet often misunderstood condition of malabsorption.

  13. The diagnosis and management of patients with lactose-intolerance.

    PubMed

    Carter, Sherry L; Attel, Susan

    2013-07-10

    Approximately 70% of the world's population is lactase deficient. This article reviews the evolutionary history of lactase deficiency, recent recommendations to establish screening, and clinical practice guidelines for increased diagnosis of this important, yet often misunderstood condition of malabsorption. PMID:23778177

  14. Adverse reactions to food: allergies and intolerances.

    PubMed

    Montalto, Massimo; Santoro, Luca; D'Onofrio, Ferruccio; Curigliano, Valentina; Gallo, Antonella; Visca, Dina; Cammarota, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Gasbarrini, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    All the anomalous reactions secondary to food ingestion are defined as 'adverse reactions to food'. In 1995 the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology suggested a classification on the basis of the responsible pathogenetic mechanism; according to this classification, non-toxic reactions can be divided into 'food allergies' when they recognize immunological mechanisms, and 'food intolerances' when there are no immunological implications. The diagnostic approach to adverse reactions to food is based on accurate clinical history and objective examination, and further execution of specific tests when allergy or intolerance is suspected. The therapy for food allergies is the elimination of the food to which hypersensibility has been found; this strategy can lead, especially in pediatric age, to tolerance. If elimination diets cannot be completely performed, or if it is not possible to identify the food to eliminate, some drugs (e.g. antihistaminics, steroids, etc.) can be administered. Specific allergen immunotherapy has been recently introduced. Fundamental is food allergy prevention, especially in high-risk subjects. The therapeutic approach to secondary food intolerances is based principally on primitive disease resolution; on the other hand, some specific treatments (e.g. beta-galactosidases in lactose malabsorption) are available in case of primary intolerance. PMID:18431058

  15. [Food allergy, food intolerance or functional disorder?].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    2009-04-01

    The term "food allergy" is widely misused for all sorts of symptoms and diseases caused by food. Food allergy (FA) is an adverse reaction to food (food hypersensitivity) occurring in susceptible individuals, which is mediated by a classical immune mechanism specific for the food itself. The best established mechanism in FA is due to the presence of IgE antibodies against the offending food. Food intolerance (FI) are all non-immune-mediated adverse reactions to food. The subgroups of FI are enzymatic (e.g. lactose intolerance due to lactase deficiency), pharmacological (reactions against biogenic amines, histamine intolerance), and undefined food intolerance (e.g. against some food additives). The diagnosis of an IgE-mediated FA is made by a carefully taken case history, supported by the demonstration of an IgE sensitization either by skin prick tests or by in vitro tests, and confirmed by positive oral provocation. For scientific purposes the only accepted test for the confirmation of FA/FI is a properly performed double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). A panel of recombinant allergens, produced as single allergenic molecules, may in future improve the diagnosis of IgE-mediated FA. Due to a lack of causal treatment possibilities, the elimination of the culprit "food allergen" from the diet is the only therapeutic option for patients with real food allergy. PMID:19340768

  16. Four-sample lactose hydrogen breath test for diagnosis of lactose malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Fox, Mark; Chu, Hua; Zheng, Xia; Long, Yan-Qin; Pohl, Daniel; Fried, Michael; Dai, Ning

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To validate 4-sample lactose hydrogen breath testing (4SLHBT) compared to standard 13-sample LHBT in the clinical setting. METHODS: Irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea (IBS-D) and healthy volunteers (HVs) were enrolled and received a 10 g, 20 g, or 40 g dose lactose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) in a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. The lactase gene promoter region was sequenced. Breath samples and symptoms were acquired at baseline and every 15 min for 3 h (13 measurements). The detection rates of lactose malabsorption (LM) and lactose intolerance (LI) for a 4SLHBT that acquired four measurements at 0, 90, 120, and 180 min from the same data set were compared with the results of standard LHBT. RESULTS: Sixty IBS-D patients and 60 HVs were studied. The genotype in all participants was C/C-13910. LM and LI detection rates increased with lactose dose from 10 g, 20 g to 40 g in both groups (P < 0.001). 4SLHBT showed excellent diagnostic concordance with standard LHBT (97%-100%, Kappa​​ 0.815-0.942) with high sensitivity (90%-100%) and specificity (100%) at all three lactose doses in both groups. CONCLUSION: Reducing the number of measurements from 13 to 4 samples did not significantly impact on the accuracy of LHBT in health and IBS-D. 4SLHBT is a valid test for assessment of LM and LI in clinical practice. PMID:26140004

  17. [Lactose tolerance and milk consumption: myths and realities].

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S; Murray, E

    1988-09-01

    The disaccharide lactose, the principal carbohydrate of animal milks, requires the enzyme lactase to split it to glucose and galactose. Undigested lactose passes to the colon where fermentation produces hydrogen and short-chain fatty acids that can cause abdominal distention, pain and sometimes diarrhea. Persistence of intestinal lactase after early childhood, is inherited as a highly-penetrant autosomal dominant genetic characteristic. On the basis of a review of over 560 references, all available data on the primary loss of intestinal lactase in Latin American populations are presented in tabular form. Prevalence of lactose non-digesters in Latin American populations ranges from 45% to 100%. However, this is not a reliable predictor of the acceptability of milk and milk products containing lactose. Milk is being used successfully for the supplementary feeding of children worldwide, and most lactose non-digesters can tolerate at least 240 ml of milk or the lactose equivalent in other products. Lactose maldigestion does not interfere with the absorption of the protein and essential micronutrients in milk. Information is provided on the lactose content of milk and milk products, on the usual milk consumption of Latin American populations, and on worldwide experimental and field observations of milk acceptability. Both adaptation to continued use of milk and milk products and relationships of milk use to various disease states in which intestinal lactase activity may be reduced are discussed. Some types of yoghurts are better tolerated because of the lactase activity of the bacteria used in their fermentation. For unusually intolerant individuals commercial enzyme preparations are available for addition to milk products but for most persons the additional cost is unnecessary. PMID:3155250

  18. Dietary fructose intolerance, fructan intolerance and FODMAPs.

    PubMed

    Fedewa, Amy; Rao, Satish S C

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intolerances to fructose, fructans and FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) are common, yet poorly recognized and managed. Over the last decade, they have come to the forefront because of new knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Patients with these problems often present with unexplained bloating, belching, distension, gas, abdominal pain, or diarrhea. Here, we have examined the most up-to-date research on these food-related intolerances, discussed controversies, and have provided some guidelines for the dietary management of these conditions. Breath testing for carbohydrate intolerance appears to be standardized and essential for the diagnosis and management of these conditions, especially in the Western population. While current research shows that the FODMAP diet may be effective in treating some patients with irritable bowel syndrome, additional research is needed to identify more foods items that are high in FODMAPs, and to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of dietary interventions.

  19. Dietary fructose intolerance, fructan intolerance and FODMAPs

    PubMed Central

    Fedewa, Amy; Rao, Satish S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intolerances to fructose, fructans and FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) are common, yet poorly recognized and managed. Over the last decade, they have come to the forefront because of new knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Patients with these problems often present with unexplained bloating, belching, distension, gas, abdominal pain or diarrhea. Here, we have examined the most up-to-date research on these food-related intolerances, discussed controversies, and have provided some guidelines for the dietary management of these conditions. Breath testing for carbohydrate intolerance appears to be standardized and essential for the diagnosis and management of these conditions, especially in the Western population. While current research shows that the FODMAP diet may be effective in treating irritable bowel syndrome, additional research is needed to identify more foods items that are high in FODMAPs, and to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of dietary interventions. PMID:24357350

  20. Evaluation of the trace metal supplements for a synthetic low lactose diet.

    PubMed Central

    Aggett, P J; More, J; Thorn, J M; Delves, H T; Cornfield, M; Clayton, B E

    1983-01-01

    A trace element supplement used with a synthetic low lactose milk (Galactomins 17 and 18) has been evaluated by means of metabolic balance studies in 4 infants with dissacharide intolerances. The supplement was considered satisfactory for iron and manganese but increases in its zinc and copper content are probably necessary to ensure adequate retentions of these metals. PMID:6859935

  1. Amperometric detection of lactose using β-galactosidase immobilized in layer-by-layer films.

    PubMed

    Campos, Paula P; Moraes, Marli L; Volpati, Diogo; Miranda, Paulo B; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Ferreira, Marystela

    2014-07-23

    A direct, low-cost method to determine the concentration of lactose is an important goal with possible impact in various types of industry. In this study, a biosensor is reported that exploits the specific interaction between lactose and the enzyme β-galactosidase (β-Gal) normally employed to process lactose into glucose and galactose for lactose-intolerant people. The biosensor was made with β-Gal immobilized in layer-by-layer (LbL) films with the polyelectrolyte poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) and poly(vinyl sufonate) (PVS) on an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode modified with a layer of Prussian Blue (PB). With an ITO/PB/(PEI/PVS)1(PEI/β-Gal)30 architecture, lactose could be determined with an amperometric method with sensitivity of 0.31 μA mmol(-1) cm(-2) and detection limit of 1.13 mmol L(-1), which is sufficient for detecting lactose in milk and for clinical exams. Detection occurred via a cascade reaction involving glucose oxidase titrated as electrolytic solution in the electrochemical cell, while PB allowed for operation at 0.0 V versus saturated calomel electrode, thus avoiding effects from interfering species. Sum-frequency generation spectroscopy data for the interface between the LbL film and a buffer containing lactose indicated that β-Gal lost order, which is the first demonstration of structural effects induced by the molecular recognition interaction with lactose. PMID:24991705

  2. Hereditary fructose intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Fructosemia; Fructose intolerance; Fructose aldolase B-deficiency; Fructose 1, 6 bisphosphate aldolase deficiency ... B. This substance is needed to break down fructose. If a person without this substance eats fructose ...

  3. Gluten Intolerance Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) empowers the gluten-free community through consumer support, advocacy, and education. • SUPPORT GIG • ... about the events taking place in your gluten-free community. Find >> Products From breads and pastas to pet ...

  4. Lactose nutrition in lactase nonpersisters.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Lactose handling by the human gut by most people, beyond being breast-fed, has been considered a disorder rather than physiological. A non-human mammalian milk source is novel for the majority. During the first 6 months of life, when neonates and infants are best breast-fed, lactose along with other macronutrients, provides energy, but may have other functions as well. At birth, babies are endowed with their mother's vaginal microbiome, but not if they are born by Caesarean section. How much maternal milk lactose survives the infant's small intestine and is processed by this unique gut microbiome and to what end is still uncertain, but no lactose or galactose appears in the faeces. Once intestinal lactase activity declines in most infants, lactose may enhance innate immunity through the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), which is best achieved by lactose synergy with other colonic fermentation metabolites such as butyrate. It is of interest whether this lactose function or a variant of it persists. It might not be evident when lactase is persistent, as it is in most people of northern European ancestry. Population genomics indicate that lactase persistence became prevalent only about 3000-1000 BC, the Bronze Age of Eurasia. Gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) in lactase nonpersisters who consume dairy foods are partly dose dependent and not usually evident with single lactose intakes≤25 g per day. Spreading intake across the day reduces the risk as can various dietary patterns. Nevertheless, individual differences in GIS lactose sensitivity may merit public health and clinical consideration.

  5. Lactose maldigestion, calcium intake and osteoporosis in African-, Asian-, and Hispanic-Americans.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K A; Savaiano, D A

    2001-04-01

    Dietary calcium is critical for the development of the human skeleton and likely plays an important role in the prevention of osteoporosis. Dairy products provide approximately three-fourths of calcium consumed in the diet and are the most concentrated sources of this essential nutrient. One obstacle that likely interferes with calcium consumption among many ethnic groups is lactose maldigestion. The real or perceived occurrence of intolerance symptoms after dairy food consumption may cause maldigesters to avoid dairy products. Several investigators have observed a relationship between lactose maldigestion, dietary calcium and osteoporosis in Caucasian populations. Research on ethnically diverse populations is necessary to better understand how lactose maldigestion influences the risk for osteoporosis. Low calcium intakes, a greater than previously thought potential for low bone density and extensive lactose maldigestion among Hispanic-American and Asian-American populations may create an elevated risk for osteoporosis. Dietary management strategies for lactose maldigesters to increase calcium consumption include consuming (1) dairy foods with meals, (2) yogurts, (3) calcium-fortified foods, (4) using lactose digestive aids and (5) including dairy foods daily in the diet to enhance colonic metabolism of lactose.

  6. Intolerance of Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Meghan L.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic and progressive neurologic condition that, by its nature, carries uncertainty as a hallmark characteristic. Although all patients face uncertainty, there is variability in how individuals cope with its presence. In other populations, the concept of “intolerance of uncertainty” has been conceptualized to explain this variability such that individuals who have difficulty tolerating the possibility of future occurrences may engage in thoughts or behaviors by which they attempt to exert control over that possibility or lessen the uncertainty but may, as a result, experience worse outcomes, particularly in terms of psychological well-being. This topical review introduces MS-focused researchers, clinicians, and patients to intolerance of uncertainty, integrates the concept with what is already understood about coping with MS, and suggests future steps for conceptual, assessment, and treatment-focused research that may benefit from integrating intolerance of uncertainty as a central feature. PMID:26300700

  7. Lactose malabsorption and colonic fermentations alter host metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Virginie; Even, Patrick C; Larue-Achagiotis, Christiane; Blouin, Jean-Marc; Blachier, François; Benamouzig, Robert; Tomé, Daniel; Davila, Anne-Marie

    2013-08-01

    Lactose malabsorption is associated with rapid production of high levels of osmotic compounds, such as organic acids and SCFA in the colon, suspected to contribute to the onset of lactose intolerance. Adult rats are lactase deficient and the present study was conducted to evaluate in vivo the metabolic consequences of acute lactose ingestion, including host-microbiota interactions. Rats received diets of 25% sucrose (S25 control group) or 25% lactose (L25 experimental group). SCFA and lactic acid were quantified in intestinal contents and portal blood. Expression of SCFA transporter genes was quantified in the colonic mucosa. Carbohydrate oxidation (Cox) and lipid oxidation (Lox) were computed by indirect calorimetry. Measurements were performed over a maximum of 13 h. Time, diet and time × diet variables had significant effects on SCFA concentration in the caecum (P<0·001, P=0·004 and P=0·007, respectively) and the portal blood (P<0·001, P=0·04 and P<0·001, respectively). Concomitantly, expression of sodium monocarboxylate significantly increased in the colonic mucosa of the L25 group (P=0·003 at t = 6 h and P<0·05 at t = 8 h). During 5 h after the meal, the L25 group's changes in metabolic parameters (Cox, Lox) were significantly lower than those of the S25 group (P=0·02). However, after 5 h, L25 Cox became greater than S25 (P=0·004). Thus, enhanced production and absorption of SCFA support the metabolic changes observed in calorimetry. These results underline the consequences of acute lactose malabsorption and measured compensations occurring in the host's metabolism, presumably through the microbiota fermentations and microbiota-host interactions.

  8. Lactose nutrition in lactase nonpersisters.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Lactose handling by the human gut by most people, beyond being breast-fed, has been considered a disorder rather than physiological. A non-human mammalian milk source is novel for the majority. During the first 6 months of life, when neonates and infants are best breast-fed, lactose along with other macronutrients, provides energy, but may have other functions as well. At birth, babies are endowed with their mother's vaginal microbiome, but not if they are born by Caesarean section. How much maternal milk lactose survives the infant's small intestine and is processed by this unique gut microbiome and to what end is still uncertain, but no lactose or galactose appears in the faeces. Once intestinal lactase activity declines in most infants, lactose may enhance innate immunity through the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), which is best achieved by lactose synergy with other colonic fermentation metabolites such as butyrate. It is of interest whether this lactose function or a variant of it persists. It might not be evident when lactase is persistent, as it is in most people of northern European ancestry. Population genomics indicate that lactase persistence became prevalent only about 3000-1000 BC, the Bronze Age of Eurasia. Gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) in lactase nonpersisters who consume dairy foods are partly dose dependent and not usually evident with single lactose intakes≤25 g per day. Spreading intake across the day reduces the risk as can various dietary patterns. Nevertheless, individual differences in GIS lactose sensitivity may merit public health and clinical consideration. PMID:26715080

  9. 21 CFR 168.122 - Lactose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactose. 168.122 Section 168.122 Food and Drugs... § 168.122 Lactose. (a) Lactose is the carbohydrate normally obtained from whey. It may be anhydrous or... the following specifications: (1) The lactose content is not less than 98.0 percent, mass over mass...

  10. 21 CFR 168.122 - Lactose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactose. 168.122 Section 168.122 Food and Drugs... § 168.122 Lactose. (a) Lactose is the carbohydrate normally obtained from whey. It may be anhydrous or... the following specifications: (1) The lactose content is not less than 98.0 percent, mass over mass...

  11. 21 CFR 168.122 - Lactose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactose. 168.122 Section 168.122 Food and Drugs... § 168.122 Lactose. (a) Lactose is the carbohydrate normally obtained from whey. It may be anhydrous or... the following specifications: (1) The lactose content is not less than 98.0 percent, mass over mass...

  12. Acidogenic fermentation of lactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaalita, W.S.; Pinder, K.L.; Lo, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Cheese whey is the main component of waste streams from cheese manufacturing plants. Whey is a high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) effluent that must be reduced before the streams are sent to the sewer. It is proposed in this article that the production of methane by anaerobic fermentation would be the best use of this stream, especially for small plants. Single-stage fermentation of lactose, the main component of whey, results in a very low pH and a stalled process. Two-phase fermentation will eliminate this problem. The acidogenic stage of fermentation has been studied at pH of between 4 and 6.5. The nature of the main products of the reaction have been found to be pH dependent. Below a pH of 4.5 a gas (CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/) is produced along with ethanol, acetate, and butyrate. Above a pH of 4.5 no gas was produced and the liquid products included less ethanol and butyrate and more acetate. A separate study on the conditions for gas formation showed that if the pH dropped for a short time below 4.5 gases were formed at all subsequent pH. This would indicate a change in population distribution due to the period at a low pH. By assuming that the desired products from the acidogenic stage were butyrate, acetate, and no gases, the optimum pH range was found to be between 6.0 and 6.5.

  13. [Metabolic intolerance to exercise].

    PubMed

    Arenas, J; Martín, M A

    2003-01-01

    Exercise intolerance (EI) is a frequent cause of medical attention, although it is sometimes difficult to come to a final diagnosis. However, there is a group of patients in whom EI is due to a metabolic dysfunction. McArdle's disease (type V glucogenosis) is due to myophosphorylase (MPL) deficiency. The ischemic exercise test shows a flat lactate curve. The most frequent mutations in the PYGM gene (MPL gene) in Spanish patients with MPL deficiency are R49X and W797R. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency is invariably associated to repetitive episodes of myoglobinuria triggered by exercise, cold, fever or fasting. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of CPT II deficiency in muscle. The most frequent mutation in the CPT2 gene is the S113L. Patients with muscle adenylate deaminase deficiency usually show either a mild myopathy or no symptom. The diagnosis is based on the absence of enzyme activity in muscle and the lack of rise of ammonia in the forearm ischemic exercise test. The mutation Q12X in the AMPD1 gene is strongly associated with the disease. Exercise intolerance is a common complaint in patients with mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) deficiencies, although it is often overshadowed by other symptoms and signs. Only recently we have come to appreciate that exercise intolerance can be the sole presentation of defects in the mtDNA, particularly in complex I, complex III, complex IV, or in some tRNAs. In addition, myoglobinuria can be observed in patients under statin treatment, particularly if associated with fibrates, due to an alteration in the assembly of the complex IV of the MRC. PMID:12838448

  14. Optimization of an innovative hollow-fiber process to produce lactose-reduced skim milk.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Novalin, Senad; Klimacek, Mario; Splechtna, Barbara; Petzelbauer, Inge; Szivak, Alexander; Kulbe, Klaus D

    2006-07-01

    The research field for applications of lactose hydrolysis has been investigated for several decades. Lactose intolerance, improvement for technical processing of solutions containing lactose, and utilization of lactose in whey are the main topics for development of biotechnological processes. We report here the optimization of a hollow-fiber membrane reactor process for enzymatic lactose hydrolysis. Lactase was circulated abluminally during luminal flow of skim milk. The main problem, the growth of microorganisms in the enzyme solution, was minimized by sterile filtration, ultraviolet irradiation, and temperature adjustment. Based on previous experiments at 23 +/- 2 degrees C, further characterization was carried out at 8 +/- 2 degrees C, 15 +/- 2 degrees C (beta-galactosidase), and 58 +/- 2 degrees C (thermostable beta-glycosidase) varying enzyme activity and flow rates. For a cost-effective process, the parameters 15 +/- 2 degrees C, 240 U/mL of beta-galactosidase, an enzyme solution flow rate of 25 L/h, and a skim milk flow rate of about 9 L/h should be used in order to achieve an aimed productivity of 360 g/(L x h) and to run at conditions for the highest process long-term stability. PMID:16891662

  15. A new innovative process to produce lactose-reduced skim milk.

    PubMed

    Novalin, Senad; Neuhaus, Winfried; Kulbe, Klaus D

    2005-09-23

    The research field for applications for lactose hydrolysis has been investigated for some decades. Lactose intolerance, improvement for technical processing of solutions containing lactose and utilisation of lactose in whey are main topics in development of biotechnological processes. In this article, the establishment of a hollow fiber membrane reactor process for enzymatic lactose hydrolysis is reported. Mesophilic beta-galactosidases were circulated abluminally during luminal flow of skim milk. The main problem, microorganisms growth in the enzyme solution, was minimised by sterile filtration and UV irradiation. In order to characterise the process parameters, such as skim milk concentration, enzyme activity and flow rates were varied. In comparison to a batch process, enzyme activity could be used longer and enzyme rest into the product should not occur. Furthermore, the three-dimensional separation of the substrate from the enzyme solution minimise blocking and washing out effects, which restrict processes with immobilised enzymes. A conversion rate of 78.11% was achieved at a skim milk flow rate of 9.9l h(-1), enzyme activity of 120 Uml(-1) and a temperature of 23+/-2 degrees C in a hollow fiber reactor with a membrane area of 4.9 m2. PMID:15955585

  16. [Food Allergy and Intolerance : Distinction, Definitions and Delimitation].

    PubMed

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Waßmann-Otto, Anja; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Immunologically mediated hypersensitivity to foods is defined as food allergy, mainly due to immunglobulins of class E (IgE) triggering immediate reactions (type I hypersensitivity) with possible involvement of mucosa, skin, airways, intestinal tract, and the vascular system. Primary food allergy is based on (early) IgE sensitization against animal (e. g., cow's milk, hen's eggs) or plant proteins (e. g. peanut, hazelnut or wheat). In the case of secondary food allergies, IgE against pollen proteins (e. g., birch) reacts to structurally related food proteins (with cross-reactions to stone and pit fruits). Non-immunological food intolerance reactions are mostly based on carbohydrate malassimilation (e. g., lactose intolerance, fructose malabsorption) and are rarely due to pseudo-allergies (e. g., flavors, dyes, preservatives) primarily in patients with chronic urticaria. Common intestinal symptoms are mainly due to functional disorders (e. g., irritable bowel disease), rarely because of inflammatory intestinal diseases (e. g., celiac disease). Histamine intolerance, gluten hypersensitivity, and so-called food type III hypersensitivities are controversial diagnoses. The aforementioned disease entities/models are of variable importance for the affected individuals, the public health system, and society in general.

  17. [Food Allergy and Intolerance : Distinction, Definitions and Delimitation].

    PubMed

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Waßmann-Otto, Anja; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Immunologically mediated hypersensitivity to foods is defined as food allergy, mainly due to immunglobulins of class E (IgE) triggering immediate reactions (type I hypersensitivity) with possible involvement of mucosa, skin, airways, intestinal tract, and the vascular system. Primary food allergy is based on (early) IgE sensitization against animal (e. g., cow's milk, hen's eggs) or plant proteins (e. g. peanut, hazelnut or wheat). In the case of secondary food allergies, IgE against pollen proteins (e. g., birch) reacts to structurally related food proteins (with cross-reactions to stone and pit fruits). Non-immunological food intolerance reactions are mostly based on carbohydrate malassimilation (e. g., lactose intolerance, fructose malabsorption) and are rarely due to pseudo-allergies (e. g., flavors, dyes, preservatives) primarily in patients with chronic urticaria. Common intestinal symptoms are mainly due to functional disorders (e. g., irritable bowel disease), rarely because of inflammatory intestinal diseases (e. g., celiac disease). Histamine intolerance, gluten hypersensitivity, and so-called food type III hypersensitivities are controversial diagnoses. The aforementioned disease entities/models are of variable importance for the affected individuals, the public health system, and society in general. PMID:27215624

  18. Prediction of lactose malabsorption in referral patients.

    PubMed

    DiPalma, J A; Narvaez, R M

    1988-03-01

    Two hundred forty-two patients referred for various gastrointestinal complaints were evaluated for clinical parameters that would predict findings of lactose malabsorption. Breath hydrogen and blood glucose lactose tests were performed after ingestion of 50 g lactose. Presenting complaints, duration of symptoms, and patient demographics such as age, sex, and ethnic heritage were not different between lactose malabsorbers and absorbers as defined by the breath hydrogen lactose test. Food-related symptoms in general and after specific foods such as milk, ice cream, cheese, and yogurt were also similar between groups. Prior to testing, 30% of malabsorbers (N = 161) and 36% of absorbers (N = 81) reported lactose-related symptoms (P = NS). The blood glucose response to lactose was abnormal in 60% of malabsorbers and 15% of absorbers. This study confirmed our impression that it is difficult to predict lactose absorption status by clinical parameters. The majority of our lactose malabsorber patients were unaware of lactose-associated symptoms. Furthermore, symptom assessment, demographics, food history, and blood glucose testing did not predict abnormal hydrogen responses to lactose. PMID:3342721

  19. Hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M; Rellos, P; Cox, T M

    1998-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI, OMIM 22960), caused by catalytic deficiency of aldolase B (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, EC 4.1.2.13), is a recessively inherited condition in which affected homozygotes develop hypoglycaemic and severe abdominal symptoms after taking foods containing fructose and cognate sugars. Continued ingestion of noxious sugars leads to hepatic and renal injury and growth retardation; parenteral administration of fructose or sorbitol may be fatal. Direct detection of a few mutations in the human aldolase B gene on chromosome 9q facilitates the genetic diagnosis of HFI in many symptomatic patients. The severity of the disease phenotype appears to be independent of the nature of the aldolase B gene mutations so far identified. It appears that hitherto there has been little, if any, selection against mutant aldolase B alleles in the population: in the UK, approximately 1.3% of neonates harbour one copy of the prevalent A149P disease allele. The ascendance of sugar as a major dietary nutrient, especially in western societies, may account for the increasing recognition of HFI as a nutritional disease and has shown the prevalence of mutant aldolase B genes in the general population. The severity of clinical expression correlates well with the immediate nutritional environment, age, culture, and eating habits of affected subjects. Here we review the biochemical, genetic, and molecular basis of human aldolase B deficiency in HFI, a disorder which responds to dietary therapy and in which the principal manifestations of disease are thus preventable. Images PMID:9610797

  20. Pharmaceutical design of a new lactose-free coprocessed excipient: application of hydrochlorothiazide as a low solubility drug model.

    PubMed

    Viscasillas Clerch, Anna; Fernandez Campos, Francisco; Del Pozo, Alfonso; Calpena Campmany, Ana Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Most co-processed excipients used in direct-compression tablets contain lactose, which prevents lactose-intolerant patients from taking such tablets. Therefore, a novel lactose-free co-processed excipient for direct compression tablets has been prepared. Microcrystalline cellulose and dicalcium phosphate dehydrate were used as primary excipients which underwent a wet granulation process and factorial experiment in order to ascertain the best prototype. Finally, the best two prototypes were added to hydrochlorothiazide, which has chosen as the model drug because of its low solubility. An extensive characterization of the new excipient as well as the drug loaded tablets is reported. Our results show adequate parameters (rheological and compression behavior, uniformity of weight, disintegration, friability, crushing force and cohesion index). Moreover, the biopharmaceutical profile was evaluated; the tablets exhibits a Weibull kinetic function and fast drug release.

  1. Preparation of lactose-free pasteurized milk with a recombinant thermostable β-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactose intolerance is a common health concern causing gastrointestinal symptoms and avoidance of dairy products by afflicted individuals. Since milk is a primary source of calcium and vitamin D, lactose intolerant individuals often obtain insufficient amounts of these nutrients which may lead to adverse health outcomes. Production of lactose-free milk can provide a solution to this problem, although it requires use of lactase from microbial sources and increases potential for contamination. Use of thermostable lactase enzymes can overcome this issue by functioning under pasteurization conditions. Results A thermostable β-glucosidase gene from Pyrococcus furiosus was cloned in frame with the Saccharomyces cerecisiae a-factor secretory signal and expressed in Pichia pastoris strain X-33. The recombinant enzyme was purified by a one-step method of weak anion exchange chromatography. The optimum temperature and pH for this β-glucosidase activity was 100°C and pH 6.0, respectively. The enzyme activity was not significantly inhibited by Ca2+. We tested the additive amount, hydrolysis time, and the influence of glucose on the enzyme during pasteurization and found that the enzyme possessed a high level of lactose hydrolysis in milk that was not obviously influenced by glucose. Conclusions The thermostablity of this recombinant β-glucosidase, combined with its neutral pH activity and favorable temperature activity optima, suggest that this enzyme is an ideal candidate for the hydrolysis of lactose in milk, and it would be suitable for application in low-lactose milk production during pasteurization. PMID:24053641

  2. Hydrogen-producing Escherichia coli strains overexpressing lactose permease: FT-IR analysis of the lactose-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Grube, Mara; Dimanta, Ilze; Gavare, Marita; Strazdina, Inese; Liepins, Janis; Juhna, Talis; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-01-01

    The lactose permease gene (lacY) was overexpressed in the septuple knockout mutant of Escherichia coli, previously engineered for hydrogen production from glucose. It was expected that raising the lactose transporter activity would elevate the intracellular lactose concentration, inactivate the lactose repressor, induce the lactose operon, and as a result stimulate overall lactose consumption and conversion. However, overexpression of the lactose transporter caused a considerable growth delay in the recombinant strain on lactose, resembling to some extent the "lactose killing" phenomenon. Therefore, the recombinant strain was subjected to selection on lactose-containing media. Selection on plates with 3% lactose yielded a strain with a decreased content of the recombinant plasmid but with an improved ability to grow and produce hydrogen on lactose. Macromolecular analysis of its biomass by means of Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that increase of the cellular polysaccharide content might contribute to the adaptation of E. coli to lactose stress. PMID:23725289

  3. Strategies to overcome statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Agouridis, Aris P; Nair, Devaki R; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-06-01

    This editorial discusses several options to overcome statin intolerance in clinical practice. For example, switching to a different statin, changing statin dosing, using lipid-lowering drugs other than statins (e.g., ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants and fibrates, alone or in combination), or combining statins with other lipid-lowering drugs. The authors focus on the potential mechanisms involved in statin-related myopathy. New lipid-lowering drugs currently in development (e.g., cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors [anacetrapib] and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 inhibitors) inhibitors may help in the management of statin intolerance while achieving low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets as set out by the guidelines.

  4. Crystallization in lactose refining-a review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shin Yee; Hartel, Richard W

    2014-03-01

    In the dairy industry, crystallization is an important separation process used in the refining of lactose from whey solutions. In the refining operation, lactose crystals are separated from the whey solution through nucleation, growth, and/or aggregation. The rate of crystallization is determined by the combined effect of crystallizer design, processing parameters, and impurities on the kinetics of the process. This review summarizes studies on lactose crystallization, including the mechanism, theory of crystallization, and the impact of various factors affecting the crystallization kinetics. In addition, an overview of the industrial crystallization operation highlights the problems faced by the lactose manufacturer. The approaches that are beneficial to the lactose manufacturer for process optimization or improvement are summarized in this review. Over the years, much knowledge has been acquired through extensive research. However, the industrial crystallization process is still far from optimized. Therefore, future effort should focus on transferring the new knowledge and technology to the dairy industry.

  5. Statin Intolerance: the Clinician's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Stulc, Tomáš; Ceška, Richard; Gotto, Antonio M

    2015-12-01

    Muscle problems and other adverse symptoms associated with statin use are frequent reasons for non-adherence and discontinuation of statin therapy, which results in inadequate control of hyperlipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. However, most patients who experience adverse symptoms during statin use are able to tolerate at least some degree of statin therapy. Given the profound cardiovascular benefits derived from statins, an adequate practical approach to statin intolerance is, therefore, of great clinical importance. Statin intolerance can be defined as the occurrence of myalgia or other adverse symptoms that are attributed to statin therapy and that lead to its discontinuation. In reality, these symptoms are actually unrelated to statin use in many patients, especially in those with atypical presentations following long periods of treatment. Thus, the first step in approaching patients with adverse symptoms during the course of statin therapy is identification of those patients for whom true statin intolerance is unlikely, since most of these patients would probably be capable of tolerating adequate statin therapy. In patients with statin intolerance, an altered dosing regimen of very low doses of statins should be attempted and, if tolerated, should gradually be increased to achieve the highest tolerable doses. In addition, other lipid-lowering drugs may be needed, either in combination with statins, or alone, if statins are not tolerated at all. Stringent control of other risk factors can aid in reducing cardiovascular risk if attaining lipid treatment goals proves difficult.

  6. Gastrointestinal food allergy and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Assa'ad, Amal H

    2006-10-01

    GI symptoms are a common manifestation of food allergy and intolerance. The primary physician is the first to evaluate these symptoms. A systematic evaluation using an accurate and detailed history, tests to identify the offending food(s), and procedures that may identify underlying pathologic disorders of the GI tract would lead to an accurate diagnosis and better targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:17048714

  7. [Fiber, food intolerances, FODMAPs, gluten and functional gastrointestinal disorders--update 2014].

    PubMed

    Leiß, O

    2014-11-01

    The controversial effects of dietary fiber on symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders are summarized. Studies concerning adverse reaction to foods are mentioned and the possible role of food allergy and food intolerances, especially pseudoallergic reactions to biogenes amines, in symptom provocation is discussed. The known effects of lactose deficiency and fructose malabsorption are reviewed. The FODMAP concept (fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols) is presented in more detail and recent studies on pathophysiological effects of FODMAP constituents and of therapeutic effects of a low FODMAP diet on symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome are discussed. Finally, studies on the new disorder non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) are summarized and the state of the discussion whether wheat intolerance is due to gluten or the grains is given.

  8. [Fiber, food intolerances, FODMAPs, gluten and functional gastrointestinal disorders--update 2014].

    PubMed

    Leiß, O

    2014-11-01

    The controversial effects of dietary fiber on symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders are summarized. Studies concerning adverse reaction to foods are mentioned and the possible role of food allergy and food intolerances, especially pseudoallergic reactions to biogenes amines, in symptom provocation is discussed. The known effects of lactose deficiency and fructose malabsorption are reviewed. The FODMAP concept (fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols) is presented in more detail and recent studies on pathophysiological effects of FODMAP constituents and of therapeutic effects of a low FODMAP diet on symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome are discussed. Finally, studies on the new disorder non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) are summarized and the state of the discussion whether wheat intolerance is due to gluten or the grains is given. PMID:25390215

  9. Lysis of Escherichia coli mutants by lactose.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J K

    1979-11-01

    Growth of Escherichia coli strain MM6-13 (ptsI suc lacI sup), which as a suppressor of the succinate-negative phenotype, was inhibited by lactose. Cells growing in yeast extract-tryptone-sodium chloride medium (LB broth) were lysed upon the addition of lactose. In Casamino Acids-salts medium, lactose inhibited growth, but due to the high K+ content no lysis occurred. Lysis required high levels of beta-galctosidase and lactose transport activity. MM6, the parental strain of MM6-13, has lower levels of both of these activities and was resistant to lysis under these conditions. When MM6 was grown in LB broth with exogenous cyclic adenosine monophosphate, however, beta-galactosidase and lactose transport activities were greatly increased, and lysis occurred upon the addition of lactose. Resting cells of both MM6 and MM6-13 were lysed by lactose in buffers containing suitable ions. In the presence of MG2+, lysis was enhanced by 5 mM KCl and 100 mM NaCl. Higher slat concentrations (50 mM KCl or 200 mM NaCl) provided partial protection from lysis. In the absence of Mg2+, lysis occurred without KCl. Lactose-dependent lysis occurred in buffers containing anions such as sulafte, chloride, phosphate, or citrate; however, thiocyanate or acetate protected the cells from lysis. These data indicate that both cations and anions, as well as the levels of lactose transport and beta-galactosidase activity, are important in lysis.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1979a - Reduced lactose whey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1979a Reduced lactose whey. (a) Reduced lactose whey is the substance obtained by the removal of lactose from whey. The lactose content of the...

  11. Development and shelf-life determination of pasteurized, microfiltered, lactose hydrolyzed skim milk.

    PubMed

    Antunes, A E C; Silva E Alves, A T; Gallina, D A; Trento, F K H S; Zacarchenco, P B; Van Dender, A G F; Moreno, I; Ormenese, R C S C; Spadoti, L M

    2014-09-01

    The segment of the world population showing permanent or temporary lactose intolerance is quite significant. Because milk is a widely consumed food with an high nutritional value, technological alternatives have been sought to overcome this dilemma. Microfiltration combined with pasteurization can not only extend the shelf life of milk but can also maintain the sensory, functional, and nutritional properties of the product. This studied developed a pasteurized, microfiltered, lactose hydrolyzed (delactosed) skim milk (PMLHSM). Hydrolysis was performed using β-galactosidase at a concentration of 0.4mL/L and incubation for approximately 21h at 10±1°C. During these procedures, the degree of hydrolysis obtained (>90%) was accompanied by evaluation of freezing point depression, and the remaining quantity of lactose was confirmed by HPLC. Milk was processed using a microfiltration pilot unit equipped with uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) ceramic membranes with a mean pore size of 1.4 μm and UTP of 60 kPa. The product was submitted to physicochemical, microbiological, and sensory evaluations, and its shelf life was estimated. Microfiltration reduced the aerobic mesophilic count by more than 4 log cycles. We were able to produce high-quality PMLHSM with a shelf life of 21 to 27d when stored at 5±1°C in terms of sensory analysis and proteolysis index and a shelf life of 50d in regard to total aerobic mesophile count and titratable acidity. PMID:25022681

  12. Development and shelf-life determination of pasteurized, microfiltered, lactose hydrolyzed skim milk.

    PubMed

    Antunes, A E C; Silva E Alves, A T; Gallina, D A; Trento, F K H S; Zacarchenco, P B; Van Dender, A G F; Moreno, I; Ormenese, R C S C; Spadoti, L M

    2014-09-01

    The segment of the world population showing permanent or temporary lactose intolerance is quite significant. Because milk is a widely consumed food with an high nutritional value, technological alternatives have been sought to overcome this dilemma. Microfiltration combined with pasteurization can not only extend the shelf life of milk but can also maintain the sensory, functional, and nutritional properties of the product. This studied developed a pasteurized, microfiltered, lactose hydrolyzed (delactosed) skim milk (PMLHSM). Hydrolysis was performed using β-galactosidase at a concentration of 0.4mL/L and incubation for approximately 21h at 10±1°C. During these procedures, the degree of hydrolysis obtained (>90%) was accompanied by evaluation of freezing point depression, and the remaining quantity of lactose was confirmed by HPLC. Milk was processed using a microfiltration pilot unit equipped with uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) ceramic membranes with a mean pore size of 1.4 μm and UTP of 60 kPa. The product was submitted to physicochemical, microbiological, and sensory evaluations, and its shelf life was estimated. Microfiltration reduced the aerobic mesophilic count by more than 4 log cycles. We were able to produce high-quality PMLHSM with a shelf life of 21 to 27d when stored at 5±1°C in terms of sensory analysis and proteolysis index and a shelf life of 50d in regard to total aerobic mesophile count and titratable acidity.

  13. Oxidation of lactose with bromine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Byung Y; Montgomery, Rex

    2005-12-12

    Oxidation of lactose by bromine in an aqueous buffered solution was conducted as a model experiment to examine the glycosidic linkage cleavage occurring during the oxidation of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. The resulting oxidation products, after reduction with sodium borodeuteride, were characterized by GLC-MS analyses of the per-O-methyl or per-O-Me3Si derivatives. Most of the products were carboxylic acids, of which lactobionic acid was major. Minor products, identified after partial fractionation on a BioGel P-2 column, comprised oxalic acid; glyceric acid; threonic and erythronic acids; tartaric acid; lyxonic, arabinonic, and xylonic acids; galactonic and gluconic acids; galactosylerythronic acid; galactosylarabinonic acid; galactosylarabinaric acid; galacturonosylarabinonic acid; and galactosylglucaric acid. No keto acids were identified. Galactose was detected as 1-deuteriogalactitol, the presence of which, together with the C6 aldonic acids, supported a galactosidic bond cleavage. Galactosylarabinonic acid was the major constituent (7.5%) among minors, and others constituted 0.2-3.7% of the principal lactobionic acid. These products together comprised 29% of the lactobionic acid, more than half (17%) of which were accounted for by the galactosidic linkage cleavage, supporting the significant decrease in molecular weight seen earlier in the bromine-oxidized polysaccharides by glycosidic cleavage.

  14. Statin intolerance: more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R; Campbell, Kristen B; Lakey, Wanda C

    2014-01-01

    The dramatic effectiveness of statins in improving the course of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease tends to overshadow questions of statin intolerance. Thus after more than 25 years of clinical statin use, intolerance remains a poorly understood, frustrating issue for patients and providers. It has been extraordinarily difficult to define statin intolerance and its implications for clinical practice. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge and raise questions that need to be addressed.

  15. Lactose crystallization delay in model infant foods made with lactose, beta-lactoglobulin, and starch.

    PubMed

    Nasirpour, A; Landillon, V; Cuq, B; Scher, J; Banon, S; Desobry, S

    2007-08-01

    Handling and storage alter infant food powders due to lactose crystallization and interactions among components. Model infant foods were prepared by colyophilization of lactose, beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), and gelatinized starch. A mixture design was used to define the percentage of each mixture component to simulate a wide range of infant food powders. The kinetics of crystallization was studied by a gravimetric method (dynamic vapor sorption) at 70% relative humidity (RH). After freeze-drying, lactose was amorphous and crystallized at 70% RH. The delay before crystallization depends on the contents of beta-LG and starch in the formulations. A mathematical model was proposed to predict crystallization time (delay) at 70% RH. For the formulation containing 50% lactose, 25% beta-LG, and 25% starch, lactose was still amorphous after 42 h at 70% RH, whereas pure amorphous lactose crystallized after approximately 70 min. Calculated and experimental results of adsorbed moisture from the formulations were compared. Adsorbed water of formulation containing lactose could not be calculated from moisture sorption properties of each component at a given RH because beta-LG and gelatinized starch prevented lactose crystal growth. PMID:17638972

  16. Medicines, excipients and dietary intolerances.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Medicinal products contain not only active drugs but also other ingredients included for a variety of purposes and collectively known as excipients.(1) People who wish to avoid a specific substance because of an allergy or intolerance may ask a healthcare professional about the constituents of a medicine and whether an alternative is available. In a previous article we discussed the issues facing people who wish to avoid certain substances for religious or cultural reasons.(2) Here, we provide an overview of several dietary conditions and the pharmaceutical issues that need to be considered by healthcare professionals advising on the suitability of a medicine. PMID:27516168

  17. [Food allergy or food intolerance?].

    PubMed

    Maître, S; Maniu, C-M; Buss, G; Maillard, M H; Spertini, F; Ribi, C

    2014-04-16

    Adverse food reactions can be classified into two main categories depending on wether an immune mechanism is involved or not. The first category includes immune mediated reactions like IgE mediated food allergy, eosinophilic oesophagitis, food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and celiac disease. The second category implies non-immune mediated adverse food reactions, also called food intolerances. Intoxications, pharmacologic reactions, metabolic reactions, physiologic, psychologic or reactions with an unknown mechanism belong to this category. We present a classification of adverse food reactions based on the pathophysiologic mechanism that can be useful for both diagnostic approach and management.

  18. Exploring the acidotolerance of beta-galactosidase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus: an attractive enzyme for lactose bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Rhimi, Moez; Aghajari, Nushin; Jaouadi, Bassem; Juy, Michel; Boudebbouze, Samira; Maguin, Emmanuelle; Haser, Richard; Bejar, Samir

    2009-12-01

    The LacZ gene encoding beta-galactosidase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 (L. bulgaricus) was cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli, followed by purification and characterization of the protein. The recombinant enzyme was shown to be a homotetramer and could be distinguished from homologues by its relatively low and broad optimal temperature range, from 35 to 50 degrees C, coupled with an optimal pH of 5.0-5.5. Remarkably, the E491A mutant showed the same optimal temperature, but displayed an optimal pH at 6.5-7.0. Whilst these beta-galactosidases are inhibited by Cu(2+) they require only 1mM Mn(2+) and 1mM Co(2+) for optimal activity and thermostability. The wild-type enzyme was remarkably stable at acid pH values when compared to mutant E491A. Kinetic studies demonstrated that the E491A mutation affected catalysis rather than enzyme affinity. Furthermore, the wild-type protein efficiently cleaved lactose extracted from whey; however, in milk the E491A mutant showed the highest lactose bioconversion rate. Thus, these enzymes are interesting at the industrial level for hydrolysis of lactose extracted from whey or milk, and thus could contribute to overcoming the lactose intolerance problem generated by milk products. PMID:19786095

  19. Diagnosing lactose malabsorption in children: difficulties in interpreting hydrogen breath test results.

    PubMed

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Entenmann, Andreas; Karall, Daniela; Müller, Thomas; Schimkowitsch, Alexander; Amann, Anton; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Lactose malabsorption (LM) is caused by insufficient enzymatic degradation of the disaccharide by intestinal lactase. Although hydrogen (H2) breath tests (HBTs) are routinely applied to diagnose LM, false-negative results are not uncommon. Thirty-two pediatric patients (19 females, 13 males) were included in this prospective study. After oral lactose administration (1 g kg(-1) bodyweight to a maximum of 25 g), breath H2 was measured by electrochemical detection. HBT was considered positive if H2 concentration exceeded an increase of  ⩾20 ppm from baseline. In addition to H2, exhaled methane (CH4), blood glucose concentrations and clinical symptoms (flatulence, abdominal pain, diarrhea) were monitored. A positive HBT indicating LM was found in 12/32 (37.5%) patients. Only five (41.7%, 5/12) of these had clinical symptoms during HBT indicating lactose intolerance (LI). Decreased blood glucose concentration increments (⩽20 mg dL(-1) (⩽1.1 mmol L(-1))) were found in 3/5 of these patients. CH4 concentrations  ⩾10 ppm at any time during the test were observed in 5/32 (15.6%) patients and in 9/32 (28.1%) between 1 ppm and 9 ppm above baseline after lactose ingestion. In patients with positive HBT 10/12 (83.3%) showed elevated CH4 (>1 ppm) above baseline in breath gas, whereas in patients with negative HBT this figure was only 4/17 (23.5%). In addition to determining H2 in exhaled air, documentation of clinical symptoms, measurement of blood glucose and breath CH4 concentrations may be helpful in deciding whether in a given case an HBT correctly identifies patients with clinically relevant LM.

  20. Diagnosing lactose malabsorption in children: difficulties in interpreting hydrogen breath test results.

    PubMed

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Entenmann, Andreas; Karall, Daniela; Müller, Thomas; Schimkowitsch, Alexander; Amann, Anton; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Lactose malabsorption (LM) is caused by insufficient enzymatic degradation of the disaccharide by intestinal lactase. Although hydrogen (H2) breath tests (HBTs) are routinely applied to diagnose LM, false-negative results are not uncommon. Thirty-two pediatric patients (19 females, 13 males) were included in this prospective study. After oral lactose administration (1 g kg(-1) bodyweight to a maximum of 25 g), breath H2 was measured by electrochemical detection. HBT was considered positive if H2 concentration exceeded an increase of  ⩾20 ppm from baseline. In addition to H2, exhaled methane (CH4), blood glucose concentrations and clinical symptoms (flatulence, abdominal pain, diarrhea) were monitored. A positive HBT indicating LM was found in 12/32 (37.5%) patients. Only five (41.7%, 5/12) of these had clinical symptoms during HBT indicating lactose intolerance (LI). Decreased blood glucose concentration increments (⩽20 mg dL(-1) (⩽1.1 mmol L(-1))) were found in 3/5 of these patients. CH4 concentrations  ⩾10 ppm at any time during the test were observed in 5/32 (15.6%) patients and in 9/32 (28.1%) between 1 ppm and 9 ppm above baseline after lactose ingestion. In patients with positive HBT 10/12 (83.3%) showed elevated CH4 (>1 ppm) above baseline in breath gas, whereas in patients with negative HBT this figure was only 4/17 (23.5%). In addition to determining H2 in exhaled air, documentation of clinical symptoms, measurement of blood glucose and breath CH4 concentrations may be helpful in deciding whether in a given case an HBT correctly identifies patients with clinically relevant LM. PMID:26934035

  1. Histamine, histamine intoxication and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovacova-Hanuskova, E; Buday, T; Gavliakova, S; Plevkova, J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of histamine in the body leads to miscellaneous symptoms mediated by its bond to corresponding receptors (H1-H4). Increased concentration of histamine in blood can occur in healthy individuals after ingestion of foods with high contents of histamine, leading to histamine intoxication. In individuals with histamine intolerance (HIT) ingestion of food with normal contents of histamine causes histamine-mediated symptoms. HIT is a pathological process, in which the enzymatic activity of histamine-degrading enzymes is decreased or inhibited and they are insufficient to inactivate histamine from food and to prevent its passage to blood-stream. Diagnosis of HIT is difficult. Multi-faced, non-specific clinical symptoms provoked by certain kinds of foods, beverages and drugs are often attributed to different diseases, such as allergy and food intolerance, mastocytosis, psychosomatic diseases, anorexia nervosa or adverse drug reactions. Correct diagnosis of HIT followed by therapy based on histamine-free diet and supplementation of diamine oxidase can improve patient's quality of life.

  2. Bistability of the lac operon during growth of Escherichia coli on lactose and lactose+glucose.

    PubMed

    Narang, Atul; Pilyugin, Sergei S

    2008-05-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli can exhibit bistability. Early studies showed that bistability occurs during growth on TMG/succinate and lactose+glucose, but not during growth on lactose. More recently, studies with lacGFP-transfected cells show bistability during growth on TMG/succinate, but not during growth on lactose and lactose+glucose. In the literature, these results are invariably attributed to variations in the destabilizing effect of the positive feedback generated by induction. Specifically, during growth on TMG/succinate, lac induction generates strong positive feedback because the permease stimulates the accumulation of intracellular TMG, which in turn, promotes the synthesis of even more permease. This positive feedback is attenuated during growth on lactose because hydrolysis of intracellular lactose by beta-galactosidase suppresses the stimulatory effect of the permease. It is attenuated even more during growth on lactose + glucose because glucose inhibits the uptake of lactose. But it is clear that the stabilizing effect of dilution also changes dramatically as a function of the medium composition. For instance, during growth on TMG/succinate, the dilution rate of lac permease is proportional to its activity, e, because the specific growth rate is independent of e (it is completely determined by the concentration of succinate). However, during growth on lactose, the dilution rate of the permease is proportional to e2 because the specific growth rate is proportional to the specific lactose uptake rate, which in turn, proportional to e. We show that: (a) This dependence on e2 creates such a strong stabilizing effect that bistability is virtually impossible during growth on lactose, even in the face of the intense positive feedback generated by induction. (b) This stabilizing effect is weakened during growth on lactose+glucose because the specific growth rate on glucose is independent of e, so that the dilution rate once again contains a term that

  3. Worry, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Statistics Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a problem for most graduate students. This study investigates the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry, and statistics anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty was significantly related to worry, and worry was significantly related to three types of statistics anxiety. Six types of statistics anxiety were…

  4. Lactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Pathanibul, Panchalee; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-09-20

    Lactose is an inevitable byproduct of the dairy industry. In addition to cheese manufacturing, the growing Greek yogurt industry generates excess acid whey, which contains lactose. Therefore, rapid and efficient conversion of lactose to fuels and chemicals would be useful for recycling the otherwise harmful acid whey. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a popular metabolic engineering host, cannot natively utilize lactose. However, we discovered that an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (EJ2) capable of fermenting cellobiose can also ferment lactose. This finding suggests that a cellobiose transporter (CDT-1) can transport lactose and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1) can hydrolyze lactose by acting as a β-galactosidase. While the lactose fermentation by the EJ2 strain was much slower than the cellobiose fermentation, a faster lactose-fermenting strain (EJ2e8) was obtained through serial subcultures on lactose. The EJ2e8 strain fermented lactose with a consumption rate of 2.16g/Lh. The improved lactose fermentation by the EJ2e8 strain was due to the increased copy number of cdt-1 and gh1-1 genes. Looking ahead, the EJ2e8 strain could be exploited for the production of other non-ethanol fuels and chemicals from lactose through further metabolic engineering. PMID:27457698

  5. cAMP Regulation of the lactose operon.

    PubMed

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2004-05-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: lactose operon, adenylate cyclase, cAMP, catabolite activator protein (CAP), expression plasmid, lac operator, lac repressor, lactose, glucose, promoter, cis- and trans-acting factors. PMID:21706723

  6. Space Flight Orthostatic Intolerance Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luty, Wei

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes investigations conducted on different orthostatic intolerance protection garments. This paper emphasizes on the engineering and operational aspects of the project. The current Shuttle pneumatic Anti-G Suit or AGS at 25 mmHg (0.5 psi) and customized medical mechanical compressive garments (20-30 mmHg) were tested on human subjects. The test process is presented. The preliminary results conclude that mechanical compressive garments can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension in hypovolemic subjects. A mechanical compressive garment is light, small and works without external pressure gas source; however the current garment design does not provide an adjustment to compensate for the loss of mass and size in the lower torso during long term space missions. It is also difficult to don. Compression garments that do not include an abdominal component are less effective countermeasures than garments which do. An early investigation conducted by the Human Adaptation and Countermeasures Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) has shown there is no significant difference between the protection function of the AGS (at 77 mmHg or 1.5 psi) and the Russian anti-g suit, Kentavr (at 25 mmHg or 0.5 psi). Although both garments successfully countered hypovolemia-induced orthostatic intolerance, the Kentavr provided protection by using lower levels of compression pressure. This more recent study with a lower AGS pressure shows that pressures at 20-30 mmHg is acceptable but protection function is not as effective as higher pressure. In addition, a questionnaire survey with flight crewmembers who used both AGS and Kentavr during different missions was also performed.

  7. Moisture sorption, compressibility and caking of lactose polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Listiohadi, Y; Hourigan, J A; Sleigh, R W; Steele, R J

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct storage studies on the moisture sorption and caking properties of lactose powder containing different polymorphs (i.e. alpha-monohydrate, alpha-anhydrous unstable, alpha-anhydrous stable, beta-anhydrous) and spray-dried lactose. The dry sample was compacted using a texture analyzer in paper cylinders and stored at relative humidity (RH) of 33%, 43%, 57% and 75% (25 degrees C, for 3 months). The samples were monitored for weight gain, moisture content, alpha/beta balance and hardness. A simple new method of powder compression for measuring the degree of hardness of caked lactose was developed using a texture analyzer. Clear distinctions were found in the storage behavior of the five different samples. Storage at various RHs caused severe caking to beta-lactose anhydrous and spray-dried lactose. The beta-lactose anhydrous was hygroscopic at 75% RH. The spray-dried lactose, which contained some amorphous lactose, was hygroscopic at all RHs studied. Its moisture sorption behavior differed from that of its major component, alpha-lactose monohydrate, by initially absorbing moisture then desorbing. alpha-Lactose monohydrate was less hygroscopic at 75% RH and it formed friable cakes. The alpha-lactose anhydrous stable was hygroscopic at 75% RH and initially formed hard cakes which became friable during storage. The unstable form of anhydrous alpha-lactose was hygroscopic at all levels of RH studied but did not cake. PMID:18485633

  8. Determination of lactose by an enzymatic method.

    PubMed

    Kleyn, D H

    1985-10-01

    The general methodology used for the determination of lactose in milk is considered, namely, polarimetry, gravimetry, infrared, colorimetry, gas-liquid chromatography, and high pressure liquid chromatography. The criteria for selecting an ideal analytical method followed by the relevance of most of these criteria in enzymatic methodology are discussed. The principle of the Boehringer-Mannheim method is presented, i.e., lactose is hydrolyzed to glucose and beta-galactose in the presence of beta-galactosidase and water. beta-Galactose is then oxidized by nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide to galactonic acid in the presence of beta-galactose dehydrogenase. The amount of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide formed is stoichiometric with the amount of lactose and is measured at 340 nm in a spectrophotometer possessing a slit width of less than or equal to 10 nm. The results of a recent Association of Official Analytical Chemists collaborative study of the B-M method are presented. From the overall mean of results on all samples, determinations by the enzymatic method averaged .49% lower than by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists gravimetric method. Standard deviations were similar for three sets of blind duplicates, which ranged between 3.67 and 4.55% lactose. F-Values revealed that variations between means obtained by laboratories differed significantly as compared with variations within laboratory means. The method has received Official First Action recognition by Association of Official Analytical Chemists.

  9. Analyzing phylogenetic trees with timed and probabilistic model checking: the lactose persistence case study.

    PubMed

    Requeno, José Ignacio; Colom, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Model checking is a generic verification technique that allows the phylogeneticist to focus on models and specifications instead of on implementation issues. Phylogenetic trees are considered as transition systems over which we interrogate phylogenetic questions written as formulas of temporal logic. Nonetheless, standard logics become insufficient for certain practices of phylogenetic analysis since they do not allow the inclusion of explicit time and probabilities. The aim of this paper is to extend the application of model checking techniques beyond qualitative phylogenetic properties and adapt the existing logical extensions and tools to the field of phylogeny. The introduction of time and probabilities in phylogenetic specifications is motivated by the study of a real example: the analysis of the ratio of lactose intolerance in some populations and the date of appearance of this phenotype. PMID:25339082

  10. Mechanisms of post-flight orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. G.; Buckey, J. C.; Gaffney, F. A.; Lane, L. D.; Levine, B. D.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Post-flight orthostatic intolerance is a dramatic physiological consequence of human adaptation to microgravity made inappropriate by a sudden return to 1-G. The immediate mechanism is almost always a failure to maintain adequate tissue perfusion, specifically perfusion of the central nervous system, but vestibular dysfunction may occasionally be the primary cause. Orthostatic intolerance is present in a wide range of clinical disorders of the nervous and cardiovascular systems. The intolerance that is produced by spaceflight and 1-G analogs (bed rest, head-down tilt at a moderate angle, water immersion) is different from its clinical counterparts by being only transiently present in subjects who otherwise have normal cardiovascular and regulatory systems. However, the same set of basic pathophysiological elements should be considered in the analysis of any form of orthostatic intolerance.

  11. Water-lactose behavior as a function of concentration and presence of lactic acid in lactose model systems.

    PubMed

    Wijayasinghe, Rangani; Vasiljevic, Todor; Chandrapala, Jayani

    2015-12-01

    The presence of high amounts of lactic acid in acid whey restricts its ability to be further processed because lactose appears to remain in its amorphous form. A systematic study is lacking in this regard especially during the concentration step. Hence, the main aim of the study was to establish the structure and behavior of water molecules surrounding lactose in the presence of 1% (wt/wt) lactic acid at a concentration up to 50% (wt/wt). Furthermore, the crystallization nature of freeze-dried lactose with or without lactic acid was established using differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Two mechanisms were proposed to describe the behavior of water molecules around lactose molecules during the concentration of pure lactose and lactose solutions with lactic acid. Pure lactose solution exhibited a water evaporation enthalpy of ~679 J·g(-1), whereas lactose+ lactic acid solution resulted in ~965 J·g(-1) at a 50% (wt/wt) concentration. This indicates a greater energy requirement for water removal around lactose in the presence of lactic acid. Higher crystallization temperatures were observed with the presence of lactic acid, indicating a delay in crystallization. Furthermore, less crystalline lactose (~12%) was obtained in the presence of lactic acid, indicating high amorphous nature compared with pure lactose where ~50% crystallinity was obtained. The Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed that the strong hydration layer consisting lactic acid and H3O(+) ions surrounded lactose molecules via strong H bonds, which restricted water mobility, induced a change in structure of lactose, or both, creating unfavorable conditions for lactose crystallization. Thus, partial or complete removal of lactic acid from acid whey may be the first step toward improving the ability of acid whey to be processed. PMID:26476948

  12. Water-lactose behavior as a function of concentration and presence of lactic acid in lactose model systems.

    PubMed

    Wijayasinghe, Rangani; Vasiljevic, Todor; Chandrapala, Jayani

    2015-12-01

    The presence of high amounts of lactic acid in acid whey restricts its ability to be further processed because lactose appears to remain in its amorphous form. A systematic study is lacking in this regard especially during the concentration step. Hence, the main aim of the study was to establish the structure and behavior of water molecules surrounding lactose in the presence of 1% (wt/wt) lactic acid at a concentration up to 50% (wt/wt). Furthermore, the crystallization nature of freeze-dried lactose with or without lactic acid was established using differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Two mechanisms were proposed to describe the behavior of water molecules around lactose molecules during the concentration of pure lactose and lactose solutions with lactic acid. Pure lactose solution exhibited a water evaporation enthalpy of ~679 J·g(-1), whereas lactose+ lactic acid solution resulted in ~965 J·g(-1) at a 50% (wt/wt) concentration. This indicates a greater energy requirement for water removal around lactose in the presence of lactic acid. Higher crystallization temperatures were observed with the presence of lactic acid, indicating a delay in crystallization. Furthermore, less crystalline lactose (~12%) was obtained in the presence of lactic acid, indicating high amorphous nature compared with pure lactose where ~50% crystallinity was obtained. The Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed that the strong hydration layer consisting lactic acid and H3O(+) ions surrounded lactose molecules via strong H bonds, which restricted water mobility, induced a change in structure of lactose, or both, creating unfavorable conditions for lactose crystallization. Thus, partial or complete removal of lactic acid from acid whey may be the first step toward improving the ability of acid whey to be processed.

  13. Yeasts that utilize lactose in sweet whey

    SciTech Connect

    Gholson, J.H.; Gough, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Since processing costs are usually higher for whey than for other available food or feed nutrients, only about one-third of whey produced in the US is used by food and feed industries. As a result whey disposal costs are a problem. Further; when whey is disposed of through municipal sewerage systems, the lactose present is changed by bacteria to lactic acid which tends to act as a preservative and retards further oxidation of whey constituents. This article describes a method of utilizing lactose-fermenting yeasts to produce large quantities of yeast cells, single-cell protein. Kluveromyces fragilis was found to be the most effective yeast species and the yeast cells produced could be used as a natural food or feed additive. Results of this study determined that certain methods and yeast strains could reduce whey-related pollution and thus help reduce costs of whey disposal.

  14. Construction of lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose fermentation into ethanol fuel.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Guo, Xuewu; Shen, Tong; Dong, Jian; Zhang, Cuiying; Xiao, Dongguang

    2013-04-01

    Two lactose-consuming diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, AY-51024A and AY-51024M, were constructed by expressing the LAC4 and LAC12 genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus in the host strain AY-5. In AY-51024A, both genes were targeted to the ATH1 and NTH1 gene-encoding regions to abolish the activity of acid/neutral trehalase. In AY-51024M, both genes were respectively integrated into the MIG1 and NTH1 gene-encoding regions to relieve glucose repression. Physiologic studies of the two transformants under anaerobic cultivations in glucose and galactose media indicated that the expression of both LAC genes did not physiologically burden the cells, except for AY-51024A in glucose medium. Galactose consumption was initiated at higher glucose concentrations in the MIG1 deletion strain AY-51024M than in the corresponding wild-type strain and AY-51024A, wherein galactose was consumed until glucose was completely depleted in the mixture. In lactose medium, the Sp. growth rates of AY-51024A and AY-51024M under anaerobic shake-flasks were 0.025 and 0.067 h(-1), respectively. The specific lactose uptake rate and ethanol production of AY-51024M were 2.50 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1) and 23.4 g l(-1), respectively, whereas those of AY-51024A were 0.98 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1) and 24.3 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1), respectively. In concentrated cheese whey powder solutions, AY-51024M produced 63.3 g l(-1) ethanol from approximately 150 g l(-1) initial lactose in 120 h, conversely, AY-51024A consumed 63.7 % of the initial lactose and produced 35.9 g l(-1) ethanol. Therefore, relieving glucose repression is an effective strategy for constructing lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae.

  15. Lactose behaviour in the presence of lactic acid and calcium.

    PubMed

    Wijayasinghe, Rangani; Vasiljevic, Todor; Chandrapala, Jayani

    2016-08-01

    Physical properties of lactose appeared influenced by presence of lactic acid in the system. Some other components such as Ca may further attenuate lactose behaviour and impact its phase transition. A model-based study was thus implemented with varying concentrations of Ca (0·12, 0·072 or 0·035% w/w) and lactic acid (0·05, 0·2, 0·4 or 1% w/w) in establishing the effects of these two main acid whey constituents on lactose phase behaviour. Concentrated solutions (50% w/w) containing lactose, lactic acid and Ca were analysed for thermal behaviour and structural changes by Differential Scanning Colorimetry (DSC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. Presence of 1% (w/w) lactic acid and 0·12% (w/w) Ca in lactose solution significantly increased the evaporation enthalpy of water, delayed and increased the energy required for lactose crystallisation as compared to pure lactose. FTIR analysis indicated a strong hydration layer surrounding lactose molecules, restricting water mobility and/or inducing structural changes of lactose, hindering its crystallisation. The formation of calcium lactate, which restricts the diffusion of lactose molecules, is also partly responsible. It appears that Ca removal from acid whey may be a necessary step in improving the processability of acid whey. PMID:27600977

  16. Lactose in dairy ingredients: Effect on processing and storage stability.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, Thom; Gazi, Inge

    2016-08-01

    Lactose is the main carbohydrate in the milk of most species. It is present in virtually all dry dairy ingredients, with levels ranging from <2% (e.g., caseinates, milk protein isolates) to 100% in lactose powders. The presence of lactose has a strong effect on ingredient processing and stability. Lactose can negatively influence powder properties and lead to undesirable effects, such as the stickiness of powder resulting in fouling during drying, or caking and related phenomena during storage. In addition, being a reducing carbohydrate, lactose can also participate in the Maillard reaction with free amino groups of proteins, peptides, and free AA. In this review, the influence of the presence (or absence) of lactose on physiochemical properties of dairy ingredients is reviewed, with particular emphasis on behavior during processing and storage. Particularly important features in this respect are whether lactose is in the (glassy) amorphous phase or in the crystalline phase, which is strongly affected by precrystallization conditions (e.g., in lactose, permeate, and whey powders) and by drying conditions. Furthermore, the moisture content and water activity of the ingredients are important parameters to consider, as they determine both mobility and reactivity, influencing Maillard reactions and concomitant browning, the crystallization of amorphous lactose during storage of dairy ingredients, glass transitions temperatures, and associated stickiness and caking phenomena. For the stickiness and caking, a crucial aspect to take into account is powder particle surface composition in relation to the bulk powder. Lactose is typically underrepresented at the powder surface, as a result of which deviations between observed lactose-induced caking and stickiness temperatures, and determined glass transition temperatures arise. By considering lactose as an integral part of ingredient composition along with all other compositional and environmental properties, lactose

  17. Lactose uptake driven by galactose efflux in Streptococcus thermophilus: Evidence for a galactose-lactose antiporter

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.W.; Ponne, C. )

    1991-04-01

    Galactose-nonfermenting (Gal{sup {minus}}) Streptococcus thermophilus TS2 releases galactose into the extracellular medium when grown in medium containing excess lactose. Starved and de-energized Gal{sup {minus}} cells, however, could be loaded with galactose to levels approximately equal to the extracellular concentration (0 to 50 mM). When loaded cells were separated from the medium and resuspended in fresh broth containing 5 mM lactose, galactose efflux occurred. De-energized, galactose-loaded cells, resuspended in buffer or medium, accumulated ({sup 14}C)lactose at a greater rate and to significantly higher intracellular concentrations than unloaded cells. Uptake of lactose by loaded cells was inhibited more than that by unloaded cells in the presence of extracellular galactose, indicating that a galactose gradient was involved in the exchange system. When de-energized, galactose-loaded cells were resuspended in carbohydrate-free medium at pH 6.7, a proton motive force ({Delta}p) of 86 to 90 mV was formed, whereas de-energized, nonloaded cells maintained a {Delta}p of about 56 mV. However, uptake of lactose by loaded cells occurred when the proton motive force was abolished by the addition of an uncoupler or in the presence of a proton-translocating ATPase inhibitor. These results support the hypothesis that galactose efflux in Gal{sup {minus}} S. thermophilus is electrogenic and that the exchange reaction (lactose uptake and galactose efflux) probably occurs via an antiporter system.

  18. High liver glycogen in hereditary fructose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Cain, A. R. R.; Ryman, Brenda E.

    1971-01-01

    A case of hereditary fructose intolerance is reported in a girl aged 2 years at the time of her death. She had apparently progressed normally until the age of 14 months. At 19 months she was admitted to hospital with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and superficial infections. Investigations revealed hypoglycaemia, persistent acidosis, aminoaciduria, and a high liver glycogen level which suggested that she had glycogen storage disease. There was also some evidence of malabsorption. At necropsy the liver enzyme estimations showed that fructose 1-phosphate aldolase activity was absent and that fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activity was reduced. Hereditary fructose intolerance and glycogen storage disease have been confused in the past on clinical grounds, but a high liver glycogen level has not previously been reported in hereditary fructose intolerance. PMID:5289293

  19. Lactobezoar and cows' milk protein intolerance.

    PubMed

    Lemoh, J N; Watt, J

    1980-02-01

    A baby girl of an atopic family who developed eczema, asthma, and cows' milk protein intolerance was found to have a gastric lactobezoar at age 9 1/2 months. She responded well to the removal of the bezoar and to the appropriate dietary treatment.

  20. Lactobezoar and cows' milk protein intolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Lemoh, J N; Watt, J

    1980-01-01

    A baby girl of an atopic family who developed eczema, asthma, and cows' milk protein intolerance was found to have a gastric lactobezoar at age 9 1/2 months. She responded well to the removal of the bezoar and to the appropriate dietary treatment. Images Figure PMID:7189657

  1. Tolerance and Intolerance in Multicultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heslep, Robert D.

    This essay argues that some proponents of multicultural education (ME) appear to teach intolerance of certain kinds of speech. The essay argues, in support, the down-playing of tolerance in ME as cultural respect, accommodation, and harmony are stronger candidates as virtues. The essay goes on to point out that ME does not teach cultural…

  2. A Radiochemical Biotechnological Approach: Preliminary Study of Lactose Uptake Rate by Kefir Cells, Using {sup 14}C-labeled Lactose, in Anaerobic Fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Golfinopoulos, A.; Soupioni, M.; Kanellaki, M.; Koutinas, A. A.

    2008-08-14

    The effect of initial lactose concentration on lactose uptake rate by kefir free cells, during the lactose fermentation, was studied in this work. For the investigation {sup 14}C-labelled lactose was used due to the fact that labeled and unlabeled molecules are fermented in the same way. The results illustrated lactose uptake rates are about up to two fold higher at lower initial (convolution sign)Be densities as compared with higher initial (convolution sign)Be densities.

  3. A Radiochemical Biotechnological Approach: Preliminary Study of Lactose Uptake Rate by Kefir Cells, Using 14C-labeled Lactose, in Anaerobic Fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfinopoulos, A.; Soupioni, M.; Kanellaki, M.; Koutinas, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of initial lactose concentration on lactose uptake rate by kefir free cells, during the lactose fermentation, was studied in this work. For the investigation 14C-labelled lactose was used due to the fact that labeled and unlabeled molecules are fermented in the same way. The results illustrated lactose uptake rates are about up to two fold higher at lower initial ∘Bé densities as compared with higher initial ∘Bé densities.

  4. Hydrolysis of whey lactose using CTAB-permeabilized yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Panesar, Parmjit S; Bera, Manav B; Kumar, Harish

    2009-01-01

    Disposal of lactose in whey and whey permeates is one of the most significant problems with regard to economics and environmental impact faced by the dairy industries. The enzymatic hydrolysis of whey lactose to glucose and galactose by beta-galactosidase constitutes the basis of the most biotechnological processes currently developed to exploit the sugar content of whey. Keeping this in view, lactose hydrolysis in whey was performed using CTAB permeabilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells. Permeabilization of K. marxianus cells in relation to beta-galactosidase activity was carried out using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) to avoid the problem of enzyme extraction. Different process parameters (biomass load, pH, temperature, and incubation time) were optimized to enhance the lactose hydrolysis in whey. Maximum hydrolysis (90.5%) of whey lactose was observed with 200 mg DW yeast biomass after 90 min of incubation period at optimum pH of 6.5 and temperature of 40 degrees C.

  5. Binding-protein-dependent lactose transport in Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, J A; Cornish, A; Jones, C W

    1990-04-01

    Agrobacterium radiobacter NCIB 11883 was grown in lactose-limited continuous culture at a dilution rate of 0.045/h. Washed cells transported [14C]lactose and [methyl-14C]beta-D-thiogalactoside, a nonmetabolisable analog of lactose, at similar rates and with similar affinities (Km for transport, less than 1 microM). Transport was inhibited to various extents by the uncoupling agent carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, by unlabeled beta-galactosides and D-galactose, and by osmotic shock. The accumulation ratio for methyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside was greater than or equal to 4,100. An abundant protein (molecular weight, 41,000) was purified from osmotic-shock fluid and shown by equilibrium dialysis to bind lactose and methyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside, the former with very high affinity (binding constant, 0.14 microM). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this lactose-binding protein exhibited some homology with several other sugar-binding proteins from bacteria. Antiserum raised against the lactose-binding protein did not cross-react with two glucose-binding proteins from A. radiobacter or with extracts of other bacteria grown under lactose limitation. Lactose transport and beta-galactosidase were induced in batch cultures by lactose, melibiose [O-alpha-D-galactoside-(1----6)alpha-D-glucose], and isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside and were subject to catabolite repression by glucose, galactose, and succinate which was not alleviated by cyclic AMP. We conclude that lactose is transported into A. radiobacter via a binding protein-dependent active transport system (in contrast to the H+ symport and phosphotransferase systems found in other bacteria) and that the expression of this transport system is closely linked to that of beta-galactosidase.

  6. Systems analysis of lactose metabolism in Trichoderma reesei identifies a lactose permease that is essential for cellulase induction.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Christa; Bååth, Jenny A; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma reesei colonizes predecayed wood in nature and metabolizes cellulose and hemicellulose from the plant biomass. The respective enzymes are industrially produced for application in the biofuel and biorefinery industry. However, these enzymes are also induced in the presence of lactose (1,4-0-ß-d-galactopyranosyl-d-glucose), a waste product from cheese manufacture or whey processing industries. In fact, lactose is the only soluble carbon source that induces these enzymes in T. reesei on an industrial level but the reason for this unique phenomenon is not understood. To answer this question, we used systems analysis of the T. reesei transcriptome during utilization of lactose. We found that the respective CAZome encoded all glycosyl hydrolases necessary for cellulose degradation and particularly for the attack of monocotyledon xyloglucan, from which ß-galactosides could be released that may act as the inducers of T. reesei's cellulases and hemicellulases. In addition, lactose also induces a high number of putative transporters of the major facilitator superfamily. Deletion of fourteen of them identified one gene that is essential for lactose utilization and lactose uptake, and for cellulase induction by lactose (but not sophorose) in pregrown mycelia of T. reesei. These data shed new light on the mechanism by which T. reesei metabolizes lactose and offers strategies for its improvement. They also illuminate the key role of ß-D-galactosides in habitat specificity of this fungus. PMID:23690947

  7. Systems analysis of lactose metabolism in Trichoderma reesei identifies a lactose permease that is essential for cellulase induction.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Christa; Bååth, Jenny A; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma reesei colonizes predecayed wood in nature and metabolizes cellulose and hemicellulose from the plant biomass. The respective enzymes are industrially produced for application in the biofuel and biorefinery industry. However, these enzymes are also induced in the presence of lactose (1,4-0-ß-d-galactopyranosyl-d-glucose), a waste product from cheese manufacture or whey processing industries. In fact, lactose is the only soluble carbon source that induces these enzymes in T. reesei on an industrial level but the reason for this unique phenomenon is not understood. To answer this question, we used systems analysis of the T. reesei transcriptome during utilization of lactose. We found that the respective CAZome encoded all glycosyl hydrolases necessary for cellulose degradation and particularly for the attack of monocotyledon xyloglucan, from which ß-galactosides could be released that may act as the inducers of T. reesei's cellulases and hemicellulases. In addition, lactose also induces a high number of putative transporters of the major facilitator superfamily. Deletion of fourteen of them identified one gene that is essential for lactose utilization and lactose uptake, and for cellulase induction by lactose (but not sophorose) in pregrown mycelia of T. reesei. These data shed new light on the mechanism by which T. reesei metabolizes lactose and offers strategies for its improvement. They also illuminate the key role of ß-D-galactosides in habitat specificity of this fungus.

  8. Mutarotational kinetics and glass transition of lactose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Ronan; Caron, Vincent; Willart, Jean-François; Descamps, Marc

    2006-11-01

    We report for the first time real time in situ and quantitative measurements of the mutarotation reaction of lactose in the solid state. The experiments have been performed by 13C NMR. We show that mutarotation is initiated on heating the amorphous state, and reaches chemical equilibrium close above the glass transition temperature Tg. We do not observe this transformation when starting from stable crystalline states. The final ratio of α and β anomers is 1:1, which suggests that the energy profile of the mutarotation reaction pathway in the solid state is actually different from the mechanism proposed for aqueous solution. This chemical equipartition is reached before the crystallization into the corresponding 1:1 molecular compound. These new data clearly illustrate the interrelation between the chemical molecular properties, the physical state of the material, and the relaxational dynamics of the glass.

  9. The biochemical basis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bouteldja, Nadia; Timson, David J

    2010-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare, but potentially lethal, inherited disorder of fructose metabolism, caused by mutation of the aldolase B gene. Treatment currently relies solely on dietary restriction of problematic sugars. Biochemical study of defective aldolase B enzymes is key to revealing the molecular basis of the disease and providing a stronger basis for improved treatment and diagnosis. Such studies have revealed changes in enzyme activity, stability and oligomerisation. However, linking these changes to disease phenotypes has not always been straightforward. This review gives a general overview of the features of hereditary fructose intolerance, then concentrates on the biochemistry of the AP variant (Ala149Pro variant of aldolase B) and molecular pathological consequences of mutation of the aldolase B gene.

  10. Orthostatic intolerance: a disorder of young women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Y. S.; Daamen, N.; Jacob, G.; Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a cause of significant disability in otherwise healthy women seen by gynecologists. Orthostatic tachycardia is often the most obvious hemodynamic abnormality found in OI patients, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety, and, in some cases, fainting (syncope). It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension, and patients with OI are traditionally women of childbearing age. Estimates suggest that at least 500,000 Americans suffer from some form of OI, and such patients comprise the largest group referred to centers specialized in autonomic disorders. This article reviews recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to orthostatic intolerance, and therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients.

  11. Intolerance to food additives - does it exist?

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul J; Kemp, Andrew S

    2012-02-01

    'Food intolerance' is often confused with a range of adverse symptoms which may be coincidental to ingestion of food. 'Food intolerance' is defined as a reaction in which symptoms must be objectively reproducible and not known to involve an immunological mechanism. A more precise term is non-allergic food hypersensitivity, which contrasts with food allergies which are due to an immunological mechanism. Some children will experience food reactions to food additives. Reported symptoms range from urticaria/angioedema to hyperactive behaviours. While parents/carers report that over one fifth of children experience of food reaction, only 1 in 20 of these are confirmed to have a non-allergic food hypersensitivity on testing.

  12. [Ocular intolerance to antiglaucoma medications is underestimated].

    PubMed

    Bresson-Dumont, H

    2010-01-01

    Since about 20 years, the large panel of the antiglaucoma eyedrops has drastically changed the management of glaucoma. Indications for filtering surgery had decreased in frequency. A great number of patients are controlled only by medications. However ocular intolerance and side effects have been reported until in 50% of the cases with 10% of severe manifestations of intolerance. Ocular side effects to topical medications may very often alter compliance. Ocular intolerance had been shown to be secondary to immunological mechanisms and direct or indirect toxicity. The immunological or allergic mechanisms are induced by a type I or IV hypersensibility and only represent 3% to 10% of all the side effects induced by topical medications. Toxic effect can be a direct through different mechanisms: pure toxic effect, acid pH, osmolarity of the solution, photosensibilisation. This will induce inflammatory reaction that will produce fibrosis in the long term. This toxic effect can be worsened by eye dryness or rosacea. Toxicity can also be indirect through an alteration of the conjunctival microbial flora and/or the lacrymal secretion. Concomitant obstruction of the lacrymal ducts may also contribute to this effect. These mechanisms could have been elucidated thank to histological studies from conjunctival mark, and more recently with confocal HRT, which gives an analysis of the ocular surface in vivo. Appropriate and early detection of intolerance to antiglaucoma medications is mandatory to adjust management strategies accordingly. These are based on the suppression or the reduction of conservative agents whenever possible, the use of fixed combinations, the reduction of the number of the instillations and the associated treatment of the ocular surface. PMID:21114054

  13. Seafood Allergy, Toxicity, and Intolerance: A Review.

    PubMed

    Prester, Ljerka

    2016-01-01

    Seafood allergies have been increasing their presence in the last 2 decades. Allergic reactions to seafood can range from mild urticarial and oral allergy syndrome to life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Ingestion of seafood infested with Anisakis larvae can cause a disease known as anisakiasis with symptoms similar to true seafood allergy. Furthermore, some adverse reactions to seafood including histamine fish poisoning (HFP), and intolerance to histamine can trigger clinical symptoms, which, although nonallergic in origin, are similar to true immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic reactions. Because seafood allergy usually remains a lifelong food allergy, this review focuses on the current knowledge on fish and shellfish allergens and emphasizes the importance of differentiating seafood allergy from other allergy-like reactions (anisakiasis, HFP, and intolerance to histamine). Key teaching points: • Fish and shellfish are potent allergens that can provoke serious IgE antibody-mediated adverse reactions in sensitive individuals. • Sensitization to seafood allergens can be achieved by ingestion, inhalation, or skin contact. • Shellfish major allergen, tropomyosin, shares significant homology to arthropods (dust mites and cockroaches). • Accidental exposures to seafood products cross-contaminated with fish or shellfish allergens (hidden allergens) during processing may present a health risk for sensitive individuals. • Allergens of fish parasite A. simplex present common hidden allergens in seafood, particularly in raw and undercooked home-made fish dishes. • Symptoms caused by HFP, histamine intolerance, and anisakiasis are similar to true seafood allergy.

  14. Idiopathic orthostatic intolerance and postural tachycardia syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Upright posture imposes a substantial gravitational stress on the body, for which we are able to compensate, in large part because of the autonomic nervous system. Alteration in autonomic function, therefore, may lead to orthostatic intolerance. On one extreme, patients with autonomic failure caused by degenerative loss of autonomic function are severely disabled by orthostatic hypotension and may faint whenever they stand up. Fortunately, such patients are relatively rare. On the other hand, disabling orthostatic intolerance can develop in otherwise normal young people. These patients can be severely impaired by symptoms of fatigue, tachycardia, and shortness of breath when they stand up. The actual incidence of this disorder is unknown, but these patients make up the largest group of patients referred to centers that specialize in autonomic disorders. We will review recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to orthostatic intolerance, therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients, and areas in which more research is needed.

  15. Construction of a flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting lactose.

    PubMed

    Domingues, L; Teixeira, J A; Lima, N

    1999-05-01

    A flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with the ability to express both the LAC4 (coding for beta-galactosidase) and LAC12 (coding for lactose permease) genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus was constructed. This recombinant strain is not only able to grow on lactose, but it can also ferment this substrate. To our knowledge this is the first time that a recombinant S. cervisiae has been found to ferment lactose in a way comparable to that of the existing lactose-fermenting yeast strains. Moreover, the flocculating capacity of the strain used in this work gives the process several advantages. On the one hand, it allows for operation in a continuous mode at high cell concentration, thus increasing the system's overall productivity; on the other hand, the biomass concentration in the effluent is reduced, thus decreasing product separation/purification costs. PMID:10390820

  16. Biomass and lipids from lactose or whey by Trichosporon beigelii

    SciTech Connect

    Tahoun, M.K.; El-Merheb, Z.; Salem, A.; Youssef, A.

    1987-02-20

    The yeast Trichosporon beigelii produced the highest amount of biomass when grown in chemical-defined medium with a ratio of carbon source to nitrogen source of 30:1. On the other hand, carbon-limited medium (C-N ratio 2:1) enhanced unsaturated fatty acids synthesis. The yeast efficiently converted unsalted whey lactose to biomass, while sodium chloride in whey raised lactose assimilation to single-cell oil (SCO). 20 references.

  17. Monoclonal antibody to an integral membrane protein, the lactose permease.

    PubMed

    Eash, J; Villarejo, M R

    1983-02-01

    A monoclonal IgG antibody directed against the lactose permease was produced from animals inoculated with membranes of a lac Y plasmid strain. The appropriate antibody was selected by a series of ELISA assays in which membranes, purified permease, or a lac Y-Z chimeric protein was the immobilized antigen. The antibody recognizes a portion of the permease exposed on the surface of membrane vesicles but does not inhibit lactose transport.

  18. Non responsive celiac disease due to coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bharadia, Lalit; Shivpuri, Deepak

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with several genetic disorders, but its association with hereditary fructose intolerance is rare. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare autosomal recessive disease of fructose metabolism presenting as vomiting after intake of fructose. An association between these two distinct genetic gastrointestinal disorders is important as treatment failure of celiac disease calls for careful evaluation for hereditary fructose intolerance. We report a patient with an association of these two disorders.

  19. Adaptation of Escherichia coli to glucose promotes evolvability in lactose.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kelly N; Castillo, Gerardo; Wünsche, Andrea; Cooper, Tim F

    2016-02-01

    The selective history of a population can influence its subsequent evolution, an effect known as historical contingency. We previously observed that five of six replicate populations that were evolved in a glucose-limited environment for 2000 generations, then switched to lactose for 1000 generations, had higher fitness increases in lactose than populations started directly from the ancestor. To test if selection in glucose systematically increased lactose evolvability, we started 12 replay populations--six from a population subsample and six from a single randomly selected clone--from each of the six glucose-evolved founder populations. These replay populations and 18 ancestral populations were evolved for 1000 generations in a lactose-limited environment. We found that replay populations were initially slightly less fit in lactose than the ancestor, but were more evolvable, in that they increased in fitness at a faster rate and to higher levels. This result indicates that evolution in the glucose environment resulted in genetic changes that increased the potential of genotypes to adapt to lactose. Genome sequencing identified four genes--iclR, nadR, spoT, and rbs--that were mutated in most glucose-evolved clones and are candidates for mediating increased evolvability. Our results demonstrate that short-term selective costs during selection in one environment can lead to changes in evolvability that confer longer term benefits. PMID:26748670

  20. Nutrition, population growth and disease: a short history of lactose.

    PubMed

    Brüssow, Harald

    2013-08-01

    Food and nutrition have played a crucial role in biological evolution. Lactation in mammals was one key invention. A central role in milk is played by lactose, otherwise an exotic sugar in nature. Lactose digestion needs the induction of specialized gut enzymes. This enzyme is shut off in a precisely timed developmental step leading to lactose malabsorption promoting weaning in the young and ovulation in the mother. The lactose-lactase system could thus regulate optimal birth spacing in land mammals. The domestication of cattle promoted milk as a food item also for adult nutrition. This was only possible by two further key inventions: the concomitant domestication of lactic acid bacteria which ferment the non-digestible lactose to the easily absorbed lactic acid and the mutation to lactase persistence (LP) in adults from dairy societies. This mutation represents one of the strongest selected loci of the human genome. Since no crucial nutritional selective advantage is conferred by LP, its dominance might be the result of indirect effects like the spread of cattle pathogens into humans. Lactase is also temporarily lost in rotavirus and Escherichia coli childhood diarrhoea and persistent diarrhoea is consequently best treated with lactose-free diets. PMID:23574334

  1. Nutrition, population growth and disease: a short history of lactose.

    PubMed

    Brüssow, Harald

    2013-08-01

    Food and nutrition have played a crucial role in biological evolution. Lactation in mammals was one key invention. A central role in milk is played by lactose, otherwise an exotic sugar in nature. Lactose digestion needs the induction of specialized gut enzymes. This enzyme is shut off in a precisely timed developmental step leading to lactose malabsorption promoting weaning in the young and ovulation in the mother. The lactose-lactase system could thus regulate optimal birth spacing in land mammals. The domestication of cattle promoted milk as a food item also for adult nutrition. This was only possible by two further key inventions: the concomitant domestication of lactic acid bacteria which ferment the non-digestible lactose to the easily absorbed lactic acid and the mutation to lactase persistence (LP) in adults from dairy societies. This mutation represents one of the strongest selected loci of the human genome. Since no crucial nutritional selective advantage is conferred by LP, its dominance might be the result of indirect effects like the spread of cattle pathogens into humans. Lactase is also temporarily lost in rotavirus and Escherichia coli childhood diarrhoea and persistent diarrhoea is consequently best treated with lactose-free diets.

  2. An assessment by the Statin Intolerance Panel: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R; Bays, Harold E; Grundy, Scott M; Jacobson, Terry A; The National Lipid Association Statin Intolerance Panel

    2014-01-01

    This article from the National Lipid Association Statin Intolerance Panel provides a framework for understanding statin intolerance and makes general recommendations for health professionals. For specific guidance on adverse events related to muscle, liver, cognition, and glucose metabolism, one should refer to the other reports of the Statin Safety Task Force for those topics. Although statin adverse effects rarely lead to permanent sequelae, symptomatic intolerance frequently hinders cardiovascular risk reduction by statins. We emphasize here the advisory role of the clinician helping each patient to make personal decisions on statin tolerability. We identify a pressing need for further research on statin intolerance and make suggestions for research design.

  3. Linking flowability and granulometry of lactose powders.

    PubMed

    Boschini, F; Delaval, V; Traina, K; Vandewalle, N; Lumay, G

    2015-10-15

    The flowing properties of 10 lactose powders commonly used in pharmaceutical industries have been analyzed with three recently improved measurement methods. The first method is based on the heap shape measurement. This straightforward measurement method provides two physical parameters (angle of repose αr and static cohesive index σr) allowing to make a first screening of the powder properties. The second method allows to estimate the rheological properties of a powder by analyzing the powder flow in a rotating drum. This more advanced method gives a large set of physical parameters (flowing angle αf, dynamic cohesive index σf, angle of first avalanche αa and powder aeration %ae) leading to deeper interpretations. The third method is an improvement of the classical bulk and tapped density measurements. In addition to the improvement of the measurement precision, the densification dynamics of the powder bulk submitted to taps is analyzed. The link between the macroscopic physical parameters obtained with these methods and the powder granulometry is analyzed. Moreover, the correlations between the different flowability indexes are discussed. Finally, the link between grain shape and flowability is discussed qualitatively.

  4. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  5. PROTON-COUPLED DYNAMICS IN LACTOSE PERMEASE

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Magnus; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Freites, J. Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J.; Kaback, H. Ronald; White, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY) catalyzes symport of a galactopyranoside and an H+ via an alternating access mechanism. The transition from an inward- to an outward-facing conformation of LacY involves sugar-release followed by deprotonation. Because the transition depends intimately upon the dynamics of LacY in a bilayer environment, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations may be the only means of following the accompanying structural changes in atomic detail. We describe here MD simulations of wild-type apo LacY in phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) lipids that features two protonation states of the critical Glu325. While the protonated system displays configurational stability, deprotonation of Glu325 causes significant structural rearrangements that bring into proximity sidechains important for H+ translocation and sugar binding and closes the internal cavity. Moreover, protonated LacY in phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids shows that the observed dynamics are lipid-dependent. Together, the simulations describe early dynamics of the inward-to-outward transition of LacY that agree well with experimental data. PMID:23000385

  6. The compelling anomaly of chemical intolerance.

    PubMed

    Miller, C S

    2001-03-01

    In science, anomalies expose the limitations of existing paradigms and drive the search for new ones. In the late 1800s, physicians observed that certain illnesses spread from sick, feverish individuals to those contacting them, paving the way for the germ theory of disease. The germ theory served as a crude, but elegant formulation that explained dozens of seemingly unrelated illnesses affecting literally every organ system. Today, we are witnessing another medical anomaly-a unique pattern of illness involving chemically exposed groups in more than a dozen countries, who subsequently report multisystem symptoms and new-onset chemical, food, and drug intolerances. These intolerances may be the hallmark for a new disease process or paradigm, just as fever is a hallmark for infection. The fact that diverse demographic groups, sharing little in common except some initial chemical exposure event, develop these intolerances is a compelling anomaly pointing to a possible new theory of disease, one that has been referred to as "Toxicant-Induced Loss of Tolerance" ("TILT"). TILT has the potential to explain certain cases of asthma, migraine headaches, and depression, as well as chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, and "Gulf War syndrome". It appears to evolve in two stages: (1) initiation, characterized by a profound breakdown in prior, natural tolerance resulting from either acute or chronic exposure to chemicals (pesticides, solvents, indoor air contaminants, etc.), followed by (2) triggering of symptoms by small quantities of previously tolerated chemicals (traffic exhaust, fragrances, gasoline), foods, drugs, and food/drug combinations (alcohol, caffeine). While the underlying dynamic remains an enigma, observations indicating that affected individuals respond to structurally unrelated drugs and experience cravings and withdrawal-like symptoms, paralleling drug addiction, suggest that multiple neurotransmitter pathways may be involved.

  7. Mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Wilson, Thad E; Crandall, Craig G

    2016-04-01

    Heat stress profoundly and unanimously reduces orthostatic tolerance. This review aims to provide an overview of the numerous and multifactorial mechanisms by which this occurs in humans. Potential causal factors include changes in arterial and venous vascular resistance and blood distribution, and the modulation of cardiac output, all of which contribute to the inability to maintain cerebral perfusion during heat and orthostatic stress. A number of countermeasures have been established to improve orthostatic tolerance during heat stress, which alleviate heat stress induced central hypovolemia (e.g., volume expansion) and/or increase peripheral vascular resistance (e.g., skin cooling). Unfortunately, these countermeasures can often be cumbersome to use with populations prone to syncopal episodes. Identifying the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in orthostatic intolerance during heat stress has proven elusive, but could provide greater insights into the development of novel and personalized countermeasures for maintaining or improving orthostatic tolerance during heat stress. This development will be especially impactful in occuational settings and clinical situations that present with orthostatic intolerance and/or central hypovolemia. Such investigations should be considered of vital importance given the impending increased incidence of heat events, and associated cardiovascular challenges that are predicted to occur with the ensuing changes in climate. PMID:26723547

  8. [Histamine intolerance--possible dermatologic sequences].

    PubMed

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Seserko, Ana; Duvancić, Tomislav; Situm, Mirna; Mihić, Josip

    2012-12-01

    Although histamine intolerance (HIT) is not very frequently encountered, it can have serious consequences. Food intolerance is a non allergic hypersensitivity to food that does not include the immune system even though the symptoms are similar to those of IgE-mediated allergic reactions. HIT apparently develops as a result of an impaired diamine oxidase (DAO) activity due to gastrointestinal disease or through DAO inhibition, as well as through a genetic predisposition which was proven in a number of patients. The intake of histamine-rich foods as well as alcohol or drugs which cause either the release of histamine or the blocking of DAO can lead to various disorders in many organs (gastrointestinal system, skin, lungs, cardiovascular system and brain), depending on the expression of histamine receptors. Dermatologic sequels can be rashes, itch, urticaria, angioedema, dermatitis, eczema and even acne, rosacea, psoriasis, and other. Recognizing the symptoms due to HIT is especially important in treating such patients. The significance of HIT in patients with atopic dermatitis in whom the benefit of a low histamine diet has been proven is becoming increasingly understood recently. Because of the possibility of symptoms affecting numerous organs, a detailed history of symptoms following the intake of histamine-rich foods or drugs that interfere with histamine metabolism is essential for making the diagnosis of HIT. Considering that such symptoms can be the result of multiple factors, the existence of HIT is usually underestimated, but considerable expectations are being made from future studies.

  9. [Intolerance to food additives: an update].

    PubMed

    Cardinale, F; Mangini, F; Berardi, M; Sterpeta Loffredo, M; Chinellato, I; Dellino, A; Cristofori, F; Di Domenico, F; Mastrototaro, M F; Cappiello, A; Centoducati, T; Carella, F; Armenio, L

    2008-12-01

    Contrary to common believing, the prevalence of the intolerance to food additives in the general population is rather low. Nowadays many doubts persist with regard both to the pathogenetic mechanisms and to the clinical and diagnostic aspects in this field. Symptoms due to, or exacerbated from, food additives usually involve non-IgE-mediate mechanisms (pseudo-allergic reactions, PAR) and are usually less severe of those induced by food allergy. The most frequent clinical feature of the intolerance to food additives still remains the urticaria-angioedema syndrome, although these substances are really involved only in a minority of patients. Other possible clinical features include anaphylaxis, atopic eczema, behaviour disturbances, asthma and non-allergic rhinitis. The diagnostic approach consists in diary cards, reporting symptoms and food habits, elimination diet and double blinded placebo-controlled oral challenge with suspected additives. However, such procedure still remains poorly standardized and numerous uncertainties persist with regard to optimal conditions for performing and interpret the challenge results. The therapeutic approach consists in the exclusion of foods and products containing the additive involved, and, in patients not compliant to the diet, in treatment with symptomatic drugs.

  10. Nutrient intake in lysinuric protein intolerance.

    PubMed

    Tanner, L M; Näntö-Salonen, K; Venetoklis, J; Kotilainen, S; Niinikoski, H; Huoponen, K; Simell, O

    2007-10-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defective transport of cationic amino acids. Poor intestinal absorption and increased renal loss of arginine, ornithine and lysine lead to low plasma concentrations of these amino acids and, subsequently, to impaired urea cycle function. The patients therefore have decreased nitrogen tolerance, which may lead to hyperammonaemia after ingestion of normal amounts of dietary protein. As a protective mechanism, most patients develop strong aversion to protein-rich foods early in life. Oral supplementation with citrulline, which is absorbed normally and metabolized to arginine and ornithine, improves protein tolerance to some extent, as do sodium benzoate and sodium phenylbutyrate also used by some patients. Despite effective prevention of hyperammonaemia, the patients still consume a very restricted diet, which may be deficient in energy, essential amino acids and some vitamins and minerals. To investigate the potential nutritional problems of patients with lysinuric protein intolerance, 77 three- to four-day food records of 28 Finnish LPI patients aged 1.5-61 years were analysed. The data suggest that the patients are clearly at risk for many nutritional deficiencies, which may contribute to their symptoms. Their diet is highly deficient in calcium, vitamin D, iron and zinc. Individualized nutritional supplementation accompanied by regular monitoring of dietary intake is therefore an essential part of the treatment of LPI. PMID:17588131

  11. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale for Children: A Psychometric Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Roy, Amy K.; Furr, Jami M.; Gotimer, Kristin; Beidas, Rinad S.; Dugas, Michel J.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has contributed to our understanding of excessive worry and adult anxiety disorders, but there is a paucity of research on IU in child samples. This gap is due to the absence of a psychometrically sound measure of IU in youth. The present study adapted parallel child- and parent-report forms of the Intolerance of…

  12. Intolerance of Uncertainty, Fear of Anxiety, and Adolescent Worry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugas, Michel J.; Laugesen, Nina; Bukowski, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertainty and worry in which change in one variable…

  13. Lactose particle engineering: Influence of ultrasound and anti-solvent on crystal habit and particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kougoulos, E.; Marziano, I.; Miller, P. R.

    2010-11-01

    This study focuses on ultrasound-assisted anti-solvent crystallization of lactose, expanding on previous studies and presenting, for the first time, the results of large scale implementation of sonocrystallization for lactose. The results further clarify the interplay between solution chemistry - namely the role of β-lactose - and crystallization, representing a step forward in the fine tuning of lactose properties for pharmaceutical manufacturing applications. Batches manufactured at laboratory and pilot scales were extensively characterised, including an approach for the quantification of β-lactose in α-lactose based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), which is described here.

  14. Estimation of the fraction of the lactose in a high lactose diet available for fermentation in the cecum and colon of the rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, K I; Benevenga, N J; Grummer, R H

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the amount of lactose which passed into the large intestine and the lactase activity in the small intestine of rats (200 g) fed a control diet or a diet containing 30% lactose. The fraction of lactose consumed in a single 1-hour meal that escaped hydrolysis in the small intestine was estimated by measuring the area under a smooth curve of a plot of lactose:marker ratio in the terminal ileum expressed as a fraction of intake, against the fraction of the total marker that passed into the large intestine. This amounted to approximately 30% and 31.5% of the lactose consumed for the rats fed the control and 30% lactose diets, respectively. In another experiment in which the rats were fed a diet containing 30% lactose and the Cr-EDTA marker ad libitum for 1 week, approximately 43% of the lactose consumed became available for fermentation in the large intestine. This work suggests that a substantial fraction of the lactose ingested is available for fermentation in the large intestine. The lactase activity of homogenates of the small intestine of rats fed the control or high lactose diet was 106 +/- 5 or 115 +/- 4 mg lactose/30 minutes/rat (P less than 0.05), respectively. The lactase activity in the small intestine homogenate (mucosa + contents) was significantly higher than that actually available in vivo (110 +/- 7 versus 69 +/- 4 mg/30 minutes/rat).

  15. Ontogeny of intestinal safety factors: lactase capacities and lactose loads.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, T P; Diamond, J

    1999-03-01

    We measured intestinal safety factors (ratio of a physiological capacity to the load on it) for lactose digestion in developing rat pups. Specifically, we assessed the quantitative relationships between lactose load and the series capacities of lactase and the Na+-glucose cotransporter (SGLT-1). Both capacities increased significantly with age in suckling pups as a result of increasing intestinal mass and maintenance of mass-specific activities. The youngest pups examined (5 days) had surprisingly high safety factors of 8-13 for both lactase and SGLT-1, possibly because milk contains lactase substrates other than lactose; it also, however, suggests that their intestinal capacities were being prepared to meet future demands rather than just current ones. By day 10 (and also at day 15), increased lactose loads resulted in lower safety factors of 4-6, values more typical of adult intestines. The safety factor of SGLT-1 in day 30 (weanling) and day 100 (adult) rats was only approximately 1.0. This was initially unexpected, because most adult intestines maintain a modest reserve capacity beyond nutrient load values, but postweaning rats appear to use hindgut fermentation, assessed by gut morphology and hydrogen production assays, as a built-in reserve capacity. The series capacities of lactase and SGLT-1 varied in concert with each other over ontogeny and as lactose load was manipulated by experimental variation in litter size.

  16. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  17. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, Vicki J.; Hutchison, Zoë L.; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  18. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  19. Crystallization of spray-dried lactose/protein mixtures in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawqi Barham, A.; Kamrul Haque, Md.; Roos, Yrjö H.; Kieran Hodnett, B.

    2006-10-01

    An in situ crystallization technique with X-ray diffraction analysis complemented by ex situ scanning electron microscopy and chromatographic analysis of the α/( α+ β) solid-state anomeric ratios has been developed to study the crystallization of lactose/protein mixtures in humid air. This technique was used to determine changes in phase composition and morphology during crystallization. Following an induction period during which water is sorbed, crystallization is rapid and the predominant phase observed using the in situ method in spray-dried lactose/sodium-caseinate, albumin and gelatin is α-lactose monohydrate. However, in the case of spray-dried lactose/whey protein isolate (WPI) the predominant phase that appears is the α/ β mixed phase with smaller amounts of α-lactose monohydrate. With pure lactose the α/ β mixed phase appears as a transient shortly after the onset of crystallization and α-lactose monohydrate and β-lactose both appear as stable crystalline phases at longer times. Another transient phase with 2 θ=12.2°, 20.7° and 21.8° was observed in spray-dried lactose/albumin. This phase decomposed as α-lactose monohydrate developed. Three phases seem to persist in the case of spray-dried lactose/gelatin, namely the phase with peaks at 2 θ=12.2°, 20.7° and 21.8°, α-lactose monohydrate and β-lactose for the duration of the in situ experiment.

  20. Selection and Neutrality in Lactose Operons of Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Dean, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    The kinetics of the permeases and β-galactosidases of six lactose operons which had been transduced into a common genetic background from natural isolates of Escherichia coli were investigated. The fitnesses conferred by the operons were determined using chemostat competition experiments in which lactose was the sole growth-limiting factor. The cell wall is demonstrated to impose a resistance to the diffusion of galactosides at low substrate concentrations. A steady state model of the flux of lactose through the metabolic pathway (diffusion, uptake and hydrolysis) is shown to be proportional to fitness. This metabolic model is used to explain why an approximately twofold range in activity among the permease alleles confers a 13% range in fitness, whereas a similar range in activity among alleles of the β-galactosidase confers a 0.5% range in fitness. This metabolic model implies that selection need not be maximized when a resource is scarce. PMID:2513251

  1. Use of lactose against the deadly biological toxin ricin.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, Takehiro; Uzawa, Hirotaka; Ohsawa, Isaac; Seto, Yasuo; Nishida, Yoshihiro

    2010-04-01

    Developing a technology for detecting and decontaminating biological toxins is needed. Ricin from Ricinus communis is a highly poisonous toxin; it was formerly used for an assassination in London and in postal attacks in the United States. Ricin is readily available from castor beans and could be used as a biological agent. We propose using glycotechnology against the illegal use of ricin. Lactose (a natural ligand of this toxin) was incorporated into polyacrylamide-based glycopolymers at variable sugar densities (18-100%) and evaluated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and the real agent, ricin. Glycopolymers (18-65% lactose densities) effectively interfered with the toxin-lactoside adhesion event (>99% efficiency within 20 min). This supported the notion of using the mammary sugar lactose against a deadly biological toxin.

  2. Use of lactose against the deadly biological toxin ricin.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, Takehiro; Uzawa, Hirotaka; Ohsawa, Isaac; Seto, Yasuo; Nishida, Yoshihiro

    2010-04-01

    Developing a technology for detecting and decontaminating biological toxins is needed. Ricin from Ricinus communis is a highly poisonous toxin; it was formerly used for an assassination in London and in postal attacks in the United States. Ricin is readily available from castor beans and could be used as a biological agent. We propose using glycotechnology against the illegal use of ricin. Lactose (a natural ligand of this toxin) was incorporated into polyacrylamide-based glycopolymers at variable sugar densities (18-100%) and evaluated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and the real agent, ricin. Glycopolymers (18-65% lactose densities) effectively interfered with the toxin-lactoside adhesion event (>99% efficiency within 20 min). This supported the notion of using the mammary sugar lactose against a deadly biological toxin. PMID:20369893

  3. Meibomian gland dysfunction and contact lens intolerance.

    PubMed

    Korb, D R; Henriquez, A S

    1980-03-01

    A study of a syndrome characterized by deficient or inadequate Meibomian gland secretions, minimal or transient symptoms suggestive of ocular dryness, fluorescein staining of the cornea (often detected only after delayed observation or sequential instillation of stain), and contact lens intolerance is described. Clinical and cytologic studies indicate that the syndrome is due to obstruction of the Meibomian gland orifices by desquamated epithelial cells that tend to aggregate in keratotic clusters, which results in alteration of the Meibomian glands' contribution to the precorneal tear film. Further complication may result from bacterial proliferation in the desquamated keratotic cells and the release of the bacteria and their toxic products into the precorneal tear film from these reservoirs in the excretory pathways of the Meibomian glands.

  4. Additivity of water sorption, alpha-relaxations and crystallization inhibition in lactose-maltodextrin systems.

    PubMed

    Potes, Naritchaya; Kerry, Joseph P; Roos, Yrjö H

    2012-08-01

    Water sorption of lactose-maltodextrin (MD) systems, structural relaxations and lactose crystallization were studied. Accurate water sorption data for non-crystalline lactose previously not available over a wide range of water activity, aw (<0.76aw) were derived from lactose-MD systems data. Structural relaxations and crystallization of lactose in lactose-maltodextrin (MD) systems were strongly affected by water and MD. At high MD contents, inhibition of crystallization was significant. Inhibition with a high dextrose equivalent (DE) MD was more pronounced possibly because of molecular number and size effects. At 0.55-0.76aw, inhibition increased with increasing MD content. At aw>0.66, the rate of lactose crystallization decreased at increasing MD contents. Different MDs with similar Tg in lactose-MD systems showed different crystallization inhibition effects. The results of the present study showed that the DE in selection of MD for applications has important effects on component crystallization characteristics.

  5. Roller compaction: Effect of relative humidity of lactose powder.

    PubMed

    Omar, Chalak S; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Palzer, Stefan; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2016-09-01

    The effect of storage at different relative humidity conditions, for various types of lactose, on roller compaction behaviour was investigated. Three types of lactose were used in this study: anhydrous lactose (SuperTab21AN), spray dried lactose (SuperTab11SD) and α-lactose monohydrate 200M. These powders differ in their amorphous contents, due to different manufacturing processes. The powders were stored in a climatic chamber at different relative humidity values ranging from 10% to 80% RH. It was found that the roller compaction behaviour and ribbon properties were different for powders conditioned to different relative humidities. The amount of fines produced, which is undesirable in roller compaction, was found to be different at different relative humidity. The minimum amount of fines produced was found to be for powders conditioned at 20-40% RH. The maximum amount of fines was produced for powders conditioned at 80% RH. This was attributed to the decrease in powder flowability, as indicated by the flow function coefficient ffc and the angle of repose. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was also applied to determine the velocity of primary particles during ribbon production, and it was found that the velocity of the powder during the roller compaction decreased with powders stored at high RH. This resulted in less powder being present in the compaction zone at the edges of the rollers, which resulted in ribbons with a smaller overall width. The relative humidity for the storage of powders has shown to have minimal effect on the ribbon tensile strength at low RH conditions (10-20%). The lowest tensile strength of ribbons produced from lactose 200M and SD was for powders conditioned at 80% RH, whereas, ribbons produced from lactose 21AN at the same condition of 80% RH showed the highest tensile strength. The storage RH range 20-40% was found to be an optimum condition for roll compacting three lactose powders, as it resulted in a minimum amount of fines in the

  6. Determination of the surface energy distributions of different processed lactose.

    PubMed

    Thielmann, Frank; Burnett, Daniel J; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2007-11-01

    Particulate interactions between drug and lactose carrier in dry powder inhaler formulations are affected by the heterogenous energy distribution on the surface of the individual compounds. A new method based on Inverse Gas Chromatography at finite concentration is applied to study the energy heterogeneity of untreated, milled, and recrystallized lactose of similar particle size distribution. Energy distributions for the dispersive surface energy and the specific free energy of ethanol are obtained. Milling causes an increase in surface energy due to formation of amorphous regions. Untreated and recrystallized materials have similar surface energies at low surface coverages but show clear differences in energy distribution. PMID:18058321

  7. Roller compaction: Effect of relative humidity of lactose powder.

    PubMed

    Omar, Chalak S; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Palzer, Stefan; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2016-09-01

    The effect of storage at different relative humidity conditions, for various types of lactose, on roller compaction behaviour was investigated. Three types of lactose were used in this study: anhydrous lactose (SuperTab21AN), spray dried lactose (SuperTab11SD) and α-lactose monohydrate 200M. These powders differ in their amorphous contents, due to different manufacturing processes. The powders were stored in a climatic chamber at different relative humidity values ranging from 10% to 80% RH. It was found that the roller compaction behaviour and ribbon properties were different for powders conditioned to different relative humidities. The amount of fines produced, which is undesirable in roller compaction, was found to be different at different relative humidity. The minimum amount of fines produced was found to be for powders conditioned at 20-40% RH. The maximum amount of fines was produced for powders conditioned at 80% RH. This was attributed to the decrease in powder flowability, as indicated by the flow function coefficient ffc and the angle of repose. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was also applied to determine the velocity of primary particles during ribbon production, and it was found that the velocity of the powder during the roller compaction decreased with powders stored at high RH. This resulted in less powder being present in the compaction zone at the edges of the rollers, which resulted in ribbons with a smaller overall width. The relative humidity for the storage of powders has shown to have minimal effect on the ribbon tensile strength at low RH conditions (10-20%). The lowest tensile strength of ribbons produced from lactose 200M and SD was for powders conditioned at 80% RH, whereas, ribbons produced from lactose 21AN at the same condition of 80% RH showed the highest tensile strength. The storage RH range 20-40% was found to be an optimum condition for roll compacting three lactose powders, as it resulted in a minimum amount of fines in the

  8. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children

    PubMed Central

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment. PMID:26978392

  9. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children.

    PubMed

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-03-10

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment.

  10. Intolerance of uncertainty, fear of anxiety, and adolescent worry.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Michel J; Laugesen, Nina; Bukowski, William M

    2012-08-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertainty and worry in which change in one variable partially explained change in the other. Fear of anxiety and worry also showed evidence of a bidirectional relation, although change in fear of anxiety had a much weaker mediational effect on change in worry than vice versa. The findings show that relative to fear of anxiety, intolerance of uncertainty may play a greater role in the etiology of worry in adolescents.

  11. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children.

    PubMed

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment. PMID:26978392

  12. Modeling operon dynamics: the tryptophan and lactose operons as paradigms.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Michael C; Santillán, Moisés; Yildirim, Necmettin

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the regulation of gene control networks and their ensuing dynamics will be a critical component in the understanding of the mountain of genomic data being currently collected. This paper reviews recent mathematical modeling work on the tryptophan and lactose operons which are, respectively, the classical paradigms for repressible and inducible operons. PMID:15127892

  13. Effect of oxygen on lactose metabolism in lactic streptococci.

    PubMed

    Smart, J B; Thomas, T D

    1987-03-01

    Three strains of Streptococcus lactis, two of Streptococcus cremoris, and one of Streptococcus thermophilus metabolized oxygen in the presence of added carbohydrate primarily via a closely coupled NADH oxidase/NADH peroxidase system. No buildup of the toxic intermediate H(2)O(2) was detected with the three S. lactis strains. All six strains contained significant superoxide dismutase activity and are clearly aerotolerant. Lactose- or glucose-driven oxygen consumption was biphasic, with a rapid initial rate followed by a slower secondary rate which correlated with factors affecting the in vivo activation of lactate dehydrogenase. The rate of oxygen consumption was rapid under conditions that led to a reduction in lactate dehydrogenase activity (low intracellular fructose 1,6-bisphosphate concentration). These conditions could be achieved with nongrowing cells by adding lactose at a constant but limiting rate. When the rate of lactose fermentation was limited to 5% of its maximum, nongrowing cells of S. lactis strains ML3 and ML8 carried out an essentially homoacetic fermentation under aerobic conditions. These same cells carried out the expected homolactic fermentation when presented with excess lactose under anaerobic conditions. Homoacetic fermentation leads to the generation of more energy, by substrate-level phosphorylation via acetate kinase, than the homolactic fermentation. However, it was not observed in growing cells and was restricted to slow fermentation rates with nongrowing cells.

  14. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  15. A prospective study of dietary lactose and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Kathleen M; Hunter, David J; Colditz, Graham A; Fuchs, Charles S; Cramer, Daniel W; Speizer, Frank E; Willett, Walter C; Hankinson, Susan E

    2004-06-10

    The milk sugar lactose is an hypothesized risk factor for epithelial ovarian cancer because of possible direct toxic effects of its metabolites on oocytes or by compensatory gonadotropin stimulation. Women are presently encouraged to consume dairy products as a source of calcium to prevent osteoporosis. The objective of our study was to prospectively assess lactose, milk and milk product consumption in relation to ovarian cancer risk among 80326 participants in the Nurses' Health Study who had no history of cancer other than nonmelanoma skin cancer. Participants in the Nurses' Health Study reported on known and suspected ovarian cancer risk factors in questionnaires mailed biennially from 1976 to 1996. Food frequency questionnaires were included in the years 1980, 1984, 1986 and 1990. Newly reported ovarian cancer was documented by review of medical records. During 16 years of follow-up (1980-1996), 301 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were confirmed. Pooled logistic regression was used to control for age, body mass index (kg/m(2)), caffeine intake, oral contraceptive use, smoking history, parity and tubal ligation. For all subtypes of invasive ovarian cancer combined, we observed a nonsignificant 40% greater risk for women in the highest category of lactose consumption compared to the lowest (multivariate relative risk (RR) 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.98-2.01). We observed a 2-fold higher risk of the serous ovarian cancer subtype among those in the highest category of lactose consumption compared to the lowest (RR 2.07, 95% CI, 1.27-3.40). For each 11-gram increase in lactose consumption (the approximate amount in one glass of milk), we observed a 20% increase in risk of serous cancers (RR 1.20, 95% CI, 1.04-1.39). Skim and low-fat milk were the largest contributors to dietary lactose. Women who consumed one or more servings of skim or low-fat milk daily had a 32% higher risk of any ovarian cancer (RR 1.32, 95% CI, 0.97-1.82) and a 69% higher

  16. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; McPhee, B. R.; Rummans, T. A.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). METHODS: Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. RESULTS: The OI group had higher supine heart rates (P<0.001) and cardiac outputs (P<0.01) than the control group. In response to HUT, OI patients underwent a greater heart rate increment (P<0.001) and greater reductions in pulse pressure (P<0.01) and CO2 (P<0.001), but total systemic resistance failed to show an increment. Among the cerebrovascular indices, all BFVs (systolic, diastolic, and mean) decreased significantly more, and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was increased in OI patients (P<0.01) compared with control subjects. In both groups, hyperventilation induced mild tachycardia (P<0.001), a significant reduction of BFV, and a significant increase of CVR associated with a fall in CO2. Hyperventilation during HUT reproduced hypocapnia, BFV reduction, and tachycardia and worsened symptoms of OI; these symptoms and indices were improved within 2 minutes of CO2 rebreathing. The relationships between CO2 and BFV and heart rate were well described by

  17. Antroduodenal motility in neurologically handicapped children with feeding intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Werlin, Steven L

    2004-01-01

    Background Dysphagia and feeding intolerance are common in neurologically handicapped children. The aim is to determine the etiologies of feeding intolerance in neurologically handicapped children who are intolerant of tube feedings. Methods Eighteen neurologically handicapped children, followed in the Tube Feeding Clinic at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin who were intolerant of gastrostomy feedings. The charts of these 18 patients were reviewed. Past medical history, diagnoses, history of fundoplication and results of various tests of gastrointestinal function including barium contrast radiography, endoscopy and antroduodenal manometry were documented. Results Five of 11 children had abnormal barium upper gastrointestinal series. Seven of 14 had abnormal liquid phase gastric emptying tests. Two of 16 had esophagitis on endoscopy. All 18 children had abnormal antroduodenal motility. Conclusions In neurologically handicapped children foregut dysmotility may be more common than is generally recognized and can explain many of the upper gastrointestinal symptoms in neurologically handicapped children. PMID:15341670

  18. Endogenous circulating sympatholytic factor in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, R. E.; Winters, B.; Hales, M.; Barnett, T.; Schwinn, D. A.; Flavahan, N.; Berkowitz, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Sympathotonic orthostatic hypotension (SOH) is an idiopathic syndrome characterized by tachycardia, hypotension, elevated plasma norepinephrine, and symptoms of orthostatic intolerance provoked by assumption of an upright posture. We studied a woman with severe progressive SOH with blood pressure unresponsive to the pressor effects of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists. We tested the hypothesis that a circulating factor in this patient interferes with vascular adrenergic neurotransmission. Preincubation of porcine pulmonary artery vessel rings with patient plasma produced a dose-dependent inhibition of vasoconstriction to phenylephrine in vitro, abolished vasoconstriction to direct electrical stimulation, and had no effect on nonadrenergic vasoconstrictive stimuli (endothelin-1), PGF-2alpha (or KCl). Preincubation of vessels with control plasma was devoid of these effects. SOH plasma inhibited the binding of an alpha(1)-selective antagonist radioligand ([(125)I]HEAT) to membrane fractions derived from porcine pulmonary artery vessel rings, rat liver, and cell lines selectively overexpressing human ARs of the alpha(1B) subtype but not other AR subtypes (alpha(1A) and alpha(1D)). We conclude that a factor in SOH plasma can selectively and irreversibly inhibit adrenergic ligand binding to alpha(1B) ARs. We propose that this factor contributes to a novel pathogenesis for SOH in this patient. This patient's syndrome represents a new disease entity, and her plasma may provide a unique tool for probing the selective functions of alpha(1)-ARs.

  19. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: Beyond Orthostatic Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Garland, Emily M; Celedonio, Jorge E; Raj, Satish R

    2015-09-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a form of chronic orthostatic intolerance for which the hallmark physiological trait is an excessive increase in heart rate with assumption of upright posture. The orthostatic tachycardia occurs in the absence of orthostatic hypotension and is associated with a >6-month history of symptoms that are relieved by recumbence. The heart rate abnormality and orthostatic symptoms should not be caused by medications that impair autonomic regulation or by debilitating disorders that can cause tachycardia. POTS is a "final common pathway" for a number of overlapping pathophysiologies, including an autonomic neuropathy in the lower body, hypovolemia, elevated sympathetic tone, mast cell activation, deconditioning, and autoantibodies. Not only may patients be affected by more than one of these pathophysiologies but also the phenotype of POTS has similarities to a number of other disorders, e.g., chronic fatigue syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vasovagal syncope, and inappropriate sinus tachycardia. POTS can be treated with a combination of non-pharmacological approaches, a structured exercise training program, and often some pharmacological support.

  20. Intolerance of uncertainty and adult separation anxiety.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Paul A; Reijntjes, Albert; Carleton, R Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU)-the tendency to react negatively to situations that are uncertain-is involved in different anxiety disorders and depression. No studies have yet examined the association between IU and symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder. However, it is possible that greater difficulties tolerating uncertainties that can occur in relationships with attachment figures inflate fears and worries about the consequences of being separated from these attachment figures. The current study examined the possible role of IU in symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder, relative to its role in symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), social anxiety, and depression, using self-reported data from 215 undergraduates (92% women) with elevated separation anxiety. Findings showed that IU was significantly associated with symptom levels of separation anxiety disorder, GAD, OCD, social anxiety, and depression (rs > .30). IU continued to explain variance in OCD, social anxiety, and depression (but not GAD and separation anxiety) when controlling for the association of neuroticism, attachment anxiety, and attachment avoidance with these symptoms. Additional findings indicated that IU is more strongly associated with symptoms of GAD, OCD, and social anxiety than symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder and depression.

  1. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: Beyond Orthostatic Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Emily M; Celedonio, Jorge E; Raj, Satish R

    2015-01-01

    Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) is a form of chronic orthostatic intolerance for which the hallmark physiological trait is an excessive increase in heart rate with assumption of upright posture. The orthostatic tachycardia occurs in the absence of orthostatic hypotension and is associated with a >6-month history of symptoms that are relieved by recumbence. The heart rate abnormality and orthostatic symptoms should not be caused by medications that impair autonomic regulation or by debilitating disorders that can cause tachycardia. POTS is a “final common pathway” for a number of overlapping pathophysiologies, including an autonomic neuropathy in the lower body, hypovolemia, elevated sympathetic tone, mast cell activation, deconditioning, and autoantibodies. Not only may patients be affected by more than one of these pathophysiologies, but also the phenotype of POTS has similarities to a number of other disorders, e.g., chronic fatigue syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, vasovagal syncope, and inappropriate sinus tachycardia. POTS can be treated with a combination of non-pharmacological approaches, a structured exercise training program, and often some pharmacological support. PMID:26198889

  2. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: Beyond Orthostatic Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Garland, Emily M; Celedonio, Jorge E; Raj, Satish R

    2015-09-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a form of chronic orthostatic intolerance for which the hallmark physiological trait is an excessive increase in heart rate with assumption of upright posture. The orthostatic tachycardia occurs in the absence of orthostatic hypotension and is associated with a >6-month history of symptoms that are relieved by recumbence. The heart rate abnormality and orthostatic symptoms should not be caused by medications that impair autonomic regulation or by debilitating disorders that can cause tachycardia. POTS is a "final common pathway" for a number of overlapping pathophysiologies, including an autonomic neuropathy in the lower body, hypovolemia, elevated sympathetic tone, mast cell activation, deconditioning, and autoantibodies. Not only may patients be affected by more than one of these pathophysiologies but also the phenotype of POTS has similarities to a number of other disorders, e.g., chronic fatigue syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vasovagal syncope, and inappropriate sinus tachycardia. POTS can be treated with a combination of non-pharmacological approaches, a structured exercise training program, and often some pharmacological support. PMID:26198889

  3. Lysinuric Protein Intolerance Presenting with Multiple Fractures.

    PubMed

    Posey, Jennifer E; Burrage, Lindsay C; Miller, Marcus J; Liu, Pengfei; Hardison, Matthew T; Elsea, Sarah H; Sun, Qin; Yang, Yaping; Willis, Alecia S; Schlesinger, Alan E; Bacino, Carlos A; Lee, Brendan H

    2014-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in SLC7A7, which encodes a component of the dibasic amino acid transporter found in intestinal and renal tubular cells. Patients typically present with vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, failure to thrive, and symptomatic hyperammonemia after protein-rich meals. Long-term complications may include pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, renal disease, and osteoporosis. We present a 5-year-old male who was followed in our skeletal dysplasia clinic for 3 years for multiple fractures, idiopathic osteoporosis, and short stature in the absence of typical features of LPI. Whole exome sequencing performed to determine the etiology of the osteoporosis and speech delay identified a nonsense mutation in SLC7A7. Chromosome microarray analysis identified a deletion involving the second allele of the same gene, and biochemical analysis supported the diagnosis of LPI. Our patient's atypical presentation underscores the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for LPI in patients with unexplained fractures and idiopathic osteoporosis, even in the absence of clinical symptoms of hyperammonemia after protein rich meals or other systemic features of classical LPI. This case further demonstrates the utility of whole exome sequencing in diagnosis of unusual presentations of rare disorders for which early intervention may modify the clinical course.

  4. Lysinuric Protein Intolerance Presenting with Multiple Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Jennifer E.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Miller, Marcus J.; Liu, Pengfei; Hardison, Matthew T.; Elsea, Sarah H.; Sun, Qin; Yang, Yaping; Willis, Alecia S.; Schlesinger, Alan E.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Lee, Brendan H.

    2014-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in SLC7A7, which encodes a component of the dibasic amino acid transporter found in intestinal and renal tubular cells. Patients typically present with vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, failure to thrive, and symptomatic hyperammonemia after protein-rich meals. Long-term complications may include pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, renal disease, and osteoporosis. We present a 5-year-old male who was followed in our skeletal dysplasia clinic for 3 years for multiple fractures, idiopathic osteoporosis, and short stature in the absence of typical features of LPI. Whole exome sequencing performed to determine the etiology of the osteoporosis and speech delay identified a nonsense mutation in SLC7A7. Chromosome microarray analysis identified a deletion involving the second allele of the same gene, and biochemical analysis supported the diagnosis of LPI. Our patient’s atypical presentation underscores the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for LPI in patients with unexplained fractures and idiopathic osteoporosis, even in the absence of clinical symptoms of hyperammonemia after protein rich meals or other systemic features of classical LPI. This case further demonstrates the utility of whole exome sequencing in diagnosis of unusual presentations of rare disorders for which early intervention may modify the clinical course. PMID:25419514

  5. Differentiating food allergies from food intolerances.

    PubMed

    Guandalini, Stefano; Newland, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    Adverse reactions to foods are extremely common, and generally they are attributed to allergy. However, clinical manifestations of various degrees of severity related to ingestion of foods can arise as a result of a number of disorders, only some of which can be defined as allergic, implying an immune mechanism. Recent epidemiological data in North America showed that the prevalence of food allergy in children has increased. The most common food allergens in the United States include egg, milk, peanut, tree nuts, wheat, crustacean shellfish, and soy. This review examines the various forms of food intolerances (immunoglobulin E [IgE] and non-IgE mediated), including celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Immune mediated reactions can be either IgE mediated or non-IgE mediated. Among the first group, Immediate GI hypersensitivity and oral allergy syndrome are the best described. Often, but not always, IgE-mediated food allergies are entities such as eosinophilic esophagitis and eosinophilic gastroenteropathy. Non IgE-mediated immune mediated food reactions include celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, two increasingly recognized disorders. Finally, non-immune mediated reactions encompass different categories such as disorders of digestion and absorption, inborn errors of metabolism, as well as pharmacological and toxic reactions.

  6. Novel products and new technologies for use of a familiar carbohydrate, milk lactose.

    PubMed

    Yang, S T; Silva, E M

    1995-11-01

    The cheese industry produces large amounts of lactose in the form of cheese whey and whey permeate, generating approximately 27 million tonnes/yr in the US alone. Many uses have been found for whey and lactose, including uses in infant formula; bakery, dairy, and confectionery products; animal feed; and feedstocks for lactose derivatives and several industrial fermentations. Lactose use in food products, however, is somewhat limited because of its low solubility and indigestibility in many individuals. For this reason, lactose is often hydrolyzed before use. Still, demand is insufficient to use all available whey lactose. The result is a low market value for lactose; almost half of the whey produced each year remains unused and is a significant waste disposal problem. Several approaches are possible for transforming lactose into value-added products. For example, galactooligosaccharides can be produce through enzymatic treatments of lactose and may be used as a probiotic food ingredient. Organic acids or xanthan gum may be produced via whey fermentation, and the fermented whey product can be used as a food ingredient with special functionality. This paper reviews the physical characteristics, production techniques, and current uses of lactose, whey, and lactose derivatives. Also examined are novel fermentation and separation technologies developed in our laboratory for the production of lactate, propionate, acetate, and xanthan gum from whey. PMID:8747342

  7. Liquid crystalline phase as a probe for crystal engineering of lactose: carrier for pulmonary drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sharvil S; Mahadik, Kakasaheb R; Paradkar, Anant R

    2015-02-20

    The current work was undertaken to assess suitability of liquid crystalline phase for engineering of lactose crystals and their utility as a carrier in dry powder inhalation formulations. Saturated lactose solution was poured in molten glyceryl monooleate which subsequently transformed into gel. The gel microstructure was analyzed by PPL microscopy and SAXS. Lactose particles recovered from gels after 48 h were analyzed for polymorphism using techniques such as FTIR, XRD, DSC and TGA. Particle size, morphology and aerosolisation properties of prepared lactose were analyzed using Anderson cascade impactor. In situ seeding followed by growth of lactose crystals took place in gels with cubic microstructure as revealed by PPL microscopy and SAXS. Elongated (size ∼ 71 μm) lactose particles with smooth surface containing mixture of α and β-lactose was recovered from gel, however percentage of α-lactose was more as compared to β-lactose. The aerosolisation parameters such as RD, ED, %FPF and % recovery of lactose recovered from gel (LPL) were found to be comparable to Respitose® ML001. Thus LC phase (cubic) can be used for engineering of lactose crystals so as to obtain particles with smooth surface, high elongation ratio and further they can be used as carrier in DPI formulations.

  8. The intracellular galactoglycome in Trichoderma reesei during growth on lactose.

    PubMed

    Karaffa, Levente; Coulier, Leon; Fekete, Erzsébet; Overkamp, Karin M; Druzhinina, Irina S; Mikus, Marianna; Seiboth, Bernhard; Novák, Levente; Punt, Peter J; Kubicek, Christian P

    2013-06-01

    Lactose (1,4-0-β-D-galactopyranosyl-D-glucose) is used as a soluble carbon source for the production of cellulases and hemicellulases for-among other purposes-use in biofuel and biorefinery industries. The mechanism how lactose induces cellulase formation in T. reesei is enigmatic, however. Previous results from our laboratory raised the hypothesis that intermediates from the two galactose catabolic pathway may give rise to the accumulation of intracellular oligogalactosides that could act as inducer. Here we have therefore used high-performance anion-exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry to study the intracellular galactoglycome of T. reesei during growth on lactose, in T. reesei mutants impaired in galactose catabolism, and in strains with different cellulase productivities. Lactose, allo-lactose, and lactulose were detected in the highest amounts in all strains, and two trisaccharides (Gal-β-1,6-Gal-β-1,4-Glc/Fru and Gal-β-1,4-Gal-β-1,4-Glc/Fru) also accumulated to significant levels. Glucose and galactose, as well as four further oligosaccharides (Gal-β-1,3/1,4/1,6-Gal; Gal-β-1,2-Glc) were only detected in minor amounts. In addition, one unknown disaccharide (Hex-β-1,1-Hex) and four trisaccharides were also detected. The accumulation of the unknown hexose disaccharide was shown to correlate with cellulase formation in the improved mutant strains as well as the galactose pathway mutants, and Gal-β-1,4-Gal-β-1,4-Glc/Fru and two other unknown hexose trisaccharides correlated with cellulase production only in the pathway mutants, suggesting that these compounds could be involved in cellulase induction by lactose. The nature of these oligosaccharides, however, suggests their formation by transglycosylation rather than by glycosyltransferases. Based on our results, the obligate nature of both galactose catabolic pathways for this induction must have another biochemical basis than providing substrates for inducer formation. PMID:23299458

  9. The intracellular galactoglycome in Trichoderma reesei during growth on lactose.

    PubMed

    Karaffa, Levente; Coulier, Leon; Fekete, Erzsébet; Overkamp, Karin M; Druzhinina, Irina S; Mikus, Marianna; Seiboth, Bernhard; Novák, Levente; Punt, Peter J; Kubicek, Christian P

    2013-06-01

    Lactose (1,4-0-β-D-galactopyranosyl-D-glucose) is used as a soluble carbon source for the production of cellulases and hemicellulases for-among other purposes-use in biofuel and biorefinery industries. The mechanism how lactose induces cellulase formation in T. reesei is enigmatic, however. Previous results from our laboratory raised the hypothesis that intermediates from the two galactose catabolic pathway may give rise to the accumulation of intracellular oligogalactosides that could act as inducer. Here we have therefore used high-performance anion-exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry to study the intracellular galactoglycome of T. reesei during growth on lactose, in T. reesei mutants impaired in galactose catabolism, and in strains with different cellulase productivities. Lactose, allo-lactose, and lactulose were detected in the highest amounts in all strains, and two trisaccharides (Gal-β-1,6-Gal-β-1,4-Glc/Fru and Gal-β-1,4-Gal-β-1,4-Glc/Fru) also accumulated to significant levels. Glucose and galactose, as well as four further oligosaccharides (Gal-β-1,3/1,4/1,6-Gal; Gal-β-1,2-Glc) were only detected in minor amounts. In addition, one unknown disaccharide (Hex-β-1,1-Hex) and four trisaccharides were also detected. The accumulation of the unknown hexose disaccharide was shown to correlate with cellulase formation in the improved mutant strains as well as the galactose pathway mutants, and Gal-β-1,4-Gal-β-1,4-Glc/Fru and two other unknown hexose trisaccharides correlated with cellulase production only in the pathway mutants, suggesting that these compounds could be involved in cellulase induction by lactose. The nature of these oligosaccharides, however, suggests their formation by transglycosylation rather than by glycosyltransferases. Based on our results, the obligate nature of both galactose catabolic pathways for this induction must have another biochemical basis than providing substrates for inducer formation.

  10. Breath hydrogen responses in infants using lactose-rice formula and regular lactose formula.

    PubMed

    Wu, T C; Hwang, B; Lee, P S

    2001-01-01

    Starch thickened infant formulas have been shown to relieve regurgitation and increase caloric retention. We compared the completeness of digestion of the carbohydrates in lactose-rice formula (study formula) with routine infant formula in infants with GER. A prospective open study of 30 normal, well-nourished infants with simple regurgitation was conducted. The clinical history on regurgitation, stool pattern and baseline breath hydrogen (bH2) test were obtained at entry, with the infants still using their original routine infant formula, and after a wash out period of 7 days, during which they were fed only with study formula. Analysis of bH2 results showed lower levels of bH2 at 1, 2 and 3 hours with study formula compared with the original formula at the 2nd and 3rd hour (p<0.05). The effectiveness of the study formula in managing GER was demonstrated by the fact that 26 out of 30 had either "some improvement" or a "good response." Hardening of the stool pattern was reported in 13 of the 30 infants after 1 week of study formula. The mean of peak bH2 in study formula fed subjects with formed and firm/hard stool was significantly lower than in those with soft and pasty stool. In conclusion, this study has shown the effectiveness of rice thickened infant formulas in managing infants with GER. Rice-starch has an additional advantage of ease of digestion. The hardening of stool pattern was also frequently observed. PMID:11811219

  11. Cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy: an important contributing cause of secondary sugar intolerance in young infants with acute infective enteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Davis, K; Robinson, M J; Boey, C G; Sumithran, E; Yadav, M; Lam, S K; Puthucheary, S D

    1979-01-01

    The effect of cows' milk protein (CMP) on the mucosal disaccharidases was investigated in 23 infants with acute infective enteritis. Jejunal biopsies performed before and after cows' milk provocation were subjected to histological examination and to mucosal disaccharidase enzyme (lactase, sucrase, and maltase) analyses. After milk challenge, changes in mucosal histology were observed in 18 infants, in 17 of them the levels of all 3 mucosal disaccharidases were much reduced. 10 of these infants developed diarrhoea and, in 6, the stools were positive for reducing sugar. It is concluded that CMP has a deleterious effect on the jejunal mucosa of young infants recovering from infective enteritis, so that in the management of young infants with sugar intolerance secondary to infective enteritis, CMP and lactose should be excluded from the diet. PMID:570376

  12. Synthesis, characterisation and microbial utilisation of amorphous polysugars from lactose.

    PubMed

    Daines, Alison M; Smart, Zlatka; Sims, Ian M; Tannock, Gerald W; Hinkley, Simon F R

    2015-03-01

    The melt polymerisations of glucose, galactose, xylose and fucose with citric acid, and mixtures of sugars therein are reported. Characterisation of the citric-acid catalysed reaction products indicated similar degrees of branched polymerisation but differences in the overall molecular weight of the polymers produced. The dairy by-product lactose could not be polymerised in a similar fashion but was shown to be readily hydrolysed using microwave radiation and a polymer generated from the melt condensation of the resultant glucose and galactose monosaccharides. A preliminary assessment of the bifido-bacterial utilisation of the lactose-derived polymerised products demonstrated a significantly different growth profile compared to commercially utilised galactooligosaccharides (GOS). PMID:25498629

  13. Modelling, property verification and behavioural equivalence of lactose operon regulation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Marcelo Cezar; Foss, Luciana; Mombach, José Carlos Merino; Ribeiro, Leila

    2007-02-01

    Understanding biochemical pathways is one of the biggest challenges in the field of molecular biology nowadays. Computer science can contribute in this area by providing formalisms and tools to simulate and analyse pathways. One formalism that is suited for modelling concurrent systems is Milner's Calculus of Communicating Systems (CCS). This paper shows the viability of using CCS to model and reason about biochemical networks. As a case study, we describe the regulation of lactose operon. After describing this operon formally using CCS, we validate our model by automatically checking some known properties for lactose regulation. Moreover, since biological systems tend to be very complex, we propose to use multiple descriptions of the same system at different levels of abstraction. The compatibility of these multiple views can be assured via mathematical proofs of observational equivalence. PMID:16620804

  14. Analysis, structural characterization, and bioactivity of oligosaccharides derived from lactose.

    PubMed

    Moreno, F Javier; Montilla, Antonia; Villamiel, Mar; Corzo, Nieves; Olano, Agustín

    2014-06-01

    The increasing interest for prebiotic carbohydrates as functional food ingredients has promoted the synthesis of galactooligosaccharides and new lactose derivatives. This review provides a comprehensive overview on the chromatographic analysis, structural characterization, and bioactivity studies of lactose-derived oligosaccharides. The most common chromatographic techniques used for the separation and structural characterization of this type of oligosaccharides, including GC and HPLC in different operational modes, coupled to various detectors are discussed. Insights on oligosaccharide MS fragmentation patterns, using different ionization sources and mass analyzers, as well as data on structural analysis by NMR spectroscopy are also described. Finally, this article deals with the bioactive effects of galacto oligosaccharides and oligosaccharides derived from lactulose on the gastrointestinal and immune systems, which support their consumption to provide significant health benefits.

  15. Persistence of high intestinal lactase activity (lactose tolerance) in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, A G; Delbrück, H; Haeckel, R; Goedde, H W; Flatz, G

    1976-09-10

    Two hundred and seventy apparently healthy adult subjects from Afghanistan, mainly from the central and eastern parts of the country, were subjected to a lactose tolerance test. The change of blood glucose from the fasting concentration at 20 min after the administration of lactose showed a bimodal distribution. Forty-seven subjects had a rise of blood glucose concentration of more than 1.1 mmol/l and were classified as persistence of high intestinal lactase activity (PHILA), a term which lays emphasis on the fact that high lactase activity in the adult is an unusual state whose prevalence in some populations requires explanation. In the Afghan sample there were no significant differences of the frequency of PHILA in different ethnic groups. PMID:965005

  16. Fermentation of glucose, lactose, galactose, mannitol, and xylose by bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    de Vries, W; Stouthamer, A H

    1968-08-01

    For six strains of Bifidobacterium bifidum (Lactobacillus bifidus), fermentation balances of glucose, lactose, galactose, mannitol, and xylose were determined. Products formed were acetate, l(+)-lactate, ethyl alcohol, and formate. l(+)-Lactate dehydrogenase of all strains studied was found to have an absolute requirement for fructose-1,6-diphosphate. The phosphoroclastic enzyme could not be demonstrated in cell-free extracts. Cell suspensions fermented pyruvate to equimolar amounts of acetate and formate. Alcohol dehydrogenase was shown in cell-free extracts. Possible explanations have been suggested for the differences in fermentation balances found for different strains and carbon sources. By enzyme determinations, it was shown that bifidobacteria convert mannitol to fructose-6-phosphate by an inducible polyol dehydrogenase and fructokinase. For one strain of B. bifidum, molar growth yields of glucose, lactose, galactose, and mannitol were determined. The mean value of Y (ATP), calculated from molar growth yields and fermentation balances, was 11.3.

  17. Influence of amorphous content on compaction behaviour of anhydrous alpha-lactose.

    PubMed

    Ziffels, S; Steckel, H

    2010-03-15

    Modified lactoses are widely used as filler-binders in direct compression of tablets. Until today, little about the compaction behaviour of anhydrous alpha-lactose is known. In this study, a new method to prepare anhydrous alpha-lactose from alpha-lactose monohydrate by desiccation with heated ethanol was evaluated and the influence of amorphous content in the lactose powder prior to modification on powder properties, compaction behaviour and storage stability was determined. The modification process led to anhydrous alpha-lactose with decreased bulk and tapped density, increased flow rate and significantly higher specific surface area. Due to the higher specific surface area, the compaction behaviour of the anhydrous alpha-lactose was found to be significantly better than the compaction behaviour of powder blends consisting of alpha-lactose monohydrate and amorphous lactose. An influence of the amorphous content prior to modification could be observed only at higher compaction forces. In general, tablets of modified powders needed longer time to disintegrate directly after compression. However, the storage stability of modified tablets was found to be better compared to the amorphous-crystalline tablets which were influenced by storage conditions, initial crushing strength as well as amorphous content due to the re-crystallization of amorphous lactose during storage. PMID:20005927

  18. Metabolism of lactose by Clostridium thermolacticum growing in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Collet, Christophe; Girbal, Laurence; Péringer, Paul; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul; Soucaille, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the metabolism of Clostridium thermolacticum, a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, growing continuously on lactose (10 g l(-1)) and to determine the enzymes involved in the pathways leading to the formation of the fermentation products. Biomass and metabolites concentration were measured at steady-state for different dilution rates, from 0.013 to 0.19 h(-1). Acetate, ethanol, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were produced at all dilution rates, whereas lactate was detected only for dilution rates below 0.06 h(-1). The presence of several key enzymes involved in lactose metabolism, including beta-galactosidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, acetate kinase, ethanol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, was demonstrated. Finally, the intracellular level of NADH, NAD+, ATP and ADP was also measured for different dilution rates. The production of ethanol and lactate appeared to be linked with the re-oxidation of NADH produced during glycolysis, whereas hydrogen produced should come from reduced ferredoxin generated during pyruvate decarboxylation. To produce more hydrogen or more acetate from lactose, it thus appears that an efficient H2 removal system should be used, based on a physical (membrane) or a biological approach, respectively, by cultivating C. thermolacticum with efficient H2 scavenging and acetate producing microorganisms.

  19. Construction of a lactose-assimilating strain of baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Adam, A C; Prieto, J A; Rubio-Texeira, M; Polaina, J

    1999-09-30

    A recombinant strain of baker's yeast has been constructed which can assimilate lactose efficiently. This strain has been designed to allow its propagation in whey, the byproduct resulting from cheese-making. The ability to metabolize lactose is conferred by the functional expression of two genes from Kluyveromyces lactis, LAC12 and LAC4, which encode a lactose permease and a beta-galactosidase, respectively. To make the recombinant strain more acceptable for its use in bread-making, the genetic transformation of the host baker's yeast was carried out with linear fragments of DNA of defined sequence, carrying as the only heterologous material the coding regions of the two K. lactis genes. Growth of the new strain on cheese whey affected neither the quality of bread nor the yeast gassing power. The significance of the newly developed strain is two-fold: it affords a cheap alternative to the procedure generally used for the propagation of baker's yeast, and it offers a profitable use for cheese whey.

  20. Acquired intolerance to organic solvents and results of vestibular testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gyntelberg, F.; Vesterhauge, S.; Fog, P.; Isager, H.; Zillstorff, K.

    1986-01-01

    Among 160 consecutive patients referred to the Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Rigshospitalet, for symptoms connected with exposure to organic solvents, 20 exhibited symptoms of acquired intolerance to minor amounts of organic solvents. Later, an additional 30 consecutive patients with symptoms of acquired intolerance were included, yielding a total of 43 men and 7 women. The characteristics of the clinical syndrome described are complaints of dizziness, nausea, and weakness after exposure to minimal solvent vapor concentrations. After having tolerated long-term occupational exposure to moderate or high air concentrations of various organic solvents, the patients became intolerant within a short period of time. Since dizziness was a frequent complaint, we tried to obtain a measure of the patients' complaints using vestibular tests. As a diagnostic test the combined vestibular tests had a sensitivity of 0.55 and a specificity of 0.87. No differences between patients with and without intolerance could be detected by the vestibular tests used. We conclude that acquired intolerance to organic solvents is a new but characteristic and easily recognizable syndrome, often with severe consequences for the patient's working ability.

  1. Relation of blood volume and blood pressure in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    A complex but crucial relationship exists between blood volume and blood pressure in human subjects; it has been recognized that in essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma, the relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure is an inverse one. This phenomenon has not been studied in individuals with low normal and reduced blood pressures. Orthostatic intolerance is a commonly encountered abnormality in blood pressure regulation often associated with tachycardia in the standing position. Most of these patients have varying degrees of reduced blood volume. We tested the hypothesis that the relationship previously found between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in pressor states would also hold in orthostatic intolerance. We studied 16 patients with a history of symptomatic orthostatic intolerance associated with an elevation in plasma norepinephrine in the upright posture and hypovolemia in 9 patients and normovolemia in 7 patients. Our studies demonstrate an inverse relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in patients with orthostatic intolerance. This finding also holds for the change in diastolic blood pressure in response to upright posture. In this relationship, patients with orthostatic intolerance with high plasma norepinephrine resemble those with essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma. We conclude that in a variety of conditions at both ends of the blood pressure spectrum, the seemingly paradoxical association of hypovolemia and diastolic blood pressure is preserved.

  2. The diagnosis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, B; Gitzelmann, R

    1981-09-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially life-threatening disorder and can be suspected from a detailed nutritional history. The usefulness of 2 diagnostic procedures, fructose tolerance test (FTT) and aldolase assay on biopsied liver, was studied. A standardized intravenous FTT with 200 mg/kg b.w. was done on 11 children with HFI, 17 age-matched contrast children, 6 adults with HFI and 6 adult controls. Blood glucose, phosphorus, urate, magnesium and fructose were followed for 2 hours. By the FTT, each HFI individual was reliably distinguished from controls and contrasts and even from those with acute liver disease other than HFI. Both children with non-HFI hepatopathy examined by both procedures had a normal FTT in spite of reduced liver fructaldolase activity. HFI children responded to the FTT by earlier and more pronounced hypoglycemia than adults, and one girl converted to an adult type response between the ages 12 and 181/2 years. Responses of two HFI sibling pairs and of one set of monozygotic twins were typical for age, but resemblance was no greater than within the unrelated HFI probands. The intravenous FTT is judged a reliable diagnostic tool, simple and harmless if done in hospital. Essential fructosuria is readily diagnosed by the FTT, but fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency and HFI are not differentiated with certainty. Liver biopsies were obtained from 35 children with HFI, 14 contrast persons and 10 controls (of which 9 organ donors) and examined enzymatically. Deficiency of fructaldolase was observed in all HFI children but also in some contrast children suffering from acute liver disease other than HFI. In these, HFI could only be excluded when the reduced activity of reference enzymes such as fructose-1,6-diphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase and liver histology were included in the evaluation. In one deceased HFI infant, fructaldolase was deficient in both, liver and kidney cortex. Extent of antibody activation and of heat

  3. Microwave-assisted isomerisation of lactose to lactulose and Maillard conjugation of lactulose and lactose with whey proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Nooshkam, Majid; Madadlou, Ashkan

    2016-06-01

    Lactose was isomerised to lactulose by microwave heating and purified by a methanolic procedure to a product with approximately 72% lactulose content. Afterwards, lactose and the lactulose-rich product (PLu) were conjugated with either whey protein isolate (WPI) or its antioxidant hydrolysate (WPH) through microwaving. Lactose had a higher Maillard reactivity than PLu, and WPH was more reactive than WPI. The browning intensity of WPI-sugar systems was however higher than that of WPH-sugar pairs. Atomic force microscopy showed larger (up to ≈103 nm) particles for WPI-PLu conjugates compared to WPH-PLu counterparts (up to ≈39 nm). The Maillard conjugation progressively increased the radical-scavenging activity of WPI/WPH-sugar pairs with increasing conjugation time and improved the foaming properties of WPI and WPH. The WPI/WPH-sugar conjugates showed higher solubility and emulsification index than unreacted counterpart pairs. For native WPI, β-lactoglobulin was not degraded by in vitro gastric digestion, whereas for WPH-PLu conjugates degraded completely.

  4. Non coeliac gluten sensitivity - A new disease with gluten intolerance.

    PubMed

    Czaja-Bulsa, Grażyna

    2015-04-01

    Until recently gluten intolerance has been believed to be typical of celiac disease (CD) and wheat allergy (WA). In the last few years, however, several study results have been published that have proved that gluten intolerance can also affect people who do not suffer from any of the above mentioned diseases. The new syndrome has been named non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) or gluten sensitivity (GS). It has been included in the new list of gluten-related disorders published in 2012. Researchers believe that NCGS is the most common syndrome of gluten intolerance. This review discusses many aspects of NCGS epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical spectrum, and treatment and current tools to identify patients suffering from CD, WA, and NCGS.

  5. Continuous ethanol fermentation of lactose by a recombinant flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain

    SciTech Connect

    Domingues, L.; Dantas, M.M.; Lima, N.; Teixeira, J.A.

    1999-09-20

    Alcohol fermentation of lactose was investigated using a recombinant flocculating Saccharomyces cetevisiae, expressing the LAC4 (coding the {beta}-galactosidase) and LAC12 (coding for lactose permease) genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus. Data on yeast fermentation and growth on a medium containing lactose as the sole carbon source are presented. In the range of studied lactose concentrations, total lactose consumption was observed with a conversion yield of ethanol close to the expected theoretical value. For the continuously operating bioreactor, an ethanol productivity of 11 g L{sup {minus}1} h{sup {minus}1} (corresponding to a feed lactose concentration of 50 g L{sup {minus}1} and a dilution rate of 0.55 h{sup {minus}1}) was obtained, which is 7 times larger than the continuous conventional systems. The system stability was confirmed by keeping it in operation for 6 months.

  6. Investigating the construct validity of intolerance of uncertainty and its unique relationship with worry.

    PubMed

    Buhr, Kristin; Dugas, Michel J

    2006-01-01

    Although recent findings suggest that intolerance of uncertainty is a fundamental construct involved in excessive worry, additional research is required to further establish the construct validity of intolerance of uncertainty and demonstrate its unique contribution to the understanding of worry. The present study examined the relationships among measures of worry, intolerance of uncertainty, intolerance of ambiguity, perfectionism, and perceived control in a sample of 197 university students. The findings indicated that intolerance of uncertainty moderately overlaps with earlier conceptualizations of intolerance of ambiguity; however, worry was more highly related to intolerance of uncertainty than to intolerance of ambiguity. Intolerance of uncertainty also emerged as the most salient predictor of worry compared to other cognitive processes such as perfectionism and perceived control. Worry and intolerance of uncertainty continued to be significantly related after controlling for intolerance of ambiguity, perfectionism, and perceived control, which implies that intolerance of uncertainty shares a unique association with worry that is not accounted for by these other cognitive factors. Overall, the findings provide evidence of construct validity and underscore the role of intolerance of uncertainty in the conceptualization of worry.

  7. Glucose intolerance states in women with the polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, R; Gambineri, A

    2013-09-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common hyperandrogenic disorder affecting 4-7% of women, is often associated with metabolic alterations, chiefly insulin resistance and obesity. Based on available scientific evidence, PCOS should be regarded as an independent risk for the development of glucose intolerance states. This short review summarizes the available literature on the prevalence and incidence of impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes in this disorder. In addition, some insights on potential factors responsible for individual susceptibility are discussed. Targeted intervention studies focused on prevention and treatment of glucose intolerance states in PCOS are warranted.

  8. Characterization and selection of suitable grades of lactose as functional fillers for capsule filling: part 1.

    PubMed

    Moolchandani, Vikas; Augsburger, Larry L; Gupta, Abhay; Khan, Mansoor; Langridge, John; Hoag, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize thermal, physical and mechanical properties of different grades of lactose and better understand the relationships between these properties and capsule filling performance. Eight grades of commercially available lactose were evaluated: Pharmatose 110 M, 125 M, 150 M, 200 M, 350 M (α-lactose monohydrate), AL (anhydrous lactose containing ∼80% β-AL), DCL11 (spray dried α-lactose monohydrate containing ∼15% amorphous lactose) and DCL15 (granulated α-lactose monohydrate containing ∼12% β-AL). In this study, different lactose grades were characterized by thermal, solid state, physical and mechanical properties and later evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA) to assess the inter-relationships among some of these properties. The lactose grades were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), moisture sorption/desorption isotherms, particle size distribution; the flow was characterized by Carr Index (CI), critical orifice diameter (COD) and angle of friction. Plug mechanical strength was estimated from its diametric crushing strength. The first and second principal components (PC) captured 47.6% and 27.4% of variation in the physical and mechanical property data, respectively. The PCA plot grouped together 110 M, AL, DCL11 and DCL15 on the one side of plot which possessed superior properties for capsule formulation and these grades were selected for future formulation development studies (part II of this work). PMID:25212639

  9. Characterization and selection of suitable grades of lactose as functional fillers for capsule filling: part 1.

    PubMed

    Moolchandani, Vikas; Augsburger, Larry L; Gupta, Abhay; Khan, Mansoor; Langridge, John; Hoag, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize thermal, physical and mechanical properties of different grades of lactose and better understand the relationships between these properties and capsule filling performance. Eight grades of commercially available lactose were evaluated: Pharmatose 110 M, 125 M, 150 M, 200 M, 350 M (α-lactose monohydrate), AL (anhydrous lactose containing ∼80% β-AL), DCL11 (spray dried α-lactose monohydrate containing ∼15% amorphous lactose) and DCL15 (granulated α-lactose monohydrate containing ∼12% β-AL). In this study, different lactose grades were characterized by thermal, solid state, physical and mechanical properties and later evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA) to assess the inter-relationships among some of these properties. The lactose grades were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), moisture sorption/desorption isotherms, particle size distribution; the flow was characterized by Carr Index (CI), critical orifice diameter (COD) and angle of friction. Plug mechanical strength was estimated from its diametric crushing strength. The first and second principal components (PC) captured 47.6% and 27.4% of variation in the physical and mechanical property data, respectively. The PCA plot grouped together 110 M, AL, DCL11 and DCL15 on the one side of plot which possessed superior properties for capsule formulation and these grades were selected for future formulation development studies (part II of this work).

  10. Minimal cross-intolerance with nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic or accelerated phase who are intolerant to imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Hochhaus, Andreas; le Coutre, Philipp D.; Rosti, Gianantonio; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Jabbour, Elias; Gillis, Kathryn; Woodman, Richard C.; Blakesley, Rick E.; Giles, Francis J.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Baccarani, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Nilotinib has significant efficacy in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) and in patients with CML-CP or CML in accelerated phase (CML-AP) after imatinib failure. We investigated the occurrence of cross-intolerance to nilotinib in imatinib-intolerant patients with CML. Only 1/75 (1%) patients with nonhematologic imatinib intolerance experienced a similar grade 3/4 adverse event (AE), and 3/75 (4%) experienced a similar persistent grade 2 nonhematologic AE on nilotinib. Only 7/40 (18%) patients with hematologic imatinib intolerance discontinued nilotinib, all because of grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia. Ninety percent of imatinib-intolerant patients with CML-CP who did not have complete hematologic response (CHR) at baseline (n = 52) achieved CHR on nilotinib. Nilotinib induced a major cytogenetic response in 66% and 41% of patients with imatinib-intolerant CML-CP and CML-AP (complete cytogenetic response in 51% and 30%), respectively. Minimal cross-intolerance was confirmed in patients with imatinib-intolerant CML. The favorable tolerability of nilotinib in patients with imatinib intolerance leads to alleviation of AE-related symptoms and significant and durable responses. In addition to its established clinical benefit in patients with newly diagnosed CML and those resistant to imatinib, nilotinib is effective and well-tolerated for long-term use in patients with imatinib intolerance. This study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00471497 PMID:21467546

  11. Are ambiguity aversion and ambiguity intolerance identical? A neuroeconomics investigation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Fujino, Junya; Ideno, Takashi; Okubo, Shigetaka; Takemura, Kazuhisa; Miyata, Jun; Kawada, Ryosaku; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Hirose, Kimito; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in understanding a person's reaction to ambiguous situations, and two similar constructs related to ambiguity, "ambiguity aversion" and "ambiguity intolerance," are defined in different disciplines. In the field of economic decision-making research, "ambiguity aversion" represents a preference for known risks relative to unknown risks. On the other hand, in clinical psychology, "ambiguity intolerance" describes the tendency to perceive ambiguous situations as undesirable. However, it remains unclear whether these two notions derived from different disciplines are identical or not. To clarify this issue, we combined an economic task, psychological questionnaires, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a sample of healthy volunteers. The individual ambiguity aversion tendency parameter, as measured by our economic task, was negatively correlated with agreeableness scores on the self-reported version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. However, it was not correlated with scores of discomfort with ambiguity, one of the subscales of the Need for Closure Scale. Furthermore, the ambiguity aversion tendency parameter was negatively correlated with gray matter (GM) volume of areas in the lateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex, whereas ambiguity intolerance was not correlated with GM volume in any region. Our results suggest that ambiguity aversion, described in decision theory, may not necessarily be identical to ambiguity intolerance, referred to in clinical psychology. Cautious applications of decision theory to clinical neuropsychiatry are recommended. PMID:25698984

  12. Aldosterone aggravates glucose intolerance induced by high fructose.

    PubMed

    Sherajee, Shamshad J; Rafiq, Kazi; Nakano, Daisuke; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2013-11-15

    We previously reported that aldosterone impaired vascular insulin signaling in vivo and in vitro. Fructose-enriched diet induces metabolic syndrome including hypertension, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and diabetes in animal. In the current study, we hypothesized that aldosterone aggravated fructose feeding-induced glucose intolerance in vivo. Rats were divided into five groups for six-week treatment; uninephrectomy (Unx, n=8), Unx+aldosterone (aldo, 0.75 µg/h, s.c., n=8), Unx+fructose (fruc, 10% in drinking water, n=8), Unx+aldo+fruc, (aldo+fruc, n=8), and Unx+aldo+fruc+spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (aldo+fruc+spiro, 20mg/kg/day, p.o., n=8). Aldo+fruc rats manifested the hypertension, and induced glucose intolerance compared to fruc intake rats assessed by oral glucose tolerance test, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study. Spironolactone, significantly improved the aldosterone-accelerated glucose intolerance. Along with improvement in insulin resistance, spironolactone suppressed upregulated mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) target gene, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinases-1 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle in aldo+fruc rats. In conclusion, these data suggested that aldosterone aggravates fructose feeding-induced glucose intolerance through MR activation.

  13. Rainbow Visibility: How One Catholic University Responded to Intolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Cheryl; Kirkley, Evelyn A.

    2002-01-01

    When intolerance of gays and lesbians at the University of San Diego became a problem, a group of students, staff, and faculty decided to do something about it. The result was a project called Rainbow Visibility that works on many forms to educate the campus community. (Author)

  14. Tolerance of Intolerance: Values and Virtues at Stake in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlenius, Kennert

    2008-01-01

    The article addresses the issue of the tolerance of intolerance in an educational context. It concerns a real case in a Swedish upper secondary school some years ago, when a student was suspended from school owing to his sympathies with Nazi ideas. One hundred and twenty student teachers' responses to this decision were analysed in respect of the…

  15. A case of galactosemia misdiagnosed as cow's milk intolerance.

    PubMed

    Della Casa, Roberto; Ungaro, Carla; Acampora, Emma; Pignata, Claudio; Vajro, Pietro; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Santamaria, Francesca; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2012-09-19

    We report on a female patient affected by galactosemia in whom the diagnosis was obscured by the concomitant presence of manifestations suggesting a cow's milk intolerance. This case exemplifies the problems in reaching a correct diagnosis in patients with metabolic diseases.

  16. Preliminary Investigation of Intolerance of Uncertainty Treatment for Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Sarah N.; Egan, Sarah; Rees, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is the tendency to react negatively to uncertain situations or events, and it has been found to be an important maintaining factor in a number of different anxiety disorders. It is often included as a part of cognitive behavioural interventions for anxiety disorders but its specific contribution to treatment outcome…

  17. Orthostatic Intolerance and Motion Sickness After Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Brown, Troy E.; Wood, Scott J.; Benavides, Edgar W.; Bondar, Roberta L.; Stein, Flo; Moradshahi, Peyman; Harm, Deborah L.; Low, Phillip A.

    1999-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is common in astronauts after prolonged space flight. However, the "push-pull effect" in military aviators suggests that brief exposures to transitions between hypo- and hypergravity are sufficient to induce untoward autonomic cardiovascular physiology in susceptible individuals. We therefore investigated orthostatic tolerance and autonomic cardiovascular function in 16 healthy test subjects before and after a seated 2-hr parabolic flight. At the same time, we also investigated relationships between parabolic flight-induced vomiting and changes in orthostatic and autonomic cardiovascular function. After parabolic flight, 8 of 16 subjects could not tolerate a 30-min upright tilt test, compared to 2 of 16 before flight. Whereas new intolerance in non-Vomiters resembled the clinical postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), new intolerance in Vomiters was characterized by comparatively isolated upright hypocapnia and cerebral vasoconstriction. As a group, Vomiters also had evidence for increased postflight fluctuations in efferent vagal-cardiac nerve traffic occurring independently of any superimposed change in respiration. Results suggest that syndromes of orthostatic intolerance resembling those occurring after space flight can occur after a brief (i.e., 2-hr) parabolic flight.

  18. A new route for the chemical valorisation of lactose.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Antonino; Catelani, Giorgio; D'Andrea, Felicia; Fisichella, Salvatore; Mariani, Manuela; Pistarà, Venerando

    2003-01-01

    A totally protected di-O-benzyl derivative of triacetonlactose dimethyl acetal was transformed into a 4'-hexeno disaccharide by elimination of acetone with t-BuOK in DMF and subsequently in 5'-C-methoxy derivative by oxidation with MCPBA in methanol as a solvent. The hydrolysis of this latter compound affords 2,6-di-O-benzyl-L-arabino-aldohexosos-5-ulose, which by intramolecular aldol condensation with DBU gives an inosose that was stereoselectively reduced to epi-inositol. Therefore our synthetic strategy offers a new and simple method to transform lactose into carbocyclic monosaccharide analogues.

  19. Quantitative determination of micronization-induced changes in the solid state of lactose.

    PubMed

    Della Bella, A; Müller, M; Soldati, L; Elviri, L; Bettini, R

    2016-05-30

    Lactose, in particular α-lactose monohydrate, is the most used carrier for inhalation. Its surface and solid-state properties play a key role in determining Dry Powder Inhalers (DPIs) performance. Techniques such as X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), which are commonly used for the characterization of lactose, are not always capable of explaining the solid-state changes induced by processing, such as micronization. In the present work, the evaluation of the effect of the micronization process on the solid-state properties of lactose was carried out by XRPD and DSC and a satisfactory, although not unequivocal, interpretation of the thermal behaviour of lactose was obtained. Thus, a new gravimetric method correlating in a quantitative manner the weight change in specific sections of the Dynamic Vapour Sorption (DVS) profile and the amount of different forms of α-lactose (hygroscopic anhydrous, stable anhydrous and amorphous) simultaneously present in a given sample was developed and validated. The method is very simple and provides acceptable accuracy in phase quantitation (LOD=1.6, 2.4 and 2.7%, LOQ=5.4, 8.0 and 8.9% for hygroscopic anhydrous, stable anhydrous and amorphous α-lactose, respectively). The application of this method to a sample of micronized lactose led to results in agreement with those obtained by DSC and evidenced that hygroscopic anhydrous α-lactose, rather than amorphous lactose, can be generated in the micronization process. The proposed method may find a more general application for the quantification of polymorphs of compounds different than lactose, provided that the various solid phases afford different weight variations in specific regions of the DVS profile. PMID:27090154

  20. Roller compaction: Effect of morphology and amorphous content of lactose powder on product quality.

    PubMed

    Omar, Chalak S; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Osborne, James D; Althaus, Tim O; Palzer, Stefan; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-12-30

    The effect of morphology and amorphous content, of three types of lactose, on the properties of ribbon produced using roller compaction was investigated. The three types of lactose powders were; anhydrous SuperTab21AN, α-lactose monohydrate 200 M, and spray dried lactose SuperTab11SD. The morphology of the primary particles was identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the powder amorphous content was quantified using NIR technique. SEM images showed that 21AN and SD are agglomerated type of lactose whereas the 200 M is a non-agglomerated type. During ribbon production, an online thermal imaging technique was used to monitor the surface temperature of the ribbon. It was found that the morphology and the amorphous content of lactose powders have significant effects on the roller compaction behaviour and on ribbon properties. The agglomerated types of lactose produced ribbon with higher surface temperature and tensile strength, larger fragment size, lower porosity and lesser fines percentages than the non-agglomerated type of lactose. The lactose powder with the highest amorphous content showed to result in a better binding ability between the primary particles. This type of lactose produced ribbons with the highest temperature and tensile strength, and the lowest porosity and amount of fines in the product. It also produced ribbon with more smooth surfaces in comparison to the other two types of lactose. It was noticed that there is a relationship between the surface temperature of the ribbon during production and the tensile strength of the ribbon; the higher the temperature of the ribbon during production the higher the tensile strength of the ribbon. PMID:26117279

  1. Roller compaction: Effect of morphology and amorphous content of lactose powder on product quality.

    PubMed

    Omar, Chalak S; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Osborne, James D; Althaus, Tim O; Palzer, Stefan; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-12-30

    The effect of morphology and amorphous content, of three types of lactose, on the properties of ribbon produced using roller compaction was investigated. The three types of lactose powders were; anhydrous SuperTab21AN, α-lactose monohydrate 200 M, and spray dried lactose SuperTab11SD. The morphology of the primary particles was identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the powder amorphous content was quantified using NIR technique. SEM images showed that 21AN and SD are agglomerated type of lactose whereas the 200 M is a non-agglomerated type. During ribbon production, an online thermal imaging technique was used to monitor the surface temperature of the ribbon. It was found that the morphology and the amorphous content of lactose powders have significant effects on the roller compaction behaviour and on ribbon properties. The agglomerated types of lactose produced ribbon with higher surface temperature and tensile strength, larger fragment size, lower porosity and lesser fines percentages than the non-agglomerated type of lactose. The lactose powder with the highest amorphous content showed to result in a better binding ability between the primary particles. This type of lactose produced ribbons with the highest temperature and tensile strength, and the lowest porosity and amount of fines in the product. It also produced ribbon with more smooth surfaces in comparison to the other two types of lactose. It was noticed that there is a relationship between the surface temperature of the ribbon during production and the tensile strength of the ribbon; the higher the temperature of the ribbon during production the higher the tensile strength of the ribbon.

  2. Antisolvent crystallisation is a potential technique to prepare engineered lactose with promising aerosolisation properties: effect of saturation degree.

    PubMed

    Kaialy, Waseem; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Engineered lactose particles were prepared by anti-solvent crystallisation technique using lactose solutions with different saturation degrees. In comparison to commercial lactose, engineered lactose particles exhibited less elongated and more irregular shape (large aggregates composed of smaller sub-units), rougher surface texture, higher specific surface area, and different anomer form. Engineered lactose powders demonstrated smaller bulk density, smaller tap density, and higher porosity than commercial lactose powder. Dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations containing engineered lactose and salbutamol sulphate as a model drug demonstrated improved drug content homogeneity and higher amounts of drug delivered to lower airway regions. Higher fine particle fraction of drug was obtained in the case of lactose powders with higher porosity, higher specific surface area and higher fine particle content (<5 μm). The results indicated that the higher the saturation degree of lactose solution used during crystallisation the smaller the specific surface area, the higher the amorphous lactose content, and the higher the β-lactose content of engineered lactose particles. Also, lactose powders obtained from lactose solution with higher degree of saturation showed higher bulk and tap densities and smaller porosity. Engineered lactose powders crystallized from lower saturation degree (20% and 30% w/v) deposited higher amounts of drug on lower airway regions. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that it is possible to prepare engineered lactose particles with favourable properties (e.g. higher fine particle fraction and better drug content homogeneity) for DPI formulations by using lactose solutions with lower degree of saturation during crystallisation process. PMID:22884837

  3. Current treatment of dyslipidaemia: PCSK9 inhibitors and statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Koskinas, Konstantinos; Wilhelm, Matthias; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the cornerstone of the management of dyslipidaemias and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Although statins are, overall, safe and well tolerated, adverse events can occur and constitute an important barrier to maintaining long-term adherence to statin treatment. In patients who cannot tolerate statins, alternative treatments include switch to another statin, intermittent-dosage regimens and non-statin lipid-lowering medications. Nonetheless, a high proportion of statin-intolerant patients are unable to achieve recommended low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol goals, thereby resulting in substantial residual cardiovascular risk. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a protease implicated in LDL receptor degradation and plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism. In recent studies, PCSK9 inhibition by means of monoclonal antibodies achieved LDL cholesterol reductions of 50% to 70% across various patient populations and background lipid-lowering therapies, while maintaining a favourable safety profile. The efficacy and safety of the monoclonal antibodies alirocumab and evolocumab were confirmed in statin-intolerant patients, indicating that PCSK9 inhibitors represent an attractive treatment option in this challenging clinical setting. PCSK9 inhibitors recently received regulatory approval for clinical use and may be considered in properly selected patients according to current consensus documents, including patients with statin intolerance. In this review we summarise current evidence regarding diagnostic evaluation of statin-related adverse events, particularly statin-associated muscle symptoms, and we discuss current recommendations on the management of statin-intolerant patients. In view of emerging evidence of the efficacy and safety of PCSK9 inhibitors, we further discuss the role of monoclonal PCSK9 antibodies in the management of statin-intolerant hypercholesterolaemic patients. PMID:27400448

  4. Effect of compression pressure on inhalation grade lactose as carrier for dry powder inhalations

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Neha Sureshrao; Jamaiwar, Swapnil; Umekar, Milind Janrao; Kotagale, Nandkishor Ramdas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study focused on the potential effects of compression forces experienced during lactose (InhaLac 70, 120, and 230) storage and transport on the flowability and aerosol performance in dry powder inhaler formulation. Materials and Methods: Lactose was subjected to typical compression forces 4, 10, and 20 N/cm2. Powder flowability and particle size distribution analysis of un-compressed and compressed lactose was evaluated by Carr's index, Hausner's ratio, the angle of repose and by laser diffraction method. Aerosol performance of un-compressed and compressed lactose was assessed in dispersion studies using glass twin-stage-liquid-impenger at flow rate 40-80 L/min. Results: At compression forces, the flowability of compressed lactose was observed same or slightly improved. Furthermore, compression of lactose caused a decrease in in vitro aerosol dispersion performance. Conclusion: The present study illustrates that, as carrier size increases, a concurrent decrease in drug aerosolization performance was observed. Thus, the compression of the lactose fines onto the surfaces of the larger lactose particles due to compression pressures was hypothesized to be the cause of these observed performance variations. The simulations of storage and transport in an industrial scale can induce significant variations in formulation performance, and it could be a source of batch-to-batch variations. PMID:27014618

  5. Determination of low levels of amorphous content in inhalation grade lactose by moisture sorption isotherms.

    PubMed

    Vollenbroek, Jasper; Hebbink, Gerald A; Ziffels, Susanne; Steckel, Hartwig

    2010-08-16

    Alpha-lactose monohydrate is widely used as an excipient in dry powder inhalers, and plays a very important role in the efficiency of the drug delivery. Due to the processing, low levels of amorphous lactose could be present in the blends. Varying amounts could have a strong effect on the efficiency of drug delivery of the powder blends. Therefore, the accurate measurement of low levels of amorphous lactose content is very important. A new method was developed to measure the amorphous content, based on dynamic vapour sorption (DVS). In contrast to the traditional re-crystallization approach of amorphous lactose, the new method is based on moisture sorption isotherms. Moisture sorption isotherms of blends of crystalline alpha-lactose and freeze-dried or spray-dried amorphous lactose were measured. By fitting the data with a Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) isotherm, a linear correlation was found between measured and actual amorphous content for the whole range of 0.1-100%. Differences between freeze-dried and spray-dried lactose, due to different molecular arrangements, could be removed by a preconditioning the samples at 35% RH prior to the isotherm measurement. It was shown that accurate determination of very low concentrations of amorphous lactose content is possible using moisture sorption isotherm analyses. PMID:20493937

  6. Inhibition of Recrystallization of Amorphous Lactose in Nanocomposites Formed by Spray-Drying.

    PubMed

    Hellrup, Joel; Alderborn, Göran; Mahlin, Denny

    2015-11-01

    This study aims at investigating the recrystallization of amorphous lactose in nanocomposites. In particular, the focus is on the influence of the nano- to micrometer length scale nanofiller arrangement on the amorphous to crystalline transition. Further, the relative significance of formulation composition and manufacturing process parameters for the properties of the nanocomposite was investigated. Nanocomposites of amorphous lactose and fumed silica were produced by co-spray-drying. Solid-state transformation of the lactose was studied at 43%, 84%, and 94% relative humidity using X-ray powder diffraction and microcalorimetry. Design of experiments was used to analyze spray-drying process parameters and nanocomposite composition as factors influencing the time to 50% recrystallization. The spray-drying process parameters showed no significant influence. However, the recrystallization of the lactose in the nanocomposites was affected by the composition (fraction silica). The recrystallization rate constant decreased as a function of silica content. The lowered recrystallization rate of the lactose in the nanocomposites could be explained by three mechanisms: (1) separation of the amorphous lactose into discrete compartments on a micrometer length scale (compartmentalization), (2) lowered molecular mobility caused by molecular interactions between the lactose molecules and the surface of the silica (rigidification), and/or (3) intraparticle confinement of the amorphous lactose. PMID:26182904

  7. Inhibition of Recrystallization of Amorphous Lactose in Nanocomposites Formed by Spray-Drying.

    PubMed

    Hellrup, Joel; Alderborn, Göran; Mahlin, Denny

    2015-11-01

    This study aims at investigating the recrystallization of amorphous lactose in nanocomposites. In particular, the focus is on the influence of the nano- to micrometer length scale nanofiller arrangement on the amorphous to crystalline transition. Further, the relative significance of formulation composition and manufacturing process parameters for the properties of the nanocomposite was investigated. Nanocomposites of amorphous lactose and fumed silica were produced by co-spray-drying. Solid-state transformation of the lactose was studied at 43%, 84%, and 94% relative humidity using X-ray powder diffraction and microcalorimetry. Design of experiments was used to analyze spray-drying process parameters and nanocomposite composition as factors influencing the time to 50% recrystallization. The spray-drying process parameters showed no significant influence. However, the recrystallization of the lactose in the nanocomposites was affected by the composition (fraction silica). The recrystallization rate constant decreased as a function of silica content. The lowered recrystallization rate of the lactose in the nanocomposites could be explained by three mechanisms: (1) separation of the amorphous lactose into discrete compartments on a micrometer length scale (compartmentalization), (2) lowered molecular mobility caused by molecular interactions between the lactose molecules and the surface of the silica (rigidification), and/or (3) intraparticle confinement of the amorphous lactose.

  8. Lactase is unchanged in suckling mice fed with lactose-free milk.

    PubMed

    Jost, B; Duluc, I; Vilotte, J L; Freund, J N

    1998-11-01

    At weaning, mammals switch from milk to complex adult food, and change from a lactose-rich to a lactose-free diet. At the same time, the small intestine matures resulting in changes in lactase expression and the onset of sucrase. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of premature and specific depletion of lactose on maturation of the small intestine and on lactase expression in suckling mice. For this purpose, from postnatal days 10 to 16, suckling mice were fed by transgenic alpha-lactalbumin-deficient females that produce lactose-free milk. Pups fed with lactose-free milk had a lower body weight than controls fed by wildtype females. They also displayed hypotrophy of intestinal muscle layers, but no obvious alterations in the morphology of the intestinal epithelium. The level of lactase activity as well as the longitudinal distribution of corresponding mRNA were unchanged compared to suckling animals nourished with normal lactose-containing milk. Finally, there was no premature onset of sucrase expression. We conclude that feeding suckling mice for six days with lactose-free milk does not provoke any premature maturation of the small intestine. Thus, decreasing lactose intake is not a major cause for the modifications of lactase expression which occur at weaning.

  9. Exploiting the lactose-GM3 interaction for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Raghavendra Vasudeva; Bavireddi, Harikrishna; Gade, Madhuri; Kikkeri, Raghavendra

    2015-05-01

    Protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions as a means to target the cell surface for therapeutic applications have been extensively investigated. However, carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions (CCIs) have largely been overlooked. Here, we investigate the concept of CCI-mediated drug delivery. Lactose-functionalized β-cyclodextrin (L-β-CD) hosting doxorubicin (Dox) was evaluated for site-specific delivery to cancer cells via interaction with GM3 , a cell-surface carbohydrate. The host-guest complex was evaluated in B16 melanoma cells, which express exceptionally high levels of GM3 , and acute monocytic leukemia (THP-1) and mouse fibroblast (NIH-3T3) cells, which lack GM3 on the cell surface. Doxorubicin (Dox) was delivered more efficiently into B16 cells compared with NIH-3T3 and THP-1 cells. In B16 cells pretreated with sialidase or sodium periodate, thus preventing CCI formation, drug uptake was significantly decreased. Taken together, the results of these studies strongly support CCI-mediated uptake via the GM3 -lactose interaction as the mechanism of controlled drug delivery.

  10. Synthesis of carbon-13 enriched disaccharides: lactose and sucrose

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Unkefer, P.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Ehler, D.S.

    1986-05-01

    Disaccharides can be prepared enzymatically and by chemical synthesis. Lactose enriched with carbon-13 at C-1 can be synthesized by reacting K/sup 13/CN with a sugar having a one fewer carbon than the desired product. Thus, a mixture of 4-O-..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-D-(1-/sup 13/C)glucose ((1-/sup 13/C)lactose) and 4-O-..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-D-(1-/sup 13/C)mannose can be synthesized from 3-O-..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-D-arabinose and K/sup 13/CN. (/sup 13/C)Sucrose is conveniently prepared in gram quantities from D-(/sup 13/C)fructose and UDP-glucose in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme sucrose synthetase. This reaction proceeds smoothly at 25/sup 0/ over a period of hours to give an equilibrium mixture which can be separated chromatographically. The glucose portion of sucrose can be labeled using enzymatically-prepared UDP-(/sup 13/C)glucose. Labeled sucrose is important for the preparation of labeled starches to be used for structural and metabolic studies.

  11. Investigation of growth rate dispersion in lactose crystallisation by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, T. D.; Ogden, M. I.; Parkinson, G. M.

    2014-09-01

    α-Lactose monohydrate crystals have been reported to exhibit growth rate dispersion (GRD). Variation in surface dislocations has been suggested as the cause of GRD, but this has not been further investigated to date. In this study, growth rate dispersion and the change in morphology were investigated in situ and via bottle roller experiments. The surfaces of the (0 1 0) faces of crystals were examined with Atomic Force Microscopy. Smaller, slow growing crystals tend to have smaller (0 1 0) faces with narrow bases and displayed a single double spiral in the centre of the crystal with 2 nm high steps. Additional double spirals in other crystals resulted in faster growth rates. Large, fast growing crystals were observed to have larger (0 1 0) faces with fast growth in both the a and b directions (giving a broader crystal base) with macro steps parallel to the (c direction). The number and location of spirals or existence of macro steps appears to influence the crystal morphology, growth rates and growth rate dispersion in lactose crystals.

  12. Effect of lactose concentration on batch production of ethanol from cheese whey using Candida pseudotropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; El-Taweel, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    The effect of lactose concentration on growth of Candida pseudotropicalis and ethanol production from cheese whey under batch conditions was investigated. Four initial lactose concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 g/L (5 to 20% wt/vol) were used. High concentration of lactose had an inhibitory effect on the specific growth rate, lactose utilization rate, and ethanol production rate. The maximum cell concentration was influenced by the initial substrate concentration as well as ethanol concentration. Inhibition of ethanol production was more pronounced at higher initial lactose concentrations. The maximum ethanol yield (96.6% of the theoretical yield) was achieved with the 100 g/L initial substrate concentration. The results indicated that pH control during alcohol fermentation of cheese whey is not necessary. 41 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  13. The influence of excipients on the stability of the moisture sensitive drugs aspirin and niacinamide: comparison of tablets containing lactose monohydrate with tablets containing anhydrous lactose.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Hoag, S W

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that in tablet formulations, moisture-sensitive drugs formulated with lactose monohydrate have the same stability as formulations containing anhydrous lactose, and to characterize the kinetics of niacinamide degradation in the solid state. Aspirin and niacinamide decomposition were used as indicators of stability. Aspirin and niacinamide tablets containing either lactose monohydrate or anhydrous lactose were separately investigated at different temperatures and relative humidities; the stability tests were done at 25 degrees C--60% RH, 40 degrees C--80% RH, 60 degrees C--60% RH, 60 degrees C--80% RH, and 80 degrees C--80% RH. Official U.S. Pharmacopeia methods were used for the aspirin and niacinamide assays. Statistical analysis showed that tablets containing lactose monohydrate have the same stability as tablets containing anhydrous lactose, which means that even though water is present in the crystal structure, the bound water does not influence the reaction rate. In addition, niacinamide degradation in the solid-state can be described by a third order rate equation.

  14. Influence of the lactose grade within dry powder formulations of fluticasone propionate and terbutaline sulphate.

    PubMed

    Le, V N P; Bierend, H; Robins, E; Steckel, H; Flament, M P

    2012-01-17

    Dry powder formulations are often composed of fine drug particles and coarser carrier particles, typically alpha-lactose monohydrate. However, the performance of a powder formulation may be highly dependent on the lactose quality and source. This study investigated the characteristics of lactose that influence the drug-to-carrier interaction and the performance of lactose-based dry powder inhaler formulations. The selected lactoses differed in the preparation processes and the content of fine lactose particles. Efficiency testing was done using fluticasone propionate and terbutaline sulphate as model drugs. Inverse gas chromatography was used to determine the surface heterogeneity distribution of different energy sites of the lactose and to understand the mechanism by which the fine carrier particles can improve the performance of dry powder inhalers. To assess the adhesion of respirable-sized drug to carrier particles, a simple method was developed based on aspiration and considering the whole blend as it is used in dry powder inhalers. When the percentage of fine lactose is high, a lower quantity of drug adheres to the lactose and/or the adhesion force is also lower. This was confirmed by the aerosolization assays done in the TSI (twin stage impinger). A correlation was observed between adhesion characteristics and inertial impaction. For both drugs, the fine particle fractions were highest in blends that present a greater proportion of lactose fine particles. A fairly good correlation between the fine particle fractions of both drugs and the peak max value and the AUC (area under curve) were found by inverse gas chromatography. With higher fine particle fraction values, which correspond to higher content of fines, the peak maxima determined by inverse gas chromatography were shifted to higher adsorption potentials, which supports the agglomeration hypothesis. PMID:22036653

  15. Butanol production from concentrated lactose/whey permeate: Use of pervaporation membrane to recover and concentrate product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In these studies butanol (acetone butanol ethanol, or ABE) was produced from concentrated lactose/whey permeate containing 211 gL-1 lactose. Fermentation of such a highly concentrated lactose solution was possible due to simultaneous product removal using a pervaporation membrane. In this system a p...

  16. Intolerance of uncertainty and decisions about delayed, probabilistic rewards.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Christian C; Ishida, Kanako; Hajcak, Greg

    2011-09-01

    Worry is the inflated concern about potential future threats and is a hallmark feature of generalized anxiety disorder. Previous theoretical work has suggested that worry may be a consequence of intolerance of uncertainty (IU). The current study seeks to explore the behavioral consequences of IU. Specifically, we examine how IU might be associated with aspects of reward-based decision making. We utilized a simple laboratory gambling task in which participants chose between small, low-probability rewards available immediately at the beginning of each trial and large, high-probability rewards only available after some variable delay. Results demonstrate that higher levels of intolerance of uncertainty were associated with a tendency to select the immediately available, but less valuable and less probable rewards. IU also predicted decision-makers' sensitivity to outcomes. We discuss the cognitive and affective mechanisms that are likely to underlie the observed decision-making behavior and the implications for anxiety disorders.

  17. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage.

  18. Exercise Intolerance in Heart Failure: Did We Forget the Brain?

    PubMed

    Brassard, Patrice; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-04-01

    Exercise tolerance is affected in patients with heart failure (HF). Although the inability of the heart to pump blood to the working muscle has been the conventional mechanism proposed to explain the lowered capacity of patients with HF to exercise, evidence suggests that the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with their exercise intolerance is more complex. Recent findings indicate that lowered cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygenation likely represent limiting factors for exercise capacity in patients with HF. After an overview of cardiac and peripheral responses during acute and chronic exercise in healthy individuals, we succinctly review cardiac and noncardiac mechanisms by which HF influences exercise tolerance. We then consider how HF, comorbidity, and HF treatment influence CBF and oxygenation at rest and during exercise. Finally, we provide suggestions for further research to improve our understanding of the role of the brain in exercise intolerance in HF.

  19. Orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia associated with norepinephrine-transporter deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Flattem, N. L.; Jordan, J.; Jacob, G.; Black, B. K.; Biaggioni, I.; Blakely, R. D.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic intolerance is a syndrome characterized by lightheadedness, fatigue, altered mentation, and syncope and associated with postural tachycardia and plasma norepinephrine concentrations that are disproportionately high in relation to sympathetic outflow. We tested the hypothesis that impaired functioning of the norepinephrine transporter contributes to the pathophysiologic mechanism of orthostatic intolerance. METHODS: In a patient with orthostatic intolerance and her relatives, we measured postural blood pressure, heart rate, plasma catecholamines, and systemic norepinephrine spillover and clearance, and we sequenced the norepinephrine-transporter gene and evaluated its function. RESULTS: The patient had a high mean plasma norepinephrine concentration while standing, as compared with the mean (+/-SD) concentration in normal subjects (923 vs. 439+/-129 pg per milliliter [5.46 vs. 2.59+/-0.76 nmol per liter]), reduced systemic norepinephrine clearance (1.56 vs. 2.42+/-0.71 liters per minute), impairment in the increase in the plasma norepinephrine concentration after the administration of tyramine (12 vs. 56+/-63 pg per milliliter [0.07 vs. 0.33+/-0.37 pmol per liter]), and a disproportionate increase in the concentration of plasma norepinephrine relative to that of dihydroxyphenylglycol. Analysis of the norepinephrine-transporter gene revealed that the proband was heterozygous for a mutation in exon 9 (encoding a change from guanine to cytosine at position 237) that resulted in more than a 98 percent loss of function as compared with that of the wild-type gene. Impairment of synaptic norepinephrine clearance may result in a syndrome characterized by excessive sympathetic activation in response to physiologic stimuli. The mutant allele in the proband's family segregated with the postural heart rate and abnormal plasma catecholamine homeostasis. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic or acquired deficits in norepinephrine inactivation may underlie hyperadrenergic

  20. Skeletal muscle pathology in endurance athletes with acquired training intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Grobler, L; Collins, M; Lambert, M; Sinclair-Smith, C; Derman, W; St, C; Noakes, T

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is well established that prolonged, exhaustive endurance exercise is capable of inducing skeletal muscle damage and temporary impairment of muscle function. Although skeletal muscle has a remarkable capacity for repair and adaptation, this may be limited, ultimately resulting in an accumulation of chronic skeletal muscle pathology. Case studies have alluded to an association between long term, high volume endurance training and racing, acquired training intolerance, and chronic skeletal muscle pathology. Objective: To systematically compare the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural status of endurance athletes with acquired training intolerance (ATI group) with asymptomatic endurance athletes matched for age and years of endurance training (CON group). Methods: Histological and electron microscopic analyses were carried out on a biopsy sample of the vastus lateralis from 18 ATI and 17 CON endurance athletes. The presence of structural and ultrastructural disruptions was compared between the two groups of athletes. Results: Significantly more athletes in the ATI group than in the CON group presented with fibre size variation (15 v 6; p = 0.006), internal nuclei (9 v 2; p = 0.03), and z disc streaming (6 v 0; p = 0.02). Conclusions: There is an association between increased skeletal muscle disruptions and acquired training intolerance in endurance athletes. Further studies are required to determine the nature of this association and the possible mechanisms involved. PMID:15562162

  1. Are ambiguity aversion and ambiguity intolerance identical? A neuroeconomics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Fujino, Junya; Ideno, Takashi; Okubo, Shigetaka; Takemura, Kazuhisa; Miyata, Jun; Kawada, Ryosaku; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Hirose, Kimito; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in understanding a person's reaction to ambiguous situations, and two similar constructs related to ambiguity, “ambiguity aversion” and “ambiguity intolerance,” are defined in different disciplines. In the field of economic decision-making research, “ambiguity aversion” represents a preference for known risks relative to unknown risks. On the other hand, in clinical psychology, “ambiguity intolerance” describes the tendency to perceive ambiguous situations as undesirable. However, it remains unclear whether these two notions derived from different disciplines are identical or not. To clarify this issue, we combined an economic task, psychological questionnaires, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a sample of healthy volunteers. The individual ambiguity aversion tendency parameter, as measured by our economic task, was negatively correlated with agreeableness scores on the self-reported version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. However, it was not correlated with scores of discomfort with ambiguity, one of the subscales of the Need for Closure Scale. Furthermore, the ambiguity aversion tendency parameter was negatively correlated with gray matter (GM) volume of areas in the lateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex, whereas ambiguity intolerance was not correlated with GM volume in any region. Our results suggest that ambiguity aversion, described in decision theory, may not necessarily be identical to ambiguity intolerance, referred to in clinical psychology. Cautious applications of decision theory to clinical neuropsychiatry are recommended. PMID:25698984

  2. Orthostatic intolerance and motion sickness after parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Brown, T. E.; Wood, S. J.; Benavides, E. W.; Bondar, R. L.; Stein, F.; Moradshahi, P.; Harm, D. L.; Fritsch-Yelle, J. M.; Low, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    Because it is not clear that the induction of orthostatic intolerance in returning astronauts always requires prolonged exposure to microgravity, we investigated orthostatic tolerance and autonomic cardiovascular function in 16 healthy subjects before and after the brief micro- and hypergravity of parabolic flight. Concomitantly, we investigated the effect of parabolic flight-induced vomiting on orthostatic tolerance, R-wave-R-wave interval and arterial pressure power spectra, and carotid-cardiac baroreflex and Valsalva responses. After parabolic flight 1) 8 of 16 subjects could not tolerate 30 min of upright tilt (compared to 2 of 16 before flight); 2) 6 of 16 subjects vomited; 3) new intolerance to upright tilt was associated with exaggerated falls in total peripheral resistance, whereas vomiting was associated with increased R-wave-R-wave interval variability and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness; and 4) the proximate mode of new orthostatic failure differed in subjects who did and did not vomit, with vomiters experiencing comparatively isolated upright hypocapnia and cerebral vasoconstriction and nonvomiters experiencing signs and symptoms reminiscent of the clinical postural tachycardia syndrome. Results suggest, first, that syndromes of orthostatic intolerance resembling those developing after space flight can develop after a brief (i.e., 2-h) parabolic flight and, second, that recent vomiting can influence the results of tests of autonomic cardiovascular function commonly utilized in returning astronauts.

  3. Drug effects on orthostatic intolerance induced by bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Dallman, M. F.; Van Loon, G.; Keil, L. C.

    1991-01-01

    Effective and practical preventive procedures for postflight orthostatic intolerance are highly desirable. The current practice of attempts to expand plasma volume by ingestion of salt and fluids before reentry has proven benefits. This study evaluated alternative options using fludrocortisone (F) to expand plasma volume (PV), dextroamphetamine (Dex) to enhance norepinephrine (NE) release, and atropine (A) to reduce the effects of vagal stimulation. Seven subjects with proven post-bedrest orthostatic intolerance returned for a 7-day 6-deg head-down bedrest study. F (0.2 mg) was given at 8:00 AM and 8:00 PM the day before and 8:00 AM the day the subjects got out of bed (2 hours before standing). PV was measured before and 1 hour after the last dose of F. Dex (5 mg) and A (0.8 mg) were then taken orally 1 hour before the stand test. F expanded PV by 16 percent and caused sodium retention. Four of the 7 subjects stood for 1 hour post-bedrest and heart rate, plasma NE and plasma renin responses to standing were greatly enhanced and sustained. Although there was a narrowing of pulse pressure, the ability to overcome orthostatic intolerance with these countermeasures was largely due to vasoconstriction and sustained high heart rate.

  4. The nocebo effect in the context of statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Tobert, Jonathan A; Newman, Connie B

    2016-01-01

    The nocebo effect, the inverse of the placebo effect, is a well-established phenomenon that is under-appreciated in cardiovascular medicine. It refers to adverse events, usually purely subjective, that result from expectations of harm from a drug, placebo, other therapeutic intervention or a nonmedical situation. These expectations can be driven by many factors including the informed consent form in a clinical trial, warnings about adverse effects communicated by clinicians when prescribing a drug, and information in the media about the dangers of certain treatments. The nocebo effect is the best explanation for the high rate of muscle and other symptoms attributed to statins in observational studies and clinical practice, but not in randomized controlled trials, where muscle symptoms, and rates of discontinuation due to any adverse event, are generally similar in the statin and placebo groups. Statin-intolerant patients usually tolerate statins under double-blind conditions, indicating that the intolerance has little if any pharmacological basis. Known techniques for minimizing the nocebo effect can be applied to the prevention and management of statin intolerance. PMID:27578103

  5. Midodrine prevents orthostatic intolerance associated with simulated spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsdell, C. D.; Mullen, T. J.; Sundby, G. H.; Rostoft, S.; Sheynberg, N.; Aljuri, N.; Maa, M.; Mukkamala, R.; Sherman, D.; Toska, K.; Yelle, J.; Bloomfield, D.; Williams, G. H.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Many astronauts after being weightless in space become hypotensive and presyncopal when they assume an upright position. This phenomenon, known as orthostatic intolerance, may interfere with astronaut function during reentry and after spaceflight and may limit the ability of an astronaut to exit a landed spacecraft unaided during an emergency. Orthostatic intolerance is more pronounced after long-term spaceflight and is a major concern with respect to the extended flights expected aboard the International Space Station and for interplanetary exploration class missions, such as a human mission to Mars. Fully effective countermeasures to this problem have not yet been developed. To test the hypothesis that alpha-adrenergic stimulation might provide an effective countermeasure, we conducted a 16-day head-down-tilt bed-rest study (an analog of weightlessness) using normal human volunteers and administered the alpha(1)-agonist drug midodrine at the end of the bed-rest period. Midodrine was found to significantly ameliorate excessive decreases in blood pressure and presyncope during a provocative tilt test. We conclude that midodrine may be an effective countermeasure for the prevention of orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight.

  6. Midodrine prevents orthostatic intolerance associated with simulated spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, C D; Mullen, T J; Sundby, G H; Rostoft, S; Sheynberg, N; Aljuri, N; Maa, M; Mukkamala, R; Sherman, D; Toska, K; Yelle, J; Bloomfield, D; Williams, G H; Cohen, R J

    2001-06-01

    Many astronauts after being weightless in space become hypotensive and presyncopal when they assume an upright position. This phenomenon, known as orthostatic intolerance, may interfere with astronaut function during reentry and after spaceflight and may limit the ability of an astronaut to exit a landed spacecraft unaided during an emergency. Orthostatic intolerance is more pronounced after long-term spaceflight and is a major concern with respect to the extended flights expected aboard the International Space Station and for interplanetary exploration class missions, such as a human mission to Mars. Fully effective countermeasures to this problem have not yet been developed. To test the hypothesis that alpha-adrenergic stimulation might provide an effective countermeasure, we conducted a 16-day head-down-tilt bed-rest study (an analog of weightlessness) using normal human volunteers and administered the alpha(1)-agonist drug midodrine at the end of the bed-rest period. Midodrine was found to significantly ameliorate excessive decreases in blood pressure and presyncope during a provocative tilt test. We conclude that midodrine may be an effective countermeasure for the prevention of orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. PMID:11356789

  7. Solid state amorphization kinetic of alpha lactose upon mechanical milling.

    PubMed

    Caron, Vincent; Willart, Jean-François; Lefort, Ronan; Derollez, Patrick; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc

    2011-11-29

    It has been previously reported that α-lactose could be totally amorphized by ball milling. In this paper we report a detailed investigation of the structural and microstructural changes by which this solid state amorphization takes place. The investigations have been performed by Powder X-ray Diffraction, Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C CP-MAS) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The results reveal the structural complexity of the material in the course of its amorphization so that it cannot be considered as a simple mixture made of a decreasing crystalline fraction and an increasing amorphous fraction. Heating this complexity can give rise to a fully nano-crystalline material. The results also show that chemical degradations upon heating are strongly connected to the melting process. PMID:21983262

  8. Polarity effects in the lactose operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Altman, Sidney

    2004-05-21

    An intergenic RNA segment between lacY and lacA of the lactose operon in Escherichia coli is cleaved by RNase P, an endoribonuclease. The cleavage of the intergenic RNA was ten times less efficient than cleavage of a tRNA precursor in vitro. Fragments of the RNase P cleavage product are detectable in vivo in the wild-type strain but not in a mutant strain at the restrictive temperature. The cleavage product that contains lacA in the wild-type strain was quickly degraded. When this intergenic segment was cloned upstream of a reporter gene, the expression of the reporter gene was also inhibited substantially in wild-type E.coli, but not in a temperature sensitive mutant strain in RNase P at the restrictive temperature. These results support data regarding the natural polarity between lacZ versus lacA, the downstream gene. PMID:15123418

  9. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-10-06

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of /sup 14/C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of approx. 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA.

  10. The pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the composition and size of casein micelles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengjie; Jin, Shaoming; Guo, Huiyuan; Zhao, Liang; Ren, Fazheng

    2015-04-15

    The effects of lactose on the changes in the composition and size of casein micelles induced by high-pressure treatment and the related mechanism of action were investigated. Dispersions of ultracentrifuged casein micelle pellets with 0-10% (w/v) lactose were subjected to high pressure (400 MPa) at 20 °C for 40 min. The results indicated that the level of non-sedimentable caseins was positively related to the amount of lactose added prior to pressure treatment, and negatively correlated to the size. A mechanism for the pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the casein micelles is proposed. Lactose inhibits the hydrophobic interactions between the micellar fragments during or after pressure release, through the hydrophilic layer formed by their hydrogen bonds around the micellar fragments. In addition, lactose does not favour the association between calcium and the casein aggregates after pressure release. Due to these two functions, lactose inhibited the formation of larger micelles after pressure treatment.

  11. Quantification of lactose content in human and cow's milk using UPLC-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fusch, Gerhard; Choi, Arum; Rochow, Niels; Fusch, Christoph

    2011-12-01

    A sensitive, accurate, and specific quantitative UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for lactose measurement of cow's and human milk and validated with cow's milk samples certified by an external laboratory. The new method employs only a dilution of raw cow's and human milk for simple preparation with no need to remove protein and fat prior to analysis with UPLC-MS/MS. It was operated in negative mode to detect lactose molecules and labeled (13)C(12)-lactose with the highest sensitivity. The principle advantages of the new LC-MS/MS method were: completed lactose determination in 5 min, absolute recovery of 97-107%, lower limit of detection <5 ng/L, and 99% linearity over the concentration range of 0.7-4.4 mg/L for both cow's and human milk. The mean lactose concentration of 51 human milk samples was measured as 56.8 ± 5.5 g/L ranging from 43 to 65 g/L. The described method represents validated lactose analysis with high accuracy and precision for a routine lactose determination in raw human milk.

  12. Novel coprocessed excipients composed of lactose, HPMC, and PVPP for tableting and its application.

    PubMed

    Wang, SongTao; Li, JinZhi; Lin, Xiao; Feng, Yi; Kou, Xiang; Babu, Sreehari; Panicucci, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    New coprocessed excipients composed of α-lactose monohydrate (a filler), HPMC E3 (a binder), and PVPP (a superdisintegrant) were developed by spray drying in this study to improve the tableting properties of lactose. Factors affecting the properties of the coprocessed excipients were investigated by a 3 × 3 × 2 factorial design. These factors include lactose grade (90 M, 200 M, and 450 M), percentage of HPMC (3.5%, 7.0%, and 10.5%), and percentage of PVPP (0% and 3.5%). The results show that the compactability of the excipients could be significantly improved by increasing either the percentage of HPMC or the primary particle size of lactose. The addition of 3.5% PVPP had little effect on the compactability, but significantly improved the disintegration ability. The developed coprocessed excipients have much lower yield pressures and much higher working efficiency during tableting compared to the main raw material (α-lactose monohydrate). These improvements are mainly attributed to the addition of HPMC and the proximately 30% amorphous lactose formed during process. Both HPMC and amorphous lactose were homogeneously distributed on the surface of the secondary particles, maximizing their effect. Furthermore, the low hygroscopicity and high glass transition temperature of HPMC led to a high yield. The drug loading capacity of the newly coprocessed excipients is also excellent. In summary, the tri-component coprocessed excipients investigated are promising and worthy of further development. PMID:25841572

  13. Novel coprocessed excipients composed of lactose, HPMC, and PVPP for tableting and its application.

    PubMed

    Wang, SongTao; Li, JinZhi; Lin, Xiao; Feng, Yi; Kou, Xiang; Babu, Sreehari; Panicucci, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    New coprocessed excipients composed of α-lactose monohydrate (a filler), HPMC E3 (a binder), and PVPP (a superdisintegrant) were developed by spray drying in this study to improve the tableting properties of lactose. Factors affecting the properties of the coprocessed excipients were investigated by a 3 × 3 × 2 factorial design. These factors include lactose grade (90 M, 200 M, and 450 M), percentage of HPMC (3.5%, 7.0%, and 10.5%), and percentage of PVPP (0% and 3.5%). The results show that the compactability of the excipients could be significantly improved by increasing either the percentage of HPMC or the primary particle size of lactose. The addition of 3.5% PVPP had little effect on the compactability, but significantly improved the disintegration ability. The developed coprocessed excipients have much lower yield pressures and much higher working efficiency during tableting compared to the main raw material (α-lactose monohydrate). These improvements are mainly attributed to the addition of HPMC and the proximately 30% amorphous lactose formed during process. Both HPMC and amorphous lactose were homogeneously distributed on the surface of the secondary particles, maximizing their effect. Furthermore, the low hygroscopicity and high glass transition temperature of HPMC led to a high yield. The drug loading capacity of the newly coprocessed excipients is also excellent. In summary, the tri-component coprocessed excipients investigated are promising and worthy of further development.

  14. Additional Value of CH₄ Measurement in a Combined (13)C/H₂ Lactose Malabsorption Breath Test: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Houben, Els; De Preter, Vicky; Billen, Jaak; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-07

    The lactose hydrogen breath test is a commonly used, non-invasive method for the detection of lactose malabsorption and is based on an abnormal increase in breath hydrogen (H₂) excretion after an oral dose of lactose. We use a combined (13)C/H₂ lactose breath test that measures breath (13)CO₂ as a measure of lactose digestion in addition to H₂ and that has a better sensitivity and specificity than the standard test. The present retrospective study evaluated the results of 1051 (13)C/H₂ lactose breath tests to assess the impact on the diagnostic accuracy of measuring breath CH₄ in addition to H₂ and (13)CO₂. Based on the (13)C/H₂ breath test, 314 patients were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, 138 with lactose malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and 599 with normal lactose digestion. Additional measurement of CH₄ further improved the accuracy of the test as 16% subjects with normal lactose digestion and no H₂-excretion were found to excrete CH₄. These subjects should have been classified as subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. In conclusion, measuring CH₄-concentrations has an added value to the (13)C/H₂ breath test to identify methanogenic subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO.

  15. Additional Value of CH₄ Measurement in a Combined (13)C/H₂ Lactose Malabsorption Breath Test: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Houben, Els; De Preter, Vicky; Billen, Jaak; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-01

    The lactose hydrogen breath test is a commonly used, non-invasive method for the detection of lactose malabsorption and is based on an abnormal increase in breath hydrogen (H₂) excretion after an oral dose of lactose. We use a combined (13)C/H₂ lactose breath test that measures breath (13)CO₂ as a measure of lactose digestion in addition to H₂ and that has a better sensitivity and specificity than the standard test. The present retrospective study evaluated the results of 1051 (13)C/H₂ lactose breath tests to assess the impact on the diagnostic accuracy of measuring breath CH₄ in addition to H₂ and (13)CO₂. Based on the (13)C/H₂ breath test, 314 patients were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, 138 with lactose malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and 599 with normal lactose digestion. Additional measurement of CH₄ further improved the accuracy of the test as 16% subjects with normal lactose digestion and no H₂-excretion were found to excrete CH₄. These subjects should have been classified as subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. In conclusion, measuring CH₄-concentrations has an added value to the (13)C/H₂ breath test to identify methanogenic subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. PMID:26371034

  16. Interactions among lactose, β-lactoglobulin and starch in co-lyophilized mixtures as determined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hajihashemi, Zohreh; Nasirpour, Ali; Scher, Joël; Desobry, Stéphane

    2014-11-01

    Processing and storage change food powders containing a large quantity of lactose due to lactose crystallization and interactions among components. Model food systems were prepared by co-lyophilization of lactose, β-lactoglobulin (BLG), and gelatinized starch. A mixture design was used to define the percentage of each mixture component to simulate a wide range of food powders. Interactions among lactose, BLG and starch were studied using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) at different relative humidities (RH), before and after 3 months storage. Results showed the presence of hydrogen bonds among these components. Moreover, interactions or formation of hydrogen bonds among lactose, starch and BLG preserved BLG against freezing and freeze-drying shocks. Lactose crystallization could be identified by comparing infrared spectra of amorphous and crystallized lactose at O - H and C - H stretching vibration bands. PMID:26396334

  17. A mechanistic investigation on the utilization of lactose as a protective agent for multi-unit pellet systems.

    PubMed

    Chin, Wun Chyi; Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2016-03-01

    The effect of lactose particle size on the extent of pellet coat damage was investigated. The extent of pellet coat damage increased linearly with lactose median particle size. It was observed that coated pellets compressed with coarser lactose grades had larger and deeper surface indentations. The surfaces of the pellets compressed with coarser lactose grades were also found to be significantly rougher. Micronized lactose was capable of protecting pellet coats from damage brought about by the presence of coarser lactose particles. The findings suggested a protective effect that micronized lactose conferred to pellet coats was not only through dimensional delimitations but also by higher interparticulate friction and longer particle rearrangement phase. As a result, the pellet volume fraction in the system was reduced. The extent of pellet coat damage was found to escalate when the pellet volume fraction in such system increased beyond a critical value of 0.39.

  18. Effect of pH and lactose concentration on solvent production from whey permeate using Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, B.M.; Maddox, I.S.

    1987-02-20

    A study was performed to optimize the production of solvents from whey permeate in batch fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum P262. Fermentations performed at relatively low pH values resulted in high solvent yields and productivities, but lactose utilization was incomplete. At higher pH values, lactose-utilization was improved but acid production dominated over solvent production. When operating at the higher pH values, an increase in the initial lactose concentration of the whey permeate resulted in lower rates of lactose utilization, and this was accompanied by increased solvent production and decreased acid production. Analysis of data from several experiments revealed a strong inverse relationship between solvent yield and lactose utilization rate. Thus, conditions which minimize the lactose utilization rate such as low culture pH values or high initial lactose concentrations, favor solventogenesis at the expense of acid production. 12 references.

  19. Effect of storage conditions on compaction behavior of two grades of spray-dried lactose.

    PubMed

    Atassi, Faraj; Almaya, Ahmad; Aburub, Aktham

    2008-01-01

    In this work we examine the effect of storage conditions (moisture exposure) on the compression behavior of 2 grades of spray-dried lactose (Pharmatose DCL 11 and Pharmatose DCL 14) under 2 different circumstances. The first was to expose powder samples to moisture, then compress them. The second was to expose precompressed tablets to moisture. We clearly show that the effect of moisture exposure and amorphous content crystallization in spray-dried lactoses on compaction behavior depends on whether this moisture exposure takes place before or after compression. In addition, the impact of storage conditions depends on the grade of spray-dried lactose. PMID:18649218

  20. Prevalence and Characteristics of Chemical Intolerance: A Japanese Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kenichi; Uchiyama, Iwao; Katoh, Takahiko; Ogata, Hiromitsu; Arashidani, Keiichi; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Population-based cross-sectional study was performed to estimate the prevalence of chemical intolerance and to examine the characteristics of the sample. A Web-based survey was conducted that included 7,245 adults in Japan. The criteria for chemical intolerance proposed by Skovbjerg yielded a prevalence of 7.5% that was approximately consistent with that reported from a Danish population-based survey. Female gender, older age, and renovation in the house during the past 7 years were positively associated with chemical intolerance. Improvements in the condition were observed with daily ventilation habits. Medical history of atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, multiple chemical sensitivity, and depression were associated with chemical intolerance. Fatigue, depressed mood, and somatic symptoms were also positively correlated with chemical intolerance. Better elucidation of the causes, comorbidities, concomitants, and consequences of chemical intolerance has the potential to provide effective solutions for its prevention and treatment. PMID:25137616

  1. The lactose repressor system: paradigms for regulation, allosteric behavior and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C J; Zhan, H; Swint-Kruse, L; Matthews, K S

    2007-01-01

    In 1961, Jacob and Monod proposed the operon model for gene regulation based on metabolism of lactose in Escherichia coli. This proposal was followed by an explication of allosteric behavior by Monod and colleagues. The operon model rationally depicted how genetic mechanisms can control metabolic events in response to environmental stimuli via coordinated transcription of a set of genes with related function (e.g. metabolism of lactose). The allosteric response found in the lactose repressor and many other proteins has been extended to a variety of cellular signaling pathways in all organisms. These two models have shaped our view of modern molecular biology and captivated the attention of a surprisingly broad range of scientists. More recently, the lactose repressor monomer was used as a model system for experimental and theoretical explorations of protein folding mechanisms. Thus, the lac system continues to advance our molecular understanding of genetic control and the relationship between sequence, structure and function. PMID:17103112

  2. Defined bacterial culture development for methane generation from lactose. [Streptococcus lactis; Clostridium formicoaceticum; Methanococcus mazei

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.T.; Tang, I.C.; Okos, M.R.

    1988-06-20

    The defined microbial cultures for methane generation from lactose were investigated. A mixed culture consisting of homolactic (Streptococcus lactis), homoacetic (Clostridium formicoaceticum), and acetate-utilizing methanogenic (Methanococcus mazei) bacteria was used to convert lactose and whey permeate to methane at mesophilic temperatures (35-37/sup 0/C) and a pH around 7.0. Lactose was first converted to lactic acid by S. lactis, then to acetic acid by C. formicoaceticum, and finally to methane and CO/sub 2/ by M. mazei. About 5.3 mol methane were obtained from each mole of lactose consumed, and the conversion of acetate to methane was the rate-limiting step for this mixed-culture fermentation.

  3. Lactose-positive Vibrio in seawater: a cause of pneumonia and septicemia in a drowning victim.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M T; Avery, D M

    1980-01-01

    Lactose-positive Vibrio is a recently recognized marine organism that has pathogenic potential for humans. An organism was isolated from the sputum and blood of a man who was resuscitated after drowning in the sea. The isolates from both sources had the characteristics of lactose-positive Vibrio, which include positive oxidase, citrate, indole, and o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside reactions and negative Voges-Proskauer, urease, and sucrose reactions. Seawater samples from 21 sites around Galveston Island were cultured for lactose-positive Vibrio over a period of 4 weeks, and 36% of the samples yielded the organism. The environmental isolates were very similar to the clinical isolates in biochemical reactions and susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. The results indicate that lactose-positive Vibrio is a common organism in the marine environment and that it should be considered in the diagnosis of infections, including pneumonia, associated with exposure to the sea. PMID:7381003

  4. Solubility and selective crystallization of lactose from solutions of its hydrolysis products glucose and galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, J.R.; Hegglin, M.; Prenosil, J.E.

    1983-06-01

    A high degree of conversion is desired when lactose is hydrolyzed to glucose and galactose. This produces, however, a high concentration of galactose, which is inhibitory for the enzyme catalyst (beta-galactosidase). The inhibition can be reduced by limiting the conversion per pass over the enzyme (e.g. to ca. 50%), separating unconverted lactose from the reactor effluent, and recycling it to the reactor inlet. (This allows the overall conversion to be raised to ca. 80-90%). The solubilities of lactose, glucose, and galactose have been determined at various temperatures and for sugar mixtures having different concentrations and degrees of hydrolysis. Various cooling crystallizations have defined convenient and simple processes for the selective separation of lactose from its hydrolysis products.

  5. Effect of a lactose-containing sweetener on root dentine demineralization in situ.

    PubMed

    Aires, C P; Tabchoury, C P M; Del Bel Cury, A A; Cury, J A

    2002-01-01

    Since lactose has been used as an excipient in powdered sweeteners, we evaluated its effect on dentine demineralization, in an in situ crossover study. Twelve adult volunteers wore palatal appliances containing 4 blocks of bovine root dentine, which were submitted 4 times a day to: distilled water (negative control), aqueous solution of powdered sweetener (Zero Cal); experimental group), 1.5% lactose solution (active group), 1.5% sucrose solution (positive control). After 15 days, microhardness was determined on dentine surface (SMH) and on the sectioned blocks (CSMH). All groups presented statistical differences in SMH before and after the treatments; water increased, while sweetener, lactose and sucrose decreased SMH. By CSMH, the only significant difference was observed after sucrose treatment. The data suggest that sweeteners containing lactose as a bulking agent may be cariogenic for root dentine.

  6. The association between Internet addiction and belief of frustration intolerance: the gender difference.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chih-Hung; Yen, Ju-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Chung-Sheng; Wang, Shing-Yaw

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated the association between Internet addiction and frustration intolerance, the gender difference of frustration intolerance, and the gender differences of the association between Internet addiction and frustration intolerance. Participants were 2,114 students (1,204 male and 910 female) who were recruited to complete the Chen Internet Addiction Scale and Frustration Discomfort scale. Females had higher scores on the subscale of entitlement and emotional intolerance and the total scale of the frustration intolerance. There was a significant gender difference on the association between Internet addiction and frustration intolerance. The association was higher in male adolescents. Regression analysis revealed male adolescents with Internet addiction had higher intolerance to frustration of entitlement and emotional discomfort, and female adolescents with it had higher intolerance to emotional discomfort and lower tolerance to frustration of achievement. Frustration intolerance should be evaluated for adolescents with Internet addiction, especially for males. Rational emotive behavior therapy focusing on different irrational beliefs should be provided to male and female adolescents with Internet addiction.

  7. A comparison of intolerance of uncertainty in analogue obsessive-compulsive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Holaway, Robert M; Heimberg, Richard G; Coles, Meredith E

    2006-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty has been defined as the unwillingness to tolerate the possibility that negative events may occur in the future, no matter how low the probability [Personality Individual Differences 17 (1994), 791-802]. Previous research suggests that intolerance of uncertainty may be more specific to worry and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) than to other anxiety disorders [e.g., Dugas, M. J., Buhr, K., & Ladouceur, R. (2004). The role of intolerance of uncertainty in the etiology and maintenance of generalized anxiety disorder. In R. G. Heimberg, C. L. Turk, & D. S. Mennin (Eds.), Generalized anxiety disorder: Advances in research and practice (pp. 143-163). New York: Guilford Press]. However, Tolin et al. [J. Anxiety Disorders 17 (2003), 233-242] argued that intolerance of uncertainty may also play a central role in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Therefore, the current study compared intolerance of uncertainty in individuals with analogue GAD and/or OCD. Intolerance of uncertainty was strongly related to pathological worry, GAD symptoms, and OCD symptoms; however, neither worry nor GAD was found to be more strongly associated with intolerance of uncertainty than OCD. Further, individuals with analogue GAD or OCD reported more intolerance of uncertainty than controls, but they did not differ significantly from each other. These findings suggest that intolerance of uncertainty may be a central theme in a number of the anxiety disorders.

  8. Athermal character of the solid state amorphization of lactose induced by ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willart, J. F.; Caron, V.; Lefort, R.; Danède, F.; Prévost, D.; Descamps, M.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we report the possibility to reach pure glassy amorphous lactose by ball milling of crystalline α lactose under a dry nitrogen atmosphere. This route to the glassy state is found to be free of mutarotation towards the anomer β while this mutarotation is unavoidable using the usual thermal route, i.e. the quench of the liquid. This result definitely makes the 'local quench melting' hypothesis unsuitable to account for amorphization by ball milling.

  9. Bistability of the naturally induced lactose utilization system of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stajic, Jelena; Wall, Michael

    2006-03-01

    In the absence of the preferred sugar glucose, lactose utilization machinery in the bacterium E. coli is activated. The genetic circuit responsible for this response, lac operon, has been observed to exhibit bistability when induced by an artificial inducer, TMG. Here we investigate conditions under which bistability might be observed in response to lactose. The aim of our study is to establish whether the natural system exhibits bistability, as is often assumed despite the lack of experimental support.

  10. Sugar reduction of skim chocolate milk and viability of alternative sweetening through lactose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, X E; Lopetcharat, K; Qiu, Y; Drake, M A

    2015-03-01

    Milk consumption by Americans has not met the standards of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Chocolate milk can improve milk consumption, especially by children, due to its color and taste. However, the high sugar content of chocolate milk is a cause for concern about its healthfulness, resulting in its removal from some school lunch programs. It is important to reduce the sugar content of chocolate milk and still maintain acceptability among consumers. It is also important to investigate other natural alternatives to sweetening. The objectives of this study were to identify the different sweetness intensity perceptions of sucrose in water and various dairy matrices, to identify the acceptable reduction in sweet taste for chocolate milk for both young adults (19-35 yr) and children (5-13 yr), and to determine if lactose hydrolysis is a viable alternative. Threshold and power function studies were used to determine the benchmark concentration of sucrose in chocolate milk. The acceptability of sugar reduction from the benchmark concentration for both young adults and children and the acceptability of lactose hydrolyzed chocolate milk (4°C for 24 h) with added lactose for young adults were evaluated. Acceptability results demonstrated that sugar reduction in chocolate milk is possible for both young adults and children as long as it does not exceed a 30% reduction (from 205 mM). Lactose hydrolysis of added lactose was used to achieve the sweetness of sucrose in chocolate milk but required >7.5% (wt/vol) added lactose, which contributed undesirable calories, indicating that lactose hydrolysis may be more suitable for other dairy beverages that require less added sugar. The findings of this study demonstrate consumer acceptance of reduced-sugar chocolate milk and a possible way to use lactose hydrolysis in dairy beverages.

  11. Effect of age and lactose on sup 67 Cu utilization in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.; Dowdy, R.; Michelmann, E.; Hill, G.; Zinn, K.; Trrokey, D.; Ellersieck, M. )

    1991-03-15

    Young and old male Fischer 344 rats were fed a control diet or a lactose diet. After four weeks rats were gavaged with approximately 6.24 uCl {sup 67}Cu, placed in metabolism cages, and fed their respective diets for an additional two weeks. Daily whole body, urine and fecal radioactivity measurements were made. Rats were killed on day 42 and livers removed for radioactivity determination. Diet had no effect on whole body retention of {sup 67}Cu in the old rats; approximately 20% of the initial dose was retained by the end of the study. In the young rats, however, lactose appeared to enhance initial {sup 67}Cu retention; by day three young control rats retained only 30% of the initial dose, while the young lactose rats retained about 50%. Retention of {sup 67}Cu at the end of the study was approximately 15% and 20% for young control and young lactose rats, respectively. During the first four days post dosing, cumulative fecal {sup 67}Cu excretion was approximately 83% for young control rats and 69% for young lactose rats indicating enhancement of {sup 67}Cu absorption by lactose in the young rats. For old rats cumulative {sup 67}Cu excretion in feces was about 50% regardless of diet. Cumulative urinary {sup 67}Cu excretion was approximately 6% and 8% for young control and lactose rats, respectively vs about 11% for old rats. {sup 67}Cu retention in liver was greater in old rats regardless of diet. The early increase in {sup 67}Cu absorption after a bolus dose may have therapeutic implications. In light of current concern regarding Cu-carbohydrate interactions, the apparent enhancement Cu retention by lactose in young rats deserves further attention.

  12. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-04-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM.

  13. At-line measurement of lactose in dairy-processing plants.

    PubMed

    Glithero, Nick; Clark, Claire; Gorton, Lo; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Pasco, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Environmental and process control applications have needs for sensors that operate continuously or repeatedly, making them applicable to batch measurement and flowing product stream measurement. Additionally, for lactose monitoring in dairy-processing plants, the sensors must have sufficient flexibility to handle a wide range of substrate concentration and be resilient to withstand wide pH excursions brought about by frequent exposure to clean-in-place chemicals that happen without any warning. This paper describes the development and trialling of an at-line lactose biosensor that meets the needs of the dairy industry for loss monitoring of lactose in dairy-processing plants by the combination of a third-generation enzyme biosensor with a sequential injection analyser. Results, both from grab sample analysis and an at-line factory prototype, are shown from their operation when installed at a Fonterra dairy factory (New Zealand) during the 2011-2012 season. Previous sensor fabrication methods were converted to a single-step process, and the flow-through cell was adapted to bubble-free operation. The lactose concentration in wastewater-processing streams was successfully monitored by taking and analysing samples every 2-3 min, semi-continuously, for 3 months by an unskilled operator. The Fonterra site flushes approximately 100-300,000 L of wastewater per hour from its lactose plant. In the 2011-2012 season, the daily mean lactose content of this wastewater varied significantly, from 0.0 to 8.0% w/v (0-233,712 μM) and equated to substantial total losses of lactose over a 6-month period. These lactose losses represent lost saleable or useable product.

  14. Sugar reduction of skim chocolate milk and viability of alternative sweetening through lactose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, X E; Lopetcharat, K; Qiu, Y; Drake, M A

    2015-03-01

    Milk consumption by Americans has not met the standards of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Chocolate milk can improve milk consumption, especially by children, due to its color and taste. However, the high sugar content of chocolate milk is a cause for concern about its healthfulness, resulting in its removal from some school lunch programs. It is important to reduce the sugar content of chocolate milk and still maintain acceptability among consumers. It is also important to investigate other natural alternatives to sweetening. The objectives of this study were to identify the different sweetness intensity perceptions of sucrose in water and various dairy matrices, to identify the acceptable reduction in sweet taste for chocolate milk for both young adults (19-35 yr) and children (5-13 yr), and to determine if lactose hydrolysis is a viable alternative. Threshold and power function studies were used to determine the benchmark concentration of sucrose in chocolate milk. The acceptability of sugar reduction from the benchmark concentration for both young adults and children and the acceptability of lactose hydrolyzed chocolate milk (4°C for 24 h) with added lactose for young adults were evaluated. Acceptability results demonstrated that sugar reduction in chocolate milk is possible for both young adults and children as long as it does not exceed a 30% reduction (from 205 mM). Lactose hydrolysis of added lactose was used to achieve the sweetness of sucrose in chocolate milk but required >7.5% (wt/vol) added lactose, which contributed undesirable calories, indicating that lactose hydrolysis may be more suitable for other dairy beverages that require less added sugar. The findings of this study demonstrate consumer acceptance of reduced-sugar chocolate milk and a possible way to use lactose hydrolysis in dairy beverages. PMID:25529422

  15. Applying the Implicit Association Test to Measure Intolerance of Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Oriana; Dentale, Francesco; Lauriola, Marco; Leone, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) is a key trans-diagnostic personality construct strongly associated with anxiety symptoms. Traditionally, IU is measured through self-report measures that are prone to bias effects due to impression management concerns and introspective difficulties. Moreover, self-report scales are not able to intercept the automatic associations that are assumed to be main determinants of several spontaneous responses (e.g., emotional reactions). In order to overcome these limitations, the Implicit Association Test (IAT) was applied to measure IU, with a particular focus on reliability and criterion validity issues. The IU-IAT and the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory (IUI) were administered to an undergraduate student sample (54 females and 10 males) with a mean age of 23 years (SD = 1.7). Successively, participants were asked to provide an individually chosen uncertain event from their own lives that may occur in the future and were requested to identify a number of potential negative consequences of it. Participants' responses in terms of cognitive thoughts (i.e., cognitive appraisal) and worry reactions toward these events were assessed using the two subscales of the Worry and Intolerance of Uncertainty Beliefs Questionnaire. The IU-IAT showed an adequate level of internal consistency and a not significant correlation with the IUI. A path analysis model, accounting for 35% of event-related worry, revealed that IUI had a significant indirect effect on the dependent variable through event-related IU thoughts. By contrast, as expected, IU-IAT predicted event-related worry independently from IU thoughts. In accordance with dual models of social cognition, these findings suggest that IU can influence event-related worry through two different processing pathways (automatic vs. deliberative), supporting the criterion and construct validity of the IU-IAT. The potential role of the IU-IAT for clinical applications was discussed. PMID:27451266

  16. Treatment of 51 pregnancies with danaparoid because of heparin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard; Kreutzenbeck, Hans-Joachim; Magnani, Harry N

    2005-01-01

    Pregnant patients with acute venous thrombosis or a history of thrombosis may need alternative anticoagulation, when heparin intolerance occurs. Only limited data on the use of the heparinoid danaparoid are available in literature. We reviewed the use of danaparoid in 51 pregnancies of 49 patients identified in literature between 1981 and 2004. All patients had developed heparin intolerance (32 due to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, 19 mainly due to heparin-induced skin rashes) and had a current and/or past history of thromboembolic complications. The initial danaparoid dose regimens ranged from 1000 to 7500 U/day administered s.c. or i.v.. The median duration of danaparoid use was 10 weeks. Danaparoid was used until delivery of a healthy infant in 37 pregnancies. In the remaining 14 pregnancies it was stopped earlier, because anticoagulant treatment was no longer required (3/14) or an adverse event led to a treatment discontinuation (11/14). Four maternal bleeding events were recorded during pregnancy, delivery or postpartum, two of them were fatal due to placental problems. Three fetal deaths were recorded, all associated with maternal complications antedating danaparoid use. Danaparoid cross-reactivity was suspected in 4 HIT patients and 5 non-HIT patients with skin reactions and was confirmed serologically in one of the two HIT patients tested. In none of five fetal cord blood- and three maternal breast milksamples anti-Xa activity transfer was observed. In conclusion danaparoid can be used as an alternative antithrombotic agent in pregnant women with high thrombotic risk and intolerance to heparins. PMID:15630492

  17. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity.

    PubMed

    van de Heijning, Bert J M; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M

    2015-07-08

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%-75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed.

  18. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity

    PubMed Central

    van de Heijning, Bert J. M.; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%–75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed. PMID:26184291

  19. Autogenic-feedback training: A countermeasure for orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.; Pickering, Thomas G.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has identified cardiovascular deconditioning as a serious biomedical problem associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority has been given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder and the resulting orthostatic intolerance experienced by crewmembers upon their return to the 1g norm of Earth. The present study was designed to examine the feasibility of training human subjects to control their own cardiovascular responses to gravitational stimulation (i.e., a tilt table). Using an operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), we would determine if subjects could learn to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily.

  20. Exercise Intolerance In Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anisha A.; Hamilton, Dale J.

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of Americans with heart failure have preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Exercise intolerance is a hallmark of HFpEF, but the pathophysiology is not well understood. Diverse etiologies and incomplete mechanistic understanding have resulted in ineffective management strategies to improve the outcomes of HFpEF. Traditional therapies that have been beneficial in the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), neurohormonal blockade in particular, have not been effective in treating HFpEF. In this review, we address underlying mechanisms of HFpEF and present the rationale supporting exercise as a component of comprehensive management. PMID:27486493

  1. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial β-Galactosidases.

    PubMed

    Dutra Rosolen, Michele; Gennari, Adriano; Volpato, Giandra; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial β-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C) and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C) β-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9 U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis β-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis β-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C), at the end of a 12 h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9 U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of β-galactosidases in the food industry.

  2. Analysis of the mechanism and regulation of lactose transport and metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Tangney, Martin; Aass, Hans C; Mitchell, Wilfrid J

    2007-03-01

    Although the acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum is currently uneconomic, the ability of the bacterium to metabolize a wide range of carbohydrates offers the potential for revival based on the use of cheap, low-grade substrates. We have investigated the uptake and metabolism of lactose, the major sugar in industrial whey waste, by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Lactose is taken up via a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) comprising both soluble and membrane-associated components, and the resulting phosphorylated derivative is hydrolyzed by a phospho-beta-galactosidase. These activities are induced during growth on lactose but are absent in glucose-grown cells. Analysis of the C. acetobutylicum genome sequence identified a gene system, lacRFEG, encoding a transcriptional regulator of the DeoR family, IIA and IICB components of a lactose PTS, and phospho-beta-galactosidase. During growth in medium containing both glucose and lactose, C. acetobutylicum exhibited a classical diauxic growth, and the lac operon was not expressed until glucose was exhausted from the medium. The presence upstream of lacR of a potential catabolite responsive element (cre) encompassing the transcriptional start site is indicative of the mechanism of carbon catabolite repression characteristic of low-GC gram-positive bacteria. A pathway for the uptake and metabolism of lactose by this industrially important organism is proposed. PMID:17209069

  3. Competitive interactions between glucose and lactose with BSA: which sugar is better for children?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiulan; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2016-04-01

    The interactions of the sugars glucose and lactose with the transport protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated using fluorescence, FT-IR and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. The results indicated that glucose could be bonded and transported by BSA, mainly involving hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions (ΔH = -86.13 kJ mol(-1)). The obtained fluorescence data from the binding of sugar and BSA were processed by the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method, and the extracted concentration profiles showed that the equilibrium constant, rglucose:BSA, was about 7. However, the binding of lactose to BSA did not quench the fluorescence significantly, and this indicated that lactose could not be directly transported by BSA. The binding experiments were further performed using the fluorescence titration method in the presence of calcium and BSA. Calcium was added so that the calcium/BSA reactions could be studied in the presence or absence of glucose, lactose or hydrolysis products. The results showed that hydrolyzed lactose seemed to enhance calcium absorption in bovine animals. It would also appear that for children, lactose provides better nutrition; however, glucose is better for adults.

  4. [Beta-galactosidase activity of strains of Kluyveromyces spp. and production of ethanol from lactose].

    PubMed

    de Figueroa, L C; Heluane, H; Rintoul, M; Córdoba, P R

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the behavior of yeast of the genus Kluyveromyces (K. fragilis 507, K. lactis 29 and K. lactis 10), which grow on lactose as sole carbon source, since they possess an enzyme system for the utilization of this sugar. We determined the beta-galactosidase activity of these strains, grown in the logarithmic phase in media containing glucose and lactose. On addition of 0 to 12% v/v ethanol to cells treated with toluene, we did not observe inhibition of the enzyme in strain 10 of Kluyveromyces lactis, which showed the greatest activity (704.4 Units). Since there exist the possibility of industrial utilization of concentrated whey (4 times), we performed fermentation tests of the three strains, at 30 C, in media containing initial lactose concentrations of 16.5 and 24.5%. After 48 h the residual lactose concentration was practically zero, and the ethanol concentrations had reached 7.60 and 10.10% v/v. It might be expected that the rate of fermentation of a disaccharide such as lactose would be related to the rate of hydrolysis of the sugar, so that strains having a higher rate of enzymatic hydrolysis should show a higher fermentation rate. However, we did not observe such behavior, as strains of Kluyveromyces having enzymatic activities as different as K. lactis 10 (704.4 U) and K. lactis 29 (189.7 U) did not show any great difference in the production of ethanol from lactose. PMID:2129474

  5. Selection of Galactose-Fermenting Streptococcus thermophilus in Lactose-Limited Chemostat Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Terence D.; Crow, Vaughan L.

    1984-01-01

    Stock cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus are essentially galactose negative (Gal−). Although both galactose 1-phosphate uridyl transferase and uridine-5-diphospho-glucose 4-epimerase are present, suggesting that the genes for the Leloir pathway exist, cells cannot induce high levels of galactokinase. Therefore, galactose is largely excreted when cultures are grown on lactose, and most strains cannot be readily adapted to grow on free galactose. Gal− cultures were grown in a chemostat under lactose limitation in which high concentrations of residual galactose were present. Under this selection pressure, Gal+ organisms eventually took over the culture with all four strains examined. Gal+ cells had induced galactokinase, and three of the four strains grew on free galactose with doubling times of 40 to 50 min. When Gal+ organisms were grown on lactose in batch culture, the galactose moiety was only partially utilized while lactose was still present. As lactose was exhausted, and catabolite repression was lifted, the Leloir pathway enzymes (especially galactokinase) were induced and the residual galactose fermented. Neither phospho-β-galactosidase activity nor the enzymes of the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway were detected in S. thermophilus. In contrast to Streptococcus cremoris and Streptococcus lactis, fermentation was homolactic with galactose in batch cultures and with lactose limitation in the chemostat. When mixed Gal+-Gal− cultures were repeatedly transferred in milk, the Gal− cells became the dominant cell type. The Gal− phenotype of stock cultures probably reflects their prolonged maintenance in milk. PMID:16346586

  6. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial β-Galactosidases

    PubMed Central

    Dutra Rosolen, Michele; Gennari, Adriano; Volpato, Giandra; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial β-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C) and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C) β-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9 U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis β-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis β-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C), at the end of a 12 h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9 U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of β-galactosidases in the food industry. PMID:26587283

  7. Quantifying the release of lactose from polymer matrix tablets with an amperometric biosensor utilizing cellobiose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Knöös, Patrik; Schulz, Christopher; Piculell, Lennart; Ludwig, Roland; Gorton, Lo; Wahlgren, Marie

    2014-07-01

    The release of lactose (hydrophilic) from polymer tablets made with hydrophobically modified poly(acrylic acid) (HMPAA) have been studied and compared to the release of ibuprofen, a hydrophobic active substance. Lactose is one of the most used excipients for tablets, but lactose release has not been widely studied. One reason could be a lack of good analytical tools. A novel biosensor with cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) was used to detect the lactose release, which has a polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC) layer that increases the response. A sample treatment using polyethylenimine (PEI) was developed to eliminate possible denaturants. The developed methodology provided a good approach to detect and quantify the released lactose. The release was studied with or without the presence of a model amphiphilic substance, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), in the release medium. Ibuprofen showed very different release rates in the different media, which was attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the drug, the HMPAA and the SDS in the release medium. The release of hydrophilic lactose, which did not associate to any of the other components, was rapid and showed only minor differences. The new methodology provides a useful tool to further evaluate tablet formulations by a relatively simple set of experiments.

  8. Glucose and galactose absorption after ingestion of milk containing hydrolysed lactose in calves with diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, A

    2000-10-01

    Ten calves which had contracted acute diarrhoea caused by rotavirus, coronavirus and Cryptosporidium were used to test the hypothesis that feeding lactose-hydrolysed cow's milk instead of unprocessed cow's milk improves sugar absorption in diarrhoeic calves. The animals were rehydrated with an orally administered solution containing electrolytes and glucose. Thereafter the calves received one test meal of whole fresh cow's milk whose lactose had been hydrolysed by added lactase and one test meal of unprocessed cow's milk at an interval of 24 h in a cross-over design trial. In comparison with unprocessed milk, the intake of milk containing hydrolysed lactose resulted in a slight decrease of mean breath hydrogen concentration (P = 0.18), but also a slight decrease of mean blood galactose concentration (P = 0.14). There was no treatment effect on mean plasma glucose concentration. Peak plasma glucose and blood galactose concentration tended to be delayed after the intake of lactose-hydrolysed milk, which implies that gastric emptying was probably delayed. The results show that feeding milk which contains hydrolysed lactose does not significantly improve lactose utilization in calves that are suffering from benign infectious diarrhoea.

  9. Modeling of lactose crystallization and color changes in model infant foods.

    PubMed

    Nasirpour, A; Scher, J; Linder, M; Desobry, S

    2006-07-01

    Lactose crystallization and color changes in formulas containing beta-lactoglobulin and gelatinized starch were investigated. Model infant formulas were prepared by colyophilization of 3 components (lactose, beta-lactoglobulin, and gelatinized starch). A mixture design was used to choose the percentage of each mixture component. These formulas were stored for 3 mo at different relative humidities (RH), ranging from approximately 0 to 94.6%, to study the lactose crystallization and color changes. Crystallization kinetics was studied by gravimetric methods, and lactose state (crystalline vs. amorphous) was verified before and after storage by differential scanning calorimetry. Before storage, lyophilized lactose was amorphous, but during storage it crystallized, depending on the RH. The lactose crystallization RH depended on the quantity of beta-lactoglobulin and gelatinized starch, and by increasing these quantities, the crystallization RH increased. For some formulas, the crystallization RH was noted at 3 different RH during storage. The first was noted after 1 d of storage and the second and third were observed later on, showing that crystallization is a time-dependent phenomenon. Nonenzymatic browning was studied in model infant formulas by yellow color changes of samples at 11.3, 43.2, 54.5, and 75.4% RH. In this study, 7 mathematical models were proposed to predict the moisture sorption properties and color changes at different RH, and the models were validated by experimental results. PMID:16772552

  10. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial β-Galactosidases.

    PubMed

    Dutra Rosolen, Michele; Gennari, Adriano; Volpato, Giandra; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial β-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C) and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C) β-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9 U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis β-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis β-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C), at the end of a 12 h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9 U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of β-galactosidases in the food industry. PMID:26587283

  11. Isolation and nucleotide sequencing of lactose carrier mutants that transport maltose.

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, R J; Wilson, T H

    1985-01-01

    The wild-type lactose carrier of Escherichia coli has a poor ability to transport the disaccharide maltose. However, it is possible to select lactose carrier mutants that have an enhanced ability to transport maltose by growing E. coli cells on maltose minimal plates in the presence of isopropyl thiogalactoside (an inducer of the lac operon). We have utilized this approach to isolate 18 independent lactose permease mutants that transport maltose. The relevant DNA sequences have been determined, and all of the mutations were found to be single base pair changes either at triplet 177 or at triplet 236. The nucleotide changes replace alanine-177 with valine or threonine, or tyrosine-236 with phenylalanine, asparagine, serine, or histidine. Transport experiments indicate that all of the mutants have faster maltose transport compared with the wild-type strain. Position 177 mutants retain the ability to transport galactosides, such as lactose and melibiose, at rates similar to the rate of the wild-type strain. In contrast, the position 236 mutants are markedly defective in the ability to transport galactosides. With regard to secondary structure, alanine-177 and tyrosine-236 are located on adjacent hydrophobic segments of the lactose carrier that are predicted to span the membrane. Thus, the results of this study indicate that the substrate recognition site of the lactose carrier is located within the plane of the lipid bilayer. In addition, a tertiary structure model is proposed that suggests how certain transmembrane segments might be localized relative to one another. Images PMID:3889919

  12. The LuxS Based Quorum Sensing Governs Lactose Induced Biofilm Formation by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Duanis-Assaf, Danielle; Steinberg, Doron; Chai, Yunrong; Shemesh, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus species present a major concern in the dairy industry as they can form biofilms in pipelines and on surfaces of equipment and machinery used in the entire line of production. These biofilms represent a continuous hygienic problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is apparently dependent on LuxS quorum sensing (QS) by Autoinducer-2 (AI-2). However, the link between sensing environmental cues and AI-2 induced biofilm formation remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of lactose, the primary sugar in milk, on biofilm formation by B. subtilis and its possible link to QS processes. Our phenotypic analysis shows that lactose induces formation of biofilm bundles as well as formation of colony type biofilm. Furthermore, using reporter strain assays, we observed an increase in AI-2 production by B. subtilis in response to lactose in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, we found that expression of eps and tapA operons, responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis in B. subtilis, were notably up-regulated in response to lactose. Importantly, we also observed that LuxS is essential for B. subtilis biofilm formation in the presence of lactose. Overall, our results suggest that lactose may induce biofilm formation by B. subtilis through the LuxS pathway. PMID:26779171

  13. Observing a Lipid-Dependent Alteration in Single Lactose Permeases

    PubMed Central

    Serdiuk, Tetiana; Sugihara, Junichi; Mari, Stefania A.; Kaback, H. Ronald; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Lipids of the Escherichia coli membrane are mainly composed of 70–80% phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and 20–25% phosphatidylglycerol (PG). Biochemical studies indicate that the depletion of PE causes inversion of the N-terminal helix bundle of the lactose permease (LacY), and helix VII becomes extramembraneous. Here we study this phenomenon using single-molecule force spectroscopy, which is sensitive to the structure of membrane proteins. In PE and PG at a ratio of 3:1, ~95% of the LacY molecules adopt a native structure. However, when PE is omitted and the membrane contains PG only, LacY almost equally populates a native and a perturbed conformation. The most drastic changes occur at helices VI and VII and the intervening loop. Since helix VII contains Asp237 and Asp240, zwitterionic PE may suppress electrostatic repulsion between LacY and PG in the PE:PG environment. Thus, PE promotes a native fold and prevents LacY from populating a functionally defective, non-native conformation. PMID:25800555

  14. Healthy diet and lifestyle clustering and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Perry, I J

    2002-11-01

    Glucose intolerance represents a spectrum of abnormalities, including impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes. It is a major public health challenge worldwide, with rapidly increasing prevalence rates in both developed and developing countries. This global epidemic of diabetes is largely driven by the globalisation of Western culture and lifestyles. Specifically, there is now evidence from large-scale observational studies, and from intervention studies, of powerful synergistic interactions between diet, obesity, exercise, smoking and alcohol in the development of glucose intolerance. It is estimated that >90% of cases of type 2 diabetes in the population could be prevented with the adoption of a prudent diet (high in cereal fibre and polyunsaturated fatty acids and low in trans-fatty acids and glycaemic load), avoidance of overweight and obesity (BMI<25 kg/m2), engagement in moderate to vigorous physical activity for at least 0.5 h/d, non-smoking and moderate alcohol consumption. These findings are biologically plausible and have major public health implications. They form the basis for a clear, simple and coherent message for health promotion and public policy. However, to make progress on these issues health will need to be placed at the centre of public policy and relevant vested interests tackled, notably in the food, entertainment, tobacco and automobile industries. PMID:12691184

  15. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage. PMID:25231862

  16. [Histamine intolerance - are the criteria of an adverse reaction met?].

    PubMed

    Reese, Imke

    2016-06-01

    Searching the internet for an explaination of recurring symptoms, many people come across the so-called histamine intolerance disorder. Also many practitioners like to diagnose this disorder without making sure that reproducibility, a prerequisite for an adverse reaction, is present. Consequently, presumably affected persons are often advised to follow a low-histamine diet. Depending on the source of information, these diets often avoid a huge variety of foods containing more or less histamine, which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While most persons benefit from such a diet in the beginning - this might be due to the change in dietary habits or the expectation of symptom improvement by dieting - in the long run the expected loss of symptoms will not happen. Underlying a diminished capacity for histamine degradation, the lack of partial or complete symptom improvement might be due to the fact that endogenous histamine release is responsible for reactions. The role of ingested histamine is discussed controversially. However, it is more than obvious that the histamine content of a certain food alone is not enough to predict its tolerance.If histamine intolerance is suspected, an individual diagnostic and therapeutic procedure is mandatory in order to minimize avoidance and to preserve a high quality of life. Ideally this is done in a close cooperation between allergologists and nutritionists/dieticians. PMID:27177895

  17. Intolerance of sexy peers: intrasexual competition among women.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, Tracy; Sharma, Aanchal

    2011-01-01

    Intrasexual competition among males of different species, including humans, is well documented. Among females, far less is known. Recent nonexperimental studies suggest that women are intolerant of attractive females and use indirect aggression to derogate potential rivals. In Study 1, an experimental design was used to test the evolutionary-based hypothesis that women would be intolerant of sexy women and would censure those who seem to make sex too readily available. Results provide strong empirical support for intrasexual competition among women. Using independent raters, blind to condition, we found that almost all women were rated as reacting negatively ("bitchy") to an attractive female confederate when she was dressed in a sexually provocative manner. In contrast, when she was dressed conservatively, the same confederate was barely noticed by the participants. In Study 2, an experimental design was used to assess whether the sexy female confederate from Study 1 was viewed as a sexual rival by women. Results indicated that as hypothesized, women did not want to introduce her to their boyfriend, allow him to spend time alone with her, or be friends with her. Findings from both studies are discussed in terms of evolutionary theory.

  18. Intolerance of sexy peers: intrasexual competition among women.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, Tracy; Sharma, Aanchal

    2011-01-01

    Intrasexual competition among males of different species, including humans, is well documented. Among females, far less is known. Recent nonexperimental studies suggest that women are intolerant of attractive females and use indirect aggression to derogate potential rivals. In Study 1, an experimental design was used to test the evolutionary-based hypothesis that women would be intolerant of sexy women and would censure those who seem to make sex too readily available. Results provide strong empirical support for intrasexual competition among women. Using independent raters, blind to condition, we found that almost all women were rated as reacting negatively ("bitchy") to an attractive female confederate when she was dressed in a sexually provocative manner. In contrast, when she was dressed conservatively, the same confederate was barely noticed by the participants. In Study 2, an experimental design was used to assess whether the sexy female confederate from Study 1 was viewed as a sexual rival by women. Results indicated that as hypothesized, women did not want to introduce her to their boyfriend, allow him to spend time alone with her, or be friends with her. Findings from both studies are discussed in terms of evolutionary theory. PMID:21932332

  19. Differentiating intolerance of uncertainty from three related but distinct constructs.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Natalie O; Ivanova, Elena; Knäuper, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in uncertainty have been associated with heightened anxiety, stress and approach-oriented coping. Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a trait characteristic that arises from negative beliefs about uncertainty and its consequences. Researchers have established the central role of IU in the development of problematic worry and maladaptive coping, highlighting the importance of this construct to anxiety disorders. However, there is a need to improve our understanding of the phenomenology of IU. The goal of this paper was to present hypotheses regarding the similarities and differences between IU and three related constructs--intolerance of ambiguity, uncertainty orientation, and need for cognitive closure--and to call for future empirical studies to substantiate these hypotheses. To assist with achieving this goal, we conducted a systematic review of the literature, which also served to identify current gaps in knowledge. This paper differentiates these constructs by outlining each definition and general approaches to assessment, reviewing the existing empirical relations, and proposing theoretical similarities and distinctions. Findings may assist researchers in selecting the appropriate construct to address their research questions. Future research directions for the application of these constructs, particularly within the field of clinical and health psychology, are discussed.

  20. Healthy diet and lifestyle clustering and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Perry, I J

    2002-11-01

    Glucose intolerance represents a spectrum of abnormalities, including impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes. It is a major public health challenge worldwide, with rapidly increasing prevalence rates in both developed and developing countries. This global epidemic of diabetes is largely driven by the globalisation of Western culture and lifestyles. Specifically, there is now evidence from large-scale observational studies, and from intervention studies, of powerful synergistic interactions between diet, obesity, exercise, smoking and alcohol in the development of glucose intolerance. It is estimated that >90% of cases of type 2 diabetes in the population could be prevented with the adoption of a prudent diet (high in cereal fibre and polyunsaturated fatty acids and low in trans-fatty acids and glycaemic load), avoidance of overweight and obesity (BMI<25 kg/m2), engagement in moderate to vigorous physical activity for at least 0.5 h/d, non-smoking and moderate alcohol consumption. These findings are biologically plausible and have major public health implications. They form the basis for a clear, simple and coherent message for health promotion and public policy. However, to make progress on these issues health will need to be placed at the centre of public policy and relevant vested interests tackled, notably in the food, entertainment, tobacco and automobile industries.

  1. Cooperative binding of lactose and the phosphorylated phosphocarrier protein HPr(Ser-P) to the lactose/H+ symport permease of Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, J J; Saier, M H

    1995-01-01

    Lactobacillus brevis accumulates lactose and nonmetabolizable lactose analogues via sugar/H+ symport, but addition of glucose to the extracellular medium results in rapid efflux of the free sugar from the cells due to the uncoupling of sugar transport from proton transport. By using vesicles of L. brevis cells, we recently showed that these regulatory/effects could be attributed to the metabolite-activated ATP-dependent protein kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation of serine-46 in the phosphocarrier protein HPr [HPr(Ser-P)] of the phosphotransferase system and that a mutant form of HPr with the serine-46-->aspartate replacement ([S46D]HPr) is apparently locked in the seryl phosphorylated conformation. We here demonstrate that [S46D]HPr binds directly to inside-out membrane vesicles of L. brevis that contain the lactose permease. Sugar substrates of the permease markedly and specifically stimulate binding of [S46D]HPr to the membranes while certain transport inhibitors such as N-ethylmaleimide block binding. The pH dependency for binding follows that for transport. Wild-type HPr and the [S46A]HPr mutant protein did not appreciably compete with [S46D]HPr for binding to the permease. These results provide evidence for the direct interaction of HPr(Ser-P) with an allosteric site on the lactose/proton symporter of L. brevis for the purpose of regulating sugar accumulation in response to the metabolic needs of the cell. PMID:7831302

  2. Promoting Good Campus Relations: Dealing with Hate Crimes and Intolerance. Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This guidance has been produced to help higher education institutions (HEIs) deal with hate crimes and intolerance. Aiming to replace the previous Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals' guidance on extremism and intolerance, this publication provides an overview of the ways in which HEIs can encourage tolerance and respect and ensure that…

  3. Relationships among Perceived Racial Stress, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Worry in a Black Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucker, LaTanya S.; West, Lindsey M.; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among chronic worry, perceived racial stress, and intolerance of uncertainty in a sample of adults who racially identify as Black. Intolerance of uncertainty has been associated with worry and generalized anxiety disorder in predominantly White samples. Given that racial stress is likely…

  4. Intolerance and psychopathology: toward a general diagnosis for racism, sexism, and homophobia.

    PubMed

    Guindon, Mary H; Green, Alan G; Hanna, Fred J

    2003-04-01

    Racism, sexism, and homophobia do not fit into any current diagnostic category. The authors propose that those who engage in such behaviors display a form of psychopathology deserving of its own category. The common denominator seems to be intolerance. The authors explore the possibility of an intolerant personality disorder, outline likely symptoms, and suggest some possible treatment considerations.

  5. Studies on Intolerance in American Life. Program in American History and Civilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Lincoln Filene Center for Citizenship and Public Affairs.

    The narrative selected for this unit on intolerance illustrates the perennial and universal methods for scapegoating. The general teaching objectives are to lead the students: 1) to feelings of tolerance toward individuals and groups who are different; 2) to investigate intolerance in terms of some of its causes: fear, deprivation, threatened…

  6. Vitamin E and Vitamin C supplementation does not prevent glucose intolerance in obese-prone rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity-induced glucose intolerance affects over 70 million Americans. Elevated oxidative stress is associated with development of glucose intolerance. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that supplementation with the anti-oxidants vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol acetate; 0.4 g/kg diet) and vitamin...

  7. Discomfort Intolerance: Evaluation of a Potential Risk Factor for Anxiety Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Richey, J. Anthony; Cromer, Kiara R.; Buckner, Julia D.

    2007-01-01

    Discomfort intolerance, defined as an individual difference in the capacity to tolerate unpleasant bodily sensations, is a construct recently posited as a risk factor for panic and anxiety psychopathology. The present report used a biological challenge procedure to evaluate whether discomfort intolerance predicts fearful responding beyond the…

  8. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Index: Replication and Extension with an English Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carleton, R. Nicholas; Gosselin, Patrick; Asmundson, Gordon J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is related to anxiety, depression, worry, and anxiety sensitivity. Precedent IU measures were criticized for psychometric instability and redundancy; alternative measures include the novel 45-item measure (Intolerance of Uncertainty Index; IUI). The IUI was developed in French with 2 parts, assessing general…

  9. Utilization of lactose and galactose by Streptococcus mutans: transport, toxicity, and carbon catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Das, Satarupa; Burne, Robert A

    2010-05-01

    Abundant in milk and other dairy products, lactose is considered to have an important role in oral microbial ecology and can contribute to caries development in both adults and young children. To better understand the metabolism of lactose and galactose by Streptococcus mutans, the major etiological agent of human tooth decay, a genetic analysis of the tagatose-6-phosphate (lac) and Leloir (gal) pathways was performed in strain UA159. Deletion of each gene in the lac operon caused various alterations in expression of a P(lacA)-cat promoter fusion and defects in growth on either lactose (lacA, lacB, lacF, lacE, and lacG), galactose (lacA, lacB, lacD, and lacG) or both sugars (lacA, lacB, and lacG). Failure to grow in the presence of galactose or lactose by certain lac mutants appeared to arise from the accumulation of intermediates of galactose metabolism, particularly galatose-6-phosphate. The glucose- and lactose-PTS permeases, EII(Man) and EII(Lac), respectively, were shown to be the only effective transporters of galactose in S. mutans. Furthermore, disruption of manL, encoding EIIAB(Man), led to increased resistance to glucose-mediated CCR when lactose was used to induce the lac operon, but resulted in reduced lac gene expression in cells growing on galactose. Collectively, the results reveal a remarkably high degree of complexity in the regulation of lactose/galactose catabolism. PMID:20190045

  10. Evaluation of granulated lactose as a carrier for DPI formulations 1: effect of granule size.

    PubMed

    Du, Ping; Du, Ju; Smyth, Hugh D C

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of large granulated lactose carrier particle systems on aerosol performance of dry powder inhaler formulations. Granulated lactose carriers with average sizes ranging from 200 to 1,000 μm were prepared and subsequently fractionated into separate narrow size powders. The fractionated granulated lactose (GL) samples were characterized in terms of size, specific surface area, surface roughness, morphology, density, flowability, and solid-state. The in vitro aerosolization performance was performed on the different size fractions of GL samples from a commercial inhaler device (Aerolizer®) with a model formulation (2% w/w salbutamol sulfate). The cascade impaction parameters employed were 60 or 90 L/min with standard (aperture size, 0.6 mm) or modified piercing holes (aperture size, 1.2 mm) of the inhaler loaded capsules. It was shown that the largest size fraction formulation (850-1000 μm) had a slight improvement in the fine particle fraction (FPF) compared to immediately preceding size fractions, explained by a smaller adhesive force between drug and carrier. Compared to commercial piercing holes, enlarged piercing holes generated a slight decreasing trend of FPF as the lactose powder sizes increased from 200-250 μm to 600-850 μm, perhaps due to the reduced detachment force by flow forces. The size, surface roughness, density, and flowability of lactose carrier as well as device design all contributed to the aerosol dispersion performance of granulated lactose-based adhesive mixtures. It was concluded that poorer or enhanced redispersion performance is not an inherent property to the significantly large size of granulated lactose carriers as previously contended.

  11. Toward a definition of intolerance of uncertainty: a review of factor analytical studies of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale.

    PubMed

    Birrell, Jane; Meares, Kevin; Wilkinson, Andrew; Freeston, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Since its emergence in the early 1990s, a narrow but concentrated body of research has developed examining the role of intolerance of uncertainty (IU) in worry, and yet we still know little about its phenomenology. In an attempt to clarify our understanding of this construct, this paper traces the way in which our understanding and definition of IU have evolved throughout the literature. This paper also aims to further our understanding of IU by exploring the latent variables measures by the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS; Freeston, Rheaume, Letarte, Dugas & Ladouceur, 1994). A review of the literature surrounding IU confirmed that the current definitions are categorical and lack specificity. A critical review of existing factor analytic studies was carried out in order to determine the underlying factors measured by the IUS. Systematic searches yielded 9 papers for review. Two factors with 12 consistent items emerged throughout the exploratory studies, and the stability of models containing these two factors was demonstrated in subsequent confirmatory studies. It is proposed that these factors represent (i) desire for predictability and an active engagement in seeking certainty, and (ii) paralysis of cognition and action in the face of uncertainty. It is suggested that these factors may represent approach and avoidance responses to uncertainty. Further research is required to confirm the construct validity of these factors and to determine the stability of this structure within clinical samples.

  12. Effects of dietary lactose on incidence and levels of salmonellae on carcasses of broiler chickens grown to market age.

    PubMed

    Waldroup, A L; Yamaguchi, W; Skinner, J T; Waldroup, P W

    1992-02-01

    Two trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of lactose in the diet of broilers grown to market weights on incidence and levels of salmonellae on the carcass. Lactose was substituted for sand in otherwise nutritionally complete diets at levels of 0, 2.5, 5, and 7.5% and fed from day-old to 49 days of age. Birds were reared on used (Trial 1) or new (Trial 2) litter and inoculated via the drinking water on Days 2, 7, and 14 with 10(8) cfu/mL Salmonella typhimurium (ATCC 14028). At 50 days, 12 (Trial 1) or 24 (Trial 2) birds per treatment were processed and prechill carcasses were evaluated for salmonellae incidence and level by the most probable number (MPN) method. Body weight of male broilers was significantly reduced by feeding diets containing up to 7.5% lactose. Feed intake of broilers fed diets containing lactose was significantly reduced and feed utilization improved, suggesting that lactose provided some metabolizable energy. The degree of litter caking was significantly increased, and cecal pH was significantly decreased as dietary lactose increased. Prechill carcases of broilers fed diets with 7.5% lactose had significantly higher levels of salmonellae than did prechill carcasses of broilers fed 0% lactose. The results of the present study suggest that supplementing poultry diets with lactose is not a viable means in itself of reducing or eliminating salmonellae incidence or levels on processed broiler carcasses.

  13. Kinetic approaches to lactose operon induction and bimodality.

    PubMed

    Michel, Denis

    2013-05-21

    The quasi-equilibrium approximation is acceptable when molecular interactions are fast enough compared to circuit dynamics, but is no longer allowed when cellular activities are governed by rare events. A typical example is the lactose operon (lac), one of the most famous paradigms of transcription regulation, for which several theories still coexist to describe its behaviors. The lac system is generally analyzed by using equilibrium constants, contradicting single-event hypotheses long suggested by Novick and Weiner (1957). Enzyme induction as an all-or-none phenomenon. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 43, 553-566) and recently refined in the study of (Choi et al., 2008. A stochastic single-molecule event triggers phenotype switching of a bacterial cell. Science 322, 442-446). In the present report, a lac repressor (LacI)-mediated DNA immunoprecipitation experiment reveals that the natural LacI-lac DNA complex built in vivo is extremely tight and long-lived compared to the time scale of lac expression dynamics, which could functionally disconnect the abortive expression bursts and forbid using the standard modes of lac bistability. As alternatives, purely kinetic mechanisms are examined for their capacity to restrict induction through: (i) widely scattered derepression related to the arrival time variance of a predominantly backward asymmetric random walk and (ii) an induction threshold arising in a single window of derepression without recourse to nonlinear multimeric binding and Hill functions. Considering the complete disengagement of the lac repressor from the lac promoter as the probabilistic consequence of a transient stepwise mechanism, is sufficient to explain the sigmoidal lac responses as functions of time and of inducer concentration. This sigmoidal shape can be misleadingly interpreted as a phenomenon of equilibrium cooperativity classically used to explain bistability, but which has been reported to be weak in this system. PMID:23454080

  14. Stability of sugar solutions: a novel study of the epimerization kinetics of lactose in water.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Rim; Drake, Alex F; Elleman, Carole; Martin, Gary P; Warren, Frederick J; Perston, Benjamin B; Ellis, Peter R; Hassoun, Mireille A; Royall, Paul G

    2014-07-01

    This article reports on the stereochemical aspects of the chemical stability of lactose solutions stored between 25 and 60 °C. The lactose used for the preparation of the aqueous solutions was α-lactose monohydrate with an anomer purity of 96% α and 4% β based on the supplied certificate of analysis (using a GC analytical protocol), which was further confirmed here by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Aliquots of lactose solutions were collected at different time points after the solutions were prepared and freeze-dried to remove water and halt epimerization for subsequent analysis by NMR. Epimerization was also monitored by polarimetry and infrared spectroscopy using a specially adapted Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) method. Hydrolysis was analyzed by ion chromatography. The three different analytical approaches unambiguously showed that the epimerization of lactose in aqueous solution follows first order reversible kinetics between 25 to 60 °C. The overall rate constant was 4.4 × 10(-4) s(-1) ± 0.9 (± standard deviation (SD)) at 25 °C. The forward rate constant was 1.6 times greater than the reverse rate constant, leading to an equilibrium constant of 1.6 ± 0.1 (±SD) at 25 °C. The rate of epimerization for lactose increased with temperature and an Arrhenius plot yielded an activation energy of +52.3 kJ/mol supporting the hypothesis that the mechanism of lactose epimerization involves the formation of extremely short-lived intermediate structures. The main mechanism affecting lactose stability is epimerization, as no permanent hydrolysis or chemical degradation was observed. When preparing aqueous solutions of lactose, immediate storage in an ice bath at 0 °C will allow approximately 3 min (180 s) of analysis time before the anomeric ratio alters significantly (greater than 1%) from the solid state composition of the starting material. In contrast a controlled anomeric composition (~38% α and ~62% β) will

  15. Associations of the lactase persistence allele and lactose intake with body composition among multiethnic children.

    PubMed

    Malek, Adil J; Klimentidis, Yann C; Kell, Kenneth P; Fernández, José R

    2013-09-01

    Childhood obesity is a worldwide health concern with a multifaceted and sometimes confounding etiology. Dairy products have been implicated as both pro- and anti-obesogenic, perhaps due to the confounding relationship between dairy, lactose consumption, and potential genetic predisposition. We aimed to understand how lactase persistence influenced obesity-related traits by observing the relationships among lactose consumption, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) near the lactase (LCT) gene and body composition parameters in a sample of multiethnic children (n = 296, 7-12 years old). We hypothesized that individuals with the lactase persistence (LP) allele of the LCT SNP (rs4988235) would exhibit a greater degree of adiposity and that this relationship would be mediated by lactose consumption. Body composition variables were measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry and a registered dietitian assessed dietary intake of lactose. Statistical models were adjusted for sex, age, pubertal stage, ethnic group, genetic admixture, socio-economic status, and total energy intake. Our findings indicate a positive, significant association between the LP allele and body mass index (p = 0.034), fat mass index (FMI) (p = 0.043), and waist circumference (p = 0.008), with associations being stronger in males than in females. Our results also reveal that lactose consumption is positively and nearly significantly associated with FMI. PMID:23479116

  16. Improving powder flow properties of a cohesive lactose monohydrate powder by intensive mechanical dry coating.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Armstrong, Brian; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J; Morton, David A V

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the cohesive lactose powder flowability. A cohesive lactose monohydrate powder was processed in either a tumbling blender or an intensive mechanical processor with either magnesium stearate or fumed silica. No substantial changes in particle size were detected by laser diffraction following either treatment. The untreated lactose sample exhibited very poor powder flow. Only limited improvements in powder flowability were indicated after the tumbling blending, intensive mechanical processing with the fumed silica or without additives. However, the intensive mechanical processing of the lactose sample with magnesium stearate demonstrated exceptionally large increases in both poured and tapped density as well as notable improvements in all powder flowability indicators examined. Our findings support the use of intensive mechanical processing technique as an effective method to coat cohesive pharmaceutical powders with selected additives, modify the surface nature of the particles, reduce the interparticle cohesive forces and hence improve powder flowability. The subtle differences in powder flow behaviour of lactose samples between the untreated and tumbling blended powders with magnesium stearate were only detected by the powder rheometer using its dynamic mode, indicating its potential advantages over traditional powder flow characterisation approaches.

  17. [Effect of crystalline metastasis of lactose on hardness of compressed baby milk powder].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Mitsuho; Otsubo, Kazumitsu; Ohara, Mika; Omae, Rika; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the crystalline metastasis of lactose, which is a main component baby milk powder, and the hardness of baby milk powder compressed by humidification followed by drying. Because baby milk powder is manufactured using a spray dryer, lactose in compressed baby milk powder exists in an amorphous (solid dispersion) form. X-ray diffraction measurement showed that this amorphous lactose metastasized to β-form crystalline lactose, and thereafter metastasized to the α-form during the humidification-drying process. As a result of this crystalline metastasis, the hardness of the compressed baby milk powder increased, and then decreased. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed bridging structures between the particles increased and then decreased during the humidification-drying process. This showed that bridging structures between the particles produced by crystalline metastasis of lactose as a result of the humidification-drying process, which leads to an increase in the hardness of the compressed baby milk powder. These results show that the necessary degree of hardness of the porous compressed baby milk powder (necessary for packaging and transportation) resulted from the humidification-drying process. PMID:23123724

  18. In silico evolved lac operons exhibit bistability for artificial inducers, but not for lactose.

    PubMed

    van Hoek, M J A; Hogeweg, P

    2006-10-15

    Bistability in the lac operon of Escherichia coli has been widely studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, bistability has been observed when E. coli is induced by an artificial, nonmetabolizable, inducer. However, if the lac operon is induced with lactose, the natural inducer, bistability has not been demonstrated. We derive an analytical expression that can predict the occurrence of bistability both for artificial inducers and lactose. We find very different conditions for bistability in the two cases. Indeed, for artificial inducers bistability is predicted, but for lactose the condition for bistability is much more difficult to satisfy. Moreover, we demonstrate that in silico evolution of the lac operon generates an operon that avoids bistability with respect to lactose, but does exhibit bistability with respect to artificial inducers. The activity of this evolved operon strikingly resembles the experimentally observed activity of the operon. Thus our computational experiments suggest that the wild-type lac operon, which regulates lactose metabolism, is not a bistable switch. Nevertheless, for engineering purposes, this operon can be used as a bistable switch with artificial inducers. PMID:16877514

  19. Lactose autoinduction with enzymatic glucose release: characterization of the cultivation system in bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sonja; Junne, Stefan; Ukkonen, Kaisa; Glazyrina, Julia; Glauche, Florian; Neubauer, Peter; Vasala, Antti

    2014-02-01

    The lactose autoinduction system for recombinant protein production was combined with enzymatic glucose release as a method to provide a constant feed of glucose instead of using glycerol as a carbon substrate. Bioreactor cultivation confirmed that the slow glucose feed does not prevent the induction by lactose. HPLC studies showed that with successful recombinant protein production only a very low amount of lactose was metabolized during glucose-limited fed-batch conditions by the Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3)pLysS in well-aerated conditions, which are problematic for glycerol-based autoinduction systems. We propose that slow enzymatic glucose feed does not cause a full activation of the lactose operon. However recombinant PDI-A protein (A-domain of human disulfide isomerase) was steadily produced until the end of the cultivation. The results of the cultivations confirmed our earlier observations with shaken cultures showing that lactose autoinduction cultures based on enzymatic glucose feed have good scalability, and that this system can be applied also to bioreactor cultivations. PMID:24215862

  20. Drying and denaturation characteristics of whey protein isolate in the presence of lactose and trehalose.

    PubMed

    Haque, M Amdadul; Chen, Jie; Aldred, Peter; Adhikari, Benu

    2015-06-15

    The denaturation kinetics of whey protein isolate (WPI), in the presence and absence of lactose and trehalose, was quantified in a convective air-drying environment. Single droplets of WPI, WPI-lactose and WPI-trehalose were dried in conditioned air (2.5% RH, 0.5m/s air velocity) at two temperatures (65°C and 80°C) for 500s. The initial solid concentration of these solutions was 10% (w/v) in all the samples. Approximately 68% of WPI was denatured when it was dried in the absence of sugars. Addition of 20% trehalose prevented the irreversible denaturation of WPI at both temperatures. Thirty percent lactose was required to prevent denaturation of WPI at 65°C and the same amount of lactose protected only 70% of WPI from denaturation at 80°C. The secondary structures of WPI were found to be altered by the drying-induced stresses, even in the presence of 20% trehalose and 30% lactose.

  1. Construction of lactose-assimilating and high-ethanol-producing yeasts by protoplast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Farahnak, F.; Seki, T.; Ryu, D.D.Y.; Ogrydziak, D.

    1986-02-01

    The availability of a yeast strain which is capable of fermenting lactose and at the same time is tolerant to high concentrations of ethanol would be useful for the production of ethanol from lactose. Kluyveromyces fragilis is capable of fermenting lactose, but it is not as tolerant as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high concentrations of ethanol. In this study, the authors have used the protoplast fusion technique to construct hybrids between auxotrophic strains of S. cerevisiae having high ethanol tolerance and an auxotrophic strain of lactose-fermenting K. fragilis isolated by ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis. The fusants obtained were prototrophic and capable of assimilating lactose and producing ethanol in excess of 13% (vol/vol). The complementation frequency of fusion was about 0.7%. Formation of fusants was confirmed by the increased amount of chromosomal DNA per cell. Fusants contained 8 x 10/sup -9/ to 16 x 10/sup -8/ ..mu..g of DNA per cell as compared with about 4 x 10/sup -8/ ..mu..g of DNA per cell for the parental strains, suggesting that multiple fusions had taken place.

  2. Compatibility studies of acyclovir and lactose in physical mixtures and commercial tablets.

    PubMed

    Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz; Hassanzadeh, Davoud; Valizadeh, Hadi; Siahi-Shadbad, Mohammad R; Mojarrad, Javid Shahbazi; Robertson, Thomas A; Roberts, Michael S

    2009-11-01

    This study documents drug-excipient incompatibility studies of acyclovir in physical mixtures with lactose and in different tablet brands. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was initially used to assess compatibility of mixtures. The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum was also compared with the spectra of pure drug and excipient. Although DSC results indicated incompatibility with lactose, FTIR spectra were mostly unmodified due to overlapping peaks. Samples of isothermally stressed physical mixture were stored at 95 degrees C for 24 h. The residual drug was monitored using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay and data fitting to solid-state kinetic models was performed. The drug loss kinetics followed a diffusion model. The aqueous mixture of drug and excipient was heated in order to prepare an adduct mixture. HPLC analysis revealed one extra peak that was fractionated and subsequently injected into the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system. The MRM (Multiple Reaction Monitoring) chromatograms characterized the peak with molecular mass corresponding to an acyclovir-lactose Maillard reaction product. The presence of lactose in commercial tablets was checked using a new TLC method. Overall, the incompatibility of acyclovir with lactose was successfully evaluated using a combination of thermal methods and LC-MS/MS. PMID:19631740

  3. Mechanisms of Orthostatic Intolerance During Real and Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session MP1 includes short reports on: (1) Orthostatic Tests after 42 Days of Simulated Weightlessness; (2) Effects of 12 Days Exposure to Simulated Microgravity on Central Circulatory Hemodynamics in the Rhesus Monkey; (3) Increased Sensitivity and Resetting of Baroflex Control of Exercise Heart Rate After Prolonged Bed-Rest; (4) Complex Cardiovascular Dynamics and Deconditioning During Head-down Bed Rest; (5) The Cardiovascular Effects of 6 Hours of Head-down Tilt Upon Athletes and Non-athletes; (6) Individual Susceptibility to Post-spaceflight Orthostatic Intolerance: Contributions of Gender-related and Microgravity-related Factors; (7) Cassiopee Mission 1996: Comparison of Cardiovascular Alteration after Short and Long-term Spaceflights; (8) Cerebral and Femoral Flow Response to LBNP during 6 Month MIR Spaceflights (93-95); and (9) Cerebrovascular Changes due to Spaceflight and Postflight Presyncope.

  4. Fruit-induced FPIES masquerading as hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Alessandro; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Cotugno, Giovanna; Koch, Pierluigi; Dahdah, Lamia

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) symptoms develop at first introduction of fruit during weaning. We report on an infant with suspected HFI who presented with repeated episodes of vomiting and hypotension after ingestion of fruit-containing meals. The first episode occurred at age 4 months. Despite negative genetic testing for HFI, strict avoidance of fruit ingestion resulted in lack of recurrence of symptoms. Oral-fructose-tolerance testing conducted with an apple mousse did not determine hypoglycemia or fructosuria but caused severe hypotension. Allergy evaluations were negative, and the history was diagnostic for fruit-induced food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome. Because this non-immunoglobulin E-mediated gastrointestinal food hypersensitivity manifests as profuse, repetitive vomiting, often with diarrhea, leading to acute dehydration and lethargy, it may be misinterpreted as HFI. We advise pediatricians to consider food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in the differential diagnosis when there is a suspicion of HFI.

  5. Managing the patient with episodic sinus tachycardia and orthostatic intolerance.

    PubMed

    Narichania, Aalap D; Schleifer, J William; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Patients with episodic sinus tachycardia and associated orthostatic intolerance present a diagnostic and management dilemma to the clinician. We define this group of disorders to include sinus node reentrant tachycardia (SNRT), inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IAST), and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). After a brief review of the current understanding of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of this group of disorders, we focus on the diagnosis and management of IAST and POTS. Our approach attempts to recognize the considerable overlap in pathophysiology and clinical presentation between these two heterogeneous conditions. Thus, we focus on a mechanism-based workup and therapeutic approach. Sinus tachycardia related to identifiable causes should first be ruled out in these patients. Next, a basic cardiovascular and autonomic workup is suggested to exclude structural heart disease, identify a putative diagnosis, and guide therapy. We review both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy, with a focus on recent advances. Larger randomized control trials and further mechanistic studies will help refine management in the future.

  6. Intolerance of Uncertainty: A Temporary Experimental Induction Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Oriana; Lauriola, Marco; Carleton, R. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a trans-diagnostic construct involved in anxiety and related disorders. Research focused on cross-sectional reporting, manipulating attitudes toward objective and impersonal events or on treatments designed to reduce IU in clinical populations. The current paper presents an experimental procedure for laboratory manipulations of IU and tests mediation hypotheses following the Intolerance of Uncertainty Model. Methods On pre-test, undergraduate volunteers (Study 1, n = 43;68% women. Study 2, n = 169;83.8% women) were asked to provide an idiosyncratic future negative life event. State-IU, Worry, Positive and Negative Affect were assessed after that a standardized procedure was used to identify event’s potential negative consequences. The same variables were assessed on post-test, after that participants were asked to read-through increasing and decreasing IU statements. Results Temporary changes on IU were consistently reproduced in both studies. Participants receiving increasing IU instructions reported greater state-IU, Worry and Negative Affect than those receiving decreasing IU instructions. However, this latter condition was not different from a control one (Study 2). Both studies revealed significant indirect effects of IU induction instructions on Worry and Negative Affect through state-IU. Limitations Both studies used undergraduate psychology students samples, younger than average population and predominantly female. Experimental manipulation and outcome measures belongs to the same semantic domain, uncertainty, potentially limiting generalizability. Conclusions Results supported the feasibility and efficacy of the proposed IU manipulation for non-clinical sample. Findings parallel clinical research showing that state-IU preceded Worry and Negative Affect states. PMID:27254099

  7. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Elberling, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI). Methods The study included participants who had previously participated in a general population-based study and reported symptoms of environmental intolerance (n = 787) and patients with IEI (n = 237). The participants completed questionnaires assessing IEI, namely, a measure of repressive coping combining scores on the Marlowe–Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS) and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and a negative affectivity scale (NAS). Multiple, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted using IEI variables as the dependent variables. Results The TMAS and MCSDS scores were independently associated with the IEI variables, but there was no evidence of a role of the repressive coping construct. While the total alexithymia score was unrelated to IEI, the TAS-20 subscale of difficulties identifying feelings (DIF) was independently associated with symptoms attributed to IEI. Negative affectivity was a strong independent predictor of the IEI variables and a mediator of the association between DIF and IEI. Conclusion Our results provide no evidence for a role of repressive coping in IEI, and our hypothesis of an association with alexithymia was only partly supported. In contrast, strong associations between IEI and negative emotional reactions, defensiveness and difficulties identifying feelings were found, suggesting a need for exploring the influence of these emotional reactions in IEI. PMID:21432559

  8. Neuroleptic intolerance in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lejuste, Florian; Thomas, Laure; Picard, Géraldine; Desestret, Virginie; Ducray, François; Rogemond, Veronique; Psimaras, Dimitri; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Groc, Laurent; Leboyer, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To precisely describe the initial psychiatric presentation of patients with anti-NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies encephalitis (anti-NMDAR encephalitis) to identify potential clues enhancing its early diagnosis. Methods: We retrospectively studied the French Reference Centre medical records of every adult patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis to specify the patients' initial psychiatric symptoms leading to hospitalization in a psychiatric department and the reasons underlying the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Results: The medical records of 111 adult patients were reviewed. Psychiatric features were the initial presentation in 65 patients (59%). Among them, several psychiatric manifestations were observed, including visual and auditory hallucinations (n = 26, 40%), depression (n = 15, 23%), mania (n = 5, 8%), acute schizoaffective episode (n = 15, 23%), and eating disorder or addiction (n = 4; 6%). Forty-five patients (40% of total cohort) were first hospitalized in a psychiatric institution (91% women), with a median duration of stay of 9 days (range 0.25–239 days). Among them, 24 patients (53%) had associated discreet neurologic signs at the first evaluation, while 17 additional patients (38%) developed neurologic signs within a few days. Twenty-one patients (47%) were transferred to a medical unit for a suspicion of antipsychotic intolerance characterized by high temperature, muscle rigidity, mutism or coma, and biological results suggesting rhabdomyolysis. Conclusions: Several psychiatric presentations were observed in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, although none was specific; however, patients, mostly women, also had discreet neurologic signs that should be carefully assessed as well as signs of antipsychotic intolerance that should raise suspicion for anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  9. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome versus Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Sunnquist, Madison; Brown, Abigail; Newton, Julia L.; Strand, Elin Bolle; Vernon, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine has recommended a change in the name and criteria for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), renaming the illness Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). The new SEID case definition requires substantial reductions or impairments in the ability to engage in pre-illness activities, unrefreshing sleep, post-exertional malaise, and either cognitive impairment or orthostatic intolerance. Purpose In the current study, samples were generated through several different methods and were used to compare this new case definition to previous case definitions for CFS, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME-ICC), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), as well as a case definition developed through empirical methods. Methods We used a cross-sectional design with samples from tertiary care settings, a biobank sample, and other forums. 796 patients from the US, Great Britain, and Norway completed the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire. Results Findings indicated that the SEID criteria identified 88% of participants in the samples analyzed, which is comparable to the 92% that met the Fukuda criteria. The SEID case definition was compared to a four item empiric criteria, and findings indicated that the four item empiric criteria identified a smaller, more functionally limited and symptomatic group of patients. Conclusion The recently developed SEID criteria appears to identify a group comparable in size to the Fukuda et al. criteria, but a larger group of patients than the Canadian ME/CFS and ME criteria, and selects more patients who have less impairment and fewer symptoms than a four item empiric criteria. PMID:26345409

  10. Neuroleptic intolerance in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lejuste, Florian; Thomas, Laure; Picard, Géraldine; Desestret, Virginie; Ducray, François; Rogemond, Veronique; Psimaras, Dimitri; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Groc, Laurent; Leboyer, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To precisely describe the initial psychiatric presentation of patients with anti-NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies encephalitis (anti-NMDAR encephalitis) to identify potential clues enhancing its early diagnosis. Methods: We retrospectively studied the French Reference Centre medical records of every adult patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis to specify the patients' initial psychiatric symptoms leading to hospitalization in a psychiatric department and the reasons underlying the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Results: The medical records of 111 adult patients were reviewed. Psychiatric features were the initial presentation in 65 patients (59%). Among them, several psychiatric manifestations were observed, including visual and auditory hallucinations (n = 26, 40%), depression (n = 15, 23%), mania (n = 5, 8%), acute schizoaffective episode (n = 15, 23%), and eating disorder or addiction (n = 4; 6%). Forty-five patients (40% of total cohort) were first hospitalized in a psychiatric institution (91% women), with a median duration of stay of 9 days (range 0.25–239 days). Among them, 24 patients (53%) had associated discreet neurologic signs at the first evaluation, while 17 additional patients (38%) developed neurologic signs within a few days. Twenty-one patients (47%) were transferred to a medical unit for a suspicion of antipsychotic intolerance characterized by high temperature, muscle rigidity, mutism or coma, and biological results suggesting rhabdomyolysis. Conclusions: Several psychiatric presentations were observed in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, although none was specific; however, patients, mostly women, also had discreet neurologic signs that should be carefully assessed as well as signs of antipsychotic intolerance that should raise suspicion for anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:27606355

  11. Human Gut Microbiota Changes Reveal the Progression of Glucose Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuying; Shen, Dongqian; Fang, Zhiwei; Jie, Zhuye; Qiu, Xinmin; Zhang, Chunfang; Chen, Yingli; Ji, Linong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the relationship of gut microbiota with the development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we analyzed 121 subjects who were divided into 3 groups based on their glucose intolerance status: normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 44), prediabetes (Pre-DM; n = 64), or newly diagnosed T2DM (n = 13). Gut microbiota characterizations were determined with 16S rDNA-based high-throughput sequencing. T2DM-related dysbiosis was observed, including the separation of microbial communities and a change of alpha diversity between the different glucose intolerance statuses. To assess the correlation between metabolic parameters and microbiota diversity, clinical characteristics were also measured and a significant association between metabolic parameters (FPG, CRP) and gut microbiota was found. In addition, a total of 28 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were found to be related to T2DM status by the Kruskal-Wallis H test, most of which were enriched in the T2DM group. Butyrate-producing bacteria (e.g. Akkermansia muciniphila ATCCBAA-835, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii L2-6) had a higher abundance in the NGT group than in the pre-DM group. At genus level, the abundance of Bacteroides in the T2DM group was only half that of the NGT and Pre-DM groups. Previously reported T2DM-related markers were also compared with the data in this study, and some inconsistencies were noted. We found that Verrucomicrobiae may be a potential marker of T2DM as it had a significantly lower abundance in both the pre-DM and T2DM groups. In conclusion, this research provides further evidence of the structural modulation of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:24013136

  12. Synthesis of novel bioactive lactose-derived oligosaccharides by microbial glycoside hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Municio, Marina; Herrero, Miguel; Olano, Agustín; Moreno, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides are increasingly demanded within the Food Science domain because of the interesting healthy properties that these compounds may induce to the organism, thanks to their beneficial intestinal microbiota growth promotion ability. In this regard, the development of new efficient, convenient and affordable methods to obtain this class of compounds might expand even further their use as functional ingredients. This review presents an overview on the most recent interesting approaches to synthesize lactose-derived oligosaccharides with potential prebiotic activity paying special focus on the microbial glycoside hydrolases that can be effectively employed to obtain these prebiotic compounds. The most notable advantages of using lactose-derived carbohydrates such as lactosucrose, galactooligosaccharides from lactulose, lactulosucrose and 2-α-glucosyl-lactose are also described and commented. PMID:24690139

  13. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor. PMID:18800304

  14. Lactose and milk replacer influence on lead absorption and lead toxicity in calves

    SciTech Connect

    Zmudzki, J.; Bratton, G.R.; Womac, C.W.; Rowe, L.D. Jr.; Wagner, B.

    1986-03-01

    The absorption, tissue deposition, retention, and excretion of ingested lead is in large part due to associated dietary factors. Young suckling calves are extremely susceptible to low doses of lead, especially when maintained totally on milk. Unfortunately, the complexity of milk makes it difficult to determine which constituent is actually responsible for increased Pb absorption. Recent studies have shown that lactose, the major carbohydrate of milk, is a dietary factor that increases the absorption of several minerals including Pb in rats. The authors laboratory has recently demonstrated that milk greatly increased the tissue deposition of lead in calves. Lactose, however, has not been considered in the ruminant animal. Moreover, liquid milk seems to increase the absorption of lead more significantly than powdered milk. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of lactose and powdered milk on lead uptake and tissue distribution in calves.

  15. Nonenzymatic browning of lactose and caseinate during dry heating at different relative humidities.

    PubMed

    Pan, Geoffrey Ge; Melton, Laurence D

    2007-11-28

    Dry mixtures of lactose and caseinate were heated at 60 degrees C for up to 96 h at different relative humidities (RHs) ranging from 29 to 95%. The resulting nonenzymatic browning was studied by determining lactulosyl lysine formation in the caseinate (as measured by the conversion to furosine), amount of reacted lactose, loss of lysine, color formation, and fluorescent intensity. For each measurement, the maximum reaction occurred at intermediate RHs. While there is general agreement between the results obtained by different methods, discrepancies are understandable given the complex nature of nonenzymatic browning. It was shown that the degradation of the Amadori product, lactulosyl lysine, increased with RH. Moreover, the Maillard reaction, as opposed to caramelization of lactose, was the major pathway at all RHs. Visible browning occurred when the destruction of Amadori product became dominant, and interactions between sugar fragments and caseinate were not the rate-limiting steps in the nonenzymatic browning.

  16. Lactose biosensor based on lactase and galactose oxidase immobilized in polyvinyl formal.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep K; Kumar, Ashok; Chaudhary, Reeti; Suman; Pundir, Suman; Pundir, C S; Sehgal, Neeta

    2007-01-01

    A lactose biosensor was developed by immobilizing lactase and galactose oxidase in a polyvinyl formal membrane and was attached to the oxygen electrode of a dissolved oxygen analyzer for estimation of lactose in milk and food products. The enzyme immobilized polyvinyl formal membrane was characterized by atomic force microscopy. The biosensor showed the linearity for 1-7 g dl(-1) of lactose and can be reused for up to 20 measurements. The effects of pH, temperature and the stability of the immobilized lactase and galactose oxidase in PVF membrane were also studied. The enzyme membrane was found stable up to 35 degrees C and had a shelf-life of more than three months at 4 degrees C.

  17. Mild protein hydrolysation of lactose-free milk further reduces milk-related gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Turpeinen, Anu; Kautiainen, Hanna; Tikkanen, Marja-Leena; Sibakov, Timo; Tossavainen, Olli; Myllyluoma, Eveliina

    2016-05-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms associated with milk are common. Besides lactose, milk proteins may cause symptoms in sensitive individuals. We have developed a method for mild enzymatic hydrolysation of milk proteins and studied the effects of hydrolysed milk on gastrointestinal symptoms in adults with a self-diagnosed sensitive stomach. In a double blind, randomised placebo-controlled study, 97 subjects consumed protein-hydrolysed lactose-free milk or commercially available lactose-free milk for 10 d. Frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms during the study period was reported and a symptom score was calculated. Rumbling and flatulence decreased significantly in the hydrolysed milk group (P < 0·05). Also, the total symptom score was lower in subjects who consumed hydrolysed milk (P < 0·05). No difference between groups was seen in abdominal pain (P = 0·47) or bloating (P = 0·076). The results suggest that mild enzymatic protein hydrolysation may decrease gastrointestinal symptoms in adults with a sensitive stomach.

  18. Lactose maldigestion during methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Fijlstra, M; Rings, E H H M; Verkade, H J; van Dijk, T H; Kamps, W A; Tissing, W J E

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis suffer from anorexia, diarrhea, and stomach pain, often causing weight loss and malnutrition. When the intestinal function during mucositis would be known, a rational feeding strategy might improve the nutritional state, accelerate recuperation, and increase survival of mucositis patients. We developed a methotrexate (MTX)-induced mucositis rat model to study nutrient digestion and absorption. To determine lactose digestion and absorption of its derivative glucose during mucositis, we injected Wistar rats intravenously with MTX (60 mg/kg) or 0.9% NaCl (controls). Four days later, we orally administered trace amounts of [1-(13)C]lactose and [U-(13)C]glucose and quantified the appearance of labeled glucose in the blood for 3 h. Finally, we determined plasma citrulline level and harvested the small intestine to assess histology, myeloperoxidase level, glycohydrolase activity, immunohistochemical protein, and mRNA expression. MTX-treated rats showed profound villus atrophy and epithelial damage. During the experimental period, the absorption of lactose-derived [1-(13)C]glucose was 4.2-fold decreased in MTX-treated rats compared with controls (P < 0.01). Lactose-derived [1-(13)C]glucose absorption correlated strongly with villus length (rho = 0.86, P < 0.001) and with plasma citrulline level (rho = 0.81, P < 0.001). MTX treatment decreased jejunal lactase activity (19.5-fold, P < 0.01) and immunohistochemical protein and mRNA expression (39.7-fold, P < 0.01) compared with controls. Interestingly, MTX treatment did not affect the absorption of [U-(13)C]glucose during the experimental period. We conclude that lactose digestion is severely decreased during mucositis while glucose absorption is still intact, when supplied in trace amounts. Plasma citrulline level might be a useful objective, noninvasive marker for lactose maldigestion during mucositis in clinic.

  19. Nondestructive evaluation of crystallized-particle size in lactose-powder by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Satoshi; Hatakeyama, Sakura; Imai, Yoh; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2014-03-01

    Transmission-type terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is applied to evaluate crystallized lactose particle of size below 30 μm, which is far too small compared to the wavelength of incident terahertz (THz)-wave. The THz-absorption spectrum of lactose is successfully deconvoluted by Lorentzian to two spectra with peaks at 17.1 cm-1 (0.53 THz) and 45.6 cm-1 (1.37 THz) derived from α-lactose monohydrate, and a spectrum at 39.7 cm-1 (1.19 THz) from anhydrous β-lactose after removal of the broad-band spectrum by polynomial cubic function. Lactose is mainly crystallized into α-lactose monohydrate from the supersaturated solution at room temperature with a small amount of anhydrous β-lactose below 4%. The absorption feature is dependent on the crystallized particle size and the integrated intensity ratio of the two absorptions due to α-lactose monohydrate is correlated in linear for the size.

  20. Crystallization of amorphous lactose at high humidity studied by terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Alexander I.; Yang, Bin; Goldup, Stephen M.; Watkinson, Michael; Donnan, Robert S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the first use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to study the hydration and crystallization of an amorphous molecular solid at high humidity. Lactose in its amorphous and monohydrate forms exhibits different terahertz spectra due to the lack of long range order in the amorphous material. This difference allowed the transformation of amorphous lactose to its monohydrate form at high humidity to be studied in real time. Spectral fitting of frequency-domain data allowed kinetic data to be obtained and the crystallization was found to obey Avrami kinetics. Bulk changes during the crystallization could also be observed in the time-domain.

  1. Novel determination of protein, fat, and lactose of milk by liquid scintillation counter

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.C.; Shand, J.H.; West, I.G.

    1981-01-01

    A method for routine determination of protein, fat, and lactose contents of milk is based on the ability of a scintillation counter to measure coloration or opalescence through attenuation of photons emitted from sealed miniature carbon-14 and hydrogen-3 radioactive standards. A series of simplified and accurate analytical procedures enable full advantage to be taken of the automatic facilities on the modern liquid scintillation counter. The methods provide several advantages over existing procedures. Accuracy of quantification was high as assessed by comparing the results with those derived by recommended Kjeldahl, Gerber, and colorimetric procedures for protein, fat, and lactose determinations, respectively.

  2. Bistable behavior of the lac operon in E. coli when induced with a mixture of lactose and TMG.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Hernández, Orlando; Santillán, Moisés

    2010-01-01

    In this work we investigate multistability in the lac operon of Escherichia coli when it is induced by a mixture of lactose and the non-metabolizable thiomethyl galactoside (TMG). In accordance with previously published experimental results and computer simulations, our simulations predict that: (1) when the system is induced by TMG, the system shows a discernible bistable behavior while, (2) when the system is induced by lactose, bistability does not disappear but excessively high concentrations of lactose would be required to observe it. Finally, our simulation results predict that when a mixture of lactose and TMG is used, the bistability region in the extracellular glucose concentration vs. extracellular lactose concentration parameter space changes in such a way that the model predictions regarding bistability could be tested experimentally. These experiments could help to solve a recent controversy regarding the existence of bistability in the lac operon under natural conditions. PMID:21423364

  3. Two types of radicals in whole milk powder. Effect of lactose crystallization, lipid oxidation, and browning reactions.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Marianne K; Lauridsen, Lene; Skibsted, Leif H; Risbo, Jens

    2005-03-01

    Whole milk powder was stored in closed vials at 60 degrees C to induce crystallization of lactose within a short time scale. After an induction period of 3-4 days simultaneous crystallization of lactose, increase of water activity, formation of browning products, and increase of radical content took place. Radicals detected before lactose crystallization were characterized by a narrow ESR spectrum (g = 2.006) and could be depleted by removal of oxygen and therefore were assigned to oxidation processes. Late-stage radicals present after crystallization of lactose gave much wider spectra (g = 2.0048) and were independent of oxygen availability and assigned to late-stage Maillard reaction products. The study indicates that the processes of lactose crystallization, browning, and formation of radical species (g = 2.0048) are strongly coupled, while lipid oxidation is less dependent on the other processes. PMID:15740077

  4. Diagnosis, Prevention, and Management of Statin Adverse Effects and Intolerance: Canadian Consensus Working Group Update (2016).

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet; Tashakkor, A Yashar

    2016-07-01

    The Canadian Consensus Working Group has updated its evaluation of the literature pertaining to statin intolerance and adverse effects. This overview introduces a pragmatic definition of statin intolerance (goal-inhibiting statin intolerance) that emphasizes the effects of symptoms on achieving nationally vetted goals in patients fulfilling indications for lipid-lowering therapy and cardiovascular risk reduction. The Canadian Consensus Working Group provides a structured framework for avoiding, evaluating and managing goal-inhibiting statin intolerance. Particularly difficult practice situations are reviewed, including management in young and elderly individuals, and in athletes and labourers. Finally, targeted at specialty practitioners, more detailed analyses of specific but more unusual adverse effects ascribed to statins are updated including evidence regarding new-onset diabetes, cognitive dysfunction, cataracts, and the rare but important immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. PMID:27342697

  5. Elements involved in catabolite repression and substrate induction of the lactose operon in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Gosalbes, M J; Monedero, V; Pérez-Martínez, G

    1999-07-01

    In Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393, the chromosomally encoded lactose operon, lacTEGF, encodes an antiterminator protein (LacT), lactose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) elements (LacE and LacF), and a phospho-beta-galactosidase. lacT, lacE, and lacF mutant strains were constructed by double crossover. The lacT strain displayed constitutive termination at a ribonucleic antiterminator (RAT) site, whereas lacE and lacF mutants showed an inducer-independent antiterminator activity, as shown analysis of enzyme activity obtained from transcriptional fusions of lac promoter (lacp) and lacpDeltaRAT with the Escherichia coli gusA gene in the different lac mutants. These results strongly suggest that in vivo under noninducing conditions, the lactose-specific PTS elements negatively modulate LacT activity. Northern blot analysis detected a 100-nucleotide transcript starting at the transcription start site and ending a consensus RAT sequence and terminator region. In a ccpA mutant, transcription initiation was derepressed but no elongation through the terminator was observed in the presence of glucose and the inducing sugar, lactose. Full expression of lacTEGF was found only in a man ccpA double mutant, indicating that PTS elements are involved in the CcpA-independent catabolite repression mechanism probably via LacT. PMID:10383959

  6. Measurement of Enzyme Kinetics by Use of a Blood Glucometer: Hydrolysis of Sucrose and Lactose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinzerling, Peter; Schrader, Frank; Schanze, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    An alternative analytical method for measuring the kinetic parameters of the enzymes invertase and lactase is described. Invertase hydrolyzes sucrose to glucose and fructose and lactase hydrolyzes lactose to glucose and galactose. In most enzyme kinetics studies, photometric methods or test strips are used to quantify the derivates of the…

  7. Enzymatic-ultraviolet method for measuring lactose in milk: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Kleyn, D H; Trout, J R

    1984-01-01

    Collaborators in 8 dairy and food industry laboratories performed one lactose determination on each of 8 unknown samples of milk, lowfat milk, or skim milk, as 3 pairs of blind duplicates. Two known samples were provided to gain experience prior to analysis of the unknown samples. All of the above samples were also analyzed for lactose content by the official AOAC gravimetric method (16.507) by a commercial laboratory. From the overall mean of results on all samples, determinations by the enzymatic method averaged 0.49% lower than by the AOAC method. This difference was significant by the t-test (P = 0.05), which indicated a lack of agreement between the compared methods in determining lactose content. Standard deviations were similar for the 3 sets of blind duplicates which ranged between 3.67 and 4.55% lactose content. F-values revealed that variations between means obtained by laboratories differed significantly as compared with variations within laboratory means. The method has been adopted official first action.

  8. Influence of solvents on the habit modification of alpha lactose monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimaladevi, P.; Srinivasan, K.

    2013-02-01

    Restricted evaporation of solvent method was adopted for the growth of alpha lactose monohydrate single crystals from different solvents. The crystal habits of grown crystals were analysed. The form of crystallization was confirmed by powder x-ray diffraction analysis. Thermal behaviour of the grown crystals was studied by using differential scanning calorimetry.

  9. Lactose-mediated carbon catabolite repression of putrescine production in dairy Lactococcus lactis is strain dependent.

    PubMed

    del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, Maria; Martín, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species most widely used as a primary starter in the dairy industry. However, several strains of L. lactis produce the biogenic amine putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. We previously reported the putrescine biosynthesis pathway in L. lactis subsp. cremoris GE2-14 to be regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose but not lactose (Linares et al., 2013). The present study shows that both these sugars repress putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis subsp. lactis T3/33, a strain isolated from a Spanish artisanal cheese. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both glucose and lactose repressed the transcriptional activity of the aguBDAC catabolic genes of the AGDI route. Finally, a screening performed in putrescine-producing dairy L. lactis strains determined that putrescine biosynthesis was repressed by lactose in all the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains tested, but in only one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain. Given the obvious importance of the lactose-repression in cheese putrescine accumulation, it is advisable to consider the diversity of L. lactis in this sense and characterize consequently the starter cultures to select the safest strains.

  10. Efficient ethanol production from glucose, lactose, and xylose by recombinant Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Alterthum, F. ); Ingram, L.O. )

    1989-08-01

    Lactose and all of the major sugars (glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose, and mannose) present in cellulose and hemicellulose were converted to ethanol by recombinant Escherichia coli containing plasmid-borne genes encoding the enzymes for the ethanol pathway from Zymomonas mobilis. Environmental tolerances, plasmid stability, expression of Z. mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase, substrate range, and ethanol production (from glucose, lactose, and xylose) were compared among eight American Type Culture Collection strains. E. coli ATCC 9637(pLOI297), ATCC 11303(pLOI297), and ATCC 15224(pLOI297) were selected for further development on the basis of environmental hardiness and ethanol production. Volumetric ethanol productivities per hour in batch culture were 1.4 g/liter for glucose (12%), 1.3 g/liter for lactose (12%), and 0.64 g/liter for xylose (8%). Ethanol productivities per hour ranged from 2.1 g/g of cell dry weight with 12% glucose to 1.3 g/g of cell dry weight with 8% xylose. The ethanol yield per gram of xylose was higher for recombinant E. coli than commonly reported for Saccharomyces cerevisiae with glucose. Glucose (12%), lactose (12%), and xylose (8%) were converted to (by volume) 7.2% ethanol, 6.5% ethanol, and 5.2% ethanol, respectively.

  11. Hydrolysis of lactose in whey permeate for subsequent fermentation to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Coté, A; Brown, W A; Cameron, D; van Walsum, G P

    2004-06-01

    Fermentation of lactose in whey permeate directly into ethanol has had only limited commercial success, as the yields and alcohol tolerances of the organisms capable of directly fermenting lactose are low. This study proposes an alternative strategy: treat the permeate with acid to liberate monomeric sugars that are readily fermented into ethanol. We identified optimum hydrolysis conditions that yield mostly monomeric sugars and limit formation of fermentation inhibitors such as hydroxymethyl furfural by caramelization reactions. Both lactose solutions and commercial whey permeates were hydrolyzed using inorganic acids and carbonic acid. In all cases, more glucose was consumed by secondary reactions than galactose. Galactose was recovered in approximately stoichiometric proportions. Whey permeate has substantial buffering capacity-even at high partial pressures (>5500 kPa[g]), carbon dioxide had little effect on the pH in whey permeate solutions. The elevated temperatures required for hydrolysis with CO2-generated inhibitory compounds through caramelization reactions. For these reasons, carbon dioxide was not a feasible acidulant. With mineral acids reversion reactions dominated, resulting in a stable amount of glucose released. However, the Maillard browning reactions also appeared to be involved. By applying Hammet's acidity function, kinetic data from all experiments were described by a single line. With concentrated inorganic acids, low reaction temperatures allowed lactose hydrolysis with minimal by-product formation and generated a hexose-rich solution amenable to fermentation. PMID:15453474

  12. Galactooligosaccharides formation during enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose: towards a prebiotic-enriched milk.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Colinas, Barbara; Fernandez-Arrojo, Lucia; Ballesteros, Antonio O; Plou, Francisco J

    2014-02-15

    The formation of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) in skim milk during treatment with several commercial β-galactosidases (Bacillus circulans, Kluyveromyces lactis and Aspergillus oryzae) was analysed in detail, at 4 and 40°C. The maximum GOS concentration was obtained at a lactose conversion of approximately 40-50% with B. circulans and A. oryzae β-galactosidases, and at 95% lactose depletion for K. lactis β-galactosidase. Using an enzyme dosage of 0.1% (v/v), the maximum GOS concentration with K. lactis β-galactosidase was achieved in 1 and 5h at 40 and 4 °C, respectively. With this enzyme, it was possible to obtain a treated milk with 7.0 g/L GOS - the human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) concentration is between 5 and 15 g/L--and with a low content of residual lactose (2.1g/L, compared with 44-46 g/L in the initial milk sample). The major GOS synthesised by this enzyme were 6-galactobiose [Gal-β(1 → 6)-Gal], allolactose [Gal-β(1 → 6)-Glc] and 6'-O-β-galactosyl-lactose [Gal-β(1 → 6)-Gal-β(1 → 4)-Glc].

  13. Incorporation of acetaminophen as an active pharmaceutical ingredient into porous lactose.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Amirali; Saffari, Morteza; Dehghani, Fariba; Langrish, Timothy

    2016-02-29

    A new formulation method for solid dosage forms with drug loadings from 0.65 ± 0.03% to 39 ± 1% (w/w) of acetaminophen (APAP) as a model drug has been presented. The proposed method involves the production of highly-porous lactose with a BET surface area of 20 ± 1 m(2)/g as an excipient using a templating method and the incorporation of drug into the porous structure by adsorption from a solution of the drug in ethanol. Drug deposition inside the carrier particles, rather than being physically distributed between them, eliminated the potential drug/carrier segregation, which resulted in excellent blend uniformities with relative standard deviations of less than 3.5% for all drug formulations. The results of DSC and XRD tests have shown deposition of nanocrystals of APAP inside the nanopores of lactose due the nanoconfinement phenomenon. FTIR spectroscopy has revealed no interaction between the adsorbed drug and the surface of lactose. The final loaded lactose particles had large BET surface areas and high porosities, which significantly increased the crushing strengths of the produced tablets. In vitro release studies in phosphate buffer (pH 5.8) have shown an acceptable delivery performance of 85% APAP release within 7 minutes for loaded powders filled in gelatin capsules. PMID:26768724

  14. Minor component effects on the determination of fat, protein, and lactose in milk by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hop, E.; Lutz, E. T.; Luinge, Hendrik J.; de Jong, E. A.; van Hemert, H. A.

    1994-01-01

    The determination of fat, protein and lactose in milk by infrared spectrometry may be affected by the presence of minor components absorbing in interfering spectral regions. The size of these effects is reported. Also, analyses with conventional filter infrared spectrometers are compared with newly developed FT-IR based methods in combination with multivariate calibration techniques.

  15. Overexpression of a modified amaranth protein in Escherichia coli with minimal media and lactose as inducer.

    PubMed

    Morales-Camacho, Jocksan Ismael; Dominguez-Dominguez, Jorge; Paredes-Lopez, Octavio

    2013-04-01

    In this research it was attempted to overexpress the acidic subunit, from the 11S amaranth seed globulin termed amarantin, modified with antihypertensive peptides in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) by manipulating some factors in batch fermenter such as growth medium composition, inducer (isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside [IPTG] or lactose), air flow, cultivation temperature, agitation speed and induction time. The possibility of using several minimal media and lactose as inducer to increase yields of the recombinant protein was investigated. Previous fermentations at flask level showed that two minimal culture media (A6 and A7) and 0.5% (w/v) lactose presented high yields of the engineered protein expression. Thus, the latter two media were tested at fermenter level, the lactose inducer, and different environmental conditions. Factors with significant effects were identified by Plackett-Burman design with center points and were adjusted at the level suggested and the yields of the recombinant protein were increased from 303.2 to 1,531 mg L(-1) in A6 and from 363.4 to 1,681 mg L(-1) in A7. Unlike some patents where the highest productivity was achieved at 24 h or afterwards, in this research the best productivity of the recombinant acidic subunit was attained at 4 and 6 h of induction using both media, respectively. PMID:23294401

  16. Catabolism of glucose and lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-12-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with (13)C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with (13)C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-(13)Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-(13)Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-(13)C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by (13)C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only

  17. Catabolism of Glucose and Lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-13C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-13Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-13Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-13C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by 13C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only pathway

  18. Mechanisms of microgravity induced orthostatic intolerance: implications for effective countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2002-01-01

    The development of orthostatic hypotension and instability immediately after return from spaceflight has been a significant operational problem to astronauts for more than four decades. Significant reductions in stroke volume and peripheral vascular resistance contribute to ineffective maintenance of systemic arterial blood pressure during standing after spaceflight despite compensatory elevations in heart rate. The primary mechanism underlying reduced stroke volume appears to be a reduction in preload associated with reduced circulating blood volume, although cardiac atrophy might also contribute. Space flight and ground based experiments have demonstrated that an inability to provide adequate peripheral vasoconstriction in astronauts that become presyncopal may be associated with several mechanisms including reduced sympathetic nerve activity, arterial smooth muscle atrophy and/or hyporeactivity, hypersensitivity of beta-adrenergic receptors, etc. In addition, an inability to provide adequate tachycardia in presyncopal subjects may be associated with reduced carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. Based on the current knowledge and understanding of cardiovascular mechanisms that are altered during exposure to microgravity, a major focus of future research should be directed to the systematic evaluation of potential countermeasures that specifically target and restore the function of these mechanisms. Based on a preliminary systematic evaluation presented in this review, acute physical exercise designed to elicit maximal effort, G-suit inflation, artificial gravity, and specific pharmacological interventions, alone or in combination, have shown promise as successful countermeasures that provide protection against post-flight orthostatic intolerance.

  19. Molecular evidence for compound heterozygosity in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, C; Tolan, D R

    1990-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an inborn error of metabolism, inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder and caused by a decrease in the activity of fructose-1-phosphate aldolase (aldolase B) in affected individuals. Investigation of the molecular basis of HFI is reported here by the identification of two molecular lesions in the aldolase B gene of the HFI individual. Using polymerase chain reaction to specifically amplify exons at this locus and T7 polymerase for the sequence determination of these double-stranded fragments, we show the mutational heterogeneity of the proband. One allele, previously indicated by restriction analysis, was confirmed as A149P (Ala 149 to Pro in exon 5). The other allele was identified as a 4-bp deletion found in exon 4, a deletion which causes a frameshift at codon 118, resulting in a truncated protein of 132 amino acids. Segregation of these mutant alleles in the proband's family was shown by using allele-specific oligodeoxynucleotides to probe blots of amplified DNA. The techniques employed here represent a rapid and efficient method for detection of other mutations in families with this disease. In addition, the ability to detect mutant alleles by allele-specific hybridization offers a new method for definitive diagnosis, a method which avoids a fructose loading or liver-biopsy examination. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2339710

  20. Wheat Allergy and Intolerence; Recent Updates and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Imran; Saeed, Farhan; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Batool, Rizwana; Aziz, Mahwash; Ahmed, Waqas

    2016-01-01

    The current review paper highlights the complicacies associated with communities relying on wheat as their dietary staple. Although, wheat is an important source of nutrients but is also linked with allergenic responses in genetically susceptible subjects. The wheat proteins especially α-amylase inhibitors, ω-5 gliadins, prolamins, nonprolamin, glucoprotein, and profilins are of significance importance. The allergenic responses are further categorized into IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated reactions. Conjugation and degranulation of the IgEs with the allergens results in release of several mediators. In contrary, non-IgE-mediated wheat allergy depends on immune complexes formed by food and food antibodies and cell-mediated immunity. As results, different diseases tend to occur on the completion of these reactions, i.e., celiac disease, baker's asthma, diarrhea, atopic dermatitis, and urticaria. This instant paper highlighted the concept of food allergy with special reference to wheat. The models are developed that are included in this paper showing the wheat allergen, their possible routes, impact on human health, and indeed possible remedies. The paper would provide the basic information for the researchers, common man, and allied stakeholders to cater the issue in details. However, the issue needs the attention of the researchers as there is a need to clarify the issues of wheat allergy and wheat intolerance.

  1. Genes and exercise intolerance: insights from McArdle disease.

    PubMed

    Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Godfrey, Richard; Santalla, Alfredo; Coll-Cantí, Jaume; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Pinós, Tomàs; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Angel; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-02-01

    McArdle disease (glycogen storage disease type V) is caused by inherited deficiency of a key enzyme in muscle metabolism, the skeletal muscle-specific isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, "myophosphorylase," which is encoded by the PYGM gene. Here we review the main pathophysiological, genotypic, and phenotypic features of McArdle disease and their interactions. To date, moderate-intensity exercise (together with pre-exercise carbohydrate ingestion) is the only treatment option that has proven useful for these patients. Furthermore, regular physical activity attenuates the clinical severity of McArdle disease. This is quite remarkable for a monogenic disorder that consistently leads to the same metabolic defect at the muscle tissue level, that is, complete inability to use muscle glycogen stores. Further knowledge of this disorder would help patients and enhance understanding of exercise metabolism as well as exercise genomics. Indeed, McArdle disease is a paradigm of human exercise intolerance and PYGM genotyping should be included in the genetic analyses that might be applied in the coming personalized exercise medicine as well as in future research on genetics and exercise-related phenotypes.

  2. Mitochondrial myopathies: diagnosis, exercise intolerance, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Raha, Sandeep

    2005-12-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies are caused by genetic mutations that directly influence the functioning of the electron transport chain (ETC). It is estimated that 1 of 8,000 people have pathology inducing mutations affecting mitochondrial function. Diagnosis often requires a multifaceted approach with measurements of serum lactate and pyruvate, urine organic acids, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), muscle histology and ultrastructure, enzymology, genetic analysis, and exercise testing. The ubiquitous distribution of the mitochondria in the human body explains the multiple organ involvement. Exercise intolerance is a common but often an overlooked hallmark of mitochondrial myopathies. The muscle consequences of ETC dysfunction include increased reliance on anaerobic metabolism (lactate generation, phosphocreatine degradation), enhanced free radical production, reduced oxygen extraction and electron flux through ETC, and mitochondrial proliferation or biogenesis (see article by Hood in current issue). Treatments have included antioxidants (vitamin E, alpha lipoic acid), electron donors and acceptors (coenzyme Q10, riboflavin), alternative energy sources (creatine monohydrate), lactate reduction strategies (dichloroacetate) and exercise training. Exercise is a particularly important modality in diagnosis as well as therapy (see article by Taivassalo in current issue). Increased awareness of these disorders by exercise physiologists and sports medicine practitioners should lead to more accurate and more rapid diagnosis and the opportunity for therapy and genetic counseling. PMID:16331134

  3. Contextual Influences on Distress Intolerance: Priming Effects on Behavioral Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Szuhany, Kristin L.; Otto, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Distress intolerance (DI), the inability to tolerate stressful experiences, has been linked to multiple psychiatric conditions and maladaptive coping patterns. Although DI is often considered a trait-like variable, evidence indicates that self-report and behavioral indices of DI can be manipulated by contextual factors. Understanding such contextual influences is important given evidence of unexpected variability in these presumed trait-like measures over brief intervals. The current study examined the influence of context (manipulated by priming concepts of “Interminability” and “Brevity”) in predicting behavioral persistence, in relation to self-reported DI. Results indicated that priming Brevity was associated with terminating a cold-pressor task more quickly. Self-reported DI was linked to earlier termination, but there was no interaction between self-reported DI and priming condition. Results indicate that contextual cues modulate performance on behavioral measures of DI. Hence, models of DI should consider both trait-like and contextual factors in understanding variability in DI measures. PMID:26366022

  4. Systemic exercise intolerance disease: What's in a name?

    PubMed

    Sen, Mahadev Singh; Sahoo, Swapnajeet; Aggarwal, Shivali; Singh, Shubh Mohan

    2016-08-01

    The syndrome characterized primarily by chronic, disabling fatigue without adequate explanation has been of interest to patients, clinicians and researchers. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a widely used term for this condition in scientific and lay literature but is not acceptable to many patients because of perceived stigma due to implied psychological causation. CFS has recently been replaced by systemic exercise intolerance disease (SEID) by the Institute of medicine with the objectives of providing and disseminating evidence-based criteria and to provide a more acceptable name for this condition. Simultaneously, changes have taken place in DSM-5 with regards to this condition. Mental health professionals need to be aware of this change in the interests of patient care. The need to replace CFS with SEID and the nosological changes also indicate an inability to do away with the Descartian mind-body dualism despite efforts to the contrary and a need to debate the failure of the bio-psycho-social model to 'mainstream' and destigmatize psychiatry. PMID:27520920

  5. Odors eliciting fear: a conditioning approach to Idiopathic Environmental Intolerances.

    PubMed

    Leer, Arne; Smeets, Monique A M; Bulsing, Patricia J; van den Hout, Marcel A

    2011-06-01

    Patients suffering from Idiopathic Environmental Intolerances (IEI) report health symptoms, referable to multiple organ systems, which are triggered by harmless odors and therefore medically unexplainable. In line with previous research that predominantly points towards psychological explanations, the present study tests the hypothesis that IEI symptoms result from learning via classical conditioning of odors to fear. A differential conditioning paradigm was employed. Hedonically different odors were compared on ease of fear acquisition. Conditioned stimuli (CSs) were Dimethyl Sulfide (unpleasant) and peach (pleasant). The unconditioned stimulus (US) was an electrical shock. During acquisition one odor (CS+) was followed by shock, while the other odor (CS-) was not. Next, fear extinction was tested by presenting both CS+ and CS- without US. Electrodermal response, odor evaluation, and sniffing behavior were monitored. Results showed successful fear conditioning irrespective of hedonic character as evidenced by electrodermal response. Acquired fear did not extinguish. There was no evidence of evaluative conditioning taking place, as CS evaluation did not change during fear acquisition. Early avoidance of the CS+, as deduced from odor inhalation measures, was demonstrated, but did not sustain during the entire acquisition phase. This study suggests that a fear conditioning account of IEI is only partially satisfactory.

  6. Intolerance of uncertainty and attentional networks: Unique associations with alerting.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Thomas A; Carleton, R Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    The present study sought to extend our understanding as to how intolerance of uncertainty (IU) relates to information-processing by investigating associations between IU and attentional networks, including alerting, orienting, and executive attention. Based upon prior research, IU was expected to cluster with alerting. An unselected sample of college students (N=86; 79% women) completed self-report measures of IU and state anxiety, as well as the attention network test. Among the attentional networks, IU only shared a positive association with alerting and the association remained intact after statistically controlling for state anxiety. State anxiety did not moderate the association between IU and alerting. Although two IU dimensions (prospective and inhibitory) both shared a positive association with alerting, only prospective IU was associated with alerting after statistically controlling for state anxiety. The results provide evidence that IU relates to an overfunctioning of the alerting attentional network, which may suggest a role of hypervigilance and a greater influence of bottom-up processing in relation to IU. Implications for how these results advance our understanding of possible links between IU and anxiety disorders are discussed. PMID:27068067

  7. Fear of heights and mild visual height intolerance independent of alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Brandt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Visual height intolerance occurs when a visual stimulus causes apprehension of losing balance and falling from some height. Affecting one-third of the population, it has a broad spectrum of symptoms, ranging from minor distress to fear of heights, which is defined as a specific phobia. Specific phobias are associated with higher alcohol consumption. This has not been specifically shown for susceptibility to the more general visual height intolerance. Methods Representative case–control study nested within a population-based cross-sectional telephone survey to assess epidemiologically 1253 individuals ≥14 years, using a questionnaire on sociodemographic data, typical symptoms, precipitating visual stimuli, and alcohol drinking patterns (overall frequency of alcohol consumption, the daily quantities, and the motives). Results Individuals susceptible or nonsusceptible to visual height intolerance showed no significant differences in drinking patterns. The daily average alcohol consumption was slightly higher in persons susceptible to visual height intolerance (4.1 g/day vs. 3.7 g/day). Of those consuming alcohol, cases and controls reported on average consuming 2.3 glasses per day. The prevalence of visual height intolerance was insignificantly higher in the small minority of those drinking 2–3 times per week versus teetotalers. Conclusions Our study does not provide evidence that visual height intolerance – contrary to various specific phobias – is significantly associated with individual alcohol consumption patterns. PMID:24392279

  8. Fear of heights and mild visual height intolerance independent of alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Brandt, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Background Visual height intolerance occurs when a visual stimulus causes apprehension of losing balance and falling from some height. Affecting one-third of the population, it has a broad spectrum of symptoms, ranging from minor distress to fear of heights, which is defined as a specific phobia. Specific phobias are associated with higher alcohol consumption. This has not been specifically shown for susceptibility to the more general visual height intolerance. Methods Representative case-control study nested within a population-based cross-sectional telephone survey to assess epidemiologically 1253 individuals ≥14 years, using a questionnaire on sociodemographic data, typical symptoms, precipitating visual stimuli, and alcohol drinking patterns (overall frequency of alcohol consumption, the daily quantities, and the motives). Results Individuals susceptible or nonsusceptible to visual height intolerance showed no significant differences in drinking patterns. The daily average alcohol consumption was slightly higher in persons susceptible to visual height intolerance (4.1 g/day vs. 3.7 g/day). Of those consuming alcohol, cases and controls reported on average consuming 2.3 glasses per day. The prevalence of visual height intolerance was insignificantly higher in the small minority of those drinking 2-3 times per week versus teetotalers. Conclusions Our study does not provide evidence that visual height intolerance - contrary to various specific phobias - is significantly associated with individual alcohol consumption patterns.

  9. Shared Variance among Self-Report and Behavioral Measures of Distress Intolerance.

    PubMed

    McHugh, R Kathryn; Daughters, Stacey B; Lejuez, Carl W; Murray, Heather W; Hearon, Bridget A; Gorka, Stephanie M; Otto, Michael W

    2011-06-01

    Distress intolerance may be an important individual difference variable in understanding maladaptive coping responses across diagnostic categories. However, the measurement of distress intolerance remains inconsistent across studies and little evidence for convergent validity among existing measures is available. This study evaluated the overlap among self-report and behavioral measures of distress intolerance in four samples, including an unselected sample, a sample of patients with drug dependence, and two samples of cigarette smokers. Results suggested that the self-report measures were highly correlated, as were the behavioral measures; however, behavioral and self-report measures did not exhibit significant associations with each other. There was some evidence of domain specificity, with anxiety sensitivity demonstrating strong associations with somatic distress intolerance, and a lack of association between behavioral measures that elicit affective distress and those that elicit somatic distress. These findings highlight a potential divergence in the literature relative to the conceptualization of distress intolerance as either sensitivity to distress or as the inability to persist at a task when distressed. Further research is needed to elucidate the conceptualization and measurement of distress intolerance to facilitate future clinical and research applications of this construct.

  10. Novel high-performance metagenome β-galactosidases for lactose hydrolysis in the dairy industry.

    PubMed

    Erich, Sarah; Kuschel, Beatrice; Schwarz, Thilo; Ewert, Jacob; Böhmer, Nico; Niehaus, Frank; Eck, Jürgen; Lutz-Wahl, Sabine; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz

    2015-09-20

    The industrially utilised β-galactosidases from Kluyveromyces spp. and Aspergillus spp. feature undesirable kinetic properties in praxis, such as an unsatisfactory lactose affinity (KM) and product inhibition (KI) by galactose. In this study, a metagenome library of about 1.3 million clones was investigated with a three-step activity-based screening strategy in order to find new β-galactosidases with more favourable kinetic properties. Six novel metagenome β-galactosidases (M1-M6) were found with an improved lactose hydrolysis performance in original milk when directly compared to the commercial β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis (GODO-YNL2). The best metagenome candidate, called "M1", was recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) in a bioreactor (volume 35 L), resulting in a total β-galactosidase M1 activity of about 1100 μkatoNPGal,37 °C L(-1). Since milk is a sensitive and complex medium, it has to be processed at 5-10 °C in the dairy industry. Therefore, the β-galactosidase M1 was tested at 8 °C in milk and possessed a good stability (t1/2=21.8 d), a desirably low apparent KM,lactose,8 °C value of 3.8±0.7 mM and a high apparent KI,galactose,8 °C value of 196.6±55.5 mM. A lactose hydrolysis process (milk, 40 nkatlactose mLmilk,8 °C(-1)) was conducted at a scale of 0.5L to compare the performance of M1 with the commercial β-galactosidase from K. lactis (GODO-YNL2). Lactose was completely (>99.99%) hydrolysed by M1 and to 99.6% (w/v) by K. lactis β-galactosidase after 25 h process time. Thus, M1 was able to achieve the limit of <100 mg lactose per litre milk, which is recommended for dairy products labelled as "lactose-free".

  11. Anemia amelioration by lactose infusion during trypanosomosis could be associated with erythrocytes membrane de-galactosylation.

    PubMed

    Balogun, E O; Balogun, J B; Yusuf, S; Inuwa, H M; Ndams, I S; Sheridan, P; Inaoka, D K; Shiba, T; Harada, S; Kita, K; Esievo, K A N; Nok, A J

    2014-01-31

    African trypanosomosis is a potentially fatal disease that is caused by extracellular parasitic protists known as African trypanosomes. These parasites inhabit the blood stream of their mammalian hosts and produce a number of pathological features, amongst which is anemia. Etiology of the anemia has been partly attributed to an autoimmunity-like mediated erythrophagocytosis of de-sialylated red blood cells (dsRBCs) by macrophages. Lactose infusion to infected animals has proven effective at delaying progression of the anemia. However, the mechanism of this anemia prevention is yet to be well characterized. Here, the hypothesis of a likely induced further modification of the dsRBCs was investigated. RBC membrane galactose (RBC m-GAL) and packed cell volume (PCV) were measured during the course of experimental trypanosomosis in mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense (stb 212). Intriguingly, while the membrane galactose on the RBCs of infected and lactose-treated mice (group D) decreased as a function of parasitemia, that of the lactose-untreated infected group (group C) remained relatively constant, as was recorded for the uninfected lactose-treated control (group B) animals. At the peak of infection, the respective cumulative percent decrease in PCV and membrane galactose were 30 and 185 for group D, and 84 and 13 for group C. From this observed inverse relationship between RBCs membrane galactose and PCV, it is logical to rationalize that the delay of anemia progression during trypanosomosis produced by lactose might have resulted from an induction of galactose depletion from dsRBCs, thereby preventing their recognition by the macrophages.

  12. Chemical and proteolysis-derived changes during long-term storage of lactose-hydrolyzed ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) milk.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Therese; Jensen, Hanne B; Sundekilde, Ulrik K; Clausen, Morten R; Eggers, Nina; Larsen, Lotte B; Ray, Colin; Andersen, Henrik J; Bertram, Hanne C

    2014-11-19

    Proteolytic activity in milk may release bitter-tasting peptides and generate free amino terminals that react with carbohydrates, which initiate Maillard reaction. Ultrahigh temperature (UHT) heat treatment inactivates the majority of proteolytic enzymes in milk. In lactose-hydrolyzed milk a β-galactosidase preparation is applied to the milk after heat treatment, which has proteolytic side activities that may induce quality deterioration of long-term-stored milk. In the present study proteolysis, glycation, and volatile compound formation were investigated in conventional (100% lactose), filtered (60% lactose), and lactose-hydrolyzed (<1% lactose) UHT milk using reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteolysis was observed in all milk types. However, the degree of proteolysis was significantly higher in the lactose-hydrolyzed milk compared to the conventional and filtered milk. The proteins most prone to proteolysis were β-CN and αs1-CN, which were clearly hydrolyzed after approximately 90 days of storage in the lactose-hydrolyzed milk.

  13. Additional Value of CH4 Measurement in a Combined 13C/H2 Lactose Malabsorption Breath Test: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Els; De Preter, Vicky; Billen, Jaak; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The lactose hydrogen breath test is a commonly used, non-invasive method for the detection of lactose malabsorption and is based on an abnormal increase in breath hydrogen (H2) excretion after an oral dose of lactose. We use a combined 13C/H2 lactose breath test that measures breath 13CO2 as a measure of lactose digestion in addition to H2 and that has a better sensitivity and specificity than the standard test. The present retrospective study evaluated the results of 1051 13C/H2 lactose breath tests to assess the impact on the diagnostic accuracy of measuring breath CH4 in addition to H2 and 13CO2. Based on the 13C/H2 breath test, 314 patients were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, 138 with lactose malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and 599 with normal lactose digestion. Additional measurement of CH4 further improved the accuracy of the test as 16% subjects with normal lactose digestion and no H2-excretion were found to excrete CH4. These subjects should have been classified as subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. In conclusion, measuring CH4-concentrations has an added value to the 13C/H2 breath test to identify methanogenic subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. PMID:26371034

  14. Cerebral vasoconstriction precedes orthostatic intolerance after parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, J. M.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Brown, T. E.; Kassam, M. S.; Bondar, R. L.; Schlegel, T. T.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of brief but repeated bouts of micro- and hypergravity on cerebrovascular responses to head-up tilt (HUT) were examined in 13 individuals after (compared to before) parabolic flight. Middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA MFV; transcranial Doppler ultrasound), eye level blood pressure (BP) and end tidal CO(2) (P(ET)CO(2)) were measured while supine and during 80 degrees HUT for 30 min or until presyncope. In the postflight tests subjects were classified as being orthostatically tolerant (OT) (n = 7) or intolerant (OI) (n = 6). BP was diminished with HUT in the OT group in both tests (p < 0.05) whereas postflight BP was not different from supine in the OI group. Postflight compared to preflight, the reduction in P(ET)CO(2) with HUT (p < 0.05) increased in both groups, although significantly so only in the OI group (p < 0.05). The OI group also had a significant decrease in supine MCA MFV postflight (p < 0.05) that was unaccompanied by a change in supine P(ET)CO(2). The decrease in MCA MFV that occurred during HUT in both groups preflight (p < 0.05) was accentuated only in the OI group postflight, particularly during the final 30 s of HUT (p < 0.05). However, this accentuated decrease in MCA MFV was not correlated to the greater decrease in P(ET)CO(2) during the same period (R = 0.20, p = 0.42). Although cerebral vascular resistance (CVR) also increased in the OI group during the last 30 s of HUT postflight (p < 0.05), the dynamic autoregulatory gain was not simultaneously changed. Therefore, we conclude that in the OI individuals, parabolic flight was associated with cerebral hypoperfusion following a paradoxical augmentation of CVR by a mechanism that was not related to changes in autoregulation nor strictly to changes in P(ET)CO(2).

  15. Visual height intolerance and acrophobia: clinical characteristics and comorbidity patterns.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Fitz, Werner; Brandt, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the general population lifetime and point prevalence of visual height intolerance and acrophobia, to define their clinical characteristics, and to determine their anxious and depressive comorbidities. A case-control study was conducted within a German population-based cross-sectional telephone survey. A representative sample of 2,012 individuals aged 14 and above was selected. Defined neurological conditions (migraine, Menière's disease, motion sickness), symptom pattern, age of first manifestation, precipitating height stimuli, course of illness, psychosocial impairment, and comorbidity patterns (anxiety conditions, depressive disorders according to DSM-IV-TR) for vHI and acrophobia were assessed. The lifetime prevalence of vHI was 28.5% (women 32.4%, men 24.5%). Initial attacks occurred predominantly (36%) in the second decade. A rapid generalization to other height stimuli and a chronic course of illness with at least moderate impairment were observed. A total of 22.5% of individuals with vHI experienced the intensity of panic attacks. The lifetime prevalence of acrophobia was 6.4% (women 8.6%, men 4.1%), and point prevalence was 2.0% (women 2.8%; men 1.1%). VHI and even more acrophobia were associated with high rates of comorbid anxious and depressive conditions. Migraine was both a significant predictor of later acrophobia and a significant consequence of previous acrophobia. VHI affects nearly a third of the general population; in more than 20% of these persons, vHI occasionally develops into panic attacks and in 6.4%, it escalates to acrophobia. Symptoms and degree of social impairment form a continuum of mild to seriously distressing conditions in susceptible subjects.

  16. Visual height intolerance and acrophobia: distressing partners for life.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Fitz, Werner; Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Brandt, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The course of illness, the degree of social impairment, and the rate of help-seeking behavior was evaluated in a sample of individuals with visual height intolerance (vHI) and acrophobia. On the basis of a previously described epidemiological sample representative of the German general population, 574 individuals with vHI were identified, 128 fulfilled the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria of acrophobia. The illness of the majority of all susceptible individuals with vHI ran a year-long chronic course. Two thirds were in the category "persistent/worse", whereas only one third was in the category "improved/remitted". Subjects with acrophobia showed significantly more traumatic triggers of onset, more signs of generalization to other height stimuli, higher rates of increasing intensity of symptom load, higher grades of social impairment, and greater overall negative impact on the quality of life than those with pure vHI. An unfavorable course of illness in pure vHI was predicted by major depression, agoraphobia, social phobia, posttraumatic stress, initial traumatic trigger, and female sex; an unfavorable course in acrophobia was predicted by major depression, chronic fatigue, panic attacks, initial traumatic trigger, social phobia, other specific phobic fears, and female sex. Help-seeking behavior was astonishingly low in the overall sample of individuals with vHI. The consequences of therapeutic interventions if complied with at all were quite modest. In adults pure vHI and even more so acrophobia are by no means only transitionally distressing states. In contrast to their occurrence in children they are more often persisting and disabling conditions. Both the utilization of and adequacy of treatment of these illnesses pose major challenges within primary and secondary neurological and psychiatric medical care.

  17. Prevalence and characteristics of lactose non-fermenting Escherichia coli in urinary isolates.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiyoung; Yu, Jinkyung; Lee, Hyeyoung; Ryu, Hyejin; Park, Kanggyun; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2014-11-01

    Recently, serotype O75 was found to be prominent among the non-ST131 ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli, and they were all lactose non-fermenters. In this study, we investigated the prevalence and characteristics of lactose non-fermenters in urinary isolates of E. coli. A total of 167 E. coli isolates was collected. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were determined by VITEK 2 (bioMerieux, France). The lactose non-fermenters underwent PCR-based O typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis, phylogenetic grouping. For ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, the resistance mechanisms were investigated. Thirty-three (19.7%) isolates were lactose non-fermenters and the ciprofloxacin resistance rate was significantly higher than in lactose fermenters (66.7% vs. 31.6%, P = 0.0002). According to the serotype, O75 was the most common (42.4%, 14/33) and was followed by O16 (5/33), O2 (4/33), O25b (3/33), O15 (1/33), O6 (1/33), O1 (1/33). All the O75 isolates were ciprofloxacin-resistant and belonged to ST1193. By MLST, they were resolved into 11 STs. ST1193 was the most common (14/33) and was followed by ST131 (8/33). Interestingly, 8 isolates of ST131 were divided into three O types [O16 (4 isolates), O25b (3), and non-typeable (1)]. The ciprofloxacin resistance rate was high in isolates of O75-ST1193 and O25b-ST131 but low in O16-ST131 and O2-ST95. All the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates showed identical triple mutations in gyrA and parC but the serotype O25b isolates had an additional mutation in parC (E84V). Only one isolate harbored aac(6')-Ib-cr variant and no qnr gene was detected. Continuous monitoring of the prevalence and clonal composition of the lactose non-fermenters is needed.

  18. Failure of lactose-restricted diets to prevent radiation-induced diarrhea in patients undergoing whole pelvis irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Bartholomew, M.

    1986-05-01

    Sixty-four patients were randomized prior to pelvic radiotherapy into one of three dietary groups: the control group maintained a regular diet except that they drank at least 480 cc of milk daily; the lactose-restricted group was placed on a lactose-restricted diet; and the lactase group drank at least 480 cc of milk with lactase enzyme added to hydrolyze 90% of the lactose. The patients kept records of their stool frequency and the number of diphenoxylate tablets required to control their diarrhea during a 5 week course of standard whole pelvis irradiation. The data does not support the concept that one of the mechanisms of radiation-induced diarrhea associated with pelvic irradiation is a reduction the ability of the intestine to hydrolyze ingested lactose due to the effect of the radiation on the small intestine. There was not a significant difference in stool frequency or diphenoxylate usage among the dietary groups.

  19. Statin intolerance - an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P; Farnier, Michel; Davidson, Michael H; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Aronow, Wilbert S; Athyros, Vasilis; Djuric, Dragan M; Ezhov, Marat V; Greenfield, Robert S; Hovingh, G Kees; Kostner, Karam; Serban, Corina; Lighezan, Daniel; Fras, Zlatko; Moriarty, Patrick M; Muntner, Paul; Goudev, Assen; Ceska, Richard; Nicholls, Stephen J; Broncel, Marlena; Nikolic, Dragana; Pella, Daniel; Puri, Raman; Rysz, Jacek; Wong, Nathan D; Bajnok, Laszlo; Jones, Steven R; Ray, Kausik K; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-06-01

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term 'statin intolerance'. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy, excluding other side effects might underestimate the number of patients with statin intolerance, which might be observed in 10 - 15% of patients. In clinical practice, statin intolerance limits effective treatment of patients at risk of, or with, cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of the most common adverse effects of statin therapy that might cause statin intolerance and the clear definition of this phenomenon is crucial to effectively treat patients with lipid disorders. Therefore, the aim of this position paper was to suggest a unified definition of statin intolerance, and to complement the recent EAS statement on SAMS, where the pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management were comprehensively presented.

  20. FOOD INTOLERANCES AND ASSOCIATED SYMPTOMS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING FOBI-CAPELLA TECHNIQUE WITHOUT GASTRIC RING

    PubMed Central

    MOREIRA, Marcella de Arruda; ESPÍNOLA, Patrícia Ramos Maciel; de AZEVEDO, Camila Wanderley

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is considered the only effective method to treat refractory obesity, and especially for those in which clinical treatment was not successful. However, the appearance of food intolerances and clinical manifestations are quite common. Aim To identify food intolerances and associated them to symptoms in patients undergoing Fobi-Capella technique without gastric ring. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of adult patients who had more than one year after surgery. Demographic, anthropometric, weight and preoperative height data were investigated. Nutritional status was classified according to the criteria established by the World Health Organization. It was considered food intolerance the presence of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloating after eating a particular food. Results The sample consisted of 61 patients who attended the nutritional consultation of which 26 (42.6%) had food intolerance, mostly related to red meat (n=12; 34.3%) during the first six months of operation; there was a significant difference between the periods between 0 and 6 months, and 7 to 12 (p=0.02). Among the symptoms reported by patients, nausea was the most recurrent until the 6th month, but without significant differences between the two periods (p=0.06). Conclusions The Fobi-Capella procedure without gastric ring promoted high frequency of intolerance to meat in general, especially for the red, chicken and fish, on this sequence; nausea was the most frequent symptom. These data suggest the need for adequate nutritional monitoring throughout the postoperative period. PMID:25861067

  1. Statin intolerance - an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P; Farnier, Michel; Davidson, Michael H; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Aronow, Wilbert S; Athyros, Vasilis; Djuric, Dragan M; Ezhov, Marat V; Greenfield, Robert S; Hovingh, G Kees; Kostner, Karam; Serban, Corina; Lighezan, Daniel; Fras, Zlatko; Moriarty, Patrick M; Muntner, Paul; Goudev, Assen; Ceska, Richard; Nicholls, Stephen J; Broncel, Marlena; Nikolic, Dragana; Pella, Daniel; Puri, Raman; Rysz, Jacek; Wong, Nathan D; Bajnok, Laszlo; Jones, Steven R; Ray, Kausik K; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-03-16

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term 'statin intolerance'. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy, excluding other side effects might underestimate the number of patients with statin intolerance, which might be observed in 10-15% of patients. In clinical practice, statin intolerance limits effective treatment of patients at risk of, or with, cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of the most common adverse effects of statin therapy that might cause statin intolerance and the clear definition of this phenomenon is crucial to effectively treat patients with lipid disorders. Therefore, the aim of this position paper was to suggest a unified definition of statin intolerance, and to complement the recent EAS statement on SAMS, where the pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management were comprehensively presented. PMID:25861286

  2. Defining the critical material attributes of lactose monohydrate in carrier based dry powder inhaler formulations using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Hanne; Hebbink, Gerald; Peters, Harry; Shur, Jagdeep; Price, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The study aimed to establish a function-based relationship between the physical and bulk properties of pre-blended mixtures of fine and coarse lactose grades with the in vitro performance of an adhesive active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Different grades of micronised and milled lactose (Lactohale (LH) LH300, LH230, LH210 and Sorbolac 400) were pre-blended with coarse grades of lactose (LH100, LH206 and Respitose SV010) at concentrations of 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 wt.%. The bulk and rheological properties and particle size distributions were characterised. The pre-blends were formulated with micronised budesonide and in vitro performance in a Cyclohaler device tested using a next-generation impactor (NGI) at 90 l/min. Correlations between the lactose properties and in vitro performance were established using linear regression and artificial neural network (ANN) analyses. The addition of milled and micronised lactose fines with the coarse lactose had a significant influence on physical and rheological properties of the bulk lactose. Formulations of the different pre-blends with budesonide directly influenced in vitro performance attributes including fine particle fraction, mass median aerodynamic diameter and pre-separator deposition. While linear regression suggested a number of physical and bulk properties may influence in vitro performance, ANN analysis suggested the critical parameters in describing in vitro deposition patterns were the relative concentrations of lactose fines % < 4.5 μm and % < 15 μm. These data suggest that, for an adhesive API, the proportion of fine particles below % < 4.5 μm and % < 15 μm could be used in rational dry powder inhaler formulation design. PMID:24831088

  3. Effect of microflora and lactose on the absorption of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium in the hindgut of the rat.

    PubMed

    Andrieux, C; Sacquet, E

    1983-01-01

    For 4 weeks, 3-month old germfree (GF) and conventional (CV) rats were given a semi-synthetic diet sterilized by irradiation with or without 10% of lactose. During the 5th week, 0.2% of titanium oxide (TiO2) was added to the diet and the rats were killed at regular intervals throughout the light/dark cycle. The patterns of TiO2 and 45Ca excretion were similar, indicating that TiO2 was a good marker of unabsorbed calcium transit. The apparent absorption coefficient of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus was determined in the ileum, caecum, large intestine and faeces by the mineral/TiO2 ratio. The effects of microflora and lactose varied with the mineral and the digestive tract level studied. --In the small intestine, microflora had no effect on the apparent absorption of calcium and magnesium but did have an unfavorable influence on phosphorus absorption. Lactose increased calcium and magnesium absorption, and this increase was similar in GF and CV rats, but lactose had a favorable effect on phosphorus absorption only in CV rats. --In the caecum, microflora had an unfavorable effect on the apparent absorption of calcium and magnesium and a favorable effect on phosphorus absorption. The ingestion of lactose reduced calcium and magnesium absorption in the caecum of GF rats and phosphorus absorption in the caecum of CV animals. --In the colon, mineral absorption was not significant in either CV or GF rats receiving the lactose-free diets. Lactose ingestion caused the absorption of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus to rise significantly only in GF rats. This absorption contributed to the stronger effect of lactose on total calcium and phosphorus absorption in GF rats.

  4. Influence of lactose on the diffusion of calcium ions at physiological temperature.

    PubMed

    Verissimo, Luis M P; Ribeiro, Vânia C M; Ribeiro, Ana C F; Melia Rodrigo, M; Esteso, Miguel A

    2014-11-15

    Mutual diffusion coefficients for calcium chloride (0.100 mol dm(-3)) in aqueous solutions containing lactose at various concentrations (from 0.005 to 0.200 mol dm(-3)) have been measured at 37°C (physiological temperature), by using a conductimetric cell coupled to an automatic system to follow the diffusion. This cell uses an open-ended capillary method based on the measurement of the electrical resistance of a solution placed inside the capillaries at recorded times. The analysis of the CaCl2 diffusion coefficient values obtained suggests the presence of some CaCl2/lactose aggregates in the media, which are influenced by the temperature.

  5. Nucleation of Alpha lactose monohydrate induced using flow through a venturi orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, J. S.; Paterson, A. H. J.; Bronlund, J. E.; Jones, J. R.

    2010-03-01

    Nucleation is a determinant of the final crystal size distribution produced during a crystallization process. Other studies in the literature have shown that mixing influences alpha lactose monohydrate nucleation. To investigate this in more detail, three different sized Venturi orifices were used to provide a point of passive mixing for supersaturated lactose solutions. This system allowed the study of different factors associated with characterising the mixing process, including cavitation, power input, Reynolds number and vortex formation. A strong relationship was found between the number of vortices created in the system and the nucleation rate. It is speculated that the vortices decrease the distance required for diffusion of molecules in the system, increasing the rate at which they can come together to form a stable nuclei.

  6. Working with Enzymes - Where Is Lactose Digested? An Enzyme Assay for Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Sandi R.; Tolleson, Tonya D.; Williams, R. Jill; Underhill, Russell D.; Deal, S. Todd

    1998-06-01

    At Georgia Southern University, we offer a sophomore-level introductory biochemistry course that is aimed at nutrition and chemistry education majors. The laboratory portion of this course has long lacked an experimental introduction to enzymes. We have developed a simple enzyme assay utilizing lactase enzyme from crushed LactAid tablets and a 5% lactose solution ("synthetic milk"). In the experiment, the students assay the activity of the enzyme on the "synthetic milk" at pHs of approximately 1, 6, and 8 with the stated goal of determining where lactose functions in the digestive tract. The activity of the lactase may be followed chromatographically or spectrophotometrically. The experiment, which is actually a simple pH assay, is easily implemented in allied health chemistry laboratory courses and readily lends itself to adaptation for more complex kinetic assays in upper-level biochemistry laboratory courses. The experimental details, including a list of required supplies and hints for implementation, are provided.

  7. Influence of load on particle size distribution of lactose-crystalline cellulose mixed powder.

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Takahiko; Miyagishim, Atsuo; Nozawa, Yasuo; Sadzuka, Yasuyuki; Sonobe, Takashi

    2008-04-16

    Effects of loads applied to a powdery layer of a mixture of lactose and crystalline cellulose (granules) on the microparticle formation were evaluated. In a 1:1 mixture, the number of particles size, 20 microm or smaller in diameter, was reduced under loading compared with the standard value. It tended to increase with increasing ratio of lactose. In samples with a particle size of 350 microm or less, the shear friction coefficient increased with increase in the load, reached a peak at a mixing ratio of 50%, and decreased with increase in the mixing ratio. These changes were similar to those of the number of particles 20 microm or smaller. These results suggest that particle formation and aggregation under loads are dependent on the mixing rate and that there is a range of mixing rates in which no changes in the particle size distribution are observed.

  8. Assessment of intestinal permeability: enzymatic determination of urinary mannitol, raffinose, sucrose and lactose on Hitachi analyzer.

    PubMed

    Hessels, Jan; Snoeyink, Ellen J M; Platenkamp, Antonius J; Voortman, Gerrit; Steggink, Jan; Eidhof, Harry H M

    2003-01-01

    The sugar absorption test is the usual test for measurement of intestinal permeability. After intestinal absorption of probe sugars the subsequently excreted sugars are measured in urine. We have developed four enzymatic methods for the measurement of the urinary concentration of the probe sugars mannitol, raffinose, lactose and sucrose. Mannitol, lactose and sucrose are directly measured on Hitachi 917 using mannitol dehydrogenase, beta-galactosidase and invertase, respectively, as enzyme reagents. Raffinose measurement needs a three hours preincubation with alpha-galactosidase, after which the liberated sucrose is measured. The analytical performances such as within- and between-run precision, linearity, lowest detection limit, interference of other sugars and comparison with a gas chromatographic method are described for the four methods. These methods are accurate an can easily be performed in any clinical laboratory.

  9. Batch and continuous synthesis of lactulose from whey lactose by immobilized β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Song, Yoon Seok; Lee, Hee Uk; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2013-01-15

    In this study, lactulose synthesis from whey lactose was investigated in batch and continuous systems using immobilized β-galactosidase. In the batch system, the optimal concentration of fructose for lactulose synthesis was 20%, and the effect of galactose, glucose and fructose on β-galactosidase activity was determined for hydrolysis of whey lactose and the transgalactosylation reaction for lactulose synthesis. Galactose and fructose were competitive inhibitors, and glucose acted as a noncompetitive inhibitor. The inhibitory effects of galactose and glucose were stronger in the transgalactosylation reaction than they were in the hydrolysis reaction. In addition, when immobilized β-galactosidase was reused for lactulose synthesis, its catalytic activity was retained to the extent of 52.9% after 10 reuses. Lactulose was synthesized continuously in a packed-bed reactor. We synthesized 19.1g/l lactulose during the continuous flow reaction at a flow rate of 0.5 ml/min.

  10. Co-induction of beta-galactosidase and the lactose-P-enolpyruvate phosphotransferase system in Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, I R; Lo, G C

    1978-01-01

    The addition of lactose, galactose, or isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to glucose-grown cells of Streptococcus salivarius 25975 resulted in the co-induction of both the lactose-P-enolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (lactose-PTS) and beta-galactosidase, with the latter the predominant metabolic system. With various strains of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis 10556, on the other hand, the lactose-PTS was the major metabolic pathway with beta-galactosidase induced either to low or negligible levels. In all cases, induction of the lactose-PTS resulted in the concomitant induction of 6-P-beta-galactosidase. The induction by lactose of both the lactose-PTS and beta-galactosidase in all strains was repressed by glucose and other catabolites, notably, fructose. Induction of beta-galactosidase in S. salivarius 25975 by IPTG was, however, relatively resistant to glucose repression. Induction experiments with IPTG and lactose suggested that a cellular metabolite of lactose metabolism was a repressor of enzyme activity. Exogenous cAMP was shown to reverse the transient repression by glucose of beta-galactosidase induction in cells of S. salivarius 25975 receiving lactose, provided the cells were grown with small amounts of toluene to overcome the permeability barrier to this nucleotide, cAMP, was however, unable to overcome the permanent repression of beta-galactosidase activity to a significant extent under these conditions. PMID:214423

  11. Properties of the Sodium Naproxen-Lactose-Tetrahydrate Co-Crystal upon Processing and Storage.

    PubMed

    Sovago, Ioana; Wang, Wenbo; Qiu, Danwen; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Bond, Andrew D; Löbmann, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    Co-crystals and co-amorphous systems are two strategies to improve the physical properties of an active pharmaceutical ingredient and, thus, have recently gained considerable interest both in academia and the pharmaceutical industry. In this study, the behavior of the recently identified sodium naproxen-lactose-tetrahydrate co-crystal and the co-amorphous mixture of sodium, naproxen, and lactose was investigated. The structure of the co-crystal is described using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structural analysis revealed a monoclinic lattice, space group P21, with the asymmetric unit containing one molecule of lactose, one of naproxen, sodium, and four water molecules. Upon heating, it was observed that the co-crystal transforms into a co-amorphous system due to the loss of its crystalline bound water. Dehydration and co-amorphization were studied using synchrotron X-ray radiation and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Subsequently, different processing techniques (ball milling, spray drying, and dehydration) were used to prepare the co-amorphous mixture of sodium, naproxen, and lactose. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) revealed the amorphous nature of the mixtures after preparation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed that the blends were single-phase co-amorphous systems as indicated by a single glass transition temperature. The samples were subsequently tested for physical stability under dry (silica gel at 25 and 40 °C) and humid conditions (25 °C/75% RH). The co-amorphous samples stored at 25 °C/75% RH quickly recrystallized into the co-crystalline state. On the other hand, the samples stored under dry conditions remained physically stable after five months of storage, except the ball milled sample stored at 40 °C which showed signs of recrystallization. Under these dry conditions, however, the ball-milled co-amorphous blend crystallized into the individual crystalline components. PMID:27104502

  12. Deterministic and stochastic simulation and analysis of biochemical reaction networks the lactose operon example.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Necmettin; Kazanci, Caner

    2011-01-01

    A brief introduction to mathematical modeling of biochemical regulatory reaction networks is presented. Both deterministic and stochastic modeling techniques are covered with examples from enzyme kinetics, coupled reaction networks with oscillatory dynamics and bistability. The Yildirim-Mackey model for lactose operon is used as an example to discuss and show how deterministic and stochastic methods can be used to investigate various aspects of this bacterial circuit. PMID:21187231

  13. Windowing of THz time-domain spectroscopy signals: A study based on lactose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Cabo, José; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; Fraile-Peláez, Francisco Javier; Rubiños-López, Óscar; López-Santos, José María; Martín-Ramos, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain spectroscopy has established itself as a reference method for determining material parameters in the terahertz spectral range. This procedure requires the processing of the measured time-domain signals in order to estimate the spectral data. In this work, we present a thorough study of the properties of the signal windowing, a step previous to the parameter extraction algorithm, that permits to improve the accuracy of the results. Lactose has been used as sample material in the study.

  14. Comparative study of erythritol and lactose monohydrate as carriers for inhalation: atomic force microscopy and in vitro correlation.

    PubMed

    Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Jones, Matthew; Edge, Stephen; Price, Robert

    2006-02-01

    The adhesion of micronised salbutamol sulphate to two carrier excipients, lactose monohydrate and erythritol, was investigated using the atomic force microscope (AFM) colloid probe technique and correlated with their respective physico-mechanical properties and aerosolisation performance. The particle size, morphology and moisture sorption properties of the carriers were similar thereby allowing direct comparison of functionality. AFM force measurements (n = 1024 force curves) were obtained between salbutamol sulphate drug probes (n = 4) and the excipients, as 63-90 microm sieve fractions and atomically smooth crystals. In general, significant differences in drug adhesion to lactose monohydrate and erythritol were observed (ANOVA, p<0.05), with erythritol exhibiting relatively greater adhesiveness. A linear relationship between drug probe adhesion to lactose monohydrate and drug probe adhesion to erythritol was established with salbutamol sulphate-lactose monohydrate adhesion being 60-70% of that of the erythritol system. In vitro analysis suggested good correlation with the adhesion measurements. The aerosolisation of salbutamol sulphate from erythritol carrier particles was significantly less (ANOVA, p<0.05) than from lactose monohydrate, with a fine particle dose (<6.4 microm) of 41.9 +/- 7.4 microg and 24.9 +/- 3.1 microg for the lactose monohydrate and erythritol carriers, respectively (n = 3).

  15. Improved xylanase production by Trichoderma reesei grown on L-arabinose and lactose or D-glucose mixtures.

    PubMed

    Xiong, H; Turunen, O; Pastinen, O; Leisola, M; von Weymarn, N

    2004-04-01

    Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 was grown on eight different natural or rare aldopentoses as the main carbon source and on mixtures of an aldopentose with D-glucose or lactose. The fungal cells consumed all aldopentoses tested, except L-xylose and L-ribose. The highest total xylanase and cellulase activities were achieved when cells were grown on L-arabinose as the main carbon source. The total xylanase activity produced by cells grown on L-arabinose was even higher than that produced by cells grown on an equal amount of lactose. In co-metabolism of D-glucose (15 g l(-1)) and L-arabinose (5 g l(-1)), the total volumetric and specific xylanase productivities were improved (derepressed) approximately 23- and 18-fold, respectively, compared to a cultivation on only D-glucose (20 g l(-1)). In a similar experiment, in which cells were grown on a mixture of lactose and L-arabinose, the xylanase productivity was approximately doubled, compared to a cultivation on only lactose. The cellulase productivities, however, were not improved by the addition of L-arabinose. Compared with a typical industrial fungal enzyme production process with lactose as the main carbon source, better volumetric and specific xylanase productivities were achieved both on a lactose/arabinose mixture and on a glucose/arabinose mixture.

  16. Lactose-hydrolyzed milk is more prone to chemical changes during storage than conventional ultra-high-temperature (UHT) milk.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Therese; Clausen, Morten R; Sundekilde, Ulrik K; Eggers, Nina; Nyegaard, Steffen; Larsen, Lotte B; Ray, Colin; Sundgren, Anja; Andersen, Henrik J; Bertram, Hanne C

    2014-08-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose to glucose and galactose gives rise to reactions that change the chemistry and quality of ambient-stored lactose-hydrolyzed ultra-high-temperature (UHT) milk. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare chemical changes in lactose-hydrolyzed and conventional UHT milk during a 9 month ambient storage period. Several complementary analyses of volatiles, free amino acids, acetate, furosine, and level of free amino terminals were concluded. The analyses revealed an increased level of free amino acids and an increased formation rate of specific compounds such as furosine and 2-methylbutanal in lactose-hydrolyzed UHT milk compared to conventional UHT milk during storage. These observations indicate more favorable conditions for Maillard and subsequent reactions in lactose-hydrolyzed milk compared to conventional UHT milk stored at ambient temperature. Furthermore, it is postulated that proteolytic activity from the lactase-enzyme preparation may be responsible for the observed higher levels of free amino acids in lactose-hydrolyzed UHT milk.

  17. Considerations on the quantitative analysis of apparent amorphicity of milled lactose by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pazesh, Samaneh; Lazorova, Lucia; Berggren, Jonas; Alderborn, Göran; Gråsjö, Johan

    2016-09-10

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate various pre-processing and quantification approaches of Raman spectrum to quantify low level of amorphous content in milled lactose powder. To improve the quantification analysis, several spectral pre-processing methods were used to adjust background effects. The effects of spectral noise on the variation of determined amorphous content were also investigated theoretically by propagation of error analysis and were compared to the experimentally obtained values. Additionally, the applicability of calibration method with crystalline or amorphous domains in the estimation of amorphous content in milled lactose powder was discussed. Two straight baseline pre-processing methods gave the best and almost equal performance. By the succeeding quantification methods, PCA performed best, although the classical least square analysis (CLS) gave comparable results, while peak parameter analysis displayed to be inferior. The standard deviations of experimental determined percentage amorphous content were 0.94% and 0.25% for pure crystalline and pure amorphous samples respectively, which was very close to the standard deviation values from propagated spectral noise. The reasonable conformity between the milled samples spectra and synthesized spectra indicated representativeness of physical mixtures with crystalline or amorphous domains in the estimation of apparent amorphous content in milled lactose. PMID:27397869

  18. Evaluation of the amorphous content of lactose by solution calorimetry and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Katainen, Erja; Niemelä, Pentti; Harjunen, Päivi; Suhonen, Janne; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2005-11-15

    Solution calorimetry can be used to determine the amorphous content of a compound when the solubility and dissolution rate of the compound in the chosen solvent are reasonably high. Sometimes, it can be difficult find a solvent in which a sample is freely soluble. The present study evaluated the use of solution calorimetry for the assessment of the amorphous content of a sample that is poorly soluble in a solvent. Physical mixtures of lactose and spray-dried lactose samples (the amorphous content varied from 0 to 100%) were analyzed by a solution calorimeter and the results were compared with Raman spectroscopy determinations. The heat of solvation of the samples was determined by solution calorimetry in organic solvents MeOH, EtOH, ACN, THF, acetone (400mg sample/100ml solvent). Lactose is virtually insoluble in ACN, THF and acetone and very slightly soluble in EtOH and MeOH. The amorphous content of the samples could not be determined by solution calorimetry in EtOH, ACN, THF or acetone. However, an excellent correlation was observed between the heat of solvation and the amorphous content of the samples in MeOH. Furthermore, the heat of solvation values of the samples in MeOH showed a linear correlation with the Raman quantifications. Therefore, our results demonstrate that solution calorimetry may represent a rapid and simple method for determining the amorphous content also in samples that are not freely soluble in the solvent. PMID:18970276

  19. Adaptive evolution of the lactose utilization network in experimentally evolved populations of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Quan, Selwyn; Ray, J Christian J; Kwota, Zakari; Duong, Trang; Balázsi, Gábor; Cooper, Tim F; Monds, Russell D

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to novel environments is often associated with changes in gene regulation. Nevertheless, few studies have been able both to identify the genetic basis of changes in regulation and to demonstrate why these changes are beneficial. To this end, we have focused on understanding both how and why the lactose utilization network has evolved in replicate populations of Escherichia coli. We found that lac operon regulation became strikingly variable, including changes in the mode of environmental response (bimodal, graded, and constitutive), sensitivity to inducer concentration, and maximum expression level. In addition, some classes of regulatory change were enriched in specific selective environments. Sequencing of evolved clones, combined with reconstruction of individual mutations in the ancestral background, identified mutations within the lac operon that recapitulate many of the evolved regulatory changes. These mutations conferred fitness benefits in environments containing lactose, indicating that the regulatory changes are adaptive. The same mutations conferred different fitness effects when present in an evolved clone, indicating that interactions between the lac operon and other evolved mutations also contribute to fitness. Similarly, changes in lac regulation not explained by lac operon mutations also point to important interactions with other evolved mutations. Together these results underline how dynamic regulatory interactions can be, in this case evolving through mutations both within and external to the canonical lactose utilization network. PMID:22253602

  20. Novel Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius variants harboring lactose metabolism genes homologous to Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Jans, Christoph; Gerber, Andrea; Bugnard, Joséphine; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) commonly associated with human and animal infections. We elucidated the lactose metabolism of S. infantarius subsp. infantarius predominant in African fermented milk products. S. infantarius subsp. infantarius isolates (n = 192) were identified in 88% of spontaneously fermented camel milk suusac samples (n = 24) from Kenya and Somalia at log₁₀ 8.2-8.5 CFU mL⁻¹. African S. infantarius isolates excreted stoichiometric amounts of galactose when grown on lactose, exhibiting a metabolism similar to Streptococcus thermophilus and distinct from their type strain. African S. infantarius subsp. infantarius CJ18 harbors a regular gal operon with 99.7-100% sequence identity to S. infantarius subsp. infantarius ATCC BAA-102(T) and a gal-lac operon with 91.7-97.6% sequence identity to S. thermophilus, absent in all sequenced SBSEC strains analyzed. The expression and functionality of lacZ was demonstrated in a β-galactosidase assay. The gal-lac operon was identified in 100% of investigated S. infantarius isolates (n = 46) from suusac samples and confirmed in Malian fermented cow milk isolates. The African S. infantarius variant potentially evolved through horizontal gene transfer of an S. thermophilus-homologous lactose pathway. Safety assessments are needed to identify any putative health risks of this novel S. infantarius variant. PMID:22475940

  1. Novel Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius variants harboring lactose metabolism genes homologous to Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Jans, Christoph; Gerber, Andrea; Bugnard, Joséphine; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) commonly associated with human and animal infections. We elucidated the lactose metabolism of S. infantarius subsp. infantarius predominant in African fermented milk products. S. infantarius subsp. infantarius isolates (n = 192) were identified in 88% of spontaneously fermented camel milk suusac samples (n = 24) from Kenya and Somalia at log₁₀ 8.2-8.5 CFU mL⁻¹. African S. infantarius isolates excreted stoichiometric amounts of galactose when grown on lactose, exhibiting a metabolism similar to Streptococcus thermophilus and distinct from their type strain. African S. infantarius subsp. infantarius CJ18 harbors a regular gal operon with 99.7-100% sequence identity to S. infantarius subsp. infantarius ATCC BAA-102(T) and a gal-lac operon with 91.7-97.6% sequence identity to S. thermophilus, absent in all sequenced SBSEC strains analyzed. The expression and functionality of lacZ was demonstrated in a β-galactosidase assay. The gal-lac operon was identified in 100% of investigated S. infantarius isolates (n = 46) from suusac samples and confirmed in Malian fermented cow milk isolates. The African S. infantarius variant potentially evolved through horizontal gene transfer of an S. thermophilus-homologous lactose pathway. Safety assessments are needed to identify any putative health risks of this novel S. infantarius variant.

  2. Improving functionality of whole egg powder by the addition of gelatine, lactose, and pullulan.

    PubMed

    Koç, Mehmet; Koç, Banu; Susyal, Gonca; Yilmazer, Melike Sakin; Bağdatlıoğlu, Neriman; Kaymak-Ertekin, Figen

    2011-01-01

    The addition of gelatine (G), lactose (L), pullulan (P), and their mixtures at equal ratios (gelatine + lactose [GL] and gelatin + pullulan [GP]) to whole egg prior to drying was studied. Their effects on the functional properties (emulsion and gelling ability, water holding capacity of gel, foaming, color) and soluble protein content of spray dried egg powder during the 6 mo of storage at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity were investigated. It was demonstrated that the emulsion and foaming stability, water holding capacity of gel, and color change were significantly affected by the storage time, whereas storage time did not affect the strength of gel texture prepared by egg powders. Gelatine and pullulan improved the foaming stability and water holding capacity. Lactose caused a decrease in emulsion and foaming stability values. The maximum color change was observed for the plain egg powder, showing that mixing whole egg with carbohydrate- and/or protein-based additives before the drying process preserved the color of egg powder. Adding carbohydrate and/or protein caused significant changes in functional properties of egg powder. PMID:22416722

  3. In vivo pharmacological evaluation of a lactose-conjugated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Shayli Varasteh; Varamini, Pegah; Steyn, Frederik; Toth, Istvan

    2015-11-10

    In the current study, the efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile of lactose-conjugated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) was examined following oral administration in male rats. A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry technique was developed and applied for measuring the concentration of lactose[Q(1)][w(6)]LHRH (compound 1) in rat plasma in order to allow measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters. LH release was evaluated using a sandwich ELISA. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax = 0.11 μg/ml) was reached at 2h (Tmax) following oral administration of the compound at 10mg/kg. The half-life was determined to be 2.6h. The absolute bioavailability of the orally administered compound was found to be 14%, which was a remarkable improvement compared to zero-to-low oral bioavailability of the native peptide. Compound 1 was effective in stimulating LH release at 20mg/kg after oral administration. The method was validated at a linear range of 0.01-20.0 μg/ml and a correlation coefficient of r(2) ≥ 0.999. The accuracy and precision values showed the reliability and reproducibility of the method for evaluation of the pharmacokinetic parameters. These findings showed that the lactose derivative of LHRH has a therapeutic potential to be further developed as an orally active therapeutics for the treatment of hormone-dependent diseases.

  4. Quantitation of two endogenous lactose-inhibitable lectins in embryonic and adult chicken tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, E.C.; Barondes, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two lactose-binding lectins from chicken tissues, chicken-lactose-lectin-I (CLL-I) and chicken-lactose-lectin-II (CLL-II) were quantified with a radioimmunoassay in extracts of a number of developing and adult chicken tissues. Both lectins could be measured in the same extract without separation, because they showed no significant immunological cross- reactivity. Many embryonic and adult tissues, including brain, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, pancreas, and spleen, contained one or both lectins, although their concentrations differed markedly. For example, embryonic muscle, the richest source of CLL-I contained only traces of CLL-II whereas embryonic kidney, a very rich source of CLL-II contained substantial CLL-I. In both muscle and kidney, lectin levels in adulthood were much lower than in the embryonic state. In contrast, CLL-I in liver and CLL-II in intestine were 10-fold to 30-fold more concentrated in the adult than in the 15-d embryo. CLL-I and CLL-II from several tissues were purified by affinity chromatography and their identity in the various tissues was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and peptide mapping. The results suggest that these lectins might have different functions in the many developing and adult tissues in which they are found.

  5. Influence of ageing, grinding and preheating on the thermal behaviour of alpha-lactose monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Garnier, S; Petit, S; Mallet, F; Petit, M-N; Lemarchand, D; Coste, S; Lefebvre, J; Coquerel, G

    2008-09-01

    It is shown that the onset temperature and the magnitude of thermal events observed during DSC analyses of alpha-lactose monohydrate can be strongly affected by various treatments such as ageing, manual grinding and preheating (cycle of preliminary dehydration and rehydration). In the case of grinding and preheating, the change of dehydration pathways was further investigated by using a suitable combination of characterization techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) performed with a synchrotron source (allowing an accurate Rietveld analysis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser particle size measurements, FTIR spectroscopy and (1)H NMR for the determination of beta-lactose contents in samples. It appeared that the dehydration mechanism is affected not only by a smaller particle size distribution, but also by residual anisotropic lattice distortions and by the formation of surface defects or high energy surfaces. The fusion-recrystallization process occurring between anhydrous forms of alpha-lactose at ca. 170 degrees C is not significantly affected by grinding, whereas a preheating treatment induces an unexpected large increase of the enthalpy associated with this transition. Our observations and interpretations confirm the important role of water molecules in the crystal cohesion of the title compound and illustrate the necessity to consider the history of each sample for a satisfactory understanding of the physical properties and the behaviour of this important pharmaceutical excipient. PMID:18617338

  6. Pre-dispositions and epigenetic inheritance in the Escherichia coli lactose operon bistable switch.

    PubMed

    Robert, Lydia; Paul, Gregory; Chen, Yong; Taddei, François; Baigl, Damien; Lindner, Ariel B

    2010-04-13

    The lactose operon regulation in Escherichia coli is a primary model of phenotypic switching, reminiscent of cell fate determination in higher organisms. Under conditions of bistability, an isogenic cell population partitions into two subpopulations, with the operon's genes turned on or remaining off. It is generally hypothesized that the final state of a cell depends solely on stochastic fluctuations of the network's protein concentrations, particularly on bursts of lactose permease expression. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the cell switching decision are not fully understood. We designed a microfluidic system to follow the formation of a transiently bimodal population within growing microcolonies. The analysis of genealogy and cell history revealed the existence of pre-disposing factors for switching that are epigenetically inherited. Both the pre-induction expression stochasticity of the lactose operon repressor LacI and the cellular growth rate are predictive factors of the cell's response upon induction, with low LacI concentration and slow growth correlating with higher switching probability. Thus, stochasticity at the local level of the network and global physiology are synergistically involved in cell response determination. PMID:20393577

  7. [Preparation of budesonide sustained-release dry powder for inhalation and influence of lactose content].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng-lin; Wang, Xiu-hua; Ni, Rui; Zhang, Lan; Muenster, Uwe; Mao, Shi-rui

    2015-09-01

    Using high pressure homogenization method combined with spray-drying, budesonide-loaded chitosan microparticles were prepared and the in vitro release profile was investigated. The microparticles were then blended with lactose using a vortex mixer, influence of mixing speed, mixing time on drug recovery rate and content homogeneity were investigated. Meanwhile, influence of lactose content on drug recovery rate, content homogeneity, powder flowability and in vitro deposition were studied. It turned out that budesonide was released from the microparicles in a sustained manner, with fine particle fraction as high as 46.0%, but the powder flowability was poor. After blending with 10 times of lactose, the drug recovery rate was 96.5%, with relative standard deviation of drug content 2.5%, and fine particle fraction of the formulation increased to 59.6% with good flowability. It's demonstrated that using a vortex mixer, budesonide sustained-release dry powder for inhalation with good recovery and content homogeneity could be prepared, the formulation had good flowability and was suitable for pulmonary inhaling. PMID:26757557

  8. Milk, yogurt, and lactose intake and ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Tang, Wenru; Sang, Lei; Dai, Xiaoli; Wei, Danping; Luo, Ying; Zhang, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Inconclusive information for the role of dairy food intake in relation to ovarian cancer risk may associate with adverse effects of lactose, which has been hypothesized to increase gonadotropin levels in animal models and ecological studies. Up to now, several studies have indicated the association between dairy food intake and risk of ovarian cancer, but no identified founding was reported. We performed this meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of the association between dairy food intake and ovarian cancer risk. Using the data from 19 available publications, we examined dairy food including low-fat/skim milk, whole milk, yogurt and lactose in relation to risk of ovarian cancer by meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the association. We observed a slightly increased risk of ovarian cancer with high intake of whole milk, but has no statistical significance (OR = 1.228, 95% CI = 1.031-1.464, P = 0.022). The results of other milk models did not provide evidence of positive association with ovarian cancer risk. This meta-analysis suggests that low-fat/skim milk, whole milk, yogurt and lactose intake has no associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer. Further studies with larger participants worldwide are needed to validate the association between dairy food intake and ovarian cancer.

  9. Biosynthesis of milk fat, protein, and lactose: roles of transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Johan S; Lohakare, Jayant; Bionaz, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The demand for high-quality milk is increasing worldwide. The efficiency of milk synthesis can be improved by taking advantage of the accumulated knowledge of the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of genes coding for proteins involved in the synthesis of fat, protein, and lactose in the mammary gland. Research in this area is relatively new, but data accumulated in the last 10 years provide a relatively clear picture. Milk fat synthesis appears to be regulated, at least in bovines, by an interactive network between SREBP1, PPARγ, and LXRα, with a potential role for other transcription factors, such as Spot14, ChREBP, and Sp1. Milk protein synthesis is highly regulated by insulin, amino acids, and amino acid transporters via transcriptional and posttranscriptional routes, with the insulin-mTOR pathway playing a central role. The transcriptional regulation of lactose synthesis is still poorly understood, but it is clear that glucose transporters play an important role. They can also cooperatively interact with amino acid transporters and the mTOR pathway. Recent data indicate the possibility of nutrigenomic interventions to increase milk fat synthesis by feeding long-chain fatty acids and milk protein synthesis by feeding amino acids. We propose a transcriptional network model to account for all available findings. This model encompasses a complex network of proteins that control milk synthesis with a cross talk between milk fat, protein, and lactose regulation, with mTOR functioning as a central hub.

  10. Effects of exercise and metformin on the prevention of glucose intolerance: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Molena-Fernandes, C.; Bersani-Amado, C. A.; Ferraro, Z. M.; Hintze, L. J.; Nardo, N.; Cuman, R. K. N.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise training (4 days) and metformin exposure on acute glucose intolerance after dexamethasone treatment in rats. Forty-two adult male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were divided randomly into four groups: sedentary control (SCT), sedentary dexamethasone-treated (SDX), training dexamethasone-treated (DPE), and dexamethasone and metformin treated group (DMT). Glucose tolerance tests and in situ liver perfusion were undertaken on fasting rats to obtain glucose profiles. The DPE group displayed a significant decrease in glucose values compared with the SDX group. Average glucose levels in the DPE group did not differ from those of the DMT group, so we suggest that exercise training corrects dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance and improves glucose profiles in a similar manner to that observed with metformin. These data suggest that exercise may prevent the development of glucose intolerance induced by dexamethasone in rats to a similar magnitude to that observed after metformin treatment. PMID:26421869

  11. (51Cr)EDTA intestinal permeability in children with cow's milk intolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Schrander, J.J.; Unsalan-Hooyen, R.W.; Forget, P.P.; Jansen, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Making use of ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA as a permeability marker, we measured intestinal permeability in a group of 20 children with proven cow's milk intolerance (CMI), a group of 17 children with similar complaints where CMI was excluded (sick controls), and a group of 12 control children. ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test results (mean +/- SD) were 6.85 +/- 3.64%, 3.42 +/- 0.94%, and 2.61 +/- 0.67% in the group with CMI, the sick control, and the control group, respectively. When compared to both control groups, patients with cow's milk intolerance (CMI) showed a significantly increased small bowel permeability. We conclude that the ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test can be helpful for the diagnosis of cow's milk intolerance.

  12. Managing chronic myeloid leukemia patients intolerant to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    DeAngelo, D J

    2012-01-01

    The outcomes for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia have improved dramatically with the development and availability of BCR–ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) over the past decade. TKI therapy has a superior safety profile compared with the previous standard of care, interferon-α, and most adverse events (AEs) observed with front-line and second-line TKI treatment are managed with supportive care. However, some patients are intolerant to TKI therapy and experience AEs that cannot be managed through dose reduction or symptomatic treatment. Careful management of AEs helps patients to remain adherent with treatment and increases their chances for successful outcomes. Proactive vigilance for potential AEs and treatment strategies that reduce symptom burden will help to minimize patient intolerance. This review discusses the most common AEs associated with intolerance to TKI therapy and treatment strategies to help manage patients at risk for or experiencing these events. PMID:23085780

  13. Orthostatic intolerance and the postural tachycardia syndrome: genetic and environment pathophysiologies. Neurolab Autonomic Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Ertl, A. C.; Diedrich, A.; Carson, R.; Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Jordan, J.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a common problem for inbound space travelers. There is usually tachycardia on standing but blood pressure may be normal, low or, rarely, elevated. This condition is analogous to the orthostatic intolerance that occurs on Earth in individuals with orthostatic tachycardia, palpitations, mitral valve prolapse, and light-headedness. Our studies during the Neurolab mission indicated that sympathetic nerve traffic is raised in microgravity and that plasma norepinephrine is higher than baseline supine levels but lower than baseline upright levels. A subgroup of patients with familial orthostatic intolerance differ from inbound space travelers in that they have an alanine-to-to-proline mutation at amino acid position 457 in their norepinephrine transporter gene. This leads to poor clearance of norepinephrine from synapses, with consequent raised heart rate. Clinical features of these syndromes are presented.

  14. Blood pressure and plasma renin activity as predictors of orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. H.; Kravik, S. E.; Geelen, G.; Keil, L.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 3 h standing, followed by a period of head-up tilt (HUT) on physiological response (orthostatic tolerance, blood pressure and heart rate), as well as on plasma vasopressin (PVP) and renin activity (PRA) were studied in 13 dehydrated (to 2.4 pct loss of body weight) subjects. Seven subjects showed signs of orthostatic intolerance (INT), manifested by sweating, pallor, nausea and dizziness. Prior to these symptoms, the INT subjects exhibited lower systolic (SP) and pulse (PP) pressures, and an elevated PRA, compared to the tolerant (TOL) subjects. HUT has aggravated increases of RPA in the INT subjects and caused an increase, higher than in TOL subjects, in PVP, while rehydration has greatly attenuated the PVP response to the HUT and decreased the PRA response. It is concluded that dehydration, together with measurements of SP, PP and PRA, may serve as a means of predicting orthostatic intolerance and may provide a physiological model for studying the causes of intolerance.

  15. Novel cellobiose 2-epimerases for the production of epilactose from milk ultrafiltrate containing lactose.

    PubMed

    Krewinkel, Manuel; Kaiser, Jana; Merz, Michael; Rentschler, Eva; Kuschel, Beatrice; Hinrichs, Jörg; Fischer, Lutz

    2015-06-01

    A selected number of enzymes have recently been assigned to the emerging class of cellobiose 2-epimerases (CE). All CE convert lactose to the rare sugar epilactose, which is regarded as a new prebiotic. Within this study, the gene products of 2 potential CE genes originating from the mesophilic bacteria Cellulosilyticum lentocellum and Dysgonomonas gadei were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatography. The enzymes have been identified as novel CE by sequence analysis and biochemical characterizations. The biochemical characterizations included the determination of the molecular weight, the substrate spectrum, and the kinetic parameters, as well as the pH and temperature profiles in buffer and food matrices. Both identified CE epimerize cellobiose and lactose into the C2 epimerization products glucosylmannose and epilactose, respectively. The epimerization activity for lactose was maximal at pH 8.0 or 7.5 and 40°C in defined buffer systems for the CE from C. lentocellum and the CE from D. gadei, respectively. In addition, biotransformations of the foodstuff milk ultrafiltrate containing lactose were demonstrated. The CE from D. gadei was produced in a stirred-tank reactor (12 L) and purified using an automatic system. Enzyme production and purification in this scale indicates that a future upscaling of CE production is possible. The bioconversions of lactose in milk ultrafiltrate were carried out either in a batch process or in a continuously operated enzyme membrane reactor (EMR) process. Both processes ran at an industrially relevant low temperature of 8°C to reduce undesirable microbial growth. The enzyme was reasonably active at the low process temperature because the CE originated from a mesophilic organism. An epilactose yield of 29.9% was achieved in the batch process within 28 h of operation time. In the continuous EMR process, the epilactose yield in the product stream was lower, at 18.5%. However, the enzyme productivity

  16. Autogenic-feedback training: A potential treatment for post-flight orthostatic intolerance in aerospace crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Miller, Neil E.; Pickering, Thomas G.; Shapiro, David

    1993-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance was identified as a serious biomedical problem associated with long duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority was given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder which are both effective and practical. A considerable body of clinical research demonstrated that people can be taught to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily and that this is an effective treatment for chronic orthostatic intolerance in paralyzed patients. The present pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility of adding training in control of blood pressure to an existing preflight training program designed to facilitate astronaut adaptation to microgravity. Using an operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), three men and two women participated in four to nine (15-30 training sessions). At the end of training, the average increase in systolic and diastolic pressure, as well as mean arterial pressures that the subjects made, ranged between 20 and 5O mmHg under both supine and 45 deg head-up tilt conditions. These findings suggest that AFT may be a useful alternative treatment or supplement to existing approaches for preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. Further, the use of operant conditioning methods for training cardiovascular responses may contribute to the general understanding of the mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance.

  17. Defining Distinct Negative Beliefs about Uncertainty: Validating the Factor Structure of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Kathryn A.; Dugas, Michel J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the English version of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS; French version: M. H. Freeston, J. Rheaume, H. Letarte, M. J. Dugas, & R. Ladouceur, 1994; English version: K. Buhr & M. J. Dugas, 2002) using a substantially larger sample than has been used in previous studies. Nonclinical undergraduate…

  18. Do Metacognitions and Intolerance of Uncertainty Predict Worry in Everyday Life? An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.

    PubMed

    Thielsch, Carolin; Andor, Tanja; Ehring, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Cognitive models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) suggest that excessive worry is due to positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and/or intolerance of uncertainty. Empirical support mainly derives from cross-sectional studies with limited conclusiveness, using self-report measures and thereby possibly causing recall biases. The aim of the present study therefore was to examine the power of these cognitive variables to predict levels of worry in everyday life using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA). Metacognitions and intolerance of uncertainty were assessed using well-established self-report questionnaires in 41 nonclinical participants who subsequently completed ratings on worry intensity and burden on a portable device for 1week at seven times a day once every 2hours. Results showed significant associations of negative metacognitive beliefs and intolerance of uncertainty, but not positive metacognitive beliefs, with worry in everyday life. In multilevel regression analyses, a substantial proportion of variance of everyday worry could be accounted for by negative metacognitions over and above trait worry and daily hassles. Intolerance of uncertainty likewise emerged as a valid predictor when tested in isolation, but did not explain additional variance once negative metacognitions were controlled. The findings support current cognitive models of excessive worry and highlight the role of negative metacognitions. By using EMA to assess levels of worry in everyday life, they extend earlier findings focusing exclusively on retrospective questionnaire measures.

  19. Computer simulation studies in fluid and calcium regulation and orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The systems analysis approach to physiological research uses mathematical models and computer simulation. Major areas of concern during prolonged space flight discussed include fluid and blood volume regulation; cardiovascular response during shuttle reentry; countermeasures for orthostatic intolerance; and calcium regulation and bone atrophy. Potential contributions of physiologic math models to future flight experiments are examined.

  20. Behavioral Manifestations and Parental Correlates of Intolerance of Ambiguity in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, David M.; And Others

    The phenomenon of intolerance of ambiguity in young children was investigated in this longitudinal study. Personality data for the total of 120 children in the study were obtained from: (1) descriptions of the children at both 3 and 4 years of age by their teachers, using the California Child Q-set; (2) the children's performance on the Lowenfeld…