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Sample records for lagerspetz henri vogt

  1. 2. DETAIL OF DISCHARGE CHUTES FROM VOGT AUTOMATIC TUBE ICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF DISCHARGE CHUTES FROM VOGT AUTOMATIC TUBE ICE MACHINE IN SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LEVEL 5; ICE DROPPED INTO HOLDING BIN BEFORE BEING TRANSFERRED TO RAIL CARS OUTSIDE BUILDING (HENRY VOGT MACHINE COMPANY, LOUISVILLE, USA, PATENT NO. 2,200,424 - Rath Packing Company, Cooler Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  2. [Oskar Vogt (1870-1959). Hypnotist and brain researcher, husband of Cecile Vogt (1875-1962)].

    PubMed

    V Stuckrad-Barre, S; Danek, A

    2004-10-01

    Oskar Vogt (1870-1955) and his wife Cecile (1875-1962) were neurologists and neuroanatomists with a strong interest in the cytoarchitectonics and myeloarchitectonics of the brain and in the functional anatomy of the basal ganglia. In the 1920s, Vogt created a multi-disciplinary brain research institute, the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut fur Hirnforschung in Berlin-Buch, with divisions for e.g. neuroanatomy, neurohistology, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, and genetics. Oskar Vogt's scientific activities are discussed briefly with special regard to his former co-worker Brodmann. After being dismissed from office by the Nazi government in 1937, the Vogts continued their work in a privately funded institute in Neustadt, in the Black Forest.

  3. Patrick Henry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Thomas M.

    Patrick Henry dominated the politics of Virginia and was a powerful voice in the affairs of the early United States. He became a lawyer at age 23 and rose to prominence following his victory in "The Parsons Case." Soon after, he was elected to the House of Burgesses where he challenged the control of the wealthy, established members and shocked…

  4. Henry Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Located in Arabia Terra, the crater shown here is known as Henry Crater. Like many other craters on Mars, the interior of Henry Crater is filled with a layered deposit. These materials were brought into the crater sometime after the impact formed the crater. The fine scale of layering can be seen in the right- center portion of the image.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome presenting with encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Alireza E.; Daneshmand, Dana; Khorvash, Farzin; Chitsaz, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    VogtKoyanagi-Harada (VKH) is a rare syndrome affecting tissues with melanocytes. The possibility that VKH syndrome has an autoimmune pathogenesis is supported by the high frequency of human leukocyte antigen-DR4 commonly associated with other autoimmune diseases. Eyes are the main affected organ, resulting in blindness. Brain disease as a late onset event is extremely rare. Here, we are reporting a 57-year-old woman with previously diagnosed VKH syndrome, presenting with a late-onset brain encephalopathy. She was treated with corticosteroids and discharged from hospital with good general condition. PMID:23956579

  6. Henry's Law: A Retrospective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Robert M.; Peticolas, Warner L.

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective view of Henry's law and its applicability in any specific system at a finite concentration is tested. It can be concluded that Henry's law is only a limiting law and is adequate at low mole fractions but is useful for practical purposes where high precision is not required.

  7. Henry Ford Health Systems

    Cancer.gov

    Henry Ford Health Systems evolved from a hospital into a system delivering care to 2.5 million patients and includes the Cancer Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Program, which focuses on epidemiologic and public health aspects of cancer.

  8. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome presenting with encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Alireza E.; Daneshmand, Dana; Khorvash, Farzin; Chitsaz, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) is a rare syndrome affecting tissues containing melanocytes. The possibility of its autoimmune pathogenesis is supported by high frequent HLA-DR4 presentation, commonly associated with other autoimmune diseases. Eyes are the main affected organs, resulting in blindness. Brain disease is a late-onset event, and is extremely rare. Here, we are reporting a 57-year-old woman, a known case of VKH syndrome, presenting with brain encephalopathy several decades after the initial presentation. We think this long period between initial presentation and presentation of encephalopathy due to VKH syndrome has not been described before. She was treated with corticosteroids and discharged home with a good general condition. PMID:24753681

  9. Henry Hudson Monument, seen from Frances Schervier Apartments, with Henry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Henry Hudson Monument, seen from Frances Schervier Apartments, with Henry Hudson Bridge, Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan skyline, and George Washington Bridge in background, looking southwest. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  10. Henry Hudson Monument, seen from Frances Schervier Apartments, with Henry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Henry Hudson Monument, seen from Frances Schervier Apartments, with Henry Hudson Bridge, Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan skyline, George Washington Bridge, Hudson River, and Palisades Interstate Park in background, looking south. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  11. Henry's Law and Noisy Knuckles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough, Doris R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Henry's Law which describes the relationship between the pressure of gas and the concentration of that gas in a solution. Presents an application of Henry's Law to the cracking of knuckles. (CCM)

  12. The myeloarchitectonic studies on the human cerebral cortex of the Vogt-Vogt school, and their significance for the interpretation of functional neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuys, Rudolf

    2013-03-01

    The human cerebral cortex contains numerous myelinated fibres, many of which are concentrated in tangentially organized layers and radially oriented bundles. The spatial organization of these fibres is by no means homogeneous throughout the cortex. Local differences in the thickness and compactness of the fibre layers, and in the length and strength of the radial bundles renders it possible to recognize areas with a different myeloarchitecture. The neuroanatomical subdiscipline aimed at the identification and delineation of such areas is known as myeloarchitectonics. There is another, closely related neuroanatomical subdiscipline, named cytoarchitectonics. The aims and scope of this subdiscipline are the same as those of myeloarchitectonics, viz. parcellation. However, this subdiscipline focuses, as its name implies, on the size, shape and arrangement of the neuronal cell bodies in the cortex, rather than on the myelinated fibres. At the beginning of the twentieth century, two young investigators, Oskar and Cécile Vogt founded a centre for brain research, aimed to be devoted to the study of the (cyto + myelo) architecture of the cerebral cortex. The study of the cytoarchitecture was entrusted to their collaborator Korbinian Brodmann, who gained great fame with the creation of a cytoarchitectonic map of the human cerebral cortex. Here, we focus on the myeloarchitectonic studies on the cerebral cortex of the Vogt-Vogt school, because these studies are nearly forgotten in the present attempts to localize functional activations and to interprete findings in modern neuroimaging studies. Following introductory sections on the principles of myeloarchitectonics, and on the achievements of three myeloarchitectonic pioneers who did not belong to the Vogt-Vogt school, the pertinent literature is reviewed in some detail. These studies allow the conclusion that the human neocortex contains about 185 myeloarchitectonic areas, 70 frontal, 6 insular, 30 parietal, 19 occipital

  13. The Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome: association with hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Jaggarao, N.; Voth, D.; Jacobsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    A 45 year old Saudi male with poliosis, alopecia areata, vitiligo, anterior uveitis, inflammatory changes in the posterior pole of the retina and paraparesis presented with features of the Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism. To the best of our knowledge the association of diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism in this syndrome has not been reported previously. PMID:2602259

  14. Applying Henry`s Law to groundwater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chidgopkar, V.R.

    1996-03-01

    Air strippers are very popular equipment for mass transfer where air and water are contacted and the contaminants are transferred from water into the air phase. In a typical air-stripper arrangement, water flows from the top and air is blown from the bottom. The increase in surface area between the air and the water phases increases the removal efficiency. In packed towers, high-surface-area packing materials are used to that end. In a sieve tray tower, water flows across the tray through channels separated by baffles and air flows from the bottom, up through holes in the tray. In diffused aerators, air is introduced through a bubbler or a nozzle into the water stream. All these units are commercially available. Several environmental consulting and remediation engineering firms use Henry`s Law to predict the stripping performance of volatile and semi-volatile contaminants present using the above equipment. Extensive work has been done during the past few decades to determine Henry`s Law constant, H. Different procedures are reported in the literature to determine henry`s Law constant for various chemicals from the experimental data and from empirical correlations. This article discusses the reasons why so much error is observed in reported values of henry`s Law constants in the literature--the effect of various parameters such as temperature, co-solubility, etc., on H value. A modified experimental procedure to measure Henry`s Law constant is presented, then the law is applied in predicting stripping performance of various chemicals.

  15. Henry Gray, plagiarist.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    The first edition of Anatomy Descriptive and Surgical (1858) was greeted with accolades, but also provoked serious controversy concerning Henry Gray's failure to acknowledge the work of earlier anatomists. A review in the Medical Times (1859) accused Gray of intellectual theft. The journal took the unusual step of substantiating its indictment by publishing twenty parallel texts from Gray and from a pre-existing textbook, Quain's Anatomy. At the recent "Vesalius Continuum" conference in Zakynthos, Greece (2014) Professor Brion Benninger disputed the theft by announcing from the floor the results of a computer analysis of both texts, which he reported exonerated Gray by revealing no evidence of plagiarism. The analysis has not been forthcoming, however, despite requests. Here the historian of Gray's Anatomy supplements the argument set out in the Medical Times 150 years ago with data suggesting unwelcome personality traits in Henry Gray, and demonstrating the utility of others' work to his professional advancement. Fair dealing in the world of anatomy and indeed the genuineness of the lustre of medical fame are important matters, but whether quantitative evidence has anything to add to the discussion concerning Gray's probity can be assessed only if Benninger makes public his computer analysis. PMID:26696521

  16. Rim of Henry Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 02 April 2002) This portion of the rim of Henry Crater has numerous dark streaks located on the slopes of the inner crater wall. These dark slope streaks have been suggested to have formed when the relatively bright dust that mantles the slopes slides downhill, either exposing a dust-free darker surface or creating a darker surface by increasing its roughness. The topography in this region appears muted, indicating the presence of regional dust mantling. The materials on floor of the crater (middle to lower left) are layered, with differing degrees of hardness and resistance to erosion producing cliffs (resistant layers) and ledges (easily eroded layers). These layered materials may have been originally deposited in water, although deposition by other means, such as windblown dust and sand, is also possible. Henry Crater, named after a 19th Century French astronomer, is 170 km in diameter and is located at 10.9o N, 336.7o W (23.3o E) in a region called Arabia Terra.

  17. Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frese, Millie K., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This issue of the children's magazine, "The Goldfinch," focuses on Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover. The articles included are: (1) "Getting To Know Herbert Clark Hoover"; (2) "Lou Henry Hoover"; (3) "Meet an Iowa Author"; (4) "The Great Depression"; (5) "A Different Kind of Coupon"; (6) "The President's Mountain School"; (6) "Where are the Books?";…

  18. Take a Hike with Henry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Linda C.

    2000-01-01

    Presents activities and relevant Web sites associated with the picture book "Henry Hikes to Fitchburg" which is based on a passage from "Walden" by Henry David Thoreau. Includes author sites, Library of Congress sites, town profiles and histories, nature crafts, and recipes. (LRW)

  19. Joseph Henry and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberg, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Joseph Henry (1797-1878) is best known for his work in electromagnetism and as the first secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. But he was also a pioneer solar physicist, an early advocate of US participation in astrophysics, and a facilitator of international cooperation in astronomy. This paper will briefly trace his role in the development of the US astronomical community from the time he taught astronomy at Princeton in the 1830s through his death, focusing on failed efforts to persuade US astronomers and patrons of astronomy that the best path for US astronomy should be astrophysics. He thought that the US could make a more significant contribution to astronomy science by striking out on a less travelled path rather than competing with the established European observatories.

  20. Oskar and Cécile Vogt, Lenin's brain and the bumble-bees of the Black Forest.

    PubMed

    Kreutzberg, G W; Klatzo, I; Kleihues, P

    1992-10-01

    Oskar Vogt (1870-1955) was a prominent German neurologist and neuroanatomist with a strong interest in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. Together with his wife Cécile (1875-1962), he published landmark papers on the cyto- and myelo-architecture of the brain and the functional anatomy of the basal ganglia. He developed the concept of pathoclisis, i.e., the selective vulnerability of specific neuronal populations in the CNS. In the 1920's, Vogt created a multi-disciplinary brain research institute, the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Hirnforschung in Berlin-Buch. After Lenin's death in 1924, Oskar Vogt was called to Moscow where he formed a new brain research institute, with the main purpose to investigate the revolutionary's brain. After being dismissed from office by the Nazi government in 1937, the Vogts continued their work in a privately funded institute in Neustadt, the Black Forest.

  1. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome in patients with Cherokee Indian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Martinez, J A; Lopez, P F; Sternberg, P; Aaberg, T M; Lambert, H M; Capone, A; Mandell, B A; Newman, N J

    1992-11-15

    Eight patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome who have Cherokee Indian ancestry ranged from 17 to 49 years of age. Five of the patients were black, three were white. Visual acuity at the time of initial examination ranged from 20/20 to counting fingers. Clinical findings included granulomatous iridocyclitis in six patients, vitreitis in seven patients, disk edema in five patients, exudative retinal detachment in six patients, and multifocal choroidal lesions in all eight patients. All of the patients were treated with systemic corticosteroids, and they recovered visual acuity of 20/40 or better. The seven patients assayed had the HLA-DRw52 haplotype, including five who were homozygous for this allele. This finding may add to the increasing evidence that a class II HLA antigen at a D-related locus may predispose carriers to the development of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome. PMID:1443025

  2. [Long-term course of immunosuppressive therapy of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wand, K; Abraham, S; Loos, D; Stumpfe, S; Lohmann, C; Maier, M; Feucht, N

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the case of a 22-year old female patient, who first presented with holocephalic headaches and bilateral loss in vision. After diagnosis of a complete Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, high-dose corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Due to recurrent headaches 6 weeks later, immunosuppressive therapy was initiated with cyclosporine A. Because of an adverse effect (hirsutism) treatment was changed to azathioprine. In a long-term follow-up over 2 years the patient showed stable clinical findings with good visual acuity.

  3. [The Henry E. Huntington Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Terry

    The biographical sketch of Henry E. Huntington includes a description of the establishment of the Huntington Library and the purpose and scope of its collection. Although this is a free and public library, its use is restricted to qualified scholars having legitimate research needs. Photographic techniques were developed at the Huntington Library…

  4. Josh Billings (Henry Wheeler Shaw).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesterson, David B.

    Designed for use by the general reader, the college student, and the teacher, this book analyzes the life and literary career of Josh Billings (Henry Wheeler Shaw), emphasizing his literary ventures and artistic talents. The analysis reveals Billings' talents as a subtle humorist, homespun philosopher, and artist of the essay. Chapters include…

  5. The Right Fit for Henry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, J. Christine; Staff, Linda K.; Theiss, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    When Henry was enrolled in a gifted program in 3rd grade, he showed many of the classic signs of giftedness, but his reading and writing skills were below grade level. An evaluation revealed that he was twice-exceptional--he was gifted and he had a learning disability. Believing that both his giftedness and his learning disability warranted…

  6. Henry Giroux and the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trend, David

    2012-01-01

    Henry A. Giroux is well known for pushing the definitions of education. From his early forays into what has been termed the "New Sociology of Education" in the early 1980s to his more recent discussions of "public pedagogy", Giroux has methodically challenged existing orthodoxies. This essay will focus on the interdisciplinary broadening of…

  7. Draper, Henry (1837-82)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    American pioneer of astronomical photography, born in Prince Edward County, VA. Made the first photograph of a stellar spectrum (Vega). His assistant WILLIAMINA FLEMING analysed the objective prism photographs of stellar spectra and formed the basis for the classification of stars, with the data eventually published by ANNIE CANNON as the Henry Draper Catalog of Stellar Spectra....

  8. Joseph Henry and the Telegraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochfelder, David

    1997-04-01

    Morse's telegraph rested upon three scientific advances which occured between 1800 and 1830: the development of battery technology, the formulation of laws governing the behavior of electrical components in circuits, and the discovery of electromagnetic phenomena. Joseph Henry was crucial to the development of the early telegraph. His work on electromagnetism made it possible for the electric current to manifest itself as useful mechanical work. Henry developed electromagnets of sufficient lifting power, but which drew relatively small currents; these magnets were the heart of Morse's telegraph receiver. Morse also used electromagnets as relays, which allowed him to transmit signals over great distances. Morse often acknowledged his debt to Henry, and the two enjoyed a cordial working relationship until the mid-1840s. But during the bitter and protracted litigation over Morse's patent, Henry testified (unwillingly, he claimed) against the inventor. This began a lifelong quarrel between the two men, the specifics of which were tedious and petty. In general terms, however, their conflict arose over different notions regarding scientific discovery and technological innovation.

  9. Henry Morgenthau's voice in history.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Henry Morgenthau (1856-1946) distinguished himself as the U.S. Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, 1913-1916, and as the chairman of the League of Nations Refugee Settlement Commission (RSC) for Greece, 1923-24. I describe aspects of his early life that shaped the man he became, his accomplishments in these two posts, and his feelings about himself over time. At the end I briefly describe his attitude toward a possible Jewish state in Palestine. PMID:25630196

  10. Violation of the Vogt-Russell theorem for homogeneous nondegenerate stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.

    1974-01-01

    A systematic study is made of the number and types of solutions of the equilibrium equations of stellar structure, in the case of homogeneous stars of Population I over the mass range 2-1000 solar masses, with four different opacity representations. A variant of the usual fitting method permits the simultaneous investigation of convergence and tendency toward multiplicity of the solutions. Quadratic interpolation and extrapolation of Carson's new opacity tables produces a very large opacity at low temperatures that greatly affects the loose outer layers of massive stars, while leaving the cores practically unaffected. As a result, over a small mass range, well above 100 solar masses, triple solutions exist, always near an effective temperature of log Te = 4.73. A simple classification of the known exceptions to the Vogt-Russell theorem on the uniqueness of stellar structure is given.

  11. Pseudotumoral and Multiple Retinal Pigment Epithelium Proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease.

    PubMed

    Yepez, Juan B; Murati, Felipe; Petitto, Michele; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of pseudotumoral retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease, in a 50-year-old female who presented with a juxtapapillary and peripheral subretinal hyperpigmented lesions in the left eye and "sunset glow fundus," hyperpigmented striae, and multiple atrophic chorioretinal spots in the periphery. The darkly pigmented exuberant larger subretinal mass extended to the periphery with associated subretinal fibrosis. This patient demonstrated the entire clinical presentation of VKH disease, which tends to course with a chronic, bilateral, granulomatous panuveitis and exudative retinal detachment associated with poliosis, vitiligo, alopecia, and central nervous system and auditory signs. Our case is unique for the presence of exuberant, pseudotumoral RPE proliferation at the juxtapapillary region and peripheral area. Although this complication has rarely been reported, a high index of suspicion is warranted for early diagnosis and avoids unnecessary treatments of a pseudotumor. PMID:26509089

  12. Layered Yardangs in Henry Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-389, 12 June 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows wind-sculpted remnants of layered sedimentary rock that once completely covered the northwestern floor of Henry Crater, an ancient impact basin located at 11.7oN, 336.4oW. These landforms, shaped somewhat like inverted boat hulls, are 'textbook examples' of a wind erosion form known as a yardang. The image covers an area 2.3 km (1.4 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  13. Henry's law constants of polyols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Müller, J.-F.

    2014-05-01

    Henry's law constants (HLC) are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. Depending on the case, infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs), solid state pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediary results. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most cases. Using these values and those from a previous work (Compernolle and Müller, 2014), an assessment is made on the partitioning of polyols, diacids and hydroxy acids to droplet and aqueous aerosol.

  14. The Don Henry Story. Teaching with Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.

    Don Henry was a student at the University of Kansas (Lawrence, Kansas) who experienced a profound political change during his years on campus. Henry became a leader in radical campus organizations, volunteered to fight in the Spanish Civil War with the Lincoln Brigade, and died on the battlefield in Aragon (Spain) in September 1937. An article in…

  15. John Henry--The Steel Driving Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David E.; Gulley, Laura L.

    2005-01-01

    The story of John Henry provided the setting for sixth-grade class to participate in a John Henry Day of mathematics experiments. The students collected data from experiments where students competed against machines and technology. The student analyzed the data by comparing two box plots, a box plot of human data, and a box plot of machine or…

  16. Henry (Hank) J. Moore (1928-1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.

    Henry (Hank) J. Moore, a member of the AGU Planetary Sciences section, died of a heart attack on September 21, 1998. He was in Utah while on a family trip to visit his daughter. His 70th birthday occurred just 3 weeks before his death. Henry, who was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, took great pride in having found and visited the small town of Albuquerque in the Extremadura region of Spain, noting the geologic similarities between that part of Spain and his birthplace in America.Henry, known for his contributions to the Apollo,Viking, Magellan, and Mars Pathfinder missions, attributed his career to a chance encounter with Gene Shoemaker in 1960. Henry was completing his Ph.D. work in geology at Stanford University and Gene obviously had spotted Henry's keen analytical mind. I suspect this pivotal meeting was far from a chance encounter.

  17. Henry Leland (1923-2013).

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sally J

    2015-01-01

    This article memorializes Henry Leland (1923-2013). Leland was an advocate for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). He was a skilled clinician and developmentalist, and his application of play therapy to affect specific outcomes in children with IDD was far ahead of its time. His legacy is reflected in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.) definition of IDD, in which severity levels are defined by a person's current adaptive capacities rather than their IQ scores. It is reflected in the fact that many states in the country have no institutions at all for persons with IDD because community living and working are now the standard. It is reflected in the social justice actions supporting persons with IDD in prisons and on death row. It is reflected in the empirically supported and widely accepted practices involving service delivery to young children with IDD and their families through use of play strategies. PMID:25581008

  18. Henry's law constants of polyols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Müller, J.-F.

    2014-12-01

    Henry's law constants (HLC) are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. While deriving HLC and depending on the case, also infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs), solid state vapour pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediate results. An error analysis on the intermediate quantities and the obtained HLC is included. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most cases. Using these values and those from a previous work (Compernolle and Müller, 2014), an assessment is made on the partitioning of polyols, diacids and hydroxy acids to droplet and aqueous aerosol.

  19. Geology of the Henry Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, G.K.

    1877-01-01

    If these pages fail to give a correct account of the structure of the Henry Mountains the fault is mine and I have no excuse. In all the earlier exploration of the Rocky Mountain Region, as well as in much of the more recent survey, the geologist has merely accompanied the geographer and has had no voice in the determination of either the route or the rate of travel. When the structure of a mountain was in doubt he was rarely able to visit the points which should resolve the doubt, but was compelled to turn regretfully away. Not so in the survey of the Henry Mountains. Geological exploration had shown that they were well disposed for examination, and that they promised to give the key to a type of structure which was at best obscurely known; and I was sent by Professor Powell to make a study of them, without restriction as to my order or method. I was limited only in time, the snow stopping my work two months after it was begun. Two months would be far too short a period in which to survey a thousand square miles in Pennsylvania or Illinois, but among the Colorado Plateaus it proved sufficient. A few comprehensive views from mountain tops gave the general distribution of the formations, and the remainder of the time was spent in the examination of the localities which best displayed the peculiar features of the structure. So thorough was the display and so satisfactory the examination, that in preparing my report I have felt less than ever before the desire to revisit the field and prove my conclusions by more extended observation.

  20. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome: Perspectives for immunogenetics, multimodal imaging, and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Silpa-Archa, Sukhum; Silpa-Archa, Narumol; Preble, Janine M; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome (VKH) is a bilateral, diffuse granulomatous uveitis associated with neurological, audiovestibular, and dermatological systems. The primary pathogenesis is T-cell-mediated autoimmune response directed towards melanocyte or melanocyte-associated antigens causing inflammation of the choroidal layer. This phenomenon usually leads to diffuse inflammatory conditions throughout most parts of eye before ocular complications ensue. The diagnosis is achieved mainly by clinical features according to the revised diagnostic criteria of VKH published in 2001, without confirmatory serologic tests as a requirement. However, ancillary tests, especially multimodal imaging, can reliably provide supportive evidence for the diagnosis of early cases, atypical presentations, and evaluation of management. Prompt treatment with systemic corticosteroids and early non-steroidal immunosuppressive drug therapy can lessen visually threatening ocular complications and bring about good visual recovery. Close monitoring warrants visual stabilization from disease recurrence and ocular complications. This article review aims not only to update comprehensive knowledge regarding VKH but also to emphasize three major perspectives of VKH: immunogenetics as the major pathogenesis of the disease, multimodal imaging, and therapeutic options. The role of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy and drug-induced VKH is also provided.

  1. Joseph Henry and the American Philosophical Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Walter E.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the extent to which Henry was affiliated with the Society and its influence on his work including his evolving relationship with the Society in the scope of the changing nature of American scientific institutions. (DF)

  2. Obituary: Henry Emil Kandrup, 1955-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Gottesman, Stephen T.

    2004-12-01

    Henry Emil Kandrup died on 18 October 2003 at his home in Gainesville Florida. Henry was a theoretical astrophysicist specializing in the application of chaotic dynamics to stellar systems. At the time of his death, Henry was a Professor at the University of Florida where he had taught for 13 years. Henry was born in Manhasset, New York on July 24, 1955 and spent most of his childhood in Great Neck. His parents, Jytte and Fred, were immigrants from Denmark where his father had worked as a silver smith. Henry was a precocious child, skipping both third and fifth grades. With the help of Sidney Spivack, a professor of sociology at Columbia University, his parents enrolled Henry in the Brooks Preparatory School in Andover, Massachusetts. After graduating at age 16, Henry enrolled at Cornell, transferring to Princeton the following year. Henry's parents adored their only child and worked hard to provide him with intellectual opportunities. Henry became an accomplished musician (organ, piano, French horn) and linguist (English, Danish, German) and was a passionate devotee of opera and ballet. Henry received his PhD in 1980 from the University of Chicago, where his thesis advisor was James Ipser. He taught at Oakland University in Michigan and Syracuse University in New York before coming to the University of Florida in 1990. Henry was sui generis. He shunned conventionality in his personal appearance and in his public demeanor, and always chose forthrightness and candor over polite silence. But to those of us who knew Henry well, his bluntness was a reflection of his intellectual consistency. Henry always said exactly what he thought, both in his published work and his public presentations, and never compromised himself for the sake of appearances. Nothing that he said or wrote was less than fully thought out. Henry's PhD thesis was entitled "Stochastic Problems in Stellar Dynamics," and most of his subsequent research was in this field. Motion in stellar systems can be

  3. The elusive Henry Jones Shrapnell.

    PubMed

    McGovern, F H

    1983-07-01

    In a small series of articles published in The London Gazette in 1830 Henry Jones Shrapnell, surgeon, first described the correct form and structure of the tympanic membrane. He divided the drum membrane into two parts, the pars tensa and the pars flaccida. To this day the latter structure is known to every otologist and to most medical students as Shrapnell's membrane. In addition he wrote on the function of the membrana tympani, the nerves of the ear, and the true anatomy of the os incus. Heretofore the lenticular process of the incus was considered a separate bone in the ossicular chain. In spite of his distinctive contribution to medicine, a search of over a decade failed to uncover little basic information about Shrapnell's life, and for this reason he has been called by a distinguished librarian, the elusive Mr. Shrapnell. Recently, from my continued investigation, and with the help of many fine London scholars, a clearer picture has emerged of Shrapnell's forebearers, his family, his education and his death. PMID:6345977

  4. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease: Novel insights into pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Du, Liping; Kijlstra, Aize; Yang, Peizeng

    2016-05-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease is one of the major vision-threatening diseases in certain populations, such as Asians, native Americans, Hispanics and Middle Easterners. It is characterized by bilateral uveitis that is frequently associated with neurological (meningeal), auditory, and integumentary manifestations. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of VKH disease need to be further elucidated, it is widely accepted that the clinical manifestations are caused by an autoimmune response directed against melanin associated antigens in the target organs, i.e. the eye, inner ear, meninges and skin. In the past decades, accumulating evidence has shown that genetic factors, including VKH disease specific risk factors (HLA-DR4) and general risk factors for immune mediated diseases (IL-23R), dysfunction of immune responses, including the innate and adaptive immune system and environmental triggering factors are all involved in the development of VKH disease. Clinically, the criteria of diagnosis for VKH disease have been further improved by the employment of novel imaging techniques for the eye. For the treatment, early and adequate corticosteroids are still the mainstream regime for the disease. However, immunosuppressive and biological agents have shown benefit for the treatment of VKH disease, especially for those patients not responding to corticosteroids. This review is focused on our current knowledge of VKH disease, especially for the diagnosis, pathogenesis (genetic factors and immune mechanisms), ancillary tests and treatment. A better understanding of the role of microbiome composition, genetic basis and ongoing immune processes along with the development of novel biomarkers and objective quantitative assays to monitor intraocular inflammation are needed to improve current management of VKH patients. PMID:26875727

  5. Optical coherence tomographic assessment of dynamic macular changes in patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    PubMed

    Ikewaki, Junko; Kimoto, Kenichi; Choshi, Toshiharu; Nagata, Mayuko; Motomura, Yuka; Tamura, Kouichirou; Shinoda, Kei; Nakatsuka, Kazuo

    2011-02-01

    To determine the relationship between visual acuity and three-dimensional optical coherence tomographic (3D-OCT) findings of the macula in eyes with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease. Twelve eyes of six patients (three men and three woman, average age 53.2 years) in the acute phase of VKH disease were examined with a 3D-OCT instrument. All of the eyes had a serous macular detachment. The height of the sensory retinal detachment (SRD) and the sensory retinal thickness (SRT) were measured by OCT before treatment (acute stage) and at the convalescent stage. The correlation between the retinal morphology and visual acuity was evaluated. The height of the SRD and the SRT were 612.5 ± 371.2 and 136. 7 ± 22.0 μm, respectively. The initial visual acuity was significantly worse in eyes with a higher SRD (P = 0.014, r = 0.68) but the correlation between initial visual acuity and SRT was not significant. The recovery of visual acuity was attained in 50.7 ± 44.1 days and the complete resolution of the SRD was attained in 30.5 ± 23.2 days. The final visual acuity was attained several days after the complete resolution of the SRD in all four eyes of patients over 60 years of age, but the recovery of visual acuity often preceded the complete resolution of the SRD. The OCT images provided a noninvasive indicator of the severity of the disease and dynamic changes in the macular morphology, reflecting the effect of treatment in association with the improvement in visual acuity. Monitoring the SRD by 3D-OCT may guide the tapering of systemic corticosteroid treatment.

  6. Joseph Henry's Conception of Scientific Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theerman, Paul

    1997-04-01

    Joseph Henry, America's premier physicist and physics teacher in the mid-nineteenth century, had decided views of scientific knowledge. These were expressed in two ways. First of all, scientific knowledge led to moral betterment. Thus the study of science was a morally good thing. This was not only because it led to the contemplation of God's creation, which was a standard reason justifying the study of science dating from the Scientific Revolution and even earlier. More importantly, the study of science itself was a moral discipline, imparting to scientists the habits and virtues of truthfulness, respect for others, care and diligence, and the discernment of meaningful patterns from experience. The moral ideals of science were expressed most strongly in Henry's upholding the international "Republic of Science"; conversely, cheapening science was a sign of moral failure. Second, for Henry and his generation, science provided a path to sure truth, separate from falsehood of both the politics and the quackery that characterized mid-century public life. Henry promoted this in his championing of the Smithsonian Institution a scientific establishment, against the ideas of others who wanted to make it a literary establishment or a training school for teachers. For Henry, the Smithsonian's scientific reputation would be established by relying on careful peer review in its publications, and supporting established scientists to write authoritative popular works. The purpose of both these activities was to raise the profile of science in the United States and further establish science and the scientific method as a guide to public life.

  7. History into Drama: The Perspective of "1 Henry IV."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Larry S.

    1978-01-01

    Contrasts Shakespeare's "Henry V" and "Henry IV" series, in which human interaction becomes history, with plays such as "Julius Caesar," which focus on psychological analysis and the internalized protagonist. (MB)

  8. Inwood Hill Park underpass, below Henry Hudson Parkway southbound, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Inwood Hill Park underpass, below Henry Hudson Parkway southbound, looking southeast. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  9. View of fourlane Henry Hudson Parkway winding through Riverdale, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of four-lane Henry Hudson Parkway winding through Riverdale, showing service roads, from White Hall Cooperative Apartments. Henry Hudson Bridge, Inwood Hill Park, the Cloisters and Fort Tryon Park, George Washington Bridge, and Manhattan skyline in background, looking southwest. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  10. Possible Pasts: Historiography and Legitimation in "Henry VIII."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Ivo

    1996-01-01

    Aims to rehabilitate the reputation of Shakespeare's "Henry VIII" and emphasizes its potential usefulness in the classroom by reconsidering it in the context of Renaissance history writing. Shows how "Henry VIII" can be taught as a commentary on or seen as a continuation of incipient themes in "The Tempest" and "Henry V." (TB)

  11. Lou Henry Hoover and the Girl Scouts: A Tribute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullin, Dare Stark

    This booklet is a special tribute to Lou Henry Hoover, wife of President Herbert Hoover, from a close friend, social secretary, and chief research assistant to the First Lady. The small booklet provides a look at the social history of the era by focusing on Lou Henry Hoover and her interest in the outdoors. Lou Henry Hoover was the first women to…

  12. Henry James on the Art of Acting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, David W.

    Henry James, the nineteenth-century American novelist, also served on occasion as a theatre critic. Between 1875 and 1890 he reviewed several productions in Boston, New York, London, and Paris for "Atlantic Monthly" and other periodicals. The reviews are of interest because of James' high standards regarding acting and his often devasting comments…

  13. Henri Hubert, racial science and political myth.

    PubMed

    Strenski, I

    1987-10-01

    Henri Hubert developed early Durkheimian critiques of racial sciences such as anthroposociology from his perspective as an archeologist, historian, and ethnographer of primitive European religions. His major works on the "primitive" Celts and Germans continue these critiques of racism. But Hubert also engaged in the political mythologizing of French national identity by trading in the republican myth of "celtisme."

  14. In the Style of Henry Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project inspired by Henry Moore's sculptures. This project consists of two activities. In the first activity, students select, sand and stain a wood block that would become a base for their plaster sculpture. This activity would keep the students independently engaged (classroom management) while the…

  15. Henry Ward Beecher: A Nation's Tribune.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Daniel Ross

    Henry Ward Beecher was America's most prominent 19th century liberal preacher and a major spokesperson for New England Transcendentalism. His philosophy integrated four fundamental themes: the creation of a moral code based on the internalization of values and peer group pressures, the establishment of the reform ideal of the impartial nonpartisan…

  16. Transcendentalism and Henry Barnard's "School Architecture"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothfork, John

    1977-01-01

    Sketches the intellectual and sociological climate that led Henry Barnard to advocate Greek Revival architecture for school buildings, takes a look at why this style and its implicit values were popular in the era between 1820-1860, and examines a few of the plans in Barnard's "School Architecture" (1838-48). (Author/RK)

  17. Henry Dyer: Engineer and Educational Innovator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsobrook, David; Mitchell, Gordon

    1997-01-01

    Describes the life and contributions of Scottish engineer Henry Dyer to educational developments in Japan and Scotland around the turn of the century. Relates his success in founding the Imperial College of Technology, Tokyo (Japan), and the lessons he brought back to Scotland after that experience. (DSK)

  18. The Ideas of Henry Jenkins and Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Byron

    2008-01-01

    Henry Jenkins, director of the Comparative Media Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and keynote speaker at the 2007 American Library Association's "Gaming, Learning and Libraries Symposium" in Chicago is a visionary leader in the areas of new media and media convergence. In a white paper on digital media and learning…

  19. Appreciating Gantos' Jack Henry as an Archetype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jinx Stapleton

    2001-01-01

    Examines the contemporary realism of the literary character Jack Henry, a middle school child, as representative of two classic literary elements, the quest cycle and the lone hero. Concludes that classic structures of plots and characteristics of hero offer many modern protagonists a shape for their realistic and ordinary adventures. (SG/47)

  20. Henri Matisse's "Beasts of the Sea"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Henri Matisse (1869-1954) was a very prolific Impressionist/Post-Impressionist artist whose longevity allowed him to produce many wonderful, brightly colored pieces of art that spanned different styles, movements and media. Elementary-school children love color and appreciate any project that does not require their work to be exact or totally…

  1. Compilation of Henry's law constants, version 3.99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.

    2014-11-01

    Many atmospheric chemicals occur in the gas phase as well as in liquid cloud droplets and aerosol particles. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the distribution between the phases. According to Henry's law, the equilibrium ratio between the abundances in the gas phase and in the aqueous phase is constant for a dilute solution. Henry's law constants of trace gases of potential importance in environmental chemistry have been collected and converted into a uniform format. The compilation contains 14775 values of Henry's law constants for 3214 species, collected from 639 references. It is also available on the internet at henrys-law.org">http://www.henrys-law.org.

  2. Contaminant Monitoring Strategy for Henrys Lake, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    John S. Irving; R. P. Breckenridge

    1992-12-01

    Henrys Lake, located in southeastern Idaho, is a large, shallow lake (6,600 acres, {approx} 17.1 feet maximum depth) located at 6,472 feet elevation in Fremont Co., Idaho at the headwaters of the Henrys Fork of the Snake River. The upper watershed is comprised of high mountains of the Targhee National Forest and the lakeshore is surrounded by extensive flats and wetlands, which are mostly privately owned. The lake has been dammed since 1922, and the upper 12 feet of the lake waters are allocated for downriver use. Henrys Lake is a naturally productive lake supporting a nationally recognized ''Blue Ribbon'' trout fishery. There is concern that increasing housing development and cattle grazing may accelerate eutrophication and result in winter and early spring fish kills. There has not been a recent thorough assessment of lake water quality. However, the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is currently conducting a study of water quality on Henrys Lake and tributary streams. Septic systems and lawn runoff from housing developments on the north, west, and southwest shores could potentially contribute to the nutrient enrichment of the lake. Many houses are on steep hillsides where runoff from lawns, driveways, etc. drain into wetland flats along the lake or directly into the lake. In addition, seepage from septic systems (drainfields) drain directly into the wetlands enter groundwater areas that seep into the lake. Cattle grazing along the lake margin, riparian areas, and uplands is likely accelerating erosion and nutrient enrichment. Also, cattle grazing along riparian areas likely adds to nutrient enrichment of the lake through subsurface flow and direct runoff. Stream bank and lakeshore erosion may also accelerate eutrophication by increasing the sedimentation of the lake. Approximately nine streams feed the lake (see map), but flows are often severely reduced or completely eliminated due to irrigation diversion. In addition, subsurface flows can occur as a

  3. Topical difluprednate for treatment of serous retinal detachment and panuveitis associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Stacey; Taban, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Summary Patients with bilateral serous retinal detachments and panuveitis related to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease are commonly managed with oral corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents, and/or intravitreal injections. We present the case of a 56-year-old Hispanic man with Harada disease whose bilateral serous retinal detachments and panuveitis were treated with topical corticosteroid difluprednate alone. Functional and anatomical recoveries were assessed by fluorescein angiograms and optical coherence tomography studies over a period of 9 months. The patient’s serous retinal detachments resolved, and his vision and panuveitis improved dramatically over a period of 2 weeks, after which he was placed on a drop taper and maintenance therapy for the remainder of the 9 months. PMID:27582676

  4. Topical difluprednate for treatment of serous retinal detachment and panuveitis associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Stacey; Taban, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bilateral serous retinal detachments and panuveitis related to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease are commonly managed with oral corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents, and/or intravitreal injections. We present the case of a 56-year-old Hispanic man with Harada disease whose bilateral serous retinal detachments and panuveitis were treated with topical corticosteroid difluprednate alone. Functional and anatomical recoveries were assessed by fluorescein angiograms and optical coherence tomography studies over a period of 9 months. The patient's serous retinal detachments resolved, and his vision and panuveitis improved dramatically over a period of 2 weeks, after which he was placed on a drop taper and maintenance therapy for the remainder of the 9 months. PMID:27582676

  5. Henri Laborit and the inhibition of action.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Edward

    2014-03-01

    Henri Laborit was one of the founders of modern neuropsychopharmacology, having discovered, or participated in, the discovery of chlorpromazine, gamma-OH, clomethiazole, and minaprine. He also put forward a theory regarding the necessity of counteracting the negative consequences of defense mechanisms during anesthesia or behavioral inhibition. The scope of his work covers neurophysiology, pharmacology, psychiatry, and psychosomatics. His independence of spirit meant that most of his research was not done within university settings.

  6. James McHenry, M.D. of Fort McHenry in Baltimore Towne.

    PubMed

    Miller, J M

    1992-05-01

    James McHenry, M.D., whose name is best known for the fort immortalized in the Star Spangled Banner, was one of the early members of Med Chi. In addition, he was secretary to George Washington; aide to Lafayette; member of the Maryland Senate, the General Assembly of Maryland, and the US Congress; and signer of the Constitution.

  7. The medical life of Henry Norman Bethune

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Jean; Goulet, Denis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Henry Norman Bethune is one of the most exciting and incredible surgeons that Canada has ever produced. Indeed, he is often characterized as one of the world’s best-known surgeons. He was an innovator and his scientific contributions have stood the test of time. In Canada, he will forever be remembered as a social activist committed to the welfare of the poor and to the reform of the health care system. In the People’s Republic of China, he is idolized and remains the only foreigner to ever become a national hero. OBJECTIVE: To detail the numerous and significant achievements of Henry Norman Bethune in the field of thoracic surgery and as a social activist and describe his heroic war-time actions on the battlefields of both Spain and China. METHOD: Information was gathered through the reading of the numerous publications written about the life and work of Bethune, interviews with knowledgeable people from Canadian and Chinese universities, analysis of Bethune’s own publications, and extensive experience of one of the authors in China. RESULTS: In the social sense, Henry Norman Bethune had a difficult personality, but he was deeply caring about the plight of his patients, especially the poor. As a thoracic surgeon, he could be ingenious, thoughtful and effective but he could also be abrasive, restless and temperamental. His scientific contributions were sound and, at the time, gained worldwide attention. As an activist, he led a crusade to reform the Canadian health care system, demanding free health care for all. His outstanding work during the Spanish Civil War, where he organized the first ever mobile blood transfusion unit, and during the Sino-Japanese war, where he was totally committed to the welfare of both soldiers and civilian population, were deliberate acts of resistance against Fascist onslaught and enthusiasm for the Communist cause. CONCLUSIONS: Henry Norman Bethune was unconventional and a revolutionary, but he was brilliant. He will

  8. Dialogue of Differences: The Writing of Henry Holmes Smith.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossen, Howard

    In addition to surveying the writings of Henry Holmes Smith, this paper explains his importance as a theoretician and practitioner of photography. After a discussion of Smith's ideas on "reading photographs" and his concerns with the ethics of photography, particularly of photojournalism, the essays in the book, "Henry Holmes Smith: Selected…

  9. 77 FR 70159 - Knueppel, Henry W.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Knueppel, Henry W.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on November 15, 2012, Henry W. Knueppel submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking...

  10. Henry Hudson Bridge over Harlem River Shipping Canal at confluence ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Henry Hudson Bridge over Harlem River Shipping Canal at confluence with Hudson River, from Isham Park, view northeast. Inwood Hill Park on left, Spuyten Duyvil Shorefront Park on right, Palisades Interstate Park in background. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  11. View of cars entering Henry Hudson Parkway southbound at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of cars entering Henry Hudson Parkway southbound at the Mosholu Parkway interchange, with outcropping in northwest Van Cortlandt Park in background, looking north. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  12. View of Harlem River Shipping Canal from Henry Hudson Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Harlem River Shipping Canal from Henry Hudson Bridge, looking southeast. Isham Park in center, Inwood Hill Park at right. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  13. Henry Hudson Bridge upper deck and pedestrian walkway showing parapets ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Henry Hudson Bridge upper deck and pedestrian walkway showing parapets with pipe rails. View of Inwood Hill Park in background, with a faint view of the Empire State Building amidst distant highrises at left, looking south. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  14. West Harlem Walk (Hudson River Valley Greenway) beneath Henry Hudson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West Harlem Walk (Hudson River Valley Greenway) beneath Henry Hudson Parkway (HHP) Viaduct at West 155th Street vicinity, with Palisades, George Washington Bridge, and Little Red Lighthouse (visible to left of bridge tower) in background, looking northeast. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  15. Henry Hudson Bridge toll plaza, upper level, looking west. Pipe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Henry Hudson Bridge toll plaza, upper level, looking west. Pipe railing parapets and pedestrian walkway on left. Inwood Hill Park in background. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  16. Teaching Students about the Environment with Henry David Thoreau

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Walden: The Ballad of Thoreau" is a two-act four-character play about the final two days writer Henry David Thoreau spent in his cabin before leaving Walden Pond. Teachers can use this play to teach about preserving the earth to students. This article presents a brief synopsis of the play and a brief biography of Henry David Thoreau.

  17. 75 FR 21288 - Henry Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Henry Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application April 16, 2010. Take notice that on April 5, 2010, Henry Gas Storage LLC (HGS), 1010 Lamar, Suite 1720, Houston, Texas 77002, filed... section 7(c)(1)(B) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA), to perform specific temporary activity related to...

  18. Professor Henry, Mr. Faraday, and the Hunt for Electromagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Albert E.

    1997-04-01

    On different sides of the Atlantic but about the same time, Michael Faraday and Joseph Henry announced success in a quest that had preoccupied the scientific community for a decade: coaxing electricity from magnetism. "Mutual induction," what Faraday and Henry had identified in the early 1830s, would turn out to be not only a foundational concept in the physics of electricity and magnetism but also the principle behind the technology of electrical transformers and generators--two mainstays of industrialization. Although Faraday's breakthrough in London and Henry's in Albany might appear to be classic examples of "independent discovery," they were not. The two natural philosophers shared a similar orientation toward their research and, moreover, a distinctive laboratory instrument: Henry's new, powerful electromagnet. Thus, the story of Henry's and Faraday's search for induction illuminates not only the workings of Victorian science but also the crucial part that an instrument--the unadorned hardware--can play in scientific inquiry. Albert Moyer takes this story from his biography of Joseph Henry that Smithsonian Institution Press is about to publish in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Henry's birth. The biography focuses on Henry's early and middle years, 1797-1847, from his emergence as America's foremost physical scientist to his election as the Smithsonian Institution's first director.

  19. The Rice University Press Initiative: An Interview with Charles Henry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevitte, Chad; Henry, Charles

    2007-01-01

    In this interview Charles Henry, publisher of the Rice University Press (RUP), discusses RUP's rebirth as a fully digital university press. Henry addresses the circumstances that led to this decision, and he further outlines the RUP business model whereby the press will publish its own titles--both digitally and in print-on-demand--while…

  20. Memory Drum Theory's C Movement: Revelations from Franklin Henry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischman, Mark G.; Christina, Robert W.; Anson, J. Greg

    2008-01-01

    Franklin Henry's "memory drum" theory of neuromotor reaction (Henry & Rogers, 1960) was one of the most influential studies of the response programming stage of information processing. The paper is the most-cited study ever published in the "Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport." However, few people know there is a noteworthy error in the…

  1. Juvenile Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease in Which Good Visual Prognosis Was Derived from Swift and Definitive Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Atsushi; Tominaga, Satoko; Kawashima, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    We report an 8-year-old girl who manifested Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease. At the first visit, conjunctival hyperemia, inflammation in the anterior chamber, serous retinal detachment, and papillitis were observed in both eyes. Fluorescein angiography (FA) revealed bilateral subretinal fluid and papillitis. Ocular computed tomography (OCT) showed subretinal fluid and choroidal hypertrophy underneath macula in both eyes. Cerebrospinal fluid examination indicated aseptic meningitis. Systemic data did not suggest the other systemic diseases. Therefore, she was diagnosed with incomplete VKH disease. After corticosteroid pulse therapy, oral prednisolone was administered for seven months. Eighteen days after the induction of the treatments, inflammation in the anterior chamber and serous retinal detachment of both eyes disappeared completely. For seven months after the induction of the treatments, she had no relapses of any symptoms. Cerebrospinal fluid examination and FA for children are difficult to conduct, since it is difficult to get informed consent of these examinations from their parents. However, those thorough examinations enable us to make a swift and definitive diagnosis of VKH disease, thus assuring good visual prognosis. We have to bear in mind that juvenile VKH disease is very rare, yet when it occurs, ophthalmologic examinations help us diagnose and treat it. PMID:27110416

  2. Le syndrome de Vogt-Koyanagi Harada dans sa forme purement oculaire: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Louaya, Shamil; Bennouk, Youssef; Kriet, Mohamed; Oubaaz, Abdelbarre

    2014-01-01

    Le syndrome de Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) est une affection systémique rare, sévère mettant en jeu le pronostic visuel malgré les traitements agressifs, caractérisée par l'association de plusieurs symptômes: oculaires, méningés, auditifs et cutanés secondaire à une auto-immunisation où le mélanocyte serait la cellule cible. Nous rapportons un nouveau cas rare où l'atteinte oculaire est isolée. La sévérité de l'uvéite réside dans la fréquence des récidives, dans la cortico-résistance et dans la forte incidence des complications qui conditionnent le pronostic et expliquent les acuités visuelles finales médiocres. La prise en charge doit être précoce afin d'essayer d'améliorer le pronostic visuel. PMID:25667692

  3. Obituary: Henry Albers (1925-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chromey, Fred

    2011-12-01

    Henry Albers, professor of astronomy at Vassar College for over thirty years, died March 29, 2009, in Fairhope, Alabama. For his work at Vassar, where he held the Maria Mitchell Chair, Albers received the first Maria Mitchell Women in Science Award for his inspiration of women astronomers. He said "In the final analysis it is the students who bring the joy into teaching." As a professional astronomer, Albers did observational work on Galactic structure in the southern Milky Way, and on the structure of the Magellanic Clouds. In retirement, Albers published Maria Mitchell - A Life in Journals and Letters, the firsthand account of America's first woman astronomer. Albers's research was on photographic near-infrared spectroscopy of red giant stars in the southern Milky Way, some proper motion studies, and on the structure of the Magellanic Clouds. A series of seven NSF grants supported his six trips to Chile to make spectroscopic observations, as well as his sabbatical collaborations at Minnesota, Leiden, and the Royal Observatory in Edinburgh. Henry Albers arrived at Vassar in 1958, to find an astronomy program that had been recently absorbed by the physics department, and that was suffering neglect after the retirement of Maud Makemson. For the next 31 years, with incredible energy -- he sometimes taught seven courses a year -- he built the astronomy program into one double in size (from one to two tenure lines), whose th century facilities have been replaced with a st century observatory. For a remarkable stretch of 20-some-years, Albers and physicist Bob Stearns, with considerable grace, alternated chairmanship of the joint department of physics and astronomy. Henry Albers was a devoted citizen of Vassar College and an enthusiastic participant in the process of faculty governance at that institution. He would have been the first to concede that his enthusiasm was sometimes excessive, and that his contributions at faculty meetings occasionally failed to move the

  4. The death of Henry II of France.

    PubMed

    Faria, M A

    1992-12-01

    On June 30, 1559, King Henry II of France (1519-1559), against the advice of his court ministers, participated in a fateful joust. The wooden lance of his younger opponent pierced the King's headgear, shattered into fragments, and penetrated his right orbit and temple. The King survived for 11 days following the mortal wound and was treated by two of the most distinguished physicians of the Renaissance: Ambroise Paré (1510-1590), the master surgeon, and Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), the great anatomist. The unfortunate event, the nature of the injury, and the medical consultation between these eminent physicians should all be of interest to neurosurgeons. The historical consequences of this event are briefly reviewed. PMID:1432144

  5. Henry Oldenburg - Shaping the Royal Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boas Hall, Marie

    2002-03-01

    Henry Oldenburg, born in 1619 in Bremen, Germany, first came to England as a diplomat on a mission to see Oliver Cromwell. He stayed on in England and in 1662 became the Secretary of the Royal Society, and its best known member to the entire learned world of his time. Through his extensive correspondence, now published, he disseminated the Society's ideals and methods at home and abroad. He fostered and encouraged the talents of many scientists later to be far more famous than he, including Newton, Flamsteed, Malpighi, and Leeuwenhoek with whom, as with many others, he developed real friendship. He founded and edited the Philosophical Transactions, the world's oldest scientific journal.His career sheds new light on the intellectual world of his time, especially its scientific aspects, and on the development of the Royal Society; his private life expands our knowledge of social mobility, the urban society, and the religious views of his time.

  6. Richard Henry Dana (1927-2015).

    PubMed

    Allen, James

    2016-01-01

    Richard Henry Dana was born on June 14, 1927, in Bronxville, New York. Dick was accepted to Princeton University in 1944 on a scholarship and graduated in 1949. He then became a student leader in the Congress of Racial Equality and participated in a series of nonviolent sit-in protests. He completed studies for his doctoral degree at the University of Illinois in clinical psychology (1953). He briefly held a series of clinical and university positions until finally settling down at the University of Arkansas (1969- 1988). It was during his long tenure in Arkansas that Dick authored one of the foundational textbooks in clinical psychology. His groundbreaking work, Multicultural Assessment Perspectives for Professional Psychology (1993), provided the first comprehensive book on the topic. Over a remarkable 10-year period, he produced a flurry of scholarly and professional activity. He passed away peacefully at his home in Portland, Oregon, on August 17, 2015. PMID:26866992

  7. Henry Norris Russell and the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVorkin, D.

    2013-04-01

    Henry Norris Russell, one of the most influential American astronomers of the first half of the 20th Century, had a special place in his heart for the Lowell Observatory. Although privately critical of the founder for his pronouncements about life on Mars and the superiority of the Mars Hill observing site, he always supported the Observatory in public and professional circles. He staunchly supported Tombaugh's detection of a planet as leading from Lowell's prediction, and always promoted V. M. Slipher's spectroscopic investigations of planetary and stellar phenomena. But how did he react to Slipher's puzzling detection of the extreme radial velocities of spiral nebulae starting in 1912, and how did he regard the extension and interpretation of those observations by Hubble and others in following decades? Here we describe the arc of Russell's reactions, dating from Slipher's first detection, as an indicator of how mainstream stellar astronomers reacted to the concept of an expanding universe.

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey September, 1936 VIEW OF FRONT VERANDA TOWARD NORTH - La Casa de Cota de la Cuesta, Lompoc Road, Buellton, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey March 1936 VIEW OF FOUNTAIN IN MISSION PARK, MISSION PROPERTY AT ONE TIME. - Mission San Fernando Rey de Espana, Fountains, Mission Boulevard, San Fernando, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 1. Henry Beardsley standing in front of his store in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Henry Beardsley standing in front of his store in Ohio. Photographer unknown, 1887. Source: William M. Beardsley - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. Henri Poincaré: Death centenary (1854-1912)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzmann, Gerhard; Villani, Cédric

    2014-08-01

    The year 2012 marked the centenary of the death of Henri Poincaré (Nancy, 1854-Paris, 1912), and through the agency of the Henri-Poincaré Institute in Paris, the Henri-Poincaré Archives in Nancy and The London Mathematical Society, brought with it several exhibitions and meetings commemorating one of the greatest minds in contemporary times. Often referred to as the last polymath, Poincaré embraced multiple branches of mathematics, theoretical physics and celestial mechanics, and made significant contributions to philosophy of science (Heinzmann & Stump, Henri Poincaré, 2013). He wrote 25 textbooks and monographs, 500-plus articles, and was deeply involved in the organization and administration of science at both the national and international levels.1

  12. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey April 1937 RUINS OF SOAP FACTORY (S. W. Side) - Mission San Gabriel Arcangel, Industrial Shop (Ruins), West Mission Drive & Junipero Serra Street, San Gabriel, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey April 1937 RUINS OF SMITHY AND SOAP FACTORY (LOOKING SOUTH) - Mission San Gabriel Arcangel, Industrial Shop (Ruins), West Mission Drive & Junipero Serra Street, San Gabriel, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey April 1937 RUINS OF FOUNTAIN, SMITHY AND SOAP FACTORY (LOOKING EAST) - Mission San Gabriel Arcangel, Industrial Shop (Ruins), West Mission Drive & Junipero Serra Street, San Gabriel, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey April 1937 RUINS OF SOAP FACTORY FROM EAST CORNER. - Mission San Gabriel Arcangel, Industrial Shop (Ruins), West Mission Drive & Junipero Serra Street, San Gabriel, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. James Paget Henry--a retrospective.

    PubMed

    Meehan, J P; Meehan, W P

    1997-01-01

    James Paget Henry really began his productive research career at the outset of the second world war. His studies of acceleration and the anoxia of high altitude were supported by the development of then new techniques of measuring and recording critical physiologic parameters such as vascular pressures, respiratory functions and haemoglobin saturation. His inquisitive mind made productive use of the instruments that had to be made by skilled instrument makers working in university shops. Much of this instrumentation has now found its way into the clinical arena where it is now the main armamentarium of cardiac diagnostic and respiratory function laboratories. His work in the space program preceeded that of the Russians but did not get recognition until Sputnik awakened the world to the possibilities of space flight. His development of the concept of a cardiovascular basis for fluid volume control and the supportive investigative work undertaken constitute a milestone in the annals of experimental physiology. The chimpanzees used in Project Mercury were found to be hypertensive which was related to the method of capture used by the commercial suppliers. This lead Jim to study the effect of early experience on resting blood pressure, an effort that soon developed into provocative studies of the biological basis of the stress response.

  17. Henry Darcy in his own words

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobeck, Patricia

    2006-09-01

    A recently published English translation of the Les Fontaines publiques de la ville de Dijon1 provides access to Henry Darcy's own words on the importance of water for public sanitation and on questions engineers face in building water supply systems. Written near the end of Darcy's life, the book is a compendium of the water knowledge he had gained over decades and his opinions on these topics reveal his personality. In the 1840s, Darcy built a water supply system to provide water to 120 street fountains for domestic purposes, street washing and firefighting. Surrounded by poverty, Darcy insisted on free water for the poor and on sharing the spring water with towns located along the aqueduct that brought it to Dijon. In the preface to the book, Darcy introduces his experiment on water flow through sand with the modest words “to my knowledge, no one has experimentally demonstrated the laws of water flow through sand.” This article provides a sampling of the book's insights into the personality of this remarkable man.

  18. James Paget Henry--a retrospective.

    PubMed

    Meehan, J P; Meehan, W P

    1997-01-01

    James Paget Henry really began his productive research career at the outset of the second world war. His studies of acceleration and the anoxia of high altitude were supported by the development of then new techniques of measuring and recording critical physiologic parameters such as vascular pressures, respiratory functions and haemoglobin saturation. His inquisitive mind made productive use of the instruments that had to be made by skilled instrument makers working in university shops. Much of this instrumentation has now found its way into the clinical arena where it is now the main armamentarium of cardiac diagnostic and respiratory function laboratories. His work in the space program preceeded that of the Russians but did not get recognition until Sputnik awakened the world to the possibilities of space flight. His development of the concept of a cardiovascular basis for fluid volume control and the supportive investigative work undertaken constitute a milestone in the annals of experimental physiology. The chimpanzees used in Project Mercury were found to be hypertensive which was related to the method of capture used by the commercial suppliers. This lead Jim to study the effect of early experience on resting blood pressure, an effort that soon developed into provocative studies of the biological basis of the stress response. PMID:9401600

  19. Fighting desires: Henry Miller's Queer Tropic.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Michael

    2002-01-01

    "Fighting Desires: Henry Miller's Queer Tropic" is an investigation of Tropic of Cancer that investigates the deeply repressed homoerotic desire that periodically surfaces. This reading is dependent upon an interpretation of Eve Sedgwick that proposes male sexuality as a continuum. By looking at the nature of the male-male relationships, as well as the lack of emotion and presence in the male-female relationships, I will show that the most intimate relationships are between men, and that these relationships are expressed through the telling of stories about (heterosexual) sex; this is the function of women within the novel: one has sex with a woman, not for the pleasure that the act brings, but for the pleasure that the recounting of the story to other men brings. Furthermore, I will look at Miller's use of puns within the novel and how they also contribute to a homoerotic reading. None of this is to argue that Miller was not homophobic and sexist--Miller very clearly was--the purpose of this essay is to show the complex nature of sexuality, even within a protagonist who asserts a very defined heterosexuality.

  20. KIR and HLA Genotypes Implicated in Reduced Killer Lymphocytes Immunity Are Associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Ralph D.; Yung, Madeline; Meguro, Akira; Ashouri, Elham; Yu, Fei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Ohno, Shigeaki

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells are killer lymphocytes that provide defense against viral infections and tumor transformation. Analogous to that of CTL, interactions of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands calibrate NK cell education and response. Gene families encoding KIRs and HLA ligands are located on different chromosomes, and feature variation in the number and type of genes. The independent segregation of KIR and HLA genes results in variable KIR-HLA interactions in individuals, which may impact disease susceptibility. We tested whether KIR-HLA combinations are associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease, a bilateral granulomatous panuveitis that has strong association with HLA-DR4. We present a case control study of 196 VKH patients and 209 controls from a highly homogeneous native population of Japan. KIR and HLA class I genes were typed using oligonucleotide hybridization method and analyzed using two-tailed Fisher’s exact probabilities. The incidence of Bx-KIR genotypes was decreased in VKH patients (odds ratio [OR] 0.58, P = 0.007), due primarily to a decrease in centromeric B-KIR motif and its associated KIRs 2DS2, 2DL2, 2DS3, and 2DL5B. HLA-B22, implicated in poor immune response, was increased in VKH (OR = 4.25, P = 0.0001). HLA-Bw4, the ligand for KIR3DL1, was decreased in VKH (OR = 0.59, P = 0.01). The KIR-HLA combinations 2DL2+C1/C2 and 3DL1+Bw4, which function in NK education, were also decreased in VKH (OR = 0.49, P = 0.012; OR = 0.59, P = 0.013). Genotypes missing these two inhibitory KIR-HLA combinations in addition to missing activating KIRs 2DS2 and 2DS3 were more common in VKH (OR = 1.90, P = 0.002). These results suggest that synergistic hyporesponsiveness of NK cells (due to poor NK education along with missing of activating KIRs) and CTL (due to HLA-B22 restriction) fail to mount an effective immune response against viral

  1. Choroidal Vascularity Index in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease: An EDI-OCT Derived Tool for Monitoring Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Li, Lilian Koh Hui; Nakhate, Vikram; Khandelwal, Neha; Mahendradas, Padmamalini

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the application of the choroidal vascularity index (CVI) in the follow-up of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH) patients derived from image binarization of enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) images with Fiji software. Our secondary objective was to derive the retinochoroidal vascularity index based on en face fundus fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography (FFA and ICGA). Methods In this retrospective cohort study, EDI-OCT scans of 18 eyes of 9 patients with VKH were obtained at baseline within 2 weeks of acute presentation, and again at 6 to 12 months. Images with poor quality were excluded. Choroidal thickness (CT) and CVI were analyzed and compared to 13 eyes of 13 healthy controls. En face FFA and ICGA obtained from 12 eyes of 7 patients were segmented to derive retinochoroidal vascularity index. Results There was no statistical difference in age or sex between the study group and controls. Choroidal thickness of patients with VKH was 359.23 ± 57.63 μm at baseline, compared to 274.09 ± 56.98 μm in controls (P = 0.003). Follow-up CT in VKH patients was 282.62 ± 42.51 μm, which was significantly decreased from baseline (P = 0.0001). Choroidal vascularity index in VKH patients was 70.03 ± 1.93% at baseline, compared to 64.63 ± 1.92% in controls (P < 0.001). Choroidal vascularity index was 66.94 ± 1.82% at follow-up, significantly reduced from baseline (P < 0.0001). Fundus fluorescein angiography and ICGA retinochoroidal vascularity indices at baseline were 70.67 ± 2.65% and 66.42 ± 2.16%, respectively. Conclusions In this small series of VKH patients, EDI-OCT–derived CVI had a statistically significant reduction over time, similar to CT. We propose that OCT, FFA, and ICGA-derived vascularity indices may be potential novel supportive tools in monitoring disease progression in VKH. Translational Relevance Choroidal vascularity index can be used potentially to study and analyze the structural changes in

  2. Using optical coherence tomography to assess the role of age and region in corneal epithelium and palisades of vogt

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsuan-Chieh; Tew, Teck Boon; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Lin, Szu-Yuan; Chang, Huai-Wen; Hu, Fung-Rong; Chen, Wei-Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) to observe the morphology and epithelial thickness (ET) of the palisades of Vogt (POV), and to evaluate the role of age and region on these structures. One hundred twelve eyes of 112 healthy subjects were enrolled and divided into 4 groups: A (0–19), B (20–39), C (40–59), and D (≥60 years old). RTvue-100 OCT was applied on the cornea and the limbus. The morphology of the subepithelial stroma underneath the epithelium of POV was classified into typical and atypical types. Maximum ET of POV was measured manually from OCT images. The positive rate of typical POV in superior, nasal, temporal, and inferior limbus was: Group A: 100%, 69.2%, 65.4%, 100%; Group B: 100%, 73.5%, 61.8%, 94.1%; Group C: 95.8%, 41.7%, 37.5%, 83.3%; Group D: 67.9%, 0%, 3.6%, 25%, showing a significant decreasing tendency with age. The maximum ET of POV in superior, nasal, temporal, and inferior limbus was: Group A: 103.5 ± 10.1 um, 89.2 ± 9.7 um, 87.9 ± 13.6 um, 104.7 ± 14.1 um; Group B: 111.4 ± 15.8 um, 85.3 ± 9.9 um, 88.2 ± 8.6 um, 112.6 ± 19.7 um; Group C: 116.4 ± 16.4 um, 82.8 ± 11.6 um, 87.0 ± 11.6 um, 120.0 ± 25.6 um; Group D: 96.3 ± 17.9 um, 73.8 ± 15.9 um, 79.2 ± 16.7 um, 87.4 ± 18.5 um. Age-dependent change was observed. In general, the maximum ET of POV in superior/inferior quadrants was thicker than the other 2 quadrants. Spectral-domain OCT is a useful tool to observe the limbal microstructure and provide invaluable information. Aging and anatomic regions had significant effects on the microstructure of these areas. PMID:27583846

  3. Applicability of Henry's Law to helium solubility in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Applicability of Henry's Law to helium solubility in olivine We have experimentally determined helium solubility in San Carlos olivine across a range of helium partial pressures (PHe) with the goal of quantifying how noble gases behave during partial melting of peridotite. Helium solubility in olivine correlates linearly with PHe between 55 and 1680 bar. This linear relationship suggests Henry's Law is applicable to helium dissolution into olivine up to 1680 bar PHe, providing a basis for extrapolation of solubility relationships determined at high PHe to natural systems. This is the first demonstration of Henry's Law for helium dissolution into olivine. Averaging all the data of the PHe series yields a Henry's coefficient of 3.8(×3.1)×10-12 mol g-1 bar-1. However, the population of Henry's coefficients shows a positive skew (skewness = 1.17), i.e. the data are skewed to higher values. This skew is reflected in the large standard deviation of the population of Henry's coefficients. Averaging the median values from each experiment yields a lower Henry's coefficient and standard deviation: 3.2(× 2.3)×10-12 mol g-1 bar-1. Combining the presently determined helium Henry's coefficient for olivine with previous determinations of helium Henry's coefficients for basaltic melts (e.g. 1) yields a partition coefficient of ~10-4. This value is similar to previous determinations obtained at higher PHe (2). The applicability of Henry's Law here suggests helium is incorporated onto relatively abundant sites within olivine that are not saturated by 1680 bar PHe or ~5×10-9 mol g-1. Large radius vacancies, i.e. oxygen vacancies, are energetically favorable sites for noble gas dissolution (3). However, oxygen vacancies are not abundant enough in San Carlos olivine to account for this solubility (e.g. 4), suggesting the 3x10-12 mol g-1 bar-1 Henry's coefficient is associated with interstitial dissolution of helium. Helium was dissolved into olivine using an externally heated

  4. Science Advisor and Applied Physicist: Joseph Henry Serves His Country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberg, Marc

    1997-04-01

    When Joseph Henry accepted the postion of secretary of the Smithsonian in 1846, his career changed radically. Although he never ceased thinking of himself as a research scientist and educator, thereafter his chief roles were those of science administrator and advisor to both the executive and legislative branches of the federal government for both science and technology. His effectiveness as an advocate became more important than his skill as an experimental physicist. Even when he entered the laboratory, his role had changed. No longer was he concerned with basic research. As a member of various government boards and committees, Henry spent the last three decades of his life concerned with the application of fundamental knowledge for the improvement of the human condition. This paper will discuss Henry's service on behalf of his country.

  5. 4. PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAIT OF HENRY OSSAWA TANNER Photocopy of pre1930 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAIT OF HENRY OSSAWA TANNER Photocopy of pre-1930 photograph, courtesy of Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. - Henry O. Tanner House, 2908 West Diamond Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Henry Giroux on Democracy Unsettled: From Critical Pedagogy to the War on Youth--An Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This interview conducted with Henry Giroux begins by probing Henry's childhood, upbringing and undergraduate years to discover where his sense of social justice took hold. It also questions Henry about his working-class background and the major influences on his thought, including his relationships with Paulo Freire and Howard Zinn. The interview…

  7. The Transformative Intellectual: An Examination of Henry Giroux's Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashani, Tony

    2012-01-01

    This article explores Henry Giroux's contributions to critical pedagogy. The author demonstrates how Giroux, as a public intellectual, has found his Ethics in the right place. The author further argues that Giroux's Ethics of virtue are present not only in the public person but also in his transformative writing.

  8. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, Henry Austin's Drawing c. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, Henry Austin's Drawing c. 1845 Restricted: Permission for use must be obtained in writing from Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library Yale University, New Haven, Conn. - Grove Street Cemetery Entrance, 227 Grove Street, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  9. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, Henry Austin's Drawing EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, Henry Austin's Drawing EAST SIDE ELEVATION Restricted: Permission for use must be obtained in writing from the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library Yale University, New Haven, Conn. - Willis Bristol House, 584 Chapel Street, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  10. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey June 1936 STONE CHURCH, SANCTUARY EAST WALL (LOOKING EAST) - Mission San Juan Capistrano, Stone Church, Olive Street, between U.S. Highway 101 & Main Street, San Juan Capistrano, Orange County, CA

  11. A Conservation with...Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Lynne V.

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview between National Endowment for the Humanities chairman, Lynne V. Cheney, and Harvard professor, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Includes discussion of multiculturalism as it relates to free speech, sexism, racism, hate speech, and ethnocentrism. Emphasizes both the open tradition of Western culture and the recent pressure for…

  12. Circles, Teenagers, and "Henry V": A Short Shakespeare Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Gillian

    2006-01-01

    The residency about which the author writes was with students at The Roeper School in Birmingham, Michigan. This school is unusual in its support for a liberal arts and process-based education. In this article the author, an accomplished director and Teaching Artist, recounts the many engaging dimensions of a student production of "Henry V."

  13. Lagrangian circulation study near Cape Henry, Virginia. [Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the circulation near Cape Henry, Virginia, was made using surface and seabed drifters and radar tracked surface buoys coupled to subsurface drag plates. Drifter releases were conducted on a line normal to the beach just south of Cape Henry. Surface drifter recoveries were few; wind effects were strongly noted. Seabed drifter recoveries all exhibited onshore motion into Chesapeake Bay. Strong winds also affected seabed recoveries, tending to move them farther before recovery. Buoy trajectories in the vicinity of Cape Henry appeared to be of an irrotational nature, showing a clockwise rotary tide motion. Nearest the cape, the buoy motion elongated to almost parallel depth contours around the cape. Buoy motion under the action of strong winds showed that currents to at least the depth of the drag plates substantially are altered from those of low wind conditions near the Bay mouth. Only partial evidence could be found to support the presence of a clockwise nontidal eddy at Virginia Beach, south of Cape Henry.

  14. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey June 1936 RUINS OF INDUSTRIAL SHOPS, TAKEN FROM NORTH WEST CORNER. - Mission San Juan Capistrano, Industrial Shops, Olive Street, between U.S. Highway 101 & Main Street, San Juan Capistrano, Orange County, CA

  15. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey June 1936 EAST WALL OF INDUSTRIAL SHOPS (LOOKING NORTH) - Mission San Juan Capistrano, Industrial Shops, Olive Street, between U.S. Highway 101 & Main Street, San Juan Capistrano, Orange County, CA

  16. America's Earliest Revolutionary Voice: Po-Pay--Not Patrick Henry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Gordon R.

    A full century before Patrick Henry's persuasive battle for the rights of oppressed people, a San Juan Pueblo Indian medicine man known only as Po-Pay was the masterful communicator and agitator who orchestrated the first American revolution to drive the Spanish back into Mexico. Seeking mineral wealth, cheap labor, and the maximum number of…

  17. The Henry semianalytical solution for saltwater intrusion with reduced dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidane, Ali; Younes, Anis; Huggenberger, Peter; Zechner, Eric

    2012-06-01

    The Henry semianalytical solution for salt water intrusion is widely used for benchmarking density dependent flow codes. The method consists of replacing the stream function and the concentration by a double set of Fourier series. These series are truncated at a given order and the remaining coefficients are calculated by solving a highly nonlinear system of algebraic equations. The solution of this system is often subject to substantial numerical difficulties. Previous works succeeded to provide semianalytical solutions only for saltwater intrusion problems with unrealistic large amount of dispersion. In this work, different truncations for the Fourier series are tested and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, which has a quadratic rate of convergence, is applied to calculate their coefficients. The obtained results provide semianalytical solutions for the Henry problem in the case of reduced dispersion coefficients and for two freshwater recharge values: the initial value suggested by Henry (1964) and the reduced one suggested by Simpson and Clement (2004). The developed semianalytical solutions are compared against numerical results obtained by using the method of lines and advanced spatial discretization schemes. The obtained semianalytical solutions improve considerably the worthiness of the Henry problem and therefore, they are more suitable for testing density dependent flow codes.

  18. Challenging Texts: Teaching Deliberately--Reading Henry David Thoreau's "Walden"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    One of the more difficult 19th-century American texts for high school students to read is undoubtedly Henry David Thoreau's "Walden." His erudite allusions, often page-long sentences, and sophisticated sense of the ironic initially leave many students cold. Still, the author encourages them to read amid the din of a cultural cacophony that shouts…

  19. A Teacher's Guide for William Shakespeare's "Henry V."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WGBH-TV, Boston, MA.

    This teacher's guide for William Shakespeare's play "Henry V" is designed to accompany the Kenneth Branagh Masterpiece Theater film production of the play, and to help teachers use the film in a variety of ways. The guide includes pre-viewing background information, five teaching units, and a pullout poster for classroom display. The guide begins…

  20. Battling for Liberty: Tecumseh's and Patrick Henry's Language of Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    The reading program described in this lesson plan extends the study of Patrick Henry's "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death" speech to demonstrate the ways Native Americans also resisted oppression through rhetoric. During five 50-minute lessons, students will: develop an awareness of both Native and non-Native movements to resist oppression and…

  1. 15. Photocopy of map, drawn by Henry Hagey, circa 1900 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of map, drawn by Henry Hagey, circa 1900 (from Willing Inhabitants, original in possession of author, Joyce Munro). FRANCONIA TOWNSHIP MAP. BRIDGE LOCATION IN BOTTOM CENTER - Allentown Road Bridge, Spanning Skippack Creek on Allentown Road, Franconia, Montgomery County, PA

  2. The Failed Educations of John Stuart Mill and Henry Adams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes and contrasts Mill's "Autobiography" and Adams'"The Education of Henry Adams" in order to present two approaches to the nature of education and of failure. Maintains that their perspectives may serve as catalysts and cautions for contemporary theories of education and its utility and relevance. (CAM)

  3. Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brent

    1995-01-01

    Presents a five-lesson, high school instructional unit on the ideas and activities of Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes student objectives, step-by-step instructional procedures, and discussion questions. Provides quotations by Thoreau and King. (CFR)

  4. Henry's law constants for dimethylsulfide in freshwater and seawater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacey, J. W. H.; Wakeham, S. G.; Howes, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    Distilled water and several waters of varying salinity were subjected, over a 0-32 C temperature range, to measurements for Henry's law constants for dimethylsulfide. Values for distilled water and seawater of the solubility parameters A and C are obtained which support the concept that the concentration of dimethylsulfide in the atmosphere is far from equilibrium with seawater.

  5. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey, MaY 1937 SHOP RUINS (DETAIL OF SOAP OVEN) - Mission San Juan Capistrano, Industrial Shops, Olive Street, between U.S. Highway 101 & Main Street, San Juan Capistrano, Orange County, CA

  6. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey April 1937 RUINS OF SOAP FACTORY & SMITHY (FROM S. E. END OF SOAP FACTORY) - Mission San Gabriel Arcangel, Industrial Shop (Ruins), West Mission Drive & Junipero Serra Street, San Gabriel, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Obituary: Roy Henry Garstang (1925-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malville, J.

    2011-12-01

    Roy Henry Garstang 84 passed away on November 1, 2009 in Boulder Colorado. He was born in Southport, England in September of 1925 to Percy Brocklehurst and Eunice (Gledhill) Garstang. He won a scholarship to Caius College in Cambridge University. Because it was wartime, he could spend only two years at his studies. However, he managed to complete three years of required work during that time, and then spent 1945-46 as a Junior Scientific Officer at the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough. He received his BA in 1946 from Cambridge, his MA in 1950, and his PhD in Mathematics in 1954, with a thesis: "Atomic Transitions in Astrophysics," working under D. R. Hartree. He also received a ScD from Cambridge in Physics and Chemistry in 1983. He married Ann in August 1959. She and two daughters, Jennifer and Susan, survive him. While still pursuing his PhD, Roy Garstang served as a Research Associate at the Yerkes Observatory, from 1951-1952, working under Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. During that time he continued with his own calculations of atomic structure and transition probabilities, although these were not part of Chandra's research interests. After earning his PhD, he went to teach at the University of London, where he also served as the Assistant Director of the University of London Observatory (1959-1964). He was editor of "The Observatory" Magazine form 1953-1960. The continuing theme of this research was to help meet the needs of astrophysicists for atomic data. In 1964, he left England for the United States, where he joined the faculty at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he would remain for the rest of his professional career. It was entirely fitting, considering his interest in performing calculations of interest to astrophysicists, that soon after arriving in Boulder he was appointed Chairman of JILA - Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (1966-1967). He was Director of the Division of Physics and AstroGeophysics (1979-80), acting

  8. Compilation of Henry's law constants (version 4.0) for water as solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.

    2015-04-01

    Many atmospheric chemicals occur in the gas phase as well as in liquid cloud droplets and aerosol particles. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the distribution between the phases. According to Henry's law, the equilibrium ratio between the abundances in the gas phase and in the aqueous phase is constant for a dilute solution. Henry's law constants of trace gases of potential importance in environmental chemistry have been collected and converted into a uniform format. The compilation contains 17 350 values of Henry's law constants for 4632 species, collected from 689 references. It is also available at henrys-law.org"target="_blank">http://www.henrys-law.org.

  9. Sarcophilia, cremation and Sir Henry Thompson (1820-1904).

    PubMed

    Jellinek, E H

    2009-11-01

    Sarcophilia, a neologism for an attachment to human remains, is set in a review of the history of the disposal of the dead. The ancient practice of cremation was relaunched late in the 19th century by the urological surgeon cum social reformer Sir Henry Thompson. He was stimulated by Edwin Chadwick and Charles Dickens, and by Charles Darwin's observations on the earthworm. Sarcophilia is the reason for the controversial Human Tissue Act of 2004. PMID:20029076

  10. Henri Rouvière (1876-1952) French anatomist.

    PubMed

    Romero-Reverón, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Henri Rouvière (1876-1952): medical doctor and professor of human anatomy at Paris University and Honorary Member of the French Academy of Medicine. He wrote important essays on human anatomy and related topics, including a Compendium of Anatomy and Dissection (1911), A Treatise on Descriptive, Topographical and Functional Anatomy (1921), an anatomy of the human lymphatic system (1932), General Anatomy, Original Forms and Anatomical Structures (1939).

  11. W. Henry Robinson: Popularising astronomy in Victorian Walsall and Birmingham

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S.

    William Henry Robinson was one of the most prominent citizens of Walsall, then part of Staffordshire, in the Victorian and Edwardian periods. An influential businessman, he managed to combine printing, publishing, editing a newspaper, writing books and poetry, maintaining a library and retail trading with founding the town's literary institute, and bringing the scientists, explorers, authors and cultural pursuits of the day to his home town. An amateur astronomer in his own right, Robinson was instrumental in setting up the BAA's Midland Branch.

  12. [Assassination of Henri IV, mental disorders and criminal responsibility].

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    On 14th May 1610, François Ravaillac, a delusional mystic, assassinated King Henri IV. Under the Ancien Regime, regicide was considered as a supreme act of patricide and received the ultimate punishment even if the perpetrator showed obvious signs of insanity. What would the situation be today? A study of this notorious historical episode provides a reflection on the way dangerousness linked to mental disorders has been viewed and treated over the last four centuries.

  13. Sarcophilia, cremation and Sir Henry Thompson (1820-1904).

    PubMed

    Jellinek, E H

    2009-11-01

    Sarcophilia, a neologism for an attachment to human remains, is set in a review of the history of the disposal of the dead. The ancient practice of cremation was relaunched late in the 19th century by the urological surgeon cum social reformer Sir Henry Thompson. He was stimulated by Edwin Chadwick and Charles Dickens, and by Charles Darwin's observations on the earthworm. Sarcophilia is the reason for the controversial Human Tissue Act of 2004.

  14. In praise of the literary eponym—Henry V sign

    PubMed Central

    Houlihan, C.; Marks, J. Charles

    2013-01-01

    The use of eponyms in medicine is often discouraged. However, the literary eponym should be an exception as it is not linked with many of the difficulties associated with conventional eponyms and offers descriptive brevity and accuracy. Here, we illustrate the point with Henry V sign, which will be familiar to many who have cared for patients in the terminal stage of illness. PMID:23108030

  15. Henry Mayhew: journalist, social investigator, and foreshadower of qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Everardo Duarte

    2012-09-01

    As a journalist, Henry Mayhew recorded daily life in London in the latter half of the nineteenth century. His approach remains of interest to historians and social scientists today in that it foreshadowed qualitative research. The article highlights methodological aspects of Mayhew's investigations and analyzes two of his reports, one on a cholera outbreak and the other on a female street vendor. It also addresses some analyses that have critiqued his work.

  16. Twilight of the gods: John Henry Mackay's Der Unschuldige.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, H

    1993-01-01

    The writings of the Scotch-German John Henry Mackay are important for the early cultural history of the modern gay movement. This article recalls this unjustly neglected anarchist writer and advocate of man/boy love by tracing his biography and pointing out his contacts with others in the movement. His late novella Der Unschuldige is analyzed to show that Mackay has encoded homosexuality there in a unique and individual way. PMID:8113599

  17. Temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants for different plant sesquiterpenes.

    PubMed

    Copolovici, Lucian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-11-01

    Sesquiterpenes are plant-produced hydrocarbons with important ecological functions in plant-to-plant and plant-to-insect communication, but due to their high reactivity they can also play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. So far, there is little information of gas/liquid phase partition coefficients (Henry's law constants) and their temperature dependencies for sesquiterpenes, but this information is needed for quantitative simulation of the release of sesquiterpenes from plants and modeling atmospheric reactions in different phases. In this study, we estimated Henry's law constants (Hpc) and their temperature responses for 12 key plant sesquiterpenes with varying structure (aliphatic, mono-, bi- and tricyclic sesquiterpenes). At 25 °C, Henry's law constants varied 1.4-fold among different sesquiterpenes, and the values were within the range previously observed for monocyclic monoterpenes. Hpc of sesquiterpenes exhibited a high rate of increase, on average ca. 1.5-fold with a 10 °C increase in temperature (Q10). The values of Q10 varied 1.2-fold among different sesquiterpenes. Overall, these data demonstrate moderately high variation in Hpc values and Hpc temperature responses among different sesquiterpenes. We argue that these variations can importantly alter the emission kinetics of sesquiterpenes from plants. PMID:26291755

  18. Henry's law constants of some environmentally important aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Betterton, E.A.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    1988-12-01

    The Henry's law constants of seven aldehydes have been determined as a function of temperature by bubble-column and by head-space techniques. The compounds were chosen for their potential importance in the polluted troposphere and to allow structure-reactivity patterns to be investigated. The results (at 25/degree/C) are as follows (in units of M atm/sup /minus/1/): chloral, 3.44 /times/ 10/sup 5/; glyoxal, greater than or equal to3 /times/ 10/sup 5/; methylglyoxal, 3.71 /times/ 10/sup 3/; formaldehyde, 2.97 /times/ 10/sup 3/; benzaldehyde, 3.74 /times/ 10/sup 1/; hydroxyacetaldehyde, 4.14 /times/ 10/sup 4/; acetaldehyde, 1.14 /times/ 10/sup 1/. A plot of Taft's parameter, ..sigma..sigma*, vs log H* (the apparent Henry's law constant) gives a straight line with a slope of 1.72. H* for formaldehyde is anomalously high, as expected, but the extremely high value for hydroxyacetaldehyde was unexpected and may indicate that ..cap alpha..-hydroxy-substituted aldehydes could have an usually high affinity for the aqueous phase. The intrinsic Henry's law constants, H, corrected for hydration, do not show a clear structure-reactivity pattern for this series of aldehydes.

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Joseph Henry: The Rise of an American Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Elspeth

    1998-09-01

    Albert Moyer has clearly done his research into the events of Joseph Henry's life. The personal, professional, sociological and scientific aspects have been meticulously detailed throughout and the ordering, as in the chapter headings, is chronological, so that there is some element of each of these aspects in each chapter. This is unfortunately both the strength and the weakness of the biography, as the detail seemed to me to be the most remarkable characteristic of the writing. But, the bigger stories, or the themes, which might have been possible, seemed to get lost. Hence, I found this a book for those who are seriously interested in Joseph Henry; but for those whose interest might be more general, say having an interest in nineteenth century growth of scientific institutions, or wanting to understand the conceptual development of electromagnetism, there seemed to be too much which came from the Henry point of view, rather than locating Henry within his time and context. This is a remark about style, rather than omission of content, as the myriad of details in each paragraph certainly inform the reader about the context. For instance, some sociology of the USA in the nineteenth century could be inferred, say showing how a young man from a modest background might make his way into a professional life, but the information is so particularly a description of Henry's experience that one has to rely on prior knowledge or make assumptions in order to create a sociological perspective. That is, I now know, what happened to Henry, but I do not know if his case was in any sense typical or atypical. Similarly there is information about education in general at that time, and scientific education, research and its publication, as it applied to Henry. The relationships between science in the USA and in Europe have a place, and there is quite a bit of information about the institutions in which Henry worked, particularly Albany Academy, Princeton and the Smithsonian. Henry

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Joseph Henry: The Rise of an American Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Elspeth

    1998-09-01

    Albert Moyer has clearly done his research into the events of Joseph Henry's life. The personal, professional, sociological and scientific aspects have been meticulously detailed throughout and the ordering, as in the chapter headings, is chronological, so that there is some element of each of these aspects in each chapter. This is unfortunately both the strength and the weakness of the biography, as the detail seemed to me to be the most remarkable characteristic of the writing. But, the bigger stories, or the themes, which might have been possible, seemed to get lost. Hence, I found this a book for those who are seriously interested in Joseph Henry; but for those whose interest might be more general, say having an interest in nineteenth century growth of scientific institutions, or wanting to understand the conceptual development of electromagnetism, there seemed to be too much which came from the Henry point of view, rather than locating Henry within his time and context. This is a remark about style, rather than omission of content, as the myriad of details in each paragraph certainly inform the reader about the context. For instance, some sociology of the USA in the nineteenth century could be inferred, say showing how a young man from a modest background might make his way into a professional life, but the information is so particularly a description of Henry's experience that one has to rely on prior knowledge or make assumptions in order to create a sociological perspective. That is, I now know, what happened to Henry, but I do not know if his case was in any sense typical or atypical. Similarly there is information about education in general at that time, and scientific education, research and its publication, as it applied to Henry. The relationships between science in the USA and in Europe have a place, and there is quite a bit of information about the institutions in which Henry worked, particularly Albany Academy, Princeton and the Smithsonian. Henry

  1. En Face Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Choroid in a Case with Central Serous Chorioretinopathy during the Course of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Komuku, Yuki; Iwahashi, Chiharu; Yano, Shinsaku; Tanaka, Chika; Nakagawa, Tomoya; Gomi, Fumi

    2015-01-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease and central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) develop serous retinal detachment; however, the treatment of each disease is totally different. Steroids treat VKH but worsen CSC; therefore, it is important to distinguish these diseases. Here, we report a case with CSC which was diagnosed by en face optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging during the course of VKH disease. A 50-year-old man was referred with blurring of vision in his right eye. Fundus examination showed bilateral optic disc swelling and macular fluid in the right eye. OCT showed thick choroid, and en face OCT images depicted blurry choroid without clear delineation of choroidal vessels. Combined with angiography findings, this patient was diagnosed with VKH disease and treated with steroids. Promptly, fundus abnormalities resolved with the reduction of the choroidal thickness and the choroidal vessels became visible on the en face images. During the tapering of the steroid, serous macular detachment in the right eye recurred several times. Steroid treatment was effective at first; however, at the fourth appearance of submacular fluid, the patient did not respond. At that time, the choroidal vessels on the en face OCT images were clear, which significantly differed from the images at the time of recurrence of VKH. Angiography also suggested CSC-like leakage. The tapering of the steroids was effective in resolving the fluid. Secondary CSC may develop in the eye with VKH after steroid treatment. En face OCT observation of the choroid may be helpful to distinguish each condition.

  2. Association of a NOS3 gene polymorphism with Behçet’s disease but not with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Yu, Hongsong; Hou, Shengping; Fang, Jing; Qin, Jieying; Yuan, Gangxiang; Kijlstra, Aize

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have identified that nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes are associated with several immune-mediated diseases. This study aimed to investigate whether NOS2 and NOS3 gene polymorphisms are associated with Behçet’s disease (BD) and Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) syndrome in a Han Chinese population. Methods An association analysis of NOS2/rs4795067, NOS3/rs1799983 and NOS3/rs1800779 was performed in 733 patients with BD, 800 patients with VKH syndrome, and 1,359 controls using PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Statistical analysis was performed with the chi-square test followed by the Bonferroni correction. Results The result showed a decreased frequency of the NOS3/rs1799983 GG genotype and an increased frequency of NOS3/rs1799983 GT genotype in the patients with BD (Bonferroni correction test [Pc]=0.02, odds ratio [OR]=0.74; Pc=2.1×10−3, OR=1.57, respectively). No significant association was found between rs1799983 and VKH syndrome. NOS2/ rs4795067 and NOS3/rs1800779 were not associated with either BD or VKH syndrome. Conclusions Our findings suggest that a NOS3/rs1799983polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to BD in Han Chinese. PMID:27114698

  3. Henry Cavendish, Johann von Soldner, and the deflection of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    1988-05-01

    The gravitational deflection of light based on Newtonian theory and the corpuscular model of light was calculated, but never published, around 1784 by Henry Cavendish, almost 20 years earlier than the first published calculation by Johann Georg von Soldner. The two results are slightly different because, while Cavendish treated a light ray emitted from infinity, von Soldner treated a light ray emitted from the surface of the gravitating body. At the first order of approximation, they agree with each other; both are one-half the value predicted by general relativity and confirmed by experiment.

  4. Henry Charlton Bastian (1837-1915): neglected neurologist and scientist.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2010-01-01

    Henry Charlton Bastian was born in Truro, Cornwall. He graduated in 1861 at the University College, London, where he worked most of his life. He was one of the first neurologists appointed to the National Hospital, Queen Square. There, he conducted original investigations and pursued wide interests both in medical and biological sciences. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1868. In addition to his reputation as a neurological diagnostician and intellectual, he became an advocate of the vexed doctrine of abiogenesis.

  5. Copper(II)-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry) Reactions: Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Murugavel, Govindarasu; Sadhu, Pradeep; Punniyamurthy, Tharmalingam

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled copper(II) complexes are described as effective catalysts for nitroaldol (Henry) reactions on water. The protocol involves a heterogeneous process and the catalysts can be recovered and recycled without loss of activity. Further, C2-symmetric N,N'-substituted chiral copper(II) salan complexes are found to be more effective catalysts than chiral copper(II) salen complexes for reactions in homogeneous catalysis, with high enantioselectivities. The reactions involve bifunctional catalysis, bearing the properties of a Brønsted base, as well as a Lewis acid, to effect the reaction in the absence of external additives.

  6. Association of HLA-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tingkun; Lv, Wenjuan; Zhang, Li; Chen, Jianhuan; Chen, Haoyu

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 has been reported to be a risk factor for Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH) with various strength of association. Its sub-alleles were also found to be associated with VKH. However the results were inconsistent. In this study, we systematically searched the related literature, pooled the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of association of HLA-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 or its sub-alleles with VKH from individual studies, and explored the potential source of heterogeneity. A total of 1853 VKH patients and 4164 controls from 21 articles were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled OR of association of HLA-DR4/HLA-DRB1*04 and VKH was 8.42 (95% CI: 5.69–12.45). There were significant heterogeneity (I2 = 71%). Subgroup analysis indicated that ethnicity was the source of heterogeneity (all I2 = 0, ORs ranged from 2.09–13.69 in subgroups). The sub-alleles, HLA-DRB1*0404 (OR = 2.57), 0405 (OR = 10.31) and 0410 (OR = 6.52) increased the risk of VKH; 0401 (OR = 0.21) protected VKH; while other sub-alleles were not associated with VKH. Our meta-analysis confirmed the association between VKH and HLA-DR4/DRB1*04, found the strength of association is different in different ethnic groups, and identified HLA-DRB1*0404, 0405 and 0410 as risk sub-alleles while 0401 as protective sub-allele. PMID:25382027

  7. Report on the geology of the Henry Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, G.K.

    1877-01-01

    The Henry Mountains have been visited only by the explorer. Previous to 1869 they were not placed upon any map, nor was mention made of them in any of the published accounts of exploration or survey in the Rocky Mountain region. In that year Professor Powell while descending the Colorado River in boats passed near their foot, and gave to them the name which they bear in honor of Prof. Joseph Henry, the distinguished physicist. In 1872 Prof. A. H. Thompson, engaged in the continuance of the survey of the river, led a party across the mountains by the Penellen Pass, and climbed some of the highest peaks. Frontiersmen in search of farming and grazing lands or of the precious metals have since that time paid several visits to the mountains; but no survey was made of them until the years 1875 and 1876, when Mr. Walter H. Graves and the writer visited them for that purpose. They are situated in Southern Utah, and are crossed by the meridian of 110° 45' and the thirty-eighth parallel. They stand upon the right bank of the Colorado River of the West, and between its tributaries, the Dirty Devil and the Escalante.

  8. 1787 and 1776: Patrick Henry, James Madison, and the Revolutionary Legitimacy of the Constitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, Lance

    1988-01-01

    Discusses Patrick Henry's and James Madison's opinions on how the U.S. Constitution should be constructed. Describes how Henry introduced a set of substantive objections which were shared by Antifederalists throughout the country and persuaded many Revolutionaries that the Constitution was essentially at odds with the principles of 1776. (BSR)

  9. A Henry's Law Test for Experimental Partitioning Studies of Iron Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chabot, N. L.; Campbell, A. J.; Humayun, M.; Agee, C. B.

    2001-01-01

    Low-level doped solid metal/liquid metal experiments analyzed by laser ablation ICP-MS allow Henry's Law to be tested. The results indicate Henry's Law is obeyed and the experimental partition coefficients can be applied to iron meteorites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. 33 CFR 80.515 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC. 80.515 Section 80.515 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.515 Cape Henry, VA...

  11. 33 CFR 80.515 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC. 80.515 Section 80.515 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.515 Cape Henry, VA...

  12. 33 CFR 80.515 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC. 80.515 Section 80.515 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.515 Cape Henry, VA...

  13. 33 CFR 80.515 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC. 80.515 Section 80.515 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.515 Cape Henry, VA...

  14. 33 CFR 80.515 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC. 80.515 Section 80.515 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.515 Cape Henry, VA...

  15. Into the Past through the Future: Captain Picard Meets Henry V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumrich, Ann Nord

    1994-01-01

    Describes beginning a unit on Shakespeare and his play "Henry V" by showing and discussing in class an episode from the television program "Star Trek: The Next Generation" called "The Defector," which opens with a scene from Henry V and makes allusions to the play throughout the episode. (SR)

  16. Transcriptomic Response to Nitric Oxide Treatment in Larix olgensis Henry

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jingli; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    Larix olgensis Henry is an important coniferous species found in plantation forests in northeastern China, but it is vulnerable to pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in plant resistance to pathogens. To study the regulatory role of NO at the transcriptional level, we characterized the transcriptomic response of L. olgensis seedlings to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor) using Illumina sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly. A significant number of putative metabolic pathways and functions associated with the unique sequences were identified. Genes related to plant pathogen infection (FLS2, WRKY33, MAPKKK, and PR1) were upregulated with SNP treatment. This report describes the potential contribution of NO to disease resistance in L. olgensis as induced by biotic stress. Our results provide a substantial contribution to the genomic and transcriptomic resources for L. olgensis, as well as expanding our understanding of the involvement of NO in defense responses at the transcriptional level. PMID:26633380

  17. Transcriptomic Response to Nitric Oxide Treatment in Larix olgensis Henry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jingli; Li, Chenghao

    2015-12-02

    Larix olgensis Henry is an important coniferous species found in plantation forests in northeastern China, but it is vulnerable to pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in plant resistance to pathogens. To study the regulatory role of NO at the transcriptional level, we characterized the transcriptomic response of L. olgensis seedlings to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor) using Illumina sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly. A significant number of putative metabolic pathways and functions associated with the unique sequences were identified. Genes related to plant pathogen infection (FLS2, WRKY33, MAPKKK, and PR1) were upregulated with SNP treatment. This report describes the potential contribution of NO to disease resistance in L. olgensis as induced by biotic stress. Our results provide a substantial contribution to the genomic and transcriptomic resources for L. olgensis, as well as expanding our understanding of the involvement of NO in defense responses at the transcriptional level.

  18. Henry Cavendish and the density of the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lally, Sean P.

    1999-01-01

    From the fall of 1797 through the spring of 1798, Henry Cavendish performed a series of experiments, which now bear his name, that were aimed at determining the density of Earth. While Cavendish is rightfully considered a brilliant experimenter by many historians, he is often credited (in both popular and historical literature) as the scientist who first accurately weighed the Earth and determined the universal constant of gravitation, G. While the universal constant of gravitation and the mass (or weight) of the Earth can indeed be calculated from the density of the Earth, this was neither Cavendish's result nor his intent in writing "Experiments to Determine the Density of the Earth." Rather, Cavendish's interest lies in solving an eighteenth-century dispute: what is the mean density of the Earth?

  19. Henry More and the development of absolute time.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Emily

    2015-12-01

    This paper explores the nature, development and influence of the first English account of absolute time, put forward in the mid-seventeenth century by the 'Cambridge Platonist' Henry More. Against claims in the literature that More does not have an account of time, this paper sets out More's evolving account and shows that it reveals the lasting influence of Plotinus. Further, this paper argues that More developed his views on time in response to his adoption of Descartes' vortex cosmology and cosmogony, providing new evidence of More's wider project to absorb Cartesian natural philosophy into his Platonic metaphysics. Finally, this paper argues that More should be added to the list of sources that later English thinkers - including Newton and Samuel Clarke - drew on in constructing their absolute accounts of time. PMID:26568082

  20. Application of Henry's Law for Binding Energies of Adsorbed Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Andrew; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Sweany, Mark; Pfeifer, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The method of isosteres is the simplest method used to calculate the differential enthalpy of adsorption. However, it is incredibly sensitive to the choice of model and respective fitting parameters. For a set of isotherms measured on a specific sample, most models converge upon a similar value at high coverage, but are inconsistent in the low pressure regime. In this talk, we investigate the application of various models for localized and mobile adsorption at low pressures in order to obtain binding energy of hydrogen to the adsorbent surface. Henry's Law analysis of the Langmuir Model of adsorption yield binding energies in excellent agreement with those obtained from the Clausius Clapeyron relation. Work supported by DOE-EERE, Award No. DE-FG36-08GO18142.

  1. Henry's law constants of diacids and hydroxy polyacids: recommended values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Müller, J.-F.

    2014-03-01

    In spite of the importance of diacids and functionalised diacids for organic aerosol formation through aqueous-phase processes in droplets and aerosol water, there seems to be no reliable set of experimental values for their Henry's law constants (HLCs). We show that their estimation through the use of infinite dilution activity coefficients is also prone to error. Here we present HLC values for diacids and hydroxy polyacids determined from solubilities, water activities and vapour pressures of solids or solutions, by employing thermodynamic relationships. The vapour pressures are found to be the largest source of error, but the analysis of the obtained HLC points to inconsistencies among specific vapour pressure data sets. Although there is considerable uncertainty, the HLC defined as aqueous concentration per unit gaseous partial pressure of linear α- and ω-diacids appear to be higher than estimated by the often cited review work of Saxena and Hildemann (1996).

  2. Emily Dickinson's ophthalmic consultation with Henry Willard Williams, MD.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Donald L

    2012-12-01

    Emily Dickinson is one of America's premier poets of the 19th century. Henry Willard Williams, MD, was one of the very first physicians to limit his practice to ophthalmology and was the established leader in his field in Boston, Massachusetts. They met during the time of the Civil War, when Emily consulted him about her ophthalmic disorder. No records of the diagnosis survive. Photophobia, aching eyes, and a restriction in her ability to work up close were her main symptoms. Iritis, exotropia, or psychiatric problems are the most frequent diagnoses offered to explain her difficulties. Rather than attempt a definitive conclusion, this article will offer an additional possibility that Dr Williams likely considered (ie, hysterical hyperaesthesia of the retina). This was a common diagnosis at that time, although it has currently faded from use.

  3. [Henri Moissan: the man, the collector, the teacher].

    PubMed

    Viel, C

    2008-01-01

    On December 10 1906, Henri Moissan was in Stockholm to receive the Nobel Prize for chemistry for his isolation of fluorine in 1886 and for his electric arc furnace he described for the first time in 1892 then later improved and which opened the way to the new field of high-temperature chemistry. This was the first Nobel Prize for chemistry awarded to a Frenchman and Moissan was the only French pharmacist to have received this high distinction. He died suddenly at the age of 54 years, two months after receiving his Nobel Prize. In this presentation, we report the main elements of his biography, recalling the man, the teacher and the great collector of paintings and autographs, particularly from the period of the French revolution. We have used several unpublished or little known documents concerning this great scientist who with is broad culture and malicious humor always found the time, despite his many obligations, to satisfy his literary and artistic tastes.

  4. W.E. Henry Symposium compendium: The importance of magnetism in physics and material science

    SciTech Connect

    Carwell, H.

    1997-09-19

    This compendium contains papers presented at the W. E. Henry Symposium, The Importance of Magnetism in Physics and Material Science. The one-day symposium was conducted to recognize the achievements of Dr. Warren Elliot Henry as educator, scientist, and inventor in a career spanning almost 70 years. Dr. Henry, who is 88 years old, attended the symposium. Nobel Laureate, Dr. Glenn Seaborg, a friend and colleague for over 40 years, attended the event and shared his personal reminiscences. Dr. Seaborg is Associate Director-At-Large at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Compendium begins with three papers which demonstrate the ongoing importance of magnetism in physics and material science. Other contributions cover the highlights of Dr. Henry`s career as a researcher, educator, and inventor. Colleagues and former students share insights on the impact of Dr. Henry`s research in the field of magnetism, low temperature physics, and solid state physics; his influence on students as an educator; and his character, intellect and ingenuity, and passion for learning and teaching. They share a glimpse of the environment and times that molded him as a man, and the circumstances under which he made his great achievements despite the many challenges he faced.

  5. A critical review of Henry's law constants for chemicals of environmental interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Donald; Shiu, Wan Ying

    1981-10-01

    The Henry's law constants (air-water partition coefficients) of hydrophobic organic compounds of environmental concern are reviewed. An outline of the thermodynamic principles which govern the relationships between vapor pressure, solubility and Henry's law constant for solid and liquid compounds is presented and experimental techniques for obtaining these quantities with the required accuracy are discussed. Vapor pressure, solubility, and Henry's law constant data are tabulated and reviewed for a total of 150 compounds in 12 tables consisting of gaseous, liquid and solid alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, monoaromatics, polynuclear aromatics, halogenated alkanes, alkenes and aromatics, and selected pesticides.

  6. [Henri Moissn, first French Nobel prize winner in chemistry: the man, the picture collector].

    PubMed

    Viel, C

    1999-03-01

    Born in Paris in September 1852, Henri Moisson died in February 1907, two months after receiving the Nobel prize for chemistry. After a short schooling at Meaux college, he was destined to be a clock maker. He owes his vocation for chemistry to Jules Plicque, a chemist and friend at the college. Henri Moisson attended Fremy's school of chemistry at the Paris Natural History Museum and undertook pharmaceutical studies. In this presentation, we take a look at Henri Moissan's child-hood and teenage years, his scientific education and offer a glimpse of the man and the picture collector.

  7. 78 FR 8682 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Henri Labrouste...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Henri Labrouste: Structure Brought to Light'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following determinations: Pursuant to the...

  8. Henry's Law Constant of Organic Nitriles Measured with GC-FID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, B.; Gangoda, M.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Nitriles are important atmospheric VOCs that paly key roles in the atmospheric nitrogen cycle and secondary aerosol formation. Nitriles and their oxidation products also have serious health effects and thus are important air pollutants. Henry's law constant is an important physical and chemical parameter to determine how gas phase species participate into gas-to-particle conversion and cloud formation and affect human health. Yet, measurements of Henry's law constants of nitriles are entirely lacking. We have developed a simple measurement technique to detect Henry's law constants of organic compounds using gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID) coupled with a bubble column. In this presentation, we will show Henry's law constants of a number of atmospherically relevant organic nitrile compounds and their temperature dependence.

  9. 46 CFR 7.55 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. 7.55 Section 7.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.55 Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. (a) A line drawn from Rudee Inlet Jetty Light “2”...

  10. 46 CFR 7.55 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. 7.55 Section 7.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.55 Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. (a) A line drawn from Rudee Inlet Jetty Light “2”...

  11. 46 CFR 7.55 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. 7.55 Section 7.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.55 Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. (a) A line drawn from Rudee Inlet Jetty Light “2”...

  12. 46 CFR 7.55 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. 7.55 Section 7.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.55 Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. (a) A line drawn from Rudee Inlet Jetty Light “2”...

  13. 46 CFR 7.55 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. 7.55 Section 7.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.55 Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. (a) A line drawn from Rudee Inlet Jetty Light “2”...

  14. Henry's voices: the representation of auditory verbal hallucinations in an autobiographical narrative.

    PubMed

    Demjén, Zsófia; Semino, Elena

    2015-06-01

    The book Henry's Demons (2011) recounts the events surrounding Henry Cockburn's diagnosis of schizophrenia from the alternating perspectives of Henry himself and his father Patrick. In this paper, we present a detailed linguistic analysis of Henry's first-person accounts of experiences that could be described as auditory verbal hallucinations. We first provide a typology of Henry's voices, taking into account who or what is presented as speaking, what kinds of utterances they produce and any salient stylistic features of these utterances. We then discuss the linguistically distinctive ways in which Henry represents these voices in his narrative. We focus on the use of Direct Speech as opposed to other forms of speech presentation, the use of the sensory verbs hear and feel and the use of 'non-factive' expressions such as I thought and as if. We show how different linguistic representations may suggest phenomenological differences between the experience of hallucinatory voices and the perception of voices that other people can also hear. We, therefore, propose that linguistic analysis is ideally placed to provide in-depth accounts of the phenomenology of voice hearing and point out the implications of this approach for clinical practice and mental healthcare. PMID:25505160

  15. Enzyme-Catalyzed Henry Reaction in Choline Chloride-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xuemei; Zhang, Suoqin; Zheng, Liangyu

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme-catalyzed Henry reaction was realized using deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as a reaction medium. The lipase from Aspergillus niger (lipase AS) showed excellent catalytic activity toward the substrates aromatic aldehydes and nitromethane in choline chloride:glycerol at a molar ratio of 1:2. Addition of 30 vol% water to DES further improved the lipase activity and inhibited DES-catalyzed transformation. A final yield of 92.2% for the lipase AS-catalyzed Henry reaction was achieved under optimized reaction conditions in only 4 h. In addition, the lipase AS activity was improved by approximately 3-fold in a DES-water mixture compared with that in pure water, which produced a final yield of only 33.4%. Structural studies with fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the established strong hydrogen bonds between DES and water may be the main driving force that affects the spatial conformation of the enzyme, leading to a change in lipase activity. The methodology was also extended to the aza-Henry reaction, which easily occurred in contrast to that in pure water. The enantioselectivity of both Henry and aza-Henry reactions was not found. However, the results are still remarkable, as we report the first use of DES as a reaction medium in a lipase-catalyzed Henry reaction.

  16. Henry's voices: the representation of auditory verbal hallucinations in an autobiographical narrative.

    PubMed

    Demjén, Zsófia; Semino, Elena

    2015-06-01

    The book Henry's Demons (2011) recounts the events surrounding Henry Cockburn's diagnosis of schizophrenia from the alternating perspectives of Henry himself and his father Patrick. In this paper, we present a detailed linguistic analysis of Henry's first-person accounts of experiences that could be described as auditory verbal hallucinations. We first provide a typology of Henry's voices, taking into account who or what is presented as speaking, what kinds of utterances they produce and any salient stylistic features of these utterances. We then discuss the linguistically distinctive ways in which Henry represents these voices in his narrative. We focus on the use of Direct Speech as opposed to other forms of speech presentation, the use of the sensory verbs hear and feel and the use of 'non-factive' expressions such as I thought and as if. We show how different linguistic representations may suggest phenomenological differences between the experience of hallucinatory voices and the perception of voices that other people can also hear. We, therefore, propose that linguistic analysis is ideally placed to provide in-depth accounts of the phenomenology of voice hearing and point out the implications of this approach for clinical practice and mental healthcare.

  17. Effects of surfactants and salt on Henry's constant of n-hexane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunping; Chen, Fayuan; Luo, Shenglian; Xie, Gengxin; Zeng, Guangming; Fan, Changzheng

    2010-03-15

    n-Hexane biological removal is intrinsically limited by its hydrophobic nature and low bioavailability. The addition of surfactants could enhance the transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and change the gas-liquid equilibrium of VOCs. In this paper, the effects of four surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), tert-octylphenoxypoly-ethoxyethanol (Triton X-100), polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), and sodium nitrate on apparent Henry's constant of n-hexane in surfactant solutions were investigated. The apparent Henry's constants were significantly reduced when surfactants concentrations exceeded their critical micelle concentrations (cmc's). On a cmc basis, the anionic surfactant SDS was found to have the greatest effect on the apparent Henry's constant with CTAB succeeding, then followed by Triton X-100 and Tween 80. However, the apparent Henry's constant of n-hexane decreased even more rapidly when Triton X-100, a nonionic surfactant, was added than when the ionic surfactant of SDS or CTAB was applied under identical mass concentration and other conditions. These results suggest that Triton X-100 have the biggest solubilization of n-hexane among the four surfactants. Sodium nitrate slightly decreased the apparent Henry's constant of n-hexane in surfactant solutions, and could be considered as a cosolvent in the surfactant-(n-hexane) solution. In addition, the relationship between apparent Henry's constant and surfactant concentration was further developed.

  18. Genetic Analysis of the Henry Mountains Bison Herd

    PubMed Central

    du Toit, Johan T.; Derr, James

    2015-01-01

    Wild American plains bison (Bison bison) populations virtually disappeared in the late 1800s, with some remnant animals retained in what would become Yellowstone National Park and on private ranches. Some of these private bison were intentionally crossbred with cattle for commercial purposes. This forced hybridization resulted in both mitochondrial and nuclear introgression of cattle genes into some of the extant bison genome. As the private populations grew, excess animals, along with their history of cattle genetics, provided founders for newly established public bison populations. Of the US public bison herds, only those in Yellowstone and Wind Cave National Parks (YNP and WCNP) appear to be free of detectable levels of cattle introgression. However, a small free-ranging population (~350 animals) exists on public land, along with domestic cattle, in the Henry Mountains (HM) of southern Utah. This isolated bison herd originated from a founder group translocated from YNP in the 1940s. Using genetic samples from 129 individuals, we examined the genetic status of the HM population and found no evidence of mitochondrial or nuclear introgression of cattle genes. This new information confirms it is highly unlikely for free-living bison to crossbreed with cattle, and this disease-free HM bison herd is valuable for the long-term conservation of the species. This bison herd is a subpopulation of the YNP/WCNP/HM metapopulation, within which it can contribute significantly to national efforts to restore the American plains bison to more of its native range. PMID:26673758

  19. James Henry Marriott: New Zealand's first professional telescope-maker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne; Romick, Carl; Brown, Pendreigh.

    2015-11-01

    James Henry Marriott was born in London in 1799 and trained as an optician and scientific instrument- maker. In 1842 he emigrated to New Zealand and in January 1843 settled in the newly-established town of Wellington. He was New Zealand's first professional telescope-maker, but we have only been able to locate one telescope made by him while in New Zealand, a brass 1-draw marine telescope with a 44-mm objective, which was manufactured in 1844. In 2004 this marine telescope was purchased in Hawaii by the second author of this paper. In this paper we provide biographical information about Marriott, describe his 1844 marine telescope and speculate on its provenance. We conclude that although he may have been New Zealand's first professional telescope-maker Marriot actually made very few telescopes or other scientific instruments. As such, rather than being recognised as a pioneer of telescope-making in New Zealand he should be remembered as the founder of New Zealand theatre.

  20. Genetic Analysis of the Henry Mountains Bison Herd.

    PubMed

    Ranglack, Dustin H; Dobson, Lauren K; du Toit, Johan T; Derr, James

    2015-01-01

    Wild American plains bison (Bison bison) populations virtually disappeared in the late 1800s, with some remnant animals retained in what would become Yellowstone National Park and on private ranches. Some of these private bison were intentionally crossbred with cattle for commercial purposes. This forced hybridization resulted in both mitochondrial and nuclear introgression of cattle genes into some of the extant bison genome. As the private populations grew, excess animals, along with their history of cattle genetics, provided founders for newly established public bison populations. Of the US public bison herds, only those in Yellowstone and Wind Cave National Parks (YNP and WCNP) appear to be free of detectable levels of cattle introgression. However, a small free-ranging population (~350 animals) exists on public land, along with domestic cattle, in the Henry Mountains (HM) of southern Utah. This isolated bison herd originated from a founder group translocated from YNP in the 1940s. Using genetic samples from 129 individuals, we examined the genetic status of the HM population and found no evidence of mitochondrial or nuclear introgression of cattle genes. This new information confirms it is highly unlikely for free-living bison to crossbreed with cattle, and this disease-free HM bison herd is valuable for the long-term conservation of the species. This bison herd is a subpopulation of the YNP/WCNP/HM metapopulation, within which it can contribute significantly to national efforts to restore the American plains bison to more of its native range. PMID:26673758

  1. Henry Beecher's Contributions to the Ethics of Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Veatch, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    In the 1950s and '60s, Henry Beecher pioneered the discussion of the ethics of clinical research, leading eventually to the publication of the famous New England Journal of Medicine article summarizing 22 research studies that Beecher suggests were unethical. Those studies generally showed a pattern of posing serious risks to subjects without anticipated proportional benefit. Beecher famously claimed that the problem was not that researchers were malicious or evil; rather, he claimed the problem was they manifested thoughtlessness or carelessness. He called for more rigorous self-scrutiny rather than public review.This article argues that Beecher's reliance on conscientious investigators is problematic. In particular, it focuses on benefits and harms to the exclusion of other moral criteria. However, both research subjects and public regulators are also concerned about autonomy and the consent requirement, confidentiality, and fairness in subject selection and research design. The movement in the 1970s toward more public scrutiny was critical, even though Beecher was right in holding that it was not "vicious disregard for subject welfare" that explained unethical protocols. PMID:27499481

  2. Henry Duret (1849-1921): a surgeon and forgotten neurologist.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier; Courrivaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Henri Duret (1849-1921) was a surgeon whose training started in the laboratory of Jean-Martin Charcot and Alfred Vulpian at La Salpêtrière in 1874. Using injections of colored gelatine, Duret was the first to describe the distribution of supply arteries in the brainstem and then in the cortex. His descriptions correlated irrigated territories, infarcted zones and secondary neurological deficits. He focused his 1878 thesis on experimental studies of brain trauma and localized the origin of disturbances in autonomic function and vigilance to the brainstem. He linked these disturbances to microhemorrhages affecting the medulla and pons, which are now known as Duret hemorrhages. Over 40 years, he authored numerous publications on digestive and gynecological surgery and on teaching in these areas. In 1905, another of his innovative works was published, which covered brain tumours, their clinical manifestations, the pathophysiological consequences of intracranial hypertension and the corresponding surgical treatments. This little-known treatise is in fact a pioneering work in neurosurgery, published well before the more familiar works of Victor Horsley and Harvey Cushing.

  3. Genetic Analysis of the Henry Mountains Bison Herd.

    PubMed

    Ranglack, Dustin H; Dobson, Lauren K; du Toit, Johan T; Derr, James

    2015-01-01

    Wild American plains bison (Bison bison) populations virtually disappeared in the late 1800s, with some remnant animals retained in what would become Yellowstone National Park and on private ranches. Some of these private bison were intentionally crossbred with cattle for commercial purposes. This forced hybridization resulted in both mitochondrial and nuclear introgression of cattle genes into some of the extant bison genome. As the private populations grew, excess animals, along with their history of cattle genetics, provided founders for newly established public bison populations. Of the US public bison herds, only those in Yellowstone and Wind Cave National Parks (YNP and WCNP) appear to be free of detectable levels of cattle introgression. However, a small free-ranging population (~350 animals) exists on public land, along with domestic cattle, in the Henry Mountains (HM) of southern Utah. This isolated bison herd originated from a founder group translocated from YNP in the 1940s. Using genetic samples from 129 individuals, we examined the genetic status of the HM population and found no evidence of mitochondrial or nuclear introgression of cattle genes. This new information confirms it is highly unlikely for free-living bison to crossbreed with cattle, and this disease-free HM bison herd is valuable for the long-term conservation of the species. This bison herd is a subpopulation of the YNP/WCNP/HM metapopulation, within which it can contribute significantly to national efforts to restore the American plains bison to more of its native range.

  4. The enigmatic figure of Dr Henry Maudsley (1835-1918).

    PubMed

    Pantelidou, Maria; Demetriades, Andreas K

    2014-08-01

    In spite of his contribution to psychiatry in 19th century Britain, Henry Maudsley remains a mysterious figure, a man mostly known for his donation to the London County Council for the building of the Maudsley Hospital and for The Maudsley Annual Lecture created in honour of his benevolence. Besides Sir Aubrey Lewis' article in 1951 and Michael Collie's attempt in 1988 to construct a biographical study on Maudsley, there does not seem to be any current endeavour to tell the story of his life, whereas Trevor Turner's contribution to the 2004 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography gives a somewhat scathing but unattributed account of Maudsley's personality. This essay attempts to explore his contributions to the Medico-Psychological Association (MPA), the current Royal College of Psychiatrists, his editorship of the Journal of Mental Health (currently named the British Journal of Psychiatry), his literary contributions and his vision for a psychiatric hospital. This essay is an attempt to demystify his figure and to explore some of the rumours and criticisms surrounding his name and the reasons why so little has been written about him. It is also a venture to unravel his complex personality and his intricate philosophy. PMID:24944050

  5. The enigmatic figure of Dr Henry Maudsley (1835-1918).

    PubMed

    Pantelidou, Maria; Demetriades, Andreas K

    2014-08-01

    In spite of his contribution to psychiatry in 19th century Britain, Henry Maudsley remains a mysterious figure, a man mostly known for his donation to the London County Council for the building of the Maudsley Hospital and for The Maudsley Annual Lecture created in honour of his benevolence. Besides Sir Aubrey Lewis' article in 1951 and Michael Collie's attempt in 1988 to construct a biographical study on Maudsley, there does not seem to be any current endeavour to tell the story of his life, whereas Trevor Turner's contribution to the 2004 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography gives a somewhat scathing but unattributed account of Maudsley's personality. This essay attempts to explore his contributions to the Medico-Psychological Association (MPA), the current Royal College of Psychiatrists, his editorship of the Journal of Mental Health (currently named the British Journal of Psychiatry), his literary contributions and his vision for a psychiatric hospital. This essay is an attempt to demystify his figure and to explore some of the rumours and criticisms surrounding his name and the reasons why so little has been written about him. It is also a venture to unravel his complex personality and his intricate philosophy.

  6. Henri Poincaré and the principle of relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messager, Valérie; Gilmore, Robert; Letellier, Christophe

    2012-09-01

    Often considered as the last 'encyclopedist', Henri Poincaré died one hundred years ago. If he was a prominent man in 1900 French Society, his heritage is not so clearly recognised, particularly in France. Among his too often misunderstood works is his contribution to the theory of relativity, mainly because it is almost never presented within Poincaré's general approach to science, including his philosophical writings. Our aim is therefore to provide an historical account of the main steps (experimental as well as theoretical) which led Poincaré to contribute to the theory of relativity. Starting from the optical experiments which led to the inconsistency of the classical (Galilean) composition law for velocities to explain light propagation, we introduce the FitzGerald and Lorentz contraction which was viewed as the 'sole hypothesis' to explain the Michelson and Morley experiment. We then show that Poincaré's contribution starts with a discussion of the principles governing the mechanics and was built step by step up to express in all its generality the principle of relativity. Poincaré thus showed the invariance of the Maxwell equations under the Lorentz transformation. In doing so, he also discovered the right composition law for velocities. Poincaré's approach to philosophy is detailed to help the reader to understand what a theory meant to him.

  7. Henry Duret (1849-1921): a surgeon and forgotten neurologist.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier; Courrivaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Henri Duret (1849-1921) was a surgeon whose training started in the laboratory of Jean-Martin Charcot and Alfred Vulpian at La Salpêtrière in 1874. Using injections of colored gelatine, Duret was the first to describe the distribution of supply arteries in the brainstem and then in the cortex. His descriptions correlated irrigated territories, infarcted zones and secondary neurological deficits. He focused his 1878 thesis on experimental studies of brain trauma and localized the origin of disturbances in autonomic function and vigilance to the brainstem. He linked these disturbances to microhemorrhages affecting the medulla and pons, which are now known as Duret hemorrhages. Over 40 years, he authored numerous publications on digestive and gynecological surgery and on teaching in these areas. In 1905, another of his innovative works was published, which covered brain tumours, their clinical manifestations, the pathophysiological consequences of intracranial hypertension and the corresponding surgical treatments. This little-known treatise is in fact a pioneering work in neurosurgery, published well before the more familiar works of Victor Horsley and Harvey Cushing. PMID:25227400

  8. On the Henry constant and isosteric heat at zero loading in gas phase adsorption.

    PubMed

    Do, D D; Nicholson, D; Do, H D

    2008-08-01

    The Henry constant and the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero loading are commonly used as indicators of the strength of the affinity of an adsorbate for a solid adsorbent. It is assumed that (i) they are observable in practice, (ii) the Van Hoff's plot of the logarithm of the Henry constant versus the inverse of temperature is always linear and the slope is equal to the heat of adsorption, and (iii) the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero loading is either constant or weakly dependent on temperature. We show in this paper that none of these three points is necessarily correct, first because these variables might not be observable since they are outside the range of measurability; second that the linearity of the Van Hoff plot breaks down at very high temperature, and third that the isosteric heat versus loading is a strong function of temperature. We demonstrate these points using Monte Carlo integration and Monte Carlo simulation of adsorption of various gases on a graphite surface. Another issue concerning the Henry constant is related to the way the adsorption excess is defined. The most commonly used equation is the one that assumes that the void volume is the volume extended all the way to a boundary passing through the centres of the outermost solid atoms. With this definition the Henry constant can become negative at high temperatures. Although adsorption at these temperatures may not be practical because of the very low value of the Henry constant, it is more useful to define the Henry constant in such a way that it is always positive at all temperatures. Here we propose the use of the accessible volume; the volume probed by the adsorbate when it is in nonpositive regions of the potential, to calculate the Henry constant.

  9. [Hypospadia and infertility of Henry II of France (1519-1559)].

    PubMed

    Hatzinger, M; Al-Shajlawi, S; Sohn, M

    2014-03-01

    Henry II (1519-1559) of France was the second son of Francis I (1494-1547) and Claude de France (1498-1524) born in 1519 in St. Germain-en-Laye. After his older brother's and his father's death in 1547, he was anointed the French king in Reims. In 1533 already, as a 14-year-old boy, for reasons of state, he was married to the same aged Catherine de Medici (1519-1589), as her uncle was Pope Clement VII (1478-1534). The marriage remained childless for 11 years since Henry, due to a distinct hypospadia and a completely sexually inexperienced wife was unable to conceive children with her. His existing liaison to Diane de Poitiers (1499-1566) - a 19-year-older maid of honor of his father Francis I from 1537 until his death - influenced his sexual life immensely.The blame for the childless marriage was placed primarily on his wife, as Henry had become father of an illegitimate daughter with a mistress. Catherine then underwent all possible medical and alchemical procedures to finally give birth to the hoped Dauphin. Ironically, her rival for the favor of her husband, Diane de Poitiers was one of her greatest allies. She made clear that the cause lay with Henry and not with his wife. This was confirmed by the added solid physician Jean Fernel (1497-1558). His treatment of Henry and the simultaneous training of the unexperienced Catherine by Diane de Poitiers led to success.The result was the birth of Francis II (1544-1560) in 1544, the first of 10 children in 12 years. Thus, the dynasty was saved. After the death of Henry in a tragic tournament accident in 1559, three of his sons became kings of France. But the line of Valois remained without further descendants and was continued by Henry IV, the first Bourbon king in 1589. PMID:24585117

  10. The Works of Henry Moseley, 1887-1915

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scerri, Eric

    2013-04-01

    In 1913 Henry Moseley, an unknown young English physicist published an article in the Philosophical Magazine under the title of ``The High Frequency Spectra of the Elements.'' The 10-page article was to have far reaching implications in both chemistry and physics and helped to resolve a major conundrum in the periodic table of the elements. The talk will briefly examine the life and work of Moseley who died tragically while fighting in the trenches of World War I in 1915. The build-up to the discovery of atomic number took several different avenues including contributions from Rutherford and Barkla. However the more direct motivation for Moseley's work, as he readily acknowledged, were the articles of an unknown Dutch econometrician Anton Van den Broek who attempted to improve on Mendeleev's periodic table. Moseley began as a student of Rutherford at Manchester and took a keen interest in the development of research using X-rays following the work of Roentgen, von Laue and Bragg. Although Rutherford was at first reluctant to enter this new field he soon yielded to young Moseley's request and sent him to Leeds for brief training with Bragg. On returning to Manchester, Moseley devised an ingenious apparatus in which a set of metal samples could be rotated so as to become the target for a beam of electrons in order to measure the frequencies of the emitted K X-rays. The first set of such experiments used nine successive elements in the periodic table, from titanium to zinc. Moseley's now immense fame rests with the results of this study as well as a subsequent one which extended the study into a further 30 elements, in addition to the use that his method was put to by himself as well as subsequent chemists and physicists.

  11. Henry Daniel Cogswell, DDS (1819-1900): a temperance advocate, philanthropist and builder of ice-water fountains.

    PubMed

    Christen, A G; Theobald, M S; Christen, J A

    1999-07-01

    Henry Daniel Cogswell (Fig. 1), the second of five children, was born in Tolland, Connecticut on March 3, 1819. His father, George Washington Cogswell, was a general carpenter, architect and builder of moderate circumstances. In 1827, when Henry was eight, his mother died. The following year, Henry's father moved to Orwell, (Oswego County) New York, in hopes of improving his financial condition. Henry was left behind in the care of his paternal grandfather, who died several months later, leaving the 10-year old boy, stranded and forced to rely upon his own resources. (In those times, when families were separated, individual members had limited means of locating one another.)

  12. Solute and heat transport model of the Henry and hilleke laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Christian D; Dausman, Alyssa M; Sukop, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    SEAWAT is a coupled version of MODFLOW and MT3DMS designed to simulate variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. The most recent version of SEAWAT, called SEAWAT Version 4, includes new capabilities to represent simultaneous multispecies solute and heat transport. To test the new features in SEAWAT, the laboratory experiment of Henry and Hilleke (1972) was simulated. Henry and Hilleke used warm fresh water to recharge a large sand-filled glass tank. A cold salt water boundary was represented on one side. Adjustable heating pads were used to heat the bottom and left sides of the tank. In the laboratory experiment, Henry and Hilleke observed both salt water and fresh water flow systems separated by a narrow transition zone. After minor tuning of several input parameters with a parameter estimation program, results from the SEAWAT simulation show good agreement with the experiment. SEAWAT results suggest that heat loss to the room was more than expected by Henry and Hilleke, and that multiple thermal convection cells are the likely cause of the widened transition zone near the hot end of the tank. Other computer programs with similar capabilities may benefit from benchmark testing with the Henry and Hilleke laboratory experiment. PMID:19563419

  13. Solute and heat transport model of the Henry and Hilleke laboratory experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, C.D.; Dausman, A.M.; Sukop, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    SEAWAT is a coupled version of MODFLOW and MT3DMS designed to simulate variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. The most recent version of SEAWAT, called SEAWAT Version 4, includes new capabilities to represent simultaneous multispecies solute and heat transport. To test the new features in SEAWAT, the laboratory experiment of Henry and Hilleke (1972) was simulated. Henry and Hilleke used warm fresh water to recharge a large sand-filled glass tank. A cold salt water boundary was represented on one side. Adjustable heating pads were used to heat the bottom and left sides of the tank. In the laboratory experiment, Henry and Hilleke observed both salt water and fresh water flow systems separated by a narrow transition zone. After minor tuning of several input parameters with a parameter estimation program, results from the SEAWAT simulation show good agreement with the experiment. SEAWAT results suggest that heat loss to the room was more than expected by Henry and Hilleke, and that multiple thermal convection cells are the likely cause of the widened transition zone near the hot end of the tank. Other computer programs with similar capabilities may benefit from benchmark testing with the Henry and Hilleke laboratory experiment. Journal Compilation ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  14. [Henry Toussaint and Louis Pasteur. Rivalry over a vaccine].

    PubMed

    Chevallier-Jussiau, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    Henry Toussaint (1847-1890) is a veterinary who studied in Veterinary School of Lyon with his great master Auguste Chauveau the famous physiologist. This place is the First School founded in Europe at the end of the XVIIIth century and has opened a way of thinking. His carrer brilliant and rich begins first in Lyon and then when he is named Professor of Anatomy and Physiology at the Veterinary School of Toulouse. Doctor of Science and Doctor of Medecine Toussaint applies "the experimental method" to his research in his laboratory and makes a lot of publications. He starts with Anatomy, then Physiology and soon he prioritizes his research to infestious diseases which cause serious damage to cattle in this time. He developes his own methods about anthrax an its "bacteridie", its nature, its way of culture and especially he studies the physiopathology of this disease. Pasteur is a renowned scientist who does study Microbiology at the same time in his laboratory in Paris, and precisely anthrax. He has explained his theories about "microbes" and has predominant advice. Toussaint admires Pasteur; in the year 1879 he finds first and isolates the microbe of "cholera des poules" (now Pasteurella) and gives Pasteur this new germ which will be used by Pasteur for his particular works about reducing of virulence by successive subcultures. In 1880 with his publishing on July 12 at the Academy of Science, Toussaint presents his successful result with an attenuated vaccine against anthrax: he has got protection against anthrax for dogs and sheep by using a vaccine which he has reduced off virulence by chemical manner. Academy congratulates him. Pasteur jealous of one's reputation contests the demonstration of Toussaint because he does not believe in the chemical method too different from his tests but will make use of this method for an experience open to the public in Pouilly-le-Fort in 1881. After this promotional event Pasteur will product and sell vaccines maked in his

  15. Agreement Between the Board of Trustees of Henry Ford Community College and the Henry Ford Community College Federation of Teachers, American Federation of Teachers, Local 1650, 1973-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry Ford Community Coll., Dearborn, MI.

    This agreement between the Board of Trustees of Henry Ford Community College and the Henry Ford Community College Federation of Teachers, American Federation of Teachers, Local 1650 covers the period of 1973-1975. Contents of the agreement cover recognition, board of trustee rights, union-board relations, conditions of employment, seniority, the…

  16. Agreement between the Board of Trustees of Henry Ford Community College and the Henry Ford Community College Federation of Teachers, American Federation of Teachers Local 1650, 1987-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry Ford Community Coll., Dearborn, MI.

    This collective bargaining agreement between the Board of Trustees of Henry Ford Community College and the Henry Ford Community College Federation of Teachers establishes conditions of employment for all full-time teachers, counselors, librarians, placement officers, and selected other professional personnel. The articles in the agreement set…

  17. Economics and feasibility of co-composting solid waste in McHenry County. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, J.

    1987-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of composting various segments of the waste stream produced in McHenry County, IL. In particular, the study emphasized co-composting of municipal solid waste (MSW) with septage, co-composting of MSW with septage and sludge, leaf- and yard-waste composting, and composting various animal wastes. In addition to specific analysis of co-composting in McHenry, the report includes chapters on the technical description and implementation of composting, environmental considerations of co-composting, comparisons of different proprietary systems, the economics of composting, and an analysis of compost markets.

  18. Henry`s law gas-solid chromatography and correlations of virial coefficients for hydrocarbons, chlorofluorocarbons, ethers, and sulfur hexafluoride adsorbed onto carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Rybolt, T.R.; Epperson, M.T.; Weaver, H.W.; Thomas, H.E.; Clare, S.E.; Manning, B.M.; McClung, J.T.

    1995-07-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to determine the Henry`s law second gas-solid virial coefficients within the temperature range of 314--615 K for ethane, propane, butane, isobutane, pentane, hexane, heptane, chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, tetrachloromethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon 11), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon 22), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon 12), methyl ether, ethyl ether, and sulfur hexafluoride with Carbopack B, a microporous carbon adsorbent. The temperature dependence of the second gas-solid virial coefficients of these adsorbates was used in conjunction with analyses based on a graphical method, a single-surface numeric integration method, a single-surface analytic expression method, and a two-surface analytic expression method to determine the gas-solid interaction energies and other parameters. The interaction energies were correlated with a ratio of the critical temperature divided by the square root of the critical pressure. The four methods were compared in their abilities to successfully calculate second gas-solid virial coefficient values.

  19. 77 FR 836 - Norfolk Southern Railway Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Henry and Spalding Counties, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Norfolk Southern Railway Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Henry and... milepost 9.72 M (east of Trestle Road in Locust Grove), in Henry and Spalding Counties, Ga. The...

  20. Basic Assumptions in the Virginia Ratification Debates: Patrick Henry vs. James Madison on the Nature of Man and Reason.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einhorn, Lois

    The identifiably different rhetorical behaviors of Patrick Henry and James Madison, as expressed in their Virginia debates, reflect each man's philosophical view of human nature and the role of reason in human behavior. Patrick Henry, expressing the pessimism of Calvinistic tradition, believed that people are intrinsically evil with a dominant…

  1. Community Arts Programs: Cohesion and Difference Case Studies. Henry Street Settlement and El Museo del Barrio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiebert-Gruen, Cathleen

    2009-01-01

    A comparative case study of two cultural institutions, Henry Street Settlement and El Museo del Barrio, founded almost eighty years apart, were involved in social justice causes and community arts. Although both of these institutions participated in the political activism of their time, they also demonstrated an important adaptability. They were…

  2. Nursing Program Associate in Applied Science Degree, Patrick Henry Community College. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jean

    In 1988, a quantitative and qualitative analysis was conducted to determine the effectiveness, quality, and image of Patrick Henry Community College's (PHCC's) nursing program. The study was initiated in response to faculty and administrator concern about the low passing rates of nursing graduates on the state licensing board examination. The…

  3. The Heuristic Method, Precursor of Guided Inquiry: Henry Armstrong and British Girls' Schools, 1890-1920

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Geoff; Rayner-Canham, Marelene

    2015-01-01

    Though guided-inquiry learning, discovery learning, student-centered learning, and problem-based learning are commonly believed to be recent new approaches to the teaching of chemistry, in fact, the concept dates back to the late 19th century. Here, we will show that it was the British chemist, Henry Armstrong, who pioneered this technique,…

  4. Astronaut Henry W. Harsfield, Jr. in suit donning/doffing exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Astronaut Henry W. Harsfield, Jr., STS-4 pilot, takes part in a suit donning/doffing exercise aboard a KC-135 'zero-gravity' aircraft. Mission Specialist William F. Fisher, far left, stands ready to assist in the exercise. Hartsfield is wearing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) minus gloves and helmet.

  5. High School Decision-Making at Henry Lord Middle School in Fall River

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronhard, Aimee A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how students at Henry Lord Middle School in Fall River take into consideration their initial college and career aspirations when making their decision for high school. Self-efficacy theory, critical theory, and a literature review related to high school decision-making inform the analysis of…

  6. View of Crew Commander Henry Hartsfield Jr. loading film into IMAX camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    View of Crew Commander Henry Hartsfield Jr. loading film into the IMAX camera during the 41-D mission. The camera is floating in front of the middeck lockers. Above it is a sticker of the University of Kansas mascott, the Jayhawk.

  7. 2004 Foster G. McGaw Prize. Winner: Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan.

    PubMed

    Rollins, Gina

    2005-04-01

    Henry Ford Health System's commitment to community service took root with its founding in 1915 and has been embraced by leaders ever since. Wide-ranging efforts of school health programs offering grief support for children earned it the 2004 McGaw Prize.

  8. Detroit's Henry Ford Health System awarded Foster G. McGaw Prize.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, is named winner of the prestigious Foster G. McGaw Prize for excellence in community service. The organization received 100,000 dollars from the sponsors, the American Hospital Association, The Baxter International Foundation and the Cardinal Health Foundation.

  9. Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jim

    This teacher's guide explores Fort McHenry and the British attack on Baltimore Harbor (Maryland) in 1814. The guide contains 11 lessons: (1) "Where in the World Is Baltimore?" (no handout-use classroom resources); (2) "Why Baltimore?" (Handout-Why Baltimore?); (3) "Now Where Do We Place the Fort?" (Handout-Map of Patapsco River/Baltimore Harbor);…

  10. Mounting a Curricular Revolution: An Interview with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Zastrow, Claus

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Harvard professor and cultural critic who has captured 25 million viewers with his PBS documentary series, African American Lives (WNET). Using genealogical research and DNA science, Gates traces the family history of 19 famous African Americans. What results is a rich and moving…

  11. Enter the Madcap Prince of Wales: Students Directing "Henry IV, Part I."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earthman, Elise Ann

    1993-01-01

    Argues that William Shakespeare's "Henry IV, Part I" is an appropriate and useful text for secondary English classrooms. Shows how the play lends itself to performance-based instruction. Outlines ways of accomplishing student engagement, using film versions, and assigning written work. (HB)

  12. On New Rhetoric, John Henry Newman and the Language of Metaphors: Implications for Branding Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler-Brunner, Jennifer Lynne

    2012-01-01

    This project interprets how John Henry Newman's (1801-1890) system of thought informs the philosophical and theoretical grounds for rhetorical praxis in the marketplace. His seminal lessons in "An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent" (1870) and "The Idea of a University" (1873 ed.) demonstrate the metaphoric power of words…

  13. Henry David Thoreau: American Transcendentalism and the Implications for Rhetoric in American Civic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grapsy, Ronald P., Jr.

    The American Philosopher Henry David Thoreau provides modern students an important perspective on the state and operation of democratic institutions and society. Many critics of his philosophy cite the author's inability to live up to his articulated tenets as grounds to dismiss the exhortative writings as idealistic and implausible. This essay…

  14. The Rhetoric of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, Renowned Speaker and Journalist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Melbourne S.

    Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, a journalist and speaker, headed a back-to-Africa movement in the second half of the nineteenth century that was one of the first black rhetorical movements to meet the challenges of institutionalized racism in the United States. Turner was a preacher in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, becoming first an elder…

  15. Henry Evelyn Bliss--The Other Immortal, or a Prophet without Honour?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, Vanda

    2008-01-01

    The paper takes a retrospective look at the work of Henry Evelyn Bliss, classificationist theorist and author of the "Bibliographic Classification". Major features of his writings and philosophy are examined and evaluated for the originality of their contribution to the corpus of knowledge in the discipline. Reactions to Bliss's work are analysed,…

  16. Pickering, Edward Charles (1846-1919) and Pickering, William Henry (1858-1938)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomers—two brothers. Born in Boston, MA, Edward became director of the Harvard College Observatory and observed the brightnesses of 45 000 stars. He hired a number of women, including WILLIAMINA P FLEMING, ANNIE J CANNON, Antonia Maury and HENRIETTA LEAVITT, and produced the Henry Draper Catalog, classifying the spectra of hundreds of thousands of stars. He and HERMANN CARL VOGEL independent...

  17. A new understanding of the first electromagnetic machine: Joseph Henry's vibrating motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littman, Michael G.; Stern, Lucas E.

    2011-02-01

    In 1831, Henry invented a battery-powered rocking-beam motor that he later described as the first electromagnetic machine. He repeatedly modified the design over his career, but only one version of a motor actually constructed by Henry is known to exist. This version is in a collection of Henry instruments at Princeton University. We found that the Princeton motor cannot have operated in the form that was displayed as early as 1884. We found evidence in several historical documents and in the instrument itself that the field magnet shown with the motor is a mistake. Instead of a single horizontal bar magnet, the motor was designed to use two elliptical magnets. We presume the error was made by whoever assembled the first public display. We modeled the dynamics of Henry's vibrating motor and compared our results to the operation of a replica motor. Modeling provides insight into how the motor is able to vibrate indefinitely even in the presence of energy loss due to friction.

  18. Visualizing the Life and Legacy of Henry VIII: Guiding Students with Eight Types of Graphic Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallavan, Nancy P.; Kottler, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Delving into the life and legacy of Henry VIII is both complex and captivating. People seem compelled to learn more abut his critical contributions and controversial conduct that range from the significant to the scandalous. Reflecting on the history of the world would be incomplete without investigating the events and escapades associated with…

  19. BUBBLE STRIPPING TO DETERMINE HYDROGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN GROUND WATER: A PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF HENRY'S LAW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bubble Stripping Method is a chemical testing method that operates on the principle of Henry's Law. It is useful for determining concentrations of hydrogen in well water, and it is capable of detecting concentrations on the order of nanomoles per liter. The method provides ...

  20. The Imaginary World of Henri Rousseau. Teacher's Guide. School Arts: Looking/Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Anne

    While Henri Rousseau's work was not easily classified into any definitive artistic style of the time--impressionism, post-impressionism, fauvism, or cubism--it has been considered a forerunner of surrealism because of its dreamlike sensibility. This teaching guide provides information about Rousseau and his work, focusing on "Tropical Forest with…

  1. Neoliberalism, Democracy and the University as a Public Sphere: An Interview with Henry A. Giroux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    "Truthout" contributor, director of "Truthout's" Public Intellectual Project (truth-out.org/public-intellectual-project) and Truthout board member Henry A. Giroux responds to questions about how the excesses of neoliberal politics have reshaped and subverted the democratic mission of higher education.

  2. Control-Structure Ratings on the Fox River at McHenry and Algonquin, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Straub, Timothy D.; Johnson, Gary P.; Hortness, Jon E.; Parker, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    The Illinois Department of Natural Resources-Office of Water Resources operates control structures on a reach of the Fox River in northeastern Illinois between McHenry and Algonquin. The structures maintain water levels in the river for flood-control and recreational purposes. This report documents flow ratings for hinged-crest gates, a broad-crested weir, sluice gates, and an ogee spillway on the control structures at McHenry and Algonquin. The ratings were determined by measuring headwater and tailwater stage along with streamflow at a wide range of flows at different gate openings. Standard control-structure rating techniques were used to rate each control structure. The control structures at McHenry consist of a 221-feet(ft)-long broad-crested weir, a 4-ft-wide fish ladder, a 50-ft-wide hinged-crest gate, five 13.75-ft-wide sluice gates, and a navigational lock. Sixty measurements were used to rate the McHenry structures. The control structures at Algonquin consist of a 242-ft-long ogee spillway and a 50-ft-wide hinged-crest gate. Forty-one measurements were used to rate the Algonquin control structures.

  3. Neostusakia, a new name for preoccupied Stusakia Kment and Henry, 2008 (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Berytidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of homonymy in the heteropteran family Berytidae is addressed. The genus Stusakia Kment and Henry, 2008 (Hemiptera) is preoccupied by Stusakia Frýda, 1998 (Mollusca: Gastropoda). As a consequence, the replacement name Neostusakia, new name, is proposed. In addition, the only two included s...

  4. Pre-Education Programs: A Comprehensive Project at Henry Ford Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zopf, Deborah; Smyrski, Larry

    This document presents an overview of a four-year comprehensive pre-education project at Henry Ford Community College (HFCC) in Michigan. To meet the needs of school districts that preferred a 32-credit certificate program as well as districts that preferred a 60-unit associate degree, HFCC employed a career-ladder approach: A 32-credit…

  5. Highly enantioselective Henry reactions of aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by an amino alcohol-copper(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Qin, Dan-Dan; Lai, Wen-Han; Hu, Di; Chen, Zheng; Wu, An-An; Ruan, Yuan-Ping; Zhou, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Hong-Bin

    2012-08-20

    Amino alcohol-Cu(II) catalyst: Highly enantioselective Henry reactions between aromatic aldehydes and nitromethane have been developed. The reactions were catalyzed by an easily available and operationally simple amino alcohol-copper(II) catalyst. In total, 38 substrates were tested and the R-configured products were obtained in good yields with excellent enantioselectivities. PMID:22791567

  6. The Henry Ford Academy: An Innovative Space for Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    n/a, n/a

    2005-01-01

    Edith Graybill, English instructor at the Henry Ford Academy in Dearborn, Michigan, speaks about her school's English language arts curriculum, the influence of the school on the role of English language arts, the theories of teaching and learning used at the Academy, and other related topics. She believes that most of the students appreciate…

  7. Fin-de-Siecle Advances in Neuroeducation: Henry Herbert Donaldson and Reuben Post Halleck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodoridou, Zoe D.; Triarhou, Lazaros C.

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on two early attempts at bridging neuroscience and education, made by Henry Herbert Donaldson (1857-1938), a neurologist, and Reuben Post Halleck (1859-1936), an educator. Their works, respectively entitled "The Growth of the Brain: A Study of the Nervous System in Relation to Education" (1895) and "The Education of the…

  8. From Romantic Idealism to Enlightenment Rationalism: Lucretia Coffin Mott Responds to Richard Henry Dana, Sr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillars, Malcolm O.

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that the contrast between speeches by Richard Henry Dana Sr. and Lucretia Coffin Mott lies not only in their two views of the woman's place and role in society but also in the respective orientation toward Romantic idealism and Enlightenment rationalism. (TB)

  9. Movement, Memory and Mathematics: Henri Bergson and the Ontology of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Elizabeth; Ferrara, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Using the work of philosopher Henri Bergson (1859-1941) to examine the nature of movement and memory, this article contributes to recent research on the role of the body in learning mathematics. Our aim in this paper is to introduce the ideas of Bergson and to show how these ideas shed light on mathematics classroom activity. Bergson's monist…

  10. Henry David Thoreau, Martin Luther King Jr., and the American Tradition of Protest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brent

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. fundamentally altered the tradition of protest and reform. Compares and contrasts the role of each man in U.S. social and constitutional history. Concludes that while Thoreau lacked the broad influence of King, his writings influenced both King and Mohandas Gandhi. (CFR)

  11. James McHenry: Soldier-Statesmen of the Constitution. A Bicentennial Series, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Center of Military History, Washington, DC.

    Less than five years after his first landing in the American colonies, James McHenry, a well-education Scots-Irish immigrant, was serving with the Continental Army outside Boston (Massachusetts), and his military experience led him into a lengthy career of public service where he forcefully and consistently upheld the ideal of a strong central…

  12. Dissolved-Solids Load in Henrys Fork Upstream from the Confluence with Antelope Wash, Wyoming, Water Years 1970-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Katharine; Kenney, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    Annual dissolved-solids load at the mouth of Henrys Fork was estimated by using data from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station 09229500, Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah. The annual dissolved-solids load for water years 1970-2009 ranged from 18,300 tons in 1977 to 123,300 tons in 1983. Annual streamflows for this period ranged from 14,100 acre-feet in 1977 to 197,500 acre-feet in 1983. The 25-percent trimmed mean dissolved-solids load for water years 1970-2009 was 44,300 tons per year at Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah. Previous simulations using a SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) model for dissolved solids specific to water year 1991 conditions in the Upper Colorado River Basin predicted an annual dissolved-solids load of 25,000 tons for the Henrys Fork Basin upstream from Antelope Wash. On the basis of computed dissolved-solids load data from Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah, together with estimated annual dissolved-solids load from Antelope Wash and Peoples Canal, this prediction was adjusted to 37,200 tons. As determined by simulations with the Upper Colorado River Basin SPARROW model, approximately 56 percent (14,000 tons per year) of the dissolved-solids load at Henrys Fork upstream from Antelope Wash is associated with the 21,500 acres of irrigated agricultural lands in the upper Henrys Fork Basin.

  13. Keratin Protein-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry) Reaction and Comparison with Other Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Häring, Marleen; Pettignano, Asja; Quignard, Françoise; Tanchoux, Nathalie; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a preliminary investigation on the ability of natural keratin to catalyze the nitroaldol (Henry) reaction between aldehydes and nitroalkanes. Both aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes bearing strong or moderate electron-withdrawing groups were converted into the corresponding β-nitroalcohol products in both DMSO and in water in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) as a phase transfer catalyst. Negligible background reactions (i.e., negative control experiment in the absence of keratin protein) were observed in these solvent systems. Aromatic aldehydes bearing electron-donating groups and aliphatic aldehydes showed poor or no conversion, respectively. In general, the reactions in water/TBAB required twice the amount of time than in DMSO to achieve similar conversions. Moreover, comparison of the kinetics of the keratin-mediated nitroaldol (Henry) reaction with other biopolymers revealed slower rates for the former and the possibility of fine-tuning the kinetics by appropriate selection of the biopolymer and solvent. PMID:27571051

  14. A French description of German psychology laboratories in 1893 by Victor Henri, a collaborator of Binet.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge; Barnes, Marissa E; Murray, David J

    2015-05-01

    There is a rich tradition of writings about the foundation of psychology laboratories, particularly in the United States but also in France. Various documents exist concerning former German laboratories in American and French literature. But the most interesting French paper was certainly written by a young psychologist named Victor Henri (1872-1940) who was a close collaborator of Alfred Binet (1857-1911) in the 1890s. Visiting various psychology laboratories, he wrote, in 1893, a clear description of the laboratories of Wundt, G. E. Müller, Martius and Ebbinghaus. An English translation is given of Henri's paper and the historical importance of his contribution is here expounded by contrasting the German and French psychologies of the time.

  15. Taxing junk food: applying the logic of the Henry tax review to food.

    PubMed

    Bond, Molly E; Williams, Michael J; Crammond, Brad; Loff, Bebe

    2010-10-18

    The recent review of taxation in Australia - the Henry tax review - has recommended that the federal government increase the taxes already levied on tobacco and alcohol. Tobacco and alcohol taxes are put forward as the best way of reducing the social harms caused by the use and misuse of these substances. Junk foods have the same pattern of misuse and the same social costs as tobacco and alcohol. The Henry tax review rejects the idea of taxing fatty foods, and to date the government has not implemented a tax on junk food. We propose that a tax on junk food be implemented as a tool to reduce consumption and address the obesity epidemic. PMID:20955126

  16. Observation of Henry's Law in Low-Density Measurements of Adsorption on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyubenko, Boris; Schmitz, Denise; Lee, Hao-Chun; Vilches, Oscar E.; Cobden, David H.

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the adsorption of noble gases on pristine suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes at low temperatures in the limit of low density (coverage), as determined from the shift of the mechanical resonance frequency of the nanotube due to mass loading. The high homogeneity of the nanotube substrate and the sensitivity of the technique allow us to observe Henry's law, in which the coverage is proportional to the gas pressure. In this limit the adsorption isotherm is determined by single-atom effects, allowing unprecedentedly accurate (+/- 2%) determination of the single-particle binding energies to a nanotube. Also, by measuring the deviation from Henry's law as coverage increases we obtain information about the pairwise interactions between the adsorbed atoms using the virial expansion.

  17. DNA-catalyzed Henry reaction in pure water and the striking influence of organic buffer systems.

    PubMed

    Häring, Marleen; Pérez-Madrigal, Maria M; Kühbeck, Dennis; Pettignano, Asja; Quignard, Françoise; Díaz, David Díaz

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript we report a critical evaluation of the ability of natural DNA to mediate the nitroaldol (Henry) reaction at physiological temperature in pure water. Under these conditions, no background reaction took place (i.e., control experiment without DNA). Both heteroaromatic aldehydes (e.g., 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde) and aromatic aldehydes bearing strong or moderate electron-withdrawing groups reacted satisfactorily with nitromethane obeying first order kinetics and affording the corresponding β-nitroalcohols in good yields within 24 h. In contrast, aliphatic aldehydes and aromatic aldehydes having electron-donating groups either did not react or were poorly converted. Moreover, we discovered that a number of metal-free organic buffers efficiently promote the Henry reaction when they were used as reaction media without adding external catalysts. This constitutes an important observation because the influence of organic buffers in chemical processes has been traditionally underestimated.

  18. Osler's Pupil, Henry W. Ochsner, MD (1877–1902): His Life, Lineage, and Death

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Paul S.

    2007-01-01

    In multiple editions of his Principles and Practice of Medicine, a 1904 speech, and his essay “A Student Life,” Sir William Osler mentions and laments the death due to typhoid of his pupil, Henry W. Ochsner (1877–1902). Harvey Cushing, MD, in his biography of Osler, describes how deeply Osler was moved by “poor” Ochsner's death. Yet little is known about Ochsner. This article describes the life story, lineage, and death of Henry W. Ochsner, MD, a son of Swiss pioneers who settled in Waumandee, Wisconsin. He was a member of a family that includes medical luminaries (e.g., Albert J. Ochsner, MD, the famous Chicago surgeon, and Alton Ochsner, MD, the founder of the Ochsner Clinic); a brilliant student and physician; a humble and beloved fellow citizen; and a favorite pupil of Osler. PMID:21603518

  19. Keratin Protein-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry) Reaction and Comparison with Other Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Häring, Marleen; Pettignano, Asja; Quignard, Françoise; Tanchoux, Nathalie; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-08-25

    Here we describe a preliminary investigation on the ability of natural keratin to catalyze the nitroaldol (Henry) reaction between aldehydes and nitroalkanes. Both aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes bearing strong or moderate electron-withdrawing groups were converted into the corresponding β-nitroalcohol products in both DMSO and in water in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) as a phase transfer catalyst. Negligible background reactions (i.e., negative control experiment in the absence of keratin protein) were observed in these solvent systems. Aromatic aldehydes bearing electron-donating groups and aliphatic aldehydes showed poor or no conversion, respectively. In general, the reactions in water/TBAB required twice the amount of time than in DMSO to achieve similar conversions. Moreover, comparison of the kinetics of the keratin-mediated nitroaldol (Henry) reaction with other biopolymers revealed slower rates for the former and the possibility of fine-tuning the kinetics by appropriate selection of the biopolymer and solvent.

  20. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Henry Draper Catalogue (edition 1985)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, N. G.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An updated, corrected and extended machine-readable version of the catalog is described. Published and unpublished errors discovered in the previous version was corrected; letters indicating supplemental stars in the BD have been moved to a new byte to distinguish them from double-star components; and the machine readable portion of The Henry Draper Extension (HDE) (HA 100) was converted to the same format as the main catalog, with additional data added as necessary.

  1. Speculative Truth - Henry Cavendish, Natural Philosophy, and the Rise of Modern Theoretical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormmach, Russell

    2004-03-01

    With a never-before published paper by Lord Henry Cavendish, as well as a biography on him, this book offers a fascinating discourse on the rise of scientific attitudes and ways of knowing. A pioneering British physicist in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Cavendish was widely considered to be the first full-time scientist in the modern sense. Through the lens of this unique thinker and writer, this book is about the birth of modern science.

  2. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1983: Henry Taube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, J.

    2002-07-01

    The 1983 Nobel Prize was awarded to Henry Taube for his work on the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions, especially in metal complexes. Taube's work represents a watershed in the development of the mechanistic chemistry of inorganic transition metal complexes. His studies of those reactions is a central feature in courses in mechanistic inorganic chemistry, and his description of inner-sphere and outer-sphere electron transfer mechanisms remain as the textbook examples.

  3. Bis(oxazoline)-based coordination polymers: a recoverable system for enantioselective Henry reactions.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Beatriz; García, José I; Herrerías, Clara I; Mayoral, José A; Miñana, Ana C

    2012-07-01

    An efficient release-capture strategy for the recovery and reuse of enantioselective catalysts in the Henry reaction is described. This strategy is based on the precipitation of an insoluble coordination polymer at the end of each reaction, allowing easy separation from products. The coordination polymer is formed through aggregation of Cu(II) ions with ditopic bisoxazoline-based chiral ligands. Up to 11 catalytic cycles have been conducted keeping good yields and enantioselectivities.

  4. Total Synthesis of Anti-Influenza Agents Zanamivir and Zanaphosphor via Asymmetric Aza-Henry Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Zhi; Fang, Jim-Min

    2016-09-01

    The potent anti-influenza agents, zanamivir and its phosphonate congener, are synthesized by using a nitro group as the latent amino group at C4 for asymmetric aza-Henry reaction with a chiral sulfinylimine, which is derived from inexpensive d-glucono-δ-lactone to establish the essential nitrogen-containing substituent at C5. This method provides an efficient way to construct the densely substituted dihydropyran core of zanamivir and zanaphosphor without using the hazardous azide reagent. PMID:27541804

  5. Henry Beecher and Consent to Research: a critical re-examination.

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G

    2016-01-01

    Henry Beecher is an iconic figure in research ethics, best known for blowing the whistle on unethical clinical research in 1966. This article traces the evolution of Beecher's view on consent to research and juxtaposes these views with his own practices relating to informed consent in the conduct of clinical research. Additionally, critical examination of Beecher's conception of informed consent as an ideal has important implications for contemporary research ethics. PMID:27499486

  6. anti-Selective Asymmetric Henry Reaction Catalyzed by a Heterobimetallic Cu-Sm-Aminophenol Sulfonamide Complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Deng, Ping; Zeng, Youmao; Xiong, Yan; Zhou, Hui

    2016-04-01

    A novel heterobimetallic Cu/Sm/aminophenol sulfonamide complex has been developed by a convenient one-pot method for the anti-selective asymmetric Henry reaction. The corresponding anti-β-nitro alcohols are obtained in up to 99% yield, >30:1 dr, and 98% ee. The results of control experiments and ESI-MS analysis of the complex indicate that the monomeric bimetallic Cu/Sm/1 complex would be the active species.

  7. William Henry Welch (1850–1934): the road to Johns Hopkins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    William Henry Welch's selection in 1884 as the first faculty member of the new medical school at Johns Hopkins created the invigorating atmosphere that generated the revolutionary changes in medical training and laboratory medicine that transformed medicine in America. Dr. Welch's family traditions, his New England upbringing, Yale education, and German university experience prepared a unique individual to lead American medicine into the 20th century. PMID:21738298

  8. The delusion of the Master: the last days of Henry James.

    PubMed

    Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    The novelist Henry James shared with his brother William, the author of the Principles of Psychology, a deep interest in the ways in which personal identity is built through one's history and experiences. At the end of his life, Henry James suffered a vascular stroke in the right hemisphere and developed a striking identity delusion. He dictated in a perfectly clear and coherent manner two letters as if they were written by Napoleon Bonaparte. He also showed signs of reduplicative paramnesia. Negative symptoms resulting from right hemisphere damage may disrupt the feelings of "warmth and intimacy and immediacy" and the "resemblance among the parts of a continuum of feelings (especially bodily feelings)", which are the foundation of personal identity according to William James. On the other hand, a left hemisphere receiving inadequate input from the damaged right hemisphere may produce positive symptoms such as delusional, confabulatory narratives. Other fragments dictated during Henry James's final disease reveal some form of insight, if partial and disintegrated, into his condition. Thus, even when consciousness is impaired by brain damage, something of its deep nature may persist, as attested by the literary characteristics of the last fragments of the Master.

  9. The last ride of Henry II of France: orbital injury and a king's demise.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Kian; Choe, Christina H; Vagefi, M Reza; Eckstein, Lauren A

    2015-01-01

    Jousting was a popular pastime for royalty in the Renaissance era. Injuries were common, and the eye was particularly at risk from the splinters of the wooden lance. On June 30, 1559, Henry II of France participated in a jousting tournament to celebrate two royal weddings. In the third match, Gabriel de Montgomery struck Henry on the right shoulder and the lance splintered, sending wooden shards into his face and right orbit. Despite being cared for by the prominent physicians Ambroise Paré and Andreas Vesalius, the king died 10 days later and was found to have a cerebral abscess. The wound was not explored immediately after the injury; nevertheless, wooden foreign bodies were discovered in the orbit at the time of autopsy. The dura had not been violated, suggesting that an infection may have traveled from the orbit into the brain. Nostradamus and Luca Guarico, the astrologer to the Medici family, had prophesied the death of Henry II of France, but he ignored their warnings and thus changed the course of history in Renaissance Europe. PMID:25890627

  10. The delusion of the Master: the last days of Henry James.

    PubMed

    Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    The novelist Henry James shared with his brother William, the author of the Principles of Psychology, a deep interest in the ways in which personal identity is built through one's history and experiences. At the end of his life, Henry James suffered a vascular stroke in the right hemisphere and developed a striking identity delusion. He dictated in a perfectly clear and coherent manner two letters as if they were written by Napoleon Bonaparte. He also showed signs of reduplicative paramnesia. Negative symptoms resulting from right hemisphere damage may disrupt the feelings of "warmth and intimacy and immediacy" and the "resemblance among the parts of a continuum of feelings (especially bodily feelings)", which are the foundation of personal identity according to William James. On the other hand, a left hemisphere receiving inadequate input from the damaged right hemisphere may produce positive symptoms such as delusional, confabulatory narratives. Other fragments dictated during Henry James's final disease reveal some form of insight, if partial and disintegrated, into his condition. Thus, even when consciousness is impaired by brain damage, something of its deep nature may persist, as attested by the literary characteristics of the last fragments of the Master. PMID:24057119

  11. miR-23a, miR-146a and miR-301a confer predisposition to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome but not to Behcet’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shengping; Ye, Zi; Liao, Dan; Bai, Lin; Liu, Yunjia; Zhang, Jun; Kijlstra, Aize; Yang, Peizeng

    2016-01-01

    Ninety-eight miRNAs are involved in the immune response. However, the genetic roles of these miRNAs remain unclear in Behcet’s disease (BD) and Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) syndrome. This study aimed to explore the association and functional roles of copy number variants (CNV) in several miRNAs with BD and VKH syndrome. Genotyping of CNVs was examined by TaqMan PCR. The expression of miR-23a, transfection efficiency and cytokine production were measured by real-time PCR, flow cytometry or ELISA. First, replication and combined studies for miR-23a, miR-146a and miR-301a demonstrated a similar association with VKH syndrome (Combined: P = 5.53 × 10−8; P = 8.43 × 10−31; P = 9.23 × 10−8, respectively). No association of CNVs of the above mentioned miRNAs was observed in BD patients. mRNA expression of miR-23a showed a positive association with its copy numbers. Additionally, individuals with high copy number of miR-23a show an increased production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), but not IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by stimulated PBMCs. miR-23a transfected ARPE-19 cells modulated the production of IL-6 and IL-8, but not MCP-1. Our results suggest that CNVs of miR-146a, miR-23a and miR-301a confer susceptibility to VKH syndrome, but not to BD. The contribution of miR-23a to VKH syndrome may be mediated by increasing the production of IL-6. PMID:26818976

  12. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constants of thirteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between 4 C and 31 C

    SciTech Connect

    Bamford, H.A.; Poster, D.L.; Baker, J.E.

    1999-09-01

    An understanding of the temperature dependence of the Henry's law constant for organic contaminant is critical when modeling the transport and fate of these contaminants in the environment. The Henry's law constants for 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were experimentally determined between 4 and 31 C using a gas-stripping apparatus. The Henry's law constants ranged between 0.02 {+-} 0.01 Pa m{sup 3}/mol for chrysene at 4 C and 73.3 {+-} 20 Pa m{sup 3}/mol for 2-methylnaphthalene at 31 C. The temperature dependence of each PAH was modeled using the van't Hoff equation to calculate the enthalpy and entropy of phase change. For nine of the PAHs, the present study reports the first experimental measured temperature dependence of their Henry's law constant. The enthalpies of phase change ranged between 35.4 {+-} 1.9 kJ/mol for 1-methylphenanthrene and 100 {+-} 8 kJ/mol for chrysene. These data can be used to extrapolate Henry's law values within the experimental temperature ranges. For all PAHs except benzo[a]fluorene, the temperature dependence can be predicted within a relative standard error {lt}10%.

  13. Polytopic bis(oxazoline)-based ligands for recoverable catalytic systems applied to the enantioselective Henry reaction.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Beatriz; García, José I; Herrerías, Clara I; Mayoral, José A; Miñana, Ana C

    2015-09-21

    Several kinds of polytopic chiral ligands (including ditopic, tritopic and tetratopic), based on the bis(oxazoline) and azabis(oxazoline) motifs, have been tested in the preparation of recoverable catalytic systems for the Henry reaction. The results obtained with the different ligands are, in general, good, but they point to the existence of a delicate balance between the coordinating ability of the ligand, the catalytic activity and the recovery of the catalyst by formation of the coordination polymer, related to the easiness to form oligomeric species in solution.

  14. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of atmospheric organics of biogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Leng, Chunbo; Kish, J Duncan; Kelley, Judas; Mach, Mindy; Hiltner, Joseph; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2013-10-10

    There have been growing interests in modeling studies to understand oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase for their potential roles in cloud chemistry, formation of secondary organic aerosols, and fate of atmospheric organics. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants, key parameters in the atmospheric models to account for mass transfer, are often unavailable. In the present work, we investigated gas-liquid equilibriums of isoprene, limonene, α-pinene, and linalool using a bubble column technique. These compounds, originating from biogenic sources, were selected for their implications in atmospheric cloud chemistry and secondary organic aerosol formation. We reported Henry's law constants (K(H)), first order loss rates (k), and gas phase diffusion coefficients over a range of temperatures relevant to the lower atmosphere (278-298 K) for the first time. The measurement results of K(H) values for isoprene, limonene, α-pinene, and linalool at 298 K were 0.036 ± 0.003; 0.048 ± 0.004; 0.029 ± 0.004; and 21.20 ± 0.30 mol L(-1) atm(-1), respectively. The fraction for these compounds in stratocumulus and cumulonimbus clouds at 278 K were also estimated in this work (isoprene, 1.0 × 10(-6), 6.8 × 10(-6); limonene, 1.5 × 10(-6), 1.0 × 10(-5); α-pinene, 4.5 × 10(-7), 3.1 × 10(-6); and linalool, 6.2 × 10(-4), 4.2 × 10(-3)). Our measurements in combination with literature results indicated that noncyclic alkenes could have smaller K(H) values than those of cyclic terpenes and that K(H) values may increase with an increasing number of double bonds. It was also shown that estimated Henry's law constants and their temperature dependence based on model prediction can differ from experimental results considerably and that direct measurements of temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of atmospheric organics are necessary for future work.

  15. Inverse temperature dependence of Henry's law coefficients for volatile organic compounds in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Karsten; Starokozhev, Elena; Schmidt, Martin U; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2009-09-01

    Upon supercooling, water expels volatile organic compounds (VOC), and Henry's law coefficients are increasing concomitant with decreasing temperature. This unexpected observation was found by measuring the VOC partitioning between supercooled water and gas phase in the temperature range from -5 degrees C to -15 degrees C for benzene, toluene, ethlybenzene, m-, p-, o-xylenes (BTEX), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE). Aqueous standard solutions were analyzed using a static headspace method in combination with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Dimensionless Henry's law coefficients (K(AW)) were calculated from measurements of the concentration of the VOCs in the headspace above the standard solutions at temperatures between -25 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The results show that the well known temperature dependence of Henry's law coefficients at temperatures above 0 degrees C is inversed upon decreasing the temperature below 0 degrees C and formation of supercooled water while decreasing the temperature to -15 degrees C. Upon further decrease of the temperature to -25 degrees C freezing of the supercooled water occurs. K(AW) values increase from 0.092 (benzene), 0.099 (toluene), 0.098 (ethylbenzene), 0.117 (m/p-xylene), 0.076 (o-xylene), 0.012 (MTBE) and 0.014 (ETBE at 5 degrees C to 0.298 (benzene), 0.498 (toluene), 0.944 (ethylbenzene), 0.327 (m/p-xylene), 0.342 (o-xylene), 0.029 (MTBE) and 0.041 (ETBE) at -25 degrees C, respectively. Inversion of Henry coefficients upon cooling the aqueous solutions to temperatures below 0 degrees C is explained by the increasing formation of ice-like clusters in the water below 0 degrees C. The VOC are expelled from these clusters resulting in enhanced VOC concentrations in the gas phase upon supercooling. Formation of ice upon further cooling to -25 degrees C results in a further increase of the VOC concentrations in the gas phase above the ice. The findings have implications for the

  16. Ground-water aspects of the lower Henrys Fork region, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosthwaite, E.J.; Mundorff, M.J.; Walker, E.H.

    1967-01-01

    The lower Henrys Fork region includes the plains and low benches between Ashton and the junction of Henrys Fork and Snake River in eastern Idaho. The northwestern and western parts of the area are part of the Snake River lava plain. The central part of the area is occupied by alluvial plains of the Snake, Teton, and Falls Rivers, and Henrys Fork. The southeastern part of the area is a bench (Rexburg Bench), chiefly on silicic and basaltic volcanic rocks, which rises gradually to mountain peaks southeast of the area. The basalt, and the sand and gravel under the alluvial plains are good aquifers and yield large amounts of water with small drawdowns. The silicic volcanic rocks and the interbedded ash, pyroclastics, and sedimentary deposits generally yield much less water than the basalt and alluvium. The regional water table slopes southward beneath the basalt and alluvial plains. Seepage from stream channels and irrigated tracts has resulted in an extensive body of ground water perched above the regional water table. The perched water in part moves vertically down to the regional water table and in part laterally to the streams. Ground water beneath the Rexburg Bench moves generally northwestward to join the regional ground-water body beneath the alluvial plain. The regional water table is below the level of the streams in the area and ground water in the main aquifer, therefore is not tributary to the streams. Recharge to the regional water table is estimated to average 725,000 acre-feet annually. Pumping from the regional ground-water reservoir for irrigation or other uses would have no effect on streamflow or surface-water rights within the study area. However, depletion of the underflow would eventually reduce the inflow to American Falls Reservoir unless the depletion was offset by additional recharge. Total withdrawals of ground water for irrigation in 1962 were estimated to be 25,000 acre-feet and caused no significant decline in the water table. In the

  17. A new revision of the Hdec (Henry Draper Extension Charts) catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashimbaeva, N.; Sementsov, V.

    A new version of the HDEC (Henry Draper Extension Charts) catalog is presented. The catalog includes 88,548 entries, more than 3500 of which (components of binary systems) were earlier corrupted by an algorithmic error (1579 multiple systems were revealed). Spectral classification of these objects has been corrected manually using the CDS data. We also corrected some mistakes of the catalog detected by the measurement model and cross-matching with other CDS catalogs, and, in some cases, by the authors of the catalog and through collaboration of the HDEC users.

  18. The Henry Cecil Ranson McBay Chair in Space Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bota, Kofi B.; King, James, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The goals and objectives of the Henry Cecil Ransom McBay Chair in Space Sciences were to: (1) provide leadership in developing and expanding Space Science curriculum; (2) contribute to the research and education endeavors of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program; (3) expand opportunities for education and hands-on research in Space and Earth Sciences; (4) enhance scientific and technological literacy at all educational levels and to increase awareness of opportunities in the Space Sciences; and (5) develop a pipeline, starting with high school, of African American students who will develop into a cadre of well-trained scientists with interest in Space Science Research and Development.

  19. Henri Wallon's Theory of Early Child Development: The Role of Emotions

    PubMed

    Veer

    1996-12-01

    The present paper gives an account of part of the stage theory of early child development of the French theorist Henri Wallon (1879-1962). Unlike his contemporary Jean Piaget, Wallon concentrated his efforts upon a description of the child's emotional development and the role emotions play in establishing the bond between child and caregiver. The description of Wallon's stage theory is preceded by biographical information and a presentation of his methodological views. It is argued that Wallon's theory is unique in its focus, exerted influence upon theorists such as Lev Vygotsky, and is basically compatible with modern insights about the nature of child development and the growth of intersubjectivity.

  20. Ernest Henry Starling (1866-1927): the scientist and the man.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Jens H

    2005-02-01

    The pre-eminent achievements of the English physician and physiologist Ernest Henry Starling were his quantitative explanation of the transcapillary transport of fluid, the discovery of the first hormone, secretin, and his formulation of the law of the heart. In some ways Starling was an outsider and he was the centre of several scientific and social controversies. However, throughout his life he stressed fundamental scientific attitudes and ideas with remarkable persistence and power, although also balance, and his scientific achievements have stood the test of time.

  1. [Sauveur-Henri-Victor Bouvier (1799-1877): orthopaedist, surgeon and promoter of physical education].

    PubMed

    Monet, Jacques; Quin, Grégory

    2013-01-01

    This article establishes the biography of a little known physician of the 19th century., whose commitment with orthopaedics and formulation of medical gymnastics was important: the surgeon-orthopaedist Sauveur-Henri-Victor Bouvier. Several constitutive processes of the medical field of the 19th century are analysed: specialization (around orthopaedics), professionalization and development of various therapeutic and hygienic methods (among them medical gymnastics). Bouvier's biography is particularly instructive and sheds new light on these different processes, as well as on the institutionalization of orthopaedics from the 1820's up to the 1870's, at the intersection between medical and educative fields, between hospital, medical faculty and teaching of gymnastics. PMID:24308261

  2. Stopping time: Henry Fox Talbot and the origins of freeze-frame photography.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Chitra

    2008-09-01

    As an image-making tool for scientists studying the transient, instantaneous photography has long been seen as opening up a visual realm previously inaccessible to the inferior testimony of the human eye. But when photographic pioneer Henry Fox Talbot took the first photograph of a moving object by the light of an electric spark in 1851, he was guided by existing visual practices designed to create instantaneous vision in the eye itself. Exploring the background behind the peculiar subject of his experiment - a mechanically spinning disc - reveals a hidden prehistory of spark-illuminated photography: physicists' pre-photographic techniques for stopping time.

  3. Henri Wallon's Theory of Early Child Development: The Role of Emotions

    PubMed

    Veer

    1996-12-01

    The present paper gives an account of part of the stage theory of early child development of the French theorist Henri Wallon (1879-1962). Unlike his contemporary Jean Piaget, Wallon concentrated his efforts upon a description of the child's emotional development and the role emotions play in establishing the bond between child and caregiver. The description of Wallon's stage theory is preceded by biographical information and a presentation of his methodological views. It is argued that Wallon's theory is unique in its focus, exerted influence upon theorists such as Lev Vygotsky, and is basically compatible with modern insights about the nature of child development and the growth of intersubjectivity. PMID:8979855

  4. Volatility dependence of Henry's law constants of condensable organics: Application to estimate depositional loss of secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.; Knote, C.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Tyndall, G.

    2014-07-01

    The water solubility of oxidation intermediates of volatile organic compounds that can condense to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is largely unconstrained in current chemistry-climate models. We apply the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere to calculate Henry's law constants for these intermediate species. Results show a strong negative correlation between Henry's law constants and saturation vapor pressures. Details depend on precursor species, extent of photochemical processing, and NOx levels. Henry's law constants as a function of volatility are made available over a wide range of vapor pressures for use in 3-D models. In an application using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) over the U.S. in summer, we find that dry (and wet) deposition of condensable organic vapors leads to major reductions in SOA, decreasing surface concentrations by ~50% (10%) for biogenic and ~40% (6%) for short chain anthropogenic precursors under the considered volatility conditions.

  5. Homogenization and effective parameters for the Henry problem in heterogeneous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, R.; Attinger, S.; Kinzelbach, W.

    2005-11-01

    General upscaling of density-dependent flow is investigated for the classical two-dimensional Henry problem of saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers. Combined theoretical and numerical results are here presented. Effective flow and transport parameters for saline intrusions could be derived for statistically isotropic and anisotropic heterogeneous permeability fields by use of homogenization theory, applying also to the preasymptotic regime. Our numerical results indicate that heterogeneities in permeability affect foremost the transient evolution of saltwater intrusion, whereas the steady state saltwater distribution is less sensitive to spatially varying permeabilities and longitudinal dispersion. For the isotropic media the effective permeability is found to correspond to the geometric mean, as under conditions without fluid density contrast. The extension of results to anisotropic media requires nontrivial corrections for the effective permeability, which include the variance of log(k) and the directional correlation lengths. The appropriate dispersion coefficients for the problem correspond to the local dispersion coefficients, rather than macrodispersion coefficients. These results are discussed in light of the specific flow configuration posed in the Henry problem.

  6. Preventing child obesity: a long-term evaluation of the HENRY approach.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca E; Willis, Thomas A; Aspinall, Nichola; Candida, Hunt; George, Jackie; Rudolf, Mary C J

    2013-07-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels, yet many health professionals lack confidence in working with parents around lifestyle change. HENRY (Health Exercise Nutrition for the Really Young) aims to tackle this through training practitioners to work more effectively with parents of preschoolers around obesity and lifestyle issues.We evaluated the long-term impact of HENRY training on health professionals' knowledge, skills and confidence in tackling obesity prevention. All practitioners trained 2007-11 (n = 1601) were invited to complete an online survey. 237 emails (14.8%) were undeliverable; 354 (26.0%) of the remainder completed the survey. A majority (67%) reported using knowledge and skills gained on a regular basis in their professional lives. Sessions on the importance of empathy and key parenting skills were considered particularly useful, with 78% and 74% respectively reporting regular use of these skills. Effects on respondents' personal lives were also reported: 61% applied the knowledge and skills at home, identifying for example, more shared family mealtimes and reduced portion sizes. The impact endures, with 71% of those undergoing training > 12 months ago, stating that they continued to use concepts in their professional lives. The findings suggest that brief training can have a sustained impact on practitioners' professional and personal lives.

  7. Preventing child obesity: a long-term evaluation of the HENRY approach.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca E; Willis, Thomas A; Aspinall, Nichola; Candida, Hunt; George, Jackie; Rudolf, Mary C J

    2013-07-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels, yet many health professionals lack confidence in working with parents around lifestyle change. HENRY (Health Exercise Nutrition for the Really Young) aims to tackle this through training practitioners to work more effectively with parents of preschoolers around obesity and lifestyle issues.We evaluated the long-term impact of HENRY training on health professionals' knowledge, skills and confidence in tackling obesity prevention. All practitioners trained 2007-11 (n = 1601) were invited to complete an online survey. 237 emails (14.8%) were undeliverable; 354 (26.0%) of the remainder completed the survey. A majority (67%) reported using knowledge and skills gained on a regular basis in their professional lives. Sessions on the importance of empathy and key parenting skills were considered particularly useful, with 78% and 74% respectively reporting regular use of these skills. Effects on respondents' personal lives were also reported: 61% applied the knowledge and skills at home, identifying for example, more shared family mealtimes and reduced portion sizes. The impact endures, with 71% of those undergoing training > 12 months ago, stating that they continued to use concepts in their professional lives. The findings suggest that brief training can have a sustained impact on practitioners' professional and personal lives. PMID:23914474

  8. Proc, Dr. Sam, Uncle Henry, and the "Little Green Book". Interview by Charles F. Wooley.

    PubMed

    Harvey, W Proctor

    2005-01-01

    During his house staff training before World War II, Dr. W. Proctor Harvey encountered Dr. Samuel A. Levine at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston. Following military service, Harvey returned to Boston and became Levine's first cardiology fellow. The book Clinical Auscultation of the Heart--the Little Green Book by Levine and Harvey in 1949 combined Levine's clinical wisdom with Harvey's objective phonocardiographic methods and brought an important objective dimension to the art of cardiac auscultation. Both Levine and Harvey shared experiences and friendship with Henry Christian, the first Physician-in-Chief when the new Brigham Hospital Opened in 1913. Christian, appointed Dean of the Harvard Medical School in 1908 at the age of 32, was referred to as the "Boy Dean." He held the Hersey Chair of Theory and Practice of Physic from 1908 until 1939, was one of the founding group of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and a major force in academic medicine. Levine served as intern to Christian and then joined the Brigham medical staff in 1915. Proctor Harvey followed Henry Christian's path from their mutual hometown of Lyunchburg, VA to the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. A series of illuminating and respectful professional interactions--initially between Christian and Levine, between Levine and Harvey in the early 1940s, and between Harvey and Christian in the 1950s--provide the background for the genesis of the Little Green Book and a remarkable example of academic heritage.

  9. Experimental determination of Henry's law constants of trifluoroacetic acid at 278-298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsuna, Shuzo; Hori, Hisao

    Equilibrium partial pressures of trifluoroacetic acid ( P C(O)OH) over aqueous trifluoroacetic acid test solutions were determined at 278.15, 288.15, and 298.15 K. The concentration of undissociated trifluoroacetic acid ( C C(O)OH) in each test solution was determined by means of attenuated total reflection IR spectroscopy and window factor analysis. From the linear relationship between P C(O)OH and C C(O)OH, the Henry's law constant of trifluoroacetic acid ( KH) at 298.15 K was determined to be 5800±700 mol dm -3 atm -1 and KH at temperature T in K was determined to be KH=5780 exp[-4120×(1/298.15-1/ T)] in mol dm -3 atm -1. The KH value at 298.15 K was 0.65 times the reported value [Bowden, D.J., Clegg, S.L., Brimblecombe, P., 1996. The Henry's law constant of trifluoroacetic acid and its partitioning into liquid water in the atmosphere. Chemosphere 32, 405-420] for p Ka=0.47 and it was equal to that for p Ka=0.2.

  10. Data set for background investigation of atmospheric constituents for Cape Henry site: August 5-22, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The laboratory was located within the Fort Story Military Reservation at Cape Henry between 5 August and 21 August 1974. Total sulfur, total hydrocarbons, NO, NO2, Nox, and O3 were monitored and reported as hourly averages. Visibility was measured using an integrating nephelometer and reported as hourly averages. Twenty-four hour averaged mass loading was determined using two high volume air samplers located on different levels (25' and 50') at the site. Temperature, wind speed, relative humidity, barometric pressure and solar radiation intensity were measured at the site or supplemented by readings taken by the U. S. Coast Guard at the Cape Henry Light House.

  11. Ground-water aspects of the lower Henrys Fork region, eastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosthwaite, E.G.; Mundorff, Maurice John; Walker, Eugene H.

    1970-01-01

    The lower Henrys Fork region in eastern Idaho includes the plains and low benches between Ashton and the junction of Henrys Fork and Snake River. The northwestern and western parts of the area are part of the Snake River basalt plain. The central part of the area is occupied by alluvial plains of the Snake, Teton, and Falls Rivers and of Henrys Fork. The alluvial deposits are underlain by basalt. The southeastern part of the area is a bench (Rexburg Bench), chiefly on silicic and basaltic volcanic rocks, which rises gradually to mountain peaks (Big Hole Mountains) southeast of the area. Irrigation wells open to the basalt under the Snake River Plain and the basalt and sands and gravels under the alluvial plains yield large amounts of water with small drawdowns. Irrigation wells in the silicic volcanic rocks and the interbedded ash, pyroclastics, and sedimentary deposits beneath the Rexburg Bench generally yield much less water. The regional water table slopes southwestward beneath the basalt and alluvial plains. It is recharged by precipitation that infiltrates into the ground in the headwaters of Henrys Fork and Falls, and Teton Rivers and by water that moves downward from an extensive perched water body caused by seepage from stream channels and surface-water irrigation. The perched water in part moves vertically down to the regional water table and in part laterally to the streams. Ground water beneath the Rexburg Bench moves generally northwestward to join the regional ground-water body beneath the alluvia,1 and basalt plain, but this area contributes very little recharge to the main aquifer body. Recharge to the regional water table is estimated to average 725,000 acre-feet annually. The regional water table is below the level of the streams in the area, and ground water in the main aquifer, therefore, is not tributary to the streams. Pumping from the regional ground-water reservoir for irrigation or other uses would have no effect on streamflow or surface

  12. The Politics of Knowledge and the Revitalization of American Democracy: A Response to Henry Giroux's "The University in Chains: Confronting the Military-Industrial-Academic Complex"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Cary

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Henry Giroux's "The University in Chains: Confronting the Military-Industrial-Academic Complex." Henry Giroux has written a provocative assessment of the contemporary challenges facing the United States as a society, which over the course of the 20th century had assumed the role of leader and exemplar…

  13. Mapping Henry: Synchrotron-sourced X-ray fluorescence mapping and ultra-high-definition scanning of an early Tudor portrait of Henry VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dredge, Paula; Ives, Simon; Howard, Daryl L.; Spiers, Kathryn M.; Yip, Andrew; Kenderdine, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    A portrait of Henry VIII on oak panel c. 1535 has recently undergone technical examination to inform questions regarding authorship and the painting's relationship to a group of similar works in the collections of the National Portrait Gallery, London, and the Society of Antiquaries. Due to previous conservation treatments of the painting, the conventional transmission X-radiograph image was difficult to interpret. As a result, the painting underwent high-definition X-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental mapping on the X-ray fluorescence microscopy beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. Scans were conducted at 12.6 and 18.5 keV, below and above the lead (Pb) L edges, respectively. Typical scan parameters were 120 μm pixel size at 7 ms dwell time, with the largest scan covering an area 545 × 287 mm2 collected in 23 h (10.8 MP). XRF mapping of the panel has guided the conservation treatment of the painting and the revelation of previously obscured features. It has also provided insight into the process of making of the painting. The informative and detailed elemental maps, alongside ultra-high-definition scans of the painting undertaken before and after varnish and over-paint removal, have assisted in comparison of the finely painted details with the London paintings. The resolution offered by the combination of imaging techniques identifies pigment distribution at an extremely fine scale, enabling a new understanding of the artist's paint application.

  14. Smog chamber experiments to investigate Henry's law constants of glyoxal using different seed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Ronit

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. Hence, they have a direct as well as an indirect impact on the earth's climate. Depending on their formation, one distinguishes between primary and secondary aerosols[1]. Important groups within the secondary aerosols are the secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In order to improve predictions about these impacts on the earth's climate the existing models need to be optimized, because they still underestimate SOA formation[2]. Glyoxal, the smallest α-dicarbonyl, not only acts as a tracer for SOA formation but also as a direct contributor to SOA. Because glyoxal has such a high vapour pressure, it was common knowledge that it does not take part in gas-particle partitioning and therefore has no impact on direct SOA formation. However, the Henry's law constant for glyoxal is surprisingly high. This has been explained by the hydration of the aldehyde groups, which means that a species with a lower vapour pressure is produced. Therefore the distribution of glyoxal between gas- and particle phase is atmospherically relevant and the direct contribution of glyoxal to SOA can no longer be neglected. A high salt concentration present in chamber seed aerosols leads to an enhanced glyoxal uptake into the particle. This effect is called "salting-in". The salting effect depends on the composition of the seed aerosol as well as the soluble compound. For very polar compounds, like glyoxal, a "salting-in" is observed[3]. Glyoxal particle formation during a smog chamber campaign at Paul-Scherrer-Institut (PSI) in Switzerland was examined using different seed aerosols such as ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sodium nitrate. The aim of this campaign was to investigate Henry's law constants for different seed aerosols. During the campaign filter samples were taken to investigate the amount of glyoxal in the particle phase. After filter extraction, the analyte was derivatized and measured using UHPLC

  15. "Extraordinary Understandings" of Composition at the University of Chicago: Frederick Champion Ward, Kenneth Burke, and Henry W. Sams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, James P.

    2007-01-01

    While Richard Weaver, R. S. Crane, Richard McKeon, and Robert Streeter have been most identified with rhetoric at the University of Chicago and its institutional return in the 1950s, the archival record demonstrates that Frederick Champion Ward, dean of the undergraduate "College" from 1947 to 1954, and Henry W. Sams, director of English in the…

  16. Life of Henry Barnard: The First United States Commissioner of Education, 1867-1870. Bulletin, 1919, No. 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Bernard C.

    1919-01-01

    Henry Barnard was "one of the men who revitalized the American common-school system", and as such, he is clearly worthy of a biography. Not only was his service a noted one to elementary education, but as college president and as the organizer of the United States Bureau of Education his activity also touched other parts of the country's…

  17. Plastic (wire-combed) grooving of a slip-formed concrete runway overlay at Patrick Henry Airport: An initial evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlin, E. C.; Horne, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    A wire-comb technique is described for transversely grooving the surface of a freshly laid (plastic state) slip-formed concrete overlay installed at Patrick Henry Airport. This method of surface texturing yields better water drainage and pavement skid resistance than that obtained with an older conventional burlap drag concrete surface treatment installed on an adjacent portion of the runway.

  18. A Vision for the Future: Henry G. Bennett Memorial Library, Southeastern Oklahoma State University Strategic Plan, 2002-2007.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dorothy

    This document presents the five-year strategic plan developed by the library director, staff, and the Library Committee for the Henry G. Bennett Memorial Library, Southeastern Oklahoma State University. The goal of this plan is to provide a framework that the library can use to focus energy and resources in fulfilling the mission of the library…

  19. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 265 - Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compounds With Henry's Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X VI Appendix VI to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Law Constant Less Than 0.1 Y/X Compound name CAS No. Acetaldol 107-89-1 Acetamide 60-35-5...

  20. Measurement of Henry's Law Constants Using Internal Standards: A Quantitative GC Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis or Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ji, Chang; Boisvert, Susanne M.; Arida, Ann-Marie C.; Day, Shannon E.

    2008-01-01

    An internal standard method applicable to undergraduate instrumental analysis or environmental chemistry laboratory has been designed and tested to determine the Henry's law constants for a series of alkyl nitriles. In this method, a mixture of the analytes and an internal standard is prepared and used to make a standard solution (organic solvent)…

  1. Disposable Youth/Damaged Democracy: Youth, Neoliberalism, and the Promise of Pedagogy in the Work of Henry Giroux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Perhaps more extensively and provocatively than any other contemporary theorist, Henry Giroux has theorized the relationship between youth and democratic public life. Beginning arguably with his first book, Ideology, Culture, and the Process of Schooling (Temple University Press, 1981), and continuing across a number of critically acclaimed works…

  2. The functions of writing: transmission between generations and role assignment within the family, in Henry James and his family.

    PubMed

    Green, A

    1994-06-01

    The Jameses provide abundant material for this study of the function of writing within a family, combining a relationship between generations and between the sexes among siblings. The starting point is Henry's dream of the Galerie d'Apollon, which can be referred to its sources in reality; its autobiographical account; and its transformation into a story. This material gives clues to some central features of his unconscious conflicts with both his father and elder brother. The father's writings deal with his concern with religion, which expresses his relationship with his own father. William transforms his father's theology into philosophy and becomes one of the pioneers of modern psychology. Alice's diary recounts her identification with her father's infirmity through her hysterical paralysis. Henry's work reveals that he is the one who really succeeded in solving his conflicts with the father. His literature is transgressive according to his father's and brother's values, though he shares their ideal of a consciousness common to the Jameses. Through fiction, Henry has indirect access to the drives; but only in his work did he acknowledge these, overcoming his oedipal conflicts. Thus Henry is the closest of the Jameses to psychoanalysis; his work enables us to make some hypotheses regarding the creative process.

  3. "Young People Are No Longer at Risk--They Are the Risk": Henry Giroux's "Youth in a Suspect Society"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClennen, Sophia A.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes Henry Giroux's recent book Youth in a Suspect Society: democracy or disposability? (Palgrave, 2009) and situates it within his post-9/11 critical interventions. Giroux has focused his recent work on theorizing, critiquing and challenging the confluence of militarization, corporatization and right-wing ideology that has…

  4. "Undoubtedly a Powerful Influence": Victor Henry's "Antinomies linguistiques" (1896) with an Annotated Translation of the First Chapter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Victor Henry's innovative presentation of some underlying contradictions in the premises on which linguistics is founded, cast in the Kantian form of antinomies. The review argues that no science remains more strongly contested than linguistics, a science whose origins are paradoxical and that contains outdated concepts. (30 references)…

  5. Searching for Politics with Henry Giroux: Through Cultural Studies to Public Pedagogy and the "Terror of Neoliberalism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    Henry A. Giroux is recognized as one of the fifty most significant thinkers on education in the 20th century. He is also considered a scholar of immense influence in a number of fields internationally, hardly an inconsequential accolade in a century noted for a glut of educational and social thinkers. Yet, its wide-ranging and ever-expanding…

  6. Teacher as Actor--Henry David Thoreau--From Room One-Eleven to Walden Pond and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barto, David

    To help maintain class interest in the important themes addressed in "Walden" and "The Duties of Civil Disobedience," a high school English teacher has presented a dramatic monologue as Henry David Thoreau to his students. After much library research, the teacher used some of the props characteristic of the author, such as a walking stick and a…

  7. All Are Worthy to Know the Earth: Henry De la Beche and the Origin of Geological Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee M.; Wandersee, James H.

    2009-01-01

    Henry T. De la Beche (1796-1855) began his geological career within an elite circle (Geological Society of London, 1817; FRS, 1819), collaborating with influential gentlemen geologists and publishing original research. When his independent income dwindled, De la Beche managed to secure governmental funding for his mapping projects. This led to…

  8. Significance of the Henri-Michaelis-Menten theory in abiotic catalysis: catechol oxidation by δ-MnO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidja, A.; Huang, P. M.

    2002-05-01

    The Henri-Michaelis-Menten theory, for more than eight decades, was only restricted to homogeneous enzymatic catalysis. A mimic of an enzymatic kinetics based on the Henri-Michaelis-Menten concept was experimentally observed in heterogeneous catalysis in the present study with δ-MnO 2 as an abiotic catalyst in the oxidation of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene). Using the derived linear forms of Lineweaver-Burk or Hofstee, the data show that similar to the enzyme tyrosinase, the kinetics of the catechol oxidation catalyzed by δ-MnO 2 can be described by the Henri-Michaelis-Menten equation, V0= VmaxS/( Km+ S), where Vmax is the maximum velocity and Km the concentration of the substrate ( S) corresponding to an initial velocity ( V0) half of Vmax. By analogy to the enzymatic kinetics, the parameters Vmax and Km for an heterogeneous abiotic catalysis were derived for the first time. Further, based on the concentration of the active centers of the mineral oxide, the kinetic constants kcat and kcat/ Km, respectively, representing the turnover frequency and the efficiency of the mineral catalyst, were also determined from the derived general rate equation of Briggs and Haldane. As an abiotic catalyst, δ-MnO 2 has a paramount role in the oxidation of phenolic compounds in soil, sediment and water environments. Therefore, the present observation is of fundamental and practical significance in elucidating the affinity between an abiotic catalyst and a substrate based on the Henri-Michaelis-Menten theory.

  9. Constituting Antebellum African American Identity: Resistance, Violence, and Masculinity in Henry Highland Garnet's (1843) "Address to the Slaves"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasinski, James

    2007-01-01

    In August 1843 Presbyterian minister Henry Highland Garnet delivered his "Address to the Slaves of the United States of America" to the National Convention of Colored Citizens in Buffalo, NY. While often read (and almost as often dismissed) as either an unqualified call for a violent slave rebellion or, at the least, a celebration of prior acts of…

  10. Values, Leadership, and Quality: The Administration of Higher Education. The David D. Henry Lectures, 1979-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1990

    This book contains five lectures, delivered as part of the David D. Henry lecture series, whose common theme revolved around broadly defined issues related to the administration of higher education. The first lecture, "Quality and Equality in Health Professions Education and Service" (Lloyd C. Elam), argues that quality and equality in the…

  11. The diary of assistant surgeon Henry Piers, HMS Investigator, 1850-54.

    PubMed

    Savours, A

    1990-01-01

    From the 16th to the mid 19th century, many voyages were made from England to discover a North West Passage between the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans. The Investigator was one of some 40 vessels that searched for the lost North West Passage expedition of 1845-48 under the command of Sir John Franklin in HM Ships Erebus and Terror, which became beset among what are now known as the Canadian Arctic Islands. The "Investigators" found no trace of Franklin, but were the first to traverse the North West Passage, although their ship had to be abandoned in Mercy Bay on Banks Island after two winters there. The diary of Assistant Surgeon Henry Piers, from the manuscript collection of the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, is here examined. Reference is also made to the narrative and report published by the senior surgeon of the Investigator, Dr Alexander Armstrong. PMID:2197406

  12. The biologist as psychologist: Henry Fairfield Osborn's early mental ability investigations.

    PubMed

    Young, Jacy L

    2012-01-01

    In the early 1880s, biologist Henry Fairfield Osborn conducted some of the first questionnaire research in American psychology. This article details how he came to distribute Francis Galton's questionnaire on mental imagery in the United States, as well as how he altered it to suit his own burgeoning psychological research interests. The development and circulation of questionnaires at the very beginning of American scientific psychology, first by Osborn and later by G. Stanley Hall, is discussed in terms of the new psychology's often-overlooked methodological plurality. Further, Osborn's late nineteenth century interest in individual variation and group differences in mental imagery ability are discussed in relation to his pervasive educational and social concerns, as well as his eventual status as a prominent eugenicist in the twentieth century United States. This research into mental imagery ability foreshadows the eugenic-oriented intelligence testing that developed in the early twentieth century. PMID:22589139

  13. The personality and health of King Henry VIII (1491-1547).

    PubMed

    Keynes, Milo

    2005-08-01

    The projection of Henry VIII in the first half of his reign, which began in 1509, is of a magnificent and accomplished 'imperial prince', the possessor of superb physical health. In 1528, when aged 37, he showed a marked change in personality due, it is here argued, to depressive illness, from which he recovered by the mid-1530s. Such ill health has not been recognized previously and it engenders a need for a reassessment of his character and actions during these years of illness. He did not suffer from syphilis and the well-known leg ulcers were less incapacitating than has been described in the past. This truly enormous and overweight man was 55 years old when he died in 1547 in chronic heart failure.

  14. HENRY H. CHEEK AND TRANSFORMISM: NEW LIGHT ON CHARLES DARWIN'S EDINBURGH BACKGROUND.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Bill

    2015-06-20

    Evidence for the transformist ideas espoused by Henry H. Cheek (1807-33), a contemporary of Charles Darwin's at the University of Edinburgh, sheds new light on the intellectual environment of Edinburgh in the late 1820s and early 1830s. Cheek was the author of several papers dealing with the transmutation of species influenced by the theories of Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1772-1844), Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (1744-1829) and the Comte de Buffon (1707-88). Some of these were read to student societies, others appeared in the Edinburgh Journal of Natural and Geographical Science, which Cheek edited between 1829 and 1831. His writings give us a valuable window onto some of the transformist theories that were circulating among Darwin's fellow medical students in the late 1820s, to which Darwin would have been exposed during his time in Edinburgh, and for which little other concrete evidence survives.

  15. Henry H. Cheek and transformism: new light on Charles Darwin's Edinburgh background

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Evidence for the transformist ideas espoused by Henry H. Cheek (1807–33), a contemporary of Charles Darwin's at the University of Edinburgh, sheds new light on the intellectual environment of Edinburgh in the late 1820s and early 1830s. Cheek was the author of several papers dealing with the transmutation of species influenced by the theories of Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1772–1844), Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (1744–1829) and the Comte de Buffon (1707–88). Some of these were read to student societies, others appeared in the Edinburgh Journal of Natural and Geographical Science, which Cheek edited between 1829 and 1831. His writings give us a valuable window onto some of the transformist theories that were circulating among Darwin's fellow medical students in the late 1820s, to which Darwin would have been exposed during his time in Edinburgh, and for which little other concrete evidence survives. PMID:26665300

  16. Henry Pritchett and his introduction to the Flexner Report of 1910.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Steven L; Groce, Victoria A; Littleton, Beth; Gunderman, Richard B

    2010-11-01

    This article provides historical background on Henry S. Pritchett, first president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (CFAT), analysis of his introduction to Abraham Flexner's 1910 report on medical education, and discussion of the major role that Pritchett played in conceiving the study on which the Flexner Report is based and his advocacy of the report's findings. The authors examine Pritchett's career as a scientist, scholar, and administrator. A textual analysis of the introduction to the Flexner Report demonstrates Pritchett's unique contributions to the report and how they complement Flexner's perspectives and conclusions. Finally, the authors discuss the significance of Pritchett's introduction, his rhetorical choices, and Pritchett's and CFAT's subsequent advocacy activities to improve medical education. PMID:20881820

  17. Measurements of the concentration in rainwater and of the Henry's law constant of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizumi, Kunio; Aoki, Kazuyuki; Nouchi, Isamu; Okita, Toshiichi; Kobayashi, Toshimi; Amakura, Shuji K.; Tajima, Moritaka

    A chemiluminescent method for measuring hydrogen peroxide was developed using hemin as a catalyst for luminol-based H 2O 2 oxidation, which gave a detection limit below 0.1 μg ∝ -1 in the solution. It was shown that most atmospheric species did not give serious interference, and that negative interference of SO 2; could be eliminated if pH of the collecting solution was above 10 whereas O 3, gave significant positive interference. The Henry's law constant of H 2O 2 was experimentally determined to be 1.42 × 10 5 M atm -1 at 20°C at ambient concentration levels of H 2O 2. This method was also applied to the measurements of H 2O 2 concentration in rainwater in Tokyo, Japan, which was in the range of 5-1065μg ∝ -1.

  18. Comments on a model for isotope effects on Henry's law constants in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, P.; Wolfsberg, M.

    1981-05-01

    A model has been proposed in the literature for isotope effects on Henry's law constants in which the motion of the dissolved molecule surrounded by a solvent cage is approximated by the motion of a particle in a cubic box. The isotope effect then arises from the three free translations of the gas phase molecule which become the restricted translations of a particle in a box for the dissolved molecule. The theoretical equation for the isotope effect is derived here on the basis of this model. Zero-point energy arguments have been used in the literature in conjunction with this model to deduce solvent cage dimensions from observed isotope effect data. These arguments are shown here to be theoretically wrong. The correct theory for the particle in a box model gives much larger dimensions for the solvent cage than the incorrect zero-point he solvent cage than the incorrect zero-point energy argument.

  19. New Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at the Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu

    SciTech Connect

    Toro, P. G. P.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Oliveira, A. C.; Gomes, F. A. A.; Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, Henry T.

    2008-04-28

    The new 0.60-m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel was designed to study advanced air-breathing propulsion system such as supersonic combustion and/or laser technologies. In addition, it may be used for hypersonic flow studies and investigations of the electromagnetic (laser) energy addition for flow control. This new hypersonic shock tunnel was designed and installed at the Laboratory for of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu, IEAv-CTA, Brazil. The design of the tunnel enables relatively long test times, 2-10 milliseconds, suitable for the experiments performed at the laboratory. Free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25 can be produced and stagnation pressures and temperatures up to 360 atm. and up to 9,000 K, respectively, can be generated. Shadowgraph and schlieren optical techniques will be used for flow visualization.

  20. Henry Sigerist and the history of medicine in Latin America: his correspondence with Juan R. Beltran.

    PubMed

    de Asúa, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    During the years of World War II, the American Association for the History of Medicine fostered a Pan-American policy aimed at establishing relationships with Latin American historians of medicine. Juan R. Beltrán, professor of history of medicine at the University of Buenos Aires, also pursued an energetic program of academic diplomacy. The correspondence between Henry Sigerist and Beltrán makes manifest that by 1941 good channels of communication were established between Baltimore and Buenos Aires, but the friendly links did not last long. The motives for this can be found in the competing aims of the AAHM and Beltrán, and the pattern of international relationships during the war years.

  1. Acid Brothers: Henry Beecher, Timothy Leary, and the psychedelic of the century.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Henry Knowles Beecher, an icon of human research ethics, and Timothy Francis Leary, a guru of the counterculture, are bound together in history by the synthetic hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Both were associated with Harvard University during a critical period in their careers and of drastic social change. To all appearances the first was a paragon of the establishment and a constructive if complex hero, the second a rebel and a criminal, a rogue and a scoundrel. Although there is no evidence they ever met, Beecher's indirect struggle with Leary over control of the 20th century's most celebrated psychedelic was at the very heart of his views about the legitimate, responsible investigator. That struggle also proves to be a revealing bellwether of the increasingly formalized scrutiny of human experiments that was then taking shape. PMID:27499488

  2. Analytical Phase Equilibrium Function for Mixtures Obeying Raoult's and Henry's Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert

    When a mixture of two substances exists in both the liquid and gas phase at equilibrium, Raoults and Henry's laws (ideal solution and ideal dilute solution approximations) can be used to estimate the gas and liquid mole fractions at the extremes of either very little solute or solvent. By assuming that a cubic polynomial can reasonably approximate the intermediate values to these extremes as a function of mole fraction, the cubic polynomial is solved and presented. A closed form equation approximating the pressure dependence on mole fraction of the constituents is thereby obtained. As a first approximation, this is a very simple and potentially useful means to estimate gas and liquid mole fractions of equilibrium mixtures. Mixtures with an azeotrope require additional attention if this type of approach is to be utilized. This work supported in part by federal Grant NRC-HQ-84-14-G-0059.

  3. Analytical Phase Equilibrium Function for Mixtures Obeying Raoult's and Henry's Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert

    When a mixture of two substances exists in both the liquid and gas phase at equilibrium, Raoults and Henry's laws (ideal solution and ideal dilute solution approximations) can be used to estimate the gas and liquid mole fractions at the extremes of either very little solute or solvent. By assuming that a cubic polynomial can reasonably approximate the intermediate values to these extremes as a function of mole fraction, the cubic polynomial is solved and presented. A closed form equation approximating the pressure dependence on mole fraction of the constituents is thereby obtained. As a first approximation, this is a very simple and potentially useful means to estimate gas and liquid mole fractions of equilibrium mixtures. Mixtures with an azeotrope require additional attention if this type of approach is to be utilized. This work paid for under NRC-HQ-84-14-G-0059.

  4. Style and non-style in anatomical illustration: From Renaissance Humanism to Henry Gray.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Style is a familiar category for the analysis of art. It is less so in the history of anatomical illustration. The great Renaissance and Baroque picture books of anatomy illustrated with stylish woodcuts and engravings, such as those by Charles Estienne, Andreas Vesalius and Govard Bidloo, showed figures in dramatic action in keeping with philosophical and theological ideas about human nature. Parallels can be found in paintings of the period, such as those by Titian, Michelangelo and Hans Baldung Grien. The anatomists also claimed to portray the body in an objective manner, and showed themselves as heroes of the discovery of human knowledge. Rembrandt's painting of Dr Nicholas Tulp is the best-known image of the anatomist as hero. The British empirical tradition in the 18th century saw William Cheselden and William Hunter working with techniques of representation that were intended to guarantee detailed realism. The ambition to portray forms life-size led to massive volumes, such as those by Antonio Mascagni. John Bell, the Scottish anatomist, criticized the size and pretensions of the earlier books and argued for a plain style adapted to the needs of teaching and surgery. Henry Gray's famous Anatomy of 1858, illustrated by Henry Vandyke Carter, aspired to a simple descriptive mode of functional representation that avoided stylishness, resulting in a style of its own. Successive editions of Gray progressively saw the replacement of Gray's method and of all his illustrations. The 150th anniversary edition, edited by Susan Standring, radically re-thinks the role of Gray's book within the teaching of medicine. PMID:20447244

  5. Surface-water/ground-water interaction along reaches of the Snake River and Henrys Fork, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hortness, Jon E.; Vidmar, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Declining water levels in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and decreases in spring discharges from the aquifer to the Snake River have spurred studies to improve understanding of the surface-water/ground-water interaction on the plain. This study was done to estimate streamflow gains and losses along specific reaches of the Snake River and Henrys Fork and to compare changes in gain and loss estimates to changes in ground-water levels over time. Data collected during this study will be used to enhance the conceptual model of the hydrologic system and to refine computer models of ground-water flow and surface-water/ground-water interactions. Estimates of streamflow gains and losses along specific subreaches of the Snake River and Henrys Fork, based on the results of five seepage studies completed during 2001?02, varied greatly across the study area, ranging from a loss estimate of 606 ft3/s in a subreach of the upper Snake River near Heise to a gain estimate of 3,450 ft3/s in a subreach of the Snake River that includes Thousand Springs. Some variations over time also were apparent in specific subreaches. Surface spring flow accounted for much of the inflow to subreaches having large gain estimates. Several subreaches alternately gained and lost streamflow during the study. Changes in estimates of streamflow gains and losses along some of the subreaches were compared with changes in water levels, measured at three different times during 2001?02, in adjacent wells. In some instances, a strong relation between changes in estimates of gains or losses and changes in ground-water levels was apparent.

  6. Style and non-style in anatomical illustration: From Renaissance Humanism to Henry Gray

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Style is a familiar category for the analysis of art. It is less so in the history of anatomical illustration. The great Renaissance and Baroque picture books of anatomy illustrated with stylish woodcuts and engravings, such as those by Charles Estienne, Andreas Vesalius and Govard Bidloo, showed figures in dramatic action in keeping with philosophical and theological ideas about human nature. Parallels can be found in paintings of the period, such as those by Titian, Michelangelo and Hans Baldung Grien. The anatomists also claimed to portray the body in an objective manner, and showed themselves as heroes of the discovery of human knowledge. Rembrandt’s painting of Dr Nicholas Tulp is the best-known image of the anatomist as hero. The British empirical tradition in the 18th century saw William Cheselden and William Hunter working with techniques of representation that were intended to guarantee detailed realism. The ambition to portray forms life-size led to massive volumes, such as those by Antonio Mascagni. John Bell, the Scottish anatomist, criticized the size and pretensions of the earlier books and argued for a plain style adapted to the needs of teaching and surgery. Henry Gray’s famous Anatomy of 1858, illustrated by Henry Vandyke Carter, aspired to a simple descriptive mode of functional representation that avoided stylishness, resulting in a style of its own. Successive editions of Gray progressively saw the replacement of Gray’s method and of all his illustrations. The 150th anniversary edition, edited by Susan Standring, radically re-thinks the role of Gray’s book within the teaching of medicine. PMID:20447244

  7. The Impact of the Henry Draper Catalogue on 20th-century Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, B. L.

    1999-12-01

    By 1900 there was a definite need to update the great star catalogues of the 19th century. First of all, the coordinates in them were pinned to the epoch of 1875. Then, too, the magnitudes were not on any systematic scale. Finally, they were all published before astronomers had any ideas or data for classifying large numbers of stars by their spectra. Under the leadership of Edward Pickering and the financing of Anna Palmer Draper, the work on the Henry Draper Memorial began at Harvard College Observatory in the late 1880s. Its primary goal was to gather and classify the photographic spectra of about 100,000 stars. As a test case, Pickering had Williamina Fleming develop a simple classification scheme and apply it to the spectra of about 10,000 stars. The Draper Catalogue was published in 1890. For the next two decades, Pickering worked to have astronomers approve the Harvard Classification scheme. After that happened in 1910 at the meeting of the International Solar Union, Annie Jump Cannon began the project of classifying 100,000 stars. She was so efficient that she completed the work in two years. Rather than limiting it to that number at that time, she continued classifying spectra for another two years for a total of 225,300 stars. Although Cannon completed the classification in 1915, it was not until 1918 that the first of nine volumes of the Henry Draper Catalogue was published. At that time, it was greeted with enthusiasm and congratulations from eminent astronomers around the world: Jacobus Kapteyn in the Netherlands, Herbert Hall Turner in England, Harlow Shapley in California, to name a few. Today, the HD Catalogue is now online and endures as a source of coherent data for a wide variety of ongoing investigations of the Milky Way.

  8. Rationale and design of the Henry Ford Exercise Testing Project (the FIT project).

    PubMed

    Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Keteyian, Steven J; Brawner, Clinton A; Whelton, Seamus; Blaha, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Although physical fitness is a powerful prognostic marker in clinical medicine, most cardiovascular population-based studies do not have a direct measurement of cardiorespiratory fitness. In line with the call from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute for innovative, low-cost, epidemiologic studies leveraging electronic medical record (EMR) data, we describe the rationale and design of the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing Project (The FIT Project). The FIT Project is unique in its combined use of directly measured clinical exercise data retrospective collection of medical history and medication treatment data at the time of the stress test, retrospective supplementation of supporting clinical data using the EMR and administrative databases and epidemiologic follow-up for cardiovascular events and total mortality via linkage with claims files and the death registry. The FIT Project population consists of 69 885 consecutive physician-referred patients (mean age, 54 ± 10 years; 54% males) who underwent Bruce protocol treadmill stress testing at Henry Ford Affiliated Hospitals between 1991 and 2009. Patients were followed for the primary outcomes of death, myocardial infarction, and need for coronary revascularization. The median estimated peak metabolic equivalent (MET) level was 10, with 17% of the patients having a severely reduced fitness level (METs < 6). At the end of the follow-up duration, 15.9%, 5.6%, and 6.7% of the patients suffered all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, or revascularization procedures, respectively. The FIT Project is the largest study of physical fitness to date. With its use of modern electronic clinical epidemiologic techniques, it is poised to answer many clinically relevant questions related to exercise capacity and prognosis.

  9. Henry Solomon Wellcome: A philanthropist and a pioneer sponsor of medical research in the Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Henry Solomon Wellcome, the famous drug manufacturer had a fascinating association with the Sudan. Besides supporting tropical medicine research in this country, he established an extensive project in the Sudan that aimed at combining archeological excavations, philanthropy and social reform. This article is an archives-based account on this side of Wellcome’s association with the Sudan. The article starts with Wellcome’s early years in the American Midwest and the evolution of his career and his rise as a world-renowned drug manufacturer. After the battle of Omdurman, Wellcome visited Sudan in 1900 – 1901 where he offered to support the establishment of the research laboratories which later came to be known as the Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories in Khartoum. He then became directly involved in the planning and running of extensive archeological excavations in the central Sudan. This project served as a field in which Wellcome found an outlet for his philanthropy. More than 4000 labourers were employed in Jebel Moya. Professional archeologists and anatomists were recruited by Wellcome to supervise the work, and all the requirements in terms of equipment were catered for. Wellcome devised a Savings Bank System whereby part of the earnings of each labourer were saved to him till the end of the season. He also introduced one of his innovations: aerial photography using box kite which was used for the first time in archeology. Wellcome made it a rule that no applicant should be turned away. The Camp Commandant had to find suitable work for each applicant, including the handicapped who were assigned to appropriate jobs like mending baskets or cutting grass for building huts. Wellcome’s welfare work had a significant impact on the local inhabitants of Jebel Moya. Henry Solomon Wellcome, 1906. Oil painting by Hugh Goldwin Riviere. Credit: Wellcome Library PMID:27493379

  10. Henry Smyth Jr. award lecture--occupational exposure limits: do we need them? Who is responsible? How do we get them?

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Harry J

    2005-04-01

    The Henry F. Smyth Jr. Award is presented to an individual who has recognized the needs of the industrial hygiene profession and has made major contributions to fulfill those needs, thereby contributing to the improvement of the public welfare. The American Academy of Industrial Hygiene (now the Academy of Industrial Hygiene) established the Henry F. Smyth Jr. Award in 1981. Henry F. Smyth Jr. was a dedicated teacher and a productive researcher whose projects enhanced the profession. This year's Award was presented to Harry Ettinger, CIH, PE, at the 2004 Professional Conference on Industrial Hygiene (PCIH) in Montreal, Canada.

  11. Discharge ratings for control structures at McHenry Dam on the Fox River, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisk, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-three measurement of discharge were used to determine discharge ratings for the five adjustable sluice gates, spillway and fish ladder at McHenry Dam on the Fox River in Illinois. Discharge ratings were determined for free weir, free orifice, and submerged orifice flow regimes. Hydraulic conditions that identify flow regimes at McHenry Dam are defined by ratios between headwater depth (h1), tailwater depth (h3), and gate opening (hg). Flow under the sluice gates is identified as weir flow when the ratio of gate opening to headwater depth is greater than 0.73, and as orifice flow when hg/H1 is less than 0.73. Free orifice flow occurs when the ratio of tailwater depth to gate opening is less than 1.3, and submerged orifice flow occurs when h3/hg is greater than 1.3. Flow under the sluice gates is identified as free weir flow when the ratio of tailwater depth to headwater depth is less than 0.75, and as submerged weir flow when h3/h1 is greater than 0.75. Flow over the spillway is identified as free weir flow when the ratio of tailwater depth to headwater depth is less than 0.60, and as submerged weir flow when h3/h1 is greater than 0.60. Discharge coefficients to be used in equations to compute discharge for various hydraulic conditions were determined. Four discharge measurement, ranging from 169 to 2990 cu ft/sec, were used to define discharge coefficients that varies from 2.61 to 3.14 for free weir flow over the spillway. Nineteen discharge measurements, ranging from 180 to 4050 cu ft/sec, were used to define discharge coefficients for free weir, free orifice, and submerged orifice flow under the sluice gates. The average value of the discharge coefficient for free weir flow under the sluice gates is 3.17. Discharge coefficients for free orifice flow varied from 0.48 to 0.66 and the discharge coefficients for submerged orifice flow from the two measurements were 0.59 and 0.67. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Fifty Years of Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbidge, E. M.

    1999-05-01

    It is easy to pick out my most memorable meeting of the AAS: the 149th meeting held in January, 1977, and hosted by the University of Hawaii, in Honolulu, HI. It was the meeting at which two traditions of the Society were broken, and we moved into the era of equal opportunity for women astronomers. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin received the highest award of the AAS: the Henry Norris Russell Lectureship. This award had never before been available to women, otherwise Cecilia would, years earlier, have been honored for the many achievements in her lifetime of renowned astronomical research. And I, the first woman to be elected President of the AAS, had the honor of presenting the illuminated scroll to Cecilia, and of introducing her on the platform where she delivered the Henry Norris Russell Prize Lecture, entitled ``Fifty Years of Novae"(1) . Cecilia opened by comparing the experience of young and old scientists in achieving exciting results from their research, and then led us through the history of the discoveries of and about some famous novae. She described the physical picture that emerged from studies of their light curves, their spectra, and the discovery of their binary nature. Three important tables were included, listing data on cataclysmic binaries (dwarf novae) and their link to the nova phenomenon in general. She recalled that she and Sergei Gaposchkin had hesitated between the names catastrophic and cataclysmic for the dwarf novae, and decided on the latter, from the dictionary definitions of those two terms: ``a cataclysm is a great and general flood" while a catastrophe ``is a final event". The nova phenomenon is recurrent, as are the dwarf novae, and both involve an outpouring of a flood of energy. She concluded by describing her 50 years' experience with novae as presenting ``the contemporary portrait of a nova", rather than a final picture, and by forecasting that the next 50 years of discovering and studying novae will be as full of surprises as the

  13. Apportionment of NMHC tailpipe vs non-tailpipe emissions in the Fort McHenry and Tuscarora mountain tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertler, Alan W.; Fujita, Eric M.; Pierson, William R.; Wittorff, David N.

    Measurements of on-road emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were made in the Fort McHenry Tunnel (Baltimore) and Tuscarora Mountain Tunnel (Pennsylvania) during the summer of 1992. Measurements were made during 11 one-hour periods in the Fort McHenry Tunnel and during 11 one-hour periods in the Tuscarora Mountain Tunnel. The observed light-duty fleets were quite new, with a median model year of approximately 1989. Speciated NMHC values were obtained from analyses of canister and Tenax samples, and light-duty speciated emission factors were calculated for the two tunnels. Fuel samples were collected in the area around the tunnels for use in constructing headspace and liquid fuel profiles for the chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model. Profiles of tailpipe emissions were obtained from the literature. The CMB was used to apportion tailpipe from non-tailpipe emissions. Non-tailpipe sources were found to constitute approximately 15% of the light-duty NMHC emissions. The Federal automotive emission-rate models, MOBILE4.1 and MOBILE5, underpredicted non-tailpipe emissions, assigning approximately 9% and 6.5%, respectively, to non-tailpipe sources. In terms of total absolute emissions, MOBILE5 predictions were approximately a factor of 2 greater than MOBILE4.1 predictions. Both MOBILE4.1 and MOBILE5 underestimated the NMHC emissions in the Fort McHenry Tunnel and overpredicted the NMHC emissions in the Tuscarora Mountain Tunnel. In all cases, the MOBILE models underestimated the absolute value of the non-tailpipe emissions. The ability of the MOBILE models to account for observed emissions when conditions are more variable than those studies in the Fort McHenry and Tuscarora Mountain tunnels is still an open question.

  14. William Henry, Duke of Gloucester (1689-1700), son of Queen Anne (1665-1714), could have ruled Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Holmes, G E F; Holmes, F F

    2008-02-01

    Hope for continuation of the Stuart dynasty in Britain ended with the death, from pneumonia in 1700, of the 11-year-old son of Princess Anne and Prince George, William Henry Duke of Gloucester. Considered by some to have been physically and mentally unfit to reign, careful examination of primary source materials shows him to have been a bright and interesting boy with mild hydrocephalus. Had he lived, he could have ruled. PMID:18463064

  15. Synthesis of novel Schiff base ligands from gluco- and galactochloraloses for the Cu(II) catalyzed asymmetric Henry reaction.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Sevda; Telli, Fatma Ç; Salman, Yeşim; Astley, Stephen T

    2015-04-30

    A series of chiral Schiff base ligands has been prepared using aminochloralose derivatives of glucose and galactose. These ligands were used as catalysts in the asymmetric Henry reaction in the presence of Cu(II) ions giving yields of up to 95%. An interesting solvent dependency on enantiomeric control was observed with the best enantiomeric excesses (up to 91%) being obtained in the presence of water. PMID:25742867

  16. Noncovalent immobilization of ionic-tagged box-Cu(OAc)2 complex and its application in asymmetric Henry reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Huai; Zhou, Zhi-Ming; Hao, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Jun; Dong, Xiao; Liu, Ying-Qiang

    2012-12-01

    Immobilized Cu(OAc)(2)-bis(oxazolines) via hydrogen bonding by SBA-15 was applied to asymmetric Henry reaction, and good enantioselectivities were obtained (up to 83% ee) between 2-methoxybenzaldehyde and CH(3)NO(2) in isopropyl alcohol (iPrOH). The catalyst could be reused seven times without any obvious loss in enantioselectivity. For the first time, this facile and clean immobilization method is applied to the use of bis(oxazolines) complexes. PMID:23001750

  17. Preparation of Poly(ionic liquid)s-Supported Recyclable Organocatalysts for the Asymmetric Nitroaldol (Henry) Reaction.

    PubMed

    Großeheilmann, Julia; Bandomir, Jenny; Kragl, Udo

    2015-12-21

    A novel strategy for the embedding of quinine-based organocatalysts in polymerized ionic liquids-based hydrogels is presented. With this technique, the encapsulated organocatalyst was successfully recovered and reused for four cycles without any loss of enantioselectivity (up to 91% ee) for the asymmetric nitroaldol (Henry) reaction. In this study, high catalyst leaching was significantly reduced (<0.01%) by controlling the water content. After catalyst removal, evaporation of the solvent affords the product in 98% purity without any further purification.

  18. Genetic comparison of the head of Henri IV and the presumptive blood from Louis XVI (both Kings of France).

    PubMed

    Charlier, Philippe; Olalde, Iñigo; Solé, Neus; Ramírez, Oscar; Babelon, Jean-Pierre; Galland, Bruno; Calafell, Francesc; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2013-03-10

    A mummified head was identified in 2010 as belonging to Henri IV, King of France. A putative blood sample from the King Louis XVI preserved into a pyrographically decorated gourd was analyzed in 2011. Both kings are in a direct male-line descent, separated by seven generations. We have retrieved the hypervariable region 1 of the mitochondrial DNA as well as a partial Y-chromosome profile from Henri IV. Five STR loci match the alleles found in Louis XVI, while another locus shows an allele that is just one mutation step apart. Taking into consideration that the partial Y-chromosome profile is extremely rare in modern human databases, we concluded that both males could be paternally related. The likelihood ratio of the two samples belonging to males separated by seven generations (as opposed to unrelated males) was estimated as 246.3, with a 95% confidence interval between 44.2 and 9729. Historically speaking, this forensic DNA data would confirm the identity of the previous Louis XVI sample, and give another positive argument for the authenticity of the head of Henri IV.

  19. The death of Henry II, King of France (1519-1559). From myth to medical and historical fact.

    PubMed

    Zanello, Marc; Charlier, Philippe; Corns, Robert; Devaux, Bertrand; Berche, Patrick; Pallud, Johan

    2015-01-01

    On 30 June 1559, Henry II, King of France, was mortally wounded in the head by a lance during a jousting match. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, Ambroise Paré and Andreas Vesalius, King Henry died 11 days later. This article, based on previously unpublished evidence, aims at examining the historical account of his death against modern medical practice to establish the probable cause of the king's death. We also discuss what treatments the doctors in the sixteenth century may have had to offer. Historical accounts of the joust provide details of the incident including the position of the visor of the king's helmet. Descriptions of the wood fragments removed from the right orbit by Italian observers and a new translation of the autopsy by Andreas Vesalius allow an accurate description of the actual injury. Our research counters previous theories and concludes that Henry II was the victim of craniofacial trauma involving the right eye and that he died from periorbital cellulitis caused by a retained foreign body in the wound, complicated by a left interhemispheric empyema preceded by a traumatic interhemispheric haematoma. It would appear that the royal court doctors advocated a wait-and-see strategy, with little actual input from Ambroise Paré or Andreas Vesalius, with a clearly regrettable outcome. PMID:25421951

  20. Determination of Henry's law constants of organochlorine pesticides in deionized and saline water as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Banu; Ozer, Serdar; Sofuoglu, Aysun; Odabasi, Mustafa

    The Henry's law constant ( H) is an important parameter that is required to estimate the air-water exchange of semi-volatile organic compounds. Henry's law constants for 17 banned/restricted/currently used organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were experimentally determined using a gas-stripping technique in deionized and saline water (3%) over a temperature range of 5-35 °C. H values (at 25 °C) ranged between 0.066±0.037 Pa m 3 mol -1 (endosulfan II) and 62.0±24.2 Pa m 3 mol -1 (heptachlor) in deionized water while the range in saline water was 0.28±0.03 Pa m 3 mol -1 ( γ-HCH) and 135.2±31.3 Pa m 3 mol -1 (heptachlor). The increase in dimensionless Henry's law constants ( H') for OCPs over the studied temperature range was between 3 ( γ-HCH)-19 times (chlorpyrifos) and 3 (endosulfan II)-80 times ( trans-nonachlor) in deionized and saline water, respectively. The calculated enthalpies of phase change (Δ HH) were within the ranges previously reported for OCPs and other organic compounds (23.8-100.2 kJ mol -1). The salting-out constant, ks, ranged between 0.04 ( γ-HCH) and 1.80 L mol -1 (endosulfan II) indicating the importance of assessing the H values of OCPs in saline water to accurately determine their partitioning and fate in seawater.

  1. Genetic comparison of the head of Henri IV and the presumptive blood from Louis XVI (both Kings of France).

    PubMed

    Charlier, Philippe; Olalde, Iñigo; Solé, Neus; Ramírez, Oscar; Babelon, Jean-Pierre; Galland, Bruno; Calafell, Francesc; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2013-03-10

    A mummified head was identified in 2010 as belonging to Henri IV, King of France. A putative blood sample from the King Louis XVI preserved into a pyrographically decorated gourd was analyzed in 2011. Both kings are in a direct male-line descent, separated by seven generations. We have retrieved the hypervariable region 1 of the mitochondrial DNA as well as a partial Y-chromosome profile from Henri IV. Five STR loci match the alleles found in Louis XVI, while another locus shows an allele that is just one mutation step apart. Taking into consideration that the partial Y-chromosome profile is extremely rare in modern human databases, we concluded that both males could be paternally related. The likelihood ratio of the two samples belonging to males separated by seven generations (as opposed to unrelated males) was estimated as 246.3, with a 95% confidence interval between 44.2 and 9729. Historically speaking, this forensic DNA data would confirm the identity of the previous Louis XVI sample, and give another positive argument for the authenticity of the head of Henri IV. PMID:23283403

  2. The death of Henry II, King of France (1519-1559). From myth to medical and historical fact.

    PubMed

    Zanello, Marc; Charlier, Philippe; Corns, Robert; Devaux, Bertrand; Berche, Patrick; Pallud, Johan

    2015-01-01

    On 30 June 1559, Henry II, King of France, was mortally wounded in the head by a lance during a jousting match. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, Ambroise Paré and Andreas Vesalius, King Henry died 11 days later. This article, based on previously unpublished evidence, aims at examining the historical account of his death against modern medical practice to establish the probable cause of the king's death. We also discuss what treatments the doctors in the sixteenth century may have had to offer. Historical accounts of the joust provide details of the incident including the position of the visor of the king's helmet. Descriptions of the wood fragments removed from the right orbit by Italian observers and a new translation of the autopsy by Andreas Vesalius allow an accurate description of the actual injury. Our research counters previous theories and concludes that Henry II was the victim of craniofacial trauma involving the right eye and that he died from periorbital cellulitis caused by a retained foreign body in the wound, complicated by a left interhemispheric empyema preceded by a traumatic interhemispheric haematoma. It would appear that the royal court doctors advocated a wait-and-see strategy, with little actual input from Ambroise Paré or Andreas Vesalius, with a clearly regrettable outcome.

  3. Exploring the association of John Henry active coping and education on smoking behavior and nicotine dependence among Blacks in the USA.

    PubMed

    Fernander, Anita F; Patten, Christi A; Schroeder, Darrell R; Stevens, Susanna R; Eberman, Kay M; Hurt, Richard D

    2005-02-01

    Although smoking is used as a coping tool in response to stress and Blacks have been found to report smoking more in response to stress than Whites, little research exists that has examined ethno-culturally specific constructs of stress and coping as they relate to smoking behavior and nicotine dependence among Blacks in the USA. This study explored the association between the ethno-culturally interactively defined construct of John Henryism, as well as the individual contributions of John Henry active coping and education on smoking behavior and nicotine dependence in a relatively urban-Midwestern Black population. Self-identified Black patients (n = 146) who had previously received a clinical intervention for nicotine dependence were followed to assess smoking status and John Henry active coping. Results revealed that patients with low levels of education who had low levels of John Henry active coping reported higher nicotine dependence scores than any other education by John Henry active coping group. Furthermore, low levels of John Henry active coping were associated with the use of menthol cigarettes and lower-educational level was associated with smoking greater than 20 cigarettes per day. Further community-based studies examining this construct among Black smokers in various socio-cultural contexts are needed to clarify the association between John Henry active coping and socioeconomic status on smoking behavior and nicotine dependence among Blacks.

  4. Mineral resources of the Henry's Lake Wilderness Study Area, Fremont County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Tysdal, R.G.; Kulik, D.M.; Peters, T.J.

    1988-06-10

    A mineral-resource survey of the 350-acre Henry's Lake Wilderness Study Area (ID-035-077) was made in 1986-87. No identified resources (known) or currently active claims exist within or adjacent to the wilderness study area. There is potential for several types of undiscovered mineral resources within the study area. The southwestern part of the wilderness study area, along the Madison Range fault, is rated as having a moderate energy-resource potential for geothermal water; the remainder of the study area has a low potential for resources of this commodity. A small outcrop of marble in the southernmost part of the study area has a low mineral-resource potential for talc; for talc in marble possibly concealed beneath the study area the mineral-resource potential is rated as unknown. The study area has a low mineral-resource potential for iron in hematite-mineralized amphibolite gneiss, and for gold, silver, and uranium. The area has no mineral-resource potential for phosphate, because the host strata have been eroded; and no resource potential for oil and gas.

  5. Uncovering strata: An investigation into the graphic innovations of geologist Henry T. De la Beche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Renee M.

    An historical investigation into the types of illustrations in the Golden Age of Geology (1788--1840) revealed the nature and progression of graphic representation at the dawning of geology as a science. Exhaustive sampling of geology texts published in the period of focus proceeded until saturation was achieved. Qualitative analysis and evaluation of early illustrations were accomplished with Edward R. Tufte's theory of graphic design. Hypothesis testing around a correlation coefficient revealed significance at the 99% confidence level for relationships between publication year and number of included graphics, and publication year and the graphic density of texts. Henry T. De la Beche emerged as an important geologist who made numerous innovative graphic contributions in the Golden Age of Geology. De la Beche promoted colliding theory graphics, or the accurate portrayal of the earth's sections and scenes that would remain valuable for future generations of geologists. He was apparently the first geologist to utilize the small multiple format. De la Beche also designed and drew scientific caricatures that encapsulated the theoretical debates of the day, as well as the social, cultural, and historical influences on the emerging theories of geology. These scientific caricatures have emerged as instructional graphics with significant classroom potential for teaching the nature of science. De la Beche also drew the first portrayal of a scene from deep time, Duria antiquior, which became the first innovative classroom geology teaching graphic. Through his introduction and development of several important genres of visual explanation, De la Beche emerged as the Father of Visual Geology Education.

  6. Water in sand and gravel deposits in McHenry County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, J.R.; Krohelski, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    Two general types of sand and gravel occur in McHenry County - unconfined aquifers, which are at or near the land surface, and semiconfined aquifers, which are overlain by one or more till members. Water levels in both types of aquifers are mapped from measurements made in the spring of 1979. The water-level configuration roughly parallels the land surface. Moraines and other topographically high features coincide with ground-water divides of local flow systems. Flow paths from divides to low-lands are relatively short - a few miles or less. Recharge predominates in uplands, whereas discharge predominates in lowlands. Water levels change seasonally in response to variations in recharge and discharge conditions. The highest water levels occur during spring and decline during the rest of the year. Ground water is of the calcium magnesium bicarbonate type and is of acceptable quality for most uses. However, for domestic and some industrial uses, treatment may be required to reduce hardness and to remove iron. Hardness ranged from 130 to 600 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate, and dissolved iron concentrations ranges from less than 10 to 6200 micrograms per liter. The specific conductance of ground water ranged from 260 to 1170 micromhos per centimeter. Specific conductance exceeded 1000 micromhos per centimeter near Huntley and Hebron. Nitrate concentration was generally less than 0.68 milligrams per liter. 22 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. New quartz oscillator switching method for nano-Henry range inductance measurements.

    PubMed

    Matko, Vojko; Jezernik, Karel

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a new method for nano-Henry inductance measurements at the frequency of 4.999 MHz with a single quartz crystal oscillating in the switching oscillating circuit. The real novelty of this method, however, lies in a considerable reduction of the temperature influence of AT-cut crystal frequency change in the temperature range between 0 °C and 50 °C through a switching method which compensates for the crystal's natural temperature characteristics. This allows for the compensation of any influences on the crystal such as the compensation of the non-linear temperature characteristics and the ageing of both the crystal and other oscillating circuit elements, as well as the reduction of the output frequency measurement errors with the help of an additional reference frequency. The experimental results show that the switching method greatly improves the measurement of small inductance changes in the range between μH and nH, allowing as a result high-precision measurements (~0.35 fH) in this range.

  8. Henry's Law vaporization studies and thermodynamics of einsteinium-253 metal dissolved in ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinschmidt, P.D.; Ward, J.W.; Matlack, G.M.; Haire, R.G.

    1984-07-01

    The cohesive energy of metallic einsteinium determines whether einsteinium is a trivalent or divalent metal. The enthalpy of sublimation, a measure of the cohesive energy, is calculated from the partial pressures of einsteinium over an alloy. The partial pressure of /sup 253/Es has been measured over the range 470--870 K, using combined target and mass spectrometric Knudsen effusion techniques. An alloy was prepared with einsteinium dissolved in a ytterbium solvent to produce a very dilute solution. Partial pressure measurements on the alloy were amenable to the experimental technique and a data analysis using a Henry's law treatment of the data. Vapor pressure data are combined with an estimated crystal entropy S/sup 0//sub 298/ and ..delta..C/sup 0//sub p/ for ytterbium, to produce enthalpy, entropy, and free energy functions from 298 to 1300 K. The vapor pressure of einsteinium in a dilute einsteinium--ytterbium alloy is described by the equation log P(atm) = -(6815 +- 216)/T+2.576 +- 0.337, from which we calculate for the enthalpy of sublimation of pure einsteinium ..delta..H/sup 0//sub 298/ (second law) = 31.76 kcal/mol. The value of the enthalpy of sublimation is consistent with the conclusion that Es is a divalent metal.

  9. Henry Knowles Beecher, Jay Katz, and the Transformation of Research with Human Beings.

    PubMed

    Capron, Alexander Morgan

    2016-01-01

    The modern history of experimentation with human beings is notable for its ethical lacunae, when even the clearest directives fail to prevent violations of subjects' rights and welfare. One such lacuna occurred during the 25 years between 1947, when the Nuremberg Code was articulated in the judgment passed on the men who had performed medical experiments in the Nazi concentration camps, and 1972, when the revelation of the 40-year-long Tuskegee Syphilis Study shocked the public and pushed Congress to adopt legislation that eventually transformed the governance of human subjects research. The work that Henry Beecher and Jay Katz did on the ethics of human experimentation beginning in 1964-which was mutually supportive but also divergent in its premises and prescriptions-played a prominent role in the policy-making processes. Beecher, whose detailed disclosure of the ethical lapses of leading researchers in his renowned 1966 New England Journal of Medicine article initiated the policy reform process, proved less influential in shaping those reforms than Katz. Ultimately, Beecher was one of the last and best exemplars of "medical ethics," while Katz-in his service on the Tuskegee Syphilis Study Ad Hoc Advisory Panel and in his testimony before, and work with, the Senate Health subcommittee-was an early practitioner of bioethics, a field in which the rules are not all written and applied by the medical profession but arise through a messier process involving outsiders and formal regulatory decisions.

  10. Tools for groundwater protection planning: An example from McHenry County, Illinois, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berg, R.C.; Curry, B. Brandon; Olshansky, R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for producing aquifer sensitivity maps from three-dimensional geologic maps, called stack-unit maps. Stack-unit maps depict the succession of geologic materials to a given depth, and aquifer sensitivity maps interpret the successions according to their ability to transmit potential contaminants. Using McHenry County, Illinois, as a case study, stack-unit maps and an aquifer sensitivity assessment were made to help land-use planners, public health officials, consultants, developers, and the public make informed decisions regarding land use. A map of aquifer sensitivity is important for planning because the county is one of the fastest growing counties in the nation, and highly vulnerable sand and gravel aquifers occur within 6 m of ground surface over 75% of its area. The aquifer sensitivity map can provide guidance to regulators seeking optimal protection of groundwater resources where these resources are particularly vulnerable. In addition, the map can be used to help officials direct waste-disposal and industrial facilities and other sensitive land-use practices to areas where the least damage is likely to occur, thereby reducing potential future liabilities.

  11. Ernest Henry Starling (1866-1927) on the glomerular and tubular functions of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Fine, Leon G

    2014-01-01

    Around the turn of the 20th century, Ernest Henry Starling (1866-1927) made many fundamental contributions to the understanding of human physiology. With a deep interest in how fluid balance is regulated, he naturally turned to explore the intricacies of kidney function. Early in his career he focused upon the process of glomerular filtration and was able to substantiate the view of Carl Ludwig that this process can be explained entirely upon the basis of hydrostatic and oncotic pressure gradients across the glomerular capillary wall and that the process can be regulated by alterations in the tone of the afferent and efferent arterioles. To explore renal tubular function he employed a heart-lung-kidney model in the dog and was able to infer that certain substances are reabsorbed by the tubules (e.g. sodium chloride) and certain by tubular secretion (e.g. uric acid, indigo carmine dye). By temporarily blocking tubular function using hydrocyanic acid he was able to conclude that secreted substances must be taken up on the peritubular side of the cell and concentrated within the cell to drive the secretory process. Finally, he was able to appreciate that the kidney is an organ which is regulated according to the needs of the organism and that the processes of glomerular filtration, tubular secretion and reabsorption are all subject to regulatory influences, which have evolved to conserve the normal chemical composition of the cells and fluids of the body. PMID:24970544

  12. William Henry Jackson (1861--1952): Riel's secretary: another case of involuntary commitment?

    PubMed

    Greenland, C; Griffin, J D

    1978-11-01

    Although there have been many studies of the trial of Louis Riel, following the 1885 rebellion, much less attention has been paid to the fate of his secretary William Henry Jackson, who was charged with "treason-felony" and found not guilty, reason of insanity. In an effort to throw some new light on this neglected aspect of midico-legal history, this paper describes the intense political and religious relationship between Riel and his secretary which culminated in the onset of Jackson's mental illness. After a trial lasting less than half an hour, Jackson was committed to the "Selkirk Asylum" under a warrant of the then Lieutenant-Governor. Two weeks before Riel was executed, Jackson escaped from hospital and made his way into the U.S.A. No attempt was made to capture him. Jackson, having changed his name to Honoré Jaxon, became a labour organizer. He died in the psychopathic ward of Bellevue Hospital in New York on 10th January, 1952 at the age of ninety.

  13. Henry Cavendish (1731-1810): hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water, and weighing the world.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-07-01

    Henry Cavendish (1731-1810) was an outstanding chemist and physicist. Although he was not a major figure in the history of respiratory physiology he made important discoveries concerning hydrogen, carbon dioxide, atmospheric air, and water. Hydrogen had been prepared earlier by Boyle but its properties had not been recognized; Cavendish described these in detail, including the density of the gas. Carbon dioxide had also previously been studied by Black, but Cavendish clarified its properties and measured its density. He was the first person to accurately analyze atmospheric air and reported an oxygen concentration very close to the currently accepted value. When he removed all the oxygen and nitrogen from an air sample, he found that there was a residual portion of about 0.8% that he could not characterize. Later this was shown to be argon. He produced large amounts of water by burning hydrogen in oxygen and recognized that these were its only constituents. Cavendish also worked on electricity and heat. However, his main contribution outside chemistry was an audacious experiment to measure the density of the earth, which he referred to as "weighing the world." This involved determining the gravitational attraction between lead spheres in a specially constructed building. Although this was a simple experiment in principle, there were numerous complexities that he overcame with meticulous attention to experimental details. His result was very close to the modern accepted value. The Cavendish Experiment, as it is called, assures his place in the history of science. PMID:24793169

  14. Henry's law constants measurements of alachlor and dichlorvos between 283 and 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Céline; Le Calvé, Stéphane; Mirabel, Philippe

    In this work, a dynamic system based on the water/air equilibrium at the interface within the length of a microporous tube was used to determine experimentally the Henry's law constants (HLC) of two pesticides: alachlor and dichlorvos. The measurements were conducted over the range 283-298 K. At 298 K, HLC were found to be equal to HLC=(14±2)×10 3 and HLC=(4.0±0.6)×10 3 (in units of M atm -1) for alachlor and dichlorvos, respectively. The obtained data were use to derive the following Arrhenius expressions: HLC=(8.0±3.4)×10 -10 exp((9200±1600)/ T) for alachlor and HLC=(2.8±0.4)×10 -13 exp((11 100±1500)/ T) for dichlorvos. At a cumulus temperature of 283 K, the fraction of alachlor and dichlorvos in the atmospheric aqueous phase is about 45% and 22%, respectively. Assuming that annual rainfall rate is 1 m/year, the wet deposition lifetimes were then estimated to be of the order of 2.8 days for alachlor and 5.6 days for dichlorvos. These latter are used to compare the relative importance of wet removal towards the lifetime in the gas phase.

  15. Henry Cavendish (1731-1810): hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water, and weighing the world.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2014-07-01

    Henry Cavendish (1731-1810) was an outstanding chemist and physicist. Although he was not a major figure in the history of respiratory physiology he made important discoveries concerning hydrogen, carbon dioxide, atmospheric air, and water. Hydrogen had been prepared earlier by Boyle but its properties had not been recognized; Cavendish described these in detail, including the density of the gas. Carbon dioxide had also previously been studied by Black, but Cavendish clarified its properties and measured its density. He was the first person to accurately analyze atmospheric air and reported an oxygen concentration very close to the currently accepted value. When he removed all the oxygen and nitrogen from an air sample, he found that there was a residual portion of about 0.8% that he could not characterize. Later this was shown to be argon. He produced large amounts of water by burning hydrogen in oxygen and recognized that these were its only constituents. Cavendish also worked on electricity and heat. However, his main contribution outside chemistry was an audacious experiment to measure the density of the earth, which he referred to as "weighing the world." This involved determining the gravitational attraction between lead spheres in a specially constructed building. Although this was a simple experiment in principle, there were numerous complexities that he overcame with meticulous attention to experimental details. His result was very close to the modern accepted value. The Cavendish Experiment, as it is called, assures his place in the history of science.

  16. The pleasures and perils of prophetic advocacy: Henry E. Sigerist and the politics of medical reform.

    PubMed Central

    Fee, E

    1996-01-01

    Henry E. Sigerist, an internationally renowned medical historian, played a surprisingly important and visible role in American medical politics in the 1930s and 1940s. Born in Paris of Swiss parents, he was professor in Leipzig, Germany, before coming to the United States in 1932 as professor of the history of medicine at Johns Hopkins University. Once in America. Sigerist became deeply involved in medical politics and the campaign for national health insurance. He argued that individualized medical practice was outdated and should gradually be superseded by state-run and state-financed health services. National health insurance was but one step in this historical progression. Sigerist thus lent the weight of history itself to the cause of medical care reform. The charming and erudite Sigerist was welcomed by the leaders of academic medicine in America. Soon, he emerged as a spokesman of the left wing of the medical profession, an effective and popular speaker and an impassioned advocate of socialized medicine. This paper traces Sigerist's political ideas and activities, and his contributions toward medical care reform in the United States. Images p1639-a p1642-a PMID:8916536

  17. Modeling hydrodynamics, temperature and water quality in Henry Hagg Lake, Oregon, 2000-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annette B.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional model CE-QUAL-W2 was used to simulate hydrodynamics, temperature, and water quality in Henry Hagg Lake, Oregon, for the years 2000 through 2003. Input data included lake bathymetry, meteorologic conditions, tributary inflows, tributary temperature and water quality, and lake outflows. Calibrated constituents included lake hydrodynamics, water temperature, orthophosphate, total phosphorus, ammonia, algae, chlorophyll a, zooplankton, and dissolved oxygen. Other simulated constituents included nitrate, dissolved and particulate organic matter, dissolved solids, and suspended sediment. Two algal groups (blue-green algae, and all other algae) were included in the model to simulate the lakes algal communities. Measured lake stage data were used to calibrate the lakes water balance; calibration of water temperature and water quality relied upon vertical profile data taken in the deepest part of the lake near the dam. The model initially was calibrated with data from 200001 and tested with data from 200203. Sensitivity tests were performed to examine the response of the model to specific parameters and coefficients, including the light-extinction coefficient, wind speed, tributary inflows of phosphorus, nitrogen and organic matter, sediment oxygen demand, algal growth rates, and zooplankton feeding preference factors.

  18. Effects of temperature, pH, and ionic strength on the Henry's law constant of triethylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Chun-Bo; Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Liu, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The Henry's law constants (KH) of triethylamine (TEA) in pure water and in 1-octanol were measured for the temperatures pertinent to the lower troposphere (278-298 K) using a bubble column system coupled to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The KH values of TEA in water and 1-octanol at 298 K are 5.75 ± 0.86 mol L-1 atm-1 and 115.62 ± 5.78 mol L-1 atm-1. The KH values display strong dependence on temperature, pH, and ionic strength. The characteristic times for TEA to establish an equilibrium between gas and droplet with a size of 5.6 µm are ~33 s (298 K, pH = 5.6); ~8.9 × 102 s (278 K, pH = 5.6); ~1.3 × 103 s (298 K, pH = 4.0); and 3.6 × 104 s (278 K, pH = 4.0). The evaluation of TEA partitioning between gas phase and condensed phase implies that TEA predominantly resides in rainwater, and TEA loss to organic aerosol is negligible.

  19. [Henri-Léonard Bertin and the development of agriculture in the Age of Enlightenment].

    PubMed

    Pédro, Georges

    2012-05-01

    This meeting of the Committee on the History of Science and Epistemology takes place as we celebrate the 250th anniversary of the creation of the world's first veterinary schools, a major event among all those that, in the wake of the Physiocrat movement initiated by Quesnay and DuPont de Nemours, shaped the modernisation of agriculture in France during the 18th century. Henri-Léonard Bertin (1720-1792) was the impetus to the restructuring process. He was well aware that farming should not remain an activity that solely provides a livelihood for the population, but that it needed to be modernised, i.e. it should produce more, and better. His view was that agriculture could become a great source of riches for France and therefore, a true economic and even political force. He used the various official positions he occupied during that period (Intendant of Lyon (1754-1757), Controller General of Finances (1759-1763), Minister-Secretary of State for Agriculture (1763-1780) to initiate a number of reforms that brought about the modernisation of the kingdom's agricultural world.

  20. Henry James's "The Ambassadors": the promise to lonely adolescents that there will be a future.

    PubMed

    Young, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Adolescence is a lonely time for all of us, as we shift our emotional attachment from our parents to our own autonomous selves and to those people outside our families who will be essential to our emotional growth. Perhaps because Henry James's novel The Ambassadors (1903) deals so masterfully with this subject, it promised the author that there would be a future beyond her senior year in college. The novel has two protagonists: a young American who has arrived at his maturity in Paris, and a middle-aged man who lives in a gray, ungratifying world because he has missed the opportunity to complete his unfolding into an independent sexual being. For background material, James called upon two periods from his own life: his unhappy adolescence, which he overcame by making a life for himself as a writer in England, and his continuing emotional growth at the time he wrote the novel, at the age of 56. The author deals with both adolescence itself and with the ways in which we use the coping skills and creative strengths we developed in adolescence to enrich our lives and sustain ourselves at times of crisis.

  1. Henry Knowles Beecher, Jay Katz, and the Transformation of Research with Human Beings.

    PubMed

    Capron, Alexander Morgan

    2016-01-01

    The modern history of experimentation with human beings is notable for its ethical lacunae, when even the clearest directives fail to prevent violations of subjects' rights and welfare. One such lacuna occurred during the 25 years between 1947, when the Nuremberg Code was articulated in the judgment passed on the men who had performed medical experiments in the Nazi concentration camps, and 1972, when the revelation of the 40-year-long Tuskegee Syphilis Study shocked the public and pushed Congress to adopt legislation that eventually transformed the governance of human subjects research. The work that Henry Beecher and Jay Katz did on the ethics of human experimentation beginning in 1964-which was mutually supportive but also divergent in its premises and prescriptions-played a prominent role in the policy-making processes. Beecher, whose detailed disclosure of the ethical lapses of leading researchers in his renowned 1966 New England Journal of Medicine article initiated the policy reform process, proved less influential in shaping those reforms than Katz. Ultimately, Beecher was one of the last and best exemplars of "medical ethics," while Katz-in his service on the Tuskegee Syphilis Study Ad Hoc Advisory Panel and in his testimony before, and work with, the Senate Health subcommittee-was an early practitioner of bioethics, a field in which the rules are not all written and applied by the medical profession but arise through a messier process involving outsiders and formal regulatory decisions. PMID:27499485

  2. Measurement of Henry's law constant for methyl tert-butyl ether using solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Bierwagen, B G; Keller, A A

    2001-08-01

    Increasing groundwater contamination with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) requires more efficient remediation technologies. Accurate measurement of MTBE's air-water partitioning coefficient (Henry's law constant, H) is important for the design and optimization of removal efficiency for many treatment systems as well as for predicting its fate and transport. Previously published data for MTBE appear to have some unusual nonlinearity at lower temperatures (15-30 degrees C), and a wide range of values exists for dimensionless H at 25 degrees C, from 0.0216 to 0.1226 in the published literature. We measured H for MTBE using headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and a static method that considers equilibrium partitioning in a closed system, for temperatures between 15 and 4 degrees C. To validate our methods, we measured H for benzene, toluene, and trichloroethylene and compared our results to previously published values, with excellent agreement. The Arrhenius plot for MTBE indicates that ln(HMBTE) = 6.85 - 2,900 T(-1), with T in K. At 25 degrees C, HMBTE = 0.0555 +/- 0.0122.

  3. Apatite (U-Th)/He Thermochronology from the Henry Mountains Laccolith Complex, Southeastern Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. E.; Reiners, P. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Henry Mountains are one of several laccolith-cored ranges on the Colorado Plateau that clearly preserve contact and structural relationships between Oligocene intrusions and the thick (~2.5 km) late Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary package, which locally upwarped to accommodate laccolith emplacement. Here, we use the Henrys not only to add to the understanding of the thermal and geomorphic evolution of the Colorado Plateau, but also as a laboratory to explore possible links between pluton emplacement, localized rock uplift and exhumation. Published hornblende 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate intrusion between 31 and 23 Ma. The range comprises five main peaks (Ellen, Pennell, Hillers, Ellsworth and Holmes), each cored by a central laccolith and satellite intrusions emplaced at varying stratigraphic levels throughout the range. Regional stratigraphic correlation suggests the Mt. Hillers laccolith, which intruded the Permain Cutler Group, was at the time of emplacement overlain by at least the entire ~2.5 km Permian-Cretaceous sedimentary package. On the south side of Mt. Hillers these country rocks dip vertically, folded against the side of the main laccolith body and ramped at least one kilometer above local baselevel for these units; this is the classic example of localized uplift as a primary accommodation mechanism for magma emplacement, and at such shallow depths this roof lifting was surely itself accommodated by surface uplift and probably erosion. Despite these intriguing uplift indicators, apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) dates from a 600 m vertical profile in these country rock sandstones and interbedded porphyry sills are nearly all 10-14 Ma, significantly younger than the age of emplacement and localized uplift. These data are consistent with intrusion at depths at least as deep as the AHe partial retention zone (PRZ; >~50-70°C, >~2-3 km), which agrees with stratigraphic estimates of emplacement depth. Also consistent with these data is cooling and exhumation of

  4. Seawater intrusion in fractured coastal aquifers: A preliminary numerical investigation using a fractured Henry problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebben, Megan L.; Werner, Adrian D.; Graf, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Despite that fractured coastal aquifers are widespread, the influence of fracture characteristics on seawater intrusion (SWI) has not been explored in previous studies. This research uses numerical modelling in a first step towards understanding the influence of fracture orientation, location and density on the extent of seawater and accompanying patterns of groundwater discharge in an idealised coastal aquifer. Specifically, aquifers containing single fractures or networks of regularly spaced fractures are studied using modified forms of the Henry SWI benchmark problem. The applicability of equivalent porous media (EPM) models for representing simple fracture networks in steady-state simulations of SWI is tested. The results indicate that the influence of fractures on SWI is likely to be mixed, ranging from enhancement to reduction in seawater extent and the width of the mixing zone. For the conceptual models considered here, vertical fractures in contact with the seawater wedge increase the width of the mixing zone, whereas vertical fractures inland of the wedge have minimal impact on the seawater distribution. Horizontal fractures in the lower part of the aquifer force the wedge seaward, whereas horizontal fractures located within the zone of freshwater discharge enhance the wedge. Inclined fractures roughly parallel to the seawater-freshwater interface increase the landward extent of seawater and fractures perpendicular to the interface inhibit the wedge. The results show that EPM models are likely inadequate for inferring salinity distributions in most of the fractured cases, although the EPM approach may be suitable for orthogonal fracture networks if fracture density is high and appropriate dispersivity values can be determined.

  5. [The materialistic strategy of Henry Howard, a Québec alienist (1815-1887).].

    PubMed

    Fugère, A

    1978-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century, Henry Howard appeared as the first Quebec "aliéniste" to attempt to develop an inclusive theoretical treatise on the question of madness. Why this sudden upheaval ? There existed numerous european theories ; that might have sufficed. The author attempts to show the multiple connections of this theoretical pro-lect to the socio-political problems of québécois society. Howard tries, from the perspective of the theory which he elaborates, to intervene in the major discussions affecting Quebec: ultra montanism, the problem of universal compusory education, public morality. At a more professional level he attempts to intervene in the legal dispute opposing judicial and medical competence in the cases of insanity pleas, as well as in the question of the scientific and social status of the "aliéniste". The involvement in these struggles manifests itself in Howard's treatise as much at the level of the concepts themselves, and their architecture, as at the thematic level and in the applications which he naturally draws. It is not onty external and contingent but works on the text from the inside as well. The article attempts to suggest that at the very moment that the treatise on the alienated-which would become the "science" that we know today- seeks to structure itself into a theory, it cannot break its attachment to its determining social context and that, ignoring its ideological role it, in truth, succeeds only in creating illusion and the impression of a progressive process, all the while being circumstantial and having a verted interest.

  6. Flexure and faulting of sedimentary host rocks during growth of igneous domes, Henry Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, M.D.; Pollard, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    A sequence of sedimentary rocks about 4 km thick was bent, stretched and uplifted during the growth of three igneous domes in the southern Henry Mountains. Mount Holmes, Mount Ellsworth and Mount Hillers are all about 12 km in diameter, but the amplitudes of their domes are about 1.2, 1.85 and 3.0 km, respectively. These mountains record successive stages in the inflation of near-surface diorite intrusions that are probably laccolithic in origin. The host rocks deformed along networks of outcrop-scale faults, or deformation bands, marked by crushed grains, consolidation of the porous sandstone and small displacements of sedimentary beds. Zones of deformation bands oriented parallel to the beds and formation contacts subdivided the overburden into thin mechanical layers that slipped over one another during doming. Measurements of outcrop-scale fault populations at the three mountains reveal a network of faults that strikes at high angles to sedimentary beds which themselves strike tangentially about the domes. These faults have normal and reverse components of slip that accommodated bending and stretching strains within the strata. An early stage of this deformation is displayed at Mount Holmes, where states of stress computed from three fault samples correlate with the theoretical distribution of stresses resulting from bending of thin, circular, elastic plates. Field observations and analysis of frictional driving stresses acting on horizontal planes above an opening-mode dislocation, as well as the paleostress analysis of faulting, indicate that bedding-plane slip and layer flexure were important components of the early deformation. As the amplitude of doming increased, radial and circumferential stretching of the strata and rotation of the older faults in the steepening limbs of the domes increased the complexity of the fault patterns. Steeply-dipping, map-scale faults with dip-slip displacements indicate a late-stage jostling of major blocks over the central

  7. Reinvestigation of the Henry's law constant for hydrogen peroxide with temperature and acidity variation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daoming; Chen, Zhongming

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is not only an important oxidant in itself; it also serves as both sink and temporary reservoir for other important oxidants including HOx (OH and HO2) radicals and O3 in the atmosphere. Its partitioning between gas and aqueous phases in the atmosphere, usually described by its Henry's law constant (K(H)), significantly influences its role in atmospheric processes. Large discrepancies between the K(H) values reported in previous work, however, have created uncertainty for atmospheric modelers. Based on our newly developed online instrumentation, we have re-determined the temperature and acidity dependence of K(H) for hydrogen peroxide at an air pressure of (0.960 +/- 0.013) atm (1 atm = 1.01325 x 10(5) Pa). The results indicated that the temperature dependence of K(H) for hydrogen peroxide fits to the Van't Hoff equation form, expressed as lnK(H) = a/T - b, and a = -deltaH/R, where K(H) is in M/atm (M is mol/L), T is in degrees Kelvin, R is the ideal gas constant, and deltaH is the standard heat of solution. For acidity dependence, results demonstrated that the K(H) value of hydrogen peroxide appeared to have no obvious dependence on decreasing pH level (from pH 7 to pH 1). Combining the dependence of both temperature and acidity, the obtained a and b were 7024 +/- 138 and 11.97 +/- 0.48, respectively, deltaH was (58.40 +/- 1.15) kJ/(K x mol), and the uncertainties represent sigma. Our determined K(H) values for hydrogen peroxide will therefore be of great use in atmospheric models. PMID:20617734

  8. How Jurassic Folds Control the Geometry of a Tertiary Intrusion: Trachyte Mesa, Henry Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosugi, K.; Connor, C.; Wetmore, P. H.; Roman, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms of igneous intrusion are important to understand for improving forecasts of volcanic activity and to interpret geophysical results gathered on volcanoes. An igneous intrusion in the Henry Mountains, Utah was mapped and found to have remarkable features: First, the magma was more dense than the surrounding host rocks and therefore injected under pressure, rather than buoyantly ascending. Second, it intruded along the axis of a syncline and in between beds of Entrada sandstone. Thus, the intrusion of dense magma was strongly controlled by pre-existing structure and magma pressure or rigidity contrasts in the host rock. We attempted to simulate the conditions of this intrusion with analog experiments in blocks of gelatin solidified in 15 cm x 15 cm x 15 cm plastic tanks. Two types of gelatin block were used: The first consisted of two layers, with a more rigid upper layer and a layer boundary molded into folds. To simulate magma intrusion, air was injected into the gelatin block from a hole in the bottom of the tank with a syringe. The air crack then ascended buoyantly in the gelatin block. The second type of gelatin block had uniform rigidity but a fold was precut in the upper part of gelatin block. In this case, both air and dyed sugar water, more dense than the gelatin block, were injected into the base of the tank. Because of the lack of buoyancy, continuous injection pressure was applied to extend the water crack upward in the gelatin block. In the first experiment, the rigidity contrast worked as a barrier to upward air crack ascent, but did not simulate fluid concentration along the axis of a syncline as observed in the Trachyte Mesa intrusion. Experiments with the precut gelatin block showed two different results based on the density contrast between the injected fluid and gelatin: When air was injected into a gelatin block, the air crack arrested in the anticline after arriving at the precut fold. However, when denser sugar water was injected into

  9. Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics Talk: Henry Cavendish, John Michell, Weighing the Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormmach, Russell

    2010-03-01

    This talk is about an interaction between two 18th-century natural philosophers (physical scientists), Henry Cavendish and John Michell, and its most important outcome, the experiment of weighing the world (their name for it) using a torsion balance (our name for it). Michell was the most inventive of the 18th century English natural philosophers, and Cavendish was the first of his countrymen to possess abilities at all comparable with Newton's. By their interests and skills, they were drawn to one another. Both were universal natural philosophers, equally adept at building scientific instruments, performing experiments, constructing theory, and using mathematics; both had a penchant for exacting, quantitative work. Both also had fitful habits of publication, which did not begin to reveal the range of their work, to the mystification of later scientists and historians. Late in life, Cavendish and Michell turned their attention to the force that Newton had examined most completely, a singular triumph of his natural philosophy, the force of universal gravitation. Over the course of the 18th century, abundant evidence of attraction had been gathered from the motions of the earth, moon, planets, and comets, phenomena which span the intermediate range of masses, sizes, and distances. But in three domains of experience, involving the extreme upper and lower limits of masses and dimensions, the universality of gravitation remained an article of faith. These were the gravity of the ``fixed'' stars, the mutual attraction of terrestrial bodies, and the gravitation of light and other special substances. Michell took on himself the task of deducing observable consequences from each of these prospective instances of universal gravitation. Cavendish encouraged Michell, and he followed up the resulting observational and experimental questions. The experiment of weighing the world was the last experiment Mitchell planned and the last experiment Cavendish published. The capstone of

  10. Emplacement of multiple magma sheets and wall rock deformation: Trachyte Mesa intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Sven; Stanik, Amy; Horsman, Eric; Tikoff, Basil; de Saint Blanquat, Michel; Habert, Guillaume

    2008-04-01

    A detailed structural and rock magnetic study of the Trachyte Mesa intrusion and deformed sedimentary wall rocks, Henry Mountains, Utah, indicates that the intrusion grew vertically and horizontally by the accumulation of multiple horizontal magma sheets. 2-3 cm thick shear zones recognized by intensely cataclasized plagioclase phenocrysts define the contact between sheets. Sheets have bulbous and / or steep frontal terminations and are flat on top. The foliation within the interior of the sheets, near the frontal termination, is subvertical. This steep foliation rotates into the subhorizontal shear zones near the top and bottom contacts and provides a magma flow direction indicator. Away from the frontal termination, the interior foliation rotates to become subhorizontal, similar to the fabric in recent analog experimental studies. Sheets are interpreted as being emplaced as plug flows. Both the field fabric and the rock magnetic data collected from 103 locations on the top of the intrusion and from 73 locations along a vertical cross section exposed in a stream gorge support a multi-stage model of intrusion growth. Emplacement begins as narrow magma channels and magma spreads radially outward from the channels to form sheets. Sheets are stacked upon one another and stop at the same lateral termination. The deformation of the sandstones at the margin of the intrusion, which are rotated upward from the margin to become the roof, is partitioned into layer parallel extension, shearing and layer-parallel shortening components. Bulk strain within the thickest sandstone layer indicates ˜20% thinning and microstructures indicate that the thinning was accommodated by grain-scale fracture-induced porosity collapse. Extension occurred as the layer was stretched over the margin of the rising intrusion. Shearing and layer-parallel shortening are a result of coupling with the underlying sheets as they advanced and accommodated through numerous faults parallel to bedding and

  11. Constraining emplacement geometry of large igneous dome growth: new evidence from Mt. Ellsworth, Henry Mountains, UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nushart, N.; Wetmore, P. H.

    2013-12-01

    Surface displacements resulting from upper-crustal intrusions are a paramount concern for communities and facilities located near active volcanic areas (e.g. Campi Flegrei, Yucca Mtn.). Study of active intrusions is limited to remote observations through geophysical/geodetic methods. While surface displacements due to intrusions can be measured easily, intrusion shapes and depths are often based on simplified assumptions (e.g. spheres and ellipsoids). These models benefit from data constraining both the geometries of the individual intrusions, and the kinematics and mechanics of deformation within the overlying strata. Mount Ellsworth, a sub-volcanic intrusion within the Henry Mtns., is an ideal natural laboratory for the study of near surface intrusions because it was emplaced into relatively flat-lying stratigraphy ~24 Ma when the stress field was largely isotropic. Previous studies of Mt. Ellsworth (i.e. Hunt, 1953; Jackson and Pollard, 1988) present competing emplacement models (e.g. single vs. multiple batch construction) based on slightly different geologic maps. Through a combination of 1:5000 scale field mapping and profile-oriented gravity study, we have produced new detailed geologic maps and cross sections of Mt. Ellsworth. These were intended to be used to test emplacement models. However, the results suggest that the initial goals set out for this study could not be realized due to the lack of exposed intrusion, the relatively small dimensions of the exposed sills, and the largely uncapped nature of the mountain. Mapping results demonstrate, however, that some of the assumptions of the models theorized by previous researchers were inappropriately applied to Mt. Ellsworth. These assumptions include the thickness and separation of stratigraphic units, the size and distribution of sills and smaller intrusions, structural attitudes of beds and sills, and the presence of exposure of the main body of the intrusion. Based on balanced cross sections

  12. [Henri Ellenberger, Henri Ey and the Traité de Psychiatrie in the "Encyclopédie Médico-Chirurgicale": an American career under the auspices of the "Evolution Psychiatrique"].

    PubMed

    Delille, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    Henri Ellenberger, psychiatrist and historian, experienced a decisive period in his career in the early fifties of the last century. Educated in France, intern at Sainte-Anne Hospital, he was working in Switzerland after the war and then tried to move to the United States. It was during his participation in the French group "l'Evolution Psychiatrique" that he happened to contribute to the treatise of psychiatry (1955) of the French medical and surgical encyclopaedia ("EMC") and organise an observation trip to the United States. He was supported at that time by Henri Ey, key figure of French psychiatry. While going back to his career, we would like to emphasise on his comments about the "Psychotherapy of schizophrenia". Even though later Ellenberger became a well-known researcher in North America, it is more a question for us to discuss the scientific ambition he had in this particular context of a French learned society as a member of "l'Evolution Psychiatrique" and as a psychiatrist formerly intern from the "Hôpitaux psychiatriques de la Seine" (Parisian district).

  13. Evaluation and prediction of Henry's law constants and aqueous solubilities for solvents and hydrocarbon fuel components. Volume 1. Technical discussion. Final report, February 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, G.B.; Mullins, M.E.; Rogers, T.N.

    1987-09-01

    Laboratory measurements of Henry's law constants are reported for 51 chemicals, spanning a wide range of chemical structures and volatilities. A static headspace method (Equilibrium Partitioning in Closed Systems, referred to as EPICS) was used to measure Henry's Law Constant, with the standard-batch air-stripping method used as a check. An average precision of 5% was obtained for the EPICS runs, and the Henry's law constants agreed reasonably well(within 10%) with the batch air-stripping results and other reported experimental values. Measurements were conducted over a temperature range of 10-30 C, and the data were correlated with a temperature regression equation coupled with a temperature-dependent error term based on 95% confidence limits. The aqueous solubilities of the study compounds were also determined via the shake-flask method at temperatures of 10, 20, and 30/sup 0/C.pacts

  14. Modeling water quality effects of structural and operational changes to Scoggins Dam and Henry Hagg Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2006-01-01

    To meet water quality targets and the municipal and industrial water needs of a growing population in the Tualatin River Basin in northwestern Oregon, an expansion of Henry Hagg Lake is under consideration. Hagg Lake is the basin's primary storage reservoir and provides water during western Oregon's typically dry summers. Potential modifications include raising the dam height by 6.1 meters (20 feet), 7.6 meters (25 feet), or 12.2 meters (40 feet); installing additional outlets (possibly including a selective withdrawal tower); and adding additional inflows to provide greater reliability of filling the enlarged reservoir. One method of providing additional inflows is to route water from the upper Tualatin River through a tunnel and into Sain Creek, a tributary to the lake. Another option is to pump water from the Tualatin River (downstream of the lake) uphill and into the reservoir during the winter--the 'pump-back' option. A calibrated CE-QUAL-W2 model of Henry Hagg Lake's hydrodynamics, temperature, and water quality was used to examine the effect of these proposed changes on water quality in the lake and downstream. Most model scenarios were run with the calibrated model for 2002, a typical water year; a few scenarios were run for 2001, a drought year. More...

  15. Theoretical analysis of the worthiness of Henry and Elder problems as benchmarks of density-dependent groundwater flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, M. J.; Clement, T. P.

    Computer models must be tested to ensure that the mathematical statements and solution schemes accurately represent the physical processes of interest. Because the availability of benchmark problems for testing density-dependent groundwater models is limited, one should be careful in using these problems appropriately. Details of a Galerkin finite-element model for the simulation of density-dependent, variably saturated flow processes are presented here. The model is tested using the Henry salt-water intrusion problem and Elder salt convection problem. The quality of these benchmark problems is then evaluated by solving the problems in the standard density-coupled mode and in a new density-uncoupled mode. The differences between the solutions indicate that the Henry salt-water intrusion problem has limited usefulness in benchmarking density-dependent flow models because the internal flow dynamics are largely determined by the boundary forcing. Alternatively, the Elder salt-convection problem is more suited to the model testing process because the flow patterns are completely determined by the internal balance of pressure and gravity forces.

  16. Chiral modification of copper exchanged zeolite-Y with cinchonidine and its application in the asymmetric Henry reaction.

    PubMed

    Deka, Jogesh; Satyanarayana, L; Karunakar, G V; Bhattacharyya, Pradip Kr; Bania, Kusum K

    2015-12-28

    Chirally modified Cu(2+) exchanged zeolite-Y was synthesized by direct adsorption of cinchonidine under ambient conditions. The chirally modified materials were characterized using various spectrochemical and physicochemical techniques viz. BET, FTIR, MAS ((1)H and (13)C NMR), XPS, SEM, cyclic voltammetry and PXRD. Characteristic peaks of cinchonidine observed in the supported materials confirmed the adsorption of cinchonidine and its coordination with the Cu(2+) active site on copper exchanged zeolite-Y. (13)C SSNMR and XPS analysis however confirmed for the half encapsulation process, only the quinoline ring of cinchonidine gets coordinated to the internal metal sites via the N atom while the quinuclidine moiety extends out of the host surface. Cinchonidine supported Cu(2+)-Y zeolites were found to exhibit good catalytic performance in the asymmetric Henry reaction. (1)H SSNMR studies also confirmed the protonation of the N atom of the quinuclidine ring during the course of the Henry reaction. Heterogeneous chiral catalysts were effective for up to two consecutive cycles. Leaching of cinchonidine after the second cycle was found to have a negative result in the catalytic performance.

  17. Reconnaissance of water quality of Lake Henry and Lake Meredith Reservoir, Crowley County, Southeastern Colorado, April-October 1987. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The report describes the water-quality characteristics of Lake Henry and Lake Meredith, Reservoir and the comparison between the characteristics and the water-quality standards established for these reservoirs. Measurements of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, and light transparency are reported for numerous sites in each lake. In addition, analyses of samples collected for nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), major chemical constituents, trace elements, phytoplankton densities, and chlorophyll a concentrations in Lake Henry and Lake Meredith are included in the report.

  18. Plug Flow, Fracture, and Fast Emplacement of a Magma Sheet, Trachyte Mesa Laccolith, Henry Mts., USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, S. S.; Serwatowski, T.; Goodwin, L.; Tikoff, B.; Horsman, E.

    2008-12-01

    Distinct magma sheets 0.5 to 3 m thick are well exposed on the NW margin of the Trachyte Mesa Laccolith, Henry Mts., USA. On the outer contact of the laccolith, magma sheet margins are defined by 2- to 3-cm-thick zones of intense cataclastic deformation of plagioclase phenocrysts. To determine if sheet margins extend away from the outer contact, three 1-m-deep cores were drilled into the top of the laccolith. Cataclastic zones are absent in the cores, but a sheet margin has been identified that is defined by consistent changes in the orientation of the magnetic foliation and by a large decrease in magnetic susceptibility. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility was measured on 122 specimens from the exposed outer surface of the intrusion and the cores. The magma sheet studied is foliated; at the top contact of the laccolith, foliation is sub-horizontal within a 2- to 3-cm-thick shear zone. At the base of this shear zone, foliation abruptly rotates into a subvertical orientation. The foliation continues to rotate toward the interior of the intrusion, defining an arc, with the base of the arc at 40 cm depth. The base of this arc coincides with a change in mean magnetic susceptibility. Crystal percentages were measured from the top 15 cm of the magma sheet in two locations. In both locations, there is a 22% decrease in the volumetric abundance of crystals within 1 cm of the shear zone. The crystal abundance increases toward the center of the magma sheet by approximately 22% in the next centimeter, suggesting that crystals were displaced toward the interior of the sheet by the high shear stress at the contact (Bagnold effect). Back-scattered electron images inside the shear zone reveal dramatic fragmentation and grain-size reduction of the plagioclase (An45) phenocrysts into micron-scale pieces which are elongated along the foliation. Where the matrix is visible between plagioclase clasts, it appears undeformed. The matrix is defined by abundant, ten-micron-sized quartz

  19. Let us keep observing and play in sand boxes (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illangasekare, T. H.

    2012-04-01

    Henry Darcy was a civil engineer recognized for a number of technical achievements and scientific discoveries. The sand column experiments for which he is known revealed the linear relationship that exists between fluid motion and driving forces at low velocities. Freeze and Back (1983) stated, ''The experiments carried out by Darcy with the help of his assistant, Ritter, in Dijon, France in 1855 and 1856 represent the beginning of groundwater hydrology as a quantitative science." Because of the prominence given to this experiment, two important facts behind Darcy's contributions to subsurface hydrology have not received much attention. First, Darcy was not only a good engineer, but he was also a highly respected scientist whose knowledge of both the fundamentals of fluid mechanics and the natural world of geology led to better conceptualizing and quantifying of groundwater processes at relevant scales to solve practical problems. The experiments for which he is known may have already been conceived, based on his theoretical understanding, and the results were anticipated (Brown 2002). Second, Darcy, through his contributions with Dupuit, showed that they understood hydrologeology at a regional scale and developed methods for quantification at the scale of geologic stratum (Ritz and Bobek, 2008). The primary thesis of this talk is that scientific contributions such as the one Darcy made require appreciation and a thorough understanding of fundamental theory coupled with observation and recording of phenomena both in nature and in the laboratory. Along with all of the significant theoretical, mathematical modeling, and computational advances we have made in the last several decades, laboratory experiments designed to observe phenomena and processes for better insight, accurate data generation, and hypothesis development are critically important to make scientific and engineering advances to address some of the emerging and societally important problems in hydrology

  20. Thomas Henry Osler (1875-1936): a descendant of Sir William Osler's great-uncle and the founder of a South African medical dynasty.

    PubMed

    Myers, Edward D

    2009-08-01

    Sir William Osler's great-uncle Benjamin emigrated from England to South Africa with his wife and children in 1820. From Benjamin's son, Stephen, descended a large family of Oslers including at least seven doctors and dentists. This paper describes the lives and careers of Thomas Henry, and his medical and dental descendants. PMID:19723960

  1. On the "Critique of Everyday Life" to "Metaphilosophy": Henri Lefebvre's Philosophical-Political Legacy of the Cultural Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sünker, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Henri Lefebvre (1901-91), philosopher and sociologist, is, together with Theodor W. Adorno, Max Horkheimer, Walter Benjamin and Ernst Bloch, one of the most relevant representatives of the first generation in Western Marxism. His engagement with Marxism led him to analyse everyday life in post-war France in order to decipher the possibilities of,…

  2. A Tall Tale Retold: The Influence of the Photographs of William Henry Jackson upon the Passage of the Yellowstone Park Act of 1872.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossen, Howard

    The photographs of William Henry Jackson taken during the 1871 survey of the Yellowstone region of Wyoming and Montana have often been cited as the first specific group of photographs used for successful persuasion. Many historians credit Jackson's photographs as being the most influential factor in persuading Congress to designate the Yellowstone…

  3. Comments on the Classic Henry and Rogers (1960) Paper on Its 50th Anniversary: Resolving the Issue of Simple versus Choice Reaction Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klapp, Stuart T.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of response complexity on simple RT, first reported by Henry and Rogers (H&R), is a robust phenomenon for complexity measured by the number of chunks in a multiple-chunk response. However, there are problems with the memory drum theory H&R used to account for this result, and no fully satisfactory alternative explanation has been…

  4. Artist as Educator? Assessing the Pedagogic Role of Folly in the Early Work of the Anglo-Swiss Artist Henry Fuseli (1741-1825)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hester Camilla

    2010-01-01

    This article examines a group of five ink, pen and wash drawings produced by the Anglo-Swiss artist Henry Fuseli in the mid-eighteenth century in Zurich. The drawings were produced for a "Narrenbuch" (Book of Fools) uniting visual images of folly with humorous slogans. The drawings are significant in that they imitate sixteenth-century print…

  5. [The electric furnace of Henri Moissan at one hundred years: connection with the electric furnace, the solar furnace, the plasma furnace?].

    PubMed

    Royère, C

    1999-03-01

    The trace of Henri Moissan's pioneer work 100 years ago is clearly evidenced by an overview of achievements in high temperature devices; 1987: "Le four électrique" by Henri Moissan; 1948-1952: "High temperature heating in a cavity rotary kiln using focusing of solar radiation" by Félix Trombe; 1962: "The cavity rotary kiln using focused solar radiation jointly with a plasma gun" by Marc Foëx; 1970: "The rotary kiln with two plasma guns and arc transfer" by Marc Foëx; 1984: "The plasma furnace" by Electricité de France (EDF) at Renardières; 1997: "The plasma furnace" by the Atomic Energy Center (CEA) at Cadarache, the VULCANO program. The first part of this contribution is devoted to Henri Moissan. Re-reading his early book on the electric furnace, especially the first chapter and the sections on silica, carbon vapor and experiments performed in casting molten metal--the conclusions are outstanding--provides modern readers with an amazing insight into future developments. The last two parts are devoted to Félix Trombe and Marc Foëx, tracing the evolution of high temperature cavity processus leading to the solar furnace and the present day plasma furnace at the CEA. Focus is placed on research conducted by the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) with the solar and plasma furnaces at Odeillo. The relationships with Henri Moissan's early work are amazing, offering a well deserved homage to this pioneer researcher.

  6. How to boost soundscapes with tax breaks-On the application of Henry George's environmental economics to noise annoyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehner, Cay

    2001-05-01

    The improvement of the characteristic soundscape in a given metropolitan area depends largely on a varied number of parameters not the least of which are economic. The way to sustain a large city not only economically responsible behavior patterns and activities are required, but ecologically viable ones as well. And, not coincidentally, if both patterns come into balance, a reduction of noise annoyance ensues. The cohesive set of measures that would provide the framework to ensure that the necessary economic activity is not antagonistic to (acoustic) ecology is provided by the US economist Henry George who advocated a comprehensive tax on land and all natural resources to replace eventually the bulk of all taxes checking production. New data will be provided in this paper to show the results of the application of a Georgist approach of eco-taxation to the improvement of sound quality and the reduction of noise annoyance.

  7. Supramolecular Columnar Liquid Crystals with Tapered-Shape Simple Pyrazoles Obtained by Efficient Henry/Michael Reactions.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Hugo; Iguarbe, Verónica; Barberá, Joaquín; Serrano, José Luis; Elduque, Anabel; Giménez, Raquel

    2016-03-24

    A straightforward synthesis of mesogenic pyrazoles starting from benzaldehydes by a combination of efficient Henry and Michael reactions led to novel supramolecular liquid crystals. The mesogens are fluorescent 3,5-dimethyl-4-(di or trialkoxyphenyl)pyrazoles and, in spite of the tapered shape of these molecules and their structural simplicity (only one phenyl ring), columnar liquid-crystal phases were formed that are stable at room temperature. The self-assembled structure was studied by XRD and the columnar cross section contains two molecules on average with an antiparallel arrangement of pyrazoles interacting through hydrogen bonds. In contrast, the single-crystal structure of a trimethoxy analog did not show hydrogen-bonded pyrazoles but chains of head-to-tail arranged molecules.

  8. Preliminary assessment report for Fort William Henry Harrison, Montana Army National Guard, Helena, Montana. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    DuWaldt, J.; Meyer, T.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at a Montana Army National Guard (MTARNG) property near Helena, Montana. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort William Henry Harrison property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  9. The first Nobel Peace Prize, Henry Dunant (founder of the International Red Cross) and his "Mémoirs".

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Raimonda; Vanni, Paolo; Baccolo, Grazia M; Guerin, Elizabeth; Vanni, Duccio

    2003-06-01

    To celebrate the memory and work of Henry Dunant, on the centenary of the presentation of the first Nobel Peace Prize, rightly awarded to Dunant for his having founded the institution of the International Red Cross, this paper presents the reader with some insights into his activities and sufferings, his trials and tribulations, and the hope and strength of his character. The ceaseless efforts made by Dunant to bring about the Institution which today represents Hope for so many suffering people who are silent victims of wars and atrocities, are fleetingly presented. The authors' intention is to give due recognition to Dunant for his work, and to highlight the humanity and the moral and social worth of the face behind the International Red Cross.

  10. Henry Currey FRIBA (1820-1900): leading Victorian hospital architect, and early exponent of the "pavilion principle".

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    2002-06-01

    The "pavilion plan" for hospital design originated in France in the 18th century and was popularised in England by John Roberton and George Godwin in the mid-19th century; the underlying rationale was that with improved ventilation the mortality rate (at that time exceedingly high) was significantly reduced. Among the enthusiasts for this new style was Florence Nightingale (herself a miasmatist)--who had experienced astronomically high death rates in the hospital at Scutari during the Crimean War (1854-6). One of the leading exponents of this style of hospital architecture was Henry Currey (1820-1900) whose greatest achievement was undoubtedly the design for the new St Thomas's Hospital on the Lambeth Palace Road.

  11. Henri Chretien, un savant entre science et technique: reflections a propos de l'invention de l'hypergonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guet Tully, Francoise

    At the beggining of the 20-th century, French engineers and scientists were not well acquainted with some of the importnat principles of applied optics developed elsewhere, especially in Germany, over the preceding fifty years. In preparation for a career as a designer of astronomical instruments, Henri Chretien visited observatories in several countries and read widely. His research in optics produced many tangible advances. The Richy-Chretien telescope, which gained popularity in the 1960s and still in use today, was designed in 1910, based on an application of the principles developed by Abbe in Germany first to make color movies and then, though another application of the same principle, to project motion pictures onto a wide screen (The "Hypergonar" objective).

  12. Shakespeare, genetics, malformations, and the Wars of the Roses: hereditary themes in Henry VI and Richard III.

    PubMed

    Hook, E B

    1987-02-01

    The four plays in the Henry VI-Richard III sequence well illustrate Shakespeare's recognition of hereditary influences upon the human condition. The inheritance of physical characteristics as manifest particularly by resemblance between fathers and sons is noted frequently. The absence of such resemblance is cited occasionally as evidence of illegitimacy. Personality traits are also viewed as inherited, although less consistently and there are important exceptions. Physical and mental traits when not derived from parents are ascribed to "nature" in the sense in which the term is often used today. Such traits are seen as being congenital or inborn even if not obviously "hereditary." Important exceptions to this are provided by the characters of the two lead characters in the play sequence. The weak-willed Henry VI is markedly different from his father, grandfather, and son who were all valiant, warlike, and brave. Shakespeare never explains this abrupt difference among generations. And the source of the evil character of Richard III is somewhat ambiguous. It seems most likely that in the first three plays of the sequence Shakespeare intended Richard's villainousness to be perceived as innate, caused by the same forces of nature that produced Richard's deformities (which are not further explained). But when Shakespeare wrote Richard III and gave more conscious consideration to what was now his central character he invoked an "environmentalist" explanation. Richard now is presented, albeit somewhat inconsistently, as evil in response to social ostracism because of his ugly deformities. This rather modern interpretation of the social origins of the personality of the deformed is particularly striking because it goes beyond anything in Shakespeare's historical sources, although Francis Bacon, a contemporary of Shakespeare, also recognized the effect of social forces upon the personality of the deformed. PMID:3551177

  13. Determination of Henry's constant, the dissociation constant, and the buffer capacity of the bicarbonate system in ruminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Hille, Katharina T; Hetz, Stefan K; Rosendahl, Julia; Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Pieper, Robert; Stumpff, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Despite the clinical importance of ruminal acidosis, ruminal buffering continues to be poorly understood. In particular, the constants for the dissociation of H2CO3 and the solubility of CO2 (Henry's constant) have never been stringently determined for ruminal fluid. The pH was measured in parallel directly in the rumen and the reticulum in vivo, and in samples obtained via aspiration from 10 fistulated cows on hay- or concentrate-based diets. The equilibrium constants of the bicarbonate system were measured at 38°C both using the Astrup technique and a newly developed method with titration at 2 levels of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2; 4.75 and 94.98 kPa), yielding mean values of 0.234 ± 0.005 mmol ∙ L(-1) ∙ kPa(-1) and 6.11 ± 0.02 for Henry's constant and the dissociation constant, respectively (n/n = 31/10). Both reticular pH and the pH of samples measured after removal were more alkalic than those measured in vivo in the rumen (by ΔpH = 0.87 ± 0.04 and 0.26 ± 0.04). The amount of acid or base required to shift the pH of ruminal samples to 6.4 or 5.8 (base excess) differed between the 2 feeding groups. Experimental results are compared with the mathematical predictions of an open 2-buffer Henderson-Hasselbalch equilibrium model. Because pCO2 has pronounced effects on ruminal pH and can decrease rapidly in samples removed from the rumen, introduction of a generally accepted protocol for determining the acid-base status of ruminal fluid with standard levels of pCO2 and measurement of base excess in addition to pH should be considered.

  14. Shakespeare, genetics, malformations, and the Wars of the Roses: hereditary themes in Henry VI and Richard III.

    PubMed

    Hook, E B

    1987-02-01

    The four plays in the Henry VI-Richard III sequence well illustrate Shakespeare's recognition of hereditary influences upon the human condition. The inheritance of physical characteristics as manifest particularly by resemblance between fathers and sons is noted frequently. The absence of such resemblance is cited occasionally as evidence of illegitimacy. Personality traits are also viewed as inherited, although less consistently and there are important exceptions. Physical and mental traits when not derived from parents are ascribed to "nature" in the sense in which the term is often used today. Such traits are seen as being congenital or inborn even if not obviously "hereditary." Important exceptions to this are provided by the characters of the two lead characters in the play sequence. The weak-willed Henry VI is markedly different from his father, grandfather, and son who were all valiant, warlike, and brave. Shakespeare never explains this abrupt difference among generations. And the source of the evil character of Richard III is somewhat ambiguous. It seems most likely that in the first three plays of the sequence Shakespeare intended Richard's villainousness to be perceived as innate, caused by the same forces of nature that produced Richard's deformities (which are not further explained). But when Shakespeare wrote Richard III and gave more conscious consideration to what was now his central character he invoked an "environmentalist" explanation. Richard now is presented, albeit somewhat inconsistently, as evil in response to social ostracism because of his ugly deformities. This rather modern interpretation of the social origins of the personality of the deformed is particularly striking because it goes beyond anything in Shakespeare's historical sources, although Francis Bacon, a contemporary of Shakespeare, also recognized the effect of social forces upon the personality of the deformed.

  15. Determination of Henry's constant, the dissociation constant, and the buffer capacity of the bicarbonate system in ruminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Hille, Katharina T; Hetz, Stefan K; Rosendahl, Julia; Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Pieper, Robert; Stumpff, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Despite the clinical importance of ruminal acidosis, ruminal buffering continues to be poorly understood. In particular, the constants for the dissociation of H2CO3 and the solubility of CO2 (Henry's constant) have never been stringently determined for ruminal fluid. The pH was measured in parallel directly in the rumen and the reticulum in vivo, and in samples obtained via aspiration from 10 fistulated cows on hay- or concentrate-based diets. The equilibrium constants of the bicarbonate system were measured at 38°C both using the Astrup technique and a newly developed method with titration at 2 levels of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2; 4.75 and 94.98 kPa), yielding mean values of 0.234 ± 0.005 mmol ∙ L(-1) ∙ kPa(-1) and 6.11 ± 0.02 for Henry's constant and the dissociation constant, respectively (n/n = 31/10). Both reticular pH and the pH of samples measured after removal were more alkalic than those measured in vivo in the rumen (by ΔpH = 0.87 ± 0.04 and 0.26 ± 0.04). The amount of acid or base required to shift the pH of ruminal samples to 6.4 or 5.8 (base excess) differed between the 2 feeding groups. Experimental results are compared with the mathematical predictions of an open 2-buffer Henderson-Hasselbalch equilibrium model. Because pCO2 has pronounced effects on ruminal pH and can decrease rapidly in samples removed from the rumen, introduction of a generally accepted protocol for determining the acid-base status of ruminal fluid with standard levels of pCO2 and measurement of base excess in addition to pH should be considered. PMID:26519978

  16. Geologic investigation of layered mound of Henry Crater, Mars: Implications for history of ancient hydrological activities in the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Samarpita; Sinha, Rishitosh Kumar; Banerjee, Debabrata; Vijayan, S.

    2016-07-01

    Craters around the Schiaparelli Basin (sim460 km diameter; 2.71^circS 16.77^circE) on Mars are distributed in a unique combination that includes infilled craters with mound on their floors. The mounds have preserved intriguing layers in stratigraphy that has exposed pristine sets of geomorphic and geochemical signatures bearing strong implications towards understanding geological history of Mars. With a view to avail the maximum scientific benefit from this unique geological assemblage on Mars, we have carried out remote analysis of stratigraphy of layers exposed over Henry crater's (sim150 km diameter; 10.79^circN 23.45^circE) mound (rising sim2km from floor) to infer the origin and episodes of geological events occurred in the region. Henry crater is situated approximately 500 km northeast of Schiaparelli Basin. Using crater counting technique the age of the topmost surface of the crater mound is found to be sim3.64 Ga since the exposure of this strata post complete infilling. The stratigraphy of consistent and conformable layers in the crater interior acts as a proxy of the long-lived event of sediment deposition in a rather quiescent condition. Distinct layering can be traced across the crater from the mound to the crater wall across the floor. Evidence for differential erosion of deposited materials, wherein local geological setup developed in the different parts of the crater interior is preserved. Using MRO HiRISE & CTX images, distinct spatial distribution of morphological features distributed in stratigraphy is observed that reveals the dominant geological agents behind their formation, viz. temporal hydrological and eolian processes. The morphological features were aided with an understanding of the composition of the exposed sedimentary succession. MRO CRISM based mineralogical investigation reveals diagnostic signature of the hydrated sulfate mineral Kieserite. Based on the thermodynamic properties of Kieserite and apparent lack of desiccation cracks in

  17. Partition coefficients for REE between garnets and liquids - Implications of non-Henry's Law behaviour for models of basalt origin and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation of Ce, Sm and Tm rare earth element (REE) partition coefficients between coexisting garnets (both natural and synthetic) and hydrous liquids shows that Henry's Law may not be obeyed over a range of REE concentrations of geological relevance. Systematic differences between the three REE and the two garnet compositions may be explained in terms of the differences between REE ionic radii and those of the dodecahedral site into which they substitute, substantiating the Harrison and Wood (1980) model of altervalent substitution. Model calculations demonstrate that significant variation can occur in the rare earth contents of melts produced from a garnet lherzolite, if Henry's Law partition coefficients do not apply for the garnet phase.

  18. Synthesis of tunable diamine ligands with spiro indane-2,2′-pyrrolidine backbone and their applications in enantioselective Henry reaction.

    PubMed

    Ćwiek, Rafał; Niedziejko, Piotr; Kałuża, Zbigniew

    2014-02-01

    Novel diamine ligands with spiro indane-2,2′-pyrrolidine scaffold were synthesized starting from Seebach’s oxazolidinone 6 and were subsequently employed in asymmetric Henry reaction. Following the initial experimental findings, further synthesis resulted in two types of spiro diamines, with varying substituents at both nitrogen atoms. Ligands of type A, containing a small substituent at N-1′ atom, and a large group at N-1 atom gave predominantly the S-configured β-nitroalcohol, while ligands of type B, with the reversed location of small and large substituents furnished the R-configured product. Both types of ligands turned out to be versatile catalysts for the Henry reaction between nitromethane and an assortment of aryl as well as alkyl aldehydes offering either S- (lig. A) or R-configured (lig. B) nitroalcohols in a good to high chemical yield and an excellent enantioselectivity up to 99% ee.

  19. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of radiologist Henry I. Kohn, M.D., Ph.D., conducted September 13, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report is a transcript of an interview of Dr. Henry I. Kohn by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Kohn was selected for this interview because of the positions he held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California at San Francisco, and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Kohn discussed his remembrances of his experiences in blood chemistry of animals and patients exposed to radiation, and his remembrances of several radiobiologists.

  20. Organocatalytic asymmetric Henry reaction of 1H-pyrrole-2,3-diones with bifunctional amine-thiourea catalysts bearing multiple hydrogen-bond donors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Liang; Yue, Deng-Feng; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Summary For the first time, a catalytic asymmetric Henry reaction of 1H-pyrrole-2,3-diones was achieved with a chiral bifunctional amine-thiourea as a catalyst possessing multiple hydrogen-bond donors. With this developed method, a range of 3-hydroxy-3-nitromethyl-1H-pyrrol-2(3H)-ones bearing quaternary stereocenters were obtained in acceptable yield (up to 75%) and enantioselectivity (up to 73% ee). PMID:26977188

  1. [Charles-Henri Fialon (1846-1933), creator of the Museum of the Faculty of Pharmacy of Paris. His family and professional life].

    PubMed

    Flahaut, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Henri Fialon was pharmacist in 1871, and worked in the family apothecary, at Rueil near Paris. At 46 years, he stopped his pharmaceutical activity, and livre quietly, being specially interested by the ancient pharmaceutical pots. He realized a very important collection, which he gave to the French Society of Pharmaceutical History. A museum was installed at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Paris which is presently in the Guillaume Valette Gallery and contains more than 500 pieces. PMID:15981391

  2. Ft. McHenry tunnel study: Source profiles and mercury emissions from diesel and gasoline powered vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Matthew S.; Lewis, Charles W.; Stevens, Robert K.; Keeler, Gerald J.; Dvonch, J. Timothy; Tremblay, Raphael T.

    During the fall of 1998, the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection sponsored a 7-day study at the Ft. McHenry tunnel in Baltimore, MD with the objective of obtaining PM 2.5 vehicle source profiles for use in atmospheric mercury source apportionment studies. PM 2.5 emission profiles from gasoline and diesel powered vehicles were developed from analysis of trace elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and condensed aliphatic hydrocarbons. PM 2.5 samples were collected using commercially available sampling systems and were extracted and analyzed using conventional well-established methods. Both inorganic and organic profiles were sufficiently unique to mathematically discriminate the contributions from each source type using a chemical mass balance source apportionment approach. However, only the organic source profiles provided unique PAH tracers (e.g., fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene) for diesel combustion that could be used to identify source contributions generated using multivariate statistical receptor modeling approaches. In addition, the study found significant emission of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg 0), divalent reactive gaseous mercury (RGM), and particulate mercury (Hg(p)) from gasoline but not from diesel powered motor vehicles. Fuel analysis supported the tunnel measurement results showing that total mercury content in all grades of gasoline (284±108 ng L -1) was substantially higher than total mercury content in diesel fuel (62±37 ng L -1) collected contemporaneously at local Baltimore retailers.

  3. Deformation structures associated with the Trachyte Mesa intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah: Implications for sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Penelope I. R.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.; Wilson, Robert W.; Jarvis, Ian; Holdsworth, Robert E.

    2016-06-01

    Deformation structures in the wall rocks of igneous intrusions emplaced at shallow crustal depths preserve an important record of how space was created for magma in the host rocks. Trachyte Mesa, a small Oligocene age intrusion in the Henry Mountains, Utah, is composed of a series of stacked tabular, sheet-like intrusions emplaced at 3-3.5 km depth into sandstone-dominated sedimentary sequences of late Palaeozoic-Mesozoic age. New structural analysis of the spatial distribution, geometry, kinematics and relative timings of deformation structures in the host rocks of the intrusion has enabled the recognition of distinct pre-, syn-, and late-stage-emplacement deformation phases. Our observations suggest a two-stage growth mechanism for individual sheets where radial growth of a thin sheet was followed by vertical inflation. Dip-slip faults formed during vertical inflation; they are restricted to the tips of individual sheets due to strain localisation, with magma preferentially exploiting these faults, initiating sill (sheet) climbing. The order in which sheets are stacked impacts on the intrusion geometry and associated deformation of wall rocks. Our results offer new insights into the incremental intrusion geometries of shallow-level magmatic bodies and the potential impact of their emplacement on surrounding host rocks.

  4. Science, religion and the geography of speech at the British Association: William Henry Dallinger (1839-1909) under the microscope.

    PubMed

    Toal, Ciaran

    2013-06-01

    Since its inception in 1831, the discussion of political and religious topics had been excluded from the meetings of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (BAAS) - it was a 'neutral' body. This strategy was designed to both unite men of science with differing religious views, and prevent the Association from becoming embroiled in theological disputes. Although not always successful, the dedication to neutrality remained throughout the BAAS's history and was an important organising principle. This paper investigates how the separation of scientific and religious knowledge played out in practice by examining the speech of William Henry Dallinger, the prominent English microscopical researcher and Methodist preacher. In 1884 Dallinger travelled to Montreal, Canada, to part in the BAAS's fifty-fourth meeting. While in the city he delivered three addresses: a guest lecture to the Association, a presentation to a local theological College and a sermon at Montreal's largest Methodist church. To the Association Dallinger presented his science without any religious commitments, yet in these other venues, and away from the Association's strictures on speech, he presented science and religion as harmonious and inexorably tied. This paper argues that where Dallinger spoke made a difference to what he said, and underlines the value of thinking 'geographically' about encounters between science and religion.

  5. On the nameless love and infinite sexualities: John Henry Mackay, Magnus Hirschfeld and the origins of the sexual emancipation movement.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J Edgar

    2005-01-01

    Two prominent representatives of the sexual emancipation movement in Germany, John Henry Mackay (1864-1933) and Magnus Hirschfeld (1868-1935) launched significant attacks on sexual binarism and its combinatories. Although Mackay defended the nameless love against seminal Christian and subsequent secularised misconstructions of its nature, he was unable to overcome the fundamental scheme of binomic sexuality. Hirschfeld, however, resolved the theoretical issue through his doctrine of sexual intermediaries (Zwischenstufenlehre) which purports that-without exception- all human beings are intersexual variants, i.e. unique composites of different proportions of masculinity and femininity. Since these proportions vary from one sexual layer of description to another in the same individual and can alter or be altered in time, it is sensu stricto not possible implies a radical deconstruction of not only binomic sexuality but its supplementation through a third sex. It offers a meta-theoretical framework for rethinking sexual difference beyond the fictional schemes and categorial closures of Western traditions of sexual identity. His assumption of potentially infinite sexualities anticipates some of the basic tenets forwarded by the philosophical and political agendas of queer studies. to postulate discrete sexual categories. Hirschfeld's doctrine.

  6. A simple method for the accurate determination of the Henry's law constant for highly sorptive, semivolatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A novel technique is developed to determine the Henry's law constants (HLCs) of seven volatile fatty acids (VFAs) with significantly high solubility using a combined application of thermal desorber/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS). In light of the strong sorptive properties of these semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), their HLCs were determined by properly evaluating the fraction lost on the surface of the materials used to induce equilibrium (vial, gas-tight syringe, and sorption tube). To this end, a total of nine repeated experiments were conducted in a closed (static) system at three different gas/liquid volume ratios. The best estimates for HLCs (M/atm) were thus 7,200 (propionic acid), 4,700 (i-butyric acid), 4,400 (n-butyric acid), 2,700 (i-valeric acid), 2,400 (n-valeric acid), 1,000 (hexanoic acid), and 1,500 (heptanoic acid). The differences in the HLC values between this study and previous studies, if assessed in terms of the percent difference, ranged from 9.2% (n-valeric acid) to 55.7% (i-valeric acid). We overcame the main cause of errors encountered in previous studies by performing the proper correction of the sorptive losses of the SVOCs that inevitably took place, particularly on the walls of the equilibration systems (mainly the headspace vial and/or the glass tight syringe). PMID:26577086

  7. Application of a BOSS-Gaussian interface for QM/MM simulations of Henry and methyl transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Vilseck, Jonah Z; Kostal, Jakub; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-10-15

    Hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computer simulations have become an indispensable tool for studying chemical and biological phenomena for systems too large to treat with QM alone. For several decades, semiempirical QM methods have been used in QM/MM simulations. However, with increased computational resources, the introduction of ab initio and density function methods into on-the-fly QM/MM simulations is being increasingly preferred. This adaptation can be accomplished with a program interface that tethers independent QM and MM software packages. This report introduces such an interface for the BOSS and Gaussian programs, featuring modification of BOSS to request QM energies and partial atomic charges from Gaussian. A customizable C-shell linker script facilitates the interprogram communication. The BOSS-Gaussian interface also provides convenient access to Charge Model 5 (CM5) partial atomic charges for multiple purposes including QM/MM studies of reactions. In this report, the BOSS-Gaussian interface is applied to a nitroaldol (Henry) reaction and two methyl transfer reactions in aqueous solution. Improved agreement with experiment is found by determining free-energy surfaces with MP2/CM5 QM/MM simulations than previously reported investigations using semiempirical methods.

  8. Mortality disparities among groups participating in an East Africa surveying expedition: the Herbert Henry Austin expedition of 1900-1901.

    PubMed

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Gavin H; Imperato, Austin C

    2013-10-01

    In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a number of European expeditions traveled to the region of Lake Rudolf, now largely in northern Kenya. Although diverse in intent, many of these were undertaken in the interests of furthering colonial territorial claims. In 1900-1901, Major Herbert Henry Austin led a British expedition down to the lake from Khartoum in the north. Of the 62 African, Arab, and European members of this expedition, only 18 (29 %) arrived at its final destination at Lake Baringo in Kenya. Because of a confluence of adverse climatic, social, and political conditions, the expedition ran short of food supplies when it arrived at the northern end of the lake in April 1901. For the next 4 months, the members of the expedition struggled down the west side of the lake and beyond. The greatest mortality (91 %) occurred among the 32 African transport drivers who were the most marginally nourished at the outset of the trip. The lowest mortality among the Africans on the expedition (15 %) occurred among the members of the Tenth Sudanese Rifles Battalion, who had an excellent nutritional status at the start of the expedition. Major Austin himself suffered from severe scurvy with retinal hemorrhages which left him partially blind in his right eye. An analysis of the mortality rates among the groups that participated in this expedition was undertaken. This revealed that poor nutritional status at the start of the trip was predictive of death from starvation.

  9. Application of a BOSS – Gaussian Interface for QM/MM Simulations of Henry and Methyl Transfer Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Vilseck, Jonah Z.; Kostal, Jakub; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computer simulations have become an indispensable tool for studying chemical and biological phenomena for systems too large to treat with quantum mechanics alone. For several decades, semi-empirical QM methods have been used in QM/MM simulations. However, with increased computational resources, the introduction of ab initio and density function methods into on-the-fly QM/MM simulations is being increasingly preferred. This adaptation can be accomplished with a program interface that tethers independent QM and MM software packages. This report introduces such an interface for the BOSS and Gaussian programs, featuring modification of BOSS to request QM energies and partial atomic charges from Gaussian. A customizable C-shell linker script facilitates the inter-program communication. The BOSS–Gaussian interface also provides convenient access to Charge Model 5 (CM5) partial atomic charges for multiple purposes including QM/MM studies of reactions. In this report, the BOSS–Gaussian interface is applied to a nitroaldol (Henry) reaction and two methyl transfer reactions in aqueous solution. Improved agreement with experiment is found by determining free-energy surfaces with MP2/CM5 QM/MM simulations than previously reported investigations employing semiempirical methods. PMID:26311531

  10. Efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of commercial hybrid poplar Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry.

    PubMed

    Yevtushenko, Dmytro P; Misra, Santosh

    2010-03-01

    Many economically important species of Populus, especially those in sections Aigeiros and Tacamahaca, remain recalcitrant to genetic transformation. In this study, a simple and reliable protocol was developed for the efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of a difficult-to-transform, but commercially viable, hybrid poplar Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry (NM6). A plant transformation vector designed to express the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene was used to detect transformation events at early stages of plant regeneration and to optimize parameters affecting poplar transformation. The use of zeatin riboside in shoot-induction medium, regeneration of shoots via indirect organogenesis, and early selection pressure were the major modifications that drastically improved the efficiency of poplar transformation and minimized the number of untransformed regenerants. Transgenic shoots were routinely obtained 4-10 weeks after co-culture with A. tumefaciens, with a greater than 90% rate of plant recovery. Stable transgene integration, ranging from a single insertion to ten copies per genome, was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. The mean transformation frequency was 36.3% and about two-thirds of the lines had 1-2 transgene copies. Among the explants, petioles and leaves had a higher transformation frequency than did stem segments. Growth characteristics and the morphology of transgenic poplar plants were identical to untransformed controls. These findings will accelerate the development of P. nigra x P. maximowiczii plants with novel traits, and may also be useful to improve transformation procedures for other Populus species.

  11. Science, religion and the geography of speech at the British Association: William Henry Dallinger (1839-1909) under the microscope.

    PubMed

    Toal, Ciaran

    2013-06-01

    Since its inception in 1831, the discussion of political and religious topics had been excluded from the meetings of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (BAAS) - it was a 'neutral' body. This strategy was designed to both unite men of science with differing religious views, and prevent the Association from becoming embroiled in theological disputes. Although not always successful, the dedication to neutrality remained throughout the BAAS's history and was an important organising principle. This paper investigates how the separation of scientific and religious knowledge played out in practice by examining the speech of William Henry Dallinger, the prominent English microscopical researcher and Methodist preacher. In 1884 Dallinger travelled to Montreal, Canada, to part in the BAAS's fifty-fourth meeting. While in the city he delivered three addresses: a guest lecture to the Association, a presentation to a local theological College and a sermon at Montreal's largest Methodist church. To the Association Dallinger presented his science without any religious commitments, yet in these other venues, and away from the Association's strictures on speech, he presented science and religion as harmonious and inexorably tied. This paper argues that where Dallinger spoke made a difference to what he said, and underlines the value of thinking 'geographically' about encounters between science and religion. PMID:23415742

  12. Inverse modeling for seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers: Insights about parameter sensitivities, variances, correlations and estimation procedures derived from the Henry problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanz, E.; Voss, C.I.

    2006-01-01

    Inverse modeling studies employing data collected from the classic Henry seawater intrusion problem give insight into several important aspects of inverse modeling of seawater intrusion problems and effective measurement strategies for estimation of parameters for seawater intrusion. Despite the simplicity of the Henry problem, it embodies the behavior of a typical seawater intrusion situation in a single aquifer. Data collected from the numerical problem solution are employed without added noise in order to focus on the aspects of inverse modeling strategies dictated by the physics of variable-density flow and solute transport during seawater intrusion. Covariances of model parameters that can be estimated are strongly dependent on the physics. The insights gained from this type of analysis may be directly applied to field problems in the presence of data errors, using standard inverse modeling approaches to deal with uncertainty in data. Covariance analysis of the Henry problem indicates that in order to generally reduce variance of parameter estimates, the ideal places to measure pressure are as far away from the coast as possible, at any depth, and the ideal places to measure concentration are near the bottom of the aquifer between the center of the transition zone and its inland fringe. These observations are located in and near high-sensitivity regions of system parameters, which may be identified in a sensitivity analysis with respect to several parameters. However, both the form of error distribution in the observations and the observation weights impact the spatial sensitivity distributions, and different choices for error distributions or weights can result in significantly different regions of high sensitivity. Thus, in order to design effective sampling networks, the error form and weights must be carefully considered. For the Henry problem, permeability and freshwater inflow can be estimated with low estimation variance from only pressure or only

  13. Micellar partitioning and its effects on Henry's law constants of chlorinated solvents in anionic and nonionic surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlong; Zheng, Gang; Nichols, Courtney M

    2006-01-01

    Micellar partitioning of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in surfactant solutions and its effects on vapor-liquid equilibrium is fundamental to the overall design and implementation of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation. Surfactant micelles greatly enhance contaminant recovery from the subsurface; however, the reduced volatility of organic compounds compromises the aboveground treatment of surfactant-laden wastewaters using air-stripping process. Batch equilibrium tests were performed to acquire micellar partition coefficients (Km) and apparent Henry's law constants (H*) of three prominent groundwater contaminants (tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, cis-dichlorethylene) in the presence of two anionic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS; sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, SDBS) and two nonionic surfactants (Triton X-100 and Tween 80). The H* values were significantly reduced in the presence of all four surfactants over their critical micelle concentrations (cmc's). On a cmc basis, the anionic surfactant SDS had the greatest effect on H*, followed by SDBS, Triton X-100, and Tween 80. Anionic surfactants decreased H* to an order of magnitude lower than nonionic surfactants, although nonionic surfactants decreased the H* at concentrations significantly lower than the anionic surfactants due to their lower cmc's. Nonionic surfactants present higher Km and molar solubilization ratio than anionic surfactants. Tetrachloroethylene has the highest Km values among three chlorinated solvents, which agrees well with the hydrophobicity (Kow) of these chemicals. An empirical correlation between log Km and log Kow is developed on the basis of data from this study and the Km values reported for a number of chlorinated and nonchlorinated hydrocarbons. Equilibrium data were also tested against three sets of models that describe the partitioning of volatile compounds in vapor-water-micelle phases. Applications of these models in experimentally determining Km from batch

  14. Physiological responses of the hybrid larch (Larix × eurolepis Henry) to cadmium exposure and distribution of cadmium in plantlets.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Amandine; Lelu-Walter, Marie-Anne; Faugeron, Céline; Gloaguen, Vincent; Saladin, Gaëlle

    2016-05-01

    Phytoextraction of Cd is a growing biotechnology although we currently know few Cd hyperaccumulators, i.e., plant species able to accumulate at least 0.1 mg Cd g(-1) dry weight in aerial organs. Owing their deep root system and high biomass, trees are more and more preferred to herbaceous species for phytoextraction. Assuming that conifers could be relevant models under cold climates, we investigated cadmium tolerance of the hybrid larch Larix × eurolepis Henry (Larix decidua × Larix kaempferi) and the efficiency of this species to store this metal. In vitro grown larches were chosen in order to reduce time of exposure and to more rapidly evaluate their potential efficiency to accumulate Cd. One-month-old plantlets were exposed for 2 and 4 weeks to 250 and 500 μM Cd. Results showed that they tolerated a 4-week exposure to 250 μM Cd, whereas the content of photosynthetic pigment strongly dropped in plantlets growing in the presence of 500 μM Cd. In the presence of 250 μM Cd, shoot growth slightly decreased but photosynthetic pigment and total soluble carbohydrate contents were not modified and no lipid peroxidation was detected. In addition, these plantlets accumulated proline, particularly in shoots (two to three times more than control). In roots, Cd concentration in the intracellular fraction was always higher than in the cell wall fraction contrary to shoots where Cd concentration in the cell wall fraction increased with time and Cd concentration in the medium. In shoots, Cd concentration was lower than in roots with a ratio of 0.2 after 4 weeks of exposure but stayed around 0.2 mg g(-1) dry weight, thus a value higher than the threshold requested for Cd hyperaccumulators. Hybrid larch would thus be a relevant candidate for field test of Cd phytoextraction.

  15. On the article by Henri Poincare` {open_quotes}on the dynamics of the electron{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Logunov, A.A.

    1996-04-01

    The first complete translations into English are presented of two articles written by the outstanding French scientist Henri Poincare and submitted by him in 1905 under the common title of {open_quotes}Sur la dynamique de l`electron{close_quotes} to different journals. In the present edition of these articles by H. Poincare, modern notation is used, and the articles are accompanied by comments written by A.A. Logunov. The author of the comments explains the profound physical meaning and essential novelty of the particular points and relationships established by Poincare. Such explanations are often interspersed with quotations from earlier articles by Poincare, thus clearly indicating that the main initial points of the new theory were put forward by the French scientist much before 1905, while certain concepts like `local` time and the arbitrariness of simultaneity were given a clear explanation from the point of view of physical meaning. A.A. Logunov`s book, presenting the works of Poincare on the development of relativity theory, has had quite a high success among specialists interested in the history of physics, and since 1984 it has been published in Russian three times. The present English-language edition is identical to the last 1988 Russian edition, and is dedicated to the 90th anniversary of Poincare`s articles `On the Dynamics of the Electron`. In preparing the English text, fragments were used of the translation of the long article by H.Poincare published in the book by Professor C.W. Kilmister from King`s College in London/Special Theory of Relativity, Pergamon Press, New York, 1970/.

  16. Measuring Uptake Coefficients and Henry's Law Constants of Gas-Phase Species with Models for Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, M. C.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are oxidized in the atmosphere and their products contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These particles have been shown to have effects on visibility, climate, and human health. Current models typically under-predict SOA concentrations from field measurements. Underestimation of these concentrations could be a result of how models treat particle growth. It is often assumed that particles grow via instantaneous thermal equilibrium partitioning between liquid particles and gas-phase species. Recent work has shown that growth may be better represented by irreversible, kinetically limited uptake of gas-phase species onto more viscous, tar-like SOA. However, uptake coefficients for these processes are not known. The goal of this project is to measure uptake coefficients and solubilities for different gases onto models serving as proxies for SOA and determine how they vary based on the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase. Experiments were conducted using two approaches: attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and a flow system coupled to a mass spectrometer. The ATR crystal was coated with the SOA proxy and the gas-phase species introduced via a custom flow system. Uptake of the gas-phase species was characterized by measuring the intensity of characteristic IR bands as a function of time, from which a Henry's law constant and initial estimate of uptake coefficients could be obtained. Uptake coefficients were also measured in a flow system where the walls of the flow tube were coated with the SOA proxy and gas-phase species introduced via a moveable inlet. Uptake coefficients were derived from the decay in gas-phase species measured by mass spectrometry. The results of this work will establish a structure-interaction relationship for uptake of gases into SOA that can be implemented into regional and global models.

  17. Racial Differences in the Prognostic Value of Cardiorespiratory Fitness (Results from the Henry Ford Exercise Testing Project).

    PubMed

    Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Qureshi, Waqas T; Keteyian, Steven J; Brawner, Clinton A; Alam, Mohsin; Dardari, Zeina; Nasir, Khurram; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this analysis was to determine whether racial differences exist in the prognostic value of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in black and white patients undergoing stress testing. We included 53,876 patients (mean age 53 ± 13, 49% women) from the Henry Ford Exercise Testing project free of established coronary disease or heart failure who completed a maximal exercise test from 1991 to 2009. Patients were followed for a mean duration of 11.5 years for all-cause mortality, ascertained by linkage with the Death Master File. Follow-up over mean 6.2 years was also available for incident myocardial infarction. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used adjusting for demographic variables, risk factors, medications, and reason for stress test referral, including formal interaction testing by race (black vs white). Black patients (n = 16,725) were younger (54 ± 13 vs 52 ± 13, p <0.001) but had higher prevalence of hypertension (73% vs 57%, p <0.001) and obesity (28% vs 21%, p <0.001). On average, black patients achieved a lower CRF compared with whites (8.4 vs 9.5 metabolic equivalents, p <0.0001). A graded increase in mortality risk was noted with decreasing CRF for both black and white patients. In multivariate Cox regression, CRF was a predictor of both myocardial infarction and mortality, with no significant interaction between race, fitness, and outcomes (all interaction terms p >0.10). CRF is a strong predictor of all-cause mortality in both white and black patients, with no significant interaction observed between race, fitness, and outcomes. PMID:26976790

  18. Racial Differences in the Prognostic Value of Cardiorespiratory Fitness (Results from the Henry Ford Exercise Testing Project).

    PubMed

    Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Qureshi, Waqas T; Keteyian, Steven J; Brawner, Clinton A; Alam, Mohsin; Dardari, Zeina; Nasir, Khurram; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this analysis was to determine whether racial differences exist in the prognostic value of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in black and white patients undergoing stress testing. We included 53,876 patients (mean age 53 ± 13, 49% women) from the Henry Ford Exercise Testing project free of established coronary disease or heart failure who completed a maximal exercise test from 1991 to 2009. Patients were followed for a mean duration of 11.5 years for all-cause mortality, ascertained by linkage with the Death Master File. Follow-up over mean 6.2 years was also available for incident myocardial infarction. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used adjusting for demographic variables, risk factors, medications, and reason for stress test referral, including formal interaction testing by race (black vs white). Black patients (n = 16,725) were younger (54 ± 13 vs 52 ± 13, p <0.001) but had higher prevalence of hypertension (73% vs 57%, p <0.001) and obesity (28% vs 21%, p <0.001). On average, black patients achieved a lower CRF compared with whites (8.4 vs 9.5 metabolic equivalents, p <0.0001). A graded increase in mortality risk was noted with decreasing CRF for both black and white patients. In multivariate Cox regression, CRF was a predictor of both myocardial infarction and mortality, with no significant interaction between race, fitness, and outcomes (all interaction terms p >0.10). CRF is a strong predictor of all-cause mortality in both white and black patients, with no significant interaction observed between race, fitness, and outcomes.

  19. Podand-based dimeric chromium(III)-salen complex for asymmetric Henry reaction: cooperative catalysis promoted by complexation of alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Guang-Hui; He, Yan-Mei; Fan, Qing-Hua

    2014-12-01

    A new kind of podand-based dimeric salen ligand was synthesized, and its association with potassium cations was investigated by (1) H NMR spectroscopy. The corresponding Cr(III) -salen dimer was assembled by a supramolecular host-guest self-assembly process and was then used as a catalyst in highly efficient and enantioselective asymmetric Henry reactions. Regulation by KBArF (BArF =[3,5-(CF3 )2 C6 H3 ]4 B) led to remarkable improvements in yield (by up to 58 %) and enantioselectivity (for example, from 80 % ee to 96 % ee). PMID:25346533

  20. Historical streamflows of Double Mountain Fork of Brazos River and water-surface elevations of Lake Alan Henry, Garza County, Texas, water years 1962-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Lubbock, Texas, operates two surface-water stations in Garza County, Tex.: USGS streamflow-gaging station 08079600 Double Mountain Fork Brazos River at Justiceburg, Tex., and 08079700 Lake Alan Henry Reservoir, a water-supply reservoir about 60 miles southeast of Lubbock, Tex., and about 10 miles east of Justiceburg, Tex. The streamflow and water-surface elevation data from the two stations are useful to water-resource managers and planners in support of forecasting and water-resource infrastructure operations and are used in regional hydrologic studies.

  1. Sir Henry Halford, president of the Royal College of Physicians, with a note on his involvement in the exhumation of King Charles I

    PubMed Central

    Morris, John S

    2007-01-01

    Henry Halford (formerly Vaughan) (1766–1844) was president of the Royal College of Physicians for an unprecedented 24 years. A successful physician, he had to resign his post at the Middlesex Hospital because of his growing private practice. He was physician to four reigning monarchs and had many famous patients including Geogiana Duchess of Devonshire in whom he correctly diagnosed a liver abscess when other physicians had failed. He was also involved in the exhumation of King Charles I, and the fourth cervical vertebra, through which the King had been executed, came into his possession. PMID:17551078

  2. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constants and KOA for simple and heteroatom-substituted PAHs by COSMO-RS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnis, J. Mark; Mackay, Donald; Harner, Tom

    2015-06-01

    Henry's Law constants (H) and octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and selected nitrogen-, oxygen- and sulfur-containing derivatives have been computed using the COSMO-RS method between -5 and 40 °C in 5 °C intervals. The accuracy of the estimation was assessed by comparison of COSMOtherm values with published experimental temperature-dependence data for these and similar PAHs. COSMOtherm log H estimates with temperature-variation for parent PAHs are shown to have a root-mean-square (RMS) error of 0.38 (PAH), based on available validation data. Estimates of O-, N- and S-substituted derivative log H values are found to have RMS errors of 0.30 at 25 °C. Log KOA estimates with temperature variation from COSMOtherm are shown to be strongly correlated with experimental values for a small set of unsubstituted PAHs, but with a systematic underestimation and associated RMS error of 1.11. Similar RMS error of 1.64 was found for COSMO-RS estimates of a group of critically-evaluated log KOA values at room temperature. Validation demonstrates that COSMOtherm estimates of H and KOA are of sufficient accuracy to be used for property screening and preliminary environmental risk assessment, and perform very well for modeling the influence of temperature on partitioning behavior in the temperature range -5 to 40 °C. Temperature-dependent shifts of up to 2 log units in log H and one log unit for log KOA are predicted for PAH species over the range -5 and 40 °C. Within the family of PAH molecules, COSMO-RS is sufficiently accurate to make it useful as a source of estimates for modeling purposes, following corrections for systematic underestimation of KOA. Average changes in the values for log H and log KOA upon substitution are given for various PAH substituent categories, with the most significant shifts being associated with the ionizing nitro functionality and keto groups.

  3. Missing what was true: problems of seeing and knowing in Henry James's The wings of the dove.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Jill

    2005-08-01

    The author examines a central theme in this late novel by Henry James in relation to current psychoanalytic ideas that link the Oedipus complex with the child's developing perception of reality (both psychic and external), specifically through the experience of seeing and being seen. Britton visualises the oedipal triangle as a psychic structure through which the child may achieve recognition not only of its parents' sexual relationship, from which it is excluded, but also of itself being observed by one parent while the child is with the other. Thus, it both observes and is observed. The differing perspectives achieved--of subjectivity and objectivity--promote the perception of objective reality, as the world of relationships grows and becomes more complex. James captures with great subtlety and penetration the experience of three characters living out a symbolic oedipal relationship in which the truth is evaded or perverted. A young couple in love exploit the situation of a dying heiress whose vulnerability is intensified by her reluctance to acknowledge the truth about their relationship. At the same time, she shrinks from the gaze of others and consigns herself to isolation and ultimate despair. The author presents three significant scenes in which seeing and being seen are central to the development. In each, the dying woman is forced to face, if momentarily, her exclusion from the sexual relationship. Increasingly this connects with her approaching death--but also with the anguished recognition that the couple have cruelly befriended her only to betray her. It is suggested that James's late style and novelistic technique require the reader to tolerate confusion and uncertainty. As the perspective shifts from one protagonist to another, we ourselves are in danger of 'missing what is true' in this characteristic Jamesian scenario, where relationships are gradually perverted by manipulation, evasion and lies. In psychoanalytic theory, this would represent a

  4. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constants and KOA for simple and heteroatom-substituted PAHs by COSMO-RS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnis, J. Mark; Mackay, Donald; Harner, Tom

    2015-06-01

    Henry's Law constants (H) and octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and selected nitrogen-, oxygen- and sulfur-containing derivatives have been computed using the COSMO-RS method between -5 and 40 °C in 5 °C intervals. The accuracy of the estimation was assessed by comparison of COSMOtherm values with published experimental temperature-dependence data for these and similar PAHs. COSMOtherm log H estimates with temperature-variation for parent PAHs are shown to have a root-mean-square (RMS) error of 0.38 (PAH), based on available validation data. Estimates of O-, N- and S-substituted derivative log H values are found to have RMS errors of 0.30 at 25 °C. Log KOA estimates with temperature variation from COSMOtherm are shown to be strongly correlated with experimental values for a small set of unsubstituted PAHs, but with a systematic underestimation and associated RMS error of 1.11. Similar RMS error of 1.64 was found for COSMO-RS estimates of a group of critically-evaluated log KOA values at room temperature. Validation demonstrates that COSMOtherm estimates of H and KOA are of sufficient accuracy to be used for property screening and preliminary environmental risk assessment, and perform very well for modeling the influence of temperature on partitioning behavior in the temperature range -5 to 40 °C. Temperature-dependent shifts of up to 2 log units in log H and one log unit for log KOA are predicted for PAH species over the range -5 and 40 °C. Within the family of PAH molecules, COSMO-RS is sufficiently accurate to make it useful as a source of estimates for modeling purposes, following corrections for systematic underestimation of KOA. Average changes in the values for log H and log KOA upon substitution are given for various PAH substituent categories, with the most significant shifts being associated with the ionizing nitro functionality and keto groups.

  5. ToF–SIMS imaging of molecular-level alteration mechanisms in Le Bonheur de vivre by Henri Matisse

    PubMed Central

    deGhetaldi, Kristin; Wiggins, Marcie B.; Buckley, Barbara; Baade, Brian; Mass, Jennifer L.; Beebe, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF–SIMS) has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for cultural heritage studies, especially when used in conjunction with established analytical techniques in the field. The ability of ToF–SIMS to simultaneously image inorganic and organic species within a paint cross section at micrometer-level spatial resolution makes it a uniquely qualified analytical technique to aid in further understanding the processes of pigment and binder alteration, as well as pigment–binder interactions. In this study, ToF–SIMS was used to detect and image both molecular and elemental species related to CdS pigment and binding medium alteration on the painting Le Bonheur de vivre (1905–1906, The Barnes Foundation) by Henri Matisse. Three categories of inorganic and organic components were found throughout Le Bonheur de vivre and co-localized in cross-sectional samples using high spatial resolution ToF–SIMS analysis: (1) species relating to the preparation and photo-induced oxidation of CdS yellow pigments (2) varying amounts of long-chain fatty acids present in both the paint and primary ground layer and (3) specific amino acid fragments, possibly relating to the painting’s complex restoration history. ToF–SIMS’s ability to discern both organic and inorganic species via cross-sectional imaging was used to compare samples collected from Le Bonheur de vivre to artificially aged reference paints in an effort to gather mechanistic information relating to alteration processes that have been previously explored using μXANES, SR-μXRF, SEM–EDX, and SR-FTIR. The relatively high sensitivity offered by ToF–SIMS imaging coupled to the high spatial resolution allowed for the positive identification of degradation products (such as cadmium oxalate) in specific paint regions that have before been unobserved. The imaging of organic materials has provided an insight into the extent of destruction of the original binding medium

  6. Use of Selected Goodness-of-Fit Statistics to Assess the Accuracy of a Model of Henry Hagg Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rounds, S. A.; Sullivan, A. B.

    2004-12-01

    Assessing a model's ability to reproduce field data is a critical step in the modeling process. For any model, some method of determining goodness-of-fit to measured data is needed to aid in calibration and to evaluate model performance. Visualizations and graphical comparisons of model output are an excellent way to begin that assessment. At some point, however, model performance must be quantified. Goodness-of-fit statistics, including the mean error (ME), mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error, and coefficient of determination, typically are used to measure model accuracy. Statistical tools such as the sign test or Wilcoxon test can be used to test for model bias. The runs test can detect phase errors in simulated time series. Each statistic is useful, but each has its limitations. None provides a complete quantification of model accuracy. In this study, a suite of goodness-of-fit statistics was applied to a model of Henry Hagg Lake in northwest Oregon. Hagg Lake is a man-made reservoir on Scoggins Creek, a tributary to the Tualatin River. Located on the west side of the Portland metropolitan area, the Tualatin Basin is home to more than 450,000 people. Stored water in Hagg Lake helps to meet the agricultural and municipal water needs of that population. Future water demands have caused water managers to plan for a potential expansion of Hagg Lake, doubling its storage to roughly 115,000 acre-feet. A model of the lake was constructed to evaluate the lake's water quality and estimate how that quality might change after raising the dam. The laterally averaged, two-dimensional, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers model CE-QUAL-W2 was used to construct the Hagg Lake model. Calibrated for the years 2000 and 2001 and confirmed with data from 2002 and 2003, modeled parameters included water temperature, ammonia, nitrate, phosphorus, algae, zooplankton, and dissolved oxygen. Several goodness-of-fit statistics were used to quantify model accuracy and bias. Model

  7. ToF-SIMS imaging of molecular-level alteration mechanisms in Le Bonheur de vivre by Henri Matisse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voras, Zachary E.; deGhetaldi, Kristin; Wiggins, Marcie B.; Buckley, Barbara; Baade, Brian; Mass, Jennifer L.; Beebe, Thomas P.

    2015-11-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for cultural heritage studies, especially when used in conjunction with established analytical techniques in the field. The ability of ToF-SIMS to simultaneously image inorganic and organic species within a paint cross section at micrometer-level spatial resolution makes it a uniquely qualified analytical technique to aid in further understanding the processes of pigment and binder alteration, as well as pigment-binder interactions. In this study, ToF-SIMS was used to detect and image both molecular and elemental species related to CdS pigment and binding medium alteration on the painting Le Bonheur de vivre (1905-1906, The Barnes Foundation) by Henri Matisse. Three categories of inorganic and organic components were found throughout Le Bonheur de vivre and co-localized in cross-sectional samples using high spatial resolution ToF-SIMS analysis: (1) species relating to the preparation and photo-induced oxidation of CdS yellow pigments (2) varying amounts of long-chain fatty acids present in both the paint and primary ground layer and (3) specific amino acid fragments, possibly relating to the painting's complex restoration history. ToF-SIMS's ability to discern both organic and inorganic species via cross-sectional imaging was used to compare samples collected from Le Bonheur de vivre to artificially aged reference paints in an effort to gather mechanistic information relating to alteration processes that have been previously explored using μXANES, SR-μXRF, SEM-EDX, and SR-FTIR. The relatively high sensitivity offered by ToF-SIMS imaging coupled to the high spatial resolution allowed for the positive identification of degradation products (such as cadmium oxalate) in specific paint regions that have before been unobserved. The imaging of organic materials has provided an insight into the extent of destruction of the original binding medium, as well as

  8. Welcome Home, Harry (Henry)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markey, Mia K.

    2008-01-01

    As the author prepares to head back to Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy (IMSA) for homecoming, she finds the analogy of Hogwarts for IMSA to be apropos. Going to IMSA opened doors for her that she hadn't even known were closed. Yet it's not easy to pin down what made her IMSA experience magical. Certainly there are some elements that are…

  9. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  10. Henri Becquerel: serendipitous brilliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2008-06-01

    Serendipity has always been an attendant to great science. Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson discovered the cosmic background radiation after first mistaking it for the effect of pigeon droppings on their microwave antenna. US spy satellites detected gamma-ray bursts when surveying the sky for evidence of secret Soviet nuclear tests during the Cold War. Satyendra Bose arrived at Bose-Einstein statistics only after discovering that a mathematical error explained the experimental data concerning the photoelectric effect. In the words of science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov, "The most exciting phrase in science is not 'Eureka!', but rather, 'That's funny...'.

  11. On the history of cultural psychiatry: Georges Devereux, Henri Ellenberger, and the psychological treatment of Native Americans in the 1950s.

    PubMed

    Delille, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Henri Ellenberger (1905-1993) wrote the first French-language synthesis of transcultural psychiatry ("Ethno-psychiatrie") for the French Encyclopédie Médico-Chirurgicale in 1965. His work casts new light on the early development of transcultural psychiatry in relation to scientific communities and networks, particularly on the role of Georges Devereux (1908-1985). The Ellenberger archives offer the possibility of comparing published texts with archival ones to create a more nuanced account of the history of transcultural psychiatry, and notably of the psychological treatment of Native Americans. This paper examines some key moments in the intellectual trajectories of Devereux and Ellenberger, including Devereux's dispute with Ackerknecht, the careers of Devereux and Ellenberger as therapists at the Menninger Foundation (Topeka, Kansas) in the 1950s, and their respective positions in the research network developed by McGill University (Montreal, Quebec) with the newsletter Transcultural Research in Mental Health Problems Finally, I consider their ties to other important figures in this field as it transitioned from colonial medicine to academic medicine, including Roger Bastide (France), Henri Collomb and the Ortigues (France and Africa), as well as Eric Wittkower and Brian Murphy (Canada) and Alexander Leighton (United States and Canada). PMID:27235144

  12. Government science in postwar America: Henry A. Wallace, Edward U. Condon, and the transformation of the National Bureau of Standards, 1945-1951.

    PubMed

    Lassman, Thomas C

    2005-03-01

    In the fall of 1945, Secretary of Commerce Henry Wallace handpicked Edward Condon, a respected theoretical physicist, to become director of the National Bureau of Standards. Already regarded by many academic and industrial scientists as a second-rate research institution, the Bureau had deteriorated further during the Great Depression. An ardent New Dealer who favored government action to prevent anticompetitive behavior in the marketplace, Wallace claimed that giant corporations leveraged their extensive patent holdings and research capabilities to manipulate markets and restrict competition at the expense of smaller firms without similar resources. Through a revitalized Bureau of Standards, Wallace intended to mitigate monopolistic behavior among large companies by transforming the Department of Commerce into an effective clearinghouse for scientific research that would stimulate technological innovation in small businesses. The Bureau's postwar expansion, however, foundered on congressional efforts to dismantle the legacies of the New Deal, Condon's lack of commitment to the technical requirements of the small business community, and the intense competition for resources within an institutionally pluralist federal research establishment dominated by the exigencies of the Cold War. Without sufficient financial support from congressional appropriations committees, Condon turned to the military to fund new research programs at the Bureau of Standards. These programs, however, owed their institutional growth to the demands of the national security state, not to the fading influence of Henry Wallace's New Deal liberalism. PMID:16114798

  13. Government science in postwar America: Henry A. Wallace, Edward U. Condon, and the transformation of the National Bureau of Standards, 1945-1951.

    PubMed

    Lassman, Thomas C

    2005-03-01

    In the fall of 1945, Secretary of Commerce Henry Wallace handpicked Edward Condon, a respected theoretical physicist, to become director of the National Bureau of Standards. Already regarded by many academic and industrial scientists as a second-rate research institution, the Bureau had deteriorated further during the Great Depression. An ardent New Dealer who favored government action to prevent anticompetitive behavior in the marketplace, Wallace claimed that giant corporations leveraged their extensive patent holdings and research capabilities to manipulate markets and restrict competition at the expense of smaller firms without similar resources. Through a revitalized Bureau of Standards, Wallace intended to mitigate monopolistic behavior among large companies by transforming the Department of Commerce into an effective clearinghouse for scientific research that would stimulate technological innovation in small businesses. The Bureau's postwar expansion, however, foundered on congressional efforts to dismantle the legacies of the New Deal, Condon's lack of commitment to the technical requirements of the small business community, and the intense competition for resources within an institutionally pluralist federal research establishment dominated by the exigencies of the Cold War. Without sufficient financial support from congressional appropriations committees, Condon turned to the military to fund new research programs at the Bureau of Standards. These programs, however, owed their institutional growth to the demands of the national security state, not to the fading influence of Henry Wallace's New Deal liberalism.

  14. On the history of cultural psychiatry: Georges Devereux, Henri Ellenberger, and the psychological treatment of Native Americans in the 1950s.

    PubMed

    Delille, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Henri Ellenberger (1905-1993) wrote the first French-language synthesis of transcultural psychiatry ("Ethno-psychiatrie") for the French Encyclopédie Médico-Chirurgicale in 1965. His work casts new light on the early development of transcultural psychiatry in relation to scientific communities and networks, particularly on the role of Georges Devereux (1908-1985). The Ellenberger archives offer the possibility of comparing published texts with archival ones to create a more nuanced account of the history of transcultural psychiatry, and notably of the psychological treatment of Native Americans. This paper examines some key moments in the intellectual trajectories of Devereux and Ellenberger, including Devereux's dispute with Ackerknecht, the careers of Devereux and Ellenberger as therapists at the Menninger Foundation (Topeka, Kansas) in the 1950s, and their respective positions in the research network developed by McGill University (Montreal, Quebec) with the newsletter Transcultural Research in Mental Health Problems Finally, I consider their ties to other important figures in this field as it transitioned from colonial medicine to academic medicine, including Roger Bastide (France), Henri Collomb and the Ortigues (France and Africa), as well as Eric Wittkower and Brian Murphy (Canada) and Alexander Leighton (United States and Canada).

  15. Apatite (U-Th)/He Date Dispersion Due to Secondary Grain Boundary Phases: An Example from the Henry Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. E.; Orme, D. A.; Reiners, P. W.

    2011-12-01

    Well-recognized (non-analytical) sources of variation in apatite (U-Th)/He dates include effects of variable: 1) radiation damage, 2) crystal size, and 3) parent zonation. The first two can be used advantageously to constrain thermal histories, and the third can often be characterized to recognize and quantify its effects. A more insidious and potentially widespread potential source of age dispersion, however, is U-Th located outside but within ~15-20 microns of dated apatites. Spiegel et al. (2009) documented the effects of He implantation from primary "bad-neighbour" grains. Secondary U-Th-bearing phases may have more complex effects. The effect of extragranular U-Th-bearing phases can make He dates too old or too young, depending on 1) when it forms, relative to the grain's cooling date, 2) whether it is recovered and analyzed with the grain, and 3) the relative U-Th content of the apatite and extragranular phase. Here we document the effects of external secondary phases on apatite He dates from samples from the Henry Mountains, Utah, where magmas intruded sedimentary rocks at 26-28 Ma. Detrital apatites from sedimentary rocks surrounding the laccoliths show positive date-eU correlations consistent with residence at ~1.5-km depths from ~27 to less than 5 Ma, when they were exhumed rapidly to near surface temperatures. Some apatite from igneous samples yield similar correlations, or uniform ~27 Ma ages regardless of eU, consistent with rapid cooling at this time. However, apatite from many igneous rocks show distinctive concave-up trends in date-eU plots. Grains with relatively high eU (~25-85 ppm) show positive date-eU correlations with maximum dates of ~27 Ma. But grains with low eU (~2-25 ppm) show inverse correlations that extend to dates as old as ~120 Ma. Many of the grains in these samples have extensive thin red-brown coatings that are likely mixtures of secondary clays and Fe-oxides. These coatings are easily removed by gentle physical abrasion, so it is

  16. A Laboratory Experiment To Measure Henry's Law Constants of Volatile Organic Compounds with a Bubble Column and a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Mukherjee, Souptik; Brewer, Brittany; Ryan, Raphael; Yu, Huan; Gangoda, Mahinda

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to measure Henry's law constants of organic compounds using a bubble column and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). This experiment is designed for upper-division undergraduate laboratory courses and can be implemented in conjunction with physical chemistry, analytical…

  17. [The union of three families of apothecaries in Paris in the 17th and 18th centuries--The apothecaries François Pihoué, François Regnault, Henry Charas and Marie Fourneau].

    PubMed

    Warolin, Christian

    2015-06-01

    The family network started with Marie Fourneau, daughter of the apothecary Jacques Fourneau, married successively two apothecaries first François Pihoué and then François Regnault and whose only daughter Marie Anne married the apothecary Henry Charas grandson of the famous apothecary Moyse Charas.

  18. Statement of Henry M. Ramirez, Chairman, Cabinet Committee on Opportunities for Spanish Speaking People, Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, July 23, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Henry M.

    On July 23, 1973, Dr. Henry M. Ramirez, Chariman of the Cabinet Committee on Opportunities for Spanish Speaking People, spoke before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations. Dr. Ramirez outlined why the Cabinet Committee is needed, gave examples of the Committee's accomplishments, and discussed future plans to assure that…

  19. [The union of three families of apothecaries in Paris in the 17th and 18th centuries--The apothecaries François Pihoué, François Regnault, Henry Charas and Marie Fourneau].

    PubMed

    Warolin, Christian

    2015-06-01

    The family network started with Marie Fourneau, daughter of the apothecary Jacques Fourneau, married successively two apothecaries first François Pihoué and then François Regnault and whose only daughter Marie Anne married the apothecary Henry Charas grandson of the famous apothecary Moyse Charas. PMID:26189312

  20. 2D X-ray and FTIR micro-analysis of the degradation of cadmium yellow pigment in paintings of Henri Matisse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouyet, E.; Cotte, M.; Fayard, B.; Salomé, M.; Meirer, F.; Mehta, A.; Uffelman, E. S.; Hull, A.; Vanmeert, F.; Kieffer, J.; Burghammer, M.; Janssens, K.; Sette, F.; Mass, J.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical and physical alterations of cadmium yellow (CdS) paints in Henri Matisse's The Joy of Life (1905-1906, The Barnes Foundation) have been recognized since 2006, when a survey by portable X-ray fluorescence identified this pigment in all altered regions of the monumental painting. This alteration is visible as fading, discoloration, chalking, flaking, and spalling of several regions of light to medium yellow paint. Since that time, synchrotron radiation-based techniques including elemental and spectroscopic imaging, as well as X-ray scattering have been employed to locate and identify the alteration products observed in this and related works by Henri Matisse. This information is necessary to formulate one or multiple mechanisms for degradation of Matisse's paints from this period, and thus ensure proper environmental conditions for the storage and the display of his works. This paper focuses on 2D full-field X-ray Near Edge Structure imaging, 2D micro-X-ray Diffraction, X-ray Fluorescence, and Fourier Transform Infra-red imaging of the altered paint layers to address one of the long-standing questions about cadmium yellow alteration—the roles of cadmium carbonates and cadmium sulphates found in the altered paint layers. These compounds have often been assumed to be photo-oxidation products, but could also be residual starting reagents from an indirect wet process synthesis of CdS. The data presented here allow identifying and mapping the location of cadmium carbonates, cadmium chlorides, cadmium oxalates, cadmium sulphates, and cadmium sulphides in thin sections of altered cadmium yellow paints from The Joy of Life and Matisse's Flower Piece (1906, The Barnes Foundation). Distribution of various cadmium compounds confirms that cadmium carbonates and sulphates are photo-degradation products in The Joy of Life, whereas in Flower Piece, cadmium carbonates appear to have been a [(partially) unreacted] starting reagent for the yellow paint, a role

  1. Nomenclatural Studies Toward a World List of Diptera Genus-Group Names. Part IV: Charles Henry Tyler Townsend.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Neal L; Pont, Adrian C; Whitmore, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The Diptera genus-group names of Charles Henry Tyler Townsend are reviewed and annotated. A total of 1506 available genus-group names in 12 families of Diptera are listed alphabetically for each name, giving author, year and page of original publication, originally included species, type species and method of fixation, current status of the name, family placement, and a list of any emendations of it that have been found in the literature. Remarks are given to clarify nomenclatural and/or taxonomic information. In addition, an index to all the species-group names of Diptera proposed by Townsend (1595, of which 1574 are available names) is given with bibliographic reference (year and page) to each original citation. An appendix with a full bibliography of almost 650 papers written by Townsend is presented with accurate dates of publication.        Two new replacement names are proposed for preoccupied genus-group names and both are named to honor our good friend and colleague, James E. O'Hara, for his decades of work on tachinids: Oharamyia Evenhuis, Pont & Whitmore, n. name, for Lindigia Townsend, 1931 [Tachinidae] (preoccupied by Karsten, 1858); Jimimyia Evenhuis, Pont & Whitmore, n. name, for Siphonopsis Townsend, 1916 [Tachinidae] (preoccupied by Agassiz, 1846).        Earlier dates of availability are found for the following: Eucnephalia Townsend, 1892 [Tachinidae]; Gabanimyia Townsend, 1914 [Tachinidae]; Incamyia Townsend, 1912 [Tachinidae]; Muscopteryx Townsend, 1892 [Tachinidae]; Philippolophosia Townsend, 1927 [Tachinidae]; Pseudokea Townsend, 1927 [Tachinidae].        Corrected or clarified included species and/or corrected or clarified type-species and methods of typification are given for: Alitophasia Townsend, 1934 [Tachinidae]; Almugmyia Townsend, 1911 [Tachinidae]; Arachnidomyia Townsend, 1934 [Sarcophagidae]; Austenina Townsend, 1921 [Glossinidae]; Austrohartigia Townsend, 1937 [Sarcophagidae]; Awatia Townsend, 1921 [Muscidae

  2. Smog chamber experiments to investigate Henry's law constants of glyoxal using different seed aerosols as well as imidazole formation in the presence of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Ronit

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. Hence, they have a direct as well as an indirect impact on the earth's climate. Depending on their formation, one distinguishes between primary and secondary aerosols[1]. Important groups within the secondary aerosols are the secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In order to improve predictions about these impacts on the earth's climate the existing models need to be optimized, because they still underestimate SOA formation[2]. Glyoxal, the smallest α-dicarbonyl, not only acts as a tracer for SOA formation but also as a direct contributor to SOA. Because glyoxal has such a high vapour pressure, it was common knowledge that it does not take part in gas-particle partitioning and therefore has no impact on direct SOA formation. However, the Henry's law constant for glyoxal is surprisingly high. This has been explained by the hydration of the aldehyde groups, which means that a species with a lower vapour pressure is produced. Therefore the distribution of glyoxal between gas- and particle phase is atmospherically relevant and the direct contribution of glyoxal to SOA can no longer be neglected[3]. Besides this particulate glyoxal is able to undergo heterogeneous chemistry with gaseous ammonia to form imidazoles. This plays an important role for regions with aerosols exhibiting alkaline pH values for example from lifestock or soil dust because imidazoles as nitrogen containing compounds change the optical properties of aerosols[4]. A high salt concentration present in chamber seed aerosols leads to an enhanced glyoxal uptake into the particle. This effect is called "salting-in". The salting effect depends on the composition of the seed aerosol as well as the soluble compound. For very polar compounds, like glyoxal, a "salting-in" is observed[3]. Glyoxal particle formation during a smog chamber campaign at Paul-Scherrer-Institut (PSI) in Switzerland was examined using different seed aerosols

  3. Determination of C1-C5 alkyl nitrates in rain, snow, white frost, lake, and tap water by a combined codistillation head-space gas chromatography technique. Determination of Henry's law constants by head-space GC.

    PubMed

    Hauff, K; Fischer, R G; Ballschmiter, K

    1998-12-01

    Alkyl nitrates with a chain length up to five carbon atoms have been determined in snow, white frost, and surface water. The samples were taken in the vicinity of Ulm, Germany, a region in central Europe. The determination of C1-C5-alkyl nitrates in water samples was achieved with a new water codistillation enrichment technique directly coupled with on-column head-space gas chromatography. The concentrations of the short chain alkyl nitrates in the different forms of wet deposition range from 89 ng L-1 for 1-propyl nitrate down to 35 ng L-1 for 1-pentyl nitrate. C1-C5-alkyl nitrates in wet depositions were also directly determined by static head-space gas chromatography. Gas-water partition coefficients KGW (Henry's law constant H) were determined by head-space gas chromatography and secondly by calculating the Henry's law constant by the ratio of vapor pressure to water solubility. The gas-water partition constants (dimensionless) or Henry's law constants range from KGW = 0.038 (H = 93 Pa m3 mol-1) for 1-propyl nitrate up to KGW = 0.122 (H = 302 Pa m3 mol-1) for 2-pentyl nitrate.

  4. Cardinal John Henry Newman and 'the ideal state and purpose of a university': nurse education, research and practice development for the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Cardinal John Henry Newman's book, The Idea of a University, first published in the mid nineteenth century, is often invoked as the epitome of the liberal Enlightenment University in discussions and debates about the role and purpose of nurse education. In this article I will examine Newman's book in greater detail and with a more critical eye than is generally the case in the writing of nurse academics. In particular, I will focus on the claims that Newman was a champion of the Enlightenment University of the nineteenth century, that he promoted the idea of 'disinterested' universal knowledge for its own sake, that he was an early advocate of the pursuit of knowledge through scientific research, and the supposition that he would have welcomed the discipline of nursing into the University. In each case, I will suggest that these claims are based on an extremely selective reading of Newman's work. I will conclude by employing the example of practice development to propose an alternative way for nursing to find its place in the modern University that does not involve a retreat into what I will argue is an outdated and nostalgic view of the aims and purpose of higher education.

  5. Analysis of alternative modifications for reducing backwater flooding at the Honey Creek coal strip-mine reclamation site in Henry County, Missouri. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Studies to determine the hydrologic conditions in mined and reclaimed mine areas, as well as areas of proposed mining, have become necessary with the enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Honey Creek in Henry County, Missouri, has been re-routed to flow through a series of former strip mining pits which lie within the Honey Creek coal strip mine reclamation site. During intense or long duration rainfalls within the Honey Creek basin, surface runoff has caused flooding on agricultural land near the upstream boundary of the reclamation site. The calculated existing design discharge (3,050 cubic feet per second) water-surface profile is compared to the expected water-surface profiles from three assumed alternative channel modifcations within the Honey Creek study area. The alternative channel modifications used in these analyses include (1) improvement of channel bottom slope, (2) relocation of spoil material, and (3) improved by-pass channel flow conditions. The alternative 1, 2, and 3 design discharge increase will reduce the agricultural field current (1990) frequency of backwater flooding from a 3-year to a 6.5-year event.

  6. The Knud Krabbe (1885-1961)-Henry Alsop Riley (1887-1966) letters (1929-59): transatlantic friendship fostered by the International Neurological Congresses.

    PubMed

    Louis, Elan D

    2011-02-01

    The correspondence between Dr Knud Krabbe in Denmark and Dr Henry Alsop Riley in the USA, archived at Columbia University, provides valuable insight into the friendship that arose between these two early leaders in neurology who lived on opposite sides of the Atlantic. Comprised of 15 surviving letters, the correspondence began in 1929 but primarily spanned the period from 1954 to 1959 and during that time showed a very familiar tone between the two men. Their correspondence is not only about work but the range of topics evidences the warmth that evolved between the two men. Their friendship likely originated at the International Neurological Congresses (INCs), which occurred every four years. This paper serves to bring this correspondence, previously not well known, into the historical literature and includes personal and biographical information. It shows how the INCs, on a human level, resulted in links between the vanguards of neurology in different countries, thus helping to foster the development of neurology as an independent medical discipline during the 20th century. PMID:21350077

  7. The Legacy of Henry Molaison (1926-2008) and the Impact of His Bilateral Mesial Temporal Lobe Surgery on the Study of Human Memory.

    PubMed

    Dossani, Rimal Hanif; Missios, Symeon; Nanda, Anil

    2015-10-01

    In 1953, neurosurgeon William Beecher Scoville performed a bilateral mesial temporal lobe resection on patient Henry Molaison, who suffered from epilepsy. The operation was novel as a treatment for epilepsy and had an unexpected consequence: a severe compromise of Molaison's anterograde memory. In a landmark 1957 publication, Scoville and Milner concluded that mesial temporal lobe structures, particularly the hippocampi, were integral to the formation of new, recent memories. Over the next 5 decades, more than 100 researchers studied Molaison's memory, behavior, and learning skills, making him one of the most famous patients in the history of cognitive neuroscience. Following his death in 2008, his brain was scanned in situ and ex vivo and then sectioned into 2401 sections. Histological evaluation of Molaison's brain further elucidated which mesial temporal lobe structures were preserved or resected in his operation, shedding new light on the neuroanatomic underpinnings of short-term memory. Scoville regretted Molaison's surgical outcome and spoke vigorously about the dangers of bilateral mesial temporal lobe surgery. This report is the first historical account of Molaison's case in the neurosurgical literature, serving as a reminder of Molaison's contributions and of the perils of bilateral mesial temporal lobe surgery.

  8. [Henri Beckquerel's discovery of radioactivity, and history of nuclear medicine. 100 years in the shadow or on the shoulder of Röntgen].

    PubMed

    Rootwelt, K

    1996-12-10

    In 1896 Henri Becquerel discovered that uranium emitted penetrating rays similar to X-rays. His finding started a series of discoveries that were rewarded with numerous Nobel prizes. Marie and Pierre Curie found that thorium was radioactive too, and discovered and described two new elements, polonium and radium. They also found that radioactive radiation could be separated into alpha, beta and gamma rays. In 1993 their daughter Irene Joliot-Curie and her husband Frederic Joliot managed to produce radioactivity artificially by bombarding atomic nuclei with alpha particles. Enrico Fermi did likewise, but bombarded the nuclei with neutrons. In the cyclotron invented by Ernest Lawrence, radioactive isotopes were produced by proton bombardment. The ability to produce radioisotopes of different elements initiated a variety of tracer studies in biology and medicine. The number of studies increased exponentially when the nuclear reactor in Oak Ridge, US, was opened for radionuclide production in 1946. This article summarises the history of the application of radionuclides in science and medicine internationally and in Norway until now.

  9. Suspended-sediment budget, flow distribution, and lake circulation for the Fox Chain of Lakes in Lake and McHenry Counties, Illinois, 1997-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schrader, David L.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.

    2000-01-01

    The Fox Chain of Lakes is a glacial lake system in McHenry and Lake Counties in northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin. Sedimentation and nutrient overloading have occurred in the lake system since the first dam was built (1907) in McHenry to raise water levels in the lake system. Using data collected from December 1, 1997, to June 1, 1999, suspended-sediment budgets were constructed for the most upstream lake in the system, Grass Lake, and for the lakes downstream from Grass Lake. A total of 64,900 tons of suspended sediment entered Grass Lake during the study, whereas a total of 70,600 tons of suspended sediment exited the lake, indicating a net scour of 5,700 tons of sediment. A total of 44,100 tons of suspended sediment was measured exiting the Fox Chain of Lakes at Johnsburg, whereas 85,600 tons entered the system downstream from Grass Lake. These suspended-sediment loads indicate a net deposition of 41,500 tons downstream from Grass Lake, which represents a trapping efficiency of 48.5 percent. A large amount of recreational boating takes place on the Fox Chain of Lakes during summer months, and suspended-sediment load was observed to rise from 110 tons per day to 339 tons per day during the 1999 Memorial Day weekend (May 26 ?31, 1999). Presumably, this rise was the result of the boating traffic because no other hydrologic event is known to have occurred that might have caused the rise. This study covers a relatively short period and may not represent the long-term processes of the Fox Chain of Lakes system, although the sediment transport was probably higher than an average year. The bed sediments found on the bottom of the lakes are composed of mainly fine particles in the silt-clay range. The Grass Lake sediments were characterized as black peat with an organic content of between 9 and 18 percent, and the median particle size ranged from 0.000811 to 0.0013976 inches. Other bed material samples were collected at streamflow-gaging stations on the

  10. Relation of Risk of Atrial Fibrillation With Systolic Blood Pressure Response During Exercise Stress Testing (from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing Project).

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Wesley T; Qureshi, Waqas T; Blaha, Michael J; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Brawner, Clinton A; Nasir, Khurram; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2015-12-15

    Decreases in systolic blood pressure during exercise may predispose to arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) because of underlying abnormal autonomic tone. We examined the association between systolic blood pressure response and incident AF in 57,442 (mean age 54 ± 13 years, 47% women, and 29% black) patients free of baseline AF who underwent exercise treadmill stress testing from the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing project. Exercise systolic blood pressure response was examined as a categorical variable across clinically relevant categories (>20 mm Hg: referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg, and ≤0 mm Hg) and per 1-SD decrease. Cox regression, adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, medications, history of coronary heart disease, history of heart failure, and metabolic equivalent of task achieved, was used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between systolic blood pressure response and incident AF. Over a median follow-up of 5.0 years, a total of 3,381 cases (5.9%) of AF were identified. An increased risk of AF was observed with decreasing systolic blood pressure response (>20 mm Hg: HR 1.0, referent; 1 to 20 mm Hg: HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.99, 1.20; ≤0 mm Hg: HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.40). Similar results were obtained per 1-SD decrease in systolic blood pressure response (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.12). The results were consistent when stratified by age, sex, race, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. In conclusion, our results suggest that a decreased systolic blood pressure response during exercise may identify subjects who are at risk for developing AF. PMID:26603907

  11. Briggs, Henry (1561-1630)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Mathematician, born in Worley Wood, Yorkshire, England. Professor at Cambridge, London (Gresham College) and Oxford. By pointing out how much more useful logarithms would be if (unlike JOHN NAPIER's original invention) they were to base 10, he was responsible for improving astronomers' ability to calculate. Published mathematical tables (logarithms, sines, tangents, secants) as an aid to such ca...

  12. Cavendish, Henry (1731-1810)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    English chemist and physicist. Cavendish used a sensitive torsion balance (the Cavendish balance), which was made to oscillate under the gravitational force of attraction of large masses, to measure the value of the gravitational constant, G, and used his value to determine the mass of the Earth....

  13. Henry Norris Russell's Toronto Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, D. H.

    1996-12-01

    In February 1924, at the invitation of C. A. Chant, Russell presented a set of 14 public lectures on the state of astronomy and astrophysics. Designed to be inspirational, they also reveal Russell's contemporary views on the state of astrophysics as well as his sense of proper practice in astronomy. During his visit, Russell was interviewed by local reporters who asked his opinion about building a large observatory, one of Chant's major projects. What Russell had to say about such ventures did not please Chant one bit.

  14. Electrical Researches of Henry Cavendish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerk Maxwell, James; Cavendish, Henry

    2010-05-01

    Introduction; Account of Cavendish's writings on electricity; 1. First published papers on electricity; 2. Preliminary propositions; 3. Appendix; 4. Thoughts concerning electricity; 5. Account of the experiments; 6. Second published paper on electricity; 7. Experiments in 1771; 8. Experiments in 1772; 9. Index to electrical experiments, 1773; 10. Measures; 11. Experiments with the artificial torpedo; 12. Resistance to electricity; 13. Calibration of tubes; 14. Resistance of copper wire; 15. Result; 16. Results; Notes by the editor; Index.

  15. Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... in 2017 Marketplaces Where Do Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump Stand on 7 Health Care Issues? Global Health ... About Immigration and Muslims in a Time of Donald Trump The Missing Debate Over Rising Health-Care Deductibles ...

  16. Sir Henry Solomon Wellcome and Dr Andrew Balfour: an enterprise on the Nile and the early foundation of public health and medical research in the Sudan (1899-1935).

    PubMed

    Elhadd, T A

    2015-01-01

    In Sudan, modern medical practice and medical research began soon after the creation of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan at the turn of the 20th century. The benevolent involvement of Sir Henry Solomon Wellcome, and the ingenious feat of his protégé Sir Andrew Balfour, was crucial to the strong foundation of that establishment. Sir Henry Wellcome provided the financial sponsorship plus influential, logistical and moral support. Dr Balfour put great energy into making the enterprise one of the most amazing medical achievements in colonial medicine. Improvement in the public health of the capital Khartoum was emulated by other doctors working in this vast country. Research was not restricted to tropical medicine; it also encompassed agricultural and chemical research. This helped with the establishment of the first modern medical school in the country in 1924 and resulted in the medical service in Sudan being described as one of the best in the world. Many British doctors flocked to Sudan to make a fortune and to set a path for their career back in Britain.

  17. Generation of sub-part-per-billion gaseous volatile organic compounds at ambient temperature by headspace diffusion of aqueous standards through decoupling between ideal and nonideal Henry's law behavior.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2013-05-21

    In the analysis of volatile organic compounds in air, the preparation of their gaseous standards at low (sub-ppb) concentration levels with high reliability is quite difficult. In this study, a simple dynamic headspace-based approach was evaluated as a means of generating vapor-phase volatile organic compounds from a liquid standard in an impinger at ambient temperature (25 °C). For a given sampling time, volatile organic compound vapor formed in the headspace was swept by bypassing the sweep gas through the impinger and collected four times in quick succession in separate sorbent tubes. In each experiment, a fresh liquid sample was used for each of the four sampling times (5, 10, 20, and 30 min) at a steady flow rate of 50 mL min(-1). The air-water partitioning at the most dynamic (earliest) sweeping stage was established initially in accord with ideal Henry's law, which was then followed by considerably reduced partitioning in a steady-state equilibrium (non-ideal Henry's law). The concentrations of gaseous volatile organic compounds, collected after the steady-state equilibrium, reached fairly constant values: for instance, the mole fraction of toluene measured at a sweeping interval of 10 and 30 min averaged 1.10 and 0.99 nmol mol(-1), respectively (after the initial 10 min sampling). In the second stage of our experiment, the effect of increasing the concentrations of liquid spiking standard was also examined by collecting sweep gas samples from two consecutive 10 min runs. The volatile organic compounds, collected in the first and second 10 min sweep gas samples, exhibited ideal and nonideal Henry's law behavior, respectively. From this observation, we established numerical relationships to predict the mole fraction (or mixing ratio) of each volatile organic compound in steady-state equilibrium in relation to the concentration of standard spiked into the system. This experimental approach can thus be used to produce sub-ppb levels of gaseous volatile organic

  18. Recent advances in thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery method to eliminate the matrix effect between air and water samples: application to the accurate determination of Henry's law constant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-05-16

    Accurate values for the Henry's law constants are essential to describe the environmental dynamics of a solute, but substantial errors are recognized in many reported data due to practical difficulties in measuring solubility and/or vapor pressure. Despite such awareness, validation of experimental approaches has scarcely been made. An experimental approach based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to concurrently allow the accurate determination of target compounds from the headspace and aqueous samples in closed equilibrated system. The analysis of six aromatics and eight non-aromatic oxygenates was then carried out in a static headspace mode. An estimation of the potential bias and mass balance (i.e., sum of mass measured individually from gas and liquid phases vs. the mass initially added to the system) demonstrates compound-specific phase dependency so that the best results are obtained by aqueous (less soluble aromatics) and headspace analysis (more soluble non-aromatics). Accordingly, we were able to point to the possible sources of biases in previous studies and provide the best estimates for the Henry's constants (Matm(-1)): benzene (0.17), toluene (0.15), p-xylene (0.13), m-xylene (0.13), o-xylene (0.19), styrene (0.27); propionaldehyde (9.26), butyraldehyde (6.19), isovaleraldehyde (2.14), n-valeraldehyde (3.98), methyl ethyl ketone (10.5), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.93), n-butyl acetate (2.41), and isobutyl alcohol (22.2).

  19. Recent advances in thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery method to eliminate the matrix effect between air and water samples: application to the accurate determination of Henry's law constant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-05-16

    Accurate values for the Henry's law constants are essential to describe the environmental dynamics of a solute, but substantial errors are recognized in many reported data due to practical difficulties in measuring solubility and/or vapor pressure. Despite such awareness, validation of experimental approaches has scarcely been made. An experimental approach based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to concurrently allow the accurate determination of target compounds from the headspace and aqueous samples in closed equilibrated system. The analysis of six aromatics and eight non-aromatic oxygenates was then carried out in a static headspace mode. An estimation of the potential bias and mass balance (i.e., sum of mass measured individually from gas and liquid phases vs. the mass initially added to the system) demonstrates compound-specific phase dependency so that the best results are obtained by aqueous (less soluble aromatics) and headspace analysis (more soluble non-aromatics). Accordingly, we were able to point to the possible sources of biases in previous studies and provide the best estimates for the Henry's constants (Matm(-1)): benzene (0.17), toluene (0.15), p-xylene (0.13), m-xylene (0.13), o-xylene (0.19), styrene (0.27); propionaldehyde (9.26), butyraldehyde (6.19), isovaleraldehyde (2.14), n-valeraldehyde (3.98), methyl ethyl ketone (10.5), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.93), n-butyl acetate (2.41), and isobutyl alcohol (22.2). PMID:24704185

  20. Effect of advanced aircraft noise reduction technology on the 1990 projected noise environment around Patrick Henry Airport. [development of noise exposure forecast contours for projected traffic volume and aircraft types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawthorn, J. M.; Brown, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    A study has been conducted of the future noise environment of Patric Henry Airport and its neighboring communities projected for the year 1990. An assessment was made of the impact of advanced noise reduction technologies which are currently being considered. These advanced technologies include a two-segment landing approach procedure and aircraft hardware modifications or retrofits which would add sound absorbent material in the nacelles of the engines or which would replace the present two- and three-stage fans with a single-stage fan of larger diameter. Noise Exposure Forecast (NEF) contours were computed for the baseline (nonretrofitted) aircraft for the projected traffic volume and fleet mix for the year 1990. These NEF contours are presented along with contours for a variety of retrofit options. Comparisons of the baseline with the noise reduction options are given in terms of total land area exposed to 30 and 40 NEF levels. Results are also presented of the effects on noise exposure area of the total number of daily operations.

  1. Two new species of Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912 (Nematoda: Anisakidae), C. fagerholmi n. sp. and C. rudolphii F from the brown pelican Pelecanus occidentalis in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, S; Cavallero, S; Dronen, N O; Barros, N B; Paggi, L

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and mitochondrial rrnS and cox2 genes, and analysis of polymorphisms in restriction profiles in the ITS and rrnS, were used to characterise anisakid nematodes belonging to Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912 infecting the brown pelican Pelecanus occidentalis (L.) in Galveston Bay, Texas and Sarasota Bay, Florida. Molecular data led to the detection of two new species: Contracaecum fagerholmi n. sp., which was also supported by clear morphological evidence, and Contracaecum rudolphii F, a new cryptic species within the Contracaecum rudolphii Hartwich, 1964 complex. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that C. fagerholmi and C. rudolphii F form two well-separated clusters, with C. fagerholmi being closely related to Contracaecum bioccai Mattiucci et al., 2008 and C. rudolphii F being included in the C. rudolphii complex. C. fagerholmi can be readily differentiated morphologically from all of its congeners, other than C. microcephalum (Rudolphii 1809) and the five currently recognised members of the C. rudolphii complex (C. rudolphii A, B, C, D and E). C. fagerholmi differs from C. microcephalum in the length of the spicules and the shape of the distal tip of the spicules, and from C. rudolphii (sensu lato) in the shape and size of the ventro-lateral and dorsal lips and by having interlabia which are not distally bifurcate. Further studies are needed to determine which morphological characteristics can be used to distinguish the cryptic species of the C. rudolphii complex in order to assign them with formal names. The recovery of a third species, C. bioccai, from the brown pelican confirms its occurrence in this host and extends its known geographical distribution. PMID:22139006

  2. 75 FR 23718 - Orders Finding That the Henry Financial Basis Contract, Henry Financial Index Contract and Henry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... loss of $0.10 per mmBtu on the futures side. Market sentiment of a strong downward pressure on gas... (``HHD'') contract traded on the IntercontinentalExchange, Inc. (``ICE''), an exempt commercial market... Commission rule 36.3(c) promulgated thereunder. \\1\\ 74 FR 53720 (October 20, 2009). DATES: Effective...

  3. Russell, Henry Norris (1877-1957)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, born in Oyster Bay, NY, spent nearly all his life working at Princeton University. He spectroscopically studied eclipsing binary stars to determine the masses of their component stars. At first collaborating with the British astronomer Hinks at Cambridge, he started to measure stellar parallaxes and, plotting the absolute magnitudes of stars whose distance he had thus measured, agains...

  4. Fathoming the hydrosphere (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    As Lord Kelvin observed: "If you can not measure it, you can not improve it." Measurement is the start of all scientific knowledge. Measurement sets science apart from metaphysical speculation. Measurement is not the last word in science but it is the first. In hydrology, progress in measurement methods has not been as rapid as in sister Earth sciences such as meteorology, oceanography, or geodynamics. Of the hundreds of scientific satellites, only one has hydrology as its main mission at the time of this writing (hopefully two at the time of the lecture). The closest we come to a large measurement infrastructure is an experimental watershed. Nothing wrong with an experimental watershed but it does not compare to, say, the Square Kilometer Array with its exabyte per day output. We tend to give up quickly because we will always have to work with effective parameters that can not be measured directly. We will never be able to know all stomata in a tree and how they interact with the turbulent flow through the canopy. We will never be able to know all pores in a soil and how water moves through them. But also effective parameters have to be measured, be it indirectly. No surprise then that my presentation will focus on measurements in hydrology and water management. First, the fun aspects and intellectual challenges of developing new measurement methods will be highlighted. From weighing trees to listening to rain to taking a stream's temperature, we have had many interesting experiences over the years. Second, the balance between model complexity and data availability will be discussed. Although there is a generally recognized need for parsimonious models in hydrology, formal approaches to finding the correct level of complexity are rare. Some complexity control approaches, borrowed from computer science, will be presented together with a hydrological application. As it turns out, these methods seem to predict nicely the onset of equifinality or the statistical illposedness of the inverse problem of finding effective parameters. Finally, an ambitious program will be presented that aims to shed light on Africa's climate and water resources, the TransAfrican HydroMeteorological Observatory or TAHMO. TAHMO's aim is to deploy and operate 20,000 hydroclimatological stations throughout subSaharan Africa. There are many aspects that are novel from the design of the stations, to deployment at schools, and a business model that should fund the system for decades to come. Given the global need for finding the water needed to produce our food by 2050 and the fact that Africa will have to play a major role in this effort, TAHMO addresses a scientific challenge of great societal importance.

  5. Talbot, William Henry Fox (1800-77)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Mathematician, parliamentarian and pioneer in photography, born in Melbury Abbas, Dorset, England, a close friend of Sir John Herschel (see HERSCHEL FAMILY), and worked with him on problems in light and photochemistry. Invented the modern methods of reproducing photographs through the negative process and making prints....

  6. Teaching the Shakespearean Film: Olivier's "Henry V."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, John

    For at least two kinds of literature instructors, classroom use of a film derived from a Shakespeare play is potentially promising: a Shakespeare course instructor can present one attempt to visualize the implications of the printed word, and a teacher of a course which compares film and literature has at least one respectable film adaptation of a…

  7. Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Thinking and Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnett, David

    2013-01-01

    Computers have become powerful conceptual and intellectual tools. Examples will be given showing how computer simulations clarified the nature of some important astrophysical processes: gravitational collapse to black holes or neutron stars, the synthesis of the elements, supernova explosions, and turbulent motion in stars. Originally computers were thought of as tools for solving differential equations by numerical integration, but modern use of computers more closely resembles the construction of a digital model of reality based on conservation laws. Implications of our new abilities to solve nonlinear problems, and the synergism developing between analytic and digital theory will be discussed, with historical comments.

  8. Aqueous solubility (in the range between 298.15 and 338.15 K), vapor pressures (in the range between 10(-5) and 80 Pa) and Henry's law constant of 1,2,3,4-dibenzanthracene and 1,2,5,6-dibenzanthracene.

    PubMed

    Abou-Naccoul, Ramy; Mokbel, Ilham; Bassil, Georgio; Saab, Joseph; Stephan, Khaled; Jose, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous solubility and vapor pressures of 1,2,3,4-dibenzanthracene and 1,2,5,6-dibenzanthracene were determined using dynamic saturation methods. For the two isomers, aqueous solubility is in the range between 10(-10) and 10(-2) in molar fraction corresponding to temperature between 298.15 and 338.15K. Vapor pressures of the pure solutes range from 10(-5) to 80 Pa. Prior to the study of the two dibenzanthracenes and in order to check the experimental procedures, solubility of fluoranthene (between 298 and 338 K) and vapor pressures of phenanthrene and fluoranthene (between 300 and 470 K) were measured. From aqueous solubility data coupled with the vapor pressures of the pure solutes, partition coefficient air-water, KAW, and Henry's constant, KH, of environmental relevance were calculated.

  9. Retinal pigment epithelial changes in chronic Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease: fundus autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos-Santos, Daniel V.; Sohn, Elliott H.; Sadda, Srinivas; Rao, Narsing A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging allows better assessment of RPE and outer retina (OR) in subjects with chronic VKH compared to examination and angiography alone. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of a series of seven consecutive patients with chronic VKH undergoing FAF and SD-OCT. Chronic VKH was defined as during >3 months. Color fundus photographs were correlated to FAF and SD-OCT images. The images were later correlated to fluorescein angiography (FA) and indocyanine green angiography (ICG-A). Results All patients had sunset glow fundus, which resulted in no apparent corresponding abnormality on FAF or SD-OCT. Lesions with decreased autofluorescence signal were observed in 11 eyes (85%), being associated with loss of the RPE and involvement of OR on SD-OCT. In 5 eyes (38%) some of these lesions were very subtle on clinical examination but easily detected by FAF. Lesions with increased autofluorescence signal were seen in 8 eyes (61.5%), showing variable involvement of the OR on SD-OCT and corresponding clinically to areas of RPE proliferation and cystoid macular edema. Conclusion Combined use of FAF and SD-OCT imaging allowed noninvasive delineation of RPE/OR changes in patients with chronic VKH, which were consistent with previous histopathological reports. Some of these changes were not apparent on clinical examination. PMID:20010321

  10. Joseph Henry and John Henry Lefroy A common 19th century vision of auroral research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, S. M.

    Research on solar-terrestrial relationships today relies primarily on in situ space data. These data, however, cover only a short period of about 30 years. Many solar and related phenomena vary on much longer time scales. For the study of these, parameters such as sunspots, magnetic activity, auroral occurrence, or other proxy data are required. Historical records of aurora are particularly useful in this connection.

  11. Does hydrology have a soul?(Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Upmanu

    2014-05-01

    Water is the distinguishing feature of Earth. Its presence sustains life, business, energy and romance. Hydrology is the science of water. Hence, it is one of the most relevant and exciting of the planetary sciences. But, does hydrology as it is taught and practiced today achieve this potential? Is understanding and predicting the hydrological cycle really in the domain of today's hydrologists? I intend to present a personal view of some puzzles as well as fundamental issues that define hydrology as a fertile ground of scientific inquiry that emerges at the intersection of the planetary and life sciences, and of course human behavior. I plan to outline 5 main questions whose explicit or implicit pursuit characterizes the essence of the hydrological being.

  12. Henri Mondor Experience with Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction Failure.

    PubMed

    Bosc, Romain; Meningaud, Jean-Paul

    2016-10-01

    Maxillofacial reconstruction surgery largely relies on the use of microsurgical free transfer techniques. Head and neck cancer surgery and ballistic injuries may lead to significant losses of multitissular substances. Even when the free transfer is successful and the microvascular critical phase is resolved, some functions or anatomic structures may not have been properly restored or have worsened. Any plastic surgery technique may be used to improve an unfavorable functional or aesthetic result after free flap reconstruction. In most cases, performing surgical readjustments using a local flap is needed. PMID:27601393

  13. A random walk on water (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2009-04-01

    Randomness and uncertainty had been well appreciated in hydrology and water resources engineering in their initial steps as scientific disciplines. However, this changed through the years and, following other geosciences, hydrology adopted a naïve view of randomness in natural processes. Such a view separates natural phenomena into two mutually exclusive types, random or stochastic, and deterministic. When a classification of a specific process into one of these two types fails, then a separation of the process into two different, usually additive, parts is typically devised, each of which may be further subdivided into subparts (e.g., deterministic subparts such as periodic and aperiodic or trends). This dichotomous logic is typically combined with a manichean perception, in which the deterministic part supposedly represents cause-effect relationships and thus is physics and science (the "good"), whereas randomness has little relationship with science and no relationship with understanding (the "evil"). Probability theory and statistics, which traditionally provided the tools for dealing with randomness and uncertainty, have been regarded by some as the "necessary evil" but not as an essential part of hydrology and geophysics. Some took a step further to banish them from hydrology, replacing them with deterministic sensitivity analysis and fuzzy-logic representations. Others attempted to demonstrate that irregular fluctuations observed in natural processes are au fond manifestations of underlying chaotic deterministic dynamics with low dimensionality, thus attempting to render probabilistic descriptions unnecessary. Some of the above recent developments are simply flawed because they make erroneous use of probability and statistics (which, remarkably, provide the tools for such analyses), whereas the entire underlying logic is just a false dichotomy. To see this, it suffices to recall that Pierre Simon Laplace, perhaps the most famous proponent of determinism in the history of philosophy of science (cf. Laplace's demon), is, at the same time, one of the founders of probability theory, which he regarded as "nothing but common sense reduced to calculation". This harmonizes with James Clerk Maxwell's view that "the true logic for this world is the calculus of Probabilities" and was more recently and epigrammatically formulated in the title of Edwin Thompson Jaynes's book "Probability Theory: The Logic of Science" (2003). Abandoning dichotomous logic, either on ontological or epistemic grounds, we can identify randomness or stochasticity with unpredictability. Admitting that (a) uncertainty is an intrinsic property of nature; (b) causality implies dependence of natural processes in time and thus suggests predictability; but, (c) even the tiniest uncertainty (e.g., in initial conditions) may result in unpredictability after a certain time horizon, we may shape a stochastic representation of natural processes that is consistent with Karl Popper's indeterministic world view. In this representation, probability quantifies uncertainty according to the Kolmogorov system, in which probability is a normalized measure, i.e., a function that maps sets (areas where the initial conditions or the parameter values lie) to real numbers (in the interval [0, 1]). In such a representation, predictability (suggested by deterministic laws) and unpredictability (randomness) coexist, are not separable or additive components, and it is a matter of specifying the time horizon of prediction to decide which of the two dominates. An elementary numerical example has been devised to illustrate the above ideas and demonstrate that they offer a pragmatic and useful guide for practice, rather than just pertaining to philosophical discussions. A chaotic model, with fully and a priori known deterministic dynamics and deterministic inputs (without any random agent), is assumed to represent the hydrological balance in an area partly covered by vegetation. Experimentation with this toy model demonstrates, inter alia, that: (1) for short time horizons the deterministic dynamics is able to give good predictions; but (2) these predictions become extremely inaccurate and useless for long time horizons; (3) for such horizons a naïve statistical prediction (average of past data) which fully neglects the deterministic dynamics is more skilful; and (4) if this statistical prediction, in addition to past data, is combined with the probability theory (the principle of maximum entropy, in particular), it can provide a more informative prediction. Also, the toy model shows that the trajectories of the system state (and derivative properties thereof) do not resemble a regular (e.g., periodic) deterministic process nor a purely random process, but exhibit patterns indicating anti-persistence and persistence (where the latter statistically complies with a Hurst-Kolmogorov behaviour). If the process is averaged over long time scales, the anti-persistent behaviour improves predictability, whereas the persistent behaviour substantially deteriorates it. A stochastic representation of this deterministic system, which incorporates dynamics, is not only possible, but also powerful as it provides good predictions for both short and long horizons and helps to decide on when the deterministic dynamics should be considered or neglected. Obviously, a natural system is extremely more complex than this simple toy model and hence unpredictability is naturally even more prominent in the former. In addition, in a complex natural system, we can never know the exact dynamics and we must infer it from past data, which implies additional uncertainty and an additional role of stochastics in the process of formulating the system equations and estimating the involved parameters. Data also offer the only solid grounds to test any hypothesis about the dynamics, and failure of performing such testing against evidence from data renders the hypothesised dynamics worthless. If this perception of natural phenomena is adequately plausible, then it may help in studying interesting fundamental questions regarding the current state and the trends of hydrological and water resources research and their promising future paths. For instance: (i) Will it ever be possible to achieve a fully "physically based" modelling of hydrological systems that will not depend on data or stochastic representations? (ii) To what extent can hydrological uncertainty be reduced and what are the effective means for such reduction? (iii) Are current stochastic methods in hydrology consistent with observed natural behaviours? What paths should we explore for their advancement? (iv) Can deterministic methods provide solid scientific grounds for water resources engineering and management? In particular, can there be risk-free hydraulic engineering and water management? (v) Is the current (particularly important) interface between hydrology and climate satisfactory?. In particular, should hydrology rely on climate models that are not properly validated (i.e., for periods and scales not used in calibration)? In effect, is the evolution of climate and its impacts on water resources deterministically predictable?

  14. Henri Poincaré: New methods of celestial mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goroff, D. L.

    This three-volume set presents an English translation of Poincaré's "Les méthodes nouvelles de la mécanique céleste", originally published in 1892 - 1899. An introduction, by D. L. Goroff, provides samples of some of the historical studies, mathematical surveys, and personal homages that have been written about Poincaré and his work. Its goal is to make a great but difficult work more accessible to contemporary readers.

  15. Un cosmologiste oublié: Jean Henri Lambert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Débarbat, Suzanne; Lévy, Jacques

    Si les travaux de Kepler ont eu une large influence sure les progrès réalisés en astronomie au cours du 17e siècle, le Siècle de lumières a vu apparaître de nouvelles conceptions. La court vie de J.H. lambert s'inscrit dans le 18e siècle. Il s'agit d'un nom bien connu dans différents domaines (photométrie, projections cartographiques, mathématiques appliquées, etc.); mais il n'est guàre mentionné en cosmologie, alors que Lambert y a fourni une contribution originale offrant quelques suprenantes anticipations...

  16. Strong Medicine: A Talk with Former Principal Henry Gradillas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Paul

    1989-01-01

    With motivational insight, educational understanding, and independence, a maverick educator transformed an East Los Angeles high school previously on a disaster course. In the process, one of his most gifted and imaginative teachers, Jaime Escalante, became a media celebrity. (Author/MSE)

  17. Poincaré, Jules Henri (1854-1912)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Born in Nancy, Lorraine, France, became professor of mathematics at the Sorbonne in Paris, contributed to all areas of mathematics, including the three-body problem of celestial mechanics and studies of the stability of the solar system. He was first to consider the possibility of chaos in planetary orbits, foreshadowing the modern study that restarted in 1963. His work began as the answer to a q...

  18. Henri Mondor Experience with Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction Failure.

    PubMed

    Bosc, Romain; Meningaud, Jean-Paul

    2016-10-01

    Maxillofacial reconstruction surgery largely relies on the use of microsurgical free transfer techniques. Head and neck cancer surgery and ballistic injuries may lead to significant losses of multitissular substances. Even when the free transfer is successful and the microvascular critical phase is resolved, some functions or anatomic structures may not have been properly restored or have worsened. Any plastic surgery technique may be used to improve an unfavorable functional or aesthetic result after free flap reconstruction. In most cases, performing surgical readjustments using a local flap is needed.

  19. Henry's Law Activity of Oxygen in Molten Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, J. W.

    2015-09-01

    A model is proposed for the solubility of oxygen in molten iron in dilute solutions in which the oxygen exists in two states, free and associated. Only the free oxygen has thermodynamic activity in the sense of interaction with an electrochemical cell to produce the voltage described by the Nernst equation.

  20. Water and the city (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, Renzo

    2010-05-01

    Total world population is about six billion, half living in cities, one third living in slums. This figure has doubled from 1960, when urban population was less than one billion out of the total figure of 3 billion; no more than one fifth was estimated to live in slums at that time. Demography experts predict that population will be around 9 billion in 2050, two thirds (6 billion) living in urban areas, and no reasonable prediction is available for slums. History shows that water is a key factor of urbanization: springs and rivers played a fundamental role in determining where one could settle, and where we are settled now. Water availability is expected to be a major control of man's life in the next future of planet Earth. The daily municipal water withdrawal ranges from 80 to 150 liters per person in China, India and Brazil cities; can they pretend to get more than 600 liters as a US citizen currently does? The impact of natural disasters such as storms and floods is strongly linked to increasing vulnerability associated with urbanization. Are state-of-the-art mitigation policies effective in reducing this impact in both terms of human casualties and economic damage? These and similar questions are fundamental to address hydrological science and engineering hydrology in next years. This talk will approach some open problems arising from the impact of increasing urbanization on the water cycle and, mostly, the associated feedback on human life. These include the need for an insight of nonstationarity, transients and feedback control of hydrological processes; the merging of the space-time scales of hydrological processes with the spatial scales of the city, and the temporal scale of lifestyles; and the way for water scientist and engineers to be involved in the design of cities and the search for life styles coherent with a sustainable development approach.

  1. The Birth of Miles Henry DeVries

    PubMed Central

    DeVries, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In this birth story, a second-time mother relates her experience of birthing her son at home after her daughter was born via cesarean surgery. Support from the International Cesarean Awareness Network, as well as a home birth midwife specializing in vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC), made the dream of a vaginal birth a reality for this mom. This story highlights the importance of having a supportive care provider and laboring in a safe and comfortable environment when pursuing a VBAC. PMID:23277724

  2. Happy Henry Half Dollar. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zishka, Phyllis

    This unit, appropriate for second grade students, contains student materials and teacher's guide for teaching about the appearance, use, and value of the half dollar. Approximate time to complete the unit is six hours. The activities are designed for individualized instruction with a learning center approach. These activities include following…

  3. How the myelin picture of the human cerebral cortex can be computed from cytoarchitectural data. A bridge between von Economo and Vogt.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, B

    1993-01-01

    In the cerebral cortex two main types of anatomical parcellation have been proposed: cyto- and myeloarchitectonics. Cytoarchitectonics is based on differences in the distribution and the sizes of cell bodies. Myeloarchitectonics relies on the layering and packing density of intracortical myelinated fibres. Thereby attention is mainly focused on those horizontal fibres which are organized in bands known as the stripes of Baillarger. Cyto- and myeloarchitectonics must be somehow related: structural changes from area to area as revealed by the Nissl stain coincide with changes in the myelin picture. In this paper, it is demonstrated that two simple assumptions are sufficient to transform quantitative data on the Nissl picture of a certain area (i.e. layer thicknesses, neuron sizes, neuron densities) into the corresponding myelin picture. The first assumption is that large neurons contribute more to the intracortical myelin content than small ones, and that this relation can be represented by a sigmoid curve. The second assumption is that the average distribution of horizontal axon collaterals of pyramidal neurons with respect to the cell body can be quantified by a simple model. On the basis of these two assumptions, myelin patterns were computed for the whole spectrum of cortical variability, including the primary visual, somatosensory, auditory and motor cortices, the speech centres and a number of association areas. Comparison of the simulations with real myelin preparations revealed remarkable similarities. These findings support the assumption that the horizontal component of the myelin picture is mainly produced by axon collaterals of pyramidal cells, and that nonpyramidal neurons and afferent fibres play a minor role. Moreover, the results suggest that the distribution of horizontal axon collaterals of pyramidal neurons and the principles of their myelination are very similar in different areas. The function of intracortical myelin is discussed. The increase in conduction velocity gained by myelination seems negligible for most intracortical fibres. It is argued that myelination may be related to learning processes during the critical period. PMID:8270790

  4. Anti-Bullying Intervention: Implementation and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmivalli, Christina; Kaukiainen, Ari; Voeten, Marinus

    2005-01-01

    Background: The participant role approach represents a view of bullying as a group process in which bystanders often encourage the bullying or silently witness it, while little support is given to the victim (e.g. Salmivalli, Lagerspetz, Bjorkqvist, Osterman, & Kaukiainen, 1996). There is a discrepancy between students' attitudes (which are often…

  5. STS-54 Physics of Toys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Greg Vogt, NASA Headquarters Education Specialist, and Carolyn Sumners, Houston Museum of Natural Science, give an overview of the spaceborne experiments that will take place on the STS-54 Endeavour mission. Mr. Vogt discusses the objectives and procedures of the experiments, which are structured around using toys to show the effects of microgravity. Mr. Vogt and Ms. Sumners then answer questions from the press.

  6. Henry David Thoreau, Forest Succession & The Nature of Science: A Method for Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric M.

    2009-01-01

    A main reason for using the history of science in classroom instruction is its utility in promoting students' understanding of the nature of science (NOS). As indicated in such documents as the "National Science Education Standards," it is important to help students develop their understanding of NOS so that they will become more critical…

  7. Henri Marie Raymond de Toulouse-Lautrec-Montfa (1864-1901): artistic genius and medical curiosity.

    PubMed

    Leigh, F W

    2013-02-01

    Toulouse-Lautrec was born in Albi in South West France. His parents were first cousins; this consanguineous marriage was responsible for his ugly deformities. Lautrec's life in Montmartre became the setting for much of his art and for his deliberate slow self-destruction. In addition to his artistic ability he was courageous, a natural leader, an accomplished chef, a connoisseur of fine wine, intelligent, humorous and very generous.

  8. Nitric acid uptake by sulfuric acid solutions under stratospheric conditions - Determination of Henry's Law solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reihs, Christa M.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of nitric acid by sulfuric acid solutions representative of stratospheric particulate at low temperatures was measured to determine the solubility of nitric acid in sulfuric acid solutions as a function of H2SO4 concentration and solution temperature. Solubilities are reported for sulfuric acid solutions ranging from 58 to 87 wt pct H2SO4 over a temperature range from 188 to 240 K, showing that, in general, the solubility of nitric acid increases with decreasing sulfuric acid concentration and with decreasing temperature. The measured solubilities indicate that nitric acid in the global stratosphere will be found predominantly in the gas phase.

  9. 76 FR 5194 - Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge, Henry, Benton, Decatur, and Humphreys Counties, TN; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... (73 FR 17994). On December 28, 1945, President Harry S. Truman signed Executive Order No. 9670... period via Federal Register notice on June 7, 2010 (75 FR 32201). We received 43 comments on the Draft... mammals, fish, reptiles, and amphibians. We announce our decision and the availability of the final...

  10. Henry James: A Collection of Critical Essays. Twentieth Century Views Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edel, Leon, Ed.

    One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major authors, this collection includes essays by Leon Edel, Joseph Conrad, Max Beerbohm, Ezra Pound, Edith Wharton, Percy Lubbock, Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Van Wyck Brooks, Edmund Wilson, E. M. Forster, William Troy, Pelham Edgar, Stephen Spender, Graham Greene,…

  11. On Goal-Oriented, Hydrogeological Site Investigation: A Holistic Approach (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Yoram

    2016-04-01

    UQ (for Uncertainty Quantification) is a critical element of groundwater management and by extension, of hydrological site investigation. While it is clear that UQ is an important goal, there is ambiguity as to what the target of the UQ should be, and how to make UQ relevant in the context of public policy. Planning for UQ (meaning what measurements to take, where, how many, what frequency, etc.), one could consider environmental performance parameters (EPMs, such as concentrations or travel time) as the targets of site investigation. But there is a need to go beyond EPMs, and to consider the uncertainty related to impacts such as enhanced cancer-risk due to groundwater contamination or, more generally, to decisions facing regulators. In any case, UQ requires site investigation, and decision-makers, who end up paying for it, are not really interested in EPMs: they care about making operational decisions that are defensible legally and justified from the perspective of public good. The key to UQ, whether considering EPMS or operational decisions concerning the public good, is defining a suitable strategy for site investigation. There is a body of published works on relating site investigations with EPMs, but much less is known on how to support operational decisions with strategies for site characterization. In this lecture, I will address this issue and I will outline a comprehensive approach for addressing it using a statistical formalism that couples hypothesis testing with Bayesian statistics. I refer to this approach as goal-oriented site investigation. I will show how site investigation strategies, with specifics such as which measurements to take and where, could be related to goals lined with operational decisions. This includes (1) defining the relevant goals; (2) formulating hypotheses; (3) defining alternative strategies for site investigation and (4) evaluating them in terms of probabilities for making errors in accepting or rejecting the hypotheses.

  12. The bright minds beyond our machines: Henry Coandă and his ideas.

    PubMed

    Coman, Ioan Mircea

    2007-04-01

    Most cardiologists rarely remember that new ideas dedicated initially to completely different areas, are the technological background of most medical devices. Also, they almost ignore the bright minds beyond these ideas. The Coandă effect, vital in the color-Doppler assessment of valvular regurgitations with eccentric jets--bears the name of a Romanian inventor whose life (1886-1972) was mostly dedicated to aeronautics and who is considered the 'father' of jet engines. His fluid dynamics discovery was patented in 1934, but its importance for medical applications was recognized much later. PMID:17413300

  13. 76 FR 63906 - Henry Gordy International, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ...: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish settlements which it provisionally accepts under the Consumer Product Safety Act in the Federal Register in... their mouth, the dart can be inhaled into the throat and it can prevent the child from breathing....

  14. 75 FR 32201 - Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge, Henry, Benton, Decatur, and Humphreys Counties, TN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... started the process through a notice in the Federal Register on April 2, 2008 (73 FR 17994). On December... we would conduct population and habitat surveys to evaluate shorebird use and invertebrate densities... more baseline inventories for non-game mammals, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates....

  15. Geochemistry of vanadium in an epigenetic, sandstone-hosted vanadium- uranium deposit, Henry Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanty, R.B.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Northrop, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    The epigenetic Tony M vanadium-uranium orebody in south-central Utah is hosted in fluvial sandstones of the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic). Measurements of the relative amounts of V+3 and V +4 in ore minerals show that V+3 is more abundant. Thermodynamic calculations show that vanadium was more likely transported to the site of mineralization as V+4. The ore formed as V+4 was reduced by hydrogen sulfide, followed by hydrolysis and precipitation of V+3 in oxide minerals or chlorite. Uranium was transported as uranyl ion (U+6), or some complex thereof, and reduced by hydrogen sulfide, forming coffinite. Detrital organic matter in the rocks served as the carbon source for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Vanadium most likely was derived from the dissolution of iron-titanium oxides. Uranium probably was derived from the overlying Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation. Previous studies have shown that the ore formed at the density-stratified interface between a basinal brine and dilute meteoric water. The mineralization processes described above occurred within the mixing zone between these two fluids. -from Authors

  16. DETERMINATION OF HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS FOR VOCS IN ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to be a newer medium for a wide variety of chemical reactions and are considered as the potential replacements for traditional volatile organic solvents. However, the separation and recovery of organic compounds from ILs has not been systematic...

  17. Estimation of Henry's Law Constant for a Diverse Set of Organic Compounds from Molecular Structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) vapor pressure and activity coefficient models were coupled to estimate Henry’s Law Constant (HLC) in water and in hexadecane for a wide range of non-polar and polar organic compounds without modification or additional p...

  18. Contributions of John Henry Poynting to the understanding of radiation pressure

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, R.; Baxter, C.

    2012-01-01

    The name of Poynting is universally recognized for his development of the well-known expression for the flow of electromagnetic energy. Not so well known is Poynting's series of papers on radiation pressure, with 2011 marking the centenary of the last of his 15 publications on this topic. This paper reviews and assesses his radiation-pressure work, with a level of coverage aimed at the reader familiar with the Maxwell electromagnetic theory and interested in the current understanding of radiation pressure. We begin with brief details of Poynting's life, followed by accounts of the relevant publications by others before and during his period of activity in the field from 1903 to 1911. His contributions to the understanding of radiation-pressure effects in the solar system, and the linear and angular momenta of light are discussed, with evaluations from a modern perspective. PMID:22792039

  19. A resolution honoring the life and service of the late Staff Sergeant Robert Henry Anderson.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. McCain, John [R-AZ

    2014-11-18

    11/18/2014 Referred to the Committee on Armed Services. (text of measure as introduced: CR S6097) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. 77 FR 57126 - Henri Wetselaar, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... Respondent performed a physical exam during which he listened to the TFO's heart and lungs, palpated his... assistant listened to the TFO's lungs, Respondent asked the TFO if he was ``looking for some stronger thing... assistant stated that 200 tablets could not be prescribed unless the TFO underwent a urine test for...

  1. Hybrid larch (Larix x eurolepis Henry): a good candidate for cadmium phytoremediation?

    PubMed

    Moudouma, Chris Fabien Moussavou; Riou, Catherine; Gloaguen, Vincent; Saladin, Gaëlle

    2013-03-01

    Studies related to phytoremediation by conifers are still at their beginning. Thus, we investigated the ability of a hybrid larch (Larix x eurolepis) to accumulate cadmium (Cd). One-month-old clonal plantlets grown in vitro were exposed for 1 week to a high Cd concentration (1.5 mM). No significant effect was observed on root and shoot biomass, root length, and needle number as a result of Cd treatment. Leaf photosynthetic pigment content and total soluble protein concentration in roots and shoots remained unchanged compared to control plantlets. Taken together, these results suggested that hybrid larch tolerated Cd in our conditions. The high Cd concentration in shoots (200 μg Cd gram(-1) dry weight) showed the good capacity of larch to translocate Cd and thus a potential use of this species for phytoremediation. Furthermore, under our conditions, phytochelatin biosynthesis pathway was slightly stimulated, suggesting that this pathway did not reach the threshold and/or another mechanism of Cd storage may be involved to explain larch tolerance to Cd.

  2. [Henry Arrault, before the Geneva convention, promotes voluntary ambulances with his friend George Sand].

    PubMed

    Trépardoux, Francis

    2006-01-01

    Born in Joigny, Arrault's family had close relationship before and during the Napoleonic period with medicine and the army. From 1825 in Paris, he owned a pharmacy shop, and created several types of first-aid boxes and devices, containing clean dressings. He acted as an official supplier for the french armies for surgery and pharmacy materials. In 1861 after the Crimean war, as he presented a new plan for improving the rescue of wounded on the battle fields, he called the French authorities upon the opportunity to ratify a specific international convention insuring the neutrality to the wounded and to the medical staff on the battle field. In 1864, Dunant succeeded in that way by creating the < Red cross >, after setting up a large diplomatic arrangement. As Arrault exhibited sympathy for the republican party, the imperial regime kept him aside of any consideration. With the support of the non conformist writer George Sand, he tempted in 1865 to make his anteriority known and accepted. Therefore, a bitter dispute opened with Dunant. During the international exhibitions, he presented his materials in London 1862, Paris 1867 and Vienna 1873. As ageing, he acted as a member of the city council of Paris among the radical republicans and died in 1887.

  3. [Lucien-Henri-Armand Coullon, called Pascalon, pharmacist, poet and humorist (1860-1940?)].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, H; Lefebvre, T

    1994-01-01

    Under the pseudonym of Pascalon, L.-H.-A. Coullon published several compilations of poems. The authors present the most important of these anthologies, Les Refrains de l'officine, as well as the personality of their creator. By means of this example they draw up a definition of "pharmaceutical humor".

  4. Some current trends in Milky Way research (the Henry Norris Russell Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok, B. J.

    1983-10-01

    A discussion is presented of the Milky Way Galaxy research trends that have recently established a far greater mass and a greater outward extent for the Galaxy than would have been considered likely only 7-8 years ago. The maximum radius of the Galaxy circa 1975 was believed to be of the order of 20 kpc. The new radius is at least three times, and possibly as much as five times, greater than the earlier value. Attention is given to such pertinent topics as the general luminosity function near the central plane of the disk, space densities at different distances from the galactic plane, the galactic corona, spiral structure studies, giant molecular clouds, and bipolar ejections.

  5. George Henry Falkiner Nuttall and the origins of parasitology and Parasitology.

    PubMed

    Cox, F E G

    2009-10-01

    By the beginning of the twentieth century, most of the major discoveries concerning the nature and life cycles of parasites had been made and tropical medicine was beginning to establish itself as a discipline but parasitology still lacked any real cohesion or focus. This focus arrived in 1908 when George Nuttall founded a new journal, Parasitology, as a Supplement to the Journal of Hygiene in order to cater for increasing numbers of papers on protozoological, helminthological and entomological topics that were being submitted for publication to that journal; thus bringing these three subjects together under one heading and, in doing so, established the discipline of parasitology. The events leading up to and the subsequent development of the discipline are discussed.

  6. Acceptance of the 2009 Henry Baldwin Ward Medal: The accidental parasitologist

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Society, President Conn, colleagues, friends, and particularly students, the Ward Medal recipient, from Clarke Read onward, traditionally recounts how their career was shaped. A decade ago, in a crumbling Kona hotel, the ASP's own tattooed lady, Janine Caira, opened her Ward Medal address with: “To all future Ward Medalists, many of whom I trust are sitting in the audience out there today, I say: savor the moment! You have no idea how much easier it is to be sitting out there where you are than standing up here where I am” (Caira 1998). I certainly didn't imagine that Janine was delivering her advice to me and it is presumptuous to imagine my story is a template for shaping a career. As the title of my talk indicates, it was an accident.

  7. 75 FR 28068 - Christopher Henry Lister, P.A.; Revocation of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... factors are * * * considered in the disjunctive.'' Robert A. Leslie, M.D., 68 FR 15227, 15230 (2003). I....'' Laurence T. McKinney, 73 FR 43260, 43265 n.22 (2008); see also Moore, 423 U.S. at 142-43 (noting that.... See Kamir Garces-Mejias, 72 FR 54931, 54935 (2007); United Prescription Services, Inc., 72 FR...

  8. Another Look at Holistic Art Education: Exploring the Legacy of Henry Schaefer-Simmern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gradle, Sally Armstrong

    2009-01-01

    In his forward to "Curriculum in Abundance" (2006), curriculum theorist William Pinar suggests that education should offer opportunities for "self-formation" which include the cultivation of our capacity to surrender, begin again, and dwell in possibility. This paper examines the theory and art education practices of a forgotten and often…

  9. William Henry Bragg in Adelaide: beginning research at a colonial locality.

    PubMed

    Jenkin, John

    2004-03-01

    This essay presents an account of W. H. Bragg's earliest research program in Australia during the years 1904-1907: a study of the behavior of alpha particles from radioactive decay. It is suggested that problems associated with distance and isolation played a pivotal role in Bragg's thinking and acting during this period and that his use of two "advocates," Ernest Rutherford and Frederick Soddy, was essential to the success of the program. It is further argued that this account supports a substantial amendment of the center-periphery model of colonial science to embrace a much closer attention to place and locality; that is, it supports a polycentric model (in which the center might still be prominent).

  10. The Scientific Papers of the Honourable Henry Cavendish, F. R. S. 2 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavendish, Henry; Clerk Maxwell, James; Thorpe, Edward, , Sir; Larmor, Joseph, , Sir

    2011-02-01

    Volume 1: Preface Sir Joseph Larmor; Introduction; First published paper on electricity, 1771; Preliminary propositions; Appendix; Thoughts concerning electricity; Account of the experiments; Second published paper on electricity, 1776; Experiments in 1771; Experiments in 1772; Experiments in 1773; Measurers; Experiments with the artificial torpedo; Resistance to electricity; Results of comparisons of charges; Results on resistance; Notes by the editor, 1879 James Clerk Maxwell; Life of Cavendish Thomas Young; Index to Cavendish Manuscripts. Volume 2: Introduction; Reprint of papers communicated by Cavendish to the Royal Society and published in the Philosophical Transactions; Unpublished papers from the original manuscripts in the possession of the Duke of Devonshire, K. G., LL. D., F. R. S.; Cavendish's mathematical and dynamical manuscripts Sir Joseph Larmor; Cavendish as a geologist Sir Archibald Geikie; Cavendish's astronomical manuscripts Sir Frank W. Dyson; Cavendish's magnetic work Charles Chree; Index.

  11. Henri Poincaré's criticism of Fin De Siècle electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrigol, Olivier

    Il faudra donc un jour ou l'autre modifier nos idées en quelque point important et briser le cadre où nous cherchons à faire rentrer à la fois les phénomènes optiques et les phénomènes électriques. Poincaré, LÉclairage Électrique, October 1895.

  12. HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL CONGENERS AND THEIR VARIATION WITH TEMPERATURE. (R825245)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  13. A CRITICAL REVIEW OF HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS. (R825689C059)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. To provide for the issuance of a commemorative postage stamp in honor of George Henry White.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Butterfield, G. K. [D-NC-1

    2011-01-26

    02/08/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, U.S. Postal Service, and Labor Policy . (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. [CIRCULATION OF DIROFILARIA REPENS (RAILLIET ET HENRY, 1911) IN THE ARID ZONE OF SOUTHERN RUSSIA].

    PubMed

    Varlamova, A I; Arkhipov, I A

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of dirofilariasis was studied in dogs from the urban and rural areas in Southern Russia. The high prevalence of Dirofilaria repens infection were established among the dogs in the Republic of Kalmykia. The blood samples from 328 dogs were tested; D. repens infection was detected in 23.6 and 15.5% of the rural and urban dogs, respectively. The highest prevalence of D. repens infection was noted in of 4-6-year-old dogs. Dogs aged 0, 1-3, 4-6 7-9, and more 10 years were infected in 0, 26.3, 33.3, 29.4, and 28.5% of cases, respectively. PMID:27405212

  16. Solid phase microextraction method development for measuring Henry's Law constants of formaldehyde in aqueous solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) has been of special concern as an indoor air pollutant because of its existence in a wide range of products and its adverse health effects. The air-water partitioning behavior of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as formaldehyde is an important process th...

  17. Beyond Conservation and Liberation: The Education of Our Aspirations. Thirteenth David Dodds Henry Lecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Linda S.

    This booklet presents the text of a lecture by Linda S. Wilson, president of Radcliffe College (Cambridge, Massachusetts) on the role of higher education as well as the responses, questions and discussion that followed. The lecture is preceded by a preface and an introduction by Morton W. Weir, chancellor of the University of Illinois at…

  18. Henry B. Stallard, MD: The 1924 Paris Olympics, and Chariots of Fire.

    PubMed

    Bullock, John D

    2011-01-01

    Hyla Bristow Stallard was one of the greatest middle-distance runners in British athletic history. While an English medical student, he won the bronze medal in the 1500-meter run at the 1924 Paris Olympics, immortalized in the critically acclaimed 1981 epic British film, Chariots of Fire. He later became one of the most famous ophthalmologists in the world for his pioneering work in radiation therapy of malignant eye disease. He was an inspiring role model for both athletes and physicians. As a gifted individual who enjoyed two international careers, he is worthy of great admiration and emulation.

  19. The Reverend Dr William Henry Dallinger, F.R.S. (1839-1909).

    PubMed

    Haas, J W

    2000-01-01

    William Dallinger illustrates a social outsider concerned with the application of science to the physical, intellectual and spiritual health of his homeland, who forced his way into the scientific life of his nation. His path was encouraged by mentors such as William McKenny who steered him into the Methodist ministry, James Drysdale who helped him get established as a scientist and John Tyndall, Thomas Huxley and Charles Darwin who encouraged his scientific efforts and smoothed his way into his nation's highest scientific circles. The shadowy figures of John Wesley and John Ray played a role in affirming the validity of his scientific interests and concerns for science education.

  20. Imagining Kansas: Place, Promotion, and Western Stereotypes in the Art of Henry Worrall (1825-1902)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bres, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In May of 1876 three men took a private Santa Fe railroad car from Topeka, Kansas, to the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. One was the Santa Fe land commissioner and the director of the railroad's exhibit, another was secretary of state for the Kansas Board of Agriculture, and the third was a self-trained artist in the railroad's employ and the…