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Sample records for lacz reporter gene

  1. A lacZ reporter gene expression atlas for 313 adult KOMP mutant mouse lines

    PubMed Central

    Pasumarthi, Ravi K.; Baridon, Brian; Djan, Esi; Trainor, Amanda; Griffey, Stephen M.; Engelhard, Eric K.; Rapp, Jared; Li, Bowen; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, K.C. Kent

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter gene (lacZ) in the vector used for the Knockout Mouse Project (KOMP) is driven by the endogenous promoter of the target gene. In tissues from KOMP mice, histochemical staining for LacZ enzyme activity can be used to determine gene expression patterns. With this technique, we have produced a comprehensive resource of gene expression using both whole mount (WM) and frozen section (FS) LacZ staining in 313 unique KOMP mutant mouse lines. Of these, ∼80% of mutants showed specific staining in one or more tissues, while ∼20% showed no specific staining, ∼13% had staining in only one tissue, and ∼25% had staining in >6 tissues. The highest frequency of specific staining occurred in the brain (∼50%), male gonads (42%), and kidney (39%). The WM method was useful for rapidly identifying whole organ and some substructure staining, while the FS method often revealed substructure and cellular staining specificity. Both staining methods had >90% repeatability in biological replicates. Nonspecific LacZ staining occurs in some tissues due to the presence of bacteria or endogenous enzyme activity. However, this can be effectively distinguished from reporter gene activity by the combination of the WM and FS methods. After careful annotation, LacZ staining patterns in a high percentage of mutants revealed a unique structure-function not previously reported for many of these genes. The validation of methods for LacZ staining, annotation, and expression analysis reported here provides unique insights into the function of genes for which little is currently known. PMID:25591789

  2. Expression pattern of STOP lacZ reporter gene in adult and developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Couégnas, Alice; Schweitzer, Annie; Andrieux, Annie; Ghandour, M Said; Boehm, Nelly

    2007-05-15

    Stable tubulin-only polypeptide (STOP) proteins are microtubule-associated proteins responsible for microtubule stabilization in neurons. STOP null mice show apparently normal cerebral anatomy but display synaptic defects associated with neuroleptic-sensitive behavioral disorders. STOP null mice have therefore been proposed as an animal model for the study of schizophrenia. In the present study, the expression pattern of STOP gene in developing and adult brain has been examined by using lacZ gene inserted in the STOP locus, as a reporter gene. beta-Galactosidase (beta-gal) immunostaining was confined to neuronal cells and projections. Strong labeling was observed in the whole olfactory system, cortical layer VII, hippocampus, hypothalamus, cerebellum, habenula, fasciculus retroflexus, and interpeduncular nucleus in adults. Additionally, ventral thalamic nucleus, clusters of positive cells in striatum, and Cajal-Retzius cells of cortical layer I were labeled in young mice. The strong expression of STOP lacZ reporter gene observed in brain is confined to areas that may be involved in the schizophrenia-related symptoms observed in STOP-deficient mice.

  3. Measurement of Ligand-Induced Activation in Single Viable T Cells Using the lacZ Reporter Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karttunen, Jaana; Shastri, Nilabh

    1991-05-01

    We have used the bacterial β-galactosidase gene (lacZ) as a reporter gene for the rapid measurement of T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-mediated activation of individual T cells. The reporter construct contained the lacZ gene under the control of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) element of the human interleukin 2 enhancer [Fiering, S., Northrop, J. P., Nolan, G. P., Matilla, P., Crabtree, G. R. & Herzenberg, L. A. (1990) Genes Dev. 4, 1823-1834]. The activity of the intracellular lacZ enzyme was analyzed by flow cytometric measurement of fluorescein accumulation in cells loaded with the fluorogenic β-galactosidase substrate fluorescein di-β-D-galactopyranoside. As a model system, the T-cell hybridoma BO4H9.1, which is specific for the lysozyme peptide (amino acids 74-88)/A^b complex, was transfected with the NF-AT-lacZ construct. lacZ activity was induced in 50-100% of the transfectant cells following exposure to pharmacological agents, to the physiological peptide/major histocompatibility complex ligand, or to other TCR-specific stimuli. Interestingly, increasing concentrations of the stimulus increased the fraction of lacZ^+ cells, but not the level of lacZ activity per cell. Even under widely varying levels of stimulus, the level of lacZ activity in individual lacZ^+ cells remained within a remarkably narrow range. These results demonstrate that TCR-mediated activation can be readily measured in single T cells and strongly suggest that, once committed to activation, the level of NF-AT transcriptional activity in individual T cells is independent of the form or concentration of stimulus. This assay is likely to prove useful for the study of early activation events in individual T cells and of TCR ligands.

  4. Comments on Methods to Suppress Endogenous β-Galactosidase Activity in Mouse Tissues Expressing the LacZ Reporter Gene.

    PubMed

    Merkwitz, Claudia; Blaschuk, Orest; Schulz, Angela; Ricken, Albert Markus

    2016-10-01

    The Escherichia coli LacZ gene (encoding β-galactosidase) is a widely used reporter for gene regulation analysis in transgenic mice. Determination of β-galactosidase activity is classically performed using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactopyranoside/ferri-/ferrocyanide (X-Gal/FeCN) histochemistry. Uncertainty about the origin of the β-galactosidase signal is encountered in tissues containing high levels of endogenous β-galactosidase. Here, we show that reliable results can nevertheless be obtained in these tissues by performing the histochemical reaction under slightly basic pH conditions (pH 8-9). We further demonstrate that in this context, analysis of tissue sections may be advantageous over that of conventional whole-mount tissues because poor dye penetration and remaining tissue acidity are avoided in tissue sections. We also recommend that bacterial debris should always be carefully removed from the luminal surface of gastrointestinal tract specimens unless staining of resident microflora is deliberately used as an internal positive control in the assay. Finally, we show that 6-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactopyranoside with nitrotetrazolium blue chloride works well as an alternative chromogenic substrate for visualizing LacZ reporter gene expression in cryostat sections. Its use in high endogenous β-galactosidase-expressing organs is superior over the use of X-Gal/FeCN at slightly basic pH conditions. PMID:27555495

  5. Comments on Methods to Suppress Endogenous β-Galactosidase Activity in Mouse Tissues Expressing the LacZ Reporter Gene.

    PubMed

    Merkwitz, Claudia; Blaschuk, Orest; Schulz, Angela; Ricken, Albert Markus

    2016-10-01

    The Escherichia coli LacZ gene (encoding β-galactosidase) is a widely used reporter for gene regulation analysis in transgenic mice. Determination of β-galactosidase activity is classically performed using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactopyranoside/ferri-/ferrocyanide (X-Gal/FeCN) histochemistry. Uncertainty about the origin of the β-galactosidase signal is encountered in tissues containing high levels of endogenous β-galactosidase. Here, we show that reliable results can nevertheless be obtained in these tissues by performing the histochemical reaction under slightly basic pH conditions (pH 8-9). We further demonstrate that in this context, analysis of tissue sections may be advantageous over that of conventional whole-mount tissues because poor dye penetration and remaining tissue acidity are avoided in tissue sections. We also recommend that bacterial debris should always be carefully removed from the luminal surface of gastrointestinal tract specimens unless staining of resident microflora is deliberately used as an internal positive control in the assay. Finally, we show that 6-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactopyranoside with nitrotetrazolium blue chloride works well as an alternative chromogenic substrate for visualizing LacZ reporter gene expression in cryostat sections. Its use in high endogenous β-galactosidase-expressing organs is superior over the use of X-Gal/FeCN at slightly basic pH conditions.

  6. A lacZ Reporter-Based Strategy for Rapid Expression Analysis and Target Validation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latent Infection Genes.

    PubMed

    Sood, Shivani; Kaur, Satinder; Shrivastava, Rahul

    2016-02-01

    We report a novel lacZ fusion vector and demonstrate its utility for expression analysis of genes associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent infection. The vector contains E. coli (oriE) and mycobacterial (oriM) origins of replication, a kanamycin resistance gene (Km(r)) as selection marker, and a lacZ reporter gene in fusion with MCS for cloning of upstream regulatory sequence of the desired genes. β-galactosidase activity of the vector was standardized for expression analysis under latent mycobacterial conditions using Phsp60, a constitutive mycobacterial promoter, utilizing Mycobacterium smegmatis as model organism. Validation of the vector was done by cloning and expression analysis of PhspX (alpha crystalline) and Picl (isocitrate lyase), promoters from two of the genes shown to be involved in M. tuberculosis persistence. Both genes showed appreciable levels of β-galactosidase expression under hypoxia-induced persistent conditions in comparison to their actively replicating state. Expression analysis of a set of hypothetical genes was also done, of which Rv0628c showed increased expression under persistent conditions. The reported fusion vector and the strategy can be effectively used for short listing and validation of drug targets deduced from various non-conclusive approaches such as bioinformatics and microarray analysis against latent/persistent form of mycobacterial infection. PMID:26597215

  7. [Mosaic expression of the lacZ reporter-gene under control of 5'-regulatory sequences of the alpha-S1-casein gene in transgenic mice].

    PubMed

    Serova, I A; Andreeva, L E; Khaĭdarova, N V; Dias, L P; Dvorianchikov, G A; Burkov, I A; Baginskaia, N V

    2009-01-01

    Phenomenon of mosaic expression at cellular level is widely presented in tissues and organs of transgenic animals. The communication is concerned a study of the mosaics in transgenic mice carrying the lacZ reporter-gene under control of the bovine and goat alpha-S1-casein genes with 5'-flanked sequences of various ex-tent: pCLZ1--721bp, pCLZ2-- 2001 bp and pCLZ3 3409 bp constructs. Five transgenic founders were generated by injection of the recombinant DNA into zygotes: pCLZ 1 - N 16, pCLZ2 - N 37 and pCLZ3 N 7, N 36, and N 48. Positive for J3-galactosidase activity cells were detected in lactating mammary glands of all transgenic females, however, distribution of the positive cells was variable. We observed two types of mosaics: clonal or "lobule" type with positive cells filling the whole of the globule or stochastic type with single positive cells scattered over one or different lobules. Two types of mosaics were characteristic of all the transgenic animals, although, females carrying the pCLZ2 transgene showed "lobule" type more often than transgenic animals with the transgenes pCLZ and pCLZ3. It is suggested that the stochastic type of mosaics occurs in the cells at terminal stage of differentiation, whereas the type arises from positive for P-galactosidase proliferating precursors. Analysis of the inheritance of the transgenes in different lines demonstrated that the pCLZl transgene was inserted in the X-chromosome of the founder whereas the other two localized in autosomes. Localization of the pCLZl transgene in the X-chromosome did not influence the mosaicism; it was similar to that of transgenic animals carrying the transgenes in autosomes. Ectopic expression of the reporter-gene was detected in mandibular glands from the offsprings of the founders N 16 and N 37 only, as well as in atrezed follicles in N 37. The weak ectopic expression saggests that the 5 S-flanked regulatory sequences used in the constructs are able to provide perfect tissue

  8. A simple system for converting lacZ to gfp reporter fusions in diverse bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goulian, Mark; van der Woude, Marjan

    2006-05-10

    We describe new plasmids that facilitate the rapid conversion of lacZ fusions to gfp transcriptional fusions in bacteria. The exchange is based on a double recombination between lacZ sequences in a suicide vector and the recipient chromosome. The suicide vector is a mobilizable, conditionally replicative plasmid that contains the gene for gfp with flanking lacZ homology and is derived from a broad host range plasmid that has been successfully used in a wide range of bacterial species. The technique was used to convert lacZ reporter fusions to gfp fusions in Escherichia coli, Bordetella bronchiseptica and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Green fluorescent protein expression in the new recombinants reflected the beta galactosidase expression in the parent strains. GFP is particularly useful for rapid quantification of gene expression in real time and in single cells. As a demonstration of an application of this system, we studied the induction of virE transcription by the VirA/VirG two-component system in A. tumefaciens in response to various levels of phenolic inducer. Analysis of GFP fluorescence in single cells revealed that at intermediate levels of inducer the population of cells was remarkably heterogeneous. The tools described here will be useful for general studies of transcriptional regulation as well as for applications that require spatial and temporal identification of gene expression, such as in the study of biofilms, and interactions between bacteria and their environment. PMID:16500039

  9. A gene expression resource generated by genome-wide lacZ profiling in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Elizabeth; Estabel, Jeanne; Oellrich, Anika; Maguire, Anna Karin; Adissu, Hibret A.; Souter, Luke; Siragher, Emma; Lillistone, Charlotte; Green, Angela L.; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Carragher, Damian M.; Karp, Natasha A.; Smedley, Damian; Adams, Niels C.; Bussell, James N.; Adams, David J.; Ramírez-Solis, Ramiro; Steel, Karen P.; Galli, Antonella; White, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Knowledge of the expression profile of a gene is a critical piece of information required to build an understanding of the normal and essential functions of that gene and any role it may play in the development or progression of disease. High-throughput, large-scale efforts are on-going internationally to characterise reporter-tagged knockout mouse lines. As part of that effort, we report an open access adult mouse expression resource, in which the expression profile of 424 genes has been assessed in up to 47 different organs, tissues and sub-structures using a lacZ reporter gene. Many specific and informative expression patterns were noted. Expression was most commonly observed in the testis and brain and was most restricted in white adipose tissue and mammary gland. Over half of the assessed genes presented with an absent or localised expression pattern (categorised as 0-10 positive structures). A link between complexity of expression profile and viability of homozygous null animals was observed; inactivation of genes expressed in ≥21 structures was more likely to result in reduced viability by postnatal day 14 compared with more restricted expression profiles. For validation purposes, this mouse expression resource was compared with Bgee, a federated composite of RNA-based expression data sets. Strong agreement was observed, indicating a high degree of specificity in our data. Furthermore, there were 1207 observations of expression of a particular gene in an anatomical structure where Bgee had no data, indicating a large amount of novelty in our data set. Examples of expression data corroborating and extending genotype-phenotype associations and supporting disease gene candidacy are presented to demonstrate the potential of this powerful resource. PMID:26398943

  10. p21-LacZ reporter mice reflect p53-dependent toxic insult

    SciTech Connect

    Vasey, Douglas B. Wolf, C. Roland; MacArtney, Thomas; Brown, Ken; Whitelaw, C. Bruce A.

    2008-03-15

    There is an urgent need to discover less toxic and more selective drugs to treat disease. The use of transgenic mice that report on toxic insult-induced transcription can provide a valuable tool in this regard. To exemplify this strategy, we have generated transgenic mice carrying a p21-LacZ transgene. Transgene activity reflected endogenous p21 gene activation in various tissues, displayed compound-specific spatial expression signatures in the brain and immune tissues and enabled p53-dependent and p53-independent responses to be identified. We discuss the application of these mice in delineating the molecular events in normal cellular growth and disease and for the evaluation of drug toxicity.

  11. Skeletal Muscle Tissue Clearing for LacZ and Fluorescent Reporters, and Immunofluorescence Staining.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mayank; Murkonda, Bhavani Sr; Asakura, Yoko; Asakura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly ordered yet complex tissue containing several cell types that interact with each other in order to maintain structure and homeostasis. It is also a highly regenerative tissue that responds to damage in a highly intricate but stereotypic manner, with distinct spatial and temporal kinetics. Proper examination of this process requires one to look at the three-dimensional orientation of the cellular and subcellular components, which can be accomplished through tissue clearing. While there has been a recent surge of protocols to study biology in whole tissue, it has primarily focused on the nervous system. This chapter describes the workflow for whole mount analysis of murine skeletal muscle for LacZ reporters, fluorescent reporters and immunofluorescence staining. Using this technique, we are able to visualize LacZ reporters more effectively in deep tissue samples, and to perform fluorescent imaging with a depth greater than 1700 μm. PMID:27492170

  12. A series of vectors to construct lacZ fusions for the study of gene expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, M J; Petit, T; Gancedo, C

    1997-12-22

    We have constructed a series of plasmids to facilitate the fusion of promoters with or without coding regions of genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe to the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli. These vectors carry a multiple cloning region in which fission yeast DNA may be inserted in three different reading frames with respect to the coding region of lacZ. The plasmids were constructed with the ura4+ or the his3+ marker of S. pombe. Functionality of the plasmids was tested measuring in parallel the expression of fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase and beta-galactosidase under the control of the fbp1+ promoter in different conditions.

  13. Radial derivatives of the mouse ventral pallium traced with Dbx1-LacZ reporters.

    PubMed

    Puelles, Luis; Medina, Loreta; Borello, Ugo; Legaz, Isabel; Teissier, Anne; Pierani, Alessandra; Rubenstein, John L R

    2016-09-01

    The progeny of Dbx1-expressing progenitors was studied in the developing mouse pallium, using two transgenic mouse lines: (1) Dbx1(nlslacZ) mice, in which the gene of the β-galactosidase reporter (LacZ) is inserted directly under the control of the Dbx1 promoter, allowing short-term lineage tracing of Dbx1-derived cells; and (2) Dbx1(CRE) mice crossed with a Cre-dependent reporter strain (ROSA26(loxP-stop-loxP-LacZ)), in which the Dbx1-derived cells result permanently labeled (Bielle et al., 2005). We thus examined in detail the derivatives of the postulated longitudinal ventral pallium (VPall) sector, which has been defined among other features by its selective ventricular zone expression of Dbx1 (the recent ascription by Puelles, 2014 of the whole olfactory cortex primordium to the VPall was tested). Earlier notions about a gradiental caudorostral reduction of Dbx1 signal were corroborated, so that virtually no signal was found at the olfactory bulb and the anterior olfactory area. The piriform cortex was increasingly labeled caudalwards. The only endopiriform grisea labeled were the ventral endopiriform nucleus and the bed nucleus of the external capsule. Anterior and basolateral parts of the whole pallial amygdala also were densely marked, in contrast to the negative posterior parts of these pallial amygdalar nuclei (leaving apart medial amygdalar parts ascribed to subpallial or extratelencephalic sources of Dbx1-derived GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons). Alternative tentative interpretations are discussed to explain the partial labeling obtained of both olfactory and amygdaloid structures. This includes the hypothesis of an as yet undefined part of the pallium, potentially responsible for the posterior amygdala, or the hypothesis that the VPall may not be wholly characterized by Dbx1 expression (this gene not being necessary for VPall molecular distinctness and histogenetic potency), which would leave a dorsal Dbx1-negative VPall subdomain of variable size

  14. Beware of your Cre-Ation: lacZ expression impairs neuronal integrity and hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Reichel, J M; Bedenk, B T; Gassen, N C; Hafner, K; Bura, S A; Almeida-Correa, S; Genewsky, A; Dedic, N; Giesert, F; Agarwal, A; Nave, K-A; Rein, T; Czisch, M; Deussing, J M; Wotjak, C T

    2016-10-01

    Expression of the lacZ-sequence is a widely used reporter-tool to assess the transgenic and/or transfection efficacy of a target gene in mice. Once activated, lacZ is permanently expressed. However, protein accumulation is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, the protein product of the bacterial lacZ gene is ß-galactosidase, an analog to the mammalian senescence-associated ß-galactosidase, a molecular marker for aging. Therefore we studied the behavioral, structural and molecular consequences of lacZ expression in distinct neuronal sub-populations. lacZ expression in cortical glutamatergic neurons resulted in severe impairments in hippocampus-dependent memory accompanied by marked structural alterations throughout the CNS. In contrast, GFP expression or the expression of the ChR2/YFP fusion product in the same cell populations did not result in either cognitive or structural deficits. GABAergic lacZ expression caused significantly decreased hyper-arousal and mild cognitive deficits. Attenuated structural and behavioral consequences of lacZ expression could also be induced in adulthood, and lacZ transfection in neuronal cell cultures significantly decreased their viability. Our findings provide a strong caveat against the use of lacZ reporter mice for phenotyping studies and point to a particular sensitivity of the hippocampus formation to detrimental consequences of lacZ expression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Construction of new cloning, lacZ reporter and scarless-markerless suicide vectors for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-05-01

    To elucidate the putative function of a gene, effective tools are required for genetic characterization that facilitate its inactivation, deletion or modification on the bacterial chromosome. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli/Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans shuttle vector pYGK was determined, allowing us to redesign and construct a new shuttle cloning vector, pJT4, and promoterless lacZ transcriptional/translational fusion plasmids, pJT3 and pJT5. Plasmids pJT4 and pJT5 contain the origin of replication necessary to maintain shuttle vector replication. In addition, a new suicide vector, pJT1, was constructed for the generation of scarless and markerless deletion mutations of genes in the oral pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans. Plasmid pJT1 is a pUC-based suicide vector that is counter-selectable for sucrose sensitivity. This vector does not leave antibiotic markers or scars on the chromosome after gene deletion and thus provides the option to combine several mutations in the same genetic background. The effectiveness of pJT1 was demonstrated by the construction of A. actinomycetemcomitans isogenic qseB single deletion (ΔqseB) mutant and lsrRK double deletion mutants (ΔlsrRK). These new vectors may offer alternatives for genetic studies in A. actinomycetemcomitans and other members of the HACEK (Haemophilus spp., A. actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group of Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. The promoter region of the arg3 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: nucleotide sequence and regulation in an arg3-lacZ gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Crabeel, M; Huygen, R; Cunin, R; Glansdorff, N

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the DNA sequence for the 5' end of the arg3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including part of the coding region and the 200 nucleotides immediately upstream. A promoter-deletion mutant was found to have lost all of the sequence lying normally in front of the gene except for the 33 nucleotides preceding the AUG codon. The role of the 5' domain in initiation and regulation of arg3 transcription was assessed by a gene fusion experiment. The Escherichia coli lacZ gene, was truncated of the eight amino-terminal codons substituted in vitro, on a 2mu plasmid, for the carboxy-terminal and 3'-flanking regions of arg3, leaving only the first 19 proximal codons and approximately 1600 nucleotides of the region preceding arg3 on the yeast chromosome. The fused gene was expressed in phase and was still submitted to the two mechanisms regulating the wild-type arg3 gene: the general, probably transcriptional control of amino acid biosynthesis and the specific, apparently post-transcriptional control mediated by the products of the argR genes. These results suggest a determining role for the 5' end portion of the arg3 messenger in the specific arginine-mediated control mechanism. PMID:11894927

  17. Databases and software for the analysis of mutations in the human p53 gene, human hprt gene and both the lacI and lacZ gene in transgenic rodents.

    PubMed

    Cariello, N F; Douglas, G R; Gorelick, N J; Hart, D W; Wilson, J D; Soussi, T

    1998-01-01

    We have created databases and software applications for the analysis of DNA mutations at the human p53 gene, the human hprt gene and both the rodent transgenic lacI and lacZ loci. The databases themselves are stand-alone dBASE files and the software for analysis of the databases runs on IBM-compatible computers with Microsoft Windows. Each database has a separate software analysis program. The software created for these databases permit the filtering, ordering, report generation and display of information in the database. In addition, a significant number of routines have been developed for the analysis of single base substitutions. One method of obtaining the databases and software is via the World Wide Web. Open the following home page with a Web Browser: http://sunsite.unc.edu/dnam/mainpage. html . Alternatively, the databases and programs are available via public FTP from: anonymous@sunsite.unc.edu. There is no password required to enter the system. The databases and software are found beneath the subdirectory: pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations. Two other programs are available at the site, a program for comparison of mutational spectra and a program for entry of mutational data into a relational database.

  18. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Julia V.; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown. PMID:26275310

  19. A cloning vector for creation of Escherichia coli lacZ translational fusions and generation of linear template for chromosomal integration.

    PubMed

    Uhlich, Gaylen A; Chen, Chin-Yi

    2012-05-01

    A novel cloning vector to aid in the construction of single copy β-galactosidase reporter systems for gene expression studies in lactose metabolizing Escherichia coli strains, including STEC, is described. The plasmid allows construction of translational fusions of cloned gene promoters to a short segment of E. coli lacZ. A selectable spectinomycin resistance marker flanked by a short lacI segment is positioned 5' to the cloning site. PCR amplification using opposing primers complementary to the upstream lacI fragment and the downstream lacZ fragment generates a linear template suitable for integration using pRedET recombination. Integration of linear template derived from the recombinant plasmid into host strains replaces the entire native lacZ promoter and fuses the promoter of interest in-frame with the lacZ gene, thus simultaneously producing a single-copy, chromosomal reporter system and eliminating background lacZ expression. Studies comparing ahpC expression from a chromosomal fusion in the lac open with that on a plasmid in E. coli strain EDL933 are shown. PMID:22197962

  20. [Toward an unpublished method of detecting human retroviruses: activation of HIV-1 LacZ recombinant provirus by the tat gene product].

    PubMed

    Bonnerot, C; Savatier, N; Nicolas, J F

    1988-01-01

    For a few of retroviruses, the level of synthesis of viral proteins is greatly increased in the presence of a transactivator gene which is encoded by the virus. For instance, for HIV, TAT acts on target sequences present in the viral long terminal repeat (LTR). HIV-1 recombinant retrovirus (RRV), where the gag, pol and part of env genes have been exchanged for the reporter nlsLacZ gene, expresses the reporter gene only in presence of TAT. When the RRV is tat defective, this activity can be complemented by tat present on a second molecule. The expression of nlsLacZ can then be detected by a simple histochemical staining. If this complementation can also be provided by a wild type virus, then their detection and titration would be greatly simplified.

  1. Quantitative Measurement of Relative Retinoic Acid Levels in E8.5 Embryos and Neurosphere Cultures Using the F9 RARE-Lacz Cell-based Reporter Assay.

    PubMed

    Ababon, Myka R; Li, Bo I; Matteson, Paul G; Millonig, James H

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important developmental morphogen that coordinates anteroposterior and dorsoventral axis patterning, somitic differentiation, neurogenesis, patterning of the hindbrain and spinal cord, and the development of multiple organ systems. Due to its chemical nature as a small amphipathic lipid, direct detection and visualization of RA histologically remains technically impossible. Currently, methods used to infer the presence and localization of RA make use of reporter systems that detect the biological activity of RA. Most established reporter systems, both transgenic mice and cell lines, make use of the highly potent RA response element (RARE) upstream of the RAR-beta gene to drive RA-inducible expression of reporter genes, such as beta-galactosidase or luciferase. The transgenic RARE-LacZ mouse is useful in visualizing spatiotemporal changes in RA signaling especially during embryonic development. However, it does not directly measure overall RA levels. As a reporter system, the F9 RARE-LacZ cell line can be used in a variety of ways, from simple detection of RA to quantitative measurements of RA levels in tissue explants. Here we describe the quantitative determination of relative RA levels generated in embryos and neurosphere cultures using the F9 RARE-LacZ reporter cell line. PMID:27684594

  2. p53 deficiency alters the yield and spectrum of radiation-induced lacZ mutants in the brain of transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particle radiation in the galacto-cosmic environment poses a significant risk in space exploration and the evaluation of radiation-induced genetic damage in tissues, especially in the central nervous system, is an important consideration in long-term manned space missions. We used a plasmid-based transgenic mouse model system, with the pUR288 lacZ transgene integrated in the genome of every cell of C57Bl/6(lacZ) mice, to evaluate the genetic damage induced by iron particle radiation. In order to examine the importance of genetic background on the radiation sensitivity of individuals, we cross-bred p53 wild-type lacZ transgenic mice with p53 nullizygous mice, producing lacZ transgenic mice that were either hemizygous or nullizygous for the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Animals were exposed to an acute dose of 1 Gy of iron particles and the lacZ mutation frequency (MF) in the brain was measured at time intervals from 1 to 16 weeks post-irradiation. Our results suggest that iron particles induced an increase in lacZ MF (2.4-fold increase in p53+/+ mice, 1.3-fold increase in p53+/- mice and 2.1-fold increase in p53-/- mice) and that this induction is both temporally regulated and p53 genotype dependent. Characterization of mutants based on their restriction patterns showed that the majority of the mutants arising spontaneously are derived from point mutations or small deletions in all three genotypes. Radiation induced alterations in the spectrum of deletion mutants and reorganization of the genome, as evidenced by the selection of mutants containing mouse genomic DNA. These observations are unique in that mutations in brain tissue after particle radiation exposure have never before been reported owing to technical limitations in most other mutation assays.

  3. Characterisation of Muta™Mouse λgt10-lacZ transgene: evidence for in vivo rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Shwed, Philip S.; Crosthwait, Jennifer; Douglas, George R.; Seligy, Vern L.

    2010-01-01

    The multicopy λgt10-lacZ transgene shuttle vector of Muta™Mouse serves as an important tool for genotoxicity studies. Here, we describe a model for λgt10-lacZ transgene molecular structure, based on characterisation of transgenes recovered from animals of our intramural breeding colony. Unique nucleotide sequences of the 47 513 bp monomer are reported with GenBank® assigned accession numbers. Besides defining ancestral mutations of the λgt10 used to construct the transgene and the Muta™Mouse precursor (strain 40.6), we validated the sequence integrity of key λ genes needed for the Escherichia coli host-based mutation reporting assay. Using three polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based chromosome scanning and cloning strategies, we found five distinct in vivo transgene rearrangements, which were common to both sexes, and involved copy fusions generating ∼10 defective copies per haplotype. The transgene haplotype was estimated by Southern hybridisation and real-time–polymerase chain reaction, which yielded 29.0 ± 4.0 copies based on spleen DNA of Muta™Mouse, and a reconstructed CD2F1 genome with variable λgt10-lacZ copies. Similar analysis of commercially prepared spleen DNA from Big Blue® mouse yielded a haplotype of 23.5 ± 3.1 copies. The latter DNA is used in calibrating a commercial in vitro packaging kit for E.coli host-based mutation assays of both transgenic systems. The model for λgt10-lacZ transgene organisation, and the PCR-based methods for assessing copy number, integrity and rearrangements, potentially extends the use of Muta™Mouse construct for direct, genomic-type assays that detect the effects of clastogens and aneugens, without depending on an E.coli host, for reporting effects. PMID:20724577

  4. Expression and phylogenetic relationships of a novel lacZ homologue from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T J; MacInnes, J I

    1997-07-01

    To learn more about the genetics and physiology of the important swine pathogen, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, we cloned the lacZ gene by complementation of an Escherichia coli delta lac mutant. The A. pleuropneumoniae lacZ gene has an open reading frame of 3015 bp which could encode a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 117022. The deduced protein shares 26.8-34.8% identity with beta-galactosidases from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Sequences with homology to seven regions commonly found in beta-galactosidases are present and amino acids corresponding to active site residues Tyr-503 and Glu-537 in E. coli LacZ are also conserved; however, there is a leucine in the place of Gly-794, a residue which has been implicated in substrate recognition. The sequences flanking the A. pleuropneumoniae lacZ gene do not share homology with known transport or regulatory genes nor do they share homology with cAMP receptor protein (CRP) or LacI binding sites. Low levels of beta-galactosidase activity could be detected when the protein was expressed from a multicopy plasmid in E. coli delta lac and when it was measured in A. pleuropneumoniae. The level of activity was not markedly reduced in the presence of glucose. Although the A. pleuropneumoniae LacZ shares some features with other beta-galactosidases, its constitutive expression and an unusual active site residue suggest that it may have a unique function. PMID:9228778

  5. Yersinia pestis lacZ expresses a beta-galactosidase with low enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrov, Alexander G; Perry, Robert D

    2006-02-01

    Although very little, if any, beta-galactosidase activity is detected in Yersinia pestis by a standard Miller assay, we found that Y. pestis KIM6+ cells formed blue colonies on plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside (X-gal). Searches of the Y. pestis genome databases revealed the presence of noncontiguous sequences highly homologous to Escherichia coli lacZ, lacY, and lacI. Yersinia pestis lacZ is predicted to encode a 1060 amino-acid protein with 62% identity and 72% similarity to beta-galactosidase from E. coli. A deletion in the Y. pestis lacZ gene caused the formation of white colonies on X-gal-containing plates and beta-galactosidase activity was at background levels in the KIM6+lacZ mutant, while the complemented strain expressed about 190 Miller units. The Y. pestis lacZ promoter was not regulated by isopropylthiogalactoside or glucose. Finally, uptake of lactose by Y. pestis may be impaired. PMID:16436060

  6. Molecular cloning of Mu d(bla lacZ) transcriptional and translational fusions.

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, B L

    1987-01-01

    The vector pBW2 was made to selectively clone chimeric plasmids with chromosomal Mu d(bla lacZ) transcriptional or translational fusions. It was tetracycline resistant and had the carboxyl-terminal end of bla distal to its PstI site. Because ligation of PstI-digested chromosomal DNA of a Mu d(bla lacZ) insertion with pBW2 restored bla, ampicillin-resistant chimeric plasmids were selectable. These plasmids had the Mu d bla amino terminus and simultaneously acquired other Mu d sequences including lacZ, the chromosomal fusion joint, and the DNA adjacent to the nearest chromosomal PstI site. The plasmid pBW2 was useful in the molecular cloning of several psi and pho::lacZ(Mu d) fusions, as well as chromosomal genes located near Mu d insertions. PMID:3032905

  7. Establishment of a LacZ marker rescue assay to detect infectious RD114 virus.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Okada, Masaya; Shojima, Takayuki; Baba, Kenji; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2008-08-01

    Cats have an infectious endogenous retrovirus, named RD114 virus, and there is a possibility that RD114 virus has contaminated live attenuated vaccines, for which feline cells are used as a substrate. To monitor infectious RD114 virus in vaccines for cats, we developed a LacZ marker rescue assay to detect infectious RD114 virus. Among four human cell lines examined, TE671 cells (human rhabdomyosarcoma) were most susceptible to RD114 virus and supported RD114 replication efficiently. Infection was enhanced approximately 5 times by the addition of polybrene at concentrations of 2 to 8 microg/ml in the medium during viral adsorption. A 4-hr viral adsorption period was sufficient to obtain the maximum titer. By inoculating samples into TE671 cells transduced with the lacZ marker gene, the limiting diluted sample (i.e., less than 10 infectious units) was detected at 12 days post-inoculation by the LacZ marker rescue assay. Based on the results obtained in this study, we propose a standard protocol of the LacZ marker rescue assay to detect infectious RD114 virus.

  8. CEST MRI reporter genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanshu; Bulte, Jeff W M; Gilad, Assaf A

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several reporter genes have been developed that can serve as a beacon for non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we provide a brief summary of recent advances in MRI reporter gene technology, as well as detailed "hands-on" protocols for cloning, expression, and imaging of reporter genes based on chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST).

  9. Proximal promoter elements of the human zeta-globin gene confer embryonic-specific expression on a linked reporter gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pondel, M D; Sharpe, J A; Clark, S; Pearson, L; Wood, W G; Proudfoot, N J

    1996-11-01

    We have investigated the transcriptional regulation of the human embryonic zeta-globin gene promoter. First, we examined the effect that deletion of sequences 5' to zeta-globin's CCAAT box have on zeta-promoter activity in erythroid cell lines. Deletions of sequences between -116 and -556 (cap = 0) had little effect while further deletion to -84 reduced zeta-promoter activity by only 2-3-fold in both transiently and stably transfected erythroid cells. Constructs containing 67, 84 and 556 bp of zeta-globin 5' flanking region linked to a beta-galactosidase reporter gene (lacZ) and hypersensitive site -40 (HS-40) of the human alpha-globin gene cluster were then employed for the generation of transgenic mice. LacZ expression from all constructs, including a 67 bp zeta-globin promoter, was erythroid-specific and most active between 8.5 and 10.5 days post-fertilisation. By 16.5 days gestation, lacZ expression dropped 40-100-fold. These results suggest that embryonic-specific activation of the human zeta-globin promoter is conferred by a 67 bp zeta-promoter fragment containing only a CCAAT and TATA box. PMID:8932366

  10. Biological Sensor for Sucrose Availability: Relative Sensitivities of Various Reporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William G.; Brandl, Maria T.; Quiñones, Beatriz; Lindow, Steven E.

    2001-01-01

    A set of three sucrose-regulated transcriptional fusions was constructed. Fusions p61RYTIR, p61RYlac, and p61RYice contain the scrR sucrose repressor gene and the promoterless gfp, lacZ, and inaZ reporter genes, respectively, fused to the scrY promoter from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Cells of Erwinia herbicola containing these fusions are induced only in media amended with sucrose, fructose, or sorbose. While a large variation in sucrose-dependent reporter gene activity was observed in cells harboring all gene fusions, fusions to the inaZ reporter gene yielded a much wider range of activity and were responsive to lower levels of sucrose than either lacZ or gfp. The lacZ reporter gene was found to be more efficient than gfp, requiring approximately 300-fold fewer cells for a detectable response over all concentrations of sucrose. Similarly, inaZ was found to be more efficient than lacZ, requiring 30-fold fewer cells at 1.45 μM sucrose and 6,100-fold fewer cells at 29 mM sucrose for a quantifiable response. The fluorescence of individual cells containing p61RYTIR was quantified following epifluorescence microscopy in order to relate the fluorescence exhibited by populations of cells in batch cultures with that of individual cells in such cultures. While the mean fluorescence intensity of a population of individual cells increased with increasing concentrations of sucrose, a wide range of fluorescence intensity was seen among individual cells. For most cultures the distribution of fluorescence intensity among individual cells was log-normally distributed, but cells grown in intermediate concentrations of sucrose exhibited two distinct populations of cells, one having relatively low fluorescence and another with much higher fluorescence. When cells were inoculated onto bean leaves, whole-cell ice nucleation and gfp-based biological sensors for sucrose each indicated that the average concentration of sucrose on moist leaf surfaces was about 20

  11. Characterization of K+ currents and the cAMP-dependent modulation in cultured Drosophila mushroom body neurons identified by lacZ expression.

    PubMed

    Wright, N J; Zhong, Y

    1995-02-01

    Electrophysiological analysis of cultured neurons provides a potential approach toward understanding the physiological defects that may contribute to abnormal behavior exhibited by mutants of the fruit fly Drosophila. However, its application has been restricted by an inability to identify a particular functional or anatomical subpopulation of neurons from the CNS. To study neurons composing the CNS mushroom body proposed as a center for insect olfactory learning, we utilized a Drosophila enhancer detector line that expresses a lacZ reporter gene in these neurons and identified them in acutely dissociated larval CNS cultures by vital fluorescent staining. The patch-clamp analysis suggests that whole-cell voltage-activated K+ currents can be classified into two types in identified mushroom body neurons. Type 1 current comprises a TEA-sensitive slowly inactivating current and noninactivating component while type 2 current contains a 4-AP-sensitive transient A-current and a noninactivating component. Application of cAMP analogs induced distinct modulation of type 1 and type 2 currents. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the lacZ gene and the subsequent staining do not significantly alter the different types of K+ currents. This initial characterization provides a basis for further analysis of mutations that impair learning and memory resulting from an abnormal cAMP cascade preferentially expressed in the mushroom body.

  12. Simultaneous measurement of benzo[a]pyrene-induced Pig-a and lacZ mutations, micronuclei and DNA adducts in Muta™ Mouse.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Christine L; Douglas, George R; Gingerich, John; Phonethepswath, Souk; Torous, Dorothea K; Dertinger, Stephen D; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M; White, Paul A

    2011-12-01

    In this study we compared the response of the Pig-a gene mutation assay to that of the lacZ transgenic rodent mutation assay, and demonstrated that multiple endpoints can be measured in a 28-day repeat dose study. Muta™Mouse were dosed daily for 28 days with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP; 0, 25, 50 and 75 mg/kg body weight/day) by oral gavage. Micronucleus (MN) frequency was determined in reticulocytes (RETs) 48 hr following the last dose. 72 h following the last dose, mice were euthanized, and tissues (glandular stomach, small intestine, bone marrow and liver) were collected for lacZ mutation and DNA adduct analysis, and blood was evaluated for Pig-a mutants. BaP-derived DNA adducts were detected in all tissues examined and significant dose-dependent increases in mutant Pig-a phenotypes (i.e., RET(CD24-) and RBC (CD24-)) and lacZ mutants were observed. We estimate that mutagenic efficiency (i.e., rate of conversion of adducts into mutations) was much lower for Pig-a compared to lacZ, and speculate that this difference is likely explained by differences in repair capacity between the gene targets, and differences in the cell populations sampled for Pig-a versus lacZ. The BaP doubling doses for both gene targets, however, were comparable, suggesting that similar mechanisms are involved in the accumulation of gene mutations. Significant dose-related increases in % MN were also observed; however, the doubling dose was considerably higher for this endpoint. The similarity in dose response kinetics of Pig-a and lacZ provides further evidence for the mutational origin of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor deficiencies detected in the Pig-a assay.

  13. TP53 and lacZ mutagenesis induced by 3-nitrobenzanthrone in Xpa-deficient human TP53 knock-in mouse embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kucab, Jill E; Zwart, Edwin P; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M

    2016-03-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a highly mutagenic compound and possible human carcinogen found in diesel exhaust. 3-NBA forms bulky DNA adducts following metabolic activation and induces predominantly G:CT:A transversions in a variety of experimental systems. Here we investigated the influence of nucleotide excision repair (NER) on 3-NBA-induced mutagenesis of the human tumour suppressor gene TP53 and the reporter gene lacZ. To this end we utilised Xpa -knockout (Xpa-Null) human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) embryo fibroblasts (HUFs). As Xpa is essential for NER of bulky DNA adducts, we hypothesized that DNA adducts induced by 3-NBA would persist in the genomes of Xpa-Null cells and lead to an increased frequency of mutation. The HUF immortalisation assay was used to select for cells harbouring TP53 mutations following mutagen exposure. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice and HUFs were more sensitive to 3-NBA treatment than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. However, following 3-NBA treatment and immortalisation, a similar frequency of TP53-mutant clones arose from Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures. In cells from both Xpa genotypes G:CT:A transversion was the predominant TP53 mutation type and mutations exhibited bias towards the non-transcribed strand. Thirty-two percent of 3-NBA-induced TP53 mutations occurred at CpG sites, all of which are hotspots for mutation in smokers' lung cancer (codons 157, 158, 175, 245, 248, 273, 282). We also examined 3-NBA-induced mutagenesis of an integrated lacZ reporter gene in HUFs, where we again observed a similar mutant frequency in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Our findings suggest that 3-NBA-DNA adducts may evade removal by global genomic NER; the persistence of 3-NBA adducts in DNA may be an important factor in its mutagenicity. PMID:26723900

  14. UV-enhanced reactivation of a UV-damaged reporter gene suggests transcription-coupled repair is UV-inducible in human cells.

    PubMed

    Francis, M A; Rainbow, A J

    1999-01-01

    The genetic disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) exhibit deficiencies in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage. CS fibroblasts retain proficient nucleotide excision repair (NER) of inactive (or bulk) DNA, but are deficient in the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) of active genes. In contrast, XP complementation group C (XP-C) fibroblasts retain proficient TCR, but are deficient in bulk DNA repair. The remaining NER-deficient XP groups exhibit deficiencies in both repair pathways. Ad5HCMVsp1lacZ is a recombinant adenovirus vector that is unable to replicate in human fibroblasts, but can efficiently infect and express the beta-galactosidase reporter gene in these cells. We have examined the host cell reactivation (HCR) of beta-galactosidase activity for UV-irradiated Ad5HCMVsp1lacZ in non-irradiated and UV-irradiated normal, XP-B, XP-C, XP-D, XP-F, XP-G, CS-A and CS-B fibroblasts. HCR of beta-galactosidase activity for UV-irradiated Ad5HCMVsp1lacZ was reduced in non-irradiated cells from each of the repair-deficient groups examined (including XP-C) relative to that in non-irradiated normal cells. Prior irradiation of cells with low UV fluences resulted in an enhancement of HCR for normal and XP-C strains, but not for the remaining XP and CS strains. HCR of the UV-damaged reporter gene in UV-irradiated XP and CS strains was similar to measurements of TCR reported previously for these cells. These results suggest that UV treatment results in an induced repair of UV-damaged DNA in the transcribed strand of an active gene in XP-C and normal cells through an enhancement of TCR or a mechanism which involves the TCR pathway. PMID:9934845

  15. TP53 and lacZ mutagenesis induced by 3-nitrobenzanthrone in Xpa-deficient human TP53 knock-in mouse embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kucab, Jill E.; Zwart, Edwin P.; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.

    2016-01-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a highly mutagenic compound and possible human carcinogen found in diesel exhaust. 3-NBA forms bulky DNA adducts following metabolic activation and induces predominantly G:C > T:A transversions in a variety of experimental systems. Here we investigated the influence of nucleotide excision repair (NER) on 3-NBA-induced mutagenesis of the human tumour suppressor gene TP53 and the reporter gene lacZ. To this end we utilised Xpa -knockout (Xpa-Null) human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) embryo fibroblasts (HUFs). As Xpa is essential for NER of bulky DNA adducts, we hypothesized that DNA adducts induced by 3-NBA would persist in the genomes of Xpa-Null cells and lead to an increased frequency of mutation. The HUF immortalisation assay was used to select for cells harbouring TP53 mutations following mutagen exposure. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice and HUFs were more sensitive to 3-NBA treatment than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. However, following 3-NBA treatment and immortalisation, a similar frequency of TP53-mutant clones arose from Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures. In cells from both Xpa genotypes G:C > T:A transversion was the predominant TP53 mutation type and mutations exhibited bias towards the non-transcribed strand. Thirty-two percent of 3-NBA-induced TP53 mutations occurred at CpG sites, all of which are hotspots for mutation in smokers’ lung cancer (codons 157, 158, 175, 245, 248, 273, 282). We also examined 3-NBA-induced mutagenesis of an integrated lacZ reporter gene in HUFs, where we again observed a similar mutant frequency in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Our findings suggest that 3-NBA-DNA adducts may evade removal by global genomic NER; the persistence of 3-NBA adducts in DNA may be an important factor in its mutagenicity. PMID:26723900

  16. Frameshift mutagenicity of aromatic amines related to aminofluorene in a lacZ reversion assay in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, G.R.; Janel-Bintz, R.; Fuchs, R.P.P.

    1997-10-01

    We studied in the mutagenicity of three aromatic amines in a lacZ reversion assay in E. coli: 2-nitrofluorene (NF), N-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), and N-hydroxy-N-2-acetylaminofluorene (NHA). Mutations that confer the Lac{sup +} phenotype were measured using an F{prime} factor from strain CC109 of Cupples et al. The F{prime} contains a lacZ mutation that reverts by a -2 frameshift at a site of repetitive dinucleotides (CG{sub 5} to CG{sub 4}). The F{prime} was transferred into strains carrying an LPS{sup d} mutation that increases permeability to aromatic amines and a plasmid (pYG219) that contains the Salmonella nat gene, which confers N- and O-acetyltransferase (NAT/OAT) activity. Mutagenesis was measured by papillation assays and quantitative reversion assays. The results show that the LPS{sup d} mutation, conferring enhanced permeability, facilitates measuring the mutagenicity of aromatic amines but is not absolutely required, in that a lower level of mutagenicity is detected in LPS{sup +} strains. The NAT/OAT activity conferred by pYG219 strongly potentiates the mutagenicity of NF and NHA. The mutagenicity of NF is undoubtedly ascribable to aminofluorene (AF) adducts: The mutagenicity of NHA may be due either to AAF adducts or to AF adducts produced by deacetylation. Surprisingly, AAF was weakly mutagenic in a NAT/OAT LPS{sup d} strain even without metabolic activation by a mammalian cytochrome P450.

  17. Directed chromosomal integration and expression of the reporter gene gusA3 in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Grace L; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2011-10-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a probiotic microbe that survives passage through the human gastrointestinal tract and interacts with the host epithelium and mucosal immune cells. The potential for L. acidophilus to express antigens at mucosal surfaces has been investigated with various antigens and plasmid expression vectors. Plasmid instability and antibiotic selection complicate the possibility of testing these constructs in human clinical trials. Integrating antigen encoding genes into the chromosome for expression is expected to eliminate selection requirements and provide genetic stability. In this work, a reporter gene encoding a β-glucuronidase (GusA3) was integrated into four intergenic chromosomal locations. The integrants were tested for genetic stability and GusA3 activity. Two locations were selected for insertion downstream of constitutively highly expressed genes, one downstream of slpA (LBA0169), encoding a highly expressed surface-layer protein, and one downstream of phosphopyruvate hydratase (LBA0889), a highly expressed gene with homologs in other lactic acid bacteria. An inducible location was selected downstream of lacZ (LBA1462), encoding a β-galactosidase. A fourth location was selected in a low-expression region. The expression of gusA3 was evaluated from each location by measuring GusA3 activity on 4-methyl-umbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide (MUG). GusA3 activity from both highly expressed loci was more than three logs higher than the gusA3-negative parent, L. acidophilus NCK1909. GusA3 activity from the lacZ locus was one log higher in cells grown in lactose than in glucose. The differences in expression levels between integration locations highlights the importance of rational targeting with gene cassettes intended for chromosomal expression.

  18. Inactivation of Btk by insertion of lacZ reveals defects in B cell development only past the pre-B cell stage.

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, R W; de Bruijn, M F; Maas, A; Dingjan, G M; Karis, A; Grosveld, F

    1996-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a cytoplasmic protein kinase that is defective in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia in man and in X-linked immunodeficiency in the mouse. There is controversy regarding the stages of B cell development that are dependent on Btk function. To determine the point in B cell differentiation at which defects in Btk become apparent, we generated a mouse model by inactivating the Btk gene through an in-frame insertion of a lacZ reporter by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. The phenomenon of X-chromosome inactivation in Btk+/- heterozygous female mice enabled us to evaluate the competition between B cell progenitors expressing wild-type Btk and those expressing the Btk-/lacZ allele in each successive step of development. Although Btk was already expressed in pro-B cells, the first selective disadvantage only became apparent at the transition from small pre-B cells to immature B cells in the bone marrow. A second differentiation arrest was found during the maturation from IgD(low)IgM(high) to IgD(high)IgM(low) stages in the periphery. Our results show that Btk expression is essential at two distinct differentiation steps, both past the pre-B cell stage. Images PMID:8890160

  19. Dual 19F/1H MR gene reporter molecules for in vivo detection of β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Hallac, Rami R.; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P.

    2012-01-01

    Increased emphasis on personalized medicine and novel therapies require the development of non-invasive strategies for assessing biochemistry in vivo. The detection of enzyme activity and gene expression in vivo is potentially important for the characterization of diseases and gene therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a particularly promising tool since it is non-invasive, and has no associated radioactivity, yet penetrates deep tissue. We now demonstrate a novel class of dual 1H/19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lacZ gene reporter molecule to specifically reveal enzyme activity in human tumor xenografts growing in mice. We report the design, synthesis, and characterization of six novel molecules and evaluation of the most effective reporter in mice in vivo. Substrates show a single 19F NMR signal and exposure to β-galactosidase induces a large 19F NMR chemical shift response. In the presence of ferric ions the liberated aglycone generates intense proton MRI T2 contrast. The dual modality approach allows both the detection of substrate and imaging of product enhancing the confidence in enzyme detection. PMID:22352428

  20. An MSC2 Promoter-lacZ Fusion Gene Reveals Zinc-Responsive Changes in Sites of Transcription Initiation That Occur across the Yeast Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Taggart, Janet; Song, Pamela Xiyao; MacDiarmid, Colin; Eide, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The Msc2 and Zrg17 proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae form a complex to transport zinc into the endoplasmic reticulum. ZRG17 is transcriptionally induced in zinc-limited cells by the Zap1 transcription factor. In this report, we show that MSC2 mRNA also increases (~1.5 fold) in zinc-limited cells. The MSC2 gene has two in-frame ATG codons at its 5’ end, ATG1 and ATG2; ATG2 is the predicted initiation codon. When the MSC2 promoter was fused at ATG2 to the lacZ gene, we found that unlike the chromosomal gene this reporter showed a 4-fold decrease in lacZ mRNA in zinc-limited cells. Surprisingly, β-galactosidase activity generated by this fusion gene increased ~7 fold during zinc deficiency suggesting the influence of post-transcriptional factors. Transcription of MSC2ATG2-lacZ was found to start upstream of ATG1 in zinc-replete cells. In zinc-limited cells, transcription initiation shifted to sites just upstream of ATG2. From the results of mutational and polysome profile analyses, we propose the following explanation for these effects. In zinc-replete cells, MSC2ATG2-lacZ mRNA with long 5’ UTRs fold into secondary structures that inhibit translation. In zinc-limited cells, transcripts with shorter unstructured 5’ UTRs are generated that are more efficiently translated. Surprisingly, chromosomal MSC2 did not show start site shifts in response to zinc status and only shorter 5’ UTRs were observed. However, the shifts that occur in the MSC2ATG2-lacZ construct led us to identify significant transcription start site changes affecting the expression of ~3% of all genes. Therefore, zinc status can profoundly alter transcription initiation across the yeast genome. PMID:27657924

  1. Determination of mutational spectrum of the pesticide, captan, with an improved set of Escherichia coli LacZ mutants.

    PubMed

    Lu, C; Pfeil, R M; Rice, C P

    1995-07-01

    The mutational spectrum of the fungicide, captan, was determined using a set of improved Escherichia coli lacZ mutants. Captan created mutations mostly at dA-dT sites (83%) with only 17% occurring at dG-dC sites. The hydrolysis products of captan do not appear to be mutagenic because samples of captan at different hydrolysis stages showed basically the same mutational spectra: 31% at AT --> CG transversions, 8% of GC --> AT transitions, 2% of GC --> CG transversions, 8% of GC --> TA transversions, 19% of AT --> TA transversions, and 32% of AT --> GC transitions. Prepared solutions of captan lost their mutational activity gradually over time, indicating that the rate of decrease in mutagenicity agreed with the kinetics of captan hydrolysis reported in other studies. Using the change in mutagenicity to predict degradation, the hydrolysis of captan in pH 7.0 buffer was about three times faster than the hydrolysis carried out in pH 4.5 buffer. To our knowledge, this is the first presentation of mutational spectrum of captan.

  2. Phosphatidylglycerolphosphate synthase encoded by the PEL1/PGS1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is localized in mitochondria and its expression is regulated by phospholipid precursors.

    PubMed

    Dzugasová, V; Obernauerová, M; Horváthová, K; Vachová, M; Záková, M; Subík, J

    1998-10-01

    The PEL1/PGS1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essential for the viability of rho-/rho degrees mutants and the normal cardiolipin content of cells. The PEL1-GFP fusion gene has been found to complement the pel1/pgs1 mutation and its fluorescent protein was localized to mitochondria similarly to the beta-galactosidase activity of a protein encoded by the PEL1-lacZ fusion gene. The expression of the PEL1-lacZ reporter gene was repressed in cells grown in the presence of inositol and choline, reduced in the ino2 and ino4 strains, but constitutive in the opi1 null-mutant strain. The results demonstrate that Pel1p, playing a vital role in cells impaired in the mitochondrial DNA, is localized in the mitochondria and expressed in response to inositol and choline. PMID:9799363

  3. LacZ β-galactosidase: structure and function of an enzyme of historical and molecular biological importance.

    PubMed

    Juers, Douglas H; Matthews, Brian W; Huber, Reuben E

    2012-12-01

    This review provides an overview of the structure, function, and catalytic mechanism of lacZ β-galactosidase. The protein played a central role in Jacob and Monod's development of the operon model for the regulation of gene expression. Determination of the crystal structure made it possible to understand why deletion of certain residues toward the amino-terminus not only caused the full enzyme tetramer to dissociate into dimers but also abolished activity. It was also possible to rationalize α-complementation, in which addition to the inactive dimers of peptides containing the "missing" N-terminal residues restored catalytic activity. The enzyme is well known to signal its presence by hydrolyzing X-gal to produce a blue product. That this reaction takes place in crystals of the protein confirms that the X-ray structure represents an active conformation. Individual tetramers of β-galactosidase have been measured to catalyze 38,500 ± 900 reactions per minute. Extensive kinetic, biochemical, mutagenic, and crystallographic analyses have made it possible to develop a presumed mechanism of action. Substrate initially binds near the top of the active site but then moves deeper for reaction. The first catalytic step (called galactosylation) is a nucleophilic displacement by Glu537 to form a covalent bond with galactose. This is initiated by proton donation by Glu461. The second displacement (degalactosylation) by water or an acceptor is initiated by proton abstraction by Glu461. Both of these displacements occur via planar oxocarbenium ion-like transition states. The acceptor reaction with glucose is important for the formation of allolactose, the natural inducer of the lac operon. PMID:23011886

  4. Local overexpression of Su(H)-MAPK variants affects Notch target gene expression and adult phenotypes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Auer, Jasmin S; Nagel, Anja C; Schulz, Adriana; Wahl, Vanessa; Preiss, Anette

    2015-12-01

    In Drosophila, Notch and EGFR signalling pathways are closely intertwined. Their relationship is mostly antagonistic, and may in part be based on the phosphorylation of the Notch signal transducer Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] by MAPK. Su(H) is a transcription factor that together with several cofactors regulates the expression of Notch target genes. Here we address the consequences of a local induction of three Su(H) variants on Notch target gene expression. To this end, wild-type Su(H), a phospho-deficient Su(H) (MAPK-) (ko) and a phospho-mimetic Su(H) (MAPK-ac) isoform were overexpressed in the central domain of the wing anlagen. The expression of the Notch target genes cut, wingless, E(spl)m8-HLH and vestigial, was monitored. For the latter two, reporter genes were used (E(spl)m8-lacZ, vg (BE) -lacZ). In general, Su(H) (MAPK-) (ko) induced a stronger response than wild-type Su(H), whereas the response to Su(H) (MAPK-ac) was very weak. Notch target genes cut, wingless and vg (BE) -lacZ were ectopically activated, whereas E(spl)m8-lacZ was repressed by overexpression of Su(H) proteins. In addition, in epistasis experiments an activated form of the EGF-receptor (DER (act) ) or the MAPK (rl (SEM) ) and individual Su(H) variants were co-overexpressed locally, to compare the resultant phenotypes in adult flies (thorax, wings and eyes) as well as to assay the response of the Notch target gene cut in cell clones.

  5. Imaging of gene expression in vivo with photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Zemp, Roger J.; Lungu, Gina; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-02-01

    In the post-genomic era, there is an increasing interest in visualizing the expression of functional genes in vivo. With the assistance of the reporter gene technique, various imaging modalities have been adopted for this purpose. In vivo gene expression imaging promises to provide biologists with a powerful tool for deepening our understanding of developmental biology, expanding our knowledge of the genetic basis of disease, and advancing the development of medicine. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of imaging gene expression with photoacoustic imaging, which offers unique absorption contrast with ultrasonic resolution in vivo. We mark tumors in rats with the lacZ reporter gene. The lacZ gene encodes an enzyme β-galactosidase, which yields a dark blue product when acting on a colorimetric assay called X-gal. Photoacoustic tomography at 650nm clearly visualizes the presence of this blue product. The spectroscopic method can also potentially improve specificity. Considering how many staining methods are used in traditional biology, we believe that photoacoustic techniques will revolutionize the field of molecular imaging. The further development of reporter gene systems with high absorbing products in the NIR region is needed.

  6. Increased expression of p53 enhances transcription-coupled repair and global genomic repair of a UVC-damaged reporter gene in human cells.

    PubMed

    Dregoesc, Diana; Rybak, Adrian P; Rainbow, Andrew J

    2007-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light-induced DNA damage is repaired by nucleotide excision repair, which is divided into two sub-pathways: global genome repair (GGR) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR). While it is well established that the GGR pathway is dependent on the p53 tumour suppressor protein in human cells, both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways have been reported for TCR. In the present work, we investigated the role of p53 in both GGR and TCR of a UVC-damaged reporter gene in human fibroblasts. We employed a non-replicating recombinant human adenovirus, AdCA17lacZ, that can efficiently infect human fibroblasts and express the beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) reporter gene under the control of the human cytomegalovirus promoter. We examined host cell reactivation (HCR) of beta-gal expression for the UVC-treated reporter construct in normal fibroblasts and in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) fibroblasts deficient in GGR, TCR, or both. HCR was examined in fibroblasts that had been pre-infected with Ad5p53wt, which expresses wild-type p53, or a control adenovirus, AdCA18luc, which expresses the luciferase gene. We show that increased expression of p53 results in enhanced HCR of the UVC-damaged reporter gene in both untreated and UVC-treated cells for normal, CS-B (TCR-deficient), and XP-C (GGR-deficient), but not XP-A (TCR- and GGR-deficient) fibroblasts. These results indicate an involvement of p53 in both TCR and GGR of the UV-damaged reporter gene in human cells. PMID:17196445

  7. A source of artifact in the lacZ reversion assay in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, George R; Gray, Carol L; Lange, Paulina B; Marando, Christie I

    2015-06-01

    The lacZ reversion assay in Escherichia coli measures point mutations that occur by specific base substitutions and frameshift mutations. The tester strains cannot use lactose as a carbon source (Lac(-)), and revertants are easily detected by growth on lactose medium (Lac(+)). Six strains identify the six possible base substitutions, and five strains measure +G, -G, -CG, +A and -A frameshifts. Strong mutagens give dose-dependent increases in numbers of revertants per plate and revertant frequencies. Testing compounds that are arguably nonmutagens or weakly mutagenic, we often noted statistically significant dose-dependent increases in revertant frequency that were not accompanied by an absolute increase in numbers of revertants. The increase in frequency was wholly ascribable to a declining number of viable cells owing to toxicity. Analysis of the conditions revealed that the frequency of spontaneous revertants is higher when there are fewer viable cells per plate. The phenomenon resembles "adaptive" or "stress" mutagenesis, whereby lactose revertants accumulate in Lac(-) bacteria under starvation conditions in the absence of catabolite repression. Adaptive mutation is observed after long incubation and might be expected to be irrelevant in a standard assay using 48-h incubation. However, we found that elevated revertant frequencies occur under typical assay conditions when the bacterial lawn is thin, and this can cause increases in revertant frequency that mimic chemical mutagenesis when treatments are toxic but not mutagenic. Responses that resemble chemical mutagenesis were observed in the absence of mutagenic treatment in strains that revert by different frameshift mutations. The magnitude of the artifact is affected by cell density, dilution, culture age, incubation time, catabolite repression and the age and composition of media. Although the specific reversion assay is effective for quickly distinguishing classes of mutations induced by potent mutagens, its

  8. cAMP target sequences enhCRE and CNRE sense low-salt intake to increase human renin gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Desch, Michael; Harlander, Sabine; Neubauer, Björn; Gerl, Melanie; Germain, Stephane; Castrop, Hayo; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of cAMP target sequences enhancer cAMP response element (enhCRE) and cAMP and overlapping negative response element (CNRE) in the control of human renin gene (REN) in vivo. enhCRE and CNRE were silenced by mutations in a 12.2-kb human renin promoter fused to LacZ reporter gene. This construct was used to generate transgenic mice (RENMut-LacZ). The expression of the transgene was correctly targeted to the juxtaglomerular portions of renal afferent arterioles which express endogenous mouse renin. Therefore, enhCRE and CNRE do not seem to be relevant for the control of the cell-specific expression of the human renin gene. The β-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol (10 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) stimulated the endogenous renin, but not the LacZ mRNA expression. Treatment of RENMut-LacZ mice with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril 10 mg/kg/day, for 7 days) or their crossing to angiotensin receptor type 1a knockout mice led to increased renin and LacZ mRNA levels. Renin expression was upregulated by low-salt diet (0.03% NaCl, for 10 days) and downregulated by high-salt diet (4% NaCl, for 10 days). In contrast, low-salt diet did not influence, while high-salt diet inhibited the expression of LacZ. In summary, enhCRE and CNRE appear to be necessary for the transactivation of the human renin gene through β-adrenoreceptors and by low-salt diet. Our data also suggest that different intracellular mechanisms mediate the effect of low- and high-salt intake on renin expression in vivo.

  9. Extended Function of Plasmid Partition Genes: the Sop System of Linear Phage-Plasmid N15 Facilitates Late Gene Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Ravin, Nikolai V.; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David

    2008-01-01

    The mitotic stability of the linear plasmid-prophage N15 of Escherichia coli depends on a partition system closely related to that of the F plasmid SopABC. The two Sop systems are distinguished mainly by the arrangement of their centromeric SopB-binding sites, clustered in F (sopC) and dispersed in N15 (IR1 to IR4). Because two of the N15 inverted repeat (IR) sites are located close to elements presumed (by analogy with phage λ) to regulate late gene expression during the lytic growth of N15, we asked whether Sop partition functions play a role in this process. In N15, a putative Q antiterminator gene is located 6 kb upstream of the probable major late promoter and two intrinsic terminator-like sequences, in contrast to λ, where the Q gene is adjacent to the late promoter. Northern hybridization and lacZ reporter activity confirmed the identity of the N15 late promoter (p52), demonstrated antiterminator activity of the Q analogue, and located terminator sequences between p52 and the first open reading frame. Following prophage induction, N15 mutated in IR2 (downstream from gene Q) or IR3 (upstream of p52) showed a pronounced delay in lysis relative to that for wild-type N15. Expression of ir3−-p52::lacZ during N15 wild-type lytic growth was strongly reduced relative to the equivalent ir3+ fusion. The provision of Q protein and the IR2 and SopAB proteins in trans to ir3+-p52::lacZ increased expression beyond that seen in the absence of any one of these factors. These results indicate that the N15 Sop system has a dual role: partition and regulation of late gene transcription during lytic growth. PMID:18359814

  10. Extended function of plasmid partition genes: the Sop system of linear phage-plasmid N15 facilitates late gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David

    2008-05-01

    The mitotic stability of the linear plasmid-prophage N15 of Escherichia coli depends on a partition system closely related to that of the F plasmid SopABC. The two Sop systems are distinguished mainly by the arrangement of their centromeric SopB-binding sites, clustered in F (sopC) and dispersed in N15 (IR1 to IR4). Because two of the N15 inverted repeat (IR) sites are located close to elements presumed (by analogy with phage lambda) to regulate late gene expression during the lytic growth of N15, we asked whether Sop partition functions play a role in this process. In N15, a putative Q antiterminator gene is located 6 kb upstream of the probable major late promoter and two intrinsic terminator-like sequences, in contrast to lambda, where the Q gene is adjacent to the late promoter. Northern hybridization and lacZ reporter activity confirmed the identity of the N15 late promoter (p52), demonstrated antiterminator activity of the Q analogue, and located terminator sequences between p52 and the first open reading frame. Following prophage induction, N15 mutated in IR2 (downstream from gene Q) or IR3 (upstream of p52) showed a pronounced delay in lysis relative to that for wild-type N15. Expression of ir3(-)-p52::lacZ during N15 wild-type lytic growth was strongly reduced relative to the equivalent ir3(+) fusion. The provision of Q protein and the IR2 and SopAB proteins in trans to ir3(+)-p52::lacZ increased expression beyond that seen in the absence of any one of these factors. These results indicate that the N15 Sop system has a dual role: partition and regulation of late gene transcription during lytic growth.

  11. Zinc-regulated genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed by transposon tagging.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, D S

    2000-01-01

    The biochemistry of human nutritional zinc deficiency remains poorly defined. To characterize in genetic terms how cells respond to zinc deprivation, zinc-regulated genes (ZRG's) were identified in yeast. Gene expression was probed using random lacZ reporter gene fusions, integrated by transposon tagging into a diploid genome as previously described. About half of the genome was examined. Cells exhibiting differences in lacZ expression on low or moderate ( approximately 0. 1 vs. 10 microm) zinc media were isolated and the gene fusions were sequenced. Ribonuclease protection assays demonstrated four- to eightfold increases for the RNAs of the ZAP1, ZRG17 (YNR039c), DPP1, ADH4, MCD4, and YEF3B genes in zinc-deficient cells. All but YEF3B were shown through reporter gene assays to be controlled by a master regulator of zinc homeostasis now known to be encoded by ZAP1. ZAP1 mutants lacked the flocculence and distended vacuoles characteristic of zinc-deficient cells, suggesting that flocculation and vacuolation serve homeostatic functions in zinc-deficient cells. ZRG17 mutants required extra zinc supplementation to repress these phenotypes, suggesting that ZRG17 functions in zinc uptake. These findings illustrate the utility of transposon tagging as an approach for studying regulated gene expression in yeast. PMID:10978274

  12. Targeting gene expression to the female larval fat body of transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Totten, D C; Vuong, M; Litvinova, O V; Jinwal, U K; Gulia-Nuss, M; Harrell, R A; Beneš, H

    2013-02-01

    As the fat body is a critical tissue for mosquito development, metamorphosis, immune and reproductive system function, the characterization of regulatory modules targeting gene expression to the female mosquito fat body at distinct life stages is much needed for multiple, varied strategies for controlling vector-borne diseases such as dengue and malaria. The hexameric storage protein, Hexamerin-1.2, of the mosquito Aedes atropalpus is female-specific and uniquely expressed in the fat body of fourth instar larvae and young adults. We have identified in the Hex-1.2 gene, a short regulatory module that directs female-, tissue-, and stage-specific lacZ reporter gene expression using a heterologous promoter in transgenic lines of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. Male transgenic larvae and pupae of one line expressed no Escherichia coli β-galactosidase or transgene product; in two other lines reporter gene activity was highly female-biased. All transgenic lines expressed the reporter only in the fat body; however, lacZ mRNA levels were no different in males and females at any stage examined, suggesting that the gene regulatory module drives female-specific expression by post-transcriptional regulation in the heterologous mosquito. This regulatory element from the Hex-1.2 gene thus provides a new molecular tool for transgenic mosquito control as well as functional genetic analysis in aedine mosquitoes.

  13. Identification of the Ω4406 Regulatory Region, a Developmental Promoter of Myxococcus xanthus, and a DNA Segment Responsible for Chromosomal Position-Dependent Inhibition of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Loconto, Jennifer; Viswanathan, Poorna; Nowak, Scott J.; Gloudemans, Monica; Kroos, Lee

    2005-01-01

    When starved, Myxococcus xanthus cells send signals to each other that coordinate their movements, gene expression, and differentiation. C-signaling requires cell-cell contact, and increasing contact brought about by cell alignment in aggregates is thought to increase C-signaling, which induces expression of many genes, causing rod-shaped cells to differentiate into spherical spores. C-signaling involves the product of the csgA gene. A csgA mutant fails to express many genes that are normally induced after about 6 h into the developmental process. One such gene was identified by insertion of Tn5 lac at site Ω4406 in the M. xanthus chromosome. Tn5 lac fused transcription of lacZ to the upstream Ω4406 promoter. In this study, the Ω4406 promoter region was identified by analyzing mRNA and by testing different upstream DNA segments for the ability to drive developmental lacZ expression in M. xanthus. The 5′ end of Ω4406 mRNA mapped to approximately 1.3 kb upstream of the Tn5 lac insertion. A 1.0-kb DNA segment from 0.8 to 1.8 kb upstream of the Tn5 lac insertion, when fused to lacZ and integrated at a phage attachment site in the M. xanthus chromosome, showed a similar pattern of developmental expression as Tn5 lac Ω4406. The DNA sequence upstream of the putative transcriptional start site was strikingly similar to promoter regions of other C-signal-dependent genes. Developmental lacZ expression from the 1.0-kb segment was abolished in a csgA mutant but was restored upon codevelopment of the csgA mutant with wild-type cells, which supply C-signal, demonstrating that the Ω4406 promoter responds to extracellular C-signaling. Interestingly, the 0.8-kb DNA segment immediately upstream of Tn5 lac Ω4406 inhibited expression of a downstream lacZ reporter in transcriptional fusions integrated at a phage attachment site in the chromosome but not at the normal Ω4406 location. To our knowledge, this is the first example in M. xanthus of a chromosomal position

  14. Evaluation of toxic potential of captan: Induction of hsp70 and tissue damage in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ) Bg9.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Aamir; Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Saxena, D K; Siddiqui, M Saeed; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2003-01-01

    The study investigated the working hypothesis that a widely used fungicide captan exerts toxic effects on nontarget organisms. Transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ) was used as a model by assaying stress gene expression as an endpoint for cytotoxicity and also to evaluate whether stress gene expression is sufficient enough to protect and to prevent tissue damage against toxic insult of the chemical. The study was further extended to understand the effect of the pesticide on development, life cycle, and reproduction of the organism and finally to evaluate a concentration of the chemical to be nontoxic to the organism. The study showed that (i) captan causes cytotoxicity at and above 0.015 ppm; (ii) at 0.0015 ppm captan, absence of hsp70 expression in the exposed organism was evaluated as the concentration referred to as no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for Drosophila; (iii) emergence pattern of flies was affected only at the highest concentration of captan by 4 days, while hatching and survivorship were unaffected even at this concentration; (iv) reproductive performance was significantly affected only at 125.0 and 1250.0 ppm captan, while in the lower dietary concentrations no such deleterious effects were observed; (v) at 1250.0 ppm, hsp70 failed to protect the cells from toxicant assault after 48 h exposure, thus leading to tissue damage as revealed by Trypan Blue staining. The present study shows the cytotoxic potential of captan and further reveals the application of stress genes in determining NOAEL and its expression as bioindicator of exposure to environmental contaminants.

  15. Selective suicide gene therapy of colon cancer cell lines exploiting fibroblast growth factor 18 promoter.

    PubMed

    Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Zeinali, Sirous

    2010-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 18 (FGF18) is one of the genes downstream of Wnt, one of the most important signaling pathways activated in colon cancer. An FGF18 promoter containing a single T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor 1 (TCF/LEF1) binding site was inserted upstream of a thymidine kinase (TK) suicide gene module, while a bacterial beta-Gal (LacZ) element served as the reporter gene. Following transient transfection with pUCFGF18LacZ, beta-Gal staining showed that 5% of SW480, 10% of HCT116, 0% of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and 0% of normal colon cells (NCCs) had expressed LacZ. beta-Gal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the ratio of pUCFGF18LacZ activity to that of positive control was 0.09 and 0.25 in SW480 and HCT116, respectively (significantly higher than mock plasmid), while there were no significant changes in the beta-Gal expression in HUVEC and NCC cells transfected with pUCFGF18LacZ or mock plasmid. Following transfection with pUCFGF18TK and pUCCMVTK (positive control), cytotoxicity analysis of transfected cells showed that treatment with ganciclovir (GCV) significantly decreased SW480 and HCT116 cell survival at GCV concentrations above 20 microg/mL. An inverse correlation between GCV concentration and cell viability was evident in both colon cancer cell lines following transfection with these suicide plasmids. pUCFGF18TK and pUCCMVTK induced apoptosis after the administration of GCV in HCT116, but not in SW480, as demonstrated by M30 cytodeath antibody. This discrepancy may stem from differences in the mechanisms of TK/GCV-induced apoptosis in p53-proficient (HCT116) and -deficient (SW480) cells. The specific activity of the FGF18 promoter in HCT116 and SW480 may reflect the advantage of this promoter over artificial promoters containing artificial TCF/LEF binding sites. PMID:20187803

  16. Shh pathway in wounds in non-diabetic Shh-Cre-eGFP/Ptch1-LacZ mice treated with MAA beads.

    PubMed

    Lisovsky, Alexandra; Sefton, Michael V

    2016-09-01

    Previously, poly(methacrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate) (MAA) beads were shown to improve vessel formation with a concomitant increase in the expression of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) gene, a pleiotropic factor implicated in vascularization. The aim of this study was to follow up on this observation in the absence of the confounding factors of diabetes in non-diabetic Shh-Cre-eGFP/Ptch1-LacZ mice; in this mouse, expression of GFP and β-Gal is consistent with the transcription patterns of Shh and its receptor patched 1 (Ptch1), respectively. In agreement with studies in diabetic males, MAA beads improved vascularization in large (15 mm × 15 mm) wounds in non-diabetic males at day 7. Shh pathway activation was suggested, as the numbers of GFP+ (Shh) and β-Gal+ (Ptch1, a target of the pathway) cells increased in the granulation tissue. Shh signaling pathway modulation was also suggested in the healthy skin surrounding the wound bed, as evidenced by an increase in the number of GFP+ and β-Gal+ cells in males at day 4. Gene expression analysis of the wounds confirmed increase in Ptch1 and showed the upregulation of a downstream transcription factor Gli3, involved in the vascular effect of the Shh pathway, implicating the pathway in the effect of MAA beads. The efficacy of MAA beads was also investigated in females; MAA beads modulated the Shh pathway within granulation tissue similarly as in males, but had no enhancement effect on the healthy skin and on vascularization. We believe that understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of MAA-based biomaterials and testing the efficacy of therapeutics in both sexes will inform the development of novel therapeutic biomaterials. PMID:27343467

  17. Mutagenesis induced by targeted alpha therapy using 213Bi-cDTPA-9.2.27 in lacZ transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Allen, Barry J; So, Trina; Abbas Rizvi, Syed M; Song, Emma Y; Fernandez, Harvey R; Lutz-Mann, Louise

    2009-05-01

    Targeted alpha therapy utilizes alpha-emitting radionuclides conjugated to monoclonal antibodies to allow specific irradiation of cancer cells whilst sparing normal, healthy tissues. The mutagenic potential of (213)Bi conjugated to a human melanoma antigen-specific antibody (9.2.27) was examined using an in vivo transgenic mouse model containing multiple copies of a lacZ target gene in every cell, allowing the quantification and comparison of mutagenesis in different organs. Mice received an ip injection of 16.65 MBq of (213)Bi-cDTPA-9.2.27, and were sacrificed at 24 h, 1 w and 4 w post-injection. Pharmacokinetic studies gave the absorbed and effective doses for each organ. The mutant frequency and mutant spectra were analysed for the brain, spleen and kidneys. The brain and spleen did not show significant increases in induced mutation frequencies compared to spontaneous background levels or changes in mutant spectra, these results being independent of p53 status. However, elevated mutation frequencies and persistent size change mutations were observed in the kidneys, but are not significant at the p = 0.05 level. The effect of p53 status was also evident, as p53 heterozygotes displayed higher mutation frequencies than their wild-type counterparts, suggesting a reduction in the p53 gene may lead to an increased susceptibility to mutagenesis. These effects were time dependent and levels returned to those of the controls at 4 w post-irradiation, albeit with a predominant residue of size mutations. These effects were observed at activities very much higher than those expected for the therapy of human patients. As such, the induction of secondary cancer with the (213)Bi-cDTPA-9.2.27 alpha immunoconjugate is not expected to be a significant problem in the clinic. PMID:19337032

  18. Tissue-specific regulation of the mouse Pkhd1 (ARPKD) gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Scott S.; Cobo-Stark, Patricia; Hajarnis, Sachin; Aboudehen, Karam; Shao, Xinli; Richardson, James A.; Patel, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, an inherited disorder characterized by the formation of cysts in renal collecting ducts and biliary dysgenesis, is caused by mutations of the polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (PKHD1) gene. Expression of PKHD1 is tissue specific and developmentally regulated. Here, we show that a 2.0-kb genomic fragment containing the proximal promoter of mouse Pkhd1 directs tissue-specific expression of a lacZ reporter gene in transgenic mice. LacZ is expressed in renal collecting ducts beginning during embryonic development but is not expressed in extrarenal tissues. The Pkhd1 promoter contains a binding site for the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1β, which is required for activity in transfected cells. Mutation of the HNF-1β-binding site abolishes the expression of the lacZ reporter gene in renal collecting ducts. Transgenes containing the 2.0-kb promoter and 2.7 kb of additional genomic sequence extending downstream to the second exon are expressed in the kidney, intrahepatic bile ducts, and male reproductive tract. This pattern overlaps with the endogenous expression of Pkhd1 and coincides with sites of expression of HNF-1β. We conclude that the proximal 2.0-kb promoter is sufficient for tissue-specific expression of Pkhd1 in renal collecting ducts in vivo and that HNF-1β is required for Pkhd1 promoter activity in collecting ducts. Additional genomic sequences located from exons 1-2 or elsewhere in the gene locus are required for expression in extrarenal tissues. PMID:24899057

  19. A Luciferase Reporter Gene System for High-Throughput Screening of γ-Globin Gene Activators.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wensheng; Silvers, Robert; Ouellette, Michael; Wu, Zining; Lu, Quinn; Li, Hu; Gallagher, Kathleen; Johnson, Kathy; Montoute, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Luciferase reporter gene assays have long been used for drug discovery due to their high sensitivity and robust signal. A dual reporter gene system contains a gene of interest and a control gene to monitor non-specific effects on gene expression. In our dual luciferase reporter gene system, a synthetic promoter of γ-globin gene was constructed immediately upstream of the firefly luciferase gene, followed downstream by a synthetic β-globin gene promoter in front of the Renilla luciferase gene. A stable cell line with the dual reporter gene was cloned and used for all assay development and HTS work. Due to the low activity of the control Renilla luciferase, only the firefly luciferase activity was further optimized for HTS. Several critical factors, such as cell density, serum concentration, and miniaturization, were optimized using tool compounds to achieve maximum robustness and sensitivity. Using the optimized reporter assay, the HTS campaign was successfully completed and approximately 1000 hits were identified. In this chapter, we also describe strategies to triage hits that non-specifically interfere with firefly luciferase. PMID:27316998

  20. Ex vivo adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and immunomodulatory protein production in human cornea.

    PubMed

    Oral, H B; Larkin, D F; Fehervari, Z; Byrnes, A P; Rankin, A M; Haskard, D O; Wood, M J; Dallman, M J; George, A J

    1997-07-01

    One attractive strategy to prevent or control allograft rejection is to genetically modify the donor tissue before transplantation. In this study, we have examined the feasibility of gene transfer to human corneal endothelium, using a number of recombinant adenovirus constructs. Ex vivo infection of human corneas with adenoviral vectors containing lacZ, under transcriptional control of either cytomegalovirus (CMV) or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) promoters, provided high-level gene expression, which was largely restricted to endothelium. Expression of the reporter gene persisted at relatively high levels for up to 7 days, followed by a decline to indetectable levels by 28 days. RT-PCR analysis of lacZ transcription showed a similar picture with a short period (3-7 days) of RNA transcription after infection. In contrast, adenoviral DNA persisted for at least 56 days. Subsequently, we examined the expression of a potential therapeutic gene, CTLA-4 Ig fusion protein. Following infection of human corneas with adenoviral vectors encoding CTLA-4 Ig protein, high levels of the fusion protein were detected in corneal culture supernatants for up to 28 days. This protein was functionally active, as determined by binding to B7.1 (CD80)-expressing transfectants. This study suggests that genetic alteration of donor cornea before transplantation is a feasible approach for preventing or controlling allograft rejection. Similar gene-based strategies might also be feasible to prevent rejection of other transplanted tissues or organs. PMID:9282165

  1. Gene transfer to subdermal tissues via a new gene gun design.

    PubMed

    Dileo, John; Miller, Theodore E; Chesnoy, Sophie; Huang, Leaf

    2003-01-01

    Although particle-mediated gene transfer technology (gene gun) has been applied for gene transfer to external tissues, the application of this technology to other tissues has met with limited success. Here we report the development of a new design of a gene gun that uses helium discharge to propel DNA-coated gold beads that are suspended in liquid. Higher discharge pressures allow for the delivery of DNA to deeper tissues. Using the new gene gun to deliver a luciferase expression plasmid resulted in higher levels of gene expression in the skin than observed with conventional guns, as well as in subdermal tissues, including subcutaneous tumors. Even when using as little as 125 ng of DNA, gene expression in skin and muscle reached its peak level at 24 hr postbombardment and remained for at least 1 week. The use of a LacZ expression plasmid showed that gene expression was distributed throughout the skin with no observable pathology. The new gene gun was used to deliver a model tumor rejection antigen (a modified human papilloma virus [HPV] E7 gene) to mice. All of the treated animals developed protective immunity against HPV-positive tumors. These results demonstrate that our new design can be used in standard gene gun applications and extends the reach of gene gun technology to tissues that were previously unavailable.

  2. Simultaneous gene inactivation and promoter reporting in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kangming; Xu, Xinyi; Gu, Liping; Hildreth, Michael; Zhou, Ruanbao

    2015-02-01

    Determining spatiotemporal gene expression and analyzing knockout mutant phenotypes have become powerful tools in elucidating the function of genes; however, genetic approaches for simultaneously inactivating a gene and monitoring its expression have not been reported in the literature. In this study, we designed a dual-functional gene knockout vector pZR606 that contains a multiple cloning site (MCS) for inserting the internal fragment of a target gene, with a gfp gene as its transcriptional marker located immediately downstream of the MCS. By using this gene knockout system, we inactivated ava_2679 from Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413, as well as all2508, alr2887, alr3608, and all4388 from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The ava_2679 knockout mutant fails to grow diazotrophically. Morphological analysis of ava_2679 knockout mutant after nitrogen step-down revealed defective junctions between heterocysts and adjacent vegetative cells, and the heterocyst was 1.53-fold longer compared to wild-type heterocysts. The alr2887, all4388, and alr3608 mutant colonies turned yellow and showed lack of protracted growth when deprived of fixed nitrogen, consistent with the previous reports that alr2887, all4388, and alr3608 are Fox genes. The all2508 encodes a GTP-binding elongation factor (EF4/LepA), and its knockout mutant exhibited reduced diazotrophic growth. The heterocyst development of all2508 knockout was significantly delayed, and only about 4.0 % of vegetative cells differentiated to heterocysts after nitrogen deprivation for 72 h, decreased 49.6 % compared to wild-type. Thus, we discovered that All2508 may regulate heterocyst development spatiotemporally. Concurrently, the GFP reporter revealed that all five target gene expressions were up-regulated in response to nitrogen deprivation. We demonstrated that the pZR606-based specific gene knockout approach worked effectively for the five selected genes, including four previously identified Fox genes or Fox gene

  3. Luciferase as a reporter of gene activity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since their development and introduction in the early days of plant genetic engineering, reporter genes have established a proven track record as effective tools for exploring the molecular underpinnings of gene regulation. When driven by appropriate genetic control systems (e.g. transcriptional pr...

  4. Cloning-free regulated monitoring of reporter and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    al-Haj, Latifa; Al-Ahmadi, Wijdan; Al-Saif, Maher; Demirkaya, Omer; Khabar, Khalid SA

    2009-01-01

    Background The majority of the promoters, their regulatory elements, and their variations in the human genome remain unknown. Reporter gene technology for transcriptional activity is a widely used tool for the study of promoter structure, gene regulation, and signaling pathways. Construction of transcriptional reporter vectors, including use of cis-acting sequences, requires cloning and time-demanding manipulations, particularly with introduced mutations. Results In this report, we describe a cloning-free strategy to generate transcriptionally-controllable linear reporter constructs. This approach was applied in common transcriptional models of inflammatory response and the interferon system. In addition, it was used to delineate minimal transcriptional activity of selected ribosomal protein promoters. The approach was tested for conversion of genes into TetO-inducible/repressible expression cassettes. Conclusion The simple introduction and tuning of any transcriptional control in the linear DNA product renders promoter activation and regulated gene studies simple and versatile. PMID:19267938

  5. Novel S-Gal(®) analogs as (1)H MRI reporters for in vivo detection of β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Gulaka, Praveen K; Yu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P; Kodibagkar, Vikram D

    2013-07-01

    The quantitative assessment of gene expression and related enzyme activity in vivo could be important for the characterization of gene altering diseases and therapy. The development of imaging techniques, based on specific reporter molecules may enable routine non-invasive assessment of enzyme activity and gene expression in vivo. We recently reported the use of commercially available S-Gal(®) as a β-galactosidase reporter for (1)H MRI, and the synthesis of several S-Gal(®) analogs with enhanced response to β-galactosidase activity. We have now compared these analogs in vitro and have identified the optimal analog, C3-GD, based on strong T1 and T2 response to enzyme presence (ΔR1 and ΔR2~1.8 times S-Gal(®)). Moreover, application is demonstrated in vivo in human breast tumor xenografts. MRI studies in MCF7-lacZ tumors implanted subcutaneously in athymic nude mice (n=6), showed significant reduction in T1 and T2 values (each~13%) 2h after intra-tumoral injection of C3-GD, whereas the MCF7 (wild type) tumors showed slight increase. Thus, C3-GD successfully detects β-galactosidase activity in vivo and shows promise as a lacZ gene (1)H MR reporter molecule.

  6. A set of lacZ mutations in Escherichia coli that allow rapid detection of specific frameshift mutations.

    PubMed

    Cupples, C G; Cabrera, M; Cruz, C; Miller, J H

    1990-06-01

    We have used site-directed mutagenesis to alter bases in lacZ near the region encoding essential residues in the active site of beta-galactosidase. The altered sequences generate runs of six or seven identical base pairs which create a frameshift, resulting in a Lac- phenotype. Reversion to Lac+ in each strain can occur only by a specific frameshift at these sequences. Monotonous runs of A's (or of T's on the opposite strand) and G's (or C's) have been constructed, as has an alternating -C-G- sequence. These specific frameshift indicator strains complement a set of six previously described strains which detect each of the base substitutions. We have examined a variety of mutagens and mutators for their ability to cause reversion to Lac+. Surprisingly, frameshifts are well stimulated at many of these runs by ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and 2-amino-purine, mutagens not widely known to induce frameshifts. A comparison of ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and 2-aminopurine frameshift specificity with that found with a mutH strain suggests that these mutagens partially or fully saturate or inactivate the methylation-directed mismatch repair system and allow replication errors leading to frameshifts to escape repair. This results in a form of indirect mutagenesis, which can be detected at certain sites. PMID:2199309

  7. Induced Reporter Gene Activity, Enhanced Stress Resistance, and Competitive Ability of a Genetically Modified Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain Released into a Field Plot Planted with Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Van Overbeek, L. S.; Van Veen, J. A.; Van Elsas, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The fates of Pseudomonas fluorescens R2fR and its mutant derivative RIWE8, which contains a lacZ reporter gene responsive to wheat root exudate, were compared in a field microplot. Inoculant survival, root colonization, translocation, resistance to stress factors, and reporter gene activity were assessed in bulk and wheat rhizosphere soils. Populations of both strains declined gradually in bulk and wheat rhizosphere soils and on the wheat rhizoplane as determined by specific CFU and immunofluorescence (IF). In samples from both bulk soil and wheat rhizosphere, IF cell counts were up to 3 orders of magnitude greater than the corresponding numbers of CFU after 120 days, indicating the presence of nonculturable inoculant cells. Estimates of RIWE8-specific target DNA molecule numbers in bulk soil samples 3 and 120 days after inoculation by most-probable-number PCR coincided with the corresponding CFU values. Transport of both strains to deeper soil layers was observed by 3 days after introduction into the microplot. Both strains colonized wheat roots similarly, and cells were seen scattered on the surface of 1-month-old wheat seedling roots by immunogold labelling-scanning electron microscopy. On average, reporter gene activity was significantly higher in wheat rhizosphere soil containing RIWE8 cells than in bulk soil or in soils containing R2fR cells. For both strains, resistance to the four stress factors ethanol, high temperature, high osmotic tension, and oxidative stress increased progressively with residence in soil. Cells from the rhizosphere of 11-day-old seedlings showed similar levels of resistance to osmotic and oxidative stresses and enhanced resistance to ethanol and heat as compared to cells from bulk soil. By 37 days, populations of R2fR and RIWE8 in the rhizosphere were significantly more sensitive to osmotic stress than were populations in bulk soil, whereas differences in response to the other stress factors were less evident. Hence, except for the

  8. Reporter genes for embryogenesis research in livestock species.

    PubMed

    Habermann, F A; Wuensch, A; Sinowatz, F; Wolf, E

    2007-09-01

    Currently, our knowledge of early mammalian embryogenesis, stem cell differentiation and development is largely based on studies performed in mouse models. However, in important aspects, e.g. the timing of epigenetic reprogramming and embryonic genome activation, livestock species probably reflect far more closely the situation in men and other non-rodent mammals. A major challenge is the fact that in mammals, the development of individual zygotes is highly variable and vulnerable, and the outcome is uncertain. Valid indicators of the highly heterogeneous development and health status, and the actual developmental potential of individual oocytes, zygotes or embryos would be crucially important to tap the full power of holistic transcriptome and proteome analyses. Fluorescent reporter proteins opened new vistas for embryology and stem cell research: they can be used as reporters for the activity of gene promoters or tagged to functional proteins to study their intracellular localization in living cells, tissues and organisms. Fluorescent reporter genes may be used to microscopically observe key processes of early development. Thus, novel information related to developmental potential can be obtained from living embryos before processing them, e.g. for "-omic" studies. This review summarizes the main current reporter gene techniques and gene transfer approaches, which might be suitable for the investigation of early embryogenesis in livestock mammals. The potential of promoter reporter genes is exemplified by a bovine model system for quantitative monitoring of transcriptional reactivation of the so-called pluripotency gene POU5F1 in cloned bovine embryos.

  9. Direct exposure of mouse ovaries and oocytes to high doses of an adenovirus gene therapy vector fails to lead to germ cell transduction.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J W

    2001-04-01

    The risk of insertion of adenovirus gene therapy DNA into female germ cells during the course of somatic gene therapy was stringently tested in the mouse by injecting up to 10(10) infectious particles directly into the ovary and by incubating naked oocytes in a solution of 2 x 10(8) particles/ml for 1 h prior to in vitro fertilization (IVF). The vector used was a recombinant adenovirus carrying the bacterial lacZ gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter (Adbeta-gal). Ovaries were stained for LacZ activity, or immunochemically for LacZ, 5-7 days after injection. Although very large amounts of LacZ activity and protein were detected, all positive staining was in the thecal portion of the ovary, with no staining seen in oocytes. In another series of experiments, mice with injected ovaries were mated, and preimplantation embryos or fetuses were analyzed either for LacZ expression or by PCR for lacZ DNA. None of 202 preimplantation embryos stained positively for LacZ and none of 58 fetuses were positive for DNA by PCR analysis. Finally, more than 1400 eggs were fertilized after exposure to the vector prior to IVF and stained as morulae for LacZ activity. Fewer than 2% of the embryos stained positively for LacZ, and experiments indicated that the staining was due to incomplete washing of the eggs prior to IVF. These data provide strong evidence that adenoviruses cannot infect oocytes and that the risk of female germ-line transduction with such vectors is very low. PMID:11319918

  10. Identification and refinement of two strong constitutive promoters for gene expression system of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongcheng; Wang, Haiyang; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ren; Mei, Yanzhen; Shao, Weilan

    2014-06-01

    Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe shares various important properties with higher eukaryotes and is now considered a useful host for elevated production of mammalian proteins for medicinal applications. The full-length nmt1 promoter has been widely used as a strong promoter in S. pombe expression system. In the present study, the promoters of the eno101 and gpd3 genes in S. pombe were identified as strong constitutive promoters. For convenient applications in the plasmids of S. pombe, these promoters were refined to 276-bp eno and 273-bp gpd promoters by deleting undesired sequences and examining the expression of reporter genes including lacZ and xynA. Both the refined eno and gpd promoters provided approximately 1.5-fold higher expression of LacZ than nmt1 promoter. Furthermore, gene expression under the control of the eno or gpd promoter was not repressed by the components of YES medium while nmt1 promoter was inhibited by thiamine in yeast extract. Therefore, both eno and gpd promoters offer opportunities for efficient production of recombinant proteins by S. pombe in high cell-density fermentation.

  11. Development of Plant Gene Vectors for Tissue-Specific Expression Using GFP as a Reporter Gene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Jacquelyn; Egnin, Marceline; Xue, Qi-Han; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Reporter genes are widely employed in plant molecular biology research to analyze gene expression and to identify promoters. Gus (UidA) is currently the most popular reporter gene but its detection requires a destructive assay. The use of jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from Aequorea Victoria holds promise for noninvasive detection of in vivo gene expression. To study how various plant promoters are expressed in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), we are transcriptionally fusing the intron-modified (mGFP) or synthetic (modified for codon-usage) GFP coding regions to these promoters: double cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S) with AMV translational enhancer, ubiquitin7-intron-ubiquitin coding region (ubi7-intron-UQ) and sporaminA. A few of these vectors have been constructed and introduced into E. coli DH5a and Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105. Transient expression studies are underway using protoplast-electroporation and particle bombardment of leaf tissues.

  12. A saturation screen for cis-acting regulatory DNA in the Hox genes of Ciona intestinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Keys, David N.; Lee, Byung-in; Di Gregorio, Anna; Harafuji, Naoe; Detter, Chris; Wang, Mei; Kahsai, Orsalem; Ahn, Sylvia; Arellano, Andre; Zhang, Quin; Trong, Stephan; Doyle, Sharon A.; Satoh, Noriyuki; Satou, Yutaka; Saiga, Hidetoshi; Christian, Allen; Rokhsar, Dan; Hawkins, Trevor L.; Levine, Mike; Richardson, Paul

    2005-01-05

    A screen for the systematic identification of cis-regulatory elements within large (>100 kb) genomic domains containing Hox genes was performed by using the basal chordate Ciona intestinalis. Randomly generated DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes containing two clusters of Hox genes were inserted into a vector upstream of a minimal promoter and lacZ reporter gene. A total of 222 resultant fusion genes were separately electroporated into fertilized eggs, and their regulatory activities were monitored in larvae. In sum, 21 separable cis-regulatory elements were found. These include eight Hox linked domains that drive expression in nested anterior-posterior domains of ectodermally derived tissues. In addition to vertebrate-like CNS regulation, the discovery of cis-regulatory domains that drive epidermal transcription suggests that C. intestinalis has arthropod-like Hox patterning in the epidermis.

  13. Genetics in methylotrophic bacteria: Appendix. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstrom, M.E.

    1998-09-01

    This research has focused primarily on promoters in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 and in methanotrophic bacteria. In Methylobacterium extorquens work continued on the moxF promoter. The author constructed chromosomal lacZ fusions of this promoter to avoid the regulation problems of plasmid-borne fragments and has shown that this is regulated normally in the chromosome. She has constructed lacZ fusions to some of the mox genes involved in the synthesis of the cofactor, PQQ, in order to carry out similar analysis of transcription of PQQ genes. The author has continued to isolate mox genes in methanotrophs for the purpose of studying their promoters and transcriptional regulation.

  14. Pleiotrophin Gene Therapy for Peripheral Ischemia: Evaluation of Full-Length and Truncated Gene Variants

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qizhi; Mok, Pamela Y.; Thomas, Anila E.; Haddad, Daniel J.; Saini, Shereen A.; Clifford, Brian T.; Kapasi, Neel K.; Danforth, Olivia M.; Usui, Minako; Ye, Weisheng; Luu, Emmy; Sharma, Rikki; Bartel, Maya J.; Pathmanabhan, Jeremy A.; Ang, Andrew A. S.; Sievers, Richard E.; Lee, Randall J.; Springer, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a growth factor with both pro-angiogenic and limited pro-tumorigenic activity. We evaluated the potential for PTN to be used for safe angiogenic gene therapy using the full length gene and a truncated gene variant lacking the domain implicated in tumorigenesis. Mouse myoblasts were transduced to express full length or truncated PTN (PTN or T-PTN), along with a LacZ reporter gene, and injected into mouse limb muscle and myocardium. In cultured myoblasts, PTN was expressed and secreted via the Golgi apparatus, but T-PTN was not properly secreted. Nonetheless, no evidence of uncontrolled growth was observed in cells expressing either form of PTN. PTN gene delivery to myocardium, and non-ischemic skeletal muscle, did not result in a detectable change in vascularity or function. In ischemic hindlimb at 14 days post-implantation, intramuscular injection with PTN-expressing myoblasts led to a significant increase in skin perfusion and muscle arteriole density. We conclude that (1) delivery of the full length PTN gene to muscle can be accomplished without tumorigenesis, (2) the truncated PTN gene may be difficult to use in a gene therapy context due to inefficient secretion, (3) PTN gene delivery leads to functional benefit in the mouse acute ischemic hindlimb model. PMID:23630585

  15. Readministration of adenoviral gene delivery to dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sarah C; McMenamin, Margaret M; Charlton, Harry M; Goodman, James; Lantos, Tibor; Simpson, Christine; Wood, Matthew J A

    2007-10-01

    An approach currently being explored as treatment for Parkinson's disease is gene therapy. An important question concerns the duration of transgene expression in dopamine neurons and the issues of vector persistence, neuronal damage and the feasibility of readministering vector to the same neuronal population. We show, using an adenoviral vector expressing the LacZ reporter gene, that transgene expression declined over time but with minimal loss of dopamine neurons or vector DNA. Readministration of vector resulted in low levels of transgene delivery to the neurons. Moreover, the neurons to which vector had already been delivered were unable to transport the retrograde tracer fluorogold. Our findings indicate that transgene expression declined in dopamine neurons despite the persistence of virus, and the capacity to readminister vector to these neurons was limited. PMID:17885611

  16. Towards liver-directed gene therapy: retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M; Raper, S E; Wilson, J M

    1991-11-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy is being considered in the treatment of inherited metabolic diseases. One approach we are considering is the transplantation of autologous hepatocytes that have been genetically modified with recombinant retroviruses ex vivo. We describe, in this report, techniques for isolating human hepatocytes and efficiently transducing recombinant genes into primary cultures. Hepatocytes were isolated from tissue of four different donors, plated in primary culture, and exposed to recombinant retroviruses expressing either the LacZ reporter gene or the cDNA for rabbit LDL receptor. The efficiency of gene transfer under optimal conditions, as determined by Southern blot analysis, varied from a maximum of one proviral copy per cell to a minimum of 0.1 proviral copy per cell. Cytochemical assays were used to detect expression of the recombinant derived proteins, E. coli beta-galactosidase and rabbit LDL receptor. Hepatocytes transduced with the LDL receptor gene expressed levels of receptor protein that exceeded the normal endogenous levels. The ability to isolate and genetically modify human hepatocytes, as described in this report, is an important step towards the development of liver-directed gene therapies in humans. PMID:1767337

  17. Dual-modality gene reporter for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Patrick, P Stephen; Hammersley, Jayne; Loizou, Louiza; Kettunen, Mikko I; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Hu, De-En; Tee, Sui-Seng; Hesketh, Robin; Lyons, Scott K; Soloviev, Dmitry; Lewis, David Y; Aime, Silvio; Fulton, Sandra M; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The ability to track cells and their patterns of gene expression in living organisms can increase our understanding of tissue development and disease. Gene reporters for bioluminescence, fluorescence, radionuclide, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been described but these suffer variously from limited depth penetration, spatial resolution, and sensitivity. We describe here a gene reporter, based on the organic anion transporting protein Oatp1a1, which mediates uptake of a clinically approved, Gd(3+)-based, hepatotrophic contrast agent (gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid). Cells expressing the reporter showed readily reversible, intense, and positive contrast (up to 7.8-fold signal enhancement) in T1-weighted magnetic resonance images acquired in vivo. The maximum signal enhancement obtained so far is more than double that produced by MRI gene reporters described previously. Exchanging the Gd(3+) ion for the radionuclide, (111)In, also allowed detection by single-photon emission computed tomography, thus combining the spatial resolution of MRI with the sensitivity of radionuclide imaging.

  18. Tbx18 targets dermal condensates for labeling, isolation, and gene ablation during embryonic hair follicle formation.

    PubMed

    Grisanti, Laura; Clavel, Carlos; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Rezza, Amelie; Tsai, Su-Yi; Sennett, Rachel; Mumau, Melanie; Cai, Chen-Leng; Rendl, Michael

    2013-02-01

    How cell fate decisions of stem and progenitor cells are regulated by their microenvironment or niche is a central question in stem cell and regenerative biology. Although functional analysis of hair follicle epithelial stem cells by gene targeting is well established, the molecular and genetic characterization of the dermal counterpart during embryonic morphogenesis has been lacking because of the absence of cell type-specific drivers. Here, we report that T-box transcription factor Tbx18 specifically marks dermal papilla (DP) precursor cells during embryonic hair follicle morphogenesis. With Tbx18(LacZ), Tbx18(H2BGFP), and Tbx18(Cre) knock-in mouse models, we demonstrate LacZ and H2BGFP (nuclear green fluorescent protein) expression and Cre activity in dermal condensates of nascent first-wave hair follicles at E14.5. As Tbx18 expression becomes more widespread throughout the dermis at later developmental stages, we use tamoxifen-inducible Cre-expressing mice, Tbx18(MerCreMer), to exclusively target DP precursor cells and their progeny. Finally, we ablate Tbx18 in full knockout mice, but find no perturbations in hair follicle formation, suggesting that Tbx18 is dispensable for normal DP function. In summary, our study establishes Tbx18 as a genetic driver to target for the first time embryonic DP precursors for labeling, isolation, and gene ablation that will greatly enhance investigations into their molecular functions during hair follicle morphogenesis. PMID:22992803

  19. Tbx18 targets dermal condensates for labeling, isolation, and gene ablation during embryonic hair follicle formation.

    PubMed

    Grisanti, Laura; Clavel, Carlos; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Rezza, Amelie; Tsai, Su-Yi; Sennett, Rachel; Mumau, Melanie; Cai, Chen-Leng; Rendl, Michael

    2013-02-01

    How cell fate decisions of stem and progenitor cells are regulated by their microenvironment or niche is a central question in stem cell and regenerative biology. Although functional analysis of hair follicle epithelial stem cells by gene targeting is well established, the molecular and genetic characterization of the dermal counterpart during embryonic morphogenesis has been lacking because of the absence of cell type-specific drivers. Here, we report that T-box transcription factor Tbx18 specifically marks dermal papilla (DP) precursor cells during embryonic hair follicle morphogenesis. With Tbx18(LacZ), Tbx18(H2BGFP), and Tbx18(Cre) knock-in mouse models, we demonstrate LacZ and H2BGFP (nuclear green fluorescent protein) expression and Cre activity in dermal condensates of nascent first-wave hair follicles at E14.5. As Tbx18 expression becomes more widespread throughout the dermis at later developmental stages, we use tamoxifen-inducible Cre-expressing mice, Tbx18(MerCreMer), to exclusively target DP precursor cells and their progeny. Finally, we ablate Tbx18 in full knockout mice, but find no perturbations in hair follicle formation, suggesting that Tbx18 is dispensable for normal DP function. In summary, our study establishes Tbx18 as a genetic driver to target for the first time embryonic DP precursors for labeling, isolation, and gene ablation that will greatly enhance investigations into their molecular functions during hair follicle morphogenesis.

  20. Distinct signatures for mutator sensitivity of lacZ reversions and for the spectrum of lacI/lacO forward mutations on the chromosome of nondividing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bharatan, Shanti M; Reddy, Manjula; Gowrishankar, J

    2004-01-01

    A conditional lethal galE(Ts)-based strategy was employed in Escherichia coli, first to eliminate all growth-associated chromosomal reversions in lacZ or forward mutations in lacI/lacO by incubation at the restrictive temperature and subsequently to recover (as papillae) spontaneous mutations that had arisen in the population of nondividing cells after shift to the permissive temperature. Data from lacZ reversion studies in mutator strains indicated that the products of all genes for mismatch repair (mutHLS, dam, uvrD), of some for oxidative damage repair (mutMT), and of that for polymerase proofreading (dnaQ) are required in dividing cells; some others for oxidative damage repair (mutY, nth nei) are required in both dividing and nondividing cells; and those for alkylation damage repair (ada ogt) are required in nondividing cells. The spectrum of lacI/lacO mutations in nondividing cells was distinguished both by lower frequencies of deletions and IS1 insertions and by the unique occurrence of GC-to-AT transitions at lacO +5. In the second approach to study mutations that had occurred in nondividing cells, lacI/lacO mutants were selected as late-arising papillae from the lawn of a galE+ strain; once again, transitions at lacO +5 were detected among the mutants that had been obtained from populations initially grown on poor carbon sources such as acetate, palmitate, or succinate. Our results indicate that the lacO +5 site is mutable only in nondividing cells, one possible mechanism for which might be that random endogenous alkylation (or oxidative) damage to DNA in these cells is efficiently corrected by the Ada Ogt (or Nth Nei) repair enzymes at most sites but not at lacO +5. Furthermore, the late-arising papillae from the second approach were composed almost exclusively of dominant lacI/lacO mutants. This finding lends support to "instantaneous gratification" models in which a spontaneous lesion, occurring at a random site in DNA of a nondividing cell, is most

  1. Ferritin reporter used for gene expression imaging by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenji; Fuma, Kazuya; Tabata, Kaori; Sawada, Makoto

    2009-10-23

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a minimally invasive way to provide high spatial resolution tomograms. However, MRI has been considered to be useless for gene expression imaging compared to optical imaging. In this study, we used a ferritin reporter, binding with biogenic iron, to make it a powerful tool for gene expression imaging in MRI studies. GL261 mouse glioma cells were over-expressed with dual-reporter ferritin-DsRed under {beta}-actin promoter, then gene expression was observed by optical imaging and MRI in a brain tumor model. GL261 cells expressing ferritin-DsRed fusion protein showed enhanced visualizing effect by reducing T2-weighted signal intensity for in vitro and in vivo MRI studies, as well as DsRed fluorescence for optical imaging. Furthermore, a higher contrast was achieved on T2-weighted images when permeating the plasma membrane of ferritin-DsRed-expressing GL261. Thus, a ferritin expression vector can be used as an MRI reporter to monitor in vivo gene expression.

  2. Photoacoustic imaging of gene expression using tyrosinase as a reporter gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Forbrich, Alexander; Harrison, Tyler; Hitt, Mary; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical reporter genes, such as green fluorescence protein, are powerful research tools that allow visualization of gene expression. We have successfully used tyrosinase as a reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging. Tyrosinase is the key regulatory enzyme in the production of melanin which has a broad optical absorption spectrum. MCF-7 cells were stably transfected with tyrosinase under the control of an inducible promoter. For photoacoustic experiments, MCF-7 cells were resuspended at 108 cells/mL and injected in 700 μm (inner diameter) plastic tubing. Photoacoustic signal of MCF-7 cells expressing tyrosinase were >20-fold greater than those of untransfected MCF-7 cells. Photoacoustic signal of tyrosinaseexpressing MCF-7 cells were approximately 2-fold lesser and greater than those of blood at 576 and 650 nm, respectively, suggesting that photoacoustic signal from blood and tyrosinase-expressing cells can be separated by dualwavelength analysis. Photoacoustic signal from tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 cells covered by chicken tissue could even be detected at a laser penetration depth of 4 cm, suggesting that tyrosinase can be used to image gene expression in relatively deep tissues. The current data suggests that tyrosinase is a strong reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging.

  3. Development of a LacZ-based transcriptional reporter system for use with Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Amanda S; Pybus, Christine; Hansen, Eric J

    2013-03-01

    The lack of a transcriptional reporter system for use in Moraxella catarrhalis has hindered studies of gene regulation in this pathogen. PCR and recombinant DNA methods were used to insert a multicloning site (MCS) and promoterless full-length Escherichia coli lacZ gene, flanked by transcriptional terminators both immediately upstream and downstream, into the M. catarrhalis recombinant plasmid pWW115. Insertion into the MCS in the newly constructed plasmid pASE222 of M. catarrhalis promoter regions controlled by either a repressor (i.e., NsrR) or activator (i.e., PhoB) yielded transcriptional fusion constructs that were appropriately responsive to signal inputs dependent on the host strain genotype, as measured quantitatively by means of a Miller β-galactosidase assay. The transcriptional reporter plasmid pASE222 should prove to be a useful tool for rapid screening of factors affecting gene expression in M. catarrhalis. PMID:23219721

  4. Induction and repression of DAN1 and the family of anaerobic mannoprotein genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs through a complex array of regulatory sites

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Brian D.; Sertil, Odeniel; Abramova, Natalia E.; Davies, Kelvin J. A.; Lowry, Charles V.

    2001-01-01

    The DAN/TIR mannoprotein genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (DAN1, DAN2, DAN3, DAN4, TIR1, TIR2, TIR3 and TIR4) are expressed in anaerobic cells while the predominant cell wall proteins Cwp1 and Cwp2 are down-regulated. Elements involved in activation and repression of the DAN/TIR genes were defined in this study, using the DAN1 promoter as a model. Nested deletions in a DAN1/lacZ reporter pinpointed regions carrying activation and repression elements. Inspection revealed two consensus sequences subsequently shown to be independent anaerobic response elements (AR1, consensus TCGTTYAG; AR2, consensus AAAAATTGTTGA). AR1 is found in all of the DAN/TIR promoters; AR2 is found in DAN1, DAN2 and DAN3. A 120 bp segment carrying two copies of AR1 preferentially activated transcription of lacZ under anaerobic conditions. A fusion of three synthetic copies of AR1 to MEL1 was also expressed anaerobically. Mutations in either AR1 site within the 120 bp segment caused a drastic loss of expression, indicating that both are necessary for activation and implying cooperativity between adjacent transcriptional activation complexes. A single AR2 site carried on a 46 bp fragment from the DAN1 promoter activated lacZ transcription under anaerobic conditions, as did a 26 bp synthetic AR2 fragment fused to MEL1. Nucleotide substitutions within the AR2 sequence eliminated the activity of the 46 bp segment. Ablation of the AR2 sequences in the full promoter caused a partial reduction of expression. The presence of the ATTGTT core (recognized by HMG proteins) in the AR2 sequence suggests that an HMG protein may activate through AR2. One region was implicated in aerobic repression of DAN1. It contains sites for the heme-induced Mot3 and Rox1 repressors. PMID:11160904

  5. Particle-mediated gene transfer into murine livers using a newly developed gene gun.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, S; Mitoro, A; Tsujinoue, H; Nakatani, T; Yoshiji, H; Tsujimoto, T; Yamazaki, M; Fukui, H

    2000-07-01

    Although particle-mediated gene transfer using gene gun technology has been applied for gene transfer into epidermis, applications of this technology to visceral tissues have not been well investigated. Although all helium gas-driven gene gun instruments have used macrocarriers to discharge DNA-coated microprojectiles so far, we used a newly developed gene gun instrument, in which a hammering bullet is used to discharge microprojectiles. With the gene gun, gold particles coated with lacZ expression plasmid were discharged to murine livers. LacZ expression was induced much more profoundly in the liver by particle-mediated gene transfer than by simple plasmid injection and electroporation-mediated gene transfer. LacZ expression was broadly and randomly distributed throughout the bombarded livers, indicating that particle-mediated gene transfer can induce transgene expression even at relatively distant areas from the surface of the bombarded tissue. Furthermore, although transgene expression was at its peak on day 2 after the bombardment, it was still detectable even on day 28. These results indicate that particle-mediated gene transfer with a newly developed gene gun may provide a new approach to gene therapy for human diseases.

  6. Robust reconstruction of gene expression profiles from reporter gene data using linear inversion

    PubMed Central

    Zulkower, Valentin; Page, Michel; Ropers, Delphine; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Time-series observations from reporter gene experiments are commonly used for inferring and analyzing dynamical models of regulatory networks. The robust estimation of promoter activities and protein concentrations from primary data is a difficult problem due to measurement noise and the indirect relation between the measurements and quantities of biological interest. Results: We propose a general approach based on regularized linear inversion to solve a range of estimation problems in the analysis of reporter gene data, notably the inference of growth rate, promoter activity, and protein concentration profiles. We evaluate the validity of the approach using in silico simulation studies, and observe that the methods are more robust and less biased than indirect approaches usually encountered in the experimental literature based on smoothing and subsequent processing of the primary data. We apply the methods to the analysis of fluorescent reporter gene data acquired in kinetic experiments with Escherichia coli. The methods are capable of reliably reconstructing time-course profiles of growth rate, promoter activity and protein concentration from weak and noisy signals at low population volumes. Moreover, they capture critical features of those profiles, notably rapid changes in gene expression during growth transitions. Availability and implementation: The methods described in this article are made available as a Python package (LGPL license) and also accessible through a web interface. For more information, see https://team.inria.fr/ibis/wellinverter. Contact: Hidde.de-Jong@inria.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072511

  7. Intravenous delivery of AAV9 vector mediates effective gene expression in ischemic stroke lesion and brain angiogenic foci

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fanxia; Kuo, Robert; Milon-Camus, Marine; Han, Zhenying; Jiang, Lidan; Young, William L.; Su, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) is a powerful tool for delivering genes to treat brain diseases. Intravenous delivery of a self-complementary, but not single-stranded, AAV9 vector (ssAAV9) mediates robust gene expression in the adult brain. We tested if ssAAV9 effectively mediates gene expression in the ischemic stroke lesion and angiogenic foci. Methods Focal ischemic stroke was induced by permanent occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCAO), and focal angiogenesis, by injecting an AAV vector expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (AAV-VEGF) into the basal ganglia. ssAAV vectors that have CMV promoter driving (AAV-CMVLacZ) or hypoxia response elements controlling (AAV-H9LacZ) LacZ expression were packaged in AAV9 or AAV1 capsid, and injected into mice through the jugular vein one hour after MCAO or four weeks after the induction of angiogenesis. LacZ gene expression was analyzed in the brain and other organs five days post LacZ vector-injection. Results LacZ expression was detected in the peri-infarct region of AAV9-CMVLacZ and AAV9-H9LacZ-injected MCAO mice, and the brain angiogenic foci of AAV9-CMVLacZ-injected mice. Minimum LacZ expression was detected in the brain of AAV1-CMVLacZ-injected mice. Robust LacZ expression was found in the liver and heart of AAV-CMVLacZ-injected mice, but not AAV9-H9LacZ-injected mice. Conclusion ssAAV9 vector could be a useful tool to deliver therapeutic genes to the ischemic stroke lesion or brain angiogenic foci. PMID:23250995

  8. Classical non-homologous end-joining pathway utilizes nascent RNA for error-free double-strand break repair of transcribed genes

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Tapryal, Nisha; Venkova, Tatiana; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pandita, Raj K.; Sarker, Altaf H.; Sarkar, Partha S.; Pandita, Tej K.; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leading to loss of nucleotides in the transcribed region can be lethal. Classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) is the dominant pathway for DSB repair (DSBR) in adult mammalian cells. Here we report that during such DSBR, mammalian C-NHEJ proteins form a multiprotein complex with RNA polymerase II and preferentially associate with the transcribed genes after DSB induction. Depletion of C-NHEJ factors significantly abrogates DSBR in transcribed but not in non-transcribed genes. We hypothesized that nascent RNA can serve as a template for restoring the missing sequences, thus allowing error-free DSBR. We indeed found pre-mRNA in the C-NHEJ complex. Finally, when a DSB-containing plasmid with several nucleotides deleted within the E. coli lacZ gene was allowed time to repair in lacZ-expressing mammalian cells, a functional lacZ plasmid could be recovered from control but not C-NHEJ factor-depleted cells, providing important mechanistic insights into C-NHEJ-mediated error-free DSBR of the transcribed genome. PMID:27703167

  9. Role of an expansin-like molecule in Dictyostelium morphogenesis and regulation of its gene expression by the signal transducer and activator of transcription protein Dd-STATa.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Shun; Shimada, Nao; Kawata, Takefumi

    2009-02-01

    Expansins are proteins involved in plant morphogenesis, exerting their effects on cellulose to extend cell walls. Dictyostelium is an organism that possesses expansin-like molecules, but their functions are not known. In this study, we analyzed the expL7 (expansin-like 7) gene, which has been identified as a putative target of Dd-STATa, a Dictyostelium homolog of the metazoan signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. Promoter fragments of the expL7 were fused to a lacZ reporter and the expression patterns determined. As expected from the behavior of the endogenous expL7 gene, the expL7/lacZ fusion gene was downregulated in Dd-STATa null slugs. In the parental strain, the expL7 promoter was activated in the anterior tip region. Mutational analysis of the promoter identified a sequence that was necessary for expression in tip cells. In addition, an activator sequence for pstAB cells was identified. These sequences act in combination with the repressor region to prevent ectopic expL7 expression in the prespore and prestalk regions of the slug and culminant. Although the expL7 null mutant showed no phenotypic change, the expL7 overexpressor showed aberrant stalk formation. These results indicate that the expansin-like molecule is important for morphogenesis in Dictyostelium.

  10. A cloning vector for creation of Escherichia coli lacZ translational fusions and generation of linear template for chromosomal integrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel cloning vector to aid in the construction of ß-galactosidase reporter systems for gene expression studies in lactose metabolizing strains of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli is described. The plasmid allows construction of translational fusions of cloned gene promoters with a short seg...

  11. [Construction and function identification of luciferase reporter gene vectors containing SNPs in NFKBIA gene 3'UTR].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Li, Jia-li; Bi, Hui-chang; Zhou, Shou-ning; Liu, Xiao-man; Zeng, Hang; Hu, Bing-fang; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the function of two SNPs (rs8904C > T and rs696G >A) in 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of NFKBIA gene by constructing luciferase reporter gene. A patient's genomic DNA with rs8904 CC and rs696 GA genotype was used as the PCR template. Full-length 3'UTR of NFKBIA gene was amplified by different primers. After sequencing validation, these fragments were inserted to the luciferase reporter vector, pGL3-promoter to construct recombinant plasmids containing four kinds of haplotypes, pGL3-rs8904C/rs696G, pGL3-rs8904C/rs696A, pGL3-rs8904T/rs696G and pGL3-rs8904T/rs696A. Then these plasmids were transfected into LS174T cells and the luciferase activity was detected. Compared with pGL3-vector transfected cells (negative control), the luciferase activity of the four kinds of recombinant plasmids was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). For rs696G > A, the luciferase activity of the recombinant plasmids containing A allele (pGL3-rs8904C/rs696A and pGL3-rs8904T/rs696A) was about 45.1% (P < 0.05) and 56.1% (P < 0.001) lower than those containing G allele (pGL3-rs8904C/rs696G and pGL3-rs8904T/rs696G), respectively. For rs8904C > T, there were no significant differences in the luciferase activity between the recombinant plasmids containing T allele and those with C allele. Together, the luciferase reporter gene vectors containing SNPs in NFKBIA gene 3'UTR were constructed successfully and rs696G > A could decrease the luciferase activity while rs8904C >T didn't have much effect on the luciferase activity. PMID:27405166

  12. [Construction and function identification of luciferase reporter gene vectors containing SNPs in NFKBIA gene 3'UTR].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Li, Jia-li; Bi, Hui-chang; Zhou, Shou-ning; Liu, Xiao-man; Zeng, Hang; Hu, Bing-fang; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the function of two SNPs (rs8904C > T and rs696G >A) in 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of NFKBIA gene by constructing luciferase reporter gene. A patient's genomic DNA with rs8904 CC and rs696 GA genotype was used as the PCR template. Full-length 3'UTR of NFKBIA gene was amplified by different primers. After sequencing validation, these fragments were inserted to the luciferase reporter vector, pGL3-promoter to construct recombinant plasmids containing four kinds of haplotypes, pGL3-rs8904C/rs696G, pGL3-rs8904C/rs696A, pGL3-rs8904T/rs696G and pGL3-rs8904T/rs696A. Then these plasmids were transfected into LS174T cells and the luciferase activity was detected. Compared with pGL3-vector transfected cells (negative control), the luciferase activity of the four kinds of recombinant plasmids was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). For rs696G > A, the luciferase activity of the recombinant plasmids containing A allele (pGL3-rs8904C/rs696A and pGL3-rs8904T/rs696A) was about 45.1% (P < 0.05) and 56.1% (P < 0.001) lower than those containing G allele (pGL3-rs8904C/rs696G and pGL3-rs8904T/rs696G), respectively. For rs8904C > T, there were no significant differences in the luciferase activity between the recombinant plasmids containing T allele and those with C allele. Together, the luciferase reporter gene vectors containing SNPs in NFKBIA gene 3'UTR were constructed successfully and rs696G > A could decrease the luciferase activity while rs8904C >T didn't have much effect on the luciferase activity.

  13. Intestinal lactase as an autologous beta-galactosidase reporter gene for in vivo gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Siamak; Eckley, Lorna; Sawyer, Greta J; Zhang, Xiaohong; Dong, Xuebin; Freund, Jean-Noel; Fabre, John W

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal lactase has potential as an autologous beta-galactosidase reporter gene for long-term gene expression studies in vivo, using chromogenic, luminescent, and fluorogenic substrates developed for Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. In normal rat tissues, reactivity with a chromogenic fucopyranoside (X-Fuc, the preferred substrate of lactase) was present only at the lumenal surface of small intestine epithelial cells. Full-length lactase (domains I-IV), mature lactase (domains III and IV), and a cytosolic form of mature lactase (domains III and IV, without the signal sequence or transmembrane region) were evaluated. Transfection of HuH-7 cells in vitro, and hydrodynamic gene delivery to the liver in vivo, resulted in excellent gene expression. The full-length and mature (homodimeric, membrane-bound) forms reacted strongly with X-Fuc but not with the corresponding galactopyranoside (X-Gal). However, the presumptively monomeric cytosolic lactase unexpectedly reacted equally well with both substrates. The fluorogenic substrate fluorescein-di-beta-D-galactopyranoside was cleaved by cytosolic lactase, but not by full-length or mature lactase. Full-length lactase, when expressed ectopically in hepatocytes in vivo, localized exclusively to the bile canalicular membrane. Intestinal lactase is highly homologous in mice, rats, and humans and has considerable potential for evaluating long-term gene expression in experimental animals and the clinic.

  14. Differentiation of the shutoff of protein synthesis by virion host shutoff and mutant gamma (1)34.5 genes of herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed

    Poon, A P; Roizman, B

    1997-03-01

    vhs protein is the product of the UL41 open reading frame of herpes simplex virus 1. The protein, made late in infection, is packaged into virions and, in newly infected cells, shuts off host protein synthesis by degrading mRNA. gamma (1)34.5 gene encodes a protein which precludes total shutoff of protein synthesis after the onset of viral DNA synthesis in infected cells of human derivation. The experiments reported here were designed to test the hypothesis that in cells infected with gamma (1)34.5- mutant the total shutoff of protein synthesis reflects the failure to alter the function of vhs made late in infection. Hence, double mutants, vhs- and gamma (1)34.5 should not cause total shutoff of protein synthesis. The mutants constructed to test the hypothesis were (i) viruses lacking 1 kbp from the coding domain of gamma (1)34.5 and carrying lacZ inserted into the coding domain of UI41, (ii) viruses with deletions in gamma (1)34.5 genes, (iii) viruses with lacZ inserted into UL41, and (iv) viruses in which the sequences of the deleted or interrupted genes were restored. We report that viruses with wild-type UL41 gene shut off the synthesis of actin, whereas viruses with interrupted genes made amounts of actin comparable to those of mock-infected cells. However, late in infection, protein synthesis in human neuroblastoma cells infected with the gamma (1)34.5- mutants was shut off irrespective of the status of the UL41 gene. Conversely, the phenotype of UI41 viruses with wild-type gamma (1)34.5 gene could not be differentiated from those of wild-type virus in the same assays. These studies indicate that the functions of the UL41 and gamma (1)34.5 genes and their products are independent of each other.

  15. Hazardous effects of effluent from the chrome plating industry: 70 kDa heat shock protein expression as a marker of cellular damage in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ).

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Saxena, Daya Krishna; Chowdhuri, Debapratim Kar

    2003-01-01

    Hazardous effects of an effluent from the chrome plating industry were examined by exposing transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ) to various concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 1.0, 10.0, and 100.0 micro L/mL) of the effluent through diet. The emergence pattern of adult flies was affected, along with impaired reproductive performance at the higher dietary concentrations of the effluent. Interestingly, the effect of the effluent was more pronounced in male than in female flies. The effect of the effluent on development of adult flies was concurrent with the expression pattern of the heat shock protein 70 gene (hsp70), both in larval tissues and in the reproductive organs of adult flies. We observed a dose- and time-dependent expression of hsp70 in third instar larvae exposed for different time intervals. Absence of hsp70 expression in larvae exposed to 0.1 micro L/mL of the effluent indicated that this is the highest nontoxic concentration for Drosophila. The stress gene assay in the reproductive organs of adult flies revealed hsp70 expression in the testis of male flies only. However, trypan blue dye exclusion tests in these tissues indicate tissue damage in the male accessory gland of adult flies, which was further confirmed by ultrastructural observations. In the present study we demonstrate the utility of transgenic Drosophila as an alternative animal model for evaluating hazardous effects of the effluent from the chrome plating industry and further reveal the cytoprotective role of hsp70 and its expression as an early marker in environmental risk assessment. PMID:14644668

  16. Replication-Competent Influenza A Viruses Expressing Reporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Michael; Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) cause annual seasonal human respiratory disease epidemics. In addition, IAV have been implicated in occasional pandemics with inordinate health and economic consequences. Studying IAV, in vitro or in vivo, requires the use of laborious secondary methodologies to identify virus-infected cells. To circumvent this requirement, replication-competent IAV expressing an easily traceable reporter protein can be used. Here we discuss the development and applications of recombinant replication-competent IAV harboring diverse fluorescent or bioluminescent reporter genes in different locations of the viral genome. These viruses have been employed for in vitro and in vivo studies, such as the screening of neutralizing antibodies or antiviral compounds, the identification of host factors involved in viral replication, cell tropism, the development of vaccines, or the assessment of viral infection dynamics. In summary, reporter-expressing, replicating-competent IAV represent a powerful tool for the study of IAV both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27347991

  17. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOEpatents

    Gambhir, Sanjiv; Pritha, Ray

    2011-06-07

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  18. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOEpatents

    Gambhir; Sanjiv , Pritha; Ray

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  19. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOEpatents

    Gambhir, Sanjiv; Pritha, Ray

    2015-07-14

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  20. Gene overexpression as a tool for identifying new trans-acting factors involved in translation termination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Namy, Olivier; Hatin, Isabelle; Stahl, Guillaume; Liu, Hongmei; Barnay, Stephanie; Bidou, Laure; Rousset, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    In eukaryotes, translation termination is dependent on the availability of both release factors, eRF1 and eRF3; however, the precise mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. In particular, the fact that the phenotype of release factor mutants is pleiotropic could imply that other factors and interactions are involved in translation termination. To identify unknown elements involved in this process, we performed a genetic screen using a reporter strain in which a leaky stop codon is inserted in the lacZ reporter gene, attempting to isolate factors modifying termination efficiency when overexpressed. Twelve suppressors and 11 antisuppressors, increasing or decreasing termination readthrough, respectively, were identified and analyzed for three secondary phenotypes often associated with translation mutations: thermosensitivity, G418 sensitivity, and sensitivity to osmotic pressure. Interestingly, among these candidates, we identified two genes, SSO1 and STU2, involved in protein transport and spindle pole body formation, respectively, suggesting puzzling connections with the translation termination process. PMID:12072456

  1. Expression of a mouse metallothionein-Escherichia coli. beta. -galactosidase fusion gene (MT-. beta. gal) in early mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, M.E.; Meneses, J.J.; Pedersen, R.A. )

    1989-08-01

    The authors have microinjected DNA containing the inducible mouse metallothionein-I (MT-I) promoter, coupled to the structural gene for Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase (lacZ), into the pronuclei of one-cell mouse embryos. A qualitative histochemical assay, with 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl {beta}-D-galactopyranoside (X-Gal) as a substrate, was used to detect expression of lacZ at several preimplantation stages. They observed staining indicative of exogenous {beta}-galactosidase activity in 5-17% of DNA-injected embryos assayed at preimplantation stages after 16-24 h treatment with ZnSO{sub 4}. Thus, lacZ can be used as an indicator gene for promoter function during early mouse embryogenesis, and the incorporation of the MT-I promoter into fusion genes can be a useful means of controlling the expression of exogenous genes in preimplantation mouse embryos.

  2. Enhancer activity of light-responsive regulatory elements in the untranslated leader regions of cyanobacterial psbA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Li, R; Golden, S S

    1993-01-01

    Three psbA genes encoding the D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction center are differentially expressed under different light intensities in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. Two of the three psbA genes, psbAII and psbAIII, are induced rapidly when light intensity is increased from 125 x 10(-6) mol.m-2.s-1 to 750 x 10(-6) mol.m-2.s-1. A recombinational cloning vector that carries a transcriptional lacZ reporter gene was used to characterize the controlling elements responsible for light induction. At least three distinct cis elements are present in the regulatory regions of pbsAII and psbAIII: basal promoters, comparable to Escherichia coli sigma 70 promoters in position and sequence, confer constitutive expression of the genes under both low and high light intensities; negative elements upstream of the promoters down-regulate the expression of the corresponding gene; and sequences downstream of the promoters that correspond to the untranslated leader regions of the mRNAs (+1 to +41 in psbAII and +1 to +39 in psbAIII) are responsible for increased expression under high light. When these light-responsive elements were combined with an E. coli promoter (conII) in different positions and orientations, the expression of the lacZ gene was induced 4- to 11-fold. The induction of gene expression under high light by these enhancers was position independent but orientation dependent. When the elements were combined with the conII promoter in the correct orientation, they also conferred a small but reproducible level of light-responsive expression on this E. coli promoter. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8265608

  3. Photoacoustic molecular imaging of ferritin as a reporter gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, S.; Carson, A.; Kim, K.

    2012-02-01

    Spectral analysis of photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging (PMI) of ferritin expressed in human melanoma cells (SK-24) was performed in vitro. Ferritin is a ubiquitously expressed protein which stores iron that can be detected by PA imaging, allowing ferritin to act as a reporter gene. To over-express ferritin, SK-24 cells were co-transfected with plasmid expressing Heavy chain ferritin (H-FT) and plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C1) using LipofectamineTM 2000. Non-transfected SK-24 cells served as a negative control. Fluorescent imaging of EGFP confirmed transfection and transgene expression in co-transfected cells. To detect iron accumulation in SK-24 cells, a focused high frequency ultrasonic transducer (60 MHz, f/1.5), synchronized to a pulsed laser (<20mJ/cm2), was used to scan the PA signal from 680 nm to 950 nm (in 10 nm increments) from the surface of the 6-well culturing plate. PA signal intensity from H-FT transfected SK-24 cells was not different from that of non-transfected SK-24 cells at wavelengths less than 770 nm, but was over 4 dB higher than non-transfected SK-24 cells at 850 ~ 950 nm. Fluorescent microscopy indicates significant accumulation of ferritin in H-FT transfected SK-24 cells, with little ferritin expression in non-transfected SK-24 cells. The PA spectral analysis clearly differentiates transfected SK-24 cells from nontransfected SK-24 cells with significantly increased iron signal at 850 ~ 950 nm, and these increased signals were associated with transfection of H-FT plasmid. As such, the feasibility of ferritin as a reporter gene for PMI has been demonstrated in vitro. The use of ferritin as a reporter gene represents a new concept for PA imaging, and may provide various opportunities for molecular imaging and basic science research.

  4. Insertion of a GFP reporter gene in influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jasmine T; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Manicassamy, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of a fluorescent reporter gene into a replication-competent influenza A virus (IAV) has made it possible to trace IAV infection in vivo. This protocol describes the process of inserting a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter into the IAV genome using the established reverse genetics system. The strategy begins with the reorganization of segment eight of the IAV genome, during which the open reading frames of nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) and the nuclear export protein (NEP) are separated to allow for GFP fusion to the NS1 protein. The NS1, GFP, and NEP open reading frames (ORF) are then cloned into the IAV rescue system backbone. Upon construction of the GFP-encoding segment eight rescue plasmid, recombinant NS1-GFP influenza virus can be rescued via co-transfection with the remaining seven rescue plasmids. The generated NS1-GFP IAV can subsequently be used to visualize infected cells, both in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Regulation of expression of sodA and msrA genes of Corynebacterium glutamicum in response to oxidative and radiative stress.

    PubMed

    El Shafey, H M; Ghanem, S

    2015-03-20

    Promoters of genes encoding superoxide dismutase (sodA) and peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase (msrA) from Cory-nebacterium glutamicum were cloned and sequenced. Promoter region analysis of sodA-msrA was unable to identify putative sites of fixed eventual regulators except for possible sites of fixed OxyR and integra-tion host factor. A study of the regulation of these genes was performed using the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli as a reporter placed under the control of sequences downstream of sodA and msrA. In silico analysis was used to identify regulators in the genome of C. glutamicum, which revealed the absence of homologs of soxRS and arcA and the presence of inactive oxyR and putative candidates of the homologs of ahpC, ohrR, integration host factor, furA, IdeR, diphtheria toxin repressor, and mntR.

  6. Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported in gene transfer experiments using the soybean seed storage protein gene. The sequencing of gene Gmg ..cap alpha..' 17.1 has been completed. Several deletion mutants of this gene are being prepared for experiments to transfer the gene into the Ti-plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The purpose is to determine which, if any, of the upstream sequences are those which regulate the developmental expression of the gene. (ACR)

  7. Hormonal activity of polycyclic musks evaluated by reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taiki; Iida, Mitsuru; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Kohra, Shinya; Takao, Yuji; Takemasa, Takehiro; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic musk fragrance compounds, such as polycyclic musks (PCMs), are a group of chemicals used extensively as personal care products, and can be found in the environment and the human body. PCMs, such as 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexa-methylcyclopenta-gamma-2-benzopyran (HHCB) and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyltetralin (AHTN), are known to have agonistic activities toward human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha) and hERbeta, and have antagonistic activity toward the human androgen receptor (hAR), as shown in several reporter gene assays. However, little is known about the interaction of PCMs with the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR), and the hormonal effects of other PCMs except for HHCB and AHTN. In this study, we focus on the interactions of six PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, 4-acetyl-1,1-dimethyl-6-tert-butyl-indan (ADBI), 6-acetyl-1,1,2,3,3,5-hexamethylindan (AHMI), 6,7-dihydro-1,1,2,3,3-pentamethyl-4(5H)-indanone (DPMI), and 5-acetyl-1,1,2,6-tetramethyl-3-isopropy-lindan (ATII) with hERalpha, hAR, and hTRbeta by in vitro reporter gene assay using Chinese hamster ovary cells. All the samples were found to be agonists toward hERalpha, whereas no agonistic activities of these PCMs for hAR and hTRbeta were observed. No antagonistic activities for hERalpha and hTRbeta were observed at the concentrations tested. However, several PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, ATII, ADBI, and AHMI, showed dose-dependent antagonistic activities for hAR, and the IC50 values of these compounds were estimated to be 1.0 x 10(-7), 1.5 x 10(-7), 1.4 x 10(-7), 9.8 x 10(-6), and 1.4 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The results suggest that these PCMs interact with hERalpha and hAR but have no hormonal effect on hTRbeta. This is the first report on the agonistic and antagonistic activities of ATII, ADBI, AHMI, and DPMI for hERalpha and hAR as determined by in vitro reporter gene assay using stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  8. Pristinamycin-inducible gene regulation in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Forti, Francesca; Crosta, Andrea; Ghisotti, Daniela

    2009-03-25

    In this work the Pip-inducible system, already used in eukaryotes, was tested in mycobacteria. This system is based on the Streptomyces coelicolor Pip repressor, the Streptomyces pristinaespiralis ptr promoter and the inducer pristinamycin I. By cloning in an integrative plasmid the ptr promoter upstream of the lacZ reporter gene and the pip gene under the control of a constitutive mycobacterial promoter, we demonstrated that the ptr promoter activity increased up to 50-fold in Mycobacterium smegmatis and up to 400-fold in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in dependence on pristinamycin I concentration, and that the promoter was fully repressed in the absence of the inducer. Three mycobacterial genes were cloned under pptr-Pip control, both in sense and antisense direction; both proteins and antisense RNAs could be over-expressed, the antisenses causing a partial reduction of the amount of the targeted proteins. This system was used to obtain two M. tuberculosis conditional mutants in the fadD32 and pknB genes: the mutant strains grew only in the presence of the inducer pristinamycin I. Thus it showed to be an effective inducible system in mycobacteria. PMID:19428723

  9. A fast-evolving human NPAS3 enhancer gained reporter expression in the developing forebrain of transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, Gretel B.; López-Leal, Rodrigo; Lorenzo, Juan R.; Franchini, Lucía F.

    2013-01-01

    The developmental brain gene NPAS3 stands out as a hot spot in human evolution because it contains the largest number of human-specific, fast-evolving, conserved, non-coding elements. In this paper we studied 2xHAR142, one of these elements that is located in the fifth intron of NPAS3. Using transgenic mice, we show that the mouse and chimp 2xHAR142 orthologues behave as transcriptional enhancers driving expression of the reporter gene lacZ to a similar NPAS3 expression subdomain in the mouse central nervous system. Interestingly, the human 2xHAR142 orthologue drives lacZ expression to an extended expression pattern in the nervous system. Thus, molecular evolution of 2xHAR142 provides the first documented example of human-specific heterotopy in the forebrain promoted by a transcriptional enhancer and suggests that it may have contributed to assemble the unique properties of the human brain. PMID:24218632

  10. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-12-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans.

  11. Gemini, a Bifunctional Enzymatic and Fluorescent Reporter of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Endy, Drew

    2009-01-01

    Background The development of collections of quantitatively characterized standard biological parts should facilitate the engineering of increasingly complex and novel biological systems. The existing enzymatic and fluorescent reporters that are used to characterize biological part functions exhibit strengths and limitations. Combining both enzymatic and fluorescence activities within a single reporter protein would provide a useful tool for biological part characterization. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe the construction and quantitative characterization of Gemini, a fusion between the β-galactosidase (β-gal) α-fragment and the N-terminus of full-length green fluorescent protein (GFP). We show that Gemini exhibits functional β-gal activity, which we assay with plates and fluorometry, and functional GFP activity, which we assay with fluorometry and microscopy. We show that the protein fusion increases the sensitivity of β-gal activity and decreases the sensitivity of GFP. Conclusions/Significance Gemini is therefore a bifunctional reporter with a wider dynamic range than the β-gal α-fragment or GFP alone. Gemini enables the characterization of gene expression, screening assays via enzymatic activity, and quantitative single-cell microscopy or FACS via fluorescence activity. The analytical flexibility afforded by Gemini will likely increase the efficiency of research, particularly for screening and characterization of libraries of standard biological parts. PMID:19888458

  12. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Two Genes for DNA polymerase delta were identified from the wild type Chinese hamster ovary cells. These genes were cloned via RT-PCR from mRNA prepared the Chinese hamster ovary cells using primers specific to conserved sequences of the DNA polymerase {delta} gene. The first gene encodes a PCNA dependent DNA polymerase {delta} gene whereas the second gene encodes a PCNA independent DNA polymerase {delta} gene. Methods were developed to clone these genes in expression vector and host systems. The role of the two genes in DNA replication and repair was determined.

  13. MRI reporter genes: applications for imaging of cell survival, proliferation, migration and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vandsburger, Moriel H; Radoul, Marina; Cohen, Batya; Neeman, Michal

    2013-07-01

    Molecular imaging strives to detect molecular events at the level of the whole organism. In some cases, the molecule of interest can be detected either directly or with targeted contrast media. However many genes and proteins and particularly those located in intracellular compartments are not accessible for targeted agents. The transcriptional regulation of these genes can nevertheless be detected, although indirectly, using reporter gene encoding for readily detectable proteins. Such reporter proteins can be expressed in the tissue of interest by genetically introducing the reporter gene in the target cells. Imaging of reporter genes has become a powerful tool in modern biomedical research. Typically, expression of fluorescent and bioluminescent proteins and the reaction product of expressed enzymes and exogenous substrates were examined using in vitro histological methods and in vivo whole body imaging methods. Recent advances in MRI reporter gene methods raised the possibility that MRI could become a powerful tool for concomitant high-resolution anatomical and functional imaging and for imaging of reporter gene activity. An immediate application of MRI reporter gene methods was by monitoring gene expression patterns in gene therapy and in vivo imaging of the survival, proliferation, migration and differentiation of pluripotent and multipotent cells used in cell-based regenerative therapies for cancer, myocardial infarction and neural degeneration. In this review, we characterized a variety of MRI reporter gene methods based on their applicability to report cell survival/proliferation, migration and differentiation. In particular, we discussed which methods were best suited for translation to clinical use in regenerative therapies.

  14. Photoacoustic microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Arie; Vanvickle-Chavez, Sarah J.; Yao, Junjie; Fleming, Timothy P.; Gillanders, William E.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-08-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid modality based on optical absorption excitation and ultrasonic detection. It is sensitive to melanin, one of the primary absorbers in skin. For cells that do not naturally contain melanin, melanin production can be induced by introducing the gene for tyrosinase, the primary enzyme responsible for expression of melanin in melanogenic cells. Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy was used in the ex vivo study reported here, where the signal from transfected cells increased by more than 10 times over wild-type cells. A subsequent in vivo experiment was conducted to demonstrate the capability of photoacoustic microscopy to spectrally differentiate between tyrosinase-catalyzed melanin and various other absorbers in tissue.

  15. [Construction and specificity of porcine bmp15 gene reporter vector].

    PubMed

    Qin, Mingming; Wei, Jianghua; Yu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jinglong; Liu, Xiaopeng; Ma, Xiaoling; Wang, Huayan

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the express specificity of bone morphogenetic protein 15 (Bmp15) in porcine. The pBMP15-EGFP reporter vector was constructed from the 2.2 kb fragment of porcine bmp15 promoter to trace the differentiation process of stem cells into oocyte-like cells. We used porcine ovary and Chinese Hamster Ovary cell line (CHO), mouse myoblast cell line (C2C12) and porcine amniotic fluid stem cell (pAFSC) to investigate the expression and regulation of this gene via RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, cell transfection, and microinjection methods. We also used single layer cell differentiation to detect the application potential of bmp15. The results show that bmp15 gene was specifically expressed in the porcine ovary and CHO rather than in C2C12 and pAFSC. In addition, the characteristic of tissue-specific of Bmp15 was detected on CHO instead of other cell lines by transient transfection. We also detected the expression of Bmp15 in oocyte at different development stages by immunofluorescence of fixed paraffin-embedded ovary sections. Furthermore, microinjection results show that bmp15 expressed in oocytes at 18 h of maturation in vitro, and continued up to 4-cell stage embryos. Most importantly, we found that the expression of Bmp15 started at day 12 after inducing pAFSC into oocyte-like cells by transfection; green fluorescent was visible in round cell masses. It indicated that bmp15 has the expression specificity and the pBMP15-EGFP reporter vector can be used to trace Bmp15 action in the differentiation of stem cells into germ cells.

  16. (Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported on research directed toward introducing a gene (Gmg 17.1) encoding the ..cap alpha..'-subunit of ..beta..-conglycinin, a soybean seed protein, into petunia plants using gene transfer mechanisms. (ACR)

  17. Expression of a human placental alkaline phosphatase gene in transfected cells: Use as a reporter for studies of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.; Zervos, P.; Raducha, M.; Harris, H.; Kadesch, T.

    1988-09-01

    The human placental alkaline phosphatase gene has been cloned and reintroduced into mammalian cells. When a plasmid carrying the gene under control of the simian virus 40 early promoter (pSV2Apap) is transfected into a variety of different cell types, placental alkaline phosphatase activity can readily be detected by using whole cell suspensions or cell lysates. Alkaline phosphatase activity can also be visualized directly in individual transfected cells by histochemical staining. The gene is appropriate for use as a reporter in studies of gene regulation since its expression is dependent on the presence of exogenous transcription control elements. The overall assay to detect the expression of the gene is quantitative, very rapid, and inexpensive. Cotransfections of cells with pSV2Apap and a related plasmid carrying the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (pSV2Acat) indicate that transcription of these two genes is detected with roughly the same sensitivity.

  18. Identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences. Final report: Report period, 15 April 1993--15 April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    This Report concludes the DOE Human Genome Program project, ``Identification of Genes in Anonymous DNA Sequence.`` The central goals of this project have been (1) understanding the problem of identifying genes in anonymous sequences, and (2) development of tools, primarily the automated identification system gm, for identifying genes. The activities supported under the previous award are summarized here to provide a single complete report on the activities supported as part of the project from its inception to its completion.

  19. Retinoic acid-mediated gene expression in transgenic reporter zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Perz-Edwards, A; Hardison, N L; Linney, E

    2001-01-01

    Retinoic acid-mediated gene activation is important for normal vertebrate development. The size and nature of retinoic acid make it difficult to identify the precise cellular location of this signaling molecule throughout an embryo. Additionally, retinoic acid (RA) signaling is regulated by a complex combination of receptors, coactivators, and antagonizing proteins. Thus, in order to integrate these signals and identify regions within a whole developing embryo where cells can respond transcriptionally to retinoic acid, we have used a reporter transgenic approach. We have generated several stable lines of transgenic zebrafish which use retinoic acid response elements to drive fluorescent protein expression. In these zebrafish lines, transgene expression is localized to regions of the neural tube, retina, notochord, somites, heart, pronephric ducts, branchial arches, and jaw muscles in embryos and larvae. Transgene expression can be induced in additional regions of the neural tube and retina as well as the immature notochord, hatching gland, enveloping cell layer, and fin by exposing embryos to retinoic acid. Treatment with retinoic acid synthase inhibitors, citral and diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB), during neurulation, greatly reduces transgene expression. DEAB treatment of embryos at gastrulation phenocopies the embryonic effects of vitamin A deprivation or targeted disruption of the RA synthase retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 in other vertebrates. Together these data suggest that the reporter expression we see in zebrafish is dependent upon conserved vertebrate pathways of RA synthesis.

  20. Reporter gene expression in dendritic cells after gene gun administration of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Craig; Hopkins, John; Harkiss, Gordon

    2005-07-21

    Dendritic cells (DC) play an integral role in plasmid DNA vaccination. However, the interaction between plasmid DNA and DC in vivo is incompletely understood. In this report, we utilise the sheep pseudoafferent cannulation model to examine the interaction between plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP) and afferent lymph DC (ALDC) following gene gun administration. The results show that peaks of fluorescent ALDC tended to appear around days 1-4 and 9-13, then erratically thereafter for up to 2 months. Phenotypic analysis showed that EGFP+ ALDC expressed MHC class II, WC6, CD1b, and SIRPalpha markers. Plasmid, detected by PCR, was found in lymph cells and cell-free plasma on a daily basis, and was present variably for up to 2 months. Plasmid was also detected in purified CD1b+ ALDC, but the presence of plasmid did not correlate with EGFP expression by ALDC. Free EGFP in afferent lymph plasma was detectable by luminometry only after three administrations of the plasmid. The results show that gene gun administered pEGFP persisted for extended periods after a single administration, leeching out of skin on a daily basis. The plasmid was associated with both the cellular and fluid components of afferent lymph. EGFP protein appeared in afferent lymph in a pulsatile manner, but associated only with ALDC.

  1. A biovar-specific signal of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae induces increased nodulation gene-inducing activity in root exudate of Vicia sativa subsp. nigra.

    PubMed Central

    van Brussel, A A; Recourt, K; Pees, E; Spaink, H P; Tak, T; Wijffelman, C A; Kijne, J W; Lugtenberg, B J

    1990-01-01

    Flavonoids in root exudate of leguminous plants activate the transcription of Rhizobium genes involved in the formation of root nodules (nod genes). We report that inoculation with the homologous symbiont R. leguminosarum bv. viciae results in an increased nod gene-inducing activity (Ini) in root exudate of V. sativa subsp. nigra, whereas inoculation with heterologous Rhizobium strains results in exudates with nod gene-inducing activity comparable to that of uninfected plants. Ini can be demonstrated by using either of the isogenic indicator strains containing an inducible nod promoter fused to the Escherichia coli lacZ reporter gene and the regulatory nodD gene of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae, R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii, or R. meliloti. The presence of genes nodDABCEL of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae appeared to be essential for induction of Ini. Mutation of the genes nodI and nodJ causes a delay of Ini, whereas gene nodF appears to be required for both the timely appearance and the maximum level of Ini activity. The nodE gene is responsible for the biovar specificity of induction of Ini by Rhizobium spp. Ini is caused by a soluble heat-stable factor of rhizobial origin. This Rhizobium-produced Ini factor has an apparent molecular weight between 1,000 and 10,000 and does not originate from flavonoid precursors. PMID:2394688

  2. Development of Timd2 as a reporter gene for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, P. Stephen; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Lyons, Scott K.; Neves, André A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the potential of an MRI gene reporter based on the ferritin receptor Timd2 (T‐cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain containing protein 2), using T1‐ and T2‐weighted imaging. Methods Pellets of cells that had been modified to express the Timd2 transgene, and incubated with either iron‐loaded or manganese‐loaded ferritin, were imaged using T1‐ and T2‐weighted MRI. Mice were also implanted subcutaneously with Timd2‐expressing cells and the resulting xenograft tissue imaged following intravenous injection of ferritin using T2‐weighted imaging. Results Timd2‐expressing cells, but not control cells, showed a large increase in both R2 and R1 in vitro following incubation with iron‐loaded and manganese‐loaded ferritin, respectively. Expression of Timd2 had no effect on cell viability or proliferation; however, manganese‐loaded ferritin, but not iron‐loaded ferritin, was toxic to Timd2‐expressing cells. Timd2‐expressing xenografts in vivo showed much smaller changes in R2 following injection of iron‐loaded ferritin than the same cells incubated in vitro with iron‐loaded ferritin. Conclusion Timd2 has demonstrated potential as an MRI reporter gene, producing large increases in R2 and R1 with ferritin and manganese‐loaded ferritin respectively in vitro, although more modest changes in R2 in vivo. Manganese‐loaded apoferritin was not used in vivo due to the toxicity observed in vitro. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Magn Reson Med 75:1697–1707, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society

  3. Editor's Highlight: Identification and Characterization of Teratogenic Chemicals Using Embryonic Stem Cells Isolated From a Wnt/β-Catenin-Reporter Transgenic Mouse Line.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Josephine; Kemler, Rolf; Luch, Andreas; Oelgeschläger, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are commonly used for the analysis of gene function in embryonic development and provide valuable models for human diseases. In recent years, ESCs have also become an attractive tool for toxicological testing, in particular for the identification of teratogenic compounds. We have recently described a Bmp-reporter ESC line as a new tool to identify teratogenic compounds and to characterize the molecular mechanisms mediating embryonic toxicity. Here we describe the use of a Wnt/β-Catenin-reporter ESC line isolated from a previously described mouse line that carries the LacZ reporter gene under the control of a β-Catenin responsive promoter. The reporter ESC line stably differentiates into cardiomyocytes within 12 days. The reporter was endogenously induced between day 3-5 of differentiation reminiscent of its expression in vivo, in which strong LacZ activity is detected around gastrulation. Subsequently its expression becomes restricted to mesodermal cells and cells undergoing an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The Wnt/β-Catenin-dependent expression of the reporter protein allowed quantification of dose- and time-dependent effects of teratogenic chemicals. In particular, valproic acid reduced reporter activity on day 7 whereas retinoic acid induced reporter activity on day 5 at concentrations comparable to the ones inhibiting the formation of functional cardiomyocytes, the classical read-out of the embryonic stem cell test (EST). In addition, we were also able to show distinct effects of teratogenic chemicals on the Wnt/β-Catenin-reporter compared with the previously described Bmp-reporter ESCs. Thus, different reporter cell lines provide complementary tools for the identification and analysis of potentially teratogenic compounds.

  4. Optical imaging of reporter gene expression using a positron-emission-tomography probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Liu, Shuanglong; Zhang, Xiaofen; Chen, Luxi; Han, Peizhen; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-11-01

    Reporter gene/reporter probe technology is one of the most important techniques in molecular imaging. Lately, many reporter gene/reporter probe systems have been coupled to different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and optical imaging (OI). It has been recently found that OI techniques could be used to monitor radioactive tracers in vitro and in living subjects. In this study, we further demonstrate that a reporter gene/nuclear reporter probe system [herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and 9-(4-18F-fluoro-3-[hydroxymethyl] butyl) guanine ([18F]FHBG)] could be successfully imaged by OI in vitro and in vivo. OI with radioactive reporter probes will facilitate and broaden the applications of reporter gene/reporter probe techniques in medical research.

  5. The necessity of magnesium cation for acid assistance aglycone departure in catalysis by Escherichia coli (lacZ) beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, M L; Withers, S G

    1978-11-01

    1. Removal of Mg2+ from Escherichia coli (lacZ) beta-galactosidase slightly increases the rate of hydrolysis of galactosyl pyridinium salts, but decreases the rate of hydrolysis of arylgalactosides. 2. Fair correlation of logkcat. and log (Km) with the pKa of aglycone is now observed for arglygalactosides, as well as for glycosyl pyridinium salts. 3. Degalactosylation of Mg2+-free enzyme is the rate-limiting step in the hydrolysis of 2,4-dinitrophenyl galactoside. 4. alpha-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects for both sets of substrates are consistent with the rate-determining generation of a glycosyl cation. 5. The pH-independent, SNl hydrolysis of 3,4-dinitrophenyl galactoside has been measured: it is as fast as that of the galactosyl 3-chloropyridinium ion. 6. Hydrolysis of these two substrates by Mg2+-free enzyme proceeds at very similar rates. 7. It is concluded that loss of both types of aglycone takes place, without acid catalysis, from the first ES complex of substrate and apoenzyme. 8. Data for galactosyl azide and thiopicrate confirm that neither charge nor change of atom is the cause of the differences in behavior between aryl galactosides and galactosylpyridinium salts.

  6. The pobA gene of Burkholderia cenocepacia encodes a group I Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferase required for biosynthesis of the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Atif H; Shastri, Sravanthi; Dave, Emma; Wowk, Irena; Agnoli, Kirsty; Cook, Anne M; Thomas, Mark S

    2011-02-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia produces the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin under iron-restricted conditions. Biosynthesis of both siderophores requires the involvement of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Using a transposon containing the lacZ reporter gene, two B. cenocepacia mutants were isolated which were deficient in siderophore production. Mutant IW10 was shown to produce normal amounts of ornibactin but only trace amounts of pyochelin, whereas synthesis of both siderophores was abolished in AHA27. Growth of AHA27, but not IW10, was inhibited under iron-restricted conditions. In both mutants, the transposon had integrated into the pobA gene, which encodes a polypeptide exhibiting similarity to the Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferases (PPTases). These enzymes are responsible for activation of NRPSs by the covalent attachment of the 4'-phosphopantetheine (P-pant) moiety of coenzyme A. Previously characterized PPTase genes from other bacteria were shown to efficiently complement both mutants for siderophore production when provided in trans. The B. cenocepacia pobA gene was also able to efficiently complement an Escherichia coli entD mutant for production of the siderophore enterobactin. Using mutant IW10, in which the lacZ gene carried by the transposon is inserted in the same orientation as pobA, it was shown that pobA is not appreciably iron-regulated. Finally, we confirmed that Sfp-type bacterial PPTases can be subdivided into two distinct groups, and we present the amino acid signature sequences which characterize each of these groups. PMID:20966087

  7. Reporter enzyme inhibitor study to aid assembly of orthogonal reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pei-i; Yue, Kimberley; Pandey, Pramod; Breault, Lyne; Harbinski, Fred; McBride, Aaron J; Webb, Brian; Narahari, Janaki; Karassina, Natasha; Wood, Keith V; Hill, Adam; Auld, Douglas S

    2013-05-17

    Reporter gene assays (RGAs) are commonly used to measure biological pathway modulation by small molecules. Understanding how such compounds interact with the reporter enzyme is critical to accurately interpret RGA results. To improve our understanding of reporter enzymes and to develop optimal RGA systems, we investigated eight reporter enzymes differing in brightness, emission spectrum, stability, and substrate requirements. These included common reporter enzymes such as firefly luciferase (Photinus pyralis), Renilla reniformis luciferase, and β-lactamase, as well as mutated forms of R. reniformis luciferase emitting either blue- or green-shifted luminescence, a red-light emitting form of Luciola cruciata firefly luciferase, a mutated form of Gaussia princeps luciferase, and a proprietary luciferase termed "NanoLuc" derived from the luminescent sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris. To determine hit rates and structure-activity relationships, we screened a collection of 42,460 PubChem compounds at 10 μM using purified enzyme preparations. We then compared hit rates and chemotypes of actives for each enzyme. The hit rates ranged from <0.1% for β-lactamase to as high as 10% for mutated forms of Renilla luciferase. Related luciferases such as Renilla luciferase mutants showed high degrees of inhibitor overlap (40-70%), while unrelated luciferases such as firefly luciferases, Gaussia luciferase, and NanoLuc showed <10% overlap. Examination of representative inhibitors in cell-based assays revealed that inhibitor-based enzyme stabilization can lead to increases in bioluminescent signal for firefly luciferase, Renilla luciferase, and NanoLuc, with shorter half-life reporters showing increased activation responses. From this study we suggest strategies to improve the construction and interpretation of assays employing these reporter enzymes.

  8. Satellite DNA from the brine shrimp Artemia affects the expression of a flanking gene in yeast.

    PubMed

    Maiorano, D; Cece, R; Badaracco, G

    1997-04-11

    We have previously revealed that in the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana an AluI DNA family of repeats, 113 bp in length, is the major component of the constitutive heterochromatin and that this repetitive DNA shows a stable curvature that confers a solenoidal geometry on the double helix in vitro. It was suggested that this particular structure may play a relevant role in determining the condensation of the heterochromatin. In this report we have cloned hexamers of highly-repetitive sequence (AluI-satellite DNA) in proximity to a yeast lacZ reporter gene on a plasmid. We find that the expression of the reporter gene is affected by the presence of this DNA in a dose- and orientation-dependent manner in the yeast, S. cerevisiae. We show that this effect is not dependent on under-replication or re-arrangements of the repetitive DNA in the cell but is due to decreased expression of the reporter gene. Our results indicate that the AluI-satellite DNA of Artemia per se is able to influence gene expression. PMID:9161405

  9. Satellite DNA from the brine shrimp Artemia affects the expression of a flanking gene in yeast.

    PubMed

    Maiorano, D; Cece, R; Badaracco, G

    1997-04-11

    We have previously revealed that in the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana an AluI DNA family of repeats, 113 bp in length, is the major component of the constitutive heterochromatin and that this repetitive DNA shows a stable curvature that confers a solenoidal geometry on the double helix in vitro. It was suggested that this particular structure may play a relevant role in determining the condensation of the heterochromatin. In this report we have cloned hexamers of highly-repetitive sequence (AluI-satellite DNA) in proximity to a yeast lacZ reporter gene on a plasmid. We find that the expression of the reporter gene is affected by the presence of this DNA in a dose- and orientation-dependent manner in the yeast, S. cerevisiae. We show that this effect is not dependent on under-replication or re-arrangements of the repetitive DNA in the cell but is due to decreased expression of the reporter gene. Our results indicate that the AluI-satellite DNA of Artemia per se is able to influence gene expression.

  10. Use of Reporter Genes in the Generation of Vaccinia Virus-Derived Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Al Ali, Sally; Baldanta, Sara; Fernández-Escobar, Mercedes; Guerra, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is one of the most extensively-studied viruses of the Poxviridae family. It is easy to genetically modify, so it has become a key tool for many applications. In this context, reporter genes facilitate the study of the role of foreign genes introduced into the genome of VACV. In this review, we describe the type of reporter genes that have been used to generate reporter-expressing VACV and the applications of the recombinant viruses obtained. Reporter-expressing VACV are currently employed in basic and immunology research, in the development of vaccines and cancer treatment. PMID:27213433

  11. Use of Reporter Genes in the Generation of Vaccinia Virus-Derived Vectors.

    PubMed

    Al Ali, Sally; Baldanta, Sara; Fernández-Escobar, Mercedes; Guerra, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is one of the most extensively-studied viruses of the Poxviridae family. It is easy to genetically modify, so it has become a key tool for many applications. In this context, reporter genes facilitate the study of the role of foreign genes introduced into the genome of VACV. In this review, we describe the type of reporter genes that have been used to generate reporter-expressing VACV and the applications of the recombinant viruses obtained. Reporter-expressing VACV are currently employed in basic and immunology research, in the development of vaccines and cancer treatment. PMID:27213433

  12. Regulation of carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis genes and identification of an evolutionarily conserved gene required for bacteriochlorophyll accumulation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, G A; Cook, D N; Ma, D; Alberti, M; Burke, D H; Hearst, J E

    1993-05-01

    The temporal expression of ten clustered genes required for carotenoid (crt) and bacteriochlorophyll (bch) biosynthesis was examined during the transition from aerobic respiration to anaerobiosis requisite for the development of the photosynthetic membrane in the bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Accumulation of crtA, crtC, crtD, crtE, crtF, crtK, bchC and bchD mRNAs increased transiently and coordinately, up to 12-fold following removal of oxygen from the growth medium, paralleling increases in mRNAs encoding pigment-binding polypeptides of the photosynthetic apparatus. The crtB and crtI genes, in contrast, were expressed similarly in the presence or absence of oxygen. The regulation patterns of promoters for the crtA and crtI genes and the bchCXYZ operon were characterized using lacZ transcriptional fusion and qualitatively reflected the corresponding mRNA accumulation patterns. We also report that the bchI gene product, encoded by a DNA sequence previously considered to be a portion of crtA, shares 49% sequence identity with the nuclear-encoded Arabidopsis thaliana Cs chloroplast protein required for normal pigmentation in plants.

  13. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  14. Signal transduction pathways that regulate CAB gene expression. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, J.

    1993-12-31

    We have completed the initial genetic and phenotypic characterization of several classes of new mutants that affect CAB gene expression. The doc mutants (for dark overexpression of cab) are characterized by elevated levels of CAB gene expression in the dark; however, unlike the previously isolated de-etiolated mutants (also isolated in my lab), the doc mutants still appear etiolated. The doc alleles define 3 loci, each of which maps to a separate chromosome. The details of the mutant isolation scheme and the genetic and phenotypic description of these new mutants are described. The second class of mutants, the gun mutants (for genomes uncoupled) show accumulation of CAB mRNA in the absence of chloroplast gene expression and development. Thus, the normally tightly coordinated expression between the chloroplast and nuclear genes that encode chloroplast-destined proteins has been uncoupled. We have shown that the Arabidopsis HY3 locus encodes the type B phytochrome apoprotein gene and have characterized the phenotypes of null hy3 alleles to ascertain a role for this phytochrome in Arabidopsis development. We have also isolated and characterized a number of alleles of the phytochrome A gene.

  15. Reporter gene technologies for imaging cell fates in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kusy, Sophie; Contag, Christopher H

    2014-01-01

    Advances in noninvasive imaging technologies that allow for in vivo dynamic monitoring of cells and cellular function in living research subjects have revealed new insights into cell biology in the context of intact organs and their native environment. In the field of hematopoiesis and stem cell research, studies of cell trafficking involved in injury repair and hematopoietic engraftment have made great progress using these new tools. Stem cells present unique challenges for imaging since after transplantation, they proliferate dramatically and differentiate. Therefore, the imaging modality used needs to have a large dynamic range, and the genetic regulatory elements used need to be stably expressed during differentiation. Multiple imaging technologies using different modalities are available, and each varies in sensitivity, ease of data acquisition, signal to noise ratios (SNR), substrate availability, and other parameters that affect utility for monitoring cell fates and function. For a given application, there may be several different approaches that can be used. For mouse models, clinically validated technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been joined by optical imaging techniques such as in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and fluorescence imaging (FLI), and all have been used to monitor bone marrow and stem cells after transplantation into mice. Photoacoustic imaging that utilizes the sound created by the thermal expansion of absorbed light to generate an image best represents hybrid technologies. Each modality requires that the cells of interest be marked with a genetic reporter that acts as a label making them uniquely visible using that technology. For each modality, there are several labels to choose from. Multiple methods for applying these different labels are available. This chapter provides an overview of the imaging technologies and commonly used labels for each, as well as detailed

  16. Infection by bacterial pathogens expressing type III secretion decreases luciferase activity: ramifications for reporter gene studies.

    PubMed

    Savkovic, S D; Koutsouris, A; Wu, G; Hecht, G

    2000-09-01

    Pathogenic microbes influence gene regulation in eukaryotic hosts. Reporter gene studies can define the roles of promoter regulatory sequences. The effect of pathogenic bacteria on reporter genes has not been examined. The aim of this study was to identify which reporter genes are reliable in studies concerning host gene regulation by bacterial pathogens expressing type III secretory systems. Human intestinal epithelial cells, T84, Caco-2 and HT-29, were transfected with plasmids containing luciferase (luc), chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) or beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) as reporter genes driven by the inducible interleukin-8 (IL-8) or constitutively active simian virus 40 (SV40) promoter. Cells were infected with enteropathogenic E. coli or Salmonella typhimurium, and the reporter activity was assessed. Luc activity significantly decreased following infection, regardless of the promoter. The activity of recombinant luc was nearly ablated by incubation with either EPEC or Salmonella in a cell-free system. Activity was partially preserved by protease inhibitors, and immunoblot analysis showed a decreased amount and molecular weight of recombinant luc, suggesting protein degradation. Neither beta-gal nor CAT activity was altered by infection. Disruption of type III secretion prevented the loss of luc activity. We conclude that CAT or beta-gal, but not luc, can be used as reliable reporter genes to assess the impact of pathogenic microbes, especially those expressing type III secretion on host cell gene regulation.

  17. Ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus-specific enhancer of Ad4BP/SF-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yuichi; Zubair, Mohamad; Ishihara, Satoru; Shinohara, Yuko; Oka, Sanae; Kimura, Shioko; Okamoto, Shiki; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Suita, Sachiyo; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2005-11-01

    Ad4BP/SF-1 [Ad4 binding protein/steroidogenic factor-1 (designated NR5A1)] is a transcription factor essential for animal reproduction. Based on the phenotypes observed in gene-disrupted mice, Ad4BP/SF-1 is thought to be involved in establishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the cis-regulatory regions of the mouse Ad4BP/SF-1 gene by transgenic mouse assays, and identified a ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH)-specific enhancer. The enhancer localized in intron 6 is highly conserved between mouse, human, and chick. The enhancer has the potential to reproduce endogenous gene expression from the fetal ventromedial diencephalon to the adult VMH. The VMH enhancer was characterized by the presence of suppressive and activating elements. Mutation of the former element resulted in ectopic lacZ reporter gene expression in an area dorsal to the intrinsic expression domain and in the ventricular zone, whereas mutations in the latter containing ATTA motifs led to the disappearance of the reporter gene expression, suggesting the involvement of homeobox proteins. Using nuclear extracts prepared from the adult hypothalami, EMSAs identified specific protein binding to the activating elements but not to the suppressive element.

  18. Expression of the subtilisin Carlsberg-encoding gene in Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M F

    1995-01-11

    The cloning and sequence of the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the Bacillus licheniformis (Bl) 6816 subtilisin Carlsberg gene (subC) are reported here. The 5' and 3' ends of subC transcripts were characterized, and the promoter identified. Expression was studied using a fused lacZ reporter gene integrated into the chromosome of heterologous host Bacillus subtilis (Bs). beta Gal activities of mutants deleted within the promoter region identified a region which is required for stimulation by the transcriptional activator proteins, DegU and DegQ. This region is close to the transcription start point (tsp), and is adjacent to a sequence homologous to that involved in DegU/Q stimulation of the Bs subtilisin gene, aprE. Expression of subC in Bs was optimized by the use of heterologous promoter and by the deletion of UTR sequences predicted to be involved in secondary structures in the native subC mRNA. Sequence comparison with other subtilisin Carlsberg-type-encoding genes revealed a high degree of conservation of the entire 5'-UTR, including regulatory sequences and promoter, as well as part of the structural gene.

  19. Terminator Operon Reporter: combining a transcription termination switch with reporter technology for improved gene synthesis and synthetic biology applications

    PubMed Central

    Zampini, Massimiliano; Mur, Luis A. J.; Rees Stevens, Pauline; Pachebat, Justin A.; Newbold, C. James; Hayes, Finbarr; Kingston-Smith, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology is characterized by the development of novel and powerful DNA fabrication methods and by the application of engineering principles to biology. The current study describes Terminator Operon Reporter (TOR), a new gene assembly technology based on the conditional activation of a reporter gene in response to sequence errors occurring at the assembly stage of the synthetic element. These errors are monitored by a transcription terminator that is placed between the synthetic gene and reporter gene. Switching of this terminator between active and inactive states dictates the transcription status of the downstream reporter gene to provide a rapid and facile readout of the accuracy of synthetic assembly. Designed specifically and uniquely for the synthesis of protein coding genes in bacteria, TOR allows the rapid and cost-effective fabrication of synthetic constructs by employing oligonucleotides at the most basic purification level (desalted) and without the need for costly and time-consuming post-synthesis correction methods. Thus, TOR streamlines gene assembly approaches, which are central to the future development of synthetic biology. PMID:27220405

  20. Terminator Operon Reporter: combining a transcription termination switch with reporter technology for improved gene synthesis and synthetic biology applications.

    PubMed

    Zampini, Massimiliano; Mur, Luis A J; Rees Stevens, Pauline; Pachebat, Justin A; Newbold, C James; Hayes, Finbarr; Kingston-Smith, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology is characterized by the development of novel and powerful DNA fabrication methods and by the application of engineering principles to biology. The current study describes Terminator Operon Reporter (TOR), a new gene assembly technology based on the conditional activation of a reporter gene in response to sequence errors occurring at the assembly stage of the synthetic element. These errors are monitored by a transcription terminator that is placed between the synthetic gene and reporter gene. Switching of this terminator between active and inactive states dictates the transcription status of the downstream reporter gene to provide a rapid and facile readout of the accuracy of synthetic assembly. Designed specifically and uniquely for the synthesis of protein coding genes in bacteria, TOR allows the rapid and cost-effective fabrication of synthetic constructs by employing oligonucleotides at the most basic purification level (desalted) and without the need for costly and time-consuming post-synthesis correction methods. Thus, TOR streamlines gene assembly approaches, which are central to the future development of synthetic biology. PMID:27220405

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MGT1 DNA repair methyltransferase gene: its promoter and entire coding sequence, regulation and in vivo biological functions.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, W; Samson, L

    1992-01-01

    We previously cloned a yeast DNA fragment that, when fused with the bacterial lacZ promoter, produced O6-methylguanine DNA repair methyltransferase (MGT1) activity and alkylation resistance in Escherichia coli (Xiao et al., EMBO J. 10,2179). Here we describe the isolation of the entire MGT1 gene and its promoter by sequence directed chromosome integration and walking. The MGT1 promoter was fused to a lacZ reporter gene to study how MGT1 expression is controlled. MGT1 is not induced by alkylating agents, nor is it induced by other DNA damaging agents such as UV light. However, deletion analysis defined an upstream repression sequence, whose removal dramatically increased basal level gene expression. The polypeptide deduced from the complete MGT1 sequence contained 18 more N-terminal amino acids than that previously determined; the role of these 18 amino acids, which harbored a potential nuclear localization signal, was explored. The MGT1 gene was also cloned under the GAL1 promoter, so that MTase levels could be manipulated, and we examined MGT1 function in a MTase deficient yeast strain (mgt1). The extent of resistance to both alkylation-induced mutation and cell killing directly correlated with MTase levels. Finally we show that mgt1 S.cerevisiae has a higher rate of spontaneous mutation than wild type cells, indicating that there is an endogenous source of DNA alkylation damage in these eukaryotic cells and that one of the in vivo roles of MGT1 is to limit spontaneous mutations. PMID:1641326

  2. Structural explanation for allolactose (lac operon inducer) synthesis by lacZ β-galactosidase and the evolutionary relationship between allolactose synthesis and the lac repressor.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Robert W; Lo, Summie; Jancewicz, Larisa J; Dugdale, Megan L; Huber, Reuben E

    2013-05-01

    β-Galactosidase (lacZ) has bifunctional activity. It hydrolyzes lactose to galactose and glucose and catalyzes the intramolecular isomerization of lactose to allolactose, the lac operon inducer. β-Galactosidase promotes the isomerization by means of an acceptor site that binds glucose after its cleavage from lactose and thus delays its exit from the site. However, because of its relatively low affinity for glucose, details of this site have remained elusive. We present structural data mapping the glucose site based on a substituted enzyme (G794A-β-galactosidase) that traps allolactose. Various lines of evidence indicate that the glucose of the trapped allolactose is in the acceptor position. The evidence includes structures with Bis-Tris (2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,2',2″-nitrilotriethanol) and L-ribose in the site and kinetic binding studies with substituted β-galactosidases. The site is composed of Asn-102, His-418, Lys-517, Ser-796, Glu-797, and Trp-999. Ser-796 and Glu-797 are part of a loop (residues 795-803) that closes over the active site. This loop appears essential for the bifunctional nature of the enzyme because it helps form the glucose binding site. In addition, because the loop is mobile, glucose binding is transient, allowing the release of some glucose. Bioinformatics studies showed that the residues important for interacting with glucose are only conserved in a subset of related enzymes. Thus, intramolecular isomerization is not a universal feature of β-galactosidases. Genomic analyses indicated that lac repressors were co-selected only within the conserved subset. This shows that the glucose binding site of β-galactosidase played an important role in lac operon evolution.

  3. Structural Explanation for Allolactose (lac Operon Inducer) Synthesis by lacZ β-Galactosidase and the Evolutionary Relationship between Allolactose Synthesis and the lac Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Robert W.; Lo, Summie; Jancewicz, Larisa J.; Dugdale, Megan L.; Huber, Reuben E.

    2013-01-01

    β-Galactosidase (lacZ) has bifunctional activity. It hydrolyzes lactose to galactose and glucose and catalyzes the intramolecular isomerization of lactose to allolactose, the lac operon inducer. β-Galactosidase promotes the isomerization by means of an acceptor site that binds glucose after its cleavage from lactose and thus delays its exit from the site. However, because of its relatively low affinity for glucose, details of this site have remained elusive. We present structural data mapping the glucose site based on a substituted enzyme (G794A-β-galactosidase) that traps allolactose. Various lines of evidence indicate that the glucose of the trapped allolactose is in the acceptor position. The evidence includes structures with Bis-Tris (2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,2′,2″-nitrilotriethanol) and l-ribose in the site and kinetic binding studies with substituted β-galactosidases. The site is composed of Asn-102, His-418, Lys-517, Ser-796, Glu-797, and Trp-999. Ser-796 and Glu-797 are part of a loop (residues 795–803) that closes over the active site. This loop appears essential for the bifunctional nature of the enzyme because it helps form the glucose binding site. In addition, because the loop is mobile, glucose binding is transient, allowing the release of some glucose. Bioinformatics studies showed that the residues important for interacting with glucose are only conserved in a subset of related enzymes. Thus, intramolecular isomerization is not a universal feature of β-galactosidases. Genomic analyses indicated that lac repressors were co-selected only within the conserved subset. This shows that the glucose binding site of β-galactosidase played an important role in lac operon evolution. PMID:23486479

  4. Structural explanation for allolactose (lac operon inducer) synthesis by lacZ β-galactosidase and the evolutionary relationship between allolactose synthesis and the lac repressor.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Robert W; Lo, Summie; Jancewicz, Larisa J; Dugdale, Megan L; Huber, Reuben E

    2013-05-01

    β-Galactosidase (lacZ) has bifunctional activity. It hydrolyzes lactose to galactose and glucose and catalyzes the intramolecular isomerization of lactose to allolactose, the lac operon inducer. β-Galactosidase promotes the isomerization by means of an acceptor site that binds glucose after its cleavage from lactose and thus delays its exit from the site. However, because of its relatively low affinity for glucose, details of this site have remained elusive. We present structural data mapping the glucose site based on a substituted enzyme (G794A-β-galactosidase) that traps allolactose. Various lines of evidence indicate that the glucose of the trapped allolactose is in the acceptor position. The evidence includes structures with Bis-Tris (2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,2',2″-nitrilotriethanol) and L-ribose in the site and kinetic binding studies with substituted β-galactosidases. The site is composed of Asn-102, His-418, Lys-517, Ser-796, Glu-797, and Trp-999. Ser-796 and Glu-797 are part of a loop (residues 795-803) that closes over the active site. This loop appears essential for the bifunctional nature of the enzyme because it helps form the glucose binding site. In addition, because the loop is mobile, glucose binding is transient, allowing the release of some glucose. Bioinformatics studies showed that the residues important for interacting with glucose are only conserved in a subset of related enzymes. Thus, intramolecular isomerization is not a universal feature of β-galactosidases. Genomic analyses indicated that lac repressors were co-selected only within the conserved subset. This shows that the glucose binding site of β-galactosidase played an important role in lac operon evolution. PMID:23486479

  5. Autonomous expression of the slo gene of the bicistronic nga-slo operon of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Savic, Dragutin J; McShan, William M; Ferretti, Joseph J

    2002-05-01

    A recent model for cytolysin-mediated translocation in Streptococcus pyogenes proposes that NAD-glycohydrolase is translocated through streptolysin O-generated pores into a host cell (J. Madden, N. Ruiz, and M. Caparon, Cell 104:143-152, 2001). This model also assumes that the NAD-glycohydrolase (nga) and streptolysin O (slo) genes that code for these products are organized in an operon-like structure expressed from a single promoter only (nga). We expand this model by showing that slo possesses its own autonomous promoter, which is located 155 bp upstream of the slo gene. Under experimental conditions in which S. pyogenes is grown in THY medium, the strength of the slo promoter, as measured by the activity of a lacZ reporter gene, resulted in low but highly reproducible values. Finally, we demonstrated that sloR, a S. pyogenes gene that closely resembles the Clostridium perfringens pfoR gene, exerts a negative effect on the expression of the slo gene. PMID:11953421

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease gene discovery. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-09

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the human gene(s) responsible for the disorder known as IBD. The work was planned in two phases. The desired products resulting from Phase 1 were BAC clone(s) containing the genetic marker(s) identified by gene/Networks, Inc. as potentially linked to IBD, plasmid subclones of those BAC(s), and new genetic markers developed from these plasmid subclones. The newly developed markers would be genotyped by gene/Networks, Inc. to ascertain evidence for linkage or non-linkage of IBD to this region. If non-linkage was indicated, the project would move to investigation of other candidate chromosomal regions. Where linkage was indicated, the project would move to Phase 2, in which a physical map of the candidate region(s) would be developed. The products of this phase would be contig(s) of BAC clones in the region exhibiting linkage to IBD, as well as plasmic subclones of the BACs and further genetic marker development. There would also be continued genotyping with new polymorphic markers during this phase. It was anticipated that clones identified and developed during these two phases would provide the physical resources for eventual disease gene discovery.

  7. Bioluminescent reporters for catabolic gene expression and pollutant bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzer, A.; DiGrazia, P.M.; Sayler, G.S. . Center for Environmental Biotechnology); Burlage, R.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The application of visualized catabolic nah-gene expression using a luxCDABE gene fusion provides a valuable method to measure quantitatively and specifically naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability. It has been demonstrated that the physiological state of the test culture together with the intrinsic regulation mechanisms of the naphthalene degradation pathway as well as the physiological aspects of the lux gene fusion have to be taken into account. The method presented provides a high potential for in situ bioprocess monitoring. In addition, the results obtained with immobilized cells provide a basis for the development of biosensors for environmental applications in specific pollutant monitoring in waste streams and soil slurry systems but, as a general method, also for more conventional biotechnological process control. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The plant mitochondrial mat-r gene/nad1 gene complex. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolstenholme, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The authors have completed sequencing the segments (totalling 19 kb, both complementary strands) of the maize mtDNA molecule that encode the entire NADH dehydrogenase subunit (nadl) gene. They have identified nucleotides in mature transcripts of the nadl gene that are edited and have generated clones of cDNAs of entire mature (fully spliced) nadl transcripts. They have examined the relative rates of splicing in transcripts of the four nadl gene group II introns and begun examining nadl intron cDNAs to determine the extent and distribution of RNA edits in introns, in order to evaluate the possibility that intron excision and exon splicing might be editing independent.

  9. Retention of oncogenicity by a Marek's disease virus mutant lacking six unique short region genes.

    PubMed

    Parcells, M S; Anderson, A S; Morgan, T W

    1995-12-01

    We previously reported the construction of Marek's disease virus (MDV) strains having mutations in various genes that map to the unique short (US) region of the viral genome (J.L. Cantello, A.S. Anderson, A. Francesconi, and R.W. Morgan, J. Virol. 65:1584-1588, 1991; M.S. Parcells, A.S. Anderson, and R.W. Morgan, Virus Genes 9:5-13, 1994; M.S. Parcells, A.S. Anderson, and R.W. Morgan, J. Virol. 68:8239-8253, 1994). These strains were constructed by using a high-passage-level serotype 1 MDV strain which grew well in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Despite the growth of the parent and mutant viruses in cell culture, in vivo studies were limited by poor growth of these strains in chickens. One of the mutants studied lacked 4.5 kbp of US region DNA and contained the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli inserted at the site of the deletion. The deletion removed MDV homologs to the US1, US2, and US10 genes of herpes simplex virus type 1 as well as three MDV-specific open reading frames. We now report the construction of a mutant MDV containing a similar deletion in the US region of the highly oncogenic RB1B strain. This mutant, RB1B delta 4.5lac, had a growth impairment in established chicken embryo fibroblasts similar to that described previously for MDVs lacking a functional US1 gene. In chickens, RB1B delta 4.5lac showed decreased early cytolytic infection, mortality, tumor incidence, and horizontal transmission. Several lymphoblastoid cell lines were established from RB1B delta 4.5lac-induced tumors, and virus reactivated from these cell lines was LacZ+. These results indicate that the deleted genes are nonessential for the transformation of chicken T cells or for the establishment and maintenance of latency. On the basis of the growth impairment observed for RB1B delta 4.5lac in cell culture and in vivo, we conclude that deletion of these genes affects the lytic replication of MDV. This is the first MDV mutant constructed in the RB1B oncogenic strain, and the methodology

  10. Far-red fluorescence gene reporter tomography for determination of placement and viability of cell-based gene therapies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yujie; Darne, Chinmay D; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Hall, Mary A; Lazard, Zawaunyka W; Davis, Alan R; Simpson, Lashan; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M; Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth A

    2013-10-01

    Non-invasive injectable cellular therapeutic strategies based on sustained delivery of physiological levels of BMP-2 for spinal fusion are emerging as promising alternatives, which could provide sufficient fusion without the associated surgical risks. However, these injectable therapies are dependent on bone formation occurring only at the specific target region. In this study, we developed and deployed fluorescence gene reporter tomography (FGRT) to provide information on in vivo cell localization and viability. This information is sought to confirm the ideal placement of the materials with respect to the area where early bone reaction is required, ultimately providing three dimensional data about the future fusion. However, because almost all conventional fluorescence gene reporters require visible excitation wavelengths, current in vivo imaging of fluorescent proteins is limited by high tissue absorption and confounding autofluorescence. We previously administered fibroblasts engineered to produce BMP-2, but is difficult to determine 3-D information of placement prior to bone formation. Herein we used the far-red fluorescence gene reporter, IFP1.4 to report the position and viability of fibroblasts and developed 3-D tomography to provide placement information. A custom small animal, far-red fluorescence tomography system integrated into a commercial CT scanner was used to assess IFP1.4 fluorescence and to demark 3-D placement of encapsulated fibroblasts with respect to the vertebrae and early bone formation as assessed from CT. The results from three experiments showed that the placement of the materials within the spine could be detected. This work shows that in vivo fluorescence gene reporter tomography of cell-based gene therapy is feasible and could help guide cell-based therapies in preclinical models.

  11. Characterization of Arabidopsis Genes Involved in Gene Silencing. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, S. R.

    1999-02-05

    Enhancer of gene silencing 1 (egs1) is an Arabidopsis mutant that enhances post-transcriptional gene silencing of the rolB gene introduced by genetic engineering (transgene). The goal of our proposal was cloning EGS1 based on its map position. Although we screened more than 2000 chromosomes for recombination, we were unable to get closer than 2 cM to the gene. We experienced an unexpected tendency of the post-transcriptionally silenced transgene to switch to a more stable silenced state. This made it impossible to select egs1 homozygotes for map based cloning. This forced us to reconsider our cloning strategy. One possibility would have been to use a different transgene as the target of gene silencing. We tested two other transgenes. Both encoded proteins unrelated to the first but they were all expressed from the same type of promoter and they all had a similar tendency to become post-transcriptionally silenced. After screening over 80 F2 segregants from each cross between our egs1 mutant and Arabidopsis of the same ecotype homozygous for the new transgene, we were disappointed to find that the egs1 mutation did not enhance post-transcription silencing of the two new genes. In 80 plants we expected to have between 4 and 6 plants that were homozygous for the transgene and for the mutant egs1 allele. If egs1 mutations could enhance gene silencing of the new transgene, these plants would not express it. However all the double homozygotes still expressed the transgene. Therefore, we could not change the target transgene for mapping. This was the state of the cloning at the time for renewal of the grant in 1999. Because the selection of new meaningful recombinant plants had become extremely inefficient using the original rolB transgene, we abandoned the attempt at map based cloning and did not apply for further funding.

  12. Regulatory regions in the yeast FBP1 and PCK1 genes.

    PubMed

    Mercado, J J; Gancedo, J M

    1992-10-19

    By deletion analysis of the fusion genes FBP1-lacZ and PCK1-lacZ we have identified a number of strong regulatory regions in the genes FBP1 and PCK1 which encode fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Lack of expression of beta-galactosidase in fusions lacking sequences from the coding regions suggests the existence of downstream activating elements. Both promoters have several UAS and URS regions as well as sites implicated in catabolite repression. We have found in both genes consensus sequences for the binding of the same regulatory proteins, such as yAP1, MIG1 or the complex HAP2/HAP3/HAP4. Neither deletion nor overexpression of the MIG1 gene affected the regulated expression of the FBP1 or PCK1 genes.

  13. Analysis of Gene Targeting & Nonhomologous End-joining. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, J. E.

    2002-11-30

    Overall, we identified a number of new proteins that participate in nonhomologous end-joining and also in telomere addition to the ends of broken chromosomes. We showed that NHEJ is severely reduced in cells expressing both yeast mating-type genes and then went on to identify the NEJ1 gene that was under this control. We showed the epistasis relations among a set of mutations that impair telomere addition and we showed that there are in fact two pathways to repair broken chromosomes in the absence of telomerase. We characterized the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in response to a single broken chromosome and characterized especially the adaptation of cells arrested by an unrepaired DSB. We demonstrated that the DNA damage response is nuclear-limited. We showed adaptation defects for Tid1and Srs2 proteins and showed that Srs2 was also recovery-defective, even when DNA was repaired.

  14. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Vectors in Liver-directed Gene Delivery of LDLR and VLDLR for Gene Therapy of Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Tytteli A K; Kurkipuro, Jere; Heikura, Tommi; Vuorio, Taina; Hytönen, Elisa; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-03-01

    Plasmid-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vectors were developed and used to deliver genes for low-density lipoprotein and very-low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR and VLDLR, respectively) or lacZ reporter into liver of an LDLR-deficient mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). SB transposase, SB100x, was used to integrate the therapeutic transposons into mice livers for evaluating the feasibility of the vectors in reducing high blood cholesterol and the progression of atherosclerosis. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of transposon-VLDLR into the livers of the mice resulted in initial 17-19% reductions in plasma cholesterol, and at the later time points, in a significant stabilization of the cholesterol level for the 6.5-month duration of the study compared to the control mice. Transposon-LDLR-treated animals also demonstrated a trend of stabilization in the cholesterol levels in the long term. Vector-treated mice had slightly less lipid accumulation in the liver and reduced aortic atherosclerosis. Clinical chemistry and histological analyses revealed normal liver function and morphology comparable to that of the controls during the follow-up with no safety issues regarding the vector type, transgenes, or the gene transfer method. The study demonstrates the safety and potential benefits of the SB transposon vectors in the treatment of FH.

  15. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Vectors in Liver-directed Gene Delivery of LDLR and VLDLR for Gene Therapy of Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Tytteli A K; Kurkipuro, Jere; Heikura, Tommi; Vuorio, Taina; Hytönen, Elisa; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-03-01

    Plasmid-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vectors were developed and used to deliver genes for low-density lipoprotein and very-low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR and VLDLR, respectively) or lacZ reporter into liver of an LDLR-deficient mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). SB transposase, SB100x, was used to integrate the therapeutic transposons into mice livers for evaluating the feasibility of the vectors in reducing high blood cholesterol and the progression of atherosclerosis. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of transposon-VLDLR into the livers of the mice resulted in initial 17-19% reductions in plasma cholesterol, and at the later time points, in a significant stabilization of the cholesterol level for the 6.5-month duration of the study compared to the control mice. Transposon-LDLR-treated animals also demonstrated a trend of stabilization in the cholesterol levels in the long term. Vector-treated mice had slightly less lipid accumulation in the liver and reduced aortic atherosclerosis. Clinical chemistry and histological analyses revealed normal liver function and morphology comparable to that of the controls during the follow-up with no safety issues regarding the vector type, transgenes, or the gene transfer method. The study demonstrates the safety and potential benefits of the SB transposon vectors in the treatment of FH. PMID:26670130

  16. The oct3 gene, a gene for an embryonic transcription factor, is controlled by a retinoic acid repressible enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Okazawa, H; Okamoto, K; Ishino, F; Ishino-Kaneko, T; Takeda, S; Toyoda, Y; Muramatsu, M; Hamada, H

    1991-01-01

    Oct3 is an embryonic octamer-binding transcription factor, whose expression is rapidly repressed by retinoic acid (RA). In this report, we have determined the transcriptional control region of the oct3 gene and studied the mechanism of the RA-mediated repression. The chromosomal oct3 gene consists of five exons. Three subdomains of the POU region and transactivating domain are located in separate exons. Transcription initiates at multiple sites in the GC-rich region lacking a typical TATA box. The upstream 2 kb region can confer the cell type-specific expression and RA-mediated repression. Analysis of the upstream region by deletion mutagenesis locates a cis element (RARE1) which functions as a stem cell-specific, yet RA-repressible, enhancer. Footprint and gel-retardation assays show that RARE1 is composed of two domains, each of which is recognized by distinct factors. Microinjection of oct3-lacZ constructs into fertilized eggs indicates that RARE1 can function in early embryos. We suggest that RARE1 is a critical cis element for oct3 gene expression in embryonic stem cells and for the RA-mediated repression. Images PMID:1915274

  17. Defective haematopoiesis in fetal liver resulting from inactivation of the EKLF gene.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Michalovich, D; Bygrave, A; Ploemacher, R; Grosveld, F

    1995-05-25

    Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) was originally isolated from erythroid cell RNA by differential screening and shown to be erythroid-specific, although a low level of EKLF was found in mast cell lines. EKLF contains three zinc-fingers homologous to those found in the Krüppel family of transcription factors. Because it binds the sequence CCACACCCT, EKLF may affect erythroid development as a result of its ability to bind to the CAC box in the promoter of the beta-globin gene. Mutation of this element leads to reduced beta-globin expression and it appears to mediate the effect of the globin locus control region on the promoter. Here we inactivate the EKLF gene through insertion of a lacZ reporter gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Heterozygous EKLF+/- mice show that the reporter gene is expressed in a developmentally specific manner in all types of erythroblasts in the fetal liver and adult bone marrow. Homozygous EKLF-/- mice appear normal during the embryonic stage of haematopoiesis in the yolk sac, but develop a fatal anaemia during early fetal life when haematopoiesis has switched to the fetal liver. Enucleated erythrocytes are formed but these do not contain the proper amount of haemoglobin. We conclude that the transcription factor EKLF is essential for the final steps of definitive erythropoiesis in fetal liver.

  18. The feasibility of targeted selective gene therapy of the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Hoffman, R M

    1995-07-01

    Loss of hair and hair colour is associated with ageing, and when it involves the scalp hair, it can be distressing to both sexes. Hair loss resulting from cancer chemotherapy is particularly distressing. However, safe, effective therapies directed to hair have only just started to be developed. The hair follicle is a complex skin appendage composed of epidermal and dermal tissue, with specialized keratinocytes, the hair matrix cells, forming the hair shaft. Specific therapy of the hair follicle depends on selective targeting of specific cells of the hair follicle. We have developed the histoculture of intact hair-growing skin on sponge-gel matrices. We have recently found in histocultured skin that liposomes can selectively target hair follicles to deliver both small and large molecules. That liposomes can target the hair follicle for delivery has been confirmed independently. Two decades ago we introduced the technique of entrapping DNA in liposomes for use in gene therapy. In this report we describe the selective targeting of the lacZ reporter gene to the hair follicles in mice after topical application of the gene entrapped in liposomes. These results demonstrate that highly selective, safe gene therapy for the hair process is feasible.

  19. Consensus: a framework for evaluation of uncertain gene variants in laboratory test reporting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of gene testing is a key component in customizing patient therapy. Where confirming evidence for a gene variant is lacking, computational prediction may be employed. A standardized framework, however, does not yet exist for quantitative evaluation of disease association for uncertain or novel gene variants in an objective manner. Here, complementary predictors for missense gene variants were incorporated into a weighted Consensus framework that includes calculated reference intervals from known disease outcomes. Data visualization for clinical reporting is also discussed. PMID:22640420

  20. A specific library of randomly integrated reporter genes for the isolation of inducible functions by cell sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Lapeyre, J.N.; Marini, F.; Gratzner, H.G. AMC ImmunoDiagnostics, Houston, TX )

    1993-01-01

    A library of cells containing randomly integrated reporter genes has been constructed. The purpose of this library is to enable the isolation of genes of interest which are inducible by radiation, biological response modifiers, cytokines, or other agents. These genes are located near reporter genes which can be induced by the upstream promoter of the gene of interest. The reporter gene, Lac Z, was randomly inserted into the genome by retroviral transduction and subsequent selection of the neo[sup r] gene with gentamycin. Studies of radiation inducible genes were undertaken, whereby cells with the radiation sensitive function were isolated by sorting the cells fluorescent after staining with the beta gal substrate, fluorescein digalactoside (FDG). This gene-tagging approach is an improvement over the cDNA library subtraction protocol in that a single library of cells with random marker gene integration can be repeatedly and sequentially probed by sorting under different, selective conditions, dependent upon the genes to be characterized.

  1. New ANTXR1 Gene Mutation for GAPO Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Salas-Alanís, Julio C; Scott, Claire A; Fajardo-Ramírez, Oscar R; Duran, Carola; Moreno-Treviño, María G; Kelsell, David P

    2016-07-01

    GAPO syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia and progressive optic atrophy (GAPO). To date, only 30 cases have been described worldwide. Recently, gene alterations in the ANTXR1 gene have been reported to be causative of this disorder, and an autosomal recessive pattern has been observed. This gene encodes a matrix-interacting protein that works as an adhesion molecule. In this report, we describe 2 homozygous siblings diagnosed with GAPO syndrome carrying a new missense mutation. This mutation produces the substitution of a glutamine in position 137 for a leucine (c.410A>T, p.Q137L). PMID:27587992

  2. A Novel Binary T-Vector with the GFP Reporter Gene for Promoter Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Bai, Yanan; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Several strategies have been developed to clone PCR fragments into desired vectors. However, most of commercially available T-vectors are not binary vectors and cannot be directly used for Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. In this study, a novel binary T-vector was constructed by integrating two AhdI restriction sites into the backbone vector pCAMBIA 1300. The T-vector also contains a GFP reporter gene and thus, can be used to analyze promoter activity by monitoring the reporter gene. On the other hand, identification and characterization of various promoters not only benefit the functional annotation of their genes but also provide alternative candidates to be used to drive interesting genes for plant genetic improvement by transgenesis. More than 1,000 putative pollen-specific rice genes have been identified in a genome-wide level. Among them, 67 highly expressed genes were further characterized. One of the pollen-specific genes LOC_Os10g35930 was further surveyed in its expression patterns with more details by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Finally, its promoter activity was further investigated by analyzing transgenic rice plants carrying the promoter::GFP cassette, which was constructed from the newly developed T-vector. The reporter GFP gene expression in these transgenic plants showed that the promoter was active only in mature but not in germinated pollens. PMID:25197968

  3. Dual-therapeutic reporter genes fusion for enhanced cancer gene therapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Sekar, T V; Foygel, K; Willmann, J K; Paulmurugan, R

    2013-05-01

    Two of the successful gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies include herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) enzyme-ganciclovir prodrug and the Escherichia coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme-CB1954 prodrug strategies; these enzyme-prodrug combinations produce activated cytotoxic metabolites of the prodrugs capable of tumor cell death by inhibiting DNA synthesis and killing quiescent cells, respectively. Both these strategies also affect significant bystander cell killing of neighboring tumor cells that do not express these enzymes. We have developed a dual-combination gene strategy, where we identified HSV1-TK and NTR fused in a particular orientation can effectively kill tumor cells when the tumor cells are treated with a fusion HSV1-TK-NTR gene- along with a prodrug combination of GCV and CB1954. In order to determine whether the dual-system demonstrate superior therapeutic efficacy than either HSV1-TK or NTR systems alone, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft studies using triple negative SUM159 breast cancer cells, by evaluating the efficacy of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis upon treatment with the dual HSV1-TK genes-GCV-CB1954 prodrugs system, and compared the efficiency to HSV1-TK-GCV and NTR-CB1954. Our cell-based studies, tumor regression studies in xenograft mice, histological analyses of treated tumors and bystander studies indicate that the dual HSV1-TK-NTR-prodrug system is two times more efficient even with half the doses of both prodrugs than the respective single gene-prodrug system, as evidenced by enhanced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in vitro in culture and xenograft of tumor tissues in animals.

  4. MS-1 magA: Revisiting Its Efficacy as a Reporter Gene for MRI.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sofia M; Williams, Steve R; Murray, Patricia; Taylor, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genes involved in the biomineralization of magnetic nanoparticles in magnetotactic bacteria have recently been proposed as reporters for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In such systems, the expression of the bacterial genes in mammalian cells purportedly leads to greater concentrations of intracellular iron or the biomineralization of iron oxides, thus leading to an enhancement in relaxation rate that is detectable via MRI. Here, we show that the constitutive expression of the magA gene from Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum is tolerated by human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells but induces a strong toxic effect in murine mesenchymal/stromal cells and kidney-derived stem cells, severely restricting its effective use as a reporter gene for stem cells. Although it has been suggested that magA is involved in iron transport, when expressed in HEK cells, it does not affect the transcription of endogenous genes related to iron homeostasis. Furthermore, the magA-induced enhancement in iron uptake in HEK cells is insignificant, suggesting this gene is a poor reporter even for cell types that can tolerate its expression. We suggest that the use of magA for stem cells should be approached with caution, and its efficacy as a reporter gene requires a careful assessment on a cell-by-cell basis. PMID:27118760

  5. Development of a gene reporter system in moderately halophilic bacteria by employing the ice nucleation gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, N; Vargas, C; Tegos, G; Perysinakis, A; Nieto, J J; Ventosa, A; Drainas, C

    1995-01-01

    The expression of the ice nucleation gene inaZ of Pseudomonas syringae in several moderate halophiles was investigated to establish its utility as a reporter for promoter activity and gene expression studies in these biotechnologically and environmentally important bacteria. A promoterless version of inaZ was introduced in two different restriction sites and at both orientations in a recombinant plasmid able to replicate in moderate halophiles and, in particular, within the sequence of its pHE1 part, a native plasmid of Halomonas elongata. One orientation of both recombinant constructs expressed high levels of ice nucleation activity in H. elongata and Volcaniella eurihalina cells, indicating that inaZ was probably introduced in the correct orientation downstream of putative native promoters. A recombinant construct carrying a tandem duplication of inaZ at the same orientation gave significantly higher ice nucleation activity, showing that inaZ is appropriate for gene dosage studies. The ice nucleation gene was also expressed in H. elongata and V. eurihalina under the control of Pbla (the promoter of the beta-lactamase gene of Escherichia coli) and Ppdc (the promoter of the pyruvate decarboxylase gene of Zymomonas mobilis). One of the inaZ reporter plasmids expressing high levels of ice nucleation activity under the control of a native putative promoter was also transferred in Halomonas subglaciescola, Halomonas meridiana, Halomonas halodurans, and Deleya halophila. In all cases, Ice+ transconjugants were successfully isolated, demonstrating that inaZ is expressed in a wide spectrum of moderately halophilic species. PMID:8526492

  6. Expression of the primary coxsackie and adenovirus receptor is downregulated during skeletal muscle maturation and limits the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nalbantoglu, J; Pari, G; Karpati, G; Holland, P C

    1999-04-10

    Skeletal muscle fibers are infected efficiently by adenoviral vectors only in neonatal animals. This lack of tropism for mature skeletal muscle may be partly due to inefficient binding of adenoviral particles to the cell surface. We evaluated in developing mouse muscle the expression levels of two high-affinity receptors for adenovirus, MHC class I and the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). The moderate levels of MHC class I transcripts that were detected in quadriceps, gastrocnemius, and heart muscle did not vary between postnatal day 3 and day 60 adult tissue. A low level of CAR expression was detected on postnatal day 3 in quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles, but CAR expression was barely detectable in adult skeletal muscle even by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, CAR transcripts were moderately abundant at all stages of heart muscle development. Ectopic expression of CAR in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells increased their transducibility by adenovirus at all multiplicities of infection (MOIs) tested as measured by lacZ reporter gene activity following AVCMVlacZ infection, with an 80-fold difference between CAR-expressing cells and control C2C12 cells at an MOI of 50. Primary myoblasts ectopically expressing CAR were injected into muscles of syngeneic hosts; following incorporation of the exogenous myoblasts into host myofibers, an increased transducibility of adult muscle fibers by AVCMVlacZ was observed in the host. Expression of the lacZ reporter gene in host myofibers coincided with CAR immunoreactivity. Furthermore, sarcolemmal CAR expression was markedly increased in regenerating muscle fibers of the dystrophic mdx mouse, fibers that are susceptible to adenovirus transduction. These analyses show that CAR expression by skeletal muscle correlates with its susceptibility to adenovirus transduction, and that forced CAR expression in mature myofibers dramatically increases their susceptibility to adenovirus transduction.

  7. 5'-coding sequence of the nasA gene of Azotobacter vinelandii is required for efficient expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baomin; Wang, Yumei; Kennedy, Christina

    2014-10-01

    The operon nasACBH in Azotobacter vinelandii encodes nitrate and nitrite reductases that sequentially reduce nitrate to nitrite and to ammonium for nitrogen assimilation into organic molecules. Our previous analyses showed that nasACBH expression is subject to antitermination regulation that occurs upstream of the nasA gene in response to the availability of nitrate and nitrite. In this study, we continued expression analyses of the nasA gene and observed that the nasA 5'-coding sequence plays an important role in gene expression, as demonstrated by the fact that deletions caused over sixfold reduction in the expression of the lacZ reporter gene. Further analysis suggests that the nasA 5'-coding sequence promotes gene expression in a way that is not associated with weakened transcript folding around the translational initiation region or codon usage bias. The findings from this study imply that there exists potential to improve gene expression in A. vinelandii by optimizing 5'-coding sequences.

  8. Role of starvation genes in the survival of deep subsurface bacterial communities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matin, A.; Schmidt, T.; Caldwell, D.

    1998-11-01

    The investigation dealt with several aspects of subsurface bacterial survival and their nature. Mutants of Pseudomonas putida, a common environmental bacterium with counterparts in the subsurface, were isolated by transposon mutagenesis. These mutants were highly sensitive to starvation stress. Reporter gene fusions also showed that these genes were starvation genes since they were induced several fold when the cultures were started. Since the regulatory religions (promoters) of starvation genes are of interest in bioremediation and in experiments designed to understand the roles of starvation genes in the maintenance of microbial community structure, the promoter of one of these genes (pstarv1, contained in strain MK107) was characterized in detail. As a preliminary to these studies, the growth characteristics of Pseudomonas putida MK1 and MK107 were compared for cells growing in batch cultures or as an attached monolayer in microstat cultures.

  9. Novel SOST gene mutation in a sclerosteosis patient from Morocco: a case report.

    PubMed

    Belkhribchia, Mohamed Reda; Collet, Corinne; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Hassani, Redouane

    2014-03-01

    Sclerosteosis (OMIM 269500) is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterized by increased bone density associated with syndactyly. It is linked to a genetic defect in the SOST gene coding for sclerostin. So far, seven different loss-of-function mutations in SOST have been reported in patients with sclerosteosis. Recently, two mutations in LRP4 gene underlying sclerosteosis were identified, reflecting the genetic heterogeneity of this disease. We report here a 30-years-old Moroccan man presented with typical clinical and radiological features of sclerosteosis who carries a novel homozygous mutation in the SOST gene, characterized as a nonsense mutation (c.79C > T; p.Gln27∗) in exon 1 of the SOST gene. This is to our knowledge the first case of sclerosteosis reported from Morocco and North Africa.

  10. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  11. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products. Progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-05-01

    The following is a review of research accomplished in the first two years of funding for the above mentioned project. The work performed is a molecular characterization of nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which are deficient in different stages in the post-transcriptional expression of a single chloroplast encoded polypeptide, the D2 protein of Photosystem II. Our long-term goals are to understand the molecular mechanisms by which nuclear gene products affect the expression of chloroplast genes. Specifically, we which to understand how specific nuclear gene products affect the turnover rate of the D2 encoding mRNA (psbD), how other nuclear encoded factors work to promote the translation of psbD mRNA and/or stabilize the D2 protein, and what the role of the D2 protein itself is in Photosystem II assembly and in the control of expression of other chloroplast genes. This progress report will be organized into four major sections concerning (I) The characterization of nuclear mutants affected in D2 translation/turnover, (II) The study of trans-acting factors which associate with the 5{prime} end of the psbD mRNA, (III) In vitro mutagenesis of the psbD gene, and (IV) Additional studies.

  12. A downstream regulatory element located within the coding sequence mediates autoregulated expression of the yeast fatty acid synthase gene FAS2 by the FAS1 gene product.

    PubMed

    Wenz, P; Schwank, S; Hoja, U; Schüller, H J

    2001-11-15

    The fatty acid synthase genes FAS1 and FAS2 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are transcriptionally co-regulated by general transcription factors (such as Reb1, Rap1 and Abf1) and by the phospholipid-specific heterodimeric activator Ino2/Ino4, acting via their corresponding upstream binding sites. Here we provide evidence for a positive autoregulatory influence of FAS1 on FAS2 expression. Even with a constant FAS2 copy number, a 10-fold increase of FAS2 transcript amount was observed in the presence of FAS1 in multi-copy, compared to a fas1 null mutant. Surprisingly, the first 66 nt of the FAS2 coding region turned out as necessary and sufficient for FAS1-dependent gene expression. FAS2-lacZ fusion constructs deleted for this region showed high reporter gene expression even in the absence of FAS1, arguing for a negatively-acting downstream repression site (DRS) responsible for FAS1-dependent expression of FAS2. Our data suggest that the FAS1 gene product, in addition to its catalytic function, is also required for the coordinate biosynthetic control of the yeast FAS complex. An excess of uncomplexed Fas1 may be responsible for the deactivation of an FAS2-specific repressor, acting via the DRS. PMID:11713312

  13. A 4.2 kb upstream region of the human corneodesmosin gene directs site-specific expression in hair follicles and hyperkeratotic epidermis of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gallinaro, Hélène; Jonca, Nathalie; Langbein, Lutz; Vincent, Christian; Simon, Michel; Serre, Guy; Guerrin, Marina

    2004-03-01

    Corneodesmosin (CDSN) is a desmosomal protein expressed in the epidermis during the late stages of differentiation and in the inner root sheath of hair follicles. The homophilic adhesive properties of the protein suggest that it reinforces keratinocyte cohesion in the upper layers of the epidermis (stratum granulosum and stratum corneum). In this study, we analyzed the expression of the CDSN gene in 16 human tissues. We confirmed the closely restricted expression pattern of CSDN. Indeed, apart from the skin, the mRNA was significantly detected only in the placenta and the thymus. As a step in elucidating the mechanisms of tissue-specific expression, transgenic mice bearing a 4.2 kb fragment of the human CSDN gene promoter linked to the LacZ gene were generated. The reporter-gene expression was detected in special areas of the inner root sheath of the hair follicles and the hair medulla but not in the epidermis. Induction of epidermis hyperproliferation however either by pharmacological agents or by wounding led to strong expression of the reporter gene in the keratinocytes of the stratum granulosum and the parakeratotic corneocytes of the stratum corneum. The data suggest that the genomic sequences and/or regulating factors responsible for the cell-specific expression of the human CDSN gene in the normal hair follicle as well as in the hyperproliferative epidermis are different from those necessary for expression in the normal epidermis.

  14. Utility of an appropriate reporter assay: Heliotrine interferes with GAL4/upstream activation sequence-driven reporter gene systems.

    PubMed

    Luckert, Claudia; Hessel, Stefanie; Lampen, Alfonso; Braeuning, Albert

    2015-10-15

    Reporter gene assays are widely used for the assessment of transcription factor activation following xenobiotic exposure of cells. A critical issue with such assays is the possibility of interference of test compounds with the test system, for example, by direct inhibition of the reporter enzyme. Here we show that the pyrrolizidine alkaloid heliotrine interferes with reporter signals derived from GAL4-based nuclear receptor transactivation assays by a mechanism independent of luciferase enzyme inhibition. These data highlight the necessity to conduct proper control experiments in order to avoid perturbation of reporter assays by test chemicals.

  15. Transcriptome Analysis of Targeted Mouse Mutations Reveals the Topography of Local Changes in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Kirov, Julia V.; Cipollone, Andreanna; Willis, Brandon; Rapp, Jared; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, Kent C.

    2016-01-01

    The unintended consequences of gene targeting in mouse models have not been thoroughly studied and a more systematic analysis is needed to understand the frequency and characteristics of off-target effects. Using RNA-seq, we evaluated targeted and neighboring gene expression in tissues from 44 homozygous mutants compared with C57BL/6N control mice. Two allele types were evaluated: 15 targeted trap mutations (TRAP); and 29 deletion alleles (DEL), usually a deletion between the translational start and the 3’ UTR. Both targeting strategies insert a bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter (LacZ) and a neomycin resistance selection cassette. Evaluating transcription of genes in +/- 500 kb of flanking DNA around the targeted gene, we found up-regulated genes more frequently around DEL compared with TRAP alleles, however the frequency of alleles with local down-regulated genes flanking DEL and TRAP targets was similar. Down-regulated genes around both DEL and TRAP targets were found at a higher frequency than expected from a genome-wide survey. However, only around DEL targets were up-regulated genes found with a significantly higher frequency compared with genome-wide sampling. Transcriptome analysis confirms targeting in 97% of DEL alleles, but in only 47% of TRAP alleles probably due to non-functional splice variants, and some splicing around the gene trap. Local effects on gene expression are likely due to a number of factors including compensatory regulation, loss or disruption of intragenic regulatory elements, the exogenous promoter in the neo selection cassette, removal of insulating DNA in the DEL mutants, and local silencing due to disruption of normal chromatin organization or presence of exogenous DNA. An understanding of local position effects is important for understanding and interpreting any phenotype attributed to targeted gene mutations, or to spontaneous indels. PMID:26839965

  16. Multimodality Imaging of Gene Transfer with a Receptor-Based Reporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ron; Parry, Jesse J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Achilefu, Samuel; Edwards, W. Barry; Rogers, Buck E.

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy trials have traditionally used tumor and tissue biopsies for assessing the efficacy of gene transfer. Non-invasive imaging techniques offer a distinct advantage over tissue biopsies in that the magnitude and duration of gene transfer can be monitored repeatedly. Human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) has been used for the nuclear imaging of gene transfer. To extend this concept, we have developed a somatostatin receptor–enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion construct (SSTR2-EGFP) for nuclear and fluorescent multimodality imaging. Methods An adenovirus containing SSTR2-EGFP (AdSSTR2-EGFP) was constructed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SCC-9 human squamous cell carcinoma cells were infected with AdEGFP, AdSSTR2, or AdSSTR2-EGFP for in vitro evaluation by saturation binding, internalization, and fluorescence spectroscopy assays. In vivo biodistribution and nano-SPECT imaging studies were conducted with mice bearing SCC-9 tumor xenografts directly injected with AdSSTR2-EGFP or AdSSTR2 to determine the tumor localization of 111In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-Tyr3-octreotate. Fluorescence imaging was conducted in vivo with mice receiving intratumoral injections of AdSSTR2, AdSSTR2-EGFP, or AdEGFP as well as ex vivo with tissues extracted from mice. Results The similarity between AdSSTR2-EGFP and wild-type AdSSTR2 was demonstrated in vitro by the saturation binding and internalization assays, and the fluorescence emission spectra of cells infected with AdSSTR2-EGFP was almost identical to the spectra of cells infected with wild-type AdEGFP. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that the tumor uptake of 111In-DTPA-Tyr3-octreotate was not significantly different (P > 0.05) when tumors (n = 5) were injected with AdSSTR2 or AdSSTR2-EGFP but was significantly greater than the uptake in control tumors. Fluorescence was observed in tumors injected with AdSSTR2-EGFP and AdEGFP in vivo and ex vivo but not in tumors injected with AdSSTR2

  17. Tyrosinase as a multifunctional reporter gene for Photoacoustic/MRI/PET triple modality molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chunxia; Cheng, Kai; Chen, Kai; Hu, Xiang; Liu, Yang; Lan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yongxue; Liu, Hongguang; Xu, Yingding; Bu, Lihong; Su, Xinhui; Zhu, Xiaohua; Meng, Shuxian; Cheng, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Development of reporter genes for multimodality molecular imaging is highly important. In contrast to the conventional strategies which have focused on fusing several reporter genes together to serve as multimodal reporters, human tyrosinase (TYR) – the key enzyme in melanin production – was evaluated in this study as a stand-alone reporter gene for in vitro and in vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Human breast cancer cells MCF-7 transfected with a plasmid that encodes TYR (named as MCF-7-TYR) and non-transfected MCF-7 cells were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Melanin targeted N-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-18F-5-fluoropicolinamide was used as a PET reporter probe. In vivo PAI/MRI/PET imaging studies showed that MCF-7-TYR tumors achieved significant higher signals and tumor-to-background contrasts than those of MCF-7 tumor. Our study demonstrates that TYR gene can be utilized as a multifunctional reporter gene for PAI/MRI/PET both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23508226

  18. First report of the blaVIM gene in environmental isolates of Buttiauxella sp.

    PubMed

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2015-04-01

    Several works have demonstrated the presence of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) in clinical bacteria. However, in environmental isolates, few works have reported on these enzymes. In this study, we report for the first time two environmental isolates of Buttiauxella sp. recovered from chrysanthemum plantations in Brazil containing blaVIM gene and producing MBLs.

  19. The naphthalene catabolic (nag) genes of Polaromonas naphthalenivorans CJ2: Evolutionary implications for two gene clusters and novel regulatory control

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, C.O.; Park, M.; Ro, H.S.; Park, W.; Madsen, E.L.

    2006-02-15

    Polaromonas naphthalenivorans CJ2, found to be responsible for the degradation of naphthalene in situ at a coal tar waste-contaminated site, is able to grow on mineral salts agar media with naphthalene as the sole carbon source. Beginning from a 484-bp nagAc-like region, we used a genome walking strategy to sequence genes encoding the entire naphthalene degradation pathway and additional flanking regions. We found that the naphthalene catabolic genes in P. naphthalenivorans CJ2 were divided into one large and one small gene cluster, separated by an unknown distance. The large gene cluster is bounded by a LysR-type regulator (nagR). The small cluster is bounded by a MarR-type regulator (nagR2). The catabolic genes of P. naphthalenivorans CJ2 were homologous to many of those of Ralstonia U2, which uses the gentisate pathway to convert naphthalene to central metabolites. However, three open reading frames (nagY, nagM, and nagN), present in Ralstonia U2, were absent. Also, P. naphthalenivorans carries two copies of gentisate dioxygenase (nagI) with 77.4% DNA sequence identity to one another and 82% amino acid identity to their homologue in Ralstonia sp. strain U2. Investigation of the operons using reverse transcription PCR showed that each cluster was controlled independently by its respective promoter. Insertional inactivation and lacZ reporter assays showed that nagR2 is a negative regulator and that expression of the small cluster is not induced by naphthalene, salicylate, or gentisate. Association of two putative Azoarcus-related transposases with the large cluster and one Azoarcus-related putative salicylate 5-hydroxylase gene (ORF2) in the small cluster suggests that mobile genetic elements were likely involved in creating the novel arrangement of catabolic and regulatory genes in P. naphthalenivorans.

  20. Functional analysis of the promoter region of amphioxus β-actin gene: a useful tool for driving gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Li, Guang; Liu, Xin; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2014-10-01

    Amphioxus is a promising new animal model for developmental biology. To develop molecular tools for this model, we characterized the promoter region of a cytoplasmic β-actin gene (Bb-actin-6-2) from the Chinese amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri. In situ hybridization and real time-quantitative PCR analyses showed that this gene is expressed in many tissues throughout embryonic development. Cloning of cDNA revealed two isoforms with distinct transcription start sites. Isoform #1 exhibits a similar exon/intron and regulatory element organization to that of vertebrate β-actin, whereas isoform #2 lacks the first exon of isoform #1 and recruits its first intron as a promoter. The activities of upstream promoter regions in the two isoforms were examined using the lacZ reporter system in amphioxus embryos. The proximal promoter of isoform #1 drove reporter gene expression broadly in 58.6 % of injected embryos. That of isoform #2 exhibited much higher activity (91.5 %) than that of isoform #1 or the human EF-1-α gene (38.2 %). We determined the minimal promoter regions of the two isoforms via functional analysis. These two regions, alone or inserted a random DNA fragment upstream, had no detectable activity, but when an upstream enhancer was inserted, the promoters directed reporter gene expression in 61.0 and 93.8 %, respectively, of injected embryos in a tissue-specific manner. Our study not only provides insight into the regulatory mechanism underlying amphioxus Bb-actin-6-2 gene expression, but also identifies two sets of efficient proximal and minimal promoters. These promoters could be used to construct gene expression vectors for transgenic studies using amphioxus as a model.

  1. Functional analysis of the promoter region of amphioxus β-actin gene: a useful tool for driving gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Li, Guang; Liu, Xin; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2014-10-01

    Amphioxus is a promising new animal model for developmental biology. To develop molecular tools for this model, we characterized the promoter region of a cytoplasmic β-actin gene (Bb-actin-6-2) from the Chinese amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri. In situ hybridization and real time-quantitative PCR analyses showed that this gene is expressed in many tissues throughout embryonic development. Cloning of cDNA revealed two isoforms with distinct transcription start sites. Isoform #1 exhibits a similar exon/intron and regulatory element organization to that of vertebrate β-actin, whereas isoform #2 lacks the first exon of isoform #1 and recruits its first intron as a promoter. The activities of upstream promoter regions in the two isoforms were examined using the lacZ reporter system in amphioxus embryos. The proximal promoter of isoform #1 drove reporter gene expression broadly in 58.6 % of injected embryos. That of isoform #2 exhibited much higher activity (91.5 %) than that of isoform #1 or the human EF-1-α gene (38.2 %). We determined the minimal promoter regions of the two isoforms via functional analysis. These two regions, alone or inserted a random DNA fragment upstream, had no detectable activity, but when an upstream enhancer was inserted, the promoters directed reporter gene expression in 61.0 and 93.8 %, respectively, of injected embryos in a tissue-specific manner. Our study not only provides insight into the regulatory mechanism underlying amphioxus Bb-actin-6-2 gene expression, but also identifies two sets of efficient proximal and minimal promoters. These promoters could be used to construct gene expression vectors for transgenic studies using amphioxus as a model. PMID:25078982

  2. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with the long term goal of our research to understand the nature of the key enzymes in eukaryotic DNA replication we have characterized the properties of the wild type DNA polymerases of the {alpha}-family and their mutants. We have also provided evidence for the role of aphidicolin in the elongation process of the in vivo DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. We also developed a technology for planned prep from a large numbers of clones for direct screening by size or restriction digestion in order to facilitate our goals to clone the DNA polymerase gene.

  3. Report of a chimeric origin of transposable elements in a bovine-coding gene.

    PubMed

    Almeida, L M; Amaral, M E J; Silva, I T; Silva, W A; Riggs, P K; Carareto, C M

    2008-02-01

    Despite the wide distribution of transposable elements (TEs) in mammalian genomes, part of their evolutionary significance remains to be discovered. Today there is a substantial amount of evidence showing that TEs are involved in the generation of new exons in different species. In the present study, we searched 22,805 genes and reported the occurrence of TE-cassettes in coding sequences of 542 cow genes using the RepeatMasker program. Despite the significant number (542) of genes with TE insertions in exons only 14 (2.6%) of them were translated into protein, which we characterized as chimeric genes. From these chimeric genes, only the FAST kinase domains 3 (FASTKD3) gene, present on chromosome BTA 20, is a functional gene and showed evidence of the exaptation event. The genome sequence analysis showed that the last exon coding sequence of bovine FASTKD3 is approximately 85% similar to the ART2A retrotransposon sequence. In addition, comparison among FASTKD3 proteins shows that the last exon is very divergent from those of Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes and Canis familiares. We suggest that the gene structure of bovine FASTKD3 gene could have originated by several ectopic recombinations between TE copies. Additionally, the absence of TE sequences in all other species analyzed suggests that the TE insertion is clade-specific, mainly in the ruminant lineage.

  4. Alpha-fetoprotein-targeted reporter gene expression imaging in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Il; Chung, Hye Kyung; Park, Ju Hui; Lee, Yong Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun

    2016-07-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in Eastern Asia, and its incidence is increasing globally. Numerous experimental models have been developed to better our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of HCC and to evaluate novel therapeutic approaches. Molecular imaging is a convenient and up-to-date biomedical tool that enables the visualization, characterization and quantification of biologic processes in a living subject. Molecular imaging based on reporter gene expression, in particular, can elucidate tumor-specific events or processes by acquiring images of a reporter gene's expression driven by tumor-specific enhancers/promoters. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various experimental HCC mouse models and we present in vivo images of tumor-specific reporter gene expression driven by an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) enhancer/promoter system in a mouse model of HCC. The current mouse models of HCC development are established by xenograft, carcinogen induction and genetic engineering, representing the spectrum of tumor-inducing factors and tumor locations. The imaging analysis approach of reporter genes driven by AFP enhancer/promoter is presented for these different HCC mouse models. Such molecular imaging can provide longitudinal information about carcinogenesis and tumor progression. We expect that clinical application of AFP-targeted reporter gene expression imaging systems will be useful for the detection of AFP-expressing HCC tumors and screening of increased/decreased AFP levels due to disease or drug treatment. PMID:27468205

  5. An Approach for Treating the Hepatobiliary Disease of Cystic Fibrosis by Somatic Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yiping; Raper, Steven E.; Cohn, Jonathan A.; Engelhardt, John F.; Wilson, James M.

    1993-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of epithelial cell ion transport that is associated with pathology in multiple organ systems, including lung, pancreas, and liver. As treatment of the pulmonary manifestations of CF has improved, management of CF liver disease has become increasingly important in adult patients. This report describes an approach for treating CF liver disease by somatic gene transfer. In situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry analysis of rat liver sections indicated that the endogenous CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene is primarily expressed in the intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells. To specifically target recombinant genes to the biliary epithelium in vivo, recombinant adenoviruses expressing lacZ or human CFTR were infused retrograde into the biliary tract through the common bile duct. Conditions were established for achieving recombinant gene expression in virtually all cells of the intrahepatic bile ducts in vivo. Expression persisted in the smaller bile ducts for the duration of the experiment, which was 21 days. These studies suggest that it may be feasible to prevent CF liver disease by genetically reconstituting CFTR expression in the biliary tract, using an approach that is clinically feasible.

  6. Identification and characterization of rabbit ROSA26 for gene knock-in and stable reporter gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongshan; Song, Jun; Zhang, Jifeng; Xu, Jie; Zhu, Tianqing; Wang, Zhong; Lai, Liangxue; Chen, Y. Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory rabbit has been a valuable model system for human disease studies. To make the rabbit model more amendable to targeted gene knockin and stable gene over-expression, we identified a rabbit orthologue of the mouse Rosa26 locus through genomic sequence homology analysis. Real-time PCR and 5′ RACE and 3′ RACE experiments revealed that this locus encodes two transcript variants of a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) (rbRosaV1 and rbRosaV2). Both variants are expressed ubiquitously and stably in different tissues. We next targeted the rabbit Rosa26 (rbRosa26) locus using CRISPR/Cas9 and produced two lines of knock-in rabbits (rbRosa26-EGFP, and rbRosa26-Cre-reporter). In both lines, all the founders and their offspring appear healthy and reproduce normally. In F1 generation animals, the rbRosa26-EGFP rabbits express EGFP, and the rbRosa26-Cre-reporter rabbits express tdTomato ubiquitously in all the tissues examined. Furthermore, disruption of rbRosa26 locus does not adversely impact the animal health and reproduction. Therefore, our work establishes rbRosa26 as a safe harbor suitable for nuclease mediated gene targeting. The addition of rbRosa26 to the tool box of transgenic research is expected to allow diverse genetic manipulations, including gain-of function, conditional knock out and lineage-tracing studies in rabbits. PMID:27117226

  7. The Myxococcus xanthus two-component system CorSR regulates expression of a gene cluster involved in maintaining copper tolerance during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sutil, María Celestina; Pérez, Juana; Gómez-Santos, Nuria; Shimkets, Lawrence J; Moraleda-Muñoz, Aurelio; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2013-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a soil-dwelling member of the δ-Proteobacteria that exhibits a complex developmental cycle upon starvation. Development comprises aggregation and differentiation into environmentally resistant myxospores in an environment that includes fluctuations in metal ion concentrations. While copper is essential for M. xanthus cells because several housekeeping enzymes use it as a cofactor, high copper concentrations are toxic. These opposing effects force cells to maintain a tight copper homeostasis. A plethora of paralogous genes involved in copper detoxification, all of which are differentially regulated, have been reported in M. xanthus. The use of in-frame deletion mutants and fusions with the reporter gene lacZ has allowed the identification of a two-component system, CorSR, that modulates the expression of an operon termed curA consisting of nine genes whose expression slowly increases after metal addition, reaching a plateau. Transcriptional regulation of this operon is complex because transcription can be initiated at different promoters and by different types of regulators. These genes confer copper tolerance during growth and development. Copper induces carotenoid production in a ΔcorSR mutant at lower concentrations than with the wild-type strain due to lack of expression of a gene product resembling subunit III of cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase. This data may explain why copper induces carotenoid biosynthesis at suboptimal rather than optimal growth conditions in wild-type strains.

  8. A novel murine gene, Sickle tail, linked to the Danforth's short tail locus, is required for normal development of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Semba, Kei; Araki, Kimi; Li, Zhengzhe; Matsumoto, Ken-ichirou; Suzuki, Misao; Nakagata, Naoki; Takagi, Katsumasa; Takeya, Motohiro; Yoshinobu, Kumiko; Araki, Masatake; Imai, Kenji; Abe, Kuniya; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2006-01-01

    We established the mutant mouse line, B6;CB-SktGtAyu8021IMEG (SktGt), through gene-trap mutagenesis in embryonic stem cells. The novel gene identified, called Sickle tail (Skt), is composed of 19 exons and encodes a protein of 1352 amino acids. Expression of a reporter gene was detected in the notochord during embryogenesis and in the nucleus pulposus of mice. Compression of some of the nuclei pulposi in the intervertebral discs (IVDs) appeared at embryonic day (E) 17.5, resulting in a kinky-tail phenotype showing defects in the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus of IVDs in SktGt/Gt mice. These phenotypes were different from those in Danforth's short tail (Sd) mice in which the nucleus pulposus was totally absent and replaced by peripheral fibers similar to those seen in the annulus fibrosus in all IVDs. The Skt gene maps to the proximal part of mouse chromosome 2, near the Sd locus. The genetic distance between them was 0.95 cM. The number of vertebrae in both [Sd +/+ SktGt] and [Sd SktGt/+ +] compound heterozygotes was less than that of Sd heterozygotes. Furthermore, the enhancer trap locus Etl4lacZ, which was previously reported to be an allele of Sd, was located in the third intron of the Skt gene.

  9. Specific patterns of defective HSV-1 gene transfer in the adult central nervous system: implications for gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Wood, M J; Byrnes, A P; Kaplitt, M G; Pfaff, D W; Rabkin, S D; Charlton, H M

    1994-11-01

    Viral vectors are a means by which genes can be delivered to specific sites in the adult central nervous system. Nevertheless, the interaction between the viral vector and cells of the nervous system, which forms the basis for specific gene transfer, is not well understood. In this study a nonreplicating defective herpes simplex virus type 1 vector, expressing the marker gene lacZ, was stereotaxically injected at varying titers into the rat central nervous system. Three sites were targeted: the caudate nucleus, dentate gyrus, and cerebellar cortex, and the resulting patterns of beta-galactosidase activity were examined. Many cells of neuronal and glial morphology, and of differing neuronal subtypes, expressed beta-galactosidase at each of the injection sites. However, beta-galactosidase activity was also detected in distant secondary brain areas, the neurons of which make afferent connections with the primary sites. This strongly suggested that the retrograde transport of defective virus was the basis for the enzyme activity observed at a distance. Moreover, retrograde transport to secondary sites was found to be highly selective and restricted to certain retrograde neuroanatomical pathways in a specific and titer dependent fashion. The pathways observed were predominantly, but not exclusively, monoaminergic in origin. This finding is supported by reports of specific tropism by HSV for monoaminergic circuits in experimental encephalitis and transneuronal tracing studies. Our observations suggest that certain functional neuronal populations, which are permissive for the retrograde transfer of defective HSV-1 vectors, might be specifically targeted for gene transfer using this approach. Conversely, a knowledge of the pathways permissive for viral uptake, retrograde transfer, and subsequent gene expression will be essential in order to predict the consequences of gene transfer using viral vectors. PMID:7821388

  10. Gene transcription and electromagnetic fields. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1992-12-31

    Our overall aim is to obtain sufficient information to allow us to ultimately determine whether ELF EM field exposure is an initiating factor in neoplastic transformation and/or if exposure can mimic characteristics of the second-step counterpart in neoplastic disease. This aim is based on our previous findings that levels of some transcripts are increased in cells exposed to EM fields. While the research is basic in nature, the ramifications have bearing on the general safety of exposure to EM fields in industrial and everyday life. A large array of diverse biological effects are reported to occur as the result of exposure to elf EM fields, suggesting that the cell response to EM fields is at a basic level, presumably initiated by molecular and/or biophysical events at the cell membrane. The hypothesized route is a signal transduction pathway involving membrane calcium fluxes. Information flow resulting from signal transduction can mediate the induction of regulatory factors in the cell, and directly affect how transcription is regulated.

  11. Genetics and molecular biology of methanogen genes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Konisky, J.

    1997-10-07

    Adenylate kinase has been isolated from four related methanogenic members of the Archaea. For each the optimum temperature for enzyme activity was similar to the temperature for optimal microbial growth and was approximately 30 C for Methanococcus voltage, 70 C for Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, 80 C for Methanococcus igneus and 80--90 C for Methanococcus jannaschii. The enzymes were sensitive to the adenylate kinase inhibitor, Ap{sub 5}A [P{sup 1}, P{sup 5}-di(adenosine-5{prime}) pentaphosphate], a property that was exploited to purify the enzymes by CIBACRON Blue affinity chromatography. The enzymes had an estimated molecular weight (approximately 23--25 kDa) in the range common for adenylate kinases. Each of the enzymes had a region of amino acid sequence close to its N-terminus that was similar to the canonical P-loop sequence reported for all adenylate kinases. However, the methanogen sequences lacked a lysine residue that has previously been found to be invariant in adenylate kinases including an enzyme isolated from the Archeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. If verified as a nucleotide binding domain, the methanogen sequence would represent a novel nucleotide binding motif. There was no correlation between amino acid abundance and the optimal temperature for enzyme activity.

  12. Synthetic versions of firefly luciferase and Renilla luciferase reporter genes that resist transgene silencing in sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Down-regulation or silencing of transgene expression can be a major hurdle to both molecular studies and biotechnology applications in many plant species. Sugarcane is particularly effective at silencing introduced transgenes, including reporter genes such as the firefly luciferase gene. Synthesizing transgene coding sequences optimized for usage in the host plant is one method of enhancing transgene expression and stability. Using specified design rules we have synthesised new coding sequences for both the firefly luciferase and Renilla luciferase reporter genes. We have tested these optimized versions for enhanced levels of luciferase activity and for increased steady state luciferase mRNA levels in sugarcane. Results The synthetic firefly luciferase (luc*) and Renilla luciferase (Renluc*) coding sequences have elevated G + C contents in line with sugarcane codon usage, but maintain 75% identity to the native firefly or Renilla luciferase nucleotide sequences and 100% identity to the protein coding sequences. Under the control of the maize pUbi promoter, the synthetic luc* and Renluc* genes yielded 60x and 15x higher luciferase activity respectively, over the native firefly and Renilla luciferase genes in transient assays on sugarcane suspension cell cultures. Using a novel transient assay in sugarcane suspension cells combining co-bombardment and qRT-PCR, we showed that synthetic luc* and Renluc* genes generate increased transcript levels compared to the native firefly and Renilla luciferase genes. In stable transgenic lines, the luc* transgene generated significantly higher levels of expression than the native firefly luciferase transgene. The fold difference in expression was highest in the youngest tissues. Conclusions We developed synthetic versions of both the firefly and Renilla luciferase reporter genes that resist transgene silencing in sugarcane. These transgenes will be particularly useful for evaluating the expression patterns conferred

  13. A hybrid herpesvirus infectious vector based on Epstein-Barr virus and herpes simplex virus type 1 for gene transfer into human cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Vos, J M

    1996-12-01

    We have developed a miniviral vector, pH300, based on the human herpesviruses 1 and 4, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), carrying EBV sequences for plasmid episomal maintenance and HSV-1 sequences for amplification and packaging in multimeric form into HSV-1 capsids in the presence of a helper virus and helper cell line. A reporter gene, the bacterial lacZ gene, which expressed beta-galactosidase, was inserted into the multiple cloning site of pH300 to make pH300-lac. The packaged pH300-lac DNA was very efficient in infecting human cells in tissue culture. The pH300-lac miniviral stock was used to infect in vitro various human cell types derived from breast cancer, lung cancer, and liver cancer. Up to 95% of cells were infected and expressed beta-galactosidase activity after exposure to viral stock at a multiplicity of infection of 3. There was essentially no apparent cytotoxicity after infection of cultured cells in vitro. To test in vivo gene delivery, human liver tumor cells preimplanted subcutaneously in nude mice and injected in situ with pH300-lac showed high efficiency of ectopic gene expression. The pH300 miniviral vector is a simple and effective gene transfer system which shows potential for gene therapy of cancer and inherited diseases.

  14. A muscle-specific intron enhancer required for rescue of indirect flight muscle and jump muscle function regulates Drosophila tropomyosin I gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.A.; Gremke, L.; Storti, R.V. ); Tansey, T. )

    1991-04-01

    The control of expression of the Drosophila melanogaster tropomyosin I (TmI) gene has been investigated by P-element transformation and rescue of the flightless TmI mutant strain, Ifm(3)3. To localize cis-acting DNA sequences that control TmI gene expression, Ifm(3)3 flies were transformed with P-element plasmids containing various deletions and rearrangements of the TmI gene. The effects of these mutations on TmI gene expression were studied by analyzing both the extent of rescue of the Ifm(3)3 mutant phenotypes and determining TmI RNA levels in the transformed flies by primer extension analysis. The results of this analysis indicate that a region located within intron 1 of the gene is necessary and sufficient for directing muscle-specific TmI expression in the adult fly. This intron region has characteristics of a muscle regulatory enhancer element that can function in conjunction with the heterologous nonmuscle hsp70 promoter to promote rescue of the mutant phenotypes and to direct expression of an hsp70-Escherichia coli lacZ reporter gene in adult muscle. The enhancer can be subdivided further into two domains of activity based on primer extension analysis of TmI mRNA levels and on the rescue of mutant phenotypes.

  15. Tetracycline inducible gene manipulation in serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tillmann; Renzland, Insa; Baur, Max; Mönks, Simon; Herrmann, Elke; Huppert, Verena; Nürnberg, Frank; Schönig, Kai; Bartsch, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) neuronal system has important and diverse physiological functions throughout development and adulthood. Its dysregulation during development or later in adulthood has been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Transgenic animal models designed to study the contribution of serotonergic susceptibility genes to a pathological phenotype should ideally allow to study candidate gene overexpression or gene knockout selectively in serotonergic neurons at any desired time during life. For this purpose, conditional expression systems such as the tet-system are preferable. Here, we generated a transactivator (tTA) mouse line (TPH2-tTA) that allows temporal and spatial control of tetracycline (Ptet) controlled transgene expression as well as gene deletion in 5-HT neurons. The tTA cDNA was inserted into a 196 kb PAC containing a genomic mouse Tph2 fragment (177 kb) by homologous recombination in E. coli. For functional analysis of Ptet-controlled transgene expression, TPH2-tTA mice were crossed to a Ptet-regulated lacZ reporter line (Ptet-nLacZ). In adult double-transgenic TPH2-tTA/Ptet-nLacZ mice, TPH2-tTA founder line L62-20 showed strong serotonergic β-galactosidase expression which could be completely suppressed with doxycycline (Dox). Furthermore, Ptet-regulated gene expression could be reversibly activated or inactivated when Dox was either withdrawn or added to the system. For functional analysis of Ptet-controlled, Cre-mediated gene deletion, TPH2-tTA mice (L62-20) were crossed to double transgenic Ptet-Cre/R26R reporter mice to generate TPH2-tTA/Ptet-Cre/R26R mice. Without Dox, 5-HT specific recombination started at E12.5. With permanent Dox administration, Ptet-controlled Cre-mediated recombination was absent. Dox withdrawal either postnatally or during adulthood induced efficient recombination in serotonergic neurons of all raphe nuclei, respectively. In the enteric nervous system, recombination could not be detected. We generated a

  16. Alpha-fetoprotein-targeted reporter gene expression imaging in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Il; Chung, Hye Kyung; Park, Ju Hui; Lee, Yong Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in Eastern Asia, and its incidence is increasing globally. Numerous experimental models have been developed to better our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of HCC and to evaluate novel therapeutic approaches. Molecular imaging is a convenient and up-to-date biomedical tool that enables the visualization, characterization and quantification of biologic processes in a living subject. Molecular imaging based on reporter gene expression, in particular, can elucidate tumor-specific events or processes by acquiring images of a reporter gene’s expression driven by tumor-specific enhancers/promoters. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various experimental HCC mouse models and we present in vivo images of tumor-specific reporter gene expression driven by an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) enhancer/promoter system in a mouse model of HCC. The current mouse models of HCC development are established by xenograft, carcinogen induction and genetic engineering, representing the spectrum of tumor-inducing factors and tumor locations. The imaging analysis approach of reporter genes driven by AFP enhancer/promoter is presented for these different HCC mouse models. Such molecular imaging can provide longitudinal information about carcinogenesis and tumor progression. We expect that clinical application of AFP-targeted reporter gene expression imaging systems will be useful for the detection of AFP-expressing HCC tumors and screening of increased/decreased AFP levels due to disease or drug treatment. PMID:27468205

  17. FOXP2 gene deletion and infant feeding difficulties: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Emily; Maron, Jill L

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P2 (FOXP2) is a well-studied gene known to play an essential role in normal speech development. Deletions in the gene have been shown to result in developmental speech disorders and regulatory disruption of downstream gene targets associated with common forms of language impairments. Despite similarities in motor planning and execution between speech development and oral feeding competence, there have been no reports to date linking deletions within the FOXP2 gene to oral feeding impairments in the newborn. The patient was a nondysmorphic, appropriately and symmetrically grown male infant born at 35-wk gestational age. He had a prolonged neonatal intensive care unit stay because of persistent oral feeding incoordination requiring gastrostomy tube placement. Cardiac and neurological imagings were within normal limits. A microarray analysis found an ∼9-kb loss within chromosome band 7q3.1 that contains exon 2 of FOXP2, demonstrating a single copy of this region instead of the normal two copies per diploid gene. This case study expands our current understanding of the role FOXP2 exerts on motor planning and coordination necessary for both oral feeding success and speech-language development. This case report has important consequences for future diagnosis and treatment for infants with FOXP2 deletions, mutations, and varying levels of gene expression.

  18. FOXP2 gene deletion and infant feeding difficulties: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Emily; Maron, Jill L.

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P2 (FOXP2) is a well-studied gene known to play an essential role in normal speech development. Deletions in the gene have been shown to result in developmental speech disorders and regulatory disruption of downstream gene targets associated with common forms of language impairments. Despite similarities in motor planning and execution between speech development and oral feeding competence, there have been no reports to date linking deletions within the FOXP2 gene to oral feeding impairments in the newborn. The patient was a nondysmorphic, appropriately and symmetrically grown male infant born at 35-wk gestational age. He had a prolonged neonatal intensive care unit stay because of persistent oral feeding incoordination requiring gastrostomy tube placement. Cardiac and neurological imagings were within normal limits. A microarray analysis found an ∼9-kb loss within chromosome band 7q3.1 that contains exon 2 of FOXP2, demonstrating a single copy of this region instead of the normal two copies per diploid gene. This case study expands our current understanding of the role FOXP2 exerts on motor planning and coordination necessary for both oral feeding success and speech–language development. This case report has important consequences for future diagnosis and treatment for infants with FOXP2 deletions, mutations, and varying levels of gene expression. PMID:27148578

  19. A mutation in ribosomal protein L9 affects ribosomal hopping during translation of gene 60 from bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, K L; Nichols, L M; Gesteland, R F; Weiss, R B

    1994-01-01

    Ribosomes hop over a 50-nt coding gap during translation of gene 60 mRNA from bacteriophage T4. This event occurs with near-unitary efficiency when gene 60-lacZ fusions are expressed in Escherichia coli. One of the components necessary for this hop is an RNA hairpin structure containing the 5' junction of the 50-nt coding gap. A mutant E. coli was isolated and found to significantly increase hopping when carrying gene 60-lacZ constructs with altered hairpins. The mutation, hop-1, changed Ser93 to Phe in rplI, the gene coding for ribosomal large-subunit protein L9. Ribosomal hopping on a synthetic sequence in the absence of a hairpin was also increased by this mutation. These data suggest that hop-1 may substitute for the function of the hairpin during ribosomal hopping. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7809071

  20. Translational Polarity of a Mutation in the Initiator Aug Codon of the λ cI Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gussin, Gary N.; Brown, Susan; Matz, Karen

    1987-01-01

    A PRM-cI-lacZ fusion inserted into the b2 region of bacteriophage λ was used to isolate mutations affecting expression of both the λ cI gene and the lacZ gene. One such mutation, a change in the cI initiator codon from AUG to AUA, reduces immunity of a λ prophage to superinfection, and causes a 60-70% reduction in β-galactosidase synthesis, even when repressor is supplied in trans. The effect of the mutation on lacZ gene expression is eliminated in a rho- bacterial strain, and the mutation has no effect on transcription initiated at PRM in vitro. Therefore, the effects of the mutation are due to premature ρ-dependent termination of transcription in the absence of translation of the cI gene, as if the mutation were a nonsense polar mutation. PMID:2959588

  1. Mesoscopic tomography imaging of reporter genes in thick printed tissue constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Mehmet S.; Lee, Vivian K.; Zhao, Lingling; Dai, Guohoa; Intes, Xavier

    2013-06-01

    We report an application of Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography to 3D tissue engineering construct. Engineered thick tissue was hosting two 3D printed vasculatures. The channels were formed by live cells, expressing GFP and mCherry reporter genes, embedded in 3mm turbid media. Tissue and cells kept in a 3mm thick perfusion chamber during the entire imaging process which took less than 5 minutes.

  2. WUS and STM-based reporter genes for studying meristem development in poplar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the development of a reporter system for monitoring meristem initiation in poplar using promoters of poplar homologs to the meristem-active regulatory genes WUSCHEL (WUS) and SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM). When ~3 kb of the 5’ flanking regions of close homologs were used to drive expression o...

  3. Inducible Gene Manipulations in Brain Serotonergic Neurons of Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tews, Björn; Bartsch, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) system has been implicated in various physiological processes and neuropsychiatric disorders, but in many aspects its role in normal and pathologic brain function is still unclear. One reason for this might be the lack of appropriate animal models which can address the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological 5-HT functioning. In this respect, rats offer many advantages over mice as they have been the animal of choice for sophisticated neurophysiological and behavioral studies. However, only recently technologies for the targeted and tissue specific modification of rat genes - a prerequisite for a detailed study of the 5-HT system - have been successfully developed. Here, we describe a rat transgenic system for inducible gene manipulations in 5-HT neurons. We generated a Cre driver line consisting of a tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of mouse Tph2 regulatory sequences. Tissue-specific serotonergic Cre recombinase expression was detected in four transgenic TPH2-CreERT2 rat founder lines. For functional analysis of Cre-mediated recombination, we used a rat Cre reporter line (CAG-loxP.EGFP), in which EGFP is expressed after Cre-mediated removal of a loxP-flanked lacZ STOP cassette. We show an in-depth characterisation of this rat Cre reporter line and demonstrate its applicability for monitoring Cre-mediated recombination in all major neuronal subpopulations of the rat brain. Upon tamoxifen induction, double transgenic TPH2-CreERT2/CAG-loxP.EGFP rats show selective and efficient EGFP expression in 5-HT neurons. Without tamoxifen administration, EGFP is only expressed in few 5-HT neurons which confirms minimal background recombination. This 5-HT neuron specific CreERT2 line allows Cre-mediated, inducible gene deletion or gene overexpression in transgenic rats which provides new opportunities to decipher the complex functions of the mammalian serotonergic system. PMID:22140568

  4. Regional mutagenicity of heterocyclic amines in the intestine: mutation analysis of the cII gene in lambda/lacZ transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Toshiaki; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Makoto; Ohnishi, Yoshinari

    2003-08-01

    Transgenic mouse assays have revealed that the mouse intestine, despite its resistance to carcinogenesis, is sensitive to the mutagenicity of some heterocyclic amines (HCAs). Little is known, however, about the level and localization of that sensitivity. We assessed the mutagenicity of four orally administered (20 mg/kg per day for 5 days) HCAs-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) hydrochloride, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (MeIQ), and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-2) acetate-in the intestine of male MutaMice. Two weeks after the last administration, we isolated epithelium from the small intestine, cecum, and colon and analyzed lacZ and cII transgene mutations. PhIP increased the lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in all the samples, and in the small intestine, cII and lacZ MFs were comparable. In the cII gene, G:C to T:A and G:C to C:G transversions were characteristic PhIP-induced mutations (which has also been reported for the rat colon, where PhIP is carcinogenic). In the small intestine, PhIP increased the cII MF to four-fold that of the control, but IQ, MeIQ, and Trp-P-2 did not have a significant mutagenic effect. In the cecum, cII MFs induced by IQ and MeIQ were 1.9 and 2.7 times those in the control, respectively. The MF induced by MeIQ in the colon was 3.1 times the control value. Mutagenic potency was in the order PhIP>MeIQ>IQ; Trp-P-2 did not significantly increase the MF in any tissue. The cecum was the most susceptible organ to HCA mutagenicity. PMID:12948818

  5. Engineering an enhanced, thermostable, monomeric bacterial luciferase gene as a reporter in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Cui, Boyu; Zhang, Lifeng; Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future.

  6. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  7. Rhizobium meliloti Genes Encoding Catabolism of Trigonelline Are Induced under Symbiotic Conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, C; Camut, S; Malpica, CA; Truchet, G; Rosenberg, C

    1990-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti trc genes controlling the catabolism of trigonelline, a plant secondary metabolite often abundant in legumes, are closely linked to nif-nod genes on the symbiotic megaplasmid pSym [Boivin, C., Malpica, C., Rosenberg, C., Denarie, J., Goldman, A., Fleury, V., Maille, M., Message, B., and Tepfer, D. (1989). In Molecular Signals in the Microbe-Plant Symbiotic and Pathogenic Systems. (Berlin: Springer-Verlag), pp. 401-407]. To investigate the role of trigonelline catabolism in the Rhizobium-legume interaction, we studied the regulation of trc gene expression in free-living and in endosymbiotic bacteria using Escherichia coli lacZ as a reporter gene. Experiments performed with free-living bacteria indicated that trc genes were organized in at least four transcription units and that the substrate trigonelline was a specific inducer for three of them. Noninducing trigonelline-related compounds such as betaines appeared to antagonize the inducing effect of trigonelline. None of the general or symbiotic regulatory genes ntrA, dctB/D, or nodD seemed to be involved in trigonelline catabolism. trc fusions exhibiting a low basal and a high induced [beta]-galactosidase activity when present on pSym were used to monitor trc gene expression in alfalfa tissue under symbiotic conditions. Results showed that trc genes are induced during all the symbiotic steps, i.e., in the rhizosphere, infection threads, and bacteroids of alfalfa, suggesting that trigonelline is a nutrient source throughout the Rhizobium-legume association. PMID:12354952

  8. Comparison and Calibration of Different Reporters for Quantitative Analysis of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Hernan G.; Lee, Heun Jin; Boedicker, James Q.; Phillips, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Absolute levels of gene expression in bacteria are observed to vary over as much as six orders of magnitude. Thermodynamic models have been proposed as a tool to describe the expression levels of a given transcriptional circuit. In this context, it is essential to understand both the limitations and linear range of the different methods for measuring gene expression and to determine to what extent measurements from different reporters can be directly compared with one aim being the stringent testing of theoretical descriptions of gene expression. In this article, we compare two protein reporters by measuring both the absolute level of expression and fold-change in expression using the fluorescent protein EYFP and the enzymatic reporter β-galactosidase. We determine their dynamic and linear range and show that they are interchangeable for measuring mean levels of expression over four orders of magnitude. By calibrating these reporters such that they can be interpreted in terms of absolute molecular counts, we establish limits for their applicability: autofluorescence on the lower end of expression for EYFP (at ∼10 molecules per cell) and interference with cellular growth on the high end for β-galactosidase (at ∼20,000 molecules per cell). These qualities make the reporters complementary and necessary when trying to experimentally verify the predictions from the theoretical models. PMID:21806921

  9. UBI4, the polyubiquitin gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a heat shock gene that is also subject to catabolite derepression control.

    PubMed

    Watt, R; Piper, P W

    1997-01-27

    Carbon and nitrogen regulation of UBI4, the stress-inducible polyubiquitin gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was investigated using a UBI4 promoter-LacZ fusion gene (UBI4-LacZ). Expression of this gene in cells grown on different media indicated that the UBI4 promoter is more active during growth on respiratory than on fermentable carbon sources but is not subject to appreciable control by nitrogen catabolite repression. UBI4-LacZ expression was virtually identical in cells having constitutively high (ras2, sra1-13) or constitutively low (ras2) levels of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, indicating that this kinase does not exert a major influence on UBI4 expression. Catabolite derepression control of the UBI4 promoter was confirmed by measurements of UBI4-LacZ expression in hap mutant and wild-type strains before and after transfer from glucose to lactate. Mutagenesis of the perfect consensus for HAP2/3/4 complex binding at position -542 resulted in considerable reduction of UBI4 promoter derepression with respiratory adaptation in HAP wild-type cells and abolished the reduced UBI4-LacZ derepression normally seen when aerobic cultures of the hap1 mutant are transferred from glucose to lactate. This HAP2/3/4 binding site is therefore a major element contributing to catabolite derepression of the UBI4 promoter, although data obtained with hapl mutant cells indicated that HAP1 also contributes to this derepression. The HAP2/3/4 and HAP1 systems are normally found to activate genes for mitochondrial (respiratory) functions. Their involvement in mediating higher activity of the UBI4 promoter during respiratory growth may reflect the contribution of UBI4 expression to tolerance of oxidative stress.

  10. Targeted gene expression without a tissue-specific promoter: creating mosaic embryos using laser-induced single-cell heat shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halfon, M. S.; Kose, H.; Chiba, A.; Keshishian, H.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a method to target gene expression in the Drosophila embryo to a specific cell without having a promoter that directs expression in that particular cell. Using a digitally enhanced imaging system to identify single cells within the living embryo, we apply a heat shock to each cell individually by using a laser microbeam. A 1- to 2-min laser treatment is sufficient to induce a heat-shock response but is not lethal to the heat-shocked cells. Induction of heat shock was measured in a variety of cell types, including neurons and somatic muscles, by the expression of beta-galactosidase from an hsp26-lacZ reporter construct or by expression of a UAS target gene after induction of hsGAL4. We discuss the applicability of this technique to ectopic gene expression studies, lineage tracing, gene inactivation studies, and studies of cells in vitro. Laser heat shock is a versatile technique that can be adapted for use in a variety of research organisms and is useful for any studies in which it is desirable to express a given gene in only a distinct cell or clone of cells, either transiently or constitutively, at a time point of choice.

  11. Contribution of individual promoters in the ddlB-ftsZ region to the transcription of the essential cell-division gene ftsZ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Flärdh, K; Garrido, T; Vicente, M

    1997-06-01

    The essential cell-division gene ftsZ is transcribed in Escherichia coli from at least six promoters found within the coding regions of the upstream ddlB, ftsQ, and ftsA genes. The contribution of each one to the final yield of ftsZ transcription has been estimated using transcriptional lacZ fusions. The most proximal promoter, ftsZ2p, contributes less than 5% of the total transcription from the region that reaches ftsZ. The ftsZ4p and ftsZ3p promoters, both located inside ftsA, produce almost 37% of the transcription. An ftsAp promoter within the ftsQ gene yields nearly 12% of total transcription from the region. A large proportion of transcription (approximately 46%) derives from promoters ftsQ2p and ftsQ1p, which are located inside the upstream ddlB gene. Thus, the ftsQAZ genes are to a large extent transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA. However, we find that the ftsZ proximal region is necessary for full expression, which is in agreement with a recent report that mRNA cleavage by RNase E at the end of the ftsA cistron has a significant role in the contol of ftsZ expression.

  12. Multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging of inducible tyrosinase reporter gene expression in xenograft tumors

    PubMed Central

    Paproski, Robert J.; Heinmiller, Andrew; Wachowicz, Keith; Zemp, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging hybrid imaging technology capable of breaking through resolution limits of pure optical imaging technologies imposed by optical-scattering to provide fine-resolution optical contrast information in deep tissues. We demonstrate the ability of multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging to estimate relative gene expression distributions using an inducible expression system and co-register images with hemoglobin oxygen saturation estimates and micro-ultrasound data. Tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin production, is used as a reporter gene owing to its strong optical absorption and enzymatic amplification mechanism. Tetracycline-inducible melanin expression is turned on via doxycycline treatment in vivo. Serial multi-wavelength imaging reveals very low estimated melanin expression in tumors prior to doxycycline treatment or in tumors with no tyrosinase gene present, but strong signals after melanin induction in tumors tagged with the tyrosinase reporter. The combination of new inducible reporters and high-resolution photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound technology is poised to bring a new dimension to the study of gene expression in vivo. PMID:24936769

  13. Molecular characterization of a maize regulatory gene. Progress report, July 1989--March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wessler, S.

    1990-12-31

    This progress report contains information concerning the characterization of the Maize regulatory gene. The findings of this research program have immediate significance. Firstly, it provides support for the notion that R proteins, produced by the regulatory gene, are functionally equivalent. Secondly, the success of these experiments provides a simple transient assay for either natural or constructed R protein mutations. The relative ease of this assay coupled with overnight results are important prerequisites to the proposed experiments involving a structure-function analysis of the R protein.

  14. Rapid, specific detection of alphaviruses from tissue cultures using a replicon-defective reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiangjiao; Zhu, Wuyang; Wang, Huanqin; Li, Jiandong; Zhang, Quanfu; He, Ying; Li, Jia; Fu, Juanjuan; Li, Dexin; Liang, Guodong

    2012-01-01

    We established a rapid, specific technique for detecting alphaviruses using a replicon-defective reporter gene assay derived from the Sindbis virus XJ-160. The pVaXJ expression vector containing the XJ-160 genome was engineered to form the expression vectors pVaXJ-EGFP expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) or pVaXJ-GLuc expressing Gaussia luciferase (GLuc). The replicon-defective reporter plasmids pVaXJ-EGFPΔnsp4 and pVaXJ-GLucΔnsp4 were constructed by deleting 1139 bp in the non-structural protein 4 (nsP4) gene. The deletion in the nsP4 gene prevented the defective replicons from replicating and expressing reporter genes in transfected BHK-21 cells. However, when these transfected cells were infected with an alphavirus, the non-structural proteins expressed by the alphavirus could act on the defective replicons in trans and induce the expression of the reporter genes. The replicon-defective plasmids were used to visualize the presence of alphavirus qualitatively or detect it quantitatively. Specificity tests showed that this assay could detect a variety of alphaviruses from tissue cultures, while other RNA viruses, such as Japanese encephalitis virus and Tahyna virus, gave negative results with this system. Sensitivity tests showed that the limit of detection (LOD) of this replicon-defective assay is between 1 and 10 PFU for Sindbis viruses. These results indicate that, with the help of the replicon-defective alphavirus detection technique, we can specifically, sensitively, and rapidly detect alphaviruses in tissue cultures. The detection technique constructed here may be well suited for use in clinical examination and epidemiological surveillance, as well as for rapid screening of potential viral biological warfare agents.

  15. Comparative analysis of conditional reporter alleles in the developing embryo and embryonic nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Ellisor, Debra; Koveal, Dorothy; Hagan, Nellwyn; Brown, Ashly; Zervas, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A long-standing problem in development is understanding how progenitor cells transiently expressing genes contribute to complex anatomical and functional structures. In the developing nervous system an additional level of complexity arises when considering how cells of distinct lineages relate to newly established neural circuits. To address these problems, we used both cumulative marking with Cre/loxP and Genetic Inducible Fate Mapping (GIFM), which permanently and heritably marks small populations of progenitors and their descendants with fine temporal control using CreER/loxP. A key component used in both approaches is a conditional phenotyping allele that has the potential to be expressed in all cell types, but is quiescent because of a loxP flanked Stop sequence, which precedes a reporter allele. Upon recombination, the resulting phenotyping allele is ‘turned on’ and then constitutively expressed. Thus, the reporter functions as a high fidelity genetic lineage tracer in vivo. Currently there is an array of reporter alleles that can be used in marking strategies, but their recombination efficiency and applicability to a wide array of tissues has not been thoroughly described. To assess the recombination/marking potential of the reporters, we utilized CreERT under the control of a Wnt1 transgene (Wnt1-CreERT) as well as a cumulative, non-inducible En1Cre knock-in line in combination with three different reporters: R26R (LacZ reporter), Z/EG (EGFP reporter), and Tau-Lox-STOP-Lox-mGFP-IRES-NLS-LacZ (membrane-targeted GFP/nuclear LacZ reporter). We marked the Wnt1 lineage using each of the three reporters at embryonic day (E) 8.5 followed by analysis at E10.0, E12.5, and in the adult. We also compared cumulative marking of cells with a history of En1 expression at the same stages. We evaluated the reporters by whole-mount and section analysis and ascertained the strengths and weaknesses of each of the reporters. Comparative analysis with the reporters

  16. Comparative analysis of conditional reporter alleles in the developing embryo and embryonic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ellisor, Debra; Koveal, Dorothy; Hagan, Nellwyn; Brown, Ashly; Zervas, Mark

    2009-10-01

    A long-standing problem in development is understanding how progenitor cells transiently expressing genes contribute to complex anatomical and functional structures. In the developing nervous system an additional level of complexity arises when considering how cells of distinct lineages relate to newly established neural circuits. To address these problems, we used both cumulative marking with Cre/loxP and Genetic Inducible Fate Mapping (GIFM), which permanently and heritably marks small populations of progenitors and their descendants with fine temporal control using CreER/loxP. A key component used in both approaches is a conditional phenotyping allele that has the potential to be expressed in all cell types, but is quiescent because of a loxP flanked Stop sequence, which precedes a reporter allele. Upon recombination, the resulting phenotyping allele is 'turned on' and then constitutively expressed. Thus, the reporter functions as a high fidelity genetic lineage tracer in vivo. Currently there is an array of reporter alleles that can be used in marking strategies, but their recombination efficiency and applicability to a wide array of tissues has not been thoroughly described. To assess the recombination/marking potential of the reporters, we utilized CreER(T) under the control of a Wnt1 transgene (Wnt1-CreER(T)) as well as a cumulative, non-inducible En1(Cre) knock-in line in combination with three different reporters: R26R (LacZ reporter), Z/EG (EGFP reporter), and Tau-Lox-STOP-Lox-mGFP-IRES-NLS-LacZ (membrane-targeted GFP/nuclear LacZ reporter). We marked the Wnt1 lineage using each of the three reporters at embryonic day (E) 8.5 followed by analysis at E10.0, E12.5, and in the adult. We also compared cumulative marking of cells with a history of En1 expression at the same stages. We evaluated the reporters by whole-mount and section analysis and ascertained the strengths and weaknesses of each of the reporters. Comparative analysis with the reporters

  17. Regulation of Dlx3 gene expression in visceral arches by evolutionarily conserved enhancer elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kenta Sumiyama; Frank H. Ruddle

    2003-04-01

    The mammalian Distal-less (Dlx) clusters (Dlx1-2, Dlx5-6, and Dlx3-7) have a nested expression pattern in developing visceral (branchial) arches. Genetic regulatory mechanisms controlling Dlx spatial expression within the visceral arches have not yet been defined. Here we show that an enhancer in the Dlx3-7 cluster can regulate the visceral arch specific expression pattern of the Dlx3 gene. We have used a 79-kb transgene construct containing the entire Dlx3-7 bigene cluster with a LacZ reporter inserted in frame in the first exon of the Dlx3 gene. Visceral arch expression is absent when a 4-kb element located within the Dlx3-7 intergenic region is deleted. A 245-bp element (I37-2) whose DNA sequence is highly conserved between human and mouse located within the 4kb-deleted region can drive visceral arch expression when fused to a hsp68-lacZ reporter transgene construct. Reporter expression is detected in 9.5 and 10.5 days postcoitum transgenic embryos in a manner consistent with the endogenous Dlx3 expression pattern in the mesenchyme of the first and second visceral arches. Thus the I37-2 element is both necessary and sufficient for Dlx3 expression. The I37-2 element contains several putative binding sites for several transcription factors including Dlx and other homeodomain proteins within the evolutionarily conserved region. Significantly, the I37-2 element shows a sequence-match including a Dlx binding site to a cis-element in the Dlx5-6 intermediate region designated mI56i [Zerucha, T., Stuhmer, T., Hatch, G., Park, B. K., Long, Q., Yu, G., Gambarotta, A., Schultz, J. R., Rubenstein, J. L. & Ekker, M. (2000) J. Neurosci. 20, 709-721], despite distant phylogenetic relationship between these clusters. Our results provide evidence for a concerted role for DLX auto- and cross-regulation in the establishment of a nested expression pattern for Dlx3-7 and Dlx5-6 clusters within the visceral arches.

  18. An infectious West Nile virus that expresses a GFP reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Theodore C; Diamond, Michael S; Ahmed, Asim A; Valentine, Laura E; Davis, Carl W; Samuel, Melanie A; Hanna, Sheri L; Puffer, Bridget A; Doms, Robert W

    2005-03-30

    West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne, neurotropic flavivirus that causes encephalitis in humans and animals. Since being introduced into the Western hemisphere in 1999, WNV has spread rapidly across North America, identifying this virus as an important emerging pathogen. In this study, we developed a DNA-launched infectious molecular clone of WNV that encodes a GFP reporter gene. Transfection of cells with the plasmid encoding this recombinant virus (pWNII-GFP) resulted in the production of infectious WNV capable of expressing GFP at high levels shortly after infection of a variety of cell types, including primary neurons and dendritic cells. Infection of cells with WNII-GFP virus was productive, and could be inhibited with both monoclonal antibodies and interferon-beta, highlighting the potential of this system in the development and characterization of novel inhibitors and therapeutics for WNV infection. As expected, insertion of the reporter gene into the viral genome was associated with a reduced rate of viral replication, providing the selective pressure for the development of variants that no longer encoded the full-length reporter gene cassette. We anticipate this DNA-based, infectious WNV reporter virus will allow novel approaches for the study of WNV infection and its inhibition both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Principal components analysis and the reported low intrinsic dimensionality of gene expression microarray data.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Michael; Müller, Franz-Josef; Zenke, Martin; Schuppert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) is a common unsupervised method for the analysis of gene expression microarray data, providing information on the overall structure of the analyzed dataset. In the recent years, it has been applied to very large datasets involving many different tissues and cell types, in order to create a low dimensional global map of human gene expression. Here, we reevaluate this approach and show that the linear intrinsic dimensionality of this global map is higher than previously reported. Furthermore, we analyze in which cases PCA fails to detect biologically relevant information and point the reader to methods that overcome these limitations. Our results refine the current understanding of the overall structure of gene expression spaces and show that PCA critically depends on the effect size of the biological signal as well as on the fraction of samples containing this signal. PMID:27254731

  20. Principal components analysis and the reported low intrinsic dimensionality of gene expression microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Michael; Müller, Franz-Josef; Zenke, Martin; Schuppert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) is a common unsupervised method for the analysis of gene expression microarray data, providing information on the overall structure of the analyzed dataset. In the recent years, it has been applied to very large datasets involving many different tissues and cell types, in order to create a low dimensional global map of human gene expression. Here, we reevaluate this approach and show that the linear intrinsic dimensionality of this global map is higher than previously reported. Furthermore, we analyze in which cases PCA fails to detect biologically relevant information and point the reader to methods that overcome these limitations. Our results refine the current understanding of the overall structure of gene expression spaces and show that PCA critically depends on the effect size of the biological signal as well as on the fraction of samples containing this signal. PMID:27254731

  1. Experimental gene therapy using p21Waf1 gene for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by gene gun technology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuichi; Fujii, Teruhiko; Yamana, Hideaki; Kato, Seiya; Morimatsu, Minoru; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    In our previous study, the proliferation rate of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, which poorly expressed p21Waf1, was found to be regulated by p21Waf1 gene transfection using adenovirus vector. In the present study, in order to examine the effect of p21Waf1 gene therapy in esophageal cancer, we used gene gun technology, which proved to be a powerful method to introduce the p21Waf1 gene into esophageal cancer cells. p21Waf1 transfection to KE3 and YES2 cells (weakly expressed p21Waf1 protein cells) showed a high expression of p21Waf1 protein after applying this gene gun technique. In KE3 and YES2 cells, statistical significant growth inhibition was observed after p21Waf1 transfection compared with LacZ transfection (KE3, p=0.0009; YES2, p<0.0001). In in vivo transfection experiments, on day 14, the estimated volume of KE3 tumors subjected to p21Waf1 gene transfection was 95% in comparison with the pretreatment volume on day 0, while the volume of KE3 tumors subjected to LacZ gene therapy increased to 268%. On day 14, the estimated volume of YES2 tumors subjected to either p21Waf1 or LacZ gene therapy increased to 474 and 686%, respectively. In KE3 and YES2 cells, significant growth inhibition was observed after combination therapy using p21Waf1 transfection and anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5Fu) compared with 5Fu alone (KE3, p<0.0001; YES2, p<0.0001). In conclusion, p21Waf1 gene therapy using the gene gun technique significantly inhibited the low basal p21Waf1 expressed esophageal cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, p21Waf1 transfection strongly enhanced the effect of 5Fu suggesting that p21Waf1 may prove beneficial in chemotherapy combined with gene therapy using gene gun technology in patients with esophageal cancer who have a low level of p21Waf1 expressed tumor.

  2. Naringenin Regulates Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Wall Synthesis in Herbaspirillum seropedicae▿

    PubMed Central

    Tadra-Sfeir, M. Z.; Souza, E. M.; Faoro, H.; Müller-Santos, M.; Baura, V. A.; Tuleski, T. R.; Rigo, L. U.; Yates, M. G.; Wassem, R.; Pedrosa, F. O.; Monteiro, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Five thousand mutants of Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 carrying random insertions of transposon pTnMod-OGmKmlacZ were screened for differential expression of LacZ in the presence of naringenin. Among the 16 mutants whose expression was regulated by naringenin were genes predicted to be involved in the synthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, and auxin. These loci are probably involved in establishing interactions with host plants. PMID:21257805

  3. [Cloning of mouse adam10 gene promoter and construction and identification of dual luciferase reporter system].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Chong; Zhang, Huan-Xin; Cao, Jiang; Sang, Wei; Wu, Qing-Yun; Zhao, Kai; Zang, Yu; Zeng, Ling-Yu; Xu, Kai-Lin

    2012-06-01

    This study was aimed to clone mouse adam10 gene promoter and construct its dual luciferase report vector, and to investigate its transcriptional activity. Total DNA was extracted from mouse brain and used for amplifying the fragment containing adam10 gene promoter by PCR. The amplified product was inserted into pGL-4.10 vector to construct pGL4.10-adam10. The pGL4.10-adam10 and control plasmid pGL4.74 were co-transfected into HEK293 FT cells by lipofectamine 2000. The activity of adam10 gene promoter was assayed by luciferase system. The results showed that the recombinant plasmid pGL4.10-adam10 containing promoter of mouse adam10 was correctly constructed. The method was optimized by changing ratio of two plasmids. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of pGL4.10-adam10 stimulated by ionomycin increased. It is concluded that the dual luciferase reporter system is successfully established, which is useful in bioluminescence imaging technology in vitro. The effect of ionomycin can enhance the transcriptional activity of adam10 gene promoter.

  4. Bortezomib and ixazomib protect firefly luciferase from degradation and can flaw respective reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonas Philipp; Clemens, Jannick Robert; Theile, Dirk; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-09-15

    Firefly luciferase-based reporter gene assays are the most commonly used assays to investigate the transcriptional regulation of gene expression. However, direct interaction of tested compounds with the firefly luciferase leading to altered enzymatic activity may lead to misinterpretation of experimental data. When investigating the proteasome inhibitors bortezomib, carfilzomib, and ixazomib, we observed increased luminescence for bortezomib and ixazomib, but not for carfilzomib, in a pregnane-X-receptor (PXR) reporter gene assay, which was inconsistent with the mRNA expression levels of the main PXR target gene CYP3A4. To further scrutinize this phenomenon, we performed experiments with constitutively expressed firefly luciferase and demonstrated that the increase in cellular firefly luciferase activity is independent from PXR activation or CYP3A4 promoter. Using cell-free assays with recombinant firefly luciferase enzyme, we made the counterintuitive observation that firefly luciferase activity is inhibited by bortezomib and ixazomib in a reversible and competitive manner. This inhibition stabilizes the firefly luciferase enzyme against proteolytic degradation (e.g., toward trypsin), thereby increasing its half-life with subsequent enhancement of total cellular luminescence that eventually mimicked PXR-driven luciferase induction. These data show that particular compounds can strikingly interfere with firefly luciferase and once more illustrate the importance of careful interpretation of data obtained from luciferase-based assays. PMID:27325500

  5. Bortezomib and ixazomib protect firefly luciferase from degradation and can flaw respective reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonas Philipp; Clemens, Jannick Robert; Theile, Dirk; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-09-15

    Firefly luciferase-based reporter gene assays are the most commonly used assays to investigate the transcriptional regulation of gene expression. However, direct interaction of tested compounds with the firefly luciferase leading to altered enzymatic activity may lead to misinterpretation of experimental data. When investigating the proteasome inhibitors bortezomib, carfilzomib, and ixazomib, we observed increased luminescence for bortezomib and ixazomib, but not for carfilzomib, in a pregnane-X-receptor (PXR) reporter gene assay, which was inconsistent with the mRNA expression levels of the main PXR target gene CYP3A4. To further scrutinize this phenomenon, we performed experiments with constitutively expressed firefly luciferase and demonstrated that the increase in cellular firefly luciferase activity is independent from PXR activation or CYP3A4 promoter. Using cell-free assays with recombinant firefly luciferase enzyme, we made the counterintuitive observation that firefly luciferase activity is inhibited by bortezomib and ixazomib in a reversible and competitive manner. This inhibition stabilizes the firefly luciferase enzyme against proteolytic degradation (e.g., toward trypsin), thereby increasing its half-life with subsequent enhancement of total cellular luminescence that eventually mimicked PXR-driven luciferase induction. These data show that particular compounds can strikingly interfere with firefly luciferase and once more illustrate the importance of careful interpretation of data obtained from luciferase-based assays.

  6. A beta-glucuronidase reporter gene construct for monitoring aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, J E; Weaver, M A; Payne, G A; Woloshuk, C P

    1995-01-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. Current research is directed at the elimination of these compounds in important food sources. The objective of this research was to develop a method to study the induction and regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis by examining the expression of one aflatoxin pathway gene, ver1. The promoter region of ver1 was fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene (uidA) from Escherichia coli to form the reporter construct, GAP13. A. flavus 656-2 was transformed with this construct. Aflatoxin production, GUS activity, and transcript accumulation were determined in transformants after shifting the cultures from a nonconducive medium to a medium conducive to aflatoxin biosynthesis. Transformants harboring GAP13 displayed GUS expression only when aflatoxin was detected in culture. Further, the transcription of the uidA gene driven by the ver1 promoter followed the same profile as for the ver1 genes. The results show that the GAP13 construct may be useful as a genetic tool to study the induction of aflatoxin in situ and to identify substances that affect the expression of genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. The utility of this construct to detect inducers of aflatoxin biosynthesis in maize kernels was tested in a bioassay. A heat-stable inducer of aflatoxin with a molecular size of less than 10 kDa was detected in extracts from maize kernels colonized by A. flavus. PMID:7618859

  7. Use of the Aspergillus oryzae actin gene promoter in a novel reporter system for exploring antifungal compounds and their target genes.

    PubMed

    Marui, Junichiro; Yoshimi, Akira; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Fujii-Watanabe, Yoshimi; Oda, Ken; Koike, Hideaki; Tamano, Koichi; Ishii, Tomoko; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Abe, Keietsu

    2010-08-01

    Demand for novel antifungal drugs for medical and agricultural uses has been increasing because of the diversity of pathogenic fungi and the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Genomic resources for various living species, including pathogenic fungi, can be utilized to develop novel and effective antifungal compounds. We used Aspergillus oryzae as a model to construct a reporter system for exploring novel antifungal compounds and their target genes. The comprehensive gene expression analysis showed that the actin-encoding actB gene was transcriptionally highly induced by benomyl treatment. We therefore used the actB gene to construct a novel reporter system for monitoring responses to cytoskeletal stress in A. oryzae by introducing the actB promoter::EGFP fusion gene. Distinct fluorescence was observed in the reporter strain with minimum background noise in response to not only benomyl but also compounds inhibiting lipid metabolism that is closely related to cell membrane integrity. The fluorescent responses indicated that the reporter strain can be used to screen for lead compounds affecting fungal microtubule and cell membrane integrity, both of which are attractive antifungal targets. Furthermore, the reporter strain was shown to be technically applicable for identifying novel target genes of antifungal drugs triggering perturbation of fungal microtubules or membrane integrity.

  8. Evaluation of a GFP Report Gene Construct for Environmental Arsenic Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, F.F.; Barnes, J.M.; Bruhn, D.F.

    2002-03-28

    Detection of arsenic and other heavy metal contaminants in the environment is critical to ensuring safe drinking water and effective cleanup of historic activities that have led to widespread contamination of soil and groundwater. Biosensors have the potential to significantly reduce the costs associated with site characterization and long term environmental monitoring. By exploiting the highly selective and sensitive natural mechanisms by which bacteria and other living organisms respond to heavy metals, and fusing transcriptionally active components of these mechanisms to reporter genes, such as B-galactosidase, bacterial luciferase (lux), or green fluorescent protein (GFP) from marine jellyfish, it is possible to produce inexpensive, yet effective biosensors. This article describes the response to submicrogram quantities of arsenite and arsenate of a whole cell arsenic biosensor utilizing a GFP reporter gene.

  9. Reporter Gene Imaging of Immune Responses to Cancer: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Purnima

    2012-01-01

    Immune responses to cancer are dynamic processes which take place through the concerted activity of innate and adaptive cell populations. In order to fully understand the efficacy of immune therapies for cancer, it is critical to understand how the treatment modulates the function of each cell type involved in the anti-tumor immune response. Molecular imaging is a versatile method for longitudinal studies of cellular localization and function. The development of reporter genes for tracking cell movement and function was a powerful addition to the immunologist's toolbox. This review will highlight the advances and challenges in the use of reporter gene imaging to track immune cell localization and function in cancer. PMID:22509199

  10. Evaluation of a GFP reporter gene construct for environmental arsenic detection.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Francisco F; Barnes, Joni M; Bruhn, Debby F

    2002-08-16

    Detection of arsenic and other heavy metal contaminants in the environment is critical to ensuring safe drinking water and effective cleanup of historic activities that have led to widespread contamination of soil and groundwater. Biosensors have the potential to significantly reduce the costs associated with site characterization and long term environmental monitoring. By exploiting the highly selective and sensitive natural mechanisms by which bacteria and other living organisms respond to heavy metals, and fusing transcriptionally active components of these mechanisms to reporter genes, such as beta-galactosidase, bacterial luciferase (lux), or green fluorescent protein (GFP) from marine jellyfish, it is possible to produce inexpensive, yet effective biosensors. This article describes the response to submicrogram quantities of arsenite and arsenate of a whole cell arsenic biosensor utilizing a GFP reporter gene.

  11. Final Report [Function of the Arabidopsis TIR1 gene in auxin response

    SciTech Connect

    Estelle, Mark

    2000-12-18

    During this grant period substantial progress was made in the characterization of the TIR1 gene in Arabidopsis. Studies showed that the TIR1 protein is part of a protein complex that includes AtCUL1, ASK1 and RBX1. This complex, called SCF-TIR1, functions in the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathway. Our work is the first report of an SCF complex in a plant system. The results of our studies are described in more detail in the report together with a publication resulting from this study.

  12. Mosaic 18q21.2 deletions including the TCF4 gene: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Labalme, Audrey; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Till, Marianne; Blanchard, Gaëlle; Dubois, Remi; Guibaud, Laurent; Heissat, Sophie; Javouhey, Etienne; Lachaux, Alain; Mure, Pierre-Yves; Ville, Dorothée; Edery, Patrick; Sanlaville, Damien

    2012-12-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) is characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphism, profound intellectual disability, and the possible occurrence of epilepsy and breathing anomalies. It is caused by haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 gene. No significant difference in clinical severity has been reported to date between PTHS patients carrying 18q21 deletions including the TCF4 gene, and those harboring TCF4 point mutations, suggesting a lack of genotype/phenotype correlation. Moreover, the size of 18q21 deletions including the TCF4 gene does not appear to have a significant effect on the phenotypic severity, suggesting that TCF4 haploinsufficiency is the most important prognostic factor in 18q deletions. We describe two unrelated patients presenting with clinical features reminiscent of PTHS and carrying mosaic interstitial 18q21 deletions characterized by array comparative genomic hybridization. One of the patients presented the lowest level of mosaic 18q21 deletion reported to date (5-10%). Our report and a review of the literature show that the mosaic status does not appear to have a significant effect on the clinical severity of 18q21 deletions, which are associated with a poor neurological outcome, whereas a mosaic TCF4 point mutation can result in a significantly milder phenotype. Malformations of internal organs are currently considered to be rare in PTHS. The patients described here had visceral anomalies, suggesting that a full morphological assessment, including heart and abdominal ultrasound scans, should be performed systematically in PTHS patients. PMID:23165966

  13. A specific mechanism for nonspecific activation in reporter-gene assays.

    PubMed

    Auld, Douglas S; Thorne, Natasha; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Inglese, James

    2008-08-15

    The importance of bioluminescence in enabling a broad range of high-throughput screening (HTS) assay formats is evidenced by widespread use in industry and academia. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms by which reporter enzyme activity can be modulated by small molecules is critical to the interpretation of HTS data. In this Perspective, we provide evidence for stabilization of luciferase by inhibitors in cell-based luciferase reporter-gene assays resulting in the counterintuitive phenomenon of signal activation. These data were derived from our analysis of luciferase inhibitor compound structures and their prevalence in the Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository using 100 HTS experiments available in PubChem. Accordingly, we found an enrichment of luciferase inhibitors in luciferase reporter-gene activation assays but not in assays using other reporters. In addition, for several luciferase inhibitor chemotypes, we measured reporter stabilization and signal activation in cells that paralleled the inhibition determined using purified luciferase to provide further experimental support for these contrasting effects.

  14. Msx genes define a population of mural cell precursors required for head blood vessel maturation.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Miguel; Goupille, Olivier; Saint Cloment, Cécile; Lallemand, Yvan; Cumano, Ana; Robert, Benoît

    2011-07-01

    Vessels are primarily formed from an inner endothelial layer that is secondarily covered by mural cells, namely vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arteries and veins and pericytes in capillaries and veinules. We previously showed that, in the mouse embryo, Msx1(lacZ) and Msx2(lacZ) are expressed in mural cells and in a few endothelial cells. To unravel the role of Msx genes in vascular development, we have inactivated the two Msx genes specifically in mural cells by combining the Msx1(lacZ), Msx2(lox) and Sm22α-Cre alleles. Optical projection tomography demonstrated abnormal branching of the cephalic vessels in E11.5 mutant embryos. The carotid and vertebral arteries showed an increase in caliber that was related to reduced vascular smooth muscle coverage. Taking advantage of a newly constructed Msx1(CreERT2) allele, we demonstrated by lineage tracing that the primary defect lies in a population of VSMC precursors. The abnormal phenotype that ensues is a consequence of impaired BMP signaling in the VSMC precursors that leads to downregulation of the metalloprotease 2 (Mmp2) and Mmp9 genes, which are essential for cell migration and integration into the mural layer. Improper coverage by VSMCs secondarily leads to incomplete maturation of the endothelial layer. Our results demonstrate that both Msx1 and Msx2 are required for the recruitment of a population of neural crest-derived VSMCs.

  15. Role of RNA splicing in mediating lineage-specific expression of the von Willebrand factor gene in the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Janes, Lauren; Beeler, David; Spokes, Katherine C; Smith, Joshua; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Oettgen, Peter; Aird, William C

    2013-05-23

    We previously demonstrated that the first intron of the human von Willebrand factor (vWF) is required for gene expression in the endothelium of transgenic mice. Based on this finding, we hypothesized that RNA splicing plays a role in mediating vWF expression in the vasculature. To address this question, we used transient transfection assays in human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes with intron-containing and intronless human vWF promoter-luciferase constructs. Next, we generated knockin mice in which LacZ was targeted to the endogenous mouse vWF locus in the absence or presence of the native first intron or heterologous introns from the human β-globin, mouse Down syndrome critical region 1, or hagfish coagulation factor X genes. In both the in vitro assays and the knockin mice, the loss of the first intron of vWF resulted in a significant reduction of reporter gene expression in endothelial cells but not megakaryocytes. This effect was rescued to varying degrees by the introduction of a heterologous intron. Intron-mediated enhancement of expression was mediated at a posttranscriptional level. Together, these findings implicate a role for intronic splicing in mediating lineage-specific expression of vWF in the endothelium.

  16. New derivatives of transposon Tn5 suitable for mobilization of replicons, generation of operon fusions and induction of genes in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Simon, R; Quandt, J; Klipp, W

    1989-08-01

    Three types of new variants of the broad-host-range transposon Tn5 are described. (i) Tn5-mob derivatives with the new selective resistance (R) markers GmR, SpR and TcR facilitate the efficient mobilization of replicons within a wide range of Gram-negative bacteria. (ii) Promoter probe transposons carry the promoterless reporter genes lacZ, nptII, or luc, and NmR, GmR or TcR as selective markers. These transposons can be used to generate transcriptional fusions upon insertion, thus facilitating accurate determinations of gene expression. (iii) Tn5-P-out derivatives carry the npt- or tac-promoter reading out from the transposon, and TcR, NmR or GmR genes. These variants allow the constitutive expression of downstream genes. The new Tn5 variants are available on mobilizable Escherichia coli vectors suitable as suicidal carriers for transposon mutagenesis of non-E. coli recipients and some on a phage lambda mutant to be used for transposon mutagenesis in E. coli. PMID:2551782

  17. A screen for upstream components of the yeast protein kinase C signal transduction pathway identifies the product of the SLG1 gene.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, J J; Nilius, S M; Heinisch, J J

    1998-04-01

    We employed the constitutive BCK1-20 allele of the gene for the MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP-KKK) in the yeast Pkc signal transduction pathway to develop a genetic screen for mutants in genes encoding upstream components. Transposon mutagenesis yielded a mutant that was completely dependent on the active allele in the absence of osmotic stabilization. The transposon had integrated at the yeast SLG1 (HCS77) locus. This gene encodes a putative membrane protein. Haploid slg1 deletion strains are sensitive to caffeine, as expected for mutants in the Pkc pathway, as well as a variety of other drugs. The response to elevated temperatures and the dependence on osmotic stabilization depends on the genetic background. Thus, in the strain used for mutagenesis, disruption of SLG1 causes the cells to become non-viable in the absence of osmotic stabilization at both 30 degrees C and 37 degrees C. In a different genetic background this phenotype was not observed. Sensitivity of the haploid deletion mutants to caffeine can be partially suppressed by overexpression of genes for other components of the Pkc pathway, such as PKC1, SLT2, ROM2, and STE20. In addition, a SLG1-lacZ reporter construct shows higher expression in the presence of caffeine or magnesium chloride in a wild-type diploid background.

  18. Phytoalexin detoxification genes and gene products: Implication for the evolution of host specific traits for pathogenicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    VanEtten, H.

    1997-06-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to determine which differences among PDA genes were associated with different levels of virulence on pea and to clone and characterize a MAK gene. The authors also proposed to characterize the pisatin detoxifying system in pea pathogens in addition to N. haematococca to assess whether pathogens of a common host had evolved similar pathogenicity genes.

  19. Using thermal energy produced by irradiation of Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MZF-NPs) for heat-inducible gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiu-sha; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Cong, Xiao-ming; Wan, Mei-ling; Jin, Li-qiang

    2008-06-01

    One of the main advantages of gene therapy over traditional therapy is the potential to target the expression of therapeutic genes in desired cells or tissues. To achieve targeted gene expression, we developed a novel heat-inducible gene expression system in which thermal energy generated by Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MZF-NPs) under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) was used to activate gene expression. MZF-NPs, obtained by co-precipitation method, were firstly surface modified with cation poly(ethylenimine) (PEI). Then thermodynamic test of various doses of MZF-NPs was preformed in vivo and in vitro. PEI-MZF-NPs showed good DNA binding ability and high transfection efficiency. In AMF, they could rise to a steady temperature. To analyze the heat-induced gene expression under an AMF, we combined P1730OR vector transfection with hyperthermia produced by irradiation of MZF-NPs. By using LacZ gene as a reporter gene and Hsp70 as a promoter, it was demonstrated that expression of a heterogeneous gene could be elevated to 10 to 500-fold over background by moderate hyperthermia (added 12.24 or 25.81 mg MZF-NPs to growth medium) in tissue cultured cells. When injected with 2.6 or 4.6 mg MZF-NPs, the temperature of tumor-bearing nude mice could rise to 39.5 or 42.8 degrees C, respectively, and the beta-gal concentration could increase up to 3.8 or 8.1 mU/mg proteins accordingly 1 day after hyperthermia treatment. Our results therefore supported hyperthermia produced by irradiation of MZF-NPs under an AMF as a feasible approach for targeted heat-induced gene expression. This novel system made use of the relative low Curie point of MZF-NPs to control the in vivo hyperthermia temperature and therefore acquired safe and effective heat-inducible transgene expression.

  20. The heme-uptake gene cluster in Vibrio fischeri is regulated by Fur and contributes to symbiotic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Septer, Alecia N.; Wang, Yanling; Ruby, Edward G.; Stabb, Eric. V.; Dunn, Anne K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although it is accepted that bacteria colonizing host tissues are commonly faced with iron-limiting conditions and that pathogenic bacteria often utilize iron from host-derived heme-based compounds, the mechanisms of iron acquisition by beneficial symbiotic bacteria are less clear. The bacterium Vibrio fischeri mutualistically colonizes the light organ of the squid Euprymna scolopes. Genome sequence analysis of V. fischeri revealed a putative heme-uptake gene cluster, and through mutant analysis we confirmed this cluster is important for hemin use by V. fischeri in culture. LacZ reporter assays demonstrated Fur-dependent transcriptional regulation of cluster promoter activity in culture. GFP-based reporter assays revealed that gene cluster promoter activity is induced in symbiotic V. fischeri as early as 14 h post-inoculation, although colonization assays with the heme uptake mutant suggested an inability to uptake heme does not begin to limit colonization until later stages of the symbiosis. Our data indicate that the squid light organ is a low iron environment and that heme-based sources of iron are used by symbiotic V. fischeri cells. These findings provide important additional information on the availability of iron during symbiotic colonization of E. scolopes by V. fischeri, as well as the role of heme uptake in non-pathogenic host-microbe interactions. PMID:21883801

  1. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Masser, Anna E.; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon‐optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half‐lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano‐Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat‐shock promoter (PCYC1–HSE), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C‐terminus of a temperature‐sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  2. Comparative Analysis of T Cell Imaging with Human Nuclear Reporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Maxim A.; Zhang, Hanwen; Lee, Jason; Moroz, Ekaterina; Zurita, Juan; Shenker, Larissa; Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald; Ponomarev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring genetically altered T cells is an important component of adoptive T cell therapy in patients, and the ability to visualize their trafficking/targeting, proliferation/expansion, and retention/death using highly sensitive reporter systems that do not induce an immunologic response would provide useful information. Therefore, we focused on human reporter gene systems that have the potential for translation to clinical studies. The objective of the in vivo imaging studies was to determine the minimum number of T cells that could be visualized with the different nuclear reporter systems. We determined the imaging sensitivity (lower limit of T cell detection) of each reporter using appropriate radiolabeled probes for PET or SPECT imaging. Methods Human T cells were transduced with retroviral vectors encoding for the human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), human sodiumiodide symporter (hNIS), a human deoxycytidine kinase double mutant (hdCKDM), and herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (hsvTK) reporter genes. After viability and growth were assessed, 105 to 3 × 106 reporter T cells were injected subcutaneously on the shoulder area. The corresponding radiolabeled probe was injected intravenously 30 min later, followed by sequential PET or SPECT imaging. Radioactivity at the T cell injection sites and in the thigh (back-ground) was measured. Results The viability and growth of experimental cells were unaffected by transduction. The hNET/meta-18F-fluorobenzylguanidine (18F-MFBG) reporter system could detect less than 1 × 105 T cells because of its high uptake in the transduced T cells and low background activity. The hNIS/124I-iodide reporter system could detect approximately 1 × 106 T cells; 124I-iodide uptake at the T cell injection site was time-dependent and associated with high background. The hdCKDM/2′-18F-fluoro-5-ethyl-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (18F-FEAU) and hsvTK/18F-FEAU reporter systems detected approximately 3 × 105 T cells

  3. The first report of the vanC₁ gene in Enterococcus faecium isolated from a human clinical specimen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingyue; Wang, Yue; Chen, Zhongju; Zhu, Xuhui; Tian, Lei; Sun, Ziyong

    2014-09-01

    The vanC₁ gene, which is chromosomally located, confers resistance to vancomycin and serves as a species marker for Enterococcus gallinarum. Enterococcus faecium TJ4031 was isolated from a blood culture and harbours the vanC₁gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were performed to detect vanXYc and vanTc genes. Only the vanXYc gene was found in the E. faecium TJ4031 isolate. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin and teicoplanin were 2 µg/mL and 1 µg/mL, respectively. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed that the vanC₁ and vanXYc genes were not expressed. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and southern hybridisation results showed that the vanC₁ gene was encoded in the chromosome. E. faecalis isolated from animals has been reported to harbour vanC₁gene. However, this study is the first to report the presence of the vanC₁gene in E. faecium of human origin. Additionally, our research showed the vanC₁gene cannot serve as a species-specific gene of E. gallinarum and that it is able to be transferred between bacteria. Although the resistance marker is not expressed in the strain, our results showed that E. faecium could acquire the vanC₁gene from different species.

  4. Identification of AAAS gene mutation in Allgrove syndrome: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    LI, WENJING; GONG, CHUNXIU; QI, ZHAN; WU, DI; CAO, BINGYAN

    2015-01-01

    Allgrove syndrome (AS) is an autosomal recessive congenital disease, caused by mutations in the AAAS gene, and is characterized by the triad of Addison's disease, achalasia and alacrima. The present study describes three newly diagnosed cases of AS, in which genetic analysis of the AAAS gene was used to identify AAAS gene mutations, to enhance the understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of AS in the Chinese population. Two of the cases exhibited homozygous mutations of c.771delG (p.Arg258GlyfsX33) in exon 8 and one case exhibited a homozygous mutation of c.1366C>T (p.Q456X) in exon 15. A review of the current literature suggests that the AAAS c.771delG mutation has only been reported in the Chinese population. Genetic analysis of the AAAS gene in Chinese AS patients at a young age may facilitate an earlier diagnosis and the timely initiation of the appropriate treatment, ultimately improving the patient outcome. PMID:26622478

  5. Regulation of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 rrnA-reporter gene fusions in response to cold shock.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Ann M; O'Connell, Kevin P; Thomashow, Michael F

    2002-09-01

    We previously reported that mutants of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 carrying luxAB insertions in each of the three 16S rRNA genes exhibited a dramatic (> or = 28-fold) increase in luminescence following a temperature downshift from 30 to 15 degrees C. These results raised the possibility that the rRNA operons (rrn) of S. meliloti were cold shock loci. In testing this possibility, we found that fusion of the S. meliloti 1021 rrnA promoter to two different reporter genes, luxAB and uidA, resulted in hybrid genes that were transiently upregulated (as measured by transcript accumulation) about four- to sixfold in response to a temperature downshift. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the rrn promoters are transiently upregulated in response to cold shock. However, much of the apparent cold shock regulation of the initial luxAB insertions was due to an unexpected mechanism: an apparent temperature-dependent inhibition of translation. Specifically, the rrnA sequences from +1 to +172 (relative to the start of transcription) were found to greatly decrease the ability of S. meliloti to translate hybrid rrn-luxAB transcripts into active protein at 30 degrees C. This effect, however, was largely eliminated at 15 degrees C. Possible mechanisms for the apparent transient increase in rrnA promoter activity and temperature-dependent inhibition of translation are discussed.

  6. A GFP-MAP4 reporter gene for visualizing cortical microtubule rearrangements in living epidermal cells

    PubMed

    Marc; Granger; Brincat; Fisher; Kao; McCubbin; Cyr

    1998-11-01

    Microtubules influence morphogenesis by forming distinct geometrical arrays in the cell cortex, which in turn affect the deposition of cellulose microfibrils. Although many chemical and physical factors affect microtubule orientation, it is unclear how cortical microtubules in elongating cells maintain their ordered transverse arrays and how they reorganize into new geometries. To visualize these reorientations in living cells, we constructed a microtubule reporter gene by fusing the microtubule binding domain of the mammalian microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4) gene with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, and transient expression of the recombinant protein in epidermal cells of fava bean was induced. The reporter protein decorates microtubules in vivo and binds to microtubules in vitro. Confocal microscopy and time-course analysis of labeled cortical arrays along the outer epidermal wall revealed the lengthening, shortening, and movement of microtubules; localized microtubule reorientations; and global microtubule reorganizations. The global microtubule orientation in some cells fluctuates about the transverse axis and may be a result of a cyclic self-correcting mechanism to maintain a net transverse orientation during cellular elongation. PMID:9811799

  7. Validation of Mitochondrial Gene Delivery in Liver and Skeletal Muscle via Hydrodynamic Injection Using an Artificial Mitochondrial Reporter DNA Vector.

    PubMed

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Ishikawa, Takuya; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-12-01

    For successful mitochondrial transgene expression, two independent processes, i.e., developing a mitochondrial gene delivery system and construction of DNA vector to achieve mitochondrial gene expression, are required. To date, very few studies dealing with mitochondrial gene delivery have been reported and, in most cases, transgene expression was not validated, because the construction of a reporter DNA vector for mitochondrial gene expression is the bottleneck. In this study, mitochondrial transgene expression by the in vivo mitochondrial gene delivery of an artificial mitochondrial reporter DNA vector via hydrodynamic injection is demonstrated. In the procedure, a large volume of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA) is rapidly injected. We designed and constructed pHSP-mtLuc (CGG) as a mitochondrial reporter DNA vector that possesses a mitochondrial heavy strand promoter (HSP) and an artificial mitochondrial genome with the reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase gene that records adjustments to the mitochondrial codon system. We delivered the pDNA into mouse liver mitochondria by hydrodynamic injection, and detected exogenous mRNA in the liver using reverse transcription PCR analysis. The hydrodynamic injection of pHSP-mtLuc (CGG) resulted in the expression of the Nluc luciferase protein in liver and skeletal muscle. Our mitochondrial transgene expression reporter system would contribute to mitochondrial gene therapy and further studies directed at mitochondrial molecular biology.

  8. Quantitative analysis of gene expression in preimplantation mouse embryos using green fluorescent protein reporter.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Serguei Yuri; Tokunaga, Tomoyuki; Schultz, Richard M; Furukawa, Tsutomu; Nagai, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Manabu; Hosoe, Misa; Yakovlev, Alexander F; Takahashi, Seiya; Izaike, Yoshiaki

    2002-07-01

    We have developed a method to monitor noninvasively, quantitatively, and in real-time transcription in living preimplantation mouse embryos by measuring expression of a short half-life form of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) following microinjection of a plasmid-borne EGFP reporter gene. A standard curve was established by injecting known amounts of recombinant green fluorescent protein, and transcriptional activity was then determined by interpolating the amount of fluorescence in the DNA-injected embryos. This approach permitted multiple measurements in single embryos with no significant detrimental effect on embryonic development as long as light exposure was brief (<30 sec) and no more than two measurements were made each day. This method should facilitate analysis of the regulation of gene expression in preimplantation embryos; in particular, during the maternal-to-zygotic transition, and in other species in which limited numbers of embryos are available. PMID:12080029

  9. Gene-Environment Interactions in Cancer Epidemiology: A National Cancer Institute Think Tank Report

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, Carolyn M.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillander, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF]>0.05) and less common (0.01genes and environment, including gene-environment interactions, into epidemiologic studies of cancer. To help address these questions, and to better inform research priorities and allocation of resources, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a “Gene-Environment Think Tank” on January 10th–011th, 2012. The objective of the Think Tank was to facilitate discussions on: 1) the state of the science; 2) the goals of gene-environment interaction studies in cancer epidemiology; and 3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of gene-environment interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. PMID:24123198

  10. First report of multiresistance gene cfr in Enterococcus species casseliflavus and gallinarum of swine origin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Dai, Lei; Wu, Congming; Shen, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and genetic environment of the multiresistance gene cfr in Enterococcus species of swine origin. Twenty-five cfr-carrying Enterococcus isolates were collected from swine in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Shandong, China. The isolates consist of 24 Enterococcus casseliflavus and one Enterococcus gallinarum isolate, and exhibited six SmaI PFGE patterns. The cfr gene was located on plasmids in all isolates except E. casseliflavus En83, in which cfr was located on the chromosomal DNA. The cfr gene environments in most of these isolates contain DNA sequences similar to pEF-01, which was first found in Enterococcus. However, inverse PCR analysis suggested that the cfr-carrying circular forms might be different from pEF-01. The circular forms in Eg51 and its transconjugant, and En23, En10, and En94 are similar to the circular form in pEF-01, except for the truncated IS1216, which is replaced by a transposase of the IS256 family in En24. The cfr circular form could not be detected in either En77 or En83, and the same cfr-carrying segments of ∼ 10 kb had only 3500bp of sequence similar to pEF-01. This is the first report of cfr gene in E. casseliflavus and E. gallinarum. The potential dissemination of the multidrug resistance gene amongst different bacterial species, especially in enterococci of human and animal origins, is concerning and should be closely monitored.

  11. Hierarchical gene regulatory systems arising from fortuitous gene associations: controlling quorum sensing by the opine regulon in Agrobacterium.

    PubMed

    Piper, K R; Beck Von Bodman, S; Hwang, I; Farrand, S K

    1999-06-01

    Conjugation of the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid pTiC58 is regulated by a hierarchy involving induction by the opines agrocinopines A and B and a quorum-sensing system. Regulation by the opines is mediated by the repressor AccR, while quorum sensing is effected by the transcriptional activator TraR and its ligand, the acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecule Agrobacterium autoinducer (AAI). These last two elements combine to activate expression of the tra system at high population densities. Sequence analysis indicated that traR is the fourth gene of an operon, which we named arc, that is transcribed divergently from accR. Complementation analysis of mutations in the genes 5' to traR showed that the other members of the arc operon are not required for conjugation. Analysis of lacZ reporter fusions demonstrated that traR expression is regulated directly by AccR. Deletion analysis showed that AccR-regulated expression of traR initiates from a promoter located in the intergenic region between accR and orfA, the first gene of the arc operon. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and primer extension analyses indicated that the arc transcript initiates upstream of orfA and proceeds uninterrupted through traR. These results are consistent with a model in which quorum sensing is subordinate to the opine regulon because traR has become associated with an operon controlled by the opine-responsive transcriptional regulator. PMID:10361309

  12. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products. Progress report, June 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5` UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  13. A promoter for the first nine genes of the Escherichia coli mra cluster of cell division and cell envelope biosynthesis genes, including ftsI and ftsW.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, H; Yasuda, S; Horiuchi, K; Park, J T

    1997-01-01

    We constructed a null allele of the ftsI gene encoding penicillin-binding protein 3 of Escherichia coli. It caused blockage of septation and loss of viability when expression of an extrachromosomal copy of ftsI was repressed, providing a final proof that ftsI is an essential cell division gene. In order to complement this null allele, the ftsI gene cloned on a single-copy mini-F plasmid required a region 1.9 kb upstream, which was found to contain a promoter sequence that could direct expression of a promoterless lacZ gene on a mini-F plasmid. This promoter sequence lies at the beginning of the mra cluster in the 2 min region of the E. coli chromosome, a cluster of 16 genes which, except for the first 2, are known to be involved in cell division and cell envelope biosynthesis. Disruption of this promoter, named the mra promoter, on the chromosome by inserting the lac promoter led to cell lysis in the absence of a lac inducer. The defect was complemented by a plasmid carrying a chromosomal fragment ranging from the mra promoter to ftsW, the fifth gene downstream of ftsI, but not by a plasmid lacking ftsW. Although several potential promoter sequences in this region of the mra cluster have been reported, we conclude that the promoter identified in this study is required for the first nine genes of the cluster to be fully expressed. PMID:9294438

  14. Search for major genes with progeny test data to accelerate the development of genetically superior loblolly pine. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-02-15

    This report details the progress of the three tasks of this project. The tasks are: (1) develop genetic models and analytical methods; (2) molecular confirmation of major gene segregation; and (3) develop strategies for marker-assisted breeding.

  15. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene PA5507 controls PQS concentration in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Kyle A.; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas aeruginosa can sense and respond to a myriad of environmental signals and utilizes a system of small molecules to communicate through intercellular signaling. The small molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal [PQS]) is one of these signals and its synthesis is important for virulence. Previously, we identified an RpiR-type transcriptional regulator, QapR, that positively affects PQS production by repressing the qapR operon. An in-frame deletion of this regulator caused P. aeruginosa to produce a greatly reduced concentration of PQS. Here, we report that QapR translation is linked to the downstream gene PA5507. We found that introduction of a premature stop codon within qapR eliminates transcriptional autorepression of the qapR operon as expected but has no effect on PQS concentration. This was investigated with a series of lacZ reporter fusions which showed that translation of QapR must terminate at, or close to, the native qapR stop codon in order for translation of PA5507 to occur. Also, it was shown that truncation of the 5′ end of the qapR transcript permitted PA5507 translation without translation of QapR. Our findings led us to conclude that PA5507 transcription and translation are both tightly controlled by QapR and this control is important for PQS homeostasis. PMID:25662317

  16. Genetic analysis of the regulation of TCH gene expression, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Braam, Janet

    2008-10-28

    The Arabidopsis TCH genes, originally isolated as a consequence of their upregulation in response to the mechanical stimulus of touch, are also upregulated by a variety of seemingly disparate environmental and hormonal stimuli. To gain insight into the complexities of TCH gene regulation, a number of approaches were taken. Regulatory elements responsible for regulation were identified and characteristics of the regulation were evaluated. Reporter genes were used to monitor expression localization and dynamics. Microarray analyses of genome-wide expression behavior indicated that touch-inducible gene expression is more widespread than generally appreciated. Identification of all touch-regulated genes shed light on the types of cellular processes that may be altered in response to mechanical stress perturbations. Expression of the TCH2 gene, also called CML24, encoding a calmodulin (CaM)-like (CML) protein, was evaluated. CML24 shares over 40% amino acid sequence identity with CaM, has 4 EF hands and undergoes a Ca2+-dependent change in migration rate through denaturing gel electrophoresis, indicating that CML24 binds Ca2+ and, as a consequence, undergoes conformational changes. CML24 expression occurs in all major organs and is induced from 2- to 15-fold in plants subjected to touch, darkness, heat, cold, hydrogen peroxide, abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The putative CML24 regulatory region confers reporter expression at sites of predicted mechanical stress, in regions undergoing growth, in vascular tissues and various floral organs and in stomata, trichomes and hydathodes. CML24 underexpressing transgenics are resistant to ABA inhibition of germination and seedling growth, defective in long-day induction of flowering, and have enhanced tolerance to CoCl2, molybdic acid, ZnSO4 and MgCl2. These data present evidence that CML24 encodes a potential Ca2+ sensor that may function to enable responses to ABA, day length and presence of various salts. Further

  17. Brief Report: Aggression and Stereotypic Behavior in Males with Fragile X Syndrome-- Moderating Secondary Genes in a "Single Gene" Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessl, David; Tassone, Flora; Cordeiro, Lisa; Koldewyn, Kami; McCormick, Carolyn; Green, Cherie; Wegelin, Jacob; Yuhas, Jennifer; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2008-01-01

    Although fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a single gene disorder with a well-described phenotype, it is not known why some individuals develop more significant maladaptive behaviors such as aggression or autistic symptoms. Here, we studied two candidate genes known to affect mood and aggression, the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and monoamine…

  18. The interferon-induced gene Ifi27l2a is active in lung macrophages and lymphocytes after influenza A infection but deletion of Ifi27l2a in mice does not increase susceptibility to infection.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Mohamed A; Hatesuer, Bastian; Wilk, Esther; Dengler, Leonie; Kasnitz, Nadine; Weiß, Siegfried; Schughart, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Interferons represent one of the first and essential host defense mechanisms after infection, and the activation of the IFN-pathway results in the transcriptional activation of hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes. The alpha-inducible protein 27 like 2A (Ifi27l2a) gene (human synonym: ISG12) is strongly up-regulated in the lung after influenza A infection in mice and has been shown in gene expression studies to be highly correlated to other activated genes. Therefore, we investigated the role of Ifi27l2a for the host defense to influenza A infections in more detail. RT-PCR analyses in non-infected mice demonstrated that Ifi27l2a was expressed in several tissues, including the lung. Detailed analyses of reporter gene expression in lungs from Ifi27l2a-LacZ mice revealed that Ifi27l2a was expressed in macrophages and lymphocytes but not in alveolar cells or bronchiolar epithelium cells. The number of macrophages and lymphocyte strongly increased in the lung after infection, but no significant increase in expression levels of the LacZ reporter gene was found within individual immune cells. Also, no reporter gene expression was found in bronchiolar epithelial cells, alveolar cells or infiltrating neutrophils after infection. Thus, up-regulation of Ifi27l2a in infected lungs is mainly due to the infiltration of macrophages and lymphocytes. Most surprisingly, deletion of Ifi27l2a in mouse knock-out lines did not result in increased susceptibility to infections with H1N1 or H7N7 influenza A virus compared to wild type C57BL/6N mice, suggesting a less important role of the gene for the host response to influenza infections than for bacterial infections. PMID:25184786

  19. Visualisation of chicken macrophages using transgenic reporter genes: insights into the development of the avian macrophage lineage

    PubMed Central

    Balic, Adam; Garcia-Morales, Carla; Vervelde, Lonneke; Gilhooley, Hazel; Sherman, Adrian; Garceau, Valerie; Gutowska, Maria W.; Burt, David W.; Kaiser, Pete; Hume, David A.; Sang, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    We have generated the first transgenic chickens in which reporter genes are expressed in a specific immune cell lineage, based upon control elements of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) locus. The Fms intronic regulatory element (FIRE) within CSF1R is shown to be highly conserved in amniotes and absolutely required for myeloid-restricted expression of fluorescent reporter genes. As in mammals, CSF1R-reporter genes were specifically expressed at high levels in cells of the macrophage lineage and at a much lower level in granulocytes. The cell lineage specificity of reporter gene expression was confirmed by demonstration of coincident expression with the endogenous CSF1R protein. In transgenic birds, expression of the reporter gene provided a defined marker for macrophage-lineage cells, identifying the earliest stages in the yolk sac, throughout embryonic development and in all adult tissues. The reporter genes permit detailed and dynamic visualisation of embryonic chicken macrophages. Chicken embryonic macrophages are not recruited to incisional wounds, but are able to recognise and phagocytose microbial antigens. PMID:25063453

  20. Detection of transformed cells in crown gall tumors using the GUS reporter gene and correlation of GUS stained cells with T-DNA gene activity

    SciTech Connect

    Black, R.C. ); Labriola, J.; Binns, A.N. )

    1990-05-01

    Crown gall tumors are a mixture of transformed hormone producing cells and normal cells. Until now it has not been possible to directly visualize these cell types in situ. We have constructed strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens that carry the 35S-{beta}-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in either wild type or mutant Ti plasmids. Using histochemical staining for GUS activity, blue (GUS positive) sectors are observed in tumor sections. In order to demonstrate that the blue sectors actually represent cells expressing other T-DNA genes, we have looked for T-DNA gene encoded enzyme activity in the stained and unstained sectors. The blue sectors accumulate octopine (a product of the octopine synthase gene on the T-DNA) while the white (GUS negative) sectors do not. We conclude that the use of the GUS reporter gene provides a sensitive and reliable method for visualizing transformation events in plant tissues. A comparison of the proportion of transformed and nontransformed cells in wild type tumors vs. tumors deficient in auxin or cytokinin encoding genes will be discussed.

  1. Identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences. Annual performance report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, C.A.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this project is the development of practical software to automate the identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences from the human, and other higher eukaryotic genomes. A software system for automated sequence analysis, gm (gene modeler) has been designed, implemented, tested, and distributed to several dozen laboratories worldwide. A significantly faster, more robust, and more flexible version of this software, gm 2.0 has now been completed, and is being tested by operational use to analyze human cosmid sequence data. A range of efforts to further understand the features of eukaryoyic gene sequences are also underway. This progress report also contains papers coming out of the project including the following: gm: a Tool for Exploratory Analysis of DNA Sequence Data; The Human THE-LTR(O) and MstII Interspersed Repeats are subfamilies of a single widely distruted highly variable repeat family; Information contents and dinucleotide compostions of plant intron sequences vary with evolutionary origin; Splicing signals in Drosophila: intron size, information content, and consensus sequences; Integration of automated sequence analysis into mapping and sequencing projects; Software for the C. elegans genome project.

  2. A Novel Homozygous Mutation in the Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 6 Gene: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Altıncık, Ayça; Schlingmann, Karl Peter; Tosun, Mahya Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia (HSH) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the transient receptor potential melastatin 6 (TRPM6) gene. Affected individuals present in early infancy with seizures caused by the severe hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia. By presenting this case report, we also aimed to highlight the need for molecular genetic analysis in inbred or familial cases with hypomagnesemia. A Turkish inbred girl, now aged six years, had presented to another hospital at age two months with seizures diagnosed to be due to hypomagnesemia. She was on magnesium replacement therapy when she was admitted to our clinic with complaints of chronic diarrhea at age 3.6 years. During her follow-up in our clinic, she showed an age-appropriate physical and neurological development. In molecular genetic analysis, a novel homozygous frame-shift mutation (c.3447delT>p.F1149fs) was identified in the TRPM6 gene. This mutation leads to a truncation of the TRPM6 protein, thereby complete loss of function. We present the clinical follow-up findings of a pediatric HSH case due to a novel mutation in the TRPM6 gene and highlight the need for molecular genetic analysis in inbred or familial cases with hypomagnesemia. PMID:26759217

  3. Cytochrome P450 2C9 gene polymorphism in phenytoin induced gingival enlargement: A case report.

    PubMed

    Babu, S P K Kennedy; Ramesh, V; Samidorai, Agila; Charles, N S C

    2013-07-01

    Gingival enlargement comprises any clinical condition in which an increase in the size of the gingiva is observed. Among the drugs that induce gingival enlargement, the antiepileptic agent phenytoin has been widely related to this condition. The Cytochrome P450(CYP) superfamily is the most commonly involved enzymes in metabolism of drugs. Common coding region CYP variants that affects drug elimination and response has been studied in great detail. Pharmacogenetic influences on drug metabolism have been widely reviewed and gene polymorphism of cytochrome P450 2C9 appeared to be responsible for much of the interindividual variability on drug elimination. Genetic variation in the CYP2C9 gene can affect metabolism, leading to altered phenotypes. Individuals with poor metaboliser alleles of CYP2C9 gene were shown to have a reduced metabolism of phenytoin compared with wild-type alleles. Thus identification of patients genotype prior to anti-epileptic drug administration could potentially prevent higher serum drug concentrations leading to adverse side effects such as gingival enlargement. This case report addresses the influence of CYP2C9 genetic polymorphism on Phenytoin drug metabolism thereby causing gingival enlargement. PMID:24082701

  4. Gonadotropic pituitary carcinoma: HER-2/neu expression and gene amplification. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Roncaroli, Federico; Nosé, Vania; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Kovacs, Kalman; Horvath, Eva; Young, William F; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Bishop, Mari C; Hsi, Bradley; Fletcher, Jonathan A

    2003-08-01

    The authors report on two gonadotropic carcinomas of the adenohypophysis that occurred in a55-year-old man (Case 1) and a 53-year-old woman (Case 2), with signs of mass effect and amenorrhea, respectively. Both lesions were macroadenomas. The tumor in Case 1 metastasized to dura mater, skull, nasal sinus, and larynx 2 years after patient presentation, whereas that in Case 2 spread to vertebral bodies and ribs after a 19-year latency. Histologically, the primary, recurrent, and metastatic lesions in Case 1 featured brisk mitotic activity and high MIB-1 levels as well as p53 labeling indices. Immunoreactivity for HER-2/neu was assessable only in rare neoplastic cells of the second recurrence and in 80% of cells of the dural metastasis. Low-level HER-2/neu gene amplification was evident in the recurrent tumors and metastasis. The sellar and metastatic tumors in Case 2 resembled benign gonadotropic adenoma with oncocytic change; p53 accumulation, HER-2/neu overexpression, and HER-2/neu gene amplification were not present. The results indicate that low-level amplification of the HER-2/neu gene might be associated with pituitary carcinomas in which more aggressive behavior is seen. Further studies are needed to determine whether HER-2/neu plays a role in the pathogenesis of pituitary carcinoma.

  5. Characterization of two trpE genes encoding anthranilate synthase {alpha}-subunit in Azospirillum brasilense

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Shimei; Xie Baoen; Chen Sanfeng . E-mail: chensf@cau.edu.cn

    2006-03-10

    The previous report from our laboratory has recently identified a new trpE gene (termed trpE {sub 2}) which exists independently in Azospirillum brasilense Yu62. In this study, amplification of trpE(G) (termed trpE {sub 1}(G) here) confirmed that there are two copies of trpE gene, one trpE being fused into trpG while the other trpE existed independently. This is First report to suggest that two copies of the trpE gene exist in this bacterium. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence demonstrated that putative leader peptide, terminator, and anti-terminator were found upstream of trpE {sub 1}(G) while these sequence features did not exist in front of trpE {sub 2}. The {beta}-galactosidase activity of an A. brasilense strain carrying a trpE {sub 2}-lacZ fusion remained constant at different tryptophan concentrations, but the {beta}-galactosidase activity of the same strain carrying a trpE {sub 1}(G)-lacZ fusion decreased as the tryptophan concentration increased. These data suggest that the expression of trpE {sub 1}(G) is regulated at the transcriptional level by attenuation while trpE {sub 2} is constantly expressed. The anthranilate synthase assays with trpE {sub 1}(G){sup -} and trpE {sub 2} {sup -} mutants demonstrated that TrpE{sub 1}(G) fusion protein is feedback inhibited by tryptophan while TrpE{sub 2} protein is not. We also found that both trpE {sub 1}(G) and trpE {sub 2} gene products were involved in IAA synthesis.

  6. A robust method for the rapid generation of recombinant Zika virus expressing the GFP reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Gadea, Gilles; Bos, Sandra; Krejbich-Trotot, Pascale; Clain, Elodie; Viranaicken, Wildriss; El-Kalamouni, Chaker; Mavingui, Patrick; Desprès, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is a major public health problem with severe human congenital and neurological anomalies. The screening of anti-ZIKV compounds and neutralizing antibodies needs reliable and rapid virus-based assays. Here, we described a convenient method leading to the rapid production of molecular clones of ZIKV. To generate a molecular clone of ZIKV strain MR766(NIID), the viral genome was directly assembled into Vero cells after introduction of four overlapping synthetic fragments that cover the full-length genomic RNA sequence. Such strategy has allowed the production of a recombinant ZIKV expressing the GFP reporter gene that is stable over two culturing rounds on Vero cells. Our data demonstrate that the ZIKV reporter virus is a very reliable GFP-based tool for analyzing viral growth and measuring the neutralizing antibody as well as rapid screening of antiviral effect of different classes of inhibitors.

  7. MEGDEL Syndrome in a Child From Palestine: Report of a Novel Mutation in SERAC1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Dweikat, Imad M; Abdelrazeq, Samer; Ayesh, Suhail; Jundi, Tawfeeq

    2015-07-01

    We report the first Palestinian child manifesting with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria psychomotor delay, muscle hypotonia, sensori-neural deafness, and Leigh-like lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a clinical phenotype that is characteristic of MEGDEL syndrome. MEGDEL syndrome was recently found to be caused by mutations in SERAC1, encoding a protein essential for mitochondrial function, phospholipid remodeling, and intracellular cholesterol trafficking. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in SERAC1 gene (c.1018delT) that generates frame shift and premature termination of protein translation. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid lactate, plasma alanine, and respiratory chain complexes in fresh muscle were normal. This report further expands the genetic spectrum of MEGDEL syndrome and adds to the evidence that it is associated with variable patterns of respiratory chain abnormalities.

  8. Melanin production by Rhizobium meliloti GR4 is linked to nonsymbiotic plasmid pRmeGR4b: cloning, sequencing, and expression of the tyrosinase gene mepA.

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Blanco, J; García, F; Fernández-López, M; Olivares, J

    1993-01-01

    Melanin production by Rhizobium meliloti GR4 is linked to nonsymbiotic plasmid pRmeGR4b (140 MDa). Transfer of this plasmid to GR4-cured derivatives or to Agrobacterium tumefaciens enables these bacteria to produce melanin. Sequence analysis of a 3.5-kb PstI fragment of plasmid pRmeGR4b has revealed the presence of a open reading frame 1,481-bp that codes for a protein whose sequence shows strong homology to two conserved regions involved in copper binding in tyrosinases and hemocyanins. In vitro-coupled transcription-translation experiments showed that this open reading frame codes for a 55-kDa polypeptide. Melanin production in GR4 is not under the control of the RpoN-NifA regulatory system, unlike that in R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli 8002. The GR4 tyrosinase gene could be expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the lacZ promoter. For avoiding confusion with mel genes (for melibiose), a change of the name of the previously reported mel genes of R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli and other organisms to mep genes (for melanin production) is proposed. Images PMID:8366027

  9. The use of the NIS reporter gene for optimizing oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Amber; Russell, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Oncolytic viruses are experimental cancer therapies being translated to the clinic. They are unique in their ability to amplify within the body, therefore requiring careful monitoring of viral replication and biodistribution. Traditional monitoring strategies fail to recapitulate the dynamic nature of oncolytic virotherapy. Consequently, clinically relevant, noninvasive, high resolution strategies are needed to effectively track virotherapy in real time. Areas covered: The expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) reporter gene is tightly coupled to viral genome replication and mediates radioisotope concentration, allowing noninvasive molecular nuclear imaging of active viral infection with high resolution. This provides insight into replication kinetics, biodistribution, the impact of vector design, administration, and dosing on therapeutic outcomes, and highlights the heterogeneity of spatial distribution and temporal evolution of infection. NIS-mediated imaging in clinical trials confirms the feasibility of this technology to noninvasively and longitudinally observe oncolytic virus infection, replication, and distribution. Expert opinion: NIS-mediated imaging provides detailed functional and molecular information on the evolution of oncolytic virus infection in living animals. The use of NIS reporter gene imaging has rapidly advanced to provide unparalleled insight into the spatial and temporal context of oncolytic infection which will be integral to optimization of oncolytic treatment strategies. PMID:26457362

  10. Mutations of SCN4A gene cause different diseases: 2 case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-li; Huang, Xiao-jun; Luan, Xing-hua; Zhou, Hai-yan; Wang, Tian; Wang, Jing-yi; Chen, Sheng-di; Tang, Hui-dong; Cao, Li

    2015-01-01

    SCN4A encodes the Nav1.4 channel and mutations in SCN4A lead to different ionic channelopathies. In this study, one sporadic individual of periodic paralysis, one paramyotonia family and 200 normal healthy controls are enrolled. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, followed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing of candidate genes, including SCN4A and CACNA1S. As a result, heterozygous mutations c.2024G>A (R675Q) and c.1333G>A (V445M) of gene SCN4A were identified in the hypokalemic periodic paralysis patient and the paramyotonia congenita family respectively. Both mutations were not detected in healthy controls. Compared with reported cases, patients with mutation R675Q usually do not present hypokalemic periodic paralysis but hyperkalemic or normokalemic periodic paralysis. The mutation V445M was first reported in Chinese patients with nondystrophic myotonias. In addition, we carried out literature review by summarizing clinical features of the 2 mutations and establish the genotype–phenotype correlations to provide guidance for diagnosis. PMID:25839108

  11. Development of tyrosinase-based reporter genes for preclinical photoacoustic imaging of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Ruschke, Karen; Dortay, Hakan; Schreiber, Isabelle; Sass, Andrea; Qazi, Taimoor; Pumberger, Matthias; Laufer, Jan

    2014-03-01

    The capability to image stem cells in vivo in small animal models over extended periods of time is important to furthering our understanding of the processes involved in tissue regeneration. Photoacoustic imaging is suited to this application as it can provide high resolution (tens of microns) absorption-based images of superficial tissues (cm depths). However, stem cells are rare, highly migratory, and can divide into more specialised cells. Genetic labelling strategies are therefore advantageous for their visualisation. In this study, methods for the transfection and viral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells with reporter genes for the co-expression of tyrosinase and a fluorescent protein (mCherry). Initial photoacoustic imaging experiments of tyrosinase expressing cells in small animal models of tissue regeneration were also conducted. Lentiviral transduction methods were shown to result in stable expression of tyrosinase and mCherry in mesenchymal stem cells. The results suggest that photoacoustic imaging using reporter genes is suitable for the study of stem cell driven tissue regeneration in small animals.

  12. Testotoxicosis: Report of Two Cases, One with a Novel Mutation in LHCGR Gene

    PubMed Central

    Özcabı, Bahar; Tahmiscioğlu Bucak, Feride; Ceylaner, Serdar; Özcan, Rahşan; Büyükünal, Cenk; Ercan, Oya; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Evliyaoğlu, Olcay

    2015-01-01

    Testotoxicosis is a rare disorder which presents as isosexual peripheral precocious puberty in males. Despite the pattern of autosomal dominant inheritance, sporadic cases also may occur. Due to activating mutation in luteinizing hormone (LH))/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) gene, early virilization and advancement in bone age are common with increased serum testosterone levels above adult ranges, despite low LH and follicular-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels. There are different treatment regimens, such as combination of bicalutamide (antiandrogen agent) and a third-generation aromatase inhibitor, that are reported to be well-tolerated and successful in slowing bone age advancement and preventing progression of virilization. We report here two patients who presented with peripheral precocious puberty and an activating mutation in the LHCGR gene: one with a family history and previously determined mutation and the other without family history and with a novel mutation (c.830G>T). Combination of bicalutamide+anastrozole was ineffective in slowing pubertal progression and bone age. Short-term results were better with ketoconazole. PMID:26831561

  13. Use of reporter-gene based bacteria to quantify phenanthrene biodegradation and toxicity in soil.

    PubMed

    Shin, Doyun; Moon, Hee Sun; Lin, Chu-Ching; Barkay, Tamar; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2011-02-01

    A phenanthrene-degrading bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA505 was used to construct two fluorescence-based reporter strains. Strain D harboring gfp gene was constructed to generate green fluorescence when the strain started to biodegrade phenanthrene. Strain S possessing gef gene was designed to die once phenanthrene biodegradation was initiated and thus to lose green fluorescence when visualized by a live/dead cell staining. Confocal laser scanning microscopic observation followed by image analysis demonstrates that the fluorescence intensity generated by strain D increased and the intensity by strain S decreased linearly at the phenanthrene concentration of up to 200 mg/L. Such quantitative increase and decrease of fluorescence intensity in strain D (i.e., from 1 to 11.90 ± 0.72) and strain S (from 1 to 0.40 ± 0.07) were also evident in the presence of Ottawa sand spiked with the phenanthrene up to 1000 mg/kg. The potential use of the reporter strains in quantitatively determining biodegradable or toxic phenanthrene was discussed.

  14. The late-annotated small ORF LSO1 is a target gene of the iron regulon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    An, Xiuxiang; Zhang, Caiguo; Sclafani, Robert A; Seligman, Paul; Huang, Mingxia

    2015-12-01

    We have identified a new downstream target gene of the Aft1/2-regulated iron regulon in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the late-annotated small open reading frame LSO1. LSO1 transcript is among the most highly induced from a transcriptome analysis of a fet3-1 mutant grown in the presence of the iron chelator bathophenanthrolinedisulfonic acid. LSO1 has a paralog, LSO2, which is constitutively expressed and not affected by iron availability. In contrast, we find that the LSO1 promoter region contains three consensus binding sites for the Aft1/2 transcription factors and that an LSO1-lacZ reporter is highly induced under low-iron conditions in a Aft1-dependent manner. The expression patterns of the Lso1 and Lso2 proteins mirror those of their mRNAs. Both proteins are localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm, but become more cytoplasmic upon iron deprivation consistent with a role in iron transport. LSO1 and LSO2 appear to play overlapping roles in the cellular response to iron starvation since single lso1 and lso2 mutants are sensitive to iron deprivation and this sensitivity is exacerbated when both genes are deleted.

  15. Construction of an artificial MicroRNA expression vector for simultaneous inhibition of multiple genes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Fu, Qiong; Chen, Ping; Ma, Li; Sin, Onsam; Guo, Deyin

    2009-05-14

    Recently, artificial microRNA (amiRNA) has become a promising RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Here, we describe a flexible and reliable method for constructing both single- and multi-amiRNA expression vectors. Two universal primers, together with two specific primers carrying the encoding sequence of amiRNA were designed and utilized to synthesize the functional amiRNA cassette through a one-step PCR. With appropriate restriction sites, the synthesized amiRNA cassettes can be cloned into any site of different destination vectors. Using the method, we constructed both single- and multi-amiRNA expression vectors to target three reporter genes, which code firefly luciferase (Fluc), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and beta-galactosidase (LacZ), respectively. The expressions of three genes were all specifically inhibited by either the corresponding single- or the multi-amiRNA expression vector in 293T cells. And the RNAi efficiency of each amiRNA produced by both single- and multi-amiRNA expression vectors was comparable.

  16. Enterococcus gallinarum carrying the vanA gene cluster: first report in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Camargo, I L B C; Barth, A L; Pilger, K; Seligman, B G S; Machado, A R L; Darini, A L C

    2004-11-01

    In 2000, Enterococcus faecalis resistant to vancomycin was first reported at a tertiary hospital in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. The resistance spread to other hospitals and surveillance programs were established by hospital infection committees to prevent the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci. In February 2002, an isolate initially identified at the genus level as Enterococcus was obtained by surveillance culture (rectal swab) from a patient admitted to a hospital for treatment of septic arthritis in the shoulder. The isolate proved to be resistant to vancomycin by the disc diffusion method and confirmed by an E-test resulting in a minimal inhibitory concentration of > or = 256 microg/ml. This isolate was sent to a reference laboratory (Laboratorio Especial de Bacteriologia e Epidemiologia Molecular, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, USP) for further study and proved to be an E. gallinarum by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers for the species. Due to the phenotype of unusually high vancomycin resistance, the isolate presumably had the resistance genes (vanA and vanB) and this was confirmed by PCR, which indicated the presence of the vanA gene. A 10.8-kb Tn1546-related transposon was also identified by long-PCR. Interspecies transfer of the vancomycin-resistance gene from the donor E. gallinarum was performed in a successful conjugation experiment in vitro, using E. faecium GE-1 and E. faecalis JH22 as receptors. This is the first report of the detection of a vanA determinant naturally acquired by E. gallinarum in Brazil, indicating the importance of characterizing VRE by both phenotype and genotype methods.

  17. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control -- A multi-level and interdisciplinary study. Progress report, February 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ts`o, P.O.P.

    1992-08-01

    This progress report describes gains made in three projects entitled (1) 3-Dimensional nuclear topography of genes and chromosomes in interphase nuclei, (2) Sequence specific identification and perturbation of the genomic DNA in living cells by nonionic oligonucleotide analogs (Matagen), and Resolution and isolation of specific DNA restriction fragments.(DT)

  18. Superior protective and therapeutic effects of IL-12 and IL-18 gene-transduced dendritic neuroblastoma fusion cells on liver metastasis of murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Hisae; Okinaga, Kota; Fukushima, Ryoji; Inaba, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Kota; Okinaga, Akira; Takahashi, Ichiro; Kaneko, Michio

    2006-03-15

    Fusion vaccine of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumor cells has the advantage of inducing an immune response against multiple tumor Ags, including unknown tumor Ags. Using the liver metastasis model of C1300 neuroblastoma cells, we assessed the protective and therapeutic effects of fusion cells transduced with the IL-12 gene and/or the IL-18 gene. Improving the fusion method by combining polyethylene glycol and electroporation increased loading efficiency. In the A/J mice vaccinated with fusion cells modified with the LacZ gene (fusion/LacZ), IFN-gamma production and CTL activity increased significantly compared with that of DCs/LacZ, C1300/LacZ, or a mixture of the two (mixture/LacZ). With the transduction of IL-12 and IL-18 genes into the fusion cells (fusion/IL-12/IL-18), the level of IFN-gamma increased more than five times that of other fusion groups. In addition, NK cell activity and CTL activity increased significantly compared with that of mixture/LacZ, fusion/LacZ, DC/LacZ, or C1300/LacZ. In the protective and therapeutic studies of fusion cell vaccine, mice vaccinated with fusion/LacZ, fusion/IL-12, fusion/IL-18, or fusion/IL-12/IL-18 showed a significant decrease in liver metastasis and a significant increase in survival compared with mice given a mixture/LacZ, DCs/LacZ, or C1300/LacZ. In particular, the mice receiving fusion/IL-12/IL-18 vaccine showed a complete protective effect and the highest therapeutic effects. The present study investigates the improved loading efficiency of fusion cells and suggests that the introduction of IL-12 and IL-18 genes can induce extremely strong protective and therapeutic effects on liver metastasis of neuroblastoma.

  19. Validating tyrosinase homologue melA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger

    2015-10-01

    To understand the pathogenic processes for infectious bacteria, appropriate research tools are required for replicating and characterizing infections. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have primarily been used to image infections in animal models, but optical scattering in tissue significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. Photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-to-resolution ratio compared to conventional optical imaging, could be useful for visualizing melA-expressing bacteria since melA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue which produces melanin. Escherichia coli-expressing melA was visibly dark in liquid culture. When melA-expressing bacteria in tubes were imaged with a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system, the signal-to-noise ratio of a 9× dilution sample was 55, suggesting that ˜20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. Multispectral (680, 700, 750, 800, 850, and 900 nm) analysis of the photoacoustic signal allowed unmixing of melA-expressing bacteria from blood. To compare photoacoustic reporter gene melA (using Vevo system) with luminescent and fluorescent reporter gene Nano-lantern (using Bruker Xtreme In-Vivo system), tubes of bacteria expressing melA or Nano-lantern were submerged 10 mm in 1% Intralipid, spaced between <1 and 20 mm apart from each other, and imaged with the appropriate imaging modality. Photoacoustic imaging could resolve the two tubes of melA-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were less than 1 mm from each other, while bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging could not resolve the two tubes of Nano-lantern-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were spaced 10 mm from each other. After injecting 100-μL of melA-expressing bacteria in the back flank of a chicken embryo, photoacoustic imaging allowed visualization of melA-expressing bacteria up to 10-mm deep into the embryo. Photoacoustic signal from melA could also be separated from deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin signal observed within the embryo and

  20. Validating tyrosinase homologue melA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Paproski, Robert J; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D; Campbell, Robert E; Zemp, Roger

    2015-10-01

    To understand the pathogenic processes for infectious bacteria, appropriate research tools are required for replicating and characterizing infections. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have primarily been used to image infections in animal models, but optical scattering in tissue significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. Photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-to-resolution ratio compared to conventional optical imaging, could be useful for visualizing melA-expressing bacteria since melA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue which produces melanin. Escherichia coli-expressing melA was visibly dark in liquid culture. When melA-expressing bacteria in tubes were imaged with a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system, the signal-to-noise ratio of a 9×dilution sample was 55, suggesting that ∼20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. Multispectral (680, 700, 750, 800, 850, and 900 nm) analysis of the photoacoustic signal allowed unmixing of melA-expressing bacteria from blood. To compare photoacoustic reporter gene melA (using Vevo system) with luminescent and fluorescent reporter gene Nano-lantern (using Bruker Xtreme In-Vivo system), tubes of bacteria expressing melA or Nano-lantern were submerged 10 mm in 1% Intralipid, spaced between <1 and 20 mm apart from each other, and imaged with the appropriate imaging modality. Photoacoustic imaging could resolve the two tubes of melA-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were less than 1 mm from each other, while bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging could not resolve the two tubes of Nano-lantern-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were spaced 10 mm from each other. After injecting 100-μL of melA-expressing bacteria in the back flank of a chicken embryo, photoacoustic imaging allowed visualization of melA-expressing bacteria up to 10-mm deep into the embryo. Photoacoustic signal from melA could also be separated from deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin signal observed within the embryo and

  1. LrhA as a new transcriptional key regulator of flagella, motility and chemotaxis genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lehnen, D; Blumer, C; Polen, T; Wackwitz, B; Wendisch, V F; Unden, G

    2002-07-01

    The function of the LysR-type regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli was defined by comparing whole-genome mRNA profiles from wild-type E. coli and an isogenic lrhA mutant on a DNA microarray. In the lrhA mutant, a large number (48) of genes involved in flagellation, motility and chemotaxis showed relative mRNA abundances increased by factors between 3 and 80. When a representative set of five flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes was tested in lacZ reporter gene fusions, similar factors for derepression were found in the lrhA mutant. In gel retardation experiments, the LrhA protein bound specifically to flhD and lrhA promoter DNA (apparent K(D) approximately 20 nM), whereas the promoters of fliC, fliA and trg were not bound by LrhA. The expression of flhDC (encoding FlhD(2)C(2)) was derepressed by a factor of 3.5 in the lrhA mutant. FlhD(2)C(2) is known as the master regulator for the expression of flagellar and chemotaxis genes. By DNase I footprinting, LrhA binding sites at the flhDC and lrhA promoters were identified. The lrhA gene was under positive autoregulation by LrhA as shown by gel retardation and lrhA expression studies. It is suggested that LrhA is a key regulator controlling the transcription of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes by regulating the synthesis and concentration of FlhD(2)C(2). PMID:12123461

  2. Epitope-Tagged Autotransporters as Single-Cell Reporters for Gene Expression by a Salmonella Typhimurium wbaP Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Curkić, Ismeta; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Diard, Médéric; Claassen, Manfred; Linke, Dirk; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity is an important trait of bacterial populations and can enhance fitness of the existing genotype in a given environment. To characterize different subpopulations, several studies have analyzed differential gene expression using fluorescent reporters. These studies visualized either single or multiple genes within single cells using different fluorescent proteins. However, variable maturation and folding kinetics of different fluorophores complicate the study of dynamics of gene expression. Here, we present a proof-of-principle study for an alternative gene expression system in a wbaP mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Tm) lacking the O-sidechain of the lipopolysaccharide. We employed the hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged inverse autotransporter invasin (invAHA) as a transcriptional reporter for the expression of the type three secretion system 1 (T1) in S. Tm. Using a two-reporter approach with GFP and the InvAHA in single cells, we verify that this reporter system can be used for T1 gene expression analysis, at least in strains lacking the O-antigen (wbaP), which are permissive for detection of the surface-exposed HA-epitope. When we placed the two reporters gfp and invAHA under the control of either one or two different promoters of the T1 regulon, we were able to show correlative expression of both reporters. We conclude that the invAHA reporter system is a suitable tool to analyze T1gene expression in S. Tm and propose its applicability as molecular tool for gene expression studies within single cells. PMID:27149272

  3. Superinduction of estrogen receptor mediated gene expression in luciferase based reporter gene assays is mediated by a post-transcriptional mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sotoca, A M; Bovee, T F H; Brand, W; Velikova, N; Boeren, S; Murk, A J; Vervoort, J; Rietjens, I M C M

    2010-10-01

    Several estrogenic compounds including the isoflavonoid genistein have been reported to induce a higher maximal response than the natural estrogen 17β-estradiol in in vitro luciferase based reporter gene bioassays for testing estrogenicity. The phenomenon has been referred to as superinduction. The mechanism underlying this effect and thus also its biological relevance remain to be elucidated. In the present study several hypotheses for the possible mechanisms underlying this superinduction were investigated using genistein as the model compound. These hypotheses included (i) a non-estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated mechanism, (ii) a role for an ER activating genistein metabolite with higher ER inducing activity than genistein itself, and (iii) a post-transcriptional mechanism that is not biologically relevant but specific for the luciferase based reporter gene assays. The data presented in this study indicate that induction and also superinduction of the reporter gene is ER-mediated, and that superinduction by genistein could be ascribed to stabilization of the firefly luciferase reporter enzyme increasing the bioluminescent signal during the cell-based assay. This indicates that the phenomenon of superinduction may not be biologically relevant but may rather represent a post-transcriptional effect on enzyme stability.

  4. Novel application of pH-sensitive firefly luciferases as dual reporter genes for simultaneous ratiometric analysis of intracellular pH and gene expression/location.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Gabriele V M; Viviani, Vadim R

    2014-12-01

    Firefly luciferases are widely used as bioluminescent reporter genes for bioimaging and biosensors. Aiming at simultaneous analyses of different gene expression and cellular events, luciferases and GFPs that exhibit distinct bioluminescence and fluorescence colors have been coupled with each promoter, making dual and multicolor reporter systems. Despite their wide use, firefly luciferase bioluminescence spectra are pH-sensitive, resulting in a typical large red shift at acidic pH, a side-effect that may affect some bioanalytical purposes. Although some intracellular pH-indicators employ dual color and fluorescent dyes, none has been considered to benefit from the characteristic spectral pH-sensitivity of firefly luciferases to monitor intracellular pH-associated stress, an important indicator of cell homeostasis. Here we demonstrate a linear relationship between the ratio of intensities in the green and red regions of the bioluminescence spectra and pH using firefly luciferases cloned in our laboratory (Macrolampis sp2 and Cratomorphus distinctus), allowing estimation of E. coli intracellular pH, thus providing a new analytical method for ratiometric intracellular pH-sensing. This is the first dual reporter system that employs a single luciferase gene to simultaneously monitor intracellular pH using spectral changes, and gene expression and/or ATP concentration using the bioluminescence intensity, showing great potential for real time bioanalysis of intracellular processes associated with metabolic changes such as apoptosis, cell death, inflammation and tissue acidification, among the other physiological changes.

  5. Knockin of Cre Gene at Ins2 Locus Reveals No Cre Activity in Mouse Hypothalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Gao, Lin; Wang, Kejia; Ma, Xianhua; Chang, Xusheng; Shi, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Ye; Yin, Kai; Liu, Zhimin; Shi, Yuguang; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J.

    2016-01-01

    The recombination efficiency and cell specificity of Cre driver lines are critical for exploring pancreatic β cell biology with the Cre/LoxP approach. Some commonly used Cre lines are based on the short Ins2 promoter fragment and show recombination activity in hypothalamic neurons; however, whether this stems from endogenous Ins2 promoter activity remains controversial. In this study, we generated Ins2-Cre knockin mice with a targeted insertion of IRES-Cre at the Ins2 locus and demonstrated with a cell lineage tracing study that the Ins2 gene is not transcriptionally active in the hypothalamus. The Ins2-Cre driver line displayed robust Cre expression and activity in pancreatic β cells without significant alterations in insulin expression. In the brain, Cre activity was mainly restricted to the choroid plexus, without significant recombination detected in the hippocampus or hypothalamus by the LacZ or fluorescent tdTomato reporters. Furthermore, Ins2-Cre mice exhibited normal glucose tolerance and insulin secretion upon glucose stimulation in vivo. In conclusion, this Ins2-Cre driver line allowed high-fidelity detection of endogenous Ins2 promoter activity in vivo, and the negative activity in the hypothalamus demonstrated that this system is a promising alternative tool for studying β cell biology. PMID:26830324

  6. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  7. Gene-environment interactions in cancer epidemiology: a National Cancer Institute Think Tank report.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Carolyn M; Mechanic, Leah E; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillanders, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF] > 0.05) and less common (0.01 < MAF < 0.05) genetic variants associated with cancer. The marginal effects of most of these variants have been small (odds ratios: 1.1-1.4). There remain unanswered questions on how best to incorporate the joint effects of genes and environment, including gene-environment (G × E) interactions, into epidemiologic studies of cancer. To help address these questions, and to better inform research priorities and allocation of resources, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a "Gene-Environment Think Tank" on January 10-11, 2012. The objective of the Think Tank was to facilitate discussions on (1) the state of the science, (2) the goals of G × E interaction studies in cancer epidemiology, and (3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of G × E interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance, and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors.

  8. Fluorescence-based gene reporter plasmid to track canonical Wnt signaling in ENS inflammation.

    PubMed

    Di Liddo, Rosa; Bertalot, Thomas; Schuster, Anne; Schrenk, Sandra; Müller, Oliver; Apfel, Johanna; Reischmann, Patricia; Rajendran, Senthilkumar; Sfriso, Riccardo; Gasparella, Marco; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Schäfer, Karl Herbert

    2016-03-15

    In several gut inflammatory or cancer diseases, cell-cell interactions are compromised, and an increased cytoplasmic expression of β-catenin is observed. Over the last decade, numerous studies provided compelling experimental evidence that the loss of cadherin-mediated cell adhesion can promote β-catenin release and signaling without any specific activation of the canonical Wnt pathway. In the present work, we took advantage of the ability of lipofectamine-like reagent to cause a synchronous dissociation of adherent junctions in cells isolated from the rat enteric nervous system (ENS) for obtaining an in vitro model of deregulated β-catenin signaling. Under these experimental conditions, a green fluorescent protein Wnt reporter plasmid called ΔTop_EGFP3a was successfully tested to screen β-catenin stabilization at resting and primed conditions with exogenous Wnt3a or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). ΔTop_EGFP3a provided a reliable and strong fluorescent signal that was easily measurable and at the same time highly sensitive to modulations of Wnt signaling following Wnt3a and LPS stimulation. The reporter gene was useful to demonstrate that Wnt3a exerts a protective activity in the ENS from overstimulated Wnt signaling by promoting a downregulation of the total β-catenin level. Based on this evidence, the use of ΔTop_EGFP3a reporter plasmid could represent a more reliable tool for the investigation of Wnt and cross-talking pathways in ENS inflammation. PMID:26767983

  9. Fluorescence-based gene reporter plasmid to track canonical Wnt signaling in ENS inflammation.

    PubMed

    Di Liddo, Rosa; Bertalot, Thomas; Schuster, Anne; Schrenk, Sandra; Müller, Oliver; Apfel, Johanna; Reischmann, Patricia; Rajendran, Senthilkumar; Sfriso, Riccardo; Gasparella, Marco; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Schäfer, Karl Herbert

    2016-03-15

    In several gut inflammatory or cancer diseases, cell-cell interactions are compromised, and an increased cytoplasmic expression of β-catenin is observed. Over the last decade, numerous studies provided compelling experimental evidence that the loss of cadherin-mediated cell adhesion can promote β-catenin release and signaling without any specific activation of the canonical Wnt pathway. In the present work, we took advantage of the ability of lipofectamine-like reagent to cause a synchronous dissociation of adherent junctions in cells isolated from the rat enteric nervous system (ENS) for obtaining an in vitro model of deregulated β-catenin signaling. Under these experimental conditions, a green fluorescent protein Wnt reporter plasmid called ΔTop_EGFP3a was successfully tested to screen β-catenin stabilization at resting and primed conditions with exogenous Wnt3a or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). ΔTop_EGFP3a provided a reliable and strong fluorescent signal that was easily measurable and at the same time highly sensitive to modulations of Wnt signaling following Wnt3a and LPS stimulation. The reporter gene was useful to demonstrate that Wnt3a exerts a protective activity in the ENS from overstimulated Wnt signaling by promoting a downregulation of the total β-catenin level. Based on this evidence, the use of ΔTop_EGFP3a reporter plasmid could represent a more reliable tool for the investigation of Wnt and cross-talking pathways in ENS inflammation.

  10. Tumor-Specific Expression and Detection of a CEST Reporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Minn, Il; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Yarlagadda, Keerthi; Bulte, Jeff W. M.; Fisher, Paul B.; Wang, Hao; Gilad, Assaf A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop an imaging tool that enables the detection of malignant tissue with enhanced specificity using the exquisite spatial resolution of MRI. Methods Two mammalian gene expression vectors were created for the expression of the lysine-rich protein (LRP) under the control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter and the progression elevated gene-3 promoter (PEG-3 promoter) for constitutive and tumor-specific expression of LRP, respectively. Using those vectors, stable cell lines of rat 9L glioma, 9LCMV-LRP and 9LPEG-LRP, were established and tested for CEST contrast in vitro and in vivo. Results 9LPEG-LRP cells showed increased CEST contrast compared with 9L cells in vitro. Both 9LCMV-LRP and 9LPEG-LRP cells were capable of generating tumors in the brains of mice, with a similar growth rate to tumors derived from wild-type 9L cells. An increase in CEST contrast was clearly visible in tumors derived from both 9LCMV-LRP and 9LPEG-LRP cells at 3.4 ppm. Conclusion The PEG-3 promoter:LRP system can be used as a cancer-specific, molecular-genetic imaging reporter system in vivo. Because of the ubiquity of MR imaging in clinical practice, sensors of this class can be used to translate molecular-genetic imaging rapidly. PMID:25919119

  11. Tracing functional circuits using c-Fos regulated expression of marker genes targeted to neuronal projections.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Mark; Greferath, Ursula; Nag, Nupur; Nithianantharajah, Jess; Wilson, Yvette M

    2004-01-01

    We have developed novel techniques to trace functionally activated circuits and synaptic plasticity within the brain. We have generated transgenic mice, FTL, which contain a tau-lacZ fusion gene regulated by the promoter for c-fos. Following a particular nervous system stimulation in these mice, only neurons, which are functionally activated, will express LacZ, which is targeted to neuronal processes by the tau protein. In the FTL mice, we found highly inducible expression of lacZ by a range of different stimuli, and successful targeting of expression to neuronal cell bodies, axons and dendrites. To test if a functionally activated circuit could be visualized, the mice were deprived of water, which activates nuclei involved in body fluid homeostasis. LacZ was induced in these nuclei and their projections, allowing the mapping of a neuroendocrine circuit. Further studies have employed these mice in the analysis of neurons and circuits activated in vision, and learning and memory. We have also developed methods to measure markers of synaptic plasticity in the brain, and found significant experience dependent changes in the levels of these markers in different parts of the brain. We believe these techniques will aid in the identification of circuits for many different brain functions, and within those circuits, the locations of synaptic plasticity.

  12. Regulation of the acuF gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Michael J; Draht, Oliver W; Davis, Meryl A

    2002-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key enzyme required for gluconeogenesis when microorganisms grow on carbon sources metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Aspergillus nidulans acuF mutants isolated by their inability to use acetate as a carbon source specifically lack PEPCK. The acuF gene has been cloned and shown to encode a protein with high similarity to PEPCK from bacteria, plants, and fungi. The regulation of acuF expression has been studied by Northern blotting and by the construction of lacZ fusion reporters. Induction by acetate is abolished in mutants unable to metabolize acetate via the TCA cycle, and induction by amino acids metabolized via 2-oxoglutarate is lost in mutants unable to form 2-oxoglutarate. Induction by acetate and proline is not additive, consistent with a single mechanism of induction. Malate and succinate result in induction, and it is proposed that PEPCK is controlled by a novel mechanism of induction by a TCA cycle intermediate or derivative, thereby allowing gluconeogenesis to occur during growth on any carbon source metabolized via the TCA cycle. It has been shown that the facB gene, which mediates acetate induction of enzymes specifically required for acetate utilization, is not directly involved in PEPCK induction. This is in contrast to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where Cat8p and Sip4p, homologs of FacB, regulate PEPCK as well as the expression of other genes necessary for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources in response to the carbon source present. This difference in the control of gluconeogenesis reflects the ability of A. nidulans and other filamentous fungi to use a wide variety of carbon sources in comparison with S. cerevisiae. The acuF gene was also found to be subject to activation by the CCAAT binding protein AnCF, a protein homologous to the S. cerevisiae Hap complex and the mammalian NFY complex.

  13. Regulation of the acuF Gene, Encoding Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Michael J.; Draht, Oliver W.; Davis, Meryl A.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key enzyme required for gluconeogenesis when microorganisms grow on carbon sources metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Aspergillus nidulans acuF mutants isolated by their inability to use acetate as a carbon source specifically lack PEPCK. The acuF gene has been cloned and shown to encode a protein with high similarity to PEPCK from bacteria, plants, and fungi. The regulation of acuF expression has been studied by Northern blotting and by the construction of lacZ fusion reporters. Induction by acetate is abolished in mutants unable to metabolize acetate via the TCA cycle, and induction by amino acids metabolized via 2-oxoglutarate is lost in mutants unable to form 2-oxoglutarate. Induction by acetate and proline is not additive, consistent with a single mechanism of induction. Malate and succinate result in induction, and it is proposed that PEPCK is controlled by a novel mechanism of induction by a TCA cycle intermediate or derivative, thereby allowing gluconeogenesis to occur during growth on any carbon source metabolized via the TCA cycle. It has been shown that the facB gene, which mediates acetate induction of enzymes specifically required for acetate utilization, is not directly involved in PEPCK induction. This is in contrast to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where Cat8p and Sip4p, homologs of FacB, regulate PEPCK as well as the expression of other genes necessary for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources in response to the carbon source present. This difference in the control of gluconeogenesis reflects the ability of A. nidulans and other filamentous fungi to use a wide variety of carbon sources in comparison with S. cerevisiae. The acuF gene was also found to be subject to activation by the CCAAT binding protein AnCF, a protein homologous to the S. cerevisiae Hap complex and the mammalian NFY complex. PMID:11741859

  14. CAT5, a new gene necessary for derepression of gluconeogenic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Proft, M; Kötter, P; Hedges, D; Bojunga, N; Entian, K D

    1995-01-01

    PCK1 encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is transcriptionally regulated by two upstream activating elements. By screening for mutants that failed to derepress a UAS2PCK1-CYC1-lacZ reporter gene we isolated the new recessive derepression mutation cat5. The CAT5 gene encodes a protein of 272 amino acids showing a 42% identity to the ZC395.2 gene product of Caenorhabditis elegans whose function is unknown. Deletion of CAT5 caused a complete loss of glucose derepression affecting gluconeogenic key enzymes. Respiration, but not mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity, was also affected. CAT5 expression is 5- to 6-fold repressed by glucose, and CAT5 transcriptional activation was dependent on CAT1 (SNF1), CAT8 and CAT5 itself. The CAT5 gene is necessary for UAS1PCK1 and UAS2PCK1 protein binding since a carbon source-specific interaction was no longer detectable in cat5 mutants. Glucose derepression of gluconeogenesis depends on the active Cat1 (Snf1) protein kinase and the Cat8 zinc cluster activator. Mig1p-independent overexpression of CAT8 did not stimulate activation of gluconeogenic promoters in cat1 and in cat5 mutants. Since Cat8p multicopy expression suppresses the ethanol growth deficiency in cat1 (snf1) mutants, these results indicate that activation of Cat8p by the Cat1p (Snf1p) kinase and the Cat5p protein might be necessary for release from glucose repression. Images PMID:8557031

  15. Illumina MiSeq sequencing disfavours a sequence motif in the GFP reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Verhelst, Judith; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used reporter genes. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyse the genetic diversity of a recombinant influenza A virus that expresses GFP and found a remarkable coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence. This coverage dip was present when virus-derived RT-PCR product or the parental plasmid DNA was used as starting material for NGS and regardless of whether Nextera XT transposase or Covaris shearing was used for DNA fragmentation. Therefore, the sequence coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence was not the result of emerging GFP mutant viruses or a bias introduced by Nextera XT fragmentation. Instead, we found that the Illumina MiSeq sequencing method disfavours the 'CCCGCC' motif in the GFP coding sequence. PMID:27193250

  16. Exploitation of Herpesviral Transactivation Allows Quantitative Reporter Gene-Based Assessment of Virus Entry and Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Henrike; Le, Vu Thuy Khanh; Ohlin, Mats; Hengel, Hartmut; Trilling, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Herpesviral entry is a highly elaborated process requiring many proteins to act in precise conjunction. Neutralizing antibodies interfere with this process to abrogate viral infection. Based on promoter transactivation of a reporter gene we established a novel method to quantify herpesvirus entry and neutralization by antibodies. Following infection with mouse and human cytomegalovirus and Herpes simplex virus 1 we observed promoter transactivation resulting in substantial luciferase expression (>1000-fold). No induction was elicited by UV-inactivated viruses. The response was MOI-dependent and immunoblots confirmed a correlation between luciferase induction and pp72-IE1 expression. Monoclonal antibodies, immune sera and purified immunoglobulin preparations decreased virus-dependent luciferase induction dose-dependently, qualifying this approach as surrogate virus neutralization test. Besides the reduced hands-on time, this assay allows analysis of herpesvirus entry in semi-permissive and non-adherent cells, which were previously non-assessable but play significant roles in herpesvirus pathology. PMID:21264213

  17. Illumina MiSeq sequencing disfavours a sequence motif in the GFP reporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Verhelst, Judith; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used reporter genes. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyse the genetic diversity of a recombinant influenza A virus that expresses GFP and found a remarkable coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence. This coverage dip was present when virus-derived RT-PCR product or the parental plasmid DNA was used as starting material for NGS and regardless of whether Nextera XT transposase or Covaris shearing was used for DNA fragmentation. Therefore, the sequence coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence was not the result of emerging GFP mutant viruses or a bias introduced by Nextera XT fragmentation. Instead, we found that the Illumina MiSeq sequencing method disfavours the ‘CCCGCC’ motif in the GFP coding sequence. PMID:27193250

  18. Comparison of in vitro hormone activities of selected phthalates using reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ouxi; Du, Guizhen; Sun, Hong; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Song, Ling; Wang, Xinru

    2009-12-01

    Phthalates are widely used in the plastic industry and food packaging, imparting softness and flexibility to normally rigid plastic medical devices and children's toys. Even though phthalates display low general toxicity, there is increasing concern on the effects of endocrine system induced by some of phthalate compounds. The hormone activity of dibutyl phthalate (DBP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were assessed using the luciferase reporter gene assays. The results showed that DBP, MBP and DEHP, not only exhibited potent antiandrogenic activity, with IC(50) value of 1.05x10(-6), 1.22x10(-7)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M respectively, but also showed the androgenic activity with EC(50) value of 6.17x10(-6), 1.13x10(-5)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M. We also found that all the three related chemicals possessed thyroid receptor (TR) antagonist activity with IC(50) of 1.31x10(-5), 2.77x10(-6)M and exceeding 1x10(-4)M respectively, and none showed TR agonist activity. These results indicate that TR might be the targets of industrial chemicals. In the ER mediate reporter gene assay, three chemicals showed no agonistic activity except for DBP, which appeared weakly estrogenic at the concentration of 1.0x10(-4)M. Together, the findings demonstrate that the three phthalates could simultaneously disrupt the function of two or more hormonal receptors. Therefore, these phthalates should be considered in risk assessments for human health.

  19. Heterologous Expression of Mannanase and Developing a New Reporter Gene System in Lactobacillus casei and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinzhong; Zou, Yexia; Ma, Chengjie; She, Qunxin; Liang, Yunxiang; Chen, Zhengjun; Ge, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Reporter gene systems are useful for studying bacterial molecular biology, including the regulation of gene expression and the histochemical analysis of protein products. Here, two genes, β-1,4-mannanase (manB) from Bacillus pumilus and β-glucuronidase (gusA) from Escherichia coli K12, were cloned into the expression vector pELX1. The expression patterns of these reporter genes in Lactobacillus casei were investigated by measuring their enzymatic activities and estimating their recombinant protein yields using western blot analysis. Whereas mannanase activity was positively correlated with the accumulation of ManB during growth, GusA activity was not; western blot analysis indicated that while the amount of GusA protein increased during later growth stages, GusA activity gradually decreased, indicating that the enzyme was inactive during cell growth. A similar trend was observed in E. coli JM109. We chose to use the more stable mannanase gene as the reporter to test secretion expression in L. casei. Two pELX1-based secretion vectors were constructed: one carried the signal peptide of the unknown secretion protein Usp45 from Lactococcus lactis (pELSH), and the other contained the full-length SlpA protein from the S-layer of L. acidophilus (pELWH). The secretion of ManB was detected in the supernatant of the pELSH-ManB transformants and in the S-layer of the cell surface of the pELWH-ManB transformants. This is the first report demonstrating that the B. pumilus manB gene is a useful reporter gene in L. casei and E.coli. PMID:26562012

  20. Epithelial and endothelial expression of the green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of bovine prion protein (PrP) gene regulatory sequences in transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire-Vieille, Catherine; Schulze, Tobias; Podevin-Dimster, Valérie; Follet, Jérome; Bailly, Yannick; Blanquet-Grossard, Françoise; Decavel, Jean-Pierre; Heinen, Ernst; Cesbron, Jean-Yves

    2000-05-01

    The expression of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPc) gene is required for prion replication and neuroinvasion in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The identification of the cell types expressing PrPc is necessary to understanding how the agent replicates and spreads from peripheral sites to the central nervous system. To determine the nature of the cell types expressing PrPc, a green fluorescent protein reporter gene was expressed in transgenic mice under the control of 6.9 kb of the bovine PrP gene regulatory sequences. It was shown that the bovine PrP gene is expressed as two populations of mRNA differing by alternative splicing of one 115-bp 5' untranslated exon in 17 different bovine tissues. The analysis of transgenic mice showed reporter gene expression in some cells that have been identified as expressing PrP, such as cerebellar Purkinje cells, lymphocytes, and keratinocytes. In addition, expression of green fluorescent protein was observed in the plexus of the enteric nervous system and in a restricted subset of cells not yet clearly identified as expressing PrP: the epithelial cells of the thymic medullary and the endothelial cells of both the mucosal capillaries of the intestine and the renal capillaries. These data provide valuable information on the distribution of PrPc at the cellular level and argue for roles of the epithelial and endothelial cells in the spread of infection from the periphery to the brain. Moreover, the transgenic mice described in this paper provide a model that will allow for the study of the transcriptional activity of the PrP gene promoter in response to scrapie infection.

  1. In vitro study for laser gene transfer in BHK-21 fibroblast cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aziz, M.; Salem, D. S.; Salama, M. S.; Badr, Y.

    2009-02-01

    Modifications to our previously introduced system for laser microbeam cell surgery were carried out in the present work to match animal cells. These modifications included: 1- Using other laser system that used before, Excimer laser with 193 and 308 nm wavelengths. The used laser here, is He-Cd with low power and 441.5 nm wavelength in the visible region. 2- Instead of using pulsed laser, we used here CW He-Cd chopped by electrical chopper, which is synchronized with the mechanical motion of the mobile stage with step 40 microns, according to cell dimensions to avoid puncturing the same cell twice. The advantages of the modified here laser setup for gene transfer is: it is less damaging to the sensitive animal cell which has thin cell membrane. The present work aimed to: 1- Design a modified laser microbeam cell surgery, applicable to animal cells, such as fibroblast cells 2- To examine the efficiency of such system. 3- To assure gene transfer and its expression in the used cells. 4- To evaluate the ultra damages produced from using the laser beam as a modality for gene transfer. On the other wards, to introduce: safe, efficient and less damaging modality for gene transfer in animal cells. To achieve these goals, we applied the introduced here home-made laser setup with its synchronized parameters to introduce pBK-CMV phagemid, containing LacZ and neomycin resistance (neor )genes into BHK-21 fibroblast cell line. The results of the present work showed that: 1- Our modified laser microbeam cell surgery setup proved to be useful and efficient tool for gene transfer into fibroblast cells. 2- The presence and expression of LacZ gene was achieved using histochemical LacZ assay. 3- Selection of G418 antibiotic sensitivity assay confirmed the presence and expression towards stability of neor gene with time. 4- Presence of LacZ and neor genes in the genomic DNA of transfected fibroblast cells was indicated using PCR analysis. 5- Transmission electron microscopy indicated

  2. Affinity labelling with a deaminatively generated carbonium ion. Kinetics and stoicheiometry of the alkylation of methionine-500 of the lacZ beta-galactosidase of Escherichia coli by beta-D-galactopyranosylmethyl-p-nitrophenyltriazene.

    PubMed Central

    Sinnott, M L; Smith, P J

    1978-01-01

    1. beta-D-Galactopyranosylmethyl-p-nitrophenyltriazene is an active-site-directed irreversible inhibitor of Mg2+-bound and Mg2+-free lacZ beta-galactosidase from Escherichia coli. 2. The Mg2+-enzyme binds the inhibitor more tightly but the complex then decomposes less rapidly than is the case with Mg2+-free enzyme. 3. Loss of enzyme activity is a linear function of the fraction of enzyme protomers to which are attached beta-D-galactopranosyl[14C]methyl residues: complete inactivation of fully active enzyme results in incorporation of 0.91 equivalent of carbohydrate label per enzyme protomer. 4. When the beta-galactopyranosylmethyl cation is generated in the active site of Mg2+-enzyme, it is captured essentially completely by the protein, but in the active site of Mg2+-free enzyme it is only captured with an efficiency of 25%. 5. Labelled enzyme was carboxymethylated and digested with trypsin; acidic hydrolysis of the isolated tryptic peptide, and field-desorption mass spectrometry of the isolated radioactive derivative, showed it to be 2,5-dioxo-3[2-(beta-D-galactopyranosylmethylthio)ethyl]-1,6-trimethylenepiperazine. 6. This is considered to have arisen from labelling of the sulphur atom of a methionine residue adjacent to a proline residue. 7. The complete amino acid sequence of the molecule [Fowler & Zabin (1977) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 74, 1507-1510] enables the labelled methionine residue to be identified as either Met-421 or Met-500. 8. Sequence data [Fowler, Zabin, Sinnott & Smith (1978) J. Biol. Chem. in the press] show the site of attack to be Met-500. PMID:105721

  3. Conditional deletion of the relaxin receptor gene in cells of smooth muscle lineage affects lower reproductive tract in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Huang, Zaohua; Lopez, Carolina; Conrad, Kirk; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2015-04-01

    Relaxin hormone secreted into the circulation during pregnancy was discovered through its effects on pubic symphysis relaxation and parturition. Genetic inactivation of the relaxin gene or its cognate relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) in mice caused failure of parturition and mammary nipple enlargement, as well as increased collagen fiber density in the cervix and vagina. However, the relaxin effect on discrete cells and tissues has yet to be determined. Using transgenic mice with a knockin LacZ reporter in the Rxfp1 allele, we showed strong expression of this gene in vaginal and cervical stromal cells, as well as pubic ligament cells. We produced a floxed Rxfp1 allele that was used in combination with the Tagln-cre transgene to generate mice with a smooth muscle-specific gene knockout. In pregnant females, the ROSA26 reporter activated by Tagln-cre was detected in smooth muscle cells of the cervix, vagina, uterine artery, and in cells of the pubic symphysis. In late pregnant females with conditional gene ablation, the length of pubic symphysis was significantly reduced compared with wild-type or heterozygous Rxfp1(+/-) females. Denser collagen content was revealed by Masson trichrome staining in reproductive tract organs, uterine artery, and pubic symphysis. The cervical and vaginal epithelium was less developed than in heterozygous or wild-type females, although nipple size was normal and the dams were able to nurse their pups. In summary, our data indicate that relaxin/RXFP1 signaling in smooth muscle cells is important for normal collagen turnover and relaxation of the pubic symphysis during pregnancy.

  4. Construction and preliminary evaluation of an Aspergillus flavus reporter gene construct as a potential tool for screening aflatoxin resistance.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert L; Brown-Jenco, Carmen S; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Payne, Gary A

    2003-10-01

    Effective preharvest strategies to eliminate aflatoxin accumulation in crops are not presently available. The molecular biology of aflatoxin biosynthesis has been extensively studied, and genetic and molecular tools such as reporter gene systems for the measurement of fungal growth have been developed. A reporter construct containing the Aspergillus flavus beta-tubulin gene promoter fused to Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase (GUS) has been shown to be a reliable tool for the indirect measurement of fungal growth in maize kernels. Since cost-saving alternative methods for the direct measurement of aflatoxin levels are needed to facilitate more widespread field and laboratory screening of maize lines, a new reporter gene construct involving the promoter region of the omtA gene of the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway was constructed and tested. Expression of GUS activity by this construct (omtA::GUS) was correlated with aflatoxin accumulation in culture. In the fungal transformant GAP26-1, which harbors this construct, aflatoxin production and GUS expression on sucrose-containing medium showed the same temporal pattern of toxin induction. Furthermore, GUS expression by GAP26-1 was shown to be associated with aflatoxin accumulation in maize kernels inoculated with this strain. Our results suggest that this and other reporter gene pathway promoter constructs may provide superior alternatives to direct aflatoxin quantification with respect to time, labor, and materials for the screening of maize lines for resistance to aflatoxin accumulation. PMID:14572235

  5. Construction and preliminary evaluation of an Aspergillus flavus reporter gene construct as a potential tool for screening aflatoxin resistance.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert L; Brown-Jenco, Carmen S; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Payne, Gary A

    2003-10-01

    Effective preharvest strategies to eliminate aflatoxin accumulation in crops are not presently available. The molecular biology of aflatoxin biosynthesis has been extensively studied, and genetic and molecular tools such as reporter gene systems for the measurement of fungal growth have been developed. A reporter construct containing the Aspergillus flavus beta-tubulin gene promoter fused to Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase (GUS) has been shown to be a reliable tool for the indirect measurement of fungal growth in maize kernels. Since cost-saving alternative methods for the direct measurement of aflatoxin levels are needed to facilitate more widespread field and laboratory screening of maize lines, a new reporter gene construct involving the promoter region of the omtA gene of the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway was constructed and tested. Expression of GUS activity by this construct (omtA::GUS) was correlated with aflatoxin accumulation in culture. In the fungal transformant GAP26-1, which harbors this construct, aflatoxin production and GUS expression on sucrose-containing medium showed the same temporal pattern of toxin induction. Furthermore, GUS expression by GAP26-1 was shown to be associated with aflatoxin accumulation in maize kernels inoculated with this strain. Our results suggest that this and other reporter gene pathway promoter constructs may provide superior alternatives to direct aflatoxin quantification with respect to time, labor, and materials for the screening of maize lines for resistance to aflatoxin accumulation.

  6. [Expression of rice dwarf virus outer coat protein gene(S8) in insect cells].

    PubMed

    Li, S; Liu, H; Chen, Z; Li, Y

    2001-04-01

    Outer coat protein gene(S8) of RDV was cloned into the transfer vector pVL 1393 to construct a recombinant vector pVL1393-S8. The recombinant vector pVL1393-S8 and the linear baculovirus RP23. LacZ were cotransfected into sf9 cells to produce the recombinant virus RP23-S8. RP23-S8 infected sf9 cells were collected and analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot. The results showed that the S8 gene of RDV was expressed in sf9 cells and the expression level of sf9 cells was higher between 72-96 h after infected.

  7. Activation of the lac genes of Tn951 by insertion sequences from Pseudomonas cepacia.

    PubMed

    Wood, M S; Lory, C; Lessie, T G

    1990-04-01

    We have identified three transposable gene-activating elements from Pseudomonas cepacia on the basis of their abilities to increase expression of the lac genes of the broad-host-range plasmid pGC91.14 (pRP1::Tn951). When introduced into auxotrophic derivatives of P. cepacia 249 (ATCC 17616), this plasmid failed to confer the ability to utilize lactose. The lac genes of Tn951 were poorly expressed in P. cepacia and were not induced by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside. Lac+ variants of the pGC91.14-containing strains which formed beta-galactosidase at high constitutive levels as a consequence of transposition of insertion sequences from the P. cepacia genome to sites upstream of the lacZ gene of Tn951 were isolated. Certain of the elements also increased gene expression in other bacteria. For example, IS407 strongly activated the lacZ gene of Tn951 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, and IS406 (but not IS407) did so in Zymomonas mobilis. The results indicate that IS elements from P. cepacia have potential for turning on the expression of foreign genes in a variety of gram-negative bacteria. PMID:2156800

  8. An extract from Prospects and Risks of Gene Technology: The Report of the Enquete Commission to the Bundestag of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    PubMed

    1988-07-01

    We are pleased to publish an English translation of the crucial section on germ line gene therapy from the Report of the German Enquete Commission. This section of the Report raises basic ethical questions concerning embryo research, as well as more specific questions relating to germ line gene therapy. This form of gene therapy involves genetic modification of the germ cells. Such a modification would be passed on to any descendents of the person whose genes had been altered. The Report had previously dealt with somatic gene therapy, which does not affect the germ line and hence is not passed on to descendents.

  9. Cold shock genes cspA and cspB from Caulobacter crescentus are posttranscriptionally regulated and important for cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mazzon, Ricardo R; Lang, Elza A S; Silva, Carolina A P T; Marques, Marilis V

    2012-12-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSPs) are nucleic acid binding chaperones, first described as being induced to solve the problem of mRNA stabilization after temperature downshift. Caulobacter crescentus has four CSPs: CspA and CspB, which are cold induced, and CspC and CspD, which are induced only in stationary phase. In this work we have determined that the synthesis of both CspA and CspB reaches the maximum levels early in the acclimation phase. The deletion of cspA causes a decrease in growth at low temperature, whereas the strain with a deletion of cspB has a very subtle and transient cold-related growth phenotype. The cspA cspB double mutant has a slightly more severe phenotype than that of the cspA mutant, suggesting that although CspA may be more important to cold adaptation than CspB, both proteins have a role in this process. Gene expression analyses were carried out using cspA and cspB regulatory fusions to the lacZ reporter gene and showed that both genes are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Deletion mapping of the long 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of each gene identified a common region important for cold induction, probably via translation enhancement. In contrast to what was reported for other bacteria, these cold shock genes have no regulatory regions downstream from ATG that are important for cold induction. This work shows that the importance of CspA and CspB to C. crescentus cold adaptation, mechanisms of regulation, and pattern of expression during the acclimation phase apparently differs in many aspects from what has been described so far for other bacteria.

  10. 'Obesity Gene' Doesn't Affect Ability to Lose Weight: Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161090.html 'Obesity Gene' Doesn't Affect Ability to Lose Weight: ... 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Having the so-called "obesity gene" doesn't affect people's ability to shed ...

  11. Reconstitution of acetosyringone-mediated Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence gene expression in the heterologous host Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lohrke, S M; Yang, H; Jin, S

    2001-06-01

    The ability to utilize Escherichia coli as a heterologous system in which to study the regulation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes and the mechanism of transfer DNA (T-DNA) transfer would provide an important tool to our understanding and manipulation of these processes. We have previously reported that the rpoA gene encoding the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase is required for the expression of lacZ gene under the control of virB promoter (virBp::lacZ) in E. coli containing a constitutively active virG gene [virG(Con)]. Here we show that an RpoA hybrid containing the N-terminal 247 residues from E. coli and the C-terminal 89 residues from A. tumefaciens was able to significantly express virBp::lacZ in E. coli in a VirG(Con)-dependent manner. Utilization of lac promoter-driven virA and virG in combination with the A. tumefaciens rpoA construct resulted in significant inducer-mediated expression of the virBp::lacZ fusion, and the level of virBp::lacZ expression was positively correlated to the copy number of the rpoA construct. This expression was dependent on VirA, VirG, temperature, and, to a lesser extent, pH, which is similar to what is observed in A. tumefaciens. Furthermore, the effect of sugars on vir gene expression was observed only in the presence of the chvE gene, suggesting that the glucose-binding protein of E. coli, a homologue of ChvE, does not interact with the VirA molecule. We also evaluated other phenolic compounds in induction assays and observed significant expression with syringealdehyde, a low level of expression with acetovanillone, and no expression with hydroxyacetophenone, similar to what occurs in A. tumefaciens strain A348 from which the virA clone was derived. These data support the notion that VirA directly senses the phenolic inducer. However, the overall level of expression of the vir genes in E. coli is less than what is observed in A. tumefaciens, suggesting that additional gene(s) from A. tumefaciens may be required for

  12. Asynchronous Bilateral Renal Infarction and Thrombophilia With Associated Gene Mutations in a 43-Year-Old Man: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu-Jie; Liu, Li-Jun; Chen, Min; Zhou, Fu-De

    2016-04-01

    Renal infarction (RI) is frequently misdiagnosed or diagnosed late because of its rarity and nonspecific clinical presentation, which may result in irreversible damage to the renal parenchyma or increase the risk of other embolic events affecting additional organs. Multiple causal mechanisms and cases of idiopathic RI have been reported, but the causal factors are not clear in most cases.Here, we report the case of a patient with heterochronic bilateral RI caused by thrombophilia. Although he had several risk factors for hypercoagulation disorders, two gene mutations-MTHFR 677 C>T and PLG 1858G>A-were identified by genome sequencing of the entire exome. The findings suggest the possibility of a synergistic relationship between the two gene mutations.Thus, screening for gene mutations may provide additional clues for clarifying the cause of RI and thrombophilia.

  13. Lenz-Majewski syndrome: Report of a case with novel mutation in PTDSS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Tamhankar, Parag M; Vasudevan, Lakshmi; Bansal, Vandana; Menon, Shyla R; Gawde, Harshavardhan M; D'Souza, Aruna; Babu, Shiny; Kondurkar, Shweta; Adhia, Rashmi; Das, Dhanjit Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Lenz-Majewski syndrome (LMS) is an extremely rare syndrome characterized by osteosclerosis, intellectual disability, characteristic facies and distinct craniofacial, dental, cutaneous and distal - limb anomalies. Recently, mutations in PTDSS1 gene have been identified as causative in six unrelated individuals. We report the seventh mutation proven case of LMS and provide a concise review of all known patients till date.

  14. Construction of a Multiplex Promoter Reporter Platform to Monitor Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression and the Identification of Usnic Acid as a Potent Suppressor of psm Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Yanli; Villanueva, Iván; Ho, Pak Leung; Davies, Julian; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm. PMID:27625639

  15. Combining random gene fission and rational gene fusion to discover near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments that report on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Naresh; Nobles, Christopher L; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Maresso, Anthony W; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2015-05-15

    Gene fission can convert monomeric proteins into two-piece catalysts, reporters, and transcription factors for systems and synthetic biology. However, some proteins can be challenging to fragment without disrupting function, such as near-infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). We describe a directed evolution strategy that can overcome this challenge by randomly fragmenting proteins and concomitantly fusing the protein fragments to pairs of proteins or peptides that associate. We used this method to create libraries that express fragmented IFP as fusions to a pair of associating peptides (IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3) and proteins (CheA and CheY) and screened for fragmented IFP with detectable near-infrared fluorescence. Thirteen novel fragmented IFPs were identified, all of which arose from backbone fission proximal to the interdomain linker. Either the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides or CheA and CheY proteins could assist with IFP fragment complementation, although the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides consistently yielded higher fluorescence. These results demonstrate how random gene fission can be coupled to rational gene fusion to create libraries enriched in fragmented proteins with AND gate logic that is dependent upon a protein-protein interaction, and they suggest that these near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments will be suitable as reporters for pairs of promoters and protein-protein interactions within whole animals.

  16. Construction of a Multiplex Promoter Reporter Platform to Monitor Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression and the Identification of Usnic Acid as a Potent Suppressor of psm Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Yanli; Villanueva, Iván; Ho, Pak Leung; Davies, Julian; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm.

  17. Construction of a Multiplex Promoter Reporter Platform to Monitor Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression and the Identification of Usnic Acid as a Potent Suppressor of psm Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Yanli; Villanueva, Iván; Ho, Pak Leung; Davies, Julian; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm. PMID:27625639

  18. Inducible expression of photoacoustic reporter gene tyrosinase in cells using a single plasmid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tyrosinase is a reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging since tyrosinase is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of melanin, a pigment capable of producing strong photoacoustic signals. We previously created a cell line capable of inducible tyrosinase expression (important due to toxicity of melanin) by stably transfecting tyrosinase in MCF-7 Tet-OnR cell line (Clontech) which expresses a doxycycline-controlled transactivator. Unfortunately, Clontech provides few Tet-On Advanced cell lines making it difficult to have inducible tyrosinase expression in cell lines not provided by Clontech. In order to simplify the creation of cell lines with inducible expression of tyrosinase, we created a single plasmid that encodes both the transactivator as well as tyrosinase. PCR was used to amplify both the transactivator and tyrosinase from the Tet-OnR Advanced and pTRE-Tight-TYR plasmids, respectively. Both PCR products were cloned into the pEGFP-N1 plasmid and the newly created plasmid was transfected into ZR-75-1, MCF-7, and MIA PaCa-1 cells using lipofectamine. After several days, brown melanin was only observed in cells incubated with doxycycline, suggesting that the newly created single plasmid allowed inducible tyrosinase expression in many different cells lines.

  19. Quantification for total demethylation potential of environmental samples utilizing the EGFP reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yan; Wang, Xiao-li; Lv, Zhan-lu; Tysklind, Mats; Guo, Chen; Liang, Bao; Wu, Jia-bing; Yang, Yong-jian; Yang, Yi-shu; Wang, Fei-fei; Duan, Xiao-li; Ma, Jin; Wei, Yong-jie; Wang, Chun-hui; Yang, Li-xin; Zhang, Jin-liang; Shi, Xiao-ming; Wang, Xian-liang

    2016-04-01

    The demethylation potential of pollutants is arguably an innate component of their toxicity in environmental samples. A method was developed for determining the total demethylation potential of food samples (TDQ). The demethylation epigenetic toxicity was determined using the Hep G2 cell line transfected with pEGFP-C3 plasmids containing a methylated promoter of the EGFP reporter gene. The total demethylation potential of the sample extracts (the 5-AZA-CdR demethylation toxic equivalency) can be quantified within one week by using a standard curve of the 5-AZA-CdR demethylation agent. To explore the applicability of TDQ for environmental samples, 17 groundwater samples were collected from heavy polluted Kuihe river and the total demethylation potentials of the sample extracts were measured successfully. Meaningful demethylation toxic equivalencies ranging from 0.00050 to 0.01747μM were found in all groundwater sample extracts. Among 19 kinds of inorganic substance, As and Cd played important roles for individual contribution to the total demethylation epigenetic toxicity. The TDQ assay is reliable and fast for quantifying the DNA demethylation potential of environmental sample extracts, which may improve epigenetic toxicity evaluations for human risk assessment, and the consistent consuming of groundwater alongside the Kuihe river pose unexpected epigenetic health risk to the local residents. PMID:26774982

  20. Galactose and Lactose Genes from the Galactose-Positive Bacterium Streptococcus salivarius and the Phylogenetically Related Galactose-Negative Bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus: Organization, Sequence, Transcription, and Activity of the gal Gene Products

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, Katy; Moineau, Sylvain; Frenette, Michel; Lessard, Christian; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a lactose- and galactose-positive bacterium that is phylogenetically closely related to Streptococcus thermophilus, a bacterium that metabolizes lactose but not galactose. In this paper, we report a comparative characterization of the S. salivarius and S. thermophilus gal-lac gene clusters. The clusters have the same organization with the order galR (codes for a transcriptional regulator and is transcribed in the opposite direction), galK (galactokinase), galT (galactose-1-P uridylyltransferase), galE (UDP-glucose 4-epimerase), galM (galactose mutarotase), lacS (lactose transporter), and lacZ (β-galactosidase). An analysis of the nucleotide sequence as well as Northern blotting and primer extension experiments revealed the presence of four promoters located upstream from galR, the gal operon, galM, and the lac operon of S. salivarius. Putative promoters with virtually identical nucleotide sequences were found at the same positions in the S. thermophilus gal-lac gene cluster. An additional putative internal promoter at the 3′ end of galT was found in S. thermophilus but not in S. salivarius. The results clearly indicated that the gal-lac gene cluster was efficiently transcribed in both species. The Shine-Dalgarno sequences of galT and galE were identical in both species, whereas the ribosome binding site of S. thermophilus galK differed from that of S. salivarius by two nucleotides, suggesting that the S. thermophilus galK gene might be poorly translated. This was confirmed by measurements of enzyme activities. PMID:11790749

  1. Functional visualization and disruption of targeted genes using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated eGFP reporter integration in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Satoshi; Taimatsu, Kiyohito; Yanagi, Kanoko; Namiki, Tomohiro; Ohga, Rie; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 complex, which is composed of a guide RNA (gRNA) and the Cas9 nuclease, is useful for carrying out genome modifications in various organisms. Recently, the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated locus-specific integration of a reporter, which contains the Mbait sequence targeted using Mbait-gRNA, the hsp70 promoter and the eGFP gene, has allowed the visualization of the target gene expression. However, it has not been ascertained whether the reporter integrations at both targeted alleles cause loss-of-function phenotypes in zebrafish. In this study, we have inserted the Mbait-hs-eGFP reporter into the pax2a gene because the disruption of pax2a causes the loss of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) in zebrafish. In the heterozygous Tg[pax2a-hs:eGFP] embryos, MHB formed normally and the eGFP expression recapitulated the endogenous pax2a expression, including the MHB. We observed the loss of the MHB in homozygous Tg[pax2a-hs:eGFP] embryos. Furthermore, we succeeded in integrating the Mbait-hs-eGFP reporter into an uncharacterized gene epdr1. The eGFP expression in heterozygous Tg[epdr1-hs:eGFP] embryos overlapped the epdr1 expression, whereas the distribution of eGFP-positive cells was disorganized in the MHB of homozygous Tg[epdr1-hs:eGFP] embryos. We propose that the locus-specific integration of the Mbait-hs-eGFP reporter is a powerful method to investigate both gene expression profiles and loss-of-function phenotypes. PMID:27725766

  2. Transfer of a plant chitinase gene into a nitrogen-fixing Azospirillum and study of its expression.

    PubMed

    Jayaraj, Jayaraman; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Liang, George H

    2004-07-01

    Azospirillum is used extensively in rice and other cereal crops as a biofertilizer. There is a substantial opportunity to improve the efficiency of this bacterium through the transfer of genes of agricultural importance from other organisms. Chitinases are antifungal proteins, and expression of chitinase genes in Azospirillum would help to develop strains with potential antifungal activities. So far there are no reports about transfer of plant genes into Azospirillum and their expression. The present study was aimed at expressing an antifungal gene (a rice chitinase) of plant origin in Azospirillum brasilense. A rice chitinase cDNA (RC 7) that codes for a 35 kDa protein was subcloned into a broad host range plasmid pDSK519 under the control of LacZ promoter. The plasmid was mobilized into the nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Azospirillum brasilense strain SP51eFL1, through biparental mating. The conjugation frequency was in the range of 35-40 x 10(-6). The transconjugants grew in nitrogen-free media and fixed gaseous nitrogen in vitro. However, their growth and nitrogen-fixing ability were slightly less than those of the wild-type. Expression of the protein was demonstrated through western blotting of the total cell protein, which detected a 35 kDa band that was immuno-reactive to a barley chitinase antibody. The cell lysates also hydrolyzed various chitin substrates, which resulted in release of free sugars demonstrating the chitinase activity of transconjugants. The expressed protein also had antifungal activity as demonstrated by inhibition of growth of the plant pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani.

  3. Repression of btuB gene transcription in Escherichia coli by the GadX protein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background BtuB (B  twelve uptake) is an outer membrane protein of Escherichia coli, it serves as a receptor for cobalamines uptake or bactericidal toxin entry. A decrease in the production of the BtuB protein would cause E. coli to become resistant to colicins. The production of BtuB has been shown to be regulated at the post-transcriptional level. The secondary structure switch of 5' untranslated region of butB and the intracellular concentration of adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl) would affect the translation efficiency and RNA stability of btuB. The transcriptional regulation of btuB expression is still unclear. Results To determine whether the btuB gene is also transcriptionally controlled by trans-acting factors, a genomic library was screened for clones that enable E. coli to grow in the presence of colicin E7, and a plasmid carrying gadX and gadY genes was isolated. The lacZ reporter gene assay revealed that these two genes decreased the btuB promoter activity by approximately 50%, and the production of the BtuB protein was reduced by approximately 90% in the presence of a plasmid carrying both gadX and gadY genes in E. coli as determined by Western blotting. Results of electrophoretic mobility assay and DNase I footprinting indicated that the GadX protein binds to the 5' untranslated region of the btuB gene. Since gadX and gadY genes are more highly expressed under acidic conditions, the transcriptional level of btuB in cells cultured in pH 7.4 or pH 5.5 medium was examined by quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the effect of GadX. The results showed the transcription of gadX with 1.4-fold increase but the level of btuB was reduced to 57%. Conclusions Through biological and biochemical analysis, we have demonstrated the GadX can directly interact with btuB promoter and affect the expression of btuB. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that the expression of btuB gene is transcriptionally repressed by the acid responsive genes gadX and

  4. Pine Gene Discovery Project - Final Report - 08/31/1997 - 02/28/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Whetten, R. W.; Sederoff, R. R.; Kinlaw, C.; Retzel, E.

    2001-04-30

    Integration of pines into the large scope of plant biology research depends on study of pines in parallel with study of annual plants, and on availability of research materials from pine to plant biologists interested in comparing pine with annual plant systems. The objectives of the Pine Gene Discovery Project were to obtain 10,000 partial DNA sequences of genes expressed in loblolly pine, to determine which of those pine genes were similar to known genes from other organisms, and to make the DNA sequences and isolated pine genes available to plant researchers to stimulate integration of pines into the wider scope of plant biology research. Those objectives have been completed, and the results are available to the public. Requests for pine genes have been received from a number of laboratories that would otherwise not have included pine in their research, indicating that progress is being made toward the goal of integrating pine research into the larger molecular biology research community.

  5. Floral-dip transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana to examine pTSO2::beta-glucuronidase reporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mara, Chloe; Grigorova, Boyana; Liu, Zhongchi

    2010-06-11

    The ability to introduce foreign genes into an organism is the foundation for modern biology and biotechnology. In the model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the floral-dip transformation method has replaced all previous methods because of its simplicity, efficiency, and low cost. Specifically, shoots of young flowering Arabidopsis plants are dipped in a solution of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying specific plasmid constructs. After dipping, the plants are returned to normal growth and yield seeds, a small percentage of which are transformed with the foreign gene and can be selected for on medium containing antibiotics. This floral-dip method significantly facilitated Arabidopsis research and contributed greatly to our understanding of plant gene function. In this study, we use the floral-dip method to transform a reporter gene, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), under the control of TSO2 promoter. TSO2, coding for the Ribonucleotide Reductase (RNR) small subunit, is a cell cycle regulated gene essential for dNDP biosynthesis in the S-phase of the cell cycle. Examination of GUS expression in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings shows that TSO2 is expressed in actively dividing tissues. The reported experimental method and materials can be easily adapted not only for research but also for education at high school and college levels.

  6. Use of bacterial and firefly luciferases as reporter genes in DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Pazzagli, M; Devine, J H; Peterson, D O; Baldwin, T O

    1992-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three different luciferase genes by placing them in a single reporter vector and expressing them in the same mammalian cell type. The luciferase genes investigated were the luc genes from the fireflies Photinus pyralis (PP) and Luciola mingrelica (LM) and the lux AB5 gene, a translational fusion of the two subunits of the bacterial luciferase from Vibrio harveyi (VH). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was also included in this study for comparison. The performances of the assay methods of the corresponding enzymes were evaluated using reference materials and the results of the expressed enzymes following transfection were calculated using calibration curves. All of the bioluminescent assays possess high reproducibility both within and between the batches (less than 15%). The comparison of the assay methods shows that firefly luciferases have the highest detection sensitivity (0.05 and 0.08 amol for PP and LM, respectively) whereas the VH bacterial luciferase has 5 amol and CAT 100 amol. On the other hand, the transfection of the various plasmids shows that the content of the expressed enzyme within the cells is much higher for CAT than for the other luciferase genes. VH luciferase is expressed at very low levels in mammalian cells due to the relatively high temperature of growing of the mammalian cells that seems to impair the correct folding of the active enzyme. PP and LM luciferases are both expressed at picomolar level but usually 10 to 70 times less in content with respect to CAT within the transfected cells. On the basis of these results the overall improvement in sensitivity related to the use of firefly luciferases as reporter genes in mammalian cells is about 30 to 50 times with respect to that of CAT. PMID:1443530

  7. Site-specific recombination-based genetic system for reporting transient or low-level gene expression.

    PubMed

    Casavant, N Carol; Beattie, Gwyn A; Phillips, Gregory J; Halverson, Larry J

    2002-07-01

    We report here the construction, characterization, and application of a plasmid-based genetic system that reports the expression of a target promoter by effecting an irreversible, heritable change in a bacterial cell. This system confers strong repression of the reporter gene gfp in the absence of target promoter expression and utilizes the site-specific recombination machinery of bacteriophage P22 to trigger high-level reporter gene expression in the original cell and its progeny after target gene induction. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this genetic system by tailoring it to indicate the availability of arabinose to the biological control agent Enterobacter cloacae JL1157 in culture and in the barley rhizosphere. The presence of bioavailable arabinose triggered the production of P22 excisionase and integrase from the reporter plasmid pAraLHB in JL1157, and this led to excision of the cI repressor gene, which is flanked by att sites, and the subsequent irreversible expression of gfp in the original cell and in its progeny. In culture, nearly 100% of an E. cloacae JL1157(pAraLHB) population expressed gfp after exposure to 6.5 to 65 microM arabinose for 3 h. We used this biosensor to demonstrate that arabinose was released from the seeds of several legumes and grass species during germination and from roots of barley seedlings grown hydroponically or in soil. When introduced into microcosms containing barley, the biosensor permitted the localization of arabinose along the roots. Arabinose was present near the root-seed junction and on the seminal roots but was not detected at the root tips. This recombination-based reporter system should be useful for monitoring bacterial exposure to transient or low levels of specific molecules directly in the environment.

  8. Use of influenza A viruses expressing reporter genes to assess the frequency of double infections in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bodewes, R; Nieuwkoop, N J; Verburgh, R J; Fouchier, R A M; Osterhaus, A D M E; Rimmelzwaan, G F

    2012-08-01

    Exchange of gene segments between mammalian and avian influenza A viruses may lead to the emergence of potential pandemic influenza viruses. Since co-infection of single cells with two viruses is a prerequisite for reassortment to take place, we assessed frequencies of double-infection in vitro using influenza A/H5N1 and A/H1N1 viruses expressing the reporter genes eGFP or mCherry. Double-infected A549 and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells were detected by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. PMID:22535774

  9. Brugada syndrome with a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene: A case report from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sayeed, Md. Zahidus; Salam, Md. Abdus; Haque, Md. Zahirul; Islam, A.K.M. Monwarul

    2014-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia that follows autosomal dominant transmission and can cause sudden death. We report a case of Brugada syndrome in a 55-year-old male patient presented with recurrent palpitation, atypical chest pain and presyncope. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 Brugada. Gene analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene with a genetic variation of D785N and a nucleotide change at 2353G-A. One of his children also had the same mutation. To our knowledge this is the first genetically proved case of Brugada syndrome in Bangladesh. PMID:24581105

  10. Unmarked gene integration into the chromosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis via precise replacement of the pyrF gene.

    PubMed

    Knipfer, N; Seth, A; Shrader, T E

    1997-01-01

    After integration into the bacterial chromosome an exogenous gene may be stably expressed without continued selection for the recombinant locus. However, chromosomal integration events occur infrequently, requiring the concomitant integration of a drug resistance marker in order to identify colonies of recombinant cells. The generation of a drug-resistant recombinant strain can both reduce the in vivo applicability of the strain and preclude the use of recombinant vectors which use the same drug resistance marker. We have constructed a plasmid, pINT-delta, which allows recombination of exogenous genes onto the Mycobacterium smegmatis chromosome. The exogenous gene completely replaces the pyrF gene and the resultant strain lacks any exogenous drug resistance marker. The methodologies described herein are general and applicable even to those bacteria for which extrachromosomal plasmids are not available. Using pINT-delta we integrated the lacZ gene into the M. smegmatis chromosome via a precise exchange of lacZ and pyrF. The resultant strain was used to demonstrate that the expression of genes integrated at the pyrF locus is repressed twofold by inclusion of uracil in the growth medium. In addition, we used pINT-delta to construct an M. smegmatis strain with a precise deletion of its pyrF locus. This strain, TSm-627, grows normally in rich medium but does not grow in medium lacking uracil. TSm-627 cells allow the pyrF gene to be used as a selectable marker for growth on medium lacking uracil. In TSm-627 cells, the pyrF gene is also useful as a counterselectable marker on complete medium containing 5'-fluoroorotic acid and uracil. Two pyrF-containing plasmids, designed to exploit the new delta pyrF strain, have been constructed and their possible applications to problems in mycobacteriology are discussed. PMID:9169204

  11. Transposon assisted gene insertion technology (TAGIT): a tool for generating fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Becker, Eric C; Jung, James; Tuwatananurak, Ida; Pogliano, Kit

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a transposon (transposon assisted gene insertion technology, or TAGIT) that allows the random insertion of gfp (or other genes) into chromosomal loci without disrupting operon structure or regulation. TAGIT is a modified Tn5 transposon that uses Kan(R) to select for insertions on the chromosome or plasmid, beta-galactosidase to identify in-frame gene fusions, and Cre recombinase to excise the kan and lacZ genes in vivo. The resulting gfp insertions maintain target gene reading frame (to the 5' and 3' of gfp) and are integrated at the native chromosomal locus, thereby maintaining native expression signals. Libraries can be screened to identify GFP insertions that maintain target protein function at native expression levels, allowing more trustworthy localization studies. We here use TAGIT to generate a library of GFP insertions in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor (LacI). We identified fully functional GFP insertions and partially functional insertions that bind DNA but fail to repress the lacZ operon. Several of these latter GFP insertions localize to lacO arrays integrated in the E. coli chromosome without producing the elongated cells frequently observed when functional LacI-GFP fusions are used in chromosome tagging experiments. TAGIT thereby faciliates the isolation of fully functional insertions of fluorescent proteins into target proteins expressed from the native chromosomal locus as well as potentially useful partially functional proteins. PMID:20090956

  12. Evaluation of an Hprt-Luciferase Reporter Gene on a Mammalian Artificial Chromosome in Response to Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Takeshi; Noda, Natsumi; Kuromi, Yasushi; Kokura, Kenji; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (Hprt) is known as a house-keeping gene, and has been used as an internal control for real-time quantitative RT-PCR and various other methods of gene expression analysis. To evaluate the Hprt mRNA levels as a reference standard, we engineered a luciferase reporter driven by a long Hprt promoter and measured its response to cytotoxicity. Methods We constructed a reporter vector that harbored a phiC31 integrase recognition site and a mouse Hprt promoter fused with green-emitting luciferase (SLG) coding sequence. The Hprt-SLG vector was loaded onto a mouse artificial chromosome containing a multi-integrase platform using phiC31 integrase in mouse A9 cells. We established three independent clones. Results The established cell lines had similar levels of expression of the Hprt-SLG reporter gene. Hprt-SLG activity increased proportionately under growth conditions and decreased under cytotoxic conditions after blasticidin or cisplatin administration. Similar increases and decreases in the SLG luminescent were observed under growth and cytotoxic conditions, respectively, to those in the fluorescent obtained using the commercially available reagent, alamarBlue. Conclusion By employing a reliable and stable expression system in a mammalian artificial chromosome, the activity of an Hprt-SLG reporter can reflect cell numbers under cell growth condition and cell viability in the evaluation of cytotoxic conditions. PMID:27493490

  13. Two DNA repair and recombination genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, are induced during meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K. ); Schild, D. )

    1989-07-01

    The DNA repair and recombination genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, were transcriptionally induced approximately 10- to 15-fold in sporulating MATa/{alpha} cells. Congenic MATa/a cells, which did not sporulate, did not show similar increases. Assays of {beta}-galactosidase activity in strains harboring either a RAD52- or RAD54-lacZ gene fusion indicated that this induction occurred at a time concomitant with a commitment to meiotic recombination, as measured by prototroph formation from his1 heteroalleles.

  14. Identification of sigma S-regulated genes in Salmonella typhimurium: complementary regulatory interactions between sigma S and cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Fang, F C; Chen, C Y; Guiney, D G; Xu, Y

    1996-09-01

    sigma S (RpoS)-regulated lacZ transcriptional fusions in Salmonella typhimurium were identified from a MudJ transposon library by placing the rpoS gene under the control of the araBAD promoter and detecting lacZ expression in the presence or absence of arabinose supplementation. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of bacteria carrying PBAD::rpoS demonstrated arabinose-dependent rpoS expression during all phases of growth. sigma S-dependent gene expression of individual gene fusions was confirmed by P22-mediated transduction of the MudJ insertions into wild-type or rpoS backgrounds. Analysis of six insertions revealed the known sigma S-regulated gene otsA, as well as five novel loci. Each of these genes is maximally expressed in stationary phase, and all but one show evidence of cyclic AMP receptor protein-dependent repression during logarithmic growth which is relieved in stationary phase. For these genes, as well as for the sigma S-regulated spvB plasmid virulence gene, a combination of rpoS overexpression and crp inactivation can result in high-level expression during logarithmic growth. The approach used to identify sigma S-regulated genes in this study provides a general method for the identification of genes controlled by trans-acting regulatory factors.

  15. Identification of a major cis-acting DNA element controlling the bidirectionally transcribed penicillin biosynthesis genes acvA (pcbAB) and ipnA (pcbC) of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, K T; Litzka, O; Brakhage, A A

    1996-01-01

    The beta-lactam antibiotic penicillin is produced as a secondary metabolite by some filamentous fungi. In this study, the molecular regulation of the Aspergillus (Emericella) nidulans penicillin biosynthesis genes acvA (pcbAB) and ipnA (pcbC) was analyzed. acvA and ipnA are divergently oriented and separated by an intergenic region of 872 bp. Translational fusions of acvA and ipnA with the two Escherichia coli reporter genes lacZ and uidA enabled us to measure the regulation of both genes simultaneously. A moving-window analysis of the 872-bp intergenic region indicated that the divergently oriented promoters are, at least in part, overlapping and share common regulatory elements. Removal of nucleotides -353 to -432 upstream of the acvA gene led to a 10-fold increase of acvA-uidA expression and simultaneously to a reduction of ipnA-lacZ expression to about 30%. Band shift assays and methyl interference analysis using partially purified protein extracts revealed that a CCAAT-containing DNA element within this region was specifically bound by a protein (complex), which we designated PENR1, for penicillin regulator. Deletion of 4 bp within the identified protein binding site caused the same contrary effects on acvA and ipnA expression as observed for all of the deletion clones which lacked nucleotides -353 to -432. The PENR1 binding site thus represents a major cis-acting DNA element. The intergenic regions of the corresponding genes of the beta-lactam-producing fungi Penicillium chrysogenum and Acremonium chrysogenum also diluted the complex formed between the A. nidulans probe and PENR1 in vitro, suggesting that these beta-lactam biosynthesis genes are regulated by analogous DNA elements and proteins. PMID:8682797

  16. Functional analysis of bifidobacterial promoters in Bifidobacterium longum and Escherichia coli using the α-galactosidase gene as a reporter.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Tamai, Saki; Hirayama, Yosuke; Onodera, Ai; Koguchi, Hiroka; Kano, Yasunobu; Yokota, Atsushi; Fukiya, Satoru

    2014-11-01

    Heterologous gene expression in bifidobacteria requires weak, strong, and inducible promoters depending on the objectives of different expression studies. Weak promoters in Escherichia coli can also be desirable for stable heterologous gene cloning. Here, we developed a reporter system using the Bifidobacterium longum α-galactosidase gene and investigated the activity and inducibility of seven bifidobacterial promoters in B. longum and their activities in E. coli. These studies revealed diverse promoter activities. Three promoters were highly active in B. longum, but only slightly active in E. coli. Among these, two phosphoketolase gene (xfp) promoters exhibited strong activity in B. longum cells grown on glucose. In contrast, the promoter activity of the fructose transporter operon (fruEKFG) was strongly induced by carbohydrates other than glucose, including fructose, xylose, and ribose. These promoters will allow strong or highly inducible expression in bifidobacteria and stable gene cloning in E. coli. In contrast to the functions of these promoters, the promoter of sucrose-utilization operon cscBA showed very high activity in E. coli but low activity in B. longum. Other three promoters were functional in both B. longum and E. coli. In particular, two sucrose phosphorylase gene (scrP) promoters showed inducible activity by sucrose and raffinose in B. longum, indicating their applicability for regulated expression studies. The diverse promoter functions revealed in this study will contribute to enabling the regulated expression of heterologous genes in bifidobacteria research.

  17. Transcriptional reporters for genes activated by cell wall stress through a non-catalytic mechanism involving Mpk1 and SBF

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Young; Levin, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The Mpk1 MAP kinase of the Cell Wall Integrity (CWI) signaling pathway induces transcription of the FKS2 gene in response to cell wall stress through a non-catalytic mechanism that involves stable association of Mpk1 with the Swi4 transcription factor. This dimeric complex binds to a Swi4 recognition site in the FKS2 promoter. The Swi6 transcription factor is also required to bind this ternary complex for transcription initiation to ensue. In this context, the Mlp1 pseudokinase serves a redundant function with Mpk1. We have identified three additional genes, CHA1, YLR042c, and YKR013w that are induced by cell wall stress through the same mechanism. We report on the behavior of several promoter-lacZ reporter plasmids designed to detect cell wall stress transcription through this pathway. PMID:20641022

  18. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Final report, May 1, 1988--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and to clone and characterize disease resistance genes by transposon tagging. The majority of studies were conducted with the Ac/Ds System. Researchers made and tested several constructs as well as utilized constructions shown to be functional in other plant species. Researchers demonstrated movement of Ac and DS in lettuce; however, they transposed at much lower frequencies in lettuce than in other plant species. Therefore, further manipulation of the system, particularly for flower specific expression of transposase, is required before a routine transposon system is available for lettuce. Populations of lettuce were generated and screened to test for the stability of resistance genes and several spontaneous mutations were isolated. Researchers also identified a resistance gene mutant in plants transformed with a Ds element and chimeric transposase gene. This is currently being characterized in detail.

  19. Isolation and characterization of B-glucosidase gene and B-glucosidase of Trichoderma viride. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, D.W.; Lundblad, R.L.

    1982-03-25

    The goal is to clone and characterize each of the cellulase genes from Trichoderma. This report is principally concerned with B-glucosidase. The induction of the Trichoderma cellulase complex by cellulose and by the soluble inducer, sophorose, has been demonstrated. B-glucosidase has been isolated and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme contains significant amounts of carbohydrate and has a molecular weight greater than bovine serum albumin (68,000). (ACR)

  20. [Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene]. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1999-04-01

    Part 1 of this research focuses on patterns of gene expression of ADPG-pyrophosphorylase in native and transgenic potato plants. To elucidate the mechanism controlling AGP expression during plant development, the expression of the potato tuber AGP small subunit (sAGP) gene was analyzed in transgenic potato plants using a promoter-{beta}-glucuronidase expression system. Part II evaluated the structure-function relationships of AGP.

  1. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae. Progress report, March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the {beta}-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate {beta}-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. {beta}-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for {beta}-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to {beta}-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  2. Assessment of allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yusuke; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2006-02-28

    Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is therapeutically useful for specifically suppressing the expression of alleles associated with disease. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASPRNAi), the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital, but is also difficult. Here, we show ASP-RNAi against the Swedish- and London-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) variants related to familial Alzheimer's disease using two reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes and carrying mutant and wild-type allelic sequences in their 3'-untranslated regions. We examined the effects of siRNA duplexes against the mutant alleles in allele-specific gene silencing and off-target silencing against the wild-type allele under heterozygous conditions, which were generated by cotransfecting the reporter alleles and siRNA duplexes into cultured human cells. Consistently, the siRNA duplexes determined to confer ASP-RNAi also inhibited the expression of the bona fide mutant APP and the production of either amyloid beta 40- or 42-peptide in Cos-7 cells expressing both the full-length Swedish- and wild-type APP alleles. The present data suggest that the system with reporter alleles may permit the preclinical assessment of siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi, and thus contribute to the design and selection of the most suitable of such siRNA duplexes.

  3. Downscaling procedures reduce chemical use in androgen receptor reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Carolina; Kirchner, Kristina; Balk, Fabian Gerhard Peter; Muschket, Matthias; Brack, Werner; Hollert, Henner; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin

    2016-11-15

    Bioactivity screening studies often face sample amount limitation with respect to the need for reliable, reproducible and quantitative results. Therefore approaches that minimize sample use are needed. Low-volume exposure and chemical dilution procedures were applied in an androgen receptor reporter gene human cell line assay to evaluate environmental contaminants and androgen receptor modulators, which were the agonist 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT); and the antagonists flutamide, bisphenol A, 1-hydroxypyrene and triclosan. Cells were exposed in around 1/3 of the medium volume recommended by the protocol (70μL/well). Further, chemical losses during pipetting steps were minimized by applying a low-volume method for compound dilution in medium (250μL for triplicate wells) inside microvolume glass inserts. Simultaneously, compounds were evaluated following conventional procedures (200μL/well, dilution in 24-well plates) for comparison of results. Low-volume exposure tests produced DHT EC50 (3.4-3.7×10(-10)M) and flutamide IC50 (2.2-3.3×10(-7)M) values very similar to those from regular assays (3.1-4.2×10(-10) and 2.1-3.3×10(-7)M respectively) and previous studies. Also, results were within assay acceptance criteria, supporting the relevance of the downscaling setup for agonistic and antagonistic tests. The low-volume exposure was also successful in determining IC50 values for 1-hydroxypyrene (2.1-2.8×10(-6)M), bisphenol A (2.6-3.3×10(-6)M), and triclosan (1.2-1.9×10(-6)M) in agreement with values obtained through high-volume exposure (2.3-2.8, 2.5-3.4 and 1.0-1.3×10(-6)M respectively). Finally, experiments following both low-volume dosing and exposure produced flutamide and triclosan IC50 values similar to those from regular tests. The low-volume experimental procedures provide a simple and effective solution for studies that need to minimize bioassay sample use while maintaining method reliability. The downscaling methods can be applied for the evaluation

  4. DNA sequence, products, and transcriptional pattern of the genes involved in production of the DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17.

    PubMed

    Genilloud, O; Moreno, F; Kolter, R

    1989-02-01

    The 3.8-kilobase segment of plasmid DNA that contains the genes required for production of the DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17 was sequenced. The sequence contains four open reading frames which were shown to be translated in vivo by the construction of fusions to lacZ. The location of these open reading frames fits well with the location of the four microcin B17 production genes, mcbABCD, identified previously through genetic complementation. The products of the four genes have been identified, and the observed molecular weights of the proteins agree with those predicted from the nucleotide sequence. The transcription of these genes was studied by using fusions to lacZ and physical mapping of mRNA start sites. Three promoters were identified in this region. The major promoter for all the genes is a growth phase-regulated OmpR-dependent promoter located upstream of mcbA. A second promoter is located within mcbC and is responsible for a low-level basal expression of mcbD. A third promoter, located within mcbD, promotes transcription in the reverse direction starting within mcbD and extending through mcbC. The resulting mRNA appears to be an untranslated antisense transcript that could play a regulatory role in the expression of these genes.

  5. Combined suicide gene therapy for pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis using BGTC liposomes.

    PubMed

    Hajri, Amor; Wack, Séverine; Lehn, Pierre; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Marescaux, Jacques; Aprahamian, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Peritoneal dissemination is a common end-stage complication of pancreatic cancer for which novel therapeutic modalities are actively investigated, as there is no current effective therapy. Thus, we evaluated, in a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis, the therapeutic potential of a novel nonviral gene therapy approach consisting of bis-guanidinium-tren-cholesterol (BGTC)-mediated lipofection of a combined suicide gene system. Human BxPC-3 pancreatic cells secreting the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) tumor marker were injected into the peritoneal cavity of nude mice. After 8 days, intraperitoneal (i.p.) lipofection was performed using BGTC/DOPE cationic liposomes complexed with plasmids encoding the two prodrug-activating enzymes Herpes Simplex Virus thymidine kinase and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase, the latter being expressed from a bicistronic cassette also encoding E. coli uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. Administration of the lipoplexes was followed by treatment with the corresponding prodrugs ganciclovir and 5-fluorocytosine. The results presented herein demonstrate that BGTC/DOPE liposomes can efficiently mediate gene transfection into peritoneal tumor nodules. Indeed, HSV-TK mRNA was detected in tumor nodule tissues by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and X-gal staining were observed in the peritoneal tumor foci following lipofection of the corresponding EGFP and LacZ reporter genes. These expression analyses also showed that transgene expression lasted for about 2 weeks and was preferential for the tumor nodules, this tumor preference being in good agreement with the absence of obvious treatment-related toxicity. Most importantly, mice receiving the full treatment scheme (BGTC liposomes, suicide genes and prodrugs) had significantly lower serum CEA levels than those of the various control groups, a finding indicating that peritoneal

  6. Identification of Coilin Mutants in a Screen for Enhanced Expression of an Alternatively Spliced GFP Reporter Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Jason L.; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Yang, Ho-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2016-01-01

    Coilin is a marker protein for subnuclear organelles known as Cajal bodies, which are sites of various RNA metabolic processes including the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Through self-associations and interactions with other proteins and RNA, coilin provides a structural scaffold for Cajal body formation. However, despite a conspicuous presence in Cajal bodies, most coilin is dispersed in the nucleoplasm and expressed in cell types that lack these organelles. The molecular function of coilin, particularly of the substantial nucleoplasmic fraction, remains uncertain. We identified coilin loss-of-function mutations in a genetic screen for mutants showing either reduced or enhanced expression of an alternatively spliced GFP reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. The coilin mutants feature enhanced GFP fluorescence and diminished Cajal bodies compared with wild-type plants. The amount of GFP protein is several-fold higher in the coilin mutants owing to elevated GFP transcript levels and more efficient splicing to produce a translatable GFP mRNA. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing data from two distinct coilin mutants revealed a small, shared subset of differentially expressed genes, many encoding stress-related proteins, and, unexpectedly, a trend toward increased splicing efficiency. These results suggest that coilin attenuates splicing and modulates transcription of a select group of genes. The transcriptional and splicing changes observed in coilin mutants are not accompanied by gross phenotypic abnormalities or dramatically altered stress responses, supporting a role for coilin in fine tuning gene expression. Our GFP reporter gene provides a sensitive monitor of coilin activity that will facilitate further investigations into the functions of this enigmatic protein. PMID:27317682

  7. Identification of Coilin Mutants in a Screen for Enhanced Expression of an Alternatively Spliced GFP Reporter Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Jason L; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Yang, Ho-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2016-08-01

    Coilin is a marker protein for subnuclear organelles known as Cajal bodies, which are sites of various RNA metabolic processes including the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Through self-associations and interactions with other proteins and RNA, coilin provides a structural scaffold for Cajal body formation. However, despite a conspicuous presence in Cajal bodies, most coilin is dispersed in the nucleoplasm and expressed in cell types that lack these organelles. The molecular function of coilin, particularly of the substantial nucleoplasmic fraction, remains uncertain. We identified coilin loss-of-function mutations in a genetic screen for mutants showing either reduced or enhanced expression of an alternatively spliced GFP reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana The coilin mutants feature enhanced GFP fluorescence and diminished Cajal bodies compared with wild-type plants. The amount of GFP protein is several-fold higher in the coilin mutants owing to elevated GFP transcript levels and more efficient splicing to produce a translatable GFP mRNA. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing data from two distinct coilin mutants revealed a small, shared subset of differentially expressed genes, many encoding stress-related proteins, and, unexpectedly, a trend toward increased splicing efficiency. These results suggest that coilin attenuates splicing and modulates transcription of a select group of genes. The transcriptional and splicing changes observed in coilin mutants are not accompanied by gross phenotypic abnormalities or dramatically altered stress responses, supporting a role for coilin in fine tuning gene expression. Our GFP reporter gene provides a sensitive monitor of coilin activity that will facilitate further investigations into the functions of this enigmatic protein. PMID:27317682

  8. The RR1 gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 is uniquely trans activated by ICP0 during infection.

    PubMed Central

    Desai, P; Ramakrishnan, R; Lin, Z W; Osak, B; Glorioso, J C; Levine, M

    1993-01-01

    As has been demonstrated for herpes simplex virus type 2, we show in this report that the herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (RR1) gene is trans activated in transient transfection assays by VP16 and ICP0 but not by ICP4. Deletion analysis demonstrated that responsiveness to induction to VP16 resides in an octamer/TAATGARAT sequence of the RR1 promoter and that the TATA box alone is sufficient to provide induction by ICP0. The induction of the RR1 gene by ICP0 but not by ICP4 suggested that it might be possible to identify the cis-acting element(s) responsive to ICP4 in an ICP4-inducible promoter. To this end, a series of chimeric promoters containing various portions of the regulatory sequences of the RR1 promoter and thymidine kinase (TK) promoter were constructed. The TK promoter is trans activated by both ICP0 and ICP4 in transient transfection assays and by ICP4 in infection. The data show that replacing the RR1 TATA region with the TK TATA region permits ICP4 inducibility even if the rest of the RR1 promoter elements remain intact. To test whether the RR1 gene is induced by ICP0 during infection, four mutant viruses were constructed. (i) TAATGARAT+ has the wild-type RR1 promoter driving chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and the RR2 promoter driving the lacZ gene. The RR2 gene codes for the small subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase and is expressed as a beta gene. (ii) TAATGARAT- has a triple-base change in the octamer/TAATGARAT element which renders it unresponsive to VP16 trans activation, eliminating that portion of the activation of the RR1 gene. (iii) TAATGARAT- delta alpha 0 has a deletion of the alpha 0 gene. (iv) TAATGARAT- delta alpha 4 has a deletion of the alpha 4 gene. Infections were carried out in Vero cells at a multiplicity of infection of 10 per cell; cells were assayed for CAT and beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) activities and for virus yields. The first two infections gave strong CAT and beta

  9. Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a soluble chloroplast protein that catalyzes the activation of rubisco, the enzyme that initiates the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle, to catalytic competency. Rca in barley consists of three polypeptides, one of 46- and two of 42-kDa, but the quaternary structure of the protein is not known. The authors have isolated and completely sequenced 8.8 kb of barley genomic DNA containing two, tandemly oriented activase genes (RcaA and RcaB) and three different cDNAs encoding the 42- and 46-kDa Rca polypeptide isoforms. Genomic Southern blot assays indicate that these sequences represent the entire Rca gene family in barley. Pre-mRNAs transcribed from the RcaA gene are alternatively spliced to give mRNAs encoding both 46- (RcaA1) and 42-kDa (RcaA2) Rca isoforms. The RcaB gene encodes a single polypeptide of 42 kDa. Primer extension and northern blot assays indicate that RcaB mRNA is expressed at a level that is 10- to 100-fold lower than RcaA mRNA. Analyses at the mRNA and protein level showed that Rca gene expression is coordinated by that of the rubisco subunits during barley leaf development.

  10. Characteristics of a thyroid hormone responsive reporter gene transduced into a Xenopus laevis cell line using lentivirus vector.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shin-Ichiro; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2005-12-01

    We introduced a self-inactivation (SIN) lentivirus vector (LV) into Xenopus laevis cell lines and established a permanent cell line expressing a reporter gene in a 3,5,3'-l-triiodothyronine (T(3)) dependent manner. The SIN LV contained the luciferase gene downstream from the X. laevis T(3)-response elements (TREs) and the SV40 promoter, and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene downstream from the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. It was integrated into the genome of X. laevis XL58, XTC2, and KR cells. The SIN LV transduced the X. laevis cells as efficiently as mammalian cells; however, the expression of EGFP in the transgene decreased with increasing culture time. A cell clone exhibiting the highest TH-dependent luciferase gene expression (XL58-TRE-Luc clone) was isolated from the EGFP-positive XL58 cell pool and characterized. The minimum effective concentration of T(3) that significantly induced the luciferase gene expression was 10(-11)M in the XL58-TRE-Luc clone. The application of the luciferase gene assay using the permanent XL58-TRE-Luc clone for the screening of thyroid-disrupting chemicals revealed that tetrachlorobisphenol A, at 10(-6)M, had a weak T(3)-agonist activity, whereas trichlorobisphenol A, at 10(-8) - 10(-6)M had a weak T(3)-antagonist activity. Our results indicated that the permanent X. laevis cell line containing a T(3)-response transgene could be used as a bioassay, with small intra-assay variation, for the rapid screening, identification, and characterization of the thyroid-disrupting chemicals. PMID:16102758

  11. Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum: report of a case with a novel gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Nicole; Zaleski, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum (PXE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive calcification and fragmentation of elastic fibers in the skin, eyes, and cardiovascular system. PXE is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene but the specific pathophysiology of this condition remains unknown. We present a case of a patient who was diagnosed with PXE after experiencing vision loss following minor ocular trauma. Our patient had angioid streaks in her right eye, skin laxity of the bilateral dorsal hands, and yellow papules coalescing on the posterior neck. The diagnosis of PXE was confirmed by histopathological examination. PCR amplification of the patient's ABCC6 gene demonstrated a novel gene mutation that is believed to be pathogenic. Patients with PXE are at an increased risk of visual and potentially life-threatening cardiovascular complications. Early diagnosis provides the patient a greater chance of reducing associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:27617603

  12. Inference of Quantitative Models of Bacterial Promoters from Time-Series Reporter Gene Data

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Diana; Pinel, Corinne; Pinhal, Stéphane; Cinquemani, Eugenio; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2015-01-01

    The inference of regulatory interactions and quantitative models of gene regulation from time-series transcriptomics data has been extensively studied and applied to a range of problems in drug discovery, cancer research, and biotechnology. The application of existing methods is commonly based on implicit assumptions on the biological processes under study. First, the measurements of mRNA abundance obtained in transcriptomics experiments are taken to be representative of protein concentrations. Second, the observed changes in gene expression are assumed to be solely due to transcription factors and other specific regulators, while changes in the activity of the gene expression machinery and other global physiological effects are neglected. While convenient in practice, these assumptions are often not valid and bias the reverse engineering process. Here we systematically investigate, using a combination of models and experiments, the importance of this bias and possible corrections. We measure in real time and in vivo the activity of genes involved in the FliA-FlgM module of the E. coli motility network. From these data, we estimate protein concentrations and global physiological effects by means of kinetic models of gene expression. Our results indicate that correcting for the bias of commonly-made assumptions improves the quality of the models inferred from the data. Moreover, we show by simulation that these improvements are expected to be even stronger for systems in which protein concentrations have longer half-lives and the activity of the gene expression machinery varies more strongly across conditions than in the FliA-FlgM module. The approach proposed in this study is broadly applicable when using time-series transcriptome data to learn about the structure and dynamics of regulatory networks. In the case of the FliA-FlgM module, our results demonstrate the importance of global physiological effects and the active regulation of FliA and FlgM half-lives for

  13. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Progress report, May 1, 1988--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-06-01

    Our goal is to clone genes in lettuce determining resistance to downy mildew. One approach involves the mobilization of transposons into resistance genes to mutate and tag the target gene. Because transposons have yet to be isolated and characterized from lettuce, the majority of our experiments have involved Ac from corn as this is increasingly the best characterized transposon. Over the past several years, various labs have contributed to a detailed understanding of the biology of Ac in corn and heterologous plant species. We have collaborated closely with several of these labs, exchanged materials and incorporated their advances into our analysis of transposition in lettuce. The original proposal described the development of a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and its subsequent use to tag disease resistance genes. The development phase involved characterization and manipulation of Ac transposition, identification of suitable whole plant selectable markers for the construction of chimeric non-autonomous elements, and investigation of the stability of resistance genes. Investigation of Ac transposition in lettuce has received the majority of our attention. Initially, we made a simple construct with wildtype Ac and introduced it into lettuce. No transposition was observed; although other labs demonstrated that the same construct was functional in tomato. We then focused on assaying for Ac transposition with constructs of increasing sophistication that had been demonstrated by others to be functional in other species. The latest constructs for transposon mutagenesis clearly demonstrated transposition in lettuce. This allowed us to generate seed stocks that we will start to screen for insertional inactivation of resistance genes this year.

  14. Molecular characterization of a maize regulatory gene. Annual progress report, November 1991--October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wessler, S.R.

    1994-05-01

    All aspects of this year`s work have converged on the central theme of post-transcriptional control of R gene expression. Unlike transcriptional control, relatively little is known about post-transcriptional regulation, especially in plants. We believe that three levels of post-transcriptional regulation have been identified: control of translation initiation as evidenced by the maize Lc gene; control of nuclear localization as evidenced by the Ds allele r-m9 of maize; and control of nuclear localization through alternative splicing of the rice R homolog.

  15. Understanding the Significance of Mutations in Tumor Suppressor Genes Identified Using Next-Generation Sequencing: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sorscher, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of tumors has been heralded as a promising tool to identify ‘actionable’ abnormalities susceptible to therapies targeting these mutated genes. Inhibiting the oncoprotein expressed from a single dominant mutated gene (oncogene) forms the basis for the success of most of the targeted gene therapies approved in the last several years. The well over 20 FDA-approved kinase inhibitors for cancer treatment are examples [Janne et al.: Nat Rev Drug Discov 2009;8: 709–723]. These and other similar agents in development might prove effective therapies for tumors originating from tissues other than those for which these drugs are currently approved. Finding such mutations in tumors of patients through NGS is being aggressively pursued by patients and their oncologists. For identified mutated tumor suppressor genes (TSG) the challenge is really the opposite. Rather than inhibiting the action of an oncoprotein, targeting would involve restoring the activity of the wild-type (WT) TSG function [Knudson: Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1971;249: 912–915]. Here, a case is reported that illustrates the implications of a mutated TSG (BRIP1) identified by NGS as potentially actionable. In such cases, measuring allelic mutation frequency potentially allows for the identification of tumors where the loss of heterozygosity of a TSG exists. Without substantial loss of expression of the WT TSG product, it would seem very unlikely that ‘replacing’ a WT TSG product that is not a lost product would be a useful therapy. PMID:27462233

  16. Virus Attenuation after Deletion of the Cytomegalovirus Fc Receptor Gene Is Not due to Antibody Control

    PubMed Central

    Crnković-Mertens, Irena; Messerle, Martin; Milotić, Irena; Szepan, Uwe; Kučić, Natalija; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    1998-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) fcr-1 gene codes for a glycoprotein located at the surface of infected cells which strongly binds the Fc fragment of murine immunoglobulin G. To determine the biological significance of the fcr-1 gene during viral infection, we constructed MCMV fcr-1 deletion mutants and revertants. The fcr-1 gene was disrupted by insertion of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene. In another mutant, the marker gene was also deleted, by recombinase cre. As expected for its hypothetical role in immunoevasion, the infection of mice with fcr-1 deletion mutants resulted in significantly restricted replication in comparison with wild-type MCMV and revertant virus. In mutant mice lacking antibodies, however, the fcr-1 deletion mutants also replicated poorly. This demonstrated that the cell surface-expressed viral glycoprotein with FcR activity strongly modulates the virus-host interaction but that this biological function is not caused by the immunoglobulin binding property. PMID:9445038

  17. Evaluating the effectiveness of transferrin receptor‐1 (TfR1) as a magnetic resonance reporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sofia M.; Herrmann, Anne; Moss, Diana; Poptani, Harish; Williams, Steve R.; Murray, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) reporter genes have the potential for tracking the biodistribution and fate of cells in vivo, thus allowing the safety, efficacy and mechanisms of action of cell‐based therapies to be comprehensively assessed. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of the iron importer transferrin receptor‐1 (TfR1) as an MR reporter gene in the model cell line CHO‐K1. Overexpression of the TfR1 transgene led to a reduction in the levels of endogenous TfR1 mRNA, but to a 60‐fold increase in total TfR1 protein levels. Although the mRNA levels of ferritin heavy chain‐1 (Fth1) did not change, Fth1 protein levels increased 13‐fold. The concentration of intracellular iron increased significantly, even when cells were cultured in medium that was not supplemented with iron and the amount of iron in the extracellular environment was thus at physiological levels. However, we found that, by supplementing the cell culture medium with ferric citrate, a comparable degree of iron uptake and MR contrast could be achieved in control cells that did not express the TfR1 transgene. Sufficient MR contrast to enable the cells to be detected in vivo following their administration into the midbrain of chick embryos was obtained irrespective of the reporter gene. We conclude that TfR1 is not an effective reporter and that, to track the biodistribution of cells with MR imaging in the short term, it is sufficient to simply culture cells in the presence of ferric citrate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26929139

  18. Transformation of somatic embryos of Prunus incisa ‘February Pink’ with a visible reporter gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system was developed for the ornamental cherry species Prunus incisa. This system uses both an antibiotic resistance gene (NPTII) and a visible selectable marker, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), to select plants. Cells from leaf and root explants were tr...

  19. Characterization of embryo-specific genes. Final report, April 1, 1987--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, R.

    1992-06-12

    The objective of the proposed research is to characterize the function and regulation of a set of embryonic genes which are expressed in the embryos, not in the plants. 22 cDNA clones were isolated from a cDNA library we constructed using mRNAS of -carrot somatic embryos. These cDNA clones identified mRNA species that are present in the somatic and zygotic embryos, but not in adult plants. The sequence of all 22cDNA clones were determined; genomic clones for three cDNA clones, DC8, DC59, and DC49 were isolated and gene sequences determined. DC8, DC49, and several other genes identified by the cDNA sequences belong to the category of late embryogenesis abundant protein genes, Lea. The function of these gens have not yet been determined, but they share common structural features, are regulated by ABA and are speculated to play a role in seed desiccation.

  20. Click beetle luciferases as dual reporters of gene expression in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kapitan, Mario; Eichhof, Isabel; Lagadec, Quentin; Ernst, Joachim F

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic genes encoding functional luciferases of the click beetle (CB) Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus have been expressed in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Both green- and red-emitting CB luciferases (CaCBGluc and CaCBRluc) were produced with high efficiency in transformants under transcriptional control of the growth-dependent ACT1 promoter, as well as by the HWP1 and UME6 promoters, which are upregulated during hyphal morphogenesis, as well as by the YWP1 and EFG1 promoters, which are downregulated. For all hyphally regulated genes, relative bioluminescence values derived from promoter fusions approximated relative transcript levels of native genes, although downregulation of YWP1 promoter activity required correction for the stability of CB luciferases (approximate half-lives 30 min for CaCBRluc and 80 min for CaCBGluc, as determined by immunoblotting). Importantly, the activity of both luciferases could be separately monitored in a single strain, in intact cells, in lysed cells or in cell extracts using luciferin as single substrate and inhibition of hypha formation by farnesol could be easily detected by the HWP1p-CaCBRluc fusion. The results suggest that CB luciferases are convenient tools to measure gene expression in C. albicans and may facilitate screenings for antifungal compounds. PMID:27339610

  1. Woodhouse-Sakati Syndrome: Report of the First Tunisian Family with the C2orf37 Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hdiji, Olfa; Turki, Emna; Bouzidi, Nouha; Bouchhima, Imen; Damak, Mariem; Bohlega, Saeed; Mhiri, Chokri

    2016-01-01

    Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome (WSS) is an infrequent autosomal recessive condition characterized by progressive extrapyramidal signs, mental retardation, hypogonadism, alopecia, and diabetes mellitus. This syndrome belongs to a heterogeneous group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders characterized iron accumulation in the brain, and it is caused by mutations of the C2orf37 gene. We report the first Tunisian family with two affected sisters presenting with a phenotype suggestive of WSS. We examined the index patient presenting with movement disorders and mental retardation and then searched for similar cases in her family, which identified a sister with similar signs. We performed a genetic study that confirmed the diagnosis and revealed a c.436delC mutation of the C2orf37 gene. Therefore, WSS is an important consideration in patients presenting with movement disorders and intellectual disability. A high consanguinity contributes to the clustering of such rare autosomal recessive syndromes. PMID:27240811

  2. Highly sensitive reporter gene assay for dioxins in human plasma by using cycloheximide as an enhancer substance.

    PubMed

    Saito, Koichi; Matsunaga, Haruyuki; Ohmura, Atsuko; Takekuma, Mikiko; Matsuki, Yasuhiko; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2009-08-01

    A reporter gene assay (RGA) that uses a mouse liver recombinant Hepa1c1c7 containing the firefly luciferase gene was developed to screen for dioxins in human plasma. For a high-sensitivity method, the addition of cycloheximide to the culture medium brought about a fivefold increase in the sensitivity. The detection limit was 0.1 pg/microL/well. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) binding affinity factors (AhR-BAF), calculated from the effect concentration 50 (EC(50)) value, showed approximately the same values as those in WHO-TEF (2006). A significant correlation between RGA and the conventional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method was obtained.

  3. The involvement of the nif-associated ferredoxin-like genes fdxA and fdxN of Herbaspirillum seropedicae in nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Souza, André L F; Invitti, Adriana L; Rego, Fabiane G M; Monteiro, Rose A; Klassen, Giseli; Souza, Emanuel M; Chubatsu, Leda S; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Rigo, Liu U

    2010-02-01

    The pathway of electron transport to nitrogenase in the endophytic beta-Proteobacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae has not been characterized. We have generated mutants in two nif-associated genes encoding putative ferredoxins, fdxA and fdxN. The fdxA gene is part of the operon nifHDKENXorf1orf2fdxAnifQmodABC and is transcribed from the nifH promoter, as revealed by lacZ gene fusion. The fdxN gene is probably cotranscribed with the nifB gene. Mutational analysis suggests that the FdxA protein is essential for maximum nitrogenase activity, since the nitrogenase activity of the fdxA mutant strain was reduced to about 30% of that of the wild-type strain. In addition, the fdxA mutation had no effect on the nitrogenase switch-off in response to ammonium. Nitrogenase activity of a mutant strain lacking the fdxN gene was completely abolished. This phenotype was reverted by complementation with fdxN expressed under lacZ promoter control. The results suggest that the products of both the fdxA and fdxN genes are probably involved in electron transfer during nitrogen fixation.

  4. The pnk/pnl gene (ORF 86) of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus is a non-essential, immediate early gene.

    PubMed

    Durantel, D; Croizier, L; Ayres, M D; Croizier, G; Possee, R D; López-Ferber, M

    1998-03-01

    Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ORF 86, located within the HindIII C fragment, potentially encodes a protein which shares sequence similarity with two T4 bacteriophage gene products, RNA ligase and polynucleotide kinase. This AcMNPV gene has been designated pnk/pnl but has yet to be assigned a function in virus replication. It has been classified as an immediate early virus gene, since the promoter was active in uninfected insect cells and mRNA transcripts were detectable from 4 to 48 h post-infection and in the presence of cycloheximide or aphidicolin in virus-infected cells. The extremities of the transcript have been mapped by primer extension and 3' RACE-PCR to positions -18 from the translational start codon and +15 downstream of the stop codon. The function of pnk/pnl was investigated by producing a recombinant virus (Acdel86lacZ) with the coding region replaced with that of lacZ. This virus replicated normally in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf 21) cells, indicating that pnk/pnl is not essential for propagation in these cells. Virus protein production in Acdel86lacZ-infected Sf 21 cells also appeared to be unaffected, with normal synthesis of the IE-1, GP64, VP39 and polyhedrin proteins. Shut-down of host protein synthesis was not abolished in recombinant infection. When other baculovirus genomes were examined for the presence of pnk/pnl by restriction enzyme digestion and PCR, a deletion was found in AcMNPV 1.2, Galleria mellonella NPV (GmMNPV) and Bombyx mori NPV (BmNPV), suggesting that in many isolates this gene has either never been acquired or has been lost during genome evolution. This is one of the first baculovirus immediate early genes that appears to be nonessential for virus survival.

  5. A seven-year storage report of good manufacturing practice-grade naked plasmid DNA: stability, topology, and in vitro/in vivo functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Walther, Wolfgang; Schmeer, Marco; Kobelt, Dennis; Baier, Ruth; Harder, Alexander; Walhorn, Volker; Anselmetti, Dario; Aumann, Jutta; Fichtner, Iduna; Schleef, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The great interest for naked plasmid DNA in gene therapy studies is reflected by the fact that it is currently used in 18% of all gene therapy trials. Therefore, validation of topology and functionality of DNA resulting from its long-term stability is an essential requirement for safe and effective gene transfer. To this aim, we analyzed the stability of good manufacturing practice-grade pCMVβ reporter plasmid DNA by capillary gel electrophoresis, agarose gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy. The plasmid DNA was produced for a clinical gene transfer study started in 2005 and was stored for meanwhile 7 years under continuously monitored conditions at -20 °C. The stability of plasmid DNA was monitored by LacZ transgene expression functional assays performed in vitro and in vivo on the 7-year-old plasmid DNA samples compared with plasmid batches newly produced in similar experimental conditions and quality standards. The analyses revealed that during the overall storage time and conditions, the proportion of open circular and supercoiled or covalently closed circular forms is conserved without linearization or degradation of the plasmid. The in vitro transfection and the in vivo jet-injection of DNA showed unaltered functionality of the long-stored plasmid. In summary, the 7-year-old and the newly produced plasmid samples showed similar topology and expression performance. Therefore, our stable storage conditions are effective to preserve the integrity of the DNA to be used in clinical studies. This is an important prerequisite for the long-term performance of gene transfer materials used in trials of long duration as well as of the reference material used in standardization procedures and assays.

  6. INDUCTION OF AN ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE REPORTER GENE IN RAINBOW TROUT HEPATOMA CELLS (RTH 149) AT 11 OR 18 DEGREES C

    EPA Science Inventory

    A reporter gene assay in a cultured rainbow trout cell line was used to determine the influence of temperature on the expression of an estrogen-responsive gene. Rainbow trout hepatoma cells (RTH 149) incubated at 11 or 18 degrees C were co-transfected with an estrogen-responsive ...

  7. Molecular Screening of "MECP2" Gene in a Cohort of Lebanese Patients Suspected with Rett Syndrome: Report on a Mild Case with a Novel Indel Mutation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbani, S.; Chouery, E.; Fayyad, J.; Fawaz, A.; El Tourjuman, O.; Badens, C.; Lacoste, C.; Delague, V.; Megarbane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked, dominant, neurodevelopment disorder represents 10% of female subjects with profound intellectual disability. Mutations in the "MECP2" gene are responsible for up to 95% of the classical RTT cases, and nearly 500 different mutations distributed throughout the gene have been reported. Methods: We report…

  8. Pseudotyped AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer in a Human Fetal Trachea Xenograft Model: Implications for In Utero Gene Therapy for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alice; Katz, Anna B.; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N.; Wilson, James M.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung disease including airway infection and inflammation currently causes the majority of morbidities and mortalities associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), making the airway epithelium and the submucosal glands (SMG) novel target cells for gene therapy in CF. These target cells are relatively inaccessible to postnatal gene transfer limiting the success of gene therapy. Our previous work in a human-fetal trachea xenograft model suggests the potential benefit for treating CF in utero. In this study, we aim to validate adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model and to compare transduction efficiencies of pseudotyping AAV2 vectors in fetal xenografts and postnatal xenograft controls. Methodology/Principal Findings Human fetal trachea or postnatal bronchus controls were xenografted onto immunocompromised SCID mice for a four-week engraftment period. After injection of AAV2/2, 2/1, 2/5, 2/7 or 2/8 with a LacZ reporter into both types of xenografts, we analyzed for transgene expression in the respiratory epithelium and SMGs. At 1 month, transduction by AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in respiratory epithelium and SMG cells was significantly greater than that of AAV2/1, 2/5, and 2/7 in xenograft tracheas. Efficiency in SMG transduction was significantly greater in AAV2/8 than AAV2/2. At 3 months, AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 transgene expression was >99% of respiratory epithelium and SMG. At 1 month, transduction efficiency of AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 was significantly less in adult postnatal bronchial xenografts than in fetal tracheal xenografts. Conclusions/Significance Based on the effectiveness of AAV vectors in SMG transduction, our findings suggest the potential utility of pseudotyped AAV vectors for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The human fetal trachea xenograft model may serve as an effective tool for further development of fetal gene therapy strategies for the in utero treatment of cystic fibrosis. PMID:22937069

  9. Immune responses to adenoviral vectors during gene transfer in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, K; Byrnes, A P; Charlton, H M; Wood, M J; Wood, K J

    1997-02-10

    We have investigated the immune response to E1-deleted adenovirus vectors encoding the lacZ gene introduced into the brains of adult mice. Injection of these nonreplicating vectors caused a marked inflammatory response in the brain as assessed by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry of leukocytes. Infiltrating leukocytes were detectable within 2 days of injection and reached a maximum by 9 days. Thereafter, the number of infiltrating cells decreased, but a small number persisted in the brain until day 60. Between 2 and 4 days after injection, the percentage of CD8+ cells detectable increased whereas the percentage of CD4+ cells present in the infiltrating population did not significantly increase until day 6, peaking on day 15. Activated CD25+ T cells were detectable between days 6 and 15. beta-Galactosidase (beta-Gal), the product of the lacZ gene encoded by the vector, was also detected, both at the injection site in the striatum and also in the substantia nigra. Expression peaked between 4 and 6 days but a small number of beta-Gal+ cells was still seen at 60 days after injection. This study demonstrates that a quantitative analysis of the immune responses caused by a nonreplicating adenovirus vector is possible in the brain. E1-deleted adenoviral vectors trigger a strong inflammatory response in the brain, but this immune response is not sufficient to eliminate completely expression of genes encoded by the adenoviral construct. PMID:9048192

  10. Mapping our genes: Federal genome projects: How vast. How fast. Contractor reports, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Contractor reports solicited by the Office of Technology Assessment in preparing a briefing report and recommendations to congress on the Federal Role in human genetic mapping are provided. The five reports in this volume are entitled - The mapping and sequencing of genomes: A comparative analysis of methods, benefits and disbenefits; Mapping the human genome: Experimental approaches for cloning and ordering DNA fragments; Mapping and sequencing the human genome in Europe; Application of human genome mapping for the global control of genetic disease; and In search of the ultimate map of the human genome: The Japanese efforts. Each of these reports have been separately indexed and abstracted for the Energy Data Base. (DT)

  11. cis-Acting sequences required for expression of the divergently transcribed Drosophila melanogaster Sgs-7 and Sgs-8 glue protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, A.; Garfinkel, M.D.; Meyerowitz, E.M. )

    1991-06-01

    The Sgs-7 and Sgs-8 glue genes at 68C are divergently transcribed and are separated by 475 bp. Fusion genes with Adh or lacZ coding sequences were constructed, and the expression of these genes, with different amounts of upstream sequences present, was tested by a transient expression procedure and by germ line transformation. A cis-acting element for both genes is located asymmetrically in the intergenic region between {minus}211 and {minus}43 bp relative to Sgs-7. It is required for correct expression of both genes. This element can confer the stage- and tissue-specific expression pattern of glue genes on a heterologous promoter. An 86-bp portion of the element, from {minus}133 to {minus}48 bp relative to Sgs-7, is shown to be capable of enhancing the expression of a truncated and therefore weakly expressed Sgs-3 fusion gene. Recently described common sequence motifs of glue gene regulatory elements.

  12. Live-cell Imaging of Pol II Promoter Activity to Monitor Gene expression with RNA IMAGEtag reporters

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ilchung; Ray, Judhajeet; Gupta, Vinayak; Ilgu, Muslum; Beasley, Jonathan; Bendickson, Lee; Mehanovic, Samir; Kraus, George A.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2014-04-20

    We describe a ribonucleic acid (RNA) reporter system for live-cell imaging of gene expression to detect changes in polymerase II activity on individual promoters in individual cells. The reporters use strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags) that can be expressed from a promoter of choice. For imaging, the cells are incubated with their ligands that are separately conjugated with one of the FRET pair, Cy3 and Cy5. The IMAGEtags were expressed in yeast from the GAL1, ADH1 or ACT1 promoters. Transcription from all three promoters was imaged in live cells and transcriptional increases from the GAL1 promoter were observed with time after adding galactose. Expression of the IMAGEtags did not affect cell proliferation or endogenous gene expression. Advantages of this method are that no foreign proteins are produced in the cells that could be toxic or otherwise influence the cellular response as they accumulate, the IMAGEtags are short lived and oxygen is not required to generate their signals. The IMAGEtag RNA reporter system provides a means of tracking changes in transcriptional activity in live cells and in real time.

  13. Smith-Magenis syndrome: a new contiguous gene syndrome. Report of three new cases.

    PubMed Central

    Moncla, A; Livet, M O; Auger, M; Mattei, J F; Mattei, M G; Giraud, F

    1991-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 was detected in three patients. They all had a similar phenotype with mental retardation, behavioural problems, facial dysmorphism, brachycephaly, a broad face with a flat midface, and short and broad hands. All three cases were ascertained over a six month period by two neuropaediatricians aware of this specific anomaly, which suggests that this microdeletion is not particularly rare. Comparison of the clinical and cytogenetic findings in a total of 24 patients allows a new contiguous gene syndrome to be defined that only high resolution analysis can detect. In two cases, molecular analysis confirmed the cytogenetic results. The Charcot-Marie-Tooth type Ia gene has recently been localised to the 17p11.2 sub-band. Images PMID:1956064

  14. Regulation of expression of a soybean storage protein subunit gene. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Madison, J.T.

    1984-07-16

    We have found that soybean cotyledons could be cultured in vitro and that the storage proteins were formed essentially as on a plant. When methionine was added to the medium, the cotyledons grew faster, and the methionine content of the protein fraction was increased by over 20 percent. The high methionine content of the protein fraction was found to be due to a shift in the relative amounts of the two major storage proteins. The later effect was the result of methionine treatment suppressing the expression of one storage protein subunit gene. The goal was to determine the mechanism by which methionine is able to regulate the expression of the ..beta..-subunit gene.

  15. Gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia: report of a family with a novel mutation of the ANO5 gene.

    PubMed

    Duong, Hannah A; Le, Karen T; Soulema, Albert L; Yueh, Ronald H; Scheuner, Maren T; Holick, Michael F; Christensen, Russell; Tajima, Tracey L; Leung, Angela M; Mallya, Sanjay M

    2016-05-01

    Gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia (GDD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by florid osseous dysplasia of the jaws, bone fragility, and diaphyseal cortical thickening and bowing of long bones. We present a family with previously undiagnosed GDD. The disorder was identified by the characteristic gnathic and skeletal manifestations in the father. Clinical and radiologic examination of the patient's son also revealed the characteristic features of GDD. Gene sequencing revealed a novel mutation (c. 1067 G>A, p. Cys356 Tyr) in the ANO5 gene, which is causative for GDD. This mutation was predicted to be detrimental by computational analyses and by structural modeling of the protein. The implications for recognition and management of this disease are discussed. PMID:27068316

  16. A novel tool for stable genomic reporter gene integration to analyze heterogeneity in Photorhabdus luminescens at the single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, Angela; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Determination of reporter gene activity at the single-cell level is a prerequisite for analyzing heterogeneous gene expression in bacteria. The insect pathogenic enteric bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is an excellent organism in which to study heterogeneity since it exists in two phenotypically different forms, called the primary and secondary variant. A tool for generating stable genomic integrations of reporter genes has been lacking for these bacteria, and this has hampered the acquisition of reliable data sets for promoter activities at the single-cell level. We therefore generated a plasmid tool named pPINT-mCherry for the easy and stable introduction of gene fragments upstream of an mCherry reporter gene followed by stable integration of the plasmid into the P. luminescens genome at the rpmE/glmS intergenic region. We demonstrate that the genomic integration of reporter genes for single-cell analysis is necessary in P. luminescens since plasmid-borne reporter genes mimic heterogeneity and are therefore not applicable in these bacteria, in contrast to their use in single-cell analysis in other bacteria like Escherichia coli. PMID:26260085

  17. Regulation of expression of a soybean storage protein subunit gene. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Madison, J.T.

    1984-04-23

    We have found that the methionine repression of the ..beta..-subunit gene expression is not due to degradation of the ..beta..-subunit but is due to an effect on synthesis of the ..beta..-subunit. The effect of methionine on the synthesis of the ..beta..-is due to an inhibition of ..beta..-subunit mRNA synthesis. 3 references, 1 figure.

  18. (Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Our first year's activities include: (1) completing a survey of the basic characteristics of activase gene expression in barley; and (2) isolating and structurally characterizing cDNA and genomic DNA sequences encoding activase from barley. Our goal was to determine whether activase mRNA and protein accumulation are coordinated with those of the rubisco subunits. We utilized the first leaves of barley as an experimental system for these studies because they can be used in two ways to study the expression of leaf genes: by following the naturally occurring differentiation of leaf cells, which occurs acropetally along the barley leaf; and by following the photomorphogenesis of etiolated barley seedlings. In the acropetal gradient of leaf cell differentiation, activase mRNA and mRNA and polypeptide expression is tightly coordinated with rubisco subunit mRNA and polypeptide expression. Although we have not measured their precise stoichiometry at each stage of leaf differentiation, activase protein is expressed at the level of about one polypeptide per rubisco holoenzyme in mature regions of the leaf. Coordination of the expression of activase mRNAs and polypeptides indicates that in the barley leaf gradient, activase gene expression is largely controlled at the level of transcription. However, translational controls may play a role in regulating activase expression on a short term basis.

  19. Single-gene dual-color reporter cell line to analyze RNA synthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Palangat, Murali; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    RNA synthesis occurs through the multi-step process of transcription which consists of initiation, elongation, termination, and cleavage of the nascent RNA. In recent years, post-initiation events have attracted considerable attention as regulatory steps in gene expression. In particular, changes in elongation rate have been proposed to alter RNA fate either through changes in RNA secondary structure or recruitment of trans-acting factors, but systematic approaches for perturbing and measuring elongation rate are currently lacking. Here, we describe a system for precisely measuring elongation dynamics for single nascent transcripts at a single gene locus in human cell lines. The system is based on observing the production of fluorescently labeled RNA stem loops which flank a region of interest. The region of interest can be altered using flp recombinases, thus allowing one to study the effects of cis-acting sequences on transcription rate. The dual-color RNAs which are made during this process are exported and translated, thus enabling visualization of each step in gene expression.

  20. [Iron regulation of gene expression in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybean symbiosis]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Guerinot, M.L.

    1992-06-01

    We wish to address the question of whether iron plays a regulatory role in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum/soybeam symbiosis. Iron may be an important regulatory signal in planta as the bacteria must acquire iron from their plant hosts and iron-containing proteins figure prominently in all nitrogen-fixing symbioses. For example, the bacterial partner is believed to synthesize the heme moiety of leghemoglobin, which may represent as much as 25--30% of the total soluble protein in an infected plant cell. For this reason, we have focused our attention on the regulation by iron of the first step in the bacterial heme biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme which catalyzes this step, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase, is encoded by the hemA gene which we had previously cloned and sequenced. Specific objectives include: to define the cis-acting sequences which confer iron regulation on the B. japonicum hemA gene; to identify trans-acting factors which regulate the expression of hemA by iron; to identify new loci which are transcriptionally responsive to changes in iron availability; and to examine the effects of mutations in various known regulatory genes for their effect on the expression of hemA.

  1. Analysis of promoters in Borrelia burgdorferi by use of a transiently expressed reporter gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sohaskey, C D; Arnold, C; Barbour, A G

    1997-01-01

    A transient chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) expression system was developed for Borrelia burgdorferi. An Escherichia coli vector containing a promoterless Streptococcus agalactiae cat gene was constructed. Promoters for ospA, ospC, and flaB were placed upstream of this cat gene, and CAT assays were performed in E. coli from these stably maintained plasmids. The plasmids with putative promoters ospA and flaB were found to be approximately 20-fold more active than were the plasmids with ospC or no promoter. The level of activity correlated well with the resistance to chloramphenicol that each plasmid provided. Next, the nonreplicative plasmid constructs were transformed by electroporation into B. burgdorferi. CAT assays were performed by both thin-layer chromatography and the fluor diffusion method. Measurement of CAT activity demonstrated that the ospA promoter was again about 20-fold more active than the promoterless cat gene. The flaB and ospC promoters increased the activity seven- and threefold, respectively, over that with the promoterless construct. This simple transient-expression assay was shown to be an effective method to study promoter function in B. burgdorferi in the absence of a well-developed genetic system. PMID:9352937

  2. The sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter confers high-level expression of the GUS reporter gene in the potato tuber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Won; Goo, Young-Min; Lee, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Jung-Myung; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2009-10-01

    Molecular farming refers to the process of creating bioengineered plants with the capability of producing potentially valuable products, such as drugs, vaccines, and chemicals. We have investigated the potential of the sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter and its transit peptide (TP) as an expression system for the mass production of foreign proteins in potato. The ibAGP1 promoter and its TP sequence were transformed into potato along with beta-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter gene, and GUS activity was subsequently analyzed in the transgenic potato plants. In tuber tissues, GUS activity in transgenic plants carrying only the ibAGP1 promoter (ibAGP1::GUS) increased up to 15.6-fold compared with that of transgenic plants carrying only the CaMV35S promoter (CaMV35S::GUS). GUS activity in transgenic plants was further enhanced by the addition of the sweetpotato TP to the recombinant vector (ibAGP1::TP::GUS), with tuber tissues showing a 26-fold increase in activity compared with that in the CaMV35S::GUS-transgenic lines. In leaf tissues, the levels of GUS activity found in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic lines were similar to those in CaMV35S::GUS-lines, but they were significantly enhanced in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-lines. GUS activity gradually increased with increasing tuber diameter in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic plants, reaching a maximum level when the tuber was 35 mm in diameter. In contrast, extremely elevated levels of GUS activity - up to about 10-fold higher than that found in CaMV35S::GUS-lines - were found in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-transgenic lines at a much earlier stage of tuber development (diameter 4 mm), and these higher levels were maintained throughout the entire tuber developmental stage. These results suggest that the sweetpotato ibAGP1 promoter and its TP are a potentially strong foreign gene expression system that can be used for molecular farming in potato plants.

  3. The sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter confers high-level expression of the GUS reporter gene in the potato tuber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Won; Goo, Young-Min; Lee, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Jung-Myung; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2009-10-01

    Molecular farming refers to the process of creating bioengineered plants with the capability of producing potentially valuable products, such as drugs, vaccines, and chemicals. We have investigated the potential of the sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter and its transit peptide (TP) as an expression system for the mass production of foreign proteins in potato. The ibAGP1 promoter and its TP sequence were transformed into potato along with beta-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter gene, and GUS activity was subsequently analyzed in the transgenic potato plants. In tuber tissues, GUS activity in transgenic plants carrying only the ibAGP1 promoter (ibAGP1::GUS) increased up to 15.6-fold compared with that of transgenic plants carrying only the CaMV35S promoter (CaMV35S::GUS). GUS activity in transgenic plants was further enhanced by the addition of the sweetpotato TP to the recombinant vector (ibAGP1::TP::GUS), with tuber tissues showing a 26-fold increase in activity compared with that in the CaMV35S::GUS-transgenic lines. In leaf tissues, the levels of GUS activity found in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic lines were similar to those in CaMV35S::GUS-lines, but they were significantly enhanced in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-lines. GUS activity gradually increased with increasing tuber diameter in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic plants, reaching a maximum level when the tuber was 35 mm in diameter. In contrast, extremely elevated levels of GUS activity - up to about 10-fold higher than that found in CaMV35S::GUS-lines - were found in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-transgenic lines at a much earlier stage of tuber development (diameter 4 mm), and these higher levels were maintained throughout the entire tuber developmental stage. These results suggest that the sweetpotato ibAGP1 promoter and its TP are a potentially strong foreign gene expression system that can be used for molecular farming in potato plants. PMID:19819408

  4. oct4-EGFP reporter gene expression marks the stem cells in embryonic development and in adult gonads of transgenic medaka.

    PubMed

    Froschauer, Alexander; Khatun, Mst Muslima; Sprott, David; Franz, Alexander; Rieger, Christiane; Pfennig, Frank; Gutzeit, Herwig O

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of pluripotency in stem cells is tightly regulated among vertebrates. One of the key genes in this process is oct4, also referred to as pou5f1 in mammals and pou2 in teleosts. Pou5f1 evolved by duplication of pou2 early in the tetrapod lineage, but only monotremes and marsupials retained both genes. Either pou2 or pou5f1 was lost from the genomes of the other tetrapods that have been analyzed to date. Consequently, these two homologous genes are often designated oct4 in functional studies. In most vertebrates oct4 is expressed in pluripotent cells of the early embryo until the blastula stage, and later persist in germline stem cells until adulthood. The isolation and analysis of stem cells from embryo or adult individuals is hampered by the need for reliable markers that can identify and define the cell populations. Here, we report the faithful expression of EGFP under the control of endogenous pou2/oct4 promoters in transgenic medaka (Oryzias latipes). In vivo imaging in oct4-EGFP transgenic medaka reveals the temporal and spatial expression of pou2 in embryos and adults alike. We describe the temporal and spatial patterns of endogenous pou2 and oct4-EGFP expression in medaka with respect to germline and adult stem cells, and discuss applications of oct4-EGFP transgenic medaka in reproductive and stem cell biology. PMID:23139203

  5. Risk assessment of gene flow from genetically engineered virus resistant cassava to wild relatives in Africa: an expert panel report.

    PubMed

    Hokanson, Karen E; Ellstrand, Norman C; Dixon, Alfred G O; Kulembeka, Heneriko P; Olsen, Kenneth M; Raybould, Alan

    2016-02-01

    The probability and consequences of gene flow to wild relatives is typically considered in the environmental risk assessment of genetically engineered crops. This is a report from a discussion by a group of experts who used a problem formulation approach to consider existing information for risk assessment of gene flow from cassava (Manihot esculenta) genetically engineered for virus resistance to the 'wild' (naturalized) relative M. glaziovii in East Africa. Two environmental harms were considered in this case: (1) loss of genetic diversity in the germplasm pool, and (2) loss of valued species, ecosystem resources, or crop yield and quality due to weediness or invasiveness of wild relatives. Based on existing information, it was concluded that gene flow will occur, but it is not likely that this will reduce the genetic diversity in the germplasm pool. There is little existing information about the impact of the virus in natural populations that could be used to inform a prediction about whether virus resistance would lead to an increase in reproduction or survival, hence abundance of M. glaziovii. However, an increase in the abundance of M. glaziovii should be manageable, and would not necessarily lead to the identified environmental harms.

  6. Bradyrhizobium (Arachis) sp. strain NC92 contains two nodD genes involved in the repression of nodA and a nolA gene required for the efficient nodulation of host plants.

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, W K; Elkan, G H

    1996-01-01

    The common nodulation locus and closely linked nodulation genes of Bradyrhizobium (Arachis) sp. strain NC92 have been isolated on an 11.0-kb EcoRI restriction fragment. The nucleotide sequence of a 7.0-kb EcoRV-EcoRI subclone was determined and found to contain open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to the nodA, nodB, nodD1, nodD2, and nolA genes of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii. Nodulation assays of nodD1, nodD2, or nolA deletion mutants on the host plants Macroptilium atropurpureum (siratro) and Vigna unguiculata (cowpea) indicate that nolA is required for efficient nodulation, as nolA mutants exhibit a 6-day nodulation delay and reduced nodule numbers. The nolA phenotype was complemented by providing the nolA ORF in trans, indicating that the phenotype is due to the lack of the nolA ORF. nodD1 mutants displayed a 2-day nodulation delay, whereas nodD2 strains were indistinguishable from the wild type. Translational nodA-lacZ, nodD1-lacZ, nodD2-lacZ, and nolA-lacZ fusions were created. Expression of the nodA-lacZ fusion was induced by the addition of peanut, cowpea, and siratro seed exudates and by the addition of the isoflavonoids genistein and daidzein. In a nodD1 or nodD2 background, basal expression of the nodA-lacZ fusion increased two- to threefold. The level of expression of the nodD2-lacZ and nolA-lacZ fusions was low in the wild type but increased in nodD1, nodD2, and nodD1 nodD2 backgrounds independently of the addition of the inducer genistein. nolA was required for increased expression of the nodD2-lacZ fusion. These data suggest that a common factor is involved in the regulation of nodD2 and nolA, and they are also consistent with a model of nod gene expression in Bradyrhizobium (Arachis) sp. strain NC92 in which negative regulation is mediated by the products of the nodD1 and nodD2 genes. PMID:8631662

  7. Molecular characterization of a maize regulatory gene. Annual progress report, March 1990--November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wessler, S.R.

    1991-12-01

    Based on initial bombardment studies we have previously concluded that promoter diversity was responsible for the diversity of naturally occurring R alleles. During this period we have found that R is controlled at the level of translation initiation and intron 1 is alternatively spliced. The experiments described in Sections 1 and 2 sought to quantify these effects and to determine whether they contribute to the tissue specific expression of select R alleles. This study was done because very little is understood about the post-transcriptional regulation of plant genes. Section 3 and 4 describe experiments designed to identify important structural components of the R protein.

  8. Gene-enzyme telationships in somatic cells and their organismal derivatives in higher plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R. A.

    1980-04-21

    Progress is reported in the following subject areas: (1) chemistry of the arogenate molecule; (2) plant enzymology at the organismal level; (3) isolation of regulatory mutants in tobacco; and (4) stability of the haploid state in Nicotiana sylvestris.

  9. Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sin Hang

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD), the most common tick-borne disease in North America, is believed to be caused exclusively by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and is usually diagnosed by clinical evaluation and serologic assays. As reported previously in a peer-reviewed article, a 13-year-old boy living in the Northeast of the USA was initially diagnosed with LD based on evaluation of his clinical presentations and on serologic test results. The patient was treated with a course of oral doxycycline for 28 days, and the symptoms resolved. A year later, the boy developed a series of unusual symptoms and did not attend school for 1 year. A LD specialist reviewed the case and found the serologic test band patterns nondiagnostic of LD. The boy was admitted to a psychiatric hospital. After discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a polymerase chain reaction test performed in a winter month when the boy was 16 years old showed a low density of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in the blood of the patient, confirmed by partial 16S rRNA (ribosomal RNA) gene sequencing. Subsequent DNA sequencing analysis presented in this report demonstrated that the spirochete isolate was a novel strain of B. burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes, which has never been reported in the world literature. This case report shows that direct DNA sequencing is a valuable tool for reliable molecular diagnosis of Lyme and related borrelioses, as well as for studies of the diversity of the causative agents of LD because LD patients infected by a rare or novel borrelial variant may produce an antibody pattern that can be different from the pattern characteristic of an infection caused by a typical B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain. PMID:27186082

  10. Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin Hang

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD), the most common tick-borne disease in North America, is believed to be caused exclusively by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and is usually diagnosed by clinical evaluation and serologic assays. As reported previously in a peer-reviewed article, a 13-year-old boy living in the Northeast of the USA was initially diagnosed with LD based on evaluation of his clinical presentations and on serologic test results. The patient was treated with a course of oral doxycycline for 28 days, and the symptoms resolved. A year later, the boy developed a series of unusual symptoms and did not attend school for 1 year. A LD specialist reviewed the case and found the serologic test band patterns nondiagnostic of LD. The boy was admitted to a psychiatric hospital. After discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a polymerase chain reaction test performed in a winter month when the boy was 16 years old showed a low density of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in the blood of the patient, confirmed by partial 16S rRNA (ribosomal RNA) gene sequencing. Subsequent DNA sequencing analysis presented in this report demonstrated that the spirochete isolate was a novel strain of B. burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes, which has never been reported in the world literature. This case report shows that direct DNA sequencing is a valuable tool for reliable molecular diagnosis of Lyme and related borrelioses, as well as for studies of the diversity of the causative agents of LD because LD patients infected by a rare or novel borrelial variant may produce an antibody pattern that can be different from the pattern characteristic of an infection caused by a typical B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain.

  11. Rous sarcoma virus contains sequences which permit expression of the gag gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Mermer, B; Malamy, M; Coffin, J M

    1983-01-01

    Several aspects of Rous sarcoma virus gene expression, including transcription, translation, and protein processing, can occur within Escherichia coli containing cloned viral DNA. The viral long terminal repeat contains a bacterial promoter, and viral sequences at or near the authentic viral initiation codon permit the initiation of translation. These signals can direct the synthesis in E. coli of the viral gag gene precursor Pr76 or, when fused to a portion of the lacZ gene, a gag-beta-galactosidase fusion protein. Pr76 is processed into gag structural proteins in E. coli in a process which is dependent upon the gag product p15. These observations suggest that E. coli can be used for the introduction and analysis of mutations in sequences relevant to viral gene expression. Images PMID:6316124

  12. Recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of xenobiotics and complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharewski, T.

    1995-12-31

    Exposure to naturally occurring or synthetic substances that possess sex steroid and/or dioxin-like activity may have long range effects on human health, reproductive fitness and environmental quality. Results from recent epidemiological studies have suggested that xenobiotics with sex steroid activity may contribute to the development of hormone-dependent cancers and disorders in the male reproductive tract as well as attenuate sperm production. However, most of these compounds, which are referred to as endocrine disruptors, are structurally dissimilar to sex steroids. Yet, based upon ambiguous assays, it has been conceded that the effects of these compounds are mediated by receptors. The authors have taken advantage of the mechanism of action of these compounds to develop recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for environmental estrogens and dioxin-like compounds. The assays use an easily measurable enzyme activity (i.e. firefly luciferase), exhibit improved sensitivity and selectivity and are amenable to automation. Data will be presented demonstrating that phytoestrogens (e.g. genistein) and xenobiotics such as pesticides (e.g. DDT, Kepone), nonionic surfactants (e.g. p-nonylphenol), and precursors used in the manufacture of plastics (e.g. Bisphenol A) exhibit estrogenic activity. In addition, the assays have been used to detect estrogenic and dioxin-like activity in complex mixtures such as pulp and paper mill black liquor and effluent. These results demonstrate the utility of recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for identifying substances or complex mixtures with estrogenic and/or dioxin-like activity.

  13. Inactivation of encapsulated cells and their therapeutic effects by means of TGL triple-fusion reporter/biosafety gene.

    PubMed

    Santos, Edorta; Larzabal, Leyre; Calvo, Alfonso; Orive, Gorka; Pedraz, José Luis; Hernández, Rosa Ma

    2013-01-01

    The immobilization of cells within alginate-poly-l-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsules has been demonstrated to be an effective technology design for long term delivery of therapeutic products. Despite promising advances, biosafety aspects still remain to be improved. Here, we describe a complete characterization of the strategy based on TGL triple-fusion reporter gene--which codifies for Herpes Simplex virus type 1 thymidine-kinase (HSV1-TK), green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Firefly Luciferase--(SFG(NES)TGL) to inactivate encapsulated cells and their therapeutic effects. Myoblasts genetically engineered to secrete erythropoietin (EPO) were retroviraly transduced with the SFG(NES)TGL plasmid to further characterize their ganciclovir (GCV)-mediated inactivation process. GCV sensitivity of encapsulated cells was 100-fold lower when compared to cells plated onto 2D surfaces. However, the number of cells per capsule and EPO secretion decayed to less than 15% at the same time that proliferation was arrested after 14 days of GCV treatment in vitro. In vivo, ten days of GCV treatment was enough to restore the increased hematocrit levels of mice implanted with encapsulated TGL-expressing and EPO-secreting cells. Altogether, these results show that TGL triple-fusion reporter gene may be a good starting point in the search of a suitable biosafety strategy to inactivate encapsulated cells and control their therapeutic effects. PMID:23174140

  14. The promoter competition assay (PCA): a new approach to identify motifs involved in the transcriptional activity of reporter genes.

    PubMed

    Hube, Florent; Myal, Yvonne; Leygue, Etienne

    2006-05-01

    Identifying particular motifs responsible for promoter activity is a crucial step toward the development of new gene-based preventive and therapeutic strategies. However, to date, experimental methods to study promoter activity remain limited. We present in this report a promoter competition assay designed to identify, within a given promoter region, motifs critical for its activity. This assay consists in co-transfecting the promoter to be analyzed and double-stranded oligonucleotides which will compete for the binding of transcription factors. Using the recently characterized SBEM promoter as model, we first delineated the feasibility of the method and optimized the experimental conditions. We then identified, within an 87-bp region responsible for a strong expression of the reporter gene, an octamer-binding site essential for its transcriptional regulation. The importance of this motif has been confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. The promoter competition assay appears to be a fast and efficient approach to identify, within a given promoter sequence, sites critical for its activity.

  15. DNA regions bound at low occupancy by transcription factors do not drive patterned reporter gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fisher, William W; Li, Jingyi Jessica; Hammonds, Ann S; Brown, James B; Pfeiffer, Barret D; Weiszmann, Richard; MacArthur, Stewart; Thomas, Sean; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Eisen, Michael B; Bickel, Peter J; Biggin, Mark D; Celniker, Susan E

    2012-12-26

    In animals, each sequence-specific transcription factor typically binds to thousands of genomic regions in vivo. Our previous studies of 20 transcription factors show that most genomic regions bound at high levels in Drosophila blastoderm embryos are known or probable functional targets, but genomic regions occupied only at low levels have characteristics suggesting that most are not involved in the cis-regulation of transcription. Here we use transgenic reporter gene assays to directly test the transcriptional activity of 104 genomic regions bound at different levels by the 20 transcription factors. Fifteen genomic regions were selected based solely on the DNA occupancy level of the transcription factor Kruppel. Five of the six most highly bound regions drive blastoderm patterns of reporter transcription. In contrast, only one of the nine lowly bound regions drives transcription at this stage and four of them are not detectably active at any stage of embryogenesis. A larger set of 89 genomic regions chosen using criteria designed to identify functional cis-regulatory regions supports the same trend: genomic regions occupied at high levels by transcription factors in vivo drive patterned gene expression, whereas those occupied only at lower levels mostly do not. These results support studies that indicate that the high cellular concentrations of sequence-specific transcription factors drive extensive, low-occupancy, nonfunctional interactions within the accessible portions of the genome.

  16. Gene-knockdown in the honey bee mite Varroa destructor by a non-invasive approach: studies on a glutathione S-transferase

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The parasitic mite Varroa destructor is considered the major pest of the European honey bee (Apis mellifera) and responsible for declines in honey bee populations worldwide. Exploiting the full potential of gene sequences becoming available for V. destructor requires adaptation of modern molecular biology approaches to this non-model organism. Using a mu-class glutathione S-transferase (VdGST-mu1) as a candidate gene we investigated the feasibility of gene knockdown in V. destructor by double-stranded RNA-interference (dsRNAi). Results Intra-haemocoelic injection of dsRNA-VdGST-mu1 resulted in 97% reduction in VdGST-mu1 transcript levels 48 h post-injection compared to mites injected with a bolus of irrelevant dsRNA (LacZ). This gene suppression was maintained to, at least, 72 h. Total GST catalytic activity was reduced by 54% in VdGST-mu1 gene knockdown mites demonstrating the knockdown was effective at the translation step as well as the transcription steps. Although near total gene knockdown was achieved by intra-haemocoelic injection, only half of such treated mites survived this traumatic method of dsRNA administration and less invasive methods were assessed. V. destructor immersed overnight in 0.9% NaCl solution containing dsRNA exhibited excellent reduction in VdGST-mu1 transcript levels (87% compared to mites immersed in dsRNA-LacZ). Importantly, mites undergoing the immersion approach had greatly improved survival (75-80%) over 72 h, approaching that of mites not undergoing any treatment. Conclusions Our findings on V. destructor are the first report of gene knockdown in any mite species and demonstrate that the small size of such organisms is not a major impediment to applying gene knockdown approaches to the study of such parasitic pests. The immersion in dsRNA solution method provides an easy, inexpensive, relatively high throughput method of gene silencing suitable for studies in V. destructor, other small mites and immature stages of ticks

  17. Imprinted genes and transpositions: epigenomic targets for low dose radiation effects. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jirtle, Randy L.

    2012-10-11

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A{sup vy}) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure (<10 cGy) during early gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the increased use of CT scans in disease diagnosis, increased number of people predicted to live and work in space, and the present concern about radiological terrorism. We showed for the first time that LDIR significantly increased DNA methylation at the A{sup vy} locus in a sex-specific manner (p=0.004). Average DNA methylation was significantly increased in male offspring exposed to doses between 0.7 cGy and 7.6 cGy with maximum effects at 1.4 cGy and 3.0 cGy (p<0.01). Offspring coat color was concomitantly shifted towards pseudoagouti (p<0.01). Maternal dietary antioxidant supplementation mitigated both the DNA methylation changes and coat color shift in the irradiated offspring (p<0.05). Thus, LDIR exposure during gestation elicits epigenetic alterations that lead to positive adaptive phenotypic changes that are negated with antioxidants, indicating they are mediated in part by oxidative stress. These findings provide evidence that in the isogenic Avy mouse model epigenetic alterations resulting from LDIR play a role in radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in

  18. Early host cell reactivation of an oxidatively damaged adenovirus-encoded reporter gene requires the Cockayne syndrome proteins CSA and CSB.

    PubMed

    Leach, Derrik M; Rainbow, Andrew J

    2011-03-01

    Reduced host cell reactivation (HCR) of a reporter gene containing 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesions in Cockayne syndrome (CS) fibroblasts has previously been attributed to increased 8-oxoG-mediated inhibition of transcription resulting from a deficiency in repair. This interpretation has been challenged by a report suggesting reduced expression from an 8-oxoG containing reporter gene occurs in all cells by a mechanism involving gene inactivation by 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase and this inactivation is strongly enhanced in the absence of the CS group B (CSB) protein. The observation of reduced gene expression in the absence of CSB protein led to speculation that decreased HCR in CS cells results from enhanced gene inactivation rather than reduced gene reactivation. Using an adenovirus-based β-galactosidase (β-gal) reporter gene assay, we have examined the effect of methylene blue plus visible light (MB + VL)-induced 8-oxoG lesions on the time course of gene expression in normal and CSA and CSB mutant human SV40-transformed fibroblasts, repair proficient and CSB mutant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and normal mouse embryo fibroblasts. We demonstrate that MB + VL treatment of the reporter leads to reduced expression of the damaged β-gal reporter relative to control at early time points following infection in all cells, consistent with in vivo inhibition of RNA polII-mediated transcription. In addition, we have demonstrated HCR of reporter gene expression occurs in all cell types examined. A significant reduction in the rate of gene reactivation in human SV40-transformed cells lacking functional CSA or CSB compared to normal cells was found. Similarly, a significant reduction in the rate of reactivation in CHO cells lacking functional CSB (CHO-UV61) was observed compared to the wild-type parental counterpart (CHO-AA8). The data presented demonstrate that expression of an oxidatively damaged reporter gene is reactivated over time and that CSA and CSB are required for

  19. RNA interference screening of interferon-stimulated genes with antiviral activities against classical swine fever virus using a reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Lian-Feng; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-04-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of pigs, which leads to significant economic losses in many countries. Viral infection can induce the production of interferons (IFNs), giving rise to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) to exert antiviral effects. Although numerous ISGs have been identified to possess antiviral activities against different viruses, rare anti-CSFV ISGs have been reported to date. In this study, to screen anti-CSFV ISGs, twenty-one ISGs reported previously were individually knocked down using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) followed by infection with a reporter CSFV expressing Renilla luciferase (Rluc). As a result, four novel anti-CSFV ISGs were identified, including natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase III A (NT5C3A), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), and 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), which were further verified to exhibit antiviral activities against wild-type CSFV. We conclude that the reporter virus is a useful tool for efficient screening anti-CSFV ISGs.

  20. Short Stature in Isodicentric Y Chromosome and Three Copies of the SHOX Gene: Clinical Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Valetto, Angelo; Bertini, Veronica; Michelucci, Angela; Toschi, Benedetta; Dati, Eleonora; Baroncelli, Giampietro I; Bertelloni, Silvano

    2016-04-01

    Short stature homeobox gene (SHOX) mutations and pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) deletions encompassing SHOX are known causes of Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and isolated short stature, while 3 copies of SHOX in cases with triple sex chromosome constitution are responsible for tall stature. Duplications involving SHOX have been rarely reported, and they were found in individuals with short, normal and tall stature. An adopted boy with short stature, isodicentric Y chromosome and 3 copies of SHOX is described. Normal growth hormone (GH) secretion and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) increase during an IGF1 generation test were found, ruling out impaired GH-IGF1 axis. No other organic or psychiatric causes of impaired growth were found. GH treatment improved linear growth, as reported in children with SHOX haploinsufficiency. This new report and the review of literature support that SHOX duplication may cause short stature, especially in those children with duplications of the 5'SHOX regulatory elements. Chromosome analysis and detailed molecular characterization of the duplicated region should be warranted in individuals with SHOX duplications in order to investigate the presence of occult chromosome imbalance. Additional reports and follow-up till adult height are needed to give conclusions on long-term efficacy and safety of GH treatment in short children with SHOX duplication. PMID:27194969

  1. RNA interference screening of interferon-stimulated genes with antiviral activities against classical swine fever virus using a reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Lian-Feng; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-04-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of pigs, which leads to significant economic losses in many countries. Viral infection can induce the production of interferons (IFNs), giving rise to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) to exert antiviral effects. Although numerous ISGs have been identified to possess antiviral activities against different viruses, rare anti-CSFV ISGs have been reported to date. In this study, to screen anti-CSFV ISGs, twenty-one ISGs reported previously were individually knocked down using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) followed by infection with a reporter CSFV expressing Renilla luciferase (Rluc). As a result, four novel anti-CSFV ISGs were identified, including natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase III A (NT5C3A), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), and 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), which were further verified to exhibit antiviral activities against wild-type CSFV. We conclude that the reporter virus is a useful tool for efficient screening anti-CSFV ISGs. PMID:26868874

  2. Promoters of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 genes of Artemisia annua direct reporter gene expression in glandular and non-glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Sunita; Longchar, Bendangchuchang; Singh, Alka; Gupta, Vikrant

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report cloning and analysis of promoters of GLABRA2 (AaGL2) homolog and a MIXTA-Like (AaMIXTA-Like1) gene from Artemisia annua. The upstream regulatory regions of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 showed the presence of several crucial cis-acting elements. Arabidopsis and A. annua seedlings were transiently transfected with the promoter-GUS constructs using a robust agro-infiltration method. Both AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters showed GUS expression preferentially in Arabidopsis single-celled trichomes and glandular as well as T-shaped trichomes of A. annua. Transgenic Arabidopsis harboring constructs in which AaGL2 or AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters would control GFP expression, showed fluorescence emanating specifically from trichome cells. Our study provides a fast and efficient method to study trichome-specific expression, and 2 promoters that have potential for targeted metabolic engineering in plants. PMID:26340695

  3. Myelodysplastic syndrome without ring sideroblasts and with Janus kinase 2 gene mutation: An unusual case report

    PubMed Central

    Ornellas, Maria Helena; De França Silva, Monique; Solza, Cristiana; De Lucena Gonçalves, Stella Beatriz Sampaio; Silva De Almeida, Liliane; De Paula Ayres-Silva, Jackline; Seixas, Taís Leite; Bastos, Elenice Ferreira; Liehr, Thomas; Alves, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cases comprise a heterogeneous group of hematological disorders that are characterized by impaired hematopoiesis, with cytopenias of different grades and risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. MDS may rarely be associated with thrombocytosis. In such cases, myelodysplasia and myeloproliferative disorders may overlap, making correct diagnosis difficult. We herein describe a case of MDS with thrombocytosis, Janus kinase 2 gene mutation-positive and Perls' staining-negative, which was initially classified as essential thrombocythemia (ET). This case highlights that MDS may be misdiagnosed as ET and inappropriate treatment may be initiated. Therefore, it is crucial to carefully combine all available data on morphology and immunophenotyping, and to perform the necessary molecular, cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses, in order to correctly diagnose this disease. PMID:27588186

  4. Luciferase Genes as Reporter Reactions: How to Use Them in Molecular Biology?

    PubMed

    Cevenini, L; Calabretta, M M; Calabria, D; Roda, A; Michelini, E

    2016-01-01

    : The latest advances in molecular biology have made available several biotechnological tools that take advantage of the high detectability and quantum efficiency of bioluminescence (BL), with an ever-increasing number of novel applications in environmental, pharmaceutical, food, and forensic fields. Indeed, BL proteins are being used to develop ultrasensitive binding assays and cell-based assays, thanks to their high detectability and to the availability of highly sensitive BL instruments. The appealing aspect of molecular biology tools relying on BL reactions is their general applicability in both in vitro assays, such as cell cultures or purified proteins, and in vivo settings, such as in whole-animal BL imaging. The aim of this chapter is to provide the reader with an overview of state-of-the-art bioluminescent tools based on luciferase genes, highlighting molecular biology strategies that have been applied so far, together with some selected examples.

  5. Phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in the United States: Report from the maternal PKU collaborative study

    SciTech Connect

    Guldberg, P.; Henriksen, K.F.; Guettler, F.

    1996-07-01

    The major cause of hyperphenylalaninemia is mutations in the gene encoding phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The known mutations have been identified primarily in European patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations responsible for PAH deficiency in the United States. One hundred forty-nine patients enrolled in the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study were subjects for clinical and molecular investigations. PAH gene mutations associated with phenylketonuria (PKU) or mild hyperphenylalaninemia (MHP) were identified on 279 of 294 independent mutant chromosomes, a diagnostic efficiency of 95%. The spectrum is composed of 71 different mutations, including 47 missense mutations, 11 splice mutations, 5 nonsense mutations, and 8 microdeletions. Sixteen previously unreported mutations were identified. Among the novel mutations, five were found in patients with MHP, and the remainder were found in patients with PKU. The most common mutations were R408W, IVS12nt1g{r_arrow}a, and Y414C, accounting for 18.7%, 7.8% and 5.4% of the mutant chromosomes, respectively. Thirteen mutations had relative frequencies of 1%-5%, and 55 mutations each had frequencies {le}1%. The mutational spectrum corresponded to that observed for the European ancestry of the U.S. population. To evaluate the extent of allelic variation at the PAH locus within the United States in comparison with other populations, we used allele frequencies to calculate the homozygosity for 11 populations where >90% ascertainment has been obtained. The United States was shown to contain one of the most heterogeneous populations, with homozygosity values similar to Sicily and ethnically mixed sample populations in Europe. The extent of allelic heterogeneity must be a major determining factor in the choice of mutation-detection methodology for molecular diagnosis in PAH deficiency. 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  6. Otx genes in evolution: are they involved in instructing the vertebrate brain morphology?

    PubMed Central

    ACAMPORA, DARIO; BOYL, PIETRO PILO; MARTINEZ-BARBERA, JUAN PEDRO; ANNINO, ALESSANDRO; SIGNORE, MASSIMO; SIMEONE, ANTONIO

    2001-01-01

    Previous mouse models have indicated that Otx1 and Otx2 play an important role in brain and sense organ development and, together with the Drosophila orthodenticle (otd) gene, they share a high degree of reciprocal functional equivalence. Interestingly, mouse models replacing the same region of the Otx2 locus with Otx1, otd or lacZ genes have revealed the existence of a differential post-transcriptional control between the visceral endoderm (VE) and epiblast cells. Indeed Otx1, otd or lacZ mRNA were transcribed in both tissues but translated only in the VE. Embryos lacking OTX1 or OTD proteins in the epiblast and derived tissues, such as the neuroectoderm and axial mesendoderm (AME), fail to maintain the anterior identity and result in a headless phenotype. This finding leads us to hypothesise that, during evolution, the specification of the vertebrate-type brain may have required epiblast cells to translate Otx2 mRNA in order to establish maintenance properties. The establishment of this regulatory control might have been reflected into a remarkable reorganisation of the rostral CNS architecture and might have represented an important event in the evolution of the vertebrate head. Current data suggest that the Otx2 replaced region and in particular the 3′ untranslated region (UTR), may contain regulatory element(s) necessary to translate and/or stabilise Otx2 mRNA in epiblast and its derivatives. PMID:11523829

  7. Single Cell Quantification of Reporter Gene Expression in Live Adult Caenorhabditis elegans Reveals Reproducible Cell-Specific Expression Patterns and Underlying Biological Variation.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, Alexander R; Tedesco, Patricia M; Sands, Bryan; Johnson, Thomas E; Brent, Roger

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans, differences in complex phenotypes such as lifespan correlate with the level of expression of particular engineered reporter genes. In single celled organisms, quantitative understanding of responses to extracellular signals and of cell-to-cell variation in responses has depended on precise measurement of reporter gene expression. Here, we developed microscope-based methods to quantify reporter gene expression in cells of Caenorhabditis elegans with low measurement error. We then quantified expression in strains that carried different configurations of Phsp-16.2-fluorescent-protein reporters, in whole animals, and in all 20 cells of the intestine tissue, which is responsible for most of the fluorescent signal. Some animals bore more recently developed single copy Phsp-16.2 reporters integrated at defined chromosomal sites, others, "classical" multicopy reporter gene arrays integrated at random sites. At the level of whole animals, variation in gene expression was similar: strains with single copy reporters showed the same amount of animal-to-animal variation as strains with multicopy reporters. At the level of cells, in animals with single copy reporters, the pattern of expression in cells within the tissue was highly stereotyped. In animals with multicopy reporters, the cell-specific expression pattern was also stereotyped, but distinct, and somewhat more variable. Our methods are rapid and gentle enough to allow quantification of expression in the same cells of an animal at different times during adult life. They should allow investigators to use changes in reporter expression in single cells in tissues as quantitative phenotypes, and link those to molecular differences. Moreover, by diminishing measurement error, they should make possible dissection of the causes of the remaining, real, variation in expression. Understanding such variation should help reveal its contribution to differences in complex

  8. Codon-optimized human sodium iodide symporter (opt-hNIS) as a sensitive reporter and efficient therapeutic gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hwa; Youn, Hyewon; Na, Juri; Hong, Kee-Jong; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2015-01-01

    To generate a more efficient in vivo reporter and therapeutic gene, we optimized the coding sequence of the human sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene by replacing NIS DNA codons from wild type to new codons having the highest usage in human gene translation. The Codon Adaptation Index (CAI), representing the number of codons effective for human expression, was much improved (0.79 for hNIS, 0.97 for opt-hNIS). Both wild-type (hNIS) and optimized human NIS (opt-hNIS) were cloned into pcDNA3.1 and pMSCV vectors for transfection. Various cancer cell lines such as thyroid (TPC-1, FRO, B-CPAP), breast (MDA-MB-231), liver (Hep3B), cervical (HeLa), and glioma (U87MG) were transfected with pcDNA3.1/hNIS or pcDNA3.1/opt-hNIS. 125I uptake by opt-hNIS-expressing cells was 1.6~2.1 times higher than uptake by wild-type hNIS-expressing cells. Stable cell lines were also established by retroviral transduction using pMSCV/hNIS or pMSCV/opt-hNIS, revealing higher NIS protein levels and 125I uptake in opt-hNIS-expressing cells than in hNIS-expressing cells. Moreover, scintigraphic images from cell plates and mouse xenografts showed stronger signals from opt-hNIS-expressing cells than hNIS-expressing cells, and radioactivity uptake by opt-hNIS-expressing tumors was 2.3-fold greater than that by hNIS-expressing tumors. To test the efficacy of radioiodine therapy, mouse xenograft models were established with cancer cells expressing hNIS or opt-hNIS. 131I treatment reduced tumor sizes of hNIS- and opt-hNIS-expressing tumors to 0.57- and 0.27- fold, respectively, compared to their sizes before therapy, suggesting an improved therapeutic effect of opt-hNIS. In summary, this study shows that codon optimization strongly increases hNIS protein levels and radioiodine uptake, thus supporting opt-hNIS as a more sensitive reporter and efficient therapeutic gene.

  9. Comparison of restriction enzyme pattern analysis and full gene sequencing of 16S rRNA gene for Nocardia species identification, the first report of Nocardia transvalensis isolated of sputum from Iran, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fatahi-Bafghi, Mehdi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Rasouli-Nasab, Masoumeh; Habibnia, Shadi; Hashemi-Shahraki, Abdorazagh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Nocardial infections occur in different organs of the body and are common in immune disorder diseases of individuals. The aim of this study was to assess Nocardia species identification by phenotypic tests and molecular techniques applied to nocardiosis in Iranian patients. In the current study, various clinical samples were collected and cultured on conventional media and using the paraffin baiting method. Various phenotypic tests were performed. For accurate identification at the species level, restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in the hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes and full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used. Twenty-seven Nocardia spp. were isolated and analysis of phenotypic tests results showed Nocardia asteroides complex, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia nova, and Nocardia spp. New RFLP patterns of Nocardia strains with hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes were obtained. Full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, N. otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, and N. nova. Nocardia infections are rarely reported and this genus is the cause of various illnesses. Accurate identification of Nocardia spp. is important for epidemiology studies and treatment. It should also be noted that some species may have similar RFLP patterns; therefore, full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is necessary for confirmation.

  10. Comparison of restriction enzyme pattern analysis and full gene sequencing of 16S rRNA gene for Nocardia species identification, the first report of Nocardia transvalensis isolated of sputum from Iran, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fatahi-Bafghi, Mehdi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Rasouli-Nasab, Masoumeh; Habibnia, Shadi; Hashemi-Shahraki, Abdorazagh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Nocardial infections occur in different organs of the body and are common in immune disorder diseases of individuals. The aim of this study was to assess Nocardia species identification by phenotypic tests and molecular techniques applied to nocardiosis in Iranian patients. In the current study, various clinical samples were collected and cultured on conventional media and using the paraffin baiting method. Various phenotypic tests were performed. For accurate identification at the species level, restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in the hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes and full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used. Twenty-seven Nocardia spp. were isolated and analysis of phenotypic tests results showed Nocardia asteroides complex, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia nova, and Nocardia spp. New RFLP patterns of Nocardia strains with hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes were obtained. Full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, N. otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, and N. nova. Nocardia infections are rarely reported and this genus is the cause of various illnesses. Accurate identification of Nocardia spp. is important for epidemiology studies and treatment. It should also be noted that some species may have similar RFLP patterns; therefore, full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is necessary for confirmation. PMID:27613736

  11. In vivo pattern of lipopolysaccharide and anti-CD3-induced NF-kappa B activation using a novel gene-targeted enhanced GFP reporter gene mouse.

    PubMed

    Magness, Scott T; Jijon, Humberto; Van Houten Fisher, Nancy; Sharpless, Ned E; Brenner, David A; Jobin, Christian

    2004-08-01

    NF-kappa B is a family of transcription factors involved in regulating cell death/survival, differentiation, and inflammation. Although the transactivation ability of NF-kappa B has been extensively studied in vitro, limited information is available on the spatial and temporal transactivation pattern in vivo. To investigate the kinetics and cellular localization of NF-kappa B-induced transcription, we created a transgenic mouse expressing the enhanced GFP (EGFP) under the transcriptional control of NF-kappa B cis elements (cis-NF-kappa B(EGFP)). A gene-targeting approach was used to insert a single copy of a NF-kappa B-dependent EGFP reporter gene 5' of the X-linked hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase locus in mouse embryonic stem cells. Embryonic fibroblasts, hepatic stellate cells, splenocytes, and dendritic cells isolated from cis-NF-kappa B(EGFP) mice demonstrated a strong induction of EGFP in response to LPS, anti-CD3, or TNF-alpha that was blocked by the NF-kappa B inhibitors BAY 11-7082 and NEMO-binding peptide. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated RelA binding to the cis-NF-kappa B(EGFP) promoter. Adenoviral delivery of NF-kappa B-inducing kinase strongly induced EGFP expression in the liver of cis-NF-kappa B(EGFP) mice. Similarly, mice injected with anti-CD3 or LPS showed increased EGFP expression in mononuclear cells, lymph node, spleen, and liver as measured by flow cytometry and/or fluorescence microscopy. Using whole organ imaging, LPS selectively induced EGFP expression in the duodenum and proximal jejunum, but not in the ileum and colon. Confocal analysis indicated EGFP expression was primarily found in lamina propria mononuclear cells. In summary, the cis-NF-kappa B(EGFP) mouse will serve as a valuable tool to address multiple questions regarding the cell-specific and real-time activation of NF-kappa B during normal and diseased states.

  12. Use of Reporter Genes to Analyze Estrogen Response: The Transgenic Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Daniel A; Pinto, Caroline Lucia; Hao, Ruixin; Bondesson, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In vivo models to detect estrogenic compounds are very valuable for screening for endocrine disruptors. Here we describe the use of transgenic estrogen reporter zebrafish as an in vivo model for identification of estrogenic properties of compounds. Live imaging of these transgenic fish provides knowledge of estrogen receptor specificity of different ligands as well as dynamics of estrogen signaling. Coupled to image analysis, the model can provide quantitative dose-response information on estrogenic activity of chemical compounds.

  13. Imaging B. anthracis heme catabolism in mice using the IFP1.4 gene reporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Banghe; Robinson, Holly; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Nobles, Christopher L.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Maresso, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    B. anthracis is a gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium which likes all pathogenic bacteria, survive by sequestering heme from its host. To image B. anthracis heme catabolism in vivo, we stably transfect new red excitable fluorescent protein, IFP1.4, that requires the heme catabolism product biliverdin (BV). IFP1.4 reporter has favorable excitation and emission characteristics, which has an absorption peak at 685 nm and an emission peak at 708 nm. Therefore, IFP1.4 reporter can be imaged deeply into the tissue with less contamination from tissue autofluorescence. However, the excitation light "leakage" through optical filters can limit detection and sensitivity of IFP1.4 reporter due to the small Stoke's shift of IFP1.4 fluorescence. To minimize the excitation light leakage, an intensified CCD (ICCD) based infrared fluorescence imaging device was optimized using two band pass filters separated by a focus lens to increase the optical density at the excitation wavelength. In this study, a mouse model (DBA/J2) was first injected with B. anthracis bacteria expressing IFP1.4, 150 μl s.c., on the ventral side of the left thigh. Then mouse was given 250 μl of a 1mM BV solution via I.V. injection. Imaging was conducted as a function of time after infection under light euthanasia, excised tissues were imaged and IFP1.4 fluorescence correlated with standard culture measurements of colony forming units (CFU). The work demonstrates the use of IFP1.4 as a reporter of bacterial utilization of host heme and may provide an important tool for understanding the pathogenesis of bacterial infection and developing new anti-bacterial therapeutics.

  14. Tomato ringspot virus coat protein binds to ARGONAUTE 1 and suppresses the translation repression of a reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Karran, Rajita A; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2014-09-01

    RNA silencing regulates plant gene expression and antiviral defenses and functions by cleaving target RNAs or repressing translation. As a counter defense, many plant viruses encode suppressor proteins that sequester small RNAs or inactivate Argonaute (AGO) proteins. All known plant virus silencing suppressor activities eventually inhibit the degradation of target mRNAs. Using a transiently expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene, we show that Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV) coat protein (CP) is a suppressor of RNA silencing that enhances GFP expression but does not prevent the degradation of the GFP mRNA or the accumulation of GFP small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Coexpression of the CP with GFP resulted in increased association of residual GFP mRNAs with polysome fractions and reduced association of GFP siRNAs with monosome fractions. AGO1 was co-immunoprecipitated with the CP and CP expression destabilized AGO1. A WG motif within the CP was critical for the enhanced GFP expression, AGO1 interaction, and AGO1 destabilization, suggesting that the ToRSV CP acts as an AGO-hook protein and competes for AGO binding with a plant cellular GW/WG protein involved in translation repression.

  15. Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina diagnosed by ornithine-δ-aminotransferase gene analysis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Jin; Lim, Dong Hui; Kim, Jae Hui; Kang, Se Woong

    2013-10-01

    A pair of 19-year-old female identical twins was referred to our hospital with progressive visual loss. They exhibited bilateral chorioretinal atrophy involving the midperiphery on fundoscopy and fluorescein angiography. Bilateral visual field constriction was noted on dynamic Goldmann perimetry, and a markedly impaired response was observed on both photopic and scotopic electroretinograms. Cystoid macular edema was identified in both eyes on optical coherence tomography. Plasma levels of ornithine were elevated. Based on these observations, the patients were diagnosed with gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by mutation analysis of the ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT) gene. Patients were treated with a pyridoxine supplement (300 mg/day) and an arginine-restricted diet to lower plasma levels of ornithine, which were successfully reduced without progression of chorioretinal atrophy for 15 months. Our report describes the first case of gyrate atrophy in the Korean population diagnosed by OAT gene analysis and treated with vitamin B6 dietary supplementation. PMID:24082780

  16. Nonketotic hyperglycinemia: novel mutation in the aminomethyl transferase gene. Case report.

    PubMed

    Gencpinar, Pinar; Çavuşoğlu, Dilek; Özbeyler, Ömer; Kaya, Özge Ö; Baydan, Figen; Olgac Dundar, Nihal

    2016-06-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an exotoxin that is produced by many strains of Staphylococcus aureus, and an important virulence factor. A PVL-positive S. aureus infection leads to rapid and severe infections of soft tissue and necrotizing pneumonia in healthy adolescents, and has a high mortality. This case report included a 12-year-old male patient who admitted for fever, respiratory distress and hip pain and was identified with necrotizing pneumonia with septic pulmonary embolism, psoas abscess, cellulitis and osteomyelitis. The PVL positive methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was isolated in the patient blood culture.

  17. Quality control of astrocyte-directed Cre transgenic mice: the benefits of a direct link between loss of gene expression and reporter activation.

    PubMed

    Requardt, Robert Pascal; Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Dublin, Pavel; Wallraff-Beck, Anke; Mikeska, Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Waha, Andreas; Steinhäuser, Christian; Willecke, Klaus; Theis, Martin

    2009-04-15

    Cre recombinase activity for cell-type restricted deletion of floxed target genes (i.e., flanked by Cre recognition loxP-sites) is often measured by separate matings with recombination-activated reporter gene mice. Using a floxed Gja1 (Cx43) allele, we demonstrate the benefits of a direct link between reporter gene expression and target gene deletion to overcome critical limitations of the Cre/loxP system. The widely used human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP)-Cre transgene exhibits variable recombination activity and requires postexperimental validation. Such quality control is essential to correlate the extent of Cre-mediated Gja1 ablation with phenotypical alterations and to maintain the activity status of hGFAP-Cre in transgenic mouse colonies. We present several strategies to control for the fidelity of hGFAP-Cre mediated recombination. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Primary Renal Sclerosing Epithelioid Fibrosarcoma: Report of Two Cases with EWSR1-CREB3L1 Gene Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Argani, Pedram; Lewin, Jack R.; Edmonds, Pamela; Netto, George J.; Prieto-Granada, Carlos; Zhang, Lei; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first two genetically confirmed cases of primary renal sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF), occurring in a 17 year-old male and a 61 year-old female. In both cases, the tumors demonstrated the typical epithelioid clear cell morphology associated with extensive hyalinizing fibrosis, raising the differential diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor, metanephric stromal tumor, and the sclerosing variant of clear cell sarcoma of the kidney. Both neoplasms demonstrated diffuse immunoreactivity for MUC4, a highly specific marker for SEF, and both demonstrated evidence of rearrangement of both the EWSR1 and CREB3L1 genes which have recently shown to be fused in this entity. Both neoplasms presented with metastatic disease. Primary renal SEF represents yet another translocation-associated sarcoma now shown to arise primarily in the kidney. PMID:25353281

  19. Mechanism Profiling of Hepatotoxicity Caused by Oxidative Stress Using Antioxidant Response Element Reporter Gene Assay Models and Big Data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Marlene Thai; Huang, Ruili; Sedykh, Alexander; Wang, Wenyi; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatotoxicity accounts for a substantial number of drugs being withdrawn from the market. Using traditional animal models to detect hepatotoxicity is expensive and time-consuming. Alternative in vitro methods, in particular cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) studies, have provided the research community with a large amount of data from toxicity assays. Among the various assays used to screen potential toxicants is the antioxidant response element beta lactamase reporter gene assay (ARE-bla), which identifies chemicals that have the potential to induce oxidative stress and was used to test > 10,000 compounds from the Tox21 program. Objective: The ARE-bla computational model and HTS data from a big data source (PubChem) were used to profile environmental and pharmaceutical compounds with hepatotoxicity data. Methods: Quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed based on ARE-bla data. The models predicted the potential oxidative stress response for known liver toxicants when no ARE-bla data were available. Liver toxicants were used as probe compounds to search PubChem Bioassay and generate a response profile, which contained thousands of bioassays (> 10 million data points). By ranking the in vitro–in vivo correlations (IVIVCs), the most relevant bioassay(s) related to hepatotoxicity were identified. Results: The liver toxicants profile contained the ARE-bla and relevant PubChem assays. Potential toxicophores for well-known toxicants were created by identifying chemical features that existed only in compounds with high IVIVCs. Conclusion: Profiling chemical IVIVCs created an opportunity to fully explore the source-to-outcome continuum of modern experimental toxicology using cheminformatics approaches and big data sources. Citation: Kim MT, Huang R, Sedykh A, Wang W, Xia M, Zhu H. 2016. Mechanism profiling of hepatotoxicity caused by oxidative stress using antioxidant response element reporter gene assay models and

  20. Lighting Up Clostridium Difficile: Reporting Gene Expression Using Fluorescent Lov Domains

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Anthony M.; Jukes, Caitlin; Candlish, Denise; Irvine, June J.; Spencer, Janice; Fagan, Robert P.; Roe, Andrew J.; Christie, John M.; Fairweather, Neil F.; Douce, Gillian R.

    2016-01-01

    The uses of fluorescent reporters derived from green fluorescent protein have proved invaluable for the visualisation of biological processes in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. However, their requirement for oxygen has limited their application in obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium difficile. Fluorescent proteins derived from Light, Oxygen or Voltage sensing (LOV) domains have been shown to bridge this limitation, but their utility as translational fusions to monitor protein expression and localisation in a strict anaerobic bacterium has not been reported. Here we demonstrate the utility of phiLOV in three species of Clostridium and its application as a marker of real-time protein translation and dynamics through genetic fusion with the cell division protein, FtsZ. Time lapse microscopy of dividing cells suggests that Z ring assembly arises through the extension of the FtsZ arc starting from one point on the circumference. Furthermore, through incorporation of phiLOV into the flagella subunit, FliC, we show the potential of bacterial LOV-based fusion proteins to be successfully exported to the extracellular environment. PMID:26996606

  1. Validation of an interferon stimulatory response element reporter gene assay for quantifying type I interferons.

    PubMed

    McCoski, S R; Xie, M; Hall, E B; Mercadante, P M; Spencer, T E; Lonergan, P; Ealy, A D

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a virus-free, cell-based interferon (IFN) bioassay and determine the utility of this assay on biological samples that contained IFN-τ, the trophoblast-secreted maternal recognition of pregnancy factor in ruminants. Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells were transduced with lentiviral particles that contained a firefly luciferase reporter construct driven by an IFN stimulatory response element (ISRE). Stably transduced cells were selected with the use of puromycin resistance. A linear, dose-responsive response was detected with human IFN-α and ovine IFN-τ. Interferon activity was detected in conditioned media from bovine trophoblast cells and uterine flushes collected from sheep and cattle. Activity also was detected in media collected after individual or small group culture of in vitro-produced bovine blastocysts at day 8 to 10 after fertilization. In summary, this IFN stimulatory response element-reporter assay may be used as an alternative to virus-dependent, cytopathic assays. It contains a similar sensitivity to IFNs and can be completed in a shorter time than cytopathic assays and does not require heightened biosafety conditions after cell transduction.

  2. Lighting Up Clostridium Difficile: Reporting Gene Expression Using Fluorescent Lov Domains.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Anthony M; Jukes, Caitlin; Candlish, Denise; Irvine, June J; Spencer, Janice; Fagan, Robert P; Roe, Andrew J; Christie, John M; Fairweather, Neil F; Douce, Gillian R

    2016-01-01

    The uses of fluorescent reporters derived from green fluorescent protein have proved invaluable for the visualisation of biological processes in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. However, their requirement for oxygen has limited their application in obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium difficile. Fluorescent proteins derived from Light, Oxygen or Voltage sensing (LOV) domains have been shown to bridge this limitation, but their utility as translational fusions to monitor protein expression and localisation in a strict anaerobic bacterium has not been reported. Here we demonstrate the utility of phiLOV in three species of Clostridium and its application as a marker of real-time protein translation and dynamics through genetic fusion with the cell division protein, FtsZ. Time lapse microscopy of dividing cells suggests that Z ring assembly arises through the extension of the FtsZ arc starting from one point on the circumference. Furthermore, through incorporation of phiLOV into the flagella subunit, FliC, we show the potential of bacterial LOV-based fusion proteins to be successfully exported to the extracellular environment. PMID:26996606

  3. Analysis of the determinants of bba64 (P35) gene expression in Borrelia burgdorferi using a gfp reporter.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Aarti; Hathaway, Marianne; McClain, Natalie; Ramesh, Geeta; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    The bba64 (P35) gene of Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, encodes a surface-exposed lipoprotein. The expression of bba64 in vitro is tightly regulated and dependent on several environmental factors. In nature, its expression is induced in the tick vector during feeding and maintained during infection of the vertebrate host. The pattern of expression of bba64 suggests that it imparts a critical function to the pathogen. A previous study has shown that the expression of bba64 is down-regulated in the absence of RpoS, suggesting that the alternative sigma factor may be involved in its expression. A DNA-binding protein has also been shown to specifically recognize a sequence in the 5' regulatory region of the gene. Therefore, the contribution of these putative determinants to the differential expression of bba64 was investigated. The role of RpoS was critically evaluated by genetic complementation of the rpoS mutant using a chromosomally targeted copy of the wild-type gene. The results confirm that RpoS is indeed required for the expression of bba64. The role of the upstream DNA-binding site was examined using bba64 promoter-gfp transcriptional fusions in a shuttle vector. The DNA-binding site was studied by targeting mutations to an inverted repeat sequence (IRS), the most prominent feature within the binding site, as well as by deletion of the entire sequence upstream of the basal promoter. Quantitative assessment of gene expression demonstrated that neither the IRS nor the sequence upstream of the promoter was essential for expression. Moreover, the expression of the reporter (GFP) appeared to remain RpoS-dependent in all cases, based on the co-expression of GFP and OspC in a subpopulation of spirochaetes and the selective expression of GFP in the stationary phase. Collectively, the data indicate that RpoS is the sole determinant of differential bba64 expression in cultured spirochaetes. PMID:18174146

  4. Isolation and functional characterization of the JcERF gene, a putative AP2/EREBP domain-containing transcription factor, in the woody oil plant Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjuan; Sun, Jingwen; Liu, Yun; Chen, Fan; Shen, Shihua

    2007-02-01

    A cDNA clone, named JcERF, was isolated from Jatropha curcas seedlings (a woody oil plant). It was classified as an ERF subfamily member based on multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic characterization. The deduced amino acid sequences of the JcERF clone showed no significant sequence similarity with other known ERF proteins except for the conserved AP2/EREBP DNA-binding domain. Expression of the JcERF gene was rapidly induced upon salinity, drought, ethylene and mechanical wounding treatments. No significant changes in the JcERF expression were observed under ABA stress. Gel retardation assay revealed that the JcERF protein could bind specifically to the GCC box as well as to the C/DRE motif. Also it can be inferred from the gel-shift that there is a possibility that the near sequence of the GCC box has an important effect on the DNA-binding activity. In yeast, the JcERF protein specifically bound to the DRE sequence and activated the transcription of two reporter genes His3 and LacZ driven by the DRE sequence. When fused to the LexA DNA-binding domain, the full-length JcERF functioned effectively as a trans-activator in the yeast one-hybrid assay. Overexpression of JcERF cDNA in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced the salt and freezing tolerance. Meanwhile the seed germination of JcERF transgenic plants was not affected by various concentrations ABA in MS medium. Taken together, the results showed that JcERF functioned as a novel transcription factor and it exhibited a mechanism of plant response to environmental factors like the other AP2/EREBP regulons that also exist in tropical woody plants.

  5. Regulation of Expression of the adhE Gene, Encoding Ethanol Oxidoreductase in Escherichia coli: Transcription from a Downstream Promoter and Regulation by Fnr and RpoS

    PubMed Central

    Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Lin, E. C. C.

    1999-01-01

    The adhE gene of Escherichia coli, located at min 27 on the chromosome, encodes the bifunctional NAD-linked oxidoreductase responsible for the conversion of acetyl-coenzyme A to ethanol during fermentative growth. The expression of adhE is dependent on both transcriptional and posttranscriptional controls and is about 10-fold higher during anaerobic than during aerobic growth. Two putative transcriptional start sites have been reported: one at position −292 and the other at −188 from the translational start codon ATG. In this study we show, by using several different transcriptional and translational fusions to the lacZ gene, that both putative transcriptional start sites can be functional and each site can be redox regulated. Although both start sites are NarL repressible in the presence of nitrate, Fnr activates only the −188 start site and Fis is required for the transcription of only the −292 start site. In addition, it was discovered that RpoS activates adhE transcription at both start sites. Under all experimental conditions tested, however, only the upstream start site is active. Available evidence indicates that under those conditions, the upstream promoter region acts as a silencer of the downstream transcriptional start site. Translation of the mRNA starting at −292, but not the one starting at −188, requires RNase III. The results support the previously postulated ribosomal binding site (RBS) occlusion model, according to which RNase III cleavage is required to release the RBS from a stem-loop structure in the long transcript. PMID:10601216

  6. Disruption of the pdhB Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Gene Affects Colony Morphology, In Vitro Growth and Cell Invasiveness of Mycoplasma agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Shivanand; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of available substrates, the metabolic potential and the growth rates of bacteria can play significant roles in their pathogenicity. This study concentrates on Mycoplasma agalactiae, which causes significant economic losses through its contribution to contagious agalactia in small ruminants by as yet unknown mechanisms. This lack of knowledge is primarily due to its fastidious growth requirements and the scarcity of genetic tools available for its manipulation and analysis. Transposon mutagenesis of M. agalactiae type strain PG2 resulted in several disruptions throughout the genome. A mutant defective in growth in vitro was found to have a transposon insertion in the pdhB gene, which encodes a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This growth difference was quite significant during the actively dividing logarithmic phase but a gradual recovery was observed as the cells approached stationary phase. The mutant also exhibited a different and smaller colony morphology compared to the wild type strain PG2. For complementation, pdhAB was cloned downstream of a strong vpma promoter and upstream of a lacZ reporter gene in a newly constructed complementation vector. When transformed with this vector the pdhB mutant recovered its normal growth and colony morphology. Interestingly, the pdhB mutant also had significantly reduced invasiveness in HeLa cells, as revealed by double immunofluorescence staining. This deficiency was recovered in the complemented strain, which had invasiveness comparable to that of PG2. Taken together, these data indicate that pyruvate dehydrogenase might be an important player in infection with and colonization by M. agalactiae. PMID:25799063

  7. Analysis of a homologue of the adducin head gene which is a potential target for the Dictyostelium STAT protein Dd-STATa.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Ryota; Hiraoka, Rieko; Shimada, Nao; Kawata, Takefumi

    2006-01-01

    A Dd-STATa-null mutant, which is defective in expression of a Dictyostelium homologue of the metazoan STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins, fails to culminate and this phenotype correlates with the loss of expression of various prestalk (pst) genes. An EST clone, SSK395, encodes a close homologue of the adducin amino-terminal head domain and harbors a putative actin-binding domain. We fused promoter fragments of the cognate gene, ahhA (adducin head homologue A), to a lacZ reporter and determined their expression pattern. The proximal promoter region is necessary for the expression of ahhA at an early (pre-aggregative) stage of development and this expression is Dd-STATa independent. The distal promoter region is necessary for expression at later stages of development in pstA cells, of the slug and in upper cup and pstAB cells during culmination. The distal region is partly Dd-STATa-dependent. The ahhA-null mutant develops almost normally until culmination, but it forms slanting culminants that tend to collapse on to the substratum. The mutant also occasionally forms fruiting bodies with swollen papillae and with constrictions in the prestalk region. The AhhA protein localizes to the stalk tube entrance and also to the upper cup cells and in cells at or near to the constricted region where an F-actin ring is localized. These findings suggest that Dd-STATa regulates culmination and may be necessary for straight downward elongation of the stalk, via the putative actin-binding protein AhhA.

  8. Quantitative, noninvasive, in vivo longitudinal monitoring of gene expression in the brain by co-AAV transduction with a PET reporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sea Young; Gay-Antaki, Carlos; Ponde, Datta E; Poptani, Harish; Vite, Charles H; Wolfe, John H

    2014-01-01

    In vivo imaging of vector transgene expression would be particularly valuable for repetitive monitoring of therapy in the brain, where invasive tissue sampling is contraindicated. We evaluated adeno-associated virus vector expression of a dopamine-2 receptor (D2R) mutant (D2R80A) by positron emission tomography in the brains of mice and cats. D2R80A is inactivated for intracellular signaling and binds subphysiologic amounts of the radioactive [18F]-fallypride analog of dopamine. The [18F]-fallypride signal bound to D2R80A in the injection site was normalized to the signal from endogenous D2R in the striatum and showed stable levels of expression within individual animals. A separate adeno-associated virus type 1 vector with identical gene expression control elements, expressing green fluorescent protein or a therapeutic gene, was coinjected with the D2R80A vector at equal doses into specific sites. Both transgenes had similar levels of gene expression by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and quantitative PCR assays, demonstrating that D2R80A is a faithful surrogate measure for expression of a gene of interest. This dual vector approach allows the D2R80A gene to be used with any therapeutic gene and to be injected into a single site for monitoring while the therapeutic gene can be distributed more widely as needed in each disease. PMID:26015960

  9. Highly efficient production of the staphylococcal nuclease reporter in Lactobacillus bulgaricus governed by the promoter of the hlbA gene.

    PubMed

    Chouayekh, Hichem; Serror, Pascale; Boudebbouze, Samira; Maguin, Emmanuelle

    2009-04-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) genome sequence analysis revealed the presence of two genes that encode histone-like HU proteins (hlbA and hlbB) showing extensive similarity to other bacterial homologues. These genes were found to be extremely conserved among several L. bulgaricus strains. The hlbA gene was shown to be constitutively transcribed from a unique promoter (phlbA) during normal growth, whereas hlbB did not seem to be expressed under usual laboratory conditions. Using a reporter cassette in which the staphylococcal nuclease was fused at its N-terminus to the lactococcal signal peptide Usp45 (SP Usp45), we have demonstrated that phlbA promotes high expression of the reporter in L. bulgaricus, which correlated with an abundant secretion of the mature nuclease in the supernatant fraction. Quantification of the exported enzyme reveals a secretion level approximately threefold higher when the expression of the reporter was under the control of phlbA compared with the lactococcal usp45 promoter. Together, these results indicate that phlbA is suitable for gene expression in L. bulgaricus, that SP Usp45 is functionally recognized and processed by the L. bulgaricus secretion machinery and that the nuclease reporter gene can be used for the identification of exported products in this bacterium.

  10. A Novel, Photosynthesis-Associated Thioredoxin-Like Gene: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, Jackie, L

    2005-09-13

    ''. These results are consistent with a role for TxlA in the synthesis of the cytochrome b6f complex, which is required for both photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport in cyanobacteria. In contrast, our PCC 7942 mutants in which the C-terminal domain of TxlA was removed are viable and appear to have normal cytochrome content, but have a subtle pigmentation phenotype (increased content of phycocyanin relative to chlorophyll) that depends on both light and CO2 availability. We have also found that PCC 6803 Sll1980 inactivation mutant merodiploids have a similar pigmentation phenotype to the PCC 7942 C-terminal truncation mutants when grown photoautotrophically. In addition, when grown heterotrophically the PCC 6803 Sll1980 inactivation mutant merodiploids remain green instead of turning a golden color like the wild-type, and they are more sensitive to the b6f complex inhibitor DBMIB than is wild type PCC 6803. That the PCC 6803 Sll1980 inactivation mutant merodiploids have these phenotypes despite the fact that they still contain normal copies of the sll1980 gene suggests that the presence of truncated Sll1980 protein interferes with the function of normal Sll1980 protein. Together, these physiological data suggest that TxlA has an essential redox role in cyanobacteria, perhaps a biosynthetic one, and may also have a nonessential regulatory role reflected in the phenotypes of the PCC 7942 C-terminal truncation mutants and the PCC 6803 Sll1980 inactivation mutant merodiploids.

  11. Validating tyrosinase homologue MelA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert; Zemp, Roger

    2015-03-01

    Antibiotic drug resistance is a major worldwide issue. Development of new therapies against pathogenic bacteria requires appropriate research tools for replicating and characterizing infections. Previously fluorescence and bioluminescence modalities have been used to image infectious burden in animal models but scattering significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. We hypothesize that photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-toresolution ratio, could be useful for visualizing MelA-expressing bacteria since MelA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue involved in melanin production. Using an inducible expression system, E. coli expressing MelA were visibly black in liquid culture. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS), MelA-expressing bacteria (at different dilutions in PBS), and chicken embryo blood were injected in plastic tubes which were imaged using a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system. Photoacoustic imaging at 6 different wavelengths (680, 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900nm) enabled spectral de-mixing to distinguish melanin signals from blood. The signal to noise ratio of 9x diluted MelA bacteria was 55, suggesting that ~20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. When MelA bacteria were injected as a 100 μL bolus into a chicken embryo, photoacoustic signals from deoxy- and oxy- hemoglobin as well as MelA-expressing bacteria could be separated and overlaid on an ultrasound image, allowing visualization of the bacterial location. Photoacoustic imaging may be a useful tool for visualizing bacterial infections and further work incorporating photoacoustic reporters into infectious bacterial strains is warranted.

  12. Familial migraine: Exclusion of the susceptibility gene from the reported locus of familial hemiplegic migraine on 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Hovatta, I.; Peltonen, L.; Kallela, M.; Faerkkilae, M.

    1994-10-01

    Genetic isolates are highly useful in analyses of the molecular background of complex diseases since the enrichment of a limited number of predisposing genes can be predicted in representative families or in specific geographical regions. It has been suggested that the pathophysiology and etiology of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) and typical migraine with aura are most probably the same. Recent assignment of FHM locus to chromosome 19p in two French families makes it now possible to test this hypothesis. We report here linkage data on four families with multiple cases of migraine disorder originating from the genetically isolated population of Finland. We were interested to discover whether the migraine in these families would also show linkage to the markers on 19p. We could exclude a region of 50 cM, flanking the reported FHM locus, as a site of migraine locus in our four families. It seems evident that locus heterogeneity exists between different diagnostic classes of migraine spectrum of diseases and also between different ethnic groups. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Generation and Characterization of a Transgenic Pig Carrying a DsRed-Monomer Reporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mei-Han; Yang, Cho-Chen; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Cheng, Winston Teng-Kui; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Lin, Yao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background Pigs are an optimal animal for conducting biomedical research because of their anatomical and physiological resemblance to humans. In contrast to the abundant resources available in the study of mice, few fluorescent protein-harboring porcine models are available for preclinical studies. In this paper, we report the successful generation and characterization of a transgenic DsRed-Monomer porcine model. Methods The transgene comprised a CMV enhancer/chicken-beta actin promoter and DsRed monomeric cDNA. Transgenic pigs were produced by using pronuclear microinjection. PCR and Southern blot analyses were applied for identification of the transgene. Histology, blood examinations and computed tomography were performed to study the health conditions. The pig amniotic fluid progenitor/stem cells were also isolated to examine the existence of red fluorescence and differentiation ability. Results Transgenic pigs were successfully generated and transmitted to offspring at a germ-line transmission rate of 43.59% (17/39). Ubiquitous expression of red fluorescence was detected in the brain, eye, tongue, heart, lung, liver, pancreas, spleen, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, kidney, testis, and muscle; this was confirmed by histology and western blot analyses. In addition, we confirmed the differentiation potential of amniotic fluid progenitor stem cells isolated from the transgenic pig. Conclusions This red fluorescent pig can serve as a host for other fluorescent-labeled cells in order to study cell-microenvironment interactions, and can provide optimal red-fluorescent-labeled cells and tissues for research in developmental biology, regenerative medicine, and xenotransplantation. PMID:25187950

  14. Construction of a cytosolic firefly luciferase reporter cassette for use in PCR-mediated gene deletion and fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, W B; Rome, C M; Hjortsø, M A; Benton, M G

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring promoter response to environmental changes using reporter systems has provided invaluable information regarding cellular state. With the development of in vivo luciferase reporter systems, inexpensive, sensitive and accurate promoter assays have been developed without the variability reported between in vitro samplings. Current luciferase reporter systems, however, are largely inflexible to modifications to the promoter of interest. To overcome problems in flexibility and stability of these expression vectors, we report the creation of a novel vector system which introduces a cytosol-localized Photinus pyralis luciferase [LUC*(-SKL)] capable of one-step, in vivo measurements into a promoter-reporter system via PCR-based gene deletion and fusion. After introduction of the reporter under HUG1 promoter control, cytosolic localization was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The dose-response of this novel construct was then compared with that of a similar HUG1Δ::yEGFP1 promoter-reporter system and shown to give a similar response pattern.

  15. Associations between oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphisms and self-reported aggressive behavior and anger: Interactions with alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ada; Westberg, Lars; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Jern, Patrick; Salo, Benny; Santtila, Pekka

    2012-09-01

    Oxytocin has been implicated in the regulation of social as well as aggressive behaviors, and in a recent study we found that the effect of alcohol on aggressive behavior was moderated by the individual's genotype on an oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphism (Johansson et al., 2012). In this study we wanted to deepen and expand the analysis by exploring associations between three (rs1488467, rs4564970, rs1042778) OXTR polymorphisms and aggressive behavior, trait anger as well as anger control in a population-based sample of Finnish men and women (N=3577) aged between 18 and 49 years (M=26.45 years, SD=5.02). A specific aim was to investigate if the polymorphisms would show interactive effects with alcohol consumption on aggressive behavior and trait anger, as well as to explore whether these polymorphisms affect differences in anger control between self-reported sober and intoxicated states. The results showed no main effects of the polymorphisms, however, three interactions between the polymorphisms and alcohol consumption were found. The effect of alcohol consumption on aggressive behavior was moderated by the genotype of the individual on the rs4564970 polymorphism, in line with previous results (Johansson et al., 2012). For trait anger, both the rs1488467 and the rs4564970 polymorphisms interacted with alcohol consumption. It appears that the region of the OXTR gene including both the rs4564970 and the rs1488467 polymorphisms may be involved in the regulation of the relationship between alcohol and aggressive behavior as well as between alcohol and the propensity to react to situations with elevated levels of anger.

  16. Use of reporter genes to identify recessive trans-acting mutations specifically involved in the regulation of Aspergillus nidulans penicillin biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed Central

    Brakhage, A A; Van den Brulle, J

    1995-01-01

    Starting from three amino acid precursors, penicillin biosynthesis is catalyzed by three enzymes which are encoded by the following three genes: acvA (pcbAB), ipnA (pcbC), and aat (penDE). To identify trans-acting mutations which are specifically involved in the regulation of these secondary metabolism genes, a molecular approach was employed by using an Aspergillus nidulans strain (AXTII9) carrying acvA-uidA and ipnA-lacZ gene fusions integrated in double copies at the chromosomal argB gene. On minimal agar plates supplemented with X-Gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside), colonies of such a strain stained blue, which is indicative of ipnA-lacZ expression. After mutagenesis with UV light, colonies were isolated on agar plates with lactose as the carbon source, which produced only a faint blue color or no color at all. Such mutants (named Prg for penicillin regulation) most likely were defective in trans-acting genes. Control experiments revealed that the mutants studied still carried the correct number of gene fusions. In a fermentation run, mutants Prg-1 and Prg-6 exhibited only 20 to 50% of the ipnA-lacZ expression of the wild-type strain and produced only 20 to 30% of the penicillin produced by the wild-type strain. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis showed that these mutants contained reduced amounts of ipnA gene product, i.e., isopenicillin N synthase. Both mutant Prg-1 and mutant Prg-6 also differed in acvA-uidA expression levels from the wild type. Segregation analysis indicated that for both mutants the Prg phenotype resulted from mutation of a single gene. Two different complementation groups, which were designated prgA1 and prgB1, were identified. However, the specific activity of the aat (penDE) gene product, i.e., acyl coenzyme A:6-aminopenicillanic acid acyltransferase, was essentially the same for the mutants as for the wild-type strain, implying that the last step of the penicillin biosynthetic pathway is not affected by the trans

  17. Pituitary specific retinoid-X receptor ligand interactions with thyroid hormone receptor signaling revealed by high throughput reporter and endogenous gene responses.

    PubMed

    Mengeling, Brenda J; Furlow, J David

    2015-10-01

    Disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) signaling can compromise vital processes both during development and in the adult. We previously reported on high-throughput screening experiments for man-made TH disruptors using a stably integrated line of rat pituitary cells, GH3.TRE-Luc, in which a thyroid hormone receptor (TR) response element drives luciferase (Luc) expression. In these experiments, several retinoid/rexinoid compounds activated the reporter. Here we show that all-trans and 13-cis retinoic acid appear to function through the heterodimer partners of TRs, retinoid-X receptors (RXRs), as RXR antagonists abrogated retinoid-induced activation. The retinoids also induced known endogenous TR target genes, showing good correlation with Luc activity. Synthetic RXR-specific agonists significantly activated all tested TR target genes, but interestingly, retinoid/rexinoid activation was more consistent between genes than the extent of T3-induced activation. In contrast, the retinoids neither activated the Luc reporter construct in transient transfection assays in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HuH7, nor two of the same T3-induced genes examined in pituitary cells. These data demonstrate the suitability and sensitivity of GH3.TRE-Luc cells for screening chemical compound libraries for TH disruption and suggest that the extent of disruption can vary on a cell type and gene-specific bases, including an underappreciated contribution by RXRs. PMID:26096596

  18. Water quality assessment using the AREc32 reporter gene assay indicative of the oxidative stress response pathway.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Dutt, Mriga; Maylin, Erin; Tang, Janet Y M; Toze, Simon; Wolf, C Roland; Lang, Matti

    2012-11-01

    The reporter gene assay AREc32 is based on the induction of the Nrf2 mediated oxidative stress response pathway in the human breast cancer cell line MCF7, where eight copies of the antioxidant response element (ARE) are linked to a reporter gene encoding for luciferase. The Nrf2-ARE pathway is responsive to many chemicals that cause oxidative stress, among them a large number of pesticides and skin irritants. We adopted and validated the AREc32 bioassay for water quality testing. tert-Butylhydroquinone served as the positive control, phenol as the negative control and other reactive chemicals were assessed for their specificity. An environmentally relevant reference chemical, benzo(a)pyrene was the most potent inducer of all tested chemicals. The concentration causing an induction ratio (IR) of 1.5 (EC(IR1.5)) was chosen as the effect benchmark value. The assay was applied to 21 water samples ranging from sewage to drinking water, including secondary treatment and various tertiary treatment options (ozonation, biologically activated carbon filtration, membrane filtration, reverse osmosis, advanced oxidation, chlorination, chloramination). The samples were enriched by solid phase extraction. In most samples the oxidative stress response was far more sensitive than cytotoxicity. The primary and secondary treated effluent exceeded the effect threshold IR 1.5 at a relative enrichment factor (REF) of 1, i.e., the native samples were active. All tertiary treated samples were less potent and their EC(IR1.5) lay between REF 1 and 10. The Nrf2 pathway was induced at a REF of approximately 10 for surface waters and drinking water, and above this enrichment cytotoxicity took over in most samples and quenched the induction. The blank (ultrapure water run through the sample enrichment process) was cytotoxic at an REF of 100, which is the limit of concentrations range that can be evaluated. Treatment typically decreased both the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress response apart

  19. An improved recombination-based in vivo expression technology-like reporter system reveals differential cyaA gene activation in Bordetella species.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Matthew S; Mason, Eliza; Henderson, Michael W; Scheller, Erich V; Cotter, Peggy A

    2013-04-01

    Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica rely on the global two-component regulatory system BvgAS to control expression of distinct phenotypic phases. In the Bvg(-) phase, expression of vrg genes, including those required for motility in B. bronchiseptica, is activated and genes encoding virulence factors are not expressed. Conversely, in the Bvg(+) phase, genes encoding virulence factors are highly expressed while genes necessary for motility are repressed. Although several genetic analyses have demonstrated the importance of the Bvg(+) phase during respiratory infection, Bvg-regulated gene activation in B. bronchiseptica has not been investigated in vivo. To address this, we developed a plasmid, pGFLIP, that encodes a sensitive Flp recombinase-based fluorescent reporter system able to document gene activation both in vitro and in vivo. Using pGFLIP, we demonstrated that cyaA, considered to be a "late" Bvg(+) phase gene, is activated substantially earlier in B. bronchiseptica than B. pertussis following a switch from Bvg(-) to Bvg(+) phase conditions. We show that the altered activation of cyaA is not due to differences in the cyaA promoter or in the bvgAS alleles of B. bronchiseptica compared to B. pertussis, but appears to be species specific. Finally, we used pGFLIP to show that flaA remains repressed during infection, confirming that B. bronchiseptica does not modulate to the Bvg(-) phase in vivo.

  20. Targeted Deletion of the Antisilencer/Enhancer (ASE) Element from Intron 1 of the Myelin Proteolipid Protein Gene (Plp1) in Mouse Reveals that the Element Is Dispensable for Plp1 Expression in Brain during Development and Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Glauber B.; Meng, Fanxue; Kockara, Neriman T.; Yang, Baoli; Wight, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Myelin proteolipid protein gene (Plp1) expression is temporally regulated in brain, which peaks during the active myelination period of CNS development. Previous studies with Plp1-lacZ transgenic mice demonstrated that (mouse) Plp1 intron 1 DNA is required for high levels of expression in oligodendrocytes. Deletion-transfection analysis revealed the intron contains a single positive regulatory element operative in the N20.1 oligodendroglial cell line, which was named ASE (antisilencer/enhancer) based on its functional properties in these cells. To investigate the role of the ASE in vivo, the element was deleted from the native gene in mouse using a Cre/lox strategy. While removal of the ASE from Plp1-lacZ constructs profoundly decreased expression in transfected oligodendroglial cell lines (N20.1 and Oli-neu), the element was dispensable to achieve normal levels of Plp1 gene expression in mouse during development (except perhaps at postnatal day 15) and throughout the remyelination period following cuprizone-induced (acute) demyelination. Thus, it is possible that the ASE is nonfunctional in vivo, or that loss of the ASE from the native gene in mouse can be compensated for by the presence of other regulatory elements within the Plp1 gene. PMID:23157328

  1. Characterization of a psychrotrophic Arthrobacter gene and its cold-active beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed Central

    Trimbur, D E; Gutshall, K R; Prema, P; Brenchley, J E

    1994-01-01

    Enzymes with high specific activities at low temperatures have potential uses for chemical conversions when low temperatures are required, as in the food industry. Psychrotrophic microorganisms which grow at low temperatures may be a valuable source of cold-active enzymes that have higher activities at low temperatures than enzymes found for mesophilic microorganisms. To find cold-active beta-galactosidases, we isolated and characterized several psychrotrophic microorganisms. One isolate, B7, is an Arthrobacter strain which produces beta-galactosidase when grown in lactose minimal media. Extracts have a specific activity at 30 degrees C of 2 U/mg with o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside as a substrate. Two isozymes were detected when extracts were subjected to electrophoresis in a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel and stained for activity with 5-bromo-4-chloro-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (X-Gal). When chromosomal DNA was prepared and transformed into Escherichia coli, three different genes encoding beta-galactosidase activity were obtained. We have subcloned and sequenced one of these beta-galactosidase genes from the Arthrobacter isolate B7. On the basis of amino acid sequence alignment, the gene was found to have probable catalytic sites homologous to those from the E. coli lacZ gene. The gene encoded a protein of 1,016 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 111 kDa. The enzyme was purified and characterized. The beta-galactosidase from isolate B7 has kinetic properties similar to those of the E. coli lacZ beta-galactosidase but has a temperature optimum 20 degrees C lower than that of the E. coli enzyme. Images PMID:7811090

  2. Molecular analysis of the PAX6 gene in Mexican patients with congenital aniridia: report of four novel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Villarroel, Camilo E.; Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina; Orozco, Lorena; Alcántara-Ortigoza, Miguel Angel; Jiménez, Diana F.; Ordaz, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Paired box gene 6 (PAX6) heterozygous mutations are well known to cause congenital non-syndromic aniridia. These mutations produce primarily protein truncations and have been identified in approximately 40%–80% of all aniridia cases worldwide. In Mexico, there is only one previous report describing three intragenic deletions in five cases. In this study, we further analyze PAX6 variants in a group of Mexican aniridia patients and describe associated ocular findings. Methods We evaluated 30 nonrelated probands from two referral hospitals. Mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and direct sequencing, and novel missense mutations and intronic changes were analyzed by in silico analysis. One intronic variation (IVS2+9G>A), which in silico analysis suggested had no pathological effects, was searched in 103 unaffected controls. Results Almost all cases exhibited phenotypes that were at the severe end of the aniridia spectrum with associated ocular alterations such as nystagmus, macular hypoplasia, and congenital cataracts. The mutation detection rate was 30%. Eight different mutations were identified: four (c.184_188dupGAGAC, c.361T>C, c.879dupC, and c.277G>A) were novel, and four (c.969C>T, IVS6+1G>C, c.853delC, and IVS7–2A>G) have been previously reported. The substitution at position 969 was observed in two patients. None of the intragenic deletions previously reported in Mexican patients were found. Most of the mutations detected predict either truncation of the PAX6 protein or conservative amino acid changes in the paired domain. We also detected two intronic non-pathogenic variations, IVS9–12C>T and IVS2+9G>A, that had been previously reported. Because the latter variation was considered potentially pathogenic, it was analyzed in 103 healthy Mexican newborns where we found an allelic frequency of 0.1116 for the A allele. Conclusions This study adds four novel mutations to the worldwide PAX6 mutational spectrum, and

  3. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection in a Young Man with a Factor V Leiden Gene Mutation: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tahir; Danyi, Peter; Topaz, On; Ali, Asghar; Jovin, Ion S.

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare but increasingly recognized cause of acute myocardial ischemia in young adults, especially in women. We report a case of spontaneous coronary dissection in a young healthy man who was also a carrier of the factor V Leiden gene mutation. PMID:24436622

  4. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection in a young man with a factor v leiden gene mutation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahir; Danyi, Peter; Topaz, On; Ali, Asghar; Jovin, Ion S

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare but increasingly recognized cause of acute myocardial ischemia in young adults, especially in women. We report a case of spontaneous coronary dissection in a young healthy man who was also a carrier of the factor V Leiden gene mutation.

  5. Brief Report: High Frequency of Biochemical Markers for Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism: No Association with the Mitochondrial Aspartate/Glutamate Carrier "SLC25A12" Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Catarina; Coutinho, Ana M.; Diogo, Luisa; Grazina, Manuela; Marques, Carla; Miguel, Teresa; Ataide, Assuncao; Almeida, Joana; Borges, Luis; Oliveira, Catarina; Oliveira, Guiomar; Vicente, Astrid M.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study we confirm the previously reported high frequency of biochemical markers of mitochondrial dysfunction, namely hyperlactacidemia and increased lactate/pyruvate ratio, in a significant fraction of 210 autistic patients. We further examine the involvement of the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier gene ("SLC25A12") in…

  6. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection in a young man with a factor v leiden gene mutation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahir; Danyi, Peter; Topaz, On; Ali, Asghar; Jovin, Ion S

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare but increasingly recognized cause of acute myocardial ischemia in young adults, especially in women. We report a case of spontaneous coronary dissection in a young healthy man who was also a carrier of the factor V Leiden gene mutation. PMID:24436622

  7. Regulation of gene expression in response to oxygen in Rhizobium etli: role of FnrN in fixNOQP expression and in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, O; Morera, C; Miranda-Rios, J; Girard, L; Romero, D; Soberón, M

    2001-12-01

    Previously, we reported finding duplicated fixNOQP operons in Rhizobium etli CFN42. One of these duplicated operons is located in the symbiotic plasmid (fixNOQPd), while the other is located in a cryptic plasmid (fixNOQPf). Although a novel FixL-FixKf regulatory cascade participates in microaerobic expression of both fixNOQP duplicated operons, we found that a mutation in fixL eliminates fixNOQPf expression but has only a moderate effect on expression of fixNOQPd. This suggests that there are differential regulatory controls. Interestingly, only the fixNOQPd operon was essential for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (L. Girard, S. Brom, A. Dávalos, O. Lopez, M. Soberón, and D. Romero, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 13:1283-1292, 2000). Searching for potential candidates responsible for the differential expression, we characterized two fnrN homologs (encoding transcriptional activators of the cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP]-Fnr family) in R. etli CFN42. One of these genes (fnrNd) is located on the symbiotic plasmid, while the other (fnrNchr) is located on the chromosome. Analysis of the expression of the fnrN genes using transcriptional fusions with lacZ showed that the two fnrN genes are differentially regulated, since only fnrNd is expressed in microaerobic cultures of the wild-type strain while fnrNchr is negatively controlled by FixL. Mutagenesis of the two fnrN genes showed that both genes participate, in conjunction with FixL-FixKf, in the microaerobic induction of the fixNOQPd operon. Participation of these genes is also seen during the symbiotic process, in which mutations in fnrNd and fnrNchr, either singly or in combination, lead to reductions in nitrogen fixation. Therefore, R. etli employs a regulatory circuit for induction of the fixNOQPd operon that involves at least three transcriptional regulators of the CRP-Fnr family. This regulatory circuit may be important for ensuring optimal production of the cbb(3), terminal oxidase during symbiosis.

  8. Multiple GCD genes required for repression of GCN4, a transcriptional activator of amino acid biosynthetic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Harashima, S; Hinnebusch, A G

    1986-11-01

    GCN4 encodes a positive regulator of multiple unlinked genes encoding amino acid biosynthetic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of GCN4 is coupled to amino acid availability by a control mechanism involving GCD1 as a negative effector and GCN1, GCN2, and GCN3 as positive effectors of GCN4 expression. We used reversion of a gcn2 gcn3 double mutation to isolate new alleles of GCD1 and mutations in four additional GCD genes which we designate GCD10, GCD11, GCD12, and GCD13. All of the mutations lead to constitutive derepression of HIS4 transcription in the absence of the GCN2+ and GCN3+ alleles. By contrast, the gcd mutations require the wild-type GCN4 allele for their derepressing effect, suggesting that each acts by influencing the level of GCN4 activity in the cell. Consistent with this interpretation, mutations in each GCD gene lead to constitutive derepression of a GCN4::lacZ gene fusion. Thus, at least five gene products are required to maintain the normal repressed level of GCN4 expression in nonstarvation conditions. Interestingly, the gcd mutations are pleiotropic and also affect growth rate in nonstarvation conditions. In addition, certain alleles lead to a loss of M double-stranded RNA required for the killer phenotype. This pleiotropy suggests that the GCD gene products contribute to an essential cellular function, in addition to, or in conjunction with, their role in GCN4 regulation.

  9. Quantitative Silencing of EGFP Reporter Gene by Self-Assembled siRNA Lipoplexes of LinOS and Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nonviral siRNA vectors prepared by the direct mixing of siRNA and mixtures of an asymmetric N4,N9-diacyl spermine conjugate, N4-linoleoyl-N9-oleoyl-1,12-diamino-4,9-diazadodecane (LinOS), with either cholesterol or DOPE, at various molar ratios of the neutral lipids, are reported. The effects of varying the lipid formulation and changing the N/P charge ratio on the intracellular delivery of siRNA to HeLa cells and on the siRNA-mediated gene silencing of a stably expressed reporter gene (EGFP) were evaluated. The presence of either cholesterol or DOPE in the mixture resulted in a marked increase in the delivery of the siRNA as well as enhanced EGFP silencing as evaluated by FACS. A LinOS/Chol 1:2 mixture resulted in the highest siRNA delivery and the most efficient EGFP silencing (reduced to 20%) at N/P = 3.0. Lowering the amount of siRNA from 15 pmol to 3.75 pmol, thus increasing the N/P charge ratio to 11.9, resulted in decreasing the amount of delivered siRNA, while the efficiency of gene silencing was comparable to that obtained with 15 pmol (N/P = 3.0) of siRNA. Mixtures of symmetrical N4,N9-dioleoyl spermine (DOS) with cholesterol at 1:2 molar ratio showed less siRNA delivery than with LinOS/Chol at N/P = 3.0 (15 pmol of siRNA), and comparable delivery at N/P = 11.9 (3.75 pmol of siRNA). The EGFP silencing was comparable with LinOS and with DOS when mixed with cholesterol 1:2 (lipoplexes prepared with 15 pmol of siRNA), but LinOS mixtures showed better EGFP silencing when the siRNA was reduced to 3.75 pmol. Lipoplex particle size determination by DLS of cholesterol mixtures was 106–118 nm, compared to 194–356 nm for lipoplexes prepared with the spermine conjugates only, and to 685 nm for the LinOS/DOPE 1:1 mixture. Confocal microscopy showed successful siRNA delivery of red tagged siRNA and quantitative EGFP knockdown in HeLa EGFP cells; Z-stack photomicrographs showed that the delivered siRNA is distributed intracellularly. Cryo-TEM of siRNA LinOS/Chol 1

  10. Validation and application of reporter gene assays for the determination of estrogenic and androgenic endocrine disruptor activity in sport supplements.

    PubMed

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T; Oplatowska, Michalina; Connolly, Lisa

    2012-07-01

    Previously developed estrogen and androgen mammalian reporter gene assays (RGAs) were assessed for their potential use as a quantitative screening method in the detection of estrogenic and androgenic endocrine disruptors (EDs) in sport supplements. The validation of both RGAs coupled with dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) was performed in accordance with European Commission Decision EC/2002/6579 for biological screening methods. Decision limits (CCα) and detection capabilities (CCβ) were established for both the estrogen and androgen RGAs. All samples were compliant with CCα and CCβ in both bioassays. Recovery rates were 96 % for 17β-estradiol and 115 % for dihydrotestosterone as obtained in their corresponding RGA. Both estrogens and androgens were stable in samples for more than 3 weeks, when stored at -20 °C. Specificity, good repeatability (coefficients of variation (CV), 12-25 %), reproducibility and robustness of both bioassays were also observed. Four different ED modes of action were determined for estrogens and androgens in 53 sport supplements, using the validated RGAs. This study revealed that 89 % of the investigated sport supplements contained estrogenic EDs and 51 % contained androgenic compounds. In conclusion, both bioassays are suitable for sport supplement screening of estrogenic and androgenic EDs.

  11. Developing in vitro reporter gene assays to assess the hormone receptor activities of chemicals frequently detected in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Si, Chaozong; Bian, Qian; Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Liansheng; Wang, Xinru

    2012-08-01

    The present study intended to develop receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene assays to evaluate and compare the estrogen receptor (ER), androgen receptor (AR) and thyroid hormone receptor (TR) activities of target chemicals. Di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate (DEHP), chlorpyrifos (CPF), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and bisphenol A (BPA) are some of the most common contaminants in drinking water and are frequently detected in China and worldwide. The chemicals were tested at concentrations of 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 times their maximum contaminant level in drinking water. The results showed that BPA possessed various activities on ER, AR and TR. DEHP and CPF could suppress 17β-estradiol or testosterone activity with different potencies, and DEHP possessed weaker anti-thyroid hormone activity. 2,4-D showed no agonist or antagonist activity against these hormone receptors, but it significantly enhanced the activity of testosterone through AR. Furthermore, the mixture of DEHP and CPF exhibited stronger ER and AR antagonist activities than each single component alone, but their combined effects were less than the expected effects based on the additive model. These results implied that the transcription activation mediated by hormone receptors was the potential endocrine-disrupting mechanism of the test chemicals. Our study also provided useful tools for evaluation of their endocrine disrupting activity.

  12. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Cell Transplantation: Part I. Reporter Gene Design, Characterization, and Optical in Vivo Imaging of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells after Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Ziv, Keren; Ito, Ken; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Jürgen K; Chung, Jaehoon; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Swanson, Julia C; Merk, Denis R; Lyons, Jennifer K; Yerushalmi, David; Teramoto, Tomohiko; Kosuge, Hisanori; Dao, Catherine N; Ray, Pritha; Patel, Manishkumar; Chang, Ya-Fang; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Cohen, Jeff Eric; Goldstone, Andrew Brooks; Habte, Frezghi; Bhaumik, Srabani; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Robbins, Robert C; Dash, Rajesh; Yang, Phillip C; Brinton, Todd J; Yock, Paul G; McConnell, Michael V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To use multimodality reporter-gene imaging to assess the serial survival of marrow stromal cells (MSC) after therapy for myocardial infarction (MI) and to determine if the requisite preclinical imaging end point was met prior to a follow-up large-animal MSC imaging study. Materials and Methods Animal studies were approved by the Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care. Mice (n = 19) that had experienced MI were injected with bone marrow-derived MSC that expressed a multimodality triple fusion (TF) reporter gene. The TF reporter gene (fluc2-egfp-sr39ttk) consisted of a human promoter, ubiquitin, driving firefly luciferase 2 (fluc2), enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp), and the sr39tk positron emission tomography reporter gene. Serial bioluminescence imaging of MSC-TF and ex vivo luciferase assays were performed. Correlations were analyzed with the Pearson product-moment correlation, and serial imaging results were analyzed with a mixed-effects regression model. Results Analysis of the MSC-TF after cardiac cell therapy showed significantly lower signal on days 8 and 14 than on day 2 (P = .011 and P = .001, respectively). MSC-TF with MI demonstrated significantly higher signal than MSC-TF without MI at days 4, 8, and 14 (P = .016). Ex vivo luciferase activity assay confirmed the presence of MSC-TF on days 8 and 14 after MI. Conclusion Multimodality reporter-gene imaging was successfully used to assess serial MSC survival after therapy for MI, and it was determined that the requisite preclinical imaging end point, 14 days of MSC survival, was met prior to a follow-up large-animal MSC study. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27308957

  13. The sweet potato RbcS gene (IbRbcS1) promoter confers high-level and green tissue-specific expression of the GUS reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Noriaki; Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-08-10

    Sweet potato is an important crop because of its high yield and biomass production. We herein investigated the potential of the promoter activity of a small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RbcS) from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) in order to develop the high expression system of exogenous DNA in Arabidopsis. We isolated two different cDNAs (IbRbcS1 and IbRbcS2) encoding RbcS from sweet potato. Their predicted amino acid sequences were well conserved with the mature RbcS protein of other plants. The tissue-specific expression patterns of these two genes revealed that expression of IbRbcS1 was specific to green tissue, whereas that of IbRbcS2 was non-photosynthetic tissues such as roots and tubers. These results suggested that IbRbcS1 was predominantly expressed in the green tissue-specific of sweet potato over IbRbcS2. Therefore, the IbRbcS1 promoter was transformed into Arabidopsis along with β-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter gene. GUS staining and semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that the IbRbcS1 promoter conferred the expression of the GUS reporter gene in green tissue-specific and light-inducible manners. Furthermore, qPCR showed that the expression levels of GUS reporter gene in IbRbcS1 pro:GUS were same as those in CaMV 35S pro:GUS plants. These results suggest that the IbRbcS1 promoter is a potentially strong foreign gene expression system for genetic transformation in plants.

  14. Comparing the functions of equine and canine influenza H3N8 virus PA-X proteins: Suppression of reporter gene expression and modulation of global host gene expression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kurtis H; Sun, Miao; Iketani, Sho; Holmes, Edward C; Parrish, Colin R

    2016-09-01

    The influenza PA-X protein is translated from the PA open reading frame from frameshifting and suppresses cellular gene expression due to its ribonuclease activity. We further defined the functional roles of PA-X by comparing PA-X proteins from two related viruses - equine influenza (EIV) and canine influenza (CIV) H3N8 - that differ in a C-terminal truncation and internal mutations. In vitro reporter gene assays revealed that both proteins were able to suppress gene expression. Interestingly, EIV PA-X demonstrated ~50% greater activity compared to CIV PA-X, and we identified the mutations that caused this difference. We used RNA-seq to evaluate the effects of PA-X on host gene expression after transfection into cultured cells. There were no significant differences in this property between EIV and CIV PA-X proteins, but expression of either resulted in the up-regulation of genes when compared to controls, most notably immunity-related proteins, trafficking proteins, and transcription factors.

  15. Spectrum of MECP2 gene mutations in a cohort of Indian patients with Rett syndrome: report of two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Raha, Sarbani; Sanghavi, Daksha; Maitra, Anurupa; Udani, Vrajesh

    2013-02-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, primarily affecting females and characterized by developmental regression, epilepsy, stereotypical hand movements, and motor abnormalities. Its prevalence is about 1 in 10,000 female births. Rett syndrome is caused by mutations within methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Over 270 individual nucleotide changes which cause pathogenic mutations have been reported. However, eight most commonly occurring missense and nonsense mutations account for almost 70% of all patients. We screened 90 individuals with Rett syndrome phenotype. A total of 19 different MECP2 mutations and polymorphisms were identified in 27 patients. Of the 19 mutations, we identified 7 (37%) frameshift, 6 (31%) nonsense, 14 (74%) missense mutations and one duplication (5%). The most frequent pathogenic changes were: missense p.T158M (11%), p.R133C (7.4%), and p.R306C (7.4%) and nonsense p.R168X (11%), p.R255X (7.4%) mutations. We have identified two novel mutations namely p.385-388delPLPP present in atypical patients and p.Glu290AlafsX38 present in a classical patient of Rett syndrome. Sequence homology for p.385-388delPLPP mutation revealed that these 4 amino acids were conserved across mammalian species. This indicated the importance of these 4 amino acids in structure and function of the protein. A novel variant p.T479T has also been identified in a patient with atypical Rett syndrome. A total of 62 (69%) patients remained without molecular genetics diagnosis that necessitates further search for mutations in other genes like CDKL5 and FOXG1 that are known to cause Rett phenotype. The majority of mutations are detected in exon 4 and only one mutation was present in exon 3. Therefore, our study suggests the need for screening exon 4 of MECP2 as first line of diagnosis in these patients.

  16. Organ-specific gene expression in maize: The P-wr allele. Final report, August 15, 1993--August 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.A.

    1997-06-01

    The ultimate aim of our work is to understand how a regulatory gene produces a specific pattern of gene expression during plant development. Our model is the P-wr gene of maize, which produces a distinctive pattern of pigmentation of maize floral organs. We are investigating this system using a combination of classical genetic and molecular approaches. Mechanisms of organ-specific gene expression are a subject of intense research interest, as it is the operation of these mechanisms during eukaryotic development which determine the characteristics of each organism Allele-specific expression has been characterized in only a few other plant genes. In maize, organ-specific pigmentation regulated by the R, B, and Pl genes is achieved by differential transcription of functionally conserved protein coding sequences. Our studies point to a strikingly different mechanism of organ-specific gene expression, involving post-transcriptional regulation of the regulatory P gene. The novel pigmentation pattern of the P-wr allele is associated with differences in the encoded protein. Furthermore, the P-wr gene itself is present as a unique tandemly amplified structure, which may affect its transcriptional regulation.

  17. Kullback-Leibler information for ordering genes using sperm typing and radiation-hybrid mapping. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chernoff, H.

    1991-10-01

    Two technologies applicable to gene mapping are those of sperm typing and radiation hybrid mapping. Sperm typing makes use of the polymerase chain reaction, a biochemical technique which allows enormous amplification (production of multiple copies) of small, selected DNA fragments from a single chromosome. A sample of sperm from a single donor is analyzed to see which alleles (distinct forms of the various genes) are present in the individual sperms. The frequencies with which the various possibilities occur can be used to supply estimates of the ordering and of the recombination probabilities among the genes for which that donor is heterozygous (having different alleles of the same gene.)

  18. Development of a new reporter gene system--dsRed/xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-xanthine for molecular imaging of processes behind the intact blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Doubrovin, Mikhail; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Serganova, Inna; Soghomonian, Suren; Myagawa, Tadashi; Beresten, Tatiana; Ageyeva, Lyudmila; Sadelain, Michel; Koutcher, Jason; Blasberg, Ronald G; Tjuvajev, Juri G Gelovani

    2003-04-01

    We report the development of a novel dual-modality fusion reporter gene system consisting of Escherichia coli xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRT) for nuclear imaging with radiolabeled xanthine and Discosoma red fluorescent protein for optical fluorescent imaging applications. The dsRed/XPRT fusion gene was successfully created and stably transduced into RG2 glioma cells, and both reporters were shown to be functional. The level of dsRed fluorescence directly correlated with XPRT enzymatic activity as measured by ribophosphorylation of [14C]-xanthine was in vitro (Ki = 0.124 +/- 0.008 vs. 0.00031 +/- 0.00005 mL/min/g in parental cell line), and [*]-xanthine octanol/water partition coefficient was 0.20 at pH = 7.4 (logP = -0.69), meeting requirements for the blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetrating tracer. In the in vivo experiment, the concentration of [14C]-xanthine in the normal brain varied from 0.20 to 0.16 + 0.05% dose/g under 0.87 + 0.24% dose/g plasma radiotracer concentration. The accumulation in vivo in the transfected flank tumor was to 2.4 +/- 0.3% dose/g, compared to 0.78 +/- 0.02% dose/g and 0.64 +/- 0.05% dose/g in the control flank tumors and intact muscle, respectively. [14C]-Xanthine appeared to be capable of specific accumulation in the transfected infiltrative brain tumor (RG2-dsRed/XPRT), which corresponded to the 585 nm fluorescent signal obtained from the adjacent cryosections. The images of endogenous gene expression with the "sensory system" have to be normalized for the transfection efficiency based on the "beacon system" image data. Such an approach requires two different "reporter genes" and two different "reporter substrates." Therefore, the novel dsRed/XPRT fusion gene can be used as a multimodality reporter system in the biological applications requiring two independent reporter genes, including the cells located behind the BBB.

  19. [Metatropic dysplasia in a girl with c.1811_1812delinsAT mutation in exon 11 of the TRPV4 gene not previously reported].

    PubMed

    Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco; Matysiak-Scholze, Uta; Heinze, Jessica; Barrera, Albaro; Lacruz-Rengel, María Angelina; Bracho, Ana; Guerrero, Yudith

    2015-01-01

    Metatropic dysplasia is a skeletal disorder with clinical heterogeneity, characterized by craniofacial dysmorphy including frontal bossing and midface hypoplasia, short trunk,progressive kyphoscoliosis and shortened limbs. The TRPV4 gene is located on 12q24.11, coding a cation channel with nonselective permeability to calcium; it is expressed and involved in many physiological processes through responses to different stimuli. Over 50 mutations in TRPV4 have been described. We present a seven months old girl with heterozygous mutation c.1811_1812delinsAT; p.I604N in intron 11 not previously reported in the TRPV4 gene and with clinical findings compatible with metatropic dysplasia.

  20. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  1. Overexpression of the MRI Reporter Genes Ferritin and Transferrin Receptor Affect Iron Homeostasis and Produce Limited Contrast in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sofia M.; Moss, Diana; Williams, Steve R.; Murray, Patricia; Taylor, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Imaging technologies that allow the non-invasive monitoring of stem cells in vivo play a vital role in cell-based regenerative therapies. Recently, much interest has been generated in reporter genes that enable simultaneous monitoring of the anatomical location and viability of cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we investigate the efficacy of ferritin heavy chain-1 (Fth1) and transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) as reporters for tracking mesenchymal stem cells. The overexpression of TfR1 was well tolerated by the cells but Fth1 was found to affect the cell’s iron homeostasis, leading to phenotypic changes in the absence of iron supplementation and an upregulation in transcript and protein levels of the cell’s endogenous transferrin receptor. Neither the sole overexpression of Fth1 nor TfR1 resulted in significant increases in intracellular iron content, although significant differences were seen when the two reporter genes were used in combination, in the presence of high concentrations of iron. The supplementation of the culture medium with iron sources was a more efficient means to obtain contrast than the use of reporter genes, where high levels of intracellular iron were reflected in transverse (T2) relaxation. The feasibility of imaging iron-supplemented cells by MRI is shown using a 3R-compliant chick embryo model. PMID:26184159

  2. False positives in a reporter gene assay: identification and synthesis of substituted N-pyridin-2-ylbenzamides as competitive inhibitors of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Heitman, Laura H; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Zweemer, Annelien M; Ye, Kai; Brussee, Johannes; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2008-08-14

    Luciferase reporter-gene assays are a commonly used technique in high-throughput screening campaigns. In this study, we report on a luciferase inhibitor (1), which emerged from an antagonistic G protein-coupled receptor luciferase reporter-gene assay screen. Instead of displaying receptor activity, compound 1 was shown to potently inhibit luciferase in an in vitro enzymatic assay with an IC50 value of 1.7 +/- 0.1 microM. In addition, 1 was a competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate luciferin. A database search yielded another inhibitor (3) with a similar N-pyridin-2-ylbenzamide core. Subsequently, several analogues were prepared to investigate the structure-activity relationships of these luciferase inhibitors. This yielded the most potent inhibitor of this series (6) with an IC50 value of 0.069 +/- 0.01 microM. Further molecular modeling studies suggested that 6 can be accommodated in the luciferin binding site. This paper is meant to alert users of luciferase reporter-gene assays for possible false positive hits including highly "druglike" molecules due to direct luciferase inhibition.

  3. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene mutations and autism: literature review and a case report of a patient with Cowden syndrome, autistic disorder, and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Conti, Sara; Condò, Maria; Posar, Annio; Mari, Francesca; Resta, Nicoletta; Renieri, Alessandra; Neri, Iria; Patrizi, Annalisa; Parmeggiani, Antonia

    2012-03-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene mutations are associated with a spectrum of clinical disorders characterized by skin lesions, macrocephaly, hamartomatous overgrowth of tissues, and an increased risk of cancers. Autism has rarely been described in association with these variable clinical features. At present, 24 patients with phosphatase and tensin homolog gene mutation, autism, macrocephaly, and some clinical findings described in phosphatase and tensin homolog syndromes have been reported in the literature. We describe a 14-year-old boy with autistic disorder, focal epilepsy, severe and progressive macrocephaly, and multiple papular skin lesions and palmoplantar punctate keratoses, characteristic of Cowden syndrome. The boy has a de novo phosphatase and tensin homolog gene mutation. Our patient is the first case described to present a typical Cowden syndrome and autism associated with epilepsy.

  4. Optic atrophy and a Leigh-like syndrome due to mutations in the c12orf65 gene: report of a novel mutation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Gena; Calderwood, Laurel; Cox, Gerald F; Robson, Caroline D; Teot, Lisa A; Mullon, Jennifer; Anselm, Irina

    2014-03-01

    Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency type 7 (COXPD7) is a rare disorder of mitochondrial metabolism that results in optic atrophy and Leigh syndrome-like disease. We describe 2 siblings with compound heterozygous mutations in the recently identified C12orf65 gene who presented with optic atrophy and mild developmental delays and subsequently developed bilateral, symmetric lesions in the brainstem reminiscent of Leigh syndrome. Repeat neuroimaging demonstrated reversibility of the findings in 1 sibling and persistent metabolic stroke in the other. This article highlights the phenotypic manifestations from a novel mutation in the C12orf65 gene and reviews the clinical presentation of the 5 other individuals reported to date who carry mutations in this gene. PMID:24284555

  5. Control of transcription of gal repressor and isorepressor genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Weickert, M J; Adhya, S

    1993-01-01

    Two regulatory proteins, Gal repressor and isorepressor, control the expression of the gal and mgl operons in Escherichia coli. The transcription start sites for galR and galS, the genes for the repressor and isorepressor, were determined by primer extension of in vivo transcripts. Study of the promoter-lacZ gene fusions introduced into the chromosome indicated that galS expression was elevated in cells in which the normal galS gene was interrupted, but not in cells in which the galR gene was deleted. When both genes were disrupted, galS expression was further elevated. Expression from the galS promoter was stimulated by the addition of D-fucose, repressed by glucose, and dependent on cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). Expression of a similar gene fusion of the galR promoter to lacZ was unregulated. Both galR and galS genes contain two potential operator sites (OE and OI) and a CRP-binding site. The arrangement of OE, OI, and the CRP-binding site in the galS gene is analogous to the arrangement in the gal and mgl promoters, but the arrangement in galR is atypical. The increased concentration of the isorepressor when inducer is present may facilitate early shutoff of the isorepressor-regulated genes of the gal regulon when inducer (substrate) concentration falls. Images PMID:8416900

  6. Fundus albipunctatus: review of the literature and report of a novel RDH5 gene mutation affecting the invariant tyrosine (p.Tyr175Phe).

    PubMed

    Skorczyk-Werner, Anna; Pawłowski, Przemysław; Michalczuk, Marta; Warowicka, Alicja; Wawrocka, Anna; Wicher, Katarzyna; Bakunowicz-Łazarczyk, Alina; Krawczyński, Maciej R

    2015-08-01

    Fundus albipunctatus (FA) is a rare, congenital form of night blindness with rod system impairment, characterised by the presence of numerous small, white-yellow retinal lesions. FA belongs to a heterogenous group of so-called flecked retina syndromes. This disorder shows autosomal recessive inheritance and is caused mostly by mutations in the RDH5 gene. This gene encodes the enzyme that is a part of the visual cycle, the 11-cis retinol dehydrogenase. This study is a brief review of the literature on FA and a report of the first molecular evidence for RDH5 gene mutation in a Polish patient with this rare disorder. We present a novel pathogenic RDH5 gene mutation in a 16-year-old female patient with symptoms of night blindness. The patient underwent ophthalmological examinations, including colour vision testing, fundus photography, automated visual field testing, full-field electroretinography (ERG) and spectral optical coherent tomography (SOCT). The patient showed typical FA ERG records, the visual field was constricted and fundus examination revealed numerous characteristic, small, white-yellowish retinal lesions. DNA sequencing of the RDH5 gene coding sequence (exons 2-5) enabled the detection of the homozygous missense substitution c.524A > T (p.Tyr175Phe) in exon 3. This is the first report of RDH5 gene mutation that affects the invariant tyrosine, one of the most conserved amino acid residues in short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs), crucial for these enzymes' activity. The location of this substitution, together with its predicted influence on the protein function, indicate that the p.Tyr175Phe mutation is the cause of FA in our patient. PMID:25820994

  7. Structural organization, nucleotide sequence, and regulation of the Haemophilus influenzae rec-1+ gene.

    PubMed Central

    Zulty, J J; Barcak, G J

    1993-01-01

    The Haemophilus influenzae rec-1+ protein plays a central role in DNA metabolism, participating in general homologous recombination, recombinational (postreplication) DNA repair, and prophage induction. Although many H. influenzae rec-1 mutants have been phenotypically characterized, little is known about the rec-1+ gene at the molecular level. In this study, we present the genetic organization of the rec-1+ locus, the DNA sequence of rec-1+, and studies of the transcriptional regulation of rec-1+ during cellular assault by DNA-damaging agents and during the induction of competence for genetic transformation. Although little is known about promoter structure in H. influenzae, we identified a potential rec-1+ promoter that is identical in 11 of 12 positions to the bacterial sigma 70-dependent promoter consensus sequence. Results from a primer extension analysis revealed that the start site of rec-1+ transcription is centered 6 nucleotides downstream of this promoter. We identified potential DNA binding sites in the rec-1+ gene for LexA, integration host factor, and cyclic AMP receptor protein. We obtained evidence that at least one of the proposed cyclic AMP receptor protein binding sites is active in modulating rec-1+ transcription. This finding makes rec-1+ control circuitry novel among recA+ homologs. Two H. influenzae DNA uptake sequences that may function as a transcription termination signal were identified in inverted orientations at the end of the rec-1+ coding sequence. In addition, we report the first use of the Escherichia coli lacZ operon fusion technique in H. influenzae to study the transcriptional control of rec-1+. Our results indicate that rec-1+ is transcriptionally induced about threefold during DNA-damaging events. Furthermore, we show that rec-1+ can substitute for recA+ in E. coli to modulate SOS induction of dinB1 expression. Surprisingly, although 5% of the H. influenzae genome is in the form of single-stranded DNA during competence for

  8. Defective herpes simplex virus type 1 vectors harboring gag, pol, and env genes can be used to rescue defective retrovirus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Savard, N; Cosset, F L; Epstein, A L

    1997-01-01

    A retroviral packaging transcription unit was constructed in which the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) gag-pol and env genes are expressed under the control of herpesvirus regulatory sequences. This transcription unit, lacking long terminal repeats, primer binding sites, and most of the retrovirus packaging signal but retaining both retroviral donor and acceptor splice sites, was cloned into a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon plasmid, and amplicon vectors (the gag-pol-env [GPE] vectors) were generated by using a defective HSV-1 vector as helper virus. The GPE vector population was used to infect human TE671 cells (ATCC CRL 8805), harboring a lacZ provirus (TE-lac2 cells), and supernatants of infected cells were collected and filtered at different times after infection. These supernatants were found to contain infectious ecotropic lacZ retroviral particles, as shown both by reverse transcription-PCR and by their ability to transduce a beta-galactosidase activity to murine NIH 3T3 cells but not to human TE671 cells. The titer of retroviral vectors released by GPE vector-infected TE-lac2 cells increased with the dose of infectious amplicon particles. Retrovirus vector production was inhibited by superinfection with helper virus, indicating that helper virus coinfection negatively interfered with retrovirus production. Induction of retrovirus vectors by GPE vectors was neutralized by anti-HSV-1 but not by anti-MoMLV antiserum, while transduction of beta-galactosidase activity to NIH 3T3 cells by supernatants of GPE vector-infected TE-lac2 cells was neutralized by anti-MoMLV antiserum. These results demonstrate that HSV-1 GPE amplicon vectors can rescue defective lacZ retrovirus vectors and suggest that they could be used as a sort of launching ramp to fire defective retrovirus vectors from within virtually any in vitro or in vivo cell type containing defective retroviral vectors. PMID:9094692

  9. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression. Annual report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  10. Comparison of rNIS and hNIS as reporter genes for noninvasive imaging of bone mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into infarcted rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuo; Cao, Wei; Lan, Xiaoli; He, Yong; Lang, Juntao; Li, Congjiao; Hu, Jia; An, Rei; Gao, Zairong; Zhang, Yongxue

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the feasibility of rat sodium iodide symporter (rNIS) and human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) as reporter genes for noninvasive monitoring of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) transplanted into infarcted rat myocardium. rBMSCs were isolated from rat bone marrow. Adenovirus (Ad) was reconstructed to contain rNIS-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or hNIS-eGFP. The transfection efficiency of Ad/eGFP/rNIS and Ad/eGFP/hNIS to rBMSCs was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, Western blot, and immunofluorescence staining. The transfected rBMSCs were transplanted into infarcted rat myocardium followed by a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) study with (99m)Tc-pertechnetate as the radiotracer and by autoradiography. The isolated rBMSCs were CD29, CD44, and CD90 positive and CD34, CD45, and CD11b negative. The expression of rNIS and hNIS in the transfected rBMSCs at both gene and protein levels was obviously higher than that without transfection. The myocardium of rats transplanted with transfected rBMSCs could be visualized by SPECT owin