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Sample records for laevis morphogenetic factor

  1. Making muscle: Morphogenetic movements and molecular mechanisms of myogenesis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Sabillo, Armbien; Ramirez, Julio; Domingo, Carmen R

    2016-03-01

    Xenopus laevis offers unprecedented access to the intricacies of muscle development. The large, robust embryos make it ideal for manipulations at both the tissue and molecular level. In particular, this model system can be used to fate map early muscle progenitors, visualize cell behaviors associated with somitogenesis, and examine the role of signaling pathways that underlie induction, specification, and differentiation of muscle. Several characteristics that are unique to X. laevis include myogenic waves with distinct gene expression profiles and the late formation of dermomyotome and sclerotome. Furthermore, myogenesis in the metamorphosing frog is biphasic, facilitating regeneration studies. In this review, we describe the morphogenetic movements that shape the somites and discuss signaling and transcriptional regulation during muscle development and regeneration. With recent advances in gene editing tools, X. laevis remains a premier model organism for dissecting the complex mechanisms underlying the specification, cell behaviors, and formation of the musculature system.

  2. Titration of four replication factors is essential for the Xenopus laevis midblastula transition.

    PubMed

    Collart, Clara; Allen, George E; Bradshaw, Charles R; Smith, James C; Zegerman, Philip

    2013-08-23

    The rapid, reductive early divisions of many metazoan embryos are followed by the midblastula transition (MBT), during which the cell cycle elongates and zygotic transcription begins. It has been proposed that the increasing nuclear to cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio is critical for controlling the events of the MBT. We show that four DNA replication factors--Cut5, RecQ4, Treslin, and Drf1--are limiting for replication initiation at increasing N/C ratios in vitro and in vivo in Xenopus laevis. The levels of these factors regulate multiple events of the MBT, including the slowing of the cell cycle, the onset of zygotic transcription, and the developmental activation of the kinase Chk1. This work provides a mechanism for how the N/C ratio controls the MBT and shows that the regulation of replication initiation is fundamental for normal embryogenesis.

  3. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  4. Platelet derived growth factor B gene expression in the Xenopus laevis developing central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Kety; Corsinovi, Debora; Rossino, Cristina; Appolloni, Irene; Malatesta, Paolo; Ori, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) belongs to the mitogen and growth factor family and like the other members it has many roles in cell differentiation, proliferation and migration during development, adult life and in pathological conditions. Among them it has been observed that aberrant PDGF signalling is frequently linked to glioma development and progression, and Pdgf-b over-expression in mouse neural progenitors leads to the formation of gliomas. Despite this evidence, the mechanisms underlying PDGF-B driven tumorigenesis and its role during brain development are not fully understood. In order to contribute to clarifying possible new roles of pdgf-b signalling, we present here the embryonic gene expression pattern of pdgf-b, so far unknown in early vertebrate development. By using Xenopus laevis as a model system we performed qRT-PCR and whole mount in situ hybridization. Pdgf-b mRNA is expressed in discrete regions of the developing central nervous system, in the cranial nerve placodes and in the notochord. We also compared the gene expression of pdgf-b with that of its receptor pdgfr-α suggesting so far unsuspected roles for this signalling pathway during the development of specific embryonic structures.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in normal and regenerating olfactory epithelium of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jimena Laura; Cervino, Ailen Soledad; Jungblut, Lucas David; Paz, Dante Agustín

    2015-03-01

    Olfactory epithelium has the capability to continuously regenerate olfactory receptor neurons throughout life. Adult neurogenesis results from proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells, and consequently, olfactory neuroepithelium offers an excellent opportunity to study neural regeneration and the factors involved in the maintenance and regeneration of all their cell types. We analyzed the expression of BDNF in the olfactory system under normal physiological conditions as well as during a massive regeneration induced by chemical destruction of the olfactory epithelium in Xenopus laevis larvae. We described the expression and presence of BDNF in the olfactory epithelium and bulb. In normal physiological conditions, sustentacular (glial) cells and a few scattered basal (stem) cells express BDNF in the olfactory epithelium as well as the granular cells in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, during massive regeneration, we demonstrated a drastic increase in basal cells expressing BDNF as well as an increase in BDNF in the olfactory bulb and nerve. Together these results suggest an important role of BDNF in the maintenance and regeneration of the olfactory system.

  6. Maturation-promoting factor induces nuclear envelope breakdown in cycloheximide-arrested embryos of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We have studied the effect of maturation-promoting factor (MPF) on embryonic nuclei during the early cleavage stage of Xenopus laevis development. When protein synthesis is inhibited by cycloheximide during this stage, the embryonic cell cycle arrests in an artificially produced G2 phase-like state, after completion of one additional round of DNA synthesis. Approximately 100 nuclei can be arrested in a common cytoplasm if cytokinesis is first inhibited by cytochalasin B. Within 5 min after injection of MPF into such embryos, the nuclear envelope surrounding each nucleus disperses, as determined histologically or by immunofluorescent staining of the nuclear lamina with antilamin antiserum. The breakdown of the nuclear envelope occurs at levels of MPF comparable to or slightly lower than those required for oocyte maturation. Amplification of MPF activity, however, does not occur in the arrested egg as it does in the oocyte. These results suggest that MPF can act to advance interphase nuclei into the first events of mitosis and show that the nuclear lamina responds rapidly to MPF. PMID:6345556

  7. Identification and Bioinformatics Analyses of the Basic Helix-loop-helix Transcription Factors in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wuyi; Li, Fengmei

    2015-04-01

    Xenopus laevis is a long established model organism for developmental, behavioral and neurological studies. Herein, an updated genome-wide survey was conducted using the ongoing genome project of Xenopus laevis and 106 non-redundant Basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) genes were identified in the Xenopus laevis genome databases. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment statistics showed 51 significant GO annotations of biological processes and molecular functions and 5 significant KEGG pathways and a number of Xenopus laevis bHLH genes play significant role in specific development or special physiology processes like the development processes of muscle and eye and other organs. Furthermore, each sub-group of the bHLH family has its special gene functions except for the common GO term categories. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed that among these identified bHLH proteins, 105 sequences could classified into 39 families with 46, 25, 10, 5, 16 and 3 members in the corresponding high-order groups A, B, C, D, E and F, respectively with an addition bHLH member categorized as an orphan. The present study provides much useful information for further researches on Xenopus laevis.

  8. Morphogenetic Effects of Neuregulin (Neu Differentiation Factor) in Cultured Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chausovsky, Alexander; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Kam, Zvi; Yarden, Yosef; Geiger, Benjamin; Bershadsky, Alexander D.

    1998-01-01

    Neuregulin, or neu differentiation factor, induces cell proliferation or differentiation through interaction with members of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases. We report that neuregulin can also induce profound morphogenic responses in cultured epithelial cells of different origins. These effects include scattering of small epithelial islands and rearrangement of larger cell islands into ordered ring-shaped arrays with internal lumens. The ring-forming cells are interconnected by cadherin- and β-catenin-containing adherens junctions. In confluent cultures, neuregulin treatment induces formation of circular lumenlike gaps in the monolayer. Both cell scattering and ring formation are accompanied by a marked increase in cell motility that is independent of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor and its receptor (c-Met). Affinity-labeling experiments implied that a combination of ErbB-2 with ErbB-3 mediates the morphogenic signal of neuregulin in gastric cells. Indeed, a similar morphogenic effect could be reconstituted in nonresponsive cells by coexpression of ErbB-2 and -3. We conclude that a heterodimer between the kinase-defective neuregulin receptor, ErbB-3, and the coreceptor, ErbB-2, mediates the morphogenetic action of neuregulin. PMID:9802906

  9. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 potentiates bone morphogenetic protein-2 induced bone formation.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosaku; Viggeswarapu, Manjula; Bargouti, Maggie; Liu, Hui; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2011-02-01

    The mechanisms driving bone marrow stem cell mobilization are poorly understood. A recent murine study found that circulating bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells (MOPCs) were recruited to the site of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-induced bone formation. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) and its cellular receptor CXCR4 have been shown to mediate the homing of stem cells to injured tissues. We hypothesized that chemokines, such as SDF-1, are also involved with mobilization of bone marrow cells. The CD45(-) fraction is a major source of MOPCs. In this report we determined that the addition of BMP-2 or SDF-1 to collagen implants increased the number of MOPCs in the peripheral blood. BMP-2-induced mobilization was blocked by CXCR4 antibody, confirming the role of SDF-1 in mobilization. We determined for the first time that addition of SDF-1 to implants containing BMP-2 enhances mobilization, homing of MOPCs to the implant, and ectopic bone formation induced by suboptimal BMP-2 doses. These results suggest that SDF-1 increases the number of osteoprogenitor cells that are mobilized from the bone marrow and then home to the implant. Thus, addition of SDF-1 to BMP-2 may improve the efficiency of BMPs in vivo, making their routine use for orthopaedic applications more affordable and available to more patients.

  10. Examining Crosstalk among Transforming Growth Factor β, Bone Morphogenetic Protein, and Wnt Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Coster, Adam D.; Thorne, Curtis A.; Wu, Lani F.; Altschuler, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    The integration of morphogenic signals by cells is not well understood. A growing body of literature suggests increasingly complex coupling among classically defined pathways. Given this apparent complexity, it is difficult to predict where, when, or even whether crosstalk occurs. Here, we investigated pairs of morphogenic pathways, previously reported to have multiple points of crosstalk, which either do not share (TGFβ and Wnt/β-catenin) or share (TGFβ and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)) core signaling components. Crosstalk was measured by the ability of one morphogenic pathway to cross-activate core transcription factors and/or target genes of another morphogenic pathway. In contrast to previous studies, we found a surprising absence of crosstalk between TGFβ and Wnt/β-catenin. Further, we did not observe expected cross-pathway inhibition in between TGFβ and BMP, despite the fact that both use (or could compete) for the shared component SMAD4. Critical to our assays was a separation of timescales, which helped separate crosstalk due to initial signal transduction from subsequent post-transcriptional feedback events. Our study revealed fewer (and different) inter-morphogenic pathway crosstalk connections than expected; even pathways that share components can be insulated from one another. PMID:27895117

  11. Synergistic interaction between the fibroblast growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathways in lens cells.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Bruce A; Musil, Linda S

    2015-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) play a central role in two processes essential for lens transparency--fiber cell differentiation and gap junction-mediated intercellular communication (GJIC). Using serum-free primary cultures of chick lens epithelial cells (DCDMLs), we investigated how the FGF and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathways positively cooperate to regulate lens development and function. We found that culturing DCDMLs for 6 d with the BMP blocker noggin inhibits the canonical FGF-to-ERK pathway upstream of FRS2 activation and also prevents FGF from stimulating FRS2- and ERK-independent gene expression, indicating that BMP signaling is required at the level of FGF receptors. Other experiments revealed a second type of BMP/FGF interaction by which FGF promotes expression of BMP target genes as well as of BMP4. Together these studies reveal a novel mode of cooperation between the FGF and BMP pathways in which BMP keeps lens cells in an optimally FGF-responsive state and, reciprocally, FGF enhances BMP-mediated gene expression. This interaction provides a mechanistic explanation for why disruption of either FGF or BMP signaling in the lens leads to defects in lens development and function.

  12. Electron microscopic study of crystals of the Xenopus laevis transcription factor IIIA-5S ribosomal RNA complex.

    PubMed

    Brown, R S; Ferguson, C; Kingswell, A; Winkler, F K; Leonard, K R

    1988-06-01

    A novel method has been developed to grow crystals of the Xenopus laevis transcription factor IIIA-5S RNA complex directly on grids for examination by electron microscopy. Microcrystals were examined in negative stain and in thin sections to reveal a hexagonal lattice with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 87.1 +/- 4.4 A and c = 143.8 +/- 12.7 A. Optical diffraction patterns from micrographs were obtained about the major crystal axes extending to about 40-A resolution. A packing scheme is proposed for which there are three or six transcription factor IIIA-5S RNA complexes in the unit cell related by 3(1) symmetry along the long cell axis. This would require that the 5S RNA molecules are arranged end-to-end, with the terminal loops of adjacent molecules overlapping.

  13. Effects of fibroblast growth factor 2 on osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation by regulating bone morphogenetic protein receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Beom

    2011-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are known to play a critical role in bone growth and development, affecting both osteogenesis and chondrogenesis. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is produced intracellularly by osteoblasts and secreted into the surrounding matrix in bone.The dose-dependent effects of FGF-2 were tested to examine the relationship between FGF-2 and osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Tests used included a cell viability test, an alkaline phosphatase activity test, and a Western blot analysis.Cultures growing in the presence of FGF-2 showed an increased value for 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and a decreased value for alkaline phosphatase activity. Results of the Western blot analysis showed that the addition of FGF-2 seems to decrease osteocalcin and bone morphogenetic protein receptor IA.These data show that FGF-2 in the tested dosage within MC3T3-E1 cells seems to affect proliferation and differentiation. Results of the Western blot analysis may add some possible mechanisms, and it may be suggested that treatment of FGF-2 may have an influence on the expression of bone morphogenetic protein receptors in osteoprecursor cells. Further elucidation of the mechanisms related to this mechanism within the in vivo model may be necessary to ascertain greater detail.

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Yongtao; Xiang Lixin; Shao Jianzhong

    2007-10-26

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multi-functional growth factors belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. It has been demonstrated that BMPs had been involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and apoptosis. However, their hallmark ability is that play a pivotal role in inducing bone, cartilage, ligament, and tendon formation at both heterotopic and orthotopic sites. In this review, we mainly concentrate on BMP structure, function, molecular signaling and potential medical application.

  15. Transcription factor COUP-TFII is indispensable for venous and lymphatic development in zebrafish and Xenopus laevis

    SciTech Connect

    Aranguren, Xabier L.; Beerens, Manu; Vandevelde, Wouter; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter; Luttun, Aernout

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} COUP-TFII deficiency in zebrafish affects arterio-venous EC specification. {yields} COUP-TFII is indispensable for lymphatic development in zebrafish. {yields} COUP-TFII knockdown in Xenopus disrupts lymphatic EC differentiation and migration. {yields} COUP-TFII's role in EC fate decisions is evolutionary conserved. -- Abstract: Transcription factors play a central role in cell fate determination. Gene targeting in mice revealed that Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter-Transcription Factor II (COUP-TFII, also known as Nuclear Receptor 2F2 or NR2F2) induces a venous phenotype in endothelial cells (ECs). More recently, NR2F2 was shown to be required for initiating the expression of Prox1, responsible for lymphatic commitment of venous ECs. Small animal models like zebrafish embryos and Xenopus laevis tadpoles have been very useful to elucidate mechanisms of (lymph) vascular development. Therefore, the role of NR2F2 in (lymph) vascular development was studied by eliminating its expression in these models. Like in mice, absence of NR2F2 in zebrafish resulted in distinct vascular defects including loss of venous marker expression, major trunk vessel fusion and vascular leakage. Both in zebrafish and Xenopus the development of the main lymphatic structures was severely hampered. NR2F2 knockdown significantly decreased prox1 expression in zebrafish ECs and the same manipulation affected lymphatic (L)EC commitment, migration and function in Xenopus tadpoles. Therefore, the role of NR2F2 in EC fate determination is evolutionary conserved.

  16. Expression of CD31, Met/hepatocyte growth factor receptor and bone morphogenetic protein in bone metastasis of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Arihiro, K; Inai, K

    2001-02-01

    The mechanism of metastasis of osteosarcoma cells to other bones has not yet fully been clarified. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether various factors involve the formation of osteosarcoma metastatic foci in other bones. Immunohistochemically, CD31 expression in osteosarcoma with no bone metastasis and osteosarcoma with bone metastasis was noted in 10 and 75% of cases, respectively. Met/hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor expression in osteosarcoma with no bone metastasis and osteosarcoma with bone metastasis was noted in 90 and 25% of cases, respectively. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) expression in osteosarcoma with no bone metastasis and osteosarcoma with bone metastasis was noted in 20 and 75% of cases, respectively. Metastasis of osteosarcoma cells to other bones was significantly correlated with expression of BMP and CD31 and with no expression of Met/HGF receptor protein in osteosarcoma cells. In contrast, expression of insulin-like growth factor receptor in osteosarcoma cells did not correlate significantly with bone metastasis. These results suggest that formation of metastatic foci of osteosarcoma cells in other bones is regulated by CD31, which is associated with migration between endothelial cells, by BMP, which can induce and activate various mesenchymal cells affecting bone formation, and by escape of effect by HGF, which promotes differentiation of osteosarcoma cells.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of gilthead seabream bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 gene by bone- and cartilage-related transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Marques, Cátia L; Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent

    2016-01-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 belongs to the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of cytokines and growth factors. While it plays important roles in embryo morphogenesis and organogenesis, BMP2 is also critical to bone and cartilage formation. Protein structure and function have been remarkably conserved throughout evolution and BMP2 transcription has been proposed to be tightly regulated, although few data is available. In this work we report the cloning and functional analysis of gilthead seabream BMP2 promoter. As in other vertebrates, seabream BMP2 gene has a 5′ non-coding exon, a feature already present in DPP gene, the fruit fly ortholog of vertebrate BMP2 gene, and maintained throughout evolution. In silico analysis of seabream BMP2 promoter revealed several binding sites for bone and cartilage related transcription factors (TFs) and their functionality was evaluated using promoter-luciferase constructions and TF-expressing vectors. Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) was shown to negatively regulate BMP2 transcription and combination with the core binding factor β (CBFβ) further reduced transcriptional activity of the promoter. Although to a lesser extent, myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) had also a negative effect on the regulation of BMP2 gene transcription, when associated with SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9b). Finally, v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (ETS1) was able to slightly enhance BMP2 transcription. Data reported here provides new insights toward the better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of BMP2 gene in a bone and cartilage context.

  18. Characterization of the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase from human plasma by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y; Stafforini, D M; Imaizumi, T; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been implicated as a mediator of inflammation and atherosclerosis. A specific degradative enzyme found in plasma, PAF acetylhydrolase, plays important roles in various pathophysiological events induced by PAF. Human macrophages and Hep G2 cells secrete PAF acetylhydrolase with characteristics identical to the plasma activity. Other investigators reported that apolipoprotein B may possess phospholipase A2 activity, which suggested that apolipoprotein B might be a zymogen for PAF acetylhydrolase. However, while macrophages express PAF acetylhydrolase activity, we did not detect cDNAs for apolipoprotein B in a cDNA library from these cells, indicating that macrophages do not express this protein. In contrast, Hep G2 cells had high levels of cDNA for apolipoprotein B, as expected. We next injected Xenopus laevis oocytes with poly(A)+ RNA extracted from cultured human macrophages and Hep G2 cells. Twenty-five to 50% of Xenopus oocytes injected with poly(A)+ RNA from macrophages or Hep G2 cells secreted a PAF acetylhydrolase activity (1.0-7.8 nmol/ml per h) that also utilized a synthetic oxidized phospholipid as substrate. The activity secreted by poly(A)+ RNA-injected oocytes associated with lipoproteins and transferred between the particles in a pH-dependent manner, much like the plasma activity. These experiments establish that the properties of the enzyme released from poly(A)+ RNA-injected oocytes are identical to those of the plasma form of PAF acetylhydrolase and that the activity detected is not the expression of a domain in apolipoprotein B. Images PMID:7937948

  19. Synergistic Effects of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor on Bone Morphogenetic Proteins Induced Bone Formation In Vivo: Influencing Factors and Future Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Wang, Hai; Qiu, Guixing; Su, Xinlin

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), as key mediators in angiogenesis and osteogenesis, are used in a combined delivery manner as a novel strategy in bone tissue engineering. VEGF has the potential to enhance BMPs induced bone formation. Both gene delivery and material-based delivery systems were incorporated in previous studies to investigate the synergistic effects of VEGF and BMPs. However, their results were controversial due to variation of methods incorporated in different studies. Factors influencing the synergistic effects of VEGF on BMPs induced bone formation were identified and analyzed in this review to reduce confusion on this issue. The potential mechanisms and directions of future studies were also proposed here. Further investigating mechanisms of the synergistic effects and optimizing these influencing factors will help to generate more effective bone regeneration. PMID:28070506

  20. Buccal pumping mechanics of Xenopus laevis tadpoles: effects of biotic and abiotic factors.

    PubMed

    Ryerson, William G; Deban, Stephen M

    2010-07-15

    Biotic factors such as body size and shape have long been known to influence kinematics in vertebrates. Movement in aquatic organisms can also be strongly affected by abiotic factors such as the viscosity of the medium. We examined the effects of both biotic factors and abiotic factors on buccal pumping kinematics in Xenopus tadpoles using high-speed imaging of an ontogenetic series of tadpoles combined with experimental manipulation of the medium over a 10-fold range of viscosity. We found influences of both biotic and abiotic factors on tadpole movements; absolute velocities and excursions of the jaws and hyoid were greater in higher viscosity fluid but durations of movements were unaffected. Smaller tadpoles have relatively wider heads and more robust hyoid muscles used in buccal expansion and compression. Lever arm ratios were found to be constant at all sizes; therefore, smaller tadpoles have relatively higher resolved muscle forces and, like tadpoles in more viscous medium, displayed higher absolute velocities of jaw and hyoid movements. Nonetheless, small tadpoles drew in water at lower Reynolds numbers (Re) than predicted by kinematics, due to negative allometry of the buccal pump. Finally, tadpoles transitioned from a flow regime dominated by viscous forces (Re=2) to an intermediate regime (Re=106).

  1. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Periodontal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Subramaniam M; Ugale, Gauri M; Warad, Shivaraj B

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that results in attachment loss and bone loss. Regeneration of the periodontal tissues entails de novo formation of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Several different approaches are currently being explored to achieve complete, reliable, and reproducible regeneration of periodontal tissues. The therapeutic management of new bone formation is one of the key issues in successful periodontal regeneration. Bone morphogenetic proteins form a unique group of proteins within the transforming growth factor superfamily of genes and have a vital role in the regulation in the bone induction and maintenance. The activity of bone morphogenetic proteins was first identified in the 1960s, but the proteins responsible for bone induction were unknown until the purification and cloning of human bone morphogenetic proteins in the 1980s, because of their osteoinductive potential. Bone morphogenetic proteins have gained a lot of interest as therapeutic agents for treating periodontal defects. A systematic search for data related to the use of bone morphogenetic proteins for the regeneration of periodontal defects was performed to recognize studies on animals and human (PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and Google search). All the studies included showed noticeable regeneration of periodontal tissues with the use of BMP. PMID:23626951

  2. Divergent antiviral roles of amphibian (Xenopus laevis) macrophages elicited by colony-stimulating factor-1 and interleukin-34.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2014-12-01

    Macrophages are integral to amphibian immunity against RVs, as well as to the infection strategies of these pathogens. Although CSF-1 was considered to be the principal mediator of macrophage development, the IL-34 cytokine, which shares no sequence identity with CSF-1, is now believed to contribute to vertebrate monopoiesis. However, the respective roles of CSF-1- and IL-34-derived macrophages are still poorly understood. To delineate the contribution of these macrophage populations to amphibian immunity against the RV FV3, we identified the Xenopus laevis IL-34 and transcriptionally and functionally compared this cytokine with the previously identified X. laevis CSF-1. The X. laevis CSF-1 and IL-34 displayed strikingly nonoverlapping developmental and tissue-specific gene-expression patterns. Furthermore, only CSF-1 but not IL-34 was up-regulated in the kidneys of FV3-challenged tadpoles. Intriguingly, recombinant forms of these cytokines (rXlCSF-1, rXlIL-34) elicited morphologically distinct tadpole macrophages, and whereas rXlCSF-1 pretreatment decreased the survival of FV3-infected tadpoles, rXlIL-34 administration significantly prolonged FV3-challenged animal survival. Compared with rXlIL-34-elicited macrophages, macrophages derived by rXlCSF-1 were more phagocytic but also significantly more susceptible to in vitro FV3 infections. By contrast, rXlIL-34-derived macrophages exhibited significantly greater in vitro antiranaviral activity and displayed substantially more robust gene expression of the NADPH oxidase components (p67(phox), gp91(phox)) and type I IFN. Moreover, FV3-challenged, rXlIL-34-derived macrophages exhibited several orders of magnitude greater up-regulation of the type I IFN gene expression. This marks the first report of the disparate roles of CSF-1 and IL-34 in vertebrate antiviral immunity.

  3. Divergent antiviral roles of amphibian (Xenopus laevis) macrophages elicited by colony-stimulating factor-1 and interleukin-34

    PubMed Central

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are integral to amphibian immunity against RVs, as well as to the infection strategies of these pathogens. Although CSF-1 was considered to be the principal mediator of macrophage development, the IL-34 cytokine, which shares no sequence identity with CSF-1, is now believed to contribute to vertebrate monopoiesis. However, the respective roles of CSF-1- and IL-34-derived macrophages are still poorly understood. To delineate the contribution of these macrophage populations to amphibian immunity against the RV FV3, we identified the Xenopus laevis IL-34 and transcriptionally and functionally compared this cytokine with the previously identified X. laevis CSF-1. The X. laevis CSF-1 and IL-34 displayed strikingly nonoverlapping developmental and tissue-specific gene-expression patterns. Furthermore, only CSF-1 but not IL-34 was up-regulated in the kidneys of FV3-challenged tadpoles. Intriguingly, recombinant forms of these cytokines (rXlCSF-1, rXlIL-34) elicited morphologically distinct tadpole macrophages, and whereas rXlCSF-1 pretreatment decreased the survival of FV3-infected tadpoles, rXlIL-34 administration significantly prolonged FV3-challenged animal survival. Compared with rXlIL-34-elicited macrophages, macrophages derived by rXlCSF-1 were more phagocytic but also significantly more susceptible to in vitro FV3 infections. By contrast, rXlIL-34-derived macrophages exhibited significantly greater in vitro antiranaviral activity and displayed substantially more robust gene expression of the NADPH oxidase components (p67phox, gp91phox) and type I IFN. Moreover, FV3-challenged, rXlIL-34-derived macrophages exhibited several orders of magnitude greater up-regulation of the type I IFN gene expression. This marks the first report of the disparate roles of CSF-1 and IL-34 in vertebrate antiviral immunity. PMID:25190077

  4. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the regulation of cell growth and gene expression in melanotrope cells of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Jenks, Bruce G; Kuribara, Miyuki; Kidane, Adhanet H; Kramer, Bianca M R; Roubos, Eric W; Scheenen, Wim J J M

    2012-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is, despite its name, also found outside the central nervous system (CNS), but the functional significance of this observation is largely unknown. This review concerns the expression of BDNF in the pituitary gland. While the presence of the neurotrophin in the mammalian pituitary gland is well documented its functional significance remains obscure. Studies on the pars intermedia of the pituitary of the amphibian Xenopus laevis have shown that BDNF is produced by the neuroendocrine melanotrope cells, its expression is physiologically regulated, and the melanotrope cells themselves express receptors for the neurotrophin. The neurotrophin has been shown to act as an autocrine factor on the melanotrope to promote cell growth and regulate gene expression. In doing so BDNF supports the physiological function of the cell to produce and release α-melanophore-stimulating hormone for the purpose of adjusting the animal's skin color to that of its background.

  5. Oocyte–somatic cell interactions in the human ovary—novel role of bone morphogenetic proteins and growth differentiation factors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsun-Ming; Qiao, Jie; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Initially identified for their capability to induce heterotopic bone formation, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional growth factors that belong to the transforming growth factor β superfamily. Using cellular and molecular genetic approaches, recent studies have implicated intra-ovarian BMPs as potent regulators of ovarian follicular function. The bi-directional communication of oocytes and the surrounding somatic cells is mandatory for normal follicle development and oocyte maturation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological role and molecular determinants of these ovarian regulatory factors within the human germline-somatic regulatory loop. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE The regulation of ovarian function remains poorly characterized in humans because, while the fundamental process of follicular development and oocyte maturation is highly similar across species, most information on the regulation of ovarian function is obtained from studies using rodent models. Thus, this review focuses on the studies that used human biological materials to gain knowledge about human ovarian biology and disorders and to develop strategies for preventing, diagnosing and treating these abnormalities. SEARCH METHODS Relevant English-language publications describing the roles of BMPs or growth differentiation factors (GDFs) in human ovarian biology and phenotypes were comprehensively searched using PubMed and the Google Scholar database. The publications included those published since the initial identification of BMPs in the mammalian ovary in 1999 through July 2016. OUTCOMES Studies using human biological materials have revealed the expression of BMPs, GDFs and their putative receptors as well as their molecular signaling in the fundamental cells (oocyte, cumulus/granulosa cells (GCs) and theca/stroma cells) of the ovarian follicles throughout follicle development. With the availability of recombinant human BMPs/GDFs and the

  6. Cation-Stress-Responsive Transcription Factors SltA and CrzA Regulate Morphogenetic Processes and Pathogenicity of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Amit K.; Barad, Shiri; Luria, Neta; Kumar, Dilip; Espeso, Eduardo A.; Prusky, Dov B.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides in the presence of cation salts NaCl and KCl inhibited fungal growth and anthracnose symptom of colonization. Previous reports indicate that adaptation of Aspergillus nidulans to salt- and osmotic-stress conditions revealed the role of zinc-finger transcription factors SltA and CrzA in cation homeostasis. Homologs of A. nidulans SltA and CrzA were identified in C. gloeosporioides. The C. gloeosporioides CrzA homolog is a 682-amino acid protein, which contains a C2H2 zinc finger DNA-binding domain that is highly conserved among CrzA proteins from yeast and filamentous fungi. The C. gloeosporioides SltA homolog encodes a 775-amino acid protein with strong similarity to A. nidulans SltA and Trichoderma reesei ACE1, and highest conservation in the three zinc-finger regions with almost no changes compared to ACE1 sequences. Knockout of C. gloeosporioides crzA (ΔcrzA) resulted in a phenotype with inhibited growth, sporulation, germination and appressorium formation, indicating the importance of this calciu006D-activated transcription factor in regulating these morphogenetic processes. In contrast, knockout of C. gloeosporioides sltA (ΔsltA) mainly inhibited appressorium formation. Both mutants had reduced pathogenicity on mango and avocado fruit. Inhibition of the different morphogenetic stages in the ΔcrzA mutant was accompanied by drastic inhibition of chitin synthase A and B and glucan synthase, which was partially restored with Ca2+ supplementation. Inhibition of appressorium formation in ΔsltA mutants was accompanied by downregulation of the MAP kinase pmk1 and carnitine acetyl transferase (cat1), genes involved in appressorium formation and colonization, which was restored by Ca2+ supplementation. Furthermore, exposure of C. gloeosporioides ΔcrzA or ΔsltA mutants to cations such as Na+, K+ and Li+ at concentrations that the wild type C. gloeosporioides is not affected had further adverse morphogenetic effects on C

  7. Cross-talk between bone morphogenetic proteins and inflammatory pathways.

    PubMed

    van der Kraan, Peter M; Davidson, Esmeralda N Blaney

    2015-11-23

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines and bone morphogenetic proteins are generally studied separately and considered to be elements of different worlds, immunology and developmental biology. Varas and colleagues report that these factors show cross-talk in rheumatoid arthritis synoviocytes. They show that pro-inflammatory cytokines not only stimulate the production of bone morphogenetic proteins but that these endogenously produced bone morphogenetic proteins interfere with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on synoviocytes.

  8. Evolution of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I): structure and expression of an IGF-I precursor from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Y; Rotwein, P

    1990-02-01

    By means of a cloning strategy employing the polymerase chain reaction, we have isolated and characterized cDNAs for Xenopus laevis insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). These cDNAs encode a primary IGF-I translation product of 153 residues that demonstrates considerable amino acid sequence similarity with IGF-IA peptides from other species. Fifty-seven of 70 residues of the mature protein are identical among human, rat, chicken, and Xenopus IGF-I, while less amino acid conservation is found at the COOH-terminus (25/35 identities) or at the NH2-terminus (24/48 identities) of the precursor protein. Despite the lower degree of structural similarity at the NH2-terminus, in vitro studies of IGF-I biosynthesis and proteolytic processing support a conserved function for the atypically long 48 residue NH2-terminal signal sequence in directing the nascent IGF-I peptide through the secretory pathway. The 5'-untranslated region of Xenopus IGF-I mRNA matches the human, rat, and chicken sequences in greater than 90% of 279 nucleotides. IGF-I mRNAs from all four species encode a conserved upstream open reading frame of 14 amino acids starting 240-250 nucleotides 5' to the translation start site, suggesting a possible role for this region in modulating IGF-I gene expression. The X. laevis IGF-I gene is transcribed and processed into three mRNAs of 1.6, 2.1, and 3.0 kilobases in liver, and IGF-I mRNAs can be detected in liver, lung, heart, kidney, and peritoneal fat of adult animals. These studies demonstrate that both the IGF-I protein precursor and potential regulatory regions of IGF-I mRNA have been conserved during vertebrate evolution, and indicate that like several other polypeptide growth factors, IGF-I may be of fundamental importance in regulating specific aspects of growth and development in all vertebrates.

  9. Role of Growth Differentiation Factor 9 and Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 in Ovarian Function and Their Importance in Mammalian Female Fertility — A Review

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Fernanda Cavallari; Cruz, Maria Helena Coelho; Leal, Claudia Lima Verde

    2016-01-01

    Growth factors play an important role during early ovarian development and folliculogenesis, since they regulate the migration of germ cells to the gonadal ridge. They also act on follicle recruitment, proliferation/atresia of granulosa cells and theca, steroidogenesis, oocyte maturation, ovulation and luteinization. Among the growth factors, the growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and the bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), belong to the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, have been implicated as essential for follicular development. The GDF9 and BMP15 participate in the evolution of the primordial follicle to primary follicle and play an important role in the later stages of follicular development and maturation, increasing the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, plasminogen activator and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR). These factors are also involved in the interconnections between the oocyte and surrounding cumulus cells, where they regulate absorption of amino acids, glycolysis and biosynthesis of cholesterol cumulus cells. Even though the mode of action has not been fully established, in vitro observations indicate that the factors GDF9 and BMP15 stimulate the growth of ovarian follicles and proliferation of cumulus cells through the induction of mitosis in cells and granulosa and theca expression of genes linked to follicular maturation. Thus, seeking greater understanding of the action of these growth factors on the development of oocytes, the role of GDF9 and BMP15 in ovarian function is summarized in this brief review. PMID:26954112

  10. Identification of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) as an instructive factor for human epidermal Langerhans cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Nighat; Bauer, Thomas; Modak, Madhura; Wagner, Karin; Schuster, Christopher; Köffel, Rene; Seyerl, Maria; Stöckl, Johannes; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid; Graf, Daniel; Strobl, Herbert

    2013-11-18

    Human Langerhans cell (LC) precursors populate the epidermis early during prenatal development and thereafter undergo massive proliferation. The prototypic antiproliferative cytokine TGF-β1 is required for LC differentiation from human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells and blood monocytes in vitro. Similarly, TGF-β1 deficiency results in LC loss in vivo. However, immunohistology studies revealed that human LC niches in early prenatal epidermis and adult basal (germinal) keratinocyte layers lack detectable TGF-β1. Here we demonstrated that these LC niches express high levels of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) and that Bmp7-deficient mice exhibit substantially diminished LC numbers, with the remaining cells appearing less dendritic. BMP7 induces LC differentiation and proliferation by activating the BMP type-I receptor ALK3 in the absence of canonical TGF-β1-ALK5 signaling. Conversely, TGF-β1-induced in vitro LC differentiation is mediated via ALK3; however, co-induction of ALK5 diminished TGF-β1-driven LC generation. Therefore, selective ALK3 signaling by BMP7 promotes high LC yields. Within epidermis, BMP7 shows an inverse expression pattern relative to TGF-β1, the latter induced in suprabasal layers and up-regulated in outer layers. We observed that TGF-β1 inhibits microbial activation of BMP7-generated LCs. Therefore, TGF-β1 in suprabasal/outer epidermal layers might inhibit LC activation, resulting in LC network maintenance.

  11. Cartilage repair by local delivery of transforming growth factor-β1 or bone morphogenetic protein-2 from a novel, segmented polyurethane/polylactic-co-glycolic bilayered scaffold.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Ricardo; Delgado, Araceli; Solis, Raul; Sanchez, Esther; Hernandez, Antonio; San Roman, Julio; Evora, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to analyze the in vitro and in vivo release kinetics and evaluate the grades of repair induced by either the release of 50 ng of transforming growth factor-β1 or 2.5 or 5 μg of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) from a bilayer scaffold of segmented polyurethane/polylactic-co-glycolic (SPU/PLGA) in osteochondral defects, in a rabbit model. The scaffold consisted of a porous, bone-directed PLGA layer, overlaid with a cartilage-directed layer of growth factor (GF)-loaded PLGA microspheres, dispersed in a matrix of SPU. The PLGA porous layer was fabricated by gas foaming. Microspheres were prepared by a double emulsion method. SPU was synthesized by following the two-step method. GF release kinetics were assessed using iodinated ((125)I) GFs. The in vivo release profiles of both GFs fitted to zero-order kinetics, demonstrating a consistently good control of their release rates by SPU. Cartilage-like tissue, characterized by histological analysis, scoring, and immunolabeling of chondrogenic differentiation markers, was observed only after 12 weeks, maintaining integrity up to at least 24 weeks, independently of the GF and the dose of BMP-2. The biocompatibility and the resulting good quality, hyaline repair cartilage convert this system into a promising candidate for future applications in osteochondral lesions.

  12. Noggin-Mediated Retinal Induction Reveals a Novel Interplay Between Bone Morphogenetic Protein Inhibition, Transforming Growth Factor β, and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Messina, Andrea; Lan, Lei; Incitti, Tania; Bozza, Angela; Andreazzoli, Massimiliano; Vignali, Robert; Cremisi, Federico; Bozzi, Yuri; Casarosa, Simona

    2015-08-01

    It has long been known that the depletion of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) is one of the key factors necessary for the development of anterior neuroectodermal structures. However, the precise molecular mechanisms that underlie forebrain regionalization are still not completely understood. Here, we show that Noggin1 is involved in the regionalization of anterior neural structures in a dose-dependent manner. Low doses of Noggin1 expand prosencephalic territories, while higher doses specify diencephalic and retinal regions at the expense of telencephalic areas. A similar dose-dependent mechanism determines the ability of Noggin1 to convert pluripotent cells in prosencephalic or diencephalic/retinal precursors, as shown by transplant experiments and molecular analyses. At a molecular level, the strong inhibition of BMP signaling exerted by high doses of Noggin1 reinforces the Nodal/transforming growth factor (TGF)β signaling pathway, leading to activation of Gli1 and Gli2 and subsequent activation of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling. We propose a new role for Noggin1 in determining specific anterior neural structures by the modulation of TGFβ and SHH signaling.

  13. Enhancement of osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells cultured by selective combination of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2).

    PubMed

    Maegawa, Naoki; Kawamura, Kenji; Hirose, Motohiro; Yajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshinori; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that bone marrow contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which can show osteoblastic differentiation when cultured in osteogenic medium containing ascorbic acid, beta-glycerophosphate and dexamethasone. The differentiation results in the appearance of osteoblasts, together with the formation of bone matrix; thus, in vitro cultured bone (osteoblasts/bone matrix) could be fabricated by MSC culture. This type of cultured bone has already been used in clinical cases involving orthopaedic problems. To improve the therapeutic effect of the cultured bone, we investigated the culture conditions that contributed to extensive osteoblastic differentiation. Rat bone marrow was primarily cultured to expand the number of MSCs and further cultured in osteogenic medium for 12 days. The culture was also conducted in a medium supplemented with either bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), or with sequential combinations of both supplements. Among them, the sequential supplementation of FGF-2 followed by BMP-2 showed high alkaline phosphatase activity, sufficient bone-specific osteocalcein expression and abundant bone matrix formation of the MSC culture. These data implied that the number of responding cells or immature osteoblasts was increased by the supplementation of FGF-2 in the early phase of the culture and that these cells can show osteoblastic differentiation, of which capability was augmented by BMP-2 in the late phase. The sequential supplementation of these cytokines into MSC culture might be suitable for the fabrication of ideal cultured bone for use in bone tissue engineering.

  14. Fibroblast growth factor 17 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 enhance cumulus expansion and improve quality of in vitro-produced embryos in cattle.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mariana Fernandes; Caixeta, Ester Siqueira; Sudiman, Jaqueline; Gilchrist, Robert B; Thompson, Jeremy G; Lima, Paula Fernanda; Price, Christopher A; Buratini, José

    2015-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family are expressed by the oocyte and are involved in the control of cumulus cell function. We tested the hypothesis that FGF17, alone or combined with BMP15 in the maturation medium, enhances cumulus expansion, meiosis progression, embryonic development, and expression of mRNA encoding key genes regulating expansion (prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 [PTGS2], hyaluronan synthase 2 [HAS2], tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6 [TNFAIP6], and pentraxin 3 [PTX3]) and markers of oocyte developmental competence (phosphofructokinase [PFKP], gremlin [GREM1], versican [VCAN], and the genomic progesterone receptor [nPR]) in cumulus cells. Fibroblast growth factor 17 and BMP15 increased the percentage of fully expanded cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs), but there was no additive effect when both were combined. Neither FGF17 nor BMP15 altered the percentage of oocytes reaching meiosis II at the end of COC culture or cleavage and blastocyst rates after IVF. However, embryo quality, as assessed by the number of cells in the inner cell mass, was improved by the combination of FGF17 with BMP15. Fibroblast growth factor 17 alone did not alter gene expression in cumulus cells at the end of IVM, whereas BMP15 increased PTGS2 and PTX3 mRNA levels. The combination of FGF17 and BMP15 increased nPR mRNA abundance in cumulus cells but did not change the expression of other markers of developmental competence. This study provides novel evidence that FGF17 enhances cumulus expansion in bovine COCs submitted to IVM and that the supplementation of the IVM medium with FGF17 and BMP15 may improve embryo quality.

  15. BMP9 (bone morphogenetic protein 9) induces NGF as an autocrine/paracrine cholinergic trophic factor in developing basal forebrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Aletta C; Mellott, Tiffany J; Lopez-Coviella, Ignacio; Tallini, Yvonne N; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Follettie, Maximillian T; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof

    2010-06-16

    Acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis and release from basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN) innervating the cerebral cortex and hippocampus are essential processes for normal learning, memory and attention. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 9 is a cholinergic differentiation factor in the developing septum that increases ACh synthesis and choline acetyltransferase (Chat) gene expression both in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the possible induction of cholinergic trophic factors by BMP9 in murine septal cells. Nerve growth factor (NGF) protein expression and secretion into the medium was increased in cultured embryonic septal cells treated with BMP9, and partially mediated BMP9-induced acetylcholine production and Chat gene expression. BMP9-induced Ngf gene expression was detected in postmitotic cells, required new protein synthesis and was blocked by BMP type I receptor inhibition. Cholinergic neurons were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting based on either transgenic expression of green fluorescent protein driven by the Chat promoter or NGF receptor (p75) immunostaining. Although both noncholinergic and cholinergic neurons in untreated cultures expressed similar low levels of Ngf, increased Ngf gene expression was restricted to Chat-positive neurons in BMP9-treated cultures. Likewise, similar levels of Ngf mRNA were detected in p75-negative and p75-positive septal cells, yet only p75-positive BFCN increased their Ngf gene expression when treated with BMP9, and only these cells expressed the Alk1 BMP receptor. The data suggest an autocrine/paracrine role for NGF in the development and/or maintenance of BFCN and imply that the stimulation of NGF production and release contributes to the cholinergic-supportive properties of BMP9.

  16. Tribulus terrestris Alters the Expression of Growth Differentiation Factor 9 and Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 in Rabbit Ovaries of Mothers and F1 Female Offspring.

    PubMed

    Abadjieva, Desislava; Kistanova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated the key role of the oocyte-derived factors, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 15 and growth differentiation factor (GDF) 9, in follicular development and ovulation, there is a lack of knowledge on the impact of external factors, which females are exposed to during folliculogenesis, on their expression. The present study investigated the effect of the aphrodisiac Tribulus terrestris on the GDF9 and BMP15 expression in the oocytes and cumulus cells at mRNA and protein levels during folliculogenesis in two generations of female rabbits. The experiment was conducted with 28 New Zealand rabbits. Only the diet of the experimental mothers group was supplemented with a dry extract of T. terrestris for the 45 days prior to insemination. The expression of BMP15 and GDF9 genes in the oocytes and cumulus cells of mothers and F1 female offspring was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The localization of the GDF9 and BMP15 proteins in the ovary tissues was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. The BMP15 and GDF9 transcripts were detected in the oocytes and cumulus cells of rabbits from all groups. T. terrestris caused a decrease in the BMP15 mRNA level in the oocytes and an increase in the cumulus cells. The GDF9 mRNA level increased significantly in both oocytes and cumulus cells. The downregulated expression of BMP15 in the treated mothers' oocytes was inherited in the F1 female offspring born to treated mothers. BMP15 and GDF9 show a clearly expressed sensitivity to the bioactive compounds of T. terrestris.

  17. Tribulus terrestris Alters the Expression of Growth Differentiation Factor 9 and Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 in Rabbit Ovaries of Mothers and F1 Female Offspring

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated the key role of the oocyte-derived factors, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 15 and growth differentiation factor (GDF) 9, in follicular development and ovulation, there is a lack of knowledge on the impact of external factors, which females are exposed to during folliculogenesis, on their expression. The present study investigated the effect of the aphrodisiac Tribulus terrestris on the GDF9 and BMP15 expression in the oocytes and cumulus cells at mRNA and protein levels during folliculogenesis in two generations of female rabbits. The experiment was conducted with 28 New Zealand rabbits. Only the diet of the experimental mothers group was supplemented with a dry extract of T. terrestris for the 45 days prior to insemination. The expression of BMP15 and GDF9 genes in the oocytes and cumulus cells of mothers and F1 female offspring was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The localization of the GDF9 and BMP15 proteins in the ovary tissues was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. The BMP15 and GDF9 transcripts were detected in the oocytes and cumulus cells of rabbits from all groups. T. terrestris caused a decrease in the BMP15 mRNA level in the oocytes and an increase in the cumulus cells. The GDF9 mRNA level increased significantly in both oocytes and cumulus cells. The downregulated expression of BMP15 in the treated mothers’ oocytes was inherited in the F1 female offspring born to treated mothers. BMP15 and GDF9 show a clearly expressed sensitivity to the bioactive compounds of T. terrestris. PMID:26928288

  18. TATA-box DNA binding activity and subunit composition for RNA polymerase III transcription factor IIIB from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    McBryant, S J; Meier, E; Leresche, A; Sharp, S J; Wolf, V J; Gottesfeld, J M

    1996-01-01

    The RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor TFIIIB contains the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP) and polymerase III-specific TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Previous studies have shown that DNA oligonucleotides containing the consensus TATA-box sequence inhibit polymerase III transcription, implying that the DNA binding domain of TBP is exposed in TFIIIB. We have investigated the TATA-box DNA binding activity of Xenopus TFIIIB, using transcription inhibition assays and a gel mobility shift assay. Gel shift competition assays with mutant and nonspecific DNAs demonstrate the specificity of the TFIIIB-TATA box DNA complex. The apparent dissociation constant for this protein-DNA interaction is approximately 0.4 nM, similar to the affinity of yeast TBP for the same sequence. TFIIIB transcriptional activity and TATA-box binding activity cofractionate during a series of four ion-exchange chromatographic steps, and reconstituted transcription reactions demonstrate that the TATA-box DNA-protein complex contains TFIIIB TAF activity. Polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 75 and 92 kDa are associated with TBP in this complex. These polypeptides were renatured after elution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-gels and tested individually and in combination for TFIIIB TAF activity. Recombinant TBP along with protein fractions containing the 75- and 92-kDa polypeptides were sufficient to reconstitute TFIIIB transcriptional activity and DNA binding activity, suggesting that Xenopus TFIIIB is composed of TBP along with these polypeptides. PMID:8756620

  19. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 and Transforming Growth Factor β1 Inhibit the Expression of the Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-34 in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chemel, Marguerite; Brion, Regis; Segaliny, Aude-Isabelle; Lamora, Audrey; Charrier, Celine; Brulin, Benedicte; Maugars, Yves; Le Goff, Benoit; Heymann, Dominique; Verrecchia, Franck

    2017-01-01

    IL-34 is a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The current study aimed to assess the IL-34 expression in response to two members of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family, TGF-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, in synovial fibroblasts from RA patients. IL-34, TGF-β1, and BMP-2 productions were measured in patient synovial fluids by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IL-34 mRNA levels were quantified by real-time quantitative PCR in human synovial fibroblasts and murine mesenchymal stem cells. Pharmacologic inhibitions were used to determine the involvement of activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) and ALK5 downstream TGF-β1 and BMP-2. IL-34, TGF-β1, and BMP-2 were expressed in synovial fluids from RA patients. We found a significant correlation between IL-34 and TGF-β1 expressions. Levels of both IL-34 and TGF-β1 were thus correlated with the total leukocyte counts in the synovial fluids. TGF-β1 and BMP-2 decreased IL-34 expression in the synovial fibroblasts or in murine mesenchymal stem cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner through ALK5 and ALK1 pathways, respectively. In addition, TGF-β1 and BMP-2 antagonized tumor necrosis factor α-induced IL-34 gene expression. This work identifies TGF-β1 and BMP-2 as potent inhibitors of IL-34 expression in RA synovial fibroblasts. These cytokines, as upstream inhibitors of IL-34, may thus contribute to antagonize inflammation and bone erosions in RA.

  20. Alterations in bone morphogenetic protein 15, growth differentiation factor 9, and gene expression in granulosa cells in preovulatory follicles of dairy cows given porcine LH.

    PubMed

    Behrouzi, Amir; Colazo, Marcos Germán; Ambrose, Divakar Justus

    2016-04-15

    In a previous work, using porcine LH (pLH) in lieu of GnRH for synchronizing ovulation in dairy cows improved pregnancy rates without increasing plasma progesterone concentrations after ovulation. The LH profile is known to remain elevated above basal concentrations (≥1 ng/mL) for up to 20 hours in pLH-treated cows compared to less than 6 hours in GnRH-treated cows. Because LH triggers a cascade of signaling networks in the preovulatory follicle to promote final maturation and support oocyte competence, we hypothesized that dissimilar LH profiles will differentially regulate the intrafollicular factors and expression of downstream genes associated with improved oocyte competence. Specific objectives were to determine differences in the abundance of oocyte-secreted factors in the preovulatory follicular fluid and target genes in granulosa cells associated with oocyte competence, in response to exogenous porcine LH or GnRH-induced endogenous bovine LH exposure, in dairy cows. Follicular contents were aspirated by a transvaginal ultrasound-guided procedure from the preovulatory follicle of cyclic, nonlactating Holstein cows 21 ± 1 hour after administration of either pLH (25-mg) or GnRH (100-μg). Mature forms of bone morphogenetic protein 15, growth differentiation factor 9, and transforming growth factorβ1 were approximately 2-fold more abundant in pLH-treated cows which were exposed to an extended, low LH profile, than in GnRH-treated cows that had a short, high LH profile. The relative abundance of messenger RNA for cyclooxygenase-2, LH receptor, and progesterone receptor in granulosa cells, was about two-, eight-, and two-fold higher, respectively, in cows subjected to pLH than GnRH treatment. We infer that the improved pregnancy rate after pLH-induced ovulation reported previously, occurred through greater activation of intrafollicular transforming growth factor-β1 superfamily members, as these proteins promote cumulus expansion and oocyte competence.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-1 and bone morphogenetic protein-2 jointly mediate prostaglandin E2-induced adipogenic differentiation of rat tendon stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junpeng; Chen, Lei; zhou, You; Liu, Xiangzhou; Tang, Kanglai

    2014-01-01

    Tendinopathy is characterized histopathologically by lipid accumulation and tissue calcification. Adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs) are believed to play key roles in these processes. The major inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to induce osteogenic differentiation of TSCs via bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and BMP-2 has also been implicated in adipogenic differentiation of stem cells. We therefore examined the mechanisms responsible for PGE2-induced adipogenesis in rat TSCs in vitro. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) mRNA and protein were significantly up-regulated in PGE2-stimulated TSCs, measured by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Incubation with specific inhibitors of cAMP, cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-δ (CEBPδ) demonstrated that IGF-1 up-regulation occurred via a cAMP/PKA/CEBPδ pathway. Furthermore, neither IGF-1 nor BMP-2 alone was able to mediate adipogenic differentiation of TSCs, but IGF-1 together with BMP-2 significantly increased adipogenesis, indicated by Oil Red O staining. Moreover, knock-down of endogenous IGF-1 and BMP2 abolished PGE2-induced adipogenic differentiation. Phosphorylation of CREB and Smad by IGF-1 and BMP-2, respectively, were required for induction of the adipogenesis-related peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2) gene and for adipogenic differentiation. In conclusion, IGF-1 and BMP-2 together mediate PGE2-induced adipogenic differentiation of TSCs in vitro via a CREB- and Smad-dependent mechanism. This improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for tendinopathies may help the development of more effective therapies.

  2. ATP hydrolysis by a domain related to translation factor GTPases drives polymerization of a static bacterial morphogenetic protein.

    PubMed

    Castaing, Jean-Philippe; Nagy, Attila; Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S

    2013-01-08

    The assembly of static supramolecular structures is a culminating event of developmental programs. One such structure, the proteinaceous shell (called the coat) that surrounds spores of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, is composed of about 70 different proteins and represents one of the most durable biological structures known. The coat is built atop a basement layer that contains an ATPase (SpoIVA) that forms a platform required for coat assembly. Here, we show that SpoIVA belongs to the translation factors class of P-loop GTPases and has evolutionarily lost the ability to bind GTP; instead, it uses ATP hydrolysis to drive its self-assembly into static filaments. We demonstrate that ATP hydrolysis is required by every subunit for incorporation into the growing polymer by inducing a conformational change that drives polymerization of a nucleotide-free filament. SpoIVA therefore differs from other self-organizing polymers (dynamic cytoskeletal structures and static intermediate filaments) in that it uses ATP hydrolysis to self-assemble, not disassemble, into a static polymer. We further show that polymerization requires a critical concentration that we propose is only achieved once SpoIVA is recruited to the surface of the developing spore, thereby ensuring that SpoIVA polymerization only occurs at the correct subcellular location during spore morphogenesis.

  3. Co-delivery and controlled release of stromal cell-derived factor-1α chemically conjugated on collagen scaffolds enhances bone morphogenetic protein-2-driven osteogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    SUN, HAIPENG; WANG, JINMING; DENG, FEILONG; LIU, YUN; ZHUANG, XIUMEI; XU, JIAYUN; LI, LONG

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable focus in investigations on the delivery systems and clinical applications of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) for novel bone formation. However, current delivery systems require high levels of BMP-2 to exert a biological function. There are several concerns in using of high levels of BMP-2, including safety and the high cost of treatment. Therefore, the development of strategies to decrease the levels of BMP-2 required in these delivery systems is required. In our previous studies, a controlled-release system was developed, which used Traut's reagent and the cross-linker, 4-(N-maleimi-domethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid 3-sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester sodium salt (Sulfo-SMCC), to chemically conjugate BMP-2 directly on collagen discs. In the current study, retention efficiency and release kinetics of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) cross-linked on collagen scaffolds were detected. In addition, the osteogenic activity of SDF-1α and suboptimal doses of BMP-2 cross-linked on collagen discs following subcutaneous implantation in rats were evaluated. Independent two-tailed t-tests and one-way analysis of variance were used for analysis. In the present study, the controlled release of SDF-1α chemically conjugated on collagen scaffolds was demonstrated. By optimizing the concentrations of Traut's reagent and the Sulfo-SMCC cross-linker, a significantly higher level of SDF-1α was covalently retained on the collagen scaffold, compared with that retained using a physical adsorption method. Mesenchymal stem cell homing indicated that the biological function of the SDF-1α cross-linked on the collagen scaffolds remained intact. In rats, co-treatment with SDF-1α and a suboptimal dose of BMP-2 cross-linked on collagen scaffolds using this chemically conjugated method induced higher levels of ectopic bone formation, compared with the physical adsorption method. No ectopic bone formation was observed following treatment with a

  4. Morphogenetic roles of acetylcholine.

    PubMed Central

    Lauder, J M; Schambra, U B

    1999-01-01

    In the adult nervous system, neurotransmitters mediate cellular communication within neuronal circuits. In developing tissues and primitive organisms, neurotransmitters subserve growth regulatory and morphogenetic functions. Accumulated evidence suggests that acetylcholine, (ACh), released from growing axons, regulates growth, differentiation, and plasticity of developing central nervous system neurons. In addition to intrinsic cholinergic neurons, the cerebral cortex and hippocampus receive extensive innervation from cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain, beginning prenatally and continuing throughout the period of active growth and synaptogenesis. Acute exposure to ethanol in early gestation (which prevents formation of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons) or neonatal lesioning of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, significantly compromises cortical development and produces persistent impairment of cognitive functions. Neonatal visual deprivation alters developmental expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in visual cortex, whereas local infusion of mAChR antagonists impairs plasticity of visual cortical neurons. These findings raise the possibility that exposure to environmental neurotoxins that affect cholinergic systems may seriously compromise brain development and have long-lasting morphologic, neurochemical, and functional consequences. PMID:10229708

  5. Morphogenetic Aspects of Murein Structure and Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Uli; Leutgeb, Werner

    1971-01-01

    The shape of Escherichia coli is fixed by the form of the sacculus. This sacculus is a macromolecule made up from the polymer murein. In an investigation of the possible factors determining the shape of the sacculus, we attempted to resolve between two fundamental alternatives. (i) Is the shape of the sacculus automatically fixed by its chemical composition? or (ii) does a special morphogenetic system exist which determines the shape of the sacculus? An analysis of sacculi from cells grown in poor and rich media and harvested at different stages of growth was made. Significant variations in the composition of murein were found, whereas the general shape of the cells remained unchanged. This finding stands opposed to the assumption of a strict correlation between chemistry and shape of the sacculus. The second alternative was investigated by attempting to change artificially the shape of the sacculus by modifying the form of the hypothetical morphogenetic system. Rod-shaped cells were converted into spherical spheroplasts which were subsequently allowed to reform a new spherical sacculus. In chemical composition this spherical sacculus was found to be indistinguishable from the rod-shaped sacculus. This finding is taken as evidence for the existence of a distinct morphogenetic apparatus in the cell wall whose form is reflected by the shape of the sacculus. Images PMID:4929868

  6. Exogenous bone morphogenetic protein-7 reduces hepatic fibrosis in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice via transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo-Lin; Peng, Jie; Li, Qing-Fu; Yang, Min; Wang, Yuan; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the antifibrotic effects of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) on Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum)-induced hepatic fibrosis in BALB/C mice. METHODS: Sixty BALB/C mice were randomly divided into three groups, including a control group (group A, n = 20), model group (group B, n = 20) and BMP-7 treated group (group C, n = 20). The mice in group B and group C were abdominally infected with S. japonicum cercariae to induce a schistosomal hepatic fibrosis model. The mice in group C were administered human recombinant BMP-7. Liver samples were extracted from mice sacrificed at 9 and 15 wk after modeling. Hepatic histopathological changes were assessed using Masson’s staining. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), phosphorylated Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3) and Smad7 protein levels and localization were measured by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively, and their mRNA expressions were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: The schistosomal hepatic fibrosis mouse model was successfully established, as the livers of mice in group B and group C showed varying degrees of typical schistosomal hepatopathologic changes such as egg granuloma and collagen deposition. The degree of collagen deposition in group C was higher than that in group A (week 9: 22.95 ± 6.66 vs 2.02 ± 0.76; week 15: 12.84 ± 4.36 vs 1.74 ± 0.80; P < 0.05), but significantly lower than that in group B (week 9: 22.95 ± 6.66 vs 34.43 ± 6.96; week 15: 12.84 ± 4.36 vs 18.90 ± 5.07; P < 0.05) at both time points. According to immunohistochemistry data, the expressions of α-SMA, TGF-β1 and pSmad2/3 protein in group C were higher than those in group A (α-SMA: week 9: 21.24 ± 5.73 vs 0.33 ± 0.20; week 15: 12.42 ± 4.88 vs 0.34 ± 0.27; TGF-β1: week 9: 37.00 ± 13.74 vs 3.73 ± 2.14; week 15: 16.71 ± 9.80 vs 3.08 ± 2.35; pSmad2/3: week 9: 12.92 ± 4.81 vs 0.83 ± 0.48; week 15: 7.87 ± 4

  7. Bovine bone morphogenetic protein-induced dentinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lianjia, Y; Yuhao, G; White, F H

    1993-10-01

    Differentiation of odontoblasts is important for dentin formation in tooth germs and mature teeth. Although previous reports have indicated that there may be a kind of inductive agent that could induce mesenchymal cells in dental pulps to differentiate into odontoblasts, and secrete dentin matrix, the primary inductive factor of odontoblasts has not been found. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), which induces the formation of cartilage and bone when implanted in muscle tissue, is found in dentin matrix. The relationship between the differentiation of odontoblasts and BMP was observed by means of immunohistochemical staining with monoclonal antibody (MAb) against BMP in dental pulp tissue and cell culture; [3H]thymidine incorporation; and measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity. The conclusions are: (1) BMP exists in odontoblasts, ameloblasts, and dentin matrix (the positive reaction in ameloblasts appeared earlier and remained stronger); (2) BMP promotes incorporation of [3H]thymidine and increases the activity of alkaline phosphatase in cultured dental pulp cells; (3) BMP-induced dental pulp cells in dental pulp tissue cultures differentiate from mesenchymal to odontoblast-like cells; and (4) BMP induces formation of osteodentin and tubular dentin when used as a dental capping agent of dogs' teeth. Bone morphogenetic protein plays an important role in differentiation of odontoblasts and might be one of the inductive agents of odontoblasts. Further investigations of BMP as a biologic dental capping agent are warranted.

  8. Role of the thrombopoietin (TPO)/Mpl system: c-Mpl-like molecule/TPO signaling enhances early hematopoiesis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Kakeda, Minoru; Kyuno, Jun-ichi; Kato, Takashi; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Asashima, Makoto

    2002-02-01

    Multiple organs are induced in the primitive embryonic ectoderm excised from blastula stage Xenopus laevis embryos, under the strict control of mesoderm inducing factors. This in vitro system is useful for exploring the mechanisms of development. In this study, the function of thrombopoietin (TPO)/c-Mpl signaling in the development of hematopoietic cells was investigated. An optimal hematopoietic cell induction system was established to evaluate the influence of growth factors on hematopoiesis. It was found that exogenous TPO enhanced hematopoiesis in explants induced by activin and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 and increased the number of both erythrocytes and leukocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of anti-c-Mpl antibody completely inhibited the expansion of hematopoietic cells stimulated by TPO, and the antibody specifically recognized blood-like cells. These results demonstrate that TPO acts on hematopoietic progenitors induced in explants and the c-Mpl-like molecule in Xenopus mediates the cellular function of TPO. We also found that forced expression of TPO in embryos promoted hematopoiesis in the ventral blood island and the dorsal-- lateral plate mesoderm. These results suggest that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are regulated by TPO/c-Mpl signaling from when they appear in their ontogeny. They also suggest that TPO/c-Mpl signaling play a crucial role in the formation of hematopoietic cells in Xenopus.

  9. Coordinated regulation of dorsal bone morphogenetic protein 4 and ventral Sonic hedgehog signaling specifies the dorso-ventral polarity in the optic vesicle and governs ocular morphogenesis through fibroblast growth factor 8 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Yasuda, Kunio; Araki, Masasuke

    2010-05-01

    Dorsal and ventral specification in the early optic vesicle plays a crucial role in vertebrate ocular morphogenesis, and proper dorsal-ventral polarity in the optic vesicle ensures that distinct structures develop in separate domains within the eye primordium. The polarity is determined progressively during development by coordinated regulation of extraocular dorsal and ventral factors. In the present study, we cultured discrete portions of embryonic chick brains by preparing anterior cephalon, anterior dorsal cephalon and anterior ventral cephalon, and clearly demonstrate that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) constitute a dorsal-ventral signaling system together with fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8). BMP4 and Shh upregulate Tbx5 and Pax2, as reported previously, and at the same time Shh downregulates Tbx5, while BMP4 affects Pax2 expression to downregulate similarly. Shh induces Fgf8 expression in the ventral optic vesicle. This, in turn, determines the distinct boundary of the retinal pigmented epithelium and the neural retina by suppressing Mitf expression. The lens develops only when signals from both the dorsal and ventral regions come across together. Inverted deposition of Shh and BMP4 signals in organ-cultured optic vesicle completely re-organized ocular structures to be inverted. Based on these observations we propose a novel model in which the two signals govern the whole of ocular development when they encounter each other in the ocular morphogenic domain.

  10. The Influence of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor and Bone Morphogenetic Protein Presentation on Tubule Organization by Human Umbilical Vascular Endothelial Cells and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Coculture.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Emily A; Fedorchak, Morgan V; Little, Steven R

    2016-11-01

    A three-dimensional in vitro Matrigel plug was used as a model to explore delivery patterns of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) to a coculture of human mesenchymal and endothelial cells. While BMP-2 is well recognized for its role in promoting fracture healing through proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast precursors, it is not a growth factor known to promote the process of angiogenesis, which is also critical for complete bone tissue repair. PDGF, in contrast, is a known regulator of angiogenesis, and also a powerful chemoattractant for osteoblast precursor cells. It has been suggested that presentation of PDGF followed by BMP may better promote vascularized bone tissue formation. Yet, it is unclear as to how cells would respond to various durations of delivery of each growth factor as well as to various amounts of overlap in presentation in terms of angiogenesis. Using a three-dimensional in vitro Matrigel plug model, we observed how various presentation schedules of PDGF and BMP-2 influenced tubule formation by human mesenchymal stem cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. We observed that sequential presentation of PDGF to BMP-2 led to increased tubule formation over simultaneous delivery of these growth factors. Importantly, a 2-4 day overlap in the sequential presentation of PDGF and BMP-2 increased tubule formation as compared with groups with zero or complete growth factor overlap, suggesting that a moderate amount of angiogenic and osteogenic growth factor overlap may be beneficial for processes associated with angiogenesis.

  11. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  12. Role of calcium in the regulation of bone morphogenetic protein 2, runt-related transcription factor 2 and Osterix in primary renal tubular epithelial cells by the vitamin D receptor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhaohui; Wang, Shaogang; He, Deng; Cui, Lei; Lu, Yuchao; Hu, Henglong; Qin, Baolong; Zhao, Zhenyu

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3/vitamin D receptor (VDR) and calcium on the expression levels of osteogenic factors in primary renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) using genetic hypercalciuric rats. The basal levels of osteogenic factors were detected in Sprague Dawley and genetic hypercalciuric rats. The gene and protein levels of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and osterix were detected in the RTECs transduced with Lenti-VDR-sh and were incubated with calcium. Using the o-cresolphthalein complexone method, the calcium levels of the primary RTECs cultured with Lenti-VDR-sh and with 1,25(OH)2D3 were assessed. The basal levels of BMP2, Runx2 and Osterix in the cells were significantly higher in the genetic hypercalciuric rats compared with the control rats. VDR knockdown in the RTECs reduced the expression levels of BMP2, Runx2 and Osterix. The calcium depositions in the primary RTECs were also decreased following exposure to Lenti-VDR-sh, but increased following treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3. The expression levels of BMP2, Runx2 and Osterix were markedly increased in the cells incubated with calcium compared with the cells treated with normal saline and the untreated cells. These findings indicated that osteogenic factors, including BMP2, Runx2 and Osterix may be important in renal stone formation in idiopathic hypercalciuria. VDR may mediate the increased expression levels of BMP2, Runx2 and Osterix by positively regulating calcium levels in primary RTECs.

  13. Molecular characterisation of growth differentiation factor 9 (gdf9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (bmp15) and their patterns of gene expression during the ovarian reproductive cycle in the European sea bass.

    PubMed

    Halm, S; Ibañez, A J; Tyler, C R; Prat, F

    2008-09-10

    Members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), have crucial roles in primary follicle growth in mammals. To initiate investigations into their significance in teleost oogenesis, we set out to clone and characterise the cDNAs of gdf9 and bmp15 and analysed their patterns of gene expression during the ovarian reproductive cycle in the European sea bass (Dicentrachus labrax). Sea bass gdf9 and bmp15 cDNAs were 2200 and 2049 bp long, coding for 438 and 459 amino acids (aas), respectively, and were most similar to zebrafish gdf9 and bmp15 (64.4 and 56.1%, respectively). By Northern analysis, sea bass gdf9 and bmp15 mRNA transcripts were detected in the ovary only of the tissues analysed and their sizes were 2.2 and 2.1 kb, respectively. Dot-blot analysis revealed high levels of gdf9 and bmp15 expression in the ovary during primary oocyte growth and previtellogenesis (July to October), with a significant decline at the onset of vitellogenesis (November) and remaining low until the beginning of new oocyte growth (April/May). There was a highly significant positive correlation (r=0.939) between gdf9 and bmp15 gene expression in individual samples. The high levels of gdf9 and bmp15 mRNA transcripts in the ovary, especially during the previtellogenic growth period suggest an important role for these factors in early primary oocyte growth in the European sea bass.

  14. Haplotype-based gene-gene interaction of bone morphogenetic protein 4 and interferon regulatory factor 6 in the etiology of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in a Chilean population.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Rafael; Colombo, Alicia; Pardo, Rosa; Suazo, José

    2017-04-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is the most common craniofacial birth defect in humans, the etiology of which can be dependent on the interactions of multiple genes. We previously reported haplotype associations for polymorphic variants of interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6), msh homeobox 1 (MSX1), bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), and transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGFB3) in Chile. Here, we analyzed the haplotype-based gene-gene interaction for markers of these genes and NSCL/P risk in the Chilean population. We genotyped 15 single nucleoptide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 152 Chilean patients and 164 controls. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks were determined using the Haploview software, and phase reconstruction was performed by the Phase program. Haplotype-based interactions were evaluated using the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method. We detected two LD blocks composed of two SNPs from BMP4 (Block 1) and three SNPs from IRF6 (Block 2). Although MDR showed no statistical significance for the global interaction model involving these blocks, we found four combinations conferring a statistically significantly increased NSCL/P risk (Block 1-Block 2): T-T/T-G C-G-T/G-A-T; T-T/T-G C-G-C/C-G-C; T-T/T-G G-A-T/G-A-T; and T-T/C-G G-A-T/G-A-T. These findings may reflect the presence of a genomic region containing potential causal variants interacting in the etiology of NSCL/P and may contribute to disentangling the complex etiology of this birth defect.

  15. Retention of duplicated ITAM-containing transmembrane signaling subunits in the tetraploid amphibian species Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Guselnikov, S V; Grayfer, L; De Jesús Andino, F; Rogozin, I B; Robert, J; Taranin, A V

    2015-11-01

    The ITAM-bearing transmembrane signaling subunits (TSS) are indispensable components of activating leukocyte receptor complexes. The TSS-encoding genes map to paralogous chromosomal regions, which are thought to arise from ancient genome tetraploidization(s). To assess a possible role of tetraploidization in the TSS evolution, we studied TSS and other functionally linked genes in the amphibian species Xenopus laevis whose genome was duplicated about 40 MYR ago. We found that X. laevis has retained a duplicated set of sixteen TSS genes, all except one being transcribed. Furthermore, duplicated TCRα loci and genes encoding TSS-coupling protein kinases have also been retained. No clear evidence for functional divergence of the TSS paralogs was obtained from gene expression and sequence analyses. We suggest that the main factor of maintenance of duplicated TSS genes in X. laevis was a protein dosage effect and that this effect might have facilitated the TSS set expansion in early vertebrates.

  16. Functional Differentiation of Uterine Stromal Cells Involves Cross-regulation between Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 and Kruppel-like Factor (KLF) Family Members KLF9 and KLF13

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inability of the uterine epithelium to enter a state of receptivity for the embryo to implant is a significant underlying cause of early pregnancy loss. We previously showed that mice null for the Progesterone Receptor (PGR)-interacting protein Kruppel-like Factor (KLF) 9 are subfertile and exhi...

  17. Transforming growth factor-β1 suppresses bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced mesenchymal-epithelial transition in HSC-4 human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells via Smad1/5/9 pathway suppression.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takahiro; Ishisaki, Akira; Kyakumoto, Seiko; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kamo, Masaharu

    2017-02-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common cancer in the oral cavity. We previously demonstrated that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) promotes the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (hOSCC) cells; however, it remains to be clarified whether the TGF-β superfamily member bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) affects this process in hOSCC cells. Here, we examined the independent and collective effects of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 on EMT and mesenchymal‑epithelial transition (MET) in a panel of four hOSCC cell lines. Notably, we found that HSC-4 cells were the most responsive to BMP-2 stimulation, which resulted in the upregulation of Smad1/5/9 target genes such as the MET inducers ID1 and cytokeratin 9 (CK9). Furthermore, BMP-2 downregulated the mesenchymal marker N-cadherin and the EMT inducer Snail, but upregulated epithelial CK9 expression, indicating that BMP-2 prefers to induce MET rather than EMT. Moreover, TGF-β1 dampened BMP-2-induced epithelial gene expression by inhibiting Smad1/5/9 expression and phosphorylation. Functional analysis revealed that TGF-β1 and BMP-2 significantly enhanced HSC-4 cell migration and proliferation, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that TGF-β positively regulates hOSCC invasion in the primary tumor, whereas BMP-2 facilitates cancer cell colonization at secondary metastatic sites. Thus, the invasive and metastatic characteristics of hOSCC appear to be reciprocally regulated by BMP and TGF-β.

  18. Protein kinase signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of the rat alpha1(I) collagen gene by transforming growth factor beta1 and bone morphogenetic protein 2 in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Palcy, S; Goltzman, D

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) family members are known for their important role in bone physiology. TGFbeta(1) and, to a smaller extent, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) have been reported to regulate the gene expression of different osteoblast markers in vitro. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in these actions. Here we report that BMP-2, like TGFbeta(1), up-regulated alpha1(I) collagen mRNA expression in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. This was mediated through an increase in the transcriptional rate of the gene rather than through the stabilization of alpha1(I) collagen mRNA, and required new protein synthesis. In addition, TGFbeta(1)- and BMP-2-induced increases in alpha1(I) collagen mRNA levels were both dependent on protein kinase C and protein tyrosine kinase activities. Furthermore, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) [MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (MEK-1/ERK)] pathway participated in the up-regulation of alpha1(I) collagen gene expression by TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2. In response to either TGFbeta(1) or BMP-2, the stimulation of alpha1(I) collagen mRNA levels was paralleled by an early increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase protein activity. Moreover, the effects of both TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2 on alpha1(I) collagen gene expression were markedly decreased in transfected ROS 17/2.8 cells expressing a dominant-negative MEK-1. Our findings therefore show that TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2, which signal through discrete cell-surface receptors, are able to trigger analogous, if not identical, protein-phosphorylation-transducing cascades leading to comparable actions on the transcription of the alpha1(I) collagen gene in osteoblastic cells. PMID:10493907

  19. Dephosphorylation of the linker regions of Smad1 and Smad2/3 by small C-terminal domain phosphatases has distinct outcomes for bone morphogenetic protein and transforming growth factor-beta pathways.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Gopal; Knockaert, Marie; Alarcón, Claudio; Montalvo, Ermelinda; Brivanlou, Ali H; Massagué, Joan

    2006-12-29

    Smad proteins transduce bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signals upon phosphorylation of their C-terminal SXS motif by receptor kinases. The activity of Smad1 in the BMP pathway and Smad2/3 in the TGFbeta pathway is restricted by pathway cross-talk and feedback through protein kinases, including MAPK, CDK2/4, p38MAPK, JNK, and others. These kinases phosphorylate Smads 1-3 at the region that links the N-terminal DNA-binding domain and the C-terminal transcriptional domain. Phosphatases that dephosphorylate the linker region are therefore likely to play an integral part in the regulation of Smad activity. We reported previously that small C-terminal domain phosphatases 1, 2, and 3 (SCP1-3) dephosphorylate Smad1 C-terminal tail, thereby attenuating BMP signaling. Here we provide evidence that SCP1-3 also dephosphorylate the linker regions of Smad1 and Smad2/3 in vitro, in mammalian cells and in Xenopus embryos. Overexpression of SCP 1, 2, or 3 decreased linker phosphorylation of Smads 1, 2 and 3. Moreover, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of SCP1/2 increased the BMP-dependent phosphorylation of the Smad1 linker region as well as the C terminus. In contrast, SCP1/2 knockdown increased the TGFbeta-dependent linker phosphorylation of Smad2/3 but not the C-terminal phosphorylation. Consequently, SCP1/2 knockdown inhibited TGFbeta transcriptional responses, but it enhanced BMP transcriptional responses. Thus, by dephosphorylating Smad2/3 at the linker (inhibitory) but not the C-terminal (activating) site, the SCPs enhance TGFbeta signaling, and by dephosphorylating Smad1 at both sites, the SCPs reset Smad1 to the basal unphosphorylated state.

  20. Strategies to detect interdigital cell death in the frog, Xenopus laevis: T3 accerelation, BMP application, and mesenchymal cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Shimizu-Nishikawa, Keiko; Nishimatsu, Shin-ichiro; Nishikawa, Akio

    2012-05-01

    Fates of digits in amniotes, i.e., free or webbed digits, are determined by the size of programmed interdigital cell death (ICD) area. However, no (or very few) cell death has thus far been observed in developing limb buds of non-amniotic terrestrial vertebrates including other anuran or urodela amphibians. We speculate that the undetectable situation of amphibian ICD is the result of their less frequency due to slow developmental speed characteristic to most amphibian species. Here, we present three strategies for detecting difficult-to-find ICD in the frog, Xenopus laevis. (1) Addition of triiodo-L-thyronine (T(3)) accelerated two to three times the limb development and increased two to four times the appearance frequency of vital dye-stainable cells in limb buds of the accelerated tadpoles (stage 54 to 55). (2) Application of human bone morphogenetic protein-4 to the autopods of tadpoles at stage 53 to 54 enhanced digital cartilage formation and induced vital dye-stainable cells around the enhanced digital cartilages within 2 d. (3) In cell culture, T(3) increased the chondrogenic and cell death activities of limb mesenchymal cells. The augmentation of both activities by T(3) was stronger in the forelimb cells than in the hindlimb cells. This situation is well coincided with the limb fates of non-webbed forelimbs and webbed hindlimbs in X. laevis adulthood. Collectively, all three approaches showed that it become possible to detect X. laevis ICD with appropriate strategies.

  1. Synergistic induction of early stage of bone formation by combination of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 and epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Jang, Soo-Jeong; Baek, Hae-Ri; Lee, Kyung Mee; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluates whether the combination of the rhBMP-2 and various types of growth factors including EGF, FGF, PDGF and VEGF increases osteoinductivity compared to the single use of rhBMP-2 through in vitro and in vivo study. Cultured human MSCs were treated with rhBMP-2 only or in combination with growth factors. For in vivo evaluation, rhBMP-2 only or with growth factors was implanted into the calvarial defect made on SD rats. Both EGF and PDGF significantly increased both ALP activity and expression level in hMSCs when treated in combination with rhBMP-2 at 3 and 7 days of differentiation and significantly raised the accumulation of the calcium at day 14. Furthermore, micro-CT scanning revealed that the EGF an FGF groups show significantly increased new bone surface ratio compared to the rhBMP-2 only group and, the EGF treatment significantly up regulated percent bone volume and trabecular number at two weeks after the surgery. VEGF treatment also significantly raised trabecular number and FGF treatment significantly increased the trabecular thickness. Histological examination revealed that the EGF combination group showed enhanced bone regeneration than the rhBMP-2 only group two weeks after the implantation. Even though the treatment of rhBMP-2 with PDGF and FGF failed to show enhanced osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo simultaneously, these results suggest that the positive effect of the combination of EGF and rhBMP-2 is expected to induce the bone formation earlier compared to the single use of rhBMP-2 in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Expansion of murine periosteal progenitor cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 reveals an intrinsic endochondral ossification program mediated by bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    van Gastel, Nick; Stegen, Steve; Stockmans, Ingrid; Moermans, Karen; Schrooten, Jan; Graf, Daniel; Luyten, Frank P; Carmeliet, Geert

    2014-09-01

    The preservation of the bone-forming potential of skeletal progenitor cells during their ex vivo expansion remains one of the major challenges for cell-based bone regeneration strategies. We report that expansion of murine periosteal cells in the presence of FGF2, a signal present during the early stages of fracture healing, is necessary and sufficient to maintain their ability to organize in vivo into a cartilage template which gives rise to mature bone. Implantation of FGF2-primed cells in a large bone defect in mice resulted in complete healing, demonstrating the feasibility of using this approach for bone tissue engineering purposes. Mechanistically, the enhanced endochondral ossification potential of FGF2-expanded periosteal cells is predominantly driven by an increased production of BMP2 and is additionally linked to an improved preservation of skeletal progenitor cells in the cultures. This characteristic is unique for periosteal cells, as FGF2-primed bone marrow stromal cells formed significantly less bone and progressed exclusively through the intramembranous pathway, revealing essential differences between both cell pools. Taken together, our findings provide insight in the molecular regulation of fracture repair by identifying a unique interaction between periosteal cells and FGF2. These insights may promote the development of cell-based therapeutic strategies for bone regeneration which are independent of the in vivo use of growth factors, thus limiting undesired side effects.

  3. XENOPUS LAEVIS: A CULTURING AND REARING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Xenopus laevis are used extensively here at MED-Duluth as a model for assessing development toxicity to xenobiotics. As a result, a culturing system has been developed that provides eggs and tadpoles of consistent high quality for use by researchers at the facility. The methods ...

  4. Xenopus laevis in Developmental and Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawid, Igor B.; Sargent, Thomas D.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of Xenopus laevis as an experimental animal in the study of embryogenesis in vertebrates. Summarizes the contributions of this system to the analysis of ribosomal and 5S RNA genes, and the diverse and highly productive applications of the oocyte injection technology. (RT)

  5. Improved Bone Healing by Angiogenic Factor-Enriched Platelet-Rich Plasma and Its Synergistic Enhancement by Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Jin; Kim, Eun-Seok; Weber, Hans-Peter; Wright, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    (1) Purpose The purpose of this study was to modify the method of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation for obtaining optimal angiogenic potential and accelerate bone healing. Also, the potential synergistic effect of a suboptimal concentration of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) and modified PRP (mPRP) on bone healing was evaluated in vivo. (2) Materials and Methods The angiogenic factor-enriched PRP which includes peripheral blood mononuclear cells (mostly lymphocytes and monocytes fraction, excluding polymorphonuclear leukocyte, PMNs) was achieved by lowering concentrations of thrombin and CaCl2, after pre-activation with shear stress using a table-top vortex machine and collagen. In vitro, endothelial cell migration activity in the mPRP group was compared to conventional PRP preparation using a modified Boyden chamber assay. In an animal study, PGA scaffold, PGA scaffold + mPRP, PGA scaffold + mPRP + rhBMP-2, and PGA scaffold + rhBMP-2 were applied to 28 NIH nude rats’ critical size calvarial defects. At 2 weeks, periosteal blood flow was measured using LDPI, and bone formation was evaluated at 8 weeks by histology, DEXA, and μCT. (3) Results mPRP induced faster migration of cord blood-derived outgrowth endothelial-like cells. In vivo, mPRP with low dose rhBMP-2 group showed significantly increased numbers of blood vessels at 2 weeks, and notable synergistic effect on bone healing at 8 weeks as evaluated with histology, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC, and μCT. (4) Conclusion mPRP used in this study improved vascular perfusion around the defect, and resulted in enhanced bone healing. Also, combining mPRP with a suboptimal dosage of rhBMP-2 improved bone formation and enhanced bone density. PMID:19014150

  6. Polystyrene nanoparticles affect Xenopus laevis development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tussellino, Margherita; Ronca, Raffaele; Formiggini, Fabio; Marco, Nadia De; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Carotenuto, Rosa

    2015-02-01

    Exposing living organisms to nanoparticulates is potentially hazardous, in particular when it takes place during embryogenesis. In this investigation, we have studied the effects of 50-nm-uncoated polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) as a model to investigate the suitability of their possible future employments. We have used the standardized Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay- Xenopus test during the early stages of larval development of Xenopus laevis, and we have employed either contact exposure or microinjections. We found that the embryos mortality rate is dose dependent and that the survived embryos showed high percentage of malformations. They display disorders in pigmentation distribution, malformations of the head, gut and tail, edema in the anterior ventral region, and a shorter body length compared with sibling untreated embryos. Moreover, these embryos grow more slowly than the untreated embryos. Expressions of the mesoderm markers, bra (T-box Brachyury gene), myod1 (myogenic differentiation1), and of neural crest marker sox9 (sex SRY (determining region Y-box 9) transcription factor sox9), are modified. Confocal microscopy showed that the nanoparticles are localized in the cytoplasm, in the nucleus, and in the periphery of the digestive gut cells. Our data suggest that PSNPs are toxic and show a potential teratogenic effect for Xenopus larvae. We hypothesize that these effects may be due either to the amount of NPs that penetrate into the cells and/or to the "corona" effect caused by the interaction of PSNPs with cytoplasm components. The three endpoints of our study, i.e., mortality, malformations, and growth inhibition, suggest that the tests we used may be a powerful and flexible bioassay in evaluating pollutants in aquatic embryos.

  7. Morphogenetic origin of natural variation.

    PubMed

    Cherdantsev, Vladimir G; Scobeyeva, Victoria A

    2012-09-01

    We studied individual pathways of gastrulation in two related amphibian species making an emphasis on the developmental dynamics of normal variation in the geometry of gastrulation movements. Analyzing the variation dynamics, we show that the linear succession of developmental stages is a secondary phenomenon disguising self-oscillations that lie at the heart of the dorsal blastopore lip morphogenesis. Characteristic features of the equations derived to describe the oscillations are, first, their dependence only on the movement geometry and, second, including of the dynamics of spatial variance directly into the movement equations, making it clear that the reasons for variability of morphogenesis are the same that for morphogenesis itself. The equations describing morphogenetic oscillations are mathematically similar to those describing natural selection in that the system tends to minimize its variance, individual or within-individual one, but the spatially uniform state turns to be unstable. Comparing of the dynamics of natural developmental variation in gastrulation in two frog species shows that, depending on the mechanics and geometry mass cell movements, different types of gastrulation movements have different proportions of the between- to within-individual differences, which strongly influences the choice of characters subject to evolution. Instead of being a source of constraints imposed on externally guided evolutionary trends, morphogenesis becomes a driving force of the adaptively silent, but directional evolution of the developing systems, which seems to be the only possible way of originating of the evolutionary novelties, both in evolution and ontogeny of the biological structures.

  8. Functional evolution of a morphogenetic gradient

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Chun Wai; Gavin-Smyth, Jackie; Ferguson, Edwin L; Schmidt-Ott, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) pattern the dorsal-ventral axis of bilaterian embryos; however, their roles in the evolution of body plan are largely unknown. We examined their functional evolution in fly embryos. BMP signaling specifies two extraembryonic tissues, the serosa and amnion, in basal-branching flies such as Megaselia abdita, but only one, the amnioserosa, in Drosophila melanogaster. The BMP signaling dynamics are similar in both species until the beginning of gastrulation, when BMP signaling broadens and intensifies at the edge of the germ rudiment in Megaselia, while remaining static in Drosophila. Here we show that the differences in gradient dynamics and tissue specification result from evolutionary changes in the gene regulatory network that controls the activity of a positive feedback circuit on BMP signaling, involving the tumor necrosis factor alpha homolog eiger. These data illustrate an evolutionary mechanism by which spatiotemporal changes in morphogen gradients can guide tissue complexity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20894.001 PMID:28005004

  9. Local activation of protein kinase A inhibits morphogenetic movements during Xenopus gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Byung-Ho; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2003-05-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has various biological roles in many organisms. However, little is known about its role in the developmental processes of vertebrates. In this study, we describe the functional analysis of PKA during gastrulation movements in Xenopus laevis. Overexpression of constitutively active PKA (cPKA) in the dorsal equatorial region of the embryo affects morphogenetic movement during gastrulation. We also show that intrinsic differences of PKA activities along the dorsoventral axis are set up and the level of PKA activity on the dorsal region is lower than that on the ventral region from late blastula to gastrula stages. In addition, PKA activation in animal explants inhibits activin-induced elongation. In cPKA-injected embryos, there were no changes in the expressions of markers involved in mesoderm specification, although the correct expression domains of these genes were altered. The effects of PKA activation can be restored by coexpression of PKI, a pseudosubstrate of PKA. We further analyzed the effects of PKA activation on the behavior of migratory gastrulating cells in vitro. Expression of cPKA in head mesoderm cells causes less polarized and/or randomized migration as demonstrated by a directional cell migration assay. Finally, we show that RhoA GTPase lies downstream of PKA, affecting activin-induced convergent extension movements. Taken together, these results suggest that overexpressed PKA can modulate a pathway responsible for morphogenetic movements during Xenopus gastrulation.

  10. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins and cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins during osteophyte formation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zoricic, Sanja; Maric, Ivana; Bobinac, Dragica; Vukicevic, Slobodan

    2003-01-01

    Bone- and cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins (BMPs and CDMPs), which are TGFβ superfamily members, are growth and differentiation factors that have been recently isolated, cloned and biologically characterized. They are important regulators of key events in the processes of bone formation during embryogenesis, postnatal growth, remodelling and regeneration of the skeleton. In the present study, we used immunohistochemical methods to investigate the distribution of BMP-2, -3, -5, -6, -7 and CDMP-1, -2, -3 in human osteophytes (abnormal bony outgrowths) isolated from osteoarthritic hip and knee joints from patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery. All osteophytes consisted of three different areas of active bone formation: (1) endochondral bone formation within cartilage residues; (2) intramembranous bone formation within the fibrous tissue cover and (3) bone formation within bone marrow spaces. The immunohistochemistry of certain BMPs and CDMPs in each of these three different bone formation sites was determined. The results indicate that each BMP has a distinct pattern of distribution. Immunoreactivity for BMP-2 was observed in fibrous tissue matrix as well as in osteoblasts; BMP-3 was mainly present in osteoblasts; BMP-6 was restricted to young osteocytes and bone matrix; BMP-7 was observed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, osteoblasts and young osteocytes of both endochondral and intramembranous bone formation sites. CDMP-1, -2 and -3 were strongly expressed in all cartilage cells. Surprisingly, BMP-3 and -6 were found in osteoclasts at the sites of bone resorption. Since a similar distribution pattern of bone morphogenetic proteins was observed during embryonal bone development, it is suggested that osteophyte formation is regulated by the same molecular mechanism as normal bone during embryogenesis. PMID:12713267

  11. cnrip1 is a regulator of eye and neural development in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaona; Suzuki, Toshiyasu; Takahashi, Chika; Nishida, Eisuke; Kusakabe, Morioh

    2015-04-01

    Cannabinoid receptor interacting protein 1 (CNRIP1), which has been originally identified as the binding partner of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1), is evolutionarily conserved throughout vertebrates, but its physiological function has been unknown. Here, we identify a developmental role of CNRIP1 using Xenopus laevis embryos. During early embryogenesis, expression of Xenopus laevis cnrip1 is highly restricted to the animal region of gastrulae where neural and eye induction occur, and afterward it is seen in neural and other tissues with a temporally and spatially regulated pattern. Morpholino-mediated knockdown experiments indicate that cnrip1 has an essential role in early eye and neural development by regulating the onset of expression of key transcription factor genes, sox2, otx2, pax6 and rax. Also, over-expression experiments suggest that cnrip1 has a potential to expand sox2, otx2, pax6 and rax expression. These results suggest an instructive role of Xenopus laevis cnrip1 in early eye and neural development. Furthermore, Xenopus laevis cnr1 knockdown leads to eye defects, which are partly similar to, but milder than, those caused by cnrip1 knockdown, suggesting a possible functional similarity between CNRIP1 and CNR1. This study is the first characterization of an in vivo role of CNRIP1 in the context of whole organisms.

  12. [Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP): clinical application for reconstruction of bone defects].

    PubMed

    Sierra-García, Gerardo Daniel; Castro-Ríos, Rocío; Gónzalez-Horta, Azucena; Lara-Arias, Jorge; Chávez-Montes, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of bone morphogenetic proteins, their use has become an invaluable ally for the treatment of bone defects. These proteins are potent growth factors, related to angiogenic and osteogenic activity. The osteoinductive capacity of recombinant bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP) in the formation of bone and cartilage has been confirmed in in vitro studies and evaluated in clinical trials. To obtain a therapeutic effect, administration is systemic, by injection over the physiological dose. Among the disadvantages, ectopic bone formation or high morbidity in cases of spinal fusion is observed. In this review, the roles of bone morphogenetic proteins in bone repair and clinical applications are analyzed. These findings represent advances in the study of bone regeneration and application of growth factors for more predictable results.

  13. Vocal competition in male Xenopus laevis frogs

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Martha L.; Corke, Anna; Korsh, Jeremy; Yin, David; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2011-01-01

    Male Xenopus laevis frogs produce underwater advertisement calls that attract gravid females and suppress calling by male competitors. Here we explore whether groups of males establish vocal ranks and whether auditory cues alone suffice for vocal suppression. Tests of male–male pairs within assigned groups reveal linear vocal dominance relations, in which each male has a defined rank. Both the duration over which males interact, as well as the number of competitive opportunities, affect linearity. Linear dominance across the group is stable for about 2 weeks; rank is dynamic. Males engage in physical interactions (clasping) while paired but clasping and vocal rank are not correlated. Playbacks of advertisement calls suppress calling and calls from high- and low-ranking males are equally effective. Thus, auditory cues alone suffice to suppress vocal behavior. Playback intensities equivalent to a nearby male advertising effectively suppress calling while low-intensity playbacks are either ineffective or stimulate vocal behavior. X. laevis advertisement calls are biphasic, composed of alternating fast and slow click trills. Approximately half the males tested are more vocally suppressed by all slow than by all fast trills; thus, these males can distinguish between the two phases. The fully aquatic family Pipidae diverged from terrestrial ancestors approximately 170 mya. Vocal suppression in the X. laevis mating system may represent the translation of an ancient anuran social strategy to underwater life. PMID:21442049

  14. Skin wound healing in different aged Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Evelina; Malagoli, Davide; Franchini, Antonella

    2013-08-01

    Xenopus froglets can perfectly heal skin wounds without scarring. To explore whether this capacity is maintained as development proceeds, we examined the cellular responses during the repair of skin injury in 8- and 15-month-old Xenopus laevis. The morphology and sequence of healing phases (i.e., inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling) were independent of age, while the timing was delayed in older frogs. At the beginning of postinjury, wound re-epithelialization occurred in form of a thin epithelium followed by a multilayered epidermis containing cells with apoptotic patterns and keratinocytes stained by anti-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) antibody. The inflammatory response, early activated by recruitment of blood cells immunoreactive to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, iNOS, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, persisted over time. The dermis repaired by a granulation tissue with extensive angiogenesis, inflammatory cells, fibroblasts, and anti-α-SMA positive myofibroblasts. As the healing progressed, wounded areas displayed vascular regression, decrease in cellularity, and rearrangement of provisional matrix. The epidermis restored to a prewound morphology while granulation tissue was replaced by a fibrous tissue in a scar-like pattern. The quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated an up-regulated expression of Xenopus suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (XSOCS-3) and Xenopus transforming growth factor-β2 (XTGF-β2) soon after wounding and peak levels were detected when granulation tissue was well developed with a large number of inflammatory cells. The findings indicate that X. laevis skin wound healing occurred by a combination of regeneration (in epidermis) and repair (in dermis) and, in contrast to froglet scarless wound healing, the growth to a more mature adult stage is associated with a decrease in regenerative capacity with scar-like tissue formation.

  15. Bone morphogenetic proteins: Signaling periodontal bone regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Anusuya, G Sai; Kandasamy, M; Jacob Raja, S A; Sabarinathan, S; Ravishankar, P; Kandhasamy, Balu

    2016-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are a group of growth factors also known as cytokines and as metabologens. Originally discovered by their ability to induce the formation of bone and cartilage, BMPs are now considered to constitute a group of pivotal morphogenetic signals, orchestrating tissue architecture throughout the body. The important functioning of BMP signals in physiology is emphasized by the multitude of roles for dysregulated BMP signaling in pathological processes. A study done wherein it was found that protein extracts from bone implanted into the animals at nonbone sites induced the formation of new cartilage and bone tissue. This protein extract contained multiple factors that stimulated bone formation and was termed as "BMP." There are at least 15 different BMPs identified to date and are a part of the transforming growth factor-β super family. The most widely studied BMPs are BMP-2, BMP-3 (osteogenin), BMP-4, and BMP-7 (osteogenic protein-1). Now, any recombination type of morphogenic proteins have been synthesized, for example - recombinant human BMPs.

  16. Bone morphogenetic proteins: Signaling periodontal bone regeneration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Anusuya, G. Sai; Kandasamy, M.; Jacob Raja, S. A.; Sabarinathan, S.; Ravishankar, P.; Kandhasamy, Balu

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are a group of growth factors also known as cytokines and as metabologens. Originally discovered by their ability to induce the formation of bone and cartilage, BMPs are now considered to constitute a group of pivotal morphogenetic signals, orchestrating tissue architecture throughout the body. The important functioning of BMP signals in physiology is emphasized by the multitude of roles for dysregulated BMP signaling in pathological processes. A study done wherein it was found that protein extracts from bone implanted into the animals at nonbone sites induced the formation of new cartilage and bone tissue. This protein extract contained multiple factors that stimulated bone formation and was termed as “BMP.” There are at least 15 different BMPs identified to date and are a part of the transforming growth factor-β super family. The most widely studied BMPs are BMP-2, BMP-3 (osteogenin), BMP-4, and BMP-7 (osteogenic protein-1). Now, any recombination type of morphogenic proteins have been synthesized, for example - recombinant human BMPs. PMID:27829744

  17. Profiling bone morphogenetic proteins and transforming growth factor-βs by hTGF-β3 pre-treated coral-derived macroporous bioreactors: the power of one.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Ugo; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Parak, Ruqayya; Milner, Brenda; Duarte, Raquel

    2015-05-01

    To study the expression profile of bone morphogenetic proteins and transforming growth factor-βs (BMPs and TGFβs), coral-derived calcium carbonate-based macroporous bioreactors with limited conversion to hydroxyapatite (7% HA/CC) were pre-loaded with and without 250 μg hTGF-β3 and implanted in the rectus abdominis of 3 non-human primates Papio ursinus euthanized on day 60. To investigate the required dose of hNoggin, a BMPs antagonist that controls the induction of bone formation, 7% HA/CC were pre-loaded with 150 μg hNoggin, with 125 μg hTGF-β3/150 μg hNoggin, with or without 125 μg hTGF-β3 and implanted in the r. abdominis of 3 additional animals euthanized on day 90. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) evaluated the expression' profile of BMP-2, BMP-3, BMP-4, BMP-6, BMP-7 and TGF-β1, -β2, and -β3 in tissue generating bioreactors as well as in the adjacent r. abdominis muscle. On day 60, 250 μg hTGF-β3 induced bone formation at the periphery of the implanted bioreactors only. On day 90, 125 μg hTGF-β3/treated bioreactors showed the induction of bone formation throughout the macroporous spaces. Untreated bioreactors induced bone, 4.11% vs. 2.00% on days 60 and 90, respectively. In hTGF-β3/treated bioreactors, BMP-2 and BMP-3 were up-regulated at both time periods, both in the homogenized constructs and in the adjacent r. abdominis muscle whilst BMP-4 in the homogenized construct only. In untreated 7% HA/CC constructs, BMP-2 was up-regulated in the macroporous construct only. On day 60, 250 μg hTGF-β3/treated and untreated macroporous constructs showed up-regulation of TGF-β1 with a six fold increase vs. TGF-β1 expression in adjacent muscle of untreated constructs. TGF-β2 was down regulated in both untreated and 250 μg hTGF-β3/treated bioreactors. On day 60, 250 μg hTGF-β3/treated bioreactors showed TGF-β3 expression in untreated, treated and adjacent muscle tissues. On day 90, BMP-2 was up

  18. Homeolog-specific targeted mutagenesis in Xenopus laevis using TALENs.

    PubMed

    Nakade, Shota; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Sakane, Yuto; Hara, Yoshihiro; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Obara, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have previously been used for targeted genome editing in various organisms including Xenopus laevis. However, because of genomic polyploidization, X. laevis usually possess homeologous genes (homeologs) with quite similar sequences that make the analysis of gene function difficult. In the present study, we show methodological examples of targeted gene modification of X. laevis homeologs. The X. laevis cytoglobin gene (cygb) consists of two homeologs (xlcygba and xlcygbb), and molecular phylogenetic analysis suggested that they have potentially different functions. Thus, there is a need to establish a method of homeolog-specific gene disruption to clarify gene functions in detail. Here, we show successful examples of homeolog-specific and simultaneous gene disruption for xlcygba and xlcygbb. We found that selective digestion can be performed with at least three mismatches in TALEN target sites in both homeologs. This report paves the way for the functional analyses of X. laevis homeologs, even those containing nearly identical sequences.

  19. Cartilage morphogenetic proteins: role in joint development, homoeostasis, and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reddi, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Articular cartilage homoeostasis is critical for joint function. The steady state homoeostasis of articular cartilage is a balance between anabolic morphogens such as cartilage derived morphogenetic proteins (CDMPs) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) of the BMP family and catabolic cytokines such as interleukin (IL)1, IL17, and tumour necrosis factor α. Although bone and articular cartilage are adjacent tissues, there is a profound difference in their regeneration potential. Bone has the highest potential for regeneration. On the other hand, articular cartilage is recalcitrant to repair. Objective: To examine the hypothesis that the feeble innate regeneration ability of cartilage is due to the preponderance of catabolic cytokines such as IL1 and IL17. Results: During a systematic investigation of CDMPs and cytokines IL17B (chondroleukin) was found in bovine articular cartilage. Discussion and conclusions: BMP-7 and IL17B are present in articular cartilage and synthesised in chondrocytes as shown by northern blots and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The coexistence of anabolic morphogens and catabolic cytokines in articular cartilage has important implications for cartilage homoeostasis and regeneration. The networks of signalling systems of morphogens and cytokines determine the net capacity for regenerative morphogenesis of articular cartilage. Finally, the feeble innate capacity for articular cartilage may be improved by targeted therapy by soluble receptors to block catabolic cytokines. PMID:14532155

  20. Live-cell Imaging and Quantitative Analysis of Embryonic Epithelial Cells in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sagar D.; Davidson, Lance A.

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic epithelial cells serve as an ideal model to study morphogenesis where multi-cellular tissues undergo changes in their geometry, such as changes in cell surface area and cell height, and where cells undergo mitosis and migrate. Furthermore, epithelial cells can also regulate morphogenetic movements in adjacent tissues1. A traditional method to study epithelial cells and tissues involve chemical fixation and histological methods to determine cell morphology or localization of particular proteins of interest. These approaches continue to be useful and provide "snapshots" of cell shapes and tissue architecture, however, much remains to be understood about how cells acquire specific shapes, how various proteins move or localize to specific positions, and what paths cells follow toward their final differentiated fate. High resolution live imaging complements traditional methods and also allows more direct investigation into the dynamic cellular processes involved in the formation, maintenance, and morphogenesis of multicellular epithelial sheets. Here we demonstrate experimental methods from the isolation of animal cap tissues from Xenopus laevis embryos to confocal imaging of epithelial cells and simple measurement approaches that together can augment molecular and cellular studies of epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:20498627

  1. Fine-tuned shuttles for bone morphogenetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Kristi A; Serpe, Mihaela

    2013-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are potent secreted signaling factors that trigger phosphorylation of Smad transcriptional regulators through receptor complex binding at the cell-surface. Resulting changes in target gene expression impact critical cellular responses during development and tissue homeostasis. BMP activity is tightly regulated in time and space by secreted modulators that control BMP extracellular distribution and availability for receptor binding. Such extracellular regulation is key for BMPs to function as morphogens and/or in the formation of morphogen activity gradients. Here, we review shuttling systems utilized to control the distribution of BMP ligands in tissue of various geometries, developing under different temporal constraints. We discuss the biological advantages for employing specific strategies for BMP shuttling and roles of varied ligand forms.

  2. Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling in development and human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Richard N.; Green, Jordan; Wang, Zhongliang; Deng, Youlin; Qiao, Min; Peabody, Michael; Zhang, Qian; Ye, Jixing; Yan, Zhengjian; Denduluri, Sahitya; Idowu, Olumuyiwa; Li, Melissa; Shen, Christine; Hu, Alan; Haydon, Rex C.; Kang, Richard; Mok, James; Lee, Michael J.; Luu, Hue L.; Shi, Lewis L.

    2014-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are a group of signaling molecules that belongs to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily of proteins. Initially discovered for their ability to induce bone formation, BMPs are now known to play crucial roles in all organ systems. BMPs are important in embryogenesis and development, and also in maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Mouse knockout models of various components of the BMP signaling pathway result in embryonic lethality or marked defects, highlighting the essential functions of BMPs. In this review, we first outline the basic aspects of BMP signaling and then focus on genetically manipulated mouse knockout models that have helped elucidate the role of BMPs in development. A significant portion of this review is devoted to the prominent human pathologies associated with dysregulated BMP signaling. PMID:25401122

  3. Xenopus laevis and Emerging Amphibian Pathogens in Chile.

    PubMed

    Soto-Azat, Claudio; Peñafiel-Ricaurte, Alexandra; Price, Stephen J; Sallaberry-Pincheira, Nicole; García, María Pía; Alvarado-Rybak, Mario; Cunningham, Andrew A

    2016-12-01

    Amphibians face an extinction crisis with no precedence. Two emerging infectious diseases, ranaviral disease caused by viruses within the genus Ranavirus and chytridiomycosis due to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), have been linked with amphibian mass mortalities and population declines in many regions of the globe. The African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) has been indicated as a vector for the spread of these pathogens. Since the 1970s, this species has been invasive in central Chile. We collected X. laevis and dead native amphibians in Chile between 2011 and 2013. We conducted post-mortem examinations and molecular tests for Ranavirus and Bd. Eight of 187 individuals (4.3 %) tested positive for Ranavirus: seven X. laevis and a giant Chilean frog (Calyptocephallela gayi). All positive cases were from the original area of X. laevis invasion. Bd was found to be more prevalent (14.4 %) and widespread than Ranavirus, and all X. laevis Bd-positive animals presented low to moderate levels of infection. Sequencing of a partial Ranavirus gene revealed 100 % sequence identity with Frog Virus 3. This is the first report of Ranavirus in Chile, and these preliminary results are consistent with a role for X. laevis as an infection reservoir for both Ranavirus and Bd.

  4. α1-adrenergic receptor signaling in osteoblasts regulates clock genes and bone morphogenetic protein 4 expression through up-regulation of the transcriptional factor nuclear factor IL-3 (Nfil3)/E4 promoter-binding protein 4 (E4BP4).

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Tanaka, Kenjiro; Togari, Akifumi

    2014-06-13

    Several studies have demonstrated that the α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) plays an important role in regulating cell growth and function in osteoblasts. However, the physiological role of α1-AR signaling in bone metabolism is largely unknown. In this study, the stimulation of phenylephrine (PHE), a nonspecific α1-AR agonist, increased the transcriptional factor Nfil3/E4BP4 and led to the rhythmic expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. We also showed that Bmp4 mRNA expression peaked in bone near zeitgeber time 8 in a 24-h rhythm. Furthermore, the expression of Nfil3 and Bmp4 displayed a circadian pattern with opposing phases, which suggested that Nfil3 repressed the expression of the Bmp4 gene during a circadian cycle. On a molecular level, both loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments demonstrated that Nfil3/E4BP4 negatively regulated Bmp4 expression in osteoblasts. Furthermore, the systemic administration of PHE increased the expression of Nfil3 mRNA in bone, whereas it decreased that of Bmp4 mRNA. The expression of Bmp4 mRNA was decreased significantly by exposure to PHE, and this was concomitant with the increase in Nfil3 binding to the D-box-containing Bmp4 promoter region in MC3T3-E1 cells, which indicates that the expression of Nfil3 by α1-AR signaling can bind directly to the Bmp4 promoter and inhibit Bmp4 expression in osteoblasts. Our results suggest that α1-AR signaling regulates clock genes and Bmp4 expression in osteoblasts. Moreover, α1-AR signaling negatively regulated Bmp4 expression by up-regulating the transcriptional factor Nfil3/E4BP4 in osteoblasts.

  5. Genes for Xenopus laevis U3 small nuclear RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Savino, R; Hitti, Y; Gerbi, S A

    1992-01-01

    Genomic Southern blots showed there are only 14 to 20 copies of U3 snRNA genes per somatic genome in Xenopus laevis, unlike the highly repetitive, tandem arrangement of other snRNA genes in this organism. Sequencing of two U3 snRNA genes from lambda clones of a genomic library revealed striking similarity upstream, but much more divergence downstream. Consensus motifs common to other U snRNA genes were also found: a distal sequence element (DSE, octamer motif at -222 to -215), a proximal sequence element (PSE, at -62 to -52) and a 3' Box (15 or 16 bp downstream of the U3 genes). The DSE of mammals also has an inverted CCAAT motif specific for U3 snRNA genes, and we find this is conserved in the amphibian U3 snRNA genes. The Xenopus inverted CCAAT motif is exactly one helical turn further upstream of the octamer motif than its mammalian counterpart, suggesting interaction of putative transcription factors bound to these motifs. Mutation of the inverted CCAAT motif and part of an adjacent Sp1 site greatly depresses transcription of the mutant U3 snRNA gene in Xenopus oocytes, implying a role in transcriptional efficiency. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays implicate transcription factor binding to this region. Images PMID:1437561

  6. Xenopus laevis - A success story in biological research in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, E.

    A feature of sensory, neuronal and motor systems is the existence of a critical period during their development. Environmental modifications, in particular stimulus depri-vation, during this period of life affects development in a long-term manner. For gravity sensory systems, space flights offer the only opportunity for deprivation conditions. Studies in the amphibian Xenopus laevis presented the most complete picture. The presentation demonstrates the importance of Xenopus laevis as an ex-perimental model animal in the past and even for future research in Space. Studies are presented which range from fertilization in Space and anatomical studies during early development under weightlessness up to post-flight studies on the anatomy of the peripheral sense organ, the spinal motor activity and behavior. Gravity depriva-tion induces anatomical as well as behavioral and neurophysiological modifications, which are normalized either during flight (thickening of the blastocoel roof) or after reentry in 1g-conditions (swimming and reflex behavior, spinal motor activity). The physiological changes can be explained by mechanisms of physiological adaptation. However, the studies also revealed stages which were insensitive to gravity depriva-tion; they point to the existence of a critical period. Observations on morphological mal-formations are described which are reversible after termination of microgravity and which are linked to a depression of vestibular reflex behavior. They might be caused by a competition between dorsalization and ventralization inducing growth factors. This observation offers the possibility for a genetic approach in finding ba-sics for microgravity effects on the development of Xenopus, and in a general frame, on the development of vertebrates including men. At the present stage of research, it remains open whether adaptive processes during exposure to altered gravity or the existence of a critical period in vestibular development are responsible for

  7. Retinal regeneration in the Xenopus laevis tadpole: a new model system

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, M. Natalia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Retinal regeneration research holds potential for providing new avenues for the treatment of degenerative diseases of the retina. Various animal models have been used to study retinal regeneration over the years, providing insights into different aspects of this process. However the mechanisms that drive this important phenomenon remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we introduce and characterize a new model system for retinal regeneration research that uses the tadpole of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. Methods The neural retina was surgically removed from Xenopus laevis tadpoles at stages 51–54, and a heparin-coated bead soaked in fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) was introduced in the eyes to induce regeneration. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses as well as DiI tracing were performed to characterize the regenerate. A similar surgical approach but with concomitant removal of the anterior portion of the eye was used to assess the capacity of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) to regenerate a retina. Immunohistochemistry for FGF receptors 1 and 2 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (pERK) was performed to start elucidating the intracellular mechanisms involved in this process. The role of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was confirmed through a pharmacological approach using the MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126. Results We observed that Xenopus laevis tadpoles were able to regenerate a neural retina upon induction with FGF-2 in vivo. The regenerated tissue has the characteristics of a differentiated retina, as assessed by the presence and distribution of different retinal cell markers, and DiI tracing indicated that it is able to form an optic nerve. We also showed that retinal regeneration in this system could take place independently of the presence of the anterior eye tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that FGF-2 treatment induces ERK phosphorylation in the

  8. Arrested development in Xenopus laevis tadpoles: how size constrains metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Rot-Nikcevic, Irena; Wassersug, Richard J

    2004-05-01

    Xenopus laevis tadpoles that arrest development and remain as larvae for several years sometimes occur spontaneously in laboratory populations. These tadpoles cease development at an early hindlimb stage, but continue to grow and develop into grossly deformed giants. Giant tadpoles lack thyroid glands, and differ in morphology and behaviour from normal larvae. They are negatively buoyant, typically with small and partially solidified lungs, and have greatly enlarged fat bodies. Giant tadpoles have mature gonads with eggs and sperm, whereas normal tadpoles of the same stage have undifferentiated gonads. Larval reproduction has never been reported in anurans, but gonadal development decoupled from metamorphosis brings these giants the closest of any anurans to being truly neotenic. We discuss behavioural and morphological factors that may hinder both reproduction in giant Xenopus larvae and the evolution of neoteny in anurans in general. Experimental treatment with exogenous thyroid hormone induces some, but not complete, metamorphic changes in these giants. The limbs and head progress through metamorphosis; however, all tadpoles die at the stage when the tail would normally be resorbed. The disproportionate growth of tissues and organs in giant tadpoles may preclude complete metamorphosis, even under exogenous thyroid hormone induction.

  9. Protein pattern of Xenopus laevis embryos grown in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Gabriella; Pagliato, Lara; Negroni, Manuela; Montorfano, Gigliola; Corsetto, Paola; Nonnis, Simona; Negri, Armando; Rizzo, Angela Maria

    2011-03-01

    Numerous studies indicate that microgravity affects cell growth and differentiation in many living organisms, and various processes are modified when cells are placed under conditions of weightlessness. However, until now, there is no coherent explanation for these observations, and little information is available concerning the biomolecules involved. Our aim has been to investigate the protein pattern of Xenopus laevis embryos exposed to simulated microgravity during the first 6 days of development. A proteomic approach was applied to compare the protein profiles of Xenopus embryos developed in simulated microgravity and in normal conditions. Attention was focused on embryos that do not present visible malformations in order to investigate if weightlessness has effects at protein level in the absence of macroscopic alterations. The data presented strongly suggest that some of the major components of the cytoskeleton vary in such conditions. Three major findings are described for the first time: (i) the expression of important factors involved in the organization and stabilization of the cytoskeleton, such as Arp (actin-related protein) 3 and stathmin, is heavily affected by microgravity; (ii) the amount of the two major cytoskeletal proteins, actin and tubulin, do not change in such conditions; however, (iii) an increase in the tyrosine nitration of these two proteins can be detected. The data suggest that, in the absence of morphological alterations, simulated microgravity affects the intracellular movement system of cells by altering cytoskeletal proteins heavily involved in the regulation of cytoskeleton remodelling.

  10. E2F and its developmental regulation in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Philpott, A; Friend, S H

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factor E2F has been implicated in cell cycle control by virtue of its association with cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases, and pRb-related tumor suppressor gene products. Eggs and embryos from the frog Xenopus laevis have been used to investigate the characteristics of E2F-like molecules in the Xenopus cell cycle and throughout early development. We find multiple E2F species in Xenopus eggs, at least one of which is modified by phosphorylation. The vast majority of E2F remains in the free form throughout the very early embryonic cell cycle, and it also remains predominantly free until some time after the mid-blastula transition, the onset of zygotic transcription. At this time, E2F complexes significantly to pRb but not to cdk2, although cdk2 binding is found in tissue culture cells from a very advanced stage in embryogenesis. This suggests that the complexing of E2F to cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases, and tumor suppressor gene products may be controlled separately in early Xenopus development. Thus, the association of E2F with other molecules may not result solely from processes affecting cell cycle progression but may also reflect developmental and differentiation cues. Images PMID:8007993

  11. Xenopus laevis a success story of biological research in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Eberhard R.

    2006-01-01

    The clawed toad Xenopus laevis is a common experimental animal used in many disciplines of life sciences, such as integrative, developmental and molecular biology or experimental medicine. Since 30 years, Xenopus is used in biological research in space. Important milestones were the years 1975, when Xenopus embryos flew for the first time on the Russian space station Salut-4 and 1994, when Xenopus eggs were successfully fertilized for the first time in space during the Japanese Spacelab mission STS-47 and developed in microgravity to vital tadpoles. Most Xenopus studies were related to embryogenesis and development. Observations during and after altered gravity revealed changes such as the thickening of the blastocoel roof, the dorsalization of the tail, and modifications of vestibular reflexes, fictive and freely swimming. Many changes were reversible even during microgravity exposure. Studies about the vestibuloocular reflex or synapse formation revealed an age-related sensitivity to altered gravity. Xenopus offers useful tools for studies about microgravity effects on living systems. Its oocyte is a suitable model to study ion channel function in space; the dorsalization model can be used to analyse growth factor sensibilities. Hardware for life support of adults, tadpoles and embryos (cf. SUPPLY unit in combination with miniaquaria) as well as for controlled experiments in space are prerequisites for an extension of research with Xenopus. The application aspect is based on the fact that fundamental research per se brings benefit to man.

  12. Bone morphogenetic proteins in multiple sclerosis: Role in neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Eixarch, Herena; Calvo-Barreiro, Laura; Montalban, Xavier; Espejo, Carmen

    2017-02-27

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors that represent the largest subgroup of signalling ligands of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily. Their participation in the proliferation, survival and cell fate of several cell types and their involvement in many pathological conditions are now well known. BMP expression is altered in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, suggesting that BMPs have a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. MS is a demyelinating and neurodegenerative autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). MS is a complex pathological condition in which genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors converge, although its aetiology remains elusive. Multifunctional molecules, such as BMPs, are extremely interesting in the field of MS because they are involved in the regulation of several adult tissues, including the CNS and the immune system. In this review, we discuss the extensive data available regarding the role of BMP signalling in neuronal progenitor/stem cell fate and focus on the participation and expression of BMPs in CNS demyelination. Additionally, we provide an overview of the involvement of BMPs as modulators of the immune system, as this subject has not been thoroughly explored even though it is of great interest in autoimmune disorders. Moreover, we describe the data on BMP signalling in autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases, including MS and its experimental models. Thus, we aim to provide an integrated view of the putative role of BMPs in MS pathogenesis and to open the field for the further development of alternative therapeutic strategies for MS patients.

  13. Novel approaches to bone grafting: porosity, bone morphogenetic proteins, stem cells, and the periosteum.

    PubMed

    Petrochenko, Peter; Narayan, Roger J

    2010-01-01

    The disadvantages involving the use of a patient's own bone as graft material have led surgeons to search for alternative materials. In this review, several characteristics of a successful bone graft material are discussed. In addition, novel synthetic materials and natural bone graft materials are being considered. Various factors can determine the success of a bone graft substitute. For example, design considerations such as porosity, pore shape, and interconnection play significant roles in determining graft performance. The effective delivery of bone morphogenetic proteins and the ability to restore vascularization also play significant roles in determining the success of a bone graft material. Among current approaches, shorter bone morphogenetic protein sequences, more efficient delivery methods, and periosteal graft supplements have shown significant promise for use in autograft substitutes or autograft extenders.

  14. Morphogenetic and Regulatory Mechanisms During Developmental Chondrogenesis: New Paradigms for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Lluís; zur Nieden, Nicole I.

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage is the first skeletal tissue to be formed during embryogenesis leading to the creation of all mature cartilages and bones, with the exception of the flat bones in the skull. Therefore, errors occurring during the process of chondrogenesis, the formation of cartilage, often lead to severe skeletal malformations such as dysplasias. There are hundreds of skeletal dysplasias, and the molecular genetic etiology of some remains more elusive than of others. Many efforts have aimed at understanding the morphogenetic event of chondrogenesis in normal individuals, of which the main morphogenetic and regulatory mechanisms will be reviewed here. For instance, many signaling molecules that guide chondrogenesis—for example, transforming growth factor-β, bone morphogenetic proteins, fibroblast growth factors, and Wnts, as well as transcriptional regulators such as the Sox family—have already been identified. Moreover, extracellular matrix components also play an important role in this developmental event, as evidenced by the promotion of the chondrogenic potential of chondroprogenitor cells caused by collagen II and proteoglycans like versican. The growing evidence of the elements that control chondrogenesis and the increasing number of different sources of progenitor cells will, hopefully, help to create tissue engineering platforms that could overcome many developmental or degenerative diseases associated with cartilage defects. PMID:19063663

  15. Dehydration triggers differential microRNA expression in Xenopus laevis brain.

    PubMed

    Luu, Bryan E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-11-15

    African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis, although primarily aquatic, have a high tolerance for dehydration, being capable of withstanding the loss of up to 32-35% of total water body water. Recent studies have shown that microRNAs play a role in the response to dehydration by the liver, kidney and ventral skin of X. laevis. MicroRNAs act by modulating the expression of mRNA transcripts, thereby affecting diverse biochemical pathways. In this study, 43 microRNAs were assessed in frog brains comparing control and dehydrated (31.2±0.83% of total body water lost) conditions. MicroRNAs of interest were measured using a modified protocol which employs polyadenylation of microRNAs prior to reverse transcription and qPCR. Twelve microRNAs that showed a significant decrease in expression (to 41-77% of control levels) in brains from dehydrated frogs (xla-miR-15a, -150, -181a, -191, -211, -218, -219b, -30c, -30e, -31, -34a, and -34b) were identified. Genomic analysis showed that the sequences of these dehydration-responsive microRNAs were highly conserved as compared with the comparable microRNAs of mice (91-100%). Suppression of these microRNAs implies that translation of the mRNA transcripts under their control could be enhanced in response to dehydration. Bioinformatic analysis using the DIANA miRPath program (v.2.0) predicted the top two KEGG pathways that these microRNAs collectively regulate: 1. Axon guidance, and 2. Long-term potentiation. Previous studies indicated that suppression of these microRNAs promotes neuroprotective pathways by increasing the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and activating anti-apoptotic pathways. This suggests that similar actions may be triggered in X. laevis brains as a protective response to dehydration.

  16. Maternal transfer of antibodies to eggs in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Poorten, Thomas J; Kuhn, Raymond E

    2009-02-01

    The immune system of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, includes nearly the full repertoire of lymphoid organs and immune cell types found in mammals. In contrast to the mammalian immune system, the development of the amphibian immune system occurs in the open environment. Oviparity necessitates a rapid ontogeny of the immune system. X. laevis larvae become immunocompetent about 2 weeks after fertilization of the egg. During this 2-week window, larvae cannot mount an adaptive immune response to potential pathogens and presumably must depend on innate responses. In the present study, the possibility of maternal transfer of antibodies to eggs was examined. Adult female X. laevis were injected three times at weekly intervals with the hapten-carrier complex, trinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (TNP-BSA). The sera of immunized frogs demonstrated antibody activity to BSA, TNP-BSA, and, importantly, trinitrophenylated ovalbumin (TNP-OVA) when examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Reactivity to TNP-OVA confirmed that antibodies were produced against TNP. The adult female frogs were induced to lay eggs by injection of human chorionic gonadotropin. Next, membrane-free extracts of the eggs were treated with protease inhibitors in order to prevent proteolysis of proteins found in the eggs. On analysis by ELISA, it was found that TNP-specific antibodies were present in the egg extracts. This demonstrated the transfer of antigen-specific antibodies from adult females to eggs in X. laevis.

  17. Protocadherin-9 involvement in retinal development in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Izuta, Yusuke; Taira, Tetsuro; Asayama, Ayako; Machigashira, Mika; Kinoshita, Tsutomu; Fujiwara, Miwako; Suzuki, Shintaro T

    2015-04-01

    Biological roles of most protocadherins (Pcdhs) are a largely unsolved problem. Therefore, we cloned cDNA for Xenopus laevis protocadherin-9 and characterized its properties to elucidate the role. The deduced amino acid sequence was highly homologous to those of mammalian protocadherin-9 s. X. laevis protocadherin-9 expressed from the cDNA in L cells showed basic properties similar to those of mammalian Pcdhs. Expression of X. laevis protocadherin-9 was first detected in stage-31 embryos and increased as the development proceeded. In the later stage embryos and the adults, the retina strongly expressed protocadherin-9, which was mainly localized at the plexiform layers. Injection of morpholino anti-sense oligonucleotide against protocadherin-9 into the fertilized eggs inhibited eye development; and eye growth and formation of the retinal laminar structure were hindered. Moreover, affected retina showed abnormal extension of neurites into the ganglion cell layer. Co-injection of protocadherin-9 mRNA with the morpholino anti-sense oligonucleotide rescued the embryos from the defects. These results suggest that X. laevis protocadherin-9 was involved in the development of retina structure possibly through survival of neurons, formation of the lamina structure and neurite localization.

  18. Composite transposable elements in the Xenopus laevis genome.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J E; Knutzon, D S; Carroll, D

    1989-01-01

    Members of two related families of transposable elements, Tx1 and Tx2, were isolated from the genome of Xenopus laevis and characterized. In both families, two versions of the elements were found. The smaller version in each family (Tx1d and Tx2d) consisted largely of two types of 400-base-pair tandem internal repeats. These elements had discrete ends and short inverted terminal repeats characteristic of mobile DNAs that are presumed to move via DNA intermediates, e.g., Drosophila P and maize Ac elements. The longer versions (Tx1c and Tx2c) differed from Tx1d and Tx2d by the presence of a 6.9-kilobase-pair internal segment that included two long open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 had one cysteine-plus-histidine-rich sequence of the type found in retroviral gag proteins. ORF2 showed more substantial homology to retroviral pol genes and particularly to the analogs of pol found in a subclass of mobile DNAs that are supposed retrotransposons, such as mammalian long interspersed repetitive sequences, Drosophila I factors, silkworm R1 elements, and trypanosome Ingi elements. Thus, the Tx1 elements present a paradox by exhibiting features of two classes of mobile DNAs that are thought to have very different modes of transposition. Two possible resolutions are considered: (i) the composite versions are actually made up of two independent elements, one of the retrotransposon class, which has a high degree of specificity for insertion into a target within the other, P-like element; and (ii) the composite elements are intact, autonomous mobile DNAs, in which the pol-like gene product collaborates with the terminal inverted repeats to cause transposition of the entire unit. Images PMID:2550791

  19. Thyroid endocrine disruption of azocyclotin to Xenopus laevis during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Cao, Chuyan; Li, Shuying; Gui, Wenjun; Zhu, Guonian

    2016-04-01

    Organotin compounds are ubiquitous contaminants that are frequently detected in the environment and in biota, which raises concern about their risk to wildlife and human health. In the present study, Nieuwkoop & Faber stage 51 Xenopus laevis tadpoles were exposed to different concentrations of azocyclotin (0, 0.02, 0.1 and 0.5μg/L) for 21 days, during which time the tadpoles underwent morphological development. Exposure to azocyclotin caused an inhibitory effect on the pre-metamorphic development of X. laevis (e.g., a shortened hind limb length). Azocyclotin induced an alteration of the triiodothyronine (T3) content, which indicated thyroid endocrine disruption. Real-time PCR was performed to examine the expression levels of the genes involved in the thyroid hormone (TH) signaling pathway. Significant down-regulation of the type 2 deiodinase gene was observed, which may be partially responsible for the decreased T3 concentrations. Furthermore, the expression of T3 responsive genes, including thyroid hormone receptor, basic transcription element binding protein, 2tromelysins-3 and matrix metalloproteinase 2, were down-regulated in tadpoles, suggesting that azocyclotin induced a decrease in the T3 contents and, in turn, affected the mRNA expression of downstream genes involved in multiple physiological responses. Chemical analysis showed that azocyclotin could accumulate in X. laevis after 21 days of exposure. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed that azocyclotin could alter the mRNA expression of genes involved in TH signaling as well as the thyroid hormone concentrations in X. laevis tadpoles, leading to endocrine disruption of thyroid system, and that azocyclotin had obvious inhibitory effects on X. laevis metamorphosis.

  20. Role of bone morphogenetic protein-7 in renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui Xi; Yiu, Wai Han; Tang, Sydney C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is final common pathway of end stage renal disease. Irrespective of the primary cause, renal fibrogenesis is a dynamic process which involves a large network of cellular and molecular interaction, including pro-inflammatory cell infiltration and activation, matrix-producing cell accumulation and activation, and secretion of profibrogenic factors that modulate extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and cell-cell interaction. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 is a protein of the TGF-β super family and increasingly regarded as a counteracting molecule against TGF-β. A large variety of evidence shows an anti-fibrotic role of BMP-7 in chronic kidney disease, and this effect is largely mediated via counterbalancing the profibrotic effect of TGF-β. Besides, BMP-7 reduced ECM formation by inactivating matrix-producing cells and promoting mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). BMP-7 also increased ECM degradation. Despite these observations, the anti-fibrotic effect of BMP-7 is still controversial such that fine regulation of BMP-7 expression in vivo might be a great challenge for its ultimate clinical application. PMID:25954203

  1. Regulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by ADP-ribosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yukihide; Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis; Maturi, Varun; Tsubakihara, Yutaro; Hottiger, Michael O.; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    We previously established a mechanism of negative regulation of transforming growth factor β signaling mediated by the nuclear ADP-ribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and the deribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), which dynamically regulate ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 and Smad4, two central signaling proteins of the pathway. Here we demonstrate that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway can also be regulated by the opposing actions of PARP1 and PARG. PARG positively contributes to BMP signaling and forms physical complexes with Smad5 and Smad4. The positive role PARG plays during BMP signaling can be neutralized by PARP1, as demonstrated by experiments where PARG and PARP1 are simultaneously silenced. In contrast to PARG, ectopic expression of PARP1 suppresses BMP signaling, whereas silencing of endogenous PARP1 enhances signaling and BMP-induced differentiation. The two major Smad proteins of the BMP pathway, Smad1 and Smad5, interact with PARP1 and can be ADP-ribosylated in vitro, whereas PARG causes deribosylation. The overall outcome of this mode of regulation of BMP signal transduction provides a fine-tuning mechanism based on the two major enzymes that control cellular ADP-ribosylation. PMID:27129221

  2. Promotion of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by Tetraspanins and Glycosphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Lindsey C.; Aydin, Taner; Yun, Sijung; Constas, Katharine; Schaeffer, Arielle; Ranjan, Sinthu; Kubba, Saad; Alam, Emad; McMahon, Devin E.; He, Jingpeng; Shwartz, Neta; Tian, Chenxi; Plavskin, Yevgeniy; Lindy, Amanda; Dad, Nimra Amir; Sheth, Sunny; Amin, Nirav M.; Zimmerman, Stephanie; Liu, Dennis; Schwarz, Erich M.; Smith, Harold; Krause, Michael W.; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) belong to the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of secreted molecules. BMPs play essential roles in multiple developmental and homeostatic processes in metazoans. Malfunction of the BMP pathway can cause a variety of diseases in humans, including cancer, skeletal disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Identification of factors that ensure proper spatiotemporal control of BMP signaling is critical for understanding how this pathway is regulated. We have used a unique and sensitive genetic screen to identify the plasma membrane-localized tetraspanin TSP-21 as a key new factor in the C. elegans BMP-like “Sma/Mab” signaling pathway that controls body size and postembryonic M lineage development. We showed that TSP-21 acts in the signal-receiving cells and genetically functions at the ligand-receptor level. We further showed that TSP-21 can associate with itself and with two additional tetraspanins, TSP-12 and TSP-14, which also promote Sma/Mab signaling. TSP-12 and TSP-14 can also associate with SMA-6, the type I receptor of the Sma/Mab pathway. Finally, we found that glycosphingolipids, major components of the tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, are required for Sma/Mab signaling. Our findings suggest that the tetraspanin-enriched membrane microdomains are important for proper BMP signaling. As tetraspanins have emerged as diagnostic and prognostic markers for tumor progression, and TSP-21, TSP-12 and TSP-14 are all conserved in humans, we speculate that abnormal BMP signaling due to altered expression or function of certain tetraspanins may be a contributing factor to cancer development. PMID:25978409

  3. Morphogenetic action through flux-limited spreading.

    PubMed

    Verbeni, M; Sánchez, O; Mollica, E; Siegl-Cachedenier, I; Carleton, A; Guerrero, I; Ruiz i Altaba, A; Soler, J

    2013-12-01

    A central question in biology is how secreted morphogens act to induce different cellular responses within a group of cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Modeling morphogenetic output in multicellular systems has so far employed linear diffusion, which is the normal type of diffusion associated with Brownian processes. However, there is evidence that at least some morphogens, such as Hedgehog (Hh) molecules, may not freely diffuse. Moreover, the mathematical analysis of such models necessarily implies unrealistic instantaneous spreading of morphogen molecules, which are derived from the assumptions of Brownian motion in its continuous formulation. A strict mathematical model considering Fick's diffusion law predicts morphogen exposure of the whole tissue at the same time. Such a strict model thus does not describe true biological patterns, even if similar and attractive patterns appear as results of applying such simple model. To eliminate non-biological behaviors from diffusion models we introduce flux-limited spreading (FLS), which implies a restricted velocity for morphogen propagation and a nonlinear mechanism of transport. Using FLS and focusing on intercellular Hh-Gli signaling, we model a morphogen gradient and highlight the propagation velocity of morphogen particles as a new key biological parameter. This model is then applied to the formation and action of the Sonic Hh (Shh) gradient in the vertebrate embryonic neural tube using our experimental data on Hh spreading in heterologous systems together with published data. Unlike linear diffusion models, FLS modeling predicts concentration fronts and the evolution of gradient dynamics and responses over time. In addition to spreading restrictions by extracellular binding partners, we suggest that the constraints imposed by direct bridges of information transfer such as nanotubes or cytonemes underlie FLS. Indeed, we detect and measure morphogen particle velocity in such cell extensions in different

  4. Morphogenetic action through flux-limited spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeni, M.; Sánchez, O.; Mollica, E.; Siegl-Cachedenier, I.; Carleton, A.; Guerrero, I.; Ruiz i Altaba, A.; Soler, J.

    2013-12-01

    A central question in biology is how secreted morphogens act to induce different cellular responses within a group of cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Modeling morphogenetic output in multicellular systems has so far employed linear diffusion, which is the normal type of diffusion associated with Brownian processes. However, there is evidence that at least some morphogens, such as Hedgehog (Hh) molecules, may not freely diffuse. Moreover, the mathematical analysis of such models necessarily implies unrealistic instantaneous spreading of morphogen molecules, which are derived from the assumptions of Brownian motion in its continuous formulation. A strict mathematical model considering Fick's diffusion law predicts morphogen exposure of the whole tissue at the same time. Such a strict model thus does not describe true biological patterns, even if similar and attractive patterns appear as results of applying such simple model. To eliminate non-biological behaviors from diffusion models we introduce flux-limited spreading (FLS), which implies a restricted velocity for morphogen propagation and a nonlinear mechanism of transport. Using FLS and focusing on intercellular Hh-Gli signaling, we model a morphogen gradient and highlight the propagation velocity of morphogen particles as a new key biological parameter. This model is then applied to the formation and action of the Sonic Hh (Shh) gradient in the vertebrate embryonic neural tube using our experimental data on Hh spreading in heterologous systems together with published data. Unlike linear diffusion models, FLS modeling predicts concentration fronts and the evolution of gradient dynamics and responses over time. In addition to spreading restrictions by extracellular binding partners, we suggest that the constraints imposed by direct bridges of information transfer such as nanotubes or cytonemes underlie FLS. Indeed, we detect and measure morphogen particle velocity in such cell extensions in different

  5. FoxO genes are dispensable during gastrulation but required for late embryogenesis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Schuff, Maximilian; Siegel, Doreen; Bardine, Nabila; Oswald, Franz; Donow, Cornelia; Knöchel, Walter

    2010-01-15

    Forkhead box (Fox) transcription factors of subclass O are involved in cell survival, proliferation, apoptosis, cell metabolism and prevention of oxidative stress. FoxO genes are highly conserved throughout evolution and their functions were analyzed in several vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. We here report on the identification of FoxO4 and FoxO6 genes in Xenopus laevis and analyze their expression patterns in comparison with the previously described FoxO1 and FoxO3 genes. We demonstrate significant differences in their temporal and spatial expression during embryogenesis and in their relative expression within adult tissues. Overexpression of FoxO1, FoxO4 or FoxO6 results in severe gastrulation defects, while overexpression of FoxO3 reveals this defect only in a constitutively active form containing mutations of Akt-1 target sites. Injections of FoxO antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) did not influence gastrulation, but, later onwards, the embryos showed a delay of development, severe body axis reduction and, finally, a high rate of lethality. Injection of FoxO4MO leads to specific defects in eye formation, neural crest migration and heart development, the latter being accompanied by loss of myocardin expression. Our observations suggest that FoxO genes in X. laevis are dispensable until blastopore closure but are required for tissue differentiation and organogenesis.

  6. A novel gene, Ami is expressed in vascular tissue in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Inui, Masafumi; Asashima, Makoto

    2006-08-01

    We report the isolation and expression pattern of a novel gene, Ami in Xenopus laevis. Ami was initially isolated as a highly expressed gene in cardiovascular tissues. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ami was most closely similar to human complement factor D and mouse adipsin in mammals. In adult Xenopus tissues, the transcript of Ami was detected in liver, fat body, lung, gut, vessel, heart, muscle, testis, and ovary, but expression in blood cells or skin was hardly detected. This expression profile was significantly different from that observed for mammalian homologues. Ami transcripts in Xenopus laevis were expressed from the late neurula stage, remained constant until the tadpole stage. The mRNA localized to paraxial regions at the neurula stage and anterior ventral regions at the tailbud stage. From the late tailbud to tadpole stage, expression was detected along the forming blood vessels, including the anterior cardinal veins, posterior cardinal veins, intersomitic veins, dorsal longitudinal anastomosing vessel, dorsal aorta, pronephric sinus, and most prominently around the vascular vitelline network. The expression around the vascular vitelline network demonstrated left-right asymmetry in stage 42 embryo. Comparison with the endothelium marker, Xmsr, suggested that Ami is expressed in endothelial cells.

  7. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (bmp2) and krüppel-like factor 9 (klf9) cross-regulation in uterine stromal cells promotes timing of uterine endometrial receptivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our laboratory has identified a novel progesterone receptor (PGR) co-activator protein, designated Krüppel-like Factor 9 (KLF9), whose absence in mice is associated with subfertility with decreased number of implanting embryos due to altered patterns of proliferation, apoptosis and aberrant P-respon...

  8. A developmental switch induced by thyroid hormone: Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Furlow, J David; Neff, Eric S

    2006-03-01

    Thyroid hormone induces the complete metamorphosis of anuran tadpoles into juvenile frogs. Arguably, anuran metamorphosis is the most dramatic effect of a hormone in any vertebrate. Recent advances in pharmacology and molecular biology have made the study of this remarkable process in the frog Xenopus laevis attractive to developmental biologists and endocrinologists alike. In particular, the availability of a straightforward transgenesis assay and the near completion of the Xenopus tropicalis genome are enabling significant advances to be made in our understanding of the major remaining problems of metamorphosis: the extraordinary tissue specificity of responses, the precise timing of morphological changes, the degree of cell autonomy of hormone responses and developmental competence. We argue that X. laevis metamorphosis presents an exciting opportunity for understanding the role of thyroid hormone in vertebrate development.

  9. Preparation of Xenopus laevis retinal cryosections for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tam, Beatrice M; Yang, Lee Ling; Bogėa, Tami H; Ross, Bradford; Martens, Garnet; Moritz, Orson L

    2015-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is the gold standard for examination of photoreceptor outer segment morphology and photoreceptor outer segment abnormalities in transgenic animal models of retinal disease. Small vertebrates such as zebrafish and Xenopus laevis tadpoles have been used to generate retinal disease models and to study outer segment processes such as protein trafficking, and their breeding capabilities facilitate experiments involving large numbers of animals and conditions. However, electron microscopy processing and analysis of these very small eyes can be challenging. Here we present a methodology that facilitates processing of X. laevis tadpole eyes for electron microscopy by introducing an intermediate cryosectioning step. This method reproducibly provides a well-oriented tissue block that can be sectioned with minimal effort by a non-expert, and also allows retroactive analysis of samples collected on slides for light microscopy.

  10. Genome evolution in the allotetraploid frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Session, Adam M; Uno, Yoshinobu; Kwon, Taejoon; Chapman, Jarrod A; Toyoda, Atsushi; Takahashi, Shuji; Fukui, Akimasa; Hikosaka, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kondo, Mariko; van Heeringen, Simon J; Quigley, Ian; Heinz, Sven; Ogino, Hajime; Ochi, Haruki; Hellsten, Uffe; Lyons, Jessica B; Simakov, Oleg; Putnam, Nicholas; Stites, Jonathan; Kuroki, Yoko; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Michiue, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Minoru; Bogdanovic, Ozren; Lister, Ryan; Georgiou, Georgios; Paranjpe, Sarita S; van Kruijsbergen, Ila; Shu, Shengquiang; Carlson, Joseph; Kinoshita, Tsutomu; Ohta, Yuko; Mawaribuchi, Shuuji; Jenkins, Jerry; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mitros, Therese; Mozaffari, Sahar V; Suzuki, Yutaka; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Yamamoto, Takamasa S; Takagi, Chiyo; Heald, Rebecca; Miller, Kelly; Haudenschild, Christian; Kitzman, Jacob; Nakayama, Takuya; Izutsu, Yumi; Robert, Jacques; Fortriede, Joshua; Burns, Kevin; Lotay, Vaneet; Karimi, Kamran; Yasuoka, Yuuri; Dichmann, Darwin S; Flajnik, Martin F; Houston, Douglas W; Shendure, Jay; DuPasquier, Louis; Vize, Peter D; Zorn, Aaron M; Ito, Michihiko; Marcotte, Edward M; Wallingford, John B; Ito, Yuzuru; Asashima, Makoto; Ueno, Naoto; Matsuda, Yoichi; Veenstra, Gert Jan C; Fujiyama, Asao; Harland, Richard M; Taira, Masanori; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2016-10-20

    To explore the origins and consequences of tetraploidy in the African clawed frog, we sequenced the Xenopus laevis genome and compared it to the related diploid X. tropicalis genome. We characterize the allotetraploid origin of X. laevis by partitioning its genome into two homoeologous subgenomes, marked by distinct families of 'fossil' transposable elements. On the basis of the activity of these elements and the age of hundreds of unitary pseudogenes, we estimate that the two diploid progenitor species diverged around 34 million years ago (Ma) and combined to form an allotetraploid around 17-18 Ma. More than 56% of all genes were retained in two homoeologous copies. Protein function, gene expression, and the amount of conserved flanking sequence all correlate with retention rates. The subgenomes have evolved asymmetrically, with one chromosome set more often preserving the ancestral state and the other experiencing more gene loss, deletion, rearrangement, and reduced gene expression.

  11. Quantitative proteomics of Xenopus laevis embryos: expression kinetics of nearly 4000 proteins during early development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liangliang; Bertke, Michelle M.; Champion, Matthew M.; Zhu, Guijie; Huber, Paul W.; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2014-03-01

    While there is a rich literature on transcription dynamics during the development of many organisms, protein data is limited. We used iTRAQ isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry to generate the largest developmental proteomic dataset for any animal. Expression dynamics of nearly 4,000 proteins of Xenopus laevis was generated from fertilized egg to neurula embryo. Expression clusters into groups. The cluster profiles accurately reflect the major events that mark changes in gene expression patterns during early Xenopus development. We observed decline in the expression of ten DNA replication factors after the midblastula transition (MBT), including a marked decline of the licensing factor XCdc6. Ectopic expression of XCdc6 leads to apoptosis; temporal changes in this protein are critical for proper development. Measurement of expression in single embryos provided no evidence for significant protein heterogeneity between embryos at the same stage of development.

  12. 'Immobile' (im), a recessive lethal mutation of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Droin, A; Beauchemin, M L

    1975-10-01

    'Immobile' (im) is a recessive lethal mutation discovered in the F3 of a Xenopus (Xenopus laevis laevis) originating from a mesodermal nucleus of a neurula transplanted into an enucleated egg. The im embryos do not contract after mechanical stimulation nor do they present any spontaneous contraction from the neurula stage onwards. Development proceeds normally during the first days after which deformation of the lower jaw and tail are observed. The im tadpoles die when normal controls are at the feeding stage. Nevous and muscular tissues are histologically normal in the mutant tadpoles; at advanced stages, however, an irregularity in the path of the myofibrils is observed which is especially conspicuous in the electron microscope. Cholinesterases and ATPase are present in the mutant muscles. Parabiosis and chimerae experiments have shown that parabionts and grafts behave according to their own genotype. Cultures of presumptive axial systems with or without ectoderm lead to the conclusion that, first of all, the abnormality is situated in the mesodermal cells and secondly that the first muscular contractions in normal Xenopus laevis are of myogenic origin. The banding pattern of the myofibrils is normal as was shown by obtaining contractions of glycerol extracted in myoblasts with ATP. It seems therefore that in this mutation, the abnormality is situated in the membraneous system of the muscular cell, sarcoplasmic reticulum and/or tubular system as is probably the case in the mdg mutation of the mouse.

  13. Twin Xenopus laevis embryos appearing from flattened eggs.

    PubMed

    Sato, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable progress has recently been made in molecular biology of double axis formation in Xenopus laevis. Leaving aside, for the time being, the problem of the gene expressions regulating Xenopus laevis development, here I show that pulse treatment could induce formation of a secondary axis in a fertilized Xenopus laevis egg. At 3 min after insemination, metal oxides were added to Xenopus fertilized eggs, and then twin embryos appeared. Zirconium oxide (ZrO2) was the most effective metal oxide for producing twin embryos. ZrO2 was added to the fertilized eggs, and 30 sec later, the eggs were dejellied with cysteine solution and washed within 7 min after insemination. The fertilized eggs began flattening at around 15 min after insemination. When the degree of flattening (the vertical length of the egg divided by the horizontal length) of the eggs at the 16- and 32-cell stages became less than 0.4 degrees, production of twin embryos occurred. Many flattened eggs at less than 0.4 degrees formed twin embryos. The third cleavage of eggs treated with metal oxides was meridional, while the normal third cleavage was horizontal.

  14. Uncovering Molecular Bases Underlying Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Alsamarah, Abdelaziz; LaCuran, Alecander E.; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Hao, Jijun; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal alteration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is implicated in many types of diseases including cancer and heterotopic ossifications. Hence, small molecules targeting BMP type I receptors (BMPRI) to interrupt BMP signaling are believed to be an effective approach to treat these diseases. However, lack of understanding of the molecular determinants responsible for the binding selectivity of current BMP inhibitors has been a big hindrance to the development of BMP inhibitors for clinical use. To address this issue, we carried out in silico experiments to test whether computational methods can reproduce and explain the high selectivity of a small molecule BMP inhibitor DMH1 on BMPRI kinase ALK2 vs. the closely related TGF-β type I receptor kinase ALK5 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase. We found that, while the rigid docking method used here gave nearly identical binding affinity scores among the three kinases; free energy perturbation coupled with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (FEP/H-REMD) simulations reproduced the absolute binding free energies in excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the binding poses identified by FEP/H-REMD led to a quantitative analysis of physical/chemical determinants governing DMH1 selectivity. The current work illustrates that small changes in the binding site residue type (e.g. pre-hinge region in ALK2 vs. ALK5) or side chain orientation (e.g. Tyr219 in caALK2 vs. wtALK2), as well as a subtle structural modification on the ligand (e.g. DMH1 vs. LDN193189) will cause distinct binding profiles and selectivity among BMP inhibitors. Therefore, the current computational approach represents a new way of investigating BMP inhibitors. Our results provide critical information for designing exclusively selective BMP inhibitors for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for diseases caused by aberrant BMP signaling. PMID:26133550

  15. Regulation of bone morphogenetic proteins in early embryonic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yukiyo; Oelgeschläger, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), a large subgroup of the TGF-β family of secreted growth factors, control fundamental events in early embryonic development, organogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. The plethora of dose-dependent cellular processes regulated by BMP signalling demand a tight regulation of BMP activity. Over the last decade, a number of proteins have been identified that bind BMPs in the extracellular space and regulate the interaction of BMPs with their cognate receptors, including the secreted BMP antagonist Chordin. In the early vertebrate embryo, the localized secretion of BMP antagonists from the dorsal blastopore lip establishes a functional BMP signalling gradient that is required for the determination of the dorsoventral or back to belly body axis. In particular, inhibition of BMP activity is essential for the formation of neural tissue in the development of vertebrate and invertebrate embryos. Here we review recent studies that have provided new insight into the regulation of BMP signalling in the extracellular space. In particular, we discuss the recently identified Twisted gastrulation protein that modulates, in concert with metalloproteinases of the Tolloid family, the interaction of Chordin with BMP and a family of proteins that share structural similarities with Chordin in the respective BMP binding domains. In addition, genetic and functional studies in zebrafish and frog provide compelling evidence that the secreted protein Sizzled functionally interacts with the Chd BMP pathway, despite being expressed ventrally in the early gastrula-stage embryo. These intriguing discoveries may have important implications, not only for our current concept of early embryonic patterning, but also for the regulation of BMP activity at later developmental stages and tissue homeostasis in the adult.

  16. Identification and characterization of Xenopus laevis homologs of mammalian TRAF6 and its binding protein TIFA.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Jun-Ichiro; Yagi, Shigenori; Ishikawa, Kosuke; Azuma, Sakura; Ikawa, Shuntaro; Semba, Kentaro

    2005-09-26

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) transduces signals from members of the TNFR superfamily and the Toll/IL-1R family, leading to activation of transcription factors such as NFkappaB and AP-1. Genetic disruption of the TRAF6 gene in mice results in various developmental abnormalities during embryogenesis, including osteopetrosis, failure of neural tube closure, defective formation of skin appendices, absence of lymph nodes, and absence of mature thymic epithelial cells. To clarify the effect of TRAF6 in development, we previously identified a TRAF-interacting protein with a forkhead-associated domain (TIFA), which binds and activates TRAF6 upon extracellular stimulation. To understand the physiological roles of TRAF6 and TIFA in early development, we studied these genes in Xenopus laevis. Here, we describe identification of X. laevis homologs of mammalian TRAF6 (XTRAF6) and TIFA (XTIFA). As was the case for the mammalian homologs, overexpression of XTRAF6 or XTIFA activated NFkappaB, whereas XTIFA carrying a mutation that abolishes XTRAF6 binding failed to activate NFkappaB, suggesting that XTIFA activates NFkappaB by binding to XTRAF6. XTIFA and XTRAF6 mRNAs were expressed at similar levels in zygotes from the neurula stage and then increased. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that XTRAF6 mRNA was expressed in the head region and neural tube during the neurula stage, and the expression expanded to the pharyngeal apparatus during the tailbud stage. This localization is consistent with the defective neural tube closure and abnormal thymus organogenesis observed in TRAF6-deficient mice. Our results suggest possible cooperation between XTRAF6 and XTIFA during embryogenesis.

  17. Tail structure is formed when blastocoel roof contacts blastocoel floor in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Akiha; Hashimoto, Chikara

    2014-04-01

    The tail organizer has been assessed by such transplantation methods as the Einsteck procedure. However, we found that simple wounding of blastocoel roof (BCR) made it possible to form secondary tails without any transplantation in Xenopus laevis. We revealed that the ectopic expression of Xbra was blocked by inhibiting the contact between BCR and blastocoel floor (BCF), and wounding per se seemed to be not directly related to the secondary tail formation. Therefore, the secondary tail might be induced by the contact between BCR and BCF due to the leak of blastocoel fluid from the wound. This secondary tail was similar to the original tail in the expression pattern of tail genes, and in the fact that the inhibition of fibroblast growth factor signaling prevented the secondary tail induction. Our results imply that the secondary tail formation reflects the developmental processes of the original tail, indicating that simple wounding of BCR is useful for the analysis of tail formation in normal development.

  18. A quantitative adverse outcome pathway model for thyroid axis disruption in Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of Xenopus laevis tadpoles is tightly controlled by the thyroid hormones tetraiodothyronine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Toxicity testing efforts have shown that several compounds interfere with development in X. laevis tadpoles by disrupting the thyroid axis a...

  19. Homoeologous chromosomes of Xenopus laevis are highly conserved after whole-genome duplication.

    PubMed

    Uno, Y; Nishida, C; Takagi, C; Ueno, N; Matsuda, Y

    2013-11-01

    It has been suggested that whole-genome duplication (WGD) occurred twice during the evolutionary process of vertebrates around 450 and 500 million years ago, which contributed to an increase in the genomic and phenotypic complexities of vertebrates. However, little is still known about the evolutionary process of homoeologous chromosomes after WGD because many duplicate genes have been lost. Therefore, Xenopus laevis (2n=36) and Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis (2n=20) are good animal models for studying the process of genomic and chromosomal reorganization after WGD because X. laevis is an allotetraploid species that resulted from WGD after the interspecific hybridization of diploid species closely related to X. tropicalis. We constructed a comparative cytogenetic map of X. laevis using 60 complimentary DNA clones that covered the entire chromosomal regions of 10 pairs of X. tropicalis chromosomes. We consequently identified all nine homoeologous chromosome groups of X. laevis. Hybridization signals on two pairs of X. laevis homoeologous chromosomes were detected for 50 of 60 (83%) genes, and the genetic linkage is highly conserved between X. tropicalis and X. laevis chromosomes except for one fusion and one inversion and also between X. laevis homoeologous chromosomes except for two inversions. These results indicate that the loss of duplicated genes and inter- and/or intrachromosomal rearrangements occurred much less frequently in this lineage, suggesting that these events were not essential for diploidization of the allotetraploid genome in X. laevis after WGD.

  20. Self-organizing potential and morphogenetic potential (comparing current embryological and Atlan's views).

    PubMed

    Bernier, R

    1986-01-01

    The concept of self-organizing potential proposed by Atlan, conceived within the framework of information theory, attempts to explain the emergence of the structures and functions of the organism, as well as the concept of morphogenetic potential, conceived in the embryological laboratories. Are the two theses diverging or converging and/or complementary to each other? The paper indicates, first, the context of Atlan's thesis and the meaning of his concepts of self-organization and self-organizing potential in evolutionary systems as well as in individual systems. It then develops an in-depth analysis of these individual systems and attempts to discern, in Atlan's thesis, the respective roles of the genetic factors (first at the initial stage of the system and then in the course of its development) and of the epigenetic factors in the formation of the individual, particularly during morphogenesis. This analysis reveals some difficulties inherent in the theory and induces the author to propose a few additional distinctions. Finally, the paper underlines the analogies and divergences between the concepts of self-organizing potential and morphogenetic potential.

  1. Distribution of two species of sea snakes, Aipysurus laevis and Emydocephalus annulatus, in the southern Great Barrier Reef: metapopulation dynamics, marine protected areas and conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukoschek, V.; Heatwole, H.; Grech, A.; Burns, G.; Marsh, H.

    2007-06-01

    Aipysurus laevis and Emydocephalus annulatus typically occur in spatially discrete populations, characteristic of metapopulations; however, little is known about the factors influencing the spatial and temporal stability of populations or whether specific conservation strategies, such as networks of marine protected areas, will ensure the persistence of species. Classification tree analyses of 35 years of distribution data (90 reefs, surveyed 1-11 times) in the southern Great Barrier Reef (GBR) revealed that longitude was a major factor determining the status of A. laevis on reefs (present = 38, absent = 38 and changed = 14). Reef exposure and reef area were also important; however, these factors did not specifically account for the population fluctuations and the recent local extinctions of A. laevis in this region. There were no relationships between the status of E. annulatus (present = 16, absent = 68 and changed = 6) and spatial or physical variables. Moreover, prior protection status of reefs did not account for the distribution of either species. Biotic factors, such as habitat and prey availability and the distribution of predators, which may account for the observed patterns of distribution, are discussed. The potential for inter-population exchange among sea snake populations is poorly understood, as is the degree of protection that will be afforded to sea snakes by the recently implemented network of No-take areas in the GBR. Data from this study provide a baseline for evaluating the responses of A. laevis and E. annulatus populations to changes in biotic factors and the degree of protection afforded on reefs within an ecosystem network of No-take marine protected areas in the southern GBR.

  2. Bacteriophage φC31 Integrase Mediated Transgenesis in Xenopus laevis for Protein Expression at Endogenous Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Bryan G.; Weeks, Daniel L.

    Bacteriophage φC31 inserts its genome into that of its host bacterium via the integrase enzyme which catalyzes recombination between a phage attachment site (attP) and a bacterial attachment site (attB). Integrase requires no accessory factors, has a high efficiency of recombination, and does not need perfect sequence fidelity for recognition and recombination between these attachment sites. These imperfect attachment sites, or pseudo-attachment sites, are present in many organisms and have been used to insert transgenes in a variety of species. Here we describe the φC31 integrase approach to make transgenic Xenopus laevis embryos.

  3. The EGF receptor and notch signaling pathways control the initiation of the morphogenetic furrow during Drosophila eye development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J P; Moses, K

    2001-07-01

    The onset of pattern formation in the developing Drosophila retina begins with the initiation of the morphogenetic furrow, the leading edge of a wave of retinal development that transforms a uniform epithelium, the eye imaginal disc into a near crystalline array of ommatidial elements. The initiation of this wave of morphogenesis is under the control of the secreted morphogens Hedgehog (Hh), Decapentaplegic (Dpp) and Wingless (Wg). We show that the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Notch signaling cascades are crucial components that are also required to initiate retinal development. We also show that the initiation of the morphogenetic furrow is the sum of two genetically separable processes: (1) the 'birth' of pattern formation at the posterior margin of the eye imaginal disc; and (2) the subsequent 'reincarnation' of retinal development across the epithelium.

  4. Toxicity of selenium to developing Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Browne, C L; Dumont, J N

    1979-07-01

    Se in the form of sodium selenite is toxic to Xenopus laevis embryos and tadpoles continuously exposed to concentrations above 1 ppm. Concentrations of 2 ppm and above result in severe developmental abnormalities and increased mortality. Uptake and loss of radioactive Se from water are rapid, but depuration is not complete indicating that some Se can remain bound by the organism. The facts that Se is toxic at low levels to Xenopus embryos and tadpoles, can cause developmental abnormalities, and accumulates in tissues suggest that increased release of Se compounds into the environment poses a potential threat to aquatic organisms.

  5. [Identification of a Novel Calcium (Ca^(2+))-Activated Chloride Channel Accessory Gene in Xenopus laevis].

    PubMed

    Lee, R M; Jeong, S M

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca^(2+))-activated chloride channel accessories (CLCAs) are putative anion channel-related proteins with diverse physiological functions. Exploring CLCA diversity is important for prediction of gene structure and function. In an effort to identify novel CLCA genes in Xenopus laevis, we successfully cloned and characterized a Xenopus laevis cDNA predicted to encode the xCLCA3 gene. Cloning of xCLCA3 was achieved by computational analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), and a tissue distribution analysis by semi-quantitative reverse transcription (RT) PCR or real-time PCR. We obtained a 2958 bp xCLCA3 cDNA sequence with an open reading frame encoding 943 amino acids. According to the primary structure analysis, xCLCA3 contains a predicted signal sequence, multiple sites of N-linked (N-) glycosylation, N-myristoylation, PKA, PKC, and casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, five putative hydrophobic segments, and the HExxH metalloprotease motif. Additionally, the transmembrane prediction server yielded a preserved N-terminal CLCA domain and a von Willebrand factor type A domain with one transmembrane domain in the C-terminal region. Expression analysis showed that xCLCA3 is expressed in a number of tissues, with strong expression in the brain, colon, small intestine, lung, kidney, and spleen, and poor expression in the heart and liver. These results suggest that xCLCA3 may be a candidate CLCA family member as well as a metalloprotease, rather than just an ion channel accessory protein.

  6. Tissue tectonics: morphogenetic strain rates, cell shape change and intercalation.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Guy B; Kabla, Alexandre J; Schultz, Nora L; Butler, Lucy C; Sanson, Benedicte; Gorfinkiel, Nicole; Mahadevan, L; Adams, Richard J

    2009-06-01

    The dynamic reshaping of tissues during morphogenesis results from a combination of individual cell behaviors and collective cell rearrangements. However, a comprehensive framework to unambiguously measure and link cell behavior to tissue morphogenesis is lacking. Here we introduce such a kinematic framework, bridging cell and tissue behaviors at an intermediate, mesoscopic, level of cell clusters or domains. By measuring domain deformation in terms of the relative motion of cell positions and the evolution of their shapes, we characterized the basic invariant quantities that measure fundamental classes of cell behavior, namely tensorial rates of cell shape change and cell intercalation. In doing so we introduce an explicit definition of cell intercalation as a continuous process. We mapped strain rates spatiotemporally in three models of tissue morphogenesis, gaining insight into morphogenetic mechanisms. Our quantitative approach has broad relevance for the precise characterization and comparison of morphogenetic phenotypes.

  7. Harmine promotes osteoblast differentiation through bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Takayuki; Lee, Ji-Won; Hibino, Ayaka; Asai, Midori; Hojo, Hironori; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Teruya, Toshiaki; Nagai, Kazuo; Chung, Ung-Il; Yagasaki, Kazumi; and others

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Harmine promotes the activity and mRNA expression of ALP. {yields} Harmine enhances the expressions of osteocalcin mRNA and protein. {yields} Harmine induces osteoblastic mineralization. {yields} Harmine upregulates the mRNA expressions of BMPs, Runx2 and Osterix. {yields} BMP signaling pathways are involved in the actions of harmine. -- Abstract: Bone mass is regulated by osteoblast-mediated bone formation and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. We previously reported that harmine, a {beta}-carboline alkaloid, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of harmine on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. Harmine promoted alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in MC3T3-E1 cells without affecting their proliferation. Harmine also increased the mRNA expressions of the osteoblast marker genes ALP and Osteocalcin. Furthermore, the mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells was enhanced by treatment with harmine. Harmine also induced osteoblast differentiation in primary calvarial osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 cells. Structure-activity relationship studies using harmine-related {beta}-carboline alkaloids revealed that the C3-C4 double bond and 7-hydroxy or 7-methoxy group of harmine were important for its osteogenic activity. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist noggin and its receptor kinase inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 attenuated harmine-promoted ALP activity. In addition, harmine increased the mRNA expressions of Bmp-2, Bmp-4, Bmp-6, Bmp-7 and its target gene Id1. Harmine also enhanced the mRNA expressions of Runx2 and Osterix, which are key transcription factors in osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, BMP-responsive and Runx2-responsive reporters were activated by harmine treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that harmine enhances osteoblast differentiation probably by inducing the expressions of

  8. Susceptibility of early life stages of Xenopus laevis to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Herkovits, J.; Perez-Coll, C.S.; Cardellini, P.; Pavanati, C.

    1997-02-01

    The susceptibility of Xenopus laevis to cadmium during different stages of development was evaluated by exposing embryos to cadmium concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 mg Cd{sup 2+}/L for 24, 48, and 72 h and assessing lethality and malformations. Susceptibility increased from the two blastomeres stage (stage 2) to stage 40, in which the 24-h LC100 was 1.13 mg Cd{sup 2+}/L, and resistance increased from this stage onward. Malformations occurred at all developmental stages evaluated, the most common being reduced size, incurvated axis, underdeveloped or abnormally developed fin, microcephaly, and microphtalmy. Scanning electron microscopy revealed changes in the ectodermal surface ranging from slightly vaulted cells to a severe reduction in the number of ciliated cells as the concentration of cadmium increased. The intraspecific variation evaluated in embryos (from four sets of parents) at seven developmental stages, expressed as the coefficient of variation of the LC100, ranged from 10 to 112% and reflects the capacity of Xenopus laevis to adapt to changing environmental conditions at different embryonic stages.

  9. Cutaneous acariasis in the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Ford, Timothy R; Dillehay, Dirck L; Mook, Deborah M

    2004-12-01

    Increased mortality was observed in a single colony of 50 Xenopus laevis. The frogs were used as oocyte donors in developmental biology studies. Necropsy findings included dermal erythema and petechiation consistent with red leg syndrome; dermal ulcerations and white, filamentous growths on the skin were consistent with Saprolegnia sp. Microscopic evaluation of the skin and fungus revealed an astigmatid mite similar to those of the genus Rhizoglyphus. The mite was also found in the water and the biological filter of the tanks housing the frogs. This mite is considered not to be a parasite of X. laevis; instead, it feeds off moss, fungi, and detritus. Subsequent evaluation of the sphagnum moss used for shipping the frogs from the supplier revealed the same mite in the moss. Our hypothesis is that the mite was introduced into the tank with the shipment of new frogs in sphagnum moss. The mites lived within the biological filter, and were only found after the growth of Saprolegnia sp. attracted the mites to the frogs. Laboratory animal care and veterinary personnel should consider non-pathogenic species of mites in the differential diagnosis of acariasis in Xenopus frogs.

  10. Mapping neurogenesis onset in the optic tectum of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Herrgen, Leah; Akerman, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells have a central role in the development and evolution of the vertebrate brain. During early brain development, neural progenitors first expand their numbers through repeated proliferative divisions and then begin to exhibit neurogenic divisions. The transparent and experimentally accessible optic tectum of Xenopus laevis is an excellent model system for the study of the cell biology of neurogenesis, but the precise spatial and temporal relationship between proliferative and neurogenic progenitors has not been explored in this system. Here we construct a spatial map of proliferative and neurogenic divisions through lineage tracing of individual progenitors and their progeny. We find a clear spatial separation of proliferative and neurogenic progenitors along the anterior-posterior axis of the optic tectum, with proliferative progenitors located more posteriorly and neurogenic progenitors located more anteriorly. Since individual progenitors are repositioned toward more anterior locations as they mature, this spatial separation likely reflects an increased restriction in the proliferative potential of individual progenitors. We then examined whether the transition from proliferative to neurogenic behavior correlates with cellular properties that have previously been implicated in regulating neurogenesis onset. Our data reveal that the transition from proliferation to neurogenesis is associated with a small change in cleavage plane orientation and a more pronounced change in cell cycle kinetics in a manner reminiscent of observations from mammalian systems. Our findings highlight the potential to use the optic tectum of Xenopus laevis as an accessible system for the study of the cell biology of neurogenesis. PMID:27358457

  11. Wnt antagonism initiates cardiogenesis in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Valerie A.; Mercola, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Heart induction in Xenopus occurs in paired regions of the dorsoanterior mesoderm in response to signals from the Spemann organizer and underlying dorsoanterior endoderm. These tissues together are sufficient to induce heart formation in noncardiogenic ventral marginal zone mesoderm. Similarly, in avians the underlying definitive endoderm induces cardiogenesis in precardiac mesoderm. Heart-inducing factors in amphibians are not known, and although certain BMPs and FGFs can mimic aspects of cardiogenesis in avians, neither can induce the full range of activities elicited by the inducing tissues. Here we report that the Wnt antagonists Dkk-1 and Crescent can induce heart formation in explants of ventral marginal zone mesoderm. Other Wnt antagonists, including the frizzled domain-containing proteins Frzb and Szl, lacked this activity. Unlike Wnt antagonism, inhibition of BMP signaling did not promote cardiogenesis. Ectopic expression of GSK3β, which inhibits β-catenin-mediated Wnt signaling, also induced cardiogenesis in ventral mesoderm. Analysis of Wnt proteins expressed during gastrulation revealed that Wnt3A and Wnt8, but not Wnt5A or Wnt11, inhibited endogenous heart induction. These results indicate that diffusion of Dkk-1 and Crescent from the organizer initiate cardiogenesis in adjacent mesoderm by establishing a zone of low Wnt3A and Wnt8 activity. PMID:11159911

  12. Embryonic Expression and Evolution of Duplicated E-Protein Genes in Xenopus Laevis: Parallels with Ancestral E-Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shain, D. H.; Neuman, T.; Zuber, M. X.

    1997-01-01

    E-proteins comprise a subfamily of helix-loop-helix transcription factors that have been identified in arthropods and several chordate taxa. In mammals, there are three classes of E-protein genes (E2A, E2-2, and HEB) that encode related, and often interchangeable, gene products. We have determined that the clawed frog Xenopus laevis contains twice the number of transcriptionally active E-protein genes when compared with other vertebrate species. Based upon genomic Southern blots and nucleotide sequence comparisons, it is likely that the additional X. laevis genes arose from tetraploidization. During embryogenesis, XE2A (homologue of mammalian E2A) transcripts were broadly expressed in anterior and posterior regions of the embryo while homologues of E2-2 (XE2.2) and HEB (XE1.2) appeared in vertebrate-specific structures including the pineal gland, olfactory bulb, and brachial arches. A phylogenetic analysis of these genes and other known metazoan E-proteins suggests that there were two periods of marked E-protein gene expansion; one that predated the radiation of vertebrates, and the other that coincided with Xenopus tetraploidization. Both of these periods were characterized by the rapid evolution of E2-2 and HEB-class genes, but not of E2A. We propose that the former genes acquired new or specialized roles during early chordate evolution and also more recently in Xenopus, as reflected by the stereotypic expression patterns of these genes during X. laevis development. PMID:9136023

  13. The daf-4 gene encodes a bone morphogenetic protein receptor controlling C. elegans dauer larva development.

    PubMed

    Estevez, M; Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Albert, P S; Massagué, J; Riddle, D L

    1993-10-14

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family is a conserved group of signalling molecules within the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily. This group, including the Drosophila decapentaplegic (dpp) protein and the mammalian BMPs, mediates cellular interactions and tissue differentiation during development. Here we show that a homologue of human BMPs controls a developmental switch in the life cycle of the free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Starvation and overcrowding induce C. elegans to form a developmentally arrested, third-stage dauer larva. The daf-4 gene, which acts to inhibit dauer larva formation and promote growth, encodes a receptor protein kinase similar to the daf-1, activin and TGF-beta receptor serine/threonine kinases. When expressed in monkey COS cells, the daf-4 receptor binds human BMP-2 and BMP-4. The daf-4 receptor is the first to be identified for any growth factor in the BMP family.

  14. Attenuation of bone morphogenetic protein signaling during amphibian limb development results in the generation of stage-specific defects

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tamsin E M; Day, Robert C; Beck, Caroline W

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate limb is one of the most intensively studied organs in the field of developmental biology. Limb development in tetrapod vertebrates is highly conserved and dependent on the interaction of several important molecular pathways. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling cascade is one of these pathways and has been shown to be crucial for several aspects of limb development. Here, we have used a Xenopus laevis transgenic line, in which expression of the inhibitor Noggin is under the control of the heat-shock promoter hsp70 to examine the effects of attenuation of BMP signaling at different stages of limb development. Remarkably different phenotypes were produced at different stages, illustrating the varied roles of BMP in development of the limb. Very early limb buds appeared to be refractory to the effects of BMP attenuation, developing normally in most cases. Ectopic limbs were produced by overexpression of Noggin corresponding to a brief window of limb development at about stage 49/50, as recently described by Christen et al. (2012). Attenuation of BMP signaling in stage 51 or 52 tadpoles lead to a reduction in the number of digits formed, resulting in hypodactyly or ectrodactyly, as well as occasional defects in the more proximal tibia-fibula. Finally, inhibition at stage 54 (paddle stage) led to the formation of dramatically shortened digits resulting from loss of distal phalanges. Transcriptome analysis has revealed the possibility that more Noggin-sensitive members of the BMP family could be involved in limb development than previously suspected. Our analysis demonstrates the usefulness of heat-shock-driven gene expression as an effective method for inhibiting a developmental pathway at different times during limb development. PMID:23981117

  15. Spiral Calcium Wave Propagation and Annihilation in Xenopus laevis Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechleiter, James; Girard, Steven; Peralta, Ernest; Clapham, David

    1991-04-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger. Information is encoded in the magnitude, frequency, and spatial organization of changes in the concentration of cytosolic free Ca2+. Regenerative spiral waves of release of free Ca2+ were observed by confocal microscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. This pattern of Ca2+ activity is characteristic of an intracellular milieu that behaves as a regenerative excitable medium. The minimal critical radius for propagation of focal Ca2+ waves (10.4 micrometers) and the effective diffusion constant for the excitation signal (2.3 x 10-6 square centimeters per second) were estimated from measurements of velocity and curvature of circular wavefronts expanding from foci. By modeling Ca2+ release with cellular automata, the absolute refractory period for Ca2+ stores (4.7 seconds) was determined. Other phenomena expected of an excitable medium, such as wave propagation of undiminished amplitude and annihilation of colliding wavefronts, were observed.

  16. Sexually differentiated central pattern generators in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Zornik, Erik; Yamaguchi, Ayako

    2008-06-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms that underlie the function of central pattern generators (CPGs) presents a formidable challenge requiring sophisticated tools and well-chosen model systems. In this article, we describe recent work on vocalizations of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. These behaviors are driven by sexually differentiated CPGs and are exceptionally well suited to this objective. In particular, a simplified mechanism of vocal production (independent of respiratory musculature) allows straightforward interpretations of nerve activity with respect to behavior. Furthermore, the development of a fictively vocalizing isolated brain, together with the finding of rapid androgen-induced masculinization of female vocalizations, provides an invaluable tool for determining how new behaviors arise from existing circuits.

  17. Cytoplasmic effect on gene function in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Yu, H J; Shi, C P; Niu, M C

    1987-05-01

    The pigmentation gene of Xenopus laevis is dominant and that of albino aP mutant recessive. Heterologous haploid hybrids are produced by UV inactivation of the egg nuclei during second polar body formation in the mutant sperm-fertilized Xenopus eggs. During development of these hybrids, melanin appeared in the eye and melanophores in the skin at stages comparable to those of the wild type, but much earlier than in the albino mutant. The number and intensity of pigment cells are intermediate between the black Xenopus and albino mutant. While a number of pigment cells remain in the hybrids, those in the albino eventually degenerate. Therefore, the development and maintenance of pigmentation in heterologous hybrids are contributed by Xenopus cytoplasm. Tadpole tail-tips were squashed and stained for chromosome counting. The results show that Xenopus and mutants are diploid (36 chromosomes) and heterologous haploid hybrids have 18 chromosomes.

  18. Sexually differentiated central pattern generators in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Zornik, Erik; Yamaguchi, Ayako

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms that underlie the function of central pattern generators (CPGs) presents a formidable challenge requiring sophisticated tools and well-chosen model systems. In this article, we describe recent work on vocalizations of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. These behaviors are driven by sexually differentiated CPGs and are exceptionally well suited to this objective. In particular, a simplified mechanism of vocal production (independent of respiratory musculature) allows straightforward interpretations of nerve activity with respect to behavior. Furthermore, the development of a fictively vocalizing isolated brain, together with the finding of rapid androgen-induced masculinization of female vocalizations, provides an invaluable tool for determining how new behaviors arise from existing circuits. PMID:18471902

  19. Characterization of histone genes isolated from Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis genomic libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Ruberti, I; Fragapane, P; Pierandrei-Amaldi, P; Beccari, E; Amaldi, F; Bozzoni, I

    1982-01-01

    Using a cDNA clone for the histone H3 we have isolated, from two genomic libraries of Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis, clones containing four different histone gene clusters. The structural organization of X. laevis histone genes has been determined by restriction mapping, Southern blot hybridization and translation of the mRNAs which hybridize to the various restriction fragments. The arrangement of the histone genes in X. tropicalis has been determined by Southern analysis using X. laevis genomic fragments, containing individual genes, as probes. Histone genes are clustered in the genome of X. laevis and X. tropicalis and, compared to invertebrates, show a higher organization heterogeneity as demonstrated by structural analysis of the four genomic clones. In fact, the order of the genes within individual clusters is not conserved. Images PMID:6296782

  20. THYROID AXIS INHIBITION IN XENOPUS LAEVIS: DEVELOPMENT OF AN AMPHIBIAN-BASED SCREENING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the initial EDSTAC recommendations, research was conducted on the development of a Xenopus laevis based tail resorption assay for evaluating thyroid axis disruption. These experiments highlighted key limitations associated with relying on tail resorption as a measu...

  1. Survival fraction and phenotype alterations of Xenopus laevis embryos at 3 Gy, 150 kV X-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Carotenuto, Rosa; Tussellino, Margherita; Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo

    2016-11-25

    To determine the radiosensitivity of Xenopus laevis embryos, aquatic organism model, for toxicity studies utilizing X-rays at acute high dose levels, by analysing its survival fraction and phenotype alterations under one-exposure integral dose. We used the standard Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay Xenopus test during the early stages of X. laevis development. The embryos were harvested until st. 46 when they were irradiated. The radiation effects were checked daily for a week and the survival, malformations and growth inhibition were assessed. Sibling tadpoles as control organisms were used. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the extent of any damage. Irradiation was performed with an X-ray tube operated at 150 kV. The tube containing the tadpoles was exposed to an air kerma of 3 Gy as measured in air with an in-beam ionization chamber. After one week, survival fraction of irradiated embryos was 58%, while for control embryos it was 81%. Hence, irradiation with 150 kV, 3 Gy X-rays produced a 23% decrease of survival in regard to unirradiated embryos. The 70% of the irradiated embryos showed an altered distribution of the skin pigmentation, in particular on the dorsal area and in the olfactory pits, where the pigment concentration increased by a factor 2. In conclusion exposure of X. laevis to 3 Gy, 150 kV X-rays induced a reduction of embryos survival and a significant modification of pigmentation. The authors think that X. laevis embryos, at st 46, is a suitable biological model for large scale investigations on the effects of ionizing radiation.

  2. Urocortins of the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis: conservation of structure and function in tetrapod evolution.

    PubMed

    Boorse, Graham C; Crespi, Erica J; Dautzenberg, Frank M; Denver, Robert J

    2005-11-01

    Several corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family genes have been identified in vertebrates. Mammals have four paralogous genes that encode CRF or the urocortins 1, 2, and 3. In teleost fishes, a CRF, urotensin I (a fish ortholog of mammalian urocortin 1) and urocortin 3 have been identified, suggesting that at least three of the four mammalian lineages arose in a common ancestor of modern bony fishes and tetrapods. Here we report the isolation of genes orthologous to mammalian urocortin 1 and urocortin 3 from the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We characterize the pharmacology of the frog peptides and show that X. laevis urocortin 1 binds to and activates the frog CRF1 and CRF2 receptors at picomolar concentrations. Similar to mammals, frog urocortin 3 is selective for the CRF2 receptor. Only frog urocortin 1 binds to the CRF-binding protein, although with significantly lower affinity than frog CRF. Both urocortin genes are expressed in brain, pituitary, heart, and kidney of juvenile frogs; urocortin 1 is also expressed in skin. We also identified novel urocortin sequences in the genomes of pufferfish, zebrafish, chicken, and dog. Phylogenetic analysis supports the view that four paralogous lineages of CRF-like peptides arose before the divergence of the actinopterygian and sarcopterygian fishes. Our findings show that the functional relationships among CRF ligands and binding proteins, and their anorexigenic actions mediated by the CRF2 receptor, arose early in vertebrate evolution.

  3. High variability of expression profiles of homeologous genes for Wnt, Hh, Notch, and Hippo signaling pathways in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Michiue, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Yasuoka, Yuuri; Goto, Toshiyasu; Ikeda, Takafumi; Nagura, Kei; Nakayama, Takuya; Taira, Masanori; Kinoshita, Tsutomu

    2017-01-12

    Cell signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Hedgehog (Hh), Notch, and Hippo, are essential for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and tissue homeostasis. In this study, we analyzed 415 genes involved in these pathways in the allotetraploid frog, Xenopus laevis. Most genes are retained in two subgenomes called L and S (193 homeologous gene pairs and 29 singletons). This conservation rate of homeologs is much higher than that of all genes in the X. laevis genome (86.9% vs 60.2%). Among singletons, 24 genes are retained in the L subgenome, a rate similar to the average for all genes (82.8% vs 74.6%). In addition, as general components of signal transduction, we also analyzed 32 heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG)-related genes and eight TLE/Groucho transcriptional corepressors-related genes. In these gene sets, all homeologous pairs have been retained. Transcriptome analysis using RNA-seq data from developmental stages and adult tissues demonstrated that most homeologous pairs of signaling components have variable expression patterns, in contrast to the conservative expression profiles of homeologs for transcription factors. Our results indicate that homeologous gene pairs for cell signaling regulation have tended to become subfunctionalized after allotetraploidization. Diversification of signaling pathways by subfunctionalization of homeologs may enhance environmental adaptability. These results provide insights into the evolution of signaling pathways after polyploidization.

  4. Copy number variation and genetic diversity of MHC Class IIb alleles in an alien population of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Mable, Barbara K; Kilbride, Elizabeth; Viney, Mark E; Tinsley, Richard C

    2015-10-01

    Xenopus laevis (the African clawed frog), which originated through hybridisation and whole genome duplication, has been used as a model for genetics and development for many years, but surprisingly little is known about immune gene variation in natural populations. The purpose of this study was to use an isolated population of X. laevis that was introduced to Wales, UK in the past 50 years to investigate how variation at the MHC compares to that at other loci, following a severe population bottleneck. Among 18 individuals, we found nine alleles based on exon 2 sequences of the Class IIb region (which includes the peptide binding region). Individuals carried from one to three of the loci identified from previous laboratory studies. Genetic variation was an order of magnitude higher at the MHC compared with three single-copy nuclear genes, but all loci showed high levels of heterozygosity and nucleotide diversity and there was not an excess of homozygosity or decrease in diversity over time that would suggest extensive inbreeding in the introduced population. Tajima's D was positive for all loci, which is consistent with a bottleneck. Moreover, comparison with published sequences identified the source of the introduced population as the Western Cape region of South Africa, where most commercial suppliers have obtained their stocks. These factors suggest that despite founding by potentially already inbred individuals, the alien population in Wales has maintained substantial genetic variation at both adaptively important and neutral genes.

  5. Expression and regulation of the decoy bone morphogenetic protein receptor BAMBI in the developing avian face.

    PubMed

    Higashihori, Norihisa; Song, Yiping; Richman, Joy M

    2008-05-01

    Here, we examine the expression and regulation of the gene BAMBI, a kinase-deficient decoy receptor capable of interacting with type I bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors in avian embryos. Initially, expression was limited to the endoderm during neurula and pharyngula stages. From embryonic day 3.5 (stage 20) and onward, BAMBI expression almost perfectly overlapped with known expression patterns for BMP4, particularly in the face and limbs. We performed bead implant experiments in the face to see which signals could be repressing or promoting expression of BAMBI. Our data point to retinoids and BMPs as being major positive regulators of BAMBI expression; however, fibroblast growth factor 2 acts to repress BAMBI. Furthermore, retinoic acid is likely to act directly on BAMBI as induction occurs in the presence of cycloheximide. The data suggested that BAMBI could be used to regulate Bmp signaling during tissue interactions that are an integral part of facial morphogenesis.

  6. The first record of the slender sunfish Ranzania laevis from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Abu El-Regal, M A; El-Moselhy, K

    2013-11-01

    A female specimen of the slender sunfish Ranzania laevis of 600 mm total length was recorded for the first time from the Red Sea after being stranded on a shallow sandy bay at Hurghada beach (27° 06' 16″ N; 33° 50' 01″ E) on 13 May 2012. Ranzania laevis is believed to have migrated from the Indian Ocean as the nearest area where it was found is coastal waters of Oman.

  7. Developing Xenopus Laevis as a Model to Screen Drugs for Fragile X Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0207 TITLE: Developing Xenopus Laevis as a Model to...COVERED 30 September 2012 – 31 March 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Developing Xenopus Laevis as a Model to Screen Drugs for Fragile X 5a. CONTRACT...that Xenopus is a valuable system in which to model Fragile X Syndrome. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fragile X Syndrome, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein

  8. Biochemical and Hematologic Reference Intervals for Aged Xenopus laevis in a Research Colony.

    PubMed

    Chang, Angela G; Hu, Jing; Lake, Elizabeth; Bouley, Donna M; Johns, Jennifer L

    2015-09-01

    Xenopus laevis, the African clawed frog, is commonly used in developmental and toxicology research studies. Little information is available on aged X. laevis; however, with the complete mapping of the genome and the availability of transgenic animal models, the number of aged animals in research colonies is increasing. The goals of this study were to obtain biochemical and hematologic parameters to establish reference intervals for aged X. laevis and to compare results with those from young adult X. laevis. Blood samples were collected from laboratory reared, female frogs (n = 52) between the ages of 10 and 14 y. Reference intervals were generated for 30 biochemistry analytes and full hematologic analysis; these data were compared with prior results for young X. laevis from the same vendor. Parameters that were significantly higher in aged compared with young frogs included calcium, calcium:phosphorus ratio, total protein, albumin, HDL, amylase, potassium, CO2, and uric acid. Parameters found to be significantly lower in aged frogs included glucose, AST, ALT, cholesterol, BUN, BUN:creatinine ratio, phosphorus, triglycerides, LDL, lipase, sodium, chloride, sodium:potassium ratio, and anion gap. Hematology data did not differ between young and old frogs. These findings indicate that chemistry reference intervals for young X. laevis may be inappropriate for use with aged frogs.

  9. Biochemical and Hematologic Reference Intervals for Aged Xenopus laevis in a Research Colony

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Angela G; Hu, Jing; Lake, Elizabeth; Bouley, Donna M; Johns, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Xenopus laevis, the African clawed frog, is commonly used in developmental and toxicology research studies. Little information is available on aged X. laevis; however, with the complete mapping of the genome and the availability of transgenic animal models, the number of aged animals in research colonies is increasing. The goals of this study were to obtain biochemical and hematologic parameters to establish reference intervals for aged X. laevis and to compare results with those from young adult X. laevis. Blood samples were collected from laboratory reared, female frogs (n = 52) between the ages of 10 and 14 y. Reference intervals were generated for 30 biochemistry analytes and full hematologic analysis; these data were compared with prior results for young X. laevis from the same vendor. Parameters that were significantly higher in aged compared with young frogs included calcium, calcium:phosphorus ratio, total protein, albumin, HDL, amylase, potassium, CO2, and uric acid. Parameters found to be significantly lower in aged frogs included glucose, AST, ALT, cholesterol, BUN, BUN:creatinine ratio, phosphorus, triglycerides, LDL, lipase, sodium, chloride, sodium:potassium ratio, and anion gap. Hematology data did not differ between young and old frogs. These findings indicate that chemistry reference intervals for young X. laevis may be inappropriate for use with aged frogs. PMID:26424243

  10. Developmental Toxicity of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products to Embryos of the African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-10

    developmental toxicity tests with embryos of the South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis used to evaluate four individual DWDB; bromodichloromethane...SUBJECT TERMS Developmental toxicity; FETAX; water disinfection by-products; frogs ; Xenopus laevis; embryo malformations; embryo mortality...Disinfection By-Products to Embryos of the African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis) L. M. Brennan,1 M. W. Toussaint,1 D. M. Kumsher,1 W. E. Dennis,’ A. B

  11. Scaling of morphogenetic patterns in reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Rasolonjanahary, Manan'Iarivo; Vasiev, Bakhtier

    2016-09-07

    Development of multicellular organisms is commonly associated with the response of individual cells to concentrations of chemical substances called morphogens. Concentration fields of morphogens form a basis for biological patterning and ensure its properties including ability to scale with the size of the organism. While mechanisms underlying the formation of morphogen gradients are reasonably well understood, little is known about processes responsible for their scaling. Here, we perform a formal analysis of scaling for chemical patterns forming in continuous systems. We introduce a quantity representing the sensitivity of systems to changes in their size and use it to analyse scaling properties of patterns forming in a few different systems. Particularly, we consider how scaling properties of morphogen gradients forming in diffusion-decay systems depend on boundary conditions and how the scaling can be improved by passive modulation of morphogens or active transport in the system. We also analyse scaling of morphogenetic signal caused by two opposing gradients and consider scaling properties of patterns forming in activator-inhibitor systems. We conclude with a few possible mechanisms which allow scaling of morphogenetic patterns.

  12. A Tunable Silk Hydrogel Device for Studying Limb Regeneration in Adult Xenopus Laevis

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Anne; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In certain amphibian models limb regeneration can be promoted or inhibited by the local wound bed environment. This research introduces a device that can be utilized as an experimental tool to characterize the conditions that promotes limb regeneration in the adult frog (Xenopus laevis) model. In particular, this device was designed to manipulate the local wound environment via a hydrogel insert. Initial characterization of the hydrogel insert revealed that this interaction had a significant influence on mechanical forces to the animal, due to the contraction of the hydrogel. The material and mechanical properties of the hydrogel insert were a factor in the device design in relation to the comfort of the animal and the ability to effectively manipulate the amputation site. The tunable features of the hydrogel were important in determining the pro-regenerative effects in limb regeneration, which was measured by cartilage spike formation and quantified by micro-computed tomography. The hydrogel insert was a factor in the observed morphological outcomes following amputation. Future work will focus on characterizing and optimizing the device’s observed capability to manipulate biological pathways that are essential for limb regeneration. However, the present work provides a framework for the role of a hydrogel in the device and a path forward for more systematic studies. PMID:27257960

  13. Seasonal variation in heavy metal accumulation in subtropical population of the terrestrial isopod, Porcellio laevis.

    PubMed

    Hussein, M A; Obuid-Allah, A H; Mohammad, A H; Scott-Fordsmand, J J; Abd El-Wakeil, K F

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the seasonal fluctuation of heavy metals in the isopod Porcellio laevis at four uncontaminated subtropical locations. This study was carried out at four different field sites in Assiut, Egypt. The concentrations of cadmium, lead, copper, and zinc in animal, soil, and litter (mug/g dry weight) were monthly recorded during the period from June 2002 till May 2003. There was little difference in metal accumulation trends between the sites. In general, the isopod showed significant increased Pb and Zn concentration during summer and spring months, whereas this was not the case for Cd and Cu. The bioaccumulation (BAF) and bioconcentration factors (BCF) of the metals revealed marked seasonal changes throughout the year. Generally, BAF of metals were higher during summer and spring, and BCF were higher during summer and autumn. Comparing the metal accumulation with climatic fluctuations (measured) it was speculated that temperature was the main factor causing seasonal fluctuations of the internal metal concentration in the isopod.

  14. The Effect of Plasma Exposure on Tail Regeneration of Tadpoles Xenopus Laevis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    June, Joyce; Rivie, Adonis; Ezuduemoih, Raphael; Menon, Jaishri; Martus, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Wound healing requires a balanced combination of nutrients and growth factors for healing and tissue regeneration. The effect of plasma exposure on tail regeneration of tadpoles, Xenopus laevis is investigated. The exposure of the wound to the helium plasma immediately followed the amputation of 40% of the tail. Amputation of the tail initiates regeneration of spinal cord, muscle, notochord, skin and connective tissues. By 24 h, the wound was covered by wound epithelium and blastema was formed by day 5. There was increased angiogenesis in plasma exposed tail regenerate compared to the control following 5 d post amputation. Observed was an increase in NO production in the regenerate of plasma exposed tadpoles was derived from increased activity of nNOS and iNOS. Western blot analysis for vascular endothelial growth factor showed stronger bands for the protein in amputated tadpoles of both the groups. Analysis of the composition and characteristics of the plasma using optical emission spectroscopy indicates excited state species consisting of N2, N2+,and OH is present in the plasma. This study was supported, in part, by the NSF Grant 1040108.

  15. Expression and functional characterization of Xhmg-at-hook genes in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Macrì, Simone; Sgarra, Riccardo; Ros, Gloria; Maurizio, Elisa; Zammitti, Salvina; Milani, Ornella; Onorati, Marco; Vignali, Robert; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2013-01-01

    High Mobility Group A proteins (HMGA1 and HMGA2) are architectural nuclear factors involved in development, cell differentiation, and cancer formation and progression. Here we report the cloning, developmental expression and functional analysis of a new multi-AT-hook factor in Xenopus laevis (XHMG-AT-hook) that exists in three different isoforms. Xhmg-at-hook1 and 3 isoforms, but not isoform 2, are expressed throughout the entire development of Xenopus, both in the maternal and zygotic phase. Localized transcripts are present in the animal pole in the early maternal phase; during the zygotic phase, mRNA can be detected in the developing central nervous system (CNS), including the eye, and in the neural crest. We show evidence that XHMG-AT-hook proteins differ from typical HMGA proteins in terms of their properties in DNA binding and in protein/protein interaction. Finally, we provide evidence that they are involved in early CNS development and in neural crest differentiation.

  16. Fungal Morphogenetic Pathways Are Required for the Hallmark Inflammatory Response during Candida albicans Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Glen E.; Nash, Andrea K.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Fidel, Paul L.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2014-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, caused primarily by Candida albicans, presents significant health issues for women of childbearing age. As a polymorphic fungus, the ability of C. albicans to switch between yeast and hyphal morphologies is considered its central virulence attribute. Armed with new criteria for defining vaginitis immunopathology, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the yeast-to-hypha transition is required for the hallmark inflammatory responses previously characterized during murine vaginitis. Kinetic analyses of vaginal infection with C. albicans in C57BL/6 mice demonstrated that fungal burdens remained constant throughout the observation period, while polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), S100A8, and interleukin-1β levels obtained from vaginal lavage fluid increased by day 3 onward. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was also positively correlated with increased effectors of innate immunity. Additionally, immunodepletion of neutrophils in infected mice confirmed a nonprotective role for PMNs during vaginitis. Determination of the importance of fungal morphogenesis during vaginitis was addressed with a two-pronged approach. Intravaginal inoculation of mice with C. albicans strains deleted for key transcriptional regulators (bcr1Δ/Δ, efg1Δ/Δ, cph1Δ/Δ, and efg1Δ/Δ cph1Δ/Δ) controlling the yeast-to-hypha switch revealed a crucial role for morphogenetic signaling through the Efg1 and, to a lesser extent, the Bcr1 pathways in contributing to vaginitis immunopathology. Furthermore, overexpression of transcription factors NRG1 and UME6, to maintain yeast and hyphal morphologies, respectively, confirmed the importance of morphogenesis in generating innate immune responses in vivo. These results highlight the yeast-to-hypha switch and the associated morphogenetic response as important virulence components for the immunopathogenesis of Candida vaginitis, with implications for transition from benign colonization to symptomatic infection. PMID

  17. Turning Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP2) on and off in Mesenchymal Cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Melissa B; Shah, Tapan A; Shaikh, Nadia N

    2015-10-01

    The concentration, location, and timing of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2, HGNC:1069, GeneID: 650) gene expression must be precisely regulated. Abnormal BMP2 levels cause congenital anomalies and diseases involving the mesenchymal cells that differentiate into muscle, fat, cartilage, and bone. The molecules and conditions that influence BMP2 synthesis are diverse. Understandably, complex mechanisms control Bmp2 gene expression. This review includes a compilation of agents and conditions that can induce Bmp2. The currently known trans-regulatory factors and cis-regulatory elements that modulate Bmp2 expression are summarized and discussed. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2, HGNC:1069, GeneID: 650) is a classical morphogen; a molecule that acts at a distance and whose concentration influences cell behavior. In mesenchymal cells, the concentration of BMP2 influences myogenesis, adipogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. Because the amount, timing, and location of BMP2 synthesis influence the allocation of cells to muscle, fat, cartilage, and bone, the mechanisms that regulate the Bmp2 gene are crucial. Key early mesodermal events that require precise Bmp2 regulation include heart specification and morphogenesis. Originally named for its osteoinductive properties, healing fractures requires BMP2. The human Bmp2 gene also has been linked to osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. In addition, all forms of pathological calcification in the vasculature and in cardiac valves involve the pro-osteogenic BMP2. The diverse tissues, mechanisms, and diseases influenced by BMP2 are too numerous to list here (see OMIM: 112261). However, in all BMP2-influenced pathologies, changes in the behavior and differentiation of pluripotent mesenchymal cells are a recurring theme. Consequently, much effort has been devoted to identifying the molecules and conditions that influence BMP2 synthesis and the complex mechanisms that control Bmp2 gene expression. This review begins with an

  18. Dynamics of background adaptation in Xenopus laevis: role of catecholamines and melanophore-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    van Zoest, I D; Heijmen, P S; Cruijsen, P M; Jenks, B G

    1989-10-01

    The pars intermedia of the pituitary gland in Xenopus laevis secretes alpha-melanophore-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), which causes dispersion of pigment in dermal melanophores in animals on a black background. In the present study we have determined plasma levels of alpha-MSH in animals undergoing adaptation to white and black backgrounds. Plasma values of black-adapted animals were high and decreased rapidly after transfer to a white background, as did the degree of pigment dispersion in dermal melanophores. Plasma MSH values of white-adapted animals were below the detection limit of our radioimmunoassay. Transfer of white animals to a black background resulted in complete dispersion of melanophore pigment within a few hours, but plasma MSH levels remained low for at least 24 hr. This discrepancy between plasma MSH and degree of pigment dispersion suggested the involvement of an additional factor for stimulating dispersion. Results of in vitro and in vivo experiments with receptor agonists and antagonists indicated that a beta-adrenergic mechanism, functioning at the level of the melanophore, is involved in the stimulation of pigment dispersion during the early stages of background adaptation.

  19. Nuclear Receptor Corepressor Recruitment by Unliganded Thyroid Hormone Receptor in Gene Repression during Xenopus laevis Development

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Laurent M.; Jones, Peter L.; Havis, Emmanuelle; Rouse, Nicole; Demeneix, Barbara A.; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TR) act as activators of transcription in the presence of the thyroid hormone (T3) and as repressors in its absence. While many in vitro approaches have been used to study the molecular mechanisms of TR action, their physiological relevance has not been addressed. Here we investigate how TR regulates gene expression during vertebrate postembryonic development by using T3-dependent amphibian metamorphosis as a model. Earlier studies suggest that TR acts as a repressor during premetamorphosis when T3 is absent. We hypothesize that corepressor complexes containing the nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR) are key factors in this TR-dependent gene repression, which is important for premetamorphic tadpole growth. To test this hypothesis, we isolated Xenopus laevis N-CoR (xN-CoR) and showed that it was present in pre- and metamorphic tadpoles. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that xN-CoR was recruited to the promoters of T3 response genes during premetamorphosis and released upon T3 treatment, accompanied by a local increase in histone acetylation. Furthermore, overexpression of a dominant-negative N-CoR in tadpole tail muscle led to increased transcription from a T3-dependent promoter. Our data indicate that N-CoR is recruited by unliganded TR to repress target gene expression during premetamorphic animal growth, an important process that prepares the tadpole for metamorphosis. PMID:12446772

  20. Labeling strategy and signal broadening mechanism of Protein NMR spectroscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yansheng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Yanhua; Xu, Guohua; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Zeting; Yao, Chendie; Liu, Maili; Li, Conggang

    2015-06-08

    We used Xenopus laevis oocytes, a paradigm for a variety of biological studies, as a eukaryotic model system for in-cell protein NMR spectroscopy. The small globular protein GB1 was one of the first studied in Xenopus oocytes, but there have been few reports since then of high-resolution spectra in oocytes. The scarcity of data is at least partly due to the lack of good labeling strategies and the paucity of information on resonance broadening mechanisms. Here, we systematically evaluate isotope enrichment and labeling methods in oocytes injected with five different proteins with molecular masses of 6 to 54 kDa. (19) F labeling is more promising than (15) N, (13) C, and (2) H enrichment. We also used (19) F NMR spectroscopy to quantify the contribution of viscosity, weak interactions, and sample inhomogeneity to resonance broadening in cells. We found that the viscosity in oocytes is only about 1.2 times that of water, and that inhomogeneous broadening is a major factor in determining line width in these cells.

  1. The Effect of Plasma on Tail Regeneration of Tadpoles Xenopus Laevis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    June, Joyce; Amadi, Chima; Menon, Jaishri; Martus, Kevin

    2013-03-01

    Healthy wounds require a balanced combination of nutrients and growth factors for healing and tissue regeneration. Nitric oxide, (NO), is also crucial in wound healing processes and linked with production of several cytokines, interaction with other free radicals and influence on microcirculation. Hypothesize is that exposure to plasma will affect wound healing and tail regeneration in tadpoles Xenopus laevis and plasma induced endogenous NO production may have an important role to play at the cellular level. Tail amputation was immediately followed by exposure of the wound to the helium plasma. For histological features, blastema (growing regenerate) was fixed in 4% neutral buffer formalin for paraffin sections. In situ staining for NO was carried out 5 days post amputation. The rate of the regenerating tail was proportional to the plasma exposure time at the expense of metamorphic rate. Histological features show that the tadpoles exposed to the plasma had a higher level of cellular proliferation and microvasculature in blastema. In situ staining for NO indicated its increased endogenous production compared to the control. These findings suggest that accelerated wound healing and tail regeneration following exposure to the plasma may be due to its direct effect on cell proliferation and increased NO production which may be involved in microvascularization. This study was supported, in part, by the NSF Grant 1040108

  2. A developmental analysis of periodic albinism in the amphibian Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Eagleson, Gerald W; van der Heijden, Roel A; Roubos, Eric W; Jenks, Bruce G

    2010-09-01

    The periodic albino of Xenopus laevis displays a transitory presence of black melanin pigment in the embryo but looses this during tadpole development. This mutation, involving a recessive allele, affects melanogenesis in dermal melanophore pigment cells. It has been suggested that the mutation is intrinsic to the melanophore cell itself or, alternatively, reflects malfunction in the neuroendocrine system that regulates melanophore cell function. This latter system, involving pituitary melanotrope cells which produces alpha-melanophore stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), is responsible for stimulating the production and dispersion of melanin pigment in dermal melanophores. The purpose of the present study was to determine to which degree the albinism is intrinsic to the melanophore or involves neuroendocrine malfunction. Experiments involved transplantation of presumptive melanophores from wild-type to albino embryos, and vice versa, immunocytochemical analysis of the albino neuroendocrine system and the creation of wild-type/albino parabiotic animals to determine if the neuroendocrine system of the albino can support melanotrope cell function. We show that the albino has a functional neuroendocrine system and conclude that the defect in the albino primarily affects the melanophore cell, possibly rendering it incapable of responding to alpha-MSH. It is also apparent from our results that in later stages of development the cellular environment of the melanotrope cell does become important to its development, but the nature of the critical cellular factors involved remains to be determined.

  3. Transient effects of microgravity on early embryos of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    De Mazière, A; Gonzalez-Jurado, J; Reijnen, M; Narraway, J; Ubbels, G A

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the role of gravity on the early development of the clawed toad Xenopus laevis, we performed an experiment on the Maser-6 sounding rocket launched from Kiruna (Sweden) on 4 Nov 1993. The aim was to find out whether a short period of microgravity during fertilization and the first few minutes of development does indeed result in abnormal axis formation as was suggested by a pilot experiment on the Maser 3 in 1989. On the Maser 6 we used two new technical additions in the Fokker CIS unit, viz. a 1-g control centrifuge and a video recording unit which both worked successfully. The 1-g control centrifuge was used to discriminate between the influences of flight perturbations and microgravity. After fertilization shortly before launch, one of the first indications of successful egg activation, the cortical contraction, was registered in microgravity and on earth. Analysis of the video tapes revealed that the cortical contraction in microgravity starts earlier than at 1 g on earth. After recovery of the eggs fertilized in microgravity and culture of the embryos on earth, the morphology of the blastocoel has some consistent differences from blastulae from eggs fertilized in the 1-g centrifuge of the rocket. However from the gastrula stage onward, the microgravity embryos apparently recover and resume normal development: the XBra gene is normally expressed, and histological examination shows normal axis formation.

  4. The thymus and tail regenerative capacity in Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Antonella; Bertolotti, Evelina

    2012-07-01

    A morphofunctional analysis of the thymus from differently aged Xenopus laevis tadpoles during regeneration of the tail is reported. In stage 50 larvae, competent to regenerate, the appendage cut provoked thymic structural modifications that affected the medullary microenvironment cells and changes in TNF-α immunoreactivity. Mucocyte-like cells, multicellular epithelial cysts, myoid cells and cells immunoreactive to TNF-α increased in number. Increased numbers of lymphocytes were also found in regenerating areas and, at the end of regeneration, thymic structural and immunocytochemical patterns were restored to control levels. The observed cellular responses and the induction of molecules critical for thymus constitutive processes suggest a stimulation of thymic function after tail amputation. In older larvae, whose capacity to form a new complete and correctly patterned tail was reduced, thymic morphological changes were more severe and may persist throughout the regeneration process with a significant reduction in organ size. In these larvae the histological patterns and the marked thymic decrease may be related to the events occurring during regeneration, i.e. the higher inflammatory response and the reduced tail regenerative potential.

  5. Basolateral Cl- uptake mechanisms in Xenopus laevis lung epithelium.

    PubMed

    Berger, Jens; Hardt, Martin; Clauss, Wolfgang G; Fronius, Martin

    2010-07-01

    A thin liquid layer covers the lungs of air-breathing vertebrates. Active ion transport processes via the pulmonary epithelial cells regulate the maintenance of this layer. This study focuses on basolateral Cl(-) uptake mechanisms in native lungs of Xenopus laevis and the involvement of the Na(+)/K(+)/2 Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) and HCO(3)(-)/Cl(-) anion exchanger (AE), in particular. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining revealed the expression of the NKCC protein in the Xenopus lung. Ussing chamber experiments demonstrated that the NKCC inhibitors (bumetanide and furosemide) were ineffective at blocking the cotransporter under basal conditions, as well as under pharmacologically stimulated Cl(-)-secreting conditions (forskolin and chlorzoxazone application). However, functional evidence for the NKCC was detected by generating a transepithelial Cl(-) gradient. Further, we were interested in the involvement of the HCO(3)(-)/Cl(-) anion exchanger to transepithelial ion transport processes. Basolateral application of DIDS, an inhibitor of the AE, resulted in a significantly decreased the short-circuit current (I(SC)). The effect of DIDS was diminished by acetazolamide and reduced by increased external HCO(3)(-) concentrations. Cl(-) secretion induced by forskolin was decreased by DIDS, but this effect was abolished in the presence of HCO(3)(-). These experiments indicate that the AE at least partially contributes to Cl(-) secretion. Taken together, our data show that in Xenopus lung epithelia, the AE, rather than the NKCC, is involved in basolateral Cl(-) uptake, which contrasts with the common model for Cl(-) secretion in pulmonary epithelia.

  6. Teratogenic effects of five anticancer drugs on Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Isidori, Marina; Piscitelli, Concetta; Russo, Chiara; Smutná, Marie; Bláha, Luděk

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, the environmental presence of pharmaceuticals - including anticancer drugs - is an emerging issue. Because of the lack of appropriate critical studies about anticancer drug effects in frogs, the aim of the present study was to investigate lethal and teratogenic effects of five anticancer drugs widely used in large quantities, i.e. 5-flourouracil, capecitabine, cisplatin, etoposide, and imatinib, in the embryos of the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, using FETAX - Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay in Xenopus. None of the studied anticancer drugs induced statistically significant mortality within the concentrations tested (0.01-50mg/L, depending on the studied compound), and no growth inhibition of embryos after a 96-h exposure was observed. Except for cisplatin, the other pharmaceuticals induced an increase of developmental malformations such as abdominal edema, axial flexure, head, eyes, gut and heart malformations with statistically significant effects observed at the highest concentrations tested (50mg/L for 5-flourouracil; 30mg/L for etoposide and 20mg/L for capecitabine and imatinib). The results indicate that anticancer drugs can affect embryogenesis mechanisms.

  7. Valproate-induced neurodevelopmental deficits in Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    James, Eric J; Gu, Jenny; Ramirez-Vizcarrondo, Carolina M; Hasan, Mashfiq; Truszkowski, Torrey L S; Tan, Yuqi; Oupravanh, Phouangmaly M; Khakhalin, Arseny S; Aizenman, Carlos D

    2015-02-18

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is increasingly thought to result from low-level deficits in synaptic development and neural circuit formation that cascade into more complex cognitive symptoms. However, the link between synaptic dysfunction and behavior is not well understood. By comparing the effects of abnormal circuit formation and behavioral outcomes across different species, it should be possible to pinpoint the conserved fundamental processes that result in disease. Here we use a novel model for neurodevelopmental disorders in which we expose Xenopus laevis tadpoles to valproic acid (VPA) during a critical time point in brain development at which neurogenesis and neural circuit formation required for sensory processing are occurring. VPA is a commonly prescribed antiepileptic drug with known teratogenic effects. In utero exposure to VPA in humans or rodents results in a higher incidence of ASD or ASD-like behavior later in life. We find that tadpoles exposed to VPA have abnormal sensorimotor and schooling behavior that is accompanied by hyperconnected neural networks in the optic tectum, increased excitatory and inhibitory synaptic drive, elevated levels of spontaneous synaptic activity, and decreased neuronal intrinsic excitability. Consistent with these findings, VPA-treated tadpoles also have increased seizure susceptibility and decreased acoustic startle habituation. These findings indicate that the effects of VPA are remarkably conserved across vertebrate species and that changes in neural circuitry resulting from abnormal developmental pruning can cascade into higher-level behavioral deficits.

  8. A restriction map of Xenopus laevis mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cordonnier, A M; Vannier, P A; Brun, G M

    1982-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA from Xenopus laevis is a 17.4 x 10(3)-base-pair circular DNA molecule. The mapping of this DNA, using 19 different restriction endonucleases is reported here. The sites are as follows: 1 for BamHI, PstI, SacI, SalI, BalI; 2 for BglII, SacII, EcoRI, ClaI, 3 for XhoI, 4 for AvaI, XbaI, PvuII, 5 for HindIII, 6 for HhaI, BclI, HpaI, 10 for AvaII and 11 for HincII. The same sites (except for one of the two ClaI sites) are observed in the molecule cloned in pBR322 DNA. The fragments corresponding to 62 cleavage sites have all been ordered and precisely located. They provide suitable conditions for further investigations connected with the study of replication and nucleotide sequence determination of this molecule.

  9. Biomimetic design processes in architecture: morphogenetic and evolutionary computational design.

    PubMed

    Menges, Achim

    2012-03-01

    Design computation has profound impact on architectural design methods. This paper explains how computational design enables the development of biomimetic design processes specific to architecture, and how they need to be significantly different from established biomimetic processes in engineering disciplines. The paper first explains the fundamental difference between computer-aided and computational design in architecture, as the understanding of this distinction is of critical importance for the research presented. Thereafter, the conceptual relation and possible transfer of principles from natural morphogenesis to design computation are introduced and the related developments of generative, feature-based, constraint-based, process-based and feedback-based computational design methods are presented. This morphogenetic design research is then related to exploratory evolutionary computation, followed by the presentation of two case studies focusing on the exemplary development of spatial envelope morphologies and urban block morphologies.

  10. Improved bone morphogenetic protein-2 retention in an injectable collagen matrix using bifunctional peptides.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Paul T; Jansen, Michelle S; Ganesan, Sathya; Benson, R Edward; Hyde-Deruyscher, Robin; Beyer, Wayne F; Gile, Joseph C; Nair, Shrikumar A; Hodges, Jonathan A; Grøn, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    To promote healing of many orthopedic injuries, tissue engineering approaches are being developed that combine growth factors such as Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) with biomaterial carriers. Although these technologies have shown great promise, they still face limitations. We describe a generalized approach to create target-specific modular peptides that bind growth factors to implantable biomaterials. These bifunctional peptide coatings provide a novel way to modulate biology on the surface of an implant. Using phage display techniques, we have identified peptides that bind with high affinity to BMP-2. The peptides that bind to BMP-2 fall into two different sequence clusters. The first cluster of peptide sequences contains the motif W-X-X-F-X-X-L (where X can be any amino acid) and the second cluster contains the motif F-P-L-K-G. We have synthesized bifunctional peptide linkers that contain BMP-2 and collagen-binding domains. Using a rat ectopic bone formation model, we have injected rhBMP-2 into a collagen matrix with or without a bifunctional BMP-2: collagen peptide (BC-1). The presence of BC-1 significantly increased osteogenic cellular activity, the area of bone formed, and bone maturity at the site of injection. Our results suggest that bifunctional peptides that can simultaneously bind to a growth factor and an implantable biomaterial can be used to control the delivery and release of growth factors at the site of implantation.

  11. The mouse muscle creatine kinase promoter faithfully drives reporter gene expression in transgenic Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wayland; Neff, Eric S; Furlow, J David

    2004-06-17

    Developing Xenopus laevis experience two periods of muscle differentiation, once during embryogenesis and again at metamorphosis. During metamorphosis, thyroid hormone induces both muscle growth in the limbs and muscle death in the tail. In mammals, the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene is activated during the differentiation from myoblasts to myocytes and has served as both a marker for muscle development and to drive transgene expression in transgenic mice. Transcriptional control elements are generally highly conserved throughout evolution, potentially allowing mouse promoter use in transgenic X. laevis. This paper compares endogenous X. laevis MCK gene expression and the mouse MCK (mMCK) promoter driving a green fluorescent protein reporter in transgenic X. laevis. The mMCK promoter demonstrated strong skeletal muscle-specific transgene expression in both the juvenile tadpole and adult frog. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrate the functional conservation of regulatory sequences in vertebrate muscle gene promoters and illustrate the utility of using X. laevis transgenesis for detailed comparative study of mammalian promoter activity in vivo.

  12. Enolase isoenzymes in adult and developing Xenopus laevis and characterization of a cloned enolase sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Segil, N; Shrutkowski, A; Dworkin, M B; Dworkin-Rastl, E

    1988-01-01

    As part of a study of glycolysis during early development we have examined the pattern of expression of enolase isoenzymes in Xenopus laevis. In addition, the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone coding for the complete amino acid sequence of one enolase gene (ENO1) in X. laevis was determined. X. laevis ENO1 shows highest homology to mammalian non-neuronal enolase. Analysis of enolase isoenzymes in X. laevis by non-denaturing electrophoresis on cellulose acetate strips revealed five isoenzymes. One form was present in all tissues tested, two additional forms were expressed in oocytes, embryos, adult liver and adult brain, and two further forms were restricted to larval and adult muscle. Since enolase is a dimer, three different monomers (gene products) could account for the observed number of isoenzymes. This pattern of enolase isoenzyme expression in X. laevis differs from that of birds and mammals. In birds and mammals the most acidic form is neuron-specific and there is only one major isoenzyme expressed in the liver. RNAase protection experiments showed the presence of ENO1 mRNA in oocytes, liver and muscle, suggesting that it codes for a non-tissue-restricted isoenzyme. ENO1 mRNA concentrations are high in early oocytes, decrease during oogenesis and decrease further after fertilization. Enolase protein, however, is maintained at high concentrations throughout this period. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3390159

  13. [Xenopus laevis peroxiredoxins: Gene expression during development and characterization of the enzymes].

    PubMed

    Sharapov, M G; Novoselov, V I; Ravin, V K

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced via catabolic and anabolic processes during normal embryonic development, and ROS content in the cell is maintained at a certain level. Peroxiredoxins are a family of selenium-independent peroxidases and play a key role in maintaining redox homeostasis of the cell. In addition to regulating the ROS level, peroxiredoxins are involved in intracellular and intercellular signaling, cell differentiation, and tissue development. The time course of peroxiredoxin gene (prx1-6) expression was studied in Xenopus laevis during early ontogeny (Nieuwkoop and Faber stages 10-63). The highest expression level was observed for prx1 at these developmental stages. The prx1, prx3, and prx4 expression level changed most dramatically in response to oxidative stress artificially induced in X. laevis embryos. In X. laevis adults, prx1-6 were all intensely expressed in all organs examined, the prx1 expression level being the highest. The X. laevis prx1-6 genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and physico-chemical characteristics were compared for the recombinant enzymes. The highest peroxidase activity and thermal stability were observed for Prx1 and Prx2. It was assumed that Prx1 plays a leading role in X. laevis early development.

  14. Xenopus laevis is a potential alternative model animal species to study reproductive toxicity of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Cong, Lin; Qin, Zhan-Fen; Jing, Xiang-Ning; Yang, Lei; Zhou, Jing-Ming; Xu, Xiao-Bai

    2006-05-10

    This study investigated effects of phytoestrogen quercetin on the gonadal development in Xenopus laevis. X. laevis at Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 46/47 were exposed to 50, 100 and 200 microg/L quercetin till 1 month postmetamorphosis. Gonads from frogs at 1 and 3 months postmetamorphosis were examined in gross morphology and histology. The highest dose of quercetin as well as estradiol (E2) significantly increased the percentages of phenotypic females. Exposure to quercetin at all doses induced abnormal testes with certain ovarian characteristics to some degree in gross morphology, including ovotestes. The abnormality rate exceeded 10% in each quercetin treatment. Histologic examination revealed that some abnormal testes exhibited intersexuality with testicular structure and ovarian structure or oocytes interspersed in testicular structure at 1 month postmetamorphosis. At 3 months postmetamorphosis, testicular abnormalities were more obvious, such as necrosis or apoptosis of spermatogonia, occurrence of developed or undeveloped oocytes, delay of the development of seminiferous tubes without or less late stage spermatocytes. The results have shown that quercetin cannot only feminize but also impair testicular development of X. laevis, i.e. X. laevis is sensitive to phytoestrogen. It is suggested that X. laevis might be an alternative model species to study reproductive toxicity of phytoestrogens.

  15. Thyroxine-dependent modulations of the expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule N-CAM during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Levi, G; Broders, F; Dunon, D; Edelman, G M; Thiery, J P

    1990-04-01

    During amphibian metamorphosis, a complete remodeling of the phenotype takes place under complex hormonal control whose final effectors are thyroid hormones. This process implies the activation of coordinated programs of cell death, proliferation, migration, adhesion and differentiation. Inasmuch as the neural cell adhesion molecule N-CAM is thought to play a central role in the control of morphogenetic processes, we have studied by immunohistofluorescence and immunoblots the patterns of expression of N-CAM at different stages of Xenopus laevis metamorphosis. A scan was made of all major organs and appendages. Before the metamorphic climax, all neuronal cell bodies and processes express high levels of N-CAM. During the metamorphic climax, N-CAM expression decreases sharply on the cell bodies and processes of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) but remains high in the central nervous system (CNS). Towards the end of metamorphosis, the PNS and spinal nerves are virtually negative for N-CAM while the CNS is still positive. The optic and olfactory nerves, although myelinated, are still strongly positive for N-CAM. The lens and olfactory epithelia express N-CAM throughout metamorphosis. In the brain. N-CAM is present at all times as three polypeptides of 180, 140, and 120 X 10(3) Mr; before metamorphosis some of the N-CAM is in its polysialylated form. During metamorphosis and the subsequent growth of the animal, the amount of N-CAM decreases gradually. In all polypeptides, the polysialylated form is the first to disappear. Cardiac muscle expresses high level of N-CAM from its first formation throughout metamorphosis; in contrast, the level of N-CAM in skeletal muscle is high in newly formed muscles, but decreases rapidly after myoblast fusion. The liver of adult Xenopus contains large amounts of a 160 X 10(3) polypeptide that is recognized by polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against N-CAM. cDNA probes of Xenopus brain N-CAM recognize major transcripts of 9.2, 3

  16. Bone morphogenetic proteins in orthopaedic trauma: recent clinical findings with human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2).

    PubMed

    Patel, A D

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces papers based on presentations from a symposium entitled "Bone Morphogenic Protein Advisory Meeting in Orthopaedic Trauma", where recent clinical findings with human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) were reviewed. It also presents two case studies which illustrate the clinical problems with the potential morbidity of tibial fractures and the potential benefits of the use of rhBMP-2 at surgery. The article concludes with a summary of the symposium. Tibial shaft fracture repair is associated with a significant financial burden on the patient, the health care providers and the medical insurance companies. It is anticipated that the clinical advantages of rhBMP-2 could lead to cost savings both inside and outside the hospital setting.

  17. A gene expression map of the larval Xenopus laevis head reveals developmental changes underlying the evolution of new skeletal elements.

    PubMed

    Square, Tyler; Jandzik, David; Cattell, Maria; Coe, Alex; Doherty, Jacob; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans

    2015-01-15

    The morphology of the vertebrate head skeleton is highly plastic, with the number, size, shape, and position of its components varying dramatically between groups. While this evolutionary flexibility has been key to vertebrate success, its developmental and genetic bases are poorly understood. The larval head skeleton of the frog Xenopus laevis possesses a unique combination of ancestral tetrapod features and anuran-specific novelties. We built a detailed gene expression map of the head mesenchyme in X. laevis during early larval development, focusing on transcription factor families with known functions in vertebrate head skeleton development. This map was then compared to homologous gene expression in zebrafish, mouse, and shark embryos to identify conserved and evolutionarily flexible aspects of vertebrate head skeleton development. While we observed broad conservation of gene expression between X. laevis and other gnathostomes, we also identified several divergent features that correlate to lineage-specific novelties. We noted a conspicuous change in dlx1/2 and emx2 expression in the second pharyngeal arch, presaging the differentiation of the reduced dorsal hyoid arch skeletal element typical of modern anamniote tetrapods. In the first pharyngeal arch we observed a shift in the expression of the joint inhibitor barx1, and new expression of the joint marker gdf5, shortly before skeletal differentiation. This suggests that the anuran-specific infrarostral cartilage evolved by partitioning of Meckel's cartilage with a new paired joint. Taken together, these comparisons support a model in which early patterning mechanisms divide the vertebrate head mesenchyme into a highly conserved set of skeletal precursor populations. While subtle changes in this early patterning system can affect skeletal element size, they do not appear to underlie the evolution of new joints or cartilages. In contrast, later expression of the genes that regulate skeletal element

  18. Enzymatic crosslinking and degradation of gelatin as a switch for bone morphogenetic protein-2 activity.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Kenrick; Fang, Josephine Y; Yang, Zhi; Han, Bo

    2011-12-01

    Current therapies for tissue regeneration rely on the presence or direct delivery of growth factors to sites of repair. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), combined with a carrier (usually collagen), is clinically proven to induce new bone formation during spinal fusion and nonunion repair. However, due to BMP-2's short half-life and its diffusive properties, orders of magnitude above physiological levels are required to ensure effectiveness. In addition, a high dose of this multifunctional growth factor is known to induce adverse effects in patients. To circumvent these challenges, we proposed and tested a new approach for BMP-2 delivery, by controlling BMP activity via carrier binding and localized proteolysis. BMP-2 was covalently bound to gelatin through site-specific enzymatic crosslinking using a microbial transglutaminase. Binding of BMP-2 to gelatin can completely switch off BMP-2 activity, as evidenced by loss of its transdifferentiating ability toward C2C12 promyoblasts. When gelatin sequestered BMP-2 is incubated with either microbial collagenase or tissue-derived matrix metalloproteinases, BMP-2 activity is fully restored. The activity of released BMP-2 correlates with the protease activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This observation suggests a novel way of delivering BMP-2 and controlling its activity. This improved delivery method, which relies on a physiological feedback, should enhance the known potential of this and other growth factors for tissue repair and regeneration.

  19. Bone morphogenetic proteins induce the expression of noggin, which limits their activity in cultured rat osteoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Gazzerro, E; Gangji, V; Canalis, E

    1998-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce the differentiation of cells of the osteoblastic lineage and enhance the function of the osteoblast. Growth factors are regulated by binding proteins, but there is no information about binding proteins for BMPs in skeletal cells. Noggin specifically binds BMPs, but its expression by cells of the osteoblastic lineage has not been reported. We tested for the expression of noggin and its induction by BMP-2 in cultures of osteoblast-enriched cells from 22-d-old fetal rat calvariae (Ob cells). BMP-2 caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in noggin mRNA and polypeptide levels, as determined by Northern and Western blot analyses. The effects of BMP-2 on noggin transcripts were dependent on protein, but independent of DNA synthesis. BMP-2 increased the rates of noggin transcription as determined by nuclear run-on assays. BMP-4, BMP-6, and TGF-beta1 increased noggin mRNA in Ob cells, but basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet- derived growth factor BB, and IGF-I did not. Noggin decreased the stimulatory effects of BMPs on DNA and collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase activity in Ob cells. In conclusion, BMPs induce noggin transcription in Ob cells, a probable mechanism to limit BMP action in osteoblasts. PMID:9854046

  20. The maturation-inducing hormone 17a-20b-dihydroxy-4pregnen-3-one regulates gene expression of inhibin A and bambi (bone morphogenetic protein and activin membrane bound inhibitor) in the rainbow trout ovary

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFb) superfamily members are important paracrine and autocrine regulators of ovarian development and steroidogenesis in mammals and birds, but their reproductive roles in fish are not well understood. The activin system, Tgfb, and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (Bmp...

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of novel ficolins from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Kakinuma, Yuji; Endo, Yuichi; Takahashi, Minoru; Nakata, Munehiro; Matsushita, Misao; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Fujita, Teizo

    2003-04-01

    Ficolins are proteins characterized by the presence of collagen- and fibrinogen-like domains. Two of three human ficolins, L-ficolin and H-ficolin, are serum lectins and are thought to play crucial roles in host defense through opsonization and complement activation. To elucidate the evolution of ficolins and the primordial complement lectin pathway, we cloned four ficolin cDNAs from Xenopus laevis, termed Xenopus ficolin (XeFCN) 1, 2, 3 and 4. The deduced amino acid sequences of the four ficolins revealed the conserved collagen- and fibrinogen-like domains. The full sequences of the four ficolins showed a 42-56% identity to human ficolins, and 60-83% between one another. Northern blots showed that XeFCN1 was expressed mainly in liver, spleen and heart, and XeFCN2 and XeFCN4 mainly in peripheral blood leukocytes, lung and spleen. We isolated ficolin proteins from Xenopus serum by affinity chromatography on N-acetylglucosamine-agarose, followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The final eluate showed polymeric bands composed of two components of 37 and 40 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid sequences and treatment with endoglycosidase F showed that the two bands are the same XeFCN1 protein with different masses of N-linked sugar. The polymeric form of the two types of XeFCN1 specifically recognized GlcNAc and GalNAc residues. These results suggest that like human L-ficolin, XeFCN1 functions in the circulation through its lectin activity.

  2. pdzrn3 is required for pronephros morphogenesis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Marracci, Silvia; Vangelisti, Alberto; Raffa, Vittoria; Andreazzoli, Massimiliano; Dente, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Pdzrn3, a multidomain protein with E3-ubiquitin ligase activity, has been reported to play a role in myoblast and osteoblast differentiation and, more recently, in neuronal and endothelial cell development. The expression of the pdzrn3 gene is developmentally regulated in various vertebrate tissues, including muscular, neural and vascular system. Little is known about its expression during kidney development, although genetic polymorphisms and alterations around the human pdzrn3 chromosomal region have been found to be associated with renal cell carcinomas and other kidney diseases. We investigated the pdzrn3 spatio-temporal expression pattern in Xenopus laevis embryos by in situ hybridization. We focused our study on the development of the pronephros, which is the embryonic amphibian kidney, functionally similar to the most primitive nephric structures of human kidney. To explore the role of pdzrn3 during renal morphogenesis, we performed loss-of-function experiments, through antisense morpholino injections and analysed the morphants using specific pronephric markers. Dynamic pdzrn3 expression was observed in embryonic tissues, such as somites, brain, eye, blood islands, heart, liver and pronephros. Loss of function experiments resulted in specific alterations of pronephros development. In particular, at early stages, pdzrn3 depletion was associated with a reduction of the pronephros anlagen and later, with perturbations of the tubulogenesis, including deformation of the proximal tubules. Rescue experiments, in which mRNA of the zebrafish pdzrn3 orthologue was injected together with the morpholino, allowed recovery of the kidney phenotypes. These results underline the importance of pdzrn3 expression for correct nephrogenesis.

  3. Histochemical identification of sialylated glycans in Xenopus laevis testis

    PubMed Central

    Valbuena, Galder; Alonso, Edurne; Ubago, María Martínez; Madrid, Juan Francisco; Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Sáez, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate chains of glycoprotein and glycosphingolipids are highly diverse molecules involved in many cell functions, including cell recognition, adhesion and signalling. Sialylated glycans are of special interest because the terminal position of sialic acid (NeuAc) in glycans linked by different ways to subterminal monosaccharides has been shown to be involved in several biological processes, as occurs with gangliosides, which have been reported as being essential in spermatogenesis in mammals. Some glycan-binding proteins, the lectins, which specifically recognize glycan sequences, have been extensively used to characterize tissue and cell carbohydrates by means of cytochemical techniques. The aim of the present work was to determine the presence of NeuAc by means of histochemical techniques in the testis of Xenopus laevis, an animal model widely used in cell and molecular biology research. However, considering that some NeuAc-binding lectins are capable of binding to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), other GlcNAc-binding lectins were also assayed. The results showed that NeuAc is mainly expressed in the interstitium, and only a weak labelling in the male germ cells was observed. Most NeuAc was located in O-linked oligosaccharides, but some masked NeuAc in N-glycans were identified in primary and secondary spermatogonia and spermatocytes. By contrast, GlcNAc was widely expressed in all germ cell types. Deglycosylative pre-treatments suggest that both N- and O-glycans and/or glycolipids could be responsible for this labelling. In addition, GlcNAc in O-linked oligosaccharides has been identified in spermatogonial cells. The acrosome of spermatids was always negative. Variations of glycan expression have been found in different cell types, suggesting that glycosylation is modified during spermatogenetic development. PMID:22881213

  4. Epithelial cell division in the Xenopus laevis embryo during gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Hatte, Guillaume; Tramier, Marc; Prigent, Claude; Tassan, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    How vertebrate epithelial cells divide in vivo and how the cellular environment influences cell division is currently poorly understood. A sine qua non condition to study cell division in situ is the ease of observation of cell division. This is fulfilled in the Xenopus embryo at the gastrula stage where polarized epithelial cells divide with a high frequency at the surface of the organism. Recently, using this model system, we have shown that epithelial cells divide by asymmetric furrowing and that the mode of cell division is regulated during development. Here, we further characterize epithelial cell division in situ. To this end, we used confocal microscopy to study epithelial cell division in the ectoderm of the Xenopus laevis gastrula. Cell division was followed either by indirect immunofluorescence in fixed embryos or by live imaging of embryos transiently expressing diverse fluorescent proteins. Here, we show that during cytokinesis, the plasma membranes of the two daughter cells are usually separated by a gap. For most divisions, daughter cells make contacts basally at a distance from the furrow tip which creates an inverted teardrop-like shaped volume tightly associated with the furrow. At the end of cytokinesis, the inverted teardrop is resorbed; thus it is a transient structure. Several proteins involved in cytokinesis are localized at the tip of the inverted teardrop suggesting that the formation of the gap could be an active process. We also show that intercalation of neighboring cells between daughter cells occasionally occurs during cytokinesis. Our results reveal an additional level of complexity in the relationship between dividing cells and also with their neighboring cells during cytokinesis in the Xenopus embryo epithelium.

  5. Quantifying calcium fluxes underlying calcium puffs in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Luciana; Solovey, Guillermo; Ventura, Alejandra C.; Dargan, Sheila; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2010-01-01

    Summary We determine the calcium fluxes through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor/channels underlying calcium puffs of Xenopus laevis oocytes using a simplified version of the algorithm of Ventura et al., 2005 [1]. An analysis of 130 puffs obtained with Fluo-4 indicates that Ca2+ release comes from a region of width ~ 450 nm, that the release duration is peaked around 18ms and that the underlying Ca2+ currents range between 0.12 and 0.95pA. All these parameters are independent of IP3 concentration. We explore what distributions of channels that open during a puff, Np, and what relations between current and number of open channels, I(Np), are compatible with our findings and with the distribution of puff-to-trigger amplitude ratio reported in Rose et al, 2006 [2]. To this end, we use simple “mean field” models in which all channels open and close simultaneously. We find that the variability among clusters plays an important role in shaping the observed puff amplitude distribution and that a model for which I(Np) ~Np for small Np and I(Np)~Np1/α (α>1) for large Np, provides the best agreement. Simulations of more detailed models in which channels open and close stochastically show that this nonlinear behavior can be attributed to the limited time resolution of the observations and to the averaging procedure that is implicit in the mean-field models. These conclusions are also compatible with observations of ~400 puffs obtained using the dye Oregon green. PMID:20097419

  6. [Morphogenetic foundations for increased evolutionary complexity in the organization of thecate hydroids shoots (Cnidaria, Hydroidomedusa, Leptomedusae)].

    PubMed

    Kosevich, I A

    2012-01-01

    The morphogenetic approach is applied to analyze the diversity of spatial organization of shoots in thecate hydroids (Cnidaria, Hydroidomedusa, Leptomedusae). The main tendencies and constraints of increased evolutionary complexity in thecate hydroids colonies are uncovered.

  7. Biochemical study of prolactin binding sites in Xenopus laevis brain and choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Muccioli, G.; Guardabassi, A.; Pattono, P. )

    1990-03-01

    The occurrence of prolactin binding sites in some brain structures (telencephalon, ventral hypothalamus, myelencephalon, hypophysis, and choroid plexus) from Xenopus laevis (anuran amphibian) was studied by the in vitro biochemical technique. The higher binding values were obtained at the level of the choroid plexus and above all of the hypothalamus. On the bases of hormonal specificity and high affinity, these binding sites are very similar to those of prolactin receptors of classical target tissues as well as of those described by us in other structures from Xenopus. To our knowledge, the present results provide the first demonstration of the occurrence of prolactin specific binding sites in Xenopus laevis choroid plexus cells.

  8. Parasites of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, in southern California, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuperman, Boris I.; Matey, Victoria E.; Fisher, Richard N.; Ervin, Edward L.; Warburton, Manna L.; Bakhireva, Ludmila; Lehman, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    A total of 230 feral African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis, from 3 localities in southern California were examined for parasites. The following species were found: 3 species of Protozoa, Nyctotherussp., Balantidium xenopodis, Protoopalina xenopodus; 2 species of Monogenea, Protopolystoma xenopodis, Gyrdicotylus gallieni; 1 species of Digenea, Clinostomum sp. (as metacercariae); 1 species of Cestoda, Cephalochlamys namaquensis; 2 species of Nematoda, Contracaecum sp. (as larvae), Eustrongylides sp. (as larvae); and 1 species of Acanthocephala, Acanthocephalus sp. (as cystacanth). Of these, the protozoans P. xenopodus and B. xenopodis, both monogeneans, and the cestode have an African origin. Contracaecum sp., Eustrongylides sp., and Acanthocephalus sp. have not been previously reported from X. laevis.

  9. Heterotopic ossification after the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7

    PubMed Central

    Papanagiotou, Marianthi; Dailiana, Zoe H; Karachalios, Theophilos; Varitimidis, Sokratis; Hantes, Michael; Dimakopoulos, Georgios; Vlychou, Marianna; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2017-01-01

    AIM To present the incidence of heterotopic ossification after the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7 (rhBMP-7) for the treatment of nonunions. METHODS Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote bone formation by auto-induction. Recombinant human BMP-7 in combination with bone grafts was used in 84 patients for the treatment of long bone nonunions. All patients were evaluated radiographicaly for the development of heterotopic ossification during the standard assessment for the nonunion healing. In all patients (80.9%) with radiographic signs of heterotopic ossification, a CT scan was performed. Nonunion site palpation and ROM evaluation of the adjacent joints were also carried out. Factors related to the patient (age, gender), the nonunion (location, size, chronicity, number of previous procedures, infection, surrounding tissues condition) and the surgical procedure (graft and fixation type, amount of rhBMP-7) were correlated with the development of heterotopic ossification and statistical analysis with Pearsons χ2 test was performed. RESULTS Eighty point nine percent of the nonunions treated with rhBMP-7, healed with no need for further procedures. Heterotopic bone formation occurred in 15 of 84 patients (17.8%) and it was apparent in the routine radiological evaluation of the nonunion site, in a mean time of 5.5 mo after the rhBMP-7 application (range 3-12). The heterotopic ossification was located at the femur in 8 cases, at the tibia in 6, and at the humerus in οne patient. In 4 patients a palpable mass was present and only in one patient, with a para-articular knee nonunion treated with rhBMP-7, the size of heterotopic ossification affected the knee range of motion. All the patients with heterotopic ossification were male. Statistical analysis proved that patient’s gender was the only important factor for the development of heterotopic ossification (P = 0.007). CONCLUSION Heterotopic ossification after the use of rhBMP-7 in nonunions was

  10. Novel bone morphogenetic protein signaling through Smad2 and Smad3 to regulate cancer progression and development

    PubMed Central

    Holtzhausen, Alisha; Golzio, Christelle; How, Tam; Lee, Yong-Hun; Schiemann, William P.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Blobe, Gerard C.

    2014-01-01

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathways have important roles in embryonic development and cellular homeostasis, with aberrant BMP signaling resulting in a broad spectrum of human disease. We report that BMPs unexpectedly signal through the canonical transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-responsive Smad2 and Smad3. BMP-induced Smad2/3 signaling occurs preferentially in embryonic cells and transformed cells. BMPs signal to Smad2/3 by stimulating complex formation between the BMP-binding TGF-β superfamily receptors, activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)3/6, and the Smad2/3 phosphorylating receptors ALK5/7. BMP signaling through Smad2 mediates, in part, dorsoventral axis patterning in zebrafish embryos, whereas BMP signaling through Smad3 facilitates cancer cell invasion. Consistent with increased BMP-mediated Smad2/3 signaling during cancer progression, Smad1/5 and Smad 2/3 signaling converge in human cancer specimens. Thus, the signaling mechanisms used by BMPs and TGF-β superfamily receptors are broader than previously appreciated.—Holtzhausen, A., Golzio, C., How, T., Lee, Y.-H., Schiemann, W. P., Katsanis, N., Blobe, G. C. Novel bone morphogenetic protein signaling through Smad2 and Smad3 to regulate cancer progression and development. PMID:24308972

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 regulates the differentiation of nitrergic enteric neurons by modulating Smad1 signaling in slow transit constipation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuliang; Liu, Shangming; Xu, Yanan; Liu, Xiuqin; Sun, Daqing

    2015-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) belong to the transforming growth factor superfamily and have been implicated in chondrogenesis and neuronal differentiation. In order to examine the function of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP‑2) on the differentiation of nitrergic enteric neurons in slow transit constipation (STC), the expression of BMP‑2 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) was investigated in the myenteric nerve plexus in STC and control tissues by immunohistochemical assays. The present study demonstrated that BMP‑2 and nNOS were expressed in the myenteric nerve plexus and their levels were differentially altered in the STC group and control group. In addition, the effect of BMP‑2 on primary myenteric neurons was investigated by measuring the neurite length. The results demonstrated that BMP‑2 regulated the differentiation of primary enteric neurons and increased the length of neurites compared with the control group. In addition, the effect of BMP‑2 on the expression of nNOS was also investigated in primary enteric neurons and the Smad1 signal transduction pathway by western blot analysis, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence assay. The results suggested that BMP‑2 promoted the expression of nNOS in primary myenteric neurons and induced phosphorylation of Smad1. These data indicate a new role for BMP‑2 as an important transcriptional cofactor that regulates the differentiation of nitrergic enteric neurons through the Smad1 pathway. Intervention of BMP‑2 may be useful for the treatment of STC.

  12. Imaging Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Experimental Gliomas12

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Anke; Waerzeggers, Yannic; Monfared, Parisa; Vukicevic, Slobodan; Kaijzel, Eric L; Winkeler, Alexandra; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) belongs to the superfamily of transforming growth factor β-like cytokines, which can act either as tumor suppressors or as tumor promoters depending on cell type and differentiation. Our investigations focused on analyzing the effects of BMP-7 during glioma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. BMP-7 treatment decreased the proliferation of Gli36ΔEGFR-LITG glioma cells up to 50%through a cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase but not by induction of apoptosis. This effect was mediated by the modulation of the expression and phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, and downstream retinoblastoma protein. Furthermore, in vivo optical imaging of luciferase activity of Gli36ΔEGFR-LITG cells implanted intracranially into nude mice in the presence or absence of BMP-7 treatment corroborated the antiproliferative effects of this cytokine. This report clearly underlines the tumor-suppressive role of BMP-7 in glioma-derived cells. Taken together, our results indicate that manipulating the BMP/transforming growth factor β signaling cascade may serve as a new strategy for imaging-guided molecular-targeted therapy of malignant gliomas. PMID:21390190

  13. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Regulates Development and Activation of CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuczma, Michal; Kraj, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors belonging to the TGF-β (transforming growth factor β) superfamily. BMPs were found to regulate multiple cell processes such as proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. They were originally described to play a pivotal role in inducing bone, cartilage, ligament, and tendon formation at both heterotopic and orthotopic sites but were found to play a significant role in embryogenesis and development of multiple tissues and organs. Activities of BMPs are regulated by a number of secreted proteins, which modulate their availability to bind cellular receptors. The functions of individual BMPs are highly redundant due to binding the same receptors and inducing overlapping signal transduction pathways. Recently, BMPs were found to regulate cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. BMPs are involved in thymic development of T cells at the early, double negative, as well as later, double positive, stages of thymopoesis. They specifically modulate thymic development of regulatory T cells (T(reg)). In the periphery, BMPs affect T cell activation, promoting generation of T(reg) cells. We found that mice deficient for one of the receptors activated by BMPs demonstrated slower growth of transplantable melanoma tumors.

  14. Morphogenetic features of soils in the Cat Tien National Park, southern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, O. S.; Myakshina, T. N.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Gubin, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    Morphogenetic features of soils on the selected plots in the Cat Tien National Park in southern Vietnam have been studied with the use of a set of morphological, analytical, and instrumental methods. The lithological factor and topographic position play the leading role in the development of the particular genetic soil features. The soils can be subdivided into four groups according to these factors. The soils developing from volcanic deposits with a predominance of tephra can be classified as thin clayey brown tropical soils (Dystric Skeletic Rhodic Cambisols (Clayic)), and the soils developed from less weathered colluvial derivatives of basalts with some admixture of tephra can be classified as dark-humus clayey tropical soils (Skeletic Greyzemic Umbrisols (Clayic)). Very poor soils developed from the eluvium of argillites are classified as thin weakly developed clayey tropical soils (Dystric Regosols (Clayic)). The soils forming from the alluvial sediments of different textures are classified as alluvial loamy sandy soils (Dystric Fluvisols (Arenic, Drainic)) and as alluvial clay loamy soils (Eutric Fluvisols (Episiltic, Endoclayic)).

  15. Role of morphogenetic proteins in skeletal tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reddi, A H

    1998-03-01

    Morphogenesis is the developmental cascade of pattern formation and body plan establishment, culminating in the adult form. It has formed the basis for the emerging discipline of tissue engineering, which uses principles of molecular developmental biology and morphogenesis gleaned through studies on inductive signals, responding stem cells, and the extracellular matrix to design and construct spare parts that restore function to the human body. Among the many organs in the body, bone has considerable powers for regeneration and is a prototype model for tissue engineering. Implantation of demineralized bone matrix into subcutaneous sites results in local bone induction. This model mimics sequential limb morphogenesis and has permitted the isolation of bone morphogens, such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), from demineralized adult bone matrix. BMPs initiate, promote, and maintain chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, but are also involved in the morphogenesis of organs other than bone. The symbiosis of the mechanisms underlying bone induction and differentiation is critical for tissue engineering and is governed by both biomechanics (physical forces) and context (microenvironment/extracellular matrix), which can be duplicated by biomimetic biomaterials such as collagens, hydroxyapatite, proteoglycans, and cell adhesion glycoproteins, including fibronectins and laminin. Rules of tissue architecture elucidated in bone morphogenesis may provide insights into tissue engineering and be universally applicable for all organs/tissues, including bones and joints.

  16. The effect of bone morphogenetic protein-2 on osteosarcoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Jonathan; Connolly, Patrick; Roth, Michael; Chung, So Hak; Zhang, Wendong; Piperdi, Sajida; Hoang, Bang; Yang, Rui; Guzik, Hillary; Gorlick, Richard; Geller, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP-2) may offer the potential to enhance allograft-host osseous union in limb-salvage surgery following osteosarcoma resection. However, there is concern regarding the effect of locally applied BMP-2 on tumor recurrence and metastasis. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effect of exogenous BMP-2 on osteosarcoma migration and invasion across a panel of tumor cell lines in vitro and to characterize the effect of BMP-2 on pulmonary osteosarcoma metastasis within a xenograft model. Experimental design The effect of BMP-2 on in vitro tumor growth and development was assessed across multiple standard and patient-derived xenograft osteosarcoma cell lines. Tumor migration capacity, invasion, and cell proliferation were characterized. In addition, the effect on metastasis was measured using a xenograft model following tail-vein injection. The effect of exogenous BMP-2 on the development of metastases was measured following both single and multiple BMP-2 administrations. Results There was no significant difference in migration capacity, invasion, or cell proliferation between the BMP-2 treated and the untreated osteosarcoma cell lines. There was no significant difference in pulmonary metastases between either the single-dose or multi-dose BMP-2 treated animals and the untreated control animals. Conclusions In the model systems tested, the addition of BMP-2 does not increase osteosarcoma proliferation, migration, invasion, or metastasis to the lungs. PMID:28264040

  17. Recurrence Methods for the Identification of Morphogenetic Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Angelo; Mocenni, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of identifying the parameters involved in the formation of spatial patterns in nonlinear two dimensional systems. To this aim, we perform numerical experiments on a prototypical model generating morphogenetic Turing patterns, by changing both the spatial frequency and shape of the patterns. The features of the patterns and their relationship with the model parameters are characterized by means of the Generalized Recurrence Quantification measures. We show that the recurrence measures Determinism and Recurrence Entropy, as well as the distribution of the line lengths, allow for a full characterization of the patterns in terms of power law decay with respect to the parameters involved in the determination of their spatial frequency and shape. A comparison with the standard two dimensional Fourier transform is performed and the results show a better performance of the recurrence indicators in identifying a reliable connection with the spatial frequency of the patterns. Finally, in order to evaluate the robustness of the estimation of the power low decay, extensive simulations have been performed by adding different levels of noise to the patterns. PMID:24066062

  18. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  19. Unequal contribution of native South African phylogeographic lineages to the invasion of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Courant, Julien; Herrel, Anthony; Rebelo, Rui; Rödder, Dennis; Measey, G. John; Backeljau, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Due to both deliberate and accidental introductions, invasive African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis) populations have become established worldwide. In this study, we investigate the geographic origins of invasive X. laevis populations in France and Portugal using the phylogeographic structure of X. laevis in its native South African range. In total, 80 individuals from the whole area known to be invaded in France and Portugal were analysed for two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes, allowing a comparison with 185 specimens from the native range. Our results show that native phylogeographic lineages have contributed differently to invasive European X. laevis populations. In Portugal, genetic and historical data suggest a single colonization event involving a small number of individuals from the south-western Cape region in South Africa. In contrast, French invasive X. laevis encompass two distinct native phylogeographic lineages, i.e., one from the south-western Cape region and one from the northern regions of South Africa. The French X. laevis population is the first example of a X. laevis invasion involving multiple lineages. Moreover, the lack of population structure based on nuclear DNA suggests a potential role for admixture within the invasive French population. PMID:26855879

  20. Lethal and sublethal effects of three insecticides on two developmental stages of Xenopus laevis and comparison with other amphibians.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuangying; Wages, Mike R; Cai, Qingsong; Maul, Jonathan D; Cobb, George P

    2013-09-01

    It has been suggested that Xenopus laevis is less sensitive than other amphibians to some chemicals, and therefore, that the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX) may have limited use in risk assessments for other amphibians. However, comparisons are based mostly on results of FETAX, which emphasizes embryos. Larval X. laevis may be more sensitive to chemicals than embryos and may serve as a better life stage in risk assessments. The present study was conducted to determine the lethal and sublethal effects of 3 insecticides (malathion, endosulfan, and α-cypermethrin) on X. laevis embryos and larvae and to compare toxicity of X. laevis with that of other amphibians. All 3 insecticides have different modes of action, and they caused mortality, malformations, and growth inhibition in both developmental stages. Compared with embryos, larvae were more sensitive to endosulfan and α-cypermethrin but not to malathion. Xenopus laevis larvae had low sensitivity to endosulfan, median sensitivity to malathion, and high sensitivity to α-cypermethrin/cypermethrin relative to other larval amphibians. Our results suggest that X. laevis larvae may generate more protective toxicity estimates in risk assessments than embryos. Xenopus laevis may have limited use in evaluating risk of organochlorine insecticides to other amphibians but may provide useful toxicity thresholds for pyrethroid and perhaps organophosphorus insecticides.

  1. Unequal contribution of native South African phylogeographic lineages to the invasion of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, in Europe.

    PubMed

    De Busschere, Charlotte; Courant, Julien; Herrel, Anthony; Rebelo, Rui; Rödder, Dennis; Measey, G John; Backeljau, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Due to both deliberate and accidental introductions, invasive African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis) populations have become established worldwide. In this study, we investigate the geographic origins of invasive X. laevis populations in France and Portugal using the phylogeographic structure of X. laevis in its native South African range. In total, 80 individuals from the whole area known to be invaded in France and Portugal were analysed for two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes, allowing a comparison with 185 specimens from the native range. Our results show that native phylogeographic lineages have contributed differently to invasive European X. laevis populations. In Portugal, genetic and historical data suggest a single colonization event involving a small number of individuals from the south-western Cape region in South Africa. In contrast, French invasive X. laevis encompass two distinct native phylogeographic lineages, i.e., one from the south-western Cape region and one from the northern regions of South Africa. The French X. laevis population is the first example of a X. laevis invasion involving multiple lineages. Moreover, the lack of population structure based on nuclear DNA suggests a potential role for admixture within the invasive French population.

  2. Neural transduction in Xenopus laevis lateral line system.

    PubMed

    Strelioff, D; Honrubia, V

    1978-03-01

    1. The process of neural excitation in hair cell systems was studied in an in vitro preparation of the Xenopus laevis (African clawed toad) lateral line organ. A specially designed stimulus chamber was used to apply accurately controlled pressure, water movement, or electrical stimuli, and to record the neural responses of the two afferent fibers innervating each organ or stitch. The objective of the study was to determine the characteristics of the neural responses to these stimuli, and thus gain insight into the transduction process. 2. A sustained deflection of the hair cell cilia due to a constant flow of water past the capula resulted in a maintained change in the mean firing rate (MFR) of the afferent fibers. The data also demonstrated that the neural response was proportional to the velocity of the water flow and indicated that both deflection and movement of the cilia were the effective physiological stimuli for this hair cell system. 3. The preparations responded to sinusoidal water movements (past the capula) over the entire frequency range of the stimulus chamber, 0.1-130 Hz, and were most sensitive between 10 and 40 Hz. The variation of the MFR and the percent modulation indicated that the average dynamic range of each organ was 23.5 dB. 4. The thresholds, if any, for sustained pressure changes and for sinusoidal pressure variations in the absence of water movements were very high. Due to the limitations of the stimulus chamber it was not possible to generate pressure stimuli of sufficient magnitude to elicit a neural response without also generating suprathreshold water-movement stimuli. Sustained pressures had no detectable effect on the neural response to water-movement stimuli. 5. The preparations were very sensitive to electrical potentials applied across the toad skin on which the hair cells were located. Potentials which made the ciliated surfaces of the hair cells positive with respect to their bases increased the MFR of the fibers, whereas

  3. Significance of temporal and spectral acoustic cues for sexual recognition in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Vignal, Clémentine; Kelley, Darcy

    2006-01-01

    As in many anurans, males of the totally aquatic species, Xenopus laevis, advertise their sexual receptivity using vocalizations. Unusually for anurans, X. laevis females also advertise producing a fertility call that results in courtship duets between partners. Although all X. laevis calls consist of repetitive click trains, male and female calls exhibit sex-specific acoustic features that might convey sexual identity. We tested the significance of the carrier frequency and the temporal pattern of calls using underwater playback experiments in which modified calls were used to evoke vocal responses in males. Since males respond differently to male and female calls, the modification of a key component of sexual identity in calls should change the male's response. We found that a female-like slow call rhythm triggers more vocal activity than a male-like fast rhythm. A call containing both a female-like temporal pattern and a female-like carrier frequency elicits higher levels of courtship display than either feature alone. In contrast, a male-like temporal pattern is sufficient to trigger typical male–male encounter vocalizations regardless of spectral cues. Thus, our evidence supports a role for temporal acoustic cues in sexual identity recognition and for spectral acoustic cues in conveying female attractiveness in X. laevis. PMID:17476767

  4. Identification and expression of an atypical isoform of metallothionein in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Scudiero, Rosaria; Tussellino, Margherita; Carotenuto, Rosa

    2015-05-01

    Exploiting the annotation of the western clawed frog Silurana tropicalis genome, we identified a new metallothionein (MT) gene, exhibiting all the features to be considered an active gene, but with an atypical coding region, showing only 17 cysteine residues instead of the canonical 20 cysteines of vertebrate metallothioneins and two anomalous cysteine triplets. However, the presence of a gene in the genome does not ensure its effective expression. By using conventional and Real-Time PCR analyses, we demonstrated that this atypical MT is constitutively expressed throughout the life cycle of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis; moreover, this gene is highly expressed in the adult liver, the major site of MT expression and synthesis in vertebrates. To our knowledge, the X. laevis MT described in this paper is the first sequence of a vertebrate MT showing only 17 cysteine residues, arranged in two Cys-Cys-Cys motifs. Phylogenetic analyses also demonstrated that the atypical X. laevis MT merges in the anuran clade, but is the most derived sequence among tetrapods MTs. Finally, Tajima's Relative Rate Test suggested a different evolutionary rate between the canonical X. laevis MT and this novel isoform.

  5. Effects of the biocide methylisothiazolinone on Xenopus laevis wound healing and tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Delos Santos, Nicole; Azmat, Summer; Cuenca, Yesenia; Drenth, Jessica; Lauper, Julia; Tseng, Ai-Sun

    2016-12-01

    The South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, has a strong history as a suitable model for environmental studies. Its embryos and transparent tadpoles are highly sensitive to the environment and their developmental processes are well described. It is also amenable for molecular studies. These characteristics enable its use for rapid identification and understanding of exposure-induced defects. To investigate the consequences of chemical exposure on aquatic animals, Xenopus laevis embryos and tadpoles were exposed to the biocide, methylisothiazolinone (MIT). Frog tadpoles exposed to MIT following tail amputation lost their natural regenerative ability. This inhibition of regeneration led to a failure to regrow tissues including the spinal cord, muscle, and notochord. This MIT-dependent regenerative defect is due to a failure to close the amputation wound. A wound healing assay revealed that while untreated embryos close their wounds within one day after injury, MIT-treated animals maintained open wounds that did not reduce in size and caused lethality. Concomitant exposure of MIT with chemicals containing thiol groups such as glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine restored normal wound healing and regeneration responses in tadpoles. Together these results indicate that exposure to MIT impairs developmental wound repair and tissue regeneration in Xenopus laevis. Thus, this study reveals new aspects of MIT activity and demonstrates that Xenopus laevis is a well-suited model for facilitating future research into chemical exposure effects on injury responses.

  6. On the natural diet of Daphnia laevis in the eutrophic Pampulha reservoir (Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais).

    PubMed

    Eskinazi-Sant'Anna, E M; Maia-Barbosa, P M; Barbosa, F A R

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the major food items ingested by adult specimens of Daphnia laevis within the eutrophic Pampulha reservoir in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The gut content was analyzed after addition of sodium hypochlorite and also through the examination of dissected guts under scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that Chlorophyceae was the main food item ingested, representing c. 80.5% of the total ingested food. Moreover, Eutetramorus fottii, Coelastrum pseudomicroporum and Oocystis lacustris, the dominant phytoplankton species within the reservoir, were the most frequent cells found in the gut contents. Euglenophyta also represented an important food item accounting for 15% of the ingested material, including mainly Trachelomonas volvocina and Euglena oxyuris, although less abundant in the reservoir (< 10% of total phytoplankton). Blue-green algae occurred at much lower percentages in the guts than in the phytoplankton. A small amount of undigested Microcystis aeruginosa colonies were also found in the gut content of D. laevis. Scanning electron microscopy results showed that, besides phytoplankton cells, a great amount of abiogenic material was also ingested. The amount of this inorganic material increased considerably in the tract (from 15% to 75% of the gut content), when a peak of D. laevis was observed in the reservoir. Our assumption is that the ingestion of this inorganic material can be a strategy used by D. laevis to obtain additional food supply.

  7. Pattern of Neurogenesis and Identification of Neuronal Progenitor Subtypes during Pallial Development in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Nerea; González, Agustín

    2017-01-01

    The complexity of the pallium during evolution has increased dramatically in many different respects. The highest level of complexity is found in mammals, where most of the pallium (cortex) shows a layered organization and neurons are generated during development following an inside-out order, a sequence not observed in other amniotes (birds and reptiles). Species-differences may be related to major neurogenetic events, from the neural progenitors that divide and produce all pallial cells. In mammals, two main types of precursors have been described, primary precursor cells in the ventricular zone (vz; also called radial glial cells or apical progenitors) and secondary precursor cells (called basal or intermediate progenitors) separated from the ventricle surface. Previous studies suggested that pallial neurogenetic cells, and especially the intermediate progenitors, evolved independently in mammalian and sauropsid lineages. In the present study, we examined pallial neurogenesis in the amphibian Xenopus laevis, a representative species of the only group of tetrapods that are anamniotes. The pattern of pallial proliferation during embryonic and larval development was studied, together with a multiple immunohistochemical analysis of putative progenitor cells. We found that there are two phases of progenitor divisions in the developing pallium that, following the radial unit concept from the ventricle to the mantle, finally result in an outside-in order of mature neurons, what seems to be the primitive condition of vertebrates. Gene expressions of key transcription factors that characterize radial glial cells in the vz were demonstrated in Xenopus. In addition, although mitotic cells were corroborated outside the vz, the expression pattern of markers for intermediate progenitors differed from mammals.

  8. Characterization of the hypothalamus of Xenopus laevis during development. II. The basal regions.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín; Moreno, Nerea

    2014-04-01

    The expression patterns of conserved developmental regulatory transcription factors and neuronal markers were analyzed in the basal hypothalamus of Xenopus laevis throughout development by means of combined immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. The connectivity of the main subdivisions was investigated by in vitro tracing techniques with dextran amines. The basal hypothalamic region is topologically rostral to the basal diencephalon and is composed of the tuberal (rostral) and mammillary (caudal) subdivisions, according to the prosomeric model. It is dorsally bounded by the optic chiasm and the alar hypothalamus, and caudally by the diencephalic prosomere p3. The tuberal hypothalamus is defined by the expression of Nkx2.1, xShh, and Isl1, and rostral and caudal portions can be distinguished by the distinct expression of Otp rostrally and Nkx2.2 caudally. In the mammillary region the xShh/Nkx2.1 combination defined the rostral mammillary area, expressing Nkx2.1, and the caudal retromammillary area, expressing xShh. The expression of xLhx1, xDll4, and Otp in the mammillary area and Isl1 in the tuberal region highlights the boundary between the two basal hypothalamic territories. Both regions are strongly connected with subpallial regions, especially those conveying olfactory/vomeronasal information, and also possess abundant intrahypothalamic connections. They show reciprocal connections with the diencephalon (mainly the thalamus), project to the midbrain tectum, and are bidirectionally related to the rhombencephalon. These results illustrate that the basal hypothalamus of anurans shares many features of specification, regionalization, and hodology with amniotes, reinforcing the idea of a basic bauplan in the organization of this prosencephalic region in all tetrapods.

  9. Twitch and tetanic tension during culture of mature Xenopus laevis single muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, R T; Feenstra, H M; Lee- de Groot, M B; Huijing, P A; van der Laarse, W J

    2001-12-01

    Investigation of the mechanisms of muscle adaptation requires independent control of the regulating factors. The aim of the present study was to develop a serum-free medium to culture mature single muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis. As an example, we used the culture system to study adaptation of twitch and tetanic force characteristics, number of sarcomeres in series and fibre cross-section. Fibres dissected from m. iliofibularis (n = 10) were kept in culture at a fibre mean sarcomere length of 2.3 microm in a culture medium without serum. Twitch and tetanic tension were determined daily. Before and after culture the number of sarcomeres was determined by laser diffraction and fibre cross-sectional area (CSA) was determined by microscopy. For five fibres twitch tension increased during culture and tetanic tension was stable for periods varying from 8 to 14 days ('stable fibres'), after which fibres were removed from culture for analysis. Fibre CSA and the number of sarcomeres in series remained constant during culture. Five other fibres showed a substantial reduction in twitch and tetanic tension within the first five days of culture ('unstable fibres'). After 7-9 days of culture, three of these fibres died. For two of the unstable fibres, after the substantial force reduction, twitch and tetanic tension increased again. Finally at day 14 and 18 of culture, respectively, the tensions attained values higher than their original values. For stable fibres, twitch contraction time, twitch half-relaxation time and tetanus 10%-relaxation time increased during culture. For unstable fibres these parameters fluctuated. For all fibres the stimulus threshold fluctuated during the first two days, and then remained constant, even for the fibres that were cultured for at least two weeks. It is concluded that the present culture system for mature muscle fibres allows long-term studies within a well-defined medium. Unfortunately, initial tetanic and twitch force are poor predictors

  10. Bone morphogenetic proteins in inflammation, glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grgurevic, Lovorka; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schulz, Tim J; Vukicevic, Slobodan

    2016-02-01

    Bore morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily, a group of secreted proteins that regulate embryonic development. This review summarizes the effects of BMPs on physiological processes not exclusively linked to the musculoskeletal system. Specifically, we focus on the involvement of BMPs in inflammatory disorders, e.g. fibrosis, inflammatory bowel disease, anchylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, we discuss the role of BMPs in the context of vascular disorders, and explore the role of these signalling proteins in iron homeostasis (anaemia, hemochromatosis) and oxidative damage. The second and third parts of this review focus on BMPs in the development of metabolic pathologies such as type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. The pancreatic beta cells are the sole source of the hormone insulin and BMPs have recently been implicated in pancreas development as well as control of adult glucose homeostasis. Lastly, we review the recently recognized role of BMPs in brown adipose tissue formation and their consequences for energy expenditure and adiposity. In summary, BMPs play a pivotal role in metabolism beyond their role in skeletal homeostasis. However, increased understanding of these pleiotropic functions also highlights the necessity of tissue-specific strategies when harnessing BMP action as a therapeutic target.

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein Smads signaling in mesenchymal stem cells affected by osteoinductive calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhurong; Wang, Zhe; Qing, Fangzhu; Ni, Yilu; Fan, Yujiang; Tan, Yanfei; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics (CaP ceramics) could induce ectopic bone formation which was regulated by various signal molecules. In this work, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured on the surface of osteoinductive hydroxyapatite (HA) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics in comparison with control (culture plate) for up to 14 days to detect the signal molecules which might be affected by the CaP ceramics. Without adding osteogenic factors, MSCs cultured on HA and BCP both expressed higher Runx2, Osterix, collagen type I, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin at various stages compared with control, thus confirmed the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. Later study demonstrated the messenger RNA level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and BMP4 were also significantly enhanced by HA and BCP. Furthermore, Smad1, 4, 5, and Dlx5, the main molecules in the BMP/Smads signaling pathway, were upregulated by HA and BCP. Moreover, the higher expression of Smads and BMP2, 4 in BCP over HA, corresponded to the better performance of BCP in stimulating in vitro osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. This was in accordance with the better osteoinductivity of BCP over HA in vivo. Altogether, these results implied that the CaP ceramics may initiate the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs by influencing the expression of molecules in BMP/Smads pathway.

  12. Bone Morphogenetic Protein-9 Induces PDLSCs Osteogenic Differentiation through the ERK and p38 Signal Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Guo; Li, Conghua; Xiang, Xuerong; Chen, Chu; Zhang, Ruyi; Yang, Xia; Yu, Xuesong; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Lan; Shi, Qiong; Weng, Yaguang

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) with bone morphogenic ability are used to treat diseases such as periodontitis. Their treatment potential is increased when used in combination with proteins that induce osteogenic differentiation. For example, bone morphogenetic protein-9 (BMP9) has been found to have potent osteogenic activity. In the present study, PDLSCs were isolated from human periodontal membrane and infected with recombinant adenoviruses expressing BMP9 (Ad-BMP9). Levels of osteogenic markers such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), and osteocalcin (OCN) as well as mineralization ability were measured. The results showed that BMP9 promoted bone formation of PDLSCs. In other experiments, SB203580 and PD98059, which are inhibitors of p38 and ERK1/2, respectively, were used to determine if these kinases are involved in the osteogenic differentiation process. The resulting protein expression profiles and osteogenic markers of PDLSCs revealed that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway might play an important role in the process of BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. PMID:25136261

  13. The content of bone morphogenetic proteins in platelets varies greatly between different platelet donors

    SciTech Connect

    Kalen, Anders; Wahlstroem, Ola; Linder, Cecilia Halling; Magnusson, Per

    2008-10-17

    Platelet derivates and platelet rich plasma have been used to stimulate bone formation and wound healing because of the rich content of potent growth factors. However, not all reports have been conclusive since some have not been able to demonstrate a positive effect. We investigated the interindividual variation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in platelets from healthy donors, and the pH-dependent effect on the release of BMPs in preparations of lysed platelets in buffer (LPB). Platelet concentrates from 31 healthy donors were prepared in pH 4.3 and pH 7.4 buffers and investigated with respect to BMP-2, -4, -6, and -7. BMP-2 and BMP-4 were significantly more common in acidic LPBs in comparison with neutral preparations. We also observed a considerable variation among platelet donors with respect to the release of BMPs at pH 4.3 and 7.4. In conclusion, a considerable variation was found among platelet donors, which may be of importance considering the ambiguous results previously reported on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

  14. The importance and the differences of bone morphogenetic proteins for osteoporotic hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Dincel, V Ercan; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin

    2014-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), major contributors to tissue repair, have become one of the most exciting fields in rheumatic and orthopaedic research. In our study we aimed to evaluate the relationship between osteoporotic hip fractures and the serum levels of BMPs to reveal their potential roles in the diagnosis of patients. The study group included 62 patients with osteoporotic hip fracture (Group 1; intertrochanteric fracture, Group 2; collum femoris fracture) and the control group. All fractures were due to low energy trauma, simple falls. For all subjects BMD measurements were in agreement for osteoporosis and no significant differences were observed between the two fracture groups. Biochemical markers; BMP-4 and BMP-7 (pg/mL) were determined by commercial Elisa kits from the serum samples. The mean and standard error values of serum samples for BMP-4 and BMP-7 in Group 1 (100.70 +/- 10.03, 74.41 +/- 6.31 respectively) and in Group 2 (112.34 +/- 11.52, 81.91 +/- 10.14 respectively) were not statistically different however for both groups only BMP-7 values increased statistically when compared to the control group. BMP-7 measurements may not only serve as potential biochemical markers for determining disease severity but also the increased levels, an osteogenic factor and bone stimulating agent in vivo, after trauma elevated levels are adaptive or protective and therefore may reduce the severity of the fracture.

  15. In anemia of multiple myeloma, hepcidin is induced by increased bone morphogenetic protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Ken; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Roodman, G. David; Huston, Alissa; Esteve, Flavia; Freytes, Cesar; Callander, Natalie; Katodritou, Eirini; Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Rivera, Seth; Vanderkerken, Karin; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Hepcidin is the principal iron-regulatory hormone and a pathogenic factor in anemia of inflammation. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) frequently present with anemia. We showed that MM patients had increased serum hepcidin, which inversely correlated with hemoglobin, suggesting that hepcidin contributes to MM-related anemia. Searching for hepcidin-inducing cytokines in MM, we quantified the stimulation of hepcidin promoter-luciferase activity in HuH7 cells by MM sera. MM sera activated the hepcidin promoter significantly more than did normal sera. We then examined the role of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), the major transcriptional regulators of hepcidin. Mutations in both BMP-responsive elements abrogated the activation dramatically, while mutations in the IL-6–responsive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-binding site (STAT3-BS) had only a minor effect. Cotreatment with anti–BMP-2/4 or noggin-Fc blocked the promoter induction with all MM sera, anti–IL-6 blocked it with a minority of sera, whereas anti–BMP-4, -6, or -9 antibodies had no effect. BMP-2–immunodepleted MM sera had decreased promoter stimulatory capacity, and BMP-2 concentrations in MM sera were significantly higher than in normal sera. Our results demonstrate that BMP-2 is a major mediator of the hepcidin stimulatory activity of MM sera. PMID:20679527

  16. Med19 promotes bone metastasis and invasiveness of bladder urothelial carcinoma via bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hui; Feng, Chen-chen; Ding, Guan-xiong; Meng, Dong-liang; Ding, Qiang; Fang, Zu-jun; Xia, Guo-wei; Xu, Gang; Jiang, Hao-wen

    2013-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) remained a major health problem. Med19 was related to tumor growth of BCa. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) were reported to be critical in bone metastasis of cancer. We therefore investigated the relations between Med19 and BMPs in BCa and their effect on bone metastasis of BCa. Bladder cancer cell lines were cultured and interfered with Med19 shRNA and control. Expressions of BMP-1, BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-5, BMP-6, BMP-7, BMP-9, and BMP-15 were studied between 2 groups. Fifty-two BCa samples were included for immunohistochemical staining of Med19 and BMP-2. Expressions were scored and studied statistically. Invasiveness was studied with Transwell assay. Silencing or Med19 in BCa cells induced altered expressions of BMPs. Increased expressions of BMP-1, BMP-4, BMP-6, BMP-7, and BMP-15 and decreased expressions of BMP-2, BMP-5, and BMP-9 were noticed, but only BMP-2 reached statistical significance. Expressions of Med19 and BMP-2 were significantly higher in cases with bone metastasis and were positively correlated in cases with bone metastasis and muscle invasion. Med19 is a critical factor involved in the invasiveness and promotion of bone metastasis of BCa, possibly via BMP-2.

  17. Does Atrazine Influence Larval Development and Sexual Differentiation in Xenopus laevis?

    PubMed Central

    Kloas, Werner; Lutz, Ilka; Springer, Timothy; Krueger, Henry; Wolf, Jeff; Holden, Larry; Hosmer, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Debate and controversy exists concerning the potential for the herbicide atrazine to cause gonadal malformations in developing Xenopus laevis. Following review of the existing literature the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency required a rigorous investigation conducted under standardized procedures. X. laevis tadpoles were exposed to atrazine at concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, 1, 25, or 100 μg/l from day 8 postfertilization (dpf) until completion of metamorphosis or dpf 83, whichever came first. Nearly identical experiments were performed in two independent laboratories: experiment 1 at Wildlife International, Ltd. and experiment 2 at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB). Both experiments employed optimized animal husbandry procedures and environmental conditions in validated flow-through exposure systems. The two experiments demonstrated consistent survival, growth, and development of X. laevis tadpoles, and all measured parameters were within the expected ranges and were comparable in negative control and atrazine-treated groups. Atrazine, at concentrations up to 100 μg/l, had no effect in either experiment on the percentage of males or the incidence of mixed sex as determined by histological evaluation. In contrast, exposure of larval X. laevis to 0.2 μg 17β-estradiol/l as the positive control resulted in gonadal feminization. Instead of an even distribution of male and female phenotypes, percentages of males:females:mixed sex were 19:75:6 and 22:60:18 in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. These studies demonstrate that long-term exposure of larval X. laevis to atrazine at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 μg/l does not affect growth, larval development, or sexual differentiation. PMID:19008211

  18. Hydrogel Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Expressing Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Enhances Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Hui-Yi; Yang, Shu-Rui; Brey, Eric M.; Chu, I-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: The application of bone tissue engineering for repairing bone defects has gradually shown some satisfactory progress. One of the concerns raising scientific attention is the poor supply of growth factors. A number of growth factor delivery approaches have been developed for promoting bone formation. However, there is no systematic comparison of those approaches on efficiency of neobone formation. In this study, the approaches using periosteum, direct supply of growth factors, or gene transfection of growth factors were evaluated to determine the osteogenic capacity on the repair of bone defect. Methods: In total, 42 male 21-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250 to 400 g were used as the bone defect model to evaluate the bone repair efficiency. Various tissue engineered constructs of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lactic acid) (PEG-PLLA) copolymer hydrogel with periosteum, with external supply of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2), or with BMP2-transfected bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) were filled in a 7-mm bone defect region. Animals were euthanized at 3 months, and the hydrogel constructs were harvested. The evaluation with histological staining and radiography analysis were performed for the volume of new bone formation. Results: The PEG-PLLA scaffold with BMMSCs promotes bone regeneration with the addition of periosteum. The group with BMP2-transfected BMMSCs demonstrated the largest volume of new bone among all the testing groups. Conclusions: Altogether, the results of this study provide the evidence that the combination of PEG-PLLA hydrogels with BMMSCs and sustained delivery of BMP2 resulted in the maximal bone regeneration. PMID:27622106

  19. Loss of endogenous bone morphogenetic protein-6 aggravates renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dendooven, Amélie; van Oostrom, Olivia; van der Giezen, Dionne M; Leeuwis, Jan Willem; Snijckers, Cristel; Joles, Jaap A; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Verhaar, Marianne C; Nguyen, Tri Q; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2011-03-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) suppresses inflammatory genes in renal proximal tubular cells and regulates iron metabolism by inducing hepcidin. In diabetic patients, an increase of myofibroblast progenitor cells (MFPCs), also known as fibrocytes, was found to be associated with decreased BMP-6 expression. We hypothesized that loss of endogenous BMP-6 would aggravate renal injury and fibrosis. Wild type (WT) and BMP-6 null mice underwent unilateral ureteral obstruction. In WT mice, ureteral obstruction down-regulated BMP-6. Obstructed kidneys of BMP-6 null mice showed more casts (1.5-fold), epithelial necrosis (1.4-fold), and brush border loss (1.3-fold). This was associated with more inflammation (1.8-fold more CD45(+) cells) and more pronounced overexpression of profibrotic genes for αSMA (2.0-fold), collagen I (6.8-fold), fibronectin (4.3-fold), CTGF (1.8-fold), and PAI-1 (3.8-fold), despite similar BMP-7 expression. Also, 1.3-fold more MFPCs were obtained from BMP-6 null than from WT mononuclear cell cultures, but in vivo only very few MFPCs were observed in obstructed kidneys, irrespective of BMP-6 genotype. The obstructed kidneys of BMP-6 null mice showed 2.2-fold more iron deposition, in association with 3.3-fold higher expression of the oxidative stress marker HO-1. Thus, ureteral obstruction leads to down-regulation of BMP-6 expression, and BMP-6 deficiency aggravates tubulointerstitial damage and fibrosis independent of BMP-7. This process appears to involve loss of both direct anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic action and indirect suppressive effects on renal iron deposition, oxidative stress, and MFPCs.

  20. Loss of Endogenous Bone Morphogenetic Protein-6 Aggravates Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dendooven, Amélie; van Oostrom, Olivia; van der Giezen, Dionne M.; Willem Leeuwis, Jan; Snijckers, Cristel; Joles, Jaap A.; Robertson, Elizabeth J.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Nguyen, Tri Q.; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) suppresses inflammatory genes in renal proximal tubular cells and regulates iron metabolism by inducing hepcidin. In diabetic patients, an increase of myofibroblast progenitor cells (MFPCs), also known as fibrocytes, was found to be associated with decreased BMP-6 expression. We hypothesized that loss of endogenous BMP-6 would aggravate renal injury and fibrosis. Wild type (WT) and BMP-6 null mice underwent unilateral ureteral obstruction. In WT mice, ureteral obstruction down-regulated BMP-6. Obstructed kidneys of BMP-6 null mice showed more casts (1.5-fold), epithelial necrosis (1.4-fold), and brush border loss (1.3-fold). This was associated with more inflammation (1.8-fold more CD45+ cells) and more pronounced overexpression of profibrotic genes for αSMA (2.0-fold), collagen I (6.8-fold), fibronectin (4.3-fold), CTGF (1.8-fold), and PAI-1 (3.8-fold), despite similar BMP-7 expression. Also, 1.3-fold more MFPCs were obtained from BMP-6 null than from WT mononuclear cell cultures, but in vivo only very few MFPCs were observed in obstructed kidneys, irrespective of BMP-6 genotype. The obstructed kidneys of BMP-6 null mice showed 2.2-fold more iron deposition, in association with 3.3-fold higher expression of the oxidative stress marker HO-1. Thus, ureteral obstruction leads to down-regulation of BMP-6 expression, and BMP-6 deficiency aggravates tubulointerstitial damage and fibrosis independent of BMP-7. This process appears to involve loss of both direct anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic action and indirect suppressive effects on renal iron deposition, oxidative stress, and MFPCs. PMID:21356359

  1. Morphogenetic Alterations of Alternaria alternata Exposed to Dicarboximide Fungicide, Iprodione

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunji; Lee, Hye Min; Kim, Young Ho

    2017-01-01

    Fungicide-resistant Alternaria alternata impede the practical control of the Alternaria diseases in crop fields. This study aimed to investigate cytological fungicide resistance mechanisms of A. alternata against dicarboximide fungicide iprodione. A. alternata isolated from cactus brown spot was cultured on potato-dextrose agar (PDA) with or without iprodione, and the fungal cultures with different growth characteristics from no, initial and full growth were observed by light and electron microscopy. Mycelia began to grow from one day after incubation (DAI) and continued to be in full growth (control-growth, Con-G) on PDA without fungicide, while on PDA with iprodione, no fungal growth (iprodione-no growth, Ipr-N) occurred for the first 3 DAI, but once the initial growth (iprodione-initial growth, Ipr-I) began at 4–5 DAI, the colonies grew and expanded continuously to be in full growth (iprodione-growth, Ipr-G), suggesting Ipr-I may be a turning moment of the morphogenetic changes resisting fungicidal toxicity. Con-G formed multicellular conidia with cell walls and septa and intact dense cytoplasm. In Ipr-N, fungal sporulation was inhibited by forming mostly undeveloped unicellular conidia with degraded and necrotic cytoplasm. However, in Ipr-I, conspicuous cellular changes occurred during sporulation by forming multicellular conidia with double layered (thickened) cell walls and accumulation of proliferated lipid bodies in the conidial cytoplasm, which may inhibit the penetration of the fungicide into conidial cells, reducing fungicide-associated toxicity, and may be utilized as energy and nutritional sources, respectively, for the further fungal growth to form mature colonies as in Ipr-G that formed multicellular conidia with cell walls and intact cytoplasm with lipid bodies as in Con-G. PMID:28167893

  2. Morphogenetic Alterations of Alternaria alternata Exposed to Dicarboximide Fungicide, Iprodione.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunji; Lee, Hye Min; Kim, Young Ho

    2017-02-01

    Fungicide-resistant Alternaria alternata impede the practical control of the Alternaria diseases in crop fields. This study aimed to investigate cytological fungicide resistance mechanisms of A. alternata against dicarboximide fungicide iprodione. A. alternata isolated from cactus brown spot was cultured on potato-dextrose agar (PDA) with or without iprodione, and the fungal cultures with different growth characteristics from no, initial and full growth were observed by light and electron microscopy. Mycelia began to grow from one day after incubation (DAI) and continued to be in full growth (control-growth, Con-G) on PDA without fungicide, while on PDA with iprodione, no fungal growth (iprodione-no growth, Ipr-N) occurred for the first 3 DAI, but once the initial growth (iprodione-initial growth, Ipr-I) began at 4-5 DAI, the colonies grew and expanded continuously to be in full growth (iprodione-growth, Ipr-G), suggesting Ipr-I may be a turning moment of the morphogenetic changes resisting fungicidal toxicity. Con-G formed multicellular conidia with cell walls and septa and intact dense cytoplasm. In Ipr-N, fungal sporulation was inhibited by forming mostly undeveloped unicellular conidia with degraded and necrotic cytoplasm. However, in Ipr-I, conspicuous cellular changes occurred during sporulation by forming multicellular conidia with double layered (thickened) cell walls and accumulation of proliferated lipid bodies in the conidial cytoplasm, which may inhibit the penetration of the fungicide into conidial cells, reducing fungicide-associated toxicity, and may be utilized as energy and nutritional sources, respectively, for the further fungal growth to form mature colonies as in Ipr-G that formed multicellular conidia with cell walls and intact cytoplasm with lipid bodies as in Con-G.

  3. Characterization of human bone morphogenetic protein gene variants for possible roles in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei Feng; Deng, Xia; Zhou, Jing; Yan, Peng; Zhao, Er Ying; Liu, Shu Lin

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a complex illness with high rates of morbidity and mortality. In embryonic development, the heart is the first formed organ, which is strictly controlled by gene regulatory networks, including transcription factors, signaling pathways, epigenetic factors and microRNAs. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4 are essential in cardiogenesis as they can induce the expression of transcription factors, NKX2-5 and GATA binding protein 4, which are important in the development of the heart. The inhibition of BMP-2 and 4- inhibits the late expression of NKX2-5 and affects cardiac differentiation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BMP-2 and -4 variations may be associated with CHD in Chinese Han populations. The rs1049007, rs235768 and rs17563 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are genetic variations located within the translated region of the BMP-2 and -4, were evaluated in 230 patients with CHD from the Chinese Han population and 160 non CHD control individuals. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ2 test, implemented using SPSS software (version 13.0). The Hardy Weinberg equilibrium test was performed on the population using online Online Encyclopedia for Genetic Epidemiology studies software, and multiple-sequence alignments of the BMP proteins were performed using Vector NTI software. No statistically significant associations were identified between these genetic variations and the risk of CHD (rs1049007, P value=0.560; rs235768, P value=0.972; rs17563, P value=0.787). In addition, no correlation was found between the patients with CHD and the non-CHD control individuals. Therefore, the rs1049007, rs235768 and rs17563 genetic variations of BMP-2 were not associated with CHD in the Chinese Han population. PMID:27357418

  4. Regulation of cyclin E stability in Xenopus laevis embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt-(Webb), Yekaterina

    Cyclin-Cdk complexes positively regulate cell cycle progression. Cyclins are regulatory subunits that bind to and activate cyclin-dependent kinases or Cdks. Cyclin E associates with Cdk2 to mediate G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle. Cyclin E is overexpressed in breast, lung, skin, gastrointestinal, cervical, and ovarian cancers. Its overexpression correlates with poor patient prognosis and is involved in the etiology of breast cancer. We have been studying how this protein is downregulated during development in order to determine if these mechanisms are disrupted during tumorigenesis, leading to its overexpression. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model, we have shown previously that during the first 12 embryonic cell cycles Cyclin E levels remain constant yet Cdk2 activity oscillates twice per cell cycle. Cyclin E is abruptly destabilized by an undefined mechanism after the 12th cell cycle, which corresponds to the midblastula transition (MBT). Based on work our work and work by others, we have hypothesized that differential phosphorylation and a change in localization result in Cyclin E degradation by the 26S proteasome at the MBT. To test this, we generated a series of point mutations in conserved threonine/serine residues implicated in degradation of human Cyclin E. Using Western blot analysis, we show that similarly to human Cyclin E, mutation of these residues to unphosphorylatable alanine stabilizes Cyclin E past the MBT when they are expressed in vivo. Cyclin E localization was studied by immunofluorescence analysis of endogenous and exogenous protein in pre-MBT, MBT, and post-MBT embryos. In addition, we developed a novel method of conjugating recombinant His6-tagged Cyclin E to fluorescent (CdSe)ZnS nanoparticles (quantum dots) capped with dihydrolipoic acid. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize His6Cyclin E-quantum dot complexes inside embryo cells in real time. We found that re-localization at the MBT from the cytoplasm to the nucleus

  5. CONCENTRATION DEPENDENT ACCUMULATION OF [3H]-DELTAMETHRIN IN SODIUM CHANNEL N AV1.2 EXPRESSING XENOPUS LAEVIS OOCYTES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of neuronal voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSCs) by pyrethroid insecticides such as deltamethrin (DLT) has been widely studied using Xenopus laevis oocytes transfected with VSSC. However, the extent of pyrethroid accumulation in VSSC-expressing oocytes is unknown....

  6. THYROID AXIS INHIBITION IN XENOPUS LAEVIS: DEVELOPMENT OF AN AMPHIBIAN-BASED SCREENING ASSAY FOR THYROID DISRUPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the initial EDSTAC recommendations, research was conducted on the development of a Xenopus laevis based tail resorption assay for evaluating thyroid axis disruption. These experiments highlighted key limitations associated with reliance on tail resorption as a meas...

  7. Manipulation and in vitro maturation of Xenopus laevis oocytes, followed by intracytoplasmic sperm injection, to study embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kei; Simpson, David; Gurdon, John B

    2015-02-09

    Amphibian eggs have been widely used to study embryonic development. Early embryonic development is driven by maternally stored factors accumulated during oogenesis. In order to study roles of such maternal factors in early embryonic development, it is desirable to manipulate their functions from the very beginning of embryonic development. Conventional ways of gene interference are achieved by injection of antisense oligonucleotides (oligos) or mRNA into fertilized eggs, enabling under- or over-expression of specific proteins, respectively. However, these methods normally require more than several hours until protein expression is affected, and, hence, the interference of gene functions is not effective during early embryonic stages. Here, we introduce an experimental system in which expression levels of maternal proteins can be altered before fertilization. Xenopus laevis oocytes obtained from ovaries are defolliculated by incubating with enzymes. Antisense oligos or mRNAs are injected into defolliculated oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. These oocytes are in vitro matured to eggs at the metaphase II (MII) stage, followed by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). By this way, up to 10% of ICSI embryos can reach the swimming tadpole stage, thus allowing functional tests of specific gene knockdown or overexpression. This approach can be a useful way to study roles of maternally stored factors in early embryonic development.

  8. Examination of KNK437- and quercetin-mediated inhibition of heat shock-induced heat shock protein gene expression in Xenopus laevis cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Manwell, Laurie A; Heikkila, John J

    2007-11-01

    We examined the effect of quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavon) and KNK437 (N-formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidene-gamma-butyrolactam), a benzylidene lactam compound, on heat-induced heat shock protein (hsp) gene expression in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. In previous studies, both quercetin and KNK437 inhibited heat shock factor activity resulting in a repression of hsp mRNA and protein accumulation in human cultured cells. In this first study of the effect of these hsp gene expression inhibitors in a non-mammalian cell line, we report that both quercetin and KNK437 reduced the heat shock-induced accumulation of hsp30, hsp47 and hsp70 mRNA in X. laevis cultured cells. However, these inhibitors had no effect on the relative level of a non-heat shock protein mRNA, ef1alpha, in either control or heat shocked cells. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses revealed that quercetin partially inhibited HSP30 protein accumulation. In contrast, HSP30 protein was not detectable in KNK437-treated cells. Finally, treatment of A6 cells with KNK437 inhibited the heat shock-induced acquisition of thermotolerance, as determined by preservation of actin filaments and cellular morphology using immunocytochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  9. Xenopus laevis FGF receptor substrate 3 (XFrs3) is important for eye development and mediates Pax6 expression in lens placode through its Shp2-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Jin; Bahn, Minjin; Kim, Yong Hwan; Shin, Jee-Yoon; Cheong, Seon-Woo; Ju, Bong-Gun; Kim, Won-Sun; Yeo, Chang-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family play important roles during various developmental processes including eye development. FRS (FGF receptor substrate) proteins bind to FGFR and serve as adapters for coordinated assembly of multi-protein complexes involved in Ras/MAPK and PI3 kinase/Akt pathways. Here, we identified Xenopus laevis Frs3 (XFrs3), a homolog of vertebrate Frs3, and investigated its roles during embryogenesis. XFrs3 is expressed maternally and zygotically with specific expression patterns throughout the early development. Knockdown of XFrs3 using a specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) caused reduction of Pax6 expression in the lens placode, and defects in the eye ranging from microphthalmia to anophthalmia. XFrs3 MO-induced defects were alleviated by wild type XFrs3 or a mutant XFrs3 (XFrs3-4YF), in which the putative tyrosine phosphorylation sites served as Grb2-binding sites are mutated. However, another XFrs3 mutant (XFrs3-2YF), in which the putative Shp2-binding sites are mutated, could not rescue the defects of XFrs3 morphants. In addition, we found that XFrs3 is important for FGF or IGF-induced ERK activation in ectodermal tissue. Taken together, our results suggest that signaling through Shp2-binding sites of XFrs3 is necessary for the eye development in Xenopus laevis.

  10. Expression of two nonallelic type II procollagen genes during Xenopus laevis embryogenesis is characterized by stage-specific production of alternatively spliced transcripts.

    PubMed

    Su, M W; Suzuki, H R; Bieker, J J; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1991-10-01

    The pattern of type II collagen expression during Xenopus laevis embryogenesis has been established after isolating specific cDNA and genomic clones. Evidence is presented suggesting that in X. laevis there are two transcriptionally active copies of the type II procollagen gene. Both genes are activated at the beginning of neurula stage and steady-state mRNA levels progressively increase thereafter. Initially, the transcripts are localized to notochord, somites, and the dorsal region of the lateral plate mesoderm. At later stages of development and parallel to increased mRNA accumulation, collagen expression becomes progressively more confined to chondrogenic regions of the tadpole. During the early period of mRNA accumulation, there is also a transient pattern of expression in localized sites that will later not undergo chondrogenesis, such as the floor plate in the ventral neural tube. At later times and coincident with the appearance of chondrogenic tissues in the developing embryo, expression of the procollagen genes is characterized by the production of an additional, alternatively spliced transcript. The alternatively spliced sequences encode the cysteine-rich globular domain in the NH2-propeptide of the type II procollagen chain. Immunohistochemical analyses with a type II collagen monoclonal antibody documented the deposition of the protein in the extracellular matrix of the developing embryo. Type II collagen expression is therefore temporally regulated by tissue-specific transcription and splicing factors directing the synthesis of distinct molecular forms of the precursor protein in the developing Xenopus embryo.

  11. Phylogeny of subclass Scuticociliatia (Protozoa, Ciliophora) using combined data inferred from genetic, morphological, and morphogenetic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yangang; Lin, Xiaofeng; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Song, Weibo

    2010-07-01

    Gene sequence-based genealogies of scuticociliates are different from those produced by morphological analyses. For this reason, 11 representative scuticociliates and two ambiguously related genera were chosen to test the ability of combined phylogenetic analyses using both gene sequences and morphological/morphogenetic characteristics. Analyses of both the SSrRNA gene sequences and the combined datasets revealed a consistent branching pattern. While the terminal branches and the order level relationships were generally well resolved, the family level relationships remain unresolved. However, two other trees based on ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequences and morphological/morphogenetic characters showed limited information, due to a lack of informative sites in these two datasets. Our data suggest, however, that the combined analysis of morphological/morphogenetic characters and gene sequences did produce some changes to the phylogenetic estimates of this group.

  12. Estrogen Opposes the Apoptotic Effects of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 on Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, David G.; Jin, Donald F.; Sanders, Michel M.

    2000-01-01

    Interactions between estrogen and growth factor signaling pathways at the level of gene expression play important roles in the function of reproductive tissues. For example, estrogen regulates transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) in the uterus during the proliferative phase of the mammalian reproductive cycle. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7), a member of the TGFβ superfamily, is also involved in the development and function of reproductive tissues. However, relatively few studies have addressed the expression of BMP-7 in reproductive tissues, and the role of BMP-7 remains unclear. As part of an ongoing effort to understand how estrogen represses gene expression and to study its interactions with other signaling pathways, chick BMP-7 (cBMP-7) was cloned. cBMP-7 mRNA levels are repressed threefold within 8 h following estrogen treatment in the chick oviduct, an extremely estrogen-responsive reproductive tissue. This regulation occurs at the transcriptional level. Estrogen has a protective role in many tissues, and withdrawal from estrogen often leads to tissue regression; however, the mechanisms mediating regression of the oviduct remain unknown. Terminal transferase-mediated end-labeling and DNA laddering assays demonstrated that regression of the oviduct during estrogen withdrawal involves apoptosis, which is a novel observation. cBMP-7 mRNA levels during estrogen withdrawal increase concurrently with the apoptotic index of the oviduct. Furthermore, addition of purified BMP-7 induces apoptosis in primary oviduct cells. This report demonstrates that the function of BMP-7 in the oviduct involves the induction of apoptosis and that estrogen plays an important role in opposing this function. PMID:10848589

  13. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene controls tooth root development in coordination with formation of the periodontium

    PubMed Central

    Rakian, Audrey; Yang, Wu-Chen; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; Cui, Yong; Harris, Marie A; Villarreal, Demitri; Feng, Jerry Q; MacDougall, Mary; Harris, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Formation of the periodontium begins following onset of tooth-root formation in a coordinated manner after birth. Dental follicle progenitor cells are thought to form the cementum, alveolar bone and Sharpey's fibers of the periodontal ligament (PDL). However, little is known about the regulatory morphogens that control differentiation and function of these progenitor cells, as well as the progenitor cells involved in crown and root formation. We investigated the role of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Bmp2) in these processes by the conditional removal of the Bmp2 gene using the Sp7-Cre-EGFP mouse model. Sp7-Cre-EGFP first becomes active at E18 in the first molar, with robust Cre activity at postnatal day 0 (P0), followed by Cre activity in the second molar, which occurs after P0. There is robust Cre activity in the periodontium and third molars by 2 weeks of age. When the Bmp2 gene is removed from Sp7+ (Osterix+) cells, major defects are noted in root, cellular cementum and periodontium formation. First, there are major cell autonomous defects in root-odontoblast terminal differentiation. Second, there are major alterations in formation of the PDLs and cellular cementum, correlated with decreased nuclear factor IC (Nfic), periostin and α-SMA+ cells. Third, there is a failure to produce vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) in the periodontium and the pulp leading to decreased formation of the microvascular and associated candidate stem cells in the Bmp2-cKOSp7-Cre-EGFP. Fourth, ameloblast function and enamel formation are indirectly altered in the Bmp2-cKOSp7-Cre-EGFP. These data demonstrate that the Bmp2 gene has complex roles in postnatal tooth development and periodontium formation. PMID:23807640

  14. Urotensin II upregulates migration and cytokine gene expression in leukocytes of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Shiori; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Uchiyama, Minoru; Matsuda, Kouhei; Konno, Norifumi

    2015-05-15

    Urotensin II (UII) exhibits diverse physiological actions including vasoconstriction, locomotor activity, osmoregulation, and immune response via the UII receptor (UTR) in mammals. However, in amphibians the function of the UII-UTR system remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the potential immune function of UII using leukocytes isolated from the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. Stimulation of male frogs with lipopolysaccharide increased mRNA expression of UII and UTR in leukocytes, suggesting that inflammatory stimuli induce activation of the UII-UTR system. Migration assays showed that both UII and UII-related peptide enhanced migration of leukocytes in a dose-dependent manner, and that UII effect was inhibited by the UTR antagonist urantide. Inhibition of Rho kinase with Y-27632 abolished UII-induced migration, suggesting that it depends on the activation of RhoA/Rho kinase. Treatment of isolated leukocytes with UII increased the expression of several cytokine genes including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and the effects were abolished by urantide. These results suggest that in amphibian leukocytes the UII-UTR system is involved in the activation of leukocyte migration and cytokine gene expression in response to inflammatory stimuli.

  15. Essential roles of LEM-domain protein MAN1 during organogenesis in Xenopus laevis and overlapping functions of emerin.

    PubMed

    Reil, Michael; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear envelope proteins are linked to an increasing number of human diseases, called envelopathies. Mutations in the inner nuclear membrane protein emerin lead to X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, characterized by muscle weakness or wasting. Conversely, mutations in nuclear envelope protein MAN1 are linked to bone and skin disorders. Both proteins share a highly conserved domain, called LEM-domain. LEM proteins are known to interact with Barrier-to-autointegration factor and several transcription factors. Most envelopathies are tissue-specific, but knowledge on the physiological roles of related LEM proteins is still unclear. For this reason, we investigated the roles of MAN1 and emerin during Xenopus laevis organogenesis. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of MAN1 revealed that MAN1 is essential for the formation of eye, skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues. The MAN1 knockdown could be compensated by ectopic expression of emerin, leading to a proper organ development. Further investigations revealed that MAN1 is involved in regulation of genes essential for organ development and tissue homeostasis. Thereby our work supports that LEM proteins might be involved in signalling essential for organ development during early embryogenesis and suggests that loss of MAN1 may cause muscle and retina specific diseases.

  16. Sulcia symbiont of the leafhopper Macrosteles laevis (Ribaut, 1927) (Insecta, Hemiptera, Cicadellidae: Deltocephalinae) harbors Arsenophonus bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kobiałka, Michał; Michalik, Anna; Walczak, Marcin; Junkiert, Łukasz; Szklarzewicz, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    The leafhopper Macrosteles laevis, like other plant sap-feeding hemipterans, lives in obligate symbiotic association with microorganisms. The symbionts are harbored in the cytoplasm of large cells termed bacteriocytes, which are integrated into huge organs termed bacteriomes. Morphological and molecular investigations have revealed that in the bacteriomes of M. laevis, two types of bacteriocytes are present which are as follows: bacteriocytes with bacterium Sulcia and bacteriocytes with Nasuia symbiont. We observed that in bacteriocytes with Sulcia, some cells of this bacterium contain numerous cells of the bacterium Arsenophonus. All types of symbionts are transmitted transovarially between generations. In the mature female, the bacteria Nasuia, bacteria Sulcia, and Sulcia with Arsenophonus inside are released from the bacteriocytes and start to assemble around the terminal oocytes. Next, the bacteria enter the cytoplasm of follicular cells surrounding the posterior pole of the oocyte. After passing through the follicular cells, the symbionts enter the space between the oocyte and follicular epithelium, forming a characteristic "symbiont ball."

  17. Developmental expression of the fermitin/kindlin gene family in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Canning, Claire A; Chan, Jessica Sze Ki; Common, John E A; Lane, E Birgitte; Jones, C Michael

    2011-08-01

    Fermitin genes are highly conserved and encode cytocortex proteins that mediate integrin signalling. Fermitin 1 (Kindlin1) is implicated in Kindler syndrome, a human skin blistering disorder. We report the isolation of the three Fermitin orthologs from Xenopus laevis embryos and describe their developmental expression patterns. Fermitin 1 is expressed in the skin, otic and olfactory placodes, pharyngeal arches, pronephric duct, and heart. Fermitin 2 is restricted to the somites and neural crest. Fermitin 3 is expressed in the notochord, central nervous system, cement gland, ventral blood islands, vitelline veins, and myeloid cells. Our findings are consistent with the view that Fermitin 1 is generally expressed in the skin, Fermitin 2 in muscle, and Fermitin 3 in hematopoietic lineages. Moreover, we describe novel sites of Fermitin gene expression that extend our knowledge of this family. Our data provide a basis for further functional analysis of the Fermitin family in Xenopus laevis.

  18. Manipulation and analysis of Xenopus laevis embryos by femtosecond near infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Aliya; Khodaparast, G.; Xu, Y.; Sethi, V.; Meehan, K.; Sible, J.

    2007-03-01

    Given the demand for new and more reliable methodologies for live cell manipulation, we have used a technique (demonstrated earlier by Tirlapur and K"onig, Nature, 418, 290, 2002) using near infrared laser pulses (NIR) to manipulate living cells, specifically, cell of Xenopus laevis embryos, without harming them. In addition nanoparticles such as silica-coated CdSe and CdTe quantum dots are injected into the cell through pores formed by the laser pulses. Due to the highly efficient and size-dependent fluorescence of QDs, they can be used in place of conventional dyes to perform live-cell imaging. In this work, we will discuss our current understanding of NIR lasers and QDs interactions with the Xenopus laevis embryos. The outcome of this project can help us to understand the fundamental phenomena and processes important in biological systems and cellular function.

  19. Diagnosis of Aeromonas hydrophila, Mycobacterium species, and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in an African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis)

    PubMed Central

    Hill, William A; Newman, Shelley J; Craig, Linden; Carter, Christopher; Czarra, Jane; Brown, J Paige

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe diagnosis of concurrent infection with Aeromonas hydrophila, Mycobacterium spp., and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in a wild female Xenopus laevis captured in Chile and transported to the United States. After approximately 130 d in the laboratory, the frog was presented for dysecdysis and obtundation. After euthanasia, tissues were submitted for histopathologic evaluation and PCR analysis for B. dendrobatidis and Ranavirus. Clinically significant gross lesions included cutaneous ulcerations on the lip, right forelimb, and ventral chest. Microscopic findings included regionally extensive splenic necrosis, diffuse pneumonia, and fibrinous coelomitis all containing intralesional bacteria. PCR analysis yielded positive results for B. dendrobatidis only. Bacterial culture of the ulcerated skin and liver yielded A. hydrophila. Infection with Contracaecum spp. was diagnosed as an incidental finding. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of simultaneous infection with Aeromonas hydrophila, Mycobacterium spp., and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in a laboratory-maintained X. laevis captured from the wild. PMID:20353698

  20. Impacts of Climate Change on the Global Invasion Potential of the African Clawed Frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Ihlow, Flora; Courant, Julien; Secondi, Jean; Herrel, Anthony; Rebelo, Rui; Measey, G John; Lillo, Francesco; De Villiers, F André; Vogt, Solveig; De Busschere, Charlotte; Backeljau, Thierry; Rödder, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    By altering or eliminating delicate ecological relationships, non-indigenous species are considered a major threat to biodiversity, as well as a driver of environmental change. Global climate change affects ecosystems and ecological communities, leading to changes in the phenology, geographic ranges, or population abundance of several species. Thus, predicting the impacts of global climate change on the current and future distribution of invasive species is an important subject in macroecological studies. The African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), native to South Africa, possesses a strong invasion potential and populations have become established in numerous countries across four continents. The global invasion potential of X. laevis was assessed using correlative species distribution models (SDMs). SDMs were computed based on a comprehensive set of occurrence records covering South Africa, North America, South America and Europe and a set of nine environmental predictors. Models were built using both a maximum entropy model and an ensemble approach integrating eight algorithms. The future occurrence probabilities for X. laevis were subsequently computed using bioclimatic variables for 2070 following four different IPCC scenarios. Despite minor differences between the statistical approaches, both SDMs predict the future potential distribution of X. laevis, on a global scale, to decrease across all climate change scenarios. On a continental scale, both SDMs predict decreasing potential distributions in the species' native range in South Africa, as well as in the invaded areas in North and South America, and in Australia where the species has not been introduced. In contrast, both SDMs predict the potential range size to expand in Europe. Our results suggest that all probability classes will be equally affected by climate change. New regional conditions may promote new invasions or the spread of established invasive populations, especially in France and Great Britain.

  1. Structure of four acidic oligosaccharides from the jelly coat surrounding the eggs of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Plancke, Y; Wieruszeski, J M; Alonso, C; Boilly, B; Strecker, G

    1995-07-15

    Novel acidic oligosaccharides were released by reductive beta-elimination from the jelly coat eggs of the Anuran Xenopus laevis. According to the structural analysis of these oligosaccharide-alditols, the following structures are proposed: [sequence: see text] where Kdn, 3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galactononulosonic acid. These results confirm the species specificity of the glycanic structures present in the secretion of amphibian oviducts, and may form the basis of a specific egg-sperm recognition process.

  2. Impacts of Climate Change on the Global Invasion Potential of the African Clawed Frog Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Ihlow, Flora; Courant, Julien; Secondi, Jean; Herrel, Anthony; Rebelo, Rui; Measey, G. John; Lillo, Francesco; De Villiers, F. André; Vogt, Solveig; De Busschere, Charlotte; Backeljau, Thierry; Rödder, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    By altering or eliminating delicate ecological relationships, non-indigenous species are considered a major threat to biodiversity, as well as a driver of environmental change. Global climate change affects ecosystems and ecological communities, leading to changes in the phenology, geographic ranges, or population abundance of several species. Thus, predicting the impacts of global climate change on the current and future distribution of invasive species is an important subject in macroecological studies. The African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), native to South Africa, possesses a strong invasion potential and populations have become established in numerous countries across four continents. The global invasion potential of X. laevis was assessed using correlative species distribution models (SDMs). SDMs were computed based on a comprehensive set of occurrence records covering South Africa, North America, South America and Europe and a set of nine environmental predictors. Models were built using both a maximum entropy model and an ensemble approach integrating eight algorithms. The future occurrence probabilities for X. laevis were subsequently computed using bioclimatic variables for 2070 following four different IPCC scenarios. Despite minor differences between the statistical approaches, both SDMs predict the future potential distribution of X. laevis, on a global scale, to decrease across all climate change scenarios. On a continental scale, both SDMs predict decreasing potential distributions in the species’ native range in South Africa, as well as in the invaded areas in North and South America, and in Australia where the species has not been introduced. In contrast, both SDMs predict the potential range size to expand in Europe. Our results suggest that all probability classes will be equally affected by climate change. New regional conditions may promote new invasions or the spread of established invasive populations, especially in France and Great

  3. [Vestibular apparatus study of the toad, Xenopus laevis, and rats under prolonged weightlessness].

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Ia A; Lychakov, D V; Pal'mbakh, L R; Govardovskiĭ, V I; Adanina, V O

    1980-01-01

    Fertilized eggs of the clawed toad Xenopus laevis were placed aboard of orbital laboratory of "Salut-6" spacecraft where they developed for 20 days at temperature 15 degrees C. The larvae were fixed in weightlessness. Light and electronmicroscopic studies revealed undisturbed structure on the saccular and utricular maculae and otolith membranes. Some ultrastructural abnormalities were found in the inner ear of adult rats after 20 days of weightlessness ("Kosmos-936").

  4. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-05-03

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity.

  5. Status of RNAs, localized in Xenopus laevis oocytes, in the frogs Rana pipiens and Eleutherodactylus coqui.

    PubMed

    Nath, Kimberly; Boorech, Jamie L; Beckham, Yvonne M; Burns, Mary M; Elinson, Richard P

    2005-01-15

    Early development in the frog model, Xenopus laevis, is governed by RNAs, localized to the vegetal cortex of the oocyte. These RNAs include Xdazl RNA, which is involved in primordial germ cell formation, and VegT RNA, which specifies the mesoderm and endoderm. In order to determine whether orthologues of these RNAs are localized and have similar functions in other frogs, we cloned RpDazl and RpVegT from Rana pipiens, a frog that is phylogenetically distant from X. laevis. RNAs from both genes are localized to the vegetal cortex of the R. pipiens oocyte, indicating that the vegetal localization is likely the basal state. The animal location of EcVegT RNA in Eleutherodactylus coqui that we found previously (Beckham et al., 2003) is then a derived state, probably due to the great increase in egg size required for direct development of this species. To answer the question of function, we injected RpVegT or EcVegT RNAs into X. laevis embryos, and assayed animal caps for gene expression. Both of these RNAs induced the expression of endodermal, mesodermal, and organizer genes, showing that the function of RpVegT and EcVegT as meso-endodermal determinants is conserved in frogs. The RNA localizations and the function of VegT orthologues in germ layer specification may be synapomorphies for anuran amphibians.

  6. Overland movement in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis): a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Measey, John

    2016-01-01

    African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) are often referred to as 'purely aquatic' but there are many publications which suggest extensive overland movements. Previous reviews which considered the topic have not answered the following questions: (1) is there evidence for overland dispersal in native and invasive ranges; (2) what is the range of distances moved overland; (3) when does overland movement occur; and (4) is there evidence of breeding migratory behaviour? A systematic review was chosen to synthesise and critically analyse all literature on the overland movement in Xenopus laevis. Database searches resulted in 57 documents which revealed a paucity of empirical studies, with 28 containing no data, and 19 having anecdotal content. Overwhelming evidence shows that both native and invasive populations of X. laevis move overland, with well documented examples for several other members of the genus (X. borealis, X. gilli, X. muelleri, X. fraseriand X. tropicalis). Reports of distances moved overland were from 40 m to 2 km, with no apparent difference between native and invasive ranges. Overland movements are not confined to wet seasons or conditions, but the literature suggests that moving overland does not occur in the middle of the day. Migrations to temporary water-bodies for breeding have been suggested, but without any corroborating data.

  7. Effects of depleted uranium on survival, growth, and metamorphosis in the african clawed frog (Xenopus laevis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, S.E.; Caldwell, C.A.; Gonzales, G.; Gould, W.R.; Arimoto, R.

    2005-01-01

    Embryos (stage 8-47, Nieuwkoop and Faber) of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) were subjected to water-borne depleted uranium (DU) concentrations that ranged from 4.8 to 77.7 mg/Lusing an acute 96-h frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). In a chronic 64-d assay, X. laevis (from embryo through metamorphosis; stages 8-66) were subjected to concentrations of DU that ranged from 6.2 to 54.3 mg/L Our results indicate DU is a non teratogenic metal. No effects on mortality, malformations, or growth were observed in the 96-h FETAX with concentrations of DU that ranged from 4.8 to 77.7 mg/L From stage 8 to stage 47, X. laevis tadpoles do not actively feed and the gills are not well developed. Thus, uptake of DU was reduced despite exposure to elevated concentrations. The 64-d assay resulted in no concentration response for either mortality or malformations; however, a delay in metamorphosis was observed in tadpoles subjected to elevated DU concentrations (from 13.1 to 54.3 mg/L) compared to tadpoles in both the well-water control and reference. The delay in metamorphosis was likely due to increasing body burden of DU that ranged from 0.98 to 2.82 mg/kg. Copyright?? Taylor & Francis Inc.

  8. Swimming kinematics and respiratory behaviour of Xenopus laevis larvae raised in altered gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejtek, M.; Souza, K.; Neff, A.; Wassersug, R.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the respiratory behaviours and swimming kinematics of Xenopus laevis tadpoles hatched in microgravity (Space Shuttle), simulated microgravity (clinostat) and hypergravity (3 g centrifuge). All observations were made in the normal 1 g environment. Previous research has shown that X. laevis raised in microgravity exhibit abnormalities in their lungs and vestibular system upon return to 1 g. The tadpoles raised in true microgravity exhibited a significantly lower tailbeat frequency than onboard 1 g centrifuge controls on the day of landing (day0), but this behaviour normalized within 9 days. The two groups did not differ significantly in buccal pumping rates. Altered buoyancy in the space-flight microgravity tadpoles was indicated by an increased swimming angle on the day after landing (day1). Tadpoles raised in simulated microgravity differed to a greater extent in swimming behaviours from their 1 g controls. The tadpoles raised in hypergravity showed no substantive effects on the development of swimming or respiratory behaviours, except swimming angle. Together, these results show that microgravity has a transient effect on the development of locomotion in X. laevis tadpoles, most notably on swimming angle, indicative of stunted lung development. On the basis of the behaviours we studied, there is no indication of neuromuscular retardation in amphibians associated with embryogenesis in microgravity.

  9. Overland movement in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis): a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) are often referred to as ‘purely aquatic’ but there are many publications which suggest extensive overland movements. Previous reviews which considered the topic have not answered the following questions: (1) is there evidence for overland dispersal in native and invasive ranges; (2) what is the range of distances moved overland; (3) when does overland movement occur; and (4) is there evidence of breeding migratory behaviour? A systematic review was chosen to synthesise and critically analyse all literature on the overland movement in Xenopus laevis. Database searches resulted in 57 documents which revealed a paucity of empirical studies, with 28 containing no data, and 19 having anecdotal content. Overwhelming evidence shows that both native and invasive populations of X. laevis move overland, with well documented examples for several other members of the genus (X. borealis, X. gilli, X. muelleri, X. fraseriand X. tropicalis). Reports of distances moved overland were from 40 m to 2 km, with no apparent difference between native and invasive ranges. Overland movements are not confined to wet seasons or conditions, but the literature suggests that moving overland does not occur in the middle of the day. Migrations to temporary water-bodies for breeding have been suggested, but without any corroborating data. PMID:27688972

  10. Xenopus laevis oocytes infected with multi-drug-resistant bacteria: implications for electrical recordings.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Denice; Mruk, Karen; Rocheleau, Jessica M; Kobertz, William R

    2011-08-01

    The Xenopus laevis oocyte has been the workhorse for the investigation of ion transport proteins. These large cells have spawned a multitude of novel techniques that are unfathomable in mammalian cells, yet the fickleness of the oocyte has driven many researchers to use other membrane protein expression systems. Here, we show that some colonies of Xenopus laevis are infected with three multi-drug-resistant bacteria: Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Oocytes extracted from infected frogs quickly (3-4 d) develop multiple black foci on the animal pole, similar to microinjection scars, which render the extracted eggs useless for electrical recordings. Although multi-drug resistant, the bacteria were susceptible to amikacin and ciprofloxacin in growth assays. Supplementing the oocyte storage media with these two antibiotics prevented the appearance of the black foci and afforded oocytes suitable for whole-cell recordings. Given that P. fluorescens associated with X. laevis has become rapidly drug resistant, it is imperative that researchers store the extracted oocytes in the antibiotic cocktail and not treat the animals harboring the multi-drug-resistant bacteria.

  11. Pan-African phylogeography of a model organism, the African clawed frog 'Xenopus laevis'.

    PubMed

    Furman, Benjamin L S; Bewick, Adam J; Harrison, Tia L; Greenbaum, Eli; Gvoždík, Václav; Kusamba, Chifundera; Evans, Ben J

    2015-02-01

    The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis has a large native distribution over much of sub-Saharan Africa and is a model organism for research, a proposed disease vector, and an invasive species. Despite its prominent role in research and abundance in nature, surprisingly little is known about the phylogeography and evolutionary history of this group. Here, we report an analysis of molecular variation of this clade based on 17 loci (one mitochondrial, 16 nuclear) in up to 159 individuals sampled throughout its native distribution. Phylogenetic relationships among mitochondrial DNA haplotypes were incongruent with those among alleles of the putatively female-specific sex-determining gene DM-W, in contrast to the expectation of strict matrilineal inheritance of both loci. Population structure and evolutionarily diverged lineages were evidenced by analyses of molecular variation in these data. These results further contextualize the chronology, and evolutionary relationships within this group, support the recognition of X. laevis sensu stricto, X. petersii, X. victorianus and herein revalidated X. poweri as separate species. We also propose that portions of the currently recognized distributions of X. laevis (north of the Congo Basin) and X. petersii (south of the Congo Basin) be reassigned to X. poweri.

  12. Enhanced in vivo osteogenesis by nanocarrier-fused bone morphogenetic protein-4

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Yasuyuki; Kitajima, Takashi; Mazaki, Tetsuro; Yoshida, Aki; Tanaka, Masato; Umezawa, Akihiro; Nakamura, Mariko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Matsukawa, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bone defects and nonunions are major clinical skeletal problems. Growth factors are commonly used to promote bone regeneration; however, the clinical impact is limited because the factors do not last long at a given site. The introduction of tissue engineering aimed to deter the diffusion of these factors is a promising therapeutic strategy. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo osteogenic capability of an engineered bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) fusion protein. Methods BMP4 was fused with a nanosized carrier, collagen-binding domain (CBD), derived from fibronectin. The stability of the CBD-BMP4 fusion protein was examined in vitro and in vivo. Osteogenic effects of CBD-BMP4 were evaluated by computer tomography after intramedullary injection without a collagen–sponge scaffold. Recombinant BMP-4, CBD, or vehicle were used as controls. Expressions of bone-related genes and growth factors were compared among the groups. Osteogenesis induced by CBD-BMP4, BMP4, and CBD was also assessed in a bone-defect model. Results In vitro, CBD-BMP4 was retained in a collagen gel for at least 7 days while BMP4 alone was released within 3 hours. In vivo, CBD-BMP4 remained at the given site for at least 2 weeks, both with or without a collagen–sponge scaffold, while BMP4 disappeared from the site within 3 days after injection. CBD-BMP4 induced better bone formation than BMP4 did alone, CBD alone, and vehicle after the intramedullary injection into the mouse femur. Bone-related genes and growth factors were expressed at higher levels in CBD-BMP4-treated mice than in all other groups, including BMP4-treated mice. Finally, CBD-BMP4 potentiated more bone formation than did controls, including BMP4 alone, when applied to cranial bone defects without a collagen scaffold. Conclusion Altogether, nanocarrier-CBD enhanced the retention of BMP4 in the bone, thereby promoting augmented osteogenic responses in the absence of a scaffold. These results

  13. MiR-503 inhibits adipogenesis by targeting bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1a

    PubMed Central

    Man, Xiao-Fei; Tan, Shu-Wen; Tang, Hao-Neng; Guo, Yue; Tang, Chen-Yi; Tang, Jun; Zhou, Ci-La; Zhou, Hou-De

    2016-01-01

    Adipogenesis plays a key role in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis and is critically related to obesity. To overcome obesity and its associated disorders, it is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in adipogenesis. An adipogenesis-related miRNA array analysis demonstrated that miR-503 was differentially expressed before and after adipocyte differentiation; however, the exact role of miR-503 in adipocyte differentiation is unclear. Thus, the objective of this study was to further examine miR-503 in adipocyte differentiation. We found significantly decreased expression of miR-503 during adipocyte differentiation process. Using bioinformatic analysis, miR-503 was identified as a potential regulator of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor 1a (BMPR1a). We then validated BMPR1a as the target of miR-503 using a dual luciferase assay, and found decreased miR-503 and increased BMPR1a expression during adipogenesis. Overexpression of miR-503 in preadipocytes repressed expression of BMPR1a and adipogenic-related factors such as CCAAT/enhancer binding protein a (C/EBPα), proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ), and adipocyte protein 2 (AP2). In addition, miR-503 overexpression impaired the phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Inhibition of miR-503 had the opposite effect. Additionally, BMPR1a interference by siRNA attenuated adipocyte differentiation and the accumulation of lipid droplets via downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Our study provides the first evidence of the role miR-503 plays in adipocyte differentiation by regulating BMPR1a via the PI3K/Akt pathway, which may become a novel target for obesity therapy. PMID:27398155

  14. Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds Combined with Bone Morphogenetic Proteins or Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Han; Yang, Hui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the current status of calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds combined with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the field of bone tissue engineering (BTE). Date Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained primarily from PubMed and Medline in publications from 1979 to 2014, with highly regarded older publications also included. The terms BTE, CaP, BMPs, and MSC were used for the literature search. Study Selection: Reviews focused on relevant aspects and original articles reporting in vitro and/or in vivo results concerning the efficiency of CaP/BMPs or CaP/MSCs composites were retrieved, reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. Results: An ideal BTE product contains three elements: Scaffold, growth factors, and stem cells. CaP-based scaffolds are popular because of their outstanding biocompatibility, bioactivity, and osteoconductivity. However, they lack stiffness and osteoinductivity. To solve this problem, composite scaffolds of CaP with BMPs have been developed. New bone formation by CaP/BMP composites can reach levels similar to those of autografts. CaP scaffolds are compatible with MSCs and CaP/MSC composites exhibit excellent osteogenesis and stiffness. In addition, a CaP/MSC/BMP scaffold can repair bone defects more effectively than an autograft. Conclusions: Novel BTE products possess remarkable osteoconduction and osteoinduction capacities, and exhibit balanced degradation with osteogenesis. Further work should yield safe, viable, and efficient materials for the repair of bone lesions. PMID:25881610

  15. The effect of nicotine on osteoinduction by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    Tamura, K; Togo, Y; Kaihara, S; Hussain, A; Takahashi, K; Bessho, K

    2014-08-01

    Nicotine, one of the constituents of tobacco, is known to have an adverse effect on human health. We sought to clarify the interaction between nicotine and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) in terms of osteogenesis in vitro and osteoinduction in vivo. Nicotine did not inhibit or stimulate alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity or the amount of osteocalcin in C2C12 cells in the presence of rhBMP-2 in vitro. Ectopic bone formation using a collagen sponge containing rhBMP-2 was evaluated with and without nicotine after 21 days using radiographic, histological, biochemical, and immunohistochemical analyses. ALP activity in the medium-dose group (2.2±0.9IU/mg protein; P=0.047) and the high-dose group (2.0±0.1IU/mg protein; P=0.03) was significantly lower than in the control group. The calcium content in the medium-dose group (35.4±12.9μg/mg tissue; P=0.0099) and high-dose group (34.8±10.5μg/mg tissue; P=0.006) was significantly lower than in the control group. The number of vascular endothelial growth factor-positive cells in the high-dose group (671.9±57.3cells/mm(2); P=0.03) was significantly lower than in the control group. Results showed that nicotine did not inhibit the stimulatory effect of rhBMP-2 in vitro, but a high dose of nicotine inhibited bone formation in vivo by adversely affecting vascularization.

  16. Sesquiterpene action, and morphogenetic signaling through the ortholog of retinoid X receptor, in higher Diptera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Morphogenetic signaling by small terpenoid hormones is a common feature of both vertebrate and invertebrate development. Most attention on insect developmental signaling by small terpenoids has focused on signaling by juvenile hormone through bHLH-PAS proteins (e.g., the MET protein), especially as...

  17. Transgenic overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 11 propeptide in skeleton enhances bone formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone morphogenetic protein 11 (BMP11) is a key regulatory protein in skeletal development. BMP11 propeptide has been shown to antagonize GDF11 activity in vitro. To explore the role of BMP11 propeptide in skeletal formation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice with skeleton-specific overexpression...

  18. [Effects of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase b/bone morphogenetic protein-15 pathway on the follicular development in the mammalian ovary].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan-qing; Chen, Li-yun; Zhang, Zheng-hong; wang, Zheng-chao

    2013-04-01

    In mammals, ovarian follicle is made of an oocyte with its surrounding granulosa cells and theca cells. Follicular growth and development is a highly coordinated programmable process, which guarantees the normal oocyte maturation and makes it having the fertilizing capacity. The paracrine and autocrine between oocytes and granulosa cells are essential for the follicular development to provide a suitable microenvironment. Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase /protein kinase B is one of these important regulatory signaling pathways during this developmental process, and bone morphogenetic protein-15 an oocyte-specific secreted signal molecule, which regulates the follicular development by paracrine in the mammalian ovary. The present article overviewed the role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase / protein kinase B signaling during the follicular development based on our previous investigation about protein kinase B /forkhead transcription factor forkhead family of transcription factors -3a, and then focused on the regulatory effects of bone morphogenetic protein-15, as a downstream signal molecule of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase / forkhead family of transcription factors -3a pathway, on ovarian follicular development, which helped to further understand the molecular mechanism regulating the follicular development and to treat ovarian diseases like infertility.

  19. The effects of temperature, desiccation, and body mass on the locomotion of the terrestrial isopod, Porcellio laevis.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Tara M; Claussen, Dennis L; Ladd, Gregory B; Buckner, Shizuka T

    2009-06-01

    Locomotion in terrestrial isopods is strongly influenced by body size and by abiotic factors. We determined the speeds of isopods of differing masses within a linear racetrack at temperatures ranging from 15 to 35 degrees C. We also predicted maximum speeds based on the Froude number concept as originally applied to vertebrates. In addition we used a circular thermal gradient to examine the temperature preferences of isopods, and we measured the effects of desiccation on locomotion. Measured speeds of the isopods progressively increased with temperature with an overall Q(10) of 1.64 and scaling exponents ranging from 0.38 to 0.63. The predicted maximum speeds were remarkably close to the measured speeds at the highest test temperature although the scaling exponents were closer to 0.15. The isopods did not exhibit a strong thermal preference within the gradient; however, they did generally avoid temperatures above 25 degrees C. Moderate desiccation had no apparent effect on locomotor performance, but there was a progressive decrease in speed once animals had lost more than 10% of their initial body mass. Though largely restricted to moist habitats, P. laevis can easily withstand short exposures to desiccating conditions, and they are capable of effective locomotion over a wide range of temperatures. Since they are nonconglobating, active escape appears to be their primary defense when threatened under exposed conditions. Although their maximum speeds may be limited both by temperature and by their inability to change gait, these speeds are clearly adequate for survival.

  20. Atrazine and malathion shorten the maturation process of Xenopus laevis oocytes and have an adverse effect on early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qichao; Lee, Jessica; Lin, Yu-Huey; Jing, Guihua; Tsai, L Jillianne; Chen, Andrew; Hetrick, Lindsay; Jocoy, Dylan; Liu, Junjun

    2016-04-01

    The use of pesticides has a negative impact on the environment. Amphibians have long been regarded as indicator species to pollutants due to their permeable skin and sensitivity to the environment. Studies have shown that population declines of some amphibians are directly linked with exposure to agricultural contaminants. In the past, much of the studies have focused on the toxic effect of contaminants on larvae (tadpoles), juvenile and adult frogs. However, due to the nature of their life cycle, amphibian eggs and early embryos are especially susceptible to the contaminants, and any alteration during the early reproductive stages may have a profound effect on the health and population of amphibians. In this study, we analyzed the effect of atrazine and malathion, two commonly used pesticides, on Xenopus laevis oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis. We found that both atrazine and malathion shortened the frog oocyte maturation process and resulted in reduced Emi2 levels at cytostatic factor-mediated metaphase arrest, and a high level of Emi2 is critically important for oocyte maturation. Furthermore, frog embryos fertilized under the influence of atrazine and/or malathion displayed a higher rate of abnormal division that eventually led to embryo death during early embryogenesis.

  1. Heparan sulfate acts as a bone morphogenetic protein coreceptor by facilitating ligand-induced receptor hetero-oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wan-Jong; Digman, Michelle A; Lander, Arthur D

    2010-11-15

    Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) not only binds several major classes of growth factors but also sometimes potentiates their activities--an effect usually termed "coreception." A view that coreception is due to the stabilization of growth factor-receptor interactions has emerged primarily from studies of the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). Recent in vivo studies have strongly suggested that HS also plays an important role in regulating signaling by the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Here, we provide evidence that the mechanism of coreception for BMPs is markedly different from that established for FGFs. First, we demonstrate a direct, stimulatory role for cell surface HS in the immediate signaling activities of BMP2 and BMP4, and we provide evidence that HS-BMP interactions are required for this effect. Next, using several independent assays of ligand binding and receptor assembly, including coimmunoprecipitation, cross-linking, and fluorescence fluctuation microscopy, we show that HS does not affect BMP binding to type I receptor subunits but instead enhances the subsequent recruitment of type II receptor subunits to BMP-type I receptor complexes. This suggests a view of HS as a catalyst of the formation of signaling complexes, rather than as a stabilizer of growth factor binding.

  2. Sequencing and analysis of 10967 full-length cDNA clones from Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, R D; Chang, E; Petrescu, A; Liao, N; Kirkpatrick, R; Griffith, M; Butterfield, Y; Stott, J; Barber, S; Babakaiff, R; Matsuo, C; Wong, D; Yang, G; Smailus, D; Brown-John, M; Mayo, M; Beland, J; Gibson, S; Olson, T; Tsai, M; Featherstone, R; Chand, S; Siddiqui, A; Jang, W; Lee, E; Klein, S; Prange, C; Myers, R M; Green, E D; Wagner, L; Gerhard, D; Marra, M; Jones, S M; Holt, R

    2005-10-31

    Sequencing of full-insert clones from full-length cDNA libraries from both Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis has been ongoing as part of the Xenopus Gene Collection initiative. Here we present an analysis of 10967 clones (8049 from X. laevis and 2918 from X. tropicalis). The clone set contains 2013 orthologs between X. laevis and X. tropicalis as well as 1795 paralog pairs within X. laevis. 1199 are in-paralogs, believed to have resulted from an allotetraploidization event approximately 30 million years ago, and the remaining 546 are likely out-paralogs that have resulted from more ancient gene duplications, prior to the divergence between the two species. We do not detect any evidence for positive selection by the Yang and Nielsen maximum likelihood method of approximating d{sub N}/d{sub S}. However, d{sub N}/d{sub S} for X. laevis in-paralogs is elevated relative to X. tropicalis orthologs. This difference is highly significant, and indicates an overall relaxation of selective pressures on duplicated gene pairs. Within both groups of paralogs, we found evidence of subfunctionalization, manifested as differential expression of paralogous genes among tissues, as measured by EST information from public resources. We have observed, as expected, a higher instance of subfunctionalization in out-paralogs relative to in-paralogs.

  3. A New Nomenclature of Xenopus laevis Chromosomes Based on the Phylogenetic Relationship to Silurana/Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Kondo, Mariko; Gilchrist, Michael J; Zorn, Aaron M; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Schmid, Michael; Taira, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Xenopus laevis (XLA) is an allotetraploid species which appears to have undergone whole-genome duplication after the interspecific hybridization of 2 diploid species closely related to Silurana/Xenopus tropicalis (XTR). Previous cDNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments have identified 9 sets of homoeologous chromosomes in X. laevis, in which 8 sets correspond to chromosomes 1-8 of X. tropicalis (XTR1-XTR8), and the last set corresponds to a fusion of XTR9 and XTR10. In addition, recent X. laevis genome sequencing and BAC-FISH experiments support this physiological relationship and show no gross chromosome translocation in the X. laevis karyotype. Therefore, for the benefit of both comparative cytogenetics and genome research, we here propose a new chromosome nomenclature for X. laevis based on the phylogenetic relationship and chromosome length, i.e. XLA1L, XLA1S, XLA2L, XLA2S, and so on, in which the numbering of XLA chromosomes corresponds to that in X. tropicalis and the postfixes 'L' and 'S' stand for 'long' and 'short' chromosomes in the homoeologous pairs, which can be distinguished cytologically by their relative size. The last chromosome set is named XLA9L and XLA9S, in which XLA9 corresponds to both XTR9 and XTR10, and hence, to emphasize the phylogenetic relationship to X. tropicalis, XLA9_10L and XLA9_10S are also used as synonyms.

  4. Danger in the reef: Proteome, toxicity, and neutralization of the venom of the olive sea snake, Aipysurus laevis.

    PubMed

    Laustsen, Andreas H; Gutiérrez, José María; Rasmussen, Arne R; Engmark, Mikael; Gravlund, Peter; Sanders, Kate L; Lohse, Brian; Lomonte, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Four specimens of the olive sea snake, Aipysurus laevis, were collected off the coast of Western Australia, and the venom proteome was characterized and quantitatively estimated by RP-HPLC, SDS-PAGE, and MALDI-TOF-TOF analyses. A. laevis venom is remarkably simple and consists of phospholipases A2 (71.2%), three-finger toxins (3FTx; 25.3%), cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISP; 2.5%), and traces of a complement control module protein (CCM; 0.2%). Using a Toxicity Score, the most lethal components were determined to be short neurotoxins. Whole venom had an intravenous LD50 of 0.07 mg/kg in mice and showed a high phospholipase A2 activity, but no proteinase activity in vitro. Preclinical assessment of neutralization and ELISA immunoprofiling showed that BioCSL Sea Snake Antivenom was effective in cross-neutralizing A. laevis venom with an ED50 of 821 μg venom per mL antivenom, with a binding preference towards short neurotoxins, due to the high degree of conservation between short neurotoxins from A. laevis and Enhydrina schistosa venom. Our results point towards the possibility of developing recombinant antibodies or synthetic inhibitors against A. laevis venom due to its simplicity.

  5. Coating with a Modular Bone Morphogenetic Peptide Promotes Healing of a Bone-Implant Gap in an Ovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Lee, Jae Sung; Nemke, Brett; Graf, Ben K.; Royalty, Kevin; Illgen, Richard; Vanderby, Ray; Markel, Mark D.; Murphy, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the potential for growth factor delivery strategies to promote orthopedic implant healing, there is a need for growth factor delivery methods that are controllable and amenable to clinical translation. We have developed a modular bone growth factor, herein termed “modular bone morphogenetic peptide (mBMP)”, which was designed to efficiently bind to the surface of orthopedic implants and also stimulate new bone formation. The purpose of this study was to coat a hydroxyapatite-titanium implant with mBMP and evaluate bone healing across a bone-implant gap in the sheep femoral condyle. The mBMP molecules efficiently bound to a hydroxyapatite-titanium implant and 64% of the initially bound mBMP molecules were released in a sustained manner over 28 days. The results demonstrated that the mBMP-coated implant group had significantly more mineralized bone filling in the implant-bone gap than the control group in C-arm computed tomography (DynaCT) scanning (25% more), histological (35% more) and microradiographic images (50% more). Push-out stiffness of the mBMP group was nearly 40% greater than that of control group whereas peak force did not show a significant difference. The results of this study demonstrated that mBMP coated on a hydroxyapatite-titanium implant stimulates new bone formation and may be useful to improve implant fixation in total joint arthroplasty applications. PMID:23185610

  6. Continued Studies on the Effects of Simazine on the Liver Histological Structure and Metamorphosis in the Developing Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Sai, Linlin; Qu, Binpeng; Li, Yan; Jia, Qiang; Bo, Cunxiang; Liu, Yanzhong; Yu, Gongchang; Xie, Lin; Li, Ling; Ng, Jack C; Peng, Cheng

    2016-10-01

    This study continued our previous work (Sai et al. in Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 95:157-163, 2015a) by analysing the effects of simazine on the liver histological structure and metamorphosis in the developing Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles (Nieuwkoop-Faber stage 46) were exposed to simazine at 0.1, 1.2, 11.0 and 100.9 μg/L for 100 days. When tadpoles were exposed to simazine at 11.0 and 100.9 µg/L, an increased mortality and damaged liver tissues were observed together with significant inhibition of percent of X. laevis completing metamorphosis on days 80 and 90 and prolonged time of completing metamorphosis. On the other hand, we found that simazine has no significant effects on liver weight and altered hepatosomatic index. Results of this study may be considered to inform risk assessment of the effects of simazine on the development of X. laevis.

  7. Waterborne exposure to triadimefon causes thyroid endocrine disruption and developmental delay in Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Li, Shuying; Yao, Tingting; Zhao, Renjie; Wang, Qiangwei; Zhu, Guonian

    2016-08-01

    Triadimefon (TDF) is a triazole-derivative fungicide that is detectable in the environment and target agricultural products, prompting concern over its risk to wildlife and human health. In our study, Nieuwkoop & Faber stage 51 Xenopus laevis tadpoles were exposed to different nominal concentrations TDF (0, 0.112, and 1.12mg/L) for 21 days while the tadpoles were undergoing pre-morphological development. Developmental condition, bioaccumulation and thyroid hormone levels, and mRNA expression of genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis were examined. Exposure to TDF caused a reduction in developmental rates on pre-metamorphosis of X. laevis. TDF exposure significantly decreased thyroid hormone (T4 and T3) concentrations, indicating thyroid endocrine disruption. The downregulation of thyroglobulin and upregulation of genes related to thyroid hormone metabolism (ugt1ab) might be responsible for the decreased thyroid hormone concentrations. Treatment with TDF also significantly increased mRNA expression of genes involved in thyroid-stimulating hormone as a compensatory mechanism response to decreased thyroid hormone concentrations. Gene expression and in silico ligand docking studies were combined to study the interaction between TDF and thyroid hormone receptor. Results showed that TDF could consequently affect the HPT axis signaling pathway. In addition, bioconcentration of TDF was observed in tadpoles, indicating the bioactivity of this compound. Taken together, the results suggest that TDF alters the HPT axis-related genes and changes thyroid hormone contents in X. laevis tadpoles, thus causing thyroid endocrine disruption and consequently delaying thyroid hormones-dependent metamorphic development.

  8. Gene expression profiles in testis of developing male Xenopus laevis damaged by chronic exposure of atrazine.

    PubMed

    Sai, Linlin; Dong, Zhihua; Li, Ling; Guo, Qiming; Jia, Qiang; Xie, Lin; Bo, Cunxiang; Liu, Yanzhong; Qu, Binpeng; Li, Xiangxin; Shao, Hua; Ng, Jack C; Peng, Cheng

    2016-09-01

    As a widely used herbicide, atrazine (AZ) has been extensively studied for its adverse effects on the reproductive system, especially feminization in male animals. However, the relationship of gene expression changes and associated toxicological endpoints remains unclear. In this study, developing Xenopus laevis tadpoles were exposed to concentration of AZ at 0.1, 1, 10 or 100 μg/L continuously. Compared with froglets in the control group, there were no significant differences in body length, body weight, liver weight and hepatosomatic index (HSI) of males in groups treated with AZ for 90 d. At 100 μg/L AZ treatment caused a significant reduction of gonad weight and gonadosomatic index (GSI) of males (p < 0.01). In addition, AZ at all dose levels caused testicular degeneration, especially in froglets from the groups with 0.1 and 100 μg/L which exhibited U-shaped dose-response trend. We further investigated the gene expression changes associated with the testicular degeneration induced by AZ. We found that the expression of 1165 genes was significantly altered with 616 upregulated and 549 downregulated compared to the expression profile of the control animals. KEGG analysis showed that genes which were significantly affected by AZ are mainly involved in arginine and proline metabolism, cell cycle, riboflavin metabolism, spliceosome, base excision repair and progesterone-mediated oocyte maturation pathway. Our results show that AZ may affect reproductive and immune systems by interference with the related gene expression changes during the male X. laevis development. The findings may help to clarify the feminization mechanisms of AZ in male X. laevis.

  9. Effects of perfluorooctanesulfonate and perfluorobutanesulfonate on the growth and sexual development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qin-Qin; Zhang, Yin-Feng; Zhou, Zhen; Shi, Ya-Li; Ge, Ya-Nan; Ren, Dong-Kai; Xu, Hai-Ming; Zhao, Ya-Xian; Wei, Wu-Ji; Qin, Zhan-Fen

    2013-09-01

    Perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), as a substitute for perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), is widespread in the environment and biotic samples as well as PFOS. To investigate effects of PFOS and PFBS on the growth and sexual development of amphibians, we exposed Xenopus laevis tadpoles at a series of concentrations of PFOS and PFBS (0.1; 1; 100; 1,000 μg/l) as well as 17-beta-estradiol (E2, 100 ng/l) and 5 alpha-androstan-17-beta-ol-3-one (DHT, 100 ng/l) from stage 46/47 to 2 months postmetamorphosis. We found that neither PFOS nor PFBS had a significant effect on the survival and growth. However, they caused hepatohistological impairment at higher concentrations (100; 1,000 μg/l). Unlike E2, PFOS at all concentrations did not alter the sex ratio and induce intersex, but caused degeneration of spermatogonia in testes except for the lowest concentration. PFBS had no effect on the sex ratio and gonadal histology. PFOS and PFBS promoted expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR), but not affected aromatase expression in the brain. The increase in expression of ER and AR suggests an increase in the responsiveness to the corresponding sex hormone and potential effects on sexual development. Our results show that PFBS as well as PFOS have adverse effects on hepato-histology and sexual development on X. laevis. Also, PFOS- and PFBS-induced increase in ER and AR expression highlights the need to further study effects of PFOS and PFBS on subsequently gonadal development, sexual dimorphism, and secondary sex characteristics in X. laevis. It is debatable that PFBS is widely used as a substitute of PFOS.

  10. The energetics of reproduction and parental care in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio laevis.

    PubMed

    Lardies, Marco A; Cotoras, Ivania S; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2004-12-01

    Parental care is a behavioral strategy that contributes to increased fitness of progeny. Among terrestrial arthropods, many isopods provide extensive parental care. Few studies have quantified the underlying cost of parental care in terms of energy. We used the terrestrial woodlouse Porcellio laevis (Latreille) as a study model to examine how energetic acquisition and expenditure in females is affected during the incubation period and how parental care affects energy balance in this species. We determined the basic reproductive biology (i.e. fecundity, reproductive output, egg volume, egg loss), energy expenditure (i.e. metabolic rate), and energy acquisition (i.e. food consumption, digestibility) of ovigerous females in different stages of embryonic development. Non-ovigerous females were used as the control group. Our results show that P. laevis displays variability in life-history traits compared with populations from other zones around the world. Ovigerous females exhibited a lower ingestion rate and lower digestibility than control females, thus indicating a lower capacity for energy acquisition. Furthermore, energy expenditure was higher in ovigerous females when compared to non-ovigerous females. In particular, females in early embryonic development stored 5.1-fold less daily energy than females without eggs. The results presented here show that the parental care provided by female P. laevis is energetically costly. Overall, our work brings us much closer to understanding the proximate mechanisms of the costs of parental care in terrestrial isopods. Both proximal mechanisms and consequences of providing care on future reproduction, should be considered in explaining the evolution of parental care.

  11. Extracellular Ca2+ Is Required for Fertilization in the African Clawed Frog, Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Duray, Alexis M.; Tembo, Maiwase; Beleny, David O.; Napolitano, Marc A.; Sauer, Monica L.; Wisner, Bennett W.

    2017-01-01

    Background The necessity of extracellular Ca2+ for fertilization and early embryonic development in the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is controversial. Ca2+ entry into X. laevis sperm is reportedly required for the acrosome reaction, yet fertilization and embryonic development have been documented to occur in high concentrations of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. Here we sought to resolve this controversy. Methodology/principal finding Using the appearance of cleavage furrows as an indicator of embryonic development, we found that X. laevis eggs inseminated in a solution lacking added divalent cations developed normally. By contrast, eggs inseminated in millimolar concentrations of BAPTA or EGTA failed to develop. Transferring embryos to varying solutions after sperm addition, we found that extracellular Ca2+ is specifically required for events occurring within the first 30 minutes after sperm addition, but not after. We found that the fluorescently stained sperm were not able to penetrate the envelope of eggs inseminated in high BAPTA, whereas several had penetrated the vitelline envelope of eggs inseminated without a Ca2+ chelator, or with BAPTA and saturating CaCl2. Together these results indicate that fertilization does not occur in high concentrations of Ca2+ chelators. Finally, we found that the jelly coat includes >5 mM of readily diffusible Ca2+. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these data are consistent with requirement of extracellular Ca2+ for fertilization. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the jelly coat surrounding the egg acts as a reserve of readily available Ca2+ ions to foster fertilization in changing extracellular milieu. PMID:28114360

  12. Localization of RNAs in oocytes of Eleutherodactylus coqui, a direct developing frog, differs from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Beckham, Yvonne M; Nath, Kimberly; Elinson, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    Eleutherodactylus coqui develops directly on land to a frog. The large 3.5-mm oocyte of E. coqui has enough yolk to allow development without a feeding tadpole. In the smaller Xenopus laevis oocyte, 1.3 mm in diameter, mRNAs involved in germ layer formation, such as VegT and Vg1, are localized to the vegetal cortex of the oocyte. We hypothesized that an animal shift has occurred in the localization of the E. coqui Orthologs of VegT and Vg1 due to the large egg size. Through a combination of degenerate reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), we cloned 1634 bp of EcVegT and 1377 bp of EcVg1. Northern blot analysis shows that the lengths of these transcripts are 2.5 kb and 1.3 kb, respectively. This result suggests that we have obtained the complete Vg1 transcript, although this transcript has an extremely short 3' untranslated region compared with X. laevis, 256 bp and 1268 bp, respectively. Zygotic expression of EcVegT closely resembles that of VegT, supporting their orthology. Radioactive RT-PCR and in situ hybridization demonstrated the presence of EcVegT and EcVg1 predominantly near the animal pole of the oocyte. RT-PCR showed that the animal blastomeres, formed from the first horizontal cleavage, inherit half of the EcVegT and EcVg1 transcripts, although they contain only about 1% of the embryo volume. Our results indicate major differences between the molecular organization of the eggs of X. laevis and E. coqui.

  13. Defined nutrient medium for the in vitro maintenance of Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Eppig, J J; Dumont, J N

    1976-06-01

    A procedure is described for the isolation and culture of large numbers of follicle cell-free Xenopus laevis oocytes in all stages of development. The isolation procedure involves the incubation of pieces of ovary in a calcium-free solution OR2 containing 0.2% collagenase. A defined nutrient medium for the maintenace of the oocytes in vitro is presented. It is shown that this medium, referred to as DNOM, can maintain certain morpological and functional characteristics of oocytes for periods up to 3 weeks.

  14. Expressional characterization of mRNA (guanine-7) methyltransferase (rnmt) during early development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lokapally, Ashwin; Metikala, Sanjeeva; Hollemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of the guanosine cap structure at the 5' end of mRNA is essential for efficient translation of all eukaryotic cellular mRNAs, gene expression and cell viability and promotes transcription, splicing, polyadenylation and nuclear export of mRNA. In the current study, we present the spatial expression pattern of the Xenopus laevis rnmt homologue. A high percentage of protein sequence similarity, especially within the methyltransferase domain, as well as an increased expression in the cells of the transcriptionally active stages, suggests a conserved RNA cap methylation function. Spatial expression analysis identified expression domains in the brain, the retina, the lens, the otic vesicles and the branchial arches.

  15. Stable magnetic field gradient levitation of Xenopus laevis: toward low-gravity simulation.

    PubMed

    Valles, J M; Lin, K; Denegre, J M; Mowry, K L

    1997-08-01

    We have levitated, for the first time, living biological specimens, embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis, using a large inhomogeneous magnetic field. The magnetic field/field gradient product required for levitation was 1430 kG2/cm, consistent with the embryo's susceptibility being dominated by the diamagnetism of water and protein. We show that unlike any other earth-based technique, magnetic field gradient levitation of embryos reduces the body forces and gravity-induced stresses on them. We discuss the use of large inhomogeneous magnetic fields as a probe for gravitationally sensitive phenomena in biological specimens.

  16. Accelerated Gene Evolution and Subfunctionalization in thePseudotetraploid Frog Xenopus Laevis

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, Uffe; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Grammar, Timothy C.; Harland,Richard M.; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2007-03-01

    Ancient whole genome duplications have been implicated in the vertebrate and teleost radiations, and in the emergence of diverse angiosperm lineages, but the evolutionary response to such a perturbation is still poorly understood. The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis experienced a relatively recent tetraploidization {approx} 40 million years ago. Analysis of the considerable amount of EST sequence available for this species together with the genome sequence of the related diploid Xenopus tropicalis provides a unique opportunity to study the genomic response to whole genome duplication.

  17. How Xenopus Laevis Replicates DNA Reliably even though Its Origins of Replication are Located and Initiated Stochastically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechhoefer, John; Marshall, Brandon

    2007-03-01

    DNA replication in Xenopus laevis is extremely reliable, failing to complete before cell division no more than once in 10 000 times; yet replication origin sites are located and initiated stochastically. Using a model based on 1D theories of nucleation and growth and using concepts from extreme-value statistics, we derive the distribution of replication times given a particular initiation function. We show that the experimentally observed initiation strategy for Xenopus laevis meets the reliability constraint and is close to the one that requires the fewest resources of a cell.

  18. Pou5f3.2-induced proliferative state of embryonic cells during gastrulation of Xenopus laevis embryo.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Eriko; Li, Chong; Lee, Jaehoon; Hotta, Hiroyo; Katayama, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Tsutomu

    2015-12-01

    POU class V (POU-V) transcription factors play the important role in maintenance of pluripotency and cell differentiation. Pou5f3.2 (Oct25), one of Xenopus POU-V transcription factors, shows the zygotic expression prior to gastrulation. In order to know the molecular mechanism of pou5f3.2 expression at gastrula stage, we examined a responsiveness of pou5f3.2 to Nodal signaling. Animal cap assay demonstrated that Xnr2 activates the gene expression of pou5f3.2. In comparative analysis of the 5'-flanking region of pou5f3.2 between Xenopus laevis and X. tropicalis, two conserved regions were detected within the flanking region. Reporter analyses showed that one of the conserved regions contained an enhancer region, which had several Smad2/3 and FoxH1 binding motifs. ChIP assay demonstrated that Smad2 binds to the enhancer region. These results suggest that Nodal signaling induces zygotic expression of pou5f3.2 at gastrula stage. To understand a role of pou5f3.2 in gastrula embryos, morpholino oligo DNA of pou5f3.2 was injected into the lateral side of one blastomere at the 2-cell stage. The morphant embryos showed diminution of Xbra1 expression and gastrulation defect in the injection side, suggesting the essential role of pou5f3.2 at the gastrula stage. Xbra1 expression and gastrulation were also inhibited by injecting with the synthesized RNAs of pou5f3.2. Furthermore, in the pou5f3.2-injected embryo, gene expression of p27Xic1 was drastically suppressed, and the number of dividing cells increased in the injection side. These results suggest that one role of pou5f3.2 is to keep the embryonic cells in undifferentiated and proliferative state during gastrulation.

  19. Odontogenic ameloblasts-associated protein (ODAM), via phosphorylation by bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IB (BMPR-IB), is implicated in ameloblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Park, Jong-Tae; Cho, Young-Sik; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Cho, Moon-Il; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2012-05-01

    To elucidate the function of the odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) in ameloblasts, we identified more than 74 proteins that interact with ODAM using protoarray. Of the identified proteins, bone morphogenetic protein receptor type-IB (BMPR-IB) was physiologically relevant in differentiating ameloblasts. ODAM and BMPR-IB exhibited similar patterns of expression in vitro, during ameloblast differentiation. ODAM and BMPR-IB interacted through the C-terminus of ODAM, which resulted in increased ODAM phosphorylation in the presence of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). Immunoprecipitation assays using Ser-Xaa-Glu (SXE) mutants of ODAM demonstrated that the phosphorylation of ODAM by BMPR-IB occurs at this motif, and this phosphorylation is required for the activation of MAPKs. ODAM phosphorylation was detected in ameloblasts during ameloblast differentiation and enamel mineralization in vitro and involved in the activation of downstream factors of MAPKs. Therefore, the BMP-2-BMPR-IB-ODAM-MAPK signaling cascade has important roles in ameloblast differentiation and enamel mineralization. Our data suggest that ODAM facilitates the progression of tooth development in cooperation with BMPR-IB through distinct domains of ODAM.

  20. The thyroid hormone receptor gene (c-erbA alpha) is expressed in advance of thyroid gland maturation during the early embryonic development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Bigler, J; Eisenman, R N

    1991-01-01

    The c-erbA proto-oncogene encodes the thyroid hormone receptor, a ligand-dependent transcription factor which plays an important role in vertebrate growth and development. To define the role of the thyroid hormone receptor in developmental processes, we have begun studying c-erbA gene expression during the ontogeny of Xenopus laevis, an organism in which thyroid hormone has well-documented effects on morphogenesis. Using polymerase chain reactions (PCR) as a sensitive assay of specific gene expression, we found that polyadenylated erbA alpha RNA is present in Xenopus cells at early developmental stages, including the fertilized egg, blastula, gastrula, and neurula. By performing erbA alpha-specific PCR on reverse-transcribed RNAs from high-density sucrose gradient fractions prepared from early-stage embryos, we have demonstrated that these erbA transcripts are recruited to polysomes. Therefore, erbA is expressed in Xenopus development prior to the appearance of the thyroid gland anlage in tailbud-stage embryos. This implies that erbA alpha/thyroid hormone receptors may play ligand-independent roles during the early development of X. laevis. Quantitative PCR revealed a greater than 25-fold range in the steady-state levels of polyadenylated erbA alpha RNA across early stages of development, as expressed relative to equimolar amounts of total embryonic RNA. Substantial increases in the levels of erbA alpha RNA were noted at stages well after the onset of zygotic transcription at the mid-blastula transition, with accumulation of erbA alpha transcripts reaching a relative maximum in advance of metamorphosis. We also show that erbA alpha RNAs are expressed unequally across Xenopus neural tube embryos. This differential expression continues through later stages of development, including metamorphosis. This finding suggests that erbA alpha/thyroid hormone receptors may play roles in tissue-specific processes across all of Xenopus development. Images PMID:1656222

  1. The B-subdomain of the Xenopus laevis XFIN KRAB-AB domain is responsible for its weaker transcriptional repressor activity compared to human ZNF10/Kox1.

    PubMed

    Born, Nadine; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Lorenz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain interacts with the nuclear hub protein TRIM28 to initiate or mediate chromatin-dependent processes like transcriptional repression, imprinting or suppression of endogenous retroviruses. The prototype KRAB domain initially identified in ZNF10/KOX1 encompasses two subdomains A and B that are found in hundreds of zinc finger transcription factors studied in human and murine genomes. Here we demonstrate for the first time transcriptional repressor activity of an amphibian KRAB domain. After sequence correction, the updated KRAB-AB domain of zinc finger protein XFIN from the frog Xenopus laevis was found to confer transcriptional repression in reporter assays in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney cells as well as in human HeLa, but not in the minnow Pimephales promelas fish cell line EPC. Binding of the XFIN KRAB-AB domain to human TRIM28 was demonstrated in a classical co-immunoprecipitation approach and visualized in a single-cell compartmentalization assay. XFIN-AB displayed reduced potency in repression as well as lower strength of interaction with TRIM28 compared to ZNF10 KRAB-AB. KRAB-B subdomain swapping between the two KRAB domains indicated that it was mainly the KRAB-B subdomain of XFIN that was responsible for its lower capacity in repression and binding to human TRIM28. In EPC fish cells, ZNF10 and XFIN KRAB repressor activity could be partially restored to low levels by adding exogenous human TRIM28. In contrast to XFIN, we did not find any transcriptional repression activity for the KRAB-like domain of human PRDM9 in HeLa cells. PRDM9 is thought to harbor an evolutionary older domain related to KRAB whose homologs even occur in invertebrates. Our results support the notion that functional bona fide KRAB domains which confer transcriptional repression and interact with TRIM28 most likely co-evolved together with TRIM28 at the beginning of tetrapode evolution.

  2. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Antagonist Noggin Promotes Skin Tumorigenesis via Stimulation of the Wnt and Shh Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Andrey A.; Mardaryev, Andrei N.; Sharova, Tatyana Y.; Grachtchouk, Marina; Atoyan, Ruzanna; Byers, H. Randolph; Seykora, John T.; Overbeek, Paul; Dlugosz, Andrzej; Botchkarev, Vladimir A.

    2009-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play pivotal roles in the regulation of skin development. To study the role of BMPs in skin tumorigenesis, BMP antagonist noggin was used to generate keratin 14-targeted transgenic mice. In contrast to wild-type mice, transgenic mice developed spontaneous hair follicle-derived tumors, which resemble human trichofolliculoma. Global gene expression profiles revealed that in contrast to anagen hair follicles of wild-type mice, tumors of transgenic mice showed stage-dependent increases in the expression of genes encoding the selected components of Wnt and Shh pathways. Specifically, expression of the Wnt ligands increased at the initiation stage of tumor formation, whereas expression of the Wnt antagonist and tumor suppressor Wnt inhibitory factor-1 decreased, as compared with fully developed tumors. In contrast, expression of the components of Shh pathway increased in fully developed tumors, as compared with the tumor placodes. Consistent with the expression data, pharmacological treatment of transgenic mice with Wnt and Shh antagonists resulted in the stage-dependent inhibition of tumor initiation, and progression, respectively. Furthermore, BMP signaling stimulated Wnt inhibitory factor-1 expression and promoter activity in cultured tumor cells and HaCaT keratinocytes, as well as inhibited Shh expression, as compared with the corresponding controls. Thus, tumor suppressor activity of the BMPs in skin epithelium depends on the local concentrations of noggin and is mediated at least in part via stage-dependent antagonizing of Wnt and Shh signaling pathways. PMID:19700758

  3. Co-stimulation with bone morphogenetic protein-9 and FK506 induces remarkable osteoblastic differentiation in rat dedifferentiated fat cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshiaki; Shinohara, Yukiya; Momozaki, Sawako; Yoshimoto, Takehiko; Noguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-10-18

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells, which are isolated from mature adipocytes using the ceiling culture method, exhibit similar characteristics to mesenchymal stem cells, and possess adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic potentials. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -9, members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, exhibit the most potent osteogenic activity of this growth factor family. However, the effects of BMP-2 and BMP-9 on the osteogenic differentiation of DFAT remain unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMP-2 and BMP-9 on osteoblastic differentiation of rat DFAT (rDFAT) cells in the presence or absence of FK506, an immunosuppressive agent. Co-stimulation with BMP-9 and FK506 induced gene expression of runx2, osterix, and bone sialoprotein, and ALP activity compared with BMP-9 alone, BMP-2 alone and BMP-2+FK506 in rDFAT cells. Furthermore, it caused mineralization of cultures and phosphorylation of smad1/5/8, compared with BMP-9 alone. The ALP activity induced by BMP-9+FK506 was not influenced by addition of noggin, a BMP antagonist. Our data suggest that the combination of BMP-9 and FK506 potently induces osteoblastic differentiation of rDFAT cells.

  4. Nanofibrous yet injectable polycaprolactone-collagen bone tissue scaffold with osteoprogenitor cells and controlled release of bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Bialorucki, Callan; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we developed a nanofibrous, yet injectable orthobiologic tissue scaffold that is capable of hosting osteoprogenitor cells and controlling kinetic release profile of the encapsulated pro-osteogenic factor without diminishing its bioactivity over 21days. This innovative injectable scaffold was synthesized by incorporating electrospun and subsequently O2 plasma-functionalized polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers within the collagen type-I solution along with MC3T3-E1 cells (pre-osteoblasts) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2). Through changing the PCL nanofiber concentration within the injectable scaffolds, we were able to tailor the mechanical strength, protein retention capacity, bioactivity preservation, and osteoinductive potential of the scaffolds. The nanofibrous internal structure of the scaffold allowed us to use a low dose of BMP2 (200ng/ml) to achieve osteoblastic differentiation in in vitro culture. The osteogenesis capacity of the injectable scaffolds were evaluated though measuring MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, ALP activity, matrix mineralization, and early- and late-osteoblast specific gene expression profiles over 21days. The results demonstrated that the nanofibrous injectable scaffold provides not only an osteoinductive environment for osteoprogenitor cells to differentiate, but also a suitable biomechanical and biochemical environment to act as a reservoir for osteogenic factors with controlled release profile.

  5. Binding of integrin α1 to bone morphogenetic protein receptor IA suggests a novel role of integrin α1β1 in bone morphogenetic protein 2 signalling.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yan; Liang, Xudong; Du, Jing; Zhou, Shuai; Yang, Chun

    2015-11-05

    Here, we observed that integrin α1β1 and bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR) IA formed a complex and co-localised in several cell types. However, the molecular interaction between these two molecules was not studied in detail to date and the role of the interaction in BMPR signalling remains unknown; thus, these were investigated here. In a steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulation, the observed development of the rupture force related to the displacement between the A-domain of integrin α1 and the extracellular domain of BMPR IA indicated a strong molecular interaction within the integrin-BMPR complex. Analysis of the intermolecular forces revealed that hydrogen bonds, rather than salt bridges, are the major contributors to these intermolecular interactions. By using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) experiments with site-directed mutants, we found that residues 85-89 in BMPR IA play the most important role for BMPR IA binding to integrin α1β1. These residues are the same as those responsible for bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2)/BMPR IA binding. In our experiments, we also found that the interference of integrin α1β1 up regulated the level of phosphorylated Smad1, 5, 8, which is the downstream of BMP/BMPR signalling. Therefore, our results suggest that integrin α1β1/BMPR IA may block BMP-2/BMPR IA complex information and interfere with the BMP-2 signalling pathway in cells.

  6. Systems Biology of the Self-regulating Morphogenetic Gradient of the Xenopus Gastrula

    PubMed Central

    Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; De Robertis, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    The morphogenetic field concept was proposed by experimental embryologists to account for the self-regulative behavior of embryos. Such fields have remained an abstract concept until the recent identification of their molecular components using a combination of genetics, biochemistry, and theoretical modeling. One of the best studied models of a morphogenetic field is the Dorsal-Ventral (D-V) patterning of the early frog embryo. This patterning system is regulated by the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway and an intricate network of secreted protein antagonists. This biochemical pathway of interacting proteins functions in the extracellular space to generate a D-V gradient of BMP signaling, which is maintained during extensive morphogenetic movements of cell layers during gastrulation. The D-V field is divided into a dorsal and a ventral center, in regions of low and high BMP signaling respectively, under opposite transcriptional control by BMPs. The robustness of the patterning is assured at two different levels. First, in the extracellular space by secreted BMP antagonists that generate a directional flow of BMP ligands to the ventral side. The flow is driven by the regulated proteolysis of the Chordin inhibitor and by the presence of a molecular sink on the ventral side that concentrates BMP signals. The tolloid metalloproteinases and the Chordin-binding protein Crossveinless-2 (CV2) are key components of this ventral sink. Second, by transcriptional feedback at the cellular level: The dorsal and ventral signaling centers adjust their size and level of BMP signaling by transcriptional feedback. This allows cells on one side of a gastrula containing about 10,000 cells to communicate with cells in the opposite pole of the embryo. PMID:20066084

  7. Bone morphogenetic proteins, cementogenesis, myoblastic stem cells and the induction of periodontal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Ugo; Petit, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    'Bone: Formation by autoinduction', initiates by invocation of soluble molecular signals which, when combined to insoluble signals or substrata trigger the ripple-like cascade of bone differentiation by induction. The osteogenic proteins of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily, the bone morphogenetic/osteogenic proteins (BMPs/OPs), and uniquely in the non-human primate Papio ursinus also the three mammalian TGF-beta isoforms, induce endochondral bone formation as recapitulation of embryonic development. The pleiotropic activities of the BMPs/OPs are vast and include the induction of periodontal tissue regeneration. Implantation of naturally derived highly purified osteogenic fractions after sequential adsorption/affinity and gel filtration chromatography in mandibular Class II furcation defects of P. ursinus induces cementogenesis as highly cellular collagenic cementoid attached to the exposed dentine with foci of nascent mineralization with inserted de novo generated Sharpey's fibres. Recombinant human osteogenic protein-1 (hOP-1) when implanted in Class II furcation defects of P. ursinus with surgically exposed dentine matrix preferentially initiates the induction of cementogenesis; on the other hand, hBMP-2 preferentially induces alveolar bone regeneration with mineralized bone covered by prominent osteoid seams. Long-term studies with gamma-irradiated 0.5 and 2.5mg hOP-1 per gram of xenogeneic bovine collagenous matrix induce the restitutio ad integrum of the periodontal tissues in furcation defects exposed by chronic periodontitis in P. ursinus. A challenging question for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is whether the presence of molecularly different osteogenic proteins of the TGF-beta superfamily has a therapeutic significance. Mechanistically, the specificity of hOP-1 primarily initiating cementogenesis in periodontal defects is regulated by both the dentine extracellular matrix upon which responding cells attach and

  8. ATP utilization for calcium uptake and force production in skinned muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Stienen, G J; Zaremba, R; Elzinga, G

    1995-01-01

    1. A method has been developed to discriminate between the rate of ATP hydrolysis associated with calcium uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and force development of the contractile apparatus in mechanically or saponin-skinned skeletal muscle fibres. The rate of ATP hydrolysis was determined in fibres of different types from the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis by enzymatic coupling of ATP re-synthesis to the oxidation of NADH. 2. The ATPase activity was determined before and after exposure of the preparations for 30 min to a solution containing 0.5% Triton X-100, which effectively abolishes the SR ATPase activity. The fibres were activated in a solution containing 5 mM caffeine to ensure that calcium uptake into the SR was maximal. 3. At saturating Ca2+ concentrations the actomyosin (AM) and SR ATPase activities in fast-twitch fibres, at 4.3 degrees C, amounted to 1.52 +/- 0.07 and 0.58 +/- 0.10 mumol s-1 (g dry wt)-1, respectively (means +/- S.E.M.; n = 25). The SR ATPase activity was 25% of the total ATPase activity. At submaximal calcium concentrations the AM ATPase activity varied in proportion to the isometric force. 4. The calcium sensitivity of the SR ATPase was larger than that of the AM ATPase and its dependence on [Ca2+] was less steep. The AM ATPase activity was half-maximal at a pCa of 6.11 (pCa = -log [Ca2+]) whereas the SR ATPase activity was half-maximal at a pCa of 6.62. 5. In Triton X-100-treated fibres, at different 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) concentrations, the AM ATPase activity and isometric force varied proportionally. The SR ATPase activity determined by extrapolation of the total ATPase activity in mechanically skinned or saponin-treated fibres to zero force, was independent of the BDM concentration in the range studied (0-20 mM). The values obtained for the SR ATPase activity in this way were similar to those obtained with Triton X-100 treatment. 6. The AM ATPase activity in slow-twitch fibres amounted to 0.74 +/- 0

  9. Development of Erythroid Progenitors under Erythropoietin Stimulation in Xenopus laevis Larval Liver.

    PubMed

    Okui, Takehito; Hosozawa, Sakiko; Kohama, Satoka; Fujiyama, Shingo; Maekawa, Shun; Muto, Hiroshi; Kato, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Erythroid progenitors that respond to erythropoietin (Epo) are present in the liver of adult Xenopus laevis. However, cells responding to Epo in the larval liver and through the metamorphosis period under hepatic remodeling have not been characterized. In this study, tadpoles were staged using the tables of Nieuwkoop and Faber (NF). Liver cells from pre- (NF56) or post- (NF66) metamorphic stage were cultured in the presence of Epo. β2-globin mRNA expression peaked at day 7 after the start of culture. Larval β2-globin was highly expressed in NF56-derived cells, while adult β2-globinwas detected in those of NF66. In both NF56- and NF66-derived cells, mRNA expression of eporand gata2 peaked at day 5 and days 3-4, respectively. In contrast, gata1 expression peaked at day 6 in NF56 cells and at day 5 in NF66 cells. Half maximal proliferation of erythrocytic blast cells derived from the liver at NF66 was observed at day 3, which was earlier than that of NF56. These results indicate that erythroid progenitors that respond to Xenopus laevis Epo are maintained in pre- and post-metamorphic liver, although the tissue architecture changes dramatically during metamorphosis. Additionally, the globin switching occurred, and/or the erythroid progenitors for larval erythrocytes were replaced by those for adult erythrocytes in the metamorphic liver.

  10. Long term effects of carbaryl exposure on antiviral immune responses in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    De Jesús Andino, Francisco; Lawrence, B Paige; Robert, Jacques

    2017-03-01

    Water pollutants associated with agriculture may contribute to the increased prevalence of infectious diseases caused by ranaviruses. We have established the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the ranavirus Frog Virus 3 (FV3) as a reliable experimental platform for evaluating the effects of common waterborne pollutants, such as the insecticide carbaryl. Following 3 weeks of exposure to 10 ppb carbaryl, X. laevis tadpoles exhibited a marked increase in mortality and accelerated development. Exposure at lower concentrations (0.1 and 1.0 ppb) was not toxic, but it impaired tadpole innate antiviral immune responses, as evidenced by significantly decreased TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-I, and IFN-III gene expression. The defect in IFN-I and IL-1β gene expression levels persisted after metamorphosis in froglets, whereas only IFN-I gene expression in response to FV3 was attenuated when carbaryl exposure was performed at the adult stage. These findings suggest that the agriculture-associated carbaryl exposure at low but ecologically-relevant concentrations has the potential to induce long term alterations in host-pathogen interactions and antiviral immunity.

  11. Effect of copper contaminated food on the life cycle and secondary production of Daphnia laevis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Giseli S; Tonietto, Alessandra E; Lombardi, Ana T; Melão, Maria da G G

    2016-11-01

    In aquatic environments, copper (Cu) plays important physiological roles in planktonic food chain, such as electron transfer in photosynthesis and constituting proteins that transport oxygen in some arthropods, while at higher concentrations it is toxic on these organisms and higher trophic levels. The combined effects of natural (e.g. volcanic activity) and anthropogenic sources (e.g. mining waste) contribute to the increase in copper pollution in different ecosystems and regions around the world. In the present study, we evaluated the bioaccumulation and effect of Cu on Raphidocelis subcapitata (freshwater algae), and the influence of Cu-contaminated food (algae) on Daphnia laevis (tropical cladoceran). The amount of copper accumulated in microalgae and cladoceran was quantified, and life-history parameters of D. laevis such as growth, reproduction and longevity were measured. The cell density of Cu exposed R. subcapitata declined, and cladoceran fed with contaminated food had lower longevity, production of eggs and neonates, and reduced secondary production. A concentration dependent increase in Cu accumulation was observed in the microalgae, while the opposite occurred in the animal, indicating a cellular metal regulatory mechanism in the latter. However, this regulation seems not to be sufficient to avoid metal induced damages in the cladoceran such as decreased longevity and reproduction. We conclude that diet is an important metal exposure route to this cladoceran, and the assessment of chronic contamination during the complete life cycle of cladoceran provides results that are similar to those observed in natural environments, especially when native organisms are investigated.

  12. Characterization of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors in the neurointermediate lobe of the amphibian Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Verburg-van Kemenade, B M; Jenks, B G; Lenssen, F J; Vaudry, H

    1987-02-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is involved in the regulation of secretion of MSH from the intermediate lobe of Xenopus laevis. The purpose of this study was to identify the GABA receptor(s) involved by determination of the effect of specific receptor agonists and antagonists on the release of immunoreactive MSH from superfused neurointermediate lobes of Xenopus. Exogenous GABA induces a rapid inhibition of MSH secretion. There was no evidence for a transitory stimulatory effect of GABA as reported for the rat melanotropes. Both the GABA agonists (GABAa) homotaurine and isoguvacine and the GABA agonist (GABAb) baclofen inhibited MSH release in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, homotaurine and baclofen caused aggregation of pigment in dermal melanophores. The MSH release-inhibiting effect of homotaurine and isoguvacine could be antagonized by the specific GABAa receptor antagonist bicuculline. However, bicuculline and picrotoxin failed to block the effect of exogenous GABA. We conclude that in the neurointermediate lobe of Xenopus laevis both GABAa and GABAb receptors are present, suggesting a dual inhibitory regulation.

  13. Transgenic Xenopus laevis for live imaging in cell and developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Chiyo; Sakamaki, Kazuhiro; Morita, Hitoshi; Hara, Yusuke; Suzuki, Makoto; Kinoshita, Noriyuki; Ueno, Naoto

    2013-05-01

    The stable transgenesis of genes encoding functional or spatially localized proteins, fused to fluorescent proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP), is an extremely important research tool in cell and developmental biology. Transgenic organisms constructed with fluorescent labels for cell membranes, subcellular organelles, and functional proteins have been used to investigate cell cycles, lineages, shapes, and polarity, in live animals and in cells or tissues derived from these animals. Genes of interest have been integrated and maintained in generations of transgenic animals, which have become a valuable resource for the cell and developmental biology communities. Although the use of Xenopus laevis as a transgenic model organism has been hampered by its relatively long reproduction time (compared to Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans), its large embryonic cells and the ease of manipulation in early embryos have made it a historically valuable preparation that continues to have tremendous research potential. Here, we report on the Xenopus laevis transgenic lines our lab has generated and discuss their potential use in biological imaging.

  14. Distribution of single wall carbon nanotubes in the Xenopus laevis embryo after microinjection.

    PubMed

    Holt, Brian D; Shawky, Joseph H; Dahl, Kris Noel; Davidson, Lance A; Islam, Mohammad F

    2016-04-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are advanced materials with the potential for a myriad of diverse applications, including biological technologies and large-scale usage with the potential for environmental impacts. SWCNTs have been exposed to developing organisms to determine their effects on embryogenesis, and results have been inconsistent arising, in part, from differing material quality, dispersion status, material size, impurity from catalysts and stability. For this study, we utilized highly purified SWCNT samples with short, uniform lengths (145 ± 17 nm) well dispersed in solution. To test high exposure doses, we microinjected > 500 µg ml(-1) SWCNT concentrations into the well-established embryogenesis model, Xenopus laevis, and determined embryo compatibility and subcellular localization during development. SWCNTs localized within cellular progeny of the microinjected cells, but were heterogeneously distributed throughout the target-injected tissue. Co-registering unique Raman spectral intensity of SWCNTs with images of fluorescently labeled subcellular compartments demonstrated that even at regions of highest SWCNT concentration, there were no gross alterations to subcellular microstructures, including filamentous actin, endoplasmic reticulum and vesicles. Furthermore, SWCNTs did not aggregate and localized to the perinuclear subcellular region. Combined, these results suggest that purified and dispersed SWCNTs are not toxic to X. laevis animal cap ectoderm and may be suitable candidate materials for biological applications.

  15. CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL CROSS-TALK IN XENOPUS LAEVIS OOCYTE AND EGG EXTRACTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Lin; Shechter, David

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin, primarily a complex of DNA and histone proteins, is the physiological form of the genome. Chromatin is generally repressive for transcription and other information transactions that occur on DNA. A wealth of post-translational modifications on canonical histones and histone variants encode regulatory information to recruit or repel effector proteins on chromatin, promoting and further repressing transcription and thereby form the basis of epigenetic information. During metazoan oogenesis, large quantities of histone proteins are synthesized and stored in preparation for the rapid early cell cycles of development and to elicit maternal control of chromatin assembly pathways. Oocyte and egg cell-free extracts of the frog Xenopus laevis are a compelling model system for the study of chromatin assembly and transcription precisely because they exist in an extreme state primed for rapid chromatin assembly or for transcriptional activity. We show that chromatin assembly rates are slower in X. laevis oocyte than in egg extracts, while conversely only oocyte extracts transcribe template plasmids. We demonstrate that rapid chromatin assembly in egg extracts represses RNA Polymerase II dependent transcription, while pre-binding of TATA-Binding Protein (TBP) to a template plasmid promotes transcription. Our experimental evidence presented here supports a model in which chromatin assembly and transcription are in competition and that the onset of zygotic genomic activation may be in part due to stable transcriptional complex assembly. PMID:27759158

  16. Significant modulation of the hepatic proteome induced by exposure to low temperature in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Kazumichi; Tanizaki, Yuta; Okui, Takehito; Watarai, Atsuko; Ueda, Shinobu; Kato, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is an ectothermic vertebrate that can survive at low environmental temperatures. To gain insight into the molecular events induced by low body temperature, liver proteins were evaluated at the standard laboratory rearing temperature (22°C, control) and a low environmental temperature (5°C, cold exposure). Using nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 58 proteins that differed in abundance. A subsequent Gene Ontology analysis revealed that the tyrosine and phenylalanine catabolic processes were modulated by cold exposure, which resulted in decreases in hepatic tyrosine and phenylalanine, respectively. Similarly, levels of pyruvate kinase and enolase, which are involved in glycolysis and glycogen synthesis, were also decreased, whereas levels of glycogen phosphorylase, which participates in glycogenolysis, were increased. Therefore, we measured metabolites in the respective pathways and found that levels of hepatic glycogen and glucose were decreased. Although the liver was under oxidative stress because of iron accumulation caused by hepatic erythrocyte destruction, the hepatic NADPH/NADP ratio was not changed. Thus, glycogen is probably utilized mainly for NADPH supply rather than for energy or glucose production. In conclusion, X. laevis responds to low body temperature by modulating its hepatic proteome, which results in altered carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:24167716

  17. Proteomics analysis of Xenopus laevis gonad tissue following chronic exposure to atrazine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuping; Wang, Jiamei; Zhu, Haojun; Ding, Jiatong; Peng, Yufa

    2015-08-01

    Atrazine is the most commonly detected pesticide contaminant in ground and surface water. Previous studies have shown that atrazine is an endocrine disruptor owing to its adverse effects on the male reproductive system in several vertebrates, but very few molecular mechanisms for these effects have been revealed. In the present study, Xenopus laevis were exposed to 100 ppb of atrazine for 120 d, and then the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technique was used to detect global changes in protein profiles of the testes and ovaries. The results showed that 100 ppb of atrazine exposure adversely affected the growth of X. laevis and did not induce hermaphroditism but delayed or prevented the development of male seminiferous tubules. Proteomic analysis showed that atrazine altered expression of 143 and 121 proteins in the testes and ovaries, respectively, and most of them are involved in cellular and metabolic processes and biological regulation based on their biological processes. In addition, apoptosis, tight junctions, and metabolic pathways were significantly altered in the atrazine-treated gonads. Based on the above results, it is postulated that the reproductive toxicity of atrazine may be the result of disruption of tight junctions and metabolic signaling pathways and/or induction of apoptosis in germ cells.

  18. Biological and biochemical properties of two Xenopus laevis N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases with contrasting roles in embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Voglmeir, Josef; Laurent, Nicolas; Flitsch, Sabine L; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Wilson, Iain B H

    2015-02-01

    The biosynthesis of mucin-type O-linked glycans in animals is initiated by members of the large family of polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts), which play important roles in embryogenesis, organogenesis, adult tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. Until now, the mammalian forms of these enzymes have been the best characterized. However, two N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (xGalNAc-T6 and xGalNAc-T16) from the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), which are most homologous to those encoded by the human GALNT6 and GALNT16 (GALNTL1) genes, were shown to have contrasting roles in TGF-β/BMP signaling in embryogenesis. In this study we have examined these two enzymes further and show differences in their in vivo function during X. laevis embyrogenesis as evidenced by in situ hybridization and overexpression experiments. In terms of enzymatic activity, both enzymes were found to be active towards the EA2 peptide, but display differential activity towards a peptide based on the sequence of ActR-IIB, a receptor relevant to TGF-β/BMP signaling. In summary, these data demonstrate that these two enzymes from different branches of the N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase do not only display differential substrate specificities, but also specific and distinct expression pattern and biological activities in vivo.

  19. NF2/Merlin is required for the axial pattern formation in the Xenopus laevis embryo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuechen; Min, Zheying; Tan, Renbo; Tao, Qinghua

    2015-11-01

    The NF2 gene product Merlin is a FERM-domain protein possessing a broad tumor-suppressing function. NF2/Merlin has been implicated in regulating multiple signaling pathways critical for cell growth and survival. However, it remains unknown whether NF2/Merlin regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling during vertebrate embryogenesis. Here we demonstrate that NF2/Merlin is required for body pattern formation in the Xenopus laevis embryo. Depletion of the maternal NF2/Merlin enhances organizer gene expression dependent on the presence of β-catenin, and causes dorsanteriorized development; Morpholino antisense oligo-mediated knockdown of the zygotic NF2/Merlin shifts posterior genes anteriorwards and reduces the anterior development. We further demonstrate that targeted depletion of NF2 in the presumptive dorsal tissues increases the levels of nuclear β-catenin in the neural epithelial cells. Biochemical analyses reveal that NF2 depletion promotes the production of active β-catenin and concurrently decreases the level of N-terminally phosphorylated β-catenin under the stimulation of the endogenous Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that NF2/Merlin negatively regulates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity during the pattern formation in early X. laevis embryos.

  20. Response of larval Xenopus laevis to atrazine: assessment of growth, metamorphosis, and gonadal and laryngeal morphology.

    PubMed

    Carr, James A; Gentles, Angie; Smith, Ernest E; Goleman, Wanda L; Urquidi, Lina J; Thuett, Kerry; Kendall, Ronald J; Giesy, John P; Gross, Tim S; Solomon, Keith R; Van Der Kraak, Glen

    2003-02-01

    Larval Xenopus laevis were exposed to one of four concentrations of atrazine (0, 1, 10, or 25 microg/L, 11 replicate tanks per treatment, 60-65 larvae per replicate) dissolved in an artificial pond water (frog embryo teratogenesis assay- Xenopus [FETAX]) medium beginning 48 h after hatching until the completion of metamorphosis. Separate groups of larvae (six replicate tanks per treatment, 60-65 larvae per replicate) were exposed to estradiol (100 microg/L), dihydrotestosterone (100 microg/L), or ethanol vehicle control dissolved in FETAX medium. None of the treatments affected posthatch mortality, larval growth, or metamorphosis. There were no treatment effects on sex ratios except for estradiol, which produced a greater percentage of female offspring. Exposure to either estradiol or 25 microg atrazine/L increased the incidence of intersex animals based on assessment of gonadal morphology. Atrazine did not reduce the size of the laryngeal dilator muscle, a sexually dimorphic muscle in this species. We conclude that environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine do not influence metamorphosis or sex ratios and do not inhibit sexually dimorphic larynx growth in X. laevis. The incidence of atrazine-induced intersex animals was small (<5%) and occurred only at the greatest concentration of atrazine tested, a concentration that is rarely observed in surface waters in the United States.

  1. In vivo tracking of histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation in Xenopus laevis during tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miyuki; Takagi, Chiyo; Miura, Shinichirou; Sakane, Yuto; Suzuki, Makoto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Endo, Tetsuya; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Sato, Yuko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ueno, Naoto; Suzuki, Ken-ichi T

    2016-04-01

    Xenopus laevis tadpoles can completely regenerate their appendages, such as tail and limbs, and therefore provide a unique model to decipher the molecular mechanisms of organ regeneration in vertebrates. Epigenetic modifications are likely to be involved in this remarkable regeneration capacity, but they remain largely unknown. To examine the involvement of histone modification during organ regeneration, we generated transgenic X. laevis ubiquitously expressing a fluorescent modification-specific intracellular antibody (Mintbody) that is able to track histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac) in vivo through nuclear enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fluorescence. In embryos ubiquitously expressing H3K9ac-Mintbody, robust fluorescence was observed in the nuclei of somites. Interestingly, H3K9ac-Mintbody signals predominantly accumulated in nuclei of regenerating notochord at 24 h postamputation following activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, apocynin (APO), an inhibitor of ROS production, attenuated H3K9ac-Mintbody signals in regenerating notochord. Our results suggest that ROS production is involved in acetylation of H3K9 in regenerating notochord at the onset of tail regeneration. We also show this transgenic Xenopus to be a useful tool to investigate epigenetic modification, not only in organogenesis but also in organ regeneration.

  2. FIRST REPORT OF 'CANDIDATUS PHYTOPLASMA ULMI' IN ULMUS LAEVIS IN GERMANY.

    PubMed

    Eisold, A M; Kube, M; Holz, S; Büttner, C

    2015-01-01

    The wall-less bacteria of the provisory taxon 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' are obligate parasites and associated to diseases in many important crops and trees worldwide. 'Ca. Phytoplasma ulmi', assigned to 16SrV-A subgroup, is a quarantine pest and described to be associated to elm phloem necrosis, leaf yellowing, stunting, witches broom and decline in various elm species. Elm yellows phytoplasmas (EY) have been reported in several European countries but not in Ulmus laevis in Germany so far. Leaf samples from European white elms (Ulmus leavis PALL.) with and without chlorotic symptoms were investigated for EYs infection in Berlin and Brandenburg, Germany, through performing diagnostic nested PCR targeting partial rRNA operon of phytoplasmas. Specific PCR-products were obtained from 30 out of 59 samples. Partial 16S-rDNA sequences were assigned to 'Ca. P. ulmi' through sequence analysis, while sequence variation was observed. This is the first report of U. laevis infected with 'Ca. P. ulmi' in Germany.

  3. Influence of contrast morphogenetic features of urban constructed soils on the functioning of Moscow green lawn urban ecosystems: analysis based on the field model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epikhina, Anna; Vizirskaya, Mariya; Mazirov, Ilya; Vasenev, Vyacheslav; Vasenev, Ivan; Valentini, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Green lawns are the key element of the urban environment. They occupy a considerable part of the city area and locate in different urban functional zones. Urban constructed soils under green lawns have a unique spatial variability in chemical and morphogenetic features. So far, there is lack of information on the influence of morphogenetic features of urban soils on the functioning of the green lawn ecosystems especially in Moscow - the biggest megalopolis in Europe. Urban lawns perform a number of principal functions including both aesthetic and environmental. The role of the green lawn ecosystems in global carbon cycle is one of their main environmental functions. It is traditionally assessed through carbon stocks and fluxes in the basic ecosystem components. So far, such a data for the urban lawn ecosystems of the Moscow megapolis is lacking. In addition to environmental functions, green lawns perform an important ornamental role, which is also a critical criterion of their optimal functioning. Considering the variability of driving factors, influencing green lawns in urban environment, we carry out the model experiment in order to analyze "pure" effect of soil morphogenetic features. The current study aimed to analyze the influence of contrast morphogenetic features of urban constructed soils on the environmental and aesthetic functions of lawn ecosystems in Moscow megapolis basing in the model experiment. We carry out the model experiment located at the experimental field of the Russian State Agrarian University. Special transparent containers developed for the experiment, provided an option to observe soil morphogenetic features dynamics, including the depth and material of the organic transformation. At the same soil body inside the containers was united with the outside environment through the system of holes in the bottom and walls. The set of urban constructed soils includ four contrast types of the top soil (turf (T), turf-sand (TSa), turf-soil (TSo) and

  4. Inverse Effects on Growth and Development Rates by Means of Endocrine Disruptors in African Clawed Frog Tadpoles ("Xenopus Laevis")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Zachary Carl

    2007-01-01

    Previous work on fish, frogs, and salamanders, showed the ability for estrogen (EE2) and anthropogenic endocrine disruptors to skew sex ratios and cause hermaphrodism. This study addressed the effects of estrogens on growth and development rates of African clawed frog tadpoles ("Xenopus laevis") during their gender determination stages. The…

  5. Dual innervation of end-plate sites and its consequences for neuromuscular transmission in muscles of adult Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Angaut-Petit, D; Mallart, A

    1979-01-01

    1. Electrophysiological study of dually innervated end-plate sites was carried out in Xenopus laevis pectoral muscle fibres. End-plate potentials (e.p.p.s) and miniature end-plate potentials (m.e.p.p.s) have been recorded in Mg-blocked preparations. 2. The mean quantal content (m) of each e.p.p. at dually innervated end-plates was significantly smaller than the corresponding values obtained at singly innervated ones. At a given doubly innervated end-plate site the values of m tended to be inversely related, so that the compound value of m (obtained by adding them) was in the same range as that found in singly innervated junctions. These findings were taken to suggest the existence of an upper limit in the average amount of transmitter released at a synaptic site. 3. It was found that neither intermittent presynaptic conduction block, nor particular muscle fibre properties could account for the low values of m in dual end plates. The small size of the nerve terminals appears to be the most likely explanation. 4. The sensitivity to acetylcholine and muscle fibre electrical properties were investigated; no differences were found between fibres with sub- or suprathreshold e.p.p.s. 5. The nature of the factors responsible for this presumed small size of the nerve endings (competition between nerve endings for a limited synaptic space on the muscle membrane or reciprocal interaction between closely located terminals) as well as the possible origins of polyinnervation are discussed. PMID:222897

  6. The role of voltage-gated calcium channels in neurotransmitter phenotype specification: Coexpression and functional analysis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brittany B; Miller, Lauren E; Herbst, Wendy A; Saha, Margaret S

    2014-08-01

    Calcium activity has been implicated in many neurodevelopmental events, including the specification of neurotransmitter phenotypes. Higher levels of calcium activity lead to an increased number of inhibitory neural phenotypes, whereas lower levels of calcium activity lead to excitatory neural phenotypes. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) allow for rapid calcium entry and are expressed during early neural stages, making them likely regulators of activity-dependent neurotransmitter phenotype specification. To test this hypothesis, multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to characterize the coexpression of eight VGCC α1 subunits with the excitatory and inhibitory neural markers xVGlut1 and xVIAAT in Xenopus laevis embryos. VGCC coexpression was higher with xVGlut1 than xVIAAT, especially in the hindbrain, spinal cord, and cranial nerves. Calcium activity was also analyzed on a single-cell level, and spike frequency was correlated with the expression of VGCC α1 subunits in cell culture. Cells expressing Cav 2.1 and Cav 2.2 displayed increased calcium spiking compared with cells not expressing this marker. The VGCC antagonist diltiazem and agonist (-)BayK 8644 were used to manipulate calcium activity. Diltiazem exposure increased the number of glutamatergic cells and decreased the number of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic cells, whereas (-)BayK 8644 exposure decreased the number of glutamatergic cells without having an effect on the number of GABAergic cells. Given that the expression and functional manipulation of VGCCs are correlated with neurotransmitter phenotype in some, but not all, experiments, VGCCs likely act in combination with a variety of other signaling factors to determine neuronal phenotype specification.

  7. Electrostatics and N-glycan-mediated membrane tethering of SCUBE1 is critical for promoting bone morphogenetic protein signalling.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-Ju; Tsao, Ku-Chi; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2016-03-01

    SCUBE1 (S1), a secreted and membrane-bound glycoprotein, has a modular protein structure composed of an N-terminal signal peptide sequence followed by nine epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats, a spacer region and three cysteine-rich (CR) motifs with multiple potential N-linked glycosylation sites, and one CUB domain at the C-terminus. Soluble S1 is a biomarker of platelet activation but an active participant of thrombosis via its adhesive EGF-like repeats, whereas its membrane-associated form acts as a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) co-receptor in promoting BMP signal activity. However, the mechanism responsible for the membrane tethering and the biological importance of N-glycosylation of S1 remain largely unknown. In the present study, molecular mapping analysis identified a polycationic segment (amino acids 501-550) in the spacer region required for its membrane tethering via electrostatic interactions possibly with the anionic heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Furthermore, deglycosylation by peptide N-glycosidase F treatment revealed that N-glycans within the CR motif are essential for membrane recruitment through lectin-mediated surface retention. Injection of mRNA encoding zebrafish wild-type but not N-glycan-deficient scube1 restores the expression of haematopoietic and erythroid markers (scl and gata1) in scube1-knockdown embryos. We describe novel mechanisms in targeting S1 to the plasma membrane and demonstrate that N-glycans are required for S1 functions during primitive haematopoiesis in zebrafish.

  8. High resolution structures of the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor in two crystal forms: Implications for ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Peter D.; Cutfield, John F.; Cutfield, Sue M. . E-mail: sue.cutfield@otago.ac.nz

    2006-12-29

    BMPRII is a type II TGF-{beta} serine threonine kinase receptor which is integral to the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling pathway. It is known to bind BMP and growth differentiation factor (GDF) ligands, and has overlapping ligand specificity with the activin type II receptor, ActRII. In contrast to activin and TGF-{beta} type ligands, BMPs bind to type II receptors with lower affinity than type I receptors. Crystals of the BMPRII ectodomain were grown in two different forms, both of which diffracted to high resolution. The tetragonal form exhibited some disorder, whereas the entire polypeptide was seen in the orthorhombic form. The two structures retain the basic three-finger toxin fold of other TGF-{beta} receptor ectodomains, and share the main hydrophobic patch used by ActRII to bind various ligands. However, they present different conformations of the A-loop at the periphery of the proposed ligand-binding interface, in conjunction with rearrangement of a disulfide bridge within the loop. This particular disulfide (Cys94-Cys117) is only present in BMPRII and activin receptors, suggesting that it is important for their likely shared mode of binding. Evidence is presented that the two crystal forms represent ligand-bound and free conformations of BMPRII. Comparison with the solved structure of ActRII bound to BMP2 suggests that His87, unique amongst TGF-{beta} receptors, may play a key role in ligand recognition.

  9. Novel Wnt Regulator NEL-Like Molecule-1 Antagonizes Adipogenesis and Augments Osteogenesis Induced by Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia; James, Aaron W.; Zhang, Xinli; Pang, Shen; Zara, Janette N.; Asatrian, Greg; Chiang, Michael; Lee, Min; Khadarian, Kevork; Nguyen, Alan; Lee, Kevin S.; Siu, Ronald K.; Tetradis, Sotirios; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2017-01-01

    The differentiation factor NEL-like molecule-1 (NELL-1) has been reported as osteoinductive in multiple in vivo preclinical models. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 is used clinically for skeletal repair, but in vivo administration can induce abnormal, adipose-filled, poor-quality bone. We demonstrate that NELL-1 combined with BMP2 significantly optimizes osteogenesis in a rodent femoral segmental defect model by minimizing the formation of BMP2-induced adipose-filled cystlike bone. In vitro studies using the mouse bone marrow stromal cell line M2-10B4 and human primary bone marrow stromal cells have confirmed that NELL-1 enhances BMP2-induced osteogenesis and inhibits BMP2-induced adipogenesis. Importantly, the ability of NELL-1 to direct BMP2-treated cells toward osteogenesis and away from adipogenesis requires intact canonical Wnt signaling. Overall, these studies establish the feasibility of combining NELL-1 with BMP2 to improve clinical bone regeneration and provide mechanistic insight into canonical Wnt pathway activity during NELL-1 and BMP2 osteogenesis. The novel abilities of NELL-1 to stimulate Wnt signaling and to repress adipogenesis may highlight new treatment approaches for bone loss in osteoporosis. PMID:26772960

  10. Evaluating Osteogenic Potential of Ligamentum Flavum Cells Cultivated in Photoresponsive Hydrogel that Incorporates Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 for Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Liu, Hsia-Wei; Wang, I-Chun; Chen, Chih-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is increasingly important in clinical practice. Ligamentum flava (LF) are typically removed during spine-related surgeries. LF may be a source of cells for spinal fusion that is conducted using tissue engineering techniques. In this investigation, LF cells of rabbits were isolated and then characterized by flow cytometry, morphological observation, and immunofluorescence staining. The LF cells were also cultivated in polyethylene (glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels that incorporated bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) growth factor, to evaluate their proliferation and secretion of ECM and differentiation in vitro. The experimental results thus obtained that the proliferation, ECM secretion, and differentiation of the PEGDA-BMP-2 group exceeded those of the PEGDA group during the period of cultivation. The mineralization and histological staining results differed similarly. A nude mice model was utilized to prove that LF cells on hydrogels could undergo osteogenic differentiation in vivo. These experimental results also revealed that the PEGDA-BMP-2 group had better osteogenic effects than the PEGDA group following a 12 weeks after transplantation. According to all of these experimental results, LF cells are a source of cells for spinal fusion and PEGDA-BMP-2 hydrogel is a candidate biomaterial for spinal fusion by tissue engineering. PMID:26426006

  11. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of bone morphogenetic proteins and activins in the skin: potential benefits for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Moura, J; da Silva, L; Cruz, M T; Carvalho, E

    2013-09-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and activins are phylogenetically conserved proteins, belonging to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, that signal through the phosphorylation of receptor-regulated Smad proteins, activating different cell responses. They are involved in various steps of skin morphogenesis and wound repair, as can be evidenced by the fact that their expression is increased in skin injuries. BMPs play not only a role in bone regeneration but are also involved in cartilage, tendon-like tissue and epithelial regeneration, maintain vascular integrity, capillary sprouting, proliferation/migration of endothelial cells and angiogenesis, promote neuron and dendrite formation, alter neuropeptide levels and are involved in immune response modulation, at least in animal models. On the other hand, activins are involved in wound repair through the regulation of skin and immune cell migration and differentiation, re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation, and also promote the expression of collagens by fibroblasts and modulate scar formation. This review aims at enunciating the effects of BMPs and activins in the skin, namely in skin development, as well as in crucial phases of skin wound healing, such as inflammation, angiogenesis and repair, and will focus on the effects of these proteins on skin cells and their signaling pathways, exploring the potential therapeutic approach of the application of BMP-2, BMP-6 and activin A in chronic wounds, particularly diabetic foot ulcerations.

  12. Bone Morphogenetic Protein-9 Enhances Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells via the JNK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Pang, Yanan; Yang, Su; Wei, Yibo; Gao, Haochen; Wang, Dalin; Cao, Zhizhong

    2017-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-9 (BMP9) shows great osteoinductive potential in bone regeneration. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) with multi-differentiation capability and low immunogenicity are increasingly used as seed cells for periodontal regenerative therapies. In the present study, we investigated the potent osteogenic activity of BMP9 on human PDLSCs (hPDLSCs), in which the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is possibly involved. Our results showed that JNK inhibition by the specific inhibitor SP600125 or adenovirus expressing small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting JNK (AdR-si-JNK) significantly decreased BMP9-induced gene and protein expression of early and late osteogenic markers, such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), and osteocalcin (OCN), in hPDLSCs. We also confirmed the in-vivo positive effect of JNKs on ectopic bone formation induced by hPDLSCs injected into the musculature of athymic nude mice and BMP9 ex vivo gene delivery. For the cellular mechanism, we found that BMP9 activated the phosphorylation of JNKs and Smad2/3, and that JNKs may engage in cross-talk with the Smad2/3 pathway in BMP9-mediated osteogenesis. PMID:28052093

  13. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) immobilized on laser-fabricated 3D scaffolds enhance osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Terzaki, Konstantina; Kaliva, Maria; Kalyva, Athanasia; Papadaki, Eleni; Vamvakaki, Maria; Farsari, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The regeneration of bone via a tissue engineering approach involves components from the macroscopic to the nanoscopic level, including appropriate 3D scaffolds, cells and growth factors. In this study, hexagonal scaffolds of different diagonals were fabricated by Direct Laser Writing using a photopolymerizable hybrid material. The proliferation of bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured on structures with various diagonals, 50, 100, 150 and 200μm increased significantly after 10days in culture, however without significant differences among them. Next, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) was immobilized onto the hybrid material both via covalent binding and physical adsorption. Both immobilization types exhibited similar high releaseate bioactivity profiles and a sustained delivery of rhBMP-2. The collagen and calcium levels produced in the extracellular matrix (ECM) were significantly elevated for the samples functionalized with BMP-2 compared to those in the osteogenic medium. Furthermore, significant upregulation of gene expression in both types of BMP-2 immobilized scaffolds was observed for alkaline phosphatase (ALPL) and osteocalcin (BGLAP) at days 7, 14, and 21, for RUNX2 at day 21, and for osteonectin (SPARC) at days 7 and 14. The results suggest that the release of bioactive rhBMP-2 from the hybrid scaffolds enhance the control over the osteogenic differentiation during cell culture.

  14. Upregulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Synthesis and Consequent Collagen II Expression in Leptin-stimulated Human Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shun-Fu; Hsieh, Rong-Ze; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Chang, Cheng Allen; Chiu, Fang-Yao; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Su, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play positive roles in cartilage development, but they can barely be detected in healthy articular cartilage. However, recent evidence has indicated that BMPs could be detected in osteoarthritic and damaged cartilage and their precise roles have not been well defined. Extremely high amounts of leptin have been reported in obese individuals, which can be associated with osteoarthritis (OA) development. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BMPs could be induced in human primary chondrocytes during leptin-stimulated OA development and the underlying mechanism. We found that expression of BMP-2 mRNA, but not BMP-4, BMP-6, or BMP-7 mRNA, could be increased in human primary chondrocytes under leptin stimulation. Moreover, this BMP-2 induction was mediated through transcription factor-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 activation via JAK2-ERK1/2-induced Ser727-phosphorylation. Of note, histone deacetylases (HDACs) 3 and 4 were both involved in modulating leptin-induced BMP-2 mRNA expression through different pathways: HDAC3, but not HDAC4, associated with STAT3 to form a complex. Our results further demonstrated that the role of BMP-2 induction under leptin stimulation is to increase collagen II expression. The findings in this study provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism of BMP-2 induction in leptin-stimulated chondrocytes and suggest that BMP-2 may play a reparative role in regulating leptin-induced OA development.

  15. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 and bone morphogenetic protein receptor expression in the pituitary gland of adult dogs in healthy condition and with ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Ochi, H; Harada, Y; Yogo, T; Kanno, N; Hara, Y

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) and its receptors, bone morphogenetic protein receptor I (BMPRI) and BMPRII, in the pituitary gland of healthy adult dogs and in those with ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the BMP4 messenger RNA expression level in the ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma samples was significantly lower than that in the normal pituitary gland samples (P = 0.03). However, there were no statistically significant differences between samples with respect to the messenger RNA expression levels of the receptors BMPRIA, BMPRIB, and BMPRII. Double-immunofluorescence analysis of the normal canine pituitary showed that BMP4 was localized in the thyrotroph (51.3 ± 7.3%) and not the corticotroph cells. By contrast, BMPRII was widely expressed in the thyrotroph (19.9 ± 5.2%) and somatotroph cells (94.7 ± 3.6%) but not in the corticotroph cells (P < 0.001, thyrotroph cells vs somatotroph cells). Similarly, in ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, BMP4 and BMPRII were not expressed in the corticotroph cells. Moreover, the percentage of BMP4-positive cells was also significantly reduced in the thyrotroph cells of the surrounding normal pituitary tissue obtained from the resected ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma (8.3 ± 7.9%) compared with that in normal canine pituitary (P < 0.001). BMP4 has been reported to be expressed in corticotroph cells in the human pituitary gland. Therefore, the results of this study reveal a difference in the cellular pattern of BMP4-positive staining in the pituitary gland between humans and dogs and further revealed the pattern of BMPRII-positive staining in the dog pituitary gland. These species-specific differences regarding BMP4 should be considered when using dogs as an animal model for Cushing's disease.

  16. The lens-regenerating competence in the outer cornea and epidermis of larval Xenopus laevis is related to pax6 expression.

    PubMed

    Gargioli, Cesare; Giambra, Vincenzo; Santoni, Sara; Bernardini, Sergio; Frezza, Domenico; Filoni, Sergio; Cannata, Stefano M

    2008-05-01

    After lentectomy, larval Xenopus laevis can regenerate a new lens by transdifferentiation of the outer cornea and pericorneal epidermis (lentogenic area). This process is promoted by retinal factor(s) accumulated into the vitreous chamber. To understand the molecular basis of the lens-regenerating competence (i.e. the capacity to respond to the retinal factor forming a new lens) in the outer cornea and epidermis, we analysed the expression of otx2, pax6, sox3, pitx3, prox1, betaB1-cry (genes all involved in lens development) by Real-time RT-PCR in the cornea and epidermis fragments dissected from donor larvae. The same fragments were also implanted into the vitreous chamber of host larvae to ascertain their lens-regenerating competence using specific anti-lens antibodies. The results demonstrate that there is a tight correlation between lens-regenerating competence and pax6 expression. In fact, (1) pax6 is the only one of the aforesaid genes to be expressed in the lentogenic area; (2) pax6 expression is absent in head epidermis outside the lentogenic area and in flank epidermis, both incapable of transdifferentiating into lens after implantation into the vitreous chamber; (3) in larvae that have undergone eye transplantation under the head or flank epidermis, pax6 re-expression was observed only in the head epidermis covering the transplanted eye. This is consistent with the fact that only the head epidermis reacquires the lens-regenerating competence after eye transplantation, forming a lens following implantation into the vitreous chamber; and (4) in larvae that have undergone removal of the eye, the epidermis covering the orbit maintained pax6 expression. This is consistent with the fact that after the eye enucleation the lentogenic area maintains the lens-regenerating competence, giving rise to a lens after implantation into the vitreous chamber. Moreover, we observed that misexpression of pax6 is sufficient to promote the acquisition of the lens

  17. Morphogenetic changes occurring in the regenerating newt tail under changed gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radugina, Elena A.; Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Dvorochkin, Natasha; Almeida, Eduardo

    2012-07-01

    It is widely accepted that gravity greatly affects animal physiology, development, and alters gene expression. Recently it became apparent that it can also affect tissue morphogenesis. In our work, we developed special laboratory conditions that allow us to produce the gravity-dependent alterations in tail regenerates of the newt Pleurodeles waltl. We examined the dynamic morphogenetic changes during 50-day tail regeneration using computer morphometric analysis. Changes that we observed under these conditions were comparable with those found earlier in our spaceflight experiments. The newts kept in aquarium deep water (low g) after 1/3 tail amputation developed normal lanceolate regenerates. In contrast, the animals that stayed on the moist mat (1g) developed tail regenerates curved ventrally, with tips almost touching the mat. The similar results were obtained with a 12-day centrifugation at 2g. The study of the regenerate morphology in low g, 1g, and 2g animal groups allowed us to determine the stage at which the morphological changes in regenerates become apparent, and to detect the main morphological events associated with the development of tail curve, such as bending of ependymal tube and reorientation of the forming cartilage. We describe cellular processes foregoing observed tissue morphogenetic changes, such as cell migration, condensation in cell population, and unequal proliferation in different areas of epidermis and blastema. Cell proliferation in epidermis and blastema of tails regenerated under the conditions of different gravitational load was evaluated by BrdU assay. In 1g newts, cell proliferation increased within the dorso-apical region of the regenerates compared with that in low g group. These results provide us with a valuable insight into the regenerative tissue homostasis that involves cell division, cell death, and migration in the newt regenerating tail. In addition, these findings could provide us with better understanding of the

  18. Optogenetic Control of Apoptosis in Targeted Tissues of Xenopus laevis Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Jewhurst, Kyle; Levin, Michael; McLaughlin, Kelly A

    2014-01-01

    KillerRed (KR) is a recently discovered fluorescent protein that, when activated with green light, releases reactive oxygen species (ROS) into the cytoplasm, triggering apoptosis in a KR-expressing cell. This property allows for the use of KR as a means of killing cells in an organism with great temporal and spatial specificity, while minimizing the nonspecific effects that can result from mechanical or chemical exposure damage techniques. Such optogenetic control of cell death, and the resulting ability to induce the targeted death of specific tissues, is invaluable for regeneration/repair studies—particularly in Xenopus laevis, where apoptosis plays a key role in regeneration and repair. We here describe a method by which membrane-bound KR, introduced to Xenopus embryos by mRNA microinjection, can be activated with green light to induce apoptosis in specific organs and tissues, with a focus on the developing eye and pronephric kidney. PMID:25374461

  19. GAP-43 augments G protein-coupled receptor transduction in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, S M; Cannon, S C; Ross, E M; Higashijima, T; Fishman, M C

    1993-01-01

    The neuronal protein GAP-43 is thought to play a role in determining growth-cone motility, perhaps as an intracellular regulator of signal transduction, but its molecular mechanism of action has remained unclear. We find that GAP-43, when microinjected into Xenopus laevis oocytes, increases the oocyte response to G protein-coupled receptor agonists by 10- to 100-fold. Higher levels of GAP-43 cause a transient current flow, even without receptor stimulation. The GAP-43-induced current, like receptor-stimulated currents, is mediated by a calcium-activated chloride channel and can be desensitized by injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. This suggests that neuronal GAP-43 may serve as an intracellular signal to greatly enhance the sensitivity of G protein-coupled receptor transduction. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7685122

  20. Planar induction of anteroposterior pattern in the developing central nervous system of Xenopus laevis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doniach, T.; Phillips, C. R.; Gerhart, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    It has long been thought that anteroposterior (A-P) pattern in the vertebrate central nervous system is induced in the embryo's dorsal ectoderm exclusively by signals passing vertically from underlying, patterned dorsal mesoderm. Explants from early gastrulae of the frog Xenopus laevis were prepared in which vertical contact between dorsal ectoderm and mesoderm was prevented but planar contact was maintained. In these, four position-specific neural markers (engrailed-2, Krox-20, XlHbox 1, and XlHbox 6) were expressed in the ectoderm in the same A-P order as in the embryo. Thus, planar signals alone, following a path available in the normal embryo, can induce A-P neural pattern.

  1. Expression of the Ca2+-binding protein, parvalbumin, during embryonic development of the frog, Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A cDNA segment encoding the Ca2+-binding protein, parvalbumin, was isolated with the use of antibodies, from a lambda gtll expression library of Xenopus laevis tadpole poly(A)+ RNAs. The bacterially expressed beta-galactosidase-parvalbumin fusion protein of one lambda recombinant shows high affinity 45Ca2+ binding. The sequence of the tadpole parvalbumin is highly similar to previously characterized beta- parvalbumins of other organisms. Data from protein and RNA blotting experiments demonstrate that parvalbumin is absent in oocytes, eggs, and early staged embryos, and only becomes expressed during embryogenesis at the time of myogenesis. The protein can be detected in individual developing muscle cells and in muscle fibers of tadpole tail muscles. A simple method is also described for the isolation of neural tube-notochord-somite complexes from Xenopus embryos. PMID:3558484

  2. Cadmium but not lead exposure affects Xenopus laevis fertilization and embryo cleavage.

    PubMed

    Slaby, Sylvain; Lemière, Sébastien; Hanotel, Julie; Lescuyer, Arlette; Demuynck, Sylvain; Bodart, Jean-François; Leprêtre, Alain; Marin, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Among the toxicological and ecotoxicological studies, few have investigated the effects on germ cells, gametes or embryos, while an impact at these stages will result in serious damage at a population level. Thus, it appeared essential to characterize consequences of environmental contaminant exposures at these stages. Therefore, we proposed to assess the effects of exposure to cadmium and lead ions, alone or in a binary mixture, on early stages of Xenopus laevis life cycle. Fertilization and cell division during segmentation were the studied endpoints. Cadmium ion exposures decreased in the fertilization rates in a concentration-dependent manner, targeting mainly the oocytes. Exposure to this metal ions induced also delays or blockages in the embryonic development. For lead ion exposure, no such effect was observed. For the exposure to the mixture of the two metal ions, concerning the fertilization success, we observed results similar to those obtained with the highest cadmium ion concentration.

  3. Metabolic Regulation of CaMKII Protein and Caspases in Xenopus laevis Egg Extracts*

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Francis; Darbandi, Rashid; Chen, Si-Ing; Eckard, Laura; Dodd, Keela; Jones, Kelly; Baucum, Anthony J.; Gibbons, Jennifer A.; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Colbran, Roger J.; Nutt, Leta K.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolism of the Xenopus laevis egg provides a cell survival signal. We found previously that increased carbon flux from glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) through the pentose phosphate pathway in egg extracts maintains NADPH levels and calcium/calmodulin regulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity to phosphorylate caspase 2 and suppress cell death pathways. Here we show that the addition of G6P to oocyte extracts inhibits the dephosphorylation/inactivation of CaMKII bound to caspase 2 by protein phosphatase 1. Thus, G6P sustains the phosphorylation of caspase 2 by CaMKII at Ser-135, preventing the induction of caspase 2-mediated apoptotic pathways. These findings expand our understanding of oocyte biology and clarify mechanisms underlying the metabolic regulation of CaMKII and apoptosis. Furthermore, these findings suggest novel approaches to disrupt the suppressive effects of the abnormal metabolism on cell death pathways. PMID:23400775

  4. D-Amino acid oxidase and presence of D-proline in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Soma, Hiroki; Furuya, Ryuji; Kaneko, Ryo; Tsukamoto, Ayaka; Shirasu, Kazumitsu; Tanigawa, Minoru; Nagata, Yoko

    2013-10-01

    We purified D-amino acid oxidase (EC 1.4.3.3, DAO) from Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The optimal temperature and pH for enzyme activity were 35-40 °C and 8.3-9.0, respectively, depending on the substrate amino acids available to the enzyme; the highest activity was observed with D-proline followed by D-phenylalanine. Activity was significantly inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, but only moderately by p-chloromercuribenzoate or benzoate. Enzyme activity was increased until the final tadpole stage, but was reduced to one-third in the adult and was localized primarily in the kidney. The tadpoles contained high concentrations of D-proline close to the final developmental stage and nearly no D-amino acids were detected in the adult frog, indicating that D-amino acid oxidase functions in metamorphosis.

  5. Sex-specific response to hypoxia in a reduced brainstem preparation from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Stéphanie; Kinkead, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory reflexes and tolerance to hypoxia show significant sexual dimorphism. However, the data supporting this notion originates exclusively from mammals. To determine whether this concept is limited to this group of vertebrates, we examined the sex-specific response to acute hypoxia in an adult reduced brainstem preparation from Xenopus laevis. Within the first 5min of exposure to hypoxic aCSF (98% N2/2% CO2), recordings of respiratory-related activity show a stronger increase in fictive breathing frequency in males than females. This initial response was followed by a decrease in respiratory-related activity; this depression occurred 6min sooner in males than females. These results represent new evidences of sexual dimorphism in respiratory control in amphibians and provide potential insight in understanding the homology with other groups of vertebrates, including mammals.

  6. Optical coherence tomography for detection of compound action potential in Xenopus Laevis sciatic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiani, Francesca; Nikolic, Konstantin; Constandinou, Timothy G.

    2016-03-01

    Due to optical coherence tomography (OCT) high spatial and temporal resolution, this technique could be used to observe the quick changes in the refractive index that accompany action potential. In this study we explore the use of time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD-OCT) for real time action potential detection in ex vivo Xenopus Laevis sciatic nerve. TD-OCT is the easiest and less expensive OCT technique and, if successful in detecting real time action potential, it could be used for low cost monitoring devices. A theoretical investigation into the order of magnitude of the signals detected by a TD-OCT setup is provided by this work. A linear dependence between the refractive index and the intensity changes is observed and the minimum SNR for which the setup could work is found to be SNR = 2 x 104.

  7. Light conditions affect the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex in Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Yamany, Nabil A.

    2008-12-01

    In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, effects of asymmetrical light conditions on the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) were tested for the developmental period between stage 47 and 49. For comparison, the rVOR was tested in dim- and high-symmetrical light environments. Test parameters were the rVOR gain and rVOR amplitude. Under all light conditions, the rVOR increased from tadpole stage 47 to 49. For all stages, the asymmetrical light field induced the strongest response, the dim light field the weakest one. The response for the left and right eye was identical, even if the tadpoles were tested under asymmetrical light conditions. The experiments can be considered as hints (1) for an age-dependent light sensitivity of vestibular neurons, and (2) for the existence of control systems for coordinated eye movements that has its origin in the proprioceptors of the extraocular eye muscles.

  8. Rhodopsin Forms Nanodomains in Rod Outer Segment Disc Membranes of the Cold-Blooded Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Tatini; Senapati, Subhadip; Sinha, Satyabrata; Whited, A M; Park, Paul S-H

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin forms nanoscale domains (i.e., nanodomains) in rod outer segment disc membranes from mammalian species. It is unclear whether rhodopsin arranges in a similar manner in amphibian species, which are often used as a model system to investigate the function of rhodopsin and the structure of photoreceptor cells. Moreover, since samples are routinely prepared at low temperatures, it is unclear whether lipid phase separation effects in the membrane promote the observed nanodomain organization of rhodopsin from mammalian species. Rod outer segment disc membranes prepared from the cold-blooded frog Xenopus laevis were investigated by atomic force microscopy to visualize the organization of rhodopsin in the absence of lipid phase separation effects. Atomic force microscopy revealed that rhodopsin nanodomains form similarly as that observed previously in mammalian membranes. Formation of nanodomains in ROS disc membranes is independent of lipid phase separation and conserved among vertebrates.

  9. Dynein-Based Accumulation of Membranes Regulates Nuclear Expansion in Xenopus laevis Egg Extracts.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuki; Merten, Christoph A

    2015-06-08

    Nuclear size changes dynamically during development and has long been observed to correlate with the space surrounding the nucleus, as well as with the volume of the cell. Here we combine an in vitro cell-free system of Xenopus laevis egg extract with microfluidic devices to systematically analyze the effect of spatial constraints. The speed of nuclear expansion depended on the available space surrounding the nucleus up to a threshold volume in the nanoliter range, herein referred to as the nuclear domain. Under spatial constraints smaller than this nuclear domain, the size of microtubule-occupied space surrounding the nucleus turned out to be limiting for the accumulation of membranes around the nucleus via the motor protein dynein, therefore determining the speed of nuclear expansion. This mechanism explains how spatial information surrounding the nucleus, such as the positioning of the nucleus inside the cell, can control nuclear expansion.

  10. Transmembrane Signal Transduction in Oocyte Maturation and Fertilization: Focusing on Xenopus laevis as a Model Animal

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Fertilization is a cell biological phenomenon of crucial importance for the birth of new life in a variety of multicellular and sexual reproduction species such as algae, animal and plants. Fertilization involves a sequence of events, in which the female gamete “egg” and the male gamete “spermatozoon (sperm)” develop, acquire their functions, meet and fuse with each other, to initiate embryonic and zygotic development. Here, it will be briefly reviewed how oocyte cytoplasmic components are orchestrated to undergo hormone-induced oocyte maturation and sperm-induced activation of development. I then review how sperm-egg membrane interaction/fusion and activation of development in the fertilized egg are accomplished and regulated through egg coat- or egg plasma membrane-associated components, highlighting recent findings and future directions in the studies using Xenopus laevis as a model experimental animal. PMID:25546390

  11. Neurotransmitter signaling pathways required for normal development in Xenopus laevis embryos: a pharmacological survey screen

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly G.; Levin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are not only involved in brain function but are also important signaling molecules for many diverse cell types. Neurotransmitters are widely conserved, from evolutionarily ancient organisms lacking nervous systems through man. Here, we report results from a loss- and gain-of-function survey, using pharmacologic modulators of several neurotransmitter pathways to examine possible roles in normal embryogenesis. Applying reagents targeting the glutamatergic, adrenergic, and dopaminergic pathways to embryos of Xenopus laevis from gastrulation to organogenesis stages, we observed and quantified numerous malformations including craniofacial defects, hyperpigmentation, muscle mispatterning, and miscoiling of the gut. These data implicate several key neurotransmitters in new embryonic patterning roles, reveal novel earlier stages for processes involved in eye development, suggest new targets for subsequent molecular-genetic investigation, and highlight the necessity for in-depth toxicology studies of psychoactive compounds to which human embryos might be exposed during pregnancy. PMID:27060969

  12. Expression-dependent pharmacology of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Acevedo, Ricardo E.; Pless, Stephan A.; Schwarz, Stephan K.W.; Ahern, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 channels are polymodal sensors of noxious stimuli and integral players in thermosensation, inflammation and pain signaling. It has been shown previously that under prolonged stimulation, these channels show dynamic pore dilation, providing a pathway for large and otherwise relatively impermeant molecules. Further, we have shown recently that these nonselective cation channels, when activated by capsaicin, are potently and reversibly blocked by external application of quaternary ammonium compounds and local anesthetics. Here we describe a novel phenomenon in transient receptor potential channel pharmacology whereby their expression levels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, as assessed by the magnitude of macroscopic currents, are negatively correlated with extracellular blocker affinity: small current densities give rise to nanomolar blockade by quaternary ammoniums and this affinity decreases linearly as current density increases. Possible mechanisms to explain these data are discussed in light of similar observations in other channels and receptors. PMID:23428812

  13. Xenopus laevis embryos can establish their spatial bilateral symmetrical body pattern without gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubbels, Geertje A.; Reijnen, Mark; Meijerink, Jocelyn; Narraway, Jenny

    1994-08-01

    One assumes that gravity cooperates with the sperm in the establishment of bilateral symmetry in the embryo, particularly in species with yolky eggs. However, only experiments under genuine microgravity can prove this. May 2nd 1988 on the TEXUS-17 Sounding Rocket, eggs of Xenopus laevis became the first vertebrate eggs ever successfully fertilized in Space /1/.Fertilization was done in fully automated hardware; the experiment was successfully repeated and extended in 1989 /2,3/. Here we report a ``Space First'' from the IML-1 Space Shuttle mission (January 1992): In similar hardware and under microgravity, artificially fertilized Xenopus eggs started embryonic development. Histological fixation was pre-programmed at the time gastrulation would occur on Earth and indeed, gastrulae were fixed. Thus after fertilization in near weightlessness Xenopus embryos do develop bilaterally symmetrically, very probably cued by the sperm alone.

  14. Xenopus laevis embryos can establish their spatial bilateral symmetrical body pattern without gravity.

    PubMed

    Ubbels, G A; Reijnen, M; Meijerink, J; Narraway, J

    1994-01-01

    One assumes that gravity cooperates with the sperm in the establishment of bilateral symmetry in the embryo, particularly in species with yolky eggs. However, only experiments under genuine microgravity can prove this. May 2nd 1988 on the TEXUS-17 Sounding Rocket, eggs of Xenopus laevis became the first vertebrate eggs ever successfully fertilized in Space. Fertilization was done in fully automated hardware; the experiment was successfully repeated and extended in 1989. Here we report a "Space First" from the IML-1 Space Shuttle mission (January 1992): In similar hardware and under microgravity, artificially fertilized Xenopus eggs started embryonic development. Histological fixation was pre-programmed at the time gastrulation would occur on Earth and indeed, gastrulae were fixed. Thus after fertilization in near weightlessness Xenopus embryos do develop bilaterally symmetrically, very probably cued by the sperm alone.

  15. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 Signalling in Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells during Development and after Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Alistair E.; Murray, Simon S.; Xiao, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in identifying the extracellular signalling pathways that regulate neural stem and precursor cell biology in the central nervous system (CNS). The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), in particular BMP4, are key players regulating neuronal and glial cell development from neural precursor cells in the embryonic, postnatal, and injured CNS. Here we review recent studies on BMP4 signalling in the generation of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendroglial cells in the CNS. We also discuss putative mechanisms that BMP4 may utilise to influence glial cell development following CNS injury and highlight some questions for further research. PMID:27293450

  16. Dose-Dependent Early Life Stage Toxicities in Xenopus laevis Exposed In Ovo to Selenium.

    PubMed

    Massé, Anita J; Muscatello, Jorgelina R; Janz, David M

    2015-11-17

    Selenium (Se) is a developmental toxicant in oviparous vertebrates. The adverse reproductive effects of Se toxicity have been predominantly investigated in fishes and birds with only a few studies focusing on amphibians. The objective of this study was to determine tissue-based toxicity thresholds for early life stage Se toxicities in Xenopus laevis as a consequence of in ovo exposure through maternal transfer of dietary Se. Following a 68-day dietary exposure to food augmented with l-selenomethionine (SeMet) at measured concentrations of 0.7 (control), 10.9, 30.4, or 94.2 μg Se/g dry mass (d.m.), adult female X. laevis were bred with untreated males, and resulting embryos were incubated until 5 days postfertilization (dpf). The measured Se concentrations in eggs were 1.6, 10.8, 28.1, and 81.7 μg Se/g d.m., respectively. No biologically significant effects were observed on fertilization success, hatchability, or mortality in offspring. Frequency and severity of morphological abnormalities were significantly greater in 5 dpf tadpoles from the highest exposure group when compared to the control, with eye lens abnormalities being the most prominent of all abnormalities. The estimated EC10 value for frequency of total early life stage abnormalities was 44.9 μg Se/g egg d.m., which suggests that this amphibian species is less sensitive to in ovo Se exposure than most of the fish species studied to date.

  17. Effects of 17 beta-estradiol exposure on Xenopus laevis gonadal histopathology.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jeffrey C; Lutz, Ilka; Kloas, Werner; Springer, Timothy A; Holden, Larry R; Krueger, Henry O; Hosmer, Alan J

    2010-05-01

    The natural estrogen 17 beta-estradiol (E2) is a potential environmental contaminant commonly employed as a positive control substance in bioassays involving estrogenic effects. The aquatic anuran Xenopus laevis is a frequent subject of reproductive endocrine disruptor research; however, histopathological investigations have tended to be less than comprehensive. Consequently, a study was designed to characterize gross and microscopic changes in the gonads of X. laevis as a result of E2 exposure. Additional goals of this study, which consisted of three separate experiments, included the standardization of diagnostic terminology and criteria, the validation of statistical methodology, and the establishment of a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) for E2 as defined by an approximately 50% conversion of presumptive genotypic males to phenotypic females. In the first experiment, frogs were exposed to nominal concentrations of 0, 0.2, 1.5, or 6.0 microg/L E2. From these experimental results and those of a subsequent range finding trial, the EC50 for E2 was determined to be approximately 0.2 microg/L. This E2 concentration was utilized in the other two experiments, which were performed at different facilities to confirm the reproducibility of results. Experiments were conducted according to Good Laboratory Practice guidelines, and the histopathologic evaluations were peer reviewed by an independent pathologist. Among the three trials, the histopathological findings that were strongly associated with E2-exposure (p<0.001 to 0.0001) included an increase in the proportion of phenotypic females, mixed sex, dilated testis tubules, dividing gonocytes in the testis, and dilated ovarian cavities in phenotypic ovaries. A comparison of the gross and microscopic evaluations suggested that some morphologic changes in the gonads may potentially be missed if studies rely entirely on macroscopic assessment.

  18. Effects of Transgenic cry1Ca Rice on the Development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuping; Wang, Jiamei; Zhu, Haojun; Li, Yunhe; Ding, Jiatong; Peng, Yufa

    2015-01-01

    In fields of genetically modified, insect-resistant rice expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, frogs are exposed to Bt Cry proteins by consuming both target and non-target insects, and through their highly permeable skin. In the present study, we assessed the potential risk posed by transgenic cry1Ca rice (T1C-19) on the development of a frog species by adding purified Cry1Ca protein or T1C-19 rice straw into the rearing water of Xenopus laevis tadpoles, and by feeding X. laevis froglets diets containing rice grains of T1C-19 or its non-transformed counterpart MH63. Our results showed that there were no significant differences among groups receiving 100 μg L-1 or 10 μg L-1 Cry1Ca and the blank control in terms of time to completed metamorphosis, survival rate, body weight, body length, organ weight and liver enzyme activity after being exposed to the Cry1Ca (P > 0.05). Although some detection indices in the rice straw groups were significantly different from those of the blank control group (P < 0.05), there was no significant difference between the T1C-19 and MH63 rice straw groups. Moreover, there were no significant differences in the mortality rate, body weight, daily weight gain, liver and fat body weight of the froglets between the T1C-19 and MH63 dietary groups after 90 days, and there were no abnormal pathological changes in the stomach, intestines, livers, spleens and gonads. Thus, we conclude that the planting of transgenic cry1Ca rice will not adversely affect frog development.

  19. Regeneration of Xenopus laevis spinal cord requires Sox2/3 expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Rosana; Edwards-Faret, Gabriela; Moreno, Mauricio; Zuñiga, Nikole; Cline, Hollis; Larraín, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord regeneration is very inefficient in humans, causing paraplegia and quadriplegia. Studying model organisms that can regenerate the spinal cord in response to injury could be useful for understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that explain why this process fails in humans. Here, we use Xenopus laevis as a model organism to study spinal cord repair. Histological and functional analyses showed that larvae at pre-metamorphic stages restore anatomical continuity of the spinal cord and recover swimming after complete spinal cord transection. These regenerative capabilities decrease with onset of metamorphosis. The ability to study regenerative and non-regenerative stages in Xenopus laevis makes it a unique model system to study regeneration. We studied the response of Sox2/3 expressing cells to spinal cord injury and their function in the regenerative process. We found that cells expressing Sox2 and/or Sox3 are present in the ventricular zone of regenerative animals and decrease in non-regenerative froglets. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) experiments and in vivo time-lapse imaging studies using green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression driven by the Sox3 promoter showed a rapid, transient and massive proliferation of Sox2/3+ cells in response to injury in the regenerative stages. The in vivo imaging also demonstrated that Sox2/3+ neural progenitor cells generate neurons in response to injury. In contrast, these cells showed a delayed and very limited response in non-regenerative froglets. Sox2 knockdown and overexpression of a dominant negative form of Sox2 disrupts locomotor and anatomical-histological recovery. We also found that neurogenesis markers increase in response to injury in regenerative but not in non-regenerative animals. We conclude that Sox2 is necessary for spinal cord regeneration and suggest a model whereby spinal cord injury activates proliferation of Sox2/3 expressing cells and their differentiation into neurons, a mechanism that is

  20. Molecular and cellular characterization of urinary bladder-type aquaporin in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yuki; Katayama, Izumi; Nakakura, Takashi; Ogushi, Yuji; Okada, Reiko; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to many anuran amphibians, water is not reabsorbed from the urinary bladder in aquatic Xenopus, thereby helping to prevent excessive water influx. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms for this process. In the present study, we have identified urinary bladder-type aquaporin, AQP-x2, in Xenopus laevis by cDNA cloning. The predicted amino acid sequence contained six putative transmembrane domains and the two conserved Asn-Pro-Ala motifs, characteristic of AQPs. The sequence also contained a putative N-glycosylation site and phosphorylation motifs for protein kinase A and protein kinase C. The oocyte swelling assay showed that AQP-x2 facilitated water permeability. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that AQP-x2 mRNA was expressed in the urinary bladder and lung, and faintly in the kidney. Immunomicroscopical study further localized AQP-x2 protein to the cytoplasm of granular cells in the luminal epithelium of the urinary bladder whilst AQP3 was observed along the basolateral side of these cells. In vitro stimulation of the urinary bladder with 10(-8)M vasotocin (AVT), 10(-8)M hydrin 1, or 10(-8)M hydrin 2 had no clear effect on the subcellular distribution of AQP-x2. When the AVT concentration was increased to 10(-6)M, however, AQP-x2 was partially transferred to the apical plasma membrane. The treatment with hydrin 1 or hydrin 2 at the same concentration failed to induce the translocation to the apical membrane. On the other hand, AQP3 remained along the basolateral side even after the treatment with vasotocin or hydrins. The results suggest that the poor responsiveness of AQP-x2 to neurohypophyseal peptides may be a main cause for the little water permeability of the urinary bladder of X. laevis.

  1. Extinction of an introduced warm-climate alien species, Xenopus laevis, by extreme weather events.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Richard C; Stott, Lucy C; Viney, Mark E; Mable, Barbara K; Tinsley, Matthew C

    Invasive, non-native species represent a major threat to biodiversity worldwide. The African amphibian Xenopus laevis is widely regarded as an invasive species and a threat to local faunas. Populations originating at the Western Cape, South Africa, have been introduced on four continents, mostly in areas with a similar Mediterranean climate. Some introduced populations are also established in cooler environments where persistence for many decades suggests a capacity for long-term adaptation. In these cases, recent climate warming might enhance invasion ability, favouring range expansion, population growth and negative effects on native faunas. In the cool temperate UK, populations have been established for about 50 years in Wales and for an unknown period, probably >20 years, in England (Lincolnshire). Our field studies over 30 and 10 years, respectively, show that in favourable conditions there may be good recruitment, fast individual growth rates and large body size; maximum longevity exceeds 23 years. Nevertheless, areas of distribution remained limited, with numbers <500 in each population. In 2010, only a single individual was captured at each locality and further searching failed to record any others in repeated sampling up to 2014. We conclude that both populations are now extinct. The winters of 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 experienced extreme cold and drought (December 2010 was the coldest in 120 years and the third driest in 100 years). The extinction of X. laevis in these areas indicates that even relatively long-established alien species remain vulnerable to rare extreme weather conditions.

  2. A role for biliverdin IXalpha in dorsal axis development of Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Falchuk, Kenneth H; Contin, Jennifer M; Dziedzic, T Scott; Feng, Zhongling; French, Thayer C; Heffron, Gregory J; Montorzi, Marcelo

    2002-01-08

    The determinants of Xenopus laevis embryos that act before their first cell division are mandatory for the formation of mRNas required to establish the dorsal axis. Although their chemical identities are unknown, a number of their properties have long been recognized. One of the determinants is present in the cytoplasm and is sensitive to UV light. Thus, exposing stage 1 embryos to either standard 254-nm or, as shown here, to 366-nm UV light during the 0.3-0.4 time fraction of their first cycle inactivates the cytoplasmic determinant. As a consequence, both types of irradiated embryos fail to express dorsal markers, e.g., goosecoid and chordin, without affecting formation of ventral markers, e.g., Vent-1. The developmental outcome is dorsal axis-deficient morphology. We report here that biliverdin IXalpha, a normal constituent of cytoplasmic yolk platelets, is photo-transformed by irradiation with either 254- or 366-nm UV light and that the transformation triggers the dorsal axis deficiency. When the 254- or 366-nm UV-irradiated embryos, fated to dorsal axis deficiency, are incubated solely with microM amounts of biliverdin, they recover and form the axis. In contrast, incubation with either in vitro photo-transformed biliverdin or biliverdin IXalpha dimethyl ester does not induce recovery. The results define an approach to produce dorsal axis-deficient embryos by photo-transforming its biliverdin by irradiation with 366-nm UV light and identify an unsuspected role for biliverdin IXalpha in X. laevis embryogenesis.

  3. Specific Ligand Binding Domain Residues Confer Low Dioxin Responsiveness to AHR1β of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Odio, Camila; Holzman, Sarah A.; Denison, Michael S.; Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Bonati, Laura; Franks, Diana G.; Hahn, Mark E.; Powell, Wade H.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a PAS-family protein that mediates the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in vertebrates. Frogs are remarkably insensitive to TCDD, and AHRs from Xenopus laevis bind TCDD with low affinity. We sought to identify structural features of X. laevis AHR1β associated with low TCDD sensitivity. Substitution of the entire ligand-binding domain (LBD) with the corresponding sequence from mouse AHRb-1 dramatically increased TCDD responsiveness in transactivation assays. To identify amino acid residues responsible, we constructed a comparative model of the AHR1β LBD using homologous domains of PAS proteins HIF2α and ARNT. The model revealed an internal cavity of similar dimensions to the putative binding cavity of mouse AHRb-1, suggesting the importance of side-chain interactions over cavity size. Of residues with side chains clearly pointing into the cavity, only two differed from the mouse sequence. When A354, located within a conserved β-strand, was changed to serine, the corresponding mouse residue, the EC50 for TCDD decreased more than 15-fold. When N325 was changed to serine, EC50 declined 3-fold. When the mutations were combined, the EC50 declined from 18.6 nM to 0.8 nM, nearly matching mouse AHR for TCDD sensitivity. Velocity sedimentation analysis confirmed that mutant frog AHRs exhibited correspondingly increased TCDD binding. We also assayed mutant AHRs for responsiveness to a candidate endogenous ligand, 6-formylindolo[3,2b]carbazole (FICZ). Mutations that increased TCDD sensitivity also increased sensitivity to FICZ. This comparative study represents a novel approach to discerning fundamental information about the structure of AHR and its interactions with biologically important agonists. PMID:23394719

  4. Regeneration of Xenopus laevis spinal cord requires Sox2/3 expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Rosana; Edwards-Faret, Gabriela; Moreno, Mauricio; Zuñiga, Nikole; Cline, Hollis; Larraín, Juan

    2015-12-15

    Spinal cord regeneration is very inefficient in humans, causing paraplegia and quadriplegia. Studying model organisms that can regenerate the spinal cord in response to injury could be useful for understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that explain why this process fails in humans. Here, we use Xenopus laevis as a model organism to study spinal cord repair. Histological and functional analyses showed that larvae at pre-metamorphic stages restore anatomical continuity of the spinal cord and recover swimming after complete spinal cord transection. These regenerative capabilities decrease with onset of metamorphosis. The ability to study regenerative and non-regenerative stages in Xenopus laevis makes it a unique model system to study regeneration. We studied the response of Sox2(/)3 expressing cells to spinal cord injury and their function in the regenerative process. We found that cells expressing Sox2 and/or Sox3 are present in the ventricular zone of regenerative animals and decrease in non-regenerative froglets. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) experiments and in vivo time-lapse imaging studies using green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression driven by the Sox3 promoter showed a rapid, transient and massive proliferation of Sox2(/)3(+) cells in response to injury in the regenerative stages. The in vivo imaging also demonstrated that Sox2(/)3(+) neural progenitor cells generate neurons in response to injury. In contrast, these cells showed a delayed and very limited response in non-regenerative froglets. Sox2 knockdown and overexpression of a dominant negative form of Sox2 disrupts locomotor and anatomical-histological recovery. We also found that neurogenesis markers increase in response to injury in regenerative but not in non-regenerative animals. We conclude that Sox2 is necessary for spinal cord regeneration and suggest a model whereby spinal cord injury activates proliferation of Sox2/3 expressing cells and their differentiation into neurons, a mechanism

  5. Exposure to butachlor causes thyroid endocrine disruption and promotion of metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuying; Li, Meng; Wang, Qiangwei; Gui, Wenjun; Zhu, Guonian

    2016-06-01

    Butachlor is extensively applied in rice paddy ecosystem in china, and has been widespread contaminant in the aquatic environment. Here, Xenopus laevis was used for the evaluation of teratogenesis developmental toxicity, and disruption of thyroid system when exposure to different concentrations of butachlor by window phase exposure. Acute toxicity investigation shown that 96 h-LC50 value of butachlor was 1.424 mg L(-1) and 0.962 mg L(-1) for tadpoles (starting from stages 46/47) and embryos (starting from stages 8/9), respectively. Exposure to butachlor caused malformation, including abnormal eye, pericardial edema, enlarged proctodaeum and bent tail. Window phase exposure test indicated that butachlor significantly promote the contents of whole-body thyroid hormones (THs, T3 and T4) at higher levels, indicating thyroid endocrine disruption. At 7 days, exposure to butachlor up-regulated the mRNA expression of genes involved in THs synthesis and metabolism (tshα, tg, tpo and dio1) and THs receptors (trα and trβ). At 14 days, up-regulation of the mRNA expression of genes related to THs synthesis and metabolism (tshα, tshβ, tg, tpo, dio1, dio2 and ttr) and THs receptors (trβ) were also observed after the exposure to butachlor. At 21 days, butachlor up-regulated the mRNA expression of tshα, tg, tpo genes and down-regulated the mRNA expression of tshβ, tg, dio1, ttr and trα genes. These results showed that butachlor could change the mRNA expression of genes involved in the HPT axis and increase whole-body thyroid hormones levels of X. laevis tadpoles in a dose- and time-dependent manner, causing thyroid endocrine disruption and developmental toxicity.

  6. Atomic force microscopy on plasma membranes from Xenopus laevis oocytes containing human aquaporin 4.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Francesco; Santacroce, Massimo; Cremona, Andrea; Gosvami, Nitya N; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2014-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a unique tool for imaging membrane proteins in near-native environment (embedded in a membrane and in buffer solution) at ~1 nm spatial resolution. It has been most successful on membrane proteins reconstituted in 2D crystals and on some specialized and densely packed native membranes. Here, we report on AFM imaging of purified plasma membranes from Xenopus laevis oocytes, a commonly used system for the heterologous expression of membrane proteins. Isoform M23 of human aquaporin 4 (AQP4-M23) was expressed in the X. laevis oocytes following their injection with AQP4-M23 cRNA. AQP4-M23 expression and incorporation in the plasma membrane were confirmed by the changes in oocyte volume in response to applied osmotic gradients. Oocyte plasma membranes were then purified by ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous sucrose gradient, and the presence of AQP4-M23 proteins in the purified membranes was established by Western blotting analysis. Compared with membranes without over-expressed AQP4-M23, the membranes from AQP4-M23 cRNA injected oocytes showed clusters of structures with lateral size of about 10 nm in the AFM topography images, with a tendency to a fourfold symmetry as may be expected for higher-order arrays of AQP4-M23. In addition, but only infrequently, AQP4-M23 tetramers could be resolved in 2D arrays on top of the plasma membrane, in good quantitative agreement with transmission electron microscopy analysis and the current model of AQP4. Our results show the potential and the difficulties of AFM studies on cloned membrane proteins in native eukaryotic membranes.

  7. Identification of a novel dehydration responsive gene, drp10, from the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Biggar, Kyle K; Biggar, Yulia; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-07-01

    During periods of environmental stress a number of different anuran species employ adaptive strategies to promote survival. Our study found that in response to dehydration (i.e., loss of total body water content), the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) increased the expression of a novel gene (drp10) that encodes a structural homolog of the freeze-responsive FR10 protein found in wood frogs. Similar to FR10, the DRP10 protein was found to also contain a highly conserved N-terminal cleavable signal peptide. Furthermore, DRP10 was found to have high structural homology to the available crystal structures of type A and E apolipoproteins in Homo sapiens, and a type IV LS-12 anti-freeze protein in the longhorn sculpin, Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosis. In response to dehydration, the transcript expression of drp10 was found to increase 1.52 ± 0.16-fold and 1.97 ± 0.11-fold in response to medium (15%) and high (30%) dehydration stresses in the liver tissue of X. laevis, respectively, while drp10 expression increased 2.12 ± 0.12-fold and 1.46 ± 0.16-fold in kidney tissue. Although the molecular function of both dehydration-responsive DRP10 and the freeze-responsive FR10 have just begun to be elucidated, it is likely that both are frog-specific proteins that likely share a similar purpose during water-related stresses.

  8. The synthetic progestogen, Levonorgestrel, but not natural progesterone, affects male mate calling behavior of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Frauke; Kloas, Werner

    2012-05-01

    Worldwide, more than 100 million women use hormonal contraceptives, which act through progestogenic modes of action. These man-made hormones can enter the aquatic environment as they are excreted via feces and urine. Xeno-progestins are able to interfere with the endocrine system of female aquatic vertebrates impairing oogenesis and reproduction. However, data on progestogenic effects on reproductive behavior of male aquatic vertebrates are lacking. To evaluate whether progestins affect the mating behavior of male Xenopus laevis, we exposed male frogs to three environmentally relevant concentrations (10(-7) M, 10(-8) M and 10(-10) M) of the synthetic progestin Levonorgestrel (LNG) and the corresponding natural steroid progesterone (PRG), respectively. LNG at all exposure concentrations increased the proportions of advertisement calling, indicating a sexually aroused state of the males. Furthermore LNG at 10(-7) M decreased the relative proportions of rasping, a call type indicating a sexually unaroused state of the male. PRG, on the other hand, did not affect any of those parameters. Temporal and spectral features of the advertisement call itself were not affected by any of the two exposure treatments. Since LNG exhibits slight androgenic activity, the results suggest that LNG effects on male mate calling behavior of X. laevis are due to its moderate androgenic but not to its progestogenic activities. However, although males' sexual arousal seems to be enhanced by LNG, the adverse effects of LNG on female reproduction presumably outweigh these enhancing effects and LNG exposure nonetheless might result in reduced reproductive success of these animals.

  9. Functional and Structural Effects of Amyloid-β Aggregate on Xenopus laevis Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Jorge; la Paz, Lenin Ochoa-de; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2012-01-01

    Xenopus laevis oocytes exposed to amyloid-β aggregate generated oscillatory electric activity (blips) that was recorded by two-microelectrode voltage-clamp. The cells exhibited a series of “spontaneous” blips ranging in amplitude from 3.8 ± 0.9 nA at the beginning of the recordings to 6.8 ± 1.7 nA after 15 min of exposure to 1 μM aggregate. These blips were similar in amplitude to those induced by the channel-forming antimicrobial agents amphotericin B (7.8 ± 1.2 nA) and gramicidin (6.3 ± 1.1 nA). The amyloid aggregate-induced currents were abolished when extracellular Ca2+ was removed from the bathing solution, suggesting a central role for this cation in generating the spontaneous electric activity. The amyloid aggregate also affected the Ca2+-dependent Cl− currents of oocytes, as shown by increased amplitude of the transient-outward chloride current (Tout) and the serum-activated, oscillatory Cl− currents. Electron microcopy revealed that amyloid aggregate induced the dissociation of the follicular cells that surround the oocyte, thus leading to a failure in the electro-chemical communication between these cells. This was also evidenced by the suppression of the oscillatory Ca2+-dependent ATP-currents, which require proper coupling between oocytes and the follicular cell layer. These observations, made using the X. laevis oocytes as a versatile experimental model, may help to understand the effects of amyloid aggregate on cellular communication. PMID:23104436

  10. Ion Currents Induced by ATP and Angiotensin II in Cultured Follicular Cells of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-Herrera, Marcelino; Zaske, Ana María; García-Colunga, Jesús; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Xenopus laevis oocytes are commonly used to study the biophysical and pharmacological properties of foreign ion channels and receptors, but little is known about those endogenously expressed in their enveloping layer of follicular cells (FCs). Whole-cell recordings and the perforated patch-clamp technique in cultured FCs held at -60 mV revealed that ATP (20-250 μM) generates inward currents of 465 ± 93 pA (mean ± standard error) in ∼60% of the FCs studied, whereas outward currents of 317 ± 100 pA were found in ∼5% of the cells. The net effect of ATP on the FCs was to activate both mono- and biphasic inward currents, with an associated increase in membrane chloride conductance. Two-microelectrode voltage-clamp recordings of nude oocytes held at -60 mV disclosed that ATP elicited biphasic inward currents, corresponding to the well-known Fin and Sin-like currents. ATP receptor antagonists like suramin, TNP-ATP, and RB2 did not inhibit any of these responses. On the other hand, when using wholecell recordings, 1 μM Ang II yielded smooth inward currents of 157 ± 45 pA in ∼16% of the FC held at -60 mV. The net Ang II response, mediated by the activation of the AT1 receptor, was a chloride current inhibited by 10 nM ZD7155. This study will help to better understand the roles of ATP and Ang II receptors in the physiology of X. laevis oocytes. PMID:22083304

  11. Evaluation of Presurgical Skin Preparation Agents in African Clawed Frogs (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Philips, Blythe H; Crim, Marcus J; Hankenson, F Claire; Steffen, Earl K; Klein, Peter S; Brice, Angela K; Carty, Anthony J

    2015-11-01

    Despite the routine collection of oocytes from African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) for use in research, few studies have evaluated methods for preparing their skin for surgery. We evaluated 3 skin preparatory agents by examining their antibacterial efficacy and the gross and microscopic appearance of Xenopus skin after exposure. Frogs (n = 14) were sedated and treated (contact time, 10 min) with 0.9% sterile NaCl on one-half of the ventrum and with 0.5% povidone-iodine or 0.75% chlorhexidine on the other half. Bacterial cultures were obtained before and after skin treatment; bacteria were identified by mass spectrometry. To assess inflammation and degenerative changes, the incision sites were photographed and biopsied at 0, 1, and 7 d after surgery. We isolated at least 22 genera of bacteria from the skin of our frog population (mean ± SE, 5.21 ± 0.82 genera per frog). Iodine (2.00 ± 0.44 genera) and chlorhexidine (0.29 ± 0.76 genera) both had greater antimicrobial activity than did saline. Skin erythema did not correlate with treatment group. Histologic evidence of epidermal degeneration and necrosis was greater on days 1 and 7 after chlorhexidine treatment than after iodine or saline. In addition, frogs treated with chlorhexidine had a higher incidence of clinical illness associated with the exposure site. In summary, although chlorhexidine has adequate antimicrobial activity against organisms on X. laevis skin, it leads to skin damage and subsequent clinical complications. We therefore do not recommend chlorhexidine as a preoperative preparation agent in Xenopus.

  12. Effects of Transgenic cry1Ca Rice on the Development of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haojun; Li, Yunhe; Ding, Jiatong; Peng, Yufa

    2015-01-01

    In fields of genetically modified, insect-resistant rice expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, frogs are exposed to Bt Cry proteins by consuming both target and non-target insects, and through their highly permeable skin. In the present study, we assessed the potential risk posed by transgenic cry1Ca rice (T1C-19) on the development of a frog species by adding purified Cry1Ca protein or T1C-19 rice straw into the rearing water of Xenopus laevis tadpoles, and by feeding X. laevis froglets diets containing rice grains of T1C-19 or its non-transformed counterpart MH63. Our results showed that there were no significant differences among groups receiving 100 μg L–1 or 10 μg L–1 Cry1Ca and the blank control in terms of time to completed metamorphosis, survival rate, body weight, body length, organ weight and liver enzyme activity after being exposed to the Cry1Ca (P > 0.05). Although some detection indices in the rice straw groups were significantly different from those of the blank control group (P < 0.05), there was no significant difference between the T1C-19 and MH63 rice straw groups. Moreover, there were no significant differences in the mortality rate, body weight, daily weight gain, liver and fat body weight of the froglets between the T1C-19 and MH63 dietary groups after 90 days, and there were no abnormal pathological changes in the stomach, intestines, livers, spleens and gonads. Thus, we conclude that the planting of transgenic cry1Ca rice will not adversely affect frog development. PMID:26695426

  13. Evaluation of Presurgical Skin Preparation Agents in African Clawed Frogs (Xenopus laevis)

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Blythe H; Crim, Marcus J; Hankenson, F Claire; Steffen, Earl K; Klein, Peter S; Brice, Angela K; Carty, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the routine collection of oocytes from African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) for use in research, few studies have evaluated methods for preparing their skin for surgery. We evaluated 3 skin preparatory agents by examining their antibacterial efficacy and the gross and microscopic appearance of Xenopus skin after exposure. Frogs (n = 14) were sedated and treated (contact time, 10 min) with 0.9% sterile NaCl on one-half of the ventrum and with 0.5% povidone–iodine or 0.75% chlorhexidine on the other half. Bacterial cultures were obtained before and after skin treatment; bacteria were identified by mass spectrometry. To assess inflammation and degenerative changes, the incision sites were photographed and biopsied at 0, 1, and 7 d after surgery. We isolated at least 22 genera of bacteria from the skin of our frog population (mean ± SE, 5.21 ± 0.82 genera per frog). Iodine (2.00 ± 0.44 genera) and chlorhexidine (0.29 ± 0.76 genera) both had greater antimicrobial activity than did saline. Skin erythema did not correlate with treatment group. Histologic evidence of epidermal degeneration and necrosis was greater on days 1 and 7 after chlorhexidine treatment than after iodine or saline. In addition, frogs treated with chlorhexidine had a higher incidence of clinical illness associated with the exposure site. In summary, although chlorhexidine has adequate antimicrobial activity against organisms on X. laevis skin, it leads to skin damage and subsequent clinical complications. We therefore do not recommend chlorhexidine as a preoperative preparation agent in Xenopus. PMID:26632790

  14. Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala) from the Sava River basin: New insights into strain formation, mtDNA-like sequences and dynamics of infection.

    PubMed

    Vardić Smrzlić, Irena; Valić, Damir; Kapetanović, Damir; Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Gjurčević, Emil; Teskeredžić, Emin

    2015-10-01

    Here we report the genetic variability and presence of mtDNA-like sequences of Pomphorhynchus laevis from the chub, Squalius cephalus, caught at the sampling sites along the Sava River and its tributary the Sutla River in Croatia. Sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene of the recovered P. laevis specimens were used for haplotype network construction and phylogenetic analysis. These analyses showed that some specimens contained mitochondrial-like sequences, and they uncovered the existence of a Sava River basin strain different from known strains of P. laevis. This is the first time that P. laevis has been shown to contain mtDNA-like sequences, suggesting the need to exercise caution during COI analyses of P. laevis using universal primers. Highly conserved sequences of two nuclear markers, the ITS region and 18S rRNA, were not helpful for understanding genetic variability or differentiating strains. Furthermore, analysis of the dynamics of P. laevis infections in S. cephalus from the Sava and Sutla Rivers showed decreased prevalence and abundance at sites with inferior water quality, positive association of parasite abundance with fish size, and no clear association of parasite abundance with fish condition index or sex.

  15. Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Suppresses TGFβ2-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in the Lens: Implications for Cataract Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Daisy Y.; Wojciechowski, Magdalena C.; Lovicu, Frank J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) is a key pathologic mechanism underlying cataract. Two members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) superfamily, TGFβ and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) have functionally distinct roles in EMT. While TGFβ is a potent inducer of EMT, BMP-7 counteracts the fibrogenic activity of TGFβ. We examine the modulating effect of BMP-7 on TGFβ-induced EMT in LECs. Methods Rat lens epithelial explants were treated exogenously with TGFβ2 alone or in combination with BMP-7 for up to 5 days. Expression levels of E-cadherin, β-catenin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and phosphorylated downstream Smads were determined using immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to study gene expression levels of EMT markers and downstream BMP target genes, including the Inhibitors of differentiation (Id). Results Transforming growth factor-β2 induced LECs to transdifferentiate into myofibroblastic cells. Addition of BMP-7 suppressed TGFβ2-induced α-SMA protein levels and mesenchymal gene expression, with retention of E-cadherin and β-catenin expression to the cell membrane. Addition of BMP-7 prevented lens capsular wrinkling and cellular loss associated with TGFβ2-induced EMT over the 5-day treatment period. The inhibitory effect of BMP-7 was accompanied by an early induction of pSmad1/5 and suppression of TGFβ2-induced pSmad2/3. Treatment with TGFβ2 alone suppressed gene expression of Id2/3 and addition of BMP-7 restored Id2/3 expression. Conclusions Exogenous administration of BMP-7 abrogated TGFβ2-induced EMT in rat lens epithelial explants. Understanding the complex interplay between the TGFβ- and BMP-7–associated Smad signaling pathways and their downstream target genes holds therapeutic promise in cataract prevention. PMID:28152139

  16. Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2, But Not Mesenchymal Stromal Cells, Exert Regenerative Effects on Canine and Human Nucleus Pulposus Cells.

    PubMed

    Bach, Frances C; Miranda-Bedate, Alberto; van Heel, Ferdi W M; Riemers, Frank M; Müller, Margot C M E; Creemers, Laura B; Ito, Keita; Benz, Karin; Meij, Björn P; Tryfonidou, Marianna A

    2017-03-01

    Chronic back pain is related to intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and dogs are employed as animal models to develop growth factor- and cell-based regenerative treatments. In this respect, the differential effects of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) on canine and human chondrocyte-like cells (CLCs) derived from the nucleus pulposus of degenerated IVDs were studied. Human and canine CLCs were cultured in 3D microaggregates in basal culture medium supplemented with/without TGF-β1 (10 ng/mL) or BMP2 (100 or 250 ng/mL). Both TGF-β1 and BMP2 increased proliferation and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) deposition of human and canine CLCs. TGF-β1 induced collagen type I deposition and fibrotic (re)differentiation, whereas BMP2 induced more collagen type II deposition. In dogs, TGF-β1 induced Smad1 and Smad2 signaling, whereas in humans, it only tended to induce Smad2 signaling. BMP2 supplementation increased Smad1 signaling in both species. This altogether indicates that Smad1 signaling was associated with collagen type II production, whereas Smad2 signaling was associated with fibrotic CLC (re)differentiation. As a step toward preclinical translation, treatment with BMP2 alone and combined with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) was further investigated. Canine male CLCs were seeded in albumin-based hydrogels with/without female bone marrow-derived MSCs (50:50) in basal or 250 ng/mL BMP2-supplemented culture medium. Although the results indicate that a sufficient amount of MSCs survived the culture period, total GAG production was not increased and GAG production per cell was even decreased by the addition of MSCs, implying that MSCs did not exert additive regenerative effects on the CLCs.

  17. Identification of the optic recess region as a morphogenetic entity in the zebrafish forebrain.

    PubMed

    Affaticati, Pierre; Yamamoto, Kei; Rizzi, Barbara; Bureau, Charlotte; Peyriéras, Nadine; Pasqualini, Catherine; Demarque, Michaël; Vernier, Philippe

    2015-03-04

    Regionalization is a critical, highly conserved step in the development of the vertebrate brain. Discrepancies exist in how regionalization of the anterior vertebrate forebrain is conceived since the "preoptic area" is proposed to be a part of the telencephalon in tetrapods but not in teleost fish. To gain insight into this complex morphogenesis, formation of the anterior forebrain was analyzed in 3D over time in zebrafish embryos, combining visualization of proliferation and differentiation markers, with that of developmental genes. We found that the region containing the preoptic area behaves as a coherent morphogenetic entity, organized around the optic recess and located between telencephalon and hypothalamus. This optic recess region (ORR) makes clear borders with its neighbor areas and expresses a specific set of genes (dlx2a, sim1a and otpb). We thus propose that the anterior forebrain (secondary prosencephalon) in teleosts contains three morphogenetic entities (telencephalon, ORR and hypothalamus), instead of two (telencephalon and hypothalamus). The ORR in teleosts could correspond to "telencephalic stalk area" and "alar hypothalamus" in tetrapods, resolving current inconsistencies in the comparison of basal forebrain among vertebrates.

  18. The oligomeric integrity of toposome is essential for its morphogenetic function.

    PubMed

    Scaturro, G; Zito, F; Matranga, V

    1998-01-01

    Sea urchin embryos are uniquely suitable for the study of morphogenetic cell interactions. Efforts to identify the molecules responsible for morphogenetic cell adhesion led to the isolation of a 22S glycoprotein complex from Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin embryo, that has been called toposome. The biological activity of toposome in mediating cellular adhesion has been fully documented. Its function in determining positional guidance during the development of the sea urchin embryo has been proposed. Here studies on the molecular structure of toposome are reported showing that, under non-reducing conditions, it is resolved in sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in a major band with an apparent molecular weight of 260 kDa, a doublet of 180-160 kDa and a lower band of 80 kDa. Digestion with EndoH endoglycosidase reduced the molecular sizes of the bands of 10%, 20% and 40%, respectively. In order to establish if the oligomeric integrity of toposome was essential for its function, the biological activity of each subunit on cells dissociated from sea urchin blastula embryos was tested. The resulting swimming embryoids were lacking skeleton, while reaggregating cells supplemented with native toposome developed into pluteus-like structures with skeletal elements.

  19. Morphogenetic fields in embryogenesis, regeneration, and cancer: Non-local control of complex patterning

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Establishment of shape during embryonic development, and the maintenance of shape against injury or tumorigenesis, requires constant coordination of cell behaviors toward the patterning needs of the host organism. Molecular cell biology and genetics have made great strides in understanding the mechanisms that regulate cell function. However, generalized rational control of shape is still largely beyond our current capabilities. Significant instructive signals function at long range to provide positional information and other cues to regulate organism-wide systems properties like anatomical polarity and size control. Is complex morphogenesis best understood as the emergent property of local cell interactions, or as the outcome of a computational process that is guided by a physically-encoded map or template of the final goal state? Here I review recent data and molecular mechanisms relevant to morphogenetic fields: large-scale systems of physical properties that have been proposed to store patterning information during embryogenesis, regenerative repair, and cancer suppression that ultimately controls anatomy. Placing special emphasis on the role of endogenous bioelectric signals as an important component of the morphogenetic field, I speculate on novel approaches for the computational modeling and control of these fields with applications to synthetic biology, regenerative medicine, and evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:22542702

  20. Delayed mortality and morphogenetic anomalies induced in Culex quinquefasciatus by the microbial control agent Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Mulla, M S; Singh, N; Darwazeh, H A

    1991-09-01

    Two preparations of Bacillus sphaericus 2362 were studied for their biological activity, delayed mortality and the induction of morphogenetic aberrations in larvae, pupae and adults of Culex quinquefasciatus. Longevity and fecundity of adult mosquitoes were also assessed. A dosage response line for B. sphaericus was established against 4th-instar larvae and sublethal concentrations (48 h LC50 and lower) were used against these larvae. Sublethal concentrations of B. sphaericus induced delayed mortality in larvae, pupae and adults. The magnitude of mortality increased in succeeding cohorts and developmental stages resulting from the surviving larvae. Only 10 and 25% overall emergence of viable adults occurred in the sublethal treatments (LC25) of 2 B. sphaericus preparations. The range of successful adult emergence was over 94% in the controls. A wide range of external morphogenetic aberrations in dead larvae, pupae and adults were noted. These aberrations and gross morphological features were quite similar to those reported for certain insect growth regulators. Sublethal concentrations had no marked effect on longevity of adults, egg deposition and hatch.

  1. Inhibition of protein kinase C zeta subspecies blocks the activation of an NF-kappa B-like activity in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, I; Sanz, L; Arenzana-Seisdedos, F; Diaz-Meco, M T; Virelizier, J L; Moscat, J

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) plays a critical role in the regulation of a large variety of cellular genes. However, the mechanism whereby this nuclear factor is activated remains to be determined. In this report, we present evidence that in oocytes from Xenopus laevis, (i) ras p21- and phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated phosphatidylcholine (PC) hydrolysis activates NF-kappa B and (ii) protein kinase C zeta subspecies is involved in the activation of NF-kappa B in response to insulin/ras p21/PC-PLC. Thus, the microinjection of either ras p21 or PC-PLC, or the exposure of oocytes to insulin, promotes a significant translocation to the nucleus of an NF-kappa B-like activity. This effect is not observed when oocytes are incubated with phorbol myristate acetate or progesterone, both of which utilize a ras p21-independent pathway for oocyte activation. These data strongly suggest a critical role of the insulin/ras p21/PC-PLC/protein kinase C zeta pathway in the control of NF-kappa B activation. Images PMID:8423794

  2. The amphibians Xenopus laevis and Silurana tropicalis possess a family of activating KIR-related Immunoglobulin-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Guselnikov, Sergey V; Reshetnikova, Evdokiya S; Najakshin, Alexander M; Mechetina, Ludmila V; Robert, Jacques; Taranin, Alexander V

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we searched the amphibian species Xenopus laevis and Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis for the presence of genes homologous to mammalian KIRs and avian CHIRs (KRIR family). By experimental and computational procedures, we identified four related ILR (Ig-like Receptors) genes in S. tropicalis and three in X. laevis. ILRs encode type I transmembrane receptors with 3-4 Ig-like extracellular domains. All predicted ILR proteins appear to be activating receptors. ILRs have a broad expression pattern, the gene transcripts were found in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the amphibian KRIR family receptors evolved independently from their mammalian and avian counterparts. The only conserved structural element of tetrapod KRIRs is the NxxR motif-containing transmembrane domain that facilitates association with FcRgamma subunit. Our findings suggest that if KRIRs of various vertebrates have any common function at all, such a function is activating rather than inhibitory.

  3. Comparison of diazinon toxicity to embryos of Xenopus laevis and Danio rerio; degradation of diazinon in water.

    PubMed

    Modra, Helena; Vrskova, Dagmar; Macova, Stanislava; Kohoutkova, Jana; Hajslova, Jana; Haluzova, Ivana; Svobodova, Zdenka

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the toxic effect of diazinon (organophosphate insecticide) to embryos of Xenopus laevis and Danio rerio. The 96-h LC₅₀ values showed higher toxicity of diazinon for X. leavis in standard solution (9.84 mg/L) compared to the pond water (12.64 mg/L). Teratogenic index for diazinon was 1.3 and 1.6, respectively. The 96-h LC₅₀ diazinon values demonstrated similar sensitivity of embryos D. rerio (8.21-9.34 mg/L) and X. laevis in standard test solutions. Our results reflect that direct application of diazinon into the water can be associated with significant risks to aquatic organisms.

  4. Thyroid hormones in the skeletogenesis and accessory sources of endogenous hormones in Xenopus laevis (Amphibia; Anura) ontogeny: Experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, S V; Vassilieva, A B

    2014-03-01

    Skeletal development was studied in normal and goitrogen-treated Xenopus laevis tadpoles reared under thyroid hormone (TH) deficiency. Early stages of skeletal development proceed similarly in both groups. Later stages are retarded or completely arrested in goitrogen-treated tadpoles. After goitrogen-treated tadpoles were transferred into pure water or into a medium containing both goitrogen and exogenous TH, tadpoles resumed development. Consequently, late stages of skeletogenesis are TH-dependent and TH-induced. Athyroid X. laevis "giant tadpoles" described in literature differ from goitrogen-arrested tadpoles in that they have features which require TH to appear. The appearance of TH-depended features in giant tadpoles indicates the occurrence of the additional sources of TH other than thyroid gland.

  5. Targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes in Xenopus laevis using two pairs of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been extensively used in genome editing in various organisms. In some cases, however, it is difficult to efficiently disrupt both paralogous genes using a single pair of TALENs in Xenopus laevis because of its polyploidy. Here, we report targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes using two pairs of TALENs in X. laevis. First, we show simultaneous targeted mutagenesis of three genes, tyrosinase paralogues (tyra and tyrb) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) by injection of two TALENs pairs in transgenic embryos carrying egfp. Consistent with the high frequency of both severe phenotypic traits, albinism and loss of GFP fluorescence, frameshift mutation rates of tyr paralogues and egfp reached 40-80%. Next, we show early introduction of TALEN-mediated mutagenesis of these target loci during embryogenesis. Finally, we also demonstrate that two different pairs of TALENs can simultaneously introduce mutations to both paralogues encoding histone chaperone with high efficiency. Our results suggest that targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes using TALENs can be applied to analyze the functions of paralogous genes with redundancy in X. laevis.

  6. Root iron uptake efficiency of Ulmus laevis and U. minor and their distribution in soils of the Iberian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Venturas, Martin; Fernández, Victoria; Nadal, Paloma; Guzmán, Paula; Lucena, Juan J.; Gil, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The calcifuge and calcicole character of wild plants has been related to nutrient availability shortages, including iron (Fe)-deficiency. Surprisingly, just a few studies examined the relation between root Fe uptake and plant distribution in different soil types. We assessed the root Fe acquisition efficiency of two Ulmus species with calcareous (Ulmus minor) and siliceous (U. laevis) soil distribution patterns in the Iberian Peninsula. Seedlings of both elm species were grown hydroponically with different Fe concentrations during 6 weeks. Plant physiological responses to Fe-limiting conditions were evaluated as were the ferric reductase activity and proton (H+) extrusion capacity of the roots. Iron deprived elm seedlings of both species were stunted and suffered severe Fe-chlorosis symptoms. After Fe re-supply leaf chlorophyll concentrations rose according to species-dependent patterns. While U. minor leaves and seedlings re-greened evenly, U. laevis did so along the nerves of new growing leaves. U. minor had a higher root ferric reductase activity and H+-extrusion capability than U. laevis and maintained a better nutrient balance when grown under Fe-limiting conditions. The two elm species were found to have different Fe acquisition efficiencies which may be related to their natural distribution in calcareous and siliceous soils of the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:24723927

  7. A Novel Trypsin Inhibitor-Like Cysteine-Rich Peptide from the Frog Lepidobatrachus laevis Containing Proteinase-Inhibiting Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Tan, Ji-Min; Du, Can-Wei; Luan, Ning; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Lai, Ren; Lu, Qiu-Min

    2015-08-01

    Various bio-active substances in amphibian skins play important roles in survival of the amphibians. Many protease inhibitor peptides have been identified from amphibian skins, which are supposed to negatively modulate the activity of proteases to avoid premature degradation or release of skin peptides, or to inhibit extracellular proteases produced by invading bacteria. However, there is no information on the proteinase inhibitors from the frog Lepidobatrachus laevis which is unique in South America. In this work, a cDNA encoding a novel trypsin inhibitor-like (TIL) cysteine-rich peptide was identified from the skin cDNA library of L. laevis. The 240-bp coding region encodes an 80-amino acid residue precursor protein containing 10 half-cysteines. By sequence comparison and signal peptide prediction, the precursor was predicted to release a 55-amino acid mature peptide with amino acid sequence, IRCPKDKIYKFCGSPCPPSCKDLTPNCIAVCKKGCFCRDGTVDNNHGKCVKKENC. The mature peptide was named LL-TIL. LL-TIL shares significant domain similarity with the peptides from the TIL supper family. Antimicrobial and trypsin-inhibitory abilities of recombinant LL-TIL were tested. Recombinant LL-TIL showed no antimicrobial activity, while it had trypsin-inhibiting activity with a Ki of 16.5178 μM. These results suggested there was TIL peptide with proteinase-inhibiting activity in the skin of frog L. laevis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of TIL peptide from frog skin.

  8. Molecular cloning and expression of prostaglandin F2α receptor isoforms during ovulation in the ovarian follicles of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiming; Su, Xiurong; Li, Taiwu; Pan, Daodong; Sena, Johnny; Dhillon, Jasvinder

    2010-11-01

    Prostaglandins F2α levels increase during ovulatory period in Xenopus laevis in response to stimulation by gonadotropins and progesterone. PGF2α exerts its effects on ovulation through interaction with its receptor (FP) in ovaries. Little is known about the characteristics of the FP receptor and its regulation during the ovulatory period in non-mammalian species. In the present study, two isoforms of prostaglandin F receptor (FP A and B) cDNAs were isolated from Xenopus laevis ovarian tissues using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) followed by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The cDNAs of FP A and FP B were sequenced. In Xenopus laevis ovary, FP A and B mRNA levels were up-regulated during gonadotropin- and progresterone-induced ovulation in vitro. The mRNA level of FP B was higher than that of FP A. Moreover, FP A and FP B mRNA levels were measured in various tissues including eye, liver, lungs, heart, muscle, ovary, and skin. Overall, FP B mRNA level was approximately 10- to 100-fold higher than that of FP A, except in the muscle and skin where FP A mRNA level was comparable to that of FP B. The results suggest that in Xenopus ovarian follicles FP receptors play an important role during gonadotropin- and progesterone-induced ovulation.

  9. Cell-mass structures expressing the aromatase gene Cyp19a1 lead to ovarian cavities in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Mawaribuchi, Shuuji; Ikeda, Nozomi; Fujitani, Kazuko; Ito, Yuzuru; Onuma, Yasuko; Komiya, Tohru; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Ito, Michihiko

    2014-10-01

    The African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, has a ZZ/ZW-type sex-determination system. We previously reported that a W-linked gene, Dm-W, can determine development as a female. However, the mechanisms of early sex differentiation remain unclear. We used microarrays to screen for genes with sexually dimorphic expression in ZZ and ZW gonads during early sex differentiation in X laevis and found several steroidogenic genes. Importantly, the steroid 17α-hydroxylase gene Cyp17a1 and the aromatase gene Cyp19a1 were highly expressed in ZZ and ZW gonads, respectively, just after sex determination. At this stage, we found that Cyp17a1, Cyp19a1, or both were expressed in the ZZ and ZW gonads in a unique mass-in-line structure, in which several masses of cells, each surrounded by a basement membrane, were aligned along the anteroposterior axis. In fact, during sex differentiation, ovarian cavities formed inside each mass of Cyp17a1- and Cyp19a1-positive cells in the ZW gonads. However, the mass-in-line structure disappeared during testicular development in the ZZ testes. These results suggested that the mass-in-line structure found in both ZZ and ZW gonads just after sex determination might be formed in advance to produce ovarian cavities and then oocytes. Consequently, we propose a view that the default sex may be female in the morphological aspect of gonads in X laevis.

  10. Pathogenicity and oxidative stress in Nile tilapia caused by Aphanomyces laevis and Phoma herbarum isolated from farmed fish.

    PubMed

    Ali, Esam H; Hashem, Mohamed; Al-Salahy, M Bassam

    2011-03-16

    Identified (n = 17) and unidentified (n = 1) fish-pathogenic fungal species from 10 genera of Oomycetes and soil fungi were isolated from 40 infected freshwater fish samples of the species Oreochromis niloticus niloticus (Nile tilapia) and Clarias gariepinus (African catfish). Samples were collected from various fish farms in the Nile Delta, Egypt. Nile tilapia were tested in aquaria for their susceptibility to the commonest Oomycetes species, Aphanomyces laevis and Achlya klebsiana, and also against the 2 most prevalent pathogenic soil fungi, Paecilomyces lilacinus and Phoma herbarum. Two techniques were used: water bath exposure and intramuscular (subcutaneous) injection. Water bath exposure to the 2 species of Oomycetes caused greater mortalities of O. niloticus niloticus than intramuscular injection, but the reverse was true of the soil fungal species. Regardless of the infection method, the 2 Oomycetes species were more potent pathogens than the soil fungal species. In both gills and mytomal muscles of fish infected by A. laevis and P. herbarum, we measured and compared with controls the oxidative stress parameters total peroxide (TP), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO), as well as levels of the antioxidants vitamin E and glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Infection by these 2 fungal species through either spore suspension or spore injection significantly increased oxidative damage in gills and induced marked decrease in most studied antioxidants. In addition, both routes showed similar effects and A. laevis depressed the antioxidants CAT, vitamin E and GSH more than P. herbarum.

  11. Enhancement of posterolateral lumbar spine fusion using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 and mesenchymal stem cells delivered in fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zunpeng; Zhu, Yue; Zhu, Haitao; He, Xiaoning; Liu, Xinchun

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have shown great potential for accelerating bone healing. In the present study, we evaluate the efficacy of fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 composite for posterolateral spinal fusion in a rabbit model. Forty adult rabbits underwent posterolateral intertransverse fusion at the L5-L6 level. The animals were randomly divided into four groups based on the implant material: fibrin glue, fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells composite, fibrin glue-recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (fibrin glue/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2) composite, and fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 composite. After six weeks, the rabbits were euthanized for manual palpation, radiographic examination, biomechanical testing, and histology. Manual palpation results showed that the fusion rate for fibrin glue, fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells, fibrin glue/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2, and fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 was 0, 0, 40%, and 70%, respectively. Moreover, fusion rate determined by radiographic examination for fibrin glue, fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells, fibrin glue/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2, and fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 was 0, 0, 40%, and 80%, respectively. Gray analysis showed that fibrin glue/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 group had higher ossification area and density than fibrin glue group; and fibrin glue/mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 group had higher ossification area and density than fibrin glue/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 group. Formation of continuous bone masses between L5 and L6 level in mesenchymal stem cells/recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2/fibrin glue group was further confirmed by computed

  12. Positive Selection in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Targets a Natural Mutation Associated with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency in Human

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  13. Sequence analysis of bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II mRNA from ascitic and nonascitic commercial broilers.

    PubMed

    Cisar, C R; Balog, J M; Anthony, N B; Donoghue, A M

    2003-10-01

    Ascites syndrome, also known as pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), is a common metabolic disorder in rapidly growing meat-type chickens. Environmental factors, such as cold, altitude, and diet, play significant roles in development of the disease, but there is also an important genetic component to PHS susceptibility. The human disease familial primary pulmonary hypertension (FPPH) is similar to PHS in broilers both genetically and physiologically. Several recent studies have shown that mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPR2) gene are a cause of FPPH in humans. To determine whether mutations in the chicken BMPR2 gene play a similar role in PHS susceptibility, BMPR-II mRNA from ascitic and nonascitic commercial broilers were sequenced and compared with the published Leghorn chicken BMPR-II mRNA sequence. Fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified in the commercial broiler BMPR-II mRNA. No mutations unique to ascites-susceptible broilers were present in the coding, 5' untranslated or 3' untranslated regions of BMPR-II mRNA. The twelve SNP present within the coding region of BMPR-II mRNA were synonymous substitutions and did not alter the BMPR-II protein sequence. In addition, analysis of BMPR2 gene expression by reverse transcriptase-PCR indicated that there were no differences in BMPR-II mRNA levels in ascitic and nonascitic birds. Therefore, it appears unlikely that mutations in the BMPR2 gene were responsible for susceptibility to PHS in these commercial broilers.

  14. [Changes of bone morphogenetic protein-7 and inhibitory Smad expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy rat kidney].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Han, Bing; Xie, Ru-Jia; Cheng, Ming-Liang

    2007-04-25

    The present study was designed to observe the expressions of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) and inhibitory Smads in kidney of rats with diabetic nephropathy (DN), and explore the possible mechanism of DN. Male Wistar rats weighing 180-220 g were single injected with streptozocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg body weight) for 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks to induce DN. Blood glucose, kidney weight/body weight and 24-hour urine protein in the control and DN rats were examined; the expressions of BMP-7, Smad6 and Smad7 were detected by using immunohistochemical techniques, Western blot and real-time PCR. The results showed that blood glucose and 24-hour urine protein in DN rats were higher than that in the control rats and kidney weight/body weight was also elevated in DN rats, especially in 16-week STZ-induced rats. The expressions of BMP-7 and Smad6 proteins in DN rats were elevated, while BMP-7 mRNA expression was increased 2 weeks after STZ injection and decreased 16 weeks after STZ injection. The expressions of Smad7 protein and mRNA were elevated in DN rats 2 weeks after STZ injection and decreased 16 weeks after STZ injection. In addition, the expressions of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and collagen type I (COL-I) mRNA were increased in DN rats. These results suggest in the early stage of DN, increase in BMP-7 and inhibitory Smad expression may play a role in the feedback regulation and restrain the development of DN.

  15. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Type II Deficiency and Increased Inflammatory Cytokine Production. A Gateway to Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Soon, Elaine; Crosby, Alexi; Southwood, Mark; Yang, Peiran; Tajsic, Tamara; Toshner, Mark; Appleby, Sarah; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Upton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPR-II) underlie most cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, disease penetrance is only 20–30%, suggesting a requirement for additional triggers. Inflammation is emerging as a key disease-related factor in PAH, but to date there is no clear mechanism linking BMPR-II deficiency and inflammation. Objectives: To establish a direct link between BMPR-II deficiency, a consequentially heightened inflammatory response, and development of PAH. Methods: We used pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from Bmpr2+/− mice and patients with BMPR2 mutations and compared them with wild-type controls. For the in vivo model, we used mice heterozygous for a null allele in Bmpr2 (Bmpr2+/−) and wild-type littermates. Measurements and Main Results: Acute exposure to LPS increased lung and circulating IL-6 and KC (IL-8 analog) levels in Bmpr2+/− mice to a greater extent than in wild-type controls. Similarly, pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from Bmpr2+/− mice and patients with BMPR2 mutations produced higher levels of IL-6 and KC/IL-8 after lipopolysaccharide stimulation compared with controls. BMPR-II deficiency in mouse and human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells was associated with increased phospho-STAT3 and loss of extracellular superoxide dismutase. Chronic lipopolysaccharide administration caused pulmonary hypertension in Bmpr2+/− mice but not in wild-type littermates. Coadministration of tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, ameliorated the exaggerated inflammatory response and prevented development of PAH. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that BMPR-II deficiency promotes an exaggerated inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo, which can instigate development of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26073741

  16. The Efficacy of Cyclic Injection of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Large-Scale Calvarial Bone Defects.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Mi; Jeong, Woo Shik; Park, Eun Jung; Choi, Jong Woo

    2017-03-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) appears to be one of the most potent growth factors thus far studied. However, recent publications on the clinical application of BMP-2 revealed that its correct control is the paramount issue in clinical practice. For improving BMP-2 delivery, the cyclic administration might be an alternative. Accordingly, the authors cyclically injected BMP-2 in a cyclic injection model of large cranial defects to maintain the proper dosage during the bone healing process. A 10-mm diameter calvarial bone defect was produced using a round drill in 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. Silk-hydroxyapatite scaffolds soaked in the appropriate concentration of BMP-2 were implanted into the defect. The animals were split into 4 single-injection groups and 3 multiple-injection groups; the latter groups received weekly subcutaneous injections of BMP-2 solution (1, 5, and 10 μg/mL) for 4 weeks, whereas the former groups received a single injection of BMP-2 at these concentrations. Each rat underwent computed tomography at 8 weeks. In terms of total volumes of the new bone, the 5 μg/mL multiple-injection BMP-2 group had significantly greater increases in bone volume than the single-injection groups. In terms of bone thickness, the multiple-injection groups had better outcomes than the single-injection groups. Thus, the cyclic injection protocol restored the original thickness without overgrowth. Cyclic injection of BMP-2 permits more accurate dosage control than single injection and improves thickness and dense bone regeneration. Therefore, it may represent a promising approach for future clinical trials. Further investigation using a greater number of animals is required.

  17. Enhanced Osteogenesis of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Regulating Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Antagonists and Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jiabing; Im, Choong Sung; Guo, Mian; Cui, Zhong-Kai; Fartash, Armita; Kim, Soyon; Patel, Nikhil; Bezouglaia, Olga; Wu, Benjamin M.; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Although adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are an attractive cell source for bone tissue engineering, direct use of ASCs alone has had limited success in the treatment of large bone defects. Although bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are believed to be the most potent osteoinductive factors to promote osteogenic differentiation of ASCs, their clinical applications require supraphysiological dosage, leading to high medical burden and adverse side effects. In the present study, we demonstrated an alternative approach that can effectively complement the BMP activity to maximize the osteogenesis of ASCs without exogenous application of BMPs by regulating levels of antagonists and agonists to BMP signaling. Treatment of ASCs with the amiloride derivative phenamil, a positive regulator of BMP signaling, combined with gene manipulation to suppress the BMP antagonist noggin, significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation of ASCs through increased BMP–Smad signaling in vitro. Furthermore, the combination approach of noggin suppression and phenamil stimulation enhanced the BMP signaling and bone repair in a mouse calvarial defect model by adding noggin knockdown ASCs to apatite-coated poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) scaffolds loaded with phenamil. These results suggest novel complementary osteoinductive strategies that could maximize activity of the BMP pathway in ASC bone repair while reducing potential adverse effects of current BMP-based therapeutics. Significance Although stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy offers a promising alternative to repair damaged bone, direct use of stem cells alone is not adequate for challenging healing environments such as in large bone defects. This study demonstrates a novel strategy to maximize bone formation pathways in osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and functional bone formation by combining gene manipulation with a small molecule activator toward osteogenesis. The findings indicate promising stem cell

  18. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuangying; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D; Cobb, George P; Maul, Jonathan D

    2015-02-01

    Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides increased transcript abundance of CSA and MUTL. In addition, mRNA abundance of HSP70 and GADD45α were increased by endosulfan and mRNA abundance of XPG was increased by α-cypermethrin. XPC, HR23B, XPG, and GADD45α exhibited elevated mRNA concentrations whereas there was a reduction in MUTL transcript concentrations in UVB-alone treatments. It appeared that even

  19. The Emergence of Cambodian Civil Society within Global Educational Governance: A Morphogenetic Approach to Agency and Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, D. Brent, Jr.; Brehm, William C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses Margaret Archer's morphogenetic approach to analyze the emergence of civil society within global educational governance. The purpose is to understand the intersection of historical structures with global actors and spaces that have accompanied the globalization of education. Based on findings from a study on the impact in Cambodia…

  20. A Conserved Potential Development Framework Applies to Shoots of Legume Species with Contrasting Morphogenetic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Faverjon, Lucas; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Abraham J.; Litrico, Isabelle; Louarn, Gaëtan

    2017-01-01

    A great variety of legume species are used for forage production and grown in multi-species grasslands. Despite their close phylogenetic relationship, they display a broad range of morphologies that markedly affect their competitive abilities and persistence in mixtures. Little is yet known about the component traits that control the deployment of plant architecture in most of these species. During the present study, we compared the patterns of shoot organogenesis and shoot organ growth in contrasting forage species belonging to the four morphogenetic groups previously identified in herbaceous legumes (i.e., stolon-formers, rhizome-formers, crown-formers tolerant to defoliation and crown-formers intolerant to defoliation). To achieve this, three greenhouse experiments were carried out using plant species from each group (namely alfalfa, birdsfoot trefoil, sainfoin, kura clover, red clover, and white clover) which were grown at low density under non-limiting water and soil nutrient availability. The potential morphogenesis of shoots characterized under these conditions showed that all the species shared a number of common morphogenetic features. All complied with a generalized classification of shoot axes into three types (main axis, primary and secondary axes). A common quantitative framework for vegetative growth and development involved: (i) the regular development of all shoot axes in thermal time and a deterministic branching pattern in the absence of stress; (ii) a temporal coordination of organ growth at the phytomer level that was highly conserved irrespective of phytomer position, and (iii) an identical allometry determining the surface area of all the leaves. The species differed in their architecture as a consequence of the values taken by component traits of morphogenesis. Assessing the relationships between the traits studied showed that these species were distinct from each other along two main PCA axes which explained 68% of total variance: the first

  1. Determining the optimal developmental stages of Xenopus laevis for initiating exposures to chemicals for sensitively detecting their feminizing effects on gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Juan; Qin, Zhan-Fen

    2016-10-01

    Xenopus laevis is an important model for detecting feminizing effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on amphibians because its genetic males can be induced to phenotypic females by estrogenic chemicals. It is crucial that chemical exposures begin at sensitive developmental stages for gonadal sex-reversal in X. laevis. To determine the optimal stages for initiating exposures, we investigated gonadal sex-reversal induced by low concentrations of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) when exposures were initiated at different stages (3/4, 45/46, 48 and 50) until stage 58. We found that 0.1nM EE2 resulted in 85%, 86%, 43%, and 19% intersex, whereas 1nM EE2 caused 77%, 81%, 17%, and 8% phenotypic females, when genetic male tadpoles were exposed from stages 3/4, 45/46, 48 and 50, respectively. The data show the sensitivity of X. laevis gonads to EE2 at stages 45/46 is similar with that at stages 3/4, but the sensitivity decreases at stage 48 and stage 50, displaying a developmental stage-dependent manner. In another experiment using the offspring of another pair of frogs, we confirmed high sensitivity of X. laevis gonads at stages 45/46 to low concentrations of EE2. Considering that stages 45/46 tadpoles are easier to manipulate and have higher survival rates than earlier embryos, we propose that stages 45/46 are the optimal stages for initiating exposure for detecting feminizing effects of EDCs on gonadal differentiation in X. laevis. The developmental stages for initiating exposures we determined will guarantee the high sensitivity for detecting feminizing effects of EDCs with low estrogenic activities on gonadal differentiation in X. laevis. Also, our study suggests that gonadal differentiation in X. laevis possibly begins at stages 45/46, but not at later stages.

  2. Transcription-Independent RNA Polymerase II Dephosphorylation by the FCP1 Carboxy-Terminal Domain Phosphatase in Xenopus laevis Early Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Palancade, Benoît; Dubois, Marie Françoise; Dahmus, Michael E.; Bensaude, Olivier

    2001-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) plays a key role in mRNA metabolism. The relative ratio of hyperphosphorylated RNAP II to hypophosphorylated RNAP II is determined by a dynamic equilibrium between CTD kinases and CTD phosphatase(s). The CTD is heavily phosphorylated in meiotic Xenopus laevis oocytes. In this report we show that the CTD undergoes fast and massive dephosphorylation upon fertilization. A cDNA was cloned and shown to code for a full-length xFCP1, the Xenopus orthologue of the FCP1 CTD phosphatases in humans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two critical residues in the catalytic site were identified. CTD phosphatase activity was observed in extracts prepared from Xenopus eggs and cells and was shown to be entirely attributable to xFCP1. The CTD dephosphorylation triggered by fertilization was reproduced upon calcium activation of cytostatic factor-arrested egg extracts. Using immunodepleted extracts, we showed that this dephosphorylation is due to xFCP1. Although transcription does not occur at this stage, phosphorylation appears as a highly dynamic process involving the antagonist action of Xp42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and FCP1 phosphatase. This is the first report that free RNAP II is a substrate for FCP1 in vivo, independent from a transcription cycle. PMID:11533226

  3. Ras-dva1 small GTPase regulates telencephalon development in Xenopus laevis embryos by controlling Fgf8 and Agr signaling at the anterior border of the neural plate.

    PubMed

    Tereshina, Maria B; Ermakova, Galina V; Ivanova, Anastasiya S; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    2014-03-15

    We previously found that the small GTPase Ras-dva1 is essential for the telencephalic development in Xenopus laevis because Ras-dva1 controls the Fgf8-mediated induction of FoxG1 expression, a key telencephalic regulator. In this report, we show, however, that Ras-dva1 and FoxG1 are expressed in different groups of cells; whereas Ras-dva1 is expressed in the outer layer of the anterior neural fold, FoxG1 and Fgf8 are activated in the inner layer from which the telencephalon is derived. We resolve this paradox by demonstrating that Ras-dva1 is involved in the transduction of Fgf8 signal received by cells in the outer layer, which in turn send a feedback signal that stimulates FoxG1 expression in the inner layer. We show that this feedback signal is transmitted by secreted Agr proteins, the expression of which is activated in the outer layer by mediation of Ras-dva1 and the homeodomain transcription factor Otx2. In turn, Agrs are essential for maintaining Fgf8 and FoxG1 expression in cells at the anterior neural plate border. Our finding reveals a novel feedback loop mechanism based on the exchange of Fgf8 and Agr signaling between neural and non-neural compartments at the anterior margin of the neural plate and demonstrates a key role of Ras-dva1 in this mechanism.

  4. Readaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex to 1g-Condition in immature lower vertebrates ( Xenopus laevis) after micro- or hypergravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, C.; Horn, E.; Eβeling, K.; Neubert, J.

    The effects of altered gravitational conditions (AGC) on the development of the static vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and readaptation to 1g were investigated in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles were exposed to microgravity (μg) during the German Space Mission D-2 for 10 days, using the STATEX closed survival system, or to 3g for 9 days during earth-bound experiments. At the beginning of AGC, the tadpoles had not yet developed the static VOR. The main results were: (i) Tadpoles with ug- or 3g-experience had a lower gain of the static VOR than the 1g-controls during the 2nd and 5th post-AGC days, (ii) Readaptation to response levels of 1g-reared controls usually occurred during the following weeks, except in slowly developing tadpoles with 3g-experience. Readaptation was less pronounced if, during the acute VOR test, tadpoles were rolled from the inclined to the normal posture than in the opposite test situation. It is postulated that (i) gravity is necessarily involved in the development of the static VOR, but only during a period including the time before onset of the first behavioural response; and (ii) readaptation which is superimposed by the processes of VOR development depends on many factors including the velocity of development, the actual excitation level of the vestibular systems and the neuroplastic properties of its specific pathways.

  5. Readaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex to 1g-condition in immature lower vertebrates (Xenopus laevis) after micro- or hypergravity exposure.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, C; Horn, E; Esseling, K; Neubert, J

    1995-01-01

    The effects of altered gravitational conditions (AGC) on the development of the static vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and readaptation to 1g were investigated in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles were exposed to microgravity during the German Space Mission D-2 for 10 days, using the STATEX closed survival system, or to 3g for 9 days during earth-bound experiments. At the beginning of AGC, the tadpoles had not yet developed the static VOR. The main results were: (i) Tadpoles with microgravity- or 3g-experience had a lower gain of the static VOR than the 1g-controls during the 2nd and 5th post-AGC days. (ii) Readaptation to response levels of 1g-reared controls usually occurred during the following weeks, except in slowly developing tadpoles with 3g-experience. Readaptation was less pronounced if, during the acute VOR test, tadpoles were rolled from the inclined to the normal posture than in the opposite test situation. It is postulated that (i) gravity is necessarily involved in the development of the static VOR, but only during a period including the time before onset of the first behavioural response; and (ii) readaptation which is superimposed by the processes of VOR development depends on many factors including the velocity of development, the actual excitation level of the vestibular systems and the neuroplastic properties of its specific pathways.

  6. A Survey of Strategies to Modulate the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Pathway: Current and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) constitute the largest subdivision of the TGF-β family of ligands and are unequivocally involved in regulating stem cell behavior. Appropriate regulation of canonical BMP signaling is critical for the development and homeostasis of numerous human organ systems, as aberrations in the BMP pathway or its regulation are increasingly associated with diverse human pathologies. In this review, we provide a wide-perspective on strategies that increase or decrease BMP signaling. We briefly outline the current FDA-approved approaches, highlight emerging next-generation technologies, and postulate prospective avenues for future investigation. We also detail how activating other pathways may indirectly modulate BMP signaling, with a particular emphasis on the relationship between the BMP and Activin/TGF-β pathways. PMID:27433166

  7. Morphogenetic implications of peristaltic fluid-tissue dynamics in the embryonic lung.

    PubMed

    Bokka, Kishore K; Jesudason, Edwin C; Warburton, David; Lubkin, Sharon R

    2015-10-07

    Peristalsis begins in the lung as soon as the smooth muscle forms, and persists until birth. Since the prenatal lung is liquid-filled, smooth muscle action can deform tissues and transport fluid far from the immediately adjacent tissues. Stretching of embryonic tissues and sensation of internal fluid flows have been shown to have potent morphogenetic effects. We hypothesize that these effects are at work in lung morphogenesis. To place that hypothesis in a quantitative framework, we analyze a model of the fluid-structure interactions between embryonic tissues and lumen fluid resulting from peristaltic waves that partially occlude the airway. We find that if the airway is closed, deformations are synchronized; by contrast, if the trachea is open, maximal occlusion precedes maximal pressure. We perform a parametric analysis of how occlusion, stretch, and flow depend on tissue stiffnesses, smooth muscle force, tissue shape and size, and fluid viscosity. We find that most of these relationships are governed by simple ratios.

  8. Irradiated human chondrocytes expressing bone morphogenetic protein 2 promote healing of osteoporotic bone fracture in rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, Youngsuk; Choi, Kyoung Baek; Lim, Chae-Lyul; Hyun, Jong-Pil; Lee, Hyeon-Youl; Lee, Kun Bok; Yun, Lillian; Ayverdi, Asli; Hwang, Sally; Yip, Vivian; Noh, Moon Jong; Lee, Kwan Hee

    2009-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) was selected as a transgene to regenerate osteoporotic bone defects after several BMPs were tested using a bone formation study in nude mice. Human chondrocytes were transduced with a BMP2-containing retroviral vector, and single clones were selected. The cells were characterized over numerous passages for growth and BMP2 expression. The single clones were irradiated and tested for viability. BMP2 expression lasted for 3 weeks before dying off completely after approximately 1 month. Irradiated and non-irradiated transduced chondrocytes successfully healed fractures in osteoporotic rats induced by ovariectomy. The osteoinducing effect of irradiated cells was better than that of their non-irradiated counterparts or a chondrocytes-only control. This study showed that delivering BMP2 from the transduced and irradiated chondrocytes could be an effective and safe method of repairing osteoporotic bone fractures.

  9. Enhanced release of bone morphogenetic proteins from demineralized bone matrix by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Choi, Jong-il

    2015-06-01

    Gamma irradiation is a useful method for sterilizing demineralized bone matrix (DBM), but its effect on the osteoinductivity of DBM is still controversial. In this study, the osteoinductive activity of gamma-irradiated DBM was examined using a mouse myoblastic cell line (C2C12). DBM was extracted from adult bovine bone and was irradiated at a dose of 25 kGy using a 60cobalt gamma-irradiator. Cell proliferation with DBM was not affected by gamma-irradiation, but alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin productions were significantly increased in C2C12 cell groups treated with gamma-irradiated DBM. It was reasoned that bone morphogenetic proteins were more efficiently released from gamma-irradiated DBM than from the non-irradiated control. This result suggests the effectiveness of radiation sterilization of bone implants

  10. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  11. Correlation between the morphogenetic types of litter and their properties in bog birch forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, T. T.; Efremov, S. P.; Avrova, A. F.

    2010-08-01

    A formalized arrangement of morphogenetic types of litter according to the physicochemical parameters provided their significant grouping in three genetic associations. The litter group (highly decomposed + moderately decomposed) is confined to the tall-grass group of bog birch forests. The rhizomatous (roughly decomposed) litter is formed in the sedge-reed grass bog birch forests. The litter group (peaty + peatified + peat) is associated with the bog-herbaceous-moss group of forest types. The genetic associations of the litters (a) reliably characterize the edaphic conditions of bog birch forests and (b)correspond to formation of the peat of certain ecological groups. We found highly informative the acid-base parameters, the exchangeable cations (Ca2+ + Mg2+) and the total potential acidity, which differentiated the genetic associations of litter practically with 100% probability. The expediency of studying litters under groups of forest types rather than under separate types of bog birch forests was demonstrated.

  12. In vivo modulation of morphogenetic movements in Drosophila embryos with femtosecond laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Supatto, Willy; Débarre, Delphine; Moulia, Bruno; Brouzés, Eric; Martin, Jean-Louis; Farge, Emmanuel; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    The complex biomechanical events associated with embryo development are investigated in vivo, by using femtosecond laser pulse-induced ablation combined with multimodal nonlinear microscopy. We demonstrate controlled intravital ablations preserving local cytoskeleton dynamics and resulting in the modulation of specific morphogenetic movements in nonmutant Drosophila embryos. A quantitative description of complex movements is obtained both in GFP-expressing systems by using whole-embryo two-photon microscopy and in unlabeled nontransgenic embryos by using third harmonic generation microscopy. This methodology provides insight into the issue of mechano-sensitive gene expression by revealing the correlation of in vivo tissue deformation patterns with Twist protein expression in stomodeal cells at gastrulation. PMID:15657140

  13. Soft Modular Robotic Cubes: Toward Replicating Morphogenetic Movements of the Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Garcia, Ricardo-Franco; Zagal, Juan Cristóbal

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present a new type of simple, pneumatically actuated, soft modular robotic system that can reproduce fundamental cell behaviors observed during morphogenesis; the initial shaping stage of the living embryo. The fabrication method uses soft lithography for producing composite elastomeric hollow cubes and permanent magnets as passive docking mechanism. Actuation is achieved by controlling the internal pressurization of cubes with external micro air pumps. Our experiments show how simple soft robotic modules can serve to reproduce to great extend the overall mechanics of collective cell migration, delamination, invagination, involution, epiboly and even simple forms of self-reconfiguration. Instead of relying in complex rigid onboard docking hardware, we exploit the coordinated inflation/deflation of modules as a simple mechanism to detach/attach modules and even rearrange the spatial position of components. Our results suggest new avenues for producing inexpensive, yet functioning, synthetic morphogenetic systems and provide new tangible models of cell behavior. PMID:28060878

  14. Polyphosphate: A Morphogenetically Active Implant Material Serving as Metabolic Fuel for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Tolba, Emad; Schröder, Heinz C; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-09-01

    The initial mineralization centers during human bone formation onto osteoblasts are composed of CaCO3 . Those bioseeds are enzymatically formed via carbonic anhydrase(s) in close association with the cell surface of the osteoblasts. Subsequently, the bicarbonate/carbonate anions are exchanged non-enzymatically by inorganic phosphate [Pi ]. One source for the supply of Pi is polyphosphate [polyP] which is a physiological polymer, formed in the osteoblasts as well as in the platelets. The energy-rich acid anhydride bonds within the polyP chain are cleaved by phosphatase(s); during this reaction free-energy might be released that could be re-used, as metabolic fuel, for the maintenance of the steady-state concentrations of the substrates/products during mineralization. Finally it is outlined that polyP, as a morphogenetically active scaffold, is even suitable for 3D cell printing.

  15. Morphogenetic circuitry regulating growth and development in the dimorphic pathogen Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Kylie J; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2013-02-01

    Penicillium marneffei is an emerging human-pathogenic fungus endemic to Southeast Asia. Like a number of other fungal pathogens, P. marneffei exhibits temperature-dependent dimorphic growth and grows in two distinct cellular morphologies, hyphae at 25°C and yeast cells at 37°C. Hyphae can differentiate to produce the infectious agents, asexual spores (conidia), which are inhaled into the host lung, where they are phagocytosed by pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Within macrophages, conidia germinate into unicellular yeast cells, which divide by fission. This minireview focuses on the current understanding of the genes required for the morphogenetic control of conidial germination, hyphal growth, asexual development, and yeast morphogenesis in P. marneffei.

  16. Soft Modular Robotic Cubes: Toward Replicating Morphogenetic Movements of the Embryo.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Andrea; Lau, Yi-Sheng; Mendoza-Garcia, Ricardo-Franco; Zagal, Juan Cristóbal

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present a new type of simple, pneumatically actuated, soft modular robotic system that can reproduce fundamental cell behaviors observed during morphogenesis; the initial shaping stage of the living embryo. The fabrication method uses soft lithography for producing composite elastomeric hollow cubes and permanent magnets as passive docking mechanism. Actuation is achieved by controlling the internal pressurization of cubes with external micro air pumps. Our experiments show how simple soft robotic modules can serve to reproduce to great extend the overall mechanics of collective cell migration, delamination, invagination, involution, epiboly and even simple forms of self-reconfiguration. Instead of relying in complex rigid onboard docking hardware, we exploit the coordinated inflation/deflation of modules as a simple mechanism to detach/attach modules and even rearrange the spatial position of components. Our results suggest new avenues for producing inexpensive, yet functioning, synthetic morphogenetic systems and provide new tangible models of cell behavior.

  17. The Controversy Surrounding Bone Morphogenetic Proteins in the Spine: A Review of Current Research

    PubMed Central

    Hustedt, Joshua W.; Blizzard, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins have been in use in spinal surgery since 2002. These proteins are members of the TGF-beta superfamily and guide mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into osteoblasts to form bone in targeted tissues. Since the first commercial BMP became available in 2002, a host of research has supported BMPs and they have been rapidly incorporated in spinal surgeries in the United States. However, recent controversy has arisen surrounding the ethical conduct of the research supporting the use of BMPs. Yale University Open Data Access (YODA) recently teamed up with Medtronic to offer a meta-analysis of the effectiveness of BMPs in spinal surgery. This review focuses on the history of BMPs and examines the YODA research to guide spine surgeons in their use of BMP in spinal surgery. PMID:25506287

  18. Bone morphogenetic proteins and their antagonists: current and emerging clinical uses

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Imran H A; Brazil, Derek P

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the TGFβ superfamily of secreted cysteine knot proteins that includes TGFβ1, nodal, activins and inhibins. BMPs were first discovered by Urist in the 1960s when he showed that implantation of demineralized bone into intramuscular tissue of rabbits induced bone and cartilage formation. Since this seminal discovery, BMPs have also been shown to play key roles in several other biological processes, including limb, kidney, skin, hair and neuronal development, as well as maintaining vascular homeostasis. The multifunctional effects of BMPs make them attractive targets for the treatment of several pathologies, including bone disorders, kidney and lung fibrosis, and cancer. This review will summarize current knowledge on the BMP signalling pathway and critically evaluate the potential of recombinant BMPs as pharmacological agents for the treatment of bone repair and tissue fibrosis in patients. PMID:24758361

  19. The protein kinase LKB1 negatively regulates bone morphogenetic protein receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erna; Edlund, Karolina; Kahata, Kaoru; Zieba, Agata; Morén, Anita; Watanabe, Yukihide; Voytyuk, Iryna; Botling, Johan; Söderberg, Ola; Micke, Patrick; Pyrowolakis, George; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase LKB1 regulates cell metabolism and growth and is implicated in intestinal and lung cancer. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates cell differentiation during development and tissue homeostasis. We demonstrate that LKB1 physically interacts with BMP type I receptors and requires Smad7 to promote downregulation of the receptor. Accordingly, LKB1 suppresses BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation and affects BMP signaling in Drosophila wing longitudinal vein morphogenesis. LKB1 protein expression and Smad1 phosphorylation analysis in a cohort of non-small cell lung cancer patients demonstrated a negative correlation predominantly in a subset enriched in adenocarcinomas. Lung cancer patient data analysis indicated strong correlation between LKB1 loss-of-function mutations and high BMP2 expression, and these two events further correlated with expression of a gene subset functionally linked to apoptosis and migration. This new mechanism of BMP receptor regulation by LKB1 has ramifications in physiological organogenesis and disease. PMID:26701726

  20. Characterization of concentration gradients of a morphogenetically active retinoid in the chick limb bud

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    It has long been suggested that the generation of biological patterns depends in part on gradients of diffusible substances. In an attempt to bridge the gap between this largely theoretical concept and experimental embryology, we have examined the physiology of diffusion gradients in an actual embryonic field. In particular, we have generated in the chick wing bud concentration gradients of the morphogenetically active retinoid TTNPB, (E)-4-[2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro- 5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)-1-prope nyl] benzoic acid, a synthetic vitamin A compound. Upon local application of TTNPB the normal 234 digit pattern is duplicated in a way that correlates with the geometry of the underlying TTNPB gradient; low doses of TTNPB lead to a shallow gradient and an additional digit 2, whereas higher doses result in a steep, far-reaching gradient and patterns with additional digits 3 and 4. The experimentally measured TTNPB distribution along the anteroposterior axis, can be modeled by a local source and a dispersed sink. This model correctly predicts the site of specification of digit 2, and provides an empirical estimate of the diffusion coefficient (D) of retinoids in embryonic limb tissue. The numerical value of approximately 10(-7) cm2s-1 for D suggests that retinoids are not freely diffusible in the limb rudiment, but interact with the previously identified cellular retinoic acid binding protein. In addition, D affords an estimate of the time required to establish a diffusion gradient as 3 to 4 h. This time span is in a range compatible with the time scale of pattern specification in developing vertebrate limbs. Our studies support the view that diffusion of morphogenetic substances is a plausible mechanism of pattern formation in secondary embryonic fields. PMID:3667700

  1. Analysis of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Use in the Treatment of Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qingqiang; Cohen, Jeremiah R.; Buser, Zorica; Park, Jong-Beom; Brodke, Darrel S.; Meisel, Hans-Joerg; Youssef, Jim A.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Yoon, S. Tim

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective database review. Objective To identify trends of the recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) use in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS). Methods PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients who underwent lumbar fusion for LDS between 2005 and 2011. The distribution of bone morphogenetic protein use rate (BR) in various surgical procedures was recorded. Patient numbers, reoperation numbers, BR, and per year BR (PYBR) were stratified by geographic region, gender, and age. Results There were 11,335 fusion surgeries, with 3,461 cases using rhBMP-2. Even though PYRB increased between 2005 and 2008, there was a significant decrease in 2010 for each procedure: 404 (34.5%) for posterior interbody fusion, 1,282 (34.3%) for posterolateral plus posterior interbody fusion (PLPIF), 1,477 (29.2%) for posterolateral fusion, and 335 (22.4%) for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. In patients using rhBMP-2, the reoperation rate was significantly lower than in patients not using rhBMP-2 (0.69% versus 1.07%, p < 0.0001). Male patients had higher PYBR compared with female patients in 2008 and 2009 (p < 0.05). The West region and PLPIF had the highest BR and PYBR. Conclusions Our data shows that the revision rates were significantly lower in patients treated with rhBMP-2 compared with patients not treated with rhBMP-2. Furthermore, rhBMP-2 use in LDS varied by year, region, gender, and type of fusion technique. In the West region, the posterior approach and patients 65 to 69 years of age had the highest rate of rhBMP-2 use. PMID:27853658

  2. A Morphogenetic Model Accounting for Pollen Aperture Pattern in Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Ressayre; Godelle; Mignot; Gouyon

    1998-07-21

    Pollen grains are embeddded in an extremely resistant wall. Apertures are well defined places where the pollen wall is reduced or absent that permit pollen tube germination. Pollen grains are produced by meiosis and aperture number definition appears to be linked with the partition that follows meiosis and leads to the formation of a tetrad of four haploid microspores. In dicotyledonous plants, meiosis is simultaneous which means that cytokinesis occurs once the two nuclear divisions are completed. A syncitium with the four nuclei stemming from meiosis is formed and cytokinesis isolates simulataneously the four products of meiosis. We propose a theoretical morphogenetic model which takes into account part of the features of the ontogeny of the pollen grains. The nuclei are considered as attractors acting upon a morphogenetic substance distributed within the cytoplasm of the dividing cell. This leads to a partition of the volume of the cell in four domains that is similar to the observations of cytokinesis in the studied species. The most widespread pattern of aperture distribution in dicotyledonous plants (three apertures equidistributed on the pollen grain equator) can be explained by bipolar interactions between nuclei stemming from the second meiotic division, and observed variations on these patterns by disturbances of these interactions. In numerous plant species, several pollen grains differing in aperture number are produced by a single individual. The distribution of the different morphs within tetrads indicates that the four daughter cells can have different aperture number. The model provides an explanation for the duplication of one of the apertures of a three-aperture pollen grain leading to a four-aperture one and in parallel it gives an explanation for how heterogeneous tetrads can be formed.Copyright 1998 Academic Press

  3. Hepatic confinement of newly produced erythrocytes caused by low-temperature exposure in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shun; Iemura, Hitomi; Kuramochi, Yuko; Nogawa-Kosaka, Nami; Nishikawa, Hironori; Okui, Takehito; Aizawa, Youichi; Kato, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Diminished erythrocyte count and erythropoiesis have been reported during hypothermia in some ectothermic animals. In this study, the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, was used to investigate the cause of hypothermia-induced anemia. We developed a new model of hypothermia at 5°C and monitored blood cell count and erythropoiesis on several days. Erythrocyte count declined by 30% on the first day following cold exposure (5°C) and mRNA expression of hemeoxygenase-1 was enhanced 10-fold; accumulation of iron as a result of heme degradation was observed in the liver. One day after low-temperature exposure, erythropoietin mRNA expression was elevated in the liver and lung compared with that at normal temperature (22°C) by qRT-PCR analysis. Examination of liver sections (i.e. the erythropoietic organ) showed an increase in o-dianisidine-positive erythrocytes in the hepatic sinusoid 5 days after the onset of low-temperature exposure compared with normal liver. Peripheral erythrocyte count remained low, indicating that newly produced erythrocytes did not migrate from the liver to the circulation during hypothermia. In conclusion, this study reveals hypothermic anemia as being associated with hepatic erythrocyte destruction; prolonged anemia during low-temperature exposure is concomitant with newly produced erythrocytes being confined to the liver and may lead to new insights into vertebrate hematopoiesis.

  4. Nonhomologous DNA end joining of synthetic hairpin substrates in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Beyert, N; Reichenberger, S; Peters, M; Hartung, M; Göttlich, B; Goedecke, W; Vielmetter, W; Pfeiffer, P

    1994-01-01

    Processes of DNA end joining are assumed to play a major role in the elimination of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in higher eucaryotic cells. Linear plasmid molecules terminated by nonhomologous restriction ends are the typical substrates used in the analysis of joining mechanisms. However, due to their limited structural variability, DSB ends generated by restriction cleavage cover probably only part of the total spectrum of naturally occurring DSB termini. We therefore devised novel DNA substrates consisting of synthetic hairpin-shaped oligonucleotides which permit the construction of blunt ends and 5'- or 3'-protruding single-strands (PSS) of arbitrary sequence and length. These substrates were tested in extracts of Xenopus laevis eggs known to efficiently join linear plasmids bearing nonhomologous restriction termini (Pfeiffer and Vielmetter, 1988). Sequences of hairpin junctions indicate that the short hairpins are joined by the same mechanisms as the plasmid substrates. However, the bimolecular DNA end joining reaction was only detectable when both hairpin partners had a minimal duplex stem length of 27bp and their PSS-tails did not exceed 10nt. Images PMID:8202366

  5. Triclosan and anuran metamorphosis: no effect on thyroid-mediated metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Fort, Douglas J; Rogers, Robert L; Gorsuch, Joseph W; Navarro, Lisa T; Peter, Robert; Plautz, James R

    2010-02-01

    Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 51 Xenopus laevis larvae were exposed for 21 days to four different concentrations of triclosan (TCS): <0.2 (control), 0.6, 1.5, 7.2, or 32.3 microg TCS/l. Primary endpoints were survival, hind limb length, body length (whole; snout to vent), developmental stage, wet whole body weight, and thyroid histology. Thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations were determined in whole thyroid and plasma samples from stage-matched exposure day 21 specimens. TH receptor-beta (TRbeta) expression was measured in stage-matched tail fin tissue samples collected at exposure days 0 and 21. Reduced larval growth occurred at exposure day 21 with 1.5 microg/l treatment. Larval developmental stage at exposure day 21 was not significantly different from controls based on observed parameters. Thyroid histology was not affected by TCS, and thyroxine (T4) levels in thyroid glands or plasma were not different from controls. A concentration-dependent increase in TRbeta expression in exposure day 21 larvae was not detected. However, increased expression was found in stage-matched larvae exposed to 1.5 or 7.2 microg TCS/l. Our study indicates that environmentally relevant TCS concentrations do not alter the normal course of thyroid-mediated metamorphosis in this standard anuran model.

  6. The mucosubstance coating the pneumonocytes in the lungs of Xenopus laevis and Lacerta viridis.

    PubMed

    Meban, C

    1975-01-01

    The layer of mucosubstance that is associated with the free surface membranes of the pneumonocytes in the lungs of the toad Xenopus laevis and the lizard Lacerta viridis was demonstrated by electron microscopy using iron oxide stain. The form and staining reactions of the mucosubstance layer were similar in both animals. In electron micrographs the mucosubstance was represented by a band of densely stained material (25-50 nm thick) which coated the entire free surface of the pneumonocytes. It appeared to be firmly attached to the outer leaflet of the superficial plasma membrane. Short lengths of osmiophilic membranes, presumed to be fragments of pulmonary surfactant, were often observed lying free in the air spaces but they did not show any affinity for iron stain. Incubation of lung sections in a solution of neuraminidase produced a marked decrease in the intensity of the surface staining; no change was detected after incubation in trypsin, papain, hyaluronidase, N-acetyl cysteine, or phosphate buffer. It is, therefore, concluded that the pneumonocyte surface coat consists mainly of a sialomucin.

  7. Functional joint regeneration is achieved using reintegration mechanism in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shigehito

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A functional joint requires integration of multiple tissues: the apposing skeletal elements should form an interlocking structure, and muscles should insert into skeletal tissues via tendons across the joint. Whereas newts can regenerate functional joints after amputation, Xenopus laevis regenerates a cartilaginous rod without joints, a “spike.” Previously we reported that the reintegration mechanism between the remaining and regenerated tissues has a significant effect on regenerating joint morphogenesis during elbow joint regeneration in newt. Based on this insight into the importance of reintegration, we amputated frogs’ limbs at the elbow joint and found that frogs could regenerate a functional elbow joint between the remaining tissues and regenerated spike. During regeneration, the regenerating cartilage was partially connected to the remaining articular cartilage to reform the interlocking structure of the elbow joint at the proximal end of the spike. Furthermore, the muscles of the remaining part inserted into the regenerated spike cartilage via tendons. This study might open up an avenue for analyzing molecular and cellular mechanisms of joint regeneration using Xenopus. PMID:27499877

  8. Long-term starvation in Xenopus laevis Daudin--II. Effects on several organs.

    PubMed

    Merkle, S; Hanke, W

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of starvation for 12 months on organo-somatic indices, glycogen, protein and water contents of several organs and the Na+/K+ ratio in muscle was studied in the South African clawed toad Xenopus laevis Daudin. 2. The liver- and ovary-somatic index were reduced by 30 and 70% of the initial value after 12 months. Fat bodies had disappeared after approximately 6 months of starvation. The indices of heart and kidney were not changed. 3. Glycogen concentration of the liver, ovaries and muscle were depleted nearly totally during the first half of the experimental time, whereas glycogen in the kidney seemed to be unaffected. 4. Protein concentration increased in the liver, decreased in the muscle and remained constant in the kidney. 5. Starvation caused an increase of the water concentration of the whole animal and different organs, especially at the end of the experiment. 6. The Na+/K+ ratio of the muscle increased significantly after 6 months of starvation and reached a maximum after 10 months.

  9. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE MIDDLE EAR APPARATUS OF THE AQUATIC FROG, XENOPUS LAEVIS

    PubMed Central

    Mason, MJ; Wang, M; Narins, PM

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of anatomical and vibrometric studies of the middle ear of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. The cartilaginous tympanic disk of Xenopus shows pronounced sexual dimorphism, that of male frogs being much larger than that of females, relative to body size. The stapes footplate, however, is not enlarged in males. The cucullaris muscle was found to insert on the stapes in frogs of both sexes. Using laser interferometry to examine the response of middle ear structures to airborne sound, the stapes footplate was found to vibrate close to 180° out-of-phase with the tympanic disk across a range of frequencies, this resembling the relationship between tympanic membrane and footplate movement previously described in ranid frogs. By contrast, whereas there is a pronounced difference in vibration velocity between tympanic membrane and footplate in ranids, the footplate vibration velocity in Xenopus was found to be similar to that of the tympanic disk. This may be interpreted as an adaptation to improve the detection of sound underwater. PMID:20953303

  10. Meckel's cartilage in Xenopus laevis during metamorphosis: a light and electron microscope study.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, D A

    1986-01-01

    Meckel's cartilage, in Xenopus laevis prior to metamorphosis, is a tissue exhibiting very large lacunae, separated by thin rims of matrix, presenting a net-like appearance, similar to that of cartilage in invertebrates. The cells on the periphery of the tissue are rather more flattened, and more closely packed. On the lateral aspects of the cartilage distinct columns of apparently dividing cells are evident. During metamorphic climax, the amount of matrix separating the lacunae increases, with an associated decrease in lacunar size, and some of the deeper cells develop cilia, which are not seen either before or after climax. By the end of metamorphic climax there is a considerable increase in the amount of matrix present in the tissue, while many cells at all depths in the cartilage show the presence of lysosome-like structures, possibly associated with the changing shape of the cartilage. Intramembranous ossification is proceeding around Meckel's cartilage, but there is no evidence of endochondral ossification up to the end of metamorphosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:3693112

  11. Comparative development of end-plate currents in two muscles of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Kullberg, R; Owens, J L

    1986-01-01

    The development of miniature end-plate currents (m.e.p.c.s) was studied in the superior oblique and interhyoideus muscles of Xenopus laevis. An analysis of m.e.p.c. decays shows that each muscle possesses its own characteristic programme of end-plate current development. In the superior oblique, the exponential decay constants of m.e.p.c.s were initially about 3 ms; they declined within half a day to 1 ms and remained at that value for six weeks. They then gradually became longer, reaching a mean value of 1.7 ms at late metamorphosis. In the interhyoideus, m.e.p.c. decay constants were initially about 6 ms. They declined in less than one day to a mean value of 2.6 ms and remained there for the following seven weeks. Upon completion of metamorphosis, the decay constants underwent a further decrease to about 1 ms. In both muscles, the changes in m.e.p.c. decays were correlated with developmental changes in muscle contraction speeds, as measured by maximum twitch frequencies. The above changes in end-plate currents in the superior oblique and interhyoideus muscles are discussed in terms of the development of acetylcholine receptor channel gating and acetylcholinesterase activity. PMID:3018234

  12. Budgett's frog (Lepidobatrachus laevis): A new amphibian embryo for developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nirav M; Womble, Mandy; Ledon-Rettig, Cristina; Hull, Margaret; Dickinson, Amanda; Nascone-Yoder, Nanette

    2015-09-15

    The large size and rapid development of amphibian embryos has facilitated ground-breaking discoveries in developmental biology. Here, we describe the embryogenesis of the Budgett's frog (Lepidobatrachus laevis), an unusual species with eggs that are over twice the diameter of laboratory Xenopus, and embryos that can tolerate higher temperatures to develop into a tadpole four times more rapidly. In addition to detailing their early development, we demonstrate that, like Xenopus, these embryos are amenable to explant culture assays and can express exogenous transcripts in a tissue-specific manner. Moreover, the steep developmental trajectory and large scale of Lepidobatrachus make it exceptionally well-suited for morphogenesis research. For example, the developing organs of the Budgett's frog are massive compared to those of most model species, and are composed of larger individual cells, thereby affording increased subcellular resolution of early vertebrate organogenesis. Furthermore, we found that complete limb regeneration, which typically requires months to achieve in most vertebrate models, occurs in a matter of days in the Budgett's tadpole, which substantially accelerates the pace of experimentation. Thus, the unusual combination of the greater size and speed of the Budgett's frog model provides inimitable advantages for developmental studies-and a novel inroad to address the mechanisms of spatiotemporal scaling during evolution.

  13. Corticosterone promotes emergence of fictive air breathing in Xenopus laevis Daudin tadpole brainstems.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Stéphanie; Dubé, Pierre-Luc; Kinkead, Richard

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of air breathing during amphibian metamorphosis requires significant changes to the brainstem circuits that generate and regulate breathing. However, the mechanisms controlling this developmental process are unknown. Because corticosterone plays an important role in the neuroendocrine regulation of amphibian metamorphosis, we tested the hypothesis that corticosterone augments fictive air breathing frequency in Xenopus laevis. To do so, we compared the fictive air breathing frequency produced by in vitro brainstem preparations from pre-metamorphic tadpoles and adult frogs before and after 1 h application of corticosterone (100 nmol l(-1)). Fictive breathing measurements related to gill and lung ventilation were recorded extracellularly from cranial nerve rootlets V and X. Corticosterone application had no immediate effect on respiratory-related motor output produced by brainstems from either developmental stage. One hour after corticosterone wash out, fictive lung ventilation frequency was increased whereas gill burst frequency was decreased. This effect was stage specific as it was significant only in preparations from tadpoles. GABA application (0.001-0.5 mmol l(-1)) augmented fictive air breathing in tadpole preparations. However, this effect of GABA was no longer observed following corticosterone treatment. An increase in circulating corticosterone is one of the endocrine processes that orchestrate central nervous system remodelling during metamorphosis. The age-specific effects of corticosterone application indicate that this hormone can act as an important regulator of respiratory control development in Xenopus tadpoles. Concurrent changes in GABAergic neurotransmission probably contribute to this maturation process, leading to the emergence of air breathing in this species.

  14. Analysis of scleraxis and dermo-1 genes in a regenerating limb of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Nakada, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Makoto; Tamura, Koji; Ide, Hiroyuki

    2006-04-01

    Xenopus laevis larvae can regenerate an exact replica of the missing part of a limb after amputation at an early limb bud stage. However, this regenerative capacity gradually decreases during metamorphosis, and a froglet is only able to regenerate hypomorphic cartilage, resulting in a spike-like structure (spike). It has been reported that the spike has tissue deformities, e.g., a muscleless structure. However, our previous study demonstrated that the muscleless feature of the spike can be improved. The existence of other kinds of tissue, such as tendon, has not been clarified. In this study, we focused on the tendon and dermis, and we isolated the scleraxis and dermo-1 genes, which are known to be marker genes for the tendon and dermis, respectively. The expressions of these genes were investigated in both the developmental and regenerating processes of a Xenopus limb. Although muscle was needed to maintain scleraxis expression, scleraxis transcription was detectable in the muscleless spike. Additionally, although grafting of matured skin, including dermal tissue, inhibited limb regeneration, the expression of dermo-1, a dermal marker gene, was detected from the early stage of the froglet blastema. These results indicate that tendon precursor cells and dermal cells exist in the regenerating froglet blastema. Our results support the idea that spike formation in postmetamorphic Xenopus limbs is epimorphic regeneration.

  15. Gonadal development of larval male Xenopus laevis exposed to atrazine in outdoor microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jooste, A.M.; Du Preez, L.H.; Carr, J.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Gross, T.S.; Kendall, R.J.; Smith, E.E.; Van Der Kraak, G. L.; Solomon, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    The potential effects of atrazine on gonadal development in metamorphs and subadults of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) were studied under conditions of natural photoperiod and temperatures in outdoor microcosms from August 2002 to June 2003 in South Africa. Triplicate 1100 L microcosms for each nominal concentration of 0.0, 1, 10, and 25 ??g of atrazine/L were used. Measured atrazine concentrations varied <25% throughout the study, and no atrazine was detected in the control microcosms. Tadpoles developed well at all concentrations. On the basis of histological examination of testes of recently metamorphosed stage 66 frogs, 57% of the individuals in the reference group exhibited testicular oocytes as compared with 57, 59, and 39% of the 1, 10, and 25 ??g/L atrazine groups, respectively. The average prevalence of testicular oocytes for all of the treatments including the controls was 54% in a single testis, while, in 35% of individuals, testicular oocytes were observed in both testes. The number of testicular oocytes per individual ranged from 0 to 58 with means of 9.5, 9.8, 8.5, and 11.1 for the 0.0, 1, 10, and 25 ??g of atrazine/L groups, respectively. Ten months after metamorphosis, another subset of juveniles was examined, and the maximum number of testicular oocytes observed was five in one animal. The presence of testicular oocytes was not related to exposure to atrazine and may be a natural phenomenon during ontogeny. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  16. Phytochemical and in vitro antimicrobial assay of the leaf extract of Newbouldia laevis.

    PubMed

    Usman, H; Osuji, J C

    2007-06-10

    The methanolic leaf extract of Newbouldia laevis was subjected to preliminary phytochemical screening and in-vitro antimicrobial tests. The extract revealed the presence of flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, steroidal and cardiac glycosides. The antimicrobial activity of the plant extract was assayed by the agar plate disc diffusion and nutrient broth dilution techniques. Test microorganisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella spp. and Candida albicans; all the organisms were laboratory isolates. The extract inhibited the growth of all the test organisms especially against Klebsiella spp. and S. aureus which had mean inhibition zone of 42.3+/-1.5 and 32.3+/-1.5 mm respectively. The results showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 1.563 mg/ml against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. and 3.125 mg/ml against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhi. The minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was 0.39 mg/ml. This study has justified the traditional use of this plant for the treatment of stomach discomfort, diarrhea, dysentery and as a remedy for wound healing whose causative agents are some of the organisms used in this study.

  17. Electroencephalographic and physiologic changes after tricaine methanesulfonate immersion of African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Lalonde-Robert, Vanessa; Desgent, Sébastien; Duss, Sandra; Vachon, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine electroencephalographic and complementary physiologic changes in Xenopus leavis frogs after bath immersion in MS222. We also evaluated the addition of sodium pentobarbital injected intracoelomi- cally 2 h after MS222 immersion to achieve euthanasia. Frogs (n = 9) weighing 105.5 ± 8.4 g (mean ± 1 SD) were immersed in MS222 at either 1 or 3 g/L until anesthesia was achieved; a conductive stainless steel screw then was implanted in the skull on top of the outer pial surface of the brain. Frogs were immersed again in MS222 at the same concentration as previously, and electroencephalograms, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and respiratory movements were recorded. Amplitude and mean frequency of the electroencephalographic signal were evaluated at 15-min intervals until a flat-line signal was achieved. At 2 h after induction, frogs were injected intracoelomically with sodium pentobarbital (0.5 mL; 240 mg/mL) to accelerate euthanasia. Immersion of frogs in 1 or 3 g/L of MS222 depressed cerebral activity within 30 min without a significant effect on cardiac function. Intracoelomic injection of sodium pentobarbital at 2 h after MS222 administration rapidly (3.2 ± 1.7 min) induced cardiac arrest. In conclusion, immersion in MS222 can be used for the collection of organs from X. laevis frogs, but the addition of pentobarbital is required to achieve euthanasia.

  18. Developmental changes in head movement kinematics during swimming in Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Hänzi, Sara; Straka, Hans

    2017-01-15

    During the post-embryonic developmental growth of animals, a number of physiological parameters such as locomotor performance, dynamics and behavioural repertoire are adjusted to match the requirements determined by changes in body size, proportions and shape. Moreover, changes in movement parameters also cause changes in the dynamics of self-generated sensory stimuli, to which motion-detecting sensory systems have to adapt. Here, we examined head movements and swimming kinematics of Xenopus laevis tadpoles with a body length of 10-45 mm (developmental stage 46-54) and compared these parameters with fictive swimming, recorded as ventral root activity in semi-intact in vitro preparations. Head movement kinematics was extracted from high-speed video recordings of freely swimming tadpoles. Analysis of these locomotor episodes indicated that the swimming frequency decreased with development, along with the angular velocity and acceleration of the head, which represent self-generated vestibular stimuli. In contrast, neither head oscillation amplitude nor forward velocity changed with development despite the ∼3-fold increase in body size. The comparison between free and fictive locomotor dynamics revealed very similar swimming frequencies for similarly sized animals, including a comparable developmental decrease of the swimming frequency. Body morphology and the motor output rhythm of the spinal central pattern generator therefore develop concurrently. This study thus describes development-specific naturalistic head motion profiles, which form the basis for more natural stimuli in future studies probing the vestibular system.

  19. Characterization of highly and moderately repetitive 500 bp Eco RI fragments from Xenopus laevis DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, S; Meyerhof, W; Korge, E; Knöchel, W

    1984-01-01

    Three different types of repetitive Eco RI fragments, which comigrate within a visible band of approximately 500 bp at gel electrophoresis of Xenopus laevis DNA Eco RI digests have been cloned and sequenced. These sequences are designated as Repetitive Eco RI Monomers: REM 1, REM 2 and REM 3. The sequences contain direct repeats, inverted repeats and palindromic elements. Genomic organization of the most abundant sequence (REM 1; 0.4% of total DNA) is that of an interspersed sequence. REM 2 (0.08%) is partly organized as an interspersed element and partly found in tandem arrangement, whereas REM 3 (0.02%) represents the tandemly repeated monomeric unit of a satellite DNA. In situ hybridization has shown that REM 1 and REM 2 sequences are found on most chromosomes, REM 1 being preferentially located on specific chromosomal loci. REM 3 is located near the centromere region of only one chromosome pair (presumably number 1). Hybridization of Northern blots from RNAs of different developmental stages revealed that REM 1, REM 2 and REM 3 sequences are transcribed and that transcription is under developmental control. Images PMID:6330690

  20. Dynamic properties of calcium-activated chloride currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    M De la Fuente, Ildefonso; Malaina, Iker; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Boyano, María Dolores; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Bringas, Carlos; Villarroel, Álvaro; Fedetz, María; Arellano, Rogelio; Cortes, Jesus M; Martínez, Luis

    2017-02-13

    Chloride is the most abundant permeable anion in the cell, and numerous studies in the last two decades highlight the great importance and broad physiological role of chloride currents mediated anion transport. They participate in a multiplicity of key processes, as for instance, the regulation of electrical excitability, apoptosis, cell cycle, epithelial secretion and neuronal excitability. In addition, dysfunction of Cl(-) channels is involved in a variety of human diseases such as epilepsy, osteoporosis and different cancer types. Historically, chloride channels have been of less interest than the cation channels. In fact, there seems to be practically no quantitative studies of the dynamics of chloride currents. Here, for the first time, we have quantitatively studied experimental calcium-activated chloride fluxes belonging to Xenopus laevis oocytes, and the main results show that the experimental Cl(-) currents present an informational structure characterized by highly organized data sequences, long-term memory properties and inherent "crossover" dynamics in which persistent correlations arise at short time intervals, while anti-persistent behaviors become dominant in long time intervals. Our work sheds some light on the understanding of the informational properties of ion currents, a key element to elucidate the physiological functional coupling with the integrative dynamics of metabolic processes.

  1. Post-translational Regulation of Hexokinase Function and Protein Stability in the Aestivating Frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Childers, Christine L; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-02-01

    Xenopus laevis endure substantial dehydration which can impose hypoxic stress due to impaired blood flow. Tissues may increase reliance on anaerobic glycolysis for energy production making the regulation of hexokinase (HK) important. We investigated the enzymatic properties and phosphorylation state of purified HK from the muscle of control and dehydrated (30% total body water lost) frogs. Bioinformatic tools were also applied to analyze the structural implication of HK phosphorylation in silico. HK from the muscle of dehydrated frogs showed a significantly higher Vmax (3.4-fold) and Km for glucose (2.4-fold) compared with control HK but the Km for ATP was unaltered. HK from dehydrated frogs also showed greater phosphoserine content (20% increase) and lower phosphothreonine (22% decrease) content compared to control HK. Control HK had a higher melting temperature (Tm = 61.9 °C) than from dehydrated (Tm = 54.2 °C) frogs when thermostability was tested using differential scanning fluorimetry. In silico phosphorylation of a Xenopus HK caused alterations in active site binding, corroborating phosphorylation as the probable mechanism for kinetic regulation. Physiological consequences of dehydration-induced HK phosphorylation appear to facilitate glycolytic metabolism in hypoxic situations. Augmented HK function increases the ability of Xenopus to overcome compromised oxidative phosphorylation associated with ischemia during dehydration.

  2. Metamorphic remodeling of the olfactory organ of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Katarina; Kuttler, Josua; Hassenklöver, Thomas; Manzini, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    The amphibian olfactory system undergoes massive remodeling during metamorphosis. The transition from aquatic olfaction in larvae to semiaquatic or airborne olfaction in adults requires anatomical, cellular, and molecular modifications. These changes are particularly pronounced in Pipidae, whose adults have secondarily adapted to an aquatic life style. In the fully aquatic larvae of Xenopus laevis, the main olfactory epithelium specialized for sensing water-borne odorous substances lines the principal olfactory cavity (PC), whereas a separate olfactory epithelium lies in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). During metamorphosis, the epithelium of the PC is rearranged into the adult "air nose," whereas a new olfactory epithelium, the adult "water nose," forms in the emerging middle cavity (MC). Here we performed a stage-by-stage investigation of the anatomical changes of the Xenopus olfactory organ during metamorphosis. We quantified cell death in all olfactory epithelia and found massive cell death in the PC and the VNO, suggesting that the majority of larval sensory neurons is replaced during metamorphosis in both sensory epithelia. The moderate cell death in the MC shows that during the formation of this epithelium some cells are sorted out. Our results show that during MC formation some supporting cells, but not sensory neurons, are relocated from the PC to the MC and that they are eventually eliminated during metamorphosis. Together our findings illustrate the structural and cellular changes of the Xenopus olfactory organ during metamorphosis.

  3. Characterization of CXC-type chemokine molecules in early Xenopus laevis development.

    PubMed

    Goto, Toshiyasu; Michiue, Tatsuo; Ito, Yuzuru; Asashima, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine molecules play important roles in the immune system. However, several chemokine molecules are expressed during early development before the immune system is established. Using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and overexpression of chemokine molecules, we identified and characterized Xenopus laevis CXC-type chemokine ligands (XCXCL13L1, XCXCL13L2, XCXCLa, XCXCLb, XCXCLd, and XCXCLe) and receptors (XCXCR1/2, XCXCR3, XCXCR5, XCXCR6, and XCXCRa) during early development. The CXC-type ligands have low identity with genes for human CXC ligands (CXCL). With the exception of XCXCRa, the CXC receptors (CXCR) identified in the present study had high (40%–65%) identity with human CXCR genes. Although the expression patterns for the CXCL and CXCR genes differed, transcript levels for all genes were very low during early embryogenesis. Overexpression of XCXCL13L1, XCXCL13L2, XCXCLa, XCXCR3, XCXCR6, and XCXCRa interfered with gastrulation and neural fold closure. The results of the present study suggest that several chemokine molecules are related to cell movements during early morphogenesis.

  4. Diverse functions of kindlin/fermitin proteins during embryonic development in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Rozario, Tania; Mead, Paul E; DeSimone, Douglas W

    2014-08-01

    The kindlin/fermitin family includes three proteins involved in regulating integrin ligand-binding activity and adhesion. Loss-of-function mutations in kindlins1 and 3 have been implicated in Kindler Syndrome and Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency III (LAD-III) respectively, whereas kindlin2 null mice are embryonic lethal. Post translational regulation of cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion has long been presumed to be important for morphogenesis, however, few specific examples of activation-dependent changes in adhesion molecule function in normal development have been reported. In this study, antisense morpholinos were used to reduce expression of individual kindlins in Xenopus laevis embryos in order to investigate their roles in early development. Kindlin1 knockdown resulted in developmental delays, gross malformations of the gut and eventual lethality by tadpole stages. Kindlin2 morphant embryos displayed late stage defects in vascular maintenance and angiogenic branching consistent with kindlin2 loss of function in the mouse. Antisense morpholinos were also used to deplete maternal kindlin2 protein in oocytes and eggs. Embryos lacking maternal kindlin2 arrested at early cleavage stages due to failures in cytokinesis. Kindlin3 morphant phenotypes included defects in epidermal ciliary beating and partial paralysis at tailbud stages but these embryos recovered eventually as morpholino levels decayed. These results indicate a remarkably diverse range of kindlin functions in vertebrate development.

  5. Flow sensing in developing Xenopus laevis is disrupted by visual cues and ototoxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Andrea Megela; Warnecke, Michaela; Vu, Thanh Thao; Smith, Andrew T Stevens

    2015-02-01

    We explored how lateral line cues interact with visual cues to mediate flow sensing behaviors in the nocturnal developing frog, Xenopus laevis, by exposing animals to current flows under different lighting conditions and after exposure to the ototoxin gentamicin. Under dark conditions, Xenopus tadpoles move downstream at the onset of current flow, then turn, and orient toward the direction of the flow with high accuracy. Postmetamorphic froglets also exhibit positive rheotaxis but with less accuracy and longer latency. The addition of discrete light cues to an otherwise dark environment disrupts rheotaxis and positioning. Orientation is less accurate, latency to orient is longer, and animals do not move as far downstream in the presence of light. Compared with untreated tadpoles tested in the dark, tadpoles exposed to gentamicin show less accurate rheotaxis with longer latency and do not move as far downstream in response to flow. These effects are compounded by the presence of light cues. The disruptive effects of light on flow sensing in Xenopus emphasize the disturbances to natural behaviors that may be produced by anthropogenic illumination in nocturnal habitats.

  6. An adhesome comprising laminin, dystroglycan and myosin IIA is required during notochord development in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Buisson, Nicolas; Sirour, Cathy; Moreau, Nicole; Denker, Elsa; Le Bouffant, Ronan; Goullancourt, Aline; Darribère, Thierry; Bello, Valérie

    2014-12-01

    Dystroglycan (Dg) is a transmembrane receptor for laminin that must be expressed at the right time and place in order to be involved in notochord morphogenesis. The function of Dg was examined in Xenopus laevis embryos by knockdown of Dg and overexpression and replacement of the endogenous Dg with a mutated form of the protein. This analysis revealed that Dg is required for correct laminin assembly, for cell polarization during mediolateral intercalation and for proper differentiation of vacuoles. Using mutations in the cytoplasmic domain, we identified two sites that are involved in cell polarization and are required for mediolateral cell intercalation, and a site that is required for vacuolation. Furthermore, using a proteomic analysis, the cytoskeletal non-muscle myosin IIA has been identified for the first time as a molecular link between the Dg-cytoplasmic domain and cortical actin. The data allowed us to identify the adhesome laminin-Dg-myosin IIA as being required to maintain the cortical actin cytoskeleton network during vacuolation, which is crucial to maintain the shape of notochordal cells.

  7. A Database of microRNA Expression Patterns in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ayisha; Ward, Nicole J; Moxon, Simon; Lopez-Gomollon, Sara; Viaut, Camille; Tomlinson, Matthew L; Patrushev, Ilya; Gilchrist, Michael J; Dalmay, Tamas; Dotlic, Dario; Münsterberg, Andrea E; Wheeler, Grant N

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs around 22 nucleotides long. They inhibit gene expression either by translational repression or by causing the degradation of the mRNAs they bind to. Many are highly conserved amongst diverse organisms and have restricted spatio-temporal expression patterns during embryonic development where they are thought to be involved in generating accuracy of developmental timing and in supporting cell fate decisions and tissue identity. We determined the expression patterns of 180 miRNAs in Xenopus laevis embryos using LNA oligonucleotides. In addition we carried out small RNA-seq on different stages of early Xenopus development, identified 44 miRNAs belonging to 29 new families and characterized the expression of 5 of these. Our analyses identified miRNA expression in many organs of the developing embryo. In particular a large number were expressed in neural tissue and in the somites. Surprisingly none of the miRNAs we have looked at show expression in the heart. Our results have been made freely available as a resource in both XenMARK and Xenbase.

  8. Recovery capabilities of Xenopus laevis after exposure to Cadmium and Zinc.

    PubMed

    Mouchet, F; Teaniniuraitemoana, V; Baudrimont, M; Daffe, G; Gauthier, L; Gonzalez, P

    2015-11-01

    The present investigation evaluates the recovery capabilities of Xenopus laevis following 12days of exposure to 30μg CdL(-1) and 1000μg ZnL(-1) alone or mixed, followed by a depuration phase in laboratory conditions. Focused endpoints, which were investigated at different times of depuration, are bioaccumulation of Cd and Zn, micronucleus induction, quantification of metallothioneins (MTs), and expression of genes involved in metal toxicity mechanisms. The results show that at the end of the contamination phase, there was higher metal bioaccumulation capability and MT synthesis in remaining tissues than in the liver. An increased expression of genes involved in detoxification and oxidative stress mechanisms was observed, suggesting an additive effect of both metals and a higher Zn regulation in the liver. During the depuration phase, the results show the recovery capability of Xenopus from 7days of depuration related to metamorphosis processes, which were observed at the end of the experiment. The results confirm the relevance of the amphibian model and the complementarities between a marker of genotoxicity, MT production, bioaccumulation and transcriptional analysis in the evaluation of the ecotoxicological impact. The results also highlight the reversible effects of Cd and Zn toxicity.

  9. Temperature-independent energy expenditure in early development of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yatsuhisa; Ode, Koji L

    2014-08-01

    The thermal dissipation of activated eggs and embryos undergoing development from cleavage to the tailbud stage of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis was measured as a function of incubation time at temperatures ranging from T = 288.2 K to 295.2 K, using a high-precision isothermal calorimeter. A23187-mediated activation of mature eggs induced stable periodic thermal oscillations lasting for 8-34 h. The frequency agreed well with the cell cycle frequency of initial cleavages at the identical temperature. In the developing embryo, energy metabolism switches from embryonic to adult features during gastrulation. The thermal dissipation after gastrulation fit well with a single modified Avrami equation, which has been used for modeling crystal-growth. Both the oscillation frequency of the activated egg and the growth rate of the embryo strongly depend on temperature with the same apparent activation energy of approximately 87 kJ mole(-1). This result suggests that early development proceeds as a single biological time, attributable to a single metabolic rate. A temperature-independent growth curve was derived by scaling the thermogram to the biological time, indicating that the amount of energy expenditure during each developmental stage is constant over the optimal temperature range.

  10. Inner Ear Formation during the Early Larval Development of Xenopus Laevis

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Quincy A.; Serrano, Elba E.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of the eight independent endorgan compartments (sacculus, utricle, horizontal canal, anterior canal, posterior canal, lagena, amphibian papilla, and basilar papilla) of the Xenopus laevis inner ear is illlustrated as the otic vesicle develops into a complex labyrinthine structure. The morphology of transverse sections and whole mounts of the inner ear was assessed in seven developmental stages (28, 31, 37, 42, 45, 47, 50) using brightfield and laser scanning confocal microscopy. The presence of mechanosensory hair cells in the sensory epithelia was determined by identification of stereociliary bundles in cryosectioned tissue and whole mounts of the inner ear labeled with the fluorescent F-actin probe, Alexa-488 phalloidin. Between stages 28 and 45 the otic vesicle grows in size, stereociliary bundles appear and increase in number, and the pars inferior and pars superior become visible. The initial formation of vestibular compartments with their nascent stereociliary bundles is seen by larval stage 47, and all eight vestibular and auditory compartments with their characteristic sensory fields are present by larval stage 50. Thus in Xenopus, inner ear compartments are established between stages 45 and 50, a two week period during which the ear quadruples in length in the anteroposterior dimension. The anatomical images presented here demonstrate the morphological changes that occur as the otic vesicle forms the auditory and vestibular endorgans of the inner ear. These images provide a resource for investigations of gene expression patterns in Xenopus during inner ear compartmentalization and morphogenesis. PMID:16217737

  11. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Narváez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR) and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level) in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group) and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group) environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis. PMID:27334694

  12. Action of nereistoxin on recombinant neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Raymond Delpech, Valérie; Ihara, Makoto; Coddou, Claudio; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2003-11-01

    Nereistoxin (NTX), a natural neurotoxin from the salivary glands of the marine annelid worm Lumbriconereis heteropoda, is highly toxic to insects. Its synthetic analogue, Cartap, was the first commercial insecticide based on a natural product. We have used voltage-clamp electrophysiology to compare the actions of NTX on recombinant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nicotinic AChRs) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes following nuclear injection of cDNAs. The recombinant nicotinic AChRs investigated were chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the Drosophila melanogaster/chicken hybrid receptors SAD/beta2 and ALS/beta2. No agonist action of NTX (0.1-100 microM) was observed on chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the Drosophila/chicken hybrid nicotinic AChRs. Currents elicited by ACh were reduced in amplitude by NTX in a dose-dependent manner. The toxin was slightly more potent on recombinant Drosophila/vertebrate hybrid receptors than on vertebrate homomeric (alpha7) or heteromeric (alpha4beta2) nicotinic AChRs. Block by NTX of the chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the SAD/beta2 and ALS/beta2 Drosophila/chicken hybrid receptors is in all cases non-competitive. Thus, the site of action on nicotinic AChRs of NTX, to which the insecticide Cartap is metabolised in insects, differs from that of the major nicotinic AChR-active insecticide, imidacloprid.

  13. Presence of tadpole and adult globin RNA sequences in oocytes of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, S. M.; Ford, P. J.; Rosbash, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    Complementary DNA transcribed from adult Xenopus laevis globin mRNA was used to assay ovary RNA from Xenopus for the presence of globin sequences by RNA·cDNA hybridization. These sequences are present at approximately the same concentration as the majority of poly(A)-containing ovary sequences. The sequences are also found at approximately 200,000 copies per cell in poly(A)-containing RNA extracted from mature oocytes. To rule out contamination of the oocytes with somatic cells, two additional experiments were performed. First, RNA isolated from ovulated unfertilized eggs, which are devoid of somatic cells, was also shown to contain the globin sequences. Second, globin mRNA was isolated from Xenopus tadpoles. Adult globin mRNA is free of the tadpole sequence and no homology was detected between adult and tadpoles globin RNA. The ovary was shown to contain tadpole globin RNA at nearly the same concentration as the adult sequences. Thus, the results cannot be explained by contamination with erythroid cells which should contain only the adult sequence. The swimming tadpole, which possesses an active circulatory system, was also assayed for the tadpole and adult globin sequences. Whereas the adult sequences are present at approximately the same concentration as in the mature oocyte, the concentration of the tadpole sequences increases at least 300-fold in the first 3 days following fertilization. PMID:269434

  14. Characterization of tweety gene (ttyh1-3) expression in Xenopus laevis during embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Rabe, Brian A.; Huyck, Ryan W.; Williams, Cheyenne C.; Saha, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    The tweety family of genes encodes large-conductance chloride channels and has been implicated in a wide array of cellular processes including cell division, cell adhesion, regulation of calcium activity, and tumorigenesis, particularly in neuronal cells. However, their expression patterns during early development remain largely unknown. Here, we describe the spatial and temporal patterning of ttyh1, ttyh2, and ttyh3 in Xenopus laevis during early embryonic development. Ttyh1 and ttyh3 are initially expressed at the late neurula stage are and primarily localized to the developing nervous system; however ttyh1 and ttyh3 both show transient expression in the somites. By swimming tadpole stages, all three genes are expressed in the brain, spinal cord, eye, and cranial ganglia. While ttyh1 is restricted to proliferative, ventricular zones, ttyh3 is primarily localized to postmitotic regions of the developing nervous system. Ttyh2, however, is strongly expressed in cranial ganglia V, VII, IX and X. The differing temporal and spatial expression patterns of ttyh1, ttyh2, and ttyh3 suggest that they may play distinct roles throughout embryonic development. PMID:25541457

  15. Tradeoffs between somatic and gonadal investments during development in the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    McCoy, Krista A; McCoy, Michael W; Amick, Alison; Guillette, Louis J; St Mary, Colette M

    2007-11-01

    Tradeoffs between time to and size at metamorphosis occur in many organisms with complex life histories. The ability to accelerate metamorphosis can increase survival to the next life stage, but the resulting smaller size at metamorphosis is often associated with lower post-metamorphic survival or reduced fecundity of adults. Reduced fecundity is thought to be because of reduced energy reserves, longer time to maturity, or reduced capacity to carry eggs or compete for mates. This pattern could also be explained by a shift in allocation to somatic growth that further retards the growth or development of reproductive tissues. The main goal of this study was to determine if the relationship between growth and development of somatic and gonadal tissues depends on environmental conditions. We address this question through two experiments in which we quantify the development and growth of the body and gonads of Xenopus laevis reared in different resource environments. First, tadpoles were reared communally and development and growth were evaluated over time. Restricted food reduced somatic and gonadal growth rate, but did not affect the developmental rate of either tissue type. Second, tadpoles were reared individually and evaluated at metamorphosis. Restricted food reduced somatic development and growth, but only influenced size, and not developmental stage of testes at metamorphosis. This work demonstrates that environmental conditions influence tradeoffs between growth and development of somatic and gonadal tissues, apparently in a sex-specific manner. These tradeoffs may contribute to phenotypic correlations between small size and reduced fitness.

  16. Comparative in vivo Study of gp96 Adjuvanticity in the Frog Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Nedelkovska, Hristina; Cruz-Luna, Tanya; McPherson, Pamela; Robert, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    We have developed in the amphibian Xenopus laevis a unique non-mammalian model to study the ability of certain heat shock proteins (hsps) such as gp96 to facilitate cross-presentation of chaperoned antigens and elicit innate and adaptive T cell responses. Xenopus skin graft rejection provides an excellent platform to study the ability of gp96 to elicit classical MHC class Ia (class Ia) restricted T cell responses. Additionally, the Xenopus model system also provides an attractive alternative to mice for exploring the ability of gp96 to generate responses against tumors that have down-regulated their class Ia molecules thereby escaping immune surveillance. Recently, we have developed an adoptive cell transfer assay in Xenopus clones using peritoneal leukocytes as antigen presenting cells (APCs), and shown that gp96 can prime CD8 T cell responses in vivo against minor histocompatibility skin antigens as well as against the Xenopus thymic tumor 15/0 that does not express class Ia molecules. We describe here the methodology involved to perform these assays including the elicitation, pulsing and adoptive transfer of peritoneal leukocytes, as well as the skin graft and tumor transplantation assays. Additionally we are also describing the harvesting and separation of peripheral blood leukocytes used for flow cytometry and proliferation assays which allow for further characterization of the effector populations involved in skin rejection and anti-tumor responses. PMID:20972386

  17. Perturbation of Organogenesis by the Herbicide Atrazine in the Amphibian Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Lenkowski, Jenny R.; Reed, J. Michael; Deininger, Lisa; McLaughlin, Kelly A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposure to anthropogenic chemicals during development can disrupt the morphogenesis of organ systems. Use of the herbicide atrazine has been debated in recent years because of its implicated, but poorly characterized, effects on vertebrates. Previous studies primarily examined the effects of atrazine exposure during metamorphosis or early developmental stages of amphibians. Objectives We sought to identify and characterize the susceptibility during the often-overlooked developmental stage of organ morphogenesis. Methods We used a static renewal experimental treatment to investigate the effects of 10, 25, and 35 mg/L atrazine from early organ morphogenesis through the onset of tadpole feeding in the aquatic amphibian model system, Xenopus laevis. We quantified malformations of the body axis, heart, and intestine, as well as apoptosis in the midbrain and pronephric kidney. Results We found a significant dose-dependent increase in the percentage of atrazine-exposed tadpoles with malformations of multiple tissues including the main body axis, circulatory system, kidney, and digestive system. Incidence of apoptotic cells also increased in the both midbrain and kidney of atrazine-exposed tadpoles. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that acute atrazine exposure (10–35 mg/L for ≤ 48 hr) during early organ morphogenesis disrupts proper organ development in an amphibian model system. The concurrent atrazine-induced apoptosis in the pronephric kidney and midbrain begins to elucidate a mechanism by which atrazine may disrupt developmental processes in nontarget organisms. PMID:18288322

  18. Lateral line-mediated rheotactic behavior in tadpoles of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis)

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Andrea M.; Costa, Lauren M.; Gerstein, Hilary B.

    2005-01-01

    Tadpoles (Xenopus laevis) have a lateral line system whose anatomical structure has been described, but whose functional significance has not been closely examined. These experiments tested the hypothesis that the lateral line system is involved in rheotaxis. Tadpoles in developmental stages 47–56 oriented toward the source of a water current. Orientation was less precise after treatment with cobalt chloride or streptomycin, but was similar to that of untreated animals after exposure to gentamicin. In no current conditions, tadpoles exhibited a characteristic head-down posture by which they held themselves in the water column at an angle around 45°. This body posture became significantly less tilted in the presence of water current. Treatment with cobalt chloride or streptomycin increased the angle of tilt close to that seen in no current conditions, while gentamicin treatment tended to decrease tilt angle. The data are consistent with anatomical and physiological findings that tadpole neuromasts are similar to superficial, but not canal, neuromasts in fishes, and they suggest that the lateral line system is involved in both directional current detection and current-related postural adjustments in Xenopus. PMID:15300386

  19. Oral immunization of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) upregulates the mucosal immunoglobulin IgX

    PubMed Central

    Du, Christina C.; Mashoof, Sara M.; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    The frog Xenopus laevis is a model species for developmental biology but is also of significant interest to comparative immunologists. Amphibians are the oldest group of organisms in which both the B lymphocytes of some species undergo immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination and also have a dedicated mucosal Ig isotype. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that frog IgX would be produced in response to oral immunization. In order to facilitate studies of humoral, and especially mucosal immunity, in this model species, we developed a gavage technique for oral immunization. The result of this oral administration of antigen to frogs was assayed by the induction of the mucosal antibody isotype, IgX, in plasma by enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), and a significant IgX upregulation was detected compared to frogs receiving systemic immunization into the coelom. These data are consistent with the view that IgX is the functional analog of mammalian IgA and mandate further studies of the relationship between IgX and IgA. Additionally, the gavage technique should be adaptable for functional studies of gut-associated immunology in other small aquatic vertebrates. PMID:22100190

  20. Intestinal immune response of Silurus glanis and Barbus barbus naturally infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala).

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, B S; Castaldelli, G; Bo, T; Lorenzoni, M; Giari, L

    2011-02-01

    Immunopathological and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestine of barbel Barbus barbus and sheatfish Silurus glanis that were naturally infected with the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus laevis. Enteric helminths often cause inflammation of the digestive tract, inducing the recruitment of different types of immune cells at the site of infection. The results of our study clearly demonstrated that mast cells (MC) were the dominant immune cells which occur at the site of inflammation in both hosts. MC were associated with fibroblasts and were found in close proximity to, and inside, the capillaries of the intestine, thus, migration of mast cells via the bloodstream was suggested. Significant degranulation of MC was present. Immunohistochemical staining revealed met-enkephalin and serotonin (5-HT) in intestinal MC of both uninfected and infected barbel and the absence of the antimicrobial peptides piscidin 3 and piscidin 4 in both species. Data are discussed with respect to host immune response to an intestinal helminth and compared with other host-parasite systems.

  1. Features of vestibuloocular reflex modulations induced by altered gravitational forces in tadpoles ( Xenopus laevis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, C.; Horn, E.

    2001-01-01

    In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, we studied the static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) in relation to modifications of the gravitational environment to find basic mechanisms of how altered gravitational forces (AGF) affect this reflex. Animals were exposed to microgravity during space flight or hypergravity (3g) for 4 to 12 days. Basic observations were that (1) the development of the rVOR is significantly affected by altered gravitational conditions, (2) the duration of 1g-readaptation depends on the strength of the test stimulus, (3) μg induces malformations of the body which are related to the rVOR depression. Future studies are based on the hypotheses (1) that the vestibular nuclei play a key roll in the adaptation to AGF conditions, (2) that the stimulus transducing systems in the sense organ are affected by AGF conditions, and (3) that fertilized eggs will be converted to normal adults guided by physiological and morphological set points representing the genetic programs. Developmental retardation or acceleration, or otherwise occurring deviations from standard development during embryonic and postembryonic life will activate genes that direct the developmental processes towards normality.

  2. Environmentally relevant concentrations of ammonium perchlorate inhibit development and metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Goleman, Wanda L; Urquidi, Lina J; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E; Kendall, Ronald J; Carr, James A

    2002-02-01

    We determined whether environmentally relevant concentrations of ammonium perchlorate alter development and metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis. Eggs and larvae were exposed to varying concentrations of ammonium perchlorate or control medium for 70 d. Most treatment-related mortality was observed within 5 d after exposure and was due in large part to reduced hatching success. The 5- and 70-d median lethal concentrations (LC50s) were 510 +/- 36 mg ammonium perchlorate/L and 223 +/- 13 mg ammonium perchlorate/L, respectively. Ammonium perchlorate did not cause any concentration-related developmental abnormalities at concentrations below the 70-d LC50. Ammonium perchlorate inhibited metamorphosis in a concentration-dependent manner as evident from effects on forelimb emergence, tail resorption, and hindlimb growth. These effects were observed after exposure to ammonium perchlorate concentrations in the parts-per-billion range, at or below concentrations reported in surface waters contaminated with ammonium perchlorate. Ammonium perchlorate significantly inhibited tail resorption after a 14-d exposure in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Committee (EDSTAC) Tier I frog metamorphosis assay for thyroid disruption in amphibians. We believe that ammonium perchlorate may pose a threat to normal development and growth in natural amphibian populations.

  3. Isolation and characterization of two alternatively spliced complementary DNAs encoding a Xenopus laevis angiotensin II receptor.

    PubMed

    Nishimatsu, S; Koyasu, N; Sugaya, T; Ohnishi, J; Yamagishi, T; Murakami, K; Miyazaki, H

    1994-08-02

    We have isolated two cDNAs of 1.7 and 3.0 kb, produced by alternative splicing, that encode a angiotensin II (AII) receptor from a Xenopus laevis heart cDNA library. The two clones had identical coding regions with each other and were found to belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily like the mammalian type 1 AII receptors (AT1); their amino acid sequence was 68.7% homologous with the human AT1 receptor sequence. However, there was a 1.3 kb insertion at the 3'-untranslated region of the longer clone. The insertion contained 9 repeats of an ATTTA motif, suggesting that the two mRNAs undergo distinct post-transcriptional regulation by virtue of a difference in their stability. Although the Xenopus receptor exhibited distinct specificities for AII receptor antagonists compared with mammalian AII receptors, several common characteristics, including the effect of dithiothreitol and guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), demonstrated that the cloned receptor is a counterpart of the mammalian AT1 receptor. Moreover, the cloned receptor was expressed most abundantly in the Xenopus heart, which is inconsistent with the tissue distribution of mammalian AII receptors. This indicated that the Xenopus heart, unlike that of mammals, plays a major role in the AII-dependent regulation of blood pressure and extracellular fluid volume.

  4. Isolation and properties of a multicatalytic proteinase complex from Xenopus laevis skin secretion.

    PubMed

    Camarão, G C; Carvalho, K M; Cohen, P

    1994-12-01

    A multicatalytic proteinase complex present in the skin secretion of Xenopus laevis was purified and its enzymatic activity towards natural and synthetic peptides was investigated. We identified three activities: i) a C-terminal deamidation enzyme activity which exhibited selectivity for the Asp-Phe-NH2 and Phe-Leu-NH2 motifs of cerulein, minigastrin Leu-enkephalinamide, (des-Tyr1)Leu-enkephalinamide and diaminobenzylthiocyanate-DVDERDVRGFASFLNH2 (DABTC-DR8kermit); ii) an endopeptidase activity that cleaves peptide bonds on the carboxyl side of hydrophobic amino acid residues such as Tyr-Gly of LHRH, Ile-Ala of PGLa and Leu-Ala of buccalin; iii) an enzyme activity that cleaves peptide bonds at the dibasic sites of peptides of the dynorphin family. The molecular weight determined by Sephacryl S-400 molecular sieve filtration indicated an M(r) about 600 kDa. The activities characterized here exhibit an optimal pH of about 7.4. The activities of the multicatalytic complex were differentially inhibited by the classical inhibitors of proteases.

  5. Functional joint regeneration is achieved using reintegration mechanism in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Rio; Yamada, Shigehito; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-02-01

    A functional joint requires integration of multiple tissues: the apposing skeletal elements should form an interlocking structure, and muscles should insert into skeletal tissues via tendons across the joint. Whereas newts can regenerate functional joints after amputation, Xenopus laevis regenerates a cartilaginous rod without joints, a "spike." Previously we reported that the reintegration mechanism between the remaining and regenerated tissues has a significant effect on regenerating joint morphogenesis during elbow joint regeneration in newt. Based on this insight into the importance of reintegration, we amputated frogs' limbs at the elbow joint and found that frogs could regenerate a functional elbow joint between the remaining tissues and regenerated spike. During regeneration, the regenerating cartilage was partially connected to the remaining articular cartilage to reform the interlocking structure of the elbow joint at the proximal end of the spike. Furthermore, the muscles of the remaining part inserted into the regenerated spike cartilage via tendons. This study might open up an avenue for analyzing molecular and cellular mechanisms of joint regeneration using Xenopus.

  6. Changes in Oscillatory Dynamics in the Cell Cycle of Early Xenopus laevis Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tony Y.-C.; Theriot, Julie A.; Ferrell, James E.

    2014-01-01

    During the early development of Xenopus laevis embryos, the first mitotic cell cycle is long (∼85 min) and the subsequent 11 cycles are short (∼30 min) and clock-like. Here we address the question of how the Cdk1 cell cycle oscillator changes between these two modes of operation. We found that the change can be attributed to an alteration in the balance between Wee1/Myt1 and Cdc25. The change in balance converts a circuit that acts like a positive-plus-negative feedback oscillator, with spikes of Cdk1 activation, to one that acts like a negative-feedback-only oscillator, with a shorter period and smoothly varying Cdk1 activity. Shortening the first cycle, by treating embryos with the Wee1A/Myt1 inhibitor PD0166285, resulted in a dramatic reduction in embryo viability, and restoring the length of the first cycle in inhibitor-treated embryos with low doses of cycloheximide partially rescued viability. Computations with an experimentally parameterized mathematical model show that modest changes in the Wee1/Cdc25 ratio can account for the observed qualitative changes in the cell cycle. The high ratio in the first cycle allows the period to be long and tunable, and decreasing the ratio in the subsequent cycles allows the oscillator to run at a maximal speed. Thus, the embryo rewires its feedback regulation to meet two different developmental requirements during early development. PMID:24523664

  7. Post-transcriptional regulation of ornithine decarboxylase in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Bassez, T; Paris, J; Omilli, F; Dorel, C; Osborne, H B

    1990-11-01

    The level at which ornithine decarboxylase expression is regulated in growing oocytes has been investigated. Immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled proteins showed that ornithine decarboxylase accumulated less rapidly in stage IV oocytes than in previtellogenic stage I + II oocytes. Quantitative Northern analysis showed that ornithine decarboxylase mRNA is abundant in oocytes (about 8 x 10(8) transcripts/cell) and this number does not significantly change during oogenesis. Polysome analysis showed that this mRNA is present in polysomes in stage I + II oocytes but has passed into puromycin-insensitive mRNP particles by stage IV of oogenesis. Therefore, during the growth phase of oogenesis, ornithine decarboxylase expression is regulated at a translational level. These results are discussed relative to the temporal expression of ornithine decarboxylase and of other proteins whose expression also decreases during oogenesis. In order to perform these experiments, the cDNA (XLODC1) corresponding to Xenopus laevis ornithine decarboxylase mRNA was cloned and sequenced.

  8. Dynamic properties of calcium-activated chloride currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    PubMed Central

    M. De la Fuente, Ildefonso; Malaina, Iker; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Boyano, María Dolores; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Bringas, Carlos; Villarroel, Álvaro; Fedetz, María; Arellano, Rogelio; Cortes, Jesus M.; Martínez, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Chloride is the most abundant permeable anion in the cell, and numerous studies in the last two decades highlight the great importance and broad physiological role of chloride currents mediated anion transport. They participate in a multiplicity of key processes, as for instance, the regulation of electrical excitability, apoptosis, cell cycle, epithelial secretion and neuronal excitability. In addition, dysfunction of Cl− channels is involved in a variety of human diseases such as epilepsy, osteoporosis and different cancer types. Historically, chloride channels have been of less interest than the cation channels. In fact, there seems to be practically no quantitative studies of the dynamics of chloride currents. Here, for the first time, we have quantitatively studied experimental calcium-activated chloride fluxes belonging to Xenopus laevis oocytes, and the main results show that the experimental Cl− currents present an informational structure characterized by highly organized data sequences, long-term memory properties and inherent “crossover” dynamics in which persistent correlations arise at short time intervals, while anti-persistent behaviors become dominant in long time intervals. Our work sheds some light on the understanding of the informational properties of ion currents, a key element to elucidate the physiological functional coupling with the integrative dynamics of metabolic processes. PMID:28198817

  9. Temperature-independent energy expenditure in early development of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yatsuhisa; Ode, Koji L.

    2014-08-01

    The thermal dissipation of activated eggs and embryos undergoing development from cleavage to the tailbud stage of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis was measured as a function of incubation time at temperatures ranging from T = 288.2 K to 295.2 K, using a high-precision isothermal calorimeter. A23187-mediated activation of mature eggs induced stable periodic thermal oscillations lasting for 8-34 h. The frequency agreed well with the cell cycle frequency of initial cleavages at the identical temperature. In the developing embryo, energy metabolism switches from embryonic to adult features during gastrulation. The thermal dissipation after gastrulation fit well with a single modified Avrami equation, which has been used for modeling crystal-growth. Both the oscillation frequency of the activated egg and the growth rate of the embryo strongly depend on temperature with the same apparent activation energy of approximately 87 kJ mole-1. This result suggests that early development proceeds as a single biological time, attributable to a single metabolic rate. A temperature-independent growth curve was derived by scaling the thermogram to the biological time, indicating that the amount of energy expenditure during each developmental stage is constant over the optimal temperature range.

  10. Characterization of a novel member of the FGF family, XFGF-20, in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Koga, C; Adati, N; Nakata, K; Mikoshiba, K; Furuhata, Y; Sato, S; Tei, H; Sakaki, Y; Kurokawa, T; Shiokawa, K; Yokoyama, K K

    1999-08-11

    The cDNA for a novel member of the FGF family (XFGF-20) was isolated from a Xenopus cDNA library prepared at the tailbud stage using as a probe the product of degenerate PCR performed with primers based on mammalian FGF-9s. This cDNA was 1860 bp long, and contained a single open reading frame that encoded 208 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence contained a motif characteristic of the FGF family and it was similar (73.1% overall homology) to XFGF-9 but differed from XFGF-9 in its amino-terminal region (33.3% homology). XFGF-20 mRNA was expressed only zygotically in embryos at and after the blastula stage, but it was also specifically expressed in the stomach and testis of adults. By contrast, XFGF-9 mRNA was expressed maternally in eggs and in many adult tissues. When XFGF-20 mRNA was overexpressed in early embryos, gastrulation was abnormal and development of anterior structures was suppressed. In such embryos, the expression of the Xbra transcript was suppressed during gastrulation while the expression of the transcripts of cerberus, Siamois, dkk-1, chordin, and Xotx-2 genes was normal. These results suggest that correct expression of XFGF-20 during gastrulation is required for the formation of normal head structures in Xenopus laevis during embryogenesis and that expression of the Xbra gene mediates this phenomenon.

  11. Platanna (Xenopus laevis) as a test organism for determining the embryotoxic effects of environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Dumpert, K.; Zietz, E.

    1984-02-01

    It has been successfully demonstrated that platanna (Xenopus laevis) allows the artificial induction of spawning at any time during the year. The number of eggs collected from a female ranged between 500 and 2400, the fertilization rate varying between 10 and 85%. When unaffected by chemicals, the embryonic development of the larvae took between 8 and 30 weeks. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), methylmercury chloride, and the thalidomide analog EM 12 were used for the experiments described. DEHP at a concentration of 2 ppm retarded the development of the larvae and caused reduced pigmentation of the tadpoles. Methylmercury chloride has been found to have teratogenic and embryolethal effects at a concentration as low as 0.01 ppm. The following teratogenic effects have been determined: bent tails of the larvae, retarded development of the filter system, disturbed osmotic regulation, deranged positional and spatial orientation. EM 12 has been proven to have embryolethal effects at concentrations around 100 ppm. At lower concentrations this substance has teratogenic effects, i.e., it interferes in various ways with the development of the limbs.

  12. Gravity-related critical periods in vestibular and tail development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Horn, Eberhard R; Gabriel, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Sensory systems are characterized by developmental periods during which they are susceptible to environmental modifications, in particular to sensory deprivation. The experiment, XENOPUS, on Soyuz in 2008 was the fourth space flight experiment since 1993 to explore whether tail and vestibular development of Xenopus laevis has a gravity-related critical period. During this flight, tadpoles were used that had developed either the early hindlimb (stage 47) or forelimb bud (stage 50) at launch of the spacecraft. The results revealed (1) no impact of microgravity on the development of the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) in both stages and (2) a stage-related sensitivity of tail development to microgravity exposure. These results were combined and compared with observations from space flights on other orbital platforms. The combined data revealed (1) a narrow gravity-related critical period for rVOR development close to the period of the first appearance of the reflex and (2) a longer one for tail development lasting from the early tail bud to the early forelimb bud stage.

  13. Microfluidic platform for electrophysiological studies on Xenopus laevis oocytes under varying gravity levels.

    PubMed

    Schaffhauser, Daniel F; Andrini, Olga; Ghezzi, Chiara; Forster, Ian C; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Egli, Marcel; Dittrich, Petra S

    2011-10-21

    Voltage clamp measurements reveal important insights into the activity of membrane ion channels. While conventional voltage clamp systems are available for laboratory studies, these instruments are generally unsuitable for more rugged operating environments. In this study, we present a non-invasive microfluidic voltage clamp system developed for the use under varying gravity levels. The core component is a multilayer microfluidic device that provides an immobilisation site for Xenopus laevis oocytes on an intermediate layer, and fluid and electrical connections from either side of the cell. The configuration that we term the asymmetrical transoocyte voltage clamp (ATOVC) also permits electrical access to the cytosol of the oocyte without physical introduction of electrodes by permeabilisation of a large region of the oocyte membrane so that a defined membrane patch can be voltage clamped. The constant low level air pressure applied to the oocyte ensures stable immobilisation, which is essential for keeping the leak resistance constant even under varying gravitational forces. The ease of oocyte mounting and immobilisation combined with the robustness and complete enclosure of the fluidics system allow the use of the ATOVC under extreme environmental conditions, without the need for intervention by a human operator. Results for oocytes over-expressing the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) obtained under laboratory conditions as well as under conditions of micro- and hypergravity demonstrate the high reproducibility and stability of the ATOVC system under distinct mechanical scenarios.

  14. In vitro maintenance of spermatogenesis in Xenopus laevis testis explants cultured in serum-free media

    SciTech Connect

    Risley, M.S.; Miller, A.; Bumcrot, D.A.

    1987-05-01

    Spermatogenesis has been maintained for extended periods in Xenopus laevis testis explants cultured in serum-free media supplemented with bovine serum albumin, insulin, transferrin, follicle-stimulating hormone, dihydrotestosterone, testosterone, retinol, ascorbate, and tocopherol. The organization of the testis fragments was maintained for 28 days, and all stages of development were present throughout the culture period. /sup 3/H-Thymidine-labeled secondary (Type B) spermatogonia developed in 28 days into spermatids at the acrosomal vesicle stage whereas labeled zygotene spermatocytes became mature spermatids in 28 days. Spermatogonial proliferation also continued in vitro for 28 days. Germ cell differentiation was not dependent upon exogenous testosterone, ascorbate, or tocopherol since /sup 3/H-labeled spermatogonia became mature spermatids in testes cultured 35 days in media lacking these supplements. Autoradiography demonstrated that 55% of the luminal sperm present in explants cultured 10 days had differentiated in vitro. Sperm from testes cultured 10-35 days were similar to sperm from freshly dissected testes with regard to motility and fecundity, and eggs fertilized with sperm from explant cultures developed normally into swimming tadpoles. The results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining vertebrate spermatogenesis in culture and suggest that in vitro analysis of Xenopus spermatogenesis using defined media may provide important insights into the evolution of regulatory mechanisms in spermatogenesis.

  15. The deep-sea natural products, biogenic polyphosphate (Bio-PolyP) and biogenic silica (Bio-Silica), as biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: fabrication of a morphogenetically-active polymer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Feng, Qingling; Draenert, Florian; Müller, Werner E G

    2013-03-08

    Bone defects in human, caused by fractures/nonunions or trauma, gain increasing impact and have become a medical challenge in the present-day aging population. Frequently, those fractures require surgical intervention which ideally relies on autografts or suboptimally on allografts. Therefore, it is pressing and likewise challenging to develop bone substitution materials to heal bone defects. During the differentiation of osteoblasts from their mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells and of osteoclasts from their hemopoietic precursor cells, a lineage-specific release of growth factors and a trans-lineage homeostatic cross-talk via signaling molecules take place. Hence, the major hurdle is to fabricate a template that is functioning in a way mimicking the morphogenetic, inductive role(s) of the native extracellular matrix. In the last few years, two naturally occurring polymers that are produced by deep-sea sponges, the biogenic polyphosphate (bio-polyP) and biogenic silica (bio-silica) have also been identified as promoting morphogenetic on both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These polymers elicit cytokines that affect bone mineralization (hydroxyapatite formation). In this manner, bio-silica and bio-polyP cause an increased release of BMP-2, the key mediator activating the anabolic arm of the hydroxyapatite forming cells, and of RANKL. In addition, bio-polyP inhibits the progression of the pre-osteoclasts to functionally active osteoclasts. Based on these findings, new bioinspired strategies for the fabrication of bone biomimetic templates have been developed applying 3D-printing techniques. Finally, a strategy is outlined by which these two morphogenetically active polymers might be used to develop a novel functionally active polymer.

  16. The Deep-Sea Natural Products, Biogenic Polyphosphate (Bio-PolyP) and Biogenic Silica (Bio-Silica), as Biomimetic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: Fabrication of a Morphogenetically-Active Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C.; Feng, Qingling; Draenert, Florian; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2013-01-01

    Bone defects in human, caused by fractures/nonunions or trauma, gain increasing impact and have become a medical challenge in the present-day aging population. Frequently, those fractures require surgical intervention which ideally relies on autografts or suboptimally on allografts. Therefore, it is pressing and likewise challenging to develop bone substitution materials to heal bone defects. During the differentiation of osteoblasts from their mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells and of osteoclasts from their hemopoietic precursor cells, a lineage-specific release of growth factors and a trans-lineage homeostatic cross-talk via signaling molecules take place. Hence, the major hurdle is to fabricate a template that is functioning in a way mimicking the morphogenetic, inductive role(s) of the native extracellular matrix. In the last few years, two naturally occurring polymers that are produced by deep-sea sponges, the biogenic polyphosphate (bio-polyP) and biogenic silica (bio-silica) have also been identified as promoting morphogenetic on both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These polymers elicit cytokines that affect bone mineralization (hydroxyapatite formation). In this manner, bio-silica and bio-polyP cause an increased release of BMP-2, the key mediator activating the anabolic arm of the hydroxyapatite forming cells, and of RANKL. In addition, bio-polyP inhibits the progression of the pre-osteoclasts to functionally active osteoclasts. Based on these findings, new bioinspired strategies for the fabrication of bone biomimetic templates have been developed applying 3D-printing techniques. Finally, a strategy is outlined by which these two morphogenetically active polymers might be used to develop a novel functionally active polymer. PMID:23528950

  17. O-glycan variability of egg-jelly mucins from Xenopus laevis: characterization of four phenotypes that differ by the terminal glycosylation of their mucins.

    PubMed

    Guerardel, Y; Kol, O; Maes, E; Lefebvre, T; Boilly, B; Davril, M; Strecker, G

    2000-12-01

    Eggs from Xenopus laevis are surrounded by several layers of jelly that are needed for proper fertilization. Jelly coat is composed of high-molecular-mass glycoconjugates to which are bound many globular proteins. O-glycans released from the jelly coat of X. laevis have been partially described in previous studies. In this study, we compared the glycosylation pattern of the egg jelly coat isolated from six specimens of X. laevis. The O-glycans were released from jelly coats by alkali/borohydride treatment. Structural characterization was performed through a combination of one- and two-dimensional (1)H-NMR and methylation analysis. This allowed the description of a new family of sulphated O-glycans present in jelly coats of all X. laevis. However, the jelly O-glycans showed a low extent of polymorphism between specimens. This intra-specific variability was restricted to the terminal substitution of O-linked oligosaccharides. The differential expression of two glycosyltransferase [an alpha-(1-->4) galactosyltransferase and an alpha-(1-->3) fucosyltransferase] activities resulted in the characterization of four phenotypes of X. laevis. Furthermore, electrophoretic analysis suggested that the high-molecular-mass fraction of jelly coat was mostly composed of mucin-type glycoproteins. Blot analysis with lectins confirmed that the glycan variability was borne by these mucin-type components. However, fertilization assays suggested that the glycan polymorphism had no repercussion on egg fertilizability.

  18. Sequencing and analysis of 10,967 full-length cDNA clones from Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis reveals post-tetraploidization transcriptome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Morin, Ryan D; Chang, Elbert; Petrescu, Anca; Liao, Nancy; Griffith, Malachi; Chow, William; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Butterfield, Yaron S; Young, Alice C; Stott, Jeffrey; Barber, Sarah; Babakaiff, Ryan; Dickson, Mark C; Matsuo, Corey; Wong, David; Yang, George S; Smailus, Duane E; Wetherby, Keith D; Kwong, Peggy N; Grimwood, Jane; Brinkley, Charles P; Brown-John, Mabel; Reddix-Dugue, Natalie D; Mayo, Michael; Schmutz, Jeremy; Beland, Jaclyn; Park, Morgan; Gibson, Susan; Olson, Teika; Bouffard, Gerard G; Tsai, Miranda; Featherstone, Ruth; Chand, Steve; Siddiqui, Asim S; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Ed; Klein, Steven L; Blakesley, Robert W; Zeeberg, Barry R; Narasimhan, Sudarshan; Weinstein, John N; Pennacchio, Christa Prange; Myers, Richard M; Green, Eric D; Wagner, Lukas; Gerhard, Daniela S; Marra, Marco A; Jones, Steven J M; Holt, Robert A

    2006-06-01

    Sequencing of full-insert clones from full-length cDNA libraries from both Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis has been ongoing as part of the Xenopus Gene Collection Initiative. Here we present 10,967 full ORF verified cDNA clones (8049 from X. laevis and 2918 from X. tropicalis) as a community resource. Because the genome of X. laevis, but not X. tropicalis, has undergone allotetraploidization, comparison of coding sequences from these two clawed (pipid) frogs provides a unique angle for exploring the molecular evolution of duplicate genes. Within our clone set, we have identified 445 gene trios, each comprised of an allotetraploidization-derived X. laevis gene pair and their shared X. tropicalis ortholog. Pairwise dN/dS, comparisons within trios show strong evidence for purifying selection acting on all three members. However, dN/dS ratios between X. laevis gene pairs are elevated relative to their X. tropicalis ortholog. This difference is highly significant and indicates an overall relaxation of selective pressures on duplicated gene pairs. We have found that the paralogs that have been lost since the tetraploidization event are enriched for several molecular functions, but have found no such enrichment in the extant paralogs. Approximately 14% of the paralogous pairs analyzed here also show differential expression indicative of subfunctionalization.

  19. O-glycan variability of egg-jelly mucins from Xenopus laevis: characterization of four phenotypes that differ by the terminal glycosylation of their mucins.

    PubMed Central

    Guerardel, Y; Kol, O; Maes, E; Lefebvre, T; Boilly, B; Davril, M; Strecker, G

    2000-01-01

    Eggs from Xenopus laevis are surrounded by several layers of jelly that are needed for proper fertilization. Jelly coat is composed of high-molecular-mass glycoconjugates to which are bound many globular proteins. O-glycans released from the jelly coat of X. laevis have been partially described in previous studies. In this study, we compared the glycosylation pattern of the egg jelly coat isolated from six specimens of X. laevis. The O-glycans were released from jelly coats by alkali/borohydride treatment. Structural characterization was performed through a combination of one- and two-dimensional (1)H-NMR and methylation analysis. This allowed the description of a new family of sulphated O-glycans present in jelly coats of all X. laevis. However, the jelly O-glycans showed a low extent of polymorphism between specimens. This intra-specific variability was restricted to the terminal substitution of O-linked oligosaccharides. The differential expression of two glycosyltransferase [an alpha-(1-->4) galactosyltransferase and an alpha-(1-->3) fucosyltransferase] activities resulted in the characterization of four phenotypes of X. laevis. Furthermore, electrophoretic analysis suggested that the high-molecular-mass fraction of jelly coat was mostly composed of mucin-type glycoproteins. Blot analysis with lectins confirmed that the glycan variability was borne by these mucin-type components. However, fertilization assays suggested that the glycan polymorphism had no repercussion on egg fertilizability. PMID:11085939

  20. Assignment of a new TGF-{beta} superfamily member, human cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-1, to chromosome 20q11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Keming; Thomas, J.T.; McBride, O.W.; Luyten, F.P.

    1996-05-15

    This report describes the localization of a new TGF {beta} superfamily member, human cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-1, to human chromosome 20q11.2 using southern analysis, RFLP analysis and linkage analysis. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Primary structure of an apical protein from Xenopus laevis that participates in amiloride-sensitive sodium channel activity

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    High resistance epithelia express on their apical side an amiloride- sensitive sodium channel that controls sodium reabsorption. A cDNA was found to encode a 1,420-amino acid long polypeptide with no signal sequence, a putative transmembrane segment, and three predicted amphipathic alpha helices. A corresponding 5.2-kb mRNA was detected in Xenopus laevis kidney, intestine, and oocytes, with weak expression in stomach and eyes. An antibody directed against a fusion protein containing a COOH-terminus segment of the protein and an antiidiotypic antibody known to recognize the amiloride binding site of the epithelial sodium channel (Kleyman, T. R., J.-P. Kraehenbuhl, and S. A. Ernst. 1991. J. Biol. Chem. 266:3907-3915) immunoprecipitated a similar protein complex from [35S]methionine-labeled and from apically radioiodinated Xenopus laevis kidney-derived A6 cells. A single integral of 130-kD protein was recovered from samples reduced with DTT. The antibody also cross-reacted by ELISA with the putative amiloride- sensitive sodium channel isolated from A6 cells (Benos, D. J., G. Saccomani, and S. Sariban-Sohraby. 1987. J. Biol. Chem. 262:10613- 10618). Although the protein is translated, cRNA injected into oocytes did not reconstitute amiloride-sensitive sodium transport, while antisense RNA or antisense oligodeoxynucleotides specific for two distinct sequences of the cloned cDNA inhibited amiloride-sensitive sodium current induced by injection of A6 cell mRNA. We propose that the cDNA encodes an apical plasma membrane protein that plays a role in the functional expression of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel. It may represent a subunit of the Xenopus laevis sodium channel or a regulatory protein essential for sodium channel function. PMID:1334959

  2. The Influence of Artificially Introduced N-Glycosylation Sites on the In Vitro Activity of Xenopus laevis Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Kazumichi; Meguro, Mizue; Sato, Kei; Tanizaki, Yuta; Nogawa-Kosaka, Nami; Kato, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), the primary regulator of erythropoiesis, is a heavily glycosylated protein found in humans and several other mammals. Intriguingly, we have previously found that EPO in Xenopus laevis (xlEPO) has no N-glycosylation sites, and cross-reacts with the human EPO (huEPO) receptor despite low homology with huEPO. In this study, we introduced N-glycosylation sites into wild-type xlEPO at the positions homologous to those in huEPO, and tested whether the glycosylated mutein retained its biological activity. Seven xlEPO muteins, containing 1–3 additional N-linked carbohydrates at positions 24, 38, and/or 83, were expressed in COS-1 cells. The muteins exhibited lower secretion efficiency, higher hydrophilicity, and stronger acidic properties than the wild type. All muteins stimulated the proliferation of both cell lines, xlEPO receptor-expressing xlEPOR-FDC/P2 cells and huEPO receptor-expressing UT-7/EPO cells, in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the muteins retained their in vitro biological activities. The maximum effect on xlEPOR-FDC/P2 proliferation was decreased by the addition of N-linked carbohydrates, but that on UT-7/EPO proliferation was not changed, indicating that the muteins act as partial agonists to the xlEPO receptor, and near-full agonists to the huEPO receptor. Hence, the EPO-EPOR binding site in X. laevis locates the distal region of artificially introduced three N-glycosylation sites, demonstrating that the vital conformation to exert biological activity is conserved between humans and X. laevis, despite the low similarity in primary structures of EPO and EPOR. PMID:25898205

  3. Cloning and expression analysis of interferon-γ-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase gene in South African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Cui, Xian-wei; Xiao, Wen; Ke, Zhen; Liu, Xia; Xu, Xing-zhou; Zhang, Shuang-quan

    2011-12-01

    In this study, an interferon-γ-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) homologue has been cloned and identified from South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis (designated XlGILT). The open reading frame (ORF) of XlGILT consists of 771 bases encoding a protein of 256 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 28.76kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 5.12. The N-terminus of the XlGILT was found to have a putative signal peptide with a cleavage site amino acid position at 15-16. SMART analysis showed that the XlGILT contained a GILT active-site C(69)GGC(72) motif and a GILT signature motif C(114)QHGKEECIGNLIETC(129). The expression levels of XlGILT mRNA were higher in spleen and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), moderate in liver, intestine, heart and kidney, and lower in lung. The XlGILT mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in spleen in vivo and PBMCs in vitro after LPS stimulation. The soluble X. laevis GILT (XlsGILT) was inserted into a pET28a vector and expressed in BL21 (DE3) cells as a His-tag fusion enzyme. After purification, further study revealed that XlsGILT was capable of catalyzing the reduction of the interchain disulfide bonds intact IgG. These results will allow for further investigation to unravel the role of this key enzyme in class II MHC-restricted antigen processing and to use X. laevis as an in vivo model for related studies.

  4. Transcriptional changes in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) exposed to 17α-ethynylestradiol during early development.

    PubMed

    Tompsett, Amber R; Higley, Eric; Pryce, Sara; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus; Wiseman, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Although the past two decades have witnessed a significant increase in the number of studies investigating effects of estrogenic chemicals on amphibians, to date little is known about specific molecular interactions of estrogens with the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal-hepatic axis in developing amphibians. Here, tissue-specific functional sets of genes, derived previously from studies of fishes exposed to endocrine active chemicals, were evaluated in Xenopus laevis exposed to 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) throughout their early development. Specifically, transcriptional responses of X. laevis exposed to 0.09, 0.84, or 8.81 µg EE2/L were characterized during sexual differentiation [31 day post hatch (dph)] and after completion of metamorphosis during the juvenile stage (89 dph). While at 31 dph there were no consistent effects of EE2 on abundances of transcripts,at 89 dph X. laevis exhibited significant alterations in expression of genes involved in steroid signaling and metabolism, synthesis of cholesterol, and vitellogenesis. Specifically, expression of androgen receptor, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, estrogen receptor α, and vitellogenin A2 was significantly greater (>2-fold) than in controls while expression of farnesoid x-activated receptors α and β was significantly less (>2-fold reduction) than in controls. These results support the hypothesis that sets of genes derived from studies in teleost fish can be extrapolated for use in amphibians during the juvenile stage but not in sexually undifferentiated individuals. Furthermore, changes in abundances of transcripts of the here utilized sets of genes in animals sampled post sexual differentiation were in accordance with developmental effects and alterations of gonadal histology reported in a parallel study. This set of genes might be useful for predicting potential adverse outcomes at later life-stages.

  5. Divergent location of ribosomal genes in chromosomes of fish thorny-headed worms, Pomphorhynchus laevis and Pomphorhynchus tereticollis (Acanthocephala).

    PubMed

    Bombarová, Marta; Marec, Frantisek; Nguyen, Petr; Spakulová, Marta

    2007-10-01

    We studied distribution of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences along with chromosomal location of the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) in males of two fish parasites, Pomphorhynchus laevis and Pomphorhynchus tereticollis (Acanthocephala). Fluorescence in situ hybridization with 18S rDNA probe identified two clusters of rDNA in each species, but revealed a remarkable difference in their location on chromosomes. In P. laevis, the rDNA-FISH signals were found in long arms of the first chromosome pair and in short arms of the second pair. Whereas in P. tereticollis, rDNA clusters were located in long arms of both the first and second chromosome pairs. The divergent location of rDNA clusters in the chromosome No. 2 supports current classification of P. tereticollis, previously considered a synonym of P. laevis, as a separate species. A possible scenario of the second chromosome rearrangement during karyotype evolution of the two species involves two successive pericentric inversions. In both species, one or two prominent nucleoli were apparent within interphase nuclei stained with either silver nitrate or a fluorescent dye YOYO-1. However, a single large nucleolus was observed in early stages of mitosis and meiosis I regardless the number of rDNA clusters. Nevertheless, two bivalents with silver-stained NORs in diakinesis and two silver-stained sites in early prophase II nuclei indicated that all NORs are active. This means that each Pomphorhynchus NOR generates a nucleolus, but the resulting nucleoli have a strong tendency to associate in a large body.

  6. Quantitative analysis of orofacial development and median clefts in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Allyson E; Dickinson, Amanda J

    2014-05-01

    Xenopus has become a useful tool to study the molecular mechanisms underlying orofacial development. However, few quantitative analyses exist to describe the anatomy of this region. In this study we combine traditional facial measurements with geometric morphometrics to describe anatomical changes in the orofacial region during normal and abnormal development. Facial measurements and principal component (PC) analysis indicate that during early tadpole development the face expands primarily in the midface region accounting for the development of the upper jaw and primary palate. The mouth opening correspondingly becomes flatter and wider as it incorporates the jaw elements. A canonical variate analysis of orofacial and mouth opening shape emphasized that changes in the orofacial shape occur gradually. Orofacial anatomy was quantified after altered levels of retinoic acid using all-trans retinoic acid or an inhibitor of retinoic acid receptors or by injecting antisense oligos targeting RALDH2. Such perturbations resulted in major decreases in the width of the midface and the mouth opening illustrated in facial measurements and a PC analysis. The mouth opening shape also had a gap in the primary palate resulting in a median cleft in the mouth opening that was only illustrated quantitatively in the morphometric analysis. Finally, canonical and discriminant function analysis statistically distinguished the orofacial and mouth opening shape changes among the different modes used to alter retinoic acid signaling levels. By combining quantitative analyses with molecular studies of orofacial development we will be better equipped to understand the complex morphogenetic processes involved in palate development and clefting.

  7. Molecular cloning and developmental expression of the caveolin gene family in the amphibian Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Razani, Babak; Park, David S; Miyanaga, Yuko; Ghatpande, Ashwini; Cohen, Justin; Wang, Xiao Bo; Scherer, Philipp E; Evans, Todd; Lisanti, Michael P

    2002-06-25

    Caveolae are approximately 50-100 nm invaginations of the plasma membrane thought to form as a result of a local accumulation of cholesterol, sphingolipids, and a unique family of three proteins known as the caveolins: Cav-1, -2, and -3. Here, we report the identification, sequenc