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Sample records for lahes likel tallinn-helsingi

  1. NASA’s SDO Captures Cascading Magnetic Arches

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A dark solar filament above the sun's surface became unstable and erupted on Dec. 16-17, 2015, generating a cascade of magnetic arches. A small eruption to the upper right of the filament was likel...

  2. Increasing selection response by Bayesian modeling of heterogeneous environmental variances

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heterogeneity of environmental variance among genotypes reduces selection response because genotypes with higher variance are more likely to be selected than low-variance genotypes. Modeling heterogeneous variances to obtain weighted means corrected for heterogeneous variances is difficult in likel...

  3. Report on an Overseas Visit in October/November 1986 to Review Maintenance Procedures for F404 Engine Electrical Control Unit and Related Matters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

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  4. National Dam Inspection Program. Crescent Lake Dam (NDI-ID Number PA-00413, DER-ID 52-142) Delaware River Basin, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

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  5. The influence of interchain coupling on intramolecular oscillation mobility in coupled macromolecular chains: The case of coplanar parallel chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čevizović, D.; Petković, S.; Galović, S.; Chizhov, A.; Reshetnyak, A.

    2015-10-01

    We enlarge our results from the study of the hopping mechanism of the oscillation excitation transport in 1D model of one biologica-likel macromolecular chain to the case of a system composed from two 1D parallel macromolecular chains with consideration of the properties of intramolecular oscillation excitations. We suppose, that due to the exciton interaction with thermal oscillation (generated by mechanical phonon subsystem) of structural elements (consisting of the peptide group) of the chains, the exciton becomes by self trapped and forms the polaron state. We suggest a model which generalizes the modified Holstein polaron model to the case of two macromolecular chains and find that because of the interchain coupling, the exciton energy band is splitted into two subbands. The hopping process of exciton migration along the macromolecular chains is studied in dependence of system parameters and temperature. We pay an special attention to the temperature range (near T = 300 K) in which living cells operate. It is found that for the certain values of the system parameters there exists the abrupt change of the exciton migration nature from practically free (light) exciton motion to an immobile (heavy, dressed by phonon cloud) quasiparticle We discuss an application of the obtained results to the exciton transport both within deoxyribonucleic acid molecule and in the 2D polymer films organized from such macromolecular chains.

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana DM2h (R8) within the Landsberg RPP1-like Resistance Locus Underlies Three Different Cases of EDS1-Conditioned Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Ana V.; Wagner, Christine; Choudhury, Sayan R.; Wang, Yiming; James, Geo Velikkakam; Griebel, Thomas; Alcázar, Ruben; Tsuda, Kenichi; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Parker, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have a large panel of nucleotide-binding/leucine rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors which monitor host interference by diverse pathogen molecules (effectors) and trigger disease resistance pathways. NLR receptor systems are necessarily under tight control to mitigate the trade-off between induced defenses and growth. Hence, mis-regulated NLRs often cause autoimmunity associated with stunting and, in severe cases, necrosis. Nucleocytoplasmic ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) is indispensable for effector-triggered and autoimmune responses governed by a family of Toll-Interleukin1-Receptor-related NLR receptors (TNLs). EDS1 operates coincidently or immediately downstream of TNL activation to transcriptionally reprogram cells for defense. We show here that low levels of nuclear-enforced EDS1 are sufficient for pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana, without causing negative effects. Plants expressing higher nuclear EDS1 amounts have the genetic, phenotypic and transcriptional hallmarks of TNL autoimmunity. In a screen for genetic suppressors of nuclear EDS1 autoimmunity, we map multiple, independent mutations to one gene, DM2h, lying within the polymorphic DANGEROUS MIX2 cluster of TNL RPP1-like genes from A. thaliana accession Landsberg erecta (Ler). The DM2 locus is a known hotspot for deleterious epistatic interactions leading to immune-related incompatibilities between A. thaliana natural accessions. We find that DM2hLer underlies two further genetic incompatibilities involving the RPP1-likeLer locus and EDS1. We conclude that the DM2hLer TNL protein and nuclear EDS1 cooperate, directly or indirectly, to drive cells into an immune response at the expense of growth. A further conclusion is that regulating the available EDS1 nuclear pool is fundamental for maintaining homeostatic control of TNL immune pathways. PMID:27082651

  7. Interpretation of diffuse He-atom scattering from steps

    SciTech Connect

    Hinch, B.J.

    1988-09-15

    With the recent improvements in dynamic range of He-surface scattering experiments, the measurement of diffuse scattered intensity from surface defects: step edges or point defects: has become a frequently executable experiment. There remain, however, certain features in the experimental data that, to date, have not been fully explained. A calculational method applicable to the scattering from step edges is developed here, firstly to calculate the basic oscillatory form of the intensities, and then to look at the previously unexplained finer structure. In particular, the paper attempts to reproduce some experimental data; that is, helium-atom scattering from a randomly stepped Pt(111) crystal, in a fixed 90/sup 0/-angle geometry (see A. M. Lahee, J. R. Manson, J. P. Toennies, and Ch. Woell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 471 (1986)). Even under a simple, hard-wall, eikonal approximation some of the previously unexplained features can be reproduced by the inclusion of a ''natural periodicity'' corrugation in the neighborhood of a step. This corrugation, with the periodicity of the lattice parameter, is allowed to decay away from the step. It is this decay length that is found to determine the characteristic width of the fine structure. The diffuse diffraction from a randomly stepped Pt(111), incidentally, now exhibits a certain degree of threefold symmetry. The enhanced corrugation amplitude in the neighborhood of a step is believed to be, of order at least, six times that observed on an unstepped Pt(111) surface. However, this enhancement factor is certainly very surface-orientation, and/or material, dependent.

  8. NARRATIVE: A short history of my life in science A short history of my life in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manson, Joseph R.

    2010-08-01

    Professor J Peter Toennies of the Max-Planck-Institut für Strömungsforschung in Göttingen, Germany (now the Max-Planck-Institut für Dynamik und Selbstorganization). Toennies was already, at that time, a major figure in the areas of physics and chemistry that use molecular and atomic beams. This was just a few years after he, with graduate student Bruce Doak, had succeeded in the first measurements of surface specific phonons using He atom scattering and, in particular, had obtained complete dispersion relations for Rayleigh modes. This was precisely the type of experiment that Celli, Cabrera and I had suggested over a decade earlier, so our research interests were an excellent match. Our work that summer with graduate student Christof Wöll and postdoc Angela Lahee developed experimental and theoretical methods for measuring the presence of isolated atomic or molecular adsorbates on surfaces. This initial visit led to a long and productive period of research on many aspects of He atom scattering from surfaces, and almost every summer from then through 1997 was spent in the very pleasant and historic city of Göttingen, which still has visible roman ruins and many old German buildings dating from the 1500s. This period was marked by interactions and collaborations with many of the graduate students, postdocs and visitors to the Toennies lab. Many of these collaborations continue to some extent even today, and include work with Andrew Graham, John Ellis, Frank Hofmann, Massimo Bertino, Robert Grisenti, Alexi Glebov, Wieland Schöllkopf, Walter Silvestri and Horst-Günter Rubahn. It was also during this period that I developed a long friendship and scientific collaboration with Jim Skofronick and Sanford Safron of the Department of Physics at Florida State University. Both were frequent visitors to the Toennies laboratory, and our collaboration extended far beyond our overlapping stays there. Among the fondest memories of visits to Göttingen are the many long walks and