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Sample records for lake baikal

  1. Seiche oscillations in Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, S. V.; Kucher, K. M.; Granin, N. G.; Sturova, I. V.

    2014-01-01

    The variations in the free surface of Lake Baikal at three stations (Bol'shie Koty, Listvyanka, and Baikal'sk) are measured. A modern recording method and an advanced technique of record processing are used. Based on 1-year-long observation data, the amplitudes of seiche oscillations and their seasonal changes are analyzed. It is found, in particular, that 67-min seiches are manifested in different seasons. Numerical calculations of seiches in Lake Baikal are made with the use of up-to-date bathymetric data on one-dimensional, plan, and spherical models. Spatial structures of oscillations with periods of 277, 152, 84, 67, and 59 min, corresponding to the well-expressed peaks of power spectral density, are studied. It is shown that the first four periods correspond to uninodal, binodal, trinodal, and quadrinodal longitudinal seiche modes of Lake Baikal. The periods of three solutions can correspond to the value of 59 min. The first of them is the seiche of the lake's South Basin, and two others are characterized by significant amplitude growth in the Small Sea and Chivyrkui Bay.

  2. Thermal springs in Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, Wayne C.; Callender, E.

    1992-01-01

    The ??18O values of pore wqters range from -15.2??? to -16.7???, and ??D values range from -119??? to -126??? (both isotopes determined relative to standard mean ocean water [SMOW]). Bottom water in Lake Baikal has a ??18O value of -5.6??? and a ??D value of -120???. Pore waters in the vent area are significantly enriched in Mg, K, Ca, and especially Na and have the lowest ??D and ??18O values; these pore waters are isotopically and chemically distinct from pore waters in other, more typical parts of the lake. The pore-water isotopic data fall on a local meteoric water line, and covariations in water isotopes and chemistry are not consistent with evaporation or hydrothermal water-rock interaction. The thermal springs represent discharging meteoric waters that have been gently heated during subsurface circulation and are largely unaltered isotopically. Chemical variations are most likely due to dissolution of subsurface evaporites. -from Authors

  3. Search for ancient microorganisms in Lake Baikal

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter-Cevera, Jennie C.; Repin, Vladimir E.; Torok, Tamas

    2000-06-14

    Lake Baikal in Russia, the world's oldest and deepest continental lake lies in south central Siberia, near the border to Mongolia. The lake is 1,643 m deep and has an area of about 46,000 km2. It holds one-fifth of all the terrestrial fresh water on Earth. Lake Baikal occupies the deepest portion of the Baikal Rift Zone. It was formed some 30-45 million years ago. The isolated Lake Baikal ecosystem represents a unique niche in nature based on its historical formation. The microbial diversity present in this environment has not yet been fully harvested or examined for products and processes of commercial interest and value. Thus, the collection of water, soil, and sub-bottom sediment samples was decided to characterize the microbial diversity of the isolated strains and to screen the isolates for their biotechnological value.

  4. Distribution of planktonic copepods of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, N. G.; Sheveleva, N. G.; Pomazkova, G. I.

    1998-06-01

    Net samples taken in the pelagic zone of Lake Baikal have revealed 6 Calanoida species, 14 Cyclopoida species and 1 Harpacticoida species. The paper reports the occurrence and abundance of these species in different pelagic biotopes of the lake in 1988-1995.

  5. Biogeochemical phosphorus mass balance for Lake Baikal, southeastern Siberia, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, E.; Granina, L.

    1997-01-01

    Extensive data for Lake Baikal have been synthesized into a geochemical mass balance for phosphorus (P). Some of the P budget and internal cycling terms for Baikal have been compared to similar terms for oligotrophic Lake Superior, mesotrophic Lake Michigan and the Baltic Sea, and the Ocean. Lake Baikal has a large external source of fluvial P compared to the Laurentian upper Great Lakes and the Ocean. The major tributary to Lake Baikal has experienced substantial increases in organic P loading during the past 25 years. This, coupled with potential P inputs from possible phosphorite mining, may threaten Baikal's oligotrophic status in the future. Water-column remineralization of particulate organic P is substantially greater in Lake Baikal than in the Laurentian Great Lakes. This is probably due to the great water depths of Lake Baikal. There is a gradient in P burial efficiency, with very high values (80%) for Lake Baikal and Lake Superior, lower values (50%) for Lake Michigan and the Baltic Sea, and a low value (13%) for the Ocean. The accumulation rate of P in Lake Baikal sediments is somewhat greater than that in the Laurentian upper Great Lakes and the Baltic Sea, and much greater than in the Ocean. Benthic regeneration rates are surprisingly similar for large lacustrine and marine environments and supply less than 10% of the P utilized for primary production in these aquatic environments.

  6. Identification of toxic Cyanobacteria in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Belykh, O I; Gladkikh, A S; Sorokovikova, E G; Tikhonova, I V; Butina, T V

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria of the genera Anabaena and Microcystis, containing genes for the synthesis of-microcystins (hepatotoxic cyanotoxins) were found for the first time in the coastal zone of Lake Baikal near-the village of Turka, where a tourism and recreational complex were constructed. According to the enzyme-immunoassay, microcystin concentration in water was 0.17 ± 0.01 µg/L. Using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, we found 3936 sequences in the eubacterial community of central basin of Lake Baikal. The summer bacterioplankton in both littoral and pelagic areas of the lake was dominated by the phylum Cyanobacteria, whereas a higher diversity of cyanobacteria was recorded in the plankton of the littoral zone. Moreover, the-potentially toxic Anabaena and Microcystis were detected in this area.

  7. Peculiarities of Lake Baikal water level regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabaeva, Darima B.; Tsydypov, Bair Z.; Ayurzhanaev, Alexander A.; Andreev, Sergey G.; Garmaev, Yendon Zh

    2016-11-01

    A 15-year-old low-water period in the basin of Lake Baikal established an endurance record in the entire history of observations. It began in the mid 90s of the last century. With some probability it may continue in the following years. An analysis of meteorological series of air temperature and precipitation in the region is conducted. A statistically significant trend of increasing temperature and decreasing rainfall is revealed. Atmospheric precipitation affects the long-term fluctuations in the river run-off to a greater extent than the other elements of the water balance. An analysis of the inflow of water into Lake Baikal is performed. It is found that the water level of the lake almost directly depends on the water content of the Selenga River. The minimal run-off in dry periods, as well as the annual run-off, tends to decrease. It is a continuous series of low run-off, which provided the negative trend in the minimal run-off. A dendrochronological reconstruction of the Selenga River run-off is made. A statistically significant trend of decreasing Selenga River run-off is revealed in the recent decades, and an analysis of temperature and precipitation for the basin on the Russian side is made.

  8. Lake Baikal, Russia as seen by STS-60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Lake Baikal, in southeastern Siberia, is the largest freshwater lake in the world. This view shows the northern end of the lake, and was taken in the early morning with low sun highlighting the mountain ranges rimming the lake basin. Pristine forests surround the lake.

  9. Active seepage and water infiltration in Lake Baikal sediments: new thermal data from TTR-Baikal 2014 (Class@Baikal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poort, Jeffrey; Khlystov, Oleg M.; Akhmanov, Grigorii G.; Khabuev, Andrei V.; Belousov, Oleg V.

    2015-04-01

    New thermal data from the sediments of Lake Baikal were collected in July 2014 during the first Training-Through-Research cruise on Lake Baikal (Class@Baikal) organized by MGU and LIN. TTR-Baikal is a comprehensive multidisciplinary program to train students on the field on pertinent scientific topics. The cruise program focused on seafloor sampling, acoustic investigations and heat flow measurements of gas seeps, flares, mud volcanoes, slumps and debris flows, canyons and channels in the coastal proximity. The thermal data were acquired using autonomous temperature sensors on a 3 meter long gravity corer that allowed analysis at the same spot of sediments, pore fluids, hydrates and microbiology. A total of eight thermal measurements were performed in five structures located on the lake floor of the Central Baikal Basin at 333-1530 meter water depths: 3 mud volcanoes (Novosibirsk, Unshuy and Krest), 1 seep site (Seep 13), and one fault outcrop in the Selenga transfer zone. All studied structures show signals of active seepage, water infiltration and/or hydrate dynamics. The strongest thermal gradient has been measured in Seep 13, suggesting a strong upflow of warm fluids similar to the Gorevoy Utes seep. At the three mud volcanoes, hydrate presence have been evidenced and both enhanced and reduced thermal gradients have been observed. This is similar to the hydrate-bearing K-2 mud volcano in Baikal (Poort et al., 2012). A strongly reduced thermal gradient was observed in the Krest mud volcano where the presence of oxidized channels at 30-40 cm under the sediment surface indicate an infiltration of cold lake water. The water infiltration process at hydrate bearing seep sites will be discussed and compared with other seep areas in the world.

  10. Lake Baikal, Russia as seen by STS-60

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-02-09

    STS060-87-087 (3-11 Feb 1994) --- Lake Baikal, in southeastern Siberia, is the largest freshwater lake in the world by volume, holding nearly 20 per cent of the world's fresh water. Lake Baikal is a biospheric reserve of high international interest to the global scientific community. It is home to some 600 endemic species, many found in no other location. This view shows the northern end of the lake, and was taken in the early morning with low sun highlighting the mountain ranges rimming the lake basin. Pristine forests surround the lake, although heavy logging is evident in other photography of the central and southern portions of the lake. Another unique aspect of Lake Baikal is the existence of the world's only known freshwater hydrothermal springs. The fault system which bounds the lake allows fluids to circulate deep into the Earth and resurface as hot springs around and in the lake. Russian and American scientists are using the Shuttle photography to examine the relationship of the lake's ice cover to areas of known hydrothermal activity. Thus Lake Baikal has been and continues to be a high-priority site for photography from space from both the Space Shuttle and the Russian Space Station MIR.

  11. Authigenic Molybdenum Isotopes Record Lake Baikal in the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, E.; Liu, H.; Lee, D.

    2013-12-01

    Authigenic molybdenum isotope signatures in marine sediments reflect the mechanisms of deposits under both oxic and reducing conditions. The studies are mainly focusing on marine environment, and the application on lake record is rare. A three-meters long gravity core (GC-99; 52°05'23'N, 105°50'24'E; water depth 201m) from Lake Baikal is studied for Mo isotopes and concentration. The result is using to examine the sources of material or/and the changes in conditions of Lake Baikal with climate changes. To approach on extracting Mo isotope signal directly related to lake water, a sequential leaching technique to extract the Mo isotopes coating on the Fe-Mn oxides and a robust chromatography technique to purify molybdenum isotopes is modified and used for all lake sediment samples. Then, Mo isotope composition is measured by applying double spike method with Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). According to the Mo concentration and its isotope composition δ98/95Mo relative to NIST-SRM-3134, the results imply Lake Baikal stayed oxic condition over the last 24 ka. Moreover, the sediment core GC-99 from Lake Baikal imply two stages fluctuations of the lake environment separated at core depth of 100cm (around 12ka); and the shifting of δ98/95Mo isotope composition shows that the lake during interglacial period was more oxic than the last glacial period due to absence of ice cover.

  12. Chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in Baikal seal (Phoca sibirica) from Lake Baikal: Levels, patterns, and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, H.; Tanabe, S.; Tatsukawa, R.; Amano, M.; Miyazaki, N.; Petrov, A.

    1995-12-31

    Contamination of chlorinated hydrocarbons such as DDTs (DDT and its metabolites), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), CHLs (chlordane compounds) and HCHs (hexachlorocyclohexanes) was assessed in the blubber of Baikal seal (Phoca sibirica) and their fish diet collected from Lake Baikal in 1992. Higher concentrations of DDTs and PCBs were detected, ranging from 4.9 to 160 {micro}g/g and 3.5 to 64 {micro}g/g on a lipid weight basis, respectively, whereas levels of CHLs and HCHs were approximately one or three orders of magnitude lower than those of DDTs and PCBs. The average of DDTs concentrations in adult male Baikal seals were about an order of magnitude higher than those reported for seals in the North Sea around UK and comparable to grey seal in the Baltic Sea, indicating that Baikal seals are categorized in a highly contaminated group. A positive age dependent accumulation of DDTs, PCBs and CHLs was found in male, while a steady-state was observed in female which attributes to the reproductive transfer, mainly lactation, of these chemicals. On the basis of contaminant burdens in adult seals, it was estimated that adult females transfer about 19% and 14% of their DDT and PCB body burdens to their pups during a reproductive process. Based on the data from isomer specific analysis of PCBs, it can be suggested that Baikal seals have higher capacity to metabolize congeners with vicinal H-atoms in meta, para positions than those of marine mammals.

  13. Functional convergence among pelagic sculpins of Lake Baikal and deepwater ciscoes of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Sideleva, Valentina G.; Todd, Thomas N.

    1999-01-01

    The vast, well-oxygenated hypolimnia of Lake Baikal and the Great Lakes were both dominated by endemic planktivorous fishes. These dominants, two species of sculpins (Comephorus, Comephoridae) in Lake Baikal and six species of deepwater ciscoes (Coregonus, Salmonidae) in the Great Lakes, although distant taxonomically, have morphologies suggesting a surprising degree of functional convergence. Here it is proposed that the same two buoyancy-regulation strategies observed in Baikal sculpins also arose in the deepwater ciscoes of the Great Lakes. One strategy favors hydrostatic lift (generated by low specific gravity) and is characterized by fatter, larger-bodied fish with smaller paired fins; the second strategy favors hydrodynamic lift (generated by swimming) and is characterized by leaner, smaller-bodied fish with larger paired fins. Both types likely evolved to feed on a single species of ecologically analogous, vertically migrating macrozooplankter: Macrohectopus branickii in Lake Baikal and Mysis relicta in the Great Lakes. It is suggested that Coregonus did not diversify and proliferate in Lake Baikal as they did in the Great Lakes because by the time Coregonus colonized Lake Baikal, pelagic sculpins were already dominant.

  14. Eutrophication dynamics in lake Baikal from remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarch, Jaime; Silow, Eugene; Krashchuk, Lyudmila S.; Pislegina, Elena V.; Shimaraeva, Svetlana V.; Izmestyeva, Lyubov R.; Santoleri, Rosalia; Moore, Marianne V.

    2017-04-01

    Lake Baikal, one of the oldest lakes on earth, the deepest (1642 m), and the largest in volume (23,615 cubic km) of all of Earth's freshwater bodies, is located nearly in the very center of Asia, 456 m above sea level. Baikal stretches for 636 km from the southwest to the northeast between 51°28' and 55°47' N, and 103°43' and 109°58' E. The area of Baikal's watershed is over 550,000 square km. Baikal is also unique in that its waters are rich in oxygen all the way to the bottom of the lake. A large number of the species living in Lake Baikal are endemic. In 1996, Lake Baikal was named a UNESCO Heritage Site, with Russia pledging to protect it. A number of recent studies have reported degradation of the benthic littoral zone such as proliferation of benthic algae, death of snails and endemic sponges, large coastal wash-ups of dead benthic algae and macrophytes, blooms of toxin-producing benthic cyanobacteria, and inputs of industrial contaminants. In the open, pelagic basins, changes in the eutrophication and water transparency have also been noticed. Such studies were based on in-situ collected data, at different spatial and temporal frequencies. Remote sensing (RS) offers a comprehensive monitoring of all littoral and open areas of the lake at a high and regular time frequency. The amount of ecological information retrieved by RS is much lower than that provided by in-situ data, but RS can determine the representativeness of the chosen in-situ stations and detect un-sampled zones that need monitoring. Additionally, RS provides a harmonized methodology in space and time, which is crucial if statistical information is going to be derived. On its turn, in-situ data is required as a ground truth to transform the RS signal into relevant ecological indicators. In this work, we provide the first results of a new international project aimed to re-analize archived RS data to study ecological changes in Lake Baikal and incorporate near-real time RS data to monitoring

  15. The Class@Baikal project: studying recent tectonics, sedimentology and geochemistry on Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmanov, Grigorii; Khlystov, Oleg; Mazzini, Adriano; Poort, Jeffrey; Giliazetdinova, Dina

    2016-04-01

    The Class@Baikal project - onboard training of the marine science students on the Baikal Lake - is successfully running for the second year following and carrying further the traditions laid out by the legendary UNESCO Training-through-Research (Floating University) Programme. Main areas studied during two Class@Baikal cruises are: "Bolshoy Mud Volcano" is located at the southern deep of the lake. Dense profiler lines grid has been acquired during the Class@Baikal-2015 expedition. A sedimentary core with mud breccia and massive gas hydrates was collected from the southern crater confirming its active status. "Krasny Yar seeps" are located within outer delta of the Selenga River. Side-scan sonar, profiler and multibeam data show that there is a well-expressed amphitheatre-shaped slump scour nearby. Slumped sediments and associated amphitheater scour were mapped. Data indicated that the seabed scour has steep walls. Propagation of the slumped sediments had been stopped by a seabed ridge of unknown origin. At the north the ridge is breached and the slumped material funnels out through a narrow opening spreading down the slope by gravity flows. "Novosibirsk" and "St.Petersburg mud volcanoes" are located along a fault. The mud volcanoes are located partially along its hanging wall and partially along its foot wall. Side-scan sonar and profiler data acquired during Class@Baikal-2015 expedition show that both mud volcanoes demonstrate evidence of a vertical material transport within feeder channels, which developed on both sides of the fault. The fault seems to be separating the mud volcano area into clusters. It is proposed that initially the fault did not have vertical offset but nevertheless initiated mud volcanic activity. The early mud volcanoes had usual symmetric morphology. The vertical offset of the fault took place later and this resulted in formation of the blocky asymmetry of the structures. "Khuray deep-water depositional system" study has begun in 2014 when

  16. Constraining modern-day silicon cycling in Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panizzo, V. N.; Swann, G. E. A.; Mackay, A. W.; Vologina, E.; Alleman, L.; André, L.; Pashley, V. H.; Horstwood, M. S. A.

    2017-03-01

    Constraining the continental silicon cycle is a key requirement in attempts to understand both nutrient fluxes to the ocean and linkages between silicon and carbon cycling over different time scales. Silicon isotope data of dissolved silica (δ30SiDSi) are presented here from Lake Baikal and its catchment in central Siberia. As well as being the world's oldest and voluminous lake, Lake Baikal lies within the seventh largest drainage basin in the world and exports significant amounts of freshwater into the Arctic Ocean. Data from river waters accounting for 92% of annual river inflow to the lake suggest no seasonal alteration or anthropogenic impact on river δ30SiDSi composition. The absence of a change in δ30SiDSi within the Selenga Delta, through which 62% of riverine flow passes, suggests a net balance between biogenic uptake and dissolution in this system. A key feature of this study is the use of δ30SiDSi to examine seasonal and spatial variations in DSi utilization and export across the lake. Using an open system model against deepwater δ30SiDSi values from the lake, we estimate that 20-24% of DSi entering Lake Baikal is exported into the sediment record. While highlighting the impact that lakes may have upon the sequestration of continental DSi, mixed layer δ30SiDSi values from 2003 and 2013 show significant spatial variability in the magnitude of spring bloom nutrient utilization with lower rates in the north relative to south basin.

  17. Space Radar Image of Baikal Lake, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    This is an X-band black-and-white image of the forests east of the Baikal Forest in the Jablonowy Mountains of Russia. The image is centered at 52.5 degrees north latitude and 116 degrees east longitude near the mining town of Bukatschatscha. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 4, 1994, during the second flight of the spaceborne radar. This area is part of an international research project known as the Taiga Aerospace Investigation using Geographic Information System Applications. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01754

  18. Space Radar Image of Baikal Lake, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an X-band black-and-white image of the forests east of the Baikal Forest in the Jablonowy Mountains of Russia. The image is centered at 52.5 degrees north latitude and 116 degrees east longitude near the mining town of Bukatschatscha. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 4, 1994, during the second flight of the spaceborne radar. This area is part of an international research project known as the Taiga Aerospace Investigation using Geographic Information System Applications.

  19. Pleistocene sediments of Lake Baikal: Lithology and stratigraphic correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulov, N. I.; Mashchuk, I. M.; Akulova, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    The Cenozoic sediments of Lake Baikal penetrated by boreholes and investigated by the manned submersible Pisces, as well as coeval deposits cropping out in beach scarps, recovered by mine workings, and drilled in the coastal zone were the object of this investigation. The main attention was paid to Pleistocene bottom sediments penetrated by Borehole BDP-99-2. The investigations included the detailed analysis of the lithology (grain-size composition, immersion mineralogy of light and heavy fractions, X-ray structural analysis of clayey fraction) and palynological assemblages to specify facies features of Cenozoic sediments, correlate all their known stratigraphic units constituting the sedimentary section of the lake with their analogs in the onshore part of the Baikal rift zone, and compile the composite Cenozoic section. The following features of these sediments are noted: (1) as a whole, Pleistocene sediments are characterized by the hydromica-smectite composition of their clayey fraction with an insignificant share of kaoline; (2) the heavy fraction is dominated by the terrigenous epidote-amphibole association poorly resistant to weathering; (3) Pleistocene sediments of the lake contain siderite, vivianite, pyrite, and goethite concretions and micrometeorites, in addition to well-known ferromanganese nodules; (4) the presence of relict palynomorphs in Pleistocene sediments of Baikal is determined by their erosion from Miocene and Pliocene cavernous clays cropping out on underwater slopes of the Posol'skaya Bank and subsequent reburial along with Pleistocene palynological assemblages.

  20. Dinoflagellates associated with freshwater sponges from the ancient lake baikal.

    PubMed

    Annenkova, Natalia V; Lavrov, Dennis V; Belikov, Sergey I

    2011-04-01

    Dinoflagellates are a diverse group of protists that are common in both marine and freshwater environments. While the biology of marine dinoflagellates has been the focus of several recent studies, their freshwater relatives remain little-investigated. In the present study we explore the diversity of dinoflagellates in Lake Baikal by identifying and analyzing dinoflagellate sequences for 18S rDNA and ITS-2 from total DNA extracted from three species of endemic Baikalian sponges (Baikalospongia intermedia,Baikalospongia rectaand Lubomirskia incrustans). Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences revealed extensive dinoflagellate diversity in Lake Baikal. We found two groups of sequences clustering within the order Suessiales, known for its symbiotic relationships with various invertebrates. Thus they may be regarded as potential symbionts of Baikalian sponges. In addition,Gyrodinium helveticum, representatives from the genus Gymnodinium, dinoflagellates close to the family Pfiesteriaceae, and a few dinoflagellates without definite affiliation were detected. No pronounced difference in the distribution of dinoflagellates among the studied sponges was found, except for the absence of the Piscinoodinium-like dinoflagellates inL. incrustans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the diversity of dinoflagellates in freshwater sponges, the first systematic investigation of dinoflagellate molecular diversity in Lake Baikal and the first finding of members of the order Suessiales as symbionts of freshwater invertebrates.

  1. Growth and potential yield of perch (Perca spp.) in selected areas of Lake Baikal and the Laurentian Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Gorman, Robert; Bronte, Charles R.; Hatcher, Charles O.; Pronin, Nikolai M.; Sokolnikov, Yury

    1998-01-01

    We compared growth, mortality, and potential yield of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) from Chivirkui Bay in Lake Baikal with that of yellow perch (P. flavescens) from three areas of the Laurentian Great Lakes --Chequamegon Bay in Lake Superior, northeastern Lake Ontario, and southwestern Lake Erie. Graded mesh gill nets were fished in August to sample perch in lakes Baikal (1993), Ontario (1985-93), and Erie (1994). Bottom trawls were fished in July-August to sample perch in Lake Superior (1973-93). Adult yellow perch from the Laurentian Great Lakes were heavier at most lengths than adult Eurasian perch from Lake Baikal. The increase in body weight per unit increase in length was greatest in Lake Erie. Total annual mortality of perch was low in Lake Baikal (0.31), intermediate in lakes Superior (0.41) and Ontario (0.54), and high in Lake Erie (0.66). Annual fishing mortality (u) for perch in Lake Baikal was 60%-70% lower than that for perch in the Great Lakes. At ages 1-3, perch in Lake Erie were longer than those in lakes Baikal, Superior, and Ontario but at ages 4-9 perch in Lake Baikal were longer than those in the other lakes. Although Eurasian perch in Lake Baikal were longer at age 4 and older, growth in length, as measured by the Brody growth coefficient, K, was lower there than in the other lakes and was similar to that in Lake Superior; yellow perch in Lake Erie grew the fastest. Yield-per-recruit was lowest in Lake Erie and highest in Lake Superior. Potential yield was influenced by growth rates and fishing mortality.

  2. Spatial distribution of methane over Lake Baikal surface.

    PubMed

    Kapitanov, V A; Tyryshkin, I S; Krivolutskii, N P; Ponomarev, Yu N; De Batist, M; Gnatovsky, R Yu

    2007-04-01

    The results of application of a high sensitivity methane laser detector to investigations of the methane concentration in the atmosphere over Baikal lake are presented as well as methane flows from the water into the atmosphere. The measurements were conducted at a stationary station and aboard the research vessel "Vereschagin" during two summer expeditions in 2003 and 2004. Mean background concentration was equal to (2.00+/-0.16) ppm in August 2003 and (1.90+/-0.07) ppm in June 2004. The areas of methane emission through the water's surface are found to be distinctly localized and to have a characteristic size of about 150-300 m in diameter. The methane concentration in the centers of these areas can reach approximately 27 ppm. Methane flows into the atmosphere in some Baikal regions were measured as well.

  3. Tectonics of the baikal rift deduced from volcanism and sedimentation: a review oriented to the Baikal and Hovsgol lake systems.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexei V; Demonterova, Elena I

    2009-01-01

    As known from inland sedimentary records, boreholes, and geophysical data, the initiation of the Baikal rift basins began as early as the Eocene. Dating of volcanic rocks on the rift shoulders indicates that volcanism started later, in the Early Miocene or probably in the Late Oligocene. Prominent tectonic uplift took place at about 20 Ma, but information (from both sediments and volcanics) on the initial stage of the rifting is scarce and incomplete. A comprehensive record of sedimentation derived from two stacked boreholes drilled at the submerged Akademichesky ridge indicates that the deep freshwater Lake Baikal existed for at least 8.4 Ma, while the exact formation of the lake in its roughly present-day shape and volume is unknown. Four important events of tectonic/environmental changes at about approximately 7, approximately 5, approximately 2.5, and approximately 0.1 Ma are seen in that record. The first event probably corresponds to a stage of rift propagation from the historical center towards the wings of the rift system. Rifting in the Hovsgol area was initiated at about this time. The event of ~5 Ma is a likely candidate for the boundary between slow and fast stages of rifting. It is reflected in a drastic change of sedimentation rate due to isolation of the Akademichesky ridge from the central and northern Lake Baikal basins. The youngest event of 0.1 Ma is reflected by the (87)0Sr/ (86)Sr ratio increase in Lake Baikal waters and probably related to an increasing rate of mountain growth (and hence erosion) resulting from glacial rebounding. The latter is responsible for the reorganization of the outflow pattern with the termination of the paleo-Manzurka outlet and the formation of the Angara outlet. The event of approximately 2.5 Ma is reflected in the decrease of the (87)Sr/(86)Sr and Na/Al ratios in Lake Baikal waters. We suggest that it is associated with a decrease of the dust load due to a reorganization of the atmospheric circulations in Mainland

  4. Towards a molecular systematics of the Lake Baikal/Lake Tuva sponges.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthias; Wrede, Petra; Grebenjuk, Vladislav A; Kaluzhnaya, Oxana V; Belikov, Sergey I; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2009-01-01

    Lake Baikal is famous for its extensive biodiversity that is equaled only by few other lakes. Fascinatingly, about 80% of all the animals the lake hosts are endemic. Sponges (Porifera) that live in symbiosis with photosynthetic algae are the most abundant animal taxon found in the littoral zone of Lake Baikal and have been grouped to the family Lubomirskiidae. In recent years, several attempts to determine the phylogenetic relationship between Lubomirskiidae and cosmopolitan freshwater sponges have been undertaken. Yet the results obtained remain inconclusive. Here, we strive to determine the phylogeny of freshwater sponges with the focus on endemic Lake Baikal species, also taking into account two poriferan species that were collected during an expedition in 2006 in two other isolated Siberian lakes, Lake Chagytai and Lake Tore-Khol. Since its discovery at the beginning of the twentieth century, the Lake Chagytai species was grouped to the Lubomirskiidae and called Baikalospongia dzhegatajensis. However, analyses of molecular sequence data [internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), ribosomal DNA (rDNA)] and morphological markers (spicules, habitus) inferred a close relationship to the cosmopolitan genus Ephydatia and also to the Lake Tore-Khol species that had not so far been described. Thus, both species were tentatively termed Ephydatia tuva (Lake Chagytai) and E. altaiensis (Lake Tore-Khol). We hypothesize that these new species might have evolved from Ephydatia-like ancestors through adaptation to the unique environmental conditions of both lakes. To test the ITS data, an unlinked genetic locus was chosen for further phylogenetic analyses, the protein-coding gene silicatein. These analyses provided not only a more robust resolution between the Lubomirskiidae, but also corroborated the grouping of the Lake Chagytai and Lake Tore-Khol species to the genus Ephydatia. In addition, the phylogenetic analyses suggest a Spongilla-like founder generation of poriferan

  5. [The history of the formation of fish parasite fauna in lake Baikal].

    PubMed

    Rusinek, O T

    2006-01-01

    The fauna of fish parasites in Lake Baikal is represented by 5 faunistic complexes, namely the boreal plain, boreal submountain, arctic freshwater, Baikal, and Sino-Indian ones. The parasites of the boreal plain complex are dominant by the number of species (43 %). Hypotheses on the origin of the recent fish and parasite faunas of Lake Baikal were advanced on the base of the data on the parasite species composition and their distribution among hosts, as well as on the base of paleontological data. It is shown that invasion of new fish species and their parasites to Baikal led to the change of the composition of natural faunistic fish complexes and parasite systems. Invading fishes play the roles of intermediate and definitive hosts in parasite systems of Baikal, that led to the change of the initial structure of these systems.

  6. An interesting natural phenomenon - giant rings on Lake Baikal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouraev, Alexei; Shimaraev, Michail; Remy, Frederique; Ivanov, Andrei; Golubov, Boris

    2010-05-01

    Starting from May 2009 scientific community and large public have been puzzled by the formation of giant rings on Baikal ice. These rings (diameter 5-7 km, thickness of dark layer - 1 - 1.8 km) have almost perfect circular shape what makes them so interesting and attractive not only to scientists, but also for large public. . The rings have been observed since 1999 by various satellites and sensors (AVHRR, MODIS, Landsat, SPOT) as early as 1999 but probably also in 1984 and 1994 (Shuttle missions). These rings are usually well observed in April, when snow cover is thin or absent. Rings have been observed in the southern tip of the lake (2009), and in three places in the central part: near Krestovskiy cape (1999, 2003, 2005 and 2008), near Turka (2008), and near Cape Nizhnee Izgolovye (2009). All these places are located in the region of steep bottom topography, over depths of more than 500 m. According to in situ measurements done by the Limnological Institute in Irkutsk in 2009, ice thickness is about 70 cm in the center and on the outside of the ring, and 40 cm in the ring itself. It is known that the Baikal lake has important hydrothermal activity, and there are numerous observations of gas (methane etc) seepage from its 7 km-thick layer of bottom sediments. Local-scale absence of ice cover (steamthroughs or "propariny") is typical for some places in Lake Baikal. They result from gas emissions (associated with rise of warm water), near capes and straits (due to better vertical mixing), thermal sources, outlets of large rivers. Often they are observed near Capes Big and Small Kadil'niy, and in the Olkhonskiye vorota strait. However they size ranges from just a half a meter to several hundreds of meters (but not several kilometers) and this could not be an explanation for the formation of giant rings. We present several existing hypotheses of the origin of these rings including gas emission, heat flux, cyclonic subsurface currents and mega-bubble formation due to

  7. Sixty years of environmental change in the world's largest freshwater lakeLake Baikal, Siberia

    PubMed Central

    HAMPTON, STEPHANIE E; IZMEST'EVA, LYUBOV R; MOORE, MARIANNE V; KATZ, STEPHEN L; DENNIS, BRIAN; SILOW, EUGENE A

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution data collected over the past 60 years by a single family of Siberian scientists on Lake Baikal reveal significant warming of surface waters and long-term changes in the basal food web of the world's largest, most ancient lake. Attaining depths over 1.6 km, Lake Baikal is the deepest and most voluminous of the world's great lakes. Increases in average water temperature (1.21 °C since 1946), chlorophyll a (300% since 1979), and an influential group of zooplankton grazers (335% increase in cladocerans since 1946) may have important implications for nutrient cycling and food web dynamics. Results from multivariate autoregressive (MAR) modeling suggest that cladocerans increased strongly in response to temperature but not to algal biomass, and cladocerans depressed some algal resources without observable fertilization effects. Changes in Lake Baikal are particularly significant as an integrated signal of long-term regional warming, because this lake is expected to be among those most resistant to climate change due to its tremendous volume. These findings highlight the importance of accessible, long-term monitoring data for understanding ecosystem response to large-scale stressors such as climate change.

  8. Geochemical mass balances of major elements in Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callender, E.; Granina, L.

    1997-01-01

    Major element mass balances for Lake Baikal are calculated with mostly previously published data for soluble fluxes and new, unpublished data for riverine suspended particulate matter chemistry. Physical transport seems to be the most important riverine process. The elements Ca, Mg, and Na seem to be very mobile in the weathering mantle and K and Si seem to be relatively mobile. A comparison of elemental input-output budgets and mass accumulation rates (MAR) in bottom sediments shows that most major elements, except Ca, Si, and Mn, have comparable riverine particulate matter fluxes and MARs. The addition of wet atmospheric deposition fluxes results in an excess of Ca, Mg, and Na entering the lake. The additive effect of these excess inputs during a 40-year period amounts to undetectable concentration increases in the water column. If erosion of weathered bedrock is the source of most dissolved and all particulate matter transported to the lake, theoretical elemental fluxes can be calculated with Al as the conservative element. Flux ratios (observed/theoretical) range from 0.7 to 2.2, but most fall within the acceptable range of 0.7-1.5. Major rock-forming elements are carried by rivers as weathering products and there are minimal biogeochemical processes that modify these inputs as suspended particulate matter accumulates in the bottom sediments of the lake.

  9. Composition of Humic Acids of the Lake Baikal Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakova, O.; Chimitdorzhieva, G.; Andreeva, D.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances are the final stage of the biogeochemical transformation of organic matter in the biosphere. Its natural compounds are found not only in soil, peat, coal, and sediments of basins. Chemical composition and properties of humic substances are determined by the functioning of the ecosystem as a whole. Therefore the study of the unique Lake Baikal sediments can provide information about their genesis, as well as the processes of organic matter transformation. For this purpose, preparations of humic acids (HA) were isolated by alkaline extraction method. The composition of HA was investigated by the elemental analyzer CHNS/O PerkinElmer Series II. Various located sediments of the Lake Baikal were the objects of the study: 1 - Chivyrkuisky Bay, 2 - Kotovo Bay, 3 - Selenga river delta near Dubinino village, 4 - Selenga river delta near Murzino village. Data on the elemental composition of HA in terms of ash-free portion show that the carbon content (CC) is of 50-53% with a maximum value in a sample 3, and minimum - in a sample 2. Such values are characteristic also for the soils with low biochemical activity. The hydrogen content is of 4,2-5,3%, a maximum value is in a sample 1. Data recalculation to the atomic percentages identified following regularities. The CC of HA is of 35-39 at. %. Hydrogen content is of 37-43 at. %. According to the content of these elements investigated substances are clearly divided into two groups: HA of the sediments of the Lake Baikal and river Selenga delta. The magnitude of the atomic ratio H/C can be seen varying degrees of condensation of the molecules of humic acids. The high atomic ratio H/C in HA of the former group indicates the predominance of aliphatic structures in the molecules. Humic acids of the later group are characterized by a low value H/C (<1), suggesting a large proportion of aromatic components in HA composition. In sediments of the Selenga river delta there is an addition of organic matter of terrigenous

  10. Vivianite formation and distribution in Lake Baikal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagel, N.; Alleman, L. Y.; Granina, L.; Hatert, F.; Thamo-Bozso, E.; Cloots, R.; André, L.

    2005-04-01

    In an effort to better understand vivianite formation processes, four Lake Baikal sediment cores spanning two to four interglacial stages in the northern, central and southern basins and under various biogeochemical environments are scrutinized. The vivianite-rich layers were detected by anomalous P-enrichments in bulk geochemistry and visually by observations on X-radiographs. The millimetric concretions of vivianite were isolated by sieving and analysed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM), microprobe, infrared spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry (ICP-AES, ICP-MS). All the vivianites display similar morphological, mineralogical and geochemical signature, suggesting a common diagenetic origin. Their geochemical signature is sensitive to secondary alteration where vivianite concretions are gradually transformed from the rim to the center into an amorphous santabarbaraite phase with a decreasing Mn content. We analysed the spatial and temporal distribution of the concretions in order to determine the primary parameters controlling the vivianite formation, e.g., lithology, sedimentation rates, and porewater chemistry. We conclude that vivianite formation in Lake Baikal is mainly controlled by porewater chemistry and sedimentation rates, and it is not a proxy for lacustrine paleoproductivity. Vivianite accumulation is not restricted to areas of slow sedimentation rates (e.g., Academician and Continent ridges). At the site of relatively fast sedimentation rate, i.e., the Posolsky Bank near the Selenga Delta, vivianite production may be more or less related to the Selenga River inputs. It could be also indirectly related to the past intensive methane escapes from the sediments. While reflecting an early diagenetic signal, the source of P and Fe porewater for vivianites genesis is still unclear.

  11. Amplitude blanking in seismic profiles from Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Agena, W.F.; Hutchinson, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Imaging of the deepest sedimentary section in Lake Baikal using multichannel seismic profiling was hampered by amplitude blanking that is regionally extensive, is associated with water depths greater than about 900 m and occurs at sub-bottom depths of 1-2 km in association with the first water-bottom multiple. Application of a powerful multiple suppression technique improved the quality of occasional discontinuous, dipping primary reflections, but failed to substantially alter the non-reflective character of the blanking zone. Detailed analysis of amplitudes from original data and synthetic models show that the threshold for detecting primary energy in deep water of Lake Baikal occurs when the primary is about 14-20 dB less than the multiple energy. The blanking occurs because of anomalously low reflectivities of the deep sediments coupled with this 20 dB limitation in real data processing. The blanking cuts across seismic stratal boundaries, and is therefore probably unrelated to depositional lithologies. The deepest, early rift deposits, inferred to come from a mixed fluvial and lacustrine setting, do not easily explain the widespread and uniform character of the blanked deposits. More likely, blanking occurs because of processes or phenomena that physically alter the deposits, causing them to be non-reflective and/or highly attenuating. No single process explains all the observations, but a combination of diagenesis, overpressure, and the presence of dispersed free gas at sub-bottom depths of 1-2 km, offer plausible and possible conditions that contribute to blanking. Copyright ?? 1996 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Long-Term and Ontogenetic Patterns of Heavy Metal Contamination in Lake Baikal Seals (Pusa sibirica).

    PubMed

    Ozersky, Ted; Pastukhov, Mikhail V; Poste, Amanda E; Deng, Xiu Y; Moore, Marianne V

    2017-09-19

    Little is known about the history of heavy metal pollution of Russia's Lake Baikal, one of the world's largest lakes and a home to numerous endemic species, including the Baikal Seal, Pusa sibirica. We investigated the history of heavy metal (V, Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg, Tl, Pb, U) pollution in Lake Baikal seals over the past 8 decades. C and N stable isotope analysis (SIA) and laser-ablation ICP-MS of seal teeth were used to examine changes in feeding ecology, heavy metal levels associated with life history events and long-term variation in metal exposure. SIA did not suggest large changes in the feeding ecology of Baikal seals over the past 80 years. LA-ICP-MS analyses revealed element-specific ontogenetic variability in metal concentrations, likely related to maternal transfer, changes in food sources and starvation. Hg and Cd levels in seals varied significantly across the time series, with concentrations peaking in the 1960s - 1970s but then declining to contemporary levels similar to those observed in the 1930s and 1940s. Trends in atmospheric emissions of Hg suggest that local sources as well as emissions from eastern Russia and Europe may be important contributors of Hg to Lake Baikal and that, despite the size of Lake Baikal, its food web appears to respond rapidly to changing inputs of contaminants.

  13. Tracing the sources of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in Lake Baikal

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, A.A.; Mamontova, E.A.; Tarasova, E.N.; McLachlan, M.S.

    2000-03-01

    Lake Baikal is a unique freshwater ecosystem that has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It contains high levels of PCBs, and Baikal seal were recently found to have PCDD/F concentrations comparable to those in the Baltic Sea. In this work fish and soil were analyzed to trace the sources of these compounds to the lake. The fish samples indicated that the PCDD/F and PCB contamination of Lake Baikal does not originate from background inputs and that the contamination increases from north to south. The soil inventory was determined at 34 sites around Lake Baikal and in the Angara River valley. For the PCDD/Fs and most PCBs, the soil inventory is a good approximation of the cumulative atmospheric deposition. It varied over a factor of 1,000, with the highest levels in Usol'ye Sibirskoe, a city 110 km north of the southwestern tip of the lake in the highly industrialized Angara River valley, and the lowest values in the pristine areas to the northeast of the lake. A continuous decrease in the soil inventory was observed moving from Usol'ye S. up the Angara River valley to Lake Baikal and from there northeastward along the lake.

  14. Study of the origin of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, M. Yu.; Snytko, V. A.; Marinaite, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    The concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the water of Lake Baikal is estimated. The published data on the composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial and communal emissions and in crude oils are analyzed. Anthropogenic sources of lake water contamination are revealed. It is concluded that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons enter the lake as a result of natural oil release.

  15. Tectonic and sediment supply control of deep rift lake turbidite systems: Lake Baikal, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.H.; Karabanov, E.B.; Colman, Steven M.; Escutia, C.

    1999-01-01

    Tectonically influenced half-graben morphology controls the amount and type of sediment supply and consequent type of late Quaternary turbidite systems developed in the active rift basins of Lake Baikal, Russia. Steep border fault slopes (footwall) on the northwest sides of half-graben basins provide a limited supply of coarser grained clastic material to multiple small fan deltas. These multiple sediment sources in turn laterally feed small (65 km) axially fed elongate mud-rich fans sourced by regional exterior drainage of the Selenga River that supplies large quantities of silt. Basin plain turbidites in the center of the linear basins and axial channels that are controlled by rift-parallel faults are fed from, and interfinger with, aprons and fans. The predictability of the turbidite systems in Lake Baikal provides the best example yet studied of how tectonics and sediment supply interact to control the development of a wide variety of coeval turbidite systems on a single basin floor.

  16. Water-level changes in Lake Baikal, Siberia: tectonism versus climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    Relative changes in the level of Lake Baikal, amounting to hundreds of meters in Quaternary time, are well documented. Data presented here show that tectonic displacements of the lake outlet or former shoreline features are entirely sufficient to explain these relative lake-level changes. In contrast, the morphology and hydrology of the lake make its level hydrologically insensitive to climate change. Available evidence indicates that, throughout the past several hundred thousand years, Lake Baikal was a dilute, through-flowing lake controlled by the level of its outlet. On the basis of geologic data alone, climatic effects on lake level, whatever their magnitude, are difficult to separate from those caused by active rift tectonism. However, considerations of (1) the hydrologic budget of the lake and (2) the configuration of the outlet suggests that potential lake-level fluctuations due solely to climate change were less than about 2m.

  17. Oil Seep in Lake Baikal Imaged and Studied with the ERS-2 and Envisat SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Andrei Yu.

    2010-12-01

    The natural source of oil in Lake Baikal in the vicinity of Cape Gorevoy Utes (Middle Baikal) has been recently discovered in optical images. Its annual rate was estimated as many as 4 tonnes of crude oil. This oil is suggested to be further disintegrated by aquatic microorganisms and do not pollute the lake environment. The ERS-2 and Envisat SAR images acquired over the lake show that rate can be much higher. Their analysis allowed getting new information about contribution of natural oil seeps. In particular, integrating SAR images in GIS and their analysis, first, revealed the relationship of these slicks with the discovered oil seep, and, second, provided new estimates of oil flux in Lake Baikal. On the basis of analysis of the SAR image signatures, it can reach, in conditions of permanent leaking, from 50 to 480 metric tonnes of oil per year.

  18. An 84-kyr paleomagnetic record from the sediments of Lake Baikal, Siberia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, J.A.; King, J.W.; Colman, Steven M.; Kravchinsky, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    We have conducted a paleomagnetic study of sediment cores obtained from the Selenga prodelta region of Lake Baikal, Russia. This record, which spans approximately the last 84 kyr, contributes to a better understanding of the nature of geomagnetic field behavior in Siberia and is a useful correlation and dating tool. We demonstrate that the Lake Baikal sediments are recording variations in the geomagnetic field. The directional record displays secular variation behavior with a geomagnetic excursion at 20 ka and additional excursions appearing as large-amplitude secular variation at 41, 61, and 67 ka. Smoothing of the geomagnetic excursion behavior occurs in Lake Baikal sediments owing to the intermediate sedimentation rate (13 cm kyr-1). The Lake Baikal relative paleointensity record correlates to absolute paleointensity data for the last 10 kyr and to relative paleointensity records from the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean for the last 84 kyr. This correlation suggests a strong global (i.e., dipole) component to these records and further supports the reliability of sediments as recorders of relative geomagnetic paleointensity. We show that a relative geomagnetic intensity stratigraphy has a potential resolution of 7 kyr by correlating continental and marine records. The geomagnetic intensity stratigraphy helps constrain the age of the difficult to date Lake Baikal sediments.

  19. Differential bioaccumulation of potentially toxic elements in benthic and pelagic food chains in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Tomasz M; Pastukhov, Mikhail V; Leeves, Sara A; Farkas, Julia; Lierhagen, Syverin; Poletaeva, Vera I; Jenssen, Bjørn M

    2016-08-01

    Lake Baikal is located in eastern Siberia in the center of a vast mountain region. Even though the lake is regarded as a unique and pristine ecosystem, there are existing sources of anthropogenic pollution to the lake. In this study, the concentrations of the potentially toxic trace elements As, Cd, Pb, Hg, and Se were analyzed in water, plankton, invertebrates, and fish from riverine and pelagic influenced sites in Lake Baikal. Concentrations of Cd, Hg, Pb and Se in Lake Baikal water and biota were low, while concentrations of As were similar or slightly higher compared to in other freshwater ecosystems. The bioaccumulation potential of the trace elements in both the pelagic and the benthic ecosystems differed between the Selenga Shallows (riverine influence) and the Listvenichnyĭ Bay (pelagic influence). Despite the one order of magnitude higher water concentrations of Pb in the Selenga Shallows, Pb concentrations were significantly higher in both pelagic and benthic fish from the Listvenichnyĭ Bay. A similar trend was observed for Cd, Hg, and Se. The identified enhanced bioavailability of contaminants in the pelagic influenced Listvenichnyĭ Bay may be attributed to a lower abundance of natural ligands for contaminant complexation. Hg was found to biomagnify in both benthic and pelagic Baikal food chains, while As, Cd, and Pb were biodiluted. At both locations, Hg concentrations were around seven times higher in benthic than in pelagic fish, while pelagic fish had two times higher As concentrations compared to benthic fish. The calculated Se/Hg molar ratios revealed that, even though Lake Baikal is located in a Se-deficient region, Se is still present in excess over Hg and therefore the probability of Hg induced toxicity in the endemic fish species of Lake Baikal is assumed to be low.

  20. Preparation and assessment of a candidate reference sample of Lake Baikal deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suturin, A. N.; Paradina, L. F.; Epov, V. N.; Semenov, A. R.; Lozhkin, V. I.; Petrov, L. L.

    2003-02-01

    The possibility of the creation of a multi-element reference sample of Lake Baikal deep-water composition is justified. This is a new type of reference sample composed of natural water with a wide range of macro- and microelements. This candidate reference sample has a matrix composition consisting of hydrocarbonate and calcium water, a composition that is typical of many rivers and lakes of the world, as well as rain water. The creation of a candidate reference sample of Lake Baikal water is possible due to the stable water composition at a depth of 500 m, and to the use of water sampling technology which results in the preservation of the initial composition of water and its absolute sterility. Trial batches of Baikal water collected annually and stored in special polyethylenetereftalate bottles for a period of 9 years remained stable and homogenous for most elements. Preliminary data for a range of elements and compounds are presented.

  1. AMS radiocarbon analyses from Lake Baikal, Siberia: Challenges of dating sediments from a large, oligotrophic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Jones, Glenn A.; Rubin, M.; King, J.W.; Peck, J.A.; Orem, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    A suite of 146 new accelerator-mass spectrometer (AMS) radiocarbon ages provides the first reliable chronology for late Quaternary sediments in Lake Baikal. In this large, highly oligotrophic lake, biogenic and authigenic carbonate are absent, and plant macrofossils are extremely rare. Total organic carbon is therefore the primary material available for dating. Several problems are associated with the TOC ages. One is the mixture of carbon sources in TOC, not all of which are syndepositional in age. This problem manifests itself in apparent ages for the sediment surface that are greater than zero. However, because most of the organic carbon in Lake Baikal sediments is algal (autochthonous) in origin, this effect is limited to about 1000+500 years, which can be corrected, at least for young deposits. The other major problem with dating Lake Baikal sediments is the very low carbon contents of glacial-age deposits, which makes them extremely susceptible to contamination with modern carbon. This problem can be minimized by careful sampling and handling procedures. The ages show almost an order of magnitude difference in sediment-accumulation rates among different sedimentary environments in Lake Baikal, from about 0.04 mm/year on isolated banks such as Academician Ridge, to nearly 0.3 mm/year in the turbidite depositional areas beneath the deep basin floors, such as the Central Basin. The new AMS ages clearly indicate that the dramatic increase in diatom productivity in the lake, as evidenced by increases in biogenic silica and organic carbon, began about 13 ka, in contrast to previous estimates of 7 ka for the age of this transition. Holocene net sedimentation rates may be less than, equal to, or greater than those in the late Pleistocene, depending on the site. This variability reflects the balance between variable terrigenous sedimentation and increased biogenic sedimentation during interglaciations. The ages reported here, and the temporal and spatial variation in

  2. [Microorganisms of Lake Baikal and Lake Nyasa as indicators of anthropogenic influence: prospects of use in biotechnology].

    PubMed

    Verkhozina, V A; Verkhozina, E V; Gonchar, D A; Dedkov, V S; Degtiarev, S Kh; Kusner, Iu S

    2004-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases (RENs) were detected in 650 microbial strains isolated from water columns and bottom sediments of deep rift lakes, Baikal (Russia) and Nyasa (Southeastern Africa). They enzymes included unique (Fan I, Aca I, and Sse 91) and very rare (Bsi I, and Cci N I) species not typical of aquatic ecosystems. Water columns, deep cores, and bottom sediments of pure areas of the lakes contained no microorganisms with new RENs. Thus, inshore areas of Lake Baikal exposed to anthropogenic influence may contain mutant bacterial strains expressing RENs that have not been described previously.

  3. Depositional and tectonic framework of the rift basins of Lake Baikal from multichannel seismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Golmshtok, A.J.; Zonenshain, L.P.; Moore, T.C.; Scholz, C.A.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1992-01-01

    Recent multichannel seismic reflection data from Lake Baikal, located in a large, active, continental rift in central Asia, image three major stratigraphic units totalling 3.5 to 7.5 km thick in four subbasins. A major change in rift deposition and faulting between the oldest and middle-rift units probably corresponds to the change from slow to fast rifting. A brief comparison of the basins of Lake Baikal with those of the East African rift system highlights differences in structural style that can be explained by differences in age and evolution of the surrounding basement rocks. -from Authors

  4. Current ecosystem processes in steppe near Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanteeva, Julia

    2015-04-01

    The steppes and forest steppes complexes of Priol'khonie at the Lake Baikal (southern Siberia, Russia) were studied in this research. Recreational activity has a significant impact on the Priol'khonie region. During soviet time this area was actively used for agriculture. Nowadays, this territory is the part of Pribaikalskyi National Park and special protection is needed. As the landscapes satisfy different human demands there are many land-management conflicts. The specific climate and soil conditions and human activity lead to erosion processes on study area. Sediment loads are transferred into the Lake Baikal and cause water pollution. Consequently, vegetation cover and phytomass play an important role for regulating hydrological processes in the ecosystems. The process of phytomass formation and its proactive role playing on sedimentation and mitigate silt detaching by rill and inter-rill erosion are considered in the research as important indicators of the ecosystem functions for steppe landscapes. These indicators were studied for the different land cover types identified on the area because the study area has a large variety of steppe and forest steppe complexes, differing in the form of relief, soil types, vegetation species composition and degree of land degradation. The fieldwork was conducted in the study area in the July and August of 2013. Thirty-two experimental sites (10 x 10 m) which characterized different types of ecosystem were established. The level of landscape degradation was estimated. The method of clipping was used for the valuation of above-ground herbaceous phytomass. The phytomass of tree stands was calculated using the volume-conversion rates for forest-steppe complexes. For the quantification of transferred silt by inter-rill erosion in different conditions (vegetation, slope, soil type, anthropogenic load) a portable rainfall simulator was created with taking into account the characteristics of the study area. The aboveground

  5. The isolation and characterization of actinobacteria from dominant benthic macroinvertebrates endemic to Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis; Rebets, Yuriy; Tokovenko, Bogdan; Voytsekhovskaya, Irina; Timofeyev, Maxim; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-03-01

    The high demand for new antibacterials fosters the isolation of new biologically active compounds producing actinobacteria. Here, we report the isolation and initial characterization of cultured actinobacteria from dominant benthic organisms' communities of Lake Baikal. Twenty-five distinct strains were obtained from 5 species of Baikal endemic macroinvertebrates of amphipods, freshwater sponges, turbellaria worms, and insects (caddisfly larvae). The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-based phylogenic analysis of obtained strains showed their affiliation to Streptomyces, Nocardia, Pseudonocardia, Micromonospora, Aeromicrobium, and Agromyces genera, revealing the diversity of actinobacteria associated with the benthic organisms of Lake Baikal. The biological activity assays showed that 24 out of 25 strains are producing compounds active against at least one of the test cultures used, including Gram-negative bacteria and Candida albicans. Complete dereplication of secondary metabolite profiles of two isolated strains led to identification of only few known compounds, while the majority of detected metabolites are not listed in existing antibiotic databases.

  6. Water chemistry and plankton composition in the mixing zone of the Selenga River with Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomberg, Irina; Sorokovikova, larisa; Popovskaya, Galina; Belykh, Olga; Bashenkhaeva, Nadya; Parfenova, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal and inter-annual variations of chemical components, bacterio- and phytoplankton and autotrophic picoplankton (APP) were studied in the distributaries of the Selenga River, Selenga shallow waters (Selenga shoal) and Lake Baikal for 2003-2013. Major variations in the chemical composition of river waters were recorded at a distance of 1-3 km off the mouths of the Selenga River distributaries (mixing zone). The total quantity of major ions and plankton composition and abundance served as indicators to distinguish between river and lake waters. Phytoplankton concentration was high in the mixing zone and caused the reduction of nutrients in this area. Changes in species composition of phytoplankton, APP, dominant groups of bacterioplankton were observed in the Selenga shoal. River phytoplankton prevailed near the mouths of distributaries, in the mixing zone these were replaced by lake species, and at a distance of 7 km offshore phytoplankton composition was typical of Lake Baikal. Organotrophic microorganisms dominated in the Selenga River water. In the mixing zone, all bacterial groups were represented in equal proportions. Oligotrophic and psychrotolerant bacteria prevailed in Lake Baikal. As the distance from the river delta increased, phycocyanin-rich picocyanobacteria were replaced by phycoerythrin-rich picocyanobacteria and the contribution of picoplankton biomass to total phytoplankton biomass was raised. Near the mouth of distributaries, APP biomass was 5 times lower than the phytoplankton biomass whilst at a distance of 7 km it was 2 times higher than typical values for Baikal phytoplankton.

  7. Ice patterns and hydrothermal plumes, Lake Baikal, Russia - Insights from Space Shuttle hand-held photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Helfert, Michael R.; Helms, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Earth photography from the Space Shuttle is used to examine the ice cover on Lake Baikal and correlate the patterns of weakened and melting ice with known hydrothermal areas in the Siberian lake. Particular zones of melted and broken ice may be surface expressions of elevated heat flow in Lake Baikal. The possibility is explored that hydrothermal vents can introduce local convective upwelling and disrupt a stable water column to the extent that the melt zones which are observed in the lake's ice cover are produced. A heat flow map and photographs of the lake are overlaid to compare specific areas of thinned or broken ice with the hot spots. The regions of known hydrothermal activity and high heat flow correlate extremely well with circular regions of thinned ice, and zones of broken and recrystallized ice. Local and regional climate data and other sources of warm water, such as river inlets, are considered.

  8. Ice patterns and hydrothermal plumes, Lake Baikal, Russia - Insights from Space Shuttle hand-held photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Helfert, Michael R.; Helms, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Earth photography from the Space Shuttle is used to examine the ice cover on Lake Baikal and correlate the patterns of weakened and melting ice with known hydrothermal areas in the Siberian lake. Particular zones of melted and broken ice may be surface expressions of elevated heat flow in Lake Baikal. The possibility is explored that hydrothermal vents can introduce local convective upwelling and disrupt a stable water column to the extent that the melt zones which are observed in the lake's ice cover are produced. A heat flow map and photographs of the lake are overlaid to compare specific areas of thinned or broken ice with the hot spots. The regions of known hydrothermal activity and high heat flow correlate extremely well with circular regions of thinned ice, and zones of broken and recrystallized ice. Local and regional climate data and other sources of warm water, such as river inlets, are considered.

  9. Can silicon isotopes be used to assess anthropogenic impacts and nutrient utilisation in Lake Baikal, Siberia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, G. E. A.; Panizzo, V. N.; Mackay, A. W.; Roberts, S.; Vologina, E.; Horstwood, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Silicon isotope geochemistry (28Si, 29Si, 30Si) represents a growing field in Earth Sciences providing information to constrain and understand biogeochemical cycling on land and in oceans. Here we present records of δ30Si (30Si/28Si) from the Lake Baikal drainage basin in central Siberia to understand silicon cycling through the dominant river tributaries and into Lake Baikal itself, the world's deepest and most voluminous lake containing one fifth of all freshwater not stored in glaciers and ice caps.Waters were collected along an upstream transect for the five dominant Lake Baikal inflows as well as from the Selenga Delta which account for >50% of the annual riverine flow to the lake. Samples for dissolved silicon (DSi) concentrations and silicon isotopic signatures (δ30SiDSi) were filtered and acidified in the field with isotopic analyses conducted on a Neptune + Multi-Collector ICP-MS using wet plasma mode with Mg doping of samples and standard-sample-standard bracketing. Analytical reproducibility is 0.11‰ (2σ) and blanks are <1% of signal intensity. The DSi concentration of all river inflow samples varies from c. 2.5-6.3 ppm, which contrasts with concentrations of < 1ppm from the Angara River, the lake's only outflow. Combined with river δ30SiDSi values of c. + 0.94 to +1.52‰ and lake water and outflow values of c. +2.50‰, the results show significant (up to 60%) biological utilisation of silicon entering the lake.With the Lake Baikal having been designated a World Heritage Site since 1996, due to its high level of biological endemicity, the work in combination with sediment cores from the lake provides an insight into the transportation and fate of silicon in the basin and an assessment of how climate change and expanding anthropogenic activities in the region including urbanisation, deforestation, agriculture and mining have impacted biogeochemical cycling.

  10. Influence of Long-Distance Climate Teleconnection on Seasonality of Water Temperature in the World's Largest Lake - Lake Baikal, Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Stephen L.; Hampton, Stephanie E.; Izmest'eva, Lyubov R.; Moore, Marianne V.

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale climate change is superimposed on interacting patterns of climate variability that fluctuate on numerous temporal and spatial scales—elements of which, such as seasonal timing, may have important impacts on local and regional ecosystem forcing. Lake Baikal in Siberia is not only the world's largest and most biologically diverse lake, but it has exceptionally strong seasonal structure in ecosystem dynamics that may be dramatically affected by fluctuations in seasonal timing. We applied time-frequency analysis to a near-continuous, 58-year record of water temperature from Lake Baikal to examine how seasonality in the lake has fluctuated over the past half century and to infer underlying mechanisms. On decadal scales, the timing of seasonal onset strongly corresponds with deviation in the zonal wind intensity as described by length of day (LOD); on shorter scales, these temperature patterns shift in concert with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Importantly, the connection between ENSO and Lake Baikal is gated by the cool and warm periods of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Large-scale climatic phenomena affecting Siberia are apparent in Lake Baikal surface water temperature data, dynamics resulting from jet stream and storm track variability in central Asia and across the Northern Hemisphere. PMID:21359207

  11. A rock-magnetic record from Lake Baikal, Siberia: Evidence for Late Quaternary climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, J.A.; King, J.W.; Colman, Steven M.; Kravchinsky, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Rock-magnetic measurements of sediment cores from the Academician Ridge region of Lake Baikal, Siberia show variations related to Late Quaternary climate change. Based upon the well-dated last glacial-interglacial transition, variations in magnetic concentration and mineralogy are related to glacial-interglacial cycles using a conceptual model. Interglacial intervals are characterized by low magnetic concentrations and a composition that is dominated by low coercivity minerals. Glacial intervals are characterized by high magnetic concentrations and increased amounts of high coercivity minerals. The variation in magnetic concentration is consistent with dilution by diatom opal during the more productive interglacial periods. We also infer an increased contribution of eolian sediment during the colder, windier, and more arid glacial conditions when extensive loess deposits were formed throughout Europe and Asia. Eolian transport is inferred to deliver increased amounts of high coercivity minerals as staining on eolian grains during the glacial intervals. Variations in magnetic concentration and mineralogy of Lake Baikal sediment correlate to the SPECMAP marine oxygen-isotope record. The high degree of correlation between Baikal magnetic concentration/mineralogy and the SPECMAP oxygen-isotope record indicates that Lake Baikal sediment preserves a history of climate change in central Asia for the last 250 ka. This correlation provides a method of estimating the age of sediment beyond the range of the radiocarbon method. Future work must include providing better age control and additional climate proxy data, thereby strengthening the correlation of continental and marine climate records. ?? 1994.

  12. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope systematics of Lake Baikal, Siberia: Implications for paleoclimate studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1998-01-01

    We interpret oxygen and hydrogen isotope data for water samples from Lake Baikal, Siberia, its tributaries and other local rivers, and local precipitation in terms of the known water budget for the modem lake in order to gain insight into past limnological and climatic processes that influenced the lake. Lake Baikal is remarkably uniform in its isotopic composition (??18O = -15.8 ?? 0.2???; ??D = -123 ?? 2???) and lies slightly to the right of the global meteoric water line, which suggests significant evaporation. Water is supplied to the lake by over 300 rivers and streams. The oxygen isotope values (??18O) of the rivers in the Baikal catchment range from -13.4 to -21.2???. The hydrogen isotope values (??D) for the same area range from -103 to -156???. Both these ranges generally conform to the global meteoric water line. The weighted average isotopic composition of input to the lake (rivers plus precipitation) is -15.2??? for ??18O and -116??? for ??D, values higher than those of the modem lake. Therefore, the isotopic composition of the modem lake cannot be related to the modem input through simple evaporation. Instead, modeling of the isotopic mass balance of the lake suggests that inputs (precipitation and influx from rivers) and outputs (evaporation and outflow) are not at a steady-state equilibrium under current climate conditions. We found previous input to the lake had lower ??18O and ??D values than modem input, which reflects cooler climates in the past compared with modern conditions. Under constant climate conditions, steady-state conditions are not expected to be reached by the lake for at least 700 yr because of its large size and the long residence time of water in the lake.

  13. The role of biological uptake in iron and manganese cycling in Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granina, L.Z.; Callender, E.

    2006-01-01

    The role of biological uptake in the internal cycling of Fe and Mn in Lake Baikal was quantified. Biological uptake, sedimentation consisting of the biogenic and lithogenic fluxes, and remineralization have been evaluated. The results of calculations show that about 5-10% of Fe and Mn accumulated in the lake are annually taken up by biota. More than 80% of this amount is again recycled after remineralization of biological material. At this, the biogenic fluxes of Fe and Mn are 2-4 times less compared to lithogenic ones. Thus not only is oxidation of Fe and Mn within the water column highly enriched in the oxygen that results in settling of Fe and Mn oxides, but also intensive biological uptake of these elements contributes to their fast removal from internal cycling. However, essential remineralization makes this process of minor importance to Fe and Mn cycling in Lake Baikal. ?? Springer 2006.

  14. Bottom sediments and pore waters near a hydrothermal vent in Lake Baikal (Frolikha Bay)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granina, L.Z.; Klerkx, J.; Callender, E.; Leermakers, M.; Golobokova, L.P.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the redox environments and the compositions of bottom sediments and sedimentary pore waters in the region of a hydrothermal vent in Frolikha Bay, Lake Baikal. According to our results, the submarine vent and its companion nearby spring on land originate from a common source. The most convincing evidence for their relation comes from the proximity of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions in pore waters and in the spring water. The isotope composition indicates a meteoric origin of pore waters, but their major- and minor-element chemistry bears imprint of deep water which may seep through permeable faulted crust. Although pore waters near the submarine vent have a specific enrichment in major and minor constituents, hydrothermal discharge at the Baikal bottom causes a minor impact on the lake water chemistry, unlike the case of freshwater geothermal lakes in the East-African Rift and North America. ?? 2007.

  15. Air-water gas exchange of organochlorine compounds in Lake Baikal, Russia

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, L.L.; Kucklick, J.R.; Bidleman, T.F.; Ivanov, G.P.; Chernyak, S.M.

    1996-10-01

    Air and surface water samples were collected at Lake Baikal, Russia, during June 1991 to determine concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. These data were combined with Henry`s law constants to estimate the gas flux rate across the air-water interface of each compound class. Air samples were collected at Lake Baikal and from nearby Irkutsk. Water samples were collected from three mid-lake stations and at the mouth of two major tributaries. Average air concentrations of chlorinated bornanes (14 pg m{sup -3}), chlordanes (4.9 pg m{sup -3}), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) (194 pg m{sup -3}) were similar to global backgound of Arctic levels. However, air concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), DDTs, and PCBs were closer to those observed in the Great Lakes region. Significantly higher levels of these three compound classes in air over Irkutsk suggests that regional atmospheric transport and deposition may be an important source of these persistent compounds to Lake Baikal. Air-water gas exchange calculations resulted in net depositional flux values for {alpha}-HCH, {gamma}-HCH, DDTs, and chlorinated bornanes at 112, 23, 3.6, and 2.4 ng m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. The total net flux of 22 PCB congeners, chlordanes, and HCB was from water to air (volatilization) at 47, 1.8, and 32 ng m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. 50 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Crustal structure of central Lake Baikal: Insights into intracontinental rifting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Taylor, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    The Cenozoic rift system of Baikal, located in the interior of the largest continental mass on Earth, is thought to represent a potential analog of the early stage of breakup of supercontinents. We present a detailed P wave velocity structure of the crust and sediments beneath the Central Basin, the deepest basin in the Baikal rift system. The structure is characterized by a Moho depth of 39-42.5 km; an 8-km-thick, laterally continuous high-velocity (7.05-7.4 km/s) lower crust, normal upper mantle velocity (8 km/s), a sedimentary section reaching maximum depths of 9 km, and a gradual increase of sediment velocity with depth. We interpret the high-velocity lower crust to be part of the Siberian Platform that was not thinned or altered significantly during rifting. In comparison to published results from the Siberian Platform, Moho under the basin is elevated by <3 km. On the basis of these results we propose that the basin was formed by upper crustal extension, possibly reactivating structures in an ancient fold-and-thrust belt. The extent and location of upper mantle extension are not revealed by our data, and it may be offset from the rift. We believe that the Baikal rift structure is similar in many respects to the Mesozoic Atlantic rift system, the precursor to the formation of the North Atlantic Ocean. We also propose that the Central Baikal rift evolved by episodic fault propagation and basin enlargement, rather than by two-stage rift evolution as is commonly assumed.

  17. Microbial community structure in methane hydrate-bearing sediments of freshwater Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Mardanov, Andrey V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Shubenkova, Olga V; Pogodaeva, Tatiana V; Zemskaya, Tamara I; Ravin, Nikolai V; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2012-02-01

    Gas hydrates in marine sediments have been known for many years but recently hydrates were found in the sediments of Lake Baikal, the largest freshwater basin in the world. Marine gas hydrates are associated with complex microbial communities involved in methanogenesis, methane oxidation, sulfate reduction and other biotransformations. However, the contribution of microorganisms to the formation of gas hydrates remains poorly understood. We examined the microbial communities in the hydrate-bearing sediments and water column of Lake Baikal using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria dominated the water sample collected at the lake floor in the hydrate-bearing site. The shallow sediments were dominated by Archaea. Methanogens of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales were abundant, whereas representatives of archaeal lineages known to perform anaerobic oxidation of methane, as well as sulfate-reducing bacteria, were not found. Affiliation of archaea to methanogenic rather than methane-oxidizing lineages was supported by analysis of the sequences of the methyl coenzyme M reductase gene. The deeper sediments located at 85-90 cm depth close to the hydrate were dominated by Bacteria, mostly assigned to Chloroflexi, candidate division JS1 and Caldiserica. Overall, our results are consistent with the biological origin of methane hydrates in Lake Baikal. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Age and growth of pike (Esox lucius) in Chivyrkui Bay, Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owens, Randall W.; Pronin, Nikolai M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe age and growth of pike (Esox lucius) in Lake Baikal. Pike were collected with gill nets and by angling in Chivyrkui Bay in late July-early August 1993 and by gill nets in June 1995. Total length (mm), weight (g), and sex were recorded and scales and cleithra were collected for aging. In 1993, pike, ages 1 to 3, ranged in length from 331 to 810 mm and in 1995 , pike, ages 2 to 10, ranged in length from 365 to 1,111 mm but only three percent were age 7 or older. Most growth in length occurred during the first two years of life. The length-weight relation for pike from Chivyrkui Bay was similar to that of pike from the St. Lawrence River. Calculated total length of pike from Lake Baikal equalled or exceeded the lengths of pike from lakes Erie or Ontario. Good agreement was found between ages from cleithra and from scales. Lengths at age in June 1995 (N=108) varied widely among pike. Females were generally larger than males at a given age among fish age-3 and older. When compared with the circumpolar growth standard, based on the von Bertalanffy growth curve, growth of Lake Baikal pike exceeded all other Asian populations, and equalled or exceeded many other northern hemisphere populations.

  19. Postpyrogenic transformation of soils under Pinus sibirica forests in the southern Lake Baikal basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoshchekov, Yu. N.; Cherednikova, Yu. S.

    2012-10-01

    The results of experimental investigations of the postpyrogenic dynamics of the widespread rawhumus podzols under Pinus sibirica forests in the southern Lake Baikal basin are discussed. Ground fires transform the diagnostic surface organic soil horizons into organic pyrogenic horizons (Opir, OL/Opir, and AOpir). The adverse effect of ground fires of different intensities on the changes in the reserves, the fractional composition of the litters, and the chemical composition of the organic horizons is shown. The soils of dark coniferous forests are inclined to long-lasting restoration. The Pinus sibirica regrowth under the canopy of deciduous species serves as the basis for the restoration of native stands and the formation of the soils characteristic of the southern part of the Lake Baikal basin.

  20. Ionofore antibiotic polynactin produced by Streptomyces sp. 156A isolated from Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Shishlyannikova, Tatyana A; Kuzmin, Anton V; Fedorova, Galina A; Shishlyannikov, Sergey M; Lipko, Irina A; Sukhanova, Elena V; Belkova, Natalia L

    2017-03-01

    The potential antibacterial activity of secondary metabolites produced by Streptomyces sp. 156A isolated from Lake Baikal was investigated. The selective liquid-liquid extraction method was applied to obtain a mixture of nactins (polynactin) produced by the strain. The polynactin consisted of nonactin (3%), monactin (18%), dinactin (36%), trinactin (31%) and tetranactin (12%). The compounds were identified by MS/MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR methods. The loss of neutral 184 and 198 Da fragments from a sodiated molecular ion, [M + Na](+), of nactins was observed in the MS/MS spectrum. The polynactin was shown to possess the antibiotic activity against Gram-positive strains including opportunistic strains and strains isolated from various ecosystems of Lake Baikal.

  1. The Selenga River delta - a geochemical barrier for the waters of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalov, Sergey; Thorslund, Josefin; Pietron, Jan; Jarsjö, Jerker

    2016-04-01

    Delta systems play an important role in retention of sediments and contaminants to downstream recipients, through processes such as gravitational sedimentation, flocculation and biofiltration. The Selenga river delta is one of the world's largest inland deltas, providing a huge buffer zone between Lake Baikal and upstream waters of the Selenga river basin. Understanding the delta functioning is critical for the planning of water management measures in the Selenga River Basin and for protection of the waters of Lake Baikal. We here study the current state and functioning of the delta's ecosystem and hydrogeochemical processes. More specifically, we considered spatio-temporal changes in water flow, morphology and transport of sediments and metals within the delta and what potential impacts these changes may have on the delta functions. Results show that the delta network has a large influence on the mass of metals reaching the Lake Baikal at the delta outlet. Regions with high density of wetlands and small channels, in contrast to main channel regions, show a consistent pattern of considerable contaminant filtering and removal (between 77-99% for key metals), during both high and low flow conditions, following with a significant increase (2-3 times) of bottom sediment pollution. Geomorphological processes also governs the barrier function of the delta, due to partitioning of flow between different channel systems. These results are particularly relevant in the light of recent and expected future changes involving both the hydrology and water quality in the Lake Baikal basin. Taken together, this emphasizes the importance of understanding the interface between flow partitioning, delta morphology, and sediment and metal patterns and storage rates for fully capturing and quantifying the variety in delta functions. This is particularly relevant coupled to hydroclimatic changes in the region, which could lead to significant decline in barrier functions of the delta due to

  2. Stratified distribution of nutrients and extremophile biota within freshwater ice covering the surface of Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Nina A; Belykh, Olga I; Golobokova, Ludmila P; Artemyeva, Olga V; Logacheva, Natalia F; Tikhonova, Irina V; Lipko, Irina A; Kostornova, Tatyana Ya; Parfenova, Valentina V; Khodzher, Tamara V; Ahn, Tae-Seok; Zo, Young-Gun

    2012-02-01

    Biological entities and gradients of selected chemicals within the seemingly barren ice layers covering Lake Baikal were investigated. Ice cores 40-68 cm long were obtained from in shore and offshore sites of Southern Lake Baikal during the cold period of a year (March-April) in 2007 and 2008. In microscopic observations of the melted ice, both algae and bacteria were found in considerable numbers (>10(3) cells/L and >10(4) cells/ml, respectively). Among all organisms found, diatom was generally the most predominant taxon in the ice. Interestingly, both planktonic and benthic algae were present in considerable numbers (2-4×10(4) cells/L). Dominant phototrophic picoplankton were comprised of small green algae of various taxa and cyanobacteria of Synechococcus and Cyanobium. The bacterial community consisted mostly of short rod and cocci cells, either free-living or aggregated. Large numbers of yeast-like cells and actinomycete mycelium were also observed. Concentrations of silica, phosphorus, and nitrate were low by an order of magnitude where biota was abundant. The profile of the ice could be interpreted as vertical stratification of nutrients and biomass due to biological activities. Therefore, the organisms in the ice were regarded to maintain high activity while thriving under freezing conditions. Based on the results, it was concluded that the freshwater ice covering the surface of Lake Baikal is considerably populated by extremophilic microorganisms that actively metabolize and form a detritus food chain in the unique large freshwater ecosystem of Lake Baikal.

  3. Contemporary limnological and sedimentary analyses to investigate anthropogenic changes in nutrient fluxes at Lake Baikal, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, S.; McGowan, S.; Swann, G. E. A.; Mackay, A. W.; Panizzo, V.; Vologina, E.

    2014-12-01

    Large tectonic freshwater lakes face serious threats to their water quality, biological diversity and endemism through pollution and global warming. Lake Baikal is an important example as anthropogenic stressors (industrial pollution and cultural eutrophication) along with climate change could greatly affect the lake's unique ecosystem and pristine water conditions. Phosphorus, nitrogen and silica are thought to control phytoplankton development, however recent changes in nutrient impacts on Lake Baikal's phytoplankton remains unproven. This research aims to investigate the effect of anthropogenic and environmentally-driven changes on this large and biodiverse lake through seasonal sampling of the phytoplankton community (determined by chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments), chemical parameters (total phosphorus, dissolved organic carbon, silicate, nitrate and other major ions) and vertical profiles of pH, temperature and photosynethetically active radiation. Results show seasonal, vertical and spatial variability in the lake's phytoplankton biomass and composition with higher summer mixed-layer pigment concentrations in the south basin resulting in higher light attenuation coefficients and lower photic zone depths (R2=0.86, p < 0.05). Redundancy analysis shows that this distribution is primarily influenced by average dissolved organic carbon concentrations within the mixing layer, with the strongest negative correlation between picoplankton biomarkers and dissolved organic carbon concentrations (R2=-0.60, p < 0.05). Geochemical biomarkers (pigments and organic carbon [δ13Corganic]) from several sediment cores place these modern day observations within an historical context and allow the impact of past environmental changes on Lake Baikal's primary productivity over the last 60 years and natural climate-driven trends in past centuries to be assessed. These results show clear spatial and temporal changes between sites over this interval with greater increases in

  4. Deep Structure and Seismic Stratigraphy of Baikal and Teletskoye Lake Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, V. M.; Seleznev, V. S.; Klerx, J.; Byslov, M. M.; Babushkin, S. M.

    The outcomes of seismic researches, which are carried out in frameworks of interna- tional scientific programs on study of largest neotectonic depressions of ancient conti- nents: Baikal and Teletskoye lakes are presented. Seismic work on study of sedimen- tary deposit and depression bottoms of Baikal and Teletskoye lakes was carried out by CSP method (single-channel continuous seismic profiling) and correlation method of refracted waves (KMRW). They were fulfilled from boat sides of 25-500 tons dis- placement. When operate by the CSP method the reception of signals was carried out from pneumosources (with frequencies 70-80 Hz and 175 HZ) to piezoelectric seis- mograph of 30-m length, when operate by KMRW the self-regulating bottom stations were used. As the result of field researches on water areas of lakes a series of seismoa- coustic profiles (CSP) of overall length more than 2000 kms and five profiles of the correlation method of refracted waves (KMRW) of~400 kms length have been carried out. From data of contineous seismic profiling (CSP) the complicated heterogeneus texture of sedimentary deposit of depressions have been found. On seismic data the series of break faults, which modern structure picture formed, have been traced. By deep researches with the KMRW method on profiles in South-Baikal hollow and de- pression of Teletskoye lake a water stratum, neozoic sedimentary deposits, thickness of precenozoic sedimentary deposits and crystalline rocks are distinguished. Thick- ness of neozoic sedimentary deposits within South-Baikal hollow and in Teletskoye lake depression makes, accordingly, 4.0-6.0 and 0.4-0.7 kms. The thickness has been differentiated on values of velocities of longitudinal waves, which vary in its limits from 2.0 to 4.0 km/sec. Between surface of crystalline rocks, fragmentary separated on KMRW profiles within investigated depressions, and thickness of neozoic deposits the stratum of precenozoic deposits with total thickness from 1 km in the

  5. Raman spectroscopic and calorimetric observations on natural gas hydrates with cubic structures I and II obtained from Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachikubo, Akihiro; Khlystov, Oleg; Kida, Masato; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Minami, Hirotsugu; Yamashita, Satoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Shoji, Hitoshi; Kalmychkov, Gennadiy; Poort, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    This study reports measurements of the Raman spectra of Lake Baikal gas hydrates and estimations of the hydration number of methane-rich samples. The hydration number of gas hydrates retrieved from the southern Baikal Basin (crystallographic structure I) was approx. 6.1. Consistent with previous results, the Raman spectra of gas hydrates retrieved from the Kukuy K-2 mud volcano in the central Baikal Basin indicated the existence of crystallographic structures I and II. Measurements of the dissociation heat of Lake Baikal gas hydrates by calorimetry (from the decomposition of gas hydrates to gas and water), employing the hydration number, revealed values of 53.7-55.5 kJ mol-1 for the southern basin samples (structure I), and of 54.3-55.5 kJ mol-1 for the structure I hydrates and 62.8-64.2 kJ mol-1 for the structure II hydrates from the Kukuy K-2 mud volcano.

  6. Atmospheric and Oceanic Phenomena in Lake Baikal Visible from Space on SAR and Optical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Andrei; Evtushenko, Natalia; Filimonova, Natalia; Terleeva, Nadezda

    2016-08-01

    Lake Baikal in the Russian Federation, the deepest and unique lake in the world, represents itself specific hydrological and weather regimes as well as different natural phenomena. Among unique those there are internal waves, giant ice rings, local winds, oil and gas seeps, etc. These phenomena leave pronounced footprints both on the lake surface and in the ice cover. Some of them are typical for inland or semi-closed seas, whereas others are specific for large lakes. These phenomena can be imaged, mapped and studied by remote sensing and in particular by combined use of SAR and optical images with middle and high resolution. Routinely imagery acquired by the Sentinel- 1A and Landsat satellites help scientists studying them from space allowing the extraction of a number of characteristics and useful features. In this paper the most distinct examples are presented and discussed with purpose to emphasize the uniqueness of Lake Baikal, which sometimes is considered as a marine laboratory. It is shown that the lake patterns associated with different phenomena visible on SAR and optical images yields information on their appearance, the spatial extent and the fine-scale structure, which cannot be obtained by other instruments and methods.

  7. Sustainable Exploitation and Conservation of the Endemic Lake Baikal Sponge (Lubomirskia baicalensis) for Application in Nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Belikov, Sergey I

    2009-01-01

    The large sub-continent of Siberia is one of the richest mineral and oil resources on Earth. In its center, one region has gained prominence: Lake Baikal. It is one of the oldest, the deepest, and the lake with the greatest volume on Earth and is inhabited by more than 1,500 endemic species. It was Pallas (1771) who discovered in the lake a sponge species, Lubomirskia baicalensis (Porifera: Demospongiae), which dominates Lake Baikal's littoral-zone benthos. This sponge species has a distinguished, pronounced body plan which is composed of modules. The application of molecular biological and cell biological techniques has allowed an insight into the richness of the genomic regulatory systems of L. baicalensis. Predominantly present are those genes which are involved in body plan formation, e.g., signal transduction, stress response, and morphogenesis. The value of this species for the understanding of the evolutionary processes is reflected by recent studies on the monophyly of Lake Baikal endemic sponge species; L. baicalensis is a reference animal for other endemic sponges of this area, such as in the Tuva region (Lake Dzhegataj). In addition, L. baicalensis gained special interest for bio-medicine after the identification of the enzyme, silicatein, which catalyzes biosilica formation for the synthesis of the siliceous skeletal elements, the spicules. The sustainable use of this enzyme became feasible after the achievement of recombinant preparations. The huge impact of the recombinantly prepared biosilica for nano-technology in general cannot yet be quantified, e.g., in the field of new materials (biozirconia and biotitania) or in semiconductor technology.

  8. Aquatic ecological biochemical investigations in the Lake Baikal region

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeeva, S.S.; Kozhova, O.M.

    1986-07-01

    The authors maintain that at the current level of investigations a constructive solution of the problem of protecting aquatic ecosystems is possible only on the basis of a thorough study of biochemical mechanisms of the interaction of biota and pollutants. They believe that in the program of investigations in the Baikal region, with consideration of the easy vulnerability of the aquatic ecosystems, ecological biochemical investigations should occupy one of the leading places. The authors suggest a method for the screening of xenobiotics, consisting of xenobiotics; chemical investigations; biochemical investigations of the properties of xenobiotics, and toxicological investigations of xenobiotics. The differences in the elimination of xenobiotics are considerable due to the species and biochemical characteristics of hydrophytes and chemical structure of the investigated toxicants. The results obtained in experiments with cyanide compounds are of considerable interest, since cyanides, the strongest poisons of animals, prove to be little toxic for higher aquatic plants and algae.

  9. Annotated checklist of the leech species diversity in the Maloe More Strait of Lake Baikal, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Kaygorodova, Irina A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, the very first checklist of the freshwater leeches of Maloe More Strait, a special part of Lake Baikal, is presented. It includes 14 free-living and parasitic species, of which four species belong to endemic Baikal genera – two species from Baicalobdella and one species each from Baicaloclepsis and Codonobdella. The checklist highlights six potentially new morphological species recorded for the first time in the area. The exact systematic position is stated for all leech species. Each species from the list is provided with information on taxonomic synonymy, data on its geographic distribution, and ecological characteristics. New species records are additionally provided with brief morphological characteristics and photos of their external morphology. PMID:26798292

  10. Conquest of the deep, old and cold: an exceptional limpet radiation in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Stelbrink, Björn; Shirokaya, Alena A; Clewing, Catharina; Sitnikova, Tatiana Y; Prozorova, Larisa A; Albrecht, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest, oldest and most speciose ancient lake in the world. The lake is characterized by high levels of molluscan species richness and endemicity, including the limpet family Acroloxidae with 25 endemic species. Members of this group generally inhabit the littoral zone, but have been recently found in the abyssal zone at hydrothermal vents and oil-seeps. Here, we use mitochondrial and nuclear data to provide a first molecular phylogeny of the Lake Baikal limpet radiation, and to date the beginning of intra-lacustrine diversification. Divergence time estimates suggest a considerably younger age for the species flock compared with lake age estimates, and the beginning of extensive diversification is possibly related to rapid deepening and cooling during rifting. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence time estimates do not clearly indicate when exactly the abyssal was colonized but suggest a timeframe coincident with the formation of the abyssal in the northern basin (Middle to Late Pleistocene). © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Tracing diatom utilisation, and its fate, in Lake Baikal, Siberia: the application of silicon isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panizzo, V. N.; Swann, G. E. A.; Mackay, A. W.; Roberts, S.; Vologina, E.; Sturm, M.; Horstwood, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The global biogeochemical cycling of silicon (Si) is intrinsically linked to the fate of CO2 in the earth's atmosphere. To date, most research has focused on the oceanic cycling of Si over glacial/interglacial timescales although, the importance of continental Si cycling (via abiotic and biotic processes) is now being addressed. Especially as the significant potential for Si sequestration in continental lake systems has been recently highlighted [1]. We present the first large-scale silicon isotope (δ30SiDSi) profiles of Lake Baikal's water column, where a comparison between both pre- and post-diatom growing season δ30SiDSi signatures are made. Samples were collected along a water profile (surface to 180 m) at numerous sites across Lake Baikal, with deep-water endmembers at 400 m and c. 1,500 m. All isotopic analyses were conducted on a Neptune + Multi-Collector ICP-MS at NIGL, UK, using wet plasma mode with Mg doping of samples and standard-sample-standard bracketing. Analytical reproducibility is 0.12‰ (2σ) and blanks are <1% of signal intensity. DSi concentrations of March water surface samples (South Basin only) range between c. 0.74 and 1.23 ppm while those collected in August are all <0.70 ppm, following seasonal biological utilisation. In turn Chlorophyll a values from South Basin profiles in August are greater (between c. 1.46 to 3.18 mg l-1) than March surface values (<0.70 mg l-1). Indeed, March δ30SiDSi surface values range between c. +2.16 and +2.45‰ while summer surface values range between c. +2.20 and +2.84‰, reflecting residual pool depletion after summer biological utilisation. δ30SiDSi values are >1‰ more enriched than dominant lake water inflows again reflecting diatom Si uptake. Annual open sediment traps deployed down Lake Baikal's water column yield δ30Sidiatom signatures of +1.25‰, which suggests that down-column diatom dissolution is minimal. Applying the diatom fractionation factor of -1.1‰[2] and adopting a closed system

  12. An Inventory of Underwater Landslides in Lake Baikal Suggests a Strong Link with Gas Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Batist, M. A. O.; Naudts, L.; Casier, R.; Khlystov, O.; Khabuev, A.; Minami, H.; Grachev, M.; Shoji, H.

    2014-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetry data from Lake Baikal were analyzed for the identification of morphologies that could indicate the presence of underwater landslides. The data were collected in 2009 by a Belgian-Russian-Japanese consortium, using a 50 kHz Seabeam 1050 echosounder, operated from RV Titov. The data cover the entire lake floor -in water depths between 200 m and 1637 m- of the Southern and Central Basins, i.e. a total surface of 15,000 km2. Our analysis revealed the presence of 26 possible underwater landslides. At least 11 of these are characterized by distinctive headwalls, scars and overall morphology, and were confirmed to be mass-wasting features by high-resolution reflection seismic data. Most of the identified underwater landslides scar the slopes of the Selenga river delta, and the sediment-charged slopes of the shoaling eastern margin of the half-graben basins. Most of the underwater landslides have a headwall occurring at water depths between 300 and 450 m; only a few occur at larger water depths. All underwater landslides occur in areas in which gas hydrates have been inferred (i.e. based on the observation of bottom-simulating reflections on seismic data) or confirmed (i.e. by deep drilling or shallow coring). The clustering of many headwalls at a water depth that is not characterized by any distinct change in slope gradient or stratigraphy, but that is close to the stability limit of gas hydrates (i.e. ca. 380 m, for pure methane hydrates, under Lake Baikal conditions), suggests that the presence of the hydrates may be one of the most important controlling factors in conditioning the underwater slopes of Lake Baikal and rendering them unstable and prone to failure. The exact conditioning process remains, however, unclear as the hydrate reservoir in Lake Baikal is considered to have remained stable, even over relatively long time scales, in the absence of any important fluctuations in lake-level and in bottom-water temperature.

  13. Transcriptome-based phylogeny of endemic Lake Baikal amphipod species flock: fast speciation accompanied by frequent episodes of positive selection.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Sergey A; Logacheva, Maria D; Popova, Nina V; Klepikova, Anna V; Penin, Aleksey A; Bazykin, Georgii A; Etingova, Anna E; Mugue, Nikolai S; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Yampolsky, Lev Y

    2017-01-01

    Endemic species flocks inhabiting ancient lakes, oceanic islands and other long-lived isolated habitats are often interpreted as adaptive radiations. Yet molecular evidence for directional selection during species flocks radiation is scarce. Using partial transcriptomes of 64 species of Lake Baikal (Siberia, Russia) endemic amphipods and two nonendemic outgroups, we report a revised phylogeny of this species flock and analyse evidence for positive selection within the endemic lineages. We confirm two independent invasions of amphipods into Baikal and demonstrate that several morphological features of Baikal amphipods, such as body armour and reduction in appendages and sensory organs, evolved in several lineages in parallel. Radiation of Baikal amphipods has been characterized by short phylogenetic branches and frequent episodes of positive selection which tended to be more frequent in the early phase of the second invasion of amphipods into Baikal when the most intensive diversification occurred. Notably, signatures of positive selection are frequent in genes encoding mitochondrial membrane proteins with electron transfer chain and ATP synthesis functionality. In particular, subunits of both the membrane and substrate-level ATP synthases show evidence of positive selection in the plankton species Macrohectopus branickii, possibly indicating adaptation to active plankton lifestyle and to survival under conditions of low temperature and high hydrostatic pressures known to affect membranes functioning. Other functional categories represented among genes likely to be under positive selection include Ca-binding muscle-related proteins, possibly indicating adaptation to Ca-deficient low mineralization Baikal waters. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Stable isotopes and organochlorines in the food webs of Lakes Baikal and Superior

    SciTech Connect

    Kucklick, J.R.; Baker, J.E.; Ostrom, N.E.; Ostrom, P.H.; Lee, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    Quantifying organochlorine biomagnification in aquatic ecosystems is traditionally accomplished by assigning discreet trophic levels, which does not adequately describe feeding relationships except in well defined systems. {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 13}C, particularly {delta}{sup 15}N values, measured in aquatic food webs provide additional information on trophic position such that it may be treated as a continuous variable. To evaluate this technique, samples were collected from the pelagic zone of Lake Baikal in August and September, 1993 for organochlorine (PCBs, DDTs, chlordanes and HCHS) and stable isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N) analyzed. These included high volume water samples, seston, net plankton, two species of pelagic sculpin Comephorus dybowskii, C. baikalensis, the omul, (Coregonus autumnalis migratorious), and 9 seal (Phoca siberica) samples of known sex and age. Food web samples from Lake Superior will be collected in June, 1994 to include benthic infauna, sculpins, Mysis and surface phytoplankton and zooplankton. Results from this study will provide a comparison of organochlorine trophodynamics between a system with a predominant pelagic food web (Lake Baikal) to one with substantial benthic/pelagic coupling (Lake Superior).

  15. Assessment of climate and land use changes impacts on the rivers inflow to the Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurovskaia, Victoriia; Semenova, Olga; Vinogradova, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    Baikal is the deepest lake in the world and one of the biggest reservoirs of fresh water. The aim of this research was to analyze the long-term variability of characteristics of river inflow to the Lake using the historical data and project possible changes in the face of non-stationary climate and land use based on hydrological modelling. The basin of the Lake Baikal has area about 545 000 km2, half of which is situated in Russia. It is characterized by different climate and landscape conditions with annual flow depth varying from 30 to more than 600 mm. Nowadays active development and use of natural resources as well as climate changes have a strong impact on the regime of rivers inflow to the Lake. The watersheds response caused by environmental non-stationarity can be variable and unpredictable. Therefore adequate hydrological models with robust parametrization are required for future projections. This study consisted of two parts. Initially we compiled the database of daily runoff data for about 50 gauges in the basin of the Baikal Lake with continuous period of observations 30-50 years. The data was used to assess the characteristics of river inflow to the Lake for the historical period and estimate observed changes due to current climate change. For the development of future projections we have chosen several small and middle-size representative watersheds in different parts of the Lake basin with area from 151 to 7800 km2 and various types of hydrological regime. The data base for modelling was developed which included the information about landscapes, soils, dominating hydrological processes. The hydrological model parameters for different dominant landscapes were estimated based on that information. We applied distributed process-based hydrological model Hydrograph developed in State Hydrological Institute, Russia (Vinogradov et al., 2011; Semenova et al., 2013). It describes all essential processes of land hydrological cycle including detailed algorithm

  16. Molecular and isotopic characteristics of gas hydrate-bound hydrocarbons in southern and central Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachikubo, Akihiro; Khlystov, Oleg; Krylov, Alexey; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Minami, Hirotsugu; Nunokawa, Yutaka; Yamashita, Satoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Shoji, Hitoshi; Nishio, Shin'ya; Kida, Masato; Ebinuma, Takao; Kalmychkov, Gennadiy; Poort, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the molecular composition (methane, ethane, and propane) and stable isotope composition (methane and ethane) of hydrate-bound gas in sediments of Lake Baikal. Hydrate-bearing sediment cores were retrieved from eight gas seep sites, located in the southern and central Baikal basins. Empirical classification of the methane stable isotopes (δ13C and δD) for all the seep sites indicated the dominant microbial origin of methane via methyl-type fermentation; however, a mixture of thermogenic and microbial gases resulted in relatively high methane δ13C signatures at two sites where ethane δ13C indicated a typical thermogenic origin. At one of the sites in the southern Baikal basin, we found gas hydrates of enclathrated microbial ethane in which 13C and deuterium were both highly depleted (mean δ13C and δD of -61.6‰ V-PDB and -285.4‰ V-SMOW, respectively). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C2 δ13C-δD classification for hydrate-bound gas in either freshwater or marine environments.

  17. Nuclear DNA content correlates with depth, body size, and diversification rate in amphipod crustaceans from ancient Lake Baikal, Russia.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Nicholas W; Yampolsky, Lev; Gregory, T Ryan

    2017-04-01

    Lake Baikal in Russia is a large, ancient lake that has been the site of a major radiation of amphipod crustaceans. Nearly 400 named species are known in this single lake, and it is thought that many more await description. The size and depth of Lake Baikal, in particular, may have contributed to the radiation of endemic amphipods by providing a large number of microhabitats for species to invade and subsequently experience reproductive isolation. Here we investigate the possibility that large-scale genomic changes have also accompanied diversification in these crustaceans. Specifically, we report genome size estimates for 36 species of Baikal amphipods, and examine the relationship between genome size, body size, and the maximum depths at which the amphipods are found in the lake. Genome sizes ranged nearly 8-fold in this sample of amphipod species, from 2.15 to 16.63 pg, and there were significant, positive, phylogenetically corrected relationships between genome size, body size, maximum depth, and diversification rate among these species. Our results suggest that major genomic changes, including transposable element proliferation, have accompanied speciation that was driven by selection for differences in body size and habitat preference in Lake Baikal amphipods.

  18. P, As, Sb, Mo, and other elements in sedimentary Fe/Mn layers of Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Müller, Beat; Granina, Liba; Schaller, Tobias; Ulrich, Andrea; Wehrli, Bernhard

    2002-02-01

    Distinct layers with accumulated iron and manganese oxyhydroxides are found in the recent sediments of Lake Baikal (Siberia). In the South and Central Basins, these concretions accumulate close to the sediment-water interface. In northern Lake Baikal and the area of Academician Ridge, however, massive Fe/Mn crusts are formed within several thousand years at redox fronts 10 to 15 cm below the sediment surface. In some places, precipitated iron and manganese oxyhydroxides are spatially separated. The patterns are a result of secondary iron and manganese oxide precipitation. This natural long-term experiment allows the analysis of competitive adsorption and coprecipitation of trace elements with iron and manganese oxides in sediments. Background concentrations in the sediment of oxoanions (P, As, Sb, Mo); of trace metals (Cr, V, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb); and of Mg, Ca, Sr, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Despite the differences in catchment geology of the many tributaries, they are remarkably uniform in sediment cores from different basins of Lake Baikal. Enrichment factors of P and As within Fe crusts revealed concentrations up to 14 and 58 times higher than the background, respectively. No enrichment of P and As was found in the Mn layers. By contrast, Mo accumulated exclusively in the Mn layer with up to 35-fold enrichment. Sb was only slightly enriched in both the Fe and the Mn layers. Among the trace metals studied, only Cd was found at elevated concentrations with a preference for the Mn layer. Ca and Sr were correlated with both Fe and Mn accumulations. The study quantifies the well-known specific adsorption and coprecipitation of P and As at authigenic iron oxides and of Mo on manganese oxides. In addition, the enrichment of Cd at manganese oxides in contrast to the conservative behavior of Zn and Pb reveals highly selective accumulation processes.

  19. To estimation of the fluxes of carbon dioxide in the Lake Baikal water-atmosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestunov, D. A.; Panchenko, Mikhail V.; Domysheva, V. M.; Belan, Boris D.

    2004-12-01

    Separate many-day series of measurements of the carbon dioxide concentration were carried out at the stationary site of the Limnological Institute SB RAS near village Bol"shie Koty in July, August and October 2003. The CO2 fluxes from the water surface are estimated. Maximum amplitude of the diurnal variations of the CO2 concentration in the chamber in August was 100 ppmV, and minimum was 45 ppmV. Comparison with the results of measurements in the atmosphere and the data on the CO2 content in the near-surface water of Lake Baikal is performed.

  20. Carbon budget in agroecosystems on gray forest soils in the Lake Baikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubnina, E. V.; Pomazkina, L. V.

    2007-05-01

    The carbon budget in agroecosystems with spring wheat was studied in long-term (1997 2004) field experiments on gray forest soils in the forest-steppe of the Lake Baikal region, including soils polluted with the fluorides emitted by an aluminum plant. Pollution was revealed to increase the deficit in the carbon budget due to the more intense mineralization of organic matter and CO2 emission from the soils. Raising of the crops’ productivity upon permanent application of fertilizers may provide maintenance of a positive carbon budget.

  1. New Records of Lake Baikal Leech Fauna: Species Diversity and Spatial Distribution in Chivyrkuy Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Kaygorodova, Irina A.; Pronin, Nikolay M.

    2013-01-01

    The study of several Lake Baikal leech collections offered us the possibility to determine species diversity in the Chivyrkuy Gulf, the biggest one in the lake. As a result, the first information on the Chivyrkuy Hirudinea fauna (Annelida, Clitellata) has been revealed. There are two orders and four families of leeches in the Chivyrkuy Gulf: order Rhynchobdellida (families Glossiphoniidae and Piscicolidae) and order Arhynchobdellida (families Erpobdellidae and Haemopidae). In total, 22 leech species and 2 subspecies belonging to 11 genera were identified. Of these, 4 taxa belong to the family Glossiphoniidae (G. concolor, A. hyalina, A. heteroclita f. papillosa, and A. heteroclita f. striata) recorded in Baikal for the first time. Representatives of 8 unidentified species (Glossophinia sp., Baicaloclepsis sp., Baicalobdella sp., Piscicola sp. 1, Piscicola sp. 2, Erpobdella sp. 1, Erpobdella sp. 2, and Erpobdella sp. 3) have been also recorded. The checklist gives a contemporary overview of the species composition of leech parasites, their hosts, and distribution within the Chivyrkuy Gulf. The analysis of spatial distribution has shown that the leech species diversity is correlated with the biological productivity of the bay. The most diverse community of leech species is detected in the eutrophic zone of the lake. PMID:23844382

  2. Sedimentary Fe/Mn layers buried deeply below the bottom surface in Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granina, L. Z.; Phedorin, M. A.; Mats, V. D.; Khlystov, O. M.

    2009-04-01

    In Lake Baikal, constantly oxygenated water column results in intensive accumulation of iron and manganese in surface oxidized sediments. However, in the region of underwater Academician Ridge Fe/Mn layers and crusts are also found deeply (meters) below the water-sediment interface. Formation of such crusts was firstly related to climatic fluctuations in the region (Deike et al. 1997), later - to tectonic events in the lake. We believe that in Baikal depression, the weathering crust, sub-aerial cover, and accompanied Fe, Mn, and P ores developed during the Cretaceous-Paleogene and Neogene epochs, characterized by warm and wet climatic conditions. Later on, the depression's diurnal surface was flooded by water basins newly formed in the region, however fragments of this surface are widely spread both on the land and the lake bottom in the regions of Olkhon Island and Academician Ridge. As a result of the Late Pleistocene tectonic movements, the surface of Academician uplift was submerged below the present lake's level. Covered this surface ancient (pre-Baikalian) ore-bearing formations were also submerged. Age of sedimentary Fe/Mn crusts buried deeply below the bottom surface in the region of Academician Ridge is about 100 Ky (Deike et al. 1997; Granina et al. 2003), and it agrees with suggestion on the crusts burial due to tectonic movements that have started in this part of the lake about 120 Ky ago. There are different evidences supported this hypothesis (Mats et al. 2000; Granina et al. 2003); new ones presented in this paper are the following: i) A map firstly constructed using the regional geological data clearly shows that location of the continental Fe and Mn ores and phosphorites in the Central Western Prebaikalie and shore-land near the Olkhon Island (Preolkhon'ie) is rather close to nearby area of the lake bottom, where Fe/Mn crusts are deeply buried within the sediments. This testifies in favor of their subaerial origin and relation to the continental

  3. Diatom succession trends in recent sediments from Lake Baikal and their relation to atmospheric pollution and to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, A. W.

    1998-01-01

    Recent environmental change in Lake Baikal has been attributed to anthropogenic influences on the ecosystem, especially through pollution and cultural eutrophication. These hypotheses are tested in this paper principally by diatom analyses in 20 short sediment cores. Most of the cores were collected with a new type of box corer specifically designed for use on Lake Baikal. Most cores contain a good sediment record but turbidites occur in some sediment profiles which may be best recognized using a combination of techniques, such as radiometric dating and percentage dry weight analyses. The most recent sediments, especially those in the southern basin and in the very north of Baikal, contain a record of anthropogenic contamination in the form of lead and spheroidal carbonaceous particles, which confirms that the southern basin of Baikal is most affected by atmospheric sources of pollution. However, there is no sedimentary diatom evidence indicating offshore water quality deterioration in Baikal owing to air pollution or eutrophication. Small increases in diatoms which indicate nutrient enrichment (e.g. Stephanodiscus minutulus, Synedra acus v. radians and Synedra acus v. acus) may reflect local eutrophication of the shallow waters close to the Selenga Delta and certain coastal sites in the southern basin near to the Baikalsk paper and pulp mill. By using numerical techniques, Lake Baikal can be split into at least four regions on the basis of its surface sediment flora: the south, middle and north basins, and the shallow waters surrounding the Selenga Delta region. Diatom analyses reveal that the endemic flora of Lake Baikal has been constantly changing over at least the last 2000 years and that these fluctuations are probably responses to natural climatic variability. Recent sediments of Baikal may be affected by taphanomic processes (e.g. dissolution) and turbidite deposition, and these must be taken into account when interpreting the sedimentary diatom record. The

  4. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M.; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments.

  5. Studies on the taxonomy and distribution of freshwater sponges in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yoshiki

    2009-01-01

    During the summers of 1993-2001, we carried out expeditions in order to collect sponges and to review their taxonomy and distribution in Lake Baikal. A total of 1,539 specimens were collected in our expeditions. Most specimens were classified into 2 families 7 genera, and 14 species, though some remained unclassified because of taxonomic confusion. Most sponges belonged to the family of Lubomirskiidae which were distributed widely in Lake Baikal. A few sponges with gemmules, which were confined to the "Little sea" near Olkhon Island and to an estuary in the North Basin, belonged to the Spongillidae. In qualitative survey of vertical distribution, B. intermedia showed the highest frequency among all species and found more often in shallow zones. L. baicalensis was second with regard to frequency and also found more often in shallow zones. Though S. papyracea had been believed to inhabit only deeper zones, it occurred in shallow zones as well. In this survey, the biomass of sponges at 10 m depth showed maximum value and showed the second largest at 20m depth.

  6. Climate-Induced Mortality of Siberian Pine and Fir in the Lake Baikal Watershed, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Petrov, Ilya A.; Golyukov, Alexei S.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Yagunov, Mikhail N.

    2016-01-01

    Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica) and fir (Abies sibirica) (so called ''dark needle conifers", DNC) showed decreased radial growth increment within the Lake Baikal watershed since the 1980s with increasing mortality recorded since the year 2000. Tree ring width was strongly correlated with vapor pressure deficit, aridity and root zone moisture. Water stress from droughts made trees more susceptible to insect attacks causing mortality in about 10% of DNC stands within the Lake Baikal watershed. Within Siberia DNC mortality increased in the southern part of the DNC range. Biogeographically, tree mortality was located within the DNC - forest-steppes transition. Tree mortality was significantly correlated with drought and soil moisture anomalies. Within the interior of the DNC range mortality occurred within relief features with high water stress risk (i.e., steep convex south facing slopes with shallow well-drained soils). In general, DNC mortality in Siberia was induced by increased aridity and severe drought (inciting factors) in synergy with biotic attacks (contributing factor). In future climate scenarios with predicted increase in aridity DNC could be eliminated from the southern part of its current range and will be replaced by drought-resistant conifers and broadleaf species (e.g., Larix sibirica, Pinus silvestris, and Betula pubescence).

  7. Climate-Induced Mortality of Siberian Pine and Fir in the Lake Baikal Watershed, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Petrov, Ilya A.; Golyukov, Alexei S.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Yagunov, Mikhail N.

    2016-01-01

    Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica) and fir (Abies sibirica) (so called ''dark needle conifers", DNC) showed decreased radial growth increment within the Lake Baikal watershed since the 1980s with increasing mortality recorded since the year 2000. Tree ring width was strongly correlated with vapor pressure deficit, aridity and root zone moisture. Water stress from droughts made trees more susceptible to insect attacks causing mortality in about 10% of DNC stands within the Lake Baikal watershed. Within Siberia DNC mortality increased in the southern part of the DNC range. Biogeographically, tree mortality was located within the DNC - forest-steppes transition. Tree mortality was significantly correlated with drought and soil moisture anomalies. Within the interior of the DNC range mortality occurred within relief features with high water stress risk (i.e., steep convex south facing slopes with shallow well-drained soils). In general, DNC mortality in Siberia was induced by increased aridity and severe drought (inciting factors) in synergy with biotic attacks (contributing factor). In future climate scenarios with predicted increase in aridity DNC could be eliminated from the southern part of its current range and will be replaced by drought-resistant conifers and broadleaf species (e.g., Larix sibirica, Pinus silvestris, and Betula pubescence).

  8. Small inverted repeats drive mitochondrial genome evolution in Lake Baikal sponges.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Dennis V; Maikova, Olga O; Pett, Walker; Belikov, Sergey I

    2012-08-15

    Demosponges, the largest and most diverse class in the phylum Porifera, possess mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markedly different from that in other animals. Although several studies investigated evolution of demosponge mtDNA among major lineages of the group, the changes within these groups remain largely unexplored. Recently we determined mitochondrial genomic sequence of the Lake Baikal sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis and described proliferation of small inverted repeats (hairpins) that occurred in it since the divergence between L. baicalensis and the most closely related cosmopolitan freshwater sponge Ephydatia muelleri. Here we report mitochondrial genomes of three additional species of Lake Baikal sponges: Swartschewskia papyracea, Rezinkovia echinata and Baikalospongia intermedia morpha profundalis (Demospongiae, Haplosclerida, Lubomirskiidae) and from a more distantly related freshwater sponge Corvomeyenia sp. (Demospongiae, Haplosclerida, Metaniidae). We use these additional sequences to explore mtDNA evolution in Baikalian sponges, paying particular attention to the variation in the rates of nucleotide substitutions and the distribution of hairpins, abundant in these genomes. We show that most of the changes in Lubomirskiidae mitochondrial genomes are due to insertion/deletion/duplication of these elements rather than single nucleotide substitutions. Thus inverted repeats can act as an important force in evolution of mitochondrial genome architecture and be a valuable marker for population- and species-level studies in this group. In addition, we infer (((Rezinkovia+Lubomirskia)+Swartschewskia)+Baikalospongia) phylogeny for the family Lubomirskiidae based on the analysis of mitochondrial coding sequences from freshwater sponges.

  9. A qualitative assessment of the influence of bioturbation in Lake Baikal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Patrick; Boes, Xavier; Goddeeris, Boudewijn; Fagel, Nathalie

    2005-04-01

    The impact of bioturbation in Lake Baikal sediments, particularly on rhythmic layering and mixing, was assessed by studying the actual vertical distribution of benthic animals in continuous accumulation zones selected by seismic survey (Vydrino Shoulder, Posolskoe Bank, Continent Ridge). To assess the influence of the bioturbation, animals were extracted from short cores and identified at the relevant taxonomic level. The faunal distribution is examined in parallel with the bioturbation tracks observed in thin section. Oligochaeta, Nematoda, Ostracoda, Copepoda, Gammaridae, Chironomidae and Hydrachnidia were found inhabiting the sediment. Among them, only oligochaete worms were assumed to have a significant impact on sediment mixing because of their "conveyor belt" feeding. The other two most abundantly sampled groups, nematods and copepods, belong to the interstitial fauna that has no significant impact on the vertical displacement of sediment particles and do not ingest the sediment. The presence of a benthic fauna as deep as 15 cm in the sediment indicates that the possibility of sediment disturbance by invertebrate activity cannot be dismissed in Lake Baikal. The effect of biological mixing is more limited in the deepest stations because the number of potential bioturbators is reduced, qualitatively as well as quantitatively. Located in the abyssal zone, Continent and Vydrino (but outside turbidites) deep stations appear to be most promising sediment records for tracking climate signal at high resolution.

  10. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S W; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-12-09

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments.

  11. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M.; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments. PMID:27934935

  12. Impact of Placer Mining on Sediment Transport in Headwaters of the Lake Baikal Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietron, J.; Jarsjo, J.; Chalov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Adverse practices in alluvial surface mining (placer mining) can lead to shifts in sediment transport regimes of rivers. However, some placer mines are located in remote parts of river basins, which constrain data availability in mining impact assessments. One such mining area is the Zaamar Goldfield (Northern Mongolia) which stretches 60 km along the Tuul River. The area is located in the headwaters of the Lake Baikal Basin, and may impact the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Lake Baikal. Previous studies indicate that the mining industry in the Zaamar Goldfield loads the river system with considerable amount of contaminated sediments (heavy metals). Still, transport processes and possible changes in local to regional sediment transport need to be better understood. In this work, we use snapshot field measurements and various flow and transport modelling techniques to analyze (1) the impact of placer mining in the sediment delivery to the river system and (2) the dynamics of further sediment transport to downstream Tuul River. Our results indicate that surface mining operations and waste management have considerable impact on the sediment input from the landscape. Furthermore, dynamic in-channel storage of sediments can act as intermittent sources of mining sediments. These effects occur in addition to impacts of on-going changes in hydro-climatic conditions of the area. We hope that our methodology and results will aid in studying similar unmonitored and mining-affected river basins.

  13. Evidence from Lake Baikal for Siberian glaciation during oxygen-isotope substage 5d

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karabanov, E.B.; Prokopenko, A.A.; Williams, D.F.; Colman, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    The paleoclimatic record from bottom sediments of Lake Baikal (eastern Siberia) reveals new evidence for an abrupt and intense glaciation during the initial part of the last interglacial period (isotope substage 5d). This glaciation lasted about 12 000 yr from 117 000 to 105 000 yr BP according to correlation with the SPEC-MAP isotope chronology. Lithological and biogeochemical evidence of glaciation from Lake Baikal agrees with evidence for the advance of ice sheet in northwestern Siberia during this time period and also with cryogenic features within the strata of Kazantzevo soils in Southern Siberia. The severe 5d glaciation in Siberia was caused by dramatic cooling due to the decrease in solar insolation (as predicted by the model of insulation changes for northern Asia according to Milankovich theory) coupled with western atmospheric transport of moisture from the opea areas of Northern Atlantic and Arctic seas (which became ice-free due to the intense warming during preceeding isotope substage 5e). Other marine and continental records show evidence for cooling during 5d, but not for intense glaciation. Late Pleistocene glaciations in the Northern Hemisphere may have begun in northwestern Siberia.

  14. Stratigraphic and structural evolution of the Selenga Delta Accommodation Zone, Lake Baikal Rift, Siberia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholz, C.A.; Hutchinson, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    Seismic reflection profiles from the Lake Baikal Rift reveal extensive details about the sediment thickness, structural geometry and history of extensional deformation and syn-rift sedimentation in this classic continental rift. The Selenga River is the largest single source of terrigenous input into Lake Baikal, and its large delta sits astride the major accommodation zone between the Central and South basins of the lake. Incorporating one of the world's largest lacustrine deltas, this depositional system is a classic example of the influence of rift basin structural segmentation on a major continental drainage. More than 3700 km of deep basin-scale multi-channel seismic reflection (MCS) data were acquired during the 1989 Russian and the 1992 Russian–American field programs. The seismic data image most of the sedimentary section, including pre-rift basement in several localities. The MCS data reveal that the broad bathymetric saddle between these two major half-graben basins is underlain by a complex of severely deformed basement blocks, and is not simply a consequence of long-term deltaic deposition. Maximum sediment thickness is estimated to be more than 9 km in some areas around the Selenga Delta. Detailed stratigraphic analyses of the Selenga area MCS data suggest that modes of deposition have shifted markedly during the history of the delta. The present mode of gravity- and mass-flow sedimentation that dominates the northern and southern parts of the modern delta, as well as the pronounced bathymetric relief in the area, are relatively recent developments in the history of the Lake Baikal Rift. Several episodes of major delta progradation, each extending far across the modern rift, can be documented in the MCS data. The stratigraphic framework defined by these prograding deltaic sequences can be used to constrain the structural as well as depositional evolution of this part of the Baikal Rift. An age model has been established for this stratigraphy, by

  15. A preliminary investigation of siliceous microfossil succession in late quaternary sediments from Lake Baikal, Siberia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julius, M. L.; Stoermer, E. F.; Colman, S. M.; Moore, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Siliceous microfossil assemblage succession was analyzed in a 100 m sediment core from Lake Baikal, Siberia. The core was recovered from the lake's central basin at a water depth of 365 m. Microfossil abundance varied greatly within the intervals sampled, ranging from samples devoid of siliceous microfossils to samples with up to 3.49 x 1011 microfossils g-1 sediment. Fluctuations in abundance appear to reflect trends in the marine δ18O record, with peak microfossil levels generally representing climate optima. Microfossil taxa present in sampled intervals changed considerably with core depth. Within each sample a small number of endemic diatom species dominated the assemblage. Changes in dominant endemic taxa between sampled intervals ranged from extirpation of some taxa, to shifts in quantitative abundance. Differences in microfossil composition and the association of variations in abundance with climate fluctuations suggest rapid speciation in response to major climatic excursions.

  16. [Molecular-phylogenetic analysis of cyclopoids (Copepoda: Cyclopoida) from Lake Baikal and its water catchment basin].

    PubMed

    Maĭor, T Iu; Sheveleva, N G; Sukhanova, L V; Timoshkin, O A; Kiril'chik, S V

    2010-11-01

    Baikalian cyclopoids represent one of the richest endemic faunas of freshwater cyclopoid copepods. The genus Diacyclops Kiefer, 1927 is the most numerous by species number in the lake. In this work, molecular-phylogenetic analysis of 14 species and 1 sub-species from Lake Baikal and its water catchment basin is performed. The regions of mitochondrial cytochrom-oxydase I (COI) and of nuclear small-subunit 18S rRNA were used as evolution markers. In the obtained set of nucleotide sequences of COT gene, an effect of synonymous substitution saturation is revealed. Baikalian representatives of the genus Diacyclops form at phylogenetic schemes by two markers a monophyletic griup, it suggest their origin from a common ancestral form. Preliminary estimate of the age of this group is 20-25 My.

  17. Faunal communities at sites of gas- and oil-bearing fluids in Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskaya, Tamara I.; Sitnikova, Tatiana Y.; Kiyashko, Sergei I.; Kalmychkov, Gennady V.; Pogodaeva, Tatiana V.; Mekhanikova, Irina V.; Naumova, Tatiana V.; Shubenkova, Olga V.; Chernitsina, Svetlana M.; Kotsar, Oleg V.; Chernyaev, Evgeny S.; Khlystov, Oleg M.

    2012-12-01

    Macro- and meiofaunal communities were examined at four geomorphologically distinct sites with different gas- and oil-bearing fluid characteristics in the northern, central and southern basins of Lake Baikal. All sites had elevated concentrations of bicarbonate, nitrate, sulphate and chloride ions in pore fluids, with highest values at the Frolikha vent. Elevated levels of iron ions were found in pore waters of the St. Petersburg methane seep and the Gorevoy Utes oil seep. The chemical composition of pore waters at the Malenky mud volcano was similar to that reported in earlier work. Consistent with published data, the Frolikha vent (northern basin) and the St. Petersburg methane seep (central basin) were characterised by methane of mixed genesis (thermogenic + biogenic), whereas the methane source was mainly thermogenic at the Gorevoy Utes oil seep (central basin) and biogenic at the Malenky mud volcano (southern basin). In contrast to marine seep ecosystems, the macrofauna was dominated only by amphipods, giant planarians and oligochaetes, whereas bivalves were absent; the meiofauna was similar to its marine counterpart, being dominated by nematodes, cyclops, harpacticoids and ostracods. A statistically significant positive relationship was revealed between faunal abundance and the availability of bacterial mats on seep sediments. Moreover, ANOVA tests showed significant increases in both meiozoobenthic and macrozoobenthic densities at "hot spot" vent/seep sites relative to discharge-free reference sites. The isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen at various trophic levels of these benthic vent/seep communities was found to differ markedly from that reported by earlier studies for the pelagic and other benthic food webs in Lake Baikal. As in marine seeps, the macrofauna had variable isotopic signatures. Light δ13C and δ15N values suggest the utilization of chemosynthetically fixed and/or methane-derived organic matter. By contrast, the heavy δ13C

  18. Climate Induced Birch Mortality in Trans-Baikal Lake Region, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, V. I.; Ranson, K. J.; Oskorbin, P. A.; Im, S. T.; Dvinskaya, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Trans-Baikal (or Zabailkal'e) region includes the forest-steppe ecotones south and east of Lake Baikal in Russia and has experienced drought for several years. The decline and mortality of birch (Betula pendula) stands within the forest-steppe ecotone Trans-Baikal region was studied based on a temporal series of satellite data, ground measurements, and tree ring analysis. During the first decade of the 21st century birch stands decline and mortality were observed on )about 5% of the total area of stands within our 1250 km(exp 2 study area. Birch forest decline and mortality occurs mainly at the margins of stands, within the forest-steppe ecotone on slopes with direct insolation. During the first decade of the 21st century summer (June-August) precipitation was about 25% below normal. Soil water content measurements were lowest within dead stands and highest within healthy stands and intermediate within damaged stands. Drought impact on stands was amplified by an increase in summer air temperatures (+0.9 C) in comparison with the previous decade. Tree ring data of ''surviving'' and ''dead'' tree groups showed a positive correlation with summer/annual precipitation and negative correlation with summer air temperatures. Temperature and precipitation extreme anomalies tend to occur in the region with a period of about 27 years. The observed anomaly was the most severe since the beginning of meteorological observations in the year 1900. Data for the other sites showed a positive climate impact on the growth and expansion of Siberian forests. That is, the same species (B. pendula) showed considerable increase (1.4 times both in height and stem volume) during 20th-21st centuries as temperature increased but precipitation remained at adequate levels.

  19. Ecology of Siberian Taimen Hucho taimen in the Lake Baikal Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matveyev, Arcadi N.; Pronin, Nikolai M.; Samusenok, Vitali P.; Bronte, Charles R.

    1998-01-01

    Taimen Hucho taimen historically inhabited most tributaries and littoral areas of Lake Baikal, in south central Siberia, where they supported subsistence and commercial fisheries. Logging, pollution, and overfishing have caused dramatic population declines or local extinction of most stocks. Most of what is known about this species has been published in eastern journals and therefore is not readily available to western scientists. New data collected during the 1980s and 1990s have been combined with other reports to provide an overview of the biology and life history of this species. Taimen are long-lived fish and can reach ages of 29 years and sizes up to 60 kg. Populations can either be strictly riverine or anadromous. Adults from both life histories ascend rivers in spring to spawn and feed, and less extensive migrations occur in fall to prey on spawning omul (Coregonus autumnalis migratorius). Principal food items for age 1 and 2 taimen are macroinvertebrates, but young taimen quickly become piscivorous at age 2 when they consume mainly black Baikal grayling (Thymallus arcticus baicalensis), and sculpins (Taracottus kneri, Cottus kesslerij). Males reach sexual maturity at ages 7 to 8 and later for females at ages 8 to 9. Average egg production per female was about 22,000 eggs. Parasite burdens are heavy but composed of few species and mediated by prey items consumed. This fish is a highly-specialized predator and plays an indispensable role in the structure of fish communities in mountains and foothills. Taimen conservation in the Baikal region is impossible without adoption and implementation of a dedicated rehabilitation program that includes the protection of remaining populations and habitat, and possibly introduction of hatchery-reared fish in selected areas where habitat remains, but parental stocks are low.

  20. High-resolution magnetostratigraphy of late quaternary sediments from Lake Baikal, Siberia: timing of intracontinental paleoclimatic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demory, François; Nowaczyk, Norbert R.; Witt, Annette; Oberhänsli, Hedi

    2005-04-01

    Sediment cores retrieved from 6 locations in Lake Baikal were subjected to a paleomagnetic study in order to establish detailed age models based on correlations of relative paleointensity records. Additional data were provided by calibrated accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating, as well as by documentation of geomagnetic excursions like Laschamp at ˜42 ka and Iceland Basin at ˜185 ka. Few intervals were affected by diagenetic features like selective reductive dissolution of magnetite and greigite mineralization (Demory et al., 2005-this issue), and those that were left out of paleointensity records. These records were tuned to the well-dated paleomagnetic record from ODP Site 984 Channell [Channell, J.E.T., 1999. Geomagnetic paleointensity and directional secular variation at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) site 984 (Bjorn Drift) since 500 ka: comparisons with ODP site 983 (Gardar drift). J. Geophys. Res., B: [Solid Earth], 104 (10):22, 937-22, 951]. The complex shape of the resulting depth/age curves highlights the need for a high-resolution age model. We focused on the climatic boundary between marine isotopic stage (MIS) 7 and 6 where the Iceland Basin paleomagnetic excursion is clearly documented in the North Atlantic Channell et al.[Channell, J.E.T., Hodell, D.A., Lehman, B., 1997. Relative geomagnetic paleointensity and d18O at ODP Site 983 (Gardar Drift, North Atlantic) since 350 ka. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 153 (1 2), 103-118] and in Lake Baikal Oda et al. [Oda, H., Nakamura, K., Ikehara, K., Nakano, T., Nishimura, M., Khlystov, O., 2002. Paleomagnetic record from Academician Ridge, Lake Baikal: a reversal excursion at the base of marine oxygen isotope stage 6. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 202 (1), 117-132] ; present study). During this period, we provide evidence for a return to cold conditions in the Lake Baikal region simultaneous to the sea surface cooling, but earlier than the global ice volume change observed in North Atlantic planktonic and

  1. Influence of long-distance climate teleconnection on seasonality of water temperature in the world's largest lake--Lake Baikal, Siberia.

    PubMed

    Katz, Stephen L; Hampton, Stephanie E; Izmest'eva, Lyubov R; Moore, Marianne V

    2011-02-16

    Large-scale climate change is superimposed on interacting patterns of climate variability that fluctuate on numerous temporal and spatial scales--elements of which, such as seasonal timing, may have important impacts on local and regional ecosystem forcing. Lake Baikal in Siberia is not only the world's largest and most biologically diverse lake, but it has exceptionally strong seasonal structure in ecosystem dynamics that may be dramatically affected by fluctuations in seasonal timing. We applied time-frequency analysis to a near-continuous, 58-year record of water temperature from Lake Baikal to examine how seasonality in the lake has fluctuated over the past half century and to infer underlying mechanisms. On decadal scales, the timing of seasonal onset strongly corresponds with deviation in the zonal wind intensity as described by length of day (LOD); on shorter scales, these temperature patterns shift in concert with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Importantly, the connection between ENSO and Lake Baikal is gated by the cool and warm periods of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Large-scale climatic phenomena affecting Siberia are apparent in Lake Baikal surface water temperature data, dynamics resulting from jet stream and storm track variability in central Asia and across the Northern Hemisphere.

  2. A cellular and metabolic assessment of the thermal stress responses in the endemic gastropod Benedictia limnaeoides ongurensis from Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Bedulina, Daria S; Shatilina, Zhanna M; Lubyaga, Yulia A; Vereshchagina, Kseniya P; Timofeyev, Maxim A

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if the Lake Baikal endemic gastropod Benedictia limnaeoides ongurensis, which inhabits in stable cold waters expresses a thermal stress response. We hypothesized that the evolution of this species in the stable cold waters of Lake Baikal resulted in a reduction of its thermal stress-response mechanisms at the biochemical and cellular levels. Contrary to our hypothesis, our results show that exposure to a thermal challenge activates the cellular and biochemical mechanisms of thermal resistance, such as heat shock proteins and antioxidative enzymes, and alters energetic metabolism in B. limnaeoides ongurensis. Thermal stress caused the elevation of heat shock protein 70 and the products of anaerobic glycolysis together with the depletion of glucose and phosphagens in the studied species. Thus, a temperature increase activates the complex biochemical system of stress response and alters the energetic metabolism in this endemic Baikal gastropod. It is concluded that the deepwater Lake Baikal endemic gastropod B. limnaeoides ongurensis retains the ability to activate well-developed biochemical stress-response mechanisms when exposed to a thermal challenge. © 2013.

  3. The diversity and antibiotic properties of actinobacteria associated with endemic deepwater amphipods of Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Protasov, Eugenii S; Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Rebets, Yuriy V; Voytsekhovskaya, Irina V; Tokovenko, Bogdan T; Shatilina, Zhanna M; Luzhetskyy, Andriy N; Timofeyev, Maxim A

    2017-07-18

    The emergence of pathogenic bacteria resistant to antibiotics increases the need for discovery of new effective antimicrobials. Unique habitats such as marine deposits, wetlands and caves or unexplored biological communities are promising sources for the isolation of actinobacteria, which are among the major antibiotic producers. The present study aimed at examining cultivated actinobacteria strains associated with endemic Lake Baikal deepwater amphipods and estimating their antibiotic activity. We isolated 42 actinobacterial strains from crustaceans belonging to Ommatogammarus albinus and Ommatogammarus flavus. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the isolation and initial characterization of representatives of Micromonospora and Pseudonocardia genera from Baikal deepwater invertebrates. Also, as expected, representatives of the genus Streptomyces were the dominant group among the isolated species. Some correlations could be observed between the number of actinobacterial isolates, the depth of sampling and the source of the strains. Nevertheless, >70% of isolated strains demonstrated antifungal activity. The dereplication analysis of extract of one of the isolated strains resulted in annotation of several known compounds that can help to explain the observed biological activities. The characteristics of ecological niche and lifestyle of deepwater amphipods suggests that the observed associations between crustaceans and isolated actinobacteria are not random and might represent long-term symbiotic interactions.

  4. Continental climate response to orbital forcing from biogenic silica records in Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Peck, J.A.; Karabanov, E.B.; Carter, Susan J.; Bradbury, J.P.; King, J.W.; Williams, D.F.

    1995-01-01

    CHANGES in insolation caused by periodic changes in the Earth's orbital parameters provide the primary forcing for global ice ages1-6. But it is not clear to what extent the climates in continental interiors are controlled directly by regional variations in insolation and to what extent they are driven instead by the highly nonlinear response of the oceans and ice sheets. Here we investigate this question using the record of biogenic silica in Lake Baikal as a proxy for climate change in this high-latitude mid-continental region. We find a good correlation between this record and that of marine oxygen isotopes4. Over the past 250 kyr the Baikal record exhibits both a strongly nonlinear component (manifested in a 100-kyr periodicity) and weaker direct-insolation components (manifested in the 41-kyr (obliquity) and 23- and 19-kyr (precession) orbital cycles). These results show that even though extreme continental climates such as this are influenced directly by insolation variations, they are dominated by the nonlinear rhythm of the oceans and ice sheets.

  5. Orbit-related long-term climate cycles revealed in a 12-Myr continental record from Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Kashiwaya, K; Ochiai, S; Sakai, H; Kawai, T

    2001-03-01

    Quaternary records of climate change from terrestrial sources, such as lake sediments and aeolian sediments, in general agree well with marine records. But continuous records that cover more than the past one million years were essentially unavailable until recently, when the high-sedimentation-rate site of Lake Baikal was exploited. Because of its location in the middle latitudes, Lake Baikal is highly sensitive to insolation changes and the entire lake remained uncovered by ice sheets throughout the Pleistocene epoch, making it a valuable archive for past climate. Here we examine long sediment cores from Lake Baikal that cover the past 12 million years. Our record reveals a gradual cooling of the Asian continental interior, with some fluctuations. Spectral analyses reveal periods of about 400 kyr, 600 kyr and 1,000 kyr, which may correspond to Milankovitch periods (reflecting orbital cycles). Our results indicate that changes in insolation were closely related to long-term environmental variations in the deep continental interior, over the past 12 million years.

  6. [Biodiversity and activity of the microbial community in the Kotelnikovsky Hot Springs (Lake Baikal)].

    PubMed

    Bel'kova, N L; Parfenova, V V; Suslova, T S; An, T S; Tadzaki, K

    2005-01-01

    Complex microbiological and chemical analyses of water and bacterial mats were performed in the Kotelnikovsky Hot Springs (Lake Baikal). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that short rods about 1.2-2 microm in diameter predominated in the natural microbial community. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with chemical analysis revealed a characteristic P peak in the bacteria-like mineral particles, which suggests their biogenic origin. Most strains of the thermophilic microorganisms were gram-positive spore-forming rods and can be assigned to the genus Bacillus. Assays for potential enzyme activity demonstrated that most of the strains tested were active at high temperature. The data obtained suggest high activity of the bacterial community in situ and its particular role in the functioning of the hydrothermal ecosystem.

  7. Phylogenetic position and age of Lake Baikal candonids (Crustacea, Ostracoda) inferred from multigene sequence analyzes and molecular dating.

    PubMed

    Karanovic, Ivana; Sitnikova, Tatiana Ya

    2017-09-01

    With 104 endemic species family Candonidae is one of the most diverse crustacean groups in Lake Baikal, yet their phylogenetic relationships and position in the family have not been addressed so far. Here, we study the phylogenetic position of Baikal candonids within the family and their evolutionary history using molecular markers for the first time since their original description. We choose 10 Baikal and 28 species from around the world, and three ribosomal RNA-s (18S, 28S, and 16S), and analyze individual and concatenated datasets using Bayesian Inference in MrBayes and BEAST. For molecular divergence time estimates, four fossil records are used to calibrate the root and three internal nodes. The 28S dataset is tested under the strict molecular clock, while for other data we use relaxed clocks. Resulting trees show incongruence between molecular and fossil divergence time estimates, with the former suggesting older ages. Strict molecular clock analysis results in narrower node age confidence intervals and younger time estimates than other analysis. All trees support at least two candonid lineages in Baikal, with two independent colonization events, and 28S suggests a major radiation between 12 and 5 Mya. This divergence time estimate mostly agrees with another, unrelated, ostracod group in the lake and other lake animals as well. Baikal candonid clades show a close phylogenetic relationship with Palearctic lineages, but their deep divergence is indicative of separate genera. Results also suggest a monophyly of tribes that today live exclusively in subterranean waters, and we offer several hypotheses of their evolutionary history.

  8. Identification of a putatively multixenobiotic resistance related Abcb1 transporter in amphipod species endemic to the highly pristine Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Pavlichenko, Vasiliy V; Protopopova, Marina V; Timofeyev, Maxim; Luckenbach, Till

    2015-04-01

    The fauna of Lake Baikal in Eastern Siberia, the largest freshwater body on Earth, is characterized by high degrees of biodiversity and endemism. Amphipods, a prominent taxon within the indigenous fauna, occur in an exceptionally high number of endemic species. Considering the specific water chemistry of Lake Baikal with extremely low levels of potentially toxic natural organic compounds, it seems conceivable that certain adaptions to adverse environmental factors are missing in endemic species, such as cellular defense mechanisms mitigating toxic effects of chemicals. The degree to which the endemic fauna is affected by the recently occurring anthropogenic water pollution of Lake Baikal may depend on the existence of such cellular defense mechanisms in those species. We here show that endemic amphipods express transcripts for Abcb1, a major component of the cellular multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) defense against toxic chemicals. Based on a partial abcb1 cDNA sequence from Gammarus lacustris, an amphipod species common across Northern Eurasia but only rarely found in Lake Baikal, respective homologous sequences were cloned from five amphipods endemic to Lake Baikal, Eulimnogammarus verrucosus, E. vittatus, E. cyaneus, E. marituji, and Gmelinoides fasciatus, confirming that abcb1 is transcribed in those species. The effects of thermal (25 °C) and chemical stress (1-2 mg L(-1) phenanthrene) in short-term exposures (up to 24 h) on transcript levels of abcb1 and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), used as a proxy for cellular stress in the experiments, were exemplarily examined in E. verrucosus, E. cyaneus, and Gammarus lacustris. Whereas increases of abcb1 transcripts upon treatments occurred only in the Baikalian species E. verrucosus and E. cyaneus but not in Gammarus lacustris, changes of hsp70 transcript levels were seen in all three species. At least for species endemic to Lake Baikal, the data thus indicate that regulation of the identified amphipod abcb1 is

  9. Lidar profiling of aerosol optical properties from Paris to Lake Baikal (Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieudonné, E.; Chazette, P.; Marnas, F.; Totems, J.; Shang, X.

    2014-11-01

    In June 2013, a ground-based mobile lidar performed the 10 000 km ride from Paris to Ulan-Ude, near Lake Baikal, profiling for the first time aerosol optical properties all the way from Western Europe to central Siberia. The instrument was equipped with N2-Raman and depolarization channels that enabled an optical speciation of aerosols in the low and middle troposphere. The backscatter-to-extinction ratio (BER) and particle depolarization ratio (PDR) at 355 nm have been retrieved. The BER in the lower boundary layer (300-700 m) was found to be 0.017 ± 0.009 sr-1 in average during the campaign, with slightly higher values in background conditions near Lake Baikal (0.021 ± 0.010 sr-1 in average) corresponding to dust-like particles. PDR values observed in Russian cities (>1.7%) are higher than the ones measured in European cities (<1.3%) due to the lifting of terrigenous aerosols by traffic on roads with a bad tarmac. Biomass burning layers from grassland or/and forest fires in southern Russia exhibit BER values ranging from 0.010 to 0.015 sr-1 and from 2 to 3% for the PDR. Desert dust aerosols originating from the Caspian and Aral seas regions were characterized for the first time, with a BER (PDR) of 0.022 sr-1 (21%) for pure dust, and 0.011 sr-1 (15%) for a mix between dust and biomass burning. The lidar observations also showed that this dust event extended over 2300 km and lasted for ~6 days. Measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) show that our results are comparable in terms of aerosol optical thickness (between 0.05 and 0.40 at 355 nm) with the mean aerosol load encountered throughout our route.

  10. Timing of Lithofacies Development in Rift Sediments of Lake Baikal (Siberia, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapota, T.; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.

    2002-12-01

    This work has been based on samples collected from, so far, the deepest borehole (core BDP-98, 600 m deep) penetrating sediment at the Academician Ridge (53 deg 4' N and 108 deg 2' E, water depth of 333 m) in Lake Baikal (BDP-Members, 2001). The Academician Ridge, structural and bathymetrical high between central and south Baikal basins with limited influence of turbidity flows, represents a suitable site for retrieval of paleoclimatic and tectonic records. The scope of the investigation includes a survey of the sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical variability in the sediment section. Studied samples, initially aimed for Be-10 dating, have been chosen to represent different lithofacies and subjected to examination by various analytical methods including grain size analyses (laser based grain size analyzer), mineralogy (X-ray diffractometry and light and electron scanning microscopy), chemistry (ICP MS). The studied samples are dominated by silt-size particles with variable content of diatoms. The inorganic particles are composed of quartz, plagioclase feldspar, K-feldspar, clay minerals (micas, chlorites, and kaolinite), carbonates (calcite and siderite), Fe-minerals (oxides and sulfides) and Ti-minerals. We observe no specific variability in mineralogy with respect to the three major facies that spread from the deltaic one at the bottom of the section (dated at 8-7 Myr) through the hemipelagic (dated at 5.5-3 Myr) to the glacial (<3 Myr). The chemical data show a generally down core decrease in silica and increase in alumina and loss on ignition. The explanation for this likely to be a higher diatom content in the hemipelagic and Quaternary facies compared to the deltaic one. Apart from strong fluctuations in each facies, the general trends of trace elements are fairly constant down core. Samples enriched in vivianite (Fe3[PO4]2 x 8H2O), concretionary siderite (FeCO3) and occasionally nests of framboidal pyrite (FeS)occur throughout the facies. There is

  11. Tracing sources and bioaccumulation of mercury in fish of Lake Baikal--Angara River using Hg isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Perrot, Vincent; Epov, Vladimir N; Pastukhov, Mikhail V; Grebenshchikova, Valentina I; Zouiten, Cyril; Sonke, Jeroen E; Husted, Søren; Donard, Olivier F X; Amouroux, David

    2010-11-01

    This study presents the determination and comparison of isotopic compositions of Hg in sediments, plankton, roach, and perch of two freshwater systems in the Lake Baikal-Angara River aquatic ecosystem: the man-made Bratsk Water Reservoir contaminated by Hg from a chlor-alkali factory and the noncontaminated Lake Baikal. Isotopic ratios of biota exhibit both significant mass-independent fractionation (MIF) (Δ(199)Hg from 0.20 to 1.87‰) and mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) (δ(202)Hg from -0.97 to -0.16‰), whereas sediments exhibit high MDF (δ(202)Hg from -1.99 to -0.83‰) but no MIF. δ(15)N and δ(13)C are correlated with methylmercury in organisms from both sites, indicating bioaccumulation and biomagnification through food webs of both regions. Combining this with isotopic composition of samples shows that δ(202)Hg increases with the trophic level of organisms and also with methylmercury in fish from Lake Baikal. This study demonstrates that MIF in fish samples from Bratsk Water Reservoir allow to trace anthropogenic Hg, since fish with the highest levels of Hg in muscle have the same isotopic composition as the sediment in which anthropogenic Hg was deposited. Less contaminated fish do not exhibit this anthropogenic signature accumulating relatively lower Hg amount from the contaminated sediments. This work reveals that Hg isotopic composition can be used to track the contribution of anthropogenic sources in fish from a contaminated lake.

  12. A 9,000 Year History of Seal Hunting on Lake Baikal, Siberia: The Zooarchaeology of Sagan-Zaba II.

    PubMed

    Nomokonova, Tatiana; Losey, Robert J; Goriunova, Ol'ga I; Novikov, Alexei G; Weber, Andrzej W

    2015-01-01

    Sagan-Zaba II, a habitation site on the shore of Siberia's Lake Baikal, contains a record of seal hunting that spans much of the Holocene, making it one of the longest histories of seal use in North Asia. Zooarchaeological analyses of the 16,000 Baikal seal remains from this well-dated site clearly show that sealing began here at least 9000 calendar years ago. The use of these animals at Sagan-Zaba appears to have peaked in the Middle Holocene, when foragers used the site as a spring hunting and processing location for yearling and juvenile seals taken on the lake ice. After 4800 years ago, seal use declined at the site, while the relative importance of ungulate hunting and fishing increased. Pastoralists began occupying Sagan-Zaba at some point during the Late Holocene, and these groups too utilized the lake's seals. Domesticated animals are increasingly common after about 2000 years ago, a pattern seen elsewhere in the region, but spring and some summer hunting of seals was still occurring. This use of seals by prehistoric herders mirrors patterns of seal use among the region's historic and modern groups. Overall, the data presented in the paper demonstrate that Lake Baikal witnessed thousands of years of human use of aquatic resources.

  13. Bottomwater formation due to hydrothermal activity in Frolikha Bay, Lake Baikal, eastern Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Kipfer, R.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.; Hofer, M.; Hohmann, R.; Imboden, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Hydrothermal water enters Frolikha Bay, a well-known site of high geothermal heat flux in the northern part of Lake Baikal, at 400 m depth. On the basis of CTD profiles, the hydrothermal water is identified as forming an anomalous bottom layer with a higher temperature (>0.15{degrees}C) and salinity (>2.5 mg{center_dot}kg{sup {minus}1}) than the overlying water. Due to the entrainment of lake water, a distinct dense water layer up to 40 m thick, stabilised by its slightly higher salinity, becomes established close to the bottom of the bay. The density current thus generated flows out of the bay towards the deeper parts of the basin. Since helium isotope analysis shows that the geochemical characteristics of the hydrothermal water are similar to those of water from nearby hot springs on land, the bottomwater of Frolikha Bay is easily interpreted in terms of the mixing of ordinary fresh water from the lake and hydrothermal water carrying isotopically heavy He from the continental crust. Because of its high crustal He content, a similar hydrothermal component may even be identified in the open water of the northern basin. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Mass transport on the slope of Kukuy Griva of Lake Baikal: results of the TTR-Class@Baikal expeditions in 2014 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyeva, Marina; Akhmanov, Grigorii; Starovoitov, Anatoly; Khlystov, Oleg; Khabuev, Andrey; Chensky, Aleksandr; Mazzini, Adriano; Tokarev, Mikhail; Giliazetdinova, Dina

    2016-04-01

    A large submarine landslide area of Lake Baikal was studied in 2014 and 2015 during two recent expeditions of the Training-Through-Research Class@Baikal project onboard RV "G.Yu. Vereshchagin". The sliding, discovered in 2009, affects the north-western slope of the so-called Kukuy Griva, an elevation situated within the underwater delta front of the Selenga river. Selenga is the largest river flowing to the Baikal Lake and the very high sedimentation rates occurring in this area result in broad mass transport processes along the slope. In 2014 a number of sparker seismic lines were acquired and several gravity cores were collected in order to map the distribution of the individual slump bodies. Seismic imaging revealed the presence of two main sedimentary units within the uppermost 200 meters. These units are characterized by differently expressed bedding and by different degree of inner deformation. Three seismic-facies within the upper unit and two seismic-facies within the lower unit were described and interpreted in terms of genesis. This interpretation outlined two periods in the Quaternary history of mass transport processes on the Kukuy Griva slope. Recent sliding events were observed particularly in the upper part of the slope. Typically these displaced bodies do not extend over large surfaces and are not characterized by significant inner deformations. In addition, to the north of Kukuy Griva a large well-expressed landslide head scarp was mapped. The buried landslides in the lower units are characterized by relatively large individual bodies comprising highly deformed sediments and covered with well-stratified non-deformed sediments. The different characteristics of the slide bodies that are confined in the upper and in the lower sedimentary units, likely result from variations in sedimentation rate and in the composition of the supplied sediment during the glacial periods. Eventual fluctuations in the lake water level can also explain these differences

  15. First record of Mylagaulid rodents (Rodentia, Mammalia) from the Miocene of Eastern Siberia (Olkhon Island, Baikal Lake, Irkutsk Region, Russia).

    PubMed

    Tesakov, A S; Lopatin, A V

    2015-01-01

    A new genus and species of rodent, Lamugaulus olkhonensis, belonging to the subfamily Promylagaulinae of the family Mylagaulidae, is described on the basis of isolated teeth from the Khalagay Formation of the Lower Miocene Tagay locality (Olkhon island, Lake Baikal, Irkutsk Region). This is the first record of mylagaulids in Eastern Siberia, significantly expanding the data on the distribution of this mainly North American group of rodents in Asia and showing its presence outside the Central Asian arid zone.

  16. A Holocene molluscan succession from floodplain sediments of the upper Lena River (Lake Baikal region), Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Dustin; Preece, Richard C.; Shchetnikov, Alexander A.; Parfitt, Simon A.; Dlussky, Konstantin G.

    2008-05-01

    Floodplain sediments of the upper Lena River near Basovo in south-central Siberia have yielded the most detailed Holocene molluscan succession yet reported from the entire eastern Palaearctic. Over 72,500 shells from at least 28 species of terrestrial and 23 species of freshwater mollusc have been recovered, an abundance and diversity far higher than previously reported from the region. The molluscan assemblages are dominated by land snails, especially members of the genus Vallonia, represented by five species including Vallonia tenuilabris and two poorly known species Vallonia kamtschatica and Vallonia cf. chinensis. Other noteworthy species recovered include Gastrocopta theeli, Carychium pessimum, Vertigo extima (southernmost record), Vertigo microsphaera and the first Asian records of three other taxa ( Vertigo geyeri, Vertigo genesii and Vertigo parcedentata). Illustrations are provided for the critical species, since opinions differ about the status of various taxa and the correct names that should be used. The molluscan assemblages show clear successional trends during the early to mid-Holocene, reflecting episodes of dryness/wetness on the floodplain. Drier conditions at ca 6350 14C yr BP coincide with major changes in the archaeological record seen at other sites in the region but it remains unclear whether the two are linked. A prominent charcoal-rich horizon dated to ca 2800 14C yr BP marks a burning event in the catchment, which resulted in a two-fold increase in sediment accumulation rate. Remains of small mammals occurred throughout the sequence including a tooth of Microtus cf. maximowiczii, possibly the first occurrence of Ungar vole west of Lake Baikal. The faunal analyses have been integrated with a detailed pedological study of the sedimentary profile and a chronology was obtained by means of 12 AMS radiocarbon dates. This study provides the first detailed palaeoecological information relating to Holocene molluscan assemblages from the Cis-Baikal

  17. Sedimentation and subsidence patterns in the central and north basins of Lake Baikal from seismic stratigraphy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, T.C.; Klitgord, Kim D.; Golmshtok, A.J.; Weber, E.

    1997-01-01

    Comparison of sedimentation patterns, basement subsidence, and faulting histories in the north and central basins of Lake Baikal aids in developing an interbasinal seismic stratigraphy that reveals the early synrift evolution of the central portion of the Baikal rift, a major continental rift system. Although there is evidence that the central and northern rift basins evolved at approximately the same time, their sedimentation histories are markedly different. Primary sediment sources for the initial rift phase were from the east flank of the rift; two major deltas developed adjacent to the central basin: the Selenga delta at the south end and the Barguzin delta at the north end. The Barguzin River system, located at the accommodation zone between the central and north basins, also fed into the southern part of the north basin and facilitated the stratigraphic linkage of the two basins. A shift in the regional tectonic environment in the mid Pliocene(?) created a second rift phase distinguished by more rapid subsidence and sediment accumulation in the north basin and by increased subsidence and extensive faulting in the central basin. The Barguzin delta ceased formation and parts of the old delta system were isolated within the north basin and on Academic Ridge. These isolated deltaic deposits provide a model for the development of hydrocarbon plays within ancient rift systems. In this second tectonic phase, the dominant sediment fill in the deeper and more rapidly subsiding north basin shifted from the flexural (eastern) margin to axial transport from the Upper Angara River at the north end of the basin.

  18. Endemic Lake Baikal sponges from deep water. 1: Potential cryptic speciation and discovery of living species known only from fossils.

    PubMed

    Itskovich, Valeria B; Kaluzhnaya, Oxana V; Veynberg, Elena; Erpenbeck, Dirk

    2015-07-23

    We revealed new deep-water species and cryptic speciation within freshwater sponges of the endemic family Lubomirskiidae (Porifera; Demospongiae; Spongillina) based on molecular and spicule morphology analyses of ITS and CO1 mtDNA. Lubomirskiidae contains a group of closely related species which are a dominant component of the benthos in Lake Baikal, the world's deepest and most ancient lake. Spicule morphology was similar between two Recent samples and species only known previously from fossils in Late Pliocene (3.2-2.8 mya) sediments. Despite the morphological similarity with the cosmopolitan family Spongillidae, molecular analysis of ITS sequences has reliably assigned these species to Lubomirskiidae. This not only indicates that species identification of freshwater fossil sponge spicules should be made with caution, but also suggests that the structure of megascleres may not be a reliable character for interpretations of paleoclimatic reconstructions for the Baikal region. Our results do not support the current classification of Lubomirskiidae into its morphologically defined genera and species, suggesting a strong discrepancy between molecular and morphological variation in Baikalian sponges. This present contribution is the first part of a study on the phylogenetic relationships of the Lake Baikal deep water sponge fauna.

  19. A 9,000 Year History of Seal Hunting on Lake Baikal, Siberia: The Zooarchaeology of Sagan-Zaba II

    PubMed Central

    Goriunova, Ol’ga I.; Novikov, Alexei G.; Weber, Andrzej W.

    2015-01-01

    Sagan-Zaba II, a habitation site on the shore of Siberia’s Lake Baikal, contains a record of seal hunting that spans much of the Holocene, making it one of the longest histories of seal use in North Asia. Zooarchaeological analyses of the 16,000 Baikal seal remains from this well-dated site clearly show that sealing began here at least 9000 calendar years ago. The use of these animals at Sagan-Zaba appears to have peaked in the Middle Holocene, when foragers used the site as a spring hunting and processing location for yearling and juvenile seals taken on the lake ice. After 4800 years ago, seal use declined at the site, while the relative importance of ungulate hunting and fishing increased. Pastoralists began occupying Sagan-Zaba at some point during the Late Holocene, and these groups too utilized the lake’s seals. Domesticated animals are increasingly common after about 2000 years ago, a pattern seen elsewhere in the region, but spring and some summer hunting of seals was still occurring. This use of seals by prehistoric herders mirrors patterns of seal use among the region’s historic and modern groups. Overall, the data presented in the paper demonstrate that Lake Baikal witnessed thousands of years of human use of aquatic resources. PMID:26009890

  20. Sediment transport dynamics linked to morphological evolution of the Selenga River delta, Lake Baikal, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, T. Y.; Nittrouer, J.; McElroy, B. J.; Czapiga, M. J.; Il'icheva, E.; Pavolv, M.; Parker, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Selenga River delta, Lake Baikal, Russia, is approximately 700 km2 in size and contains three active lobes that receive varying amounts of water and sediment discharge. This delta represents a unique end-member in so far that the system is positioned along the deep-water (~1500 m) margin of Lake Baikal and therefore exists as a shelf-edge delta. In order to evaluate the morphological dynamics of the Selenga delta, field expeditions were undertaken during July 2013 and 2014, to investigate the morphologic, sedimentologic, and hydraulic nature of this delta system. Single-beam bathymetry data, sidescan sonar data, sediment samples, and aerial survey data were collected and analyzed to constrain: 1) channel geometries within the delta, 2) bedform sizes and spatial distributions, 3) grain size composition of channel bed sediment as well as bank sediment, collected from both major and minor distributary channels, and 4) elevation range of the subaerial portion of the delta. Our data indicate that the delta possesses downstream sediment fining, ranging from predominantly gravel and sand near the delta apex to silt and sand at the delta-lake interface. Field surveys also indicate that the Selenga delta has both eroding and aggrading banks, and that the delta is actively incising into some banks that consist of terraces, which are defined as regions that are not inundated by typical 2- to 4-year flood discharge events. Therefore the terraces are distinct from the actively accreting regions of the delta that receive sedimentation via water inundation during regular river floods. We spatially constrain the regions of the Selenga delta that are inundated during floods versus terraced using a 1-D water-surface hydrodynamic model that produces estimates of stage for flood water discharges, whereby local water surface elevations produced with the model are compared to the measured terrestrial elevations. Our analyses show that terrace elevations steadily decrease downstream

  1. Local transfer of PAH to the offshore water of lake Baikal. Pro et contra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, A.; Marinayte, I.

    2003-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are characteristic micro-compounds in the chemical compositions of the aerosol in the eastern regions of Siberia. PAH concentration levels and their ratio have a large seasonal dependence. The maximum concentration of the PAH in the aerosol (to 300 ng/m3) is observed during coal season. In winter under conditions of the Siberian anticyclone solid particles of gas emission with PAH settle mainly near their sources. Snow cover sampled in the industrial centers of Pribaikalye, cities of Irkutsk and Shelekhov, were characterised by a high level of accumulation of PAH (to 0.84 mg/m2 - Irkutsk and 16 mg/m2-Shelekhov). On the southern shore of Lake Baikal main PAH sources are the sites of Slyudyanka, Baikalsk, Babushkin and the villages Kultuk, Tankhoy, Boyarsky. PAH accumulation rates in the snow cover in this area are 5-100 times less (0.015-0.16 mg/m2). Profile points in unpopulated areas on the southern shore have relatively high PAH accumulation levels (0.01-0.1 mg/m2) as compared with the similar regions of Pribaikalye (0.004-0.02 mg/m2). Levels of PAH and accumulation rates of benzo[a]pyrene (200- 500 ng/m2 per week) at the Irkutsk-Listvyanka profile (0.01-0.1 mg/m2) suggest a small local PAH transfer along the Angara river from the industrial centres to the Lake Baikal area. In summer, the total PAH concentration in the atmospheric aerosol of the industrial centers of Pribaikalye is 20-100 times lower. However, in case of substantial PAH emissions into the atmosphere and favourable meteorological conditions, the local transfer may be essential. In the spring of 1996, for example, there were heavy forest fires in Pribaikalye, and the PAH concentration in the atmosphere of Irkutsk reached 15-20 ng/m3. At the same period, the water samples of the lake tributaries on the southern shore contained very high concentrations of PAH from 280 to 1400 ng/l in comparison with those sampled in the same region the following year - < 2.5 to

  2. Stock structure of Lake Baikal omul as determined by whole-body morphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bronte, Charles R.; Fleischer, G.W.; Maistrenko, S.G.; Pronin, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    In Lake Baikal, three morphotypes of omul Coregonus autumnalis migratorius are recognized; the littoral, pelagic, and deep-water forms. Morphotype assignment is difficult, and similar to that encountered in pelagic and deep-water coregonines in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Principal component analysis revealed separation of all three morphotypes based on caudal peduncle length and depth, length and depth of the body between the dorsal and anal fin, and distance between the pectoral and the pelvic fins. Strong negative loadings were associated with head measurements. Omul of the same morphotype captured at different locations were classified to location of capture using step-wise discriminant function analysis. Jackknife correct classifications ranged from 43 to 78% for littoral omul from five locations, and 45–86% for pelagic omul from four locations. Patterns of location misclassification of littoral omul suggested that the sub-population structure, hence stock affinity, may be influenced by movements and intermixing of individuals among areas that are joined bathymetrically. Pelagic omul were more distinguishable by site and may support a previous hypothesis of a spawning-based rather than a foraging-based sub-population structure. Omul morphotypes may reflect adaptations to both ecological and local environmental conditions, and may have a genetic basis.

  3. Atmospheric methanethiol emitted from a pulp and paper plant on the shore of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Kei; Obata, Tomoaki; Obolkin, Vladimir A.; Potemkin, Vladimir L.; Hirota, Kazutoshi; Takeuchi, Masaki; Arita, Shou; Khodzher, Tamara V.; Grachev, Michael A.

    2010-07-01

    On-site measurement of methanethiol (CH 3SH) was performed for three years on ships and cars near a pulp and paper plant standing on the shore of Lake Baikal in Siberia, Russia, to investigate the behavior and impact of atmospheric CH 3SH emitted from a point source. Despite its strong odor, there are few reports on atmospheric CH 3SH, while many investigations have been carried out on dimethyl sulfide (DMS). In this work, CH 3SH and DMS were measured every 15 min by a recently developed automated instrument based on single column trapping/separation and chemiluminescence measurement. Hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ozone were also measured simultaneously by individual instruments. Of these sulfur compounds, CH 3SH was dominant and its concentration sometimes reached several tens of ppbv. The concentration of CH 3SH was high at night, because of the lack of photodecomposition and local winds from the mountain to the lake. Such time variation was marked in the summer. The CH 3SH level decreased significantly downwind, while decreases in concentrations of other compounds such as DMS and SO 2 were relatively small. From these temporal and spatial variations, the behavior of CH 3SH is described in this paper. The impact of CH 3SH near the Siberian big sources is discussed with the presented data.

  4. Biogenic silica in Lake Baikal sediments: results from 1990-1992 American cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Susan J.; Colman, Steven M.

    1994-01-01

    The Lake Baikal Paleoclimate Project is a joint Russian-American program established to study the paleoclimate of Central Asia. During three summer field seasons, duplicate Russian and American cores were taken at a number of sites in different sedimentary environments in the lake. Eight cores returned to the U.S. were quantitatively analyzed for biogenic silica using a single-step 5-hour alkaline leach, followed by dissolved silicon analysis by inductively-coupled-plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy. Sediments of Holocene age in these cores have biogenic silica maxima that range from about 15 to 80 percent. An underlying zone in each core with low biogenic-silica concentrations (0 to 5 percent) dates from the last glacial maximum. The transition from the last glaciation to the present interglaciation, recorded by biogenic silica, began about 13,000 years ago. Biogenic silica profiles from these cores appear to be a good measure of past diatom productivity and a useful basis for paleoclimatic interpretations.

  5. Paleomagnetic record from Academician Ridge, Lake Baikal: a reversal excursion at the base of marine oxygen isotope stage 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ikehara, K.; Nakano, T.; Nishimura, M.; Khlystov, O.

    2002-08-01

    Paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic studies on a hydraulic piston core (Ver98-1, St.6) from Academician Ridge, Lake Baikal showed the occurrence of a reversal excursion at 670-696 cm depth, which is at the base of marine oxygen isotope stage 6. A correlation of X-ray CT values, as a proxy of relative density, to the marine oxygen isotope record provides an age of 177-183 ka for this reversal excursion. It can be correlated with other excursion records from Lake Baikal, found in Core 287-K2 from Academician Ridge [King et al., Russ. Geol. Geophys. 34 (1993) 148-162] and in core BDP93-1 drilled on the Buguldeika saddle [BDP-93, Quat. Int. 37 (1997) 3-17]. We correlate the Lake Baikal reversal excursion with a well documented excursion in the Brunhes Chron, the Iceland Basin event (186-189 ka) from ODP Sites 983 and 984 in the North Atlantic [Channell, J. Geophys. Res. 104 (1999) 22937-22951]. Also the relative paleointensity record agrees well with that from ODP Site 983 [Channell, J. Geophys. Res. 104 (1999) 22937-22951]. The Lake Baikal excursion and the Iceland Basin event correspond to the minimum of relative intensity at 188 ka in Sint-800 [Guyodo and Valet, Nature 399 (1999) 249-252]. We argue that it is distinct from the Jamaica/Pringle Falls excursion, estimated at 205-215 ka [Langereis et al., Geophys. J. Int. 129 (1997) 75-94]. This is supported by the recalibration of the age of another excursion found in Core St.16 in Lake Baikal [Sakai et al., Bull. Nagoya Univ. Furukawa Mus. 13 (1997) 11-22] with an age of ˜223 ka, which is close to the age of the Jamaica/Pringle Falls excursion, as suggested earlier [King et al., Russ. Geol. Geophys. 34 (1993) 148-162]. The VGP path of the reversal excursion (177-183 ka) consists of a southward swing through the North Atlantic, followed by a loop through Africa and the Indian Ocean. The path morphology is similar to that of the Iceland Basin event from the North Atlantic [Channell, J. Geophys. Res. 104 (1999) 22937-22951].

  6. Uranium-series disequilibrium, sedimentation, diatom frustules, and paleoclimate change in Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edgington, D.N.; Robbins, J.A.; Colman, Steven M.; Orlandini, K.A.; Gustin, M.-P.

    1996-01-01

    The large volume of water, approximately one-fifth of the total surface fresh water on the planet, contained in Lake Baikal in southeastern Siberia is distinguished by having a relatively high concentration of uranium (ca. 2 nM), and, together with the surface sediments, an unusually high 234U/238U alpha activity ratio of 1.95. About 80% of the input of uranium to the lake, with a 234U/238U ratio of 2.0, comes from the Selenga River. Profiles of uranium, as well as the extent of isotopic disequilibrium in a 9 m sediment core collected on Academic Ridge, generally show high values during interglacial periods corresponding to high diatom frustule numbers (DiFr) and biogenic silica (BSi) data that have been reported elsewhere. During glacial periods (low DiFr and BSi), uranium progeny (234U and 230Th) were in secular equilibrium with low concentrations of their parent 238U. Radionuclide distributions were interpreted in terms of a quantitative model allowing for adsorption of riverine inputs of uranium onto two classes of sedimenting particles with differing 238U/232Th ratios and uranium progeny in secular equilibrium. If the 234U/238U activity ratio of adsorbed uranium has remained constant, mean sedimentation rates can be independently estimated as 3.6 ?? 0.6 and 3.7 ?? 0.9 cm ?? kyr-1 for the decay of 234U and in-growth of 230Th, respectively. These rates are consistent with a mean rate of 3.76 cm ?? kyr-1, calculated by optimization of the correspondence between adsorbed 238U and ??18O in dated oceanic sediments. The adsorbed uranium apparently tracks variable river flow during interglacials and is drastically reduced during periods of glaciation. Evidently, uranium has not been significantly redistributed within Baikal sediments over at least the past 250 kyr and is a unique, biologically non-essential, tracer for climate-sensitive processes, which provide their own internal geochronometers, potentially useful for ages up to 1 Myr BP.

  7. Quaternary sedimentation and subsidence history of Lake Baikal, Siberia, based on seismic stratigraphy and coring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Karabanov, E.B.; Nelson, C. H.

    2003-01-01

    The long, continuous, high-latitude, stratigraphic record of Lake Baikal was deposited in three broad sedimentary environments, defined by high-resolution seismic-reflection and coring methods: (1) turbidite depositional systems, by far the most widespread, characterizing most of the margins and floors of the main basins of the lake, (2) large deltas of major drainages, and (3) tectonically or topographically isolated ridges and banks. Holocene sedimentation rates based on radiocarbon ages vary by more than an order of magnitude among these environments, from less than about 0.03 mm/yr on ridges and banks to more than about 0.3 mm/yr on basin floors. Extrapolating these rates, with a correction for compaction, yields tentative estimates of about 25 and 11 Ma for the inception of rifting in the Central and North basins, respectively, and less than 6 Ma for the 200-m sediment depth on Academician Ridge. The Selenga Delta has the distinctive form of a classic prograding Gilbert-type delta, but its history appears to represent a complex combination of tectonism and sedimentation. The central part of the delta is underlain by prograding, shallow-water sequences, now several hundred meters below the lake surface. These deposits and much of the delta slope are mantled by fine-grained, deep-water, hemipelagic deposits whose base is estimated to be about 650,000 years old. Modern coarse-grained sediment bypasses the delta slope through fault-controlled canyons that feed large, subaqueous fans at the ends of the South and Central basins. These relations, along with abundant other evidence of recent faulting and the great depths of the Central and South basins, suggest that these two rift basins have experienced a period of unusually rapid subsidence over the last 650,000 years, during at least part of which sedimentation has failed to keep pace.

  8. Deep water renewal in Lake Baikal: A model for long-term analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, Sebastiano; Toffolon, Marco

    2013-12-01

    The phenomenon of deep water renewal in the South Basin of Lake Baikal is investigated by means of a simplified one-dimensional model. The downwelling process, whereby large volumes of superficial, cold, and oxygenated water periodically sink to the lake bottom (>1400m) due to thermobaric instability, is simulated by means of three main submodules: a reaction-diffusion equation for temperature and other tracers, and two Lagrangian algorithms, the first for the vertical stabilization of unstable density regions (including thermobaric effects) and the second handling the downwelling mechanism. A self-consistent procedure for the dynamical reconstruction of the diapycnal diffusivity profile is included to account for the effect of the variability of external conditions. The model has been developed aimed at providing a detailed description of deep-ventilation and a quantification of its consequences at the basin scale; the core algorithms have been designed suitably to perform long-term simulations (hundreds of years) and to deal with a limited amount of information about boundary conditions, which are expressed in terms of wind forcing and surface water temperature. The main parameters have been calibrated using measured profiles of temperature and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-12) concentration over a 40 year historical period. A long-term simulation (one millennium), in which the current meteorological conditions have been kept statistically unchanged, has been used to determine the asymptotic dynamics. The results are consistent with previous measurements and estimates, suggesting that the model is suitable to qualitatively and quantitatively simulate deep water renewal in deep, temperate lakes, capturing the relative contribution and interaction of the different processes involved.

  9. Congener-specific patterns and toxic assessment of polychlorinated biphenyls in resident and migratory birds from Southern India and Lake Baikal in Russia.

    PubMed

    Kunisue, T; Watanabe, M; Subramanian, A; Titenko, A M; Tanabe, S

    2003-11-01

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), including non-, mono-, and di-ortho congeners, were determined in migratory and resident birds collected from India and Lake Baikal in Russia. In the 11 different species examined, total PCBs concentrations were in the range of 11-4500 ng/g (wet wt). IUPAC 105, 118, 138, 153, and 180 were the predominant congeners in almost all the birds. White-cheeked tern collected from India and common tern collected from Lake Baikal showed high PCBs concentrations of 4400 ng/g (wet wt) and 4500 ng/g (wet wt), respectively, and accumulated relatively high ratios of penta-CBs (IUPAC 118, 105, 99). Toxic equivalents (TEQs) of non- and mono-ortho PCB congeners in birds collected from India and Lake Baikal were in the range of 1.5-56 and 2.8-370 pg/g wet wt, respectively. Toxic assessment results led by calculated TEQs of the transfer to eggs from female birds revealed that TEQs in most of migratory and resident birds were comparable to the lowest observable effect level (LOAEL) of chicken which is a highly sensitive species against dioxin-like compounds. Calculated transfer TEQs to eggs of common tern collected from Lake Baikal in autumn, however, exceeded the LOAEL of CYP1A induction in bald eagle embryos and ED50 of that in pheasant embryos, suggesting that embryo toxicity by coplanar PCBs in some avian species breeding in Lake Baikal is possible.

  10. Information support of territorial wildlife management of Lake Baikal and the surrounding areas (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnykh, Svetlana

    2013-04-01

    The UNESCO World Heritage Committee inscribed Lake Baikal in the World Heritage List under all four natural criteria as the most outstanding example of a freshwater ecosystem. It is the oldest and deepest lake in the world, which is the main freshwater reserve surrounded by a system of protected areas that have high scientific and natural values. However, there is a conflict between three main interests within the territory: the preservation of the unique ecosystem of the lake and its surrounding areas, the need for regional economic development, and protection of interests of the population, living on the shores of Lake Baikal. Solutions to the current challenges are seen in the development of control mechanisms for the wildlife management to ensure sustainable development and conservation of lake and the surrounding regions. For development mechanisms of territorial management of the complex and valuable area it is necessary to analyze features of its functioning and self-control (adaptable possibilities), allowing ecosystems to maintain their unique properties under influence of various external factors: anthropogenic (emissions, waste water, streams of tourists) and natural (climate change) load. While determining the direction and usage intensity of the territory these possibilities and their limits should be considered. Also for development of management strategy it is necessary to consider the relation of people to land and water, types of wildlife management, ownership, rent, protection from the negative effects, and etc. The relation of people to the natural area gives a chance to prioritize the direction in the resource use and their protection. Results of the scientific researches (reaction of an ecosystem on influence of various factors and system of relations to wildlife management objects) are the basis for the nature protection laws in the field of wildlife management and environmental protection. The methodology of legal zoning of the territory was

  11. A 640 kyr geomagnetic and palaeoclimatic record from Lake Baikal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchinsky, Vadim A.; Evans, Michael E.; Peck, John A.; Sakai, Hideo; Krainov, Mikhail A.; King, John W.; Kuzmin, Mikhail I.

    2007-07-01

    Magnetic remanence vectors for 1737 samples from two ~100 m cores of Lake Baikal sediments are reported along with complete magnetic susceptibility profiles obtained from a pass-through system. Chronological control is established by means of two independent correlations; first, by matching susceptibility variations to the oceanic oxygen isotope record and second, by matching the relative palaeointensity variations to the SINT-800 global reference curve. These both imply an average deposition rate of 15 cm kyr-1 and a basal age of ~640 ka. Spectral analysis reveals the presence of Milankovitch signals at ~100 kyr (eccentricity), ~41 kyr (obliquity) and ~23 and ~19 kyr (precession). Stable remanence vectors are almost all of normal polarity. The few exceptions comprise brief intervals of low and/or negative inclinations which probably represent geomagnetic excursions. However, these are far less numerous than the high sedimentation rate would lead one to expect. Furthermore, only four of them can be readily matched to the-still poorly understood-global pattern. These are the Laschamp, the Albuquerque, the Iceland Basin and perhaps the West Eifel excursions which occurred at ~38 000, ~146 000, at 180 000-190 000 and at 480 000-495 000 yr ago, respectively.

  12. Endemic Lake Baikal sponges from deep water. 2: Taxonomy and Bathymetric Distribution.

    PubMed

    Itskovich, Valeria B; Kaluzhnaya, Oxana V; Veynberg, Elena; Erpenbeck, Dirk

    2017-02-22

    Unique samples of deep-water sponges of Lake Baikal were collected between 120 and 1450 m depth and their taxonomy and bathymetric distribution were studied. Based on morphological studies with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular analyses (CO1, ITS) we describe a new species, Baikalospongia abyssalis sp. nov. Spicule morphology of this new species is similar to Palaeoephydatia sp., a species previously known only from fossils in Late Pliocene (3.2-2.8 mya) sediments. Other sponge samples collected were identified as Baikalospongia intermedia intermedia, B. intermedia profundalis, B. bacillifera, B. fungiformis, B. martinsoni and Swartschewskia papyracea, all from the family Lubomirskiidae. Sponge specimens with giant spicules, identified as B. fungiformis, were found at great depths. B.i. intermedia and B. i. profundalis are dominating species at great depth. Light is a limiting factor for distribution of Lubomirskia baicalensis, possibly due to its symbiosis with photosynthetic protists. The current study extends our knowledge on the distribution boundaries of Lubomirskiidae at great depths.

  13. Early diagenetic processes generate iron and manganese oxide layers in the sediments of Lake Baikal, Siberia.

    PubMed

    Torres, Natascha T; Och, Lawrence M; Hauser, Peter C; Furrer, Gerhard; Brandl, Helmut; Vologina, Elena; Sturm, Michael; Bürgmann, Helmut; Müller, Beat

    2014-04-01

    Distinct layers of iron(III) and manganese(IV) (Fe/Mn) oxides are found buried within the reducing part of the sediments in Lake Baikal and cause considerable complexity and steep vertical gradients with respect to the redox sequence. For the on-site investigation of the responsible biogeochemical processes, we applied filter tube samplers for the extraction of sediment porewater combined with a portable capillary electrophoresis instrument for the analyses of inorganic cations and anions. On the basis of the new results, the sequence of diagenetic processes leading to the formation, transformation, and dissolution of the Fe/Mn layers was investigated. With two exemplary cores we demonstrate that the dissolution of particulate Fe and Mn is coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of CH₄ (AOM) either via the reduction of sulphate (SO₄(2-)) and the subsequent generation of Fe(II) by S(-II) oxidation, or directly coupled to Fe reduction. Dissolved Fe(II) diffuses upwards to reduce particulate Mn(IV) thus forming a sharp mineral boundary. An alternative dissolution pathway is indicated by the occurrence of anaerobic nitrification of NH₄(+) observed at locations with Mn(IV). Furthermore, the reasons and consequences of the non-steady-state sediment pattern and the resulting redox discontinuities are discussed and a suggestion for the burial of active Fe/Mn layers is presented.

  14. Land use changing and land use optimization of Lake Baikal basin on the example of two key areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodyankina, S.

    2012-04-01

    Lake Baikal contains roughly 20% of the world's unfrozen surface fresh water. It was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996. Today levels of urbanization and economic stress on environmental resources is increasing on the shorts of the lake Baikal. The potential of economic development (industry, local tourism, and mining) of the Severobaykalsky and Sludyansky districts is rather high although they are characterized not only by beneficial features for local economy but also by considerable disadvantages for nature of this world valuable territory. This investigation show human-caused landscape changes during economic development of the two key areas in Baikal water catchment basin during 10 years (point of reference is 2000 year). Key areas are 1) the Baikalo-Patomskoe highland in the north of the Baikal catchment basin (Severobaykalsky district, Republic of Buryatia); 2) Khamar-Daban mountain system in the south of the Baikal catchment basin (Sludyansky districy, Irkutsk region). Since 2000 year land use of the territory has changed. Areas of agriculture were reduced but recreation activity on the bank of the lake was increased. Methods of GIS analysis and local statistic analysis of landscape characteristic were used. Nature, rural and urban areas ratio are estimated. Vegetation and soil condition assessment were made. The essence of this research is in helping to make decisions linked to upcoming problems: situation identification, evaluation and forecasting of the potential landscape condition, optimization of land use, mitigation of impact and mapping of territories and nature resources which have a high ecological value or endangered by industrial impact. For this purpose landscape maps of the territories on the base of the remote sensing information and field investigations were created. They used to calculate potential landscape functions of the territory without taking into account present impact of anthropogenic actions. Land use maps for years

  15. Morphology and Sediment Transport Dynamics of the Selenga River Delta, Lake Baikal, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, T. Y.; Il'icheva, L.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Pavolv, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Selenga River fan delta is a lacustrine system located in southeastern Siberia, Russia, where Selenga River flows into Lake Baikal. The Selenga River is the largest source of sediment and water entering Lake Baikal. Covering ~550 km2, the Selenga delta is one of the largest freshwater deltas in the world. Evaluating the Selenga delta and its morphology is very important for local residents who rely upon the delta for both ecological and agricultural welfare. However, a sediment budget remains poorly constrained, as do estimates for the partitioning of water and sediment amongst the numerous bifurcating delta channels. This information is critical for addressing how the delta morphology evolves and influences the stratigraphic composition of the delta. To investigate the morphological characteristics of the delta, a field expedition was undertaken during July 2013 in collaboration with Russian scientists. The overall goal of the field work was to constrain delta dynamics through data collection. Field measurements included single-beam bathymetry data and sidescan sonar data to characterize: 1) channel geometries of the delta; 2) bedform sizes and distribution; and 3) grain-size composition of the channel bed. Flow velocity measurements were collected within the bifurcating channels to measure water discharge. Bedload samples were obtained within the active distributary channels to measure downstream sediment fining. Additionally, channel island cores were collected in order to analyze the internal architecture of the delta. The data reveal a systematic downstream sediment fining, from a predominantly gravel bed near the delta apex, to a fine-sand bed at the delta-lake interface (~40 km total distance). Bathymetry data document how width-to-depth ratios systematically decrease downstream in association with increasing channel bifurcations and decreasing channel-bed grain size. Furthermore, the investigations reveal that the delta is actively terraced, with the

  16. Drought-Caused Forest Decline In The Trans-Baikal Lake Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranson, J.; Kharuk, V.; Oscorbin, P.; Im, S.

    2011-12-01

    One of the important consequences of observed and predicted climate change is regional desertification and conversion of forest lands into steppes. We documented progressive forest decline in the trans-Baikal Lake mountains (center point coordinates ~ 51°30'N/116°30'E). This area has a sever continental climate and is a transition area between the Siberian taiga and Mongolian steppes and deserts. Forests are dominated by birch and occupy north-facing mountains slopes (with elevations up to 1200 m). Southern facing slopes are typically covered by grass communities. Analysis of field measurements and satellite temporal data showed an increasing forest decline during the last decades (i.e, 1990-2010). The typical pattern of forest decline was ring-like with the forest die-back starting in the boundary area around the outside of the stand within the forest-grass transition zone. This decline was likely, caused by decreases in precipitation and soil water content. During the last two decades summer precipitation decrease was > 10% (P>0.05), and is now 270 ±30 mm/yr. Similarly, hydrothermal index value decreased to about 12% (P>0.05). Satellite-derived forest decline correlates with precipitation and hydrothermal index decreases. Soil studies showed highest water content values within soils of healthy stands, with minimum values within the dead stand areas, and intermediate within the transition zone. Satellite - based estimates of the total area with drought-caused forest decline was about 106 ha. Along with the observed decline of birch stands, two others climate-caused phenomena were noted within the study and adjacent areas during the last decades: a significant increase of fire frequency and decrease of lake surface area.

  17. Gold mining impact on riverine heavy metal transport in a sparsely monitored region: the upper Lake Baikal Basin case.

    PubMed

    Thorslund, Josefin; Jarsjö, Jerker; Chalov, Sergey R; Belozerova, Ekaterina V

    2012-10-26

    Mining and ore excavation can cause the acidification and heavy metal pollution of downstream water systems. It can be difficult to assess the load contributions from individual mining areas, which is commonly required for environmental impact assessments. In the current study, we quantified the net impact of the unmonitored mining activities in the Zaamar Goldfield (Mongolia) on heavy metal transport in the downstream Tuul River-Selenga River-Lake Baikal water systems. We also noted that the Zaamar site shares the conditions of limited monitoring with many rapidly developing regions of the world. The heavy metal concentrations and flow data were obtained from historical measurement campaigns, long-term monitoring, and a novel field campaign. The results indicate that natural mass flows of heavy metals in dissolved form increased by an order of magnitude because of mining. Prevailing alkaline conditions in the vicinity of Zaamar can limit the dissolution, maintaining the on-site concentrations below health-risk based guideline values. However, suspended river concentrations are much higher than the dissolved concentrations. The placer gold mining at the Zaamar site has increased the total riverine mass flows of Al, As, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn by 44.300, 30.1, 65.7, 47.800, 1.480, 76.0 and 65.0 tonnes per year respectively. We suggest that local to regional transformation and enrichment processes in combination with suspended sediment transport from numerous existing upstream mining areas contribute to high concentrations of dissolved heavy metals in downstream parts of the Selenga River, including its delta area at Lake Baikal. Furthermore, single hydrological events can increase the suspended load concentrations by at least one order of magnitude. Overall, the Selenga River Basin, which drains into Lake Baikal, should be recognised as one of the world's most impacted areas with regard to heavy metal loads, and it contributes to 1% and 3% of the world flux of

  18. Impacts of Hydro-Climatic Change, Permafrost Thaw and Industrial Pressures in the Lake Baikal Drainage Basin (Mongolia and Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsjo, J.; Törnqvist, R.; Bring, A.; Pietron, J.; Rogberg, P.; Asokan, S. M.; Destouni, G.

    2014-12-01

    The large Arctic river Yenisei and Lake Baikal with its unique ecosystem containing endemic species are influenced by on-going hydro-climatic changes in the Lake Baikal Drainage Basin. The latter extends from southern Siberia into northern Mongolia, and contains one of the word's larger mining regions, for instance with mining of gold, silver, copper and coal. Recognizing that changing hydro-climatic conditions in the basin may lead to changed loading pattern of anthropogenic substances to Lake Baikal and Yenisei, we aim at identifying long-term historic and projected future hydro-climatic trends in this basin and their (possible) impacts. The analyses are based on hydro-climatic observations and the output 22 Earth System Models (ESMs) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5). Observations show that warming rates of the basin were twice as high as the global average during past 70 years. Decreased intra annual variability of river discharge over this period indicates basin-scale permafrost degradation. CMIP5 ensemble projections show further future warming, implying continued permafrost thaw. Most individual models as well as the CMIP5 ensemble mean result indicate increased runoff in the future. However the spread of individual model results is large. Parallel results show that such increased runoff can considerably increase the annual riverine sediment loads and consequently the loading of contaminants that are attached to the sediments, in particular downstream of mining sites. More generally, this exemplifies how long-term hydro-climatic changes, permafrost thaw, and industrial pressures may interact in increasing the bioavailability of contaminants in downstream recipients.

  19. Fast approximate migration of ground penetrating radar using Kalman estimators and determination of the lithospheric structure of Lake Baikal, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dena Ornelas, Oscar S.

    This dissertation is composed of two quite different studies. The first is related to the development of a migration algorithm for vertical incidence Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) using the Kalman approach. The scope of any migration tool is to correct the position and to recover the true geometry of subsurface GPR targets. The advantage of using the Kalman approach is that the GPR records can be migrated at the same time when the data are being collected, avoiding further processing as is required by the available synthetic aperture algorithms for diffraction hyperbola collapse. The second part is a study of the lithosphere of the Lake Baikal, which is one of only a small number of Cenozoic continental rifts, the Baikal Rift Zone (BRZ) is a natural laboratory for understanding processes of rifting. Located in south-central Russia, the rift zone is known for Lake Baikal, a rift valley lake that contains 20% of the world's fresh water. Rifting in the region began about 25 Ma along the boundary between the Archean-Paleoproterozoic Siberian craton and the Early Paleozoic age Sayan-Baikal orogenic belt. Here we present a new velocity model for the structure of the crust along a 160-km transect in the north basin of Lake Baikal. The data, recorded in 1992, come from five 4-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed at ca 40 km intervals. The source consisted of 2 air guns with a combined volume of 120 liters, that were fired at 240 m intervals along the transect. The data are of moderately good quality and are characterized by strong first arrivals to offsets of 40 km and a series of wide-angle reflections from interfaces in the crust, including the Moho. Travel times for both P- and S-wave arrivals from the crust were picked from the data. The velocity model, obtained through a combination of forward modeling and inversion, contains two shallow layers associated with basin sediments, a low velocity zone (LVZ) at 6 to 9 km depth, mid-crustal interfaces at ca

  20. Lidar observations of atmospheric internal waves in the boundary layer of the atmosphere on the coast of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, Viktor A.; Smalikho, Igor N.

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric internal waves (AIWs) in the boundary layer of atmosphere have been studied experimentally with the use of Halo Photonics pulsed coherent Doppler wind lidar Stream Line. The measurements were carried out over 14-28 August 2015 on the western coast of Lake Baikal (51°50'47.17'' N, 104°53'31.21'' E), Russia. The lidar was placed at a distance of 340 m from Lake Baikal at a height of 180 m above the lake level.

    A total of six AIW occurrences have been revealed. This always happened in the presence of one or two (in five out of six cases) narrow jet streams at heights of approximately 200 and 700 m above ground level at the lidar location. The period of oscillations of the wave addend of the wind velocity components in four AIW events was 9 min, and in the other two it was approximately 18 and 6.5 min. The amplitude of oscillations of the horizontal wind velocity component was about 1 m s-1, while the amplitude of oscillations of the vertical velocity was 3 times smaller. In most cases, internal waves were observed for 45 min (5 wave oscillations with a period of 9 min). Only once the AIW lifetime was about 4 h.

  1. Lignin phenols in sediments of Lake Baikal, Siberia: Application to paleoenvironmental studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Colman, Steven M.; Lerch, H.E.

    1997-01-01

    Sediments from three cores obtained from distinct depositional environments in Lake Baikal, Siberia were analyzed for organic carbon, total nitrogen and lignin phenol concentration and composition. Results were used to examine changes in paleoenvironmental conditions during climatic cycles of the late Quaternary (< 125 ka). Average organic carbon, and total nitrogen concentrations, atomic C/N ratios and organic carbon accumulation rates were significantly higher in the Holocene compared with the late Pleistocene, reflecting overall warmer temperatures and increased runoff during the Holocene. A Holocene maximum in organic carbon was observed at about 6 ka, and may represent the warmest wettest period of the Holocene. At one site (Academician Ridge) pronounced late Pleistocene maxima in organic carbon and biogenic silica were observed at about 80-85 ka, probably indicative of an interstadial period with enhanced aquatic productivity. Total sedimentary lignin phenol contents were generally lower in the late Pleistocene compared to the Holocene, but with several peaks in concentration during the late Pleistocene. These late Pleistocene peaks in total sedimentary lignin content (dated at about 80, 50 and 30 ka) directly precede or occur during peaks in sedimentary biogenic silica contents. These periods likely represent relatively warm interstadial times, with increased precipitation producing the observed increase in terrestrial runoff and aquatic productivity. Lignin phenol ratios (S/V, C/V and P/V) were used to examine changes in terrestrial vegetation type resulting from changes in paleoenvironmental conditions during the late Pleistocene. A degree of caution must be used in the interpretation of these ratios with regard to vegetation sources and paleoenvironmental conditions, because of potential compositional changes in lignin resulting from biodegradation. Nevertheless, results show that long glacial periods were characterized by terrestrial vegetation composed

  2. Lidar profiling of aerosol optical properties from Paris to Lake Baikal (Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieudonné, E.; Chazette, P.; Marnas, F.; Totems, J.; Shang, X.

    2015-05-01

    In June 2013, a ground-based mobile lidar performed the ~10 000 km ride from Paris to Ulan-Ude, near Lake Baikal, profiling for the first time aerosol optical properties all the way from western Europe to central Siberia. The instrument was equipped with N2-Raman and depolarization channels that enabled an optical speciation of aerosols in the low and middle troposphere. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio (also called lidar ratio or LR) and particle depolarization ratio (PDR) at 355 nm have been retrieved. The LR in the lower boundary layer (300-700 m) was found to be 63 ± 17 sr on average during the campaign with a distribution slightly skewed toward higher values that peaks between 50 and 55 sr. Although the difference is small, PDR values observed in Russian cities (>2%, except after rain) are systematically higher than the ones measured in Europe (<1%), which is probably an effect of the lifting of terrigenous aerosols by traffic on roads. Biomass burning layers from grassland or/and forest fires in southern Russia exhibit LR values ranging from 65 to 107 sr and from 3 to 4% for the PDR. During the route, desert dust aerosols originating from the Caspian and Aral seas regions were characterized for the first time, with a LR (PDR) of 43 ± 14 sr (23 ± 2%) for pure dust. The lidar observations also showed that this dust event extended over 2300 km and lasted for ~6 days. Measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) show that our results are comparable in terms of aerosol optical thickness (between 0.05 and 0.40 at 355 nm) with the mean aerosol load encountered throughout our route.

  3. Seasonal variation of persistent organochlorine accumulation in birds from Lake Baikal, Russia, and the role of the south Asian region as a source of pollution for wintering migrants.

    PubMed

    Kunisue, Tatsuya; Minh, Tu Binh; Fukuda, Kayo; Watanabe, Mafumi; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Titenko, Alexei M

    2002-04-01

    Concentrations of persistent organochlorines (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), and chlordane compounds (CHLs) were determined in whole body soft tissue homogenates and in muscles of resident and migratory birds collected from Lake Baikal, Russia. The residue pattern in both resident and migratory birds was in the following order: PCBs > DDTs > HCHs > CHLs. OC concentrations in migratory birds varied, depending on the feeding habit. The maximum levels of OCs were found in piscivores, followed by insectivores, omnivores, and herbivores. OC residue levels in Lake Baikal birds were lower than those in the Great Lakes region as well as in other lakes in Europe and Japan. Concentrations of HCHs and DDTs in most of the migratory birds collected in the spring were higher than for those collected in the autumn, indicating a notable accumulation in wintering grounds. Compilation and analysis of the available data in fish and birds from Asia suggested that the tropical and subtropical regions in south Asian countries may be a source of pollution for the wintering accumulation of migratory birds from Lake Baikal. Relatively higher compositions of alpha- and gamma-HCH in total HCHs, p,p'-DDT in total DOTs were observed in some migratory species, indicating recent exposure to HCHs and DDTs in Lake Baikal or wintering areas. PCB isomer patterns were different between residents and migrants, with the predominance of lower chlorinated congeners in migratory species, suggesting recent PCB accumulation in stopover sites during wintering. TEQ concentrations of toxic non- and mono-ortho coplanar PCBs in common terns from Lake Baikal were comparable to those reported in some species from Japan, the United States, and Europe. Relative contributions of non-ortho coplanar congeners to toxic equivalents (TEQs) were predominant, in which CB-126 accounted for the highest toxicity contribution. Estimated TEQ

  4. Flux of lipophilic photosynthetic pigments to the surface sediments of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fietz, Susanne; Sturm, Michael; Nicklisch, Andreas

    2005-04-01

    The pigment flux to the sediment surface was studied in Lake Baikal to evaluate the validity of approaches reconstructing long-term variations in standing crops of phytoplankton by fossil pigment analysis. Chlorophylls and carotenoids were analysed by HPLC in suspended and settling matter and in the surface sediment of the central south basin (c. 1400-m water depth). Sedimentation rates of dry matter, organic carbon and nitrogen were also determined. The flux of particulate matter in 40 m, directly below the euphotic zone, amounted to 14.9 g m -2 month -1 with a carbon content of 21.9%, and an atomic C/N ratio of 14.8. The pigment flux was 12.1 μmol m -2 month -1 chlorophyll a, 40.8 μmol m -2 month -1 pheophorbide a, 6.5 μmol m -2 month -1 pheophytin a, 2.1 μmol m -2 month -1 chlorophyllide a, and 0.3 μmol m -2 month -1 pyropheophytin a. The decay during sedimentation can be described by two-exponential or decay regression models for organic carbon, total nitrogen, chlorophyll a, pheophorbide a, chlorophyllide a, chlorophyll b, and most carotenoids, but not for pheophytin a, pheophytin b, and pyropheophytin a. The two-phase character of the models outlined that, for the former components, the flux diminished strongly in a first phase down to 250-m water depth and remained rather stable below 250 m. The chlorophyll a/carbon ratio also decreased with depth, whereas the pheophytin a/carbon ratio and the pyropheophytin a/carbon ratio increased with depth. From chlorophyll a, plus its degradation products, 28% reached the lake bottom when compared to the sedimentation below the euphotic zone. Based on the marker pigments fucoxanthin, chlorophyll b, and zeaxanthin, the contribution of the main phytoplankton groups to the settled chlorophyll a was estimated as 87% Bacillariophyceae+Chrysophyceae, 11% Chlorophyta, and 2% cyanobacterial picoplankton. These relationships changed only little during the sedimentation through the whole water column, but diverged from

  5. Bacterial community composition in the water column of the deepest freshwater Lake Baikal as determined by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kurilkina, Maria I; Zakharova, Yulia R; Galachyants, Yuri P; Petrova, Darya P; Bukin, Yuri S; Domysheva, Valentina M; Blinov, Vadim V; Likhoshway, Yelena V

    2016-07-01

    The composition of bacterial communities in Lake Baikal in different hydrological periods and at different depths (down to 1515 m) has been analyzed using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V3 variable region. Most of the resulting 34 562 reads of the Bacteria domain have clustered into 1693 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified with the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Cyanobacteria. It has been found that their composition at the family level and relative contributions to bacterial communities distributed over the water column vary depending on hydrological period. The number of OTUs and the parameters of taxonomic richness (ACE, Chao1 indices) and diversity (Shannon and inverse Simpson index) reach the highest values in water layers. The composition of bacterial communities in these layers remains relatively constant, whereas that in surface layers differs between hydrological seasons. The dynamics of physicochemical conditions over the water column and their relative constancy in deep layers are decisive factors in shaping the pattern of bacterial communities in Lake Baikal. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. [Detection of methane in the water column at gas and oil seep sites in central and southern Lake Baikal].

    PubMed

    Zakharenko, A S; Pimenov, N V; Ivanov, V G; Zemskaia, T I

    2015-01-01

    Microbiological and biogeochemical investigation of the water column of oligotrophic Lake Baikal at the sites of the K2 and Bolshoy mud volcanoes and the Gorevoy Utes oil seep was carried out in July 2013. Total microbial numbers (TMN), cell numbers of type I and type II methanotrophs, and methane concentrations were measured; the rate of methane oxidation was determined. Methane concentrations in Lake Baikal water column varied from 0.09 to 1 μL/L, while methane oxidation rates varied from 0.007 to 0.9 nL/(L day). The highest rates of methane oxidation were revealed in the near-bottom water horizons at the sites of the Bolshoy mud volcano and the Gorevoy Utes oil seep. These were the sites where the most pronounced anomalies in methane concentration were also detected. TMN varied from 0.123 x 10(6) to 1.64 x 10(6) cells/mL. Methanotrophic bacteria were revealed in the water column at all sites, their abundance did not always correlate with methane concentrationsand the rates of methane oxidation. Methanotrophs constituted not more than 1.63% of the total microbial number, with their highest abundance in the upper 200 m of the water column.

  7. Falling phytoplankton: altered access to the photic zone over 60 years of warming in Lake Baikal, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, S. E.; Izmest'eva, L. R.; Moore, M.; Katz, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Vertical stratification of aquatic ecosystems can be strongly reinforced by long-term warming, altering access to suitable habitat differentially across plankton taxa. Surface waters in the world's most voluminous freshwater lake - Lake Baikal in Siberia - are warming at an average rate of 2.01°C century-1, with more dramatic warming in the summer (3.78°C century-1). This long-term warming trend occurs within seasonal cycles of freezing and thawing, and against the larger backdrop of shorter-term climate dynamics, such as those associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and Arctic Oscillation, with which shifting Siberian weather patterns affect the timing of seasonal changes (e.g., stratification) at the lake. While the increasing temperature difference between surface and deeper waters implies stronger stratification in the summer in general, the available long-term temperature data are not sufficiently fine-scaled across depth to further resolve stratification patterns. However, analysis of long-term vertical phytoplankton distributions may give perspectives on the dynamics of the physical environment that plankton experience. For example, many of Lake Baikal's endemic, cold-adapted phytoplankton species are large and heavy diatoms that require strong mixing to remain suspended, a process that is suppressed by stronger summer stratification. Observed vertical patterns of algal distribution are consistent with the predictions of increased warming and intensified stratification with diatoms present in summer increasingly sinking far beyond the photic zone. Specifically, the average depth of diatoms in August, the most reliably stratified month at Lake Baikal, has increased from depths roughly aligned with photic zone (0.1% light penetration) limits (ca. 40 m) in the 1970s to average depths approximately 48 m below the photic zone by the end of the century. Concurrently, smaller motile algae such as cryptomonads have maintained or increased their presence in

  8. Vertical stability and the Brunt-Väisäla frequency of deep natural waters by the example of Lake Baikal, Lake Tanganyika, and the World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherstyankin, P. P.; Kuimova, L. N.

    2009-12-01

    Theoretical analysis, calculations, and comparison with the results of observations in Lake Baikal, Lake Tanganyika, and the World Ocean are performed for the vertical stability E and the Brunt-Väisäla frequency N in the form of N 2 with regard to all components (at the constant temperature T and the salinity S, the common adiabatic form at T, S Const). The adiabatic stability E ad and the Väisäla frequency N in the form of N {/ad 2} are always positive; at a change from the inverse to the direct temperature stratification, they have deep minimums reaching 10-16 m-1 and 10-15 s-2 and less; the minimums have the form of a special point, a reversal point of the first kind called a “cusp.” The reality of these reversal points is confirmed by the analysis of the investigation procedure, comparison with the results of previous theoretical (Sherstyankin, et al., 2007), and experimental (observations in Baikal, Shimaraev et al., 1994) works. The features of vertical profiles of E ad , E and N {/ad 2}, N 2, as well as the layers where the Brunt-Väisäla frequency is less than the inertial frequency, are studied. The analysis with regard to all components of the stability E ad and the Brunt-Väisäla frequency N makes a great contribution to understanding of mixing processes in theoretical and experimental investigations; it is valid in all reservoirs of the Earth with inverse and direct temperature stratification, including Lake Baikal, Lake Tanganyika, and the World Ocean.

  9. The effect of bloom of filamentous green algae on the reproduction of yellowfin sculpin Cottocomephorus grewingkii (Dybowski, 1874) (Cottoidae) during ecological crisis in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Khanaev, I V; Dzyuba, E V; Kravtsova, L S; Grachev, M A

    2016-03-01

    In shallow water areas of open Lake Baikal, filamentous green alga of the genus Spirogyra grows abundantly. Together with alga of the genus Ulothrix, it forms algal mats. According to our observations from 2010 to 2013, the spawning habitat conditions for the yellowfin sculpin Cottocomephorus grewingkii (Dybowski, 1874) (Cottidae) proved to be significantly disturbed in the littoral zone of Listvennichnyi Bay (southern Baikal), which, in turn, reduced the number of egg layings. With a 100% projective cover of the floor and a high density of green filamentous algae, the shallow-water stony substrate becomes completely inaccessible for spawning of the August population.

  10. ESR signals in a core from the lake Baikal: implications for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, S.; Hidaka, K.; Takamatsu, N.

    2002-12-01

    Electron spin resonance dating method has been used for obtaining ages of Quaternary events using speleothem, corals, shells, hydroxyapatite in tooth enamel, gypsum, and quartz (Ikeya, 1993). Recently, it was also found that an ESR signal in quartz of loess is useful to discuss the variation of its origin (e. g. Ono et al., 1998). The method is based on the signal intensity of the heat treated (gamma ray irradiation and heating, Toyoda and Ikeya, 1991) E 1_f center (an unpaired electron at an oxygen vacancy) correlates the original (crystallization) age of quartz (e.g. Toyoda and Hattori, 2000). If there is variation in ages of basement rocks (origin of loess), ESR signal intensity may differentiate the origins. We applied the present method to sediments taken from the core of the lake Baikal with the length of 600m. The ESR intensity of the heat treated E1_f center was determined by an ESR measurement at room temperature for about 100 mg of the bulk samples, with a microwave power of 0.01 mW, field modulation amplitude of 0.1 mT, and with a scan range of 5 mT around g=2.001 after gamma ray irradiation to 1 kGy and subsequent heating at 300C. The ESR signal of the E1_f center was clearly observed although other minerals are also included in the bulk sample. The peak to peak height was taken as the signal intensity after normalizing the height with the gain (the instrumental setting at the time of measurement), mass, and the intensity of the standard simultaneously measured with the sample. The concentrations of the quartz in the bulk samples were obtained by the X ray diffraction study, normalizing the peak intensity with a standard CeO sample. The variation of the ESR signal intensity with depth of the core will be presented together with the possible climate change which may have caused the variation. References M. Ikeya (1993) New applications of electron spin resonance, dating, dosimetry and imaging, World Scientific. Y. Ono, T. Naruse, M. Ikeya, H. Kohno, and

  11. The Equation of State and The Speed of Sound On Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherstyankin, P. P.; Ivanov, V. G.; Ras, V. V. Blinov Lin Sb

    Usually as an equation for Baikal water state is used in the form (Chen, Millero 1986), which correlates with important effects connected with the temperature of maximal density (Sherstyankin, Kuimova, Potemkin 2000). However any experimental proofs of applicability of such equation of a status of the Baikal waters was not. It became possible at comparison of values of speed of a sound designed for the Baikal waters at use of the equation of a state in the form Chen-Millero, with values of speed of a sound determined experimentally Chenskii et al. (1998) and which the equations of a state of water are caused real, but unknown. The speeds of a sound with applica- tion of the equation of a state in the form Chen-Millero were designed by two ways: under the formula in the form Chen, Millero (1986) and on adiabatic and isothermal compressibilities (Sherstyankin et al. 2002, in press). The values of speed of a sound designed by both ways, have appeared little bit more (circa 0.2 m/s) experimental val- ues (absolute mistake +/- 0.2 m/s, Chenskii at al. 1986). The equation of a state for Baikal waters, taken in the form (Chen, Millero 1986), a little bit differs from real and can be used for practical purposes. The work is supported by the grants RFBR No.01-05-65097 and No.01-05-97229.

  12. Magnetostratigraphy of the Lake Baikal sediments: A unique record of 8.4 Ma of continuous sedimentation in the continental environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchinsky, Vadim A.

    2017-05-01

    Lake Baikal sedimentary records in general and magnetostratigraphy in particular have already enormously contributed in the global context to evaluate environmental and climatic changes in the deep continental setting. The Baikal Drilling Project (BDP) has become a world leader in pioneering recovery of extremely long (several hundred meters) lacustrine sediment sequences from deep water. This has made it possible, for the first time, to obtain a continental archive with the same chronostratigraphic integrity as marine records to address critical questions of the last eight million years. It explains why the amount of publications on Lake Baikal sedimentary and magnetic records can be compared to the number of papers for the Oceanic Drilling Program. The unique continuity of the Lake Baikal deep drilled cores - short piston cores and deep drilled cores - of 1993, 1996, and 1998 enables one to reconstruct reliably the geomagnetic polarity chrons and a number of the shorter geomagnetic events. Data from three very long cores allows a comparison to the geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS) and detailed records of geomagnetic events in the last 8.4 Ma. A refined age model, supported by 10Be dates, provides constraints for the short geomagnetic events. Some geomagnetic events are correlated with geomagnetic excursions already discussed in the literature; others are identified for the first time and may need future confirmation.

  13. Baikal-GVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrorin, A. D.; Avrorin, A. V.; Aynutdinov, V. M.; Bannash, R.; Belolaptikov, I. A.; Brudanin, V. B.; Budnev, N. M.; Danilchenko, I. A.; Demidov, S. V.; Domogatsky, G. V.; Doroshenko, A. A.; Dvornicky, R.; Dyachok, A. N.; Dzhilkibaev, Zh.-A. M.; Fajt, L.; Fialkovsky, S. V.; Gafarov, A. R.; Gaponenko, O. N.; Golubkov, K. V.; Gress, T. I.; Honz, Z.; Kebkal, K. G.; Kebkal, O. G.; Konischev, K. V.; Korobchenko, A. V.; Koshechkin, A. P.; Koshel, F. K.; Kozhin, A. V.; Kulepov, V. F.; Kuleshov, D. A.; Milenin, M. B.; Mirgazov, R. A.; Osipova, E. R.; Panfilov, A. I.; Pan'kov, L. V.; Pliskovsky, E. N.; Rozanov, M. I.; Rjabov, E. V.; Shamakhov, F. A.; Shaybonov, B. A.; Sheifler, A. A.; Shelepov, M. D.; Simkovic, F.; Skurihin, A. V.; Smagina, A. A.; Stekl, I.; Suvorova, O. V.; Tabolenko, V. A.; Tarashansky, B. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Zagorodnikov, A. V.; Zurbanov, V. L.

    2017-03-01

    We present the status of the Gigaton Volume Detector in Lake Baikal (Baikal-GVD) designed for the detection of high energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. The telescope consists of functionally independent clusters, sub-arrays of optical modules (OMs), which are connected to shore by individual electro-optical cables. During 2015 the GVD demonstration cluster, comprising 192 OMs, has been successfully operated in Lake Baikal. In 2016 this array was upgraded to baseline configuration of GVD cluster with 288 OMs arranged on eight vertical strings. Thus the instrumented water volume has been increased up to about 5.9 Mtons. The array was commissioned in early April 2016 and takes data since then. We describe the configuration and design of the 2016 array. Preliminary results obtained with data recorded in 2015 are also discussed.

  14. Formation of ferric iron crusts in Quaternary sediments of Lake Baikal, Russia, and implications for paleoclimate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deike, R.G.; Granina, L.; Callender, E.; McGee, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphate-bearing, ferric iron and siliceous crusts ranging in age from Recent to approximately 65,000 yr B.P. are observed in sediments of Lake Baikal. In younger sediments the crusts are at the base of a spectrum of secondary iron and manganese oxides that accumulate near the sediment/water interface in the zone of positive oxidation potential beneath an oxygenated water column. In areas where the average Quaternary sedimentation rates have been slow (e.g. 0.026 mm/yr), the crusts are more common, and span a wider range of ages. No crusts have been found where the Quaternary sedimentation mode has been deltaic and rapid (0.15 mm/yr). Independent core correlation based on magnetic properties of the sediment suggests that crusts can be correlated over most of Academician Ridge, an area that is particularly sensitive to climatic events affecting the concentration of suspended sediment. These crusts may be indicative of periods of low suspended sediment concentration, which occur during sustained transitions from glacial periods of high detrital input, to interglacial periods of high diatom sedimentation. The crusts are dominated by iron-rich and siliceous amorphous mineral phases, with an FeO:SiO2 by weight of 3:1. Regardless of age or location in the lake the Fe phase always includes Ca, P and Mn. Extensive microprobe data for these four elements recast as normalized elemental weight percent reveal linear trends of Ca:P and Fe:P. With increasing P, Ca also increases such that the two elements maintain a linear relationship passing very close to the origin and with a mean molar Ca:P=0.3 (too low for well-characterized apatite). Conversely, with increasing P, Fe decreases (mean molar Fe:P=3.4). There is no correlation between Mn and P. Molar Fe:P ratios for vivianite (an Fe(II) phosphate mineral observed in sediments closely below some crusts) are clustered around a stoichiometric composition. The covariant increase in Ca:P and the corresponding decrease in Fe:P may

  15. [Size structure of the sable in the Lake Baikal Region: a decadal analysis over the last sixty years].

    PubMed

    Monakhov, V G

    2014-01-01

    The skull sizes of eight Lake Baikal sable populations (n = 1859) were studied. It was noted that six of them constitute a homogeneous group of the small forms of the species. The decadal dynamics of 17 craniometric characters was analyzed. An increase in the skull size in the second half of the 20th century, common for both males and females, was revealed. The average growth trend over a decade was determined for the condylobasal skull length;-it amounted to 0.15 mm in males and 0.11 mm in females. It was established that decadal deviations in sizes are, in most cases, not significant statistically; they are of an oppositely directed nature and do not disturb the species stability.

  16. Biogenic silica records from the BDP93 drill site and adjacent areas of the Selenga Delta, Lake Baikal, Siberia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Peck, J.A.; Hatton, J.; Karabanov, E.B.; King, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Biogenic silica contents of sediments on the lower Selenga Delta and Buguldeika saddle in Lake Baikal show distinct fluctuations that reflect changes in diatom productivity, and ultimately, climate. The pattern of the upper 50 m of the section, dating from about 334 ka, is similar to that of the marine oxygen-isotope record, increasingly so as the younger sediments become progressively finer grained and less locally derived with time. The last two interglaciations are marked by biogenic silica abundances similar to those of the Holocene. The equivalent of marine oxygen-isotope stage 3 is distinctly intermediate in character between full glacial and full interglacial biogenic silica values. Following near-zero values during the last glacial maximum, biogenic silica began to increase at about 13 ka. The rise in biogenic silica to Holocene values was interrupted by an abrupt decrease during Younger Dryas time, about 11 to 10 14C ka.

  17. Higher mass-independent isotope fractionation of methylmercury in the pelagic food web of Lake Baikal (Russia).

    PubMed

    Perrot, Vincent; Pastukhov, Mikhail V; Epov, Vladimir N; Husted, Søren; Donard, Olivier F X; Amouroux, David

    2012-06-05

    Mercury undergoes several transformations that influence its stable isotope composition during a number of environmental and biological processes. Measurements of Hg isotopic mass-dependent (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in food webs may therefore help to identify major sources and processes leading to significant bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg). In this work, δ(13)C, δ(15)N, concentration of Hg species (MeHg, inorganic Hg), and stable isotopic composition of Hg were determined at different trophic levels of the remote and pristine Lake Baikal ecosystem. Muscle of seals and different fish as well as amphipods, zooplankton, and phytoplankton were specifically investigated. MDF during trophic transfer of MeHg leading to enrichment of heavier isotopes in the predators was clearly established by δ(202)Hg measurements in the pelagic prey-predator system (carnivorous sculpins and top-predator seals). Despite the low concentrations of Hg in the ecosystem, the pelagic food web reveals very high MIF Δ(199)Hg (3.15-6.65‰) in comparison to coastal fish (0.26-1.65‰) and most previous studies in aquatic organisms. Trophic transfer does not influence MIF signature since similar Δ(199)Hg was observed in sculpins (4.59 ± 0.55‰) and seal muscles (4.62 ± 0.60‰). The MIF is suggested to be mainly controlled by specific physical and biogeochemical characteristics of the water column. The higher level of MIF in pelagic fish of Lake Baikal is mainly due to the bioaccumulation of residual MeHg that is efficiently turned over and photodemethylated in deep oligotrophic and stationary (i.e., long residence time) freshwater columns.

  18. Sedimentation processes and new age constraints on rifting stages in Lake Baikal: results of deep-water drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, M. I.; Karabanov, E. B.; Prokopenko, A. A.; Gelety, V. F.; Antipin, V. S.; Williams, D. F.; Gvozdkov, A. N.

    With this paper we present a first attempt to combine the direct results on lithology, composition and age dating in the boreholes BDP-93, BDP-96 and BDP-97 with geological and seismic data from the areas where those sections were drilled. The sedimentary environments represented by the BDP boreholes are markedly different and possess characteristic lithological features. The results of the deep drilling provide the essential means for testing numerous age models used in geological reconstructions of the Lake Baikal rifting dynamics. Neither the basin-wide unconformity interpreted from seismic data, nor the interpreted change from shallow-water to deep-water facies at the boundary of the seismic stratigraphic complexes were found in the BDP-96 boreholes on Academician Ridge. Also, lithology does not support the proposed reconstructions of intense lake level fluctuations and transgressions during the Pliocene at Academician Ridge. The continuous deep-water hemipelagic sedimentation at Academician Ridge has existed for the past 5Ma. The beginning of an intense rifting phase of the Neobaikalian sub-stage and related drastic changes in sedimentation processes were interpreted on seismic sections as the basin-wide unconformity B10. Different age estimates for this boundary ranged from Late Pliocene (3.5Ma) to Plio-Pleistocene boundary. As shown by BDP-96 borehole, B10 is associated with a lithological change from diatomaceous ooze to dense silty clay and not with an erosional contact. The new age for this boundary in BDP-96 is approximately 2.5Ma. This new age constraint suggests that the upper sedimentary strata of Northern Baikal (1.5-1.7km thick) have formed during the past 2.5Ma with average sedimentation rates of 60-70cm/ka. The BDP-93 boreholes at Buguldeika suggest that uplift in Primorsky Range took place prior to 1.07-1.31Ma, a date which exceeds the age of previous geological models.

  19. The centuries-old and thousand- year oscillations of uranium distribution in the Lake Baikal sediments, according to the neutron-fission (n,f)-autoradiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichenko, Ivan; Zhmodik, Sergey; Belyanin, Dmitriy; Khlistov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The trace elements local distribution data, particularly (U, P, Br, Mo, BiSi et. all) in a lake and oceans bottom sediments reflects the conditions of those sediments formation, and correlates with changes in paleoclimatic conditions. In papers [Colman et all, 1995; Goldberg et all, 2000, etc.] established that the concentrations of some elements contained in the bottom sediments of Lake Baikal, in particular BiSi, Sr / Ba, Sr / Rb, Ti, U et al., reflect changes in insolation caused by periodic oscillations parameters Earth's orbit (Milankovitch cycles). At the same time, a bottom sediments of the largest continental lake (Lake Baikal), can keep a record of changes less periodicity. Our research focuses on the study of the spatial distribution of uranium with high resolution in the bottom sediments of Lake Baikal. The purpose of this research is determination the centure-old and thousand- old year oscillations in the concentration of uranium in the sediments of Lake Baikal. Fragments of the lake sediment columns taken from the axial part of the Akademicheskiy Ridge in Lake Baikal (stations coordinates St -8 (53 32'15"N 107 56'25"E); - and St11 - (53 33'51"N 108 00'05"E) were studied using complex of local analysis methods, such as: n, f - and n, β-autoradiography, SEM. The distributions of uranium and phosphorus in the authigenic component of sediments along the whole columns length (with the resolution of 10 micron which corresponds to the time resolution of about six months) have been studied by the autoradiography method. Statistical data analysis (Fourier and wavelet analysis) were used for detection oscillations in the uranium concentration Three main different factors of concentrators were established for uranium and phosphorus in the sediments of the Academic mountain range:1) sedimentation, 2) nutrient,3) diagenetic. The periodicity (range from 100 to 1,000 years), in the distribution of authigenic uranium in the sediment column were identified by

  20. Intersexual differences of heat shock response between two amphipods (Eulimnogammarus verrucosus and Eulimnogammarus cyaneus) in Lake Baikal

    PubMed Central

    Bedulina, Daria; Meyer, Michael F.; Gurkov, Anton; Kondratjeva, Ekaterina; Baduev, Boris; Gusdorf, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Acute temperature fluctuations are common in surface waters, and aquatic organisms may manifest physiological responses to punctuated temperature spikes long before behavioral responses. Ectotherms, especially cryophilic stenotherms such as those endemic to Lake Baikal (Siberia), may demonstrate specialized physiological responses to acute temperature increases because their proteomes have evolved to function most efficiently at lower temperatures (e.g., <10 °C). Therefore, our study questioned the nature and degree of variation in physiological response to acute thermal stress in two congenerous, endemic Baikal amphipod species, Eulimnogammarus verrucosus and Eulimnogammarus cyaneus. We hypothesized that because interspecific and intersexual thermosensitivity varies significantly among ectotherms, there would be divergent intersexual and interspecific strategies to withstand acute thermal stress, manifested in different protein compositions and concentrations. We exposed individuals to the species’ respective LT50 for one hour followed by a three-hour recovery period. We then performed 1D-PAGE, Western blotting, 2D-PAGE, and Mass Spectrometry techniques and assessed relative intersexual and interspecific changes in proteomic composition and heat shock protein 70 level. Our results demonstrate that females tend to be more sensitive to an acute thermal stimulus than males, most likely because females allocate significant energy to reproduction and less to heat shock response, evidenced by females’ significantly lower LT50time. Lower level of Hsp70 was found in females of the thermosensitive E. verrucosus compared to males of this species. No intersexual differences were found in Hsp70 level in thermotolerant E. cyaneus. Higher levels of hemocyanin subunits and arginine kinase were found in E. cyaneus females after heat shock and recovery compared to males, which was not found for E. verrucosus, suggesting interspecific mechanisms for E. cyaneus’s higher

  1. Intersexual differences of heat shock response between two amphipods (Eulimnogammarus verrucosus and Eulimnogammarus cyaneus) in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Bedulina, Daria; Meyer, Michael F; Gurkov, Anton; Kondratjeva, Ekaterina; Baduev, Boris; Gusdorf, Roman; Timofeyev, Maxim A

    2017-01-01

    Acute temperature fluctuations are common in surface waters, and aquatic organisms may manifest physiological responses to punctuated temperature spikes long before behavioral responses. Ectotherms, especially cryophilic stenotherms such as those endemic to Lake Baikal (Siberia), may demonstrate specialized physiological responses to acute temperature increases because their proteomes have evolved to function most efficiently at lower temperatures (e.g., <10 °C). Therefore, our study questioned the nature and degree of variation in physiological response to acute thermal stress in two congenerous, endemic Baikal amphipod species, Eulimnogammarus verrucosus and Eulimnogammarus cyaneus. We hypothesized that because interspecific and intersexual thermosensitivity varies significantly among ectotherms, there would be divergent intersexual and interspecific strategies to withstand acute thermal stress, manifested in different protein compositions and concentrations. We exposed individuals to the species' respective LT50 for one hour followed by a three-hour recovery period. We then performed 1D-PAGE, Western blotting, 2D-PAGE, and Mass Spectrometry techniques and assessed relative intersexual and interspecific changes in proteomic composition and heat shock protein 70 level. Our results demonstrate that females tend to be more sensitive to an acute thermal stimulus than males, most likely because females allocate significant energy to reproduction and less to heat shock response, evidenced by females' significantly lower LT50time. Lower level of Hsp70 was found in females of the thermosensitive E. verrucosus compared to males of this species. No intersexual differences were found in Hsp70 level in thermotolerant E. cyaneus. Higher levels of hemocyanin subunits and arginine kinase were found in E. cyaneus females after heat shock and recovery compared to males, which was not found for E. verrucosus, suggesting interspecific mechanisms for E. cyaneus's higher

  2. Joint observations of the dynamics of atmospheric aerosol by means of aerosol and Doppler lidars on the coast of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanenko, G. P.; Smalikho, I. N.; Balin, Yu. S.; Banakh, V. A.; Klemasheva, M. G.; Novoselov, M. M.; Rudi, Yu. A.; Penner, I. E.; Sukharev, A. A.; Falits, A. V.; Chen, W.-N.

    2015-11-01

    Observations of the aerosol atmosphere by means of the "LOSA-M2" aerosol Raman lidar and the "Stream Line" pulsed coherent Doppler lidar were carried out in August 2014 near village Boyarsk (Baikal Lake coast). The wind field and its impact on the stratification and dynamics of the aerosol layers in the lower troposphere were studied under various synoptic conditions. The data of simultaneous observations of wave-like motions in the boundary layer of the troposphere by two lidars are presented.

  3. High-throughput sequencing of microbial eukaryotes in Lake Baikal reveals ecologically differentiated communities and novel evolutionary radiations.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhenzhen; Berney, Cedric; Hartikainen, Hanna; Mahamdallie, Shazia; Gardner, Michelle; Boenigk, Jens; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Bass, David

    2017-08-01

    We performed high-throughput 18S rDNA V9 region sequencing analyses of microeukaryote (protist) communities at seven sites with depths ranging from 0 to 1450 m in the southern part of Lake Baikal. We show that microeukaryotic diversity differed according to water column depth and sediment depth. Chrysophytes and perkinsids were diverse in subsurface samples, novel radiations of petalomonads and Ichthyobodo relatives were found in benthic samples, and a broad range of divergent OTUs were detected in deep subbenthic samples. Members of clades usually associated with marine habitats were also detected, including syndineans for the first time in freshwater systems. Fungal- and cercozoan-specific c. 1200 bp amplicon clone libraries also revealed many novel lineages in both planktonic and sediment samples at all depths, a novel radiation of aphelids in shallower benthic samples, and partitioning of sarcomonad lineages in shallow vs deep benthic samples. Putative parasitic lineages accounted for 12.4% of overall reads, including a novel radiation of Ichthyobodo (fish parasite) relatives. Micrometazoans were also analysed, including crustaceans, rotifers and nematodes. The deepest (>1000 m) subsurface sediment samples harboured some highly divergent sequence types, including heterotrophic flagellates, parasites, putative metazoans and sequences likely representing organisms originating from higher up in the water column. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Assessing inflow alterations into Lake Baikal from Selenga river basin with respect to changing climate and land use conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreido, Vsevolod; Kalugin, Andrey; Motovilov, Yuri; Millionshchikova, Tatiana

    2017-04-01

    The trans-boundary Selenga river basin is the largest tributary of Lake Baikal, which has been experiencing a profound increase of annual near-surface air temperature - 1.6 to 1.8⁰C during the last 70 years, nearly twice as global increase. A significant drought that has been registered in the Selenga basin for the last 20 years has drawn attention of a number of hydrologists worldwide to investigate its drivers. In this study we used the ECOMAG hydrological modeling software to construct a semi-distributed data-driven hydrological model that accounts for weather forcing, hydrological soil properties and land-use conditions to assess runoff generation in the river basin and its current and future response to climate and land-use alteration. Due to lack of daily weather observation data, the model was driven with EWEMBI weather dataset for calibration and validation purposes. To investigate the possible impact on runoff due to climate change in the XXI century we used an ensemble of 7 GCMs from CMIP5 experiment operating according to 4 IPCC greenhouse gas RCPs. To account for possible land-use changes we used HYDE dataset for the years 1990-2100. The modeling results show that the current drought conditions may be prolonged and intensified according to the most severe RCPs. At the same time, land-use conditions appear to have limited influence on the runoff generation for this area is not subject to heavy irrigation-intensive agriculture.

  5. Thermal Preference Ranges Correlate with Stable Signals of Universal Stress Markers in Lake Baikal Endemic and Holarctic Amphipods

    PubMed Central

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis; Bedulina, Daria; Shatilina, Zhanna; Jakob, Lena; Vereshchagina, Kseniya; Lubyaga, Yulia; Gurkov, Anton; Shchapova, Ekaterina; Luckenbach, Till; Lucassen, Magnus; Sartoris, Franz Josef; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Timofeyev, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is the most pervasive abiotic environmental factor for aquatic organisms. Fluctuations in temperature range lead to changes in metabolic performance. Here, we aimed to identify whether surpassing the thermal preference zones is correlated with shifts in universal cellular stress markers of protein integrity, responses to oxidative stress and lactate content, as indicators of anaerobic metabolism. Exposure of the Lake Baikal endemic amphipod species Eulimnogammarus verrucosus (Gerstfeldt, 1858), Ommatogammarus flavus (Dybowski, 1874) and of the Holarctic amphipod Gammarus lacustris Sars 1863 (Amphipoda, Crustacea) to increasing temperatures resulted in elevated heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and lactate content, elevated antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e., catalase and peroxidase), and reduced lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase activities. Thus, the zone of stability (absence of any significant changes) of the studied molecular and biochemical markers correlated with the behaviorally preferred temperatures. We conclude that the thermal behavioral responses of the studied amphipods are directly related to metabolic processes at the cellular level. Thus, the determined thermal ranges may possibly correspond to the thermal optima. This relationship between species-specific behavioral reactions and stress response metabolism may have significant ecological consequences that result in a thermal zone-specific distribution (i.e., depths, feed spectrum, etc.) of species. As a consequence, by separating species with different temperature preferences, interspecific competition is reduced, which, in turn, increases a species’ Darwinian fitness in its environment. PMID:27706227

  6. Thermal Preference Ranges Correlate with Stable Signals of Universal Stress Markers in Lake Baikal Endemic and Holarctic Amphipods.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis; Bedulina, Daria; Shatilina, Zhanna; Jakob, Lena; Vereshchagina, Kseniya; Lubyaga, Yulia; Gurkov, Anton; Shchapova, Ekaterina; Luckenbach, Till; Lucassen, Magnus; Sartoris, Franz Josef; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Timofeyev, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is the most pervasive abiotic environmental factor for aquatic organisms. Fluctuations in temperature range lead to changes in metabolic performance. Here, we aimed to identify whether surpassing the thermal preference zones is correlated with shifts in universal cellular stress markers of protein integrity, responses to oxidative stress and lactate content, as indicators of anaerobic metabolism. Exposure of the Lake Baikal endemic amphipod species Eulimnogammarus verrucosus (Gerstfeldt, 1858), Ommatogammarus flavus (Dybowski, 1874) and of the Holarctic amphipod Gammarus lacustris Sars 1863 (Amphipoda, Crustacea) to increasing temperatures resulted in elevated heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and lactate content, elevated antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e., catalase and peroxidase), and reduced lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase activities. Thus, the zone of stability (absence of any significant changes) of the studied molecular and biochemical markers correlated with the behaviorally preferred temperatures. We conclude that the thermal behavioral responses of the studied amphipods are directly related to metabolic processes at the cellular level. Thus, the determined thermal ranges may possibly correspond to the thermal optima. This relationship between species-specific behavioral reactions and stress response metabolism may have significant ecological consequences that result in a thermal zone-specific distribution (i.e., depths, feed spectrum, etc.) of species. As a consequence, by separating species with different temperature preferences, interspecific competition is reduced, which, in turn, increases a species' Darwinian fitness in its environment.

  7. [Production of gaseous hydrocarbons by microbial communities of Lake Baikal bottom sediments].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, O N; Bukin, S V; Lomakina, A V; Kalmychkov, G V; Ivanov, V G; Morozov, I V; Pogodaeva, T V; Pimenov, N V; Zemskaya, T I

    2014-01-01

    Production of gaseous hydrocarbons by the microbial community of the Posolsky Bank methane seep bottom sediments (Southern Baikal) was studied at 4°C. Formation of both methane and a heavier gas- eous hydrocarbon, ethane, was detected in enrichment cultures. The highest methane concentrations (6.15 and 4.51 mmol L(-1)) were revealed in enrichments from the sediments from 55-cm depth incubated with-so- dium acetate and H2/CO2 gas mixture, respectively. A decrease in activity of aceticlastic methanogensand a decrease in methane concentration produced by hydrogenotrophic archaea occurred with depth. The highest concentration of ethane was revealed in enrichments from the microbial community of the layer close to gas hydrates (75 cm) incubated with CO2 as a substrate. According to analysis of the 16S rRNA gene fragments from the clone library, these enrichments were found to contain members of the phylum Crenarchaeota form- ing a separate cluster with members of the class Thermoprotei. The phylum Euryarchaeota was represented by nucleotide sequences of the organisms homologous to members of the orders Methanococcales, Methanosa- rcinales, and Thermoplasmatales.

  8. Rift flank segmentation, basin initiation and propagation: a neotectonic example from Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agar, S.M.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1995-01-01

    New surficial data (field, Landsat TM and topography) define morpho-tectonic domains and rift flank segmentation in the Ol'khon region of the Central Baikal rift. Deformation, drainage and depositional patterns indicate a change in the locus of active extension that may relate to a recent (

  9. Desulfonatronum zhilinae sp. nov., a novel haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from soda Lake Alginskoe, Trans-Baikal Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Zakharyuk, Anastasiya G; Kozyreva, Ludmila P; Khijniak, Tatyana V; Namsaraev, Bair B; Shcherbakova, Victoria A

    2015-05-01

    A novel haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated Al915-01(T), was isolated from benthic sediments of the Lake Alginskoe, a soda lake located in the Trans-Baikal Region, Russia. Cells of the strain were Gram-stain negative, motile, non-spore-forming vibrion (0.4-0.5 × 1.2-2.3 µm). Strain Al915-01(T) grew in the pH range from 8.0 to 10.5 (optimum pH 9.0) and required NaCl for growth (5-100 g l(-1) NaCl, optimum 40 g l(-1)). The bacterium grew at 10-40 °C (optimally at 36 °C) and used lactate, formate and pyruvate as electron donors in the presence of sulfate. It was able to reduce sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate and nitrate with lactate as an electron donor. The isolate was able to grow lithoheterotrophically with sulfate and molecular hydrogen if acetate was added as a carbon source. The predominant fatty acids were anteisoC15:0, isoC17:1, C18:1ω7 and C16:1ω7. The G+C content in the DNA was 58.3 ± 1 mol %. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the new bacterium belongs to the genus Desulfonatronum. The closest relatives were Desulfonatronum buryatense Ki5(T) (99.9 % similarity) and Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(T) (99.2 % similarity). On the basis of the genotypic, phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, the isolate is proposed as a representative of a novel species Desulfonatronum zhilinae with the type strain Al915-01(T) (=VKM B-2744(T) = DSM 26338(T)).

  10. Analysis of Lake Baikal's phytoplankton and fluvial input dynamics using SeaWiFS satellite data within the Scope of the Paleoclimate Project CONTINENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, B.; Oberhaensli, H.; Kaufmann, H.

    2003-04-01

    Multispectral ocean colour satellite data provide a new tool for spatial and temporal limnological data overview. The Ulaan Baatar (Mongolia) HRPT (high resolution picture transmission) station provides the paleoclimate EC-Project CONTINENT "High Resolution CONTINENTal Paleoclimate Record in Lake Baikal (Siberia, Russia)" with daily SeaWiFS data covering the area of south-eastern Siberia. After a SeaWiFS data processing chain with radiometric and atmospheric correction, we use the water leaving reflectances to gain information on phytoplankton and suspended sediment whose dynamics are a response to the present climate forcing. During the CONTINENT Summer cruises in 2001 and 2002, we were able to verify the spectral analysis of SeaWiFS satellite data with a high quality calibration/validation ground truth data set (field spectrometer and fluorometer measurement activities simultaneously to water sampling activities for pigment and suspended matter SPM and DOC analysis and algae counting). The fluviatil input into Lake Baikal is visible in the SeaWiFS data due to its higher loads of suspended matter, further particularly due to the presence of coloured dissolved organic matter (cDOM). These coloured fraction of DOM (mainly humic acids) originate from the bog areas and swampy basins within the Lake Baikal watershed. The so called yellow substances react optically with a strong absorption in the blue spectral bands of SeaWiFS and are therefore ideal tracers for the river input even over long distances from the river inflow. The phytoplankton main pigment chlorophyll-a is made visible by its absorption band in the blue which results in a green reflectance peak. Additional pigment groups (carotinoids, phycobilins) differentiate the spectral shape of the water leaving reflectance depending on the respective main phytoplankton composition. On satellite images obtained in late Summer, we can differentiate between diatom and cyanobacteria-picoplankton dominated surface water

  11. First discovery and formation process of authigenic siderite from gas hydrate-bearing mud volcanoes in fresh water: Lake Baikal, eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Alexey; Khlystov, Oleg; Zemskaya, Tamara; Minami, Hirotsugu; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nunokawa, Yutaka; Kida, Masato; Shoji, Hitoshi; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Pogodaeva, Tatiana

    2008-03-01

    We report on the first authigenic siderite (FeCO3) concretions recovered from near-bottom sediments at gas hydrate-bearing mud volcanoes in fresh water (Lake Baikal, Eastern Siberia). The carbonates appear as firm `plate-type' formations at the Malenky mud volcano (Southern Baikal Basin) and as soft nodules at the K-2 mud volcano (Central Baikal Basin). Calcium is the main divalent component which substitutes iron in the carbonate lattice (7 to 20 mol%). The δ 13C values of the carbonates (+3.3 to +6.8‰ at Malenky, and +16.5 to +21.9‰ PDB at K-2) indicate that their formation is due to methanogenesis. The latter was most likely caused by the microbial methyl-type (acetate) fermentation that is suggested from the isotopic composition of the accompanying methane hydrates and dissolved methane. General depletion of the siderites in 18O (-11.6 to -9.9 ‰ at Malenky, and -13.9 to -12.3‰ PDB at K-2) is mainly inherited from the isotope composition of pore water (-15.2 to -15.4‰ SMOW) at ambient temperature (3.5°C).

  12. [Distribution of Aspidogaster conchicola (Aspidogastrea, Aspidogastridae) in the organism of Colletopterum spp. (Bivalvia, Unionidae) of different age from the Chivyrkuiski Gulf of Lake Baikal].

    PubMed

    Dugarov, Zh N

    2010-01-01

    Distribution of Aspidogaster conchicola Baer, 1827 in the organisms of its hosts Colletopterum spp. from the Chivyrkuiski Gulf of Lake Baikal was investigated. The number of A. conchicola in the organism of Colletopterum spp. was found to decrease along the row pericardial cavity-mantle cavity-gills-kidney. The pericardial cavity of Colletopterum spp. is the most favorable habitat for A. conchicola with 72% of the helminthes parasitizing in it. In the pericardial cavity the largest number (61%) of A. conchicola was found in its posterior part.

  13. The Structure of Microbial Community and Degradation of Diatoms in the Deep Near-Bottom Layer of Lake Baikal

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Yulia R.; Galachyants, Yuri P.; Kurilkina, Maria I.; Likhoshvay, Alexander V.; Petrova, Darya P.; Shishlyannikov, Sergey M.; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Likhoshway, Yelena V.

    2013-01-01

    Insight into the role of bacteria in degradation of diatoms is important for understanding the factors and components of silica turnover in aquatic ecosystems. Using microscopic methods, it has been shown that the degree of diatom preservation and the numbers of diatom-associated bacteria in the surface layer of bottom sediments decrease with depth; in the near-bottom water layer, the majority of bacteria are associated with diatom cells, being located either on the cell surface or within the cell. The structure of microbial community in the near-bottom water layer has been characterized by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, which has revealed 149 208 unique sequences. According to the results of metagenomic analysis, the community is dominated by representatives of Proteobacteria (41.9%), Actinobacteria (16%); then follow Acidobacteria (6.9%), Cyanobacteria (5%), Bacteroidetes (4.7%), Firmicutes (2.8%), Nitrospira (1.6%), and Verrucomicrobia (1%); other phylotypes account for less than 1% each. For 18.7% of the sequences, taxonomic identification has been possible only to the Bacteria domain level. Many bacteria identified to the genus level have close relatives occurring in other aquatic ecosystems and soils. The metagenome of the bacterial community from the near-bottom water layer also contains 16S rRNA gene sequences found in previously isolated bacterial strains possessing hydrolytic enzyme activity. These data show that potential degraders of diatoms occur among the vast variety of microorganisms in the near-bottom water of Lake Baikal. PMID:23560063

  14. Heat and mass transfer effects during displacement of deepwater methane hydrate to the surface of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Alexander V.; Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Rozhkov, Aleksey N.

    2016-06-01

    The present paper focuses on heat and mass exchange processes in methane hydrate fragments during in situ displacement from the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) to the water surface of Lake Baikal. After being extracted from the methane hydrate deposit at the lakebed, hydrate fragments were placed into a container with transparent walls and a bottom grid. There were no changes in the hydrate fragments during ascent within the GHSZ. The water temperature in the container remained the same as that of the ambient water (~3.5 °C). However, as soon as the container crossed the upper border of the GHSZ, first signs of hydrate decomposition and transformation into free methane gas were observed. The gas filled the container and displaced water from it. At 300 m depth, the upper and lower thermometers in the container simultaneously recorded noticeable decreases of temperature. The temperature in the upper part of the container decreased to -0.25 °C at about 200 m depth, after which the temperature remained constant until the water surface was reached. The temperature at the bottom of the container reached -0.25 °C at about 100 m depth, after which it did not vary during further ascent. These observed effects could be explained by the formation of a gas phase in the container and an ice layer on the hydrate surface caused by heat consumption during hydrate decomposition (self-preservation effect). However, steady-state simulations suggest that the forming ice layer is too thin to sustain the hydrate internal pressure required to protect the hydrate from decomposition. Thus, the mechanism of self-preservation remains unclear.

  15. The Rise and Fall of Plankton: Long-Term Changes in the Vertical Distribution of Algae and Grazers in Lake Baikal, Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Stephanie E.; Gray, Derek K.; Izmest'eva, Lyubov R.; Moore, Marianne V.; Ozersky, Tedy

    2014-01-01

    Both surface water temperatures and the intensity of thermal stratification have increased recently in large lakes throughout the world. Such physical changes can be accompanied by shifts in plankton community structure, including changes in relative abundances and depth distributions. Here we analyzed 45 years of data from Lake Baikal, the world's oldest, deepest, and most voluminous lake, to assess long-term trends in the depth distribution of pelagic phytoplankton and zooplankton. Surface water temperatures in Lake Baikal increased steadily between 1955 and 2000, resulting in a stronger thermal gradient within the top 50 m of the water column. In conjunction with these physical changes our analyses reveal significant shifts in the daytime depth distribution of important phytoplankton and zooplankton groups. The relatively heavy diatoms, which often rely on mixing to remain suspended in the photic zone, shifted downward in the water column by 1.90 m y-1, while the depths of other phytoplankton groups did not change significantly. Over the same time span the density-weighted average depth of most major zooplankton groups, including cladocerans, rotifers, and immature copepods, exhibited rapid shifts toward shallower positions (0.57–0.75 m y−1). As a result of these depth changes the vertical overlap between herbivorous copepods (Epischura baikalensis) and their algal food appears to have increased through time while that for cladocerans decreased. We hypothesize that warming surface waters and reduced mixing caused these ecological changes. Future studies should examine how changes in the vertical distribution of plankton might impact energy flow in this lake and others. PMID:24586441

  16. The rise and fall of plankton: long-term changes in the vertical distribution of algae and grazers in Lake Baikal, Siberia.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Stephanie E; Gray, Derek K; Izmest'eva, Lyubov R; Moore, Marianne V; Ozersky, Tedy

    2014-01-01

    Both surface water temperatures and the intensity of thermal stratification have increased recently in large lakes throughout the world. Such physical changes can be accompanied by shifts in plankton community structure, including changes in relative abundances and depth distributions. Here we analyzed 45 years of data from Lake Baikal, the world's oldest, deepest, and most voluminous lake, to assess long-term trends in the depth distribution of pelagic phytoplankton and zooplankton. Surface water temperatures in Lake Baikal increased steadily between 1955 and 2000, resulting in a stronger thermal gradient within the top 50 m of the water column. In conjunction with these physical changes our analyses reveal significant shifts in the daytime depth distribution of important phytoplankton and zooplankton groups. The relatively heavy diatoms, which often rely on mixing to remain suspended in the photic zone, shifted downward in the water column by 1.90 m y(-1), while the depths of other phytoplankton groups did not change significantly. Over the same time span the density-weighted average depth of most major zooplankton groups, including cladocerans, rotifers, and immature copepods, exhibited rapid shifts toward shallower positions (0.57-0.75 m y(-1)). As a result of these depth changes the vertical overlap between herbivorous copepods (Epischura baikalensis) and their algal food appears to have increased through time while that for cladocerans decreased. We hypothesize that warming surface waters and reduced mixing caused these ecological changes. Future studies should examine how changes in the vertical distribution of plankton might impact energy flow in this lake and others.

  17. Tobrilus methanus sp. n. and Tripyla posolskii sp. n. (Nematoda, Triplonchida) from Lake Baikal, Russia.

    PubMed

    Gagarin, Vladimir G; Naumova, Tatyana V

    2016-11-20

    Two new nematode species found in Lake Baikal (Russia) are described and illustrated. Tobrilus methanus sp. n. is morphologically close to T. modestus Gagarin, 1996 and T. incognitus Tsalolikhin, 1972. The new species differs from T. modestus by the thinner body (a = 20-29 vs a = 15.5-18.5), longer pharynx (b = 3.4-4.4 vs b = 5.0-6.2), comparatively longer tail (c' = 3.4-5.0 vs c' = 2.0-2.5), less number of supplementary organs (6 vs 7-8) and presence of subterminal seta. T. methanus sp. n. differs from T. incognitus by the thicker body (a = 20-29 vs a = 35-37), longer pharynx (b = 3.4-4.4 vs b = 5.1-5.8), shorter outer labial setae (3-4 µm long vs 10 µm long) and presence of crystalloids. Tripyla posolskii sp. n. is close to T. dybowskii Tsalolikhin, 1976, but differs by the shorter body (L = 1548-2078 µm vs L = 2400-3530 µm), shorter tail (c = 4.7-7.2, c' = 5.8-7.9 vs c = 2.8-4.8, c' = 7.3-11.9) and shorter spicules (47-57 µm long vs 85-92 µm long). A key for the identification of valid species of the genus Tobrilus from Lake Baikal is given.

  18. Active faults of the Baikal depression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levi, K.G.; Miroshnichenko, A.I.; San'kov, V. A.; Babushkin, S.M.; Larkin, G.V.; Badardinov, A.A.; Wong, H.K.; Colman, S.; Delvaux, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Baikal depression occupies a central position in the system of the basins of the Baikal Rift Zone and corresponds to the nucleus from which the continental lithosphere began to open. For different reasons, the internal structure of the Lake Baikal basin remained unknown for a long time. In this article, we present for the first time a synthesis of the data concerning the structure of the sedimentary section beneath Lake Baikal, which were obtained by complex seismic and structural investigations, conducted mainly from 1989 to 1992. We make a brief description of the most interesting seismic profiles which provide a rough idea of a sedimentary unit structure, present a detailed structural interpretation and show the relationship between active faults in the lake, heat flow anomalies and recent hydrothermalism.

  19. [Specific features of blood cell composition and structure in fishes from the pelagial and coastal zones of Lake Baikal].

    PubMed

    Iakhnenko, V M; Klimenkov, I V

    2009-01-01

    Differences in the proportions and ultrastructure of peripheral blood cells between the Baikal cisco and roach have been revealed. Both species contain all main cell types involved in the immune response in higher vertebrates. However, cells mediating the innate immune response are represented in the Baikal cisco only by monocytes and pseudogranulocytes, whereas the blood of roach additionally contains true granulocytes. Significantly greater numbers of leukocytes and thrombocytes per unit volume in the roach are evidence for mobilization of the immune system in this species. The peripheral blood of both species contains lymphocytes, which are responsible for adaptive immunity. The content of hemoglobin in erythrocytes is lower in the roach than in the Baikal cisco. The state of blood in the two species may be considered adapted to typical conditions in their habitats.

  20. On Eulimnogammarus messerschmidtii, sp. n. (Amphipoda: Gammaridea) from Lake Baikal, Siberia, with redescription of E. cyanoides (Sowinsky) and remarks on taxonomy of the genus Eulimnogammarus.

    PubMed

    Bedulina, Daria S; Takhteev, Vadim V; Pogrebnyak, Svyatoslav G; Govorukhina, Ekaterina B; Madyarova, Ekaterina V; Lubyaga, Yulia A; Vereshchagina, Kseniya P; Timofeyev, Maxim A; Luckenbach, Till

    2014-07-22

    A new amphipod species of the endemic fauna of Lake Baikal (East Siberia, Russia), Eulimnogammarus messerschmidtii sp. n., from the littoral zone of the northern part of the lake is described. The species is characterized by the presence of a group of spines with dense setae on the last 4 body segments. The basal peduncular segment of antenna 1 bears bunches of dense setae without spines, uropods 3 are covered by dense simple setae without plumose setae and the outer ramus has a second small article. The body length of sampled specimens ranges from 7.5 to 18 mm. Population analysis at one of the sampling points revealed a spring-summer reproduction period for this species. This species was previously erroneously identified as E. cyanoides. E. cyanoides is here redescribed in details based on the lectotype. The differences between E. messerschmidtii sp. n., E. cyanoides and other closely related Eulimnogammarus species are described. The taxonomy of the genus Eulimnogammarus is discussed.

  1. Expression patterns and organization of the hsp70 genes correlate with thermotolerance in two congener endemic amphipod species (Eulimnogammarus cyaneus and E. verrucosus) from Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Bedulina, D S; Evgen'ev, M B; Timofeyev, M A; Protopopova, M V; Garbuz, D G; Pavlichenko, V V; Luckenbach, T; Shatilina, Z M; Axenov-Gribanov, D V; Gurkov, A N; Sokolova, I M; Zatsepina, O G

    2013-03-01

    We studied various aspects of heat-shock response with special emphasis on the expression of heat-shock protein 70 (hsp70) genes at various levels in two congener species of littoral endemic amphipods (Eulimnogammarus cyaneus and E. verrucosus) from Lake Baikal which show striking differences in their vertical distribution and thermal tolerance. Although both the species studied demonstrate high constitutive levels of Hsp70, the thermotolerant E. cyaneus exhibited a 5-fold higher basal level of Hsp70 proteins under normal physiological conditions (7 °C) and significantly lower induction of Hsp70 after temperature elevation compared with the more thermosensitive E. verrucosus. We isolated the hsp70 genes from both species and analysed their sequences. Two isoforms of the cytosolic Hsp70/Hsc70 proteins were detected in both species under normal physiological conditions and encoded by two distinct hsp/hsc70 family members. While both Hsp70 isoforms were synthesized without heat shock, only one of them was induced by temperature elevation. The observed differences in the Hsp70 expression patterns, including the dynamics of Hsp70 synthesis and threshold of induction, suggest that the increased thermotolerance in E. cyaneus (compared with E. verrucosus) is associated with a complex structural and functional rearrangement of the hsp70 gene family and favoured the involvement of Hsp70 in adaptation to fluctuating thermal conditions. This study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the thermal adaptation of Baikal amphipods and represents the first report describing the structure and function of the hsp70 genes of endemic Baikal species dwelling in thermally contrasting habitats.

  2. Primary production and microbial activity in the euphotic zone of Lake Baikal (Southern Basin) during late winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straškrábová, V.; Izmest'yeva, L. R.; Maksimova, E. A.; Fietz, S.; Nedoma, J.; Borovec, J.; Kobanova, G. I.; Shchetinina, E. V.; Pislegina, E. V.

    2005-04-01

    Three years of regular weekly/biweekly monitoring of seasonal changes in temperature, transparency, chlorophyll a (CHL) and bacteria [erythrosine-stained microscopic counts and cultivable colony forming units (CFUs)] at the vertical profile in the South basin of Lake Baikal (51°54'195″N, 105°04'235″E, depth 800 m) were evaluated. In more detail, the structure and function of phytoplankton and the microbial loop in the euphotic layer at the same site were investigated during the late-winter-early-spring period under the ice. The depth of euphotic zone (up to 1% of surface irradiation) was 35 to 40 m. Primary production was measured three times a week with the 14C method in 2, 10, 20, 30 and 40 m. Maximum production was found in 10 m, with lower values towards the surface (light inhibition) and towards the lower layers. The total production in cells larger than 1 μm in the column (0-40 m) was 204-240 mg C d -1 m -2, 30-40% of it being in cells 1-3 μm (mostly picocyanobacteria), which represented roughly 9% of the total chlorophyll a (estimated from pigment analyses). A major part of phytoplankton biomass was formed by diatoms ( Synedra acus Hust., Asterionella formosa Hass. and Stephanodiscus meyerii Genkal & Popovskaya). Total production (including extracellular, dissolved organic matter) was 235-387 mg C day -1 m -2, and the exudates were readily used by bacteria (particles 0.2-1 μm). This part amounted to 1-5% of cellular production in 2 to 20 m and 11-77% of cellular production in 20-40 m, i.e., in light-limited layers. From 0 to 30 m, chlorophyll a concentration was 0.8 to 1.3 μg l -1, wherefrom it decreased rapidly to 0.1 μg l -1 towards the depth of 40 m. Bacteria (DAPI-stained microscopic counts) reached 0.5-1.4×10 6 ml -1; their cell volumes measured via image analysis were small (average 0.05 μm -3), often not well countable when erythrosine stain was used. Bacterial biomasses were in the range of 6-21 μg C l -1. Numbers of colony forming

  3. Linking the10Be continental record of Lake Baikal to marine and ice archives of the last 50 ka: Implication for the global dust-aerosol input

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Peck, J.; King, J.; Colman, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present here a 10Be profile from the continental sediments of Lake Baikal (the world's largest fresh water lake), which, for the first time, shows the ??? 40 ka 10Be enhancement and a pattern that strongly matches those from the marine and ice records for the last 50 ka. This finding provides a new horizon for global and regional correlation of continental archives. Additionally, our VADM-predicted 10Be production confirms and further strengthens a common global cause (geomagnetic field intensity) for the change in atmospheric 10Be over the last 50 ka. We also show that most of the 10Be inventory to the lake has been provided by riverine input, but with a significant addition from direct precipitation and dust-aerosol fallout. We estimate a higher dust-aerosol contribution of 10Be during the Holocene and interstadial stage 3 (22-50 ka) as compared with the glacial period (12-22 ka). Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. The Ability of Microbial Community of Lake Baikal Bottom Sediments Associated with Gas Discharge to Carry Out the Transformation of Organic Matter under Thermobaric Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bukin, Sergei V; Pavlova, Olga N; Manakov, Andrei Y; Kostyreva, Elena A; Chernitsyna, Svetlana M; Mamaeva, Elena V; Pogodaeva, Tatyana V; Zemskaya, Tamara I

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compare the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities inhabiting the subsurface sediment in geographically distinct locations is one of the keys to understanding the evolution and function of the subsurface biosphere. Prospective areas for study of the subsurface biosphere are the sites of hydrocarbon discharges on the bottom of the Lake Baikal rift, where ascending fluxes of gas-saturated fluids and oil from deep layers of bottom sediments seep into near-surface sediment. The samples of surface sediments collected in the area of the Posolskaya Bank methane seep were cultured for 17 months under thermobaric conditions (80°C, 5 MPa) with the addition of complementary organic substrate, and a different composition for the gas phase. After incubation, the presence of intact cells of microorganisms, organic matter transformation and the formation of oil biomarkers was confirmed in the samples, with the addition of Baikal diatom alga Synedra acus detritus, and gas mixture CH4:H2:CO2. Taxonomic assignment of the 16S rRNA sequence data indicates that the predominant sequences in the enrichment were Sphingomonas (55.3%), Solirubrobacter (27.5%) and Arthrobacter (16.6%). At the same time, in heat-killed sediment and in sediment without any additional substrates, which were cultivated in a CH4 atmosphere, no geochemical changes were detected, nor the presence of intact cells and 16S rRNA sequences of Bacteria and Archaea. This data may suggest that the decomposition of organic matter under culturing conditions could be performed by microorganisms from low-temperature sediment layers. One possible explanation of this phenomenon is migration of the representatives of the deep thermophilic community through fault zones in the near surface sediment layers, together with gas-bearing fluids.

  5. The Ability of Microbial Community of Lake Baikal Bottom Sediments Associated with Gas Discharge to Carry Out the Transformation of Organic Matter under Thermobaric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bukin, Sergei V.; Pavlova, Olga N.; Manakov, Andrei Y.; Kostyreva, Elena A.; Chernitsyna, Svetlana M.; Mamaeva, Elena V.; Pogodaeva, Tatyana V.; Zemskaya, Tamara I.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compare the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities inhabiting the subsurface sediment in geographically distinct locations is one of the keys to understanding the evolution and function of the subsurface biosphere. Prospective areas for study of the subsurface biosphere are the sites of hydrocarbon discharges on the bottom of the Lake Baikal rift, where ascending fluxes of gas-saturated fluids and oil from deep layers of bottom sediments seep into near-surface sediment. The samples of surface sediments collected in the area of the Posolskaya Bank methane seep were cultured for 17 months under thermobaric conditions (80°C, 5 MPa) with the addition of complementary organic substrate, and a different composition for the gas phase. After incubation, the presence of intact cells of microorganisms, organic matter transformation and the formation of oil biomarkers was confirmed in the samples, with the addition of Baikal diatom alga Synedra acus detritus, and gas mixture CH4:H2:CO2. Taxonomic assignment of the 16S rRNA sequence data indicates that the predominant sequences in the enrichment were Sphingomonas (55.3%), Solirubrobacter (27.5%) and Arthrobacter (16.6%). At the same time, in heat-killed sediment and in sediment without any additional substrates, which were cultivated in a CH4 atmosphere, no geochemical changes were detected, nor the presence of intact cells and 16S rRNA sequences of Bacteria and Archaea. This data may suggest that the decomposition of organic matter under culturing conditions could be performed by microorganisms from low-temperature sediment layers. One possible explanation of this phenomenon is migration of the representatives of the deep thermophilic community through fault zones in the near surface sediment layers, together with gas-bearing fluids. PMID:27242716

  6. Presence of the 54-chromosome common vole (Mammalia) on Olkhon Island (Lake Baikal, East Siberia, Russia), and the occurrence of an unusual X-chromosome variant

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, S.V.; Tchabovsky, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report a new finding of the 54-chromosome sibling species of the common vole in East Siberia - the first description from Olkhon Island (Lake Baikal). The karyotype of a male specimen revealed by routine staining and C-banding demonstrates the unambiguous presence of Microtus rossiaemeridionalis Ognev, 1924 (recently often regarded as as junior synonym of Microtus levis Miller, 1908). Comparison with conspecific specimens from the European part of the species range (from the left bank of the river Volga) shows that the vole of the island population has a smaller X-chromosome due to a reduced quantity of C-positive heterochromatin. This is just the third example of this type of X-chromosome variant with previous cases on an Arctic island (Svalbard) and the West Siberian lowland (Novosibirsk) and the only one on a lake island. Although Microtus rossiaemeridionalis is largely monomorphic in its karyotype, our data show that one specific type of X-chromosome variant is remarkably widespread, though rare. PMID:24260647

  7. Isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in subsurface sediments of gas hydrate-bearing mud volcanoes, Lake Baikal: implications for methane and carbonate origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Alexey A.; Khlystov, Oleg M.; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hirotsugu; Nunokawa, Yutaka; Shoji, Hitoshi; Zemskaya, Tamara I.; Naudts, Lieven; Pogodaeva, Tatyana V.; Kida, Masato; Kalmychkov, Gennady V.; Poort, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    We report on the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in pore-water samples recovered by gravity coring from near-bottom sediments at gas hydrate-bearing mud volcanoes/gas flares (Malenky, Peschanka, Peschanka 2, Goloustnoe, and Irkutsk) in the Southern Basin of Lake Baikal. The δ13C values of DIC become heavier with increasing subbottom depth, and vary between -9.5 and +21.4‰ PDB. Enrichment of DIC in 13C indicates active methane generation in anaerobic environments near the lake bottom. These data confirm our previous assumption that crystallization of carbonates (siderites) in subsurface sediments is a result of methane generation. Types of methanogenesis (microbial methyl-type fermentation versus CO2-reduction) were revealed by determining the offset of δ13C between dissolved CH4 and CO2, and also by using δ13C and δD values of dissolved methane present in the pore waters. Results show that both mechanisms are most likely responsible for methane generation at the investigated locations.

  8. [Microbial communities of the discharge zone of oil- and gas-bearing fluids in low-mineral Lake Baikal].

    PubMed

    Lomakina, A V; Pogodaeva, T V; Morozov, I V; Zemskaya, T I

    2014-01-01

    At the site of natural ingress of oil microbial diversity in the Central Baikal bottom sediments differing in the chemical composition of pore waters was studied by molecular biological techniques. The sediments saturated with oil and methane were found to contain members of 10 bacterial and 2 archaeal phyla. The oxidized sediment layer contained methanotrophic bacteria belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria, which had a specific structure of the pmoA gene and clustered together with uncultured methanotrophs from cold ecosystems. The upper sediment layer contained also oil-oxidizing bacteria and the alkB genes most colsely related to those of Rhodococcus. The microbial community of reduced sediments exhibited lower diversity and was represented mostly by the organisms involved in hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  9. Geochemical and microbiological characteristics of sediments near the Malenky mud volcano (Lake Baikal, Russia), with evidence of Archaea intermediate between the marine anaerobic methanotrophs ANME-2 and ANME-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskaya, Tamara I.; Pogodaeva, Tatiayna V.; Shubenkova, Olga V.; Сhernitsina, Svetlana M.; Dagurova, Olga P.; Buryukhaev, Savelii P.; Namsaraev, Bair B.; Khlystov, Oleg M.; Egorov, Aleksandr V.; Krylov, Aleksei A.; Kalmychkov, Gennadii V.

    2010-06-01

    Detailed lithological, biogeochemical and molecular biological analyses of core sediments collected in 2002-2006 from the vicinity of the Malenky mud volcano, Lake Baikal, reveal considerable spatial variations in pore water chemical composition, with total concentrations of dissolved salts varying from 0.1 to 1.8‰. Values of methane δ13С in the sediments suggest a biogenic origin (δ13Сmin. -61.3‰, δ13Сmax. -72.9‰). Rates of sulphate reduction varied from 0.001 to 0.7 nmol cm-3 day-1, of autotrophic methanogenesis from 0.01 to 2.98 nmol CH4 cm-3 day-1, and of anaerobic oxidation of methane from 0 to 12.3 nmol cm-3 day-1. These results indicate that methanogenic processes dominate in gas hydrate-bearing sediments of Lake Baikal. Based on clone libraries of 16S rRNA genes amplified with Bacteria- and Archaea-specific primers, investigation of microbial diversity in gas hydrate-bearing sediments revealed bacterial 16S rRNA clones classified as Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi and OP11. Archaeal clone sequences are related to the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Baikal sequences of Archaea form a distinct cluster occupying an intermediate position between the marine groups ANME-2 and ANME-3 of anaerobic methanotrophs.

  10. [Cytophotometric determination of genome size in two species of Cyclops Lake Baikal (Crustacea: Copepoda: Cyclopoina) in ontogenetic development].

    PubMed

    Ivankina, E A; Alekseeva, A L; Omel'ianchuk, L V; Pal'chikova, I G; sheveleva, N G; Kiril'chik, S V; Zhimulev, I F

    2013-01-01

    Genome size of Cyclops in cells at early stages of cleavage (up to the 5th division) and in somatic cells were estimated by a static digital Feulgen cytophotometry in order to study the quantitative changes in DNA content during chromatin diminution. Our realization of the cytophotometric method was approbeted on five different digital-imaging systems in blood cells of four vertebrate species. In all cases, we observed a direct correlation of the obtained and known from the literature data on the genome size and a high reproducibility, which allows to use these systems in future work. We also optimized the conditions for DNA hydrolysis of both blood smears, and for two species of Cyclops from the Moscow population, as 30 min in 5 N HCl at 24 degrees C. Here we first revealed chromatin diminution in two endemic Baikal species of Cyclopoida: Acanthocyclops incolotaenia and Diacyclops galbinus estimated the extent ofchromatin diminution in Diacyclops galbinus as 95.5-96.2 %. Cytometric analysis of the third species, Mesocyclops leuckarti, did not reveal obvious chromatin diminution. We also optimized the conditions for DNA hydrolysis of both blood smear preparations, and for two species of copepods from the Moscow population, as 30 min in 5N HCl at 24 degrees C.

  11. The signature of bankfull hydraulic conditions reflected by properties of the channel bank: a case study from the Selenga River delta, Lake Baikal, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, T. Y.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Czapiga, M. J.; Ma, H.; McElroy, B. J.; Il'icheva, E.; Pavlov, M.; Parker, G.

    2016-12-01

    A recent model developed to describe variable river channel Shields number proposed that the bankfull shear velocity value is nearly independent of bed material grain size, and instead is dependent on the kinematic viscosity of water. This fluid property has an important influence on the settling velocity of washload sediment, which is material generally not found on the channel bed, but is deposited on the adjacent levees during overbank flow. It is therefore hypothesized that bankfull shear velocity values for a lowland fluvial channel can be estimated based on the grain size properties of the bank sediment, after considering the vegetated state of the bank. This hypothesis is tested using a variety of data collected during two field expeditions (2014, 2016) to the Selenga River Delta, Lake Baikal, Russia, because this system demonstrates significant changes in bank material and flow hydraulic conditions across the distributary channel network. The data include: 1) channel geometry measurements, 2) bank and floodplain sediment samples, 3) water samples to measure washload concentration and grain size, 4) flow velocity measurements, and 5) bank vegetation type, to estimate sediment trapping efficiency. Analyses of the data document a downstream fining of bank sediment grain size, with medium sand present near the delta apex, to mud at the delta margin. Bankfull channel depth decreases downstream, from meter-scale near the apex, to decimeter-scale at the delta margin, where the channel banks transition from subaerial to subaqueous expression. Flow velocity - decreasing downstream - is used to calculate shear velocity. An analytical framework is developed to explore the physical connections between grain size of the bank material, bankfull depth, and shear velocity. This analysis is the first to establish a connection between bankfull geometry, bank material properties, and Shields number, and therefore provides insights regarding fluvial-deltaic morphodynamics.

  12. [Clostridium alkalicellum sp. nov., an obligately alkaliphilic cellulolytic bacterium from a soda lake in the Baikal region].

    PubMed

    Zhilina, T N; Kevbrin, V V; Turova, T P; Lysenko, A M; Kostrikina, N A; Zavarzin, G A

    2005-01-01

    The first anaerobic alkaliphilic cellulolytic microorganism has been isolated from the Verkhnee Beloe soda lake (Buryatiya, Russia) with pH 10.2 and a salt content of up to 24 g/l. Five strains were characterized. Strain Z-7026 was chosen as the type strain. The cells of the isolate are gram-positive spore-forming rods. A mucous external capsule is produced. The microorganism is obligately alkaliphilic, growing in a pH range of 8.0-10.2, with an optimum at pH 9.0. Sodium ions and, in carbonate-buffered media, sodium chloride are obligately required. The microorganism is slightly halophilic; it grows at 0.017-0.4 M Na+ with an optimum at 0.15-0.3 M Na+. The metabolism is fermentative and strictly anaerobic. Cellulose, cellobiose, and xylan can be used as growth substrates. Plant and algal debris can be fermented. Lactate, ethanol, acetate, hydrogen, and traces of formate are produced during cellulose or cellobiose fermentation. Yeast extract or vitamins are required for anabolic purposes. The microorganism fixes dinitrogen and is nitrogenase-positive. It is tolerant to up to 48 mM Na2S. Growth is not inhibited by kanamycin or neomycin. Chloramphenicol, streptomycin, penicillin, ampicillin, ampiox, bacillin, novobiocin, and bacitracin suppress growth. The DNA G+C content is 29.9 mol %. According to the nucleotide sequence of its 16S rRNA gene, strain Z-7026 is phylogenetically close to the neutrophilic cellulolytic bacteria Clostridium thermocellum (95.5%), C. aldrichii (94.9%), and Acetivibrio cellulolyticus (94.8%). It is proposed as a new species: Clostridium alkalicellum sp. nov.

  13. [Genome similarity of Baikal omul and sig].

    PubMed

    Bychenko, O S; Sukhanova, L V; Ukolova, S S; Skvortsov, T A; Potapov, V K; Azhikina, T L; Sverdlov, E D

    2009-01-01

    Two members of the Baikal sig family, a lake sig (Coregonus lavaretus baicalensis Dybovsky) and omul (C. autumnalis migratorius Georgi), are close relatives that diverged from the same ancestor 10-20 thousand years ago. In this work, we studied genomic polymorphism of these two fish species. The method of subtraction hybridization (SH) did not reveal the presence of extended sequences in the sig genome and their absence in the omul genome. All the fragments found by SH corresponded to polymorphous noncoding genome regions varying in mononucleotide substitutions and short deletions. Many of them are mapped close to genes of the immune system and have regions identical to the Tc-1-like transposons abundant among fish, whose transcription activity may affect the expression of adjacent genes. Thus, we showed for the first time that genetic differences between Baikal sig family members are extremely small and cannot be revealed by the SH method. This is another endorsement of the hypothesis on the close relationship between Baikal sig and omul and their evolutionarily recent divergence from a common ancestor.

  14. Data acquisition system for the Baikal-GVD neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrorin, A. V.; Avrorin, A. D.; Aynutdinov, V. M.; Bannasch, R.; Belolaptikov, I. A.; Bogorodsky, D. Yu.; Brudanin, V. B.; Budnev, N. M.; Danilchenko, I. A.; Dzhilkibaev, Zh.-A. M.; Domogatsky, G. V.; Doroshenko, A. A.; Dyachok, A. N.; Fialkovsky, S. V.; Gafarov, A. R.; Gaponenko, O. N.; Golubkov, K. V.; Gress, T. I.; Hons, Z.; Kebkal, K. G.; Kebkal, O. G.; Konischev, K. V.; Korobchenko, A. V.; Koshechkin, A. P.; Koshel, F. K.; Kozhin, V. A.; Kulepov, V. F.; Kuleshov, D. A.; Lyashuk, V. I.; Milenin, M. B.; Mirgazov, R. R.; Osipova, E. A.; Panfilov, A. I.; Pan'kov, L. V.; Pliskovsky, E. N.; Rozanov, M. I.; Ryabov, E. V.; Shaibonov, B. A.; Sheifler, A. A.; Skurikhin, A. V.; Smagina, A. A.; Suvorova, O. V.; Tabolenko, V. A.; Tarashchansky, B. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Zagorodnikov, A. V.; Zhukov, V. A.; Zurbanov, V. L.

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the Baikal-GVD project is the construction of a km3-scale neutrino telescope in Lake Baikal. The Gigaton Volume Detector consists of a large three-dimensional array of photo-multiplier tubes. The first GVD-cluster has been deployed and commissioned in April 2015. The data acquisition system (DAQ) of the detector takes care of the digitization of the photo-multiplier tube signals, data transmission, filtering and storage. The design and the implementation of the data acquisition system are described.

  15. [The molecular genetic typification of planarians in the genus Bdellocephala (Dendrocoelidae, Tricladida, Turbellaria) from Lake Baikal with an assessment of their species diversity].

    PubMed

    Kuznedelov, K D; Novikova, O A; Naumova, T V

    2000-01-01

    Baikal planaria from genus Bdellocephala were typified using rDNA locus coding 5'--end domain of 18S ribosome RNA. Five colour forms of 24 possible variants that differ in diapason 0-1.3% of genotype were determined by comparative analysis of nucleotide sequences. The authors use back colour--one of the most variable and typical character in the given group--to collect material for investigation. It allows to minimize the size of investigation sample and at the same time to cover maximum variability of Bdellocephala. One of the positive result of molecular typification of colour forms was a discovery of unique individuals that belong to new species. Karyological analysis of colour forms shows variations in chromosome numbers that divide planaria into 3 groups (2n = 20, 24, 26). Comparative analysis of morphological and ecological characters and karyotypes of some forms united by the same genotype allows to distinguish them as separate species. Criteria of modern phenetic system of Baikal planaria are discussed.

  16. LED based calibration systems of the Baikal-GVD neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrorin, A. D.; Avrorin, A. V.; Aynutdinov, V. M.; Bannash, R.; Belolaptikov, I. A.; Bogorodsky, D. Yu.; Brudanin, V. B.; Budnev, N. M.; Danilchenko, I. A.; Domogatsky, G. V.; Doroshenko, A. A.; Dyachok, A. N.; Dzhilkibaev, Zh.-A. M.; Fialkovsky, S. V.; Gafarov, A. R.; Gaponenko, O. N.; Golubkov, K. V.; Gress, T. I.; Honz, Z.; Kebkal, K. G.; Kebkal, O. G.; Konischev, K. V.; Korobchenko, A. V.; Koshechkin, A. P.; Koshel, F. K.; Kozhin, A. V.; Kulepov, V. F.; Kuleshov, D. A.; Ljashuk, V. I.; Milenin, M. B.; Mirgazov, R. A.; Osipova, E. R.; Panfilov, A. I.; Pan'kov, L. V.; Pliskovsky, E. N.; Rozanov, M. I.; Rjabov, E. V.; Shaybonov, B. A.; Sheifler, A. A.; Shelepov, M. D.; Skurihin, A. V.; Smagina, A. A.; Suvorova, O. V.; Tabolenko, V. A.; Tarashansky, B. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Zagorodnikov, A. V.; Zhukov, V. A.; Zurbanov, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    Baikal-GVD is a cubic-kilometer scale neutrino telescope, which is currently under construction in Lake Baikal. GVD will consist of an array of optical modules arranged in clusters of strings. The first GVD-cluster has been deployed and put in operation in April 2015. We describe equipment and methods for the calibration of the first GVD-cluster and discuss the accuracy of the calibration procedures.

  17. Timing of Early Proterozoic collisional and extensional events in the granulite-gneiss-charnockite-granite complex, Lake Baikal, USSR: A U-Pb, Rb-Sr, and Sm-Nd isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aftalion, M. ); Bibikova, E.V. ); Bowes, D.R. ); Hopwood, A.M. ); Perchuk, L.L. )

    1991-11-01

    In the Sharyzhalgay Complex of the Lake Baikal region in eastern Siberia Early Proterozoic collisional and extensional events were separated by ca. 100 m.yr. The earlier collisional event, associated with the development of granulites and gneisses as the result of high-grade dynamothermal metamorphism, took place close to 1965 {plus minus} 4 Ma. A {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb vs. {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb isochron for zircon from five size fractions and a six point Rb-Sr whole-rock errorchron give generally corresponding ages of 1956 {plus minus} 8 and 1963 {plus minus} 163 Ma, respectively. The later extensional event, associated with charnockitization due to the uprise of fluids and heat in a regime corresponding to the middle to upper crustal levels of a Basin and Range-type province, was initiated in the 1880-1860 Ma period. The event was continued with magmatic emplacement of granitic masses into the deep levels of caldera-like structures, possibly during the upper time range of lower concordia intercept ages of 1817 +30/{minus}32 and 1797 +40/{minus}44 Ma for two distinctly different zircon populations in a pyroxene-bearing granodiorite interpreted as an evolved (and contaminated) product of the mantle-derived magma that was the source of CO{sub 2} involved in the charnockitization. Upper intercept ages of 2784 +48/{minus}45 and 2775 +61/{minus}55 Ma indicate late Archean crust at depth as the source region of the incorporated zircon. T{sub DM} ages from Sm-Nd isotopic data show that the protolith of the lithologically layered supracrustal assemblage, subsequently polyphase deformed and polymetamorphosed in Early Proterozoic times, was also formed in Early Proterozoic (not Archean) times.

  18. Hydrocarbon gases in Baikal bottom sediments: preliminary results of the Second international Class@Baikal cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidischeva, Olesya; Akhmanov, Grigorii; Khlystov, Oleg; Giliazetdinova, Dina

    2016-04-01

    In July 2015 the research cruise in the waters of Lake Baikal was carried out onboard RV "G.Yu. Vereshchagin". The expedition was organized by Lomonosov Moscow State University and Limnological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences. The main purpose of the expedition was to study the modern sedimentation and natural geological processes on the bottom of Lake Baikal. One of the tasks of the cruise was to conduct gas-geochemical survey of bottom sediments. The samples of hydrocarbon gases were collected during the cruise. Subsequent study of the composition and origin of the sampled gas was carried out in the laboratories of Moscow State University. 708 samples from 61 bottom sampling stations were studied. Analyzed samples are from seven different areas located in the southern and central depressions of the lake: (1) "Goloustnoe" seepage area; (2) Bolshoy mud volcano; (3) Elovskiy Area; (4) "Krasny Yar" Seep; (5) "St. Petersburg" Seep; (6) Khuray deep-water depositional system; and (7) Kukuy Griva (Ridge) area. The results of molecular composition analysis indicate that hydrocarbon gases in bottom sediments from almost all sampling stations are represented mostly by pure methane. Ethane was detected only in some places within "Krasny Yar", "Goloustnoe" and "St. Petersburg" seepage areas. The highest concentrations of methane were registered in the sediments from the "Krasny Yar" area - 14 457 μl/l (station TTR-BL15-146G) - and from the "St. Petersburg" area - 13 684 μl/l (station TTR-BL15-125G). The sediments with high concentrations of gases were sampled from active fluid discharge areas, which also can be well distinguished on the seismic profiles. Gas hydrates were obtained in the areas of "Krasny Yar", "Goloustnoe", and "St. Petersburg" seeps and in the area of the Bolshoy mud volcano. Isotopic composition δ13C(CH4) was studied for 100 samples of hydrocarbon gases collected in areas with high methane concentration in bottom sediments. The average value is

  19. Overview of geology and tectonic evolution of the Baikal-Tuva area.

    PubMed

    Gladkochub, Dmitry; Donskaya, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides the results of geological investigations of the main tectonic units of the Baikal-Tuva region (southwestern part of Siberia) during the last decades: the ancient Siberian craton and adjacent areas of the Central Asian Orogenic belt. In the framework of these main units we describe small-scale blocks (terranes) with focus on details of their inner structure and evolution through time. As well as describing the geology and tectonics of the area studied, we give an overview of underwater sediments, neotectonics, and some phenomena of history and development of the Baikal, Khubsugul, Chargytai, and Tore-Chol Lakes basins of the Baikal-Tuva region. It is suggested that these lakes' evolution was controlled by neotectonic processes, modern seismic activity, and global climate changes.

  20. Evidence for a seismogenic upper mantle and lower crust in the Baikal rift

    SciTech Connect

    Deverchere, J.; Houdry, F. ); Diament, M. ); Solonenko, N.V.; Solonenko, A.V. )

    1991-06-01

    The high level seismicity of the Baikal rift zone and its spatial distribution in dense swarms and belts provide an opportunity to study the seismogenic behavior of a continental lithosphere submitted to extension in an early stage. Using data from a regional seismological network, the authors analyze a significantly large set of events from an earthquake swarm located east of the nearly aseismic northern Baikal lake. They find that at least 10% of the well-constrained events are located in the lower crust or the uppermost mantle. The fault plane solutions of earthquakes within the crust define a NW-SE extensional stress regime perpendicular to the rift axis. Results confirm the idea that zones of continental extension may exhibit significant rigidity. The authors propose to infer a migration of deformation from the northern Baikal lake to an initially stronger part of the lithosphere, i.e. the Barguzin rift and its extension to the east.

  1. P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath the Baikal Rift Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, R. A.; Nyblade, A. A.; Boman, E. C.

    2001-12-01

    Over 100 p wave travel times from the 1500 km en echelon Baikal Rift system are used in this study.The events range 3 to 13 degrees from Talaya, Russia (TLY) along the axis of southwest northeast trending rift in East Siberia. A Herglotz Wiechert inversion of these events resolved a crust of 6.4 km/s and a gradient in the mantle starting at 35 km depth and 7.7 km/s down to 200 km depth and 8.2 km/s. This is compatible with Gao et al,1994 cross sectional structure which cuts the rift at about 400km from TLY. The Baikal Rift hosts the deepest lake and is the most seismically active rift in the world. It is one of the few continental rifts, it separates the Siberian craton and the Syan-Baikal mobile fold belt. Two events, the March 21 1999 magnitude 5.7 earthquake 638 km from TLY and the November 13th 1995 magnitude 5.9 earthquake 863 km from TLY were modeled for there PnL wave structure using the discrete wavenumber method and the Harvard CMT solutions with adjusted depths from p-pP times. The PnL signals match well. A genetic algorithm will used to perturb the velocity structure and compare to a selection of the events between 3 and 13 degrees many will require moment tensor solutions.

  2. Sequentially sampled gas hydrate water, coupled with pore water and bottom water isotopic and ionic signatures at the Kukuy mud volcano, Lake Baikal: ambiguous deep-rooted source of hydrate-forming water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Hirotsugu; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Soramoto, Yusuke; Kotake, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Shoji, Hitoshi; Pogodaeva, Tatyana; Khlystov, Oleg; Khabuev, Andrey; Naudts, Lieven; De Batist, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic and ionic composition of pure gas hydrate (GH) water was examined for GHs recovered in three gravity cores (165-193 cm length) from the Kukuy K-9 mud volcano (MV) in Lake Baikal. A massive GH sample from core St6GC4 (143-165 cm core depth interval) was dissociated progressively over 6 h in a closed glass chamber, and 11 sequentially collected fractions of dissociated GH water analyzed. Their hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions, and the concentrations of Cl- and HCO3 - remained essentially constant over time, except that the fraction collected during the first 50 minutes deviated partly from this pattern. Fraction #1 had a substantially higher Cl- concentration, similar to that of pore water sampled immediately above (135-142 cm core depth) the main GH-bearing interval in that core. Like the subsequent fractions, however, the HCO3 - concentration was markedly lower than that of pore water. For the GH water fractions #2 to #11, an essentially constant HCO3 -/Cl- ratio of 305 differed markedly from downcore pore water HCO3 -/Cl- ratios of 63-99. Evidently, contamination of the extracted GH water by ambient pore water probably adhered to the massive GH sample was satisfactorily restricted to the initial phase of GH dissociation. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of hydrate-forming water was estimated using the measured isotopic composition of extracted GH water combined with known isotopic fractionation factors between GH and GH-forming water. Estimated δD of -126 to -133‰ and δ18O of -15.7 to -16.7‰ differed partly from the corresponding signatures of ambient pore water (δD of -123‰, δ18O of -15.6‰) and of lake bottom water (δD of -121‰, δ18O of -15.8‰) at the St6GC4 coring site, suggesting that the GH was not formed from those waters. Observations of breccias in that core point to a possible deep-rooted water source, consistent with published thermal measurements for the neighboring Kukuy K-2 MV. By contrast, the pore

  3. Comparative sequence stratigraphy of low-latitude versus high-latitude lacustrine rift basins: Seismic data examples from the East African and Baikal rifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholz, C.A.; Moore, T.C.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Golmshtok, A. Ja; Klitgord, Kim D.; Kurotchkin, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    Lakes Baikal, Malawi and Tanganyika are the world's three largest rift valley lakes and are the classic modem examples of lacustrine rift basins. All the rift lakes are segmented into half-graben basins, and seismic reflection datasets reveal how this segmentation controls the filling of the rift basins through time. In the early stages of rifting, basins are fed primarily by flexural margin and axial margin drainage systems. At the climax of syn-rift sedimentation, however, when the basins are deeply subsided, almost all the margins are walled off by rift shoulder uplifts, and sediment flux into the basins is concentrated at accommodation zone and axial margin river deltas. Flexural margin unconformities are commonplace in the tropical lakes but less so in high-latitude Lake Baikal. Lake levels are extremely dynamic in the tropical lakes and in low-latitude systems in general because of the predominance of evaporation in the hydrologic cycle in those systems. Evaporation is minimized in relation to inflow in the high-latitude Lake Baikal and in most high-latitude systems, and consequently, major sequence boundaries tend to be tectonically controlled in that type of system. The acoustic stratigraphies of the tropical lakes are dominated by high-frequency and high-amplitude lake level shifts, whereas in high-latitude Lake Baikal, stratigraphic cycles are dominated by tectonism and sediment-supply variations.

  4. Crustal extension in the Baikal rift zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zorin, Yu; Cordell, L.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the gravity field along four profiles crossing the Baikal rift zone permits an estimate of the amount of anomalous mass produced by 1. (1) graben-fill sediments, 2. (2) Moho uplift and intrusion of mantle sills and dikes, 3. (3) an asthenospheric bulge. Crustal extension is evaluated based on the idea of mass and volume balance of material introduced into and removed from the initial volume of the crust. Extension in the Baikal rift increases southwestward from 0.9 km in the Chara depression to 19.3 km in the South Baikal depression. These values generally agree with the position of the Euler pole determined from seismic data (fault plane solutions). Average rotation velocity for the lithospheric plates separated by the rift zone is estimated to be 5.93 ?? 10-4 rad/m.y. over about 30 m.y. ?? 1991.

  5. Morphotectonics of the Tunka rift and its bordering mountains in the Baikal rift system, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchetnikov, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    The Tunka section of the Baikal rift system presents a uniform alternation of the following neostructural forms: tilted horsts and asymmetrical block uplifts on the northern flank; the central system of the rift valleys; and the arched uplift of the southern flank. This is a standard set of morphostructural elements for the Baikal rift system. The main morphological feature of the Tunka rift is the strong inclination of its floor, ranging from 900 m to 200 km in general elevation above Lake Baikal. Such traits of recent geodynamics as volcanism, thermal activity, and seismicity are also different from other parts of the rift zone. All of these features of the Tunka rift are related to the deep structure of the rift zone. The peculiarities of the neotectonic structure of the Tunka rift, which are clearly expressed morphologically as is typical of the Baikal rift system, as well as its unique features are in accordance with deep geodynamic processes of the region. On the other hand, the development of the rift basin structures of the southwestern area near Baikal is complicated by inversion deformations. Local uplifts followed by deformations of the basin sedimentary cover and inverted morphostructures expressed in relief are fixed against the background of the general subsidence of blocks of the pre-Cenozoic basement grabens. The Tunka rift has repeatedly experienced inversion deformations throughout its history. The last wave of such deformations involved the southwestern region near Baikal in the second half of the late Pleistocene. During the Quaternary, the positive component prevailed in the whole range of vertical movements of the inter-rift and interbasin blocks; since the late Neogene, these structures have experienced a slow but steady uplift, accompanied by their extension at the expense of the bordering basins. The remote influence of the India-Asia collision on the formation of the southwestern section of the Baikal rift system is very significant and

  6. THE ORIGIN OF THE BAIKAL DEPRESSION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Baikal is deep, long, and comparatively narrow. A characteristic morphological trait of the Baikal depressions is its transverse asymmetry, an...the great Obruchev Fault in the earth’s crust, the vertical throw of which is as much as 2.5 km. The opposite, southeast flank of the depression is a...development of the Baikalian structure --- that is, the depression and its rim-mountains --- is still going on, at a rate that is not only not slackening but is even speeding up. (Author)

  7. Upper mantle P velocity structure beneath the Baikal Rift from modeling regional seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Richard A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2003-02-01

    Uppermost mantle P wave velocity structure beneath the Baikal rift and southern margin of the Siberian Platform has been investigated by using a grid search method to model Pnl waveforms from two moderate earthquakes recorded by station TLY at the southwestern end of Lake Baikal. The results yielded a limited number of successful models which indicate the presence of upper mantle P wave velocities beneath the rift axis and the margin of the platform that are 2-5% lower than expected. The magnitude of the velocity anomalies and their location support the presence of a thermal anomaly that extends laterally beyond the rift proper, possibly created by small-scale convection or a plume-like, thermal upwelling.

  8. Long-term cultivation of primmorphs from freshwater Baikal sponges Lubomirskia baikalensis.

    PubMed

    Chernogor, Lubov I; Denikina, Natalia N; Belikov, Sergey I; Ereskovsky, Alexander V

    2011-08-01

    The work was aimed at performing long-term cultivation of primmorphs in vitro from freshwater sponge Lubomirskia baikalensis (Pallas 1776), collected from Lake Baikal, obtaining its long-term primmorph culture in both natural (NBW) and artificial (ABW) Baikal water and at identifying the impact of different environmental factors on formation and growth of primmorphs. The first fine aggregates of L. baikalensis are formed in vitro 10-15 min after dissociation of sponge cells. Epithelization of aggregates begins 4 h later after the dissociation. Young primmorphs are formed 1 or 2 days later. The surface of primmorphs is covered with a layer of exopinacocytes. The primmorphs remain viable for more than 10 months at 3-6 °C. Over 50% of primmorphs in NBW and 25% in ABW are attached to the substrate and grow like adult sponges. Thus, the long-term primmorph cultivation in vitro allows the creation of a controlled live model system under experimental conditions. The results of this work will allow the creation of a cell culture collection of Baikal freshwater sponges for studying morphogenesis of primmorphs during cultivation at different stages and transdifferentiation of their cells, physiological functions of sponge cells, processes of spiculogenesis, identification of proteins involved in biomineralization process, decoding of their genes, as well as a spectrum of secondary metabolites.

  9. Velocity structure around the Baikal rift zone from teleseismic and local earthquake traveltimes and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Carole; Koulakov, Ivan; Deverchère, Jacques

    1998-10-01

    We present new results on the velocity structure of the Baikal rift zone, Asia, deduced from a comparative teleseismic and local tomography analysis. The aim of this paper is to better identify the role of deep mantle processes versus that of far-field tectonic effects on the occurrence of extensional tectonics within a continental plate. We use 36000 traveltimes of P-refracted waves from the ISC catalogues and Pg and Pn traveltimes of 578 earthquakes recorded by the Russian regional network to determine a velocity model by the use of local and teleseismic inversion procedures. The models show that some velocity patterns are continuous from the surface down to at least 400 km. Among them, a narrow negative anomaly goes through Mongolia and follows the southern and eastern margins of the Siberian craton: this structure is interpreted as a thin mantle plume rising beneath the rift axis. However, our results do not evidence any wide asthenospheric upwarp at this place. Other velocity anomalies observed near the surface are not deeply rooted. In particular, a negative anomaly is observed at shallow levels (48 km) beneath the northern third of Lake Baikal, which is disconnected from deeper structures. It may be explained by the existence of underplated magmatic material at the bottom of the crust. By comparing the geometry of deep-rooted anomalies to the present-day stress field patterns, we conclude that the sub-lithospheric mantle dynamics is not the main factor controlling extensional processes in the Baikal rift. However, it does contribute to a thermal weakening of the lithosphere along a mechanical discontinuity bounding the Siberian shield. We finally conclude that three favourable conditions are gathered in the Baikal area to generate extension: far-field extensional stress field, mechanical inherited lithospheric weakness and heat supply. Further studies should help to precise the genetic link between these three factors.

  10. [Differential expression of DTSsa4 Tc1-like transposons in closely related populations of Baikal ciscoes].

    PubMed

    Bychenko, O S; Sukhanova, L V; Azhikina, T L; Sverdlov, E D

    2009-01-01

    Two representatives of Baikal ciscoes - lake cisco and omul - diverged from a common ancestor as recently as 10-20 thousand years ago. We have found an increasing expression level of DTSsa4 Tc1-like DNA transposons in cisco and omul brains. The mapping of the sequences of these transposons from Salmo salar and Danio rerio genomes has shown that in some cases, these transposons are located in the 5' and 3' regions, as well as in the promoter regions of various genes. Probably, Tc1-like transposons affect the activity of neighboring genes, providing the adaptive divergence of the cisco population.

  11. Actinobacteria possessing antimicrobial and antioxidant activities isolated from the pollen of scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) grown on the Baikal shore.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Voytsekhovskaya, Irina V; Rebets, Yuriy V; Tokovenko, Bogdan T; Penzina, Tatyana A; Gornostay, Tatyana G; Adelshin, Renat V; Protasov, Eugenii S; Luzhetskyy, Andriy N; Timofeyev, Maxim A

    2016-10-01

    Isolated ecosystems existing under specific environmental conditions have been shown to be promising sources of new strains of actinobacteria. The taiga forest of Baikal Siberia has not been well studied, and its actinobacterial population remains uncharacterized. The proximity between the huge water mass of Lake Baikal and high mountain ranges influences the structure and diversity of the plant world in Siberia. Here, we report the isolation of eighteen actinobacterial strains from male cones of Scots pine trees (Pinus sylvestris) growing on the shore of the ancient Lake Baikal in Siberia. In addition to more common representative strains of Streptomyces, several species belonging to the genera Rhodococcus, Amycolatopsis, and Micromonospora were isolated. All isolated strains exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. We identified several strains that inhibited the growth of the pathogen Candida albicans but did not hinder the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several isolates were active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The high proportion of biologically active strains producing antibacterial and specific antifungal compounds may reflect their role in protecting pollen against phytopathogens.

  12. The formation of Proval Bay as an episode in the development of the Baikal rift basin: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchetnikov, A. A.; Radziminovich, Ya. B.; Vologina, E. G.; Ufimtsev, G. F.

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides a cumulative review of important specific features in the formation and development of Proval Bay (Lake Baikal) as a large seismic dislocation element. This bay appeared during one of the largest historical earthquakes in Siberia (MLH 7.5) on January 12, 1862. As a result, more than 230 km2 of the shore was submerged. The paper considers the formation of Proval Bay in the context of analysis conducted on general morphological characteristics of the Baikal rift and in terms of the occurrence of the main elements in the mechanism of its neotectonic development. It is precisely these seismotectonic phenomena, associated with the subsidence of large tectonic blocks, which primarily cause the growth of Lake Baikal basin. In spite of the fact that the northwestern side of the rift has a more pronounced morphological structure, whose general elements are high and steep monolithic tectonic escarpments, major lithospheric extension and its associated extension of the rift, thinning and rearrangement of blocks in the upper lithosphere slab occur on the more gently sloping eastern side.

  13. Class@Baikal: the Endurance of the UNESCO Training-Through-Research Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, A.; Akhmanov, G.; Khlystov, O.; Tokarev, M.; Korost, D. V.; Poort, J.; Fokina, A.; Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Yurchenko, A.; Vodopyanov, S.

    2014-12-01

    In July 2014, by the initiative of the Moscow State University and Limnological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, the first Training-through-Research Class@Baikal was launched in Lake Baikal, Russia. The cruise program focused on seafloor sampling and acoustic investigations of gas seeps, flares, mud volcanoes, slumps and debris flows, canyons and channels in the coastal proximity. A comprehensive multidisciplinary program to train students has been developed to cover sedimentology, fluid geochemistry, biology, geophysics and marine geology in general. Daily lectures were conducted on board by academics presenting pertinent research projects, and cruise planning and preliminary results were discussed with all the scientific crew. A daily blog with updates on the expedition activities, images, and ongoing cruise results, was also completed (i.e. visit the cruise blog: http://baikal.festivalnauki.ru/) and gave the opportunity to interact with experts as well as attract the interest also of a broader audience. This project is a follow up to the well-established UNESCO Training-through-Research (TTR) Floating University Programme (http://floatinguniversity.ru/) that covered large areas on the European and arctic margins since 1991 with 18 research cruises attended by about 1000 BSc, MSc and PhD students from Europe, Asia, Africa and America. The crucial goal of both programmes is the training of new generations of scientists through active research directly on the field. Students can access the collected data and samples for their Master and PhD projects. Typically an extensive set of analyses and data processing is completed in-house and the results and interpretations are presented at post cruise meetings and international conferences. The Baikal lake is 25 million years old rift zone and provides a large variety of active geological features that can be easily reached at daily sailing distance. This represents an extraordinary opportunity to switch and focus

  14. Variations of the Hydrothermal Characteristics over the Baikal Natural Territory on the Background of Global Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgina, T. M.; Voropai, N. N.; Maksyutova, E.

    2014-12-01

    In recent decades studying of climate changes on the globe became one of the most important researches. From this point of view, Siberia is particular climatically interest region in Eurasia because of its complicated bioclimatic structure. Climatic changed observed over the region substantially contributes into global climate processes. In particular, temperature trends in the second half of the 20th century were quite high (>0.2 oC/10 yr). The aim of the present work is to estimate intensity of hydrothermal characteristics changes for 1961-2008 over the Baikal Natural Territory on the background of global climate change. Most of the area is characterized by extreme continental climate while the climate of the Baikal coast is close to the seaside. Winter temperature at the shores of Lake Baikal is 5oC higher than at the central areas, but summer air temperature is lower. The annual average temperature is negative almost at the whole area. Annual trends of air temperature are positive and ranged from 0.24 to 0,52 °C per 10 yrs. Trends for individual months are also positive. They vary from 0.33 (September) to 0.99 °C per 10 years (February). Precipitations over the territory are distributed irregularly. A highest precipitation observes within the Khamar-Daban ridge and on the windward slopes of the ridges bordering the Baikal Lake (up to 1400 mm), at the hinterland highlands (400-700 mm), and in the central part of the Transbaikal steppe (200-250 mm). Minimal amount of precipitation observes in winter, the highest in July and August. Precipitation trends are not statistically significant. The most important extreme hydrothermal phenomena occurring at the study area are droughts. Months and years were revealed when more than 60% of the territory was occupied by the drought. The highest frequency of these events was registered in the period of 1990-2008. Increased droughts intensity observed at coastal stations of the Baikal Lake in May-June, Predbajkale - in July

  15. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  16. Differences in Brain Transcriptomes of Closely Related Baikal Coregonid Species

    PubMed Central

    Bychenko, Oksana S.; Sukhanova, Lyubov V.; Azhikina, Tatyana L.; Skvortsov, Timofey A.; Belomestnykh, Tuyana V.; Sverdlov, Eugene D.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to get deeper insight into genetic factors involved in the adaptive divergence of closely related species, specifically two representatives of Baikal coregonids—Baikal whitefish (Coregonus baicalensis Dybowski) and Baikal omul (Coregonus migratorius Georgi)—that diverged from a common ancestor as recently as 10–20 thousand years ago. Using the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression method, we obtained libraries of short representative cDNA sequences (tags) from the brains of Baikal whitefish and omul. A comparative analysis of the libraries revealed quantitative differences among ~4% tags of the fishes under study. Based on the similarity of these tags with cDNA of known organisms, we identified candidate genes taking part in adaptive divergence. The most important candidate genes related to the adaptation of Baikal whitefish and Baikal omul, identified in this work, belong to the genes of cell metabolism, nervous and immune systems, protein synthesis, and regulatory genes as well as to DTSsa4 Tc1-like transposons which are widespread among fishes. PMID:24719892

  17. Speciation in ancient lakes.

    PubMed

    Martens, K

    1997-05-01

    About a dozen lakes in the world are up to three orders of magnitude older than most others. Lakes Tanganyika (East Africa) and Baikal (Siberia) have probably existed in some form for 12-20 million years, maybe more. Such lakes can have different origins, sizes, shapes, depths and limnologies, but, in contrast to short-lived (mostly post-glacial) lakes, they have exceptionally high faunal diversity and levels of endemicity. A multitude of and processes accounting for these explosive radiations have recently been documented, most of them based on particular groups in certain lakes, but comparative research can detect repeated patterns. No special speciafion mechanism, exclusive to ancient lakes has been demonstrated, although cases of ultra-rapid speciation have been documented. Extant diversity results not by simple accumulation, but by a complex process of immigration, speciation and extinction.

  18. Tomography-based mantle flow beneath Mongolia-Baikal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tao

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in seismic tomography of Asia allows us to explore and understand more clearly the mantle flow below the Mongolia-Baikal area. We present a tomography-based model of mantle convection that provides a good match to the residual topography. The model provides predictions on the present-day mantle flow and flow-induced asthenospheric deformation which give us new insights on the mantle dynamics in the Mongolia-Baikal area. The predicted mantle flow takes on a very similar pattern at the depths shallower or deeper than 400 km and almost opposite flow directions between the upper (shallower than 400 km) and lower (deeper than 400 km) parts. The flow pattern could be divided into the 'simple' eastern region and the 'complex' western region in the Mongolia. The upwelling originating from about 350 km depth beneath Baikal rift zone is an important possible drive force to the rifting. The seismic anisotropy cannot be simply related with asthenospheric flow and flow-induced deformation in the entire Mongolia-Baikal area, but they could be considered as an important contributor to the seismic anisotropy in the eastern region of Mongolia and around and in Sayan-Baikal orogenic belt.

  19. Implications of new gravity data for Baikal Rift zone structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppel, C.; Kogan, M. G.; Mcnutt, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    Newly available, 2D Bouguer gravity anomaly data from the Baikal Rift zone, Siberia, indicate that this discrete, intracontinental rift system is regionally compensated by an elastic plate about 50 km thick. However, spectral and spatial domain analyses and isostatic anomaly calculations show that simple elastic plate theory does not offer an adequate explanation for compensation in the rift zone, probably because of significant lateral variations in plate strength and the presence of subsurface loads. Our results and other geophysical observations support the interpretation that the Baikal Rift zone is colder than either the East African or Rio Grande rift.

  20. Implications of new gravity data for Baikal Rift zone structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppel, C.; Kogan, M. G.; Mcnutt, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    Newly available, 2D Bouguer gravity anomaly data from the Baikal Rift zone, Siberia, indicate that this discrete, intracontinental rift system is regionally compensated by an elastic plate about 50 km thick. However, spectral and spatial domain analyses and isostatic anomaly calculations show that simple elastic plate theory does not offer an adequate explanation for compensation in the rift zone, probably because of significant lateral variations in plate strength and the presence of subsurface loads. Our results and other geophysical observations support the interpretation that the Baikal Rift zone is colder than either the East African or Rio Grande rift.

  1. Geodynamics of the Baikal-Stanovoy seismic belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1983-01-01

    The convection generated tensional stress field in the earth, as inferred from satellite gravity data, reveals an anomalous lens of upwelling mantle rocks under the Baikal rift zone. The point of no strain at 56 deg N 116 deg E forms a seismic gap along the Baikal-Stanovoy seismic belt. East of this point, the stress field changes from extension to compression. Therefore, the position of no strain at the eastern termination of the rift accounts for the dying-out of the rift zone and for the appearance of a compressive structure in the Stanovoy Range.

  2. Diversity of the major capsid genes (g23) of T4-like bacteriophages in the eutrophic Lake Kotokel in East Siberia, Russia.

    PubMed

    Butina, Tatyana V; Belykh, Olga I; Potapov, Sergey A; Sorokovikova, Ekaterina G

    2013-07-01

    Numerous studies revealed high diversity of T4-like bacteriophages in various environments, but so far, little is known about T4-like virus diversity in freshwater bodies, particularly in eutrophic lakes. The present study was aimed at elucidating molecular diversity of T4-like bacteriophages in eutrophic Lake Kotokel located near Lake Baikal by partial sequencing of the major capsid genes (g23) of T4-like bacteriophages. The majority of g23 fragments from Lake Kotokel were most similar to those from freshwater lakes and paddy fields. Despite the proximity and direct water connection between Lake Kotokel and Lake Baikal, g23 sequence assemblages from two lakes were different. UniFrac analysis showed that uncultured T4-like viruses from Lake Kotokel tended to cluster with those from the distant lake of the same trophic status. This fact suggested that the trophic conditions affected the formation of viral populations, particularly of T4-like viruses, in freshwater environments.

  3. Elemental composition of peat organic matter as an indicator of trophic conditions of marsh ecosystems in the south of the Baikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasova, E. N.; Bezrukova, E. V.; Mamontova, E. A.; Mamontov, A. A.; Kuzmin, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    Based on measurements of the concentrations of C, N, P, and chlorophyll- a, as well as on palynological analysis of the core Vdr 2011 of peaty sediments from the Vydrinaya River along the southern coast of Lake Baikal, the geochemical characteristics of eutrophy were compared to pollen indices of changes in the environment and the mode of marsh ecosystem transformations into various trophic states was specified. It was shown that geochemical parameters of the changes in the environment may be considered as the characteristics of trophic conditions in ecosystems in the course of paleo-reconstructions.

  4. Sedimentary Simulation for the Late Quaternary Sediments of Lake Hovsgol in Northern Mongolia: Reconstruction of Sedimentary Processes, Lake-Level Fluctuations, and Burial History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, D.; Cha, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Hovsgol is a tectonic lake in Baikal Rift System, located in northern Mongolia and 200 km away from southwestern Lake Baikal. In this study, SEDPAK computer simulation program is used to reconstruct the sedimentary process, lake-level and burial history. A khub012 line across the south central part in Lake Hovsgol and KDP-01, HDP-04 and HDP-06 core data drilled in nearby sites have been used for simulation modeling. Sedimentary sequences in the seismic section are divided into six sedimentary units. Input parameters of sediment supply, subsidence rate, and lake-level change for the sedimentary simulation are estimated for each sedimentary unit. As a result of sedimentary simulation, the various sedimentary processes, lake-level change, burial history, which were seriously affected from initial basin surfaces, are reconstructed for each sedimentary unit. They are main components of paleoenvironmental settings. The results are correlated with eustatic sea-level change, marine oxygen isotope record, and diatom content in Lake Baikal sediments, and they match well each other. It reflects the Hovsgol Lake sediments archive well the record of global climate change.

  5. A search for neutrino signal from dark matter annihilation in the center of the Milky Way with Baikal NT200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrorin, A. D.; Avrorin, A. V.; Aynutdinov, V. M.; Bannasch, R.; Belolaptikov, I. A.; Bogorodsky, D. Yu.; Brudanin, V. B.; Budnev, N. M.; Danilchenko, I. A.; Demidov, S. V.; Domogatsky, G. V.; Doroshenko, A. A.; Dyachok, A. N.; Dzhilkibaev, Zh.-A. M.; Fialkovsky, S. V.; Gafarov, A. R.; Gaponenko, O. N.; Golubkov, K. V.; Gress, T. I.; Honz, Z.; Kebkal, K. G.; Kebkal, O. G.; Konischev, K. V.; Korobchenko, A. V.; Koshechkin, A. P.; Koshel, F. K.; Kozhin, A. V.; Kulepov, V. F.; Kuleshov, D. A.; Ljashuk, V. I.; Milenin, M. B.; Mirgazov, R. A.; Osipova, E. R.; Panfilov, A. I.; Pan'kov, L. V.; Pliskovsky, E. N.; Rozanov, M. I.; Rjabov, E. V.; Shaybonov, B. A.; Sheifler, A. A.; Shelepov, M. D.; Skurihin, A. V.; Smagina, A. A.; Suvorova, O. V.; Tabolenko, V. A.; Tarashansky, B. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Zagorodnikov, A. V.; Zhukov, V. A.; Zurbanov, V. L.

    2016-08-01

    We reanalyze the dataset collected during the years 1998-2003 by the deep underwater neutrino telescope NT200 in the lake Baikal with the low energy threshold (10 GeV) in searches for neutrino signal from dark matter annihilations near the center of the Milky Way. Two different approaches are used in the present analysis: counting events in the cones around the direction towards the Galactic Center and the maximum likelihood method. We assume that the dark matter particles annihilate dominantly over one of the annihilation channels bbbar , W+W- , τ+τ- , μ+μ- or ννbar . No significant excess of events towards the Galactic Center over expected neutrino background of atmospheric origin is found and we derive 90% CL upper limits on the annihilation cross section of dark matter.

  6. Burying Dogs in Ancient Cis-Baikal, Siberia: Temporal Trends and Relationships with Human Diet and Subsistence Practices

    PubMed Central

    Losey, Robert J.; Garvie-Lok, Sandra; Leonard, Jennifer A.; Katzenberg, M. Anne; Germonpré, Mietje; Nomokonova, Tatiana; Sablin, Mikhail V.; Goriunova, Olga I.; Berdnikova, Natalia E.; Savel’ev, Nikolai A.

    2013-01-01

    The first objective of this study is to examine temporal patterns in ancient dog burials in the Lake Baikal region of Eastern Siberia. The second objective is to determine if the practice of dog burial here can be correlated with patterns in human subsistence practices, in particular a reliance on terrestrial mammals. Direct radiocarbon dating of a suite of the region’s dog remains indicates that these animals were given burial only during periods in which human burials were common. Dog burials of any kind were most common during the Early Neolithic (∼7–8000 B.P.), and rare during all other time periods. Further, only foraging groups seem to have buried canids in this region, as pastoralist habitation sites and cemeteries generally lack dog interments, with the exception of sacrificed animals. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data indicate that dogs were only buried where and when human diets were relatively rich in aquatic foods, which here most likely included river and lake fish and Baikal seal (Phoca sibirica). Generally, human and dog diets appear to have been similar across the study subregions, and this is important for interpreting their radiocarbon dates, and comparing them to those obtained on the region’s human remains, both of which likely carry a freshwater old carbon bias. Slight offsets were observed in the isotope values of dogs and humans in our samples, particularly where both have diets rich in aquatic fauna. This may result from dietary differences between people and their dogs, perhaps due to consuming fish of different sizes, or even different tissues from the same aquatic fauna. This paper also provides a first glimpse of the DNA of ancient canids in Northeast Asia. PMID:23696851

  7. Burying dogs in ancient Cis-Baikal, Siberia: temporal trends and relationships with human diet and subsistence practices.

    PubMed

    Losey, Robert J; Garvie-Lok, Sandra; Leonard, Jennifer A; Katzenberg, M Anne; Germonpré, Mietje; Nomokonova, Tatiana; Sablin, Mikhail V; Goriunova, Olga I; Berdnikova, Natalia E; Savel'ev, Nikolai A

    2013-01-01

    The first objective of this study is to examine temporal patterns in ancient dog burials in the Lake Baikal region of Eastern Siberia. The second objective is to determine if the practice of dog burial here can be correlated with patterns in human subsistence practices, in particular a reliance on terrestrial mammals. Direct radiocarbon dating of a suite of the region's dog remains indicates that these animals were given burial only during periods in which human burials were common. Dog burials of any kind were most common during the Early Neolithic (∼7-8000 B.P.), and rare during all other time periods. Further, only foraging groups seem to have buried canids in this region, as pastoralist habitation sites and cemeteries generally lack dog interments, with the exception of sacrificed animals. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data indicate that dogs were only buried where and when human diets were relatively rich in aquatic foods, which here most likely included river and lake fish and Baikal seal (Phoca sibirica). Generally, human and dog diets appear to have been similar across the study subregions, and this is important for interpreting their radiocarbon dates, and comparing them to those obtained on the region's human remains, both of which likely carry a freshwater old carbon bias. Slight offsets were observed in the isotope values of dogs and humans in our samples, particularly where both have diets rich in aquatic fauna. This may result from dietary differences between people and their dogs, perhaps due to consuming fish of different sizes, or even different tissues from the same aquatic fauna. This paper also provides a first glimpse of the DNA of ancient canids in Northeast Asia.

  8. Postcambrian stratified rocks of the northern part of the Baikal-Vitim fold area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldygerov, V. V.; Krainov, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    The Ordovician stratified rocks previously referred to Riphean or Vendian are widespread in the northern part of the Baikal-Vitim fold area. They include volcanosedimentary rocks which accumulated in continental riftlike troughs after Vendian-Cambrian platform regime and were accompanied by subvolcanic bodies. The coarse-clastic facies, frequently olistostromes with olistoplaques, are abundant in the marginal parts of the troughs. The sandy-silty-clay rocks dominate in the centre. The volcanic rocks represent the contrast rhyolite-basaltic series and compose paleovolcanoes of the central type, locally, complicated by calderas. Tuffaceous material is nearly almost present in synchronous sedimentary rocks. In the Ordovician, the northern part of the Baikal-Vitim fold area was an uplift of island arc type complicated by the riftlike troughs. It occupied the central part of the Baikal-Vitim arc. The location of the troughs was subjected to its structural plan. They were formed successively after the Riphean-Vendian Baikal-Muya volcano-plutonic belt. The uplift existed within a shallow basin occupying nearly the entire Siberian Platform and Baikal-Vitim fold area. The data obtained confirm that marine sedimentary basin with islands sometimes existed within the Baikal-Vitim fold area and was a part of the basin occupying the adjacent part of the Siberian Platform. The effect of pulsating plume in the northern part of the Baikal-Vitim fold area periodically, including Ordovician, led to the origination of the uplift and to renewal of tectonic and volcano-plutonic activity.

  9. Basaltic Martian analogues from the Baikal Rift Zone and Mongolian terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgurewicz, J.; Kostylew, J.

    2007-08-01

    In order to compare the results of studies of the western part of the Valles Marineris canyon on Mars there have been done field works on terrestrial surface areas similar with regard to geological setting and environmental conditions. One of the possible terrestrial analogues of the Valles Marineris canyon is the Baikal Rift Zone [1]. Field investigations have been done on the south end of the Baikal Lake, in the Khamar-Daban massif, where the outcrops of volcanic rocks occur. The second part of the field works has been done in the Mongolian terranes: Mandalovoo, Gobi Altay and Bayanhongor, because of environmental conditions being similar to those on Mars. The Mandalovoo terrane comprises a nearly continuous Paleozoic islandarc sequence [2]. In the Gobi Altay terrane an older sequence is capped by younger Devonian-Triassic volcanic-sedimentary deposits [2]. The Bayanhongor terrane forms a northwest-trending, discontinuous, narrow belt that consists of a large ophiolite allochton [3]. The collected samples of basalts derive from various geologic environments. The CORONA satellite-images have been used for the imaging of the Khamar-Daban massif and the Mandalovoo terrane. These images have the same spatial resolution and range as the Mars Orbiter Camera images of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. In the Mandalovoo terrane these images allowed to find an area with large amounts of tectonic structures, mainly faults (part of the Ongi massif), similar to the studied area on Mars. Microscopic observations in thin sections show diversification of composition and structures of basalts. These rocks have mostly a porphyric structure, rarely aphyric. The main components are plagioclases, pyroxenes and olivines phenocrysts, in different proportions. The groundmass usually consist of plagioclases, pyroxenes and opaques. The most diversified are basalts from the Mandalovoo terrane. Infrared spectroscopy has been used to analyse the composition of the rock material and compare

  10. Mantle Flow Across the Baikal Rift Constrained With Integrated Seismic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S.; Meier, T.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    ruled out. As shown for the model of subcontinental asthenospheric flow by Morgan and Morgan (2005), this mantle flow pattern can explain not only the rifting but also the basaltic volcanism observed in the Lake Baikal region.

  11. Chemical and isotope compositions of nitric thermal water of Baikal rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyusnin, A. M.; Chernyavsky, M. K.; Peryazeva, E. G.

    2010-05-01

    Three types of hydrotherms (nitric, carbonaceous and methane) are distinguished within the Baikal Rift Zone. The unloading sites of nitric therms are mostly located in the central and north-eastern parts of the Rift. Several chemical types are found among nitric therms (Pinneker, Pisarsky, Lomonosov, 1968; Lomonosov, 1974, etc.). The formation of terms being various in chemical compositions is associated with effect of several factors, i.e. various chemical, mineralogical compositions of rocks, various temperatures, extent of interaction in water-rock system, etc. The ratio data of water oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of the studied thermal springs indicate that water is largely of meteoric origin. All established ratios of oxygen (δ18OSMOW = -19.5‰ - -17.5‰) and hydrogen (δDSMOW = -155‰ - - 130‰) isotopes are along the line of meteoric waters. Oxygen values from -20‰ to -5‰ are characteristic of the current meteoric and surface waters in the region. The average value equals -16.5‰ in Lake Baikal. By our data, a large group with oxygen lighter isotope composition that corresponds to isotope ratio being specific for glaciers is revealed in fissure-vein waters. Significant shift toward the oxygen getting heavier is observed in some springs. It is mostly observed in the springs that form chemical composition within the area of the intrusive and metamorphic rock distribution. As a result of hydrolysis reaction of alumosilicates, heavy isotope passes from rocks into water molecule, whereas oxygen heavy isotope passes from rocks into solutes during decomposition of carbonates. High contents of fluoride and sulfate-ions are specific feature of the Baikal Rift Zone most nitric therms. Water is tapped in one of the drill holes, where fluoride-ion dominates in its anion composition (46.7 mg/dm3) and pH reaches 10, 12. The sulphate sulphur isotope composition studies carried out allow to conclude that its heavy isotope (δ34SCDT = +25‰ - +30‰) prevails in

  12. Microelements in solonchaks of the western Trans-Baikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosorova, S. B.; Merkusheva, M. G.; Boloneva, L. N.; Baldanova, A. L.; Ubugunov, L. L.

    2016-04-01

    Distribution patterns of microelements (Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Cr, Co, Pb, and Cd) in solonchaks of the western Trans-Baikal region were studied. It was found that their concentrations in typical solonchaks of haloxerophytic steppe differed from those in solonchaks of moistened habitats (playa, gleyed, and dark solonchaks) because of the differences in their landscape positions and ecological conditions. A general rise in the contents of the microelements was observed from the northeast to the southwest in agreement with changes in the parent materials. Different degrees of correlation of the contents of the microelements and their exchangeable forms with the contents of soluble salts, humus, and physical clay in the soils and the soil reaction were found. The average and extreme concentrations of the microelements were determined. The studied typical solonchaks differed from the zonal chestnut soils in the higher contents of Co, Cr, and Cd; whereas solonchaks of moistened habitats were enriched in Mn, Co, and Cd.

  13. Asthenospheric diapir beneath the Baikal rift: Petrological constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A. I.; Popov, A. M.

    1992-07-01

    Presence of partially molten material at the base of the crust is one of the key elements in models advanced for the deep structure of the Baikal rift zone. This upper mantle anomaly can be interpreted either as a discontinuous 0-50 km thick layer, which is connected with the asthenosphere via narrow conduits (asthenolith, tensional failure model), or as a 200-300 km wide asthenospheric bulge which is in contact with the base of the crust (mantle plume model). Petrological data on mantle xenoliths from Cenozoic basalts do not agree with the simplistic model of complete mechanical replacement of the subrustal lithosphere by hot asthenospheric material. Spinel and garnet Iherzolite xenoliths represent lithospheric mantle material, derived from depths of 45-75 km; they display the compositional and thermal heterogeneity of the lithosphère which is related to its metasomatism and heating and also its cooling. It is suggested that in the area of the Baikal rift zone, tectonothermal activity of the lithosphère, reflecting its permeability, was caused by its extension in conjunction with the India-Eurasia collision. Lithospheric stretching induced decompression, partial melting and upwelling of the asthenosphere and intrusion of melts and fluids into the mantle lithosphère, and, perhaps, into the lower crust. Thus, the upper part of the asthenospheric bulge, which is characterized by low velocities at the Moho, low mantle densities and a highly uneven thermal field, probably corresponds to a zone of partially destroyed lithospheric mantle, that is impregnated with melts and fluids.

  14. [Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria from microbial communities of Goryachinsk Thermal Spring (Baikal Area, Russia)].

    PubMed

    Kalashnikov, A M; Gaĭsin, V A; Sukhacheva, M V; Namsaraeva, B B; Panteleeva, A N; Nuianzina-Boldareva, E N; Kuznetsov, B B; Gorlenko, V M

    2014-01-01

    Species composition of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in microbial mats of the Goryachinsk thermal spring was investigated along the temperature gradient. The spring belonging to nitrogenous alkaline hydrotherms is located at the shore of Lake Baikal 188 km north-east from Ulan-Ude. The water is of the sulfate-sodium type, contains trace amounts of sulfide, salinity does not exceed 0.64 g/L, pH 9.5. The temperature at the outlet of the spring may reach 54 degrees C. The cultures of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, nonsulfur and sulfur purple bacteria, and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were identified using the pufLM molecular marker. The fmoA marker was used for identification of green sulfur bacteria. Filamentous cyanobacteria predominated in the mats, with anoxygenic phototrophs comprising a minor component of the phototrophic communities. Thermophilic bacteria Chloroflexus aurantiacus were detected irn the samples from both the thermophilic and mesophilic mats. Cultures ofnonsulfur purple bacteria similar to Blastochloris sulfoviridis and Rhodomicrobium vannielii were isolatd from the mats developing at high (50.6-49.4 degrees C) and low temperatures (45-20 degrees C). Purple sulfur bacteria Allochromatium sp. and Thiocapsa sp., as well as green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium sp., were revealedin low-temperature mats. Truly thermophilic purple and gree sulfur bacteria were not found in the spring. Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria found in the spring were typical of the sulfuret communities, for which the sulfur cycle is mandatory. The presence of aerobic bacteriochlorophylla-containing bacteria identified as Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) tumifaciens in the mesophilic (20 degrees C) mat is of interest.

  15. Chromospheric telescope of Baikal Astrophysical Observatory. New light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomorovsky, Valeriy; Kushtal, Galina; Lopteva, Lyubov; Proshin, Vladimir; Trifonov, Viktor; Chuprakov, Sergey; Khimich, Valeriy

    2016-06-01

    A chromospheric telescope is an important instrument for synoptic observations and solar research. After several decades of observations with the chromospheric telescope at Baikal Astrophysical Observatory, a need arose to improve the characteristics of this telescope and filter. A new reimaging lens to produce full-disk solar images 18 mm in diameter at the CCD camera Hamamatsu C-124 with a detector 36×24 mm (4000×2672 pixels) was designed and manufactured to replace the out-of-operation 50×50 mm Princeton Instruments camera. A contrast interference blocking filter and a new Iceland spar and quartz crystal plates instead of damaged ones were made and installed in the Hα birefringent filter (BF), manufactured by Bernhard Halle Nachfl. The optical immersion in the filter was changed. All telescope optics was cleaned and adjusted. We describe for the first time the design features and their related BF passband tuning. The wavefront interferograms of optical elements and telescope as a whole show that the wavefront distortion of the optical path is within 0.25 λ. The BF and pre-filter spectral parameters provide high-contrast monochromatic images. Besides, we give examples of solar chromospheric images in the Hα line core and wing.

  16. Physical and chemical stability of nanostructured lipid drug carriers (NLC) based on natural lipids from Baikal region (Siberia, Russia).

    PubMed

    Averina, E S; Müller, R H; Popov, D V; Radnaeva, L D

    2011-05-01

    At the turn of the millennium, a new generation of lipid nanoparticles for pharmacology was developed, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). The features of NLC structure which allow the inclusion of natural biologically active lipids in the NLC matrix open a wide prospect for the creation of high performance drug carriers. In this study NLC formulations were developed based on natural lipids from the Siberia region (Russia): fish oil from Lake Baikal fish; polyunsaturated fatty acid fractions and monounsaturated and saturated fatty acid fractions from fish oil and Siberian pine seed oil. Formulation parameters of NLC such as as type of surfactant and storage conditions were evaluated. The data obtained indicated high physical stability of NLC formulated on the basis of pure fish oil stabilized by Tween 80 and NLC formulated on the basis of free fatty acids stabilized by Poloxamer 188. The good chemical stability of the lipid matrix and the high concentrations of the biologically active polyunsaturated fatty acids in the NLC developed open wide prospects for their use in pharmaceutics and cosmetics.

  17. Dark matter constraints from an observation of dSphs and the LMC with the Baikal NT200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrorin, A. D.; Avrorin, A. V.; Aynutdinov, V. M.; Bannasch, R.; Belolaptikov, I. A.; Brudanin, V. B.; Budnev, N. M.; Danilchenko, I. A.; Demidov, S. V.; Domogatsky, G. V.; Doroshenko, A. A.; Dvornicky, R.; Dyachok, A. N.; Dzhilkibaev, Zh.-A. M.; Fajt, L.; Fialkovsky, S. V.; Gafarov, R. R.; Gaponenko, O. N.; Golubkov, K. V.; Gress, T. I.; Honz, Z.; Kebkal, K. G.; Kebkal, O. G.; Konishchev, K. V.; Korobchenko, A. V.; Koshechkin, A. P.; Koshel, F. K.; Kozhin, A. V.; Kulepov, V. F.; Kuleshov, D. A.; Milenin, M. V.; Mirgazov, R. A.; Osipova, E. A.; Panfilov, A. I.; Pan'kov, L. V.; Pliskovsky, E. N.; Rozanov, M. I.; Rjabov, E. V.; Shaybonov, B. A.; Sheifler, A. A.; Shelepov, M. D.; Skurihin, A. V.; Suvorova, O. V.; Tabolenko, V. A.; Tarashchansky, B. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Zagorodnikov, A. V.; Zurbanov, V. L.

    2017-07-01

    We have analyzed the neutrino events recoded in the deep-water neutrino experiment NT200 in Lake Baikal in five years of observations toward dark dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the southern hemisphere and the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This analysis completes the series of works based on NT200 data in the search for a dark matter annihilation signal in astrophysical objects. We have found no significant excess in the number of observed events relative to the expected background from atmospheric neutrinos in all tested directions, in 22 dSphs and the LMC. For a sample of five selected dwarf galaxies we have performed a joint analysis of the data by the maximum likelihood method. We have obtained a correspondence of the observational data to the null hypothesis about the presence of only background events and established 90% confidence-level upper limits for the annihilation cross sections of dark matter particles with a mass from 30 GeV to 10 TeV in several annihilation channels both in the joint analysis of the selected sample of galaxies and in the analysis toward the LMC. The strongest constraints at a level of 7 × 10-21 cm3 s-1 have been obtained for the direction toward the LMC in the channel of annihilation into a pair of neutrinos.

  18. Stable isotope composition of Earth's large lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasechko, S.; Gibson, J. J.; YI, Y.; Birks, S. J.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2011-12-01

    Lakes cover about three percent of Earth's continental area. Large lakes can significantly influence lake shore and regional climates by increasing specific humidity during evaporation and by moderating air temperatures. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen can be used to quantify lake evaporation, providing a supplementary and often cost-advantageous alternative to conventional hydrologic approaches that require over lake monitoring. Further, stable isotopes in lake sediments are an established tool in paleolimnology; however, interpreting changes to a lake's past isotope composition requires a comprehensive understanding of contemporary controls. Here, δ18O and δ2H values of water in modern lakes exceeding roughly five hundred square kilometres are compiled (n > 35). Voluminous and seasonally mixed lakes - such as the North American Great Lakes - have the most homogenous stable isotope compositions, while perennially-stratified and shallow lakes show greater variability. A rudimentary stable isotope mass balance is used to assess evaporation fluxes from large lakes on Earth. The approach taken simultaneously constrains evaporation outputs for both oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes by accounting for lake effects on the overlying atmosphere. Model development highlights important considerations such as isotopic stratification (Tanganyika), disequilibrium isotopic mass balances (Baikal), and non-steady hydrologic balances. Further, the isotope composition of Earth's continental surface water reservoir is calculated. This value - weighted to volume - is δ18O = -7.5±1.7 per mille relative to standard mean ocean water. The compiled data may be a useful tracer of continental evaporate in global atmospheric water cycle studies and could be coupled to climate models capable of incorporating oxygen-18 and deuterium tracers to improve or validate calculations of lake effects on regional water cycling.

  19. Synchronization episodes in annual numbers of earthquakes in the Mongolian-Baikal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuchevskii, A. V.; Bayar, G.; Bum-Ochir, S.

    2010-03-01

    Correlation analysis of annual numbers of earthquakes for Baikal Region and Mongolia allowed us to discover episodes of synchronized change in velocity of the seismic current in the territory of seven territories and twelve sections of the Mongolian-Baikal Region (MBR), substantially distant from each other. The three episodes of short-term synchronization in seismic process in the MBR were detected, namely, in the late 1960s, in the early 1980s, and in the mid 1990s. The episode of the early 1980s was observed in all the territories, while the episode of the late 1960s was expressed more weakly in Mongolia and distinguished mostly with an implementation length of three years. The episode of the mid 1990s requires further study with the use of parameters for seismic sources. The observed synchronization for annual numbers of earthquakes is evidence for the fact that activation of seismic process takes place almost simultaneously throughout the huge territory of the MBR during stress reconstruction in the lithosphere of the Baikal Rift Zone (BRZ); this activation forms a short-term coherent change in the velocity of quakes current for the spatial-temporal distribution of seismicity, which shows the seismogenic relation between Baikal Region and Mongolia.

  20. Comparative ecology of exotic invaders and ecologically equivalent species of hydrobionths in the Great Lakes of the world: Results of Russia-USA cooperation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pronin, N.M.; Fleischer, G.W.; Kohl, S. G.; Korsunov, V. M.; Baldanova, D.R.; Bronte, C.R.; Garmayeva, C. H.; Hatcher, C. H.; Hoff, M.H.; Maistrenko, S.G.; Nester, R.; O'Gorman, Robert; Owens, R.W.; Pronina, S.V.; Selgeby, J.H.; Sokolnikov, Yury; Todd, N. T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents brief fragments of the results of joint Russia-US research conducted through the cooperative project entitled, 'Comparative ecology of exotic invaders and ecologically equivalent species of hydrobionths in the Great Lakes of the world: Lake Baikal and the Laurentian Great Lakes.' The project was executed under the Agreement on Scientific Cooperation between the Institute of General and Experimental Biology (formerly Buryat Institute of Biology) of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Great Lakes Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  1. Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) as a potential sensing biomarker of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in aquatic mammal: molecular characterization, expression level, and ligand profiling in Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica).

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroki; Iwata, Hisato; Kim, Eun-Young; Tsydenova, Oyuna; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki; Petrov, Evgeny A; Batoev, Valeriy B; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2006-11-01

    To characterize the function of constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) in aquatic mammals, CAR complementary DNA (cDNA) was cloned from the liver of Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica) from Lake Baikal, Russia, and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels in various tissues/organs of the wild population and the CAR ligand profiles were investigated. The seal CAR cDNA had an open reading frame of 1047 bp encoding 348 amino acids that revealed 74-84% amino acid identities with CARs from rodents and human. The mRNA expression profile of tissues/organs represented that Baikal seal CAR was predominantly expressed in the liver followed by heart and intestine. The expression analysis of hepatic CAR mRNA showed no correlation with expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A, 1B, 2B, 2C, and 3A-like proteins, indicating that the CAR expression level may not be the sole determinant of the regulation of these CYP expressions in the seal liver. There was no significant correlation between CAR expression and any of the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) levels. Furthermore, we performed an in vitro CAR transactivation assay using MCF-7 cells transfected with Baikal seal CAR expression plasmid and (NR1)(3)-luciferase reporter gene plasmid. In the transactivation analysis of Baikal seal CAR, neither repression by androstanol and androstenol, nor activation by estrone and estradiol, which are recognized as endogenous ligands for mouse and human CARs, was detected. On the other hand, bile acids such as chenodeoxycholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and lithocholic acid activated the seal CAR as well as mouse CAR. As for exogenous chemicals, the seal CAR was transactivated by a human CAR agonist, 6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime), but not by a mouse CAR agonist, (1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene). In addition, the seal CAR was also activated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (Kanechlor-500, International Union of Pure and

  2. Biological diversity and population history of Middle Holocene hunter-gatherers from the Cis-Baikal region of Siberia.

    PubMed

    Movsesian, Alla A; Bakholdina, Varvara Yu; Pezhemsky, Denis V

    2014-12-01

    In the past decades, prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the Cis-Baikal region has been a subject of multidisciplinary research. In this study, we used nonmetric cranial traits to assess the genetic relationships between various spatial and temporal groups of Cis-Baikal Middle Holocene hunter-gatherers and to reveal genetic continuity between the Cis-Baikal Neolithic-Bronze Age population and modern native Siberians. Cranial series belonging to the bearers of the Early Neolithic Kitoi (n = 72), Late Neolithic Serovo (n = 54), and Early Bronze Glazkovo (n = 98) cultures were examined. Phenotypic differentiation was analyzed by the mean measure of divergence and Nei's genetic distances. Our results revealed several patterns of spatiotemporal biodiversity among the Cis-Baikal Middle Holocene populations, including biological similarity between the Early and Late Neolithic-Bronze Age groups, which suggests that the temporal hiatus between the Early and Late Neolithic does not necessarily imply genetic discontinuity in the region. The following possible scenarios of population history in the Cis-Baikal region are proposed: 1) continuous occupation with outside invasion of new migrant groups in the Late Neolithic and Bronze Age and 2) migration of the Early Neolithic groups to the nearby regions and subsequent return of their descendants to the ancestral territory. A comparison of Cis-Baikal Neolithic populations with modern Siberian natives suggests that the Сis-Baikal region could have been a source area for population expansions into different parts of Siberia in the Neolithic and Bronze Age times. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Large mammals from the Upper Neopleistocene reference sections in the Tunka rift valley, southwestern Baikal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchetnikov, A. A.; Klementiev, A. M.; Filinov, I. A.; Semeney, E. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents the data on new finds of fossil macrotheriofauna in the reference sections of the Upper Neopleistocene sediments in the Tunka rift valley (southwestern Baikal Region). The osteological material of a number of Late Neopleistocene mammals including extinct species rare for the Baikal region such as Crocuta spelaea, Panthera spelaea, and Spirocerus kiakhtensis (?) was directly dated with a radiocarbon (AMS) method. The obtained 14C data (18000-35000 years) allow one to rejuvenate significantly the upper limit of the common age interval of habitat of these animals in southern part of Eastern Siberia. Cave hyena and spiral-horned antelope lived in the Tunka rift valley in the Baikal region in Late Kargino time (37-24 ka), and cave lion survived the maximum in the Sartan cryochron in the region (21-20 ka). The study of collected paleontological collections provides a basis for selection of independent Kargino (MIS 3) faunal assemblages to use them for regional biostratigraphic analysis of Pleistocene deposits. Radiocarbon age dating of samples allows one to attribute confidently all paleofaunal remains available to the second half of the Late Pleistocene.

  4. a system approach to the long term forecasting of the climat data in baikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abasov, N.; Berezhnykh, T.

    2003-04-01

    The Angara river running from Baikal with a cascade of hydropower plants built on it plays a peculiar role in economy of the region. With view of high variability of water inflow into the rivers and lakes (long-term low water periods and catastrophic floods) that is due to climatic peculiarities of the water resource formation, a long-term forecasting is developed and applied for risk decreasing at hydropower plants. Methodology and methods of long-term forecasting of natural-climatic processes employs some ideas of the research schools by Academician I.P.Druzhinin and Prof. A.P.Reznikhov and consists in detailed investigation of cause-effect relations, finding out physical analogs and their application to formalized methods of long-term forecasting. They are divided into qualitative (background method; method of analogs based on solar activity), probabilistic and approximative methods (analog-similarity relations; discrete-continuous model). These forecasting methods have been implemented in the form of analytical aids of the information-forecasting software "GIPSAR" that provides for some elements of artificial intelligence. Background forecasts of the runoff of the Ob, the Yenisei, the Angara Rivers in the south of Siberia are based on space-time regularities that were revealed on taking account of the phase shifts in occurrence of secular maxima and minima on integral-difference curves of many-year hydrological processes in objects compared. Solar activity plays an essential role in investigations of global variations of climatic processes. Its consideration in the method of superimposed epochs has allowed a conclusion to be made on the higher probability of the low-water period in the actual inflow to Lake Baikal that takes place on the increasing branch of solar activity of its 11-year cycle. The higher probability of a high-water period is observed on the decreasing branch of solar activity from the 2nd to the 5th year after its maximum. Probabilistic method

  5. Age and growth comparisons of Hovsgol grayling (Thymallus nigrescens Dorogostaisky, 1923), Baikal grayling (T. baicalensis Dybowski, 1874), and lenok (Brachymystax lenok Pallas, 1773) in lentic and lotic habitats of Northern Mongolia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsogtsaikhan, Pureviin; Mendsaikhan, Budiin; Jargalmaa, Ganzorigiin; Ganzorig, Batsaikhanii; Weidel, Brian C.; Filosa, Christopher; Free, Christopher; Young, Talia; Jensen, Olaf P.

    2017-01-01

    Despite concern over the conservation status of many Mongolian salmonids and the importance of their ecological role in Mongolia's aquatic ecosystems, little is known about their basic biology. Hovsgol grayling (Thymallus nigrescens) is endemic to Lake Hovsgol, Mongolia and listed as endangered on the Mongolian Red List. Baikal grayling (T. baicalensis) and lenok (Brachymystax lenok) are found in lakes and rivers throughout the Selenge drainage. A detailed study of the age and growth of these three salmonids was conducted based on 1,682 samples collected from July 2006 to July 2013 in Lake Hovsgol, its outlet the Eg River, and one of the Eg's largest tributaries, the Uur River. Our results suggest that Hovsgol grayling in particular can reach a much older maximum age (17 years in our samples) than previously believed based on aging from scales. Female Hovsgol grayling were heavier at a given length than their male counterparts. Lenok had a greater average length-at-age in Lake Hovsgol compared to the rivers and greater weight-at-length in the warmer Uur River than in the Eg; female lenok from the rivers had a greater average length-at-age than their male counterparts. This study provides critical new information for the management and conservation of these threatened salmonid species in Mongolia.

  6. Numerical modeling of the spring thermal bar and pollutant transport in a large lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsydenov, Bair O.; Kay, Anthony; Starchenko, Alexander V.

    2016-08-01

    The spring riverine thermal bar phenomenon is investigated numerically on an example of Lake Baikal, and the spread of pollutants coming from the Selenga River is forecast using the 2.5 D non-hydrostatic model in the Boussinesq approximation. This hydrodynamic model takes into account the diurnal variability of the heat fluxes on the lake surface and the effects of wind and the Earth's rotation. The results of numerical modeling show that the variability of the total heat flux over 24 h plays a significant role in the variation of the thermal bar movement rate that contributes to the rapid mixing of impurities entering with river water.

  7. [Microbial communities and their ability to oxidize n-alkanes in the area of release of gas- and oil-containing fluids in Mid-Baikal (Cape Gorevoi Utes)].

    PubMed

    avlova, O N; Lomakina, A V; Gorshkov, A G; Suslova, M Iu; Likhoshvaĭ, A V; Zemskaia, T I

    2012-01-01

    The microbial community in the area of oil seep in Mid-Baikal (Cape Gorevoi Utes) was studied. The number of microorganisms that oxidize normal hydrocarbons, petroleum, and easily accessible organic matter in the water mass of the lake, bottom sediments, and bitumen structures was studied in 2005-2009. The high heterogeneity of the distribution of microorganisms associated with the deparaffination of oil in the areas of oil seeps was noted. The maximum concentrations of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms in the samples of bottom water above bitumen structures (up to 2200 +/- 175 CFU/ml) and in bitumen structures themselves (up to 170000 +/- 13000 CFU/g) were determined. A model experiment showed that in the conditions of low temperatures (4 degrees C) the degradation of the fraction of oil n-alkanes by the natural microbial community reaches 90% over a period of 60 days.

  8. Age of overthrust-type granites in the accretionary‒collisional system of the early Caledonides (western Baikal region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, E. I.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Fedorovsky, V. S.; Bayanova, T. B.; Mazukabzov, A. M.; Travin, A. V.; Volkova, N. I.; Khromykh, S. V.; Khlestov, V. V.; Tishin, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    The western Baikal region (Ol'khon region, Nutgei zone, Kharikta area) is characterized by the development of packets of thrust-type folds and synkinematic granites corresponding to the stage of thrust deformations (overthrust-type granites). Two stages in the formation of thrust-type folds separated by episodes of granite emplacement are definable. The data obtained make it possible to estimate both the time of transition from thrust to strike-slip deformations and the duration of accretionary‒collisional events that resulted in regional strike-slip deformations, which terminated in the western Baikal region 460‒455 Ma ago.

  9. Rifting Attractor Structures in the Baikal Rift System: Location and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuchevskii, Anatoly V.

    2014-07-01

    The current geodynamics and tectonophysics of the Baikal rift system (BRS) as recorded in lithospheric stress and strain are discussed in the context of self organization of nonlinear dissipative dynamic systems and nonlinear media. The regional strain field inferred from instrumental seismic moment and fault radius data for almost 70,000 MLH ⩾ 2.0 events of 1968 through 1994 shows a complex pattern with zones of high strain anisotropy in the central part and both flanks of the rift system (the South Baikal, Hovsgöl, and Muya rift basins, respectively). The three zones of local strain anisotropy highs coincide with domains of predominantly vertical stress where earthquakes of different magnitudes are mostly of normal slip geometry. Pulse-like reversals of principal stresses in the high-strain domains appear to be nonlinear responses of the system to subcrustal processes. In this respect, the BRS lithosphere is interpreted in terms of the self organization theory as a geological dissipative system. Correspondingly, the domains of high strain anisotropy and stress change, called rifting attractor structures (RAS), are the driving forces of its evolution. The location and nonlinear dynamics of the rifting attractors have controlled lithospheric stress and strain of the rift system over the period of observations, and the same scenario may have been valid also in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic rifting history. The suggested model of a positive-feedback (fire-like) evolution of nonlinear dynamical systems with rifting attractors opens a new perspective on the current geodynamics and tectonophysics of the Baikal rift system.

  10. Gas-oil fluids in the formation of travertines in the Baikal rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarinov, A. A.; Yalovik, L. I.; Shumilova, T. G.; Kanakin, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Active participation of gas-oil fluids in the processes of mineral formation and petrogenesis in travertines of the Arshan and Garga hot springs is substantiated. The parageneses of the products of pyrolytic decomposition and oxidation of the gas-oil components of hydrothermal fluids (amorphous bitumen, graphite-like CM, and graphite) with different genetic groups of minerals crystallized in a wide range of P-T conditions were established. Travertines of the Baikal rift zone were formed from multicomponent hydrous-gas-oil fluids by the following basic mechanisms of mineral formation: chemogenic, biogenic, cavitation, fluid pyrometamorphism, and pyrolysis.

  11. [Telomere length and phylogenetic relationship of Baikal and Siberian planarians (Turbellaria, Tricladida)].

    PubMed

    Koroleva, A G; Evtushenko, E V; Timoshkin, O A; Vershinin, A V; Kiril'chik, S V

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of the telomeric DNA (tDNA) and the phylogeny of the Baikal and Siberian planarians have been studied based on the analysis of the 18S rDNA and beta-actin gene fragments. A relationship between tDNA and the planarians size has been demonstrated. Giant planarians with a minor exception have longer tDNA than little planarians. Phylogenetic affinity between the species that have the stretched tracks of tDNA, big size and similar habitats may indicate possible role of tDNA in the development of the indefinite regenerative capacity of planarians.

  12. Accumulation features and temporal trends of PCDDs, PCDFs and PCBs in Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica).

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Daisuke; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Ochi, Yoko; Iwata, Hisato; Tsydenova, Oyuna; Takahashi, Shin; Amano, Masao; Petrov, Evgeny A; Batoev, Valeriy B; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2009-03-01

    This study investigated the accumulation features and temporal trends of PCDD/Fs, dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs) and non-dioxin-like PCBs (NDL-PCBs) in the blubber of Baikal seals collected in 1992 and 2005. DL-PCBs (480-3600ng/g) and NDL-PCBs (980-35,000ng/g) were dominant contaminants. Concentrations of PCDDs and PCBs in males were significantly higher than in females. In males, age-dependent accumulation was observed for PCDDs, mono-ortho PCBs and NDL-PCBs. PCDFs and non-ortho PCBs showed no such trends, implying that exposure of seals to these contaminants has been decreasing in recent years. No decreasing temporal trend was observed for PCDDs, mono-ortho PCBs and NDL-PCBs, suggesting that Baikal seals are still exposed to PCDDs and PCBs. TEQs of PCDDs and mono-ortho PCBs in seals collected in 2005 accounted for 62-77% of total TEQs. The TEQ levels in 40% of the specimens exceeded the threshold level for immunosuppression observed in harbor seals (209pg/g).

  13. An exposed slab window margin: the eastern part of the Neoproterozoic Baikal-Muya belt, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotova, A.; Khain, E.; Razumovskiy, A.; Anosova, M.; Orlova, A.

    2012-04-01

    A series of dykes and small laccolith-type magmatic bodies of tonalite, trondhjemite, granodiorite and granites marks the final stage in the geological history of the Baikal-Muya belt in an adjacent area of the Siberian craton. These bodies intrude granulite-enderbite-charnokite complex, as well as troctolite Tonkiy Mys massif. These high-silica (SiO2N56%), high alumina (Al2O3>15%), pyroxene or and amphibole bearing granitoids, with Na2O>4%, high Sr (>400 ppm), low Y (<7 ppm), high Sr/Y(>35), low Yb (<1), and are geochemically similar to adakites. The same structural position was defined for granites showing K2O=4.5% and K2O/Na2O=1,4. The tonalites of this complex collected f yielded the U-Pb zircon age of 591±3 Ma (LA ICP-MS data). Previously obtained age estimate for the enderbites is 617±5 Ma [Amelin et al., 2000]. Three samples of enderbites and gneisse provided U-Pb zircon ages fallen into the time span between 603-620 Ma. The Slyudinskii massif of high-Ti gabbronorites spatially related to the enderbite-granulite complex was crystallized 618±61 Ma ago [Makrygina et al., 1993]. The published data obtained for the massif (585±22 Ma [Makrygina et al., 1993]) show that troctolite-gabbro massifs crystallized simultaneously or insignificantly later than granulite-enderbite complex at upper levels of the lithosphere. Rocks of these massifs and the gabbro-granulite-enderbite series formed at lower levels have been joined during a stage of tectonic activity and intruded by adakites 591±3 Ma ago. High tectonic activity also reflected in deposition of the coarse clastics occurred in a lower part of Kholodnenskaya suite and contemporary formations. The following events can be reconstructed for the eastern part of the Baikal-Muya belt. Formation of the heterogeneous accretional orogenic structure (tectonic collage), with ophiolites and remnants of earlier formed Neoproterozoic island arcs and related complexes [Izokh, 1998; Rytsk, 2001; Shatskii et al., 1996], was

  14. A critical review of the development, current hotspots, and future directions of Lake Taihu research from the bibliometrics perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Yao, Xiaolong; Qin, Boqiang

    2016-07-01

    Lake Taihu, as the important drinking water source of the Yangtze River Delta urban agglomeration and the third largest freshwater lake in China, has experienced serious lake eutrophication and water quality deterioration in the past three decades. Growing scientific, political, and public attention has been given to the water quality of Lake Taihu. This study aimed to conduct a comparative quantitative and qualitative analysis of the development, current hotspots, and future directions of Lake Taihu research using a bibliometric analysis of eight well-studied lakes (Lake Taihu, Lake Baikal, Lake Biwa, Lake Erie, Lake Michigan, Lake Ontario, Lake Superior and Lake Victoria) around the world based on the Science Citation Index (SCI) database. A total of 1582 papers discussing Lake Taihu research were published in 322 journals in the past three decades. However, the first paper about Lake Taihu research was not found in the SCI database until 1989, and there were only zero, one, or two papers each year from 1989 to 1995. There had been rapid development in Lake Taihu research since 1996 and a sharp increase in papers since 2005. A keyword analysis showed that "sediment," "eutrophication", "Microcystis aeruginosa", "cyanobacterial blooms", and "remote sensing" were the most frequently used keywords of the study subject. Owing to its significant impact on aquatic ecosystems, a crucial emphasis has been placed on climate change recently. In addition, the future focuses of research directions, including (1) environmental effects of physical processes; (2) nutrient cycles and control and ecosystem responses; (3) cyanobacteria bloom monitoring, causes, forecast and management; (4) eutrophication and climate change interactions; and (5) ecosystem degradation mechanism and ecological practice of lake restoration, are presented based on the keyword analysis. Through multidisciplinary fields (physics, chemistry, and biology) cross and synthesis study of Lake Taihu, the

  15. Palaeostress reconstructions and geodynamics of the Baikal region, Central Asia, Part I. Palaeozoic and Mesozoic pre-rift evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, D.; Moeys, R.; Stapel, G.; Melnikov, A.; Ermikov, V.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents the first palaeostress results obtained for the basement of the Baikal rift system, in southern Siberia (Russia). Large-scale structural analysis and palaeostress reconstructions show that the Palaeozoic-Mesozoic kinematic history, precursor of the Baikal Cenozoic rifting, is characterized by the succession of six regional palaeostress stages. Stress inversion of fault-slip data and earthquake focal mechanisms is performed using an improved right-dieder method, followed by rotational optimization (D. Delvaux, TENSOR program). The results are interpreted in the light of recent developments in the investigation of regional intraplate stress field, and used as additional constraints for palaeogeodynamic reconstruction of Central Asia. After the final Palaeozoic closure of the Palaeo-Asian ocean on the southern margin of the Siberian platform, the marginal suture with the Sayan-Baikal Caledonian belt was repeatedly and preferentially reactivated during the subsequent Palaeozoic and Mesozoic history. This suture zone also controlled the opening of the Baikal rift system in the Cenozoic. The progressive closure of the Palaeo-Asian and Mongol-Okhotsk oceans generated successive continental collisions, which were recorded in the Baikal area by brittle-ductile and brittle deformations. The first two palaeostress stages correspond to the successive collage of Precambrian microcontinents and Caledonian terranes along the southern margin of the Siberian platform: (1) Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician N-S compression; and (2) Late Silurian-Early Devonian NW-SE compression. The next two stages are related to the remote effects of the complex evolution of the western Palaeo-Asian ocean, southwest of the Siberian continent: (3) Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous N-S compression, recorded only in the Altai region; and (4) Late Carboniferous-Early Permian E-W compression, recorded both in the Altai and Baikal regions. The last stages are the consequences of the

  16. Seismic and electrical work at rivers and lakes of Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, V. S.; Soloviev, V. M.; Liseikin, A. V.; Sigonin, P.

    2013-05-01

    In West and East Siberia a great deal of rivers and big lakes are situated. For oil and gas exploration these places hold much promise. It is very difficult to carry out seismic work in these regions, when temperature is fall down below 40 degrees centigrade. It is necessary to pave ways for technical equipment, to organize shooting operations in some cases, that harming ecology of investigated regions. It is well-known, that at seas and big reservoirs seismic works are carried out with use of air guns as sources and floating or ground cables as receivers. There is a special interest to carry out jointly processing and interpretation of seismic survey and electrical data. We should learn how to carry out such researches at rivers, developed a special combined technology on river seismic and electrical works carrying out. Geophysical Survey SB RAS has been carried out seismic and electrical works at rivers and reservoirs of Siberia for more then 20 years. We had to work in conditions, when depth of a reservoir was more then 10 meters or less then 1 meter. It was necessary to work out or adapt some floating equipment, to create air-guns working on light depths ("Malysh", "Sibiryak"), to create new recording equipment (seismic and electrical variants of "Baikal" equipment) for carrying out work in such conditions. There are presented the results of seismic researches, carried out in the Lake Baikal, Lake Teletskoe. For the first time it was determined, that the depth of sedimentary cover under Lake Baikal exceeds 14 km. On demands of government and private companies we carried out river works in Common-depth-point method at such rivers as: Ob, Volga, Enisey, Vakh, Lena, Kirenga, Nizhnya Tunguska. Comparison of results got at river profiles with surface ones, crossing the river, showed in difficult surface conditions (central part of the River Lena, the Nizhnya Tunguska) river seismic sections are better then surface sections. It is connected with the fact, that

  17. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4)…

  18. Nonlinear geodynamics of the Baikal rift system: An evolution scenario with triple equilibrium bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuchevskii, Anatoly V.

    2010-01-01

    This is an attempt to analyze the current lithospheric stress pattern in the Baikal rift in terms of nonlinear dynamics as an open self-organizing system in order to gain more insights into the general laws of regional seismicity. According to the suggested approach, the stress pattern inferred from seismic moments of 70,000 MLH ≥ 2.0 events that occurred in the region between 1968 and 1994 is presented as a phase portrait in the phase spaces of the seismic moments. The obtained phase portrait of the system evolution fits well a scenario with triple equilibrium bifurcation where stress bifurcations account for the frequency of M > 5.5 earthquakes. Extrapolation of the results into the nearest future indicates probability of such a bifurcation (a catastrophe of stress), i.e., there is growing risk that M ≈ 7 events may happen in the region within a few years.

  19. High-Resolution Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of The Baikal and Amur Regions of Eastern Russia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    the terranes that form northern China (Figure 1). This suture closed in roughly mid- Mesozoic time. The present-day boundary between the Eurasia plate...receiver functions, have shown low-velocity layers in the crust beneath the Baikal rift zone, early Mesozoic Mongolia-Okhotsk fold areas, and the...major structures and the late Mesozoic –Early Cenonoic subduction in the region. Compared to the Pn slowness perturbation model from differential Pn

  20. [Spatial distribution and species composition of prosthecate bacteria in Lake Baĭkal].

    PubMed

    Lapteva, N A; Bel'kova, N L; Parfenova, V V

    2007-01-01

    From the water column of Lake Baikal, several strains of prosthecate bacteria belonging to the genera Caulobacter and Brevundimonas were isolated. In this article, the methods applied for their isolation and cell number determination are described; the occurrence frequency and spatial distribution of these microorganisms in the lake are demonstrated. Characterization of the species composition of cultivable and uncultivable prosthecate bacteria was carried out using the methods of traditional and molecular microbiology, respectively. A comparative phylogenetic analysis of the DNA sequences of uncultivable bacteria, which showed homology to the members of the alpha subclass of proteobacteria, was carried out. It was demonstrated that the lake water column is inhabited by uncultivable alpha-proteobacteria of uncertain phylogenetic affinity, in addition to representatives of the species Caulobacter vibrioides and C. leidyi, which were detected by traditional microbiological methods.

  1. Integrated perspectives on geological and biological dynamics in ancient Lake Ohrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, B.; Wilke, T.; Francke, A.; Leicher, N.; Krastel, S.; Zanchetta, G.; Sulpizio, R.; Sadori, L.; Just, J.; Levkov, Z.; Wonik, T.; Vogel, H.; Wagner-Cremer, F.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Ohrid on the Balkan Peninsula is, along with lakes Baikal and Elgygytgyn in Russia and Lake Bosumtwi in Ghana, one of the very few lakes in the world that provides a continuous and high resolution record of environmental change of >1 Ma. With >300 endemic taxa, Lake Ohrid has the fourth highest degree of endemism in the world, being exceeded only by lakes Baikal, Tanganyika and Malawi. The combination of its long existence and high endemism makes Lake Ohrid a unique target to study the drivers of speciation and endemism. For this purpose, a 569 m long sediment sequence was recovered from the central part of the lake in spring 2013 within the scope of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and the Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO) project. Here, we present the results to date of analysis of the upper 248 m of this sequence, which covers the last ca. 640 ka according to an age model based on tephrostratigraphy as well as tuning of in situ physical and biogeochemical proxy data to orbital parameters and to the global benthic isotope stack. The sedimentological, physical, and geochemical data from the sediment sequence indicate changes in primary productivity, water column stratification, and water depth of the lake, and in weathering and erosion processes in the catchment. These changes can be clearly correlated with the intensity of glacial and interglacial periods as well as stadials and interstadials. However, paleontological and molecular clock analyses indicate that these changes and also the tephra deposition from eruptions of Italian volcanoes apparently did not lead to significant extinction events in the endemic species community. The lack of such catastrophic extinction events is probably due to the buffering capacity of the deep lake, possibly enhanced by the continuous existence of subaquatic karst springs with relatively stable habitats in the surroundings. This would enable the

  2. Heat flux at the base of lake ice cover estimated from fine structure of the ice-water boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Georgiy; Aslamov, Ilya; Kozlov, Vladimir; Granin, Nikolay; Engelhardt, Christof; Förster, Josephine

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal lake ice is a highly changeable part of the cryosphere undergoing remarkable impact by global warming. Vertical heat transport across the boundary layer under ice affects strongly the growth and melting of lake ice cover. The existing models of ice cover dynamics focus basically on the dependence of the ice thickness on the air temperature with implicit account of the snow cover effects. The heat flux at the water-ice boundary, in turn, is usually neglected or parameterized in a very simplistic form. However, neglecting of the basal ice melting due to heat flux at the ice-water interface produces appreciable errors in the modeled ice cover duration. We utilize fine-structure observations taken during 2009-2015 in ice-water boundary layers of Lake Baikal and arctic Lake Kilpisjärvi to reveal the major physical drivers of the heat exchange at the ice bottom and to explain the high geographical, spatial, and temporal variability in the heat flux magnitudes. The methods provide first detailed estimations of the heat exchange beneath the ice cover, available previously only from bulk estimations. The fluxes in Lake Baikal have magnitudes of 101 W m-2 and vary strongly between different parts of the lake being influenced by large-scale horizontal circulation with current velocities amounting at up to 7 cm s-1. The shallow lake fluxes, while an order of magnitude weaker, are highly non-stationary, being affected by the turbulence due to oscillating currents under ice. Our results demonstrate the role played by the boundary layer mixing in the ice growth and melting, as well as characterize the physical processes responsible for the vertical heat exchange and provide a basis for an improved parameterization of ice cover in coupled lake-atmosphere models.

  3. Lake Tahoe

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, list of partner agencies.

  4. Granitoids of different geodynamic settings of Baikal region (Russia) their geochemical evolution and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipin, Viktor; Sheptyakova, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    In the southern folded framing of the Siberian craton the granitoid magmatism of different ages involves batholiths, small low-depth intrusions and intrusion-dyke belts with diverse mineral and geochemical characteristics of rocks. Granitoid formation could be related to the Early Paleozoic collision stage and intra-plate magmatism of the Late Paleozoic age of the geologic development of Baikal area. The Early Paleozoic granitoids of Khamar-Daban Ridge and Olkhon region revealed their closeness in age and composition. They were referred to syncollision S-type formations derived from gneiss-schistose substratum of metamorphic sequences. The magmatic rocks were classified into various geochemical types comprising formations of normal Na-alkalinity (migmatites and plagiogranites), calc-alkaline and subalkaline (K-Na granitoids, granosyenites and quartz syenites) series. It is significant, that plagiomigmatites and plagiogranites in all elements repeat the shape of the chart of normalized contents marked for trend of K-Na granitoids, but at considerably lower level of concentrations of all elements. This general pattern of element distribution might indicate similar anatectic origin of both granitoid types, but from crustal substrata distinguished by composition and geochemical features. Comparative geochemical analysis pointed out that the source of melts of the Early Paleozoic granitoids of the Olkhon (505-477 Ma) and Khamar-Daban (516-490 Ma) complexes of the Baikal region could be the crustal substratum, which is obviously the criterion for their formation in the collisional geodynamic setting. Using the Late Paleozoic subalkaline magmatism proceeding at the Khamar-Daban Range (Khonzurtay pluton, 331 Ma) as an example, it was found that the formation of monzodiorite-syenite-leucogranite series was considerably contributed by the processes of hybridism and assimilation through mixing of the upper mantle basaltoid magma derived melts of granitic composition. The

  5. Lake Powell

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Lake Powell     View Larger Image ... format (14.42 mb)   This true-color image over Lake Powell was acquired by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) in late March 2000. Lake Powell was formed with the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, on ...

  6. Semiarid landscapes response to Aeolian processes during Holocene in Baikal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan'ko, Lidia; Opekunova, Marina

    2010-05-01

    Arid and semiarid landscapes play a significant role in global climate, biogeochemical, and hydrological processes. Regional analysis of the past aeolian processes is essential for improve our understanding of how various landscape and ecosystems responded to climate change in the past. Our investigation presents details on sand dunes and on loess-like sediments. The study areas are situated in the northern part of Baikal Region (Eastern Siberia). In its depressions, the so-called Barguzinskaya and Tunkinskaya Valley surrounded mountain ranges local dunefieds and loess-like sediments have developed. Present climate in the study areas is continental, characterized by low precipitation(mean annual 250-450 mm) and wide annual range of temperature. Field investigations indicate that the Holocene deposits of the Barguzinskaya and Tunkinskaya Valley are sealed the pedo-sedimentary interface. The analytical results suggest that one's represents a changeover from intensified soil formation to accelerated aeolian dust accumulation. The original content of calcium carbonate and gypsum at the base of some sections of loess-like sediments indicates the aeolian origin of these sediments. In whole, the soil horizons are a proof for humid phases. The change was forced by climatic aridity. Absolute dating of the organogenic components of soils (14C) indicate the age positions of the arid and humid climate phases. Our results indicate not only 1-4 long-time episodes of aeolian dust accumulation during the Holocene, but shot-time aeolian accumulation episodes, that were specific for Late Holocene. For example, in the Tunkinskaya Valley the Late Holocene soil formation replaced by aeolian deposit at 1700 - 1900, 800 and 200-250 years ago, in the Barguzinskaya Valley - about 3100 - 2900, 2300 and 600 years ago. It can be concluded that a periodical formation of the aeolian deposits in the semiarid landscapes during Holocene can be postulated. Aeolian and loess-like sediments of the

  7. Assimilation of solids during ascent of magmas from the Bartoy Field of the Baikal Region, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Johnson R.; Haskin, Larry A.; Luhr, James; Rasskazov, Sergei

    1993-01-01

    Most investigators ascribe mare basalt magma genesis to partial melting at depths of approximately 130 to greater than 400 km within the cumulate pile deposited from a lunar magma ocean. Mare basalts share with mid-ocean ridge basalts the characteristic of relative depletion in LREE and other incompatible trace elements that arises from melting within 'used' mantle, from which crust-forming elements have already been separated. Some mare basalt types do not show the classical, La-Nd depleted mare basalt REE distributions; however, some types are isotopically heterogeneous. These differences have been ascribed to assimilation, mainly AFC-style, of KREEPy highland material overlying the source region. Might such assimilation occur during magma ascent through the KREEPy material? To gain information from a terrestrial setting on possible assimilation during ascent, we have studied a suite of Quaternary nepheline-hawalites and nepheline-mugearites from the Bartoy cinder cone complex of the Baikal Rift, Siberia. The Bartoy magmas originated from greater than 80 km deep, and erupted through thick Archean crust. We find evidence for assimilation of approximately 31 wt. percent xenocrysts of garnet, aluminous clinopyroxene, kaersutite, and olivine, all presumably from the basalt source region, but no appreciable assimilation of overlying crust, consistent with isotopic constraints. Magmatic superheat made available by rapid ascent and decomposition accounts adequately for the energy of assimilation; no accompanying fractional crystallization is required or evident.

  8. Space Nuclear Facility test capability at the Baikal-1 and IGR sites Semipalatinsk-21, Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. J.; Stanley, M. L.; Martinell, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    The International Space Technology Assessment Program was established 1/19/92 to take advantage of the availability of Russian space technology and hardware. DOE had two delegations visit CIS and assess its space nuclear power and propulsion technologies. The visit coincided with the Conference on Nuclear Power Engineering in Space Nuclear Rocket Engines at Semipalatinsk-21 (Kurchatov, Kazakhstan) on Sept. 22-25, 1992. Reactor facilities assessed in Semipalatinski-21 included the IVG-1 reactor (a nuclear furnace, which has been modified and now called IVG-1M), the RA reactor, and the Impulse Graphite Reactor (IGR), the CIS version of TREAT. Although the reactor facilities are being maintained satisfactorily, the support infrastructure appears to be degrading. The group assessment is based on two half-day tours of the Baikals-1 test facility and a brief (2 hr) tour of IGR; because of limited time and the large size of the tour group, it was impossible to obtain answers to all prepared questions. Potential benefit is that CIS fuels and facilities may permit USA to conduct a lower priced space nuclear propulsion program while achieving higher performance capability faster, and immediate access to test facilities that cannot be available in this country for 5 years. Information needs to be obtained about available data acquisition capability, accuracy, frequency response, and number of channels. Potential areas of interest with broad application in the U.S. nuclear industry are listed.

  9. Retinal Ganglion Cell Topography and Retinal Resolution in the Baikal Seal (Pusa sibirica).

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Y

    2016-01-01

    The total number, size, topographic distribution, and cell density of ganglion cells were studied in retinal wholemounts of Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica). The ganglion cell size varied from 10 to 38 μm. A distinct cell group consisted of large ganglion cells of more than 30 μm in diameter. The topographic distribution of ganglion cells showed a definite area of high cell density similar to the area centralis of terrestrial carnivores. This area was located approximately 6-7 mm dorsotemporally of the geometric center of the wholemount. In this area, the peak cell densities in two wholemounts were 3,800 and 3,400 cells/mm2 (mean 3,600 cells/mm2). With a posterior nodal distance of 24 mm (underwater), this density corresponds to 631 cells/square degree. These values predict a retinal resolution of 2.4' in water and 3.0' in air. The topographic distribution of large cells featured the highest density in the same location as the total ganglion cell population.

  10. Longwavelength gravity anomalies and the deep thermal structure of the Baikal rift

    SciTech Connect

    Diament, M. ); Kogan, M.G. )

    1990-10-01

    The analysis of the gravity field over the Baikal rift area has been carried out in order: (1) to detect the amount of the deep hot material, and (2) to constrain the flexural rigidity of the lithosphere. The authors removed a few first harmonics of the global field and the gravity effects due to the crust from the observed field and found a residual anomaly which is aligned with the rift. This residual, which they attribute to the mantle, shows a minimum of about 15 mgal in amplitude and 900 km width, which is superimposed over a wider minimum with smaller amplitude. A model involving a simple stretching of the lithosphere with diffusion of heat predicts the right order of magnitude for both the amplitude and the wavelength of the 900-km anomaly. Results confirm that the stretching factor is of the order of 1.2 to 1.5. Interpretation of the coherence function computed between gravity and topography shows that the lithosphere in the area has a significant equivalent elastic thickness of about 30 km (i.e. flexural rigidity about 2.3 10{sup 23} N.m.).

  11. [Evolutional relationships of endemic green algae Draparnaldioides simplex from Lake Baikal with nonbaicalian taxa of family Chaetoforaceae (Chlorophyta)].

    PubMed

    Mincheva, E V; Peretolchina, T E; Izhboldina, L A; Kravtsova, L S; Shcherbakov, D Iu

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships between the endemic baicalian green algae Draparnaldioides simplex C. meyer et Skabitsch, 1976 and holarctic taxa of green algae were studied using the fragment of 18S rDNA and internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2 of nuclear DNA. We showed that the baicalian genus Draparnaldioides is a separate taxon. The genetic difference between Draparnaldioides and nonbaicalian taxa of the sister groups of the green algae are small enough to indicate relative youth of the genus Draparnaldioides and its recent radiation from a common ancestor with Draparnaldia and Chaetophora.

  12. Application of a new cultivation technology, I-tip, for studying microbial diversity in freshwater sponges of Lake Baikal, Russia.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dawoon; Seo, Eun-Young; Epstein, Slava S; Joung, Yochan; Han, Jaemin; Parfenova, Valentina V; Belykh, Olga I; Gladkikh, Anna S; Ahn, Tae Seok

    2014-11-01

    One of the fundamental methods for cultivating bacterial strains is conventional plating on solid media, but this method does not reveal the true diversity of the bacterial community. In this study, we develop a new technique and introduce a new device we term, I-tip. The I-tip was developed as an in situ cultivation device that allows microorganisms to enter and natural chemical compounds to diffuse, thereby permitting the microorganisms to grow utilizing chemical compounds in their natural environment. The new method was used to cultivate microorganisms from Baikalian sponges, and the results were compared with conventional plating as well as a pyrosequencing-based molecular survey. The I-tip method produced cultures of 34 species from five major phyla, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Gammaproteobacteria, 'missing' only two major phyla detected by pyrosequencing. Meanwhile, standard cultivation produced a smaller collection of 16 species from three major phyla, Betaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Gammaproteobacteria, failing to detect over half of the major phyla registered by pyrosequencing. We conclude that the I-tip method can narrow the gap between cultivated and uncultivated species, at least for some of the more challenging microbial communities such as those associated with animal hosts.

  13. Numerical reconstruction of Late-Cenosoic evolution of normal-fault scarps in Baikal Rift Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byzov, Leonid; San'kov, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Numerical landscape development modeling has recently become a popular tool in geo-logic and geomorphic investigations. We employed this technique to reconstruct Late-Cenosoic evolution of Baikal Rift Zone mountains. The objects of research were Barguzin Range and Svyatoy Nos Upland. These structures are formed under conditions of crustal extension and bounded by active normal faults. In our experiments we used instruments, engineered by Greg Tucker (University of Colo-rado) - CHILD (Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development) and 'Bedrock Fault Scarp'. First program allowed constructing the complex landscape model considering tectonic uplift, fluvial and hillslope processes; second program is used for more accurate simulating of triangular facet evolution. In general, our experiments consisted in testing of tectonic parameters, and climatic char-acteristic, erosion and diffusion properties, hydraulic geometry were practically constant except for some special runs. Numerous experiments, with various scenarios of development, showed that Barguzin range and Svyatoy Nos Upland has many common features. These structures characterized by internal differentiation, which appear in height and shape of slopes. At the same time, individual segments of these objects are very similar - this conclusion refers to most developing parts, with pronounced facets and V-shaped valleys. Accordingly modelling, these landscapes are in a steady state and are undergoing a uplift with rate 0,4 mm/yr since Early Pliocene (this solution accords with AFT-dating). Lower segments of Barguzin Range and Svyatoy Nos Upland also have some general fea-tures, but the reasons of such similarity probably are different. In particular, southern segment of Svyatoy Nos Upland, which characterized by relative high slope with very weak incision, may be formed as result very rapid fault movement or catastrophic landslide. On the other hand, a lower segment of Barguzin Range (Ulun segment, for example

  14. Field studies and some results of numerical modeling of a ring structure on Baikal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granin, N. G.; Kozlov, V. V.; Tsvetova, E. A.; Gnatovsky, R. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents the results of complex analysis of the field data and of mathematical modeling of the ice ring structure more than 4 km across, which was identified by the space images of South Baikal in April 2009. The measurements revealed that the ice thickness was 74 cm in the center of the structure, decreased to 43 cm at a distance of 2 km, and increased up to 70 cm and more beyond the ring. The ice water in the central part was warmer by 0.5°C and less saline (for 2 mg/kg) relative to the periphery of the structure. According to the tracer movements, the maximum velocities of the ice currents (3-4 cm/s) were observed at a distance of 2-3 km from the center of the structure with minimum ice thickness. The event was modeled using several mathematical models of various scales. The 3-D nonhydrostatic modeling of the large-scale processes on the basis of the temperature measured in the area of the structure showed the presence of local anticyclonic circulation, where the velocities of the currents increased up to the maximum (5-7 cm/s) at the distance of 2-3 km from the center and then decreased. The variations in the ice thickness in the area of the ring structure were modeled on the basis of these calculation results. The ice thicknesses determined in the context of the Stefan problem for the 2-D axis-symmetrical temperature distribution model are close to the measured ones. According to the model, the formation of the ring structure spans a period of 25-35 days. The origination of the dark ring on the satellite images is related to the lower ice thickness relative to the ambient areas and to the water level in microfractures closer to the ice surface.

  15. Evolution of predator-prey interactions in ancient lakes: implications for coevolution in marine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.

    1985-01-01

    Highly generalized predator-prey interrelationships are a hallmark of most lacustrine ecosystems where accommodation to the physical environment plays the major role in determining organismal distributions. Since the vast majority of lakes are ephemeral on a geological and evolutionary times scale, dispersal, rather than organism interaction, appears to be the dominant selective theme in lacustrine species evolution. In a few, very long lasting lakes, notably modern Lakes Tanganyika (Africa) and Baikal (USSR) and ancient lakes of the Brazilian Rift (Cretaceous) and Snake River Plain (Tertiary), invertebrates and fish occur which demonstrate the development of intense biological accommodation in coevolving predator-prey interactions. Shell crushing experiments on 2 endemic Tanganyikan gastropods, Lavigeria nassa and Spekia zonata show them to be comparable to warm temperature marine species in terms of grow load strength: 1-2 orders of magnitude stronger than confamilial cosmopolitan species from more ephemeral lakes in the same region of Africa. Shell repair is commonly observed in these and other Tanganyikan endemic snails although it is exceedingly rare inmost other lakes. The study of these early stages of evolutionary processes and rates in coevolving predator-prey systems in isolated lacustrine microcosms has important implications for those paleontologists concerned with marine invertebrates. It may shed considerable light on the interpretation of such events as the marine Mesozoic Revolution.

  16. Lake Constance

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... Swiss shores of Lake Constance at the town of Rorschach. Eutrophication, or the process of nutrient enrichment, is rapidly accelerated ... of the value of Lake Constance, efforts to mitigate eutrophication were initiated in the 1970's. MISR was built and is managed ...

  17. Blood levels of polychlorinated biphenyls and their hydroxylated metabolites in Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica): emphasis on interspecies comparison, gender difference and association with blood thyroid hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Daisuke; Nomiyama, Kei; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Iwata, Hisato; Tsydenova, Oyuna; Amano, Masao; Petrov, Evgeny A; Batoev, Valeriy B; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica) are still being exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and the population is at risk. In the present study, we measured the residue levels of PCBs and their hydroxylated metabolites (OH-PCBs) in the blood of Baikal seals and assessed the impact of OH-PCBs on the thyroid function. Blood concentrations of PCBs and OH-PCBs were in the range of 2.8-130 ng g(-1)wet wt. and 0.71-4.6 ng g(-1)wetwt., respectively. Concentrations of higher-chlorinated OH-PCBs (hexa- to octa-PCBs) were more than 70% to total OH-PCB concentrations, indicating Baikal seals are mostly risked by higher-chlorinated OH-PCBs. High levels of 4OH-CB146 and 4OH-CB187 and low levels of 4OH-CB107/4'OH-CB108 found in Baikal seals were different from those in other phocidae species, suggesting the unique drug-metabolizing enzyme activities and/or contamination sources in this species. Concentrations of some OH-PCBs in males were significantly higher than those in females. These results suggest that these isomers may be preferentially transferred from mother to pup via cord blood. However, concentrations of almost all the isomers were not significantly correlated with the levels of blood total T3 and T4, implying less impact of PCB-related compounds on the thyroid hormone circulation.

  18. Contrasting patterns of Y-chromosome variation in South Siberian populations from Baikal and Altai-Sayan regions.

    PubMed

    Derenko, Miroslava; Malyarchuk, Boris; Denisova, Galina A; Wozniak, Marcin; Dambueva, Irina; Dorzhu, Choduraa; Luzina, Faina; Miścicka-Sliwka, Danuta; Zakharov, Ilia

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the genetic history of autochthonous South Siberian populations and to estimate the contribution of distinct patrilineages to their gene pools, we have analyzed 17 Y-chromosomal binary markers (YAP, RPS4Y(711), SRY-8299, M89, M201, M52, M170, 12f2, M9, M20, 92R7, SRY-1532, DYS199, M173, M17, Tat, and LLY22 g) in a total sample of 1,358 males from 14 ethnic groups of Siberia (Altaians-Kizhi, Teleuts, Shors, Tuvinians, Todjins, Tofalars, Sojots, Khakassians, Buryats, Evenks), Central/Eastern Asia (Mongolians and Koreans) and Eastern Europe (Kalmyks and Russians). Based on both, the distribution pattern of Y-chromosomal haplogroups and results on AMOVA analysis we observed the statistically significant genetic differentiation between the populations of Baikal and Altai-Sayan regions. We suggest that these regional differences can be best explained by different contribution of Central/Eastern Asian and Eastern European paternal lineages into gene pools of modern South Siberians. The population of the Baikal region demonstrates the prevalence of Central/Eastern Asian lineages, whereas in the populations of Altai and Sayan regions the highest paternal contribution resulted from Eastern European descent is revealed. Yet, our data on Y-chromosome STRs variation demonstrate the clear differences between the South Siberian and Eastern European R1a1-lineages with the evolutionary ages compatible with divergence time between these two regional groups.

  19. Lake Powell

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-20

    The white ring around Lake Powell tells the story. The surface is down 98 feet. This is critical, because Powell, Lake Mead, and other lakes along the Colorado River provide water for millions of people in five states. We are in the eighth year of a drought on the Colorado River. This year was the driest year ever reported in Southern California, and there is a severe drought in Northern California, down to less than 30-percent of snow pack. This ASTER image of part of Lake Powell was acquired in 2001. The gray area depicts the shrunken, reduced 2007 lake extent compared to the extended, larger black area in 2001. The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km, and is centered near 37.1 degrees north latitude, 111.3 degrees west longitude. This image from NASA Terra satellite. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA10614

  20. Great Lakes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Bands of lake effect snow drift eastward from the western Great Lakes in this true-color image captured by the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite's Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on January 5, 2017. National Weather Service forecasters expect light to moderate lake effect snow showers to continue throughout the day today and into Saturday (1/7). Lake-effect snow forms when cold air passes over the warmer waters of a lake. This causes some lake water to evaporate into the air and warm it. This warmer, wetter air rises and cools as it moves away from the lake. When it cools, it releases that moisture and, if it’s cold enough, that moisture turns into snow. Although true-color images like this may appear to be photographs of Earth, they aren't. They are created by combining data from the three color channels on the VIIRS instrument sensitive to the red, green and blue (or RGB) wavelengths of light into one composite image. In addition, data from several other channels are often also included to cancel out or correct atmospheric interference that may blur parts of the image. Credit: NOAA/NASA/Suomi NPP via NOAA's Environmental Visualization Laboratory

  1. White Lake AOC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    White Lake is in Muskegon County along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. It was named an Area of Concern on the Great Lakes under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1987 and delisted in 2014.

  2. Principles of lake sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Janasson, L.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive outline on the basic sedimentological principles for lakes, and focuses on environmental aspects and matters related to lake management and control-on lake ecology rather than lake geology. This is a guide for those who plan, perform and evaluate lake sedimentological investigations. Contents abridged: Lake types and sediment types. Sedimentation in lakes and water dynamics. Lake bottom dynamics. Sediment dynamics and sediment age. Sediments in aquatic pollution control programmes. Subject index.

  3. Geochemistry records from laminated sediments of Shira Lake (Russian Asia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phedorin, M.; Vologina, E.; Drebuschak, M.; Tolomeev, A.; Kirichenko, I.; Toyabin, A.

    2009-04-01

    We measured downcore elements distributions in five cores collected across the Shira Lake situated in Central part of Asia (E90o12', N54o30'). The lake is small (32km2), saline (ca.20g/l SO4-, Cl-, Na+, Mg+, K+), being filled with regional precipitation of about 300mm/year (mainly through one major tributary, river Son) and has no surface outflow. The aim of our study was to reconstruct history of changes in the regime of the lake that happened both before and during period of instrumental meteorological observations. In particular, we were interested in lake-level changes due to evaporation, water supply from surface and from underground sources, and in changes of bioproduction in the lake as well. To construct depth-age model for the cores, we measured Cs-137 and unsupported Pb-210 in top layers of the cores. The sedimentation rate thus identified varied in the range of 1-2 mm/year for different cores. We visually observed fine sedimentation ‘rhythms' having thickness of about 0.x-2.x mm: these layers may now be reliably identified as annual lamination. We also determined concentrations of elements in the sediments by recording x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra when continuously scanning the halves of the cores under sharp synchrotron radiation (SR) beam, using an instrument described in (Zolotarev et al., 2001). The resolution of the scanning was 0.1 mm. After processing of the measured XRF-SR data as in (Phedorin and Goldberg, 2005) we obtained downcore records of 20 elements. We correlated all five cores employing elements patterns. We qualitatively identified variations in surface-water supply treating markers of ‘clastic' material (Ti, Rb, Zr). We identified downcore variations in authgenic mineralization, which appeared to have different kinds: Ca-related, Sr-related, Ba-related, Fe-related. We tried to assess biogenic production changes from Br distribution, admitting analogy of Br in Shira sediments to Br in Lake Baikal sediments (Phedorin et al., 2000

  4. Variability of the atmospheric turbulence in the region lake of Baykal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botygina, N. N.; Kopylov, E. A.; Lukin, V. P.; Kovadlo, P. G.; Shihovcev, A. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The estimations of the fried parameter according to micrometeorological and optical measurements in the atmospheric surface layer in the area of lake Baikal, Baikal astrophysical Observatory. According to the archive of NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data obtained vertical distribution of temperature pulsations, and revealed the most pronounced atmospheric layers with high turbulence. A comparison of astronomical conditions vision in winter and in summer. By the registration of optical radiation of the Sun with telescopes, ground-based there is a need to compensate for the effects of atmospheric turbulence. Atmospheric turbulence reduces the angular resolution of the observed objects and distorts the structure of the obtained images. To improve image quality, and ideally closer to angular resolution, limited only by diffraction, it is necessary to implement and use adaptive optics system. The specificity of image correction using adaptive optics is that it is necessary not only to compensate for the random jitter of the image as a whole, but also adjust the geometry of the individual parts of the image. Evaluation of atmospheric radius of coherence (Fried parameter) are of interest not only for site-testing research space, but also are the basis for the efficient operation of adaptive optical systems 1 .

  5. U-Th age of the Kazantsevo (MIS 5) Horizon of the Upper Neopleistocene Ust Oda reference section, Baikal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, F. E.; Schetnikov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, V. Yu.; Filinov, I. A.; Grigoriev, V. A.; Savenko, V. B.; Kazanskii, A. Yu.; Matasova, G. G.; Starikova, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    For the first time, the organic sediments of the Kazantsevo Horizon (Baikal Region) were characterized geochronometrically. The 230Th/U age of the buried gyttias from the Upper Neopleistocene Ust Oda stratotypical section on the Kitoi River was determined using a new version of isochronous approximation. The assemblage of all the 230Th/U age data, which were obtained taking into account the errors in the entire range from 136 to 86 kyr, indicates that most likely gyttia age is 115-104 kyr (MIS 5 d). Thus, the paleontological conclusions on the Kazantsevo age of the Ust Oda Formation with buried gyttias are confirmed. Our geochronometric data supplement and make more reliable the age model of the formation of sedimentary rocks of the Ust Oda section.

  6. The Vendian age of granodiorites and plagiogranites of the Tallainskii complex (Baikal-Muya Belt): U-Pb isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rytsk, E. Yu.; Salnikova, E. B.; Glebovitsky, V. A.; Velikoslavinsky, S. D.; Alekseev, I. A.; Fedoseenko, A. M.; Plotkina, Yu. V.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents the results of U-Pb isotope dating of zircons from granodiorites and plagiogranites of the Tallainskii gabbro-granodiorite-plagiogranite complex of the Karalon-Mamakan zone of the Baikal-Muya belt, ascribed to the Tallainskii pluton. The age datings obtained for granodiorite of the Eleninskii massif (605 ± 6 Ma) and plagiogranite of the Ust-Berezovo massif (609 ± 6 Ma) are in close agreement within the limits of error. Taking into account previously published data, the emplacement of the Tallainskii complex occurred within the age interval of 615-603 Ma in connection with postcollision extension. The "island arc" geochemical characteristics of granodiorites and plagiogranites can be explained by magmatic differentiation and (or) participation in the formation of a melt source enriched in the suprasubduction component involved in petrogenesis during the preceding Neoproterozoic period.

  7. Lake Powell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The white ring around Lake Powell tells the story. The surface is down 98 feet. This is critical, because Powell, Lake Mead, and other lakes along the Colorado River provide water for millions of people in five states. We are in the eighth year of a drought on the Colorado River. This year was the driest year ever reported in Southern California, and there is a severe drought in Northern California, down to less than 30-percent of snow pack. This ASTER image of part of Lake Powell was acquired in 2001. The gray area depicts the shrunken, reduced 2007 lake extent compared to the extended, larger black area in 2001.

    The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km, and is centered near 37.1 degrees north latitude, 111.3 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. Flora of the forests as the indicator of climate change of Baikal Region (South Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivobokov, Leonid; Anenkhonov, Oleg

    2010-05-01

    The problem of global climate warming and its consequences for nature and civilization has been actively discussed in scientific and political publications during last 15 years. Although quantitative estimations of the rate of warming can be rather differ by results of different authors. A relevant component of such assessment is the prognosis of vegetation development under conditions of climate warming. Our study was carried out on the western macroslope of the Ikatskii Ridge in the northern Baikal region (South Siberia). This area is located on the territory where permafrost may have a continuous, discontinuous, or insular distribution. The plant cover of study area is characterized by dominance of larch (Larix gmelinii (Rupr.) Rupr.) and pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests that form a forest belt. In this belt, two parts can be distinguished: the lower, forest-steppe part (550-900 m a.s.l.), which is limited by steppe at the lower part and the upper, mountain-taiga part (800-1600 m a.s.l.) with mountain tundra on the top. Pine forests by Braun-Blanquet approach include to hemiboreal forests Rhytidio rugosi-Laricetea sibiricae K. Korotkov et Ermakov 1999. Larch forests presented by boreal forests Vaccinio-Piceetea Br.-Bl. in Br.-Bl., Siss. et Vlieger 1939. Floristic compositions of these classes were analyzed as cenofloras. Floristic complexes of cenofloras included the species of dark coniferous, light coniferous, preboreal, forest-steppe, mountain steppe, true steppe, montane, and meadow zonal groups. The cenoflora of class Rhytidio-Laricetea is presented by 222 species of vascular plants. This cenoflora mostly has the steppe and forest floristic complexes, respectively 54.4 and 35.5%. The cenoflora of class Vaccinio-Piceetea include 153 species and the light coniferous group of the forest floristic complex prevailed. The total share of forest species in the cenoflora reaches 70.6%. Other floristic complexes (meadow, steppe, and mountain) has the similar

  9. Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Mac, Michael J.; Opler, Paul A.; Puckett Haecker, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    The Great Lakes region, as defined here, includes the Great Lakes and their drainage basins in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. The region also includes the portions of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the 21 northernmost counties of Illinois that lie in the Mississippi River drainage basin, outside the floodplain of the river. The region spans about 9º of latitude and 20º of longitude and lies roughly halfway between the equator and the North Pole in a lowland corridor that extends from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean.The Great Lakes are the most prominent natural feature of the region (Fig. 1). They have a combined surface area of about 245,000 square kilometers and are among the largest, deepest lakes in the world. They are the largest single aggregation of fresh water on the planet (excluding the polar ice caps) and are the only glacial feature on Earth visible from the surface of the moon (The Nature Conservancy 1994a).The Great Lakes moderate the region’s climate, which presently ranges from subarctic in the north to humid continental warm in the south (Fig. 2), reflecting the movement of major weather masses from the north and south (U.S. Department of the Interior 1970; Eichenlaub 1979). The lakes act as heat sinks in summer and heat sources in winter and are major reservoirs that help humidify much of the region. They also create local precipitation belts in areas where air masses are pushed across the lakes by prevailing winds, pick up moisture from the lake surface, and then drop that moisture over land on the other side of the lake. The mean annual frost-free period—a general measure of the growing-season length for plants and some cold-blooded animals—varies from 60 days at higher elevations in the north to 160 days in lakeshore areas in the south. The climate influences the general distribution of wild plants and animals in the region and also influences the activities and distribution of the human

  10. Lake Bonneville

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, Grove Karl

    1890-01-01

    This volume is a contribution to the later physical history of the Great Basin. As a geographic province the Great Basin is characterized by a dry climate, changes of drainage, volcanic eruption, and crustal displacement. Lake Bonneville, the special theme of the volume, was a phenomenon of climate and drainage, but its complete history includes an account of contemporaneous eruption and displacement.

  11. Estimation of ice thickness on large lakes from passive microwave and radar altimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, Claude; Kang, Kyung-Kuk; Kouraev, Alexei; Mercier, Franck

    2010-05-01

    Lake ice grows steadily between the end of freeze-up period and the onset of break-up period as a result of the thermodynamics of freezing water as well as dynamic ice motion on the surface. In thermodynamic thickening, the conductive heat flow controls the ice growth rate and the ice thickness, and the ice thickens downward as a result of heat loss at the top of the ice cover. There has been some demonstration of the potential of brightness temperature from passive microwave airborne radiometers to estimate ice thickness. The value of passive microwave and radar altimeter data from current satellite missions merits to be examined in this respect. The major objective of this study was estimate ice thickness from brightness temperature (TB) at 10.65 and 18.70 GHz from AMSR-E channels and the 19.35 GHz frequency channel from SSM/I on large lakes of the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. Great Bear Lake, Great Slave Lake, Lake Baikal). The evolution of horizontally and vertically polarized TB derived from AMSR-E level 2A raw brightness temperature and EASE Grid Level-3 SSM/I products was compared with ice thicknesses obtained with a previously validated thermodynamic lake ice model and in situ observations over the course of seven winter seasons (2002 and 2009), as well as with recent estimates from the Jason-2 Ku-band radar altimeter data (since 2008). Results show that both passive microwave and radar altimeter data acquired in the 10-19 GHz frequency range offer a promising means for estimating ice thickness from large northern lakes.

  12. Lake Mackay, Australia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-27

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows Lake Mackay, the largest of hundreds of ephemeral lakes scattered throughout Western Australia and the Northern Territory, and is the second largest lake in Australia.

  13. Mineralogical-geochemical features of travertines of the modern continental hydrotherms: A G-1 well, Tunka depression, Baikal rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soktoev, B. R.; Rikhvanov, L. P.; Ilenok, S. S.; Baranovskaya, N. V.; Taisaev, T. T.

    2015-07-01

    The mineral and chemical composition of travertines is studied in the modern discharge zone of the hydrothermal fluids of the Tunka depression, Baikal rift zone. The matrix of travertines is mostly made up of aragonite and calcite, which host about 20 mineral phases of Ag, Au, Pb, Cu, Sb, Sn, Fe, and other chemical elements. Similar rocks have previously been found in areas of modern submarine ore formation and tectonically active structures of the crust (New Zealand, the Cheleken Peninsula and others). Our materials confirm the opinion of some researchers who study modern hydrothermal ore formation in spreading zones that the formation of hydrothermal deposits requires favorable geochemical barriers rather than significant contents of metals in thermal waters. It is shown that microbial communities, concentrating chemical elements playing an important role in formation of ore mineralization in the discharge zones of thermal waters may be these barriers. According to our data, at the territory of the Tunka depression, thermal carbonic waters with endogenic components are delivered to the upper crustal horizons, involved in the existing hydrogeological systems, mixed with waters of active water exchange, and contribute to their chemical composition. This is manifested in the specific elemental and micromineral (Au, Ag, etc.) composition of the limescale of drinking water. In this local discharge zone, an effect of radioactive orphans has been found, which is similar to that established in barite chimneys from the Juan-de-Fuca Ridge.

  14. The Dymond Legacy: Oceans to Lakes and Back Again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilskaln, C. H.

    2004-12-01

    Jack Dymond was an extremely unique scientist and colleague. His high level of professional ambition, risk-taking, and accomplishment were largely hidden behind a gentle and open-minded demeanor which always had room for thoughtful consideration of new ideas and different points of view. Although very different in personality, Jack shared with Degens and Edmonds the ability to encourage us to think broadly, globally, and to apply our expertise and knowledge to systems with which we might not be so familiar or comfortable. Jack believed that studying multiple systems was the best way to truly unravel the geochemical fingerprints recorded in sediments and rocks, thus leading us to a better understanding of how the earth, how Gaia, really works. To this end, Jack applied oceanographic techniques and concepts of marine geochemical cycling to large lakes of the world and encouraged a new generation of oceanographers to do the same. His exhaustive study of Crater Lake involving numerous oceanographic colleagues, and his collaboration with Siberian scientists working on Lake Baikal, provided extraordinary new insights into lacustrine hydrothermal systems which generated significant worldwide interest. Jack was an integrated thinker, an enthusiastic collaborator, and a great source of support and encouragement for his colleagues. His big picture view of the earth and its processes, many of which he knew intimately, was never intimidating, only enlightening. He drew upon his vast research experience and systems approach to demystify for his students and the public the important feed-backs between the biosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere. In this manner, he made some of his most important contributions to science by providing the public and young scientists with an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic links between earth processes and global climate change.

  15. Molecular archives of climatic history: exploring patterns of genomic differentiation in endemic species radiations of ancient lakes (MOLARCH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, K.

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the evolutionary response of species to global climate change because time scales are too long to be directly studied. Recent phylogenetic studies on taxa inhabiting ancient lakes suggested that climate-induced environmental changes can be reconstructed by analyzing genetic patterns within and among species. In fact such evolutionary responses seem to coincide with climate driven lake level-fluctuations and to be concentrated within narrow periods of time. Yet, it remains unclear to what extent such changes occur simultaneously across taxonomic groups and ecological guilds. Our study combines phylogenetic and paleoclimate data to test how patterns of evolutionary diversification agree with predictions of three groups of hypotheses (i) the ‘turnover pulse' and ‘paleo-ecological incumbency' hypotheses, predicting that speciation pulses across major taxa coincide with times of major lake level changes; (ii) the ‘ecological locking' hypothesis, also predicts simultaneous speciation pulses but not necessarily at times of major lake level changes; (iii) the ‘individual response' hypothesis, predicts no correlation of speciation pulses across taxa. These hypotheses will be tested using mtDNA sequences from selected endemic taxa (fish, crustaceans) of Lakes Baikal and Tanganyika, the two oldest lakes on Earth. Patterns of intraspecific diversity (reflecting dynamics of population size changes) and of the synchrony of interspecific divergences across taxa are used to investigate the evolutionary effects of lake level changes on different time scales, in taxa occurring in different habitats, within lakes and across continents. Combined with paleoclimatic information this will elucidate the effects of global climatic induced changes on the more general dynamics of diversification, loss of variation, adaptive radiations and speciation events. Computer simulations of sequence evolution generated in various ecological scenarios will be used to

  16. Anorogenic nature of magmatism in the Northern Baikal volcanic belt: Evidence from geochemical, geochronological (U-Pb), and isotopic (Pb, Nd) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neymark, L.A.; Larin, A.M.; Nemchin, A.A.; Ovchinnikova, G.V.; Rytsk, E. Yu

    1998-01-01

    The Northern Baikal volcanic belt has an age of 1.82-1.87 Ga and extends along the boundary between the Siberian Platform and the Baikal foldbelt. The volcanic belt is composed of volcanics of the Akitkan Group and granitic rocks of the Irel and Primorsk complexes. The geochemistry of the rocks points to the intraplate anorogenic nature of the belt. U-Pb zircon dating of the Chuya granitoids revealed that they are older (2020-2060 Ma) than the Northern Baikal volcanic belt and, thus, cannot be regarded as its component. Data on the Pb isotopic system of feldspars from the granitoids confirm the contemporaneity of all volcanic rocks of the belt except the volcanics of the upper portion of the Akitkan Group (Chaya Formation). Our data suggest its possibly younger (???1.3 Ga) age. The isotopic Nd and Pb compositions of the acid volcanic rocks provide evidence of the heterogeneity of their crustal protoliths. The volcanics of the Malaya Kosa Formation have ??Nd(T) = -6.1, ??2 = 9.36, and were most probably produced with the participation of the U-depleted lower continental crust of Archean age. Other rocks of the complex show ??Nd(T) from -0.1 to -2.4, ??2 = 9.78, and could have been formed by the recycling of the juvenile crust. The depletion of the Malaya Kosa volcanics in most LILEs and HFSEs compared with other acid igneous rocks of the belt possibly reflects compositional differences between the Late Archean and Early Proterozoic crustal sources. The basaltic rocks of the Malaya Kosa Formation (??Nd varies from -4.6 to -5.4) were produced by either the melting of the enriched lithospheric mantle or the contamination of derivatives of the depleted mantle by Early Archean lower crustal rocks, which are not exposed within the area. Copyright ?? 1998 by MAEe Cyrillic signK Hay??a/Interperiodica Publishing.

  17. Genetic variability of Babesia parasites in Haemaphysalis spp. and Ixodes persulcatus ticks in the Baikal region and Far East of Russia.

    PubMed

    Rar, V A; Epikhina, T I; Suntsova, O V; Kozlova, I V; Lisak, O V; Pukhovskaya, N M; Vysochina, N P; Ivanov, L I; Tikunova, N V

    2014-12-01

    To study Babesia diversity in Ixodid ticks in Russia, Ixodes persulcatus, Haemaphysalis japonica, Haemaphysalisconcinna, Dermacentor silvarum, and Dermacentor nuttalli ticks collected in the Far East and Baikal region were assayed for the presence of Babesia spp. using nested PCR. In total, Babesia DNA was detected in 30 of the 1125 (2.7%) I. persulcatus, 17 of the 573 (3.0%) H. concinna, and 12 of the 543 (2.2%) H. japonica but was undetectable in any of the 294 analyzed Dermacentor spp. Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences were determined for all of the positive samples. Among the positive ticks, nine I. persulcatus were infected by Babesia microti 'US'-type, five I. persulcatus were infected by Babesia divergens-like parasites, and 11 I. persulcatus were infected by Babesia venatorum. For all three of these species, the determined 18S rRNA gene sequences were identical to those of the Babesia genetic variants found previously in I. persulcatus in Russia. In addition, five I. persulcatus from the Baikal region and all of the positive Haemaphysalis spp. ticks carried 13 different sequence variants of Babesia sensu stricto belonging to distinct phylogenetic clusters. Babesia spp. from 29 ticks of different species collected in distinct locations belonged to the cluster of cattle and ovine parasites (Babesia crassa, Babesiamajor, Babesiamotasi, Babesiabigemina, etc.). Babesia spp. from four H. japonica ticks in the Far East belonged to the cluster formed by parasites of carnivores. One more Babesia sequence variant detected in an I. persulcatus tick from the Baikal region belonged to the cluster formed by parasites of cattle and wild cervids (B. divergens, Babesiacapreoli, B. venatorum, Babesiaodocoilei, etc.). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Toxicokinetics of PCDD, PCDF, and coplanar PCB congeners in Baikal seals, Pusa sibirica: age-related accumulation, maternal transfer, and hepatic sequestration.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hisato; Watanabe, Mafumi; Okajima, Yuka; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Amano, Masao; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki; Petrov, Evgeny A

    2004-07-01

    To assess the toxicokinetic behavior and potential toxicity of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Baikal seals, congener-specific levels and tissue distribution were evaluated in the liver and blubber, and the effects of biological factors including sex and growth were assessed. Total 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents (TEQs) were in the range of 210-920 pgTEQ/g fat wt (180-800 pgTEQ/g wet wt) in the blubber and 290-7800 pgTEQ/g fat wt (10-570 pgTEQ/wet wt) in the liver. Non-ortho coplanar PCB126 was the most TEQ-contributed congener accounting for 37-59% of the total TEQs in the liver. From the unique congener profiles, weak metabolic properties of Baikal seals for 2,3,7,8-TCDF and 1,2,3,7,8-P5CDF are suggested. Concentrations of most congeners linearly increased with age in male seals, whereas in adult females the levels revealed an age-related decline. The increasing and declining rates were congener-specific. Maternal transfer rates of 5 representative congeners from adult female to pup through lactation, which was estimated from male-female differences in the body burden, was 1.1 ngTEQ/kg/day for the first pup and decreased with every lactational epoch. The liver-blubber distribution of 1,2,3,4,7,8-H6CDD, 1,2,3,6,7,8-H6CDD, PCB81, PCB126, and PCB169 was dependent on the hepatic total TEQ, indicating hepatic sequestration by induced cytochrome P450 (CYP). These results indicate that congener profile in Baikal seals is governed by complex factors including sex, tissue concentration, binding to CYP, and rates of absorption and metabolism/excretion.

  19. Okanagan Lake, British Columbia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-01

    STS068-155-011 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- (Okanagan Lake, British Columbia) View southward down the lake; Vernon is in the foreground, Kelowna just before the bend in the lake, and Penticton at the far end of the lake. Green crops are still vigorous despite the season (early October); clear-cuts dot the forested hillsides.

  20. Rediscovery of lake balls in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Donald W.; Hiltunen, Jarl K.; Owens, Randall W.

    1983-01-01

    For the first time in 70 years, the occurrence of a 'lake ball' in Lake Michigan is here reported in the literature. According to a published system of classification, the object we collected in 1978 was a 'false' lake ball. Dissection revealed that it was colonized by 5 chironomid larvae and 162 oligochaetes. The species and numerical proportions of the oligochaetes indicated that it was formed in or near the mouth of a eutrophic tributary rather than in the open waters of Lake Michigan where it was found. Because of their mobility, false lake balls may be ecologically important, serving as natural vehicles for the dispersal of invertebrates.

  1. Seismotectonic destruction of the Earth's crust in the zone of interaction of the northeastern side of the Baikal rift and the Aldan-Stanovoy block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaeva, L. P.; Koz'min, B. M.; Imaev, V. S.; Grib, N. N.; Ashurkov, S. V.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the modern structural-tectonic pattern and a tectonodynamic model of the zone of interaction of the most seismically active northeastern side of the Baikal rift zone (BRZ) and the conjugate system of seismogenic structures of the Aldan-Stanovoy block, where disastrous events with M ≥ 6.0 have been reported. Regularities in the structural formation of active faults and their kinematics are discussed. The faults form block structures accumulating significant tectonic strain. Motions between large tectonic blocks cause sudden release of the strain, which results in catastrophic events (M ≥ 6.0) with focal mechanisms of definite kinematic type.

  2. Draft genome sequence of Thermoactinomyces sp. Gus2-1 isolated from the hot-spring Gusikha in Bargusin Valley (Baikal Rift Zone, Russia).

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Aleksey S; Bryanskaya, Alla V; Kotenko, Anastasia V; Peltek, Sergey E

    2017-03-01

    The Thermoactinomyces sp. strain Gus2-1 was isolated from hot-spring sediments sample from the hot-spring Gusikha in Bargusin Valley (Baikal Rift Zone, Russia). The sequenced and annotated genome is 2,623,309 bp and encodes 2513 genes. The draft genome sequence of the Thermoactinomyces sp. strain Gus2-1 has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession JPZM01000000 and the sequences could be found at the site https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/JPZM01000000.

  3. Unusual 8.5 Ma andesites from the Barguzin basin of the Baikal Rift Zone, Southern Siberia: melting of peraluminous source rocks for subsequent xenocrystic sapphires in basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasskazov, Sergei; Chuvashova, Irina; Yasnygina, Tatyana; Fefelov, Nikolai; Saranina, Elena; Ilyasova, Agul; Fedin, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Pliocene-Quaternary mantle-derived basanites and related alkaline volcanic rocks from Southern Siberia include sapphires of jeweler quality, origin of which is disputable. In the Barguzin basin, we have found unusual Late Miocene crust-derived pyroclastic andesitic material that might exhibit magmatic liquids from a peraluminous source region of the jeweler sapphires. Peraluminous character of the andesites is demonstrated by mutually consistent increasing ACNK from 1.79 to 3.19, ANK from 2.59 to 4.15, Al2O3 content from 20.4 to 26.5 wt.%, and CIPW-normative corundum from 9.7 to 18.6 %. Crustal origin of the andesites is inferred from low Nb/U, Ce/Pb, high Rb/Sr, and strongly enriched signatures of initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.710162-0.712082) and epsilon Nd (-13.4-14.7). In Rb-Sr isochron diagram, the upper limit of andesitic data points correspond to the reference line of ca. 440 Ma with initial 87Sr/86Sr at 0.705 that assumes the early Silurian isotopic closure of the source region. As a rule, deep-seated mineral inclusions do not occur in early lavas of a volcanic area and appear in those of later eruptive stages. This indicates their origin through interaction between the earlier magmatic liquids and wall-rocks. In the Al2O3 versus total Fe2O3 diagram, the unusual andesites are comparable to silica-rich corundum-bearing rocks from metamorphic terranes. We suggest that the andesite eruption in the Barguzin basin was provided by selective melting of the Al-Si-rich source during structural reorganization that occurred in the Baikal Rift Zone between 9 and 5 Ma, when rifting began propagating from the Southern Baikal basin to the Northern Baikal one. The high-temperature processes in a weakened layer favored to growing corundum crystals. Afterwards, the jeweler sapphires were extracted from the reactivated crust of the Baikal Rift Zone by ascending Pliocene-Quaternary mantle-derived liquids. The study is supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant 14-05-31328).

  4. Lake Volta, Ghana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Lake Volta in Ghana was acquired March 31, 2002 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Lake Volta is one of the world's largest artificially created lakes. Lake Volta is actually a reservoir formed from the damming of the Volta River, and extends 250 miles north of the Akosombo Dam. The lake covers an area of 8,482 square km. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  5. Lake Chad, Chad, Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-04-29

    Africa's Lake Chad where the borders of Chad, Niger, Nigeria and Cameroon merge (13.0N, 14.0E) has been undergoing change for the past 25 to 30 years when it was first noticed that the lake is drying up. Since then, astronauts have been photographing it on a regular basis to record the diminishing lake bed. This lake was once the aproximate size of Lake Erie but is now only about half that size and is still receeding.

  6. Specific features of electric field in the atmosphere and Radon emanations in Tunkin Basin of Baikal rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, S.; Loktev, D.

    2013-05-01

    Development of methods for diagnosing local crust encourages finding new ways for preventing hazardous geologic phenomena. Using measurements of several geophysical fields in addition to seismic methods enables to improve the existing methods and increase their reliability. In summer of 2009 and 2010, complex geophysical acquisition company was organized in the Tunkin Basin of the Baikal rift zone in South-Eastern Siberia, that runs 200 km to East-West from the southern tip of Baikal. Stationary observations were carried out in the central part of the Tunkin Basin, at the Geophysical observatory "I" of Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics of Siberian Branch of RAS and "II" near the Arshan settlement. Along with observations of microseismic noise and electric field variations in soil, there were performed measurements of electric field strength (Ez) in lowest atmosphere and volumetric activity of natural Radon in subsoil. Meteorological parameters were monitored with the use of DavisVantagePro meteorological stations. The analysis of observations showed that characteristic features of electric field in near-surface atmosphere are majorly defined by complex orography of the place and, consequently, by quickly changing meteorological conditions: thunderstorm activity and other mesometeorological events (with characteristic scale of tens of km and few hours long) in nearby rocks. The results of Ez(t) measurements performed under "good" weather conditions showed that the character of field variations depended on the local time with their maximum in daylight hours and minimum in the night. The analysis of Radon volumetric activity evidenced that its variations are influenced by atmospheric pressure and tides, and such influence is different at points "I" and "II". In particular, the tidal and atmospheric influence on Radon variations is more pronounced at "II" if compared to "I", which can be explained by locations of the registration points. Registration Point "II" is

  7. The mineralogy and geochemistry of quartz-tourmaline schlieren in the granites of the Primorsky Complex, Western Baikal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savel'eva, V. B.; Bazarova, E. P.; Kanakin, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    Quartz-tourmaline schlieren have been found within rapakivi-like granites of the Early Proterozoic Primorsky Complex in the Western Baikal Region. These rocks are biotite leucogranites with normal alkalinity (A/CNK = 1.00-1.04); a high iron mole fraction (92-95%); a K2O/Na2O value of about 2.0; relatively high F, Li, Rb, Cs, Sn, Pb, Th, and U contents; and low Ba, Sr, Eu, Zn, Sc, and V contents. The schlieren composed of quartz and tourmaline with relics of feldspar also contain fluorite, rare muscovite, chlorite, and accessory rutile, ilmenite, zircon, monazite, xenotime, and bastnäsite. B2O3 and F contents in the schlieren are 2.29-2.63 and 0.30-0.47 wt %, respectively. Fe2O3 (4.8-5.4 wt %), F, and H2O contents are higher in these schlieren than in the host granite, while SiO2, CaO, Na2O, K2O, and P2O5 contents are lower than in host rocks. K2O/Na2O values decrease in the schlieren down to 0.4. Enrichment of the schlieren in Fe and other ore elements (Zn, Co, Cu, Sn, etc.), together with B, F, H2O, and Na, suggests that they crystallized from fluid-saturated melt segregated from aluminosilicate melt in the apical part of a shallow-seated intrusion. The formation of tourmaline may be related to the interaction of the fluid with feldspars in the crystallizing granites; it was accompanied by a separation of fluid F-CO2. Quartz precipitated at the next stage, due to the acidic character of the aqueous fluid. In general, the relationships of minerals in the schlieren indicate distinct fractionation of LREE, HREE, and Y in the fluid-saturated melt.

  8. Landscape dynamics assessment of dry climatic zones on the Baikal-Gobi transect from NDVI time series and field investigations data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayapina, D. O.; Zharnikova, M. A.; Tsydypov, B. Z.; Sodnomov, B. V.; Garmaev, E. Zh

    2016-11-01

    Starting in the eighties of the 20th century, the scientists of the Baikal Institute of Nature Management (BINM SB RAS) have been conducting field observations of the Transbaikalia geosystems transformation due to the change of climate and nature management. An utmost importance is placed on the study of a negative response of the land geosystems. This is shown through their deterioration, degradation, and desertification in particular. Through the years of research (1985-2015) in dry areas of the north of Central Asia, the scientists of the BINM SB RAS established a network of key sites for contact monitoring of the status and dynamics of the geosystems and the negative natural-anthropogenic processes along the Baikal-Gobi meridional transect (51-44° N, 105-107° E). The monitoring of the status and dynamics of the vegetation cover of some key sites is conducted by processing and analysis of multitemporal and multispectral Landsat and MODIS Terra imagery. An automatic analysis of the time variation of NDVI and a comparison with the progress of the index in the previous seasons are performed. The landscape indication of the key sites is made on the basis of satellite imagery and complete geobotanical descriptions. Landscape profiles and facies maps with natural boundaries are created.

  9. Seismicity and S-wave velocity structure of the crust and the upper mantle in the Baikal rift and adjacent regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredkina, Alena; Kozhevnikov, Vladimir; Melnikova, Valentina; Solovey, Oksana

    2016-12-01

    Correlations between seismicity, seismotectonic deformation (STD) field and velocity structure of the crust and the upper mantle in the Baikal rift and the adjacent areas of the Siberian platform and the Mongol-Okhotsk fold belt have been investigated. The 3D S-wave velocity structure up to the depths of 500 km has been modeled using a representative sample of Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves (about 3200 paths) at periods from 10 to 250 s. The STD pattern has been reconstructed from mechanisms of large earthquakes, and is in good agreement with GPS and structural data. Analysis of the results has shown that most of large shallow earthquakes fall in regions of low S-wave velocities in the uppermost mantle (western Mongolia and areas of recent mountain building in southern Siberia) and in zones of their relatively high lateral variations (northeastern flank of the Baikal rift). In the first case the dominant STD regime is compression manifested in a mixture of thrust and strike-slip deformations. In the second case we observe a general predominance of extension.

  10. Analysis of thyroid hormones in serum of Baikal seals and humans by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and immunoassay methods: application of the LC-MS/MS method to wildlife tissues.

    PubMed

    Kunisue, Tatsuya; Eguchi, Akifumi; Iwata, Hisato; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2011-12-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for the regulation of growth and development in both humans and wildlife. Until recently, TH concentrations in the tissues of animals have been examined by immunoassay (IA) methods. IA methods are sensitive, but for TH analysis, they are compromised by a lack of adequate specificity. In this study, we determined the concentrations of six THs, L-thyroxine (T(4)), 3,3',5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T(3)), 3,3',5'-triiodo-L-thyronine (rT(3)), 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine (3,5-T(2)), 3,3'-diiodo-L-thyronine (3,3'-T(2)), and 3-iodo-L-thyronine (3-T(1)), in the serum of humans (n = 79) and wild Baikal seals (n = 37), by isotope ([(13)C(6)]-T(4))-dilution liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and compared the TH levels with those measured by an electrochemiluminescent immunoassay (ECLIA) method. T(3) and T(4) were detected in all serum samples of both humans and Baikal seals, whereas T(1), 3,3'-T(2), and 3,5-T(2) were below the limit of detection (LOD). rT(3) was detected in Baikal seal sera at concentrations higher than T(3) in 28 seal samples, indicating an anomaly in deiodinase activity in Baikal seals. In humans, regression analyses of TH concentrations, measured by ECLIA and LC-MS/MS methods, showed significant correlations for T(4) (r = 0.852) and T(3) (r = 0.676; after removal of a serum sample with abnormal T(3) levels). In Baikal seals, a low correlation coefficient (r = 0.466) for T(4) levels and no correlation for T(3) levels (p = 0.093) were found between ECLIA and LC-MS/MS methods. These results suggest that interference by a nonspecific reaction against anti-T(3) and anti-T(4) antibodies used in the ECLIA can contribute to inaccuracies in TH measurement in Baikal seals. When the relationship between concentrations of THs in sera and dioxin-like toxic equivalents in blubber samples of Baikal seals (n = 19) was examined, a significantly negative correlation was found for serum T(4) levels measured by the LC

  11. Lake Nasser and Toshka Lakes, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Nasser (center) and the Toshka Lakes (center left) glow emerald green and black in this MODIS true-color image acquired March 8, 2002. Located on and near the border of Egypt and Norther Sudan, these lakes are an oasis of water in between the Nubian (lower right) and Libyan Deserts (upper left). Also visible are the Red Sea (in the upper right) and the Nile River (running north from Lake Nasser). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  12. Lake Huron LAMPs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The approach in Lake Huron differs from the Lakewide Management Plans of the other Great Lakes: no formal binational designation of lakewide beneficial use impairments, nor extensive lakewide modeling of chemical loadings

  13. Lake Tahoe Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate, change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, list of partner agencies.

  14. The Great Lakes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Great Lakes form the largest surface freshwater system on Earth. The U.S. and Canada work together to restore and protect the environment in the Great Lakes Basin. Top issues include contaminated sediments, water quality and invasive species.

  15. Lakes on Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-24

    The Cassini spacecraft, using its radar system, has discovered very strong evidence for hydrocarbon lakes on Titan. Dark patches, which resemble terrestrial lakes, seem to be sprinkled all over the high latitudes surrounding Titan north pole

  16. Looking Down on Lakes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-07

    NASA Cassini spacecraft peers down though layers of haze to glimpse the lakes of Titan northern regions. Titan has a hydrological cycle similar to Earth, but instead of water, Titan lakes and seas are filled with liquid methane and ethane.

  17. Lakes Ecosystem Services Online

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northeastern lakes provide valuable ecosystem services that benefit residents and visitors and are increasingly important for provisioning of recreational opportunities and amenities. Concurrently, however, population growth threatens lakes by, for instance, increasing nutrient ...

  18. National Lakes Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Lakes Assessment is a collaborative, statistical survey of the nation's lakes. It is one of four national surveys that EPA and its partners conduct to assess the condition and health of the nation's water resources.

  19. About Lake Tahoe

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate, change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, list of partner agencies.

  20. Lakes Ecosystem Services Online

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northeastern lakes provide valuable ecosystem services that benefit residents and visitors and are increasingly important for provisioning of recreational opportunities and amenities. Concurrently, however, population growth threatens lakes by, for instance, increasing nutrient ...

  1. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Eckert, Thomas H.; Schaner, Ted; Bowlby, James N.; Schleen, Larry P.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to maintain the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population in Lake Ontario by stocking fry failed and the species was extirpated by the 1950s. Hatchery fish stocked in the 1960s did not live to maturity because of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) predation and incidental commercial harvest. Suppression of sea lampreys began with larvicide treatments of Lake Ontario tributaries in 1971 and was enhanced when the tributaries of Oneida Lake and Lake Erie were treated in the 1980s. Annual stocking of hatchery fish was resumed with the 1972 year class and peaked at about 1.8 million yearlings and 0.3 million fingerlings from the 1985–1990 year classes. Survival of stocked yearlings declined over 50% in the 1980 s and was negatively correlated with the abundance of lake trout > 550 mm long (r = −0.91, P < 0.01, n = 12). A slot length limit imposed by the State of New York for the 1988 fishing season reduced angler harvest. Angler harvest in Canadian waters was 3 times higher in eastern Lake Ontario than in western Lake Ontario. For the 1977–1984 year classes, mean annual survival rate of lake trout age 6 and older was 0.45 (range: 0.35–0.56). In U.S. waters during 1985–1992, the total number of lake trout harvested by anglers was about 2.4 times greater than that killed by sea lampreys. The number of unmarked lake trout < 250 mm long in trawl catches in 1978–1992 was not different from that expected due to loss of marks and failure to apply marks at the hatchery, and suggested that recruitment of naturally-produced fish was nil. However, many of the obstacles which may have impeded lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario during the 1980s are slowly being removed, and there are signs of a general ecosystem recovery. Significant recruitment of naturally produced lake trout by the year 2000, one interim objective of the rehabilitation plan for the Lake, may be achieved.

  2. SARAL/AltiKa observations for the studies of ice cover on lakes and oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouraev, Alexei; Zakharova, Elena; Remy, Frederique; Fleury, Sara; Guerreiro, Kevin; Willmes, Sascha; Suknev, Andrei

    2015-04-01

    With the launch of SARAL/AltiKa satellite mission scientific community has now a new source of information to study ice cover on water bodies and oceans. AltiKa observations provide a continuity with the previous satellite radar altimetry observations from ERS-1, -2 and ENVISAT mission that have the same orbit. Moreover, with the new Ka-band altimeter it gives new insights into the ice cover structure and properties. We present studies of ice cover on lakes (Lake Baikal) and Arctic ocean (for leads and polynyas detection). For Lake Baikal we use the synergy of simultaneous active (radar altimeter) and passive (radiometer) observations from radar altimetric satellites - SARAL/Altika and also TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, ENVISAT and Geosat Follow-On. We present ice discrimination methodology from different satellite missions and discuss specificity of AltiKa observations. We analyse temporal variability of altimetric waveform parameters over ice-covered and ice-free surface for AltiKa and complement this analysis by satellite imagery (MODIS, Landsat), as well as our dedicated field observations of ice cover properties along the AltiKa tracks in spring 2013 and 2014. For the Arctic ocean we investigate the performance of SARAL/AltiKa to detect the leads and the coastal polynyas as well as its ability to represent spatial and temporal dynamic of water openings. The method consists first in analysis of along-track radar waveforms with collocated high-resolution Landsat images in order to localise ice/water transitions. We discuss the potential of several techniques that could be used for leads and polynya studies and for freeboard estimation. This research has been done in the framework of the Russian-French cooperation GDRI "CAR-WET-SIB", CNES TOSCA AO, ANR "CLASSIQUE", IDEX Transversalité InHERA, CNRS-Russia "Franco-Siberian Center for Research and Education" and PICS BaLaLaICA, ESA Proposal C1P.13132, Russian FZP 1.5 and EU FP7 "MONARCH-A" projects.

  3. A Killer Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In 1986, Lake Nyos, a volcanic lake in Cameroon, released a huge amount of carbon dioxide gas, killing over 1,700 people in the surrounding area. This case study, developed for use in a limnology or aquatic biology course, explores that event, introducing students to concepts relating to lake formation, thermal stratification, and dissolved gases.…

  4. Lake Layers: Stratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Chris; And Others

    This teacher guide and student workbook set contains two learning activities, designed for fifth through ninth grade students, that concentrate on lake stratification and water quality. In the activities students model the seasonal temperature changes that occur in temperate lakes and observe the resulting stratification of lake waters. Students…

  5. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This book contains lesson plans that provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into elementary subjects. The book is divided into three subject areas: (1) History, which includes the origins of the Great Lakes, Great Lakes people, and shipwrecks; (2) Social Studies, which covers government, acid rain as a…

  6. Great Lakes: Chemical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tenth Great Lakes Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society met to assess current Chemical Research activity in the Great Lakes Basin, and addressed to the various aspects of the theme, Chemistry of the Great Lakes. Research areas reviewed included watershed studies, atmospheric and aquatic studies, and sediment studies. (BT)

  7. A Killer Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In 1986, Lake Nyos, a volcanic lake in Cameroon, released a huge amount of carbon dioxide gas, killing over 1,700 people in the surrounding area. This case study, developed for use in a limnology or aquatic biology course, explores that event, introducing students to concepts relating to lake formation, thermal stratification, and dissolved gases.…

  8. Great Lakes in January

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    This image taken on January 13, 2015 from the Suomi NPP satellite's VIIRS instrument shows the Great Lakes and surrounding areas. The latest Great Lakes Surface Environmental Analysis (GLSEA) from the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory shows total ice cover of 29.3% as of January 13th. Credit: NOAA/NASA/NPP Via NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

  9. Great Lakes: Chemical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tenth Great Lakes Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society met to assess current Chemical Research activity in the Great Lakes Basin, and addressed to the various aspects of the theme, Chemistry of the Great Lakes. Research areas reviewed included watershed studies, atmospheric and aquatic studies, and sediment studies. (BT)

  10. Lake Effects: The Lake Superior Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beery, Tom; And Others

    This curriculum guide was launched in response to a need for Lake Superior-specific educational materials and contains lessons and activities that can be used to teach about Lake Superior. The lessons in this book are divided into four sections. Each of the first three sections has a background section that provides basic information about Lake…

  11. Lake Effects: The Lake Superior Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beery, Tom; And Others

    This curriculum guide was launched in response to a need for Lake Superior-specific educational materials and contains lessons and activities that can be used to teach about Lake Superior. The lessons in this book are divided into four sections. Each of the first three sections has a background section that provides basic information about Lake…

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of freshwater sponges provide evidence for endemism and radiation in ancient lakes.

    PubMed

    Meixner, Martin J; Lüter, Carsten; Eckert, Carsten; Itskovich, Valeria; Janussen, Dorte; von Rintelen, Thomas; Bohne, Alexandra V; Meixner, Johannes M; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2007-12-01

    Morphologic and phylogenetic analysis of freshwater sponges endemic to lakes in Central Sulawesi, Siberia and South-East Europe is presented. We also analyzed several cosmopolitan sponge species from Eurasia and North America and included sponge sequences from public databases. In agreement with previous reports [Addis, J.S., Peterson, K.J., 2005. Phylogenetic relationships of freshwater sponges (Porifera, Spongillina) inferred from analyses of 18S rDNA, COI mtDNA, and ITS2 rDNA sequences. Zool. Scr. 34, 549-557], the metaniid sponge Corvomeyenia sp. was the most deeply branching species within a monophyletic lineage of the suborder Spongillina. Pachydictyum globosum (Malawispongiidae) and Nudospongilla vasta (Spongillidae), two morphologically quite distinct species from Sulawesi were found in a joint clade with Trochospongilla (Spongillidae) rendering Trochospongilla paraphyletic. Furthermore, Ochridaspongia sp., another Malawispongiidae, clustered far away from that clade, together with Ephydatia fluviatilis, making the latter family polyphyletic. The Lubomirskiidae endemic to Lake Baikal, Lubomirskia abietina, Baikalospongia bacillifera, B. intermedia, and Swartschewskia papyracea formed a well-supported clade that was most closely linked to the genus Ephydatia (99.9% identity over a total length of 2169 concatenated nucleotide positions). Our study indicates the frequent and independent origin of sponge species endemic to different freshwater ecosystems from a few cosmopolitan founder species. The highly specific primer sets newly developed here facilitate work on the molecular phylogeny and DNA barcoding of sponges.

  13. Integrative assessment of potential effects of dioxins and related compounds in wild Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica): application of microarray and biochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Shusaku; Imaeda, Daisuke; Nakayama, Kei; Udaka, Masayuki; Kim, Eun-Young; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Masako; Matsuda, Tomonari; Matsui, Saburo; Petrov, Evgeny A; Batoev, Valeriy B; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Iwata, Hisato

    2011-09-01

    We have previously indicated that accumulation of chlorinated dioxins and related compounds (DRCs) induced cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 isozymes in the liver of wild Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica). Here we attempt to assess the potential effects of DRCs triggered by the induction of these CYP1 isozymes in this species, using an integrative approach, combining gene expression monitoring and biochemical assays. To screen genes that may potentially respond to the exposure of DRCs, we constructed a custom cDNA oligo array that can target mRNAs in Baikal seals, and monitored hepatic mRNA expression levels in the wild population. Correlation analyses between the hepatic total 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) and mRNA levels supported our previous findings that high accumulation of DRCs induces the transcription of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genes. In addition, our integrative assessment indicated that the chronic exposure to DRCs may alter the hepatic transcript levels of genes related to oxidative stress, Fe ion homeostasis, and inflammatory responses. The expression levels of CYP1A2 showed significant positive correlations with levels of malondialdehyde, a biomarker of lipid peroxidation, and of etheno-dA, a DNA adduct, suggesting that the lipid peroxidation may be enhanced through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggered by CYP1A2 induction. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between heme oxygenase activities and malondialdehyde levels, suggesting the prompted heme degradation by ROS. Fetuin-A levels, which are suppressed by inflammation, showed a significant negative correlation with TEQ levels, and hepcidin levels, which are conversely increased by inflammation, had significant positive correlations with malondialdehyde and etheno-dA levels, implying the progression of inflammation by DRC-induced oxidative stress. Taken together, we propose here that wild Baikal seals may suffer from effects of chronic

  14. Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jingjing; Mei, Ying; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2017-10-01

    This review on stream, lake, and reservoir management covers selected 2016 publications on the focus of the following sections: Stream, lake, and reservoir management • Water quality of stream, lake, and reservoir • Reservoir operations • Models of stream, lake, and reservoir • Remediation and restoration of stream, lake, and reservoir • Biota of stream, lake, and reservoir • Climate effect of stream, lake, and reservoir.

  15. Hazardous crater lakes studied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Minoru

    Crater lakes usually sit on top of volcanic conduits and act as condensers of magmatic vapor. Studies of crater lakes can therefore provide information on both deep magmatic activity and variations in the degassing state of a shallow magmatic body. The Lake Nyos gas disaster of August 1986 and a similar event in August 1984 at Lake Monoun, both in Cameroon, resulted from the accumulation of magmatic CO2 in the bottom layers of the lakes. Geochemical monitoring of crater lakes is a promising tool for forecasting not only limnic but also volcanic eruptions. Acid-mineralized waters formed by condensation of hot magmatic volatiles in crater lakes are thought to bear some resemblance to hydrothermal fluids acting in the genesis of acid-sulfate alteration and Au-Cu-Ag mineralization of volcanic-hosted precious metal deposits.

  16. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, F.L.; Wells, F.C.; Shelby, W.J.; McPherson, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Lake Austin and Town Lake are impoundments on the Colorado River in Travis County, central Texas, and are a source of water for municipal industrial water supplies, electrical-power generation, and recreation for more than 500,000 people in the Austin metropolitan area. Small vertical temperature variations in both lakes were attributed to shallow depths in the lakes and short retention times of water in the lakes during the summer months. The largest areal variations in dissolved oxygen generally occur in Lake Austin during the summer as a result of releases of water from below the thermocline in Lake Travis. Except for iron, manganese, and mercury, dissolved concentrations of trace elements in water collected from Lake Austin and Town Lake did not exceed the primary or secondary drinking water standards set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Little or no effect of stormwater runoff on temperature, dissolved oxygen, or minor elements could be detected in either Lake Austin or Town Lake. Little seasonal or areal variation was noted in nitrogen concentrations in Lake Austin or Town lake. Total phosphorus concentrations generally were small in both lakes. Increased concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were detected after storm runoff inflow in Town Lake, but not in Lake Austin; densities of fecal-coliform bacteria increased in Lake Austin and Town Lake, but were substantially greater in Town Lake than in Lake Austin. 18 refs., 38 figs., 59 tabs.

  17. Diatoms from Lake Kushu: A pilot study to test the potential of a Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental archive from Rebun Island (Hokkaido Region, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mareike; Tarasov, Pavel E.; Hoelzmann, Philipp; Meyer, Hanno; Leipe, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Rebun Island is a key research area for the Baikal-Hokkaido Archaeology Project to better understand the dynamics of the Neolithic hunter-gatherers in the NW Pacific region. Hence, the ca. 19.5 m sediment core RK12 spanning the last ca. 16.6 cal. kyr BP was obtained from Lake Kushu. Our aim is to test its potential as a high-resolution multi-proxy archive. Here, we used diatoms to investigate the modern ecosystem of Lake Kushu and its surrounding area on Rebun Island and of Hime-numa Pond on Rishiri Island and selected core samples for comparison. Modern diatom and stable isotope analyses show well-mixed freshwater bodies with eutrophic, alkaline conditions. The fossil diatom and geochemical sediment analyses display three phases that represent major changes in the lake development: (i) a marshy phase (ca. 16.6-10 cal. kyr BP); (ii) a brackish water lagoon phase (ca. 10-6.6 cal. kyr BP); and (iii) a freshwater lake phase (since ca. 6.6 cal. kyr BP). This shows the major role of the post-glacial climate amelioration, global sea-level rise and marine transgression in the development of this landscape. Further analyses will provide a palaeolimnological record at (sub-)decadal resolution that will facilitate the interpretation of the hunter-gatherer dynamics.

  18. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Payne, N. Robert; Johnson, James E.; Bowen, Charles; Ebener, Mark P.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to restore lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Huron after their collapse in the 1940s were underway in the early 1970s with completion of the first round of lampricide applications in tributary streams and the stocking of several genotypes. We assess results of rehabilitation and establish a historical basis for comparison by quantifying the catch of spawning lake trout from Michigan waters in 1929-1932. Sixty-eight percent of this catch occurred in northern waters (MH-1) and most of the rest (15%) was from remote reefs in the middle of the main basin. Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) increased in the early 1980s in the main basin and depressed spawning populations of lake trout. This increase was especially severe in northern waters and appeared to be associated with untreated populations in the St. Marys River. Excessive commercial fishing stemming from unresolved treaty rights also contributed to loss of spawning fish in northern Michigan waters. Seneca-strain lake trout did not appear to be attacked by sea lampreys until they reached a size > 532 mm. At sizes > 632 mm, Seneca trout were 40-fold more abundant than the Marquette strain in matched-planting experiments. Natural reproduction past the fry stage has occurred in Thunder Bay and South Bay, but prospects for self-sustaining populations of lake trout in the main basin are poor because sea lampreys are too abundant, only one side of the basin is stocked, and stocking is deferred to allow commercial gillnetting in areas where most of the spawning occurred historically. Backcross lake trout, a lake trout x splake (s. Fontinalis x s. Namaycush) hybrid, did not reproduce in Georgian Bay, but this genotype is being replaced with pure-strain lake trout, whose early performance appears promising.

  19. Modern fault formation in the Earth's crust of the Baikal rift system according to the data on the mechanisms of earthquake sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San'kov, V. A.; Dobrynina, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    The spatial characteristics of seismotectonic deformations and the most likely fracture planes in the earthquake sources of the Baikal rift system (BRS) are determined using the method of cataclastic analysis of fractures [1]. It is shown that extension conditions with a strike of modern fractures parallel to the rift-controlling faults are dominant in the central zone and in most of the NE flank of the BRS. The flat average dip of fractures in the earthquake sources of the main fault zones for some rift depressions allow a suggestion about the flattening of faults in the middle crust. The antithetic faults are steeper. The BRS flanks are characterized by dominant shear deformations and more diverse morphogenetic faults in the earthquake sources (strike-slip faults, reversed faults, and normal faults). The modern faults at the BRS flanks weakly inherit the neotectonic structure.

  20. Changes of clay mineral assemblages in Lake Hovsgol (Mongolia) in the course of their transportation and sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanova, A.; Solotchina, E.; Krivonogov, S.

    2009-04-01

    As known, clay minerals of lake sediments sensitively indicate climatic and environmental changes. Composition of clay mineral assemblages depends on petrography and weathering pattern of parental rocks in lake catchments. Lake Hovsgol, the second large basin in the Baikal Rift Zone, differs from the first one by extremely small drainage area: its ratio to the lake surface is 1.8 (compare with 17 of Lake Baikal). This peculiarity of lake Hovsgol defines the amount of clay minerals deposited in bottom sediments and the value of their transformation in the course of transportation We studied a number of short sediment cores (up to 1.75 m long) obtained from different parts of the lake in the framework of the Hovsgol Drilling Project, 2001-2007. Regularities of modern clay minerals transportation were studied in 80 samples from river mouths and piedmont slopes around the lake. Their mineral composition was determined by X-ray powder diffraction and IR-spectroscopy. For X-ray, we prepared the oriented mounts by transferring the suspension of bulk sample in distilled water onto a glass slide. Slides, dried at room temperature, then were solvated for about 24 hours with ethylene-glycol vapor in an evacuated desiccator. Measurements were conducted on an automated powder diffractometer with CuKα radiation, graphite monochromator. The comparative analysis of clay minerals and their crystallochemical parameters were performed by the original method of modeling X-ray diffraction profiles, based on the calculation of the interference function of the one-dimensional disordered crystals with finite thickness and using a specially developed optimization procedure. Quantitative estimations of the composition of minerals such as quartz, plagioclase, carbonate were made by IR-spectroscopy. Samples were prepared using the KBr pellet method. It was established that the mineral association in bottom sediments includes illite, smectite, chlorite, chlorite-smectite, muscovite, kaolinite

  1. Comparative 16S rRNA Analysis of Lake Bacterioplankton Reveals Globally Distributed Phylogenetic Clusters Including an Abundant Group of Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Zaichikov, Evgeny; Belkova, Natalia; Denissova, Ludmilla; Pernthaler, Jakob; Pernthaler, Annelie; Amann, Rudolf

    2000-01-01

    In a search for cosmopolitan phylogenetic clusters of freshwater bacteria, we recovered a total of 190 full and partial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences from three different lakes (Lake Gossenköllesee, Austria; Lake Fuchskuhle, Germany; and Lake Baikal, Russia). The phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA data set showed that our sequences fall into 16 clusters, which otherwise include bacterial rDNA sequences of primarily freshwater and soil, but not marine, origin. Six of the clusters were affiliated with the α, four were affiliated with the β, and one was affiliated with the γ subclass of the Proteobacteria; four were affiliated with the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group; and one was affiliated with the class Actinobacteria (formerly known as the high-G+C gram-positive bacteria). The latter cluster (hgcI) is monophyletic and so far includes only sequences directly retrieved from aquatic environments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes specific for the hgcI cluster showed abundances of up to 1.7 × 105 cells ml−1 in Lake Gossenköllesee, with strong seasonal fluctuations, and high abundances in the two other lakes investigated. Cell size measurements revealed that Actinobacteria in Lake Gossenköllesee can account for up to 63% of the bacterioplankton biomass. A combination of phylogenetic analysis and FISH was used to reveal 16 globally distributed sequence clusters and to confirm the broad distribution, abundance, and high biomass of members of the class Actinobacteria in freshwater ecosystems. PMID:11055963

  2. Stage fluctuations of Wisconsin lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, Leo B.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes lake-stage fluctuations of 83 gaged lakes in Wisconsin and presents techniques for estimating stage fluctuation at ungaged lakes. Included are stage information at 83 lakes and stage-frequency data for 32 of these lakes that had sufficient record for analysis. Lakes are classified by a hydrologic-topographic lake classification scheme as ground-water flowthrough (GWF) lakes, surface-water drainage (SWD) lakes, and surface-water flow-through (SWF) lakes. Lakes within the same class were found to have similar water-level fluctuations. The lake-stage records indicate that most annual maximums occur during the months of May and June for all three classes. Annual minimum lake levels generally occur in September for surface-water drainage lakes, in March for surface-water flowthrough lakes, and in November for ground-water flow-through lakes. Data for each lake include location, period of water-level record, hydrologic classification, drainage area, surface area, lake volume, maximum depth, long-term mean stage and its standard deviation, maximum and minimum observed lake stage, and the average annual lake-stage fluctuation.

  3. Salting our freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Hilary A; Bartlett, Sarah L; Burke, Samantha M; Doubek, Jonathan P; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E; Skaff, Nicholas K; Summers, Jamie C; Farrell, Kaitlin J; McCullough, Ian M; Morales-Williams, Ana M; Roberts, Derek C; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2017-04-10

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L(-1)), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue.

  4. Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of crescent-shaped Lake Balkhash was taken by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) on April 27, 2000. Lake Balkhash is located in eastern Kazakhstan, north of the Tian-Shan mountains. The Ili River flows into the western end of the lake, filling it with bright sediment. This sediment highlights the difference between the freshwater western side of the lake and the saline eastern side. A sandbar prevents mixing between the lake's two sections.Other features in this image include Lake Sayram in the lower right (southeast) corner, which is surrounded by the Borohoro Shan mountain range. At center right, just north of the Borohoro Shan, are lakes Sasykkol (left) and Alakol (right). The Karatal River flows northward through an arid and sandy landscape into the center of Lake Balkhash. The full-size image compares the region on April 27th image with one from the 18th. In that time sediments in lakes Balkhash and Sasykol increased noticeably, probably due to snowmelt-note the decrease in snowcover on the region's mountains. Also, the ice on Lake Sayram melted. These images were retrieved by the SeaWiFS high-resolution ground station in Mongolia, which recently began sending data to Goddard Space Flight Center. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  5. Salting our freshwater lakes

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Sarah L.; Burke, Samantha M.; Doubek, Jonathan P.; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E.; Skaff, Nicholas K.; Summers, Jamie C.; Farrell, Kaitlin J.; McCullough, Ian M.; Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Roberts, Derek C.; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2017-01-01

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L−1), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue. PMID:28396392

  6. View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ridge showing spillway at photo center, view southwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  7. In-lake Modeling Recommendation Report for Lake Champlain TMDL

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report describes the recommended modeling approach for the in-lake modeling component of the Lake Champlain TMDL project. The report was prepared by Tetra Tech, with input from the Lake Champlain modeling workgroup. (TetraTech, 2012b)

  8. 9. GRANT LAKE AND MONO LAKE IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GRANT LAKE AND MONO LAKE IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Genesis of rare-metal pegmatites and alkaline apatite-fluorite rocks of Burpala massi, Northern Baikal folded zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikova, Irina; Vladykin, Nikolai

    2015-04-01

    Burpalinsky rare metal alkaline massif in the Northern Baikal folded zone in southern margin of Siberian Platform, is a of intrusion central type, created 287 Ma covering area of about 250 km2. It is composed of nepheline syenites and pulaskites grading to quartz syenites in the contacts. Veines and dykes are represented by shonkinites, sodalite syenite, leucocratic granophyres, alkali granites and numerous rare metal alkaline syenite pegmatites and two dykes of carbonatites. All rocks except for granites are cut by a large apatite-fluorite dyke rocks with mica and magnetite, which in turn is cut by alaskite granites dyke. The massif has been studied by A.M. Portnov, A.A. Ganzeev et al. (1992) Burpalinsky massif is highly enriched with trace elements, which are concentrated in pegmatite dykes. About 70 rare-metal minerals we found in massif. Zr-silicates: zircon, eudialyte, lovenite, Ti-lovenite, velerite, burpalite, seidozerite, Ca- seidozerite, Rosenbuschite, vlasovite, katapleite, Ca-katapleite, elpidite. Ti- minerals:- sphene, astrophyllite, ramsaite, Mn-neptunite bafertisite, chevkinite, Mn-ilmenite, pirofanite, Sr-perrerit, landauite, rutile, anatase, brookite; TR- minerals - loparite, metaloparite, britolite, rinkolite, melanocerite, bastnesite, parisite, ankilite, monazite, fluocerite, TR-apatite; Nb- minerals - pyrochlore, loparite. Other rare minerals leucophanite, hambergite, pyrochlore, betafite, torite, thorianite, tayniolite, brewsterite, cryolite and others. We have proposed a new scheme massif: shonkinites - nepheline syenites - alkaline syenite - quartz syenites - veined rocks: mariupolites, rare-metal pegmatites, apatite, fluorite rock alyaskite and alkaline granites and carbonatites (Sotnikova, 2009). Apatite-fluorite rocks are found in the central part of massif. This is a large vein body of 2 km length and a 20 m width cutting prevailing pulaskites. Previously, these rocks were regarded as hydrothermal low-temperature phase. New geological and

  10. 2016 Lake Michigan Lake Trout Working Group Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Breidert, Brian; Boyarski, David; Bronte, Charles R.; Dickinson, Ben; Donner, Kevin; Ebener, Mark P.; Gordon, Roger; Hanson, Dale; Holey, Mark; Janssen, John; Jonas, Jory; Kornis, Matthew; Olsen, Erik; Robillard, Steve; Treska, Ted; Weldon, Barry; Wright, Greg D.

    2017-01-01

    This report provides a review on the progression of lake trout rehabilitation towards meeting the Salmonine Fish Community Objectives (FCOs) for Lake Michigan (Eshenroder et. al. 1995) and the interim goal and evaluation objectives articulated in A Fisheries Management Implementation Strategy for the Rehabilitation of Lake Trout in Lake Michigan (Dexter et al. 2011); we also include data describing lake trout stocking and mortality to portray the present state of progress towards lake trout rehabilitation.

  11. Origins of rainbow smelt in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.

    1983-01-01

    The first rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) to enter Lake Ontario were probably migrants from an anadromous strain introduced into New York's Finger Lakes. Since the upper Great Lakes were originally stocked with a landlocked strain from Green Lake, Maine, subsequent migration to Lake Ontario from Lake Erie makes Lake Ontario unique among the Great Lakes in probably having received introductions from two distinct populations.

  12. Hydrology of Indiana lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perrey, Joseph Irving; Corbett, Don Melvin

    1956-01-01

    The stabilization of lake levels often requires the construction of outlet control structures. A detailed study of past lake-level elevations and other hydologic date is necessary to establish a level that can be maintained and to determine the means necessary for maintaining the established level. Detailed lake-level records for 28 lakes are included in the report, and records for over 100 other lakes data are available in the U.S. Geological Survey Office, Indianapolis, Ind. Evaporation data from the four Class A evaporation station of the U. S. Weather Bureau have been compiled in this report. A table showing the established legal lake level and related data is included.

  13. Mono Lake, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-24

    In eastern California, along the western edge of the Great Basin, sits Mono Lake. This is a salty remnant of a wetter era. Estimates are that the lake existed for at least 760,000 years. Now surrounded by mountain ranges, however, Mono Lake has no outlet; water entering the lake can only evaporate away, so Mono Lake is saltier than the ocean. South of the lake appear some of the geologic features known as Mono Craters. Geologists estimate that the Mono Craters last erupted about 650 years ago. The image was acquired July 7, 2016, covers an area of 22.6 by 34 km, and is located at 37.9 degrees north, 119 degrees west. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21518

  14. Lake Enriquillo, Dominican Republic

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-15

    Lake Enriquillo is a hypersaline lake in the Dominican Republic. In 2004, the lake covered an area of 164 square kilometers; by 2011, it had doubled in size and grown to 350 km2, inundating farmland and homes. Various reasons for the flooding include increases in rainfall; increase of sediments going into the lake, raising the lakebed; and milder temperatures, reducing surface evaporation. The lake is home to the largest population of American crocodiles in the Caribbean. The images were acquired October 26, 2003 and June 10, 2017, cover an area of 22.7 by 45.4 km, and are located at 18.5 degrees north, 71.6 degrees west. An image of Lake Enriquillo taken in 2003 is available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21815

  15. David Morrison on Lake Vostok

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Dr. David Morrison discusses the implications of research possibilities at Lake Vostok, one of the largest subglacial lakes located over two miles beneath the ice in Antarctica. The lake has been c...

  16. Aquatic biogeochemistry: Cleaner Chinese lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corman, Jessica

    2017-07-01

    Phosphorus loading can cause eutrophication of lakes. Analyses of lake chemistry in China reveal that policies have led to lower phosphorus levels overall, but increasing trends in some lakes suggest that expanded policies may be needed.

  17. Lake Mead, NV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Lake Mead, Nevada, (36.0N, 114.5E) where the water from the Colorado River empties after it's 273 mile journey through the Grand Canyon of Arizona is the subject of this photo. Other features of interest are Hoover Dam on the south shore of Lake Mead where cheap hydroelectric power is secondary to the water resources made available in this northern desert region and the resort city of Las Vegas, just to the west of Lake Mead.

  18. Great Lakes Literacy Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Manzo, Lyndsey

    2011-03-01

    Lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, and Erie together form North America's Great Lakes, a region that contains 20% of the world's fresh surface water and is home to roughly one quarter of the U.S. population (Figure 1). Supporting a $4 billion sport fishing industry, plus $16 billion annually in boating, 1.5 million U.S. jobs, and $62 billion in annual wages directly, the Great Lakes form the backbone of a regional economy that is vital to the United States as a whole (see http://www.miseagrant.umich.edu/downloads/economy/11-708-Great-Lakes-Jobs.pdf). Yet the grandeur and importance of this freshwater resource are little understood, not only by people in the rest of the country but also by many in the region itself. To help address this lack of knowledge, the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Great Lakes, supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, developed literacy principles for the Great Lakes to serve as a guide for education of students and the public. These “Great Lakes Literacy Principles” represent an understanding of the Great Lakes' influences on society and society's influences on the Great Lakes.

  19. Lakes, Lagerstaetten, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, E. G.; Park, L. E.

    2001-12-01

    The diversity of terrestrial systems is estimated to be greater than in the marine realm. However no hard data yet exists to substantiate this claim. Ancient lacustrine deposits may preserve an exceptionally diverse fossil fauna and aid in determining continental faunal diversities. Fossils preserved in lake deposits, especially those with exceptional preservation (i.e. Konservat Lagerstaetten), may represent a dependable method for determining species diversity changes in the terrestrial environment because of their faunal completeness. Important Konservat Lagerstaetten, such as the Green River Formation (US) and Messel (Germany), both Eocene in age, are found in lake sediments and show a remarkable faunal diversity for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To date information from nearly 25 lake lagerstaetten derived from different types of lake basins from the Carboniferous to the Miocene have been collected and described. Carboniferous sites derive from the cyclothems of Midcontinent of the US while many Cenozoic sites have been described from North and South America as well as Europe and Australia. Asian sites contain fossils from the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. With this data, insight into the evolutionary processes associated with lake systems can be examined. Do lakes act as unique evolutionary crucibles in contrast to marine systems? The speciation of cichlid fishes in present-day African lakes appears to be very high and is attributed to the diversity of environments found in large rift lakes. Is this true of all ancient lakes or just large rift lakes? The longevity of a lake system may be an important factor in allowing speciation and evolutionary processes to occur; marine systems are limited only in the existence of environments as controlled by tectonics and sea level changes, on the order of tens of millions of years. Rift lakes are normally the longest lived in the millions of years. Perhaps there are only certain types of lakes in which speciation of

  20. Great Lakes: Great Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Sea Grant Inst., Albany, NY.

    This folder contains 12 fact sheets designed to improve the quality of gardens near the Great Lakes. The titles are: (1) "Your Garden and the Great Lakes"; (2) "Organic Gardening"; (3) "Fruit and Vegetable Gardening"; (4) "Composting Yard Wastes"; (5) "Herbicides and Water Quality"; (6)…

  1. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... mountains including the Wasatch Range to the east, and the temperature difference between the Great Salt Lake and the overlying atmosphere ... snow cover between the winter and summer views, water color changes in parts of the Great Salt Lake are apparent in these images. The ...

  2. Lessons from a Lake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goethals, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study that included classroom lessons on hydroelectric power, the history and construction of a nearby lake, data recording, the use of field guides, and methods of counting natural populations. The study culminated in a field trip to the lake. (JRH)

  3. Great Lakes Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ron

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reservoirs of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. They are also a magnificent resource for the teachers of Ontario. Study of the Great Lakes can bring to life the factors that shape the ecology…

  4. The Great Lakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seasons, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reserviors of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. These lakes and their relationship with people of Canada and the United States can be useful as a subject for teaching the impact of human…

  5. The lakes of Titan.

    PubMed

    Stofan, E R; Elachi, C; Lunine, J I; Lorenz, R D; Stiles, B; Mitchell, K L; Ostro, S; Soderblom, L; Wood, C; Zebker, H; Wall, S; Janssen, M; Kirk, R; Lopes, R; Paganelli, F; Radebaugh, J; Wye, L; Anderson, Y; Allison, M; Boehmer, R; Callahan, P; Encrenaz, P; Flamini, E; Francescetti, G; Gim, Y; Hamilton, G; Hensley, S; Johnson, W T K; Kelleher, K; Muhleman, D; Paillou, P; Picardi, G; Posa, F; Roth, L; Seu, R; Shaffer, S; Vetrella, S; West, R

    2007-01-04

    The surface of Saturn's haze-shrouded moon Titan has long been proposed to have oceans or lakes, on the basis of the stability of liquid methane at the surface. Initial visible and radar imaging failed to find any evidence of an ocean, although abundant evidence was found that flowing liquids have existed on the surface. Here we provide definitive evidence for the presence of lakes on the surface of Titan, obtained during the Cassini Radar flyby of Titan on 22 July 2006 (T16). The radar imaging polewards of 70 degrees north shows more than 75 circular to irregular radar-dark patches, in a region where liquid methane and ethane are expected to be abundant and stable on the surface. The radar-dark patches are interpreted as lakes on the basis of their very low radar reflectivity and morphological similarities to lakes, including associated channels and location in topographic depressions. Some of the lakes do not completely fill the depressions in which they lie, and apparently dry depressions are present. We interpret this to indicate that lakes are present in a number of states, including partly dry and liquid-filled. These northern-hemisphere lakes constitute the strongest evidence yet that a condensable-liquid hydrological cycle is active in Titan's surface and atmosphere, in which the lakes are filled through rainfall and/or intersection with the subsurface 'liquid methane' table.

  6. The lakes of Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stofan, E.R.; Elachi, C.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.D.; Stiles, B.; Mitchell, K.L.; Ostro, S.; Soderblom, L.; Wood, C.; Zebker, H.; Wall, S.; Janssen, M.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Paillou, P.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2007-01-01

    The surface of Saturn's haze-shrouded moon Titan has long been proposed to have oceans or lakes, on the basis of the stability of liquid methane at the surface. Initial visible and radar imaging failed to find any evidence of an ocean, although abundant evidence was found that flowing liquids have existed on the surface. Here we provide definitive evidence for the presence of lakes on the surface of Titan, obtained during the Cassini Radar flyby of Titan on 22 July 2006 (T16). The radar imaging polewards of 70?? north shows more than 75 circular to irregular radar-dark patches, in a region where liquid methane and ethane are expected to be abundant and stable on the surface. The radar-dark patches are interpreted as lakes on the basis of their very low radar reflectivity and morphological similarities to lakes, including associated channels and location in topographic depressions. Some of the lakes do not completely fill the depressions in which they lie, and apparently dry depressions are present. We interpret this to indicate that lakes are present in a number of states, including partly dry and liquid-filled. These northern-hemisphere lakes constitute the strongest evidence yet that a condensable-liquid hydrological cycle is active in Titan's surface and atmosphere, in which the lakes are filled through rainfall and/or intersection with the subsurface 'liquid methane' table. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Great Lakes Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ron

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reservoirs of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. They are also a magnificent resource for the teachers of Ontario. Study of the Great Lakes can bring to life the factors that shape the ecology…

  8. Lessons from a Lake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goethals, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study that included classroom lessons on hydroelectric power, the history and construction of a nearby lake, data recording, the use of field guides, and methods of counting natural populations. The study culminated in a field trip to the lake. (JRH)

  9. Lake Wobegon Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraleda, Jorge; Stork, David G.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce Lake Wobegon dice, where each die is "better than the set average." Specifically, these dice have the paradoxical property that on every roll, each die is more likely to roll greater than the set average on the roll, than less than this set average. We also show how to construct minimal optimal Lake Wobegon sets for all "n" [greater…

  10. Lake Wobegon Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraleda, Jorge; Stork, David G.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce Lake Wobegon dice, where each die is "better than the set average." Specifically, these dice have the paradoxical property that on every roll, each die is more likely to roll greater than the set average on the roll, than less than this set average. We also show how to construct minimal optimal Lake Wobegon sets for all "n" [greater…

  11. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  12. Evaporation From Lake Superior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C.; Blanken, P.; Hedstrom, N.; Leshkevich, G.; Fortin, V.; Charpentier, D.; Haywood, H.

    2009-05-01

    Evaporation is a critical component of the water balance of each of the Laurentian Great Lakes, and understanding the magnitude and physical controls of evaporative water losses are important for several reasons. Recently, low water levels in Lakes Superior and Michigan/Huron have had socioeconomic, ecological, and even meteorological impacts (e.g. water quality and quantity, transportation, invasive species, recreation, etc.). The recent low water levels may be due to increased evaporation, but this is not known as operational evaporation estimates are currently calculated as the residual of water or heat budgets. Perhaps surprisingly, almost nothing is known about evaporation dynamics from Lake Superior and few direct measurements of evaporation have been made from any of the Laurentian Great Lakes. This research is the first to attempt to directly measure evaporation from Lake Superior by deploying eddy covariance instrumentation. Results of evaporation rates, their patterns and controlling mechanisms will be presented. The direct measurements of evaporation are used with concurrent satellite and climate model data to extrapolate evaporation measurements across the entire lake. This knowledge could improve predictions of how climate change may impact the lake's water budget and subsequently how the water in the lake is managed.

  13. The Great Lakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seasons, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reserviors of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. These lakes and their relationship with people of Canada and the United States can be useful as a subject for teaching the impact of human…

  14. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Freeman L.; Wells, Frank C.; Shelby, Wanda J.; McPherson, Emma

    1988-01-01

    Water-quality data collected from Lake Austin and Town Lake, following runoff, generally were not adequate to fully determine the effects of runoff on the lakes. Data collection should not to be limited to fixed-station sampling following runoff, and both lakes need to be sampled simultaneously as soon as possible following significant precipitation.

  15. Lake trout in northern Lake Huron spawn on submerged drumlins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Stephen C.; Binder, Thomas; Wattrus, Nigel J.; Faust, Matthew D.; Janssen, John; Menzies, John; Marsden, J. Ellen; Ebener, Mark P.; Bronte, Charles R.; He, Ji X.; Tucker, Taaja R.; Hansen, Michael J.; Thompson, Henry T.; Muir, Andrew M.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of spawning lake trout Salvelinus namaycush near Drummond Island in northern Lake Huron indicate that lake trout use drumlins, landforms created in subglacial environments by the action of ice sheets, as a primary spawning habitat. From these observations, we generated a hypothesis that may in part explain locations chosen by lake trout for spawning. Most salmonines spawn in streams where they rely on streamflows to sort and clean sediments to create good spawning habitat. Flows sufficient to sort larger sediment sizes are generally lacking in lakes, but some glacial bedforms contain large pockets of sorted sediments that can provide the interstitial spaces necessary for lake trout egg incubation, particularly if these bedforms are situated such that lake currents can penetrate these sediments. We hypothesize that sediment inclusions from glacial scavenging and sediment sorting that occurred during the creation of bedforms such as drumlins, end moraines, and eskers create suitable conditions for lake trout egg incubation, particularly where these bedforms interact with lake currents to remove fine sediments. Further, these bedforms may provide high-quality lake trout spawning habitat at many locations in the Great Lakes and may be especially important along the southern edge of the range of the species. A better understanding of the role of glacially-derived bedforms in the creation of lake trout spawning habitat may help develop powerful predictors of lake trout spawning locations, provide insight into the evolution of unique spawning behaviors by lake trout, and aid in lake trout restoration in the Great Lakes.

  16. Lake Superior revisited 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCallum, Wayne R.; Selgeby, James H.

    1987-01-01

    The Lake Superior fish community has changed substantially since the early 1960s, when control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) became effective. Self-reproducing stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) have been reestablished in many inshore areas, although they have not yet reached pre-sea lamprey abundance; offshore lake trout are probably at or near pre-sea lamprey abundance. Stocks of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) appear to have fully recovered; commercial catches are at or above historical levels. Lake herring (Coregonus artedii) are recovering rapidly in U.S. waters and are abundant in western Canadian waters. The population of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), which declined in the 1970s, is recovering. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus) are becoming more abundant as a result of increased stocking in U.S. waters and are reproducing in most suitable tributaries; they have become significant in anglers' creels.

  17. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in California Region 18 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  18. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Tennessee Region 6 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  19. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Ohio Region 5 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  20. Evidence of offshore lake trout reproduction in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Bowen, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef, an offshore reef complex, was an historically important spawning area believed to represent some of the best habitat for the rehabilitation of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Lake Huron. Since 1986, lake trout have been stocked on these offshore reefs to reestablish self-sustaining populations. We sampled with beam trawls to determine the abundance of naturally reproduced age-0 lake trout on these offshore reefs during May-July in 1994-1998 and 2000-2002. In total, 123 naturally reproduced lake trout fry were caught at Six Fathom Bank, and 2 naturally reproduced lake trout fry were caught at nearby Yankee Reef. Our findings suggest that this region of Lake Huron contains suitable habitat for lake trout spawning and offers hope that lake trout rehabilitation can be achieved in the main basin of Lake Huron.

  1. Lake whitefish and lake herring population structure and niche in ten south-central Ontario lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carl, Leon M.; McGuiness, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This study compares simple fish communities of ten oligotrophic lakes in south-central Ontario. Species densities and population size structure vary significantly among these lake communities depending on fish species present beyond the littoral zone. Lake whitefish are fewer and larger in the presence of lake herring than in their absence. Diet analysis indicates that lake whitefish shift from feeding on both plankton and benthic prey when lake herring are absent to a primarily benthic feeding niche in the presence of lake herring. When benthic round whitefish are present, lake whitefish size and density decline and they move lower in the lake compared to round whitefish. Burbot are also fewer and larger in lakes with lake herring than in lakes without herring. Burbot, in turn, appear to influence the population structure of benthic coregonine species. Lower densities of benthic lake whitefish and round whitefish are found in lakes containing large benthic burbot than in lakes with either small burbot or where burbot are absent. Predation on the pelagic larvae of burbot and lake whitefish by planktivorous lake herring alters the size and age structure of these populations. As life history theory predicts, those species with poor larval survival appear to adopt a bet-hedging life history strategy of long-lived individuals as a reproductive reserve.

  2. Lake sturgeon population characteristics in Rainy Lake, Minnesota and Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, W.E.; Kallemeyn, L.W.; Willis, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rainy Lake contains a native population of lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens that has been largely unstudied. The aims of this study were to document the population characteristics of lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake and to relate environmental factors to year-class strength for this population. Gill-netting efforts throughout the study resulted in the capture of 322 lake sturgeon, including 50 recaptures. Lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake was relatively plump and fast growing compared with a 32-population summary. Population samples were dominated by lake sturgeon between 110 and 150 cm total length. Age–structure analysis of the samples indicated few younger (<10 years) lake sturgeon, but the smallest gill net mesh size used for sampling was 102 mm (bar measure) and would not retain small sturgeon. Few lake sturgeon older than age 50 years were captured, and maximum age of sampled fish was 59 years. Few correlations existed between lake sturgeon year-class indices and both annual and monthly climate variables, except that mean June air temperature was positively correlated with year-class strength. Analysis of Rainy Lake water elevation and resulting lake sturgeon year-class strength indices across years yielded consistent but weak negative correlations between late April and early June, when spawning of lake sturgeon occurs. The baseline data collected in this study should allow Rainy Lake biologists to establish more specific research questions in the future.

  3. Lake sturgeon population characteristics in Rainy Lake, Minnesota and Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, W.E.; Kallemeyn, L.W.; Willis, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rainy Lake contains a native population of lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens that has been largely unstudied. The aims of this study were to document the population characteristics of lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake and to relate environmental factors to year-class strength for this population. Gill-netting efforts throughout the study resulted in the capture of 322 lake sturgeon, including 50 recaptures. Lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake was relatively plump and fast growing compared with a 32-population summary. Population samples were dominated by lake sturgeon between 110 and 150 cm total length. Age–structure analysis of the samples indicated few younger (<10 years) lake sturgeon, but the smallest gill net mesh size used for sampling was 102 mm (bar measure) and would not retain small sturgeon. Few lake sturgeon older than age 50 years were captured, and maximum age of sampled fish was 59 years. Few correlations existed between lake sturgeon year-class indices and both annual and monthly climate variables, except that mean June air temperature was positively correlated with year-class strength. Analysis of Rainy Lake water elevation and resulting lake sturgeon year-class strength indices across years yielded consistent but weak negative correlations between late April and early June, when spawning of lake sturgeon occurs. The baseline data collected in this study should allow Rainy Lake biologists to establish more specific research questions in the future.

  4. Whiting in Lake Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Satellites provide a view from space of changes on the Earth's surface. This series of images from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) aboard the Orbview-2 satellite shows the dramatic change in the color of Lake Michigan during the summer. The bright color that appears in late summer is probably caused by calcium carbonate-chalk-in the water. Lake Michigan always has a lot of calcium carbonate in it because the floor of the lake is limestone. During most of the year the calcium carbonate remains dissolved in the cold water, but at the end of summer the lake warms up, lowering the solubility of calcium carbonate. As a result, the calcium carbonate precipitates out of the water, forming clouds of very small solid particles that appear as bright swirls from above. The phenomenon is appropriately called a whiting event. A similar event occured in 1999, but appears to have started later and subsided earlier. It is also possible that a bloom of the algae Microcystis is responsible for the color change, but unlikely because of Lake Michigan's depth and size. Microcystis blooms have occured in other lakes in the region, however. On the shore of the lake it is possible to see the cities of Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Both appear as clusters of gray-brown pixels. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  5. Yellowstone lake nanoarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  6. Yellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E.; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P.; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations. PMID:24062731

  7. Ecology under lake ice.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Stephanie E; Galloway, Aaron W E; Powers, Stephen M; Ozersky, Ted; Woo, Kara H; Batt, Ryan D; Labou, Stephanie G; O'Reilly, Catherine M; Sharma, Sapna; Lottig, Noah R; Stanley, Emily H; North, Rebecca L; Stockwell, Jason D; Adrian, Rita; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A; Arvola, Lauri; Baulch, Helen M; Bertani, Isabella; Bowman, Larry L; Carey, Cayelan C; Catalan, Jordi; Colom-Montero, William; Domine, Leah M; Felip, Marisol; Granados, Ignacio; Gries, Corinna; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Haberman, Juta; Haldna, Marina; Hayden, Brian; Higgins, Scott N; Jolley, Jeff C; Kahilainen, Kimmo K; Kaup, Enn; Kehoe, Michael J; MacIntyre, Sally; Mackay, Anson W; Mariash, Heather L; McKay, Robert M; Nixdorf, Brigitte; Nõges, Peeter; Nõges, Tiina; Palmer, Michelle; Pierson, Don C; Post, David M; Pruett, Matthew J; Rautio, Milla; Read, Jordan S; Roberts, Sarah L; Rücker, Jacqueline; Sadro, Steven; Silow, Eugene A; Smith, Derek E; Sterner, Robert W; Swann, George E A; Timofeyev, Maxim A; Toro, Manuel; Twiss, Michael R; Vogt, Richard J; Watson, Susan B; Whiteford, Erika J; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A

    2017-01-01

    Winter conditions are rapidly changing in temperate ecosystems, particularly for those that experience periods of snow and ice cover. Relatively little is known of winter ecology in these systems, due to a historical research focus on summer 'growing seasons'. We executed the first global quantitative synthesis on under-ice lake ecology, including 36 abiotic and biotic variables from 42 research groups and 101 lakes, examining seasonal differences and connections as well as how seasonal differences vary with geophysical factors. Plankton were more abundant under ice than expected; mean winter values were 43.2% of summer values for chlorophyll a, 15.8% of summer phytoplankton biovolume and 25.3% of summer zooplankton density. Dissolved nitrogen concentrations were typically higher during winter, and these differences were exaggerated in smaller lakes. Lake size also influenced winter-summer patterns for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), with higher winter DOC in smaller lakes. At coarse levels of taxonomic aggregation, phytoplankton and zooplankton community composition showed few systematic differences between seasons, although literature suggests that seasonal differences are frequently lake-specific, species-specific, or occur at the level of functional group. Within the subset of lakes that had longer time series, winter influenced the subsequent summer for some nutrient variables and zooplankton biomass.

  8. Whiting in Lake Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Satellites provide a view from space of changes on the Earth's surface. This series of images from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) aboard the Orbview-2 satellite shows the dramatic change in the color of Lake Michigan during the summer. The bright color that appears in late summer is probably caused by calcium carbonate-chalk-in the water. Lake Michigan always has a lot of calcium carbonate in it because the floor of the lake is limestone. During most of the year the calcium carbonate remains dissolved in the cold water, but at the end of summer the lake warms up, lowering the solubility of calcium carbonate. As a result, the calcium carbonate precipitates out of the water, forming clouds of very small solid particles that appear as bright swirls from above. The phenomenon is appropriately called a whiting event. A similar event occured in 1999, but appears to have started later and subsided earlier. It is also possible that a bloom of the algae Microcystis is responsible for the color change, but unlikely because of Lake Michigan's depth and size. Microcystis blooms have occured in other lakes in the region, however. On the shore of the lake it is possible to see the cities of Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Both appear as clusters of gray-brown pixels. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  9. Ecology of playa lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haukos, David A.; Smith, Loren M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 25,000 and 30,000 playa lakes are in the playa lakes region of the southern high plains (Fig. 1). Most playas are in west Texas (about 20,000), and fewer, in New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Colorado. The playa lakes region is one of the most intensively cultivated areas of North America. Dominant crops range from cotton in southern areas to cereal grains in the north. Therefore, most of the native short-grass prairie is gone, replaced by crops and, recently, grasses of the Conservation Reserve Program. Playas are the predominant wetlands and major wildlife habitat of the region.More than 115 bird species, including 20 species of waterfowl, and 10 mammal species have been documented in playas. Waterfowl nest in the area, producing up to 250,000 ducklings in wetter years. Dominant breeding and nesting species are mallards and blue-winged teals. During the very protracted breeding season, birds hatch from April through August. Several million shorebirds and waterfowl migrate through the area each spring and fall. More than 400,000 sandhill cranes migrate through and winter in the region, concentrating primarily on the larger saline lakes in the southern portion of the playa lakes region.The primary importance of the playa lakes region to waterfowl is as a wintering area. Wintering waterfowl populations in the playa lakes region range from 1 to 3 million birds, depending on fall precipitation patterns that determine the number of flooded playas. The most common wintering ducks are mallards, northern pintails, green-winged teals, and American wigeons. About 500,000 Canada geese and 100,000 lesser snow geese winter in the playa lakes region, and numbers of geese have increased annually since the early 1980’s. This chapter describes the physiography and ecology of playa lakes and their attributes that benefit waterfowl.

  10. Lake Tengiz from space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    In orbit above the semi-desert grasslands in Kazakhstan, an astronaut aboard the International Space Station spotted one of the few features that stand out. Lake Tengiz is the only large lake (1590 square kilometers, 615 square miles) in northern Kazakhstan. Through white wisps of cloud, the crew member photographed the 50 kilometer-long eastern shore of the lake, with its thin, winding islands and white beaches. The islands and intervening waterways make a rich habitat for birds in this part of Asia. At least 318 species of birds have been identified at the lake; 22 of them are endangered. It is the northernmost habitat of the pink flamingo. The lake system is Kazakhstan’s first UNESCO World Heritage Site, and it has been declared a RAMSAR wetland site of international importance. Part of the richness of area is its complex hydrology. Fresh water enters the system via the Kulanutpes River, so there are small lakes (lower right) full of fresh water. But in this closed basin, the water in the main lake (top) slowly evaporates, becoming salty. Winds stir up bigger waves on the main lake, dispersing sediment and salt and making the water a cloudier and lighter blue-green. (Another astronaut photograph shows the entire lake system, while this story provides more information.) The strange shape of the islands is not easy to interpret. They may be drowned remnants of delta distributaries of the Kulanutpes River. Westerly winds probably have had a smoothing effect on the shorelines, especially in a shallow lake like Tengiz, which is only about 6 meters (20 feet) deep. The lake has an exciting history for people who follow space exploration. In 1976, a Soyuz spacecraft landed in the lake near the north shore (top right). The capsule crashed through the ice and sank during an October snowstorm when temperatures were -22°C (-8°F). Because of low power, the capsule was unheated and the crew was feared lost. It was many hours before the airtight capsule was located and

  11. Lake Mead, NV

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-22

    SL2-03-192 (22 June 1973) --- Lake Mead, Nevada, (36.0N, 114.5E) where the water from the Colorado River empties after it's 273 mile journey through the Grand Canyon of Arizona is the subject of this photo. Other features of interest are Hoover Dam on the south shore of Lake Mead where cheap hydroelectric power is secondary to the water resources made available in this northern desert region and the resort city of Las Vegas, just to the west of Lake Mead. In this harsh desert environment, color infrared photography readily penetrates haze, detects and portrays vegetation as shades of red. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Lake Mead, NV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Lake Mead, Nevada, (36.0N, 114.5E) where the water from the Colorado River empties after it's 273 mile journey through the Grand Canyon of Arizona is the subject of this photo. Other features of interest are Hoover Dam on the south shore of Lake Mead where cheap hydroelectric power is secondary to the water resources made available in this northern desert region and the resort city of Las Vegas, just to the west of Lake Mead. In this harsh desert environment, color infrared photography readily penetrates haze, detects and portrays vegetation as shades of red.

  13. Yamzho Yumco Lake, Tibet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-01

    Yamzho Yumco (Sacred Swan) Lake in Tibet is surrounded by snow-capped mountains and is one of the three largest sacred lakes. It is highly crenellated with many bays and inlets. The lake is home to Samding Monastery, headed by a female re-incarnation (Wikipedia). The image was acquired March 6, 2014, covers an area of 49.8 by 60 km, and is centered at 28.9 degrees north, 90.6 degrees east. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21304

  14. Lake Poopo, Bolivia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-28

    In the high plains of the Andes in Bolivia, Lake Poopo has virtually vanished, as shown in this image from NASA Terra spacecraft. Once covering over 3,000 square kilometers, the lake essentially dried up in 2015. What led to Lake Poopo's demise? Water diversions upstream, weather extremes and recurrent droughts are thought to blame. The images cover an area of 48.9 by 55.1 km, were acquired February 14, 2001 and November 6, 2016, and are located near 18.7 degrees south, 67.1 degrees west. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21546

  15. National Lakes Assessment Data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Lakes Assessment (NLA) is a first-ever statistically-valid survey of the biological condition of lakes and reservoirs throughout the U.S. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) worked with states and tribes to conduct the assessment in 2007. Data for each parameter sampled in the National Lakes Assessment (NLA) are available for downloading in a series of files as comma separated values (*.csv). Each *.csv data file has a companion text file (*.txt) that lists a dataset label and individual descriptions for each variable. Users should view the *.txt files first to help guide their understanding and use of the data.

  16. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Great Lakes Region 4 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  17. Can lake sensitivity to desiccation be predicted from lake geometry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi Haghighi, Ali; Menberu, Meseret Walle; Aminnezhad, Mousa; Marttila, Hannu; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-08-01

    Declining lake levels (Aral Sea syndrome) can be caused by changes in climate, increased water use or changed regulation patterns. This paper introduces a novel lake geometry index (LGI) to quantify lake hydrological characteristics. The index was developed using a large representative dataset of lake hypsographic characteristics from 152 lakes and man-made reservoirs. Using the LGI index, lakes can be classified into five groups: groups 1-4 when LGI is 0.5-2.5, 2.5-4.5, 4.5-6.5 and 6.5-8.5, respectively, and group 5 when LGI is >8.5. Naturally shallow and vast lakes and wetlands fall into the first group and deep man-made reservoirs in narrow valleys are in group 5. The response of three different lake systems (LGI 0.75, 2.75 and 6.5) to different water flow scenarios was then simulated using the water balance equation. From this, the index 'potential lake area' (Apot) was developed to show lake responses to changed hydro-climatological conditions. Apot and LGI can be used to classify lakes into open or closed systems. Simulations showed that lakes with low LGI have a shorter response time to flow and climate changes. As a result, the impact of water balance restoration is faster for lakes with low LGI than for lakes with high LGI. The latter are also more vulnerable to climate variation and change.

  18. [FEATURES OF CONSTITUTIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF YOUNG MALES AGED OF 17-20 YEARS, NATIVES OF THE BAIKAL REGION WITH REGARD TO THEIR FUNCTIONAL GROUPS OF HEALTH].

    PubMed

    Kolokoltsev, M M

    2016-01-01

    The study of somatotypes of the constitution is an important point in planning of the improvements of measures among the population in various regions of Russia. The purpose of the work was to reveal features of age dynamics of somatotypes of the constitution in students of youthful age of the Baikal Region by means of somatotyping according to scheme by Nikityuk B. A. and Kozlova A.I (1990) with taking into account their functional group of health. There were examined 1286 Slavic young males, natives of the Irkutsk region, aged of 17-20 years, from them, according to data of the medical examination 996 were referred to the 1st (main) and 290--to the 2nd (preparatory) functional group of health for physical exercises. There were established significant differences in somatotypes of the constitution in young men of the 1st and 2nd functional groups of health. In both functional groups there is noted a significant amount of young males with transitional somatotypes that testifies to incompleteness of growth processes of their organism. The obtained results of a somatotyping are used in the educational process for a training individualization on physical culture of students of IRGTU, and also in construction of independent physical--improving programs.

  19. Characteristics of radiation and propagation of seismic waves in the Baikal Rift Zone estimated by simulations of acceleration time histories of the recorded earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, O. V.; Tubanov, Ts. A.

    2017-01-01

    The regularities in the radiation and propagation of seismic waves within the Baikal Rift Zone in Buryatia are studied to estimate the ground motion parameters from the probable future strong earthquakes. The regional parameters of seismic radiation and propagation are estimated by the stochastic simulation (which provides the closest agreement between the calculations and observations) of the acceleration time histories of the earthquakes recorded by the Ulan-Ude seismic station. The acceleration time histories of the strongest earthquakes ( M W 3.4-4.8) that occurred in 2006-2011 at the epicentral distances of 96-125 km and had source depths of 8-12 km have been modeled. The calculations are conducted with estimates of the Q-factor which were previously obtained for the region. The frequency-dependent attenuation and geometrical spreading are estimated from the data on the deep structure of the crust and upper mantle (velocity sections) in the Ulan-Ude region, and the parameters determining the wave forms and duration of acceleration time histories are found by fitting. These parameters fairly well describe all the considered earthquakes. The Ulan-Ude station can be considered as the reference bedrock station with minimum local effects. The obtained estimates for the parameters of seismic radiation and propagation can be used for forecasting the ground motion from the future strong earthquakes and for constructing the seismic zoning maps for Buryatia.

  20. Paleopathological Description and Diagnosis of Metastatic Carcinoma in an Early Bronze Age (4588+34 Cal. BP) Forager from the Cis-Baikal Region of Eastern Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Lieverse, Angela R.; Temple, Daniel H.; Bazaliiskii, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive osteolytic and osteoblastic lesions were observed on the skeletal remains of an adult male excavated from an Early Bronze Age cemetery dated to 4556+32 years BP, located in the Cis-Baikal region of Siberia (Russian Federation). Lytic lesions ranged in size from several mm to over 60 mm in diameter and had irregular, moth-eaten borders. Many of these lesions destroyed trabecular bone, though a hollowed shell of cortical bone often remained observable. Radiographic analysis revealed numerous lytic lesions within trabecular bone that had not yet affected the cortex. Blastic lesions were identified as spiculated lines, bands, or nodules of mostly immature (woven) bone formed at irregular intervals. Anatomical elements with the greatest involvement included those of the axial skeleton (skull, vertebrae, sacrum, ribs, and sternum) as well as proximal appendicular elements (ossa coxae, proximal femora, clavicles, scapulae, and proximal humeri). Osteocoalescence of destructive foci was observed on the ilium and frontal bone, with the largest lesion found on the right ilium. Differential diagnoses include metastatic carcinoma, mycotic infections, tuberculosis, Langerhan's cell histiocytosis, and multiple myeloma. Based on lesion appearance and distribution, age and sex of the individual, as well as pathogen endemism, the most likely diagnostic option for this set of lesions is metastatic carcinoma. The age and sex of this individual and appearance of the lesions may reflect carcinoma of the lung or, possibly, prostate. This represents one of the earliest cases of metastatic carcinoma worldwide and the oldest case documented thus far from Northeast Asia. PMID:25470373

  1. Paleopathological description and diagnosis of metastatic carcinoma in an Early Bronze Age (4588+34 Cal. BP) forager from the Cis-Baikal region of Eastern Siberia.

    PubMed

    Lieverse, Angela R; Temple, Daniel H; Bazaliiskii, Vladimir I

    2014-01-01

    Extensive osteolytic and osteoblastic lesions were observed on the skeletal remains of an adult male excavated from an Early Bronze Age cemetery dated to 4556+32 years BP, located in the Cis-Baikal region of Siberia (Russian Federation). Lytic lesions ranged in size from several mm to over 60 mm in diameter and had irregular, moth-eaten borders. Many of these lesions destroyed trabecular bone, though a hollowed shell of cortical bone often remained observable. Radiographic analysis revealed numerous lytic lesions within trabecular bone that had not yet affected the cortex. Blastic lesions were identified as spiculated lines, bands, or nodules of mostly immature (woven) bone formed at irregular intervals. Anatomical elements with the greatest involvement included those of the axial skeleton (skull, vertebrae, sacrum, ribs, and sternum) as well as proximal appendicular elements (ossa coxae, proximal femora, clavicles, scapulae, and proximal humeri). Osteocoalescence of destructive foci was observed on the ilium and frontal bone, with the largest lesion found on the right ilium. Differential diagnoses include metastatic carcinoma, mycotic infections, tuberculosis, Langerhan's cell histiocytosis, and multiple myeloma. Based on lesion appearance and distribution, age and sex of the individual, as well as pathogen endemism, the most likely diagnostic option for this set of lesions is metastatic carcinoma. The age and sex of this individual and appearance of the lesions may reflect carcinoma of the lung or, possibly, prostate. This represents one of the earliest cases of metastatic carcinoma worldwide and the oldest case documented thus far from Northeast Asia.

  2. Molecular characterization of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8 viruses isolated from Baikal teals found dead during a 2014 outbreak in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seol-Hee; Hur, Moonsuk; Suh, Jae-Hwa; Woo, Chanjin; Wang, Seung-Jun; Park, Eung-Roh; Hwang, Jongkyung; An, In-Jung; Jo, Seong-Deok; Shin, Jeong-Hwa; Yu, Seung Do; Choi, Kyunghee; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Nineteen highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N8 viruses were isolated from wild birds in the Donglim reservoir in Gochang, Jeonbuk province, Korea, which was first reported to be an outbreak site on January 17, 2014. Most genes from the nineteen viruses shared high nucleotide sequence identities (i.e., 99.7% to 100%). Phylogenetic analysis showed that these viruses were reassortants of the HPAI H5 subtype and the H4N2 strain and that their hemagglutinin clade was 2.3.4.4, which originated from Eastern China. The hemagglutinin protein contained Q222 and G224 at the receptor-binding site. Although the neuraminidase protein contained I314V and the matrix 2 protein contained an S31N substitution, other mutations resulting in oseltamivir and amantadine resistance were not detected. No substitutions associated with increased virulence and enhanced transmission in mammals were detected in the polymerase basic protein 2 (627E and 701D). Non-structural-1 was 237 amino acids long and had an ESEV motif with additional RGNKMAD amino acids in the C terminal region. These viruses caused deaths in the Baikal teal, which was unusual, and outbreaks occurred at the same time in both poultry and wild birds. These data are helpful for epidemiological understanding of HPAI and the design of prevention strategies. PMID:26245355

  3. Morphology and physical properties of soil material in cryogenic cracks of permafrost-affected meadow-chernozemic soils of the Trans-Baikal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybenov, Yu. B.; Chimitdorzhieva, G. D.; Chimitdorzhieva, E. O.; Egorova, R. A.; Mil'kheev, E. Yu.; Davydova, T. V.; Korsunova, Ts. D.-Ts.

    2016-08-01

    Meadow-chernozemic soils (Turbic Chernozems Molliglossic) in the western Trans-Baikal Region are dissected by large cryogenic cracks penetrating to the depth of 100-120 cm and filled with humified material. The depth of humus pockets is 50-80 cm, and their width in the upper part is 50-90 cm. The lower boundary of most of the humus pockets lies at the depth of 60-70 cm. The development of cryogenic cracks proceeded due to their penetration into the frozen ground, which is evidenced by their sharply narrowing lower part. The fraction of physical clay (<0.01 mm) constitutes a considerable part of the material filling the cracks, which explains the significant humus content in this material. The contents of humus and adsorbed bases sharply decrease down through the soil profile in the soil mass between the cracks and remain relatively stable in the material filling the cracks. The soil mass in humus pockets is less compact that that in the background soil mass at the same depth, which is explained by the higher humus content in the pockets. Humified soil material in the pockets is also characterized by a higher porosity and, hence, higher water permeability than the surrounding soil mass.

  4. Lake Ilopango, El Salvador

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-10

    Lake Ilopango is a crater lake which fills a volcanic caldera in central El Salvador, immediately east of the capital city San Salvador. The caldera collapsed most recently in about 500 AD, producing 20 times as much ash as the Mount St. Helens eruption, and blanketing an area of at least 10,000 square kilometers waist-deep in ash. The only historical eruption occurred in 1879, forming lava domes, now islets in the lake. Quetzaltepec is the stratovolcano just west of the city. Its last eruption in 1917 produced lavas flowing down the northwest flank, and evaporated the crater lake. The image was acquired March 5, 2006, covers an area of 27 by 42 km, and is located at 13.7 degrees north, 89.1 degrees west. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19237

  5. Challenges to the Lake

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade we have extensively studied coastal ecosystems in the Great Lakes. Some research efforts have linked coastal receiving systems to conditions in their contributing watersheds; others have focused on developing invasive species detection and monitoring strat...

  6. About Deer Lake AOC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Named an Area of Concern under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1987, due to beneficial use impairments caused by mercury contamination: consumption restrictions, deformities or reproductive problems, eutrophication.

  7. Pompton Lakes Photo Gallery

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This gallery provides representative photographs of the soil removal and dredging operations within the Pompton Lake Study Area (PLSA) performed starting in 2016 through the present. It will be periodically updated in conjunction with the progress of the

  8. Lake Sharpe, South Dakota

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-26

    NASA Terra spacecraft views central South Dakota, where the Missouri River forms a meander bend, creating Lake Sharpe. Eventually, the Missouri River will cut through the skinny peninsula, creating a shorter path.

  9. Challenges to the Lake

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade we have extensively studied coastal ecosystems in the Great Lakes. Some research efforts have linked coastal receiving systems to conditions in their contributing watersheds; others have focused on developing invasive species detection and monitoring strat...

  10. Is Lake Tahoe Terminal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, R. N.; Reuter, J.; Heyvaert, A.; Lewis, J.; Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, G.; Thorne, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Tahoe, an iconic ultra-oligotrophic lake in the central Sierra Nevada, has been studied intensively since 1968, with the goal of understanding and ultimately controlling its eutrophication and loss of clarity. Research on the lake has included a) periodic profiles of primary productivity, nutrients, temperature, and plankton; b) Secchi depth; c) nutrient limitation experiments; d) analysis of sediment cores; e) radiocarbon dating of underwater in-place tree stumps; g) analysis of long-term temperature trends. Work in its watershed has included a) monitoring of stream discharge, sediment and nutrients at up to 20 stream gaging stations; b) monitoring of urban runoff water quality at selected sites; c) development of a GIS data base, including soils, vegetation, and land use. Based on these studies, we know that a) primary productivity in the lake is limited by phosphorus, and continues to increase; b) the loss of clarity continues, but at a declining rate; c) the lake has been warming since 1970, and its resistance to deep mixing is increasing; d) historically the lake level drops below the outlet elevation about one year in seven; e) 6300 to 4300 yrs BP lake level was below the present outlet elevation long enough for large trees to grow; f) the date of the peak snowmelt runoff is shifting toward earlier dates; g) after accounting for annual runoff, loads of nutrients and suspended sediment have declined significantly in some basin streams since 1980. Downscaled outputs from GCM climatic models have recently been used to drive hydrologic models and a lake clarity model, projecting future trends in the lake and watersheds. Results show a) the temperature and thermal stability will likely continue to increase, with deep mixing shutting down in the latter half of this century; b) the lake may drop below the outlet for an extended period beginning about 2085; c) the annual snowpack will continue to decline, with earlier snowmelt and shift from snowfall to rain; d

  11. Antarctic subglacial lake discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattyn, Frank

    Antarctic subglacial lakes were long time supposed to be relatively closed and stable environments with long residence times and slow circulations. This view has recently been challenged with evidence of active subglacial lake discharge underneath the Antarctic ice sheet. Satellite altimetry observations witnessed rapid changes in surface elevation across subglacial lakes over periods ranging from several months to more than a year, which were interpreted as subglacial lake discharge and subsequent lake filling, and which seem to be a common and widespread feature. Such discharges are comparable to jökulhlaups and can be modeled that way using the Nye-Röthlisberger theory. Considering the ice at the base of the ice sheet at pressure melting point, subglacial conduits are sustainable over periods of more than a year and over distances of several hundreds of kilometers. Coupling of an ice sheet model to a subglacial lake system demonstrated that small changes in surface slope are sufficient to start and sustain episodic subglacial drainage events on decadal time scales. Therefore, lake discharge may well be a common feature of the subglacial hydrological system, influencing the behavior of large ice sheets, especially when subglacial lakes are perched at or near the onset of large outlet glaciers and ice streams. While most of the observed discharge events are relatively small (101-102 m3 s-1), evidence for larger subglacial discharges is found in ice free areas bordering Antarctica, and witnessing subglacial floods of more than 106 m3 s-1 that occurred during the middle Miocene.

  12. Lake Superior, Duluth, MN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This view shows the west end of Lake Superior and Duluth, MN (47.0N, 91.0W). Portions of Minnesota, Michigan and Ontario, Canada are in the scene. The Duluth metropolitan area is at the west end of the lake. The discoloration plume in the water at Duluth is the result of tailings from the iron ore smelters that process the iron ore from the nearby open pit mines seen near the upper left corner of the photo.

  13. Dragon Lake, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nicknamed 'Dragon Lake,' this body of water is formed by the Bratskove Reservoir, built along the Angara river in southern Siberia, near the city of Bratsk. This image was acquired in winter, when the lake is frozen. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on December 19, 1999. This is a natural color composite image made using blue, green, and red wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  14. Lake Chad, Chad, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fluctuating water levels of Lake Chad, (13.0N, 15.0E) at the intersection of the borders of Chad, Niger and Cameroon in the Sahara Desert, is an index of the drought in Africa. The lake level continues to decrease as indicated by the growing number and extent of emerging islands as previously submerged ancient sand dunes become visible. The water impounded between the dunes is probably because of local rainfall rather than a reversal of desertification.

  15. Lake Chad, Chad, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fluctuating water levels of Lake Chad, (13.0N, 15.0E) at the intersection of the borders of Chad, Niger and Cameroon in the Sahara Desert, is an index of the drought in Africa. The lake level continues to decrease as indicated by the growing number and extent of emerging islands as previously submerged ancient sand dunes become visible. The water impounded between the dunes is probably because of local rainfall rather than a reversal of desertification.

  16. Lake Chad, Chad, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Once a great inland lake, Lake Chad (13.0N, 14.0E) in the Sahara Desert at the intersection of the African nations of Chad, Niger, Nigeria and Cameroon, is now in decline. The larger northern lobe is almost totally dry and slowly filling in with encroaching sand dunes. The southern lobe, still retains some water in the lower center but the water surface area is less than 2000 square kilometers and sand dunes are filling in the north end.

  17. Dragon Lake, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nicknamed 'Dragon Lake,' this body of water is formed by the Bratskove Reservoir, built along the Angara river in southern Siberia, near the city of Bratsk. This image was acquired in winter, when the lake is frozen. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on December 19, 1999. This is a natural color composite image made using blue, green, and red wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  18. Lake retention of manufactured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Koelmans, A A; Quik, J T K; Velzeboer, I

    2015-01-01

    For twenty-five world lakes and three engineered nanoparticles (ENP), lake retention was calculated using a uniformly mixed lake mass balance model. This follows similar approaches traditionally used in water quality management. Lakes were selected such that lake residence times, depths and areal hydraulic loadings covered the widest possible range among existing lakes. Sedimentation accounted for natural colloid as well as suspended solid settling regimes. An ENP-specific mixed sedimentation regime is proposed. This regime combines ENP sedimentation through slow settling with natural colloids from the water column, with faster settling with suspended solids from a selected part of the water column. Although sedimentation data and hydrodynamic concepts as such were not new, their first time combination or application to ENPs shows in which cases lake retention is important for these particles. In combination with ENP emission data, lake retention translates directly into potential risks of ENPs for lake benthic communities.

  19. Lake Garda, Italy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-21

    This ASTER image was acquired on July 29, 2000 and covers an area of 30 by 57 km in northern Italy. Lake Garda was formed by glaciers during the last Ice Age, and is Italy's largest lake. Lago di Garda lies in the provinces of Verona, Brescia, and Trento, and is 51 kilometers (32 miles) long and from 3 to 18 kilometers (2 to 11 miles) wide. The Sarca is its chief affluent, and the lake is drained southward by the Mincio, which discharges into the Po River. Many villas are situated on its shores. On the peninsula of Sirmione, at the southern end of the lake, are the ruins of a Roman villa and a castle of the Scaligers, an Italian family of the 16th century. The RIGHT image has the land area masked out, and a harsh stretch was applied to the lake values to display variations in sediment load. Also visible are hundreds of boats and their wakes, criss-crossing the lake. The image is centered at 45.6 degrees north latitude, 10.6 degrees east longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02671

  20. Schistosomiasis in Lake Malawi.

    PubMed

    Cetron, M S; Chitsulo, L; Sullivan, J J; Pilcher, J; Wilson, M; Noh, J; Tsang, V C; Hightower, A W; Addiss, D G

    1996-11-09

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic infection caused by trematodes. Humans are infected through skin contact with free-swimming cercariae which develop in freshwater snails. Schistosomiasis has been endemic to Malawi for several decades, but the open waters and shores of Lake Malawi have long been thought to be risk-free with regard to schistosomiasis transmission. However, in 1992, two US Peace Corps volunteers developed central nervous system schistosomiasis due to infection with Schistosoma haematobium following recreational water exposure at Cape Maclear on Lake Malawi. In light of these infections, a cross-sectional survey of resident expatriates and visitors to Malawi was subsequently conducted during March-April 1993 to determine the transmission potential and risk for acquiring schistosomiasis in the lake. 305 US citizens and 650 non-US foreign nationals participated in the study. Serological evidence of current or past schistosome infection was identified in 303 subjects. Indeed, seroprevalence was 32% among expatriates whose freshwater exposure was limited to Lake Malawi; S. haematobium antibodies were found in 135 of 141 seropositive specimens. The risk of seropositivity increased with the number of freshwater exposures at Lake Malawi resorts. While many resort areas in the southwestern lake region posed a significant risk, Cape Maclear was the location most strongly associated with seropositivity. Schistosome-infected Bulinus globosus, the snail vector of S. haematobium in Malawi, were found at Cape Maclear and other locations along the lakeshore.

  1. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  2. Overview: Ancient Lake Creede

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bethke, Philip M.; Hay, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    Lake Creede was moderately saline closed-basin lake that developed in the 26.9 Ma Creede caldera in the San Juan Mountains in the southwest Colorado. The volcaniclastic sediments deposited within the late Oligocene lake were first described and named as the Creede Formation by Emmons and Larsen (1923). The lake and its sedimentary fill are of interest first as representatives of a caldera-hosted lake in a silicic volcanic terrane, and second because of the likely involvement of lake fluids or related pore waters in the deposition of the 25 Ma silver and base-metal ores of the Creede mining district north of the Creede caldera (Fig. 1), as proposed Bethke and Rye (1979). Much of the material presented in this volume is based on observation of core samples and on downhole geophysical measurements obtained as part of a U.S. Continental Scientific Drilling Program in the moat of the Creede caldera. These core and downhole studies are supplemented by outcrop studies, some initiated in support of the drilling program (Bethke and Lipman, 1987), and by conceptual studies of the evolution of the Creede caldera and its surrounding landscape. Not surprisingly, not all authors agree on all interpretation. Most disagreements are pointed out in this overview chapter, and may present opportunities for future study.

  3. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  4. Is Lake Chabot Eutrophic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, K.; Logan, J.; Esterlis, P.; Lew, A.; Nguyen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction/Abstract: Lake Chabot is an integral part of the East Bay watershed that provides habitats for animals and recreation for humans year-round. Lake Chabot has been in danger of eutrophication due to excessive dumping of phosphorous and nitrogen into the water from the fertilizers of nearby golf courses and neighboring houses. If the lake turned out to be eutrophified, it could seriously impact what is currently the standby emergency water supply for many Castro Valley residents. Eutrophication is the excessive richness of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus in a lake, usually as a result of runoff. This buildup of nutrients causes algal blooms. The algae uses up most of the oxygen in the water, and when it dies, it causes the lake to hypoxify. The fish in the lake can't breathe, and consequently suffocate. Other oxygen-dependant aquatic creatures die off as well. Needless to say, the eutrophication of a lake is bad news for the wildlife that lives in or around it. The level of eutrophication in our area in Northern California tends to increase during the late spring/early summer months, so our crew went out and took samples of Lake Chabot on June 2. We focused on the area of the lake where the water enters, known on the map as Honker Bay. We also took readings a ways down in deeper water for comparison's sake. Visually, the lake looked in bad shape. The water was a murky green that glimmered with particulate matter that swirled around the boat as we went by. In the Honker Bay region where we focused our testing, there were reeds bathed in algae that coated the surface of the lake in thick, swirling patterns. Surprisingly enough, however, our test results didn't reveal any extreme levels of phosphorous or nitrogen. They were slightly higher than usual, but not by any significant amount. The levels we found were high enough to stimulate plant and algae growth and promote eutrophication, but not enough to do any severe damage. After a briefing with a

  5. TOXAPHENE STUDY OF GREAT LAKES TRIBUTARY SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Product is the paper "Pulp and Paper Mills as Sources of Toxaphene to Lake Superior and Northern Lake Michigan" published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research, 25(2):383-394 International Association of Great Lakes 1999.

  6. TOXAPHENE STUDY OF GREAT LAKES TRIBUTARY SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Product is the paper "Pulp and Paper Mills as Sources of Toxaphene to Lake Superior and Northern Lake Michigan" published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research, 25(2):383-394 International Association of Great Lakes 1999.

  7. Glacial lake inventory and lake outburst potential in Uzbekistan.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Maxim A; Sabitov, Timur Y; Tomashevskaya, Irina G; Glazirin, Gleb E; Chernomorets, Sergey S; Savernyuk, Elena A; Tutubalina, Olga V; Petrakov, Dmitriy A; Sokolov, Leonid S; Dokukin, Mikhail D; Mountrakis, Giorgos; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Stoffel, Markus

    2017-03-16

    Climate change has been shown to increase the number of mountain lakes across various mountain ranges in the World. In Central Asia, and in particular on the territory of Uzbekistan, a detailed assessment of glacier lakes and their evolution over time is, however lacking. For this reason we created the first detailed inventory of mountain lakes of Uzbekistan based on recent (2002-2014) satellite observations using WorldView-2, SPOT5, and IKONOS imagery with a spatial resolution from 2 to 10m. This record was complemented with data from field studies of the last 50years. The previous data were mostly in the form of inventories of lakes, available in Soviet archives, and primarily included localized in-situ data. The inventory of mountain lakes presented here, by contrast, includes an overview of all lakes of the territory of Uzbekistan. Lakes were considered if they were located at altitudes above 1500m and if lakes had an area exceeding 100m(2). As in other mountain regions of the World, the ongoing increase of air temperatures has led to an increase in lake number and area. Moreover, the frequency and overall number of lake outburst events have been on the rise as well. Therefore, we also present the first outburst assessment with an updated version of well-known approaches considering local climate features and event histories. As a result, out of the 242 lakes identified on the territory of Uzbekistan, 15% are considered prone to outburst, 10% of these lakes have been assigned low outburst potential and the remainder of the lakes have an average level of outburst potential. We conclude that the distribution of lakes by elevation shows a significant influence on lake area and hazard potential. No significant differences, by contrast, exist between the distribution of lake area, outburst potential, and lake location with respect to glaciers by regions.

  8. Great Lakes, No Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    NASA image acquired August 28, 2010 Late August 2010 provided a rare satellite view of a cloudless summer day over the entire Great Lakes region. North Americans trying to sneak in a Labor Day weekend getaway on the lakes were hoping for more of the same. The Great Lakes comprise the largest collective body of fresh water on the planet, containing roughly 18 percent of Earth's supply. Only the polar ice caps contain more fresh water. The region around the Great Lakes basin is home to more than 10 percent of the population of the United States and 25 percent of the population of Canada. Many of those people have tried to escape record heat this summer by visiting the lakes. What they found, according to The Hamilton Spectator, was record-breaking water temperatures fueled by record-breaking air temperatures in the spring and summer. By mid-August, the waters of Lake Superior were 6 to 8°C (11 to 14°F) above normal. Lake Michigan set records at about 4°C (7°F) above normal. The other three Great Lakes – Huron, Erie, and Ontario -- were above normal temperatures, though no records were set. The image was gathered by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite at 1:30 p.m. Central Daylight Time (18:30 UTC) on August 28. Open water appears blue or nearly black. The pale blue and green swirls near the coasts are likely caused by algae or phytoplankton blooms, or by calcium carbonate (chalk) from the lake floor. The sweltering summer temperatures have produced an unprecedented bloom of toxic blue-green algae in western Lake Erie, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer. NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Mike Carlowicz. Instrument: Aqua - MODIS Click here to see more images from NASA Goddard’s Earth Observatory NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft

  9. Contaminants in American alligator eggs from Lake Apopka, Lake Griffin, and Lake Okeechobee, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Percival, H.F.; Jennings, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Residues of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and 16 elements were measured in American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) eggs collected in 1984 from Lakes Apopka, Griffin, and Okeechobee in central and south Florida. Organochlorine pesticides were highest in eggs from Lake Apopka. None of the elements appeared to be present at harmful concentrations in eggs from any of the lakes. A larger sample of eggs was collected in 1985, but only from Lakes Griffin, a lake where eggs were relatively clean, and Apopka, where eggs were most contaminated. In 1985, hatching success of artificially incubated eggs was lower for Lake Apopka, and several organochlorine pesticides were higher than in eggs from Lake Griffin. However, within Lake Apopka, higher levels of pesticides in chemically analyzed eggs were not associated with reduced hatching success of the remaining eggs in the clutch. Therefore, it did not appear that any of the pesticides we measured were responsible for the reduced hatching of Lake Apopka eggs.

  10. Evidence of Lake Trout reproduction at Lake Michigan's mid-lake reef complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janssen, J.; Jude, D.J.; Edsall, T.A.; Paddock, R.W.; Wattrus, N.; Toneys, M.; McKee, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Mid-Lake Reef Complex (MLRC), a large area of deep (> 40 m) reefs, was a major site where indigenous lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan aggregated during spawning. As part of an effort to restore Lake Michigan's lake trout, which were extirpated in the 1950s, yearling lake trout have been released over the MLRC since the mid-1980s and fall gill net censuses began to show large numbers of lake trout in spawning condition beginning about 1999. We report the first evidence of viable egg deposition and successful lake trout fry production at these deep reefs. Because the area's existing bathymetry and habitat were too poorly known for a priori selection of sampling sites, we used hydroacoustics to locate concentrations of large fish in the fall; fish were congregating around slopes and ridges. Subsequent observations via unmanned submersible confirmed the large fish to be lake trout. Our technological objectives were driven by biological objectives of locating where lake trout spawn, where lake trout fry were produced, and what fishes ate lake trout eggs and fry. The unmanned submersibles were equipped with a suction sampler and electroshocker to sample eggs deposited on the reef, draw out and occasionally catch emergent fry, and collect egg predators (slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus). We observed slimy sculpin to eat unusually high numbers of lake trout eggs. Our qualitative approaches are a first step toward quantitative assessments of the importance of lake trout spawning on the MLRC.

  11. Big lake records preserved in a little lake's sediment: An example from Silver Lake, Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, T.G.; Loope, W.L.; Pierce, W.; Jol, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    We reconstruct postglacial lake-level history within the Lake Michigan basin using soil stratigraphy, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), sedimentology and 14C data from the Silver Lake basin, which lies adjacent to Lake Michigan. Stratigraphy in nine vibracores recovered from the floor of Silver Lake appears to reflect fluctuation of water levels in the Lake Michigan basin. Aeolian activity within the study area from 3,000 years (cal yr. B.P.) to the present was inferred from analysis of buried soils, an aerial photograph sequence, and GPR. Sediments in and around Silver Lake appear to contain a paleoenvironmental record that spans the entire post-glacial history of the Lake Michigan basin. We suggest that (1) a pre-Nipissing rather than a Nipissing barrier separated Silver Lake basin from the Lake Michigan basin, (2) that the Nipissing transgression elevated the water table in the Silver Lake basin about 6,500 cal yr. B.P., resulting in reestablishment of a lake within the basin, and (3) that recent dune migration into Silver Lake is associated with levels of Lake Michigan.

  12. Winter Lake Breezes near the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Case studies of lake breezes during wintertime cold air pools in Utah's Salt Lake Valley are examined. While summer breezes originating from the Great Salt Lake are typically deeper, of longer duration, and have higher wind speeds than winter breezes, the rate of inland penetration and cross-frontal temperature differences can be higher during the winter. The characteristics of winter breezes and the forcing mechanisms controlling them (e.g., snow cover, background flow, vertical stability profile, clouds, lake temperature, lake sheltering, and drainage pooling) are more complex and variable than those evident in summer. During the afternoon in the Salt Lake Valley, these lake breezes can lead to elevated pollution levels due to the transport of fine particle pollutants from over the Great Salt Lake, decreased vertical mixing depth, and increased vertical stability.

  13. Inorganic geochemistry data from Lake El'gygytgyn sediments: marine isotope stages 6-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minyuk, P. S.; Borkhodoev, V. Y.; Wennrich, V.

    2014-03-01

    Geochemical analyses were performed on sediments recovered by deep drilling at Lake El'gygytgyn in central Chukotka, northeastern Russia (67°30' N; 172°05' E). Major and rare element concentrations were determined using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) on the < 250 μm fraction from 617 samples dated to ca. 440 and 125 ka, which approximates marine isotope stages (MIS) 11 to 6. The inorganic geochemistry indicates significant variations in elemental composition between glaciations and interglaciations. Interglacial sediments are characterized by high contents of SiO2, Na2O, CaO, K2O, and Sr and are depleted in Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2, and MgO. An extreme SiO2 enrichment during MIS 11.3 and 9.3 was caused by an enhanced flux of biogenic silica (BSi). The geochemical structure of MIS 11 shows similar characteristics as seen in MIS 11 records from Lake Baikal (southeastern Siberia) and Antarctic ice cores, thereby arguing for the influence of global forcings on these records. High sediment content of TiO2, Fe2O3, MgO, Al2O3, LOI, Ni, Cr, and Zr typifies glacial stages, with the most marked increases during MIS 7.4 and 6.6. Reducing conditions during glacial times are indicated by peaks in the Fe2O3 content and coinciding low Fe2O3/MnO ratios. This conclusion also is supported by P2O5 and MnO enrichment, indicating an increased abundance of authigenic, fine-grained vivianite. Elemental ratios (CIA, CIW, PIA, and Rb/Sr) indicate that glacial sediments are depleted in mobile elements, like Na, Ca, K and Sr. This depletion was caused by changes in the sedimentation regime and thus reflects environmental changes.

  14. Inorganic data from El'gygytgyn Lake sediments: stages 6-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minyuk, P. S.; Borkhodoev, V. Ya.; Wennrich, V.

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical study was performed on sediment of deep drilling core from El'gygytgyn Lake, located in central Chukotka, northeastern Russia (67°30' N; 172°05' E). Major and rare elements were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) on 600 samples covering the timeframe between ca. 450 and 125 ka corresponding to Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 11 to 6. Inorganic geochemistry data indicates significant variations in the elemental compositions corresponding to the glacials and interglacials periods. Interglacial sediments are characterized by high contents of SiO2, Na2O, CaO, K2O, Sr and are depleted in Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2, MgO. Extreme enrichments in SiO2 during MIS 11.3 and 9.3 are caused by an enhanced flux of biogenic silica (BSi). Geochemical structure of stage 11 shows very similar peculiarities to features of stage 11 from records of Lake Baikal/SE Siberia and Antarctic ice cores. High contents of TiO2, Fe2O3, MgO, Al2O3, LOI, Ni, Cr and Zr are typical for sediments of glacial stages, among those MIS 7.4 and 6.6 are the most marked. Peaks in the Fe2O3 content and coinciding low Fe2O3/MnO ratios during glacials indicate reducing condition in the sediments. This is also supported by enrichments in P2O5 and MnO, indicating an increased abundance of authigenic fine grained vivianite. Some elemental ratios indicate an enhanced alteration of glacial sediments accompanied by a loss of mobile elements, like Na, Ca, K and Sr. The higher alteration of sediments can presumably be traced back to changes in the sedimentation regime and diagenetic processes, and thus, reflects environmental changes.

  15. Crater Lake revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, David W.; Dartnell, Peter; Bacon, Charles R.; Robinson, Joel E.; Gardner, James V.

    2003-01-01

    Around 500,000 people each year visit Crater Lake National Park in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. Volcanic peaks, evergreen forests, and Crater Lake’s incredibly blue water are the park’s main attractions. Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago by the eruption and subsequent collapse of a 12,000-foot volcano called Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama drastically changed the landscape all around the volcano and spread a blanket of volcanic ash at least as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000 year history of cone building activity like that of other Cascade volcanoes such as Mount Shasta. Since the climactic eruption, there have been several less violent, smaller postcaldera eruptions within the caldera itself. However, relatively little was known about the specifics of these eruptions because their products were obscured beneath Crater Lake’s surface. As the Crater Lake region is still potentially volcanically active, understanding past eruptive events is important to understanding future eruptions, which could threaten facilities and people at Crater Lake National Park and the major transportation corridor east of the Cascades. Recently, the lake bottom was mapped with a high-resolution multibeam echo sounder. The new bathymetric survey provides a 2m/pixel view of the lake floor from its deepest basins virtually to the shoreline. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, the bathymetry data can be visualized and analyzed to shed light on the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of Crater Lake.

  16. Lake Sarez, Tajikistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Sarez (top), deep in the Pamir mountains of Tajikistan, was created 90 years ago when a strong earthquake triggered a massive landslide that, in turn, became a huge dam along the Murghob River, now called the Usoi Dam. The resulting lake is perched above surrounding drainages at an elevation greater than 3000m, and is part of the watershed that drains the towering Akademi Nauk Range (see the regional image, lower). The lake is 61 km long and as deep as 500 m, and holds an estimated 17 cubic km of water. The area experiences considerable seismic activity, and scientists fear that part of the right bank may slump into the lake, creating a huge wave that will top over and possibly breach the natural dam. Such a wave would create a catastrophic flood downstream along the Bartang, Panj and Amu Darya Rivers, perhaps reaching all the way to the Aral Sea. Currently, central Asian governments, as well as the World Bank and the UN are monitoring the dam closely, and have proposed gradually lowering the lake level as a preventive measure. More information about the lake is available at the following web sites: Lake Sarez Study group, UN Report, Reliefweb Digital photograph numbers ISS002-E-7771 and ISS002-E-7479 were taken in the spring of 2001 from Space Station Alpha and are provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  17. The Wandering Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In the area at the very far eastern corner of China's Taklimakan Desert, Lop Nor Lake was located up until some years ago. Lop Nor, also called the 'the heart of the heart' of Asia, was the place where the waters of the largest inner basin (i.e., not flowing into the sea) of the world-including the Tarim and Kum-daria Rivers-were collected. Depending on the balance between rainfall water yield and evaporation, both position and size of the lake were strongly variable, thus giving rise to the legend of the Wandering Lake. 'Lop City' was the place where Marco Polo took his last rest before facing the one-year long crossing of the Gobi Desert. Starting from the end of the 19th century, several explorers tried to find the legendary place. One such explorer was Sven Hedin, who was commissioned by the Governor of Nanjing to lead an expedition to find the lake. In 1937, the Swedish explorer published his book entitled The Wandering Lake. Comparing this very precise map from Sven Hedin's book with the above Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) false-color image (acquired on October 28, 2001), one can find a faint sign on the soil where the Lop Nor was located. This image, derived using a combination of MODIS' near-infrared and red channels (vegetation in red), shows where the Tarim River waters currently end their flow. The Wandering Lake does not exist anymore. The combination of climate change and human exploitation of water resources for agriculture caused the disappearance of the lake. This image was processed by Telespazio, Earth Observation division, new products development facility in Rome, Italy. The MODIS sensor flies aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, launched in December 1999. Caption and image courtesy Luca Pietranera, Telespazio, Rome, Italy, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  18. The Wandering Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In the area at the very far eastern corner of China's Taklimakan Desert, Lop Nor Lake was located up until some years ago. Lop Nor, also called the 'the heart of the heart' of Asia, was the place where the waters of the largest inner basin (i.e., not flowing into the sea) of the world-including the Tarim and Kum-daria Rivers-were collected. Depending on the balance between rainfall water yield and evaporation, both position and size of the lake were strongly variable, thus giving rise to the legend of the Wandering Lake. 'Lop City' was the place where Marco Polo took his last rest before facing the one-year long crossing of the Gobi Desert. Starting from the end of the 19th century, several explorers tried to find the legendary place. One such explorer was Sven Hedin, who was commissioned by the Governor of Nanjing to lead an expedition to find the lake. In 1937, the Swedish explorer published his book entitled The Wandering Lake. Comparing this very precise map from Sven Hedin's book with the above Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) false-color image (acquired on October 28, 2001), one can find a faint sign on the soil where the Lop Nor was located. This image, derived using a combination of MODIS' near-infrared and red channels (vegetation in red), shows where the Tarim River waters currently end their flow. The Wandering Lake does not exist anymore. The combination of climate change and human exploitation of water resources for agriculture caused the disappearance of the lake. This image was processed by Telespazio, Earth Observation division, new products development facility in Rome, Italy. The MODIS sensor flies aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, launched in December 1999. Caption and image courtesy Luca Pietranera, Telespazio, Rome, Italy, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  19. Lake Sarez, Tajikistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Sarez (top), deep in the Pamir mountains of Tajikistan, was created 90 years ago when a strong earthquake triggered a massive landslide that, in turn, became a huge dam along the Murghob River, now called the Usoi Dam. The resulting lake is perched above surrounding drainages at an elevation greater than 3000m, and is part of the watershed that drains the towering Akademi Nauk Range (see the regional image, lower). The lake is 61 km long and as deep as 500 m, and holds an estimated 17 cubic km of water. The area experiences considerable seismic activity, and scientists fear that part of the right bank may slump into the lake, creating a huge wave that will top over and possibly breach the natural dam. Such a wave would create a catastrophic flood downstream along the Bartang, Panj and Amu Darya Rivers, perhaps reaching all the way to the Aral Sea. Currently, central Asian governments, as well as the World Bank and the UN are monitoring the dam closely, and have proposed gradually lowering the lake level as a preventive measure. More information about the lake is available at the following web sites: Lake Sarez Study group, UN Report, Reliefweb Digital photograph numbers ISS002-E-7771 and ISS002-E-7479 were taken in the spring of 2001 from Space Station Alpha and are provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  20. Examining indirect effects of lake trout recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the recovery of lake trout populations in Lake Superior, there are indications of decreased forage fish abundance and density-dependence in lake trout. In Lake Superior, lean lake trout historically occupied depths < 60 m, and siscowet lake trout occupied depths > 60 m...

  1. Examining indirect effects of lake trout recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the recovery of lake trout populations in Lake Superior, there are indications of decreased forage fish abundance and density-dependence in lake trout. In Lake Superior, lean lake trout historically occupied depths < 60 m, and siscowet lake trout occupied depths > 60 m...

  2. Hydrogeologic Controls on Lake Level at Mountain Lake, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roningen, J. M.; Burbey, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Mountain Lake in Giles County, Virginia has a documented history of severe natural lake-level changes involving groundwater seepage that extend over the past 4200 years. Featured in the 1986 movie Dirty Dancing, the natural lake dried up completely in September 2008 and levels have not yet recovered. A hydrogeologic investigation was undertaken in an effort to determine the factors influencing lake level changes. A daily water balance, dipole-dipole electrical resistivity surveying, well logging and chemical sampling have shed light on: 1) the influence of a fault not previously discussed in literature regarding the lake, 2) the seasonal response to precipitation of a forested first-order drainage system in fractured rock, and 3) the possibility of flow pathways related to karst features. Geologic controls on lake level were investigated using several techniques. Geophysical surveys using dipole-dipole resistivity located possible subsurface flowpaths both to and from the lake. Well logs, lineament analysis, and joint sampling were used to assess structural controls on lake hydrology. Major ions were sampled at wells, springs, streams, and the lake to evaluate possible mixing of different sources of water in the lake. Groundwater levels were monitored for correlation to lake levels, rainfall events, and possible seismic effects. The hydrology of the lake was quantified with a water balance on a daily time step. Results from the water balance indicate steady net drainage and significant recharge when vegetation is dormant, particularly during rain-on-snow melt events. The resistivity survey reveals discrete areas that represent flow pathways from the lake, as well as flowpaths to springs upgradient of the lake located in the vicinity of the fault. The survey also suggests that some flowpaths may originate outside of the topographic watershed of the lake. Chemical evidence indicates karst may underlie the lakebed. Historical data suggest that artificial intervention

  3. Chemours Pompton Lakes Works Site, Pompton Lakes, NJ

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    E.I. DuPont De Nemours & Company is located at 2000 Cannonball Road, Pompton Lakes, New Jersey. The DuPont Pompton Lakes Works site (DuPont) occupies approximately 570 acres of land in Pompton Lakes and Wanaque.

  4. National Lakes Assessment: A Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Lakes Assessment A Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Lakes presents the results of an unprecedented assessment of the nation’s lakes. This report is part of the National Aquatic Resource Surveys, a series of statistically based surveys designed to provide the pub...

  5. View of Lake Sabrina Dam and dry Lake Sabrina Basin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam and dry Lake Sabrina Basin with the upstream side of the outlet structure visible at photo center, view to north-northwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  6. National Lakes Assessment: A Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Lakes Assessment A Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Lakes presents the results of an unprecedented assessment of the nation’s lakes. This report is part of the National Aquatic Resource Surveys, a series of statistically based surveys designed to provide the pub...

  7. Predicting Lake Depths from Topography to Map Global Lake Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzman, N.; Pavelsky, T.

    2016-12-01

    The depth of a lake affects its role in climate and biogeochemical cycling. There is a lack of lake depth data due to the difficulty of measuring bathymetry, which impedes the accurate inclusion of lakes in climate models and the assessment of global water resources and carbon storage. However, lake depths can be estimated from land topography, for which remotely-sensed DEM data is available. We develop a simple statistical model to predict lake depth from two explanatory variables: the mean relief above the lake surface of a buffer surrounding the lake, and whether the lake's location was glaciated in the last ice age. The model is based on 328 lakes with known depths, located on all continents but Antarctica, and has an r2 of 0.57. We then apply this model to a set of over 200,000 lakes from the Global Lakes and Wetlands Database to produce global gridded maps of predicted total lake volume and average depth. The realistic depth estimates provided by our model may improve the accuracy of future studies of climate and water resources.

  8. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents th...

  9. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents th...

  10. 42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to peaks of Outter Lodge, completed in 1964. Construction of the lake got underway in 1964. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  11. Real-estate lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Spieker, Andrew Maute

    1971-01-01

    Since the dawn of civilization waterfront land has been an irresistible attraction to man. Throughout history he has sought out locations fronting on oceans, rivers, and lakes. Originally sought for proximity .to water supply and transportation, such locations are now sought more for their esthetic qualities and for recreation. Usable natural waterfront property is limited, however, and the more desirable sites in many of our urban areas have already been taken. The lack of available waterfront sites has led to the creation of many artificial bodies of water. The rapid suburbanization that has characterized urban growth in America since the end of World War II, together with increasing affluence and le-isure time, has created a ready market for waterfront property. Accordingly, lake-centered subdivisions and developments dot the suburban landscape in many of our major urban areas. Literally thousands of lakes surrounded by homes have materialized during this period of rapid growth. Recently, several "new town" communities have been planned around this lake-centered concept. A lake can be either an asset or a liaoility to a community. A clean, clear, attractively landscaped lake is a definite asset, whereas a weed-choked, foul-smelling mudhole is a distinct liability. The urban environment poses both problems and imaginative opportunities in the development of lakes. Creation of a lake causes changes in all aspects of the environment. Hydrologic systems and ecological patterns are usually most severely altered. The developer should be aware of the potential changes; it is not sufficient merely to build a dam across a stream or to dig a hole in the ground. Development of Gl a successful lake requires careful planning for site selection and design, followed by thorough and cc ntinual management. The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics of real-estate lakes, to pinpoint potential pmblems, and to suggest possible planning and management guidelines

  12. Great Lakes Initiative (GLI) Clearinghouse

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Great Lakes Initiative Toxicity Clearinghouse is a central location for information on criteria, toxicity data, exposure parameters and other supporting documents used in developing water quality standards in the Great Lakes watershed.

  13. National Lakes Assessment 2007 Results

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Lakes Assessment samples over 1,000 lakes, ponds and reservoirs across the country. Key findings from this assessment in 2007 include the biological condition and most widespread stressors of these waterbodies.

  14. Different Looks for Titan Lakes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-08

    Lakes on Saturn moon Titan reflect radio waves in varying ways in this image from NASA Cassini spacecraft. If a lake is fully liquid, it looks dark, but if it is only partially liquid, it looks brighter.

  15. Regional Lake quality patterns: Their relationship to lake conservation and management decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.A.; Hughes, R.M.; Larsen, D.P.; Paulsen, S.G.; Omernik, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    Understanding regional lake quality patterns is important to lake restoration. It puts specific lake conditions into perspective, provides a basis for establishing lake quality goals, identifies lakes most likely to benefit from restoration and forms a framework for assessing restoration success. Two techniques used to characterize regional lake quality patterns are discussed. Combining the two approaches provides an effective means to describe lake regions management goals and restoration success. Case examples illustrate the significant of regional lake quality to specific lake restoration projects.

  16. Microplastic pollution in lakes and lake shoreline sediments - A case study on Lake Bolsena and Lake Chiusi (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elke Kerstin; Paglialonga, Lisa; Czech, Elisa; Tamminga, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Rivers and effluents have been identified as major pathways for microplastics of terrestrial sources. Moreover, lakes of different dimensions and even in remote locations contain microplastics in striking abundances. This study investigates concentrations of microplastic particles at two lakes in central Italy (Lake Bolsena, Lake Chiusi). A total number of six Manta Trawls have been carried out, two of them one day after heavy winds occurred on Lake Bolsena showing effects on particle distribution of fragments and fibers of varying size categories. Additionally, 36 sediment samples from lakeshores were analyzed for microplastic content. In the surface waters 2.68 to 3.36 particles/m(3) (Lake Chiusi) and 0.82 to 4.42 particles/m(3) (Lake Bolsena) were detected, respectively. Main differences between the lakes are attributed to lake characteristics such as surface and catchment area, depth and the presence of local wind patterns and tide range at Lake Bolsena. An event of heavy winds and moderate rainfall prior to one sampling led to an increase of concentrations at Lake Bolsena which is most probable related to lateral land-based and sewage effluent inputs. The abundances of microplastic particles in sediments vary from mean values of 112 (Lake Bolsena) to 234 particles/kg dry weight (Lake Chiusi). Lake Chiusi results reveal elevated fiber concentrations compared to those of Lake Bolsena what might be a result of higher organic content and a shift in grain size distribution towards the silt and clay fraction at the shallow and highly eutrophic Lake Chiusi. The distribution of particles along different beach levels revealed no significant differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sanctuaries for lake trout in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Jon G.; Eshenroder, Randy L.; Hartman, Wilbur L.

    1987-01-01

    Populations of lake trout, severely depleted in Lake Superior and virtually extirpated from the other Great Lakes because of sea lamprey predation and intense fishing, are now maintained by annual plantings of hatchery-reared fish in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario and parts of Lake Superior. The extensive coastal areas of the Great Lakes and proximity to large populations resulted in fishing pressure on planted lake trout heavy enough to push annual mortality associated with sport and commercial fisheries well above the critical level needed to reestablish self-sustaining stocks. The interagency, international program for rehabilitating lake trout includes controlling sea lamprey abundance, stocking hatchery-reared lake trout, managing the catch, and establishing sanctuaries where harvest is prohibited. Three lake trout sanctuaries have been established in Lake Michigan: the Fox Island Sanctuary of 121, 500 ha, in the Chippewa-Ottawa Treaty fishing zone in the northern region of the lake; the Milwaukee Reef Sanctuary of 160, 000 ha in midlake, in boundary waters of Michigan and Wisconsin; and Julian's Reef Sanctuary of 6, 500 ha, in Illinois waters. In northern Lake Huron, Drummond Island Sanctuary of 55, 000 ha is two thirds in Indian treaty-ceded waters in Michigan and one third in Ontario waters of Canada. A second sanctuary, Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef Sanctuary, in central Lake Huron contains 168, 000 ha. Sanctuary status for the Canadian areas remains to be approved by the Provincial government. In Lake Superior, sanctuaries protect the spawning grounds of Gull Island Shoal (70, 000 ha) and Devils Island Shoal (44, 000 ha) in Wisconsin's Apostle Island area. These seven sanctuaries, established by the several States and agreed upon by the States, Indian tribes, the U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Province of Ontario, contribute toward solving an interjurisdictional fishery problem.

  18. The Ancestral Carnivore Karyotype As Substantiated by Comparative Chromosome Painting of Three Pinnipeds, the Walrus, the Steller Sea Lion and the Baikal Seal (Pinnipedia, Carnivora)

    PubMed Central

    Beklemisheva, Violetta R.; Perelman, Polina L.; Lemskaya, Natalya A.; Kulemzina, Anastasia I.; Proskuryakova, Anastasia A.; Burkanov, Vladimir N.; Graphodatsky, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Karyotype evolution in Carnivora is thoroughly studied by classical and molecular cytogenetics and supplemented by reconstructions of Ancestral Carnivora Karyotype (ACK). However chromosome painting information from two pinniped families (Odobenidae and Otariidae) is noticeably missing. We report on the construction of the comparative chromosome map for species from each of the three pinniped families: the walrus (Odobenus rosmarus, Odobenidae–monotypic family), near threatened Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus, Otariidae) and the endemic Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica, Phocidae) using combination of human, domestic dog and stone marten whole-chromosome painting probes. The earliest karyological studies of Pinnipedia showed that pinnipeds were characterized by a pronounced karyological conservatism that is confirmed here with species from Phocidae, Otariidae and Odobenidae sharing same low number of conserved human autosomal segments (32). Chromosome painting in Pinnipedia and comparison with non-pinniped carnivore karyotypes provide strong support for refined structure of ACK with 2n = 38. Constructed comparative chromosome maps show that pinniped karyotype evolution was characterized by few tandem fusions, seemingly absent inversions and slow rate of genome rearrangements (less then one rearrangement per 10 million years). Integrative comparative analyses with published chromosome painting of Phoca vitulina revealed common cytogenetic signature for Phoca/Pusa branch and supports Phocidae and Otaroidea (Otariidae/Odobenidae) as sister groups. We revealed rearrangements specific for walrus karyotype and found the chromosomal signature linking together families Otariidae and Odobenidae. The Steller sea lion karyotype is the most conserved among three studied species and differs from the ACK by single fusion. The study underlined the strikingly slow karyotype evolution of the Pinnipedia in general and the Otariidae in particular. PMID:26821159

  19. The Ancestral Carnivore Karyotype As Substantiated by Comparative Chromosome Painting of Three Pinnipeds, the Walrus, the Steller Sea Lion and the Baikal Seal (Pinnipedia, Carnivora).

    PubMed

    Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Perelman, Polina L; Lemskaya, Natalya A; Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Proskuryakova, Anastasia A; Burkanov, Vladimir N; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Karyotype evolution in Carnivora is thoroughly studied by classical and molecular cytogenetics and supplemented by reconstructions of Ancestral Carnivora Karyotype (ACK). However chromosome painting information from two pinniped families (Odobenidae and Otariidae) is noticeably missing. We report on the construction of the comparative chromosome map for species from each of the three pinniped families: the walrus (Odobenus rosmarus, Odobenidae-monotypic family), near threatened Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus, Otariidae) and the endemic Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica, Phocidae) using combination of human, domestic dog and stone marten whole-chromosome painting probes. The earliest karyological studies of Pinnipedia showed that pinnipeds were characterized by a pronounced karyological conservatism that is confirmed here with species from Phocidae, Otariidae and Odobenidae sharing same low number of conserved human autosomal segments (32). Chromosome painting in Pinnipedia and comparison with non-pinniped carnivore karyotypes provide strong support for refined structure of ACK with 2n = 38. Constructed comparative chromosome maps show that pinniped karyotype evolution was characterized by few tandem fusions, seemingly absent inversions and slow rate of genome rearrangements (less then one rearrangement per 10 million years). Integrative comparative analyses with published chromosome painting of Phoca vitulina revealed common cytogenetic signature for Phoca/Pusa branch and supports Phocidae and Otaroidea (Otariidae/Odobenidae) as sister groups. We revealed rearrangements specific for walrus karyotype and found the chromosomal signature linking together families Otariidae and Odobenidae. The Steller sea lion karyotype is the most conserved among three studied species and differs from the ACK by single fusion. The study underlined the strikingly slow karyotype evolution of the Pinnipedia in general and the Otariidae in particular.

  20. Michigan: The Great Lakes State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Sandra Lee; La Luzerne-Oi, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Although Michigan is often called the "Wolverine State," its more common nickname is the "Great Lakes State." This name comes from the fact that Michigan is the only state in the United States that borders four of the five Great Lakes. Also referred to as the "Water Wonderland," Michigan has 11,000 additional lakes,…

  1. AirMISR Rogers Lake

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    AirMISR ROGERS LAKE 2001 Project Title:  AirMISR Discipline:  ... ER-2 Spatial Coverage:  Rogers Lake, California (34.75, 35.33)(-118.06, -117.51) Spatial ... Data Readme Files:  Readme Rogers Lake Read Software Files :  IDL Code ...

  2. Red Lake Forestry Greenhouse Program

    Treesearch

    Gloria Whitefeather-Spears

    2002-01-01

    In 1916, The Red Lake Indian Forest Act was created. The Red Lake Band of Chippewa in Minnesota stood alone and refused to consent to allotment. Consequently, The Red Lake Band is the only tribe in Minnesota for which a congressional act was passed to secure a permanent economic foundation for the band and its future.

  3. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  4. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  5. Lake-level frequency analysis for Devils Lake, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiche, Gregg J.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    1996-01-01

    An annual lake-volume model and a statistical water mass-balance model were used to estimate future lake-level probabilities for Devils Lake. Comparison of the models indicates upper exceedance levels of the water mass-balance model increase much more rapidly than those of the annual lake-volume model. For simulation year 5, the 99-percent exceedance is 1,417.6 feet above sea level for the annual lake-volume model and 1,423.2 feet above sea level for the water mass-balance model.

  6. Lake Superior, Deluth, MN

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-22

    SL2-05-454 (22 June 1973) --- This view shows the west end of Lake Superior and Duluth, MN (47.0N, 91.0W). Portions of Minnesota, Michigan and Ontario, Canada are in the scene. The Duluth metropolitan area is at the west end of the lake. The discoloration plume in the water at Duluth is the result of tailings from the iron ore smelters that process the iron ore from the nearby open pit mines seen near the upper left corner of the photo. Photo credit: NASA

  7. The Great Lakes whitefish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John; Elliot, Charles

    1942-01-01

    In every one of the Great Lakes- Ontario, Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior- the most valuable fishes are declining, and there is no evidence that this trend will be reversed. Under existing conditions of a diversity of regulations that vary between states and between the two countries, and with the present methods of fishing, the Great Lakes fisheries are doomed. This chapter deals with the common whitefish, a valuable species which many believe to be the next that will go unless positive action is forthcoming soon.

  8. Transient Tsunamis in Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L.; Mei, C.; Alam, M.

    2013-12-01

    A large number of lakes are surrounded by steep and unstable mountains with slopes prone to failure. As a result, landslides are likely to occur and impact water sitting in closed reservoirs. These rare geological phenomena pose serious threats to dam reservoirs and nearshore facilities because they can generate unexpectedly large tsunami waves. In fact, the tallest wave experienced by contemporary humans occurred because of a landslide in the narrow bay of Lituya in 1958, and five years later, a deadly landslide tsunami overtopped Lake Vajont's dam, flooding and damaging villages along the lakefront and in the Piave valley. If unstable slopes and potential slides are detected ahead of time, inundation maps can be drawn to help people know the risks, and mitigate the destructive power of the ensuing waves. These maps give the maximum wave runup height along the lake's vertical and sloping boundaries, and can be obtained by numerical simulations. Keeping track of the moving shorelines along beaches is challenging in classical Eulerian formulations because the horizontal extent of the fluid domain can change over time. As a result, assuming a solid slide and nonbreaking waves, here we develop a nonlinear shallow-water model equation in the Lagrangian framework to address the problem of transient landslide-tsunamis. In this manner, the shorelines' three-dimensional motion is part of the solution. The model equation is hyperbolic and can be solved numerically by finite differences. Here, a 4th order Runge-Kutta method and a compact finite-difference scheme are implemented to integrate in time and spatially discretize the forced shallow-water equation in Lagrangian coordinates. The formulation is applied to different lake and slide geometries to better understand the effects of the lake's finite lengths and slide's forcing mechanism on the generated wavefield. Specifically, for a slide moving down a plane beach, we show that edge-waves trapped by the shoreline and free

  9. Megasplash at Lake Tahoe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. G.; Schweickert, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Backwash from a major ~10 km3 landslide in Lake Tahoe washed away Tioga age (21 ka) moraines (Schweickert, et al 2000; Howle, 2012). Coring in the lake demonstrates a 7700-8000 yr Mt. Mazama ash is widely distributed in lake sediments that overlie the landslide blocks. Moreover, core stratigraphy and radiocarbon ages indicate that all of the sediments cored (to about 3 m depth reaching back 12 ka) were deposited after the landslide (Smith et al., 2013). The age of the landslide is hence constrained at 12-21 ka. Fifteen major subaqueous sand wave channels 2.5 to 10.2 km in length originate from subaqueous delta-terraces at depths of 5-28 m on the margins of the lake. The channels, apparently formed by turbidity currents, are distinctly erosional in their upper part, and transform to deposition aprons in their lower part as they approach the flat lake floor at 500 m depth. The channels contain wave forms (giant ripple marks) convex upstream with maximum wavelengths of 450 m. The lower depositional aprons are surfaced by sand waves convex downstream with maximum wavelengths of 100-300 m. Sand wave convexity mimics the contour of the substrate. The sand wave channel systems are mantled by the post-slide 12 ka sediments and hence have been inactive since that time. These channel-fan structures were apparently produced by backwash from the giant Tahoe landslide, which splashed ~5 km3 of water onto the surrounding countryside thereby lowering lake level by ~10 m. The sediment-charged backwash first deposited the delta-terraces at the lowered lake level and then partly eroded them to generate the sand wave channels, within minutes or hours, while seiche activity resurfaced the delta-terraces. A remarkably similar, though smaller, presently-forming system of turbidity sand wave channels has been imaged at the mouth of the Squamish River in British Columbia (Hughes Clark et al., 2012). The Tahoe splash-induced backwash was briefly equivalent to more than fifteen Squamish

  10. Reevaluation of lake trout and lake whitefish bioenergetics models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Pothoven, Steve A.; Kao, Yu-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Using a corrected algorithm for balancing the energy budget, we reevaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the laboratory and for lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in the laboratory and in the field. For lake trout, results showed that the bioenergetics model slightly overestimated food consumption by the lake trout when they were fed low and intermediate rations, whereas the model predicted food consumption by lake trout fed ad libitum without any detectable bias. The slight bias in model predictions for lake trout on restricted rations may have been an artifact of the feeding schedule for these fish, and we would therefore recommend application of the Wisconsin lake trout bioenergetics model to lake trout populations in the field without any revisions to the model. Use of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for coregonids resulted in overestimation of food consumption by lake whitefish both in the laboratory and in the field by between 20 and 30%, on average. This overestimation of food consumption was most likely due to overestimation of respiration rate. We therefore adjusted the respiration component of the bioenergetics model to obtain a good fit to the observed consumption in our laboratory tanks. The adjusted model predicted the consumption in the laboratory and the field without any detectable bias. Until a detailed lake whitefish respiration study can be conducted, we recommend application of our adjusted version of the Wisconsin generalized coregonid bioenergetics model to lake whitefish populations in the field.

  11. Maturity schedules of lake trout in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.

    1998-01-01

    We determined maturity schedules of male and female lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan from nearshore populations and from an offshore population on Sheboygan Reef, which is located in midlake. Gill nets and bottom trawls were used to catch lake trout in fall 1994 and 1995 from two nearshore sites and Sheboygan Reef. Each lake trout was judged immature or mature, based on visual examination of gonads. Probit analysis, coupled with relative potency testing, revealed that age-at-maturity and length-at-maturity were similar at the two nearshore sites, but that lake trout from the nearshore sites matured at a significantly earlier age than lake trout from Sheboygan Reef. However, length at maturity for the nearshore populations was nearly identical to that for the offshore population, suggesting that rate of lake trout maturation in Lake Michigan was governed by growth rather than age. Half of the lake trout males reached maturity at a total length of 580 mm, whereas half of the females were mature at a length of 640 mm. Over half of nearshore males were mature by age 5, and over half the nearshore females matured by age 6. Due to a slower growth rate, maturity was delayed by 2 years on Sheboygan Reef compared with the nearshore populations. Documentation of this delay in maturation may be useful in deciding stocking allocations for lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Michigan.

  12. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  13. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  14. Lake whitefish diet, condition, and energy density in Lake Champlain and the lower four Great Lakes following dreissenid invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbst, Seth J.; Marsden, J. Ellen; Lantry, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis support some of the most valuable commercial freshwater fisheries in North America. Recent growth and condition decreases in Lake Whitefish populations in the Great Lakes have been attributed to the invasion of the dreissenid mussels, zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and quagga mussels D. bugensis, and the subsequent collapse of the amphipod, Diporeia, a once-abundant high energy prey source. Since 1993, Lake Champlain has also experienced the invasion and proliferation of zebra mussels, but in contrast to the Great Lakes, Diporeia were not historically abundant. We compared the diet, condition, and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain after the dreissenid mussel invasion to values for those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario. Lake Whitefish were collected using gill nets and bottom trawls, and their diets were quantified seasonally. Condition was estimated using Fulton's condition factor (K) and by determining energy density. In contrast to Lake Whitefish from some of the Great Lakes, those from Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish did not show a dietary shift towards dreissenid mussels, but instead fed primarily on fish eggs in spring, Mysis diluviana in summer, and gastropods and sphaeriids in fall and winter. Along with these dietary differences, the condition and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain were high compared with those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario after the dreissenid invasion, and were similar to Lake Whitefish from Lake Erie; fish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario consumed dreissenids, whereas fish from Lake Erie did not. Our comparisons of Lake Whitefish populations in Lake Champlain to those in the Great Lakes indicate that diet and condition of Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish were not negatively affected by the dreissenid mussel invasion.

  15. Temperature Trends in Montane Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Sadro, S.; Jellison, R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term temperature trends in lakes integrate hydrological and meteorological factors. We examine temperature trends in a small montane lake with prolonged ice-cover and large seasonal snowfall and in a large saline lake. Emerald Lake, located in the Sierra Nevada (California), is representative of high-elevation lakes throughout the region. No significant trend in outflow temperature was apparent from 1991to 2012. Snowfall in the watershed accounted for 93% of the variability in average summer lake temperatures. Mono Lake (California) lies in a closed, montane basin and is hypersaline and monomictic or meromictic. Temperature profiles have been collected from 1982 to 2010. In the upper water column, the July-August-September water temperatures increased 0.8-1.0°C over the 29 years. This rate of warming is less than published estimates based on satellite-derived skin temperatures and will discussed in the context of general limnological interpretation of temperature trends.

  16. The Mack Lake fire.

    Treesearch

    Albert J. Simard; Donald A. Haines; Richard W. Blank; John S. Frost

    1983-01-01

    Describes the Mack Lake Fire near Mio, Michigan. Few documented wildfires have exceeded its average spread rate (2 mi/h) and energy release rate (8,800 Btu/ft/sec). The extreme behavior resulted from high winds, low humidity, low fuel moisture and jack pine fuels. Horizontal roll vortices may have contributed to the death of one firefighter.

  17. The People's Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Karen Townsend

    1975-01-01

    Citizen action to stop the disposal of taconite tailings into Lake Superior was unsuccessful when the courts settled in the favor of industry. Although citizen research revealed a form of asbestos, as well as other toxic chemicals in the discharged wastes, company representatives stated that there were no health hazards. (MA)

  18. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This booklet introduces an environmental curriculum for use in a variety of elementary subjects. The lesson plans provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into the subjects of history, social studies, and environmental sciences. Each of these sections contains background information, discussion points, and a…

  19. Finger Lakes LPG

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Finger Lakes LPG Storage, LLC; Two Brush Creek Blvd, Suite 200; Kansas City; Missouri 64112 (Applicant) has applied to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 300f et. seq (the Act), for

  20. Lake Ontario: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey with towed electronic instrumentation along the Lake Ontario nearshore (720 km) at a 20 meter contour. The survey was conducted September 6-10, 2008 with a shorter 300 km survey conducted August 14-15 for comparing of temporal variability. ...

  1. Lake Michigan: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey in the nearshore of Lake Michigan at a 20 meter contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The nearly 1200 km survey was conducted Sep 8-15, 2010. We also conducted six cross-contour tows. Along the survey tracks we sampled fixed stat...

  2. Lake Naivasha, Kenya

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-29

    If you live in Europe and buy roses, the chance is good that they were grown in Kenya -- specifically, in one of the colossal greenhouses that blot out the once wild shores of Lake Naivasha, 90km north-west of Nairobi. Image from NASA Terra satellite.

  3. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for the dry, powdery snow that results from the arid climate and location at the ... should be used with the red filter placed over your left eye. The canyons and peaks of the Uinta and Wasatch Mountains are ...

  4. Quebec: Lake Manicouagan

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... kilometers in diameter and is composed of impact-brecciated rock. Glaciation and other erosional processes have reduced the extent of the ... about 5 kilometers. The lake is bounded by erosion-resistant metamorphic and igneous rocks, and shock metamorphic effects are abundant in ...

  5. Lake classification in Vermont

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, V.; Bryant, N.

    1981-01-01

    In order to comply with the Federal Clean Water Act and, in so doing, develop a procedure to periodically update the classification, the State of Vermont evaluated the ability of LANDSAT to detect general water quality and specific water quality parameters in Vermont lakes. Unsupervised and supervised classifications as well as regression analyses were used to examine LANDSAT data from Lake Champlain and from four small nearby lakes. Unsupervised and supervised classifications were found to be of somewhat limited value. Regression analyses revealed a good correlation between depth-integrated total phosphorus concentrations and LANDSAT band 4 data (r2= 0.92) and between Secchi disk transparencies and LANDSAT band 4 data (r2 - 0.85). No correlation was found between depth-integrated chlorophyll-a samples and LANDSAT data. Vermont is expanding this LANDSAT evaluation to include the remaining lakes in the state greater than twenty acres and steps are being taken to incorporate LANDSAT into the state's ongoing water quality monitoring programs.

  6. The Great Lakes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image captured March 28, 2011 The Great Lakes Satellite: Terra NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  7. The People's Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Karen Townsend

    1975-01-01

    Citizen action to stop the disposal of taconite tailings into Lake Superior was unsuccessful when the courts settled in the favor of industry. Although citizen research revealed a form of asbestos, as well as other toxic chemicals in the discharged wastes, company representatives stated that there were no health hazards. (MA)

  8. Mono Lake, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-01

    STS068-150-020 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- An exceptionally clear, high-contrast view of the desert basins east and south of Mono Lake, California. Light clouds dot the mountain ranges; the clouds were transparent to radar beams from the Space Radar Laboratory 2 (SRL-2) payload.

  9. Poet Lake Crystal Approval

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This September 19, 2016 letter from EPA approves the petition from Poet Biorefining-Lake Crystal, regarding non-grandfathered ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for renewable fuel (D-code 6) RINs under the RFS

  10. Temperate Lakes Discovered on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vixie, Graham; Barnes, Jason W.; Jackson, Brian; Wilson, Paul

    2012-04-01

    We have discovered two temperate lakes on Titan using Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Three key features help to identify these surface features as lakes: morphology, albedo, and specular reflection. The presence of lakes at the mid-latitudes mean liquid can accumulate and remain stable outside of the poles. We first identify a lake surface by looking for possible shorelines with a lacustrine morphology. Then, we apply a simple atmospheric correction that produces an approximate surface albedo. Next, we prepare cylindrical projection maps of the brightness of the sky as seen from any points on the surface to identify specular reflections. Our techniques can then be