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Sample records for lake constance phylogeny

  1. Lake Constance

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Lake Constance, Europe     View ... This Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of Lake Constance covers an area measuring 355 kilometers x 287 kilometers, and ... wastewater and fertilizers. This leads to overproduction of algae and aquatic plants, exhaustion of available oxygen, loss of some fish ...

  2. Bacteria Associated with Benthic Diatoms from Lake Constance: Phylogeny and Influences on Diatom Growth and Secretion of Extracellular Polymeric Substances▿

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Christian G.; Bahulikar, Rahul; Rahalkar, Monali; Schink, Bernhard; Kroth, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    The composition of diatom-associated bacterial communities was studied with 14 different unialgal xenic diatom cultures isolated from freshwater epilithic biofilms of Lake Constance, Germany. A clear dominance of Alphaproteobacteria was observed, followed by Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Verrucomicrobia. Pure cultures of the diatom Cymbella microcephala, which was found to be dominant in epilithic biofilms in Lake Constance, were cocultivated with six associated bacterial strains. All these bacterial strains were able to grow in C. microcephala cultures in the absence of organic cosubstrates. Diatom growth was generally enhanced in the presence of bacteria, and polysaccharide secretion was generally increased in the presence of Proteobacteria. The monomer composition of extracellular polysaccharides of C. microcephala changed in relation to the presence of different bacteria, but the dominant monomers were less affected. Our results indicate that these changes were caused by the diatom itself rather than by specific bacterial degradation. One Bacteroidetes strain strongly influenced carbohydrate secretion by the alga via extracellular soluble compounds. Biofilms were formed only in the presence of bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis and coculture studies indicate an adaptation of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes to the microenvironment created by the diatom biofilm. PMID:18931294

  3. Seasonal variation of solitary wave properties in Lake Constance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusse, M.; Freistühler, H.; Peeters, F.

    2012-04-01

    The properties of internal solitary waves (ISWs) depend on the stratification of the water body. In most climatic regions the stratification in lakes and oceans varies during the year, and hence the properties of the ISWs can also be expected to change over the seasons. On the basis of a long-term temperature time series recorded over 6 years, this paper investigates seasonal changes in the characteristic properties of ISWs in Lake Überlingen, a subbasin of Lake Constance. A large number of ISWs with amplitudes ranging from 3 m to 30 m were identified. More than 15% of the leading ISWs of a wave train were associated with density inversions, often indicating shear instabilities or trapped cores. For all waves the propagation depth and the value of a nonlinearity index nlp providing the degree of nonlinearity were determined, propagation depth being the rest height of the isotherm undergoing maximum displacement and nlp the ratio between wave amplitude and propagation depth. The index nlp was found to be a good parameter for predicting the occurrence of inversions. The statistical analysis of the wave properties derived from the observations revealed that the degree of nonlinearity of the ISWs changes with season. Complementary to the statistical analysis, the seasonally averaged ISW properties were compared with wave prototypes obtained numerically from the Dubreil-Jacotin-Long (DJL) and the stratified Korteweg-deVries (KdV) models. The simulations indicate that the typical stratification and its seasonal variation are responsible for the degree and the seasonality of nonlinearity of the ISWs.

  4. ["Constanze": a trinational project on avian influenza in wild birds at Lake Constance].

    PubMed

    Brunhart, I; Baumer, A; Reist, M; Stärk, K; Griot, C

    2010-11-01

    When highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 (HPAI H5N1) arrived at Lake Constance in February 2006, little was known about its ecology and epidemiology in wild birds. In order to prevent virus transmission from wild birds to poultry, the adjacent countries initiated the tri-national, interdisciplinary research program «Constanze» to investigate avian influenza infections in water birds at Lake Constance. In collaboration with government agencies scientists examined the prevalence of AI virus in the region of Lake Constance for a period of 33 months, compared the effectiveness of different surveillance methods and analysed the migration behaviour of water birds. Although virus introduction from regions as far as the Ural Mountains seemed possible based on the migration behaviour of certain species, no influenza A viruses of the highly pathogenic subtype H5N1 (HPAIV) was found. However, influenza A viruses of different low pathogenic subtypes were isolated in 2.2 % of the sampled birds (swabs). Of the different surveillance methods utilised in the program the sampling of so called sentinel birds was particularly efficient.

  5. ["Constanze": a trinational project on avian influenza in wild birds at Lake Constance].

    PubMed

    Brunhart, I; Baumer, A; Reist, M; Stärk, K; Griot, C

    2010-11-01

    When highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 (HPAI H5N1) arrived at Lake Constance in February 2006, little was known about its ecology and epidemiology in wild birds. In order to prevent virus transmission from wild birds to poultry, the adjacent countries initiated the tri-national, interdisciplinary research program «Constanze» to investigate avian influenza infections in water birds at Lake Constance. In collaboration with government agencies scientists examined the prevalence of AI virus in the region of Lake Constance for a period of 33 months, compared the effectiveness of different surveillance methods and analysed the migration behaviour of water birds. Although virus introduction from regions as far as the Ural Mountains seemed possible based on the migration behaviour of certain species, no influenza A viruses of the highly pathogenic subtype H5N1 (HPAIV) was found. However, influenza A viruses of different low pathogenic subtypes were isolated in 2.2 % of the sampled birds (swabs). Of the different surveillance methods utilised in the program the sampling of so called sentinel birds was particularly efficient. PMID:21043024

  6. Chemical characterization of Lake Constance sediments record by high resolution EDXRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammlmair, D.; Wessels, M.

    2003-04-01

    Sediment-input into Lake Constance is mainly characterized by the Alpine Rhine River which drains some 12000 km2 in the Alps. Due to melting of snow in the catchment, the annual runoff and sediment input has a strong maximum in summer. This is superimposed by single events of heavy rain fall generating strong flood events and leads to annually laminated sediments along the northern slope of Lake Constance. These were used to reconstruct past environmental history and processes within the lake and its catchment, such as heavy metal contamination, eutrophication, and climate history. A typical core covering a time span of some 180 years during which the Lake and its catchment was heavily influenced by hydraulic engineering (end of 1800s), chemical pollution, and eutrophication and recovery since the 1990s was scanned for major and trace element contents with an EDXRF core scanner (Mo-tube, 45 kV, 30mA, slit capillary, 50 µm step size and 30 sec signal accumulation time). In our contribution, we present first results of selected elements which were used to characterize the sedimentary record according to - background-sediments deposited during years with low runoff and low allochthonous sediment accumulation influenced by anthropogenic heavy metal input (brownish-grey layers) - calcite precipitation within the lake (thin white layers) - individual flood-layers of tributaries to the Alpine-Rhine-River System (grey lamina) - other smaller tributaries draining the molasse catchment (brown and yellowish layers) - chemical gradation within a single layer.

  7. Dust transport and palaeoclimate during the Oldest Dryas in Central Europe - implications from varves (Lake Constance)

    SciTech Connect

    Niessen, F.; Lister, G.; Giovanoli, F.

    1992-10-01

    This paper evaluates evidence for seasonal loess deposits in peri-Alpine Lake Constance at the end of the last Glacial (Oldest Dryas chronozone). The sedimentology of laminated couplets comprising yellow and grey silts evaluates the couplets as varves comprising alternations of loess and glacial silt and clay. The laminae, less than 1 mm thick, include from bottom to top: (1) a matrix of well-sorted, non-graded fine yellow silt with sand-size intraclasts, (2) coarsening-upward grey silt with a cap of fining-upward silt to clay. This is typical and reflects summer and winter deposits (silt and clay, respectively). The authors propose that the lack of grading and the matrix supported fabric is indicative of aeolian transport and interpret the yellow laminae as loess deposits. Volcanic glass intraclasts in the loess layers are probably derived from volcanic terrain to the west of the lake, indicating an easterly palaeowind direction. Deposition of loess in the lake occurred regularly at the beginning of each annual cycle, suggesting the palaeowinds were associated with winter and/or spring conditions. Two transport scenarios are suggested to explain the sand grains scattered in this deep-water lacustrine record. 1. The grains may have been transported as bedload over the annual winter ice-cover of the lake under moderate wind strengths, frozen into the ice, and released for deposition during spring melt. 2. The sand grains were blown directly out onto the lake water by very strong winds during spring. The first scenario is contrary to the general view that loess was transported during summer, and that loess deposits thus reflect summer conditions only. Loess input to the lake shows a transitional decrease after ca. 14.3 kyr BP and cessation at ca. 14 kyr BP, probably as a result of a change of wind behaviour, increased humidity and/or vegetational changes during the Oldest Dryas in central Europe. 62 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in Sediments of Lake Constance, an Oligotrophic Freshwater Lake▿

    PubMed Central

    Deutzmann, Jörg S.; Schink, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate as terminal electron acceptor has been reported for various environments, including freshwater habitats, and also, nitrate and nitrite were recently shown to act as electron acceptors for methane oxidation in eutrophic freshwater habitats. Radiotracer experiments with sediment material of Lake Constance, an oligotrophic freshwater lake, were performed to follow 14CO2 formation from 14CH4 in sediment incubations in the presence of different electron acceptors, namely, nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, or oxygen. Whereas 14CO2 formation without and with sulfate addition was negligible, addition of nitrate increased 14CO2 formation significantly, suggesting that AOM could be coupled to denitrification. Nonetheless, denitrification-dependent AOM rates remained at least 1 order of magnitude lower than rates of aerobic methane oxidation. Using molecular techniques, putative denitrifying methanotrophs belonging to the NC10 phylum were detected on the basis of the pmoA and 16S rRNA gene sequences. These findings show that sulfate-dependent AOM was insignificant in Lake constant sediments. However, AOM can also be coupled to denitrification in this oligotrophic freshwater habitat, providing first indications that this might be a widespread process that plays an important role in mitigating methane emissions. PMID:21551281

  9. Spatially explicit exposure assessment for small streams in catchments of the orchard growing region `Lake Constance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, B.; Bach, M.; Krumpe, J.

    2009-04-01

    1. Introduction Small streams differ greatly from the standardised water body used in the context of aquatic risk assessment for the regulation of plant protection products in Germany. The standard water body is static, with a depth of 0.3 m and a width of 1.0 m. No dilution or water replacement takes place. Spray drift happens always in direction to the water body. There is no variability in drift deposition rate (90th percentile spray drift deposition values [2]). There is no spray drift filtering by vegetation. The application takes place directly adjacent to the water body. In order to establish a more realistic risk assessment procedure the Federal Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety (BVL) and the Federal Environment Agency (UBA) aggreed to replace deterministic assumptions with data distributions and spatially explicit data and introduce probabilistic methods [3, 4, 5]. To consider the spatial and temporal variability in the exposure situations of small streams the hydraulic and morphological characteristics of catchments need to be described as well as the spatial distribution of fields treated with pesticides. As small streams are the dominant type of water body in most German orchard regions, we use the growing region Lake Constance as pilot region. 2. Materials and methods During field surveys we derive basic morphological parameters for small streams in the Lake Constance region. The mean water width/depth ratio is 13 with a mean depth of 0.12 m. The average residence time is 5.6 s/m (n=87) [1]. Orchards are mostly located in the upper parts of the catchments. Based on an authoritative dataset on rivers and streams of Germany (ATKIS DLM25) we constructed a directed network topology for the Lake Constance region. The gradient of the riverbed is calculated for river stretches of > 500 m length. The network for the pilot region consists of 2000 km rivers and streams. 500 km stream length are located within a distance of 150 m to orchards. Within

  10. Impact of submerged aquatic macrophytes on 3-dim current systems and hydrodynamic transport processes in Lake Constance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Thomas; Lüddeke, Frauke; Thiange, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    According to the assessment criteria of the European water framework directive Lake Constance is having a good water quality. Nevertheless upcoming criteria using environmental quality measures show that there are still problems with respect to micropollutants. In fact, we observe significantly enhanced concentrations of micropollutants close to river mouths and in the areas of shallow water zones within Lake Constance compared to deep water concentrations. These findings are caused by river water plumes which can flow over distances of kilometers in the lake without being diluted or mixed only weakly with the surrounding lake water body. Besides, in the area of interest exist large populations of submerged aquatic macrophytes (SAM). There is only little knowledge, how these influence the distribution and transport processes of micropollutants. In order to assess the impact and distribution of river water plumes in different areas of the lake we implemented a 3-dim hydrodynamic model using DELFT3D-FLOW on a locally refined numerical grid which enables to cover different process scales of the distribution of river water bodies ranging from a few meters up to basin wide scales in the order of a few kilometers. We used numerical tracers (conservative and non-conservative) in order to quantify the impact of different abstract substance classes which are distinguished by their decay rates. In order to asses the influence of SAM populations on current field and transport processes we used a special simulation technique - the trachytope concept. The results of our 3-dim hydrodynamic model showed significantly changed current velocities, residence times and age of water parameters within the SAM areas compared to the control simulation without SAM. By simulating the propagation of coliform bacteria using numerical tracers with spatially and temporarily variable decay rates, we found complex impact pattern of the SAM on the distribution of these potentially harmful

  11. Transmission dynamics of highly pathogenic avian influenza at Lake Constance (Europe) during the outbreak of winter 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Penny, M A; Saurina, J; Keller, I; Jenni, L; Bauer, H-G; Fiedler, W; Zinsstag, J

    2010-09-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) H5N1 poses a serious threat to domestic animals. Despite the large number of studies on influenza A virus in waterbirds, little is still known about the transmission dynamics, including prevalence, behavior, and spread of these viruses in the wild waterbird population. From January to April 2006, the HPAI H5N1 virus was confirmed in 82 dead wild waterbirds at the shores of Lake Constance. In this study, we present simple mathematical models to examine this outbreak and to investigate the transmission dynamics of HPAI in wild waterbirds. The population dynamics model of wintering birds was best represented by a sinusoidal function. This model was considered the most adequate to represent the susceptible compartment of the SIR model. The three transmission models predict a basic reproduction ratio (R (0)) with value of approximately 1.6, indicating a small epidemic, which ended with the migration of susceptible wild waterbirds at the end of the winter. With this study, we quantify for the first time the transmission of HPAI H5N1 virus at Lake Constance during the outbreak of winter 2005-2006. It is a step toward the improvement of the knowledge of transmission of the virus among wild waterbirds. PMID:20680395

  12. Pb isotopes in sediments of Lake Constance, Central Europe constrain the heavy metal pathways and the pollution history of the catchment, the lake and the regional atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kober, B.; Wessels, M.; Bollhoefer, A.; Mangini

    1999-05-01

    Pb isotope ratios and Pb concentrations of well-dated sediments of Lake Constance, Central Europe have been analyzed using thermal ion mass spectrometry. Sequential extraction studies indicated isotope homogeneity of the leachable Pb components within the investigated layers. Since the middle of the 19th century a significant anthropogenic Pb component appeared in the lake sediments, and rapidly approaches concentration levels similar to that of the geogenic Pb background (20 ppm) at the beginning of the 20th century. Anthropogenic Pb was predominantly transferred to the lake sediments via the atmosphere. Pb sources were coal combustion, industrial ore processing and leaded gasoline. The flux of a fluvial Pb component to the lake sediments, additive to atmospheric Pb deposition, peaked in about 1960. This flux is attributed to (re)mobilization of Pb from polluted parts of the lake catchment, and indicates the change of catchment soils from a pollution sink to a heavy metal source. The strong reduction of anthropogenic Pb in the uppermost lake sediments since the 1960s has been caused by advances of environmental protection. The lake sediments record the changing fluxes and the isotope composition of the deposited aeolian Pb pollution. During the 20th century aeolian Pb fluxes to the lake sediments were in the range of 1--4 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}/a. During peak emission periods of gasoline Pb to the atmosphere (1960--1990) the aerosol Pb isotope composition was rather constant ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb: 1.12--1.13) and probably a mixture of Canadian and Australian with Russian and Central European Pb types. Aeolian Pb isotope and Pb flux trends in the lake sediments as a whole agree well with the trends found in Alpine glaciers (Doering et al., 1997a,b) and in ombrotrophic peat bogs of Switzerland (Shotyk et al., 1996). However, different industrial Pb components were deposited in the archives of aeolian pollution during the early 20th century.

  13. Multi-level approach for the integrated assessment of polar organic micropollutants in an international lake catchment: the example of Lake Constance.

    PubMed

    Moschet, Christoph; Götz, Christian; Longrée, Philipp; Hollender, Juliane; Singer, Heinz

    2013-07-01

    Polar organic micropollutants (MPs) can have ecotoxicological effects on aquatic ecosystems and their occurrence in drinking water is a threat to public health. An extensive exposure assessment of MPs in large river and lake catchments is a necessary but challenging proposition for researchers and regulators. To get a complete picture of MP exposure in a large catchment, we employed a novel integrated strategy including MP measurement in the international catchment of Lake Constance and mass-flux modeling. A comprehensive screening of 252 MPs in the lake water by high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to identify the most commonly present MPs for the study site. It was found that the wastewater borne MPs diclofenac, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, acesulfame, sucralose, benzotriazole, and methylbenzotriazole accounted for the most frequent and prominent findings. The concentration pattern of these compounds in the catchment was calculated based on regionalized inputs from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and substance specific elimination rates. In 52, 8, and 3 of the 112 investigated river locations the concentration exceeded the predicted no-effect levels for diclofenac, sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine, respectively. By coupling the catchment and lake model the effect of future trends in usage as well as possible mitigation options were evaluated for the tributaries and the lake. The upgrade of the major WWTPs in the catchment with a postozonation step would lead to a load reduction between 32% and 52% for all substances except for sucralose (10%). PMID:23441970

  14. Water Quality Monitoring for Lake Constance with a Physically Based Algorithm for MERIS Data

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, Daniel; Heege, Thomas; Nieke, Jens; Kneubühler, Mathias; Itten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    A physically based algorithm is used for automatic processing of MERIS level 1B full resolution data. The algorithm is originally used with input variables for optimization with different sensors (i.e. channel recalibration and weighting), aquatic regions (i.e. specific inherent optical properties) or atmospheric conditions (i.e. aerosol models). For operational use, however, a lake-specific parameterization is required, representing an approximation of the spatio-temporal variation in atmospheric and hydrooptic conditions, and accounting for sensor properties. The algorithm performs atmospheric correction with a LUT for at-sensor radiance, and a downhill simplex inversion of chl-a, sm and y from subsurface irradiance reflectance. These outputs are enhanced by a selective filter, which makes use of the retrieval residuals. Regular chl-a sampling measurements by the Lake's protection authority coinciding with MERIS acquisitions were used for parameterization, training and validation.

  15. Genetic diversity of upper Lake Constance whitefish Coregonus spp. under the influence of fisheries: a DNA study based on archived scale samples from 1932, 1975 and 2006.

    PubMed

    Gum, B; Geist, J; Eckenfels, S; Brinker, A

    2014-06-01

    This investigation examined changes in the genetic diversity of pelagic upper Lake Constance (ULC) whitefish Coregonus wartmanni population before and after the alteration of fishery methods and management from 1932 to 2006. The study spans a period of pronounced changes in trophic status of the lake and transitions from traditional relatively unselective pelagic seine (Klusgarn) fishing to highly size-selective nylon gillnet techniques. In addition, supportive breeding and stocking became most popular during the phase of eutrophication in the 1970s. The main hypothesis is that size-selective fisheries and breeding lead to an overall decrease in genetic variability over time. A total of 215 archived C. wartmanni scale samples from 1932, 1975 and 2006 were analysed by genotyping 11 microsatellite loci. A comparison of population genetic parameters, including allelic richness, observed and expected heterozygosities, and estimates of effective population sizes, suggests that the genetic diversity of C. wartmanni population has not decreased. The appearance of new alleles in the gene pool in 1975 and 2006 may be indicative of admixture with other forms in the lake or with stocked allochthonous forms. Overall, the fisheries management practice in ULC, including the effects of size-selective fisheries, supportive breeding and stocking, have not significantly altered the genetic diversity of Coregonus spp. over an 80 year period.

  16. Depth-specific and spatiotemporal variation of δ13C and δ15N in Charophytes of Lake Constance: implications for food web studies.

    PubMed

    Matuszak, Anja; Voigt, Christian C; Storch, Ilse; Bauer, Hans-Günther; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2011-07-30

    Macrophytes are at the base of many lake food webs providing essential food resources for animals at higher trophic level, such as invertebrates, fish and waterbirds. However, data regarding the spatiotemporal variation in isotopic composition of macrophytes are generally missing. We measured the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of Charophytes at Lake Constance, where they constitute a major food source for waterbirds. Our data reveal seasonal and site-specific differences as well as depth-specific variations in isotopic carbon values within the littoral zone. Charophytes were enriched in (13)C at sites of higher productivity: the δ(13)C values were high in summer, at shallow and at relatively nutrient-rich sites, and comparatively low in winter, and in deeper and nutrient-poorer sites. In contrast, no temporal or spatial trend was found to explain the variability in the isotopic nitrogen values. These results imply that the seasonal timing of food intake (relative to turnover rates of consumers tissue) and the potential depth of foraging need to be taken into account when calculating the relative contribution of energy sources to diets of consumers such as waterbirds.

  17. Methane release from sediment seeps to the atmosphere is counteracted by highly active Methylococcaceae in the water column of deep oligotrophic Lake Constance.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Maren; Bussmann, Ingeborg; Tichy, Lucas; Deutzmann, Jörg; Schink, Bernhard; Pester, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Methane emissions from freshwater environments contribute substantially to global warming but are under strong control of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria. Recently discovered methane seeps (pockmarks) in freshwater lake sediments have the potential to bypass this control by their strong outgassing activity. Whether this is counteracted by pelagic methanotrophs is not well understood yet. We used a (3)H-CH4-radiotracer technique and pmoA-based molecular approaches to assess the activity, abundance and community structure of pelagic methanotrophs above active pockmarks in deep oligotrophic Lake Constance. Above profundal pockmarks, methane oxidation rates (up to 458 nmol CH4 l(-1) d(-1)) exceeded those of the surrounding water column by two orders of magnitude and coincided with maximum methanotroph abundances of 0.6% of the microbial community. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a dominance of members of the Methylococcaceae in the water column of both, pockmark and reference sites, with most of the retrieved sequences being associated with a water-column specific clade. Communities at pockmark and reference locations also differed in parts, which was likely caused by entrainment of sediment-hosted methanotrophs at pockmark sites. Our results show that the release of seep-derived methane to the atmosphere is counteracted by a distinct methanotrophic community with a pronounced activity throughout bottom waters. PMID:27267930

  18. Methane release from sediment seeps to the atmosphere is counteracted by highly active Methylococcaceae in the water column of deep oligotrophic Lake Constance.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Maren; Bussmann, Ingeborg; Tichy, Lucas; Deutzmann, Jörg; Schink, Bernhard; Pester, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Methane emissions from freshwater environments contribute substantially to global warming but are under strong control of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria. Recently discovered methane seeps (pockmarks) in freshwater lake sediments have the potential to bypass this control by their strong outgassing activity. Whether this is counteracted by pelagic methanotrophs is not well understood yet. We used a (3)H-CH4-radiotracer technique and pmoA-based molecular approaches to assess the activity, abundance and community structure of pelagic methanotrophs above active pockmarks in deep oligotrophic Lake Constance. Above profundal pockmarks, methane oxidation rates (up to 458 nmol CH4 l(-1) d(-1)) exceeded those of the surrounding water column by two orders of magnitude and coincided with maximum methanotroph abundances of 0.6% of the microbial community. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a dominance of members of the Methylococcaceae in the water column of both, pockmark and reference sites, with most of the retrieved sequences being associated with a water-column specific clade. Communities at pockmark and reference locations also differed in parts, which was likely caused by entrainment of sediment-hosted methanotrophs at pockmark sites. Our results show that the release of seep-derived methane to the atmosphere is counteracted by a distinct methanotrophic community with a pronounced activity throughout bottom waters.

  19. Quantification of the methane concentration field around Pockmarks in Lake Constance with online membrane inlet mass spectrometry (Inspectr200-200)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentz, Torben; Schlüter, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Worldwide, the release of methane from sediments of lakes, coastal regions as well as ocean margins is observed. The gas release is often associated with specific features like pockmarks (morphological depressions at the seafloor), mud volcanoes, cold seeps as well as occurrence of gas hydrates. For such sites, gas plumes were observed by underwater camera systems as well as acoustic techniques. Compared to such semi-quantitative information, rather unknown is the concentration field of CH4 and other gases around e.g. pockmarks. This is mainly due to laborious sampling schemes (e.g. by Rosette Water Sampler) and rather time consuming CH4 analysis by gas chromatography. We investigated the CH4 concentration field around pockmarks in Lake Constance (Germany) by application of membrane inlet mass spectrometry (Inspectr200-200) combined with a submersible pump system. By this means very steep horizontal and vertical gradients of methane concentrations were observed in bottom as well as surface waters. Compilation of the continuous gas analyzes allowed a 3D visualization of the CH4 concentration field above pockmarks and computation of methane inventories for the water column.

  20. Rethinking Colour Constancy.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; Tokunaga, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colour constancy registered in experiments are usually thought to be small enough that they do not contradict the notion of colour constancy. However, it is important to determine how the deviations from colour constancy relate to the limits metamer mismatching imposes on constancy. Hence, we calculated metamer mismatching's effect for the 20 Munsell papers and 8 pairs of illuminants employed in the colour constancy study by Logvinenko and Tokunaga and found it to be so extensive that the two notions-metamer mismatching and colour constancy-must be mutually exclusive. In particular, the notion of colour constancy leads to some paradoxical phenomena such as the possibility of 20 objects having the same colour under chromatic light dispersing into a hue circle of colours under neutral light. Thus, colour constancy refers to a phenomenon, which because of metamer mismatching, simply cannot exist. Moreover, it obscures the really important visual phenomenon; namely, the alteration of object colours induced by illumination change. We show that colour is not an independent, intrinsic attribute of an object, but rather an attribute of an object/light pair, and then define a concept of material colour in terms of equivalence classes of such object/light pairs. We suggest that studying the shift in material colour under a change in illuminant will be more fruitful than pursuing colour constancy's false premise that colour is an intrinsic attribute of an object.

  1. Rethinking Colour Constancy

    PubMed Central

    Logvinenko, Alexander D.; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; Tokunaga, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Colour constancy needs to be reconsidered in light of the limits imposed by metamer mismatching. Metamer mismatching refers to the fact that two objects reflecting metameric light under one illumination may reflect non-metameric light under a second; so two objects appearing as having the same colour under one illuminant can appear as having different colours under a second. Yet since Helmholtz, object colour has generally been believed to remain relatively constant. The deviations from colour constancy registered in experiments are usually thought to be small enough that they do not contradict the notion of colour constancy. However, it is important to determine how the deviations from colour constancy relate to the limits metamer mismatching imposes on constancy. Hence, we calculated metamer mismatching’s effect for the 20 Munsell papers and 8 pairs of illuminants employed in the colour constancy study by Logvinenko and Tokunaga and found it to be so extensive that the two notions—metamer mismatching and colour constancy—must be mutually exclusive. In particular, the notion of colour constancy leads to some paradoxical phenomena such as the possibility of 20 objects having the same colour under chromatic light dispersing into a hue circle of colours under neutral light. Thus, colour constancy refers to a phenomenon, which because of metamer mismatching, simply cannot exist. Moreover, it obscures the really important visual phenomenon; namely, the alteration of object colours induced by illumination change. We show that colour is not an independent, intrinsic attribute of an object, but rather an attribute of an object/light pair, and then define a concept of material colour in terms of equivalence classes of such object/light pairs. We suggest that studying the shift in material colour under a change in illuminant will be more fruitful than pursuing colour constancy’s false premise that colour is an intrinsic attribute of an object. PMID:26356217

  2. Stereoscopic depth constancy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Depth constancy is the ability to perceive a fixed depth interval in the world as constant despite changes in viewing distance and the spatial scale of depth variation. It is well known that the spatial frequency of depth variation has a large effect on threshold. In the first experiment, we determined that the visual system compensates for this differential sensitivity when the change in disparity is suprathreshold, thereby attaining constancy similar to contrast constancy in the luminance domain. In a second experiment, we examined the ability to perceive constant depth when the spatial frequency and viewing distance both changed. To attain constancy in this situation, the visual system has to estimate distance. We investigated this ability when vergence, accommodation and vertical disparity are all presented accurately and therefore provided veridical information about viewing distance. We found that constancy is nearly complete across changes in viewing distance. Depth constancy is most complete when the scale of the depth relief is constant in the world rather than when it is constant in angular units at the retina. These results bear on the efficacy of algorithms for creating stereo content. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269596

  3. Stereoscopic depth constancy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Phillip; Banks, Martin S

    2016-06-19

    Depth constancy is the ability to perceive a fixed depth interval in the world as constant despite changes in viewing distance and the spatial scale of depth variation. It is well known that the spatial frequency of depth variation has a large effect on threshold. In the first experiment, we determined that the visual system compensates for this differential sensitivity when the change in disparity is suprathreshold, thereby attaining constancy similar to contrast constancy in the luminance domain. In a second experiment, we examined the ability to perceive constant depth when the spatial frequency and viewing distance both changed. To attain constancy in this situation, the visual system has to estimate distance. We investigated this ability when vergence, accommodation and vertical disparity are all presented accurately and therefore provided veridical information about viewing distance. We found that constancy is nearly complete across changes in viewing distance. Depth constancy is most complete when the scale of the depth relief is constant in the world rather than when it is constant in angular units at the retina. These results bear on the efficacy of algorithms for creating stereo content.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'.

  4. Colour constancy in insects.

    PubMed

    Chittka, Lars; Faruq, Samia; Skorupski, Peter; Werner, Annette

    2014-06-01

    Colour constancy is the perceptual phenomenon that the colour of an object appears largely unchanged, even if the spectral composition of the illuminating light changes. Colour constancy has been found in all insect species so far tested. Especially the pollinating insects offer a remarkable opportunity to study the ecological significance of colour constancy since they spend much of their adult lives identifying and choosing between colour targets (flowers) under continuously changing ambient lighting conditions. In bees, whose colour vision is best studied among the insects, the compensation provided by colour constancy is only partial and its efficiency depends on the area of colour space. There is no evidence for complete 'discounting' of the illuminant in bees, and the spectral composition of the light can itself be used as adaptive information. In patchy illumination, bees adjust their spatial foraging to minimise transitions between variously illuminated zones. Modelling allows the quantification of the adaptive benefits of various colour constancy mechanisms in the economy of nature. We also discuss the neural mechanisms and cognitive operations that might underpin colour constancy in insects.

  5. Binaural Loudness Constancy.

    PubMed

    Culling, John F; Dare, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In binaural loudness summation, diotic presentation of a sound usually produces greater loudness than monaural presentation. However, experiments using loudspeaker presentation with and without earplugs find that magnitude estimates of loudness are little altered by the earplug, suggesting a form of loudness constancy. We explored the significance of controlling stimulation of the second ear using meatal occlusion as opposed to the deactivation of one earphone. We measured the point of subjective loudness equality (PSLE) for monaural vs. binaural presentation using an adaptive technique for both speech and noise. These stimuli were presented in a reverberant room over a loudspeaker to the right of the listener, or over lightweight headphones. Using the headphones, stimuli were either presented dry, or matched to those of the loudspeaker by convolution with impulse responses measured from the loudspeaker to the listener position, using an acoustic manikin. The headphone response was also compensated. Using the loudspeaker, monaural presentation was achieved by instructing the listener to block the left ear with a finger. Near perfect binaural loudness constancy was observed using loudspeaker presentation, while there was a summation effect of 3-6 dB for both headphone conditions. However, only partial constancy was observed when meatal occlusion was simulated. These results suggest that there may be contributions to binaural loudness constancy from residual low frequencies at the occluded ear as well as a cognitive element, which is activated by the knowledge that one ear is occluded.

  6. Phylogenies of microcystin-producing cyanobacteria in the lower Laurentian Great Lakes suggest extensive genetic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Timothy W; Watson, Susan B; Rozmarynowycz, Mark J; Ciborowski, Jan J H; McKay, Robert Michael; Bullerjahn, George S

    2014-01-01

    Lake St. Clair is the smallest lake in the Laurentian Great Lakes system. MODIS satellite imagery suggests that high algal biomass events have occurred annually along the southern shore during late summer. In this study, we evaluated these events and tested the hypothesis that summer bloom material derived from Lake St. Clair may enter Lake Erie via the Detroit River and represent an overlooked source of potentially toxic Microcystis biomass to the western basin of Lake Erie. We conducted a seasonally and spatially resolved study carried out in the summer of 2013. Our goals were to: 1) track the development of the 2013 summer south-east shore bloom 2) conduct a spatial survey to characterize the extent of toxicity, taxonomic diversity of the total phytoplankton population and the phylogenetic diversity of potential MC-producing cyanobacteria (Microcystis, Planktothrix and Anabaena) during a high biomass event, and 3) compare the strains of potential MC-producers in Lake St. Clair with strains from Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. Our results demonstrated a clear predominance of cyanobacteria during a late August bloom event, primarily dominated by Microcystis, which we traced along the Lake St. Clair coastline downstream to the Detroit River's outflow at Lake Erie. Microcystin levels exceeded the Province of Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard (1.5 µg L(-1)) for safe drinking water at most sites, reaching up to five times this level in some areas. Microcystis was the predominant microcystin producer, and all toxic Microcystis strains found in Lake St. Clair were genetically similar to toxic Microcystis strains found in lakes Erie and Ontario. These findings suggest extensive genetic connectivity among the three systems.

  7. Phylogenies of Microcystin-Producing Cyanobacteria in the Lower Laurentian Great Lakes Suggest Extensive Genetic Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Timothy W.; Watson, Susan B.; Rozmarynowycz, Mark J.; Ciborowski, Jan J. H.; McKay, Robert Michael; Bullerjahn, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Lake St. Clair is the smallest lake in the Laurentian Great Lakes system. MODIS satellite imagery suggests that high algal biomass events have occurred annually along the southern shore during late summer. In this study, we evaluated these events and tested the hypothesis that summer bloom material derived from Lake St. Clair may enter Lake Erie via the Detroit River and represent an overlooked source of potentially toxic Microcystis biomass to the western basin of Lake Erie. We conducted a seasonally and spatially resolved study carried out in the summer of 2013. Our goals were to: 1) track the development of the 2013 summer south-east shore bloom 2) conduct a spatial survey to characterize the extent of toxicity, taxonomic diversity of the total phytoplankton population and the phylogenetic diversity of potential MC-producing cyanobacteria (Microcystis, Planktothrix and Anabaena) during a high biomass event, and 3) compare the strains of potential MC-producers in Lake St. Clair with strains from Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. Our results demonstrated a clear predominance of cyanobacteria during a late August bloom event, primarily dominated by Microcystis, which we traced along the Lake St. Clair coastline downstream to the Detroit River's outflow at Lake Erie. Microcystin levels exceeded the Province of Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard (1.5 µg L−1) for safe drinking water at most sites, reaching up to five times this level in some areas. Microcystis was the predominant microcystin producer, and all toxic Microcystis strains found in Lake St. Clair were genetically similar to toxic Microcystis strains found in lakes Erie and Ontario. These findings suggest extensive genetic connectivity among the three systems. PMID:25207941

  8. Synaesthesia and colour constancy.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Holly; Mattingley, Jason B; Arnold, Derek H

    2013-04-01

    Grapheme-colour synaesthesia is an atypical condition characterized by the perception of colours when reading achromatic text. We investigated the level of colour processing responsible for these experiences. To do so, we tapped a central characteristic of colour perception. In different lighting conditions the same wavelength of light can prompt the perception of different colours. This helps humans recognize distinctive coloured objects despite changes in illumination. We wanted to see if synaesthetic colours were generated at a neural locus that was susceptible to colour constancy analyses. We used colour matching and naming tasks to examine interactions between simulated coloured illuminants and synaesthetic colours. Neither synaesthetic colour matching or naming was impacted. This contrasted with non-synaesthetic control participants, who performed the colour-matching task with graphemes physically coloured to mimic synaesthesia. Our data suggest that synaesthetic colour signals are not generated at lower-levels of colour processing, but are introduced at higher levels of analysis and are therefore not impacted by the processes responsible for perceptual constancy.

  9. An Interview with Constance Reid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexanderson, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Constance Reid, a well-known author of books on mathematics and mathematicians, is interviewed at her home in San Francisco in July, 1979. She discusses her studies of the lives of Hilbert, Courant and other mathematicians. (MP)

  10. Surveys, simulation and single-cell assays relate function and phylogeny in a lake ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Preheim, Sarah P; Olesen, Scott W; Spencer, Sarah J; Materna, Arne; Varadharajan, Charuleka; Blackburn, Matthew; Friedman, Jonathan; Rodríguez, Jorge; Hemond, Harold; Alm, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Much remains unknown about what drives microbial community structure and diversity. Highly structured environments might offer clues. For example, it may be possible to identify metabolically similar species as groups of organisms that correlate spatially with the geochemical processes they carry out. Here, we use a 16S ribosomal RNA gene survey in a lake that has chemical gradients across its depth to identify groups of spatially correlated but phylogenetically diverse organisms. Some groups had distributions across depth that aligned with the distributions of metabolic processes predicted by a biogeochemical model, suggesting that these groups performed biogeochemical functions. A single-cell genetic assay showed, however, that the groups associated with one biogeochemical process, sulfate reduction, contained only a few organisms that have the genes required to reduce sulfate. These results raise the possibility that some of these spatially correlated groups are consortia of phylogenetically diverse and metabolically different microbes that cooperate to carry out geochemical functions. PMID:27562262

  11. Surveys, simulation and single-cell assays relate function and phylogeny in a lake ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Preheim, Sarah P; Olesen, Scott W; Spencer, Sarah J; Materna, Arne; Varadharajan, Charuleka; Blackburn, Matthew; Friedman, Jonathan; Rodríguez, Jorge; Hemond, Harold; Alm, Eric J

    2016-08-15

    Much remains unknown about what drives microbial community structure and diversity. Highly structured environments might offer clues. For example, it may be possible to identify metabolically similar species as groups of organisms that correlate spatially with the geochemical processes they carry out. Here, we use a 16S ribosomal RNA gene survey in a lake that has chemical gradients across its depth to identify groups of spatially correlated but phylogenetically diverse organisms. Some groups had distributions across depth that aligned with the distributions of metabolic processes predicted by a biogeochemical model, suggesting that these groups performed biogeochemical functions. A single-cell genetic assay showed, however, that the groups associated with one biogeochemical process, sulfate reduction, contained only a few organisms that have the genes required to reduce sulfate. These results raise the possibility that some of these spatially correlated groups are consortia of phylogenetically diverse and metabolically different microbes that cooperate to carry out geochemical functions.

  12. Color constancy and hue scaling.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Sven; Doerschner, Katja; Maloney, Laurence T

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we used a hue scaling technique to examine human color constancy performance in simulated three-dimensional scenes. These scenes contained objects of various shapes and materials and a matte test patch at the center of the scene. Hue scaling settings were made for test patches under five different illuminations. Results show that subjects had nearly stable hue scalings for a given test surface across different illuminants. In a control experiment, only the test surfaces that belonged to one illumination condition were presented, blocked in front of a black background. Surprisingly, the hue scalings of the subjects in the blocked control experiment were not simply determined by the color codes of the test surface. Rather, they depended on the sequence of previously presented test stimuli. In contrast, subjects' hue scalings in a second control experiment (with order of presentations randomized) were completely determined by the color codes of the test surface. Our results show that hue scaling is a useful technique to investigate color constancy in a more phenomenological sense. Furthermore, the results from the blocked control experiment underline the important role of slow chromatic adaptation for color constancy.

  13. Constructing Phylogenies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilardello, Nicholas; Valdes, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Introduces a method for constructing phylogenies using molecular traits and elementary graph theory. Discusses analyzing molecular data and using weighted graphs, minimum-weight spanning trees, and rooted cube phylogenies to display the data. (DDR)

  14. Color constancy in Japanese animation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Yasuyo G.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we measure the colors used in a Japanese Animations. The result can be seen on CIE-xy color spaces. It clearly shows that the color system is not a natural appearance system but an imagined and artistic appearance system. Color constancy of human vision can tell the difference in skin and hair colors between under moonlight and day light. Human brain generates a match to the memorized color of an object from daylight viewing conditions to the color of the object in different viewing conditions. For example, Japanese people always perceive the color of the Rising Sun in the Japanese flag as red even in a different viewing condition such as under moonlight. Color images captured by a camera cannot present those human perceptions. However, Japanese colorists in Animation succeeded in painting the effects of color constancy not only under moonlight but also added the memory matching colors. They aim to create a greater impact on viewer's perceptions by using the effect of the memory matching colors. In this paper, we propose the Imagined Japanese Animation Color System. This system in art is currently a subject of research in Japan. Its importance is that it could also provide an explanation on how human brain perceives the same color under different viewing conditions.

  15. Flower Constancy, Insect Psychology, and Plant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittka, Lars; Thomson, James D.; Waser, Nickolas M.

    Individuals of some species of pollinating insects tend to restrict their visits to only a few of the available plant species, in the process bypassing valuable food sources. The question of why this flower constancy exists is a rich and important one with implications for the organization of natural communities of plants, floral evolution, and our understanding of the learning processes involved in finding food. Some scientists have assumed that flower constancy is adaptive per se. Others argued that constancy occurs because memory capacity for floral features in insects is limited, but attempts to identify the limitations often remained rather simplistic. We elucidate now different sensory and motor memories from natural foraging tasks are stored and retrieved, using concepts from modern learning science and visual search, and conclude that flower constancy is likely to have multiple causes. Possible constraints favoring constancy are interference sensitivity of short-term memory, and temporal limitations on retrieving information from long-term memory as rapidly as from short-term memory, but further empirical evidence is needed to substantiate these possibilities. In addition, retrieving memories may be slower and more prone to errors when there are several options than when an insect copes with only a single task. In addition to memory limitations, we also point out alternative explanations for flower constancy. We then consider the way in which floral parameters, such as interplant distances, nectar rewards, flower morphology, and floral color (as seen through bees' eyes) affect constancy. Finally, we discuss the implications of pollinator constancy for plant evolution. To date there is no evidence that flowers have diverged to favor constancy, although the appropriate tests may not have yet been conducted. However, there is good evidence against the notion that pollinator constancy is involved in speciation or maintenance of plant species integrity.

  16. A tribal level phylogeny of Lake Tanganyika cichlid fishes based on a genomic multi-marker approach.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britta S; Matschiner, Michael; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-02-01

    The species-flocks of cichlid fishes in the East African Great Lakes Victoria, Malawi and Tanganyika constitute the most diverse extant adaptive radiations in vertebrates. Lake Tanganyika, the oldest of the lakes, harbors the morphologically and genetically most diverse assemblage of cichlids and contains the highest number of endemic cichlid genera of all African lakes. Based on morphological grounds, the Tanganyikan cichlid species have been grouped into 12-16 distinct lineages, so-called tribes. While the monophyly of most of the tribes is well established, the phylogenetic relationships among the tribes remain largely elusive. Here, we present a new tribal level phylogenetic hypothesis for the cichlid fishes of Lake Tanganyika that is based on the so far largest set of nuclear markers and a total alignment length of close to 18kb. Using next-generation amplicon sequencing with the 454 pyrosequencing technology, we compiled a dataset consisting of 42 nuclear loci in 45 East African cichlid species, which we subjected to maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses. We analyzed the entire concatenated dataset and each marker individually, and performed a Bayesian concordance analysis and gene tree discordance tests. Overall, we find strong support for a position of the Oreochromini, Boulengerochromini, Bathybatini and Trematocarini outside of a clade combining the substrate spawning Lamprologini and the mouthbrooding tribes of the 'H-lineage', which are both strongly supported to be monophyletic. The Eretmodini are firmly placed within the 'H-lineage', as sister-group to the most species-rich tribe of cichlids, the Haplochromini. The phylogenetic relationships at the base of the 'H-lineage' received less support, which is likely due to high speciation rates in the early phase of the radiation. Discordance among gene trees and marker sets further suggests the occurrence of past hybridization and/or incomplete lineage sorting in the cichlid

  17. Color constancy by category correlation.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Corral, Javier; Vanrell, Maria; Baldrich, Ramon; Tous, Francesc

    2012-04-01

    Finding color representations that are stable to illuminant changes is still an open problem in computer vision. Until now, most approaches have been based on physical constraints or statistical assumptions derived from the scene, whereas very little attention has been paid to the effects that selected illuminants have on the final color image representation. The novelty of this paper is to propose perceptual constraints that are computed on the corrected images. We define the category hypothesis, which weights the set of feasible illuminants according to their ability to map the corrected image onto specific colors. Here, we choose these colors as the universal color categories related to basic linguistic terms, which have been psychophysically measured. These color categories encode natural color statistics, and their relevance across different cultures is indicated by the fact that they have received a common color name. From this category hypothesis, we propose a fast implementation that allows the sampling of a large set of illuminants. Experiments prove that our method rivals current state-of-art performance without the need for training algorithmic parameters. Additionally, the method can be used as a framework to insert top-down information from other sources, thus opening further research directions in solving for color constancy.

  18. Spatial constancy mechanisms in motor control.

    PubMed

    Medendorp, W Pieter

    2011-02-27

    The success of the human species in interacting with the environment depends on the ability to maintain spatial stability despite the continuous changes in sensory and motor inputs owing to movements of eyes, head and body. In this paper, I will review recent advances in the understanding of how the brain deals with the dynamic flow of sensory and motor information in order to maintain spatial constancy of movement goals. The first part summarizes studies in the saccadic system, showing that spatial constancy is governed by a dynamic feed-forward process, by gaze-centred remapping of target representations in anticipation of and across eye movements. The subsequent sections relate to other oculomotor behaviour, such as eye-head gaze shifts, smooth pursuit and vergence eye movements, and their implications for feed-forward mechanisms for spatial constancy. Work that studied the geometric complexities in spatial constancy and saccadic guidance across head and body movements, distinguishing between self-generated and passively induced motion, indicates that both feed-forward and sensory feedback processing play a role in spatial updating of movement goals. The paper ends with a discussion of the behavioural mechanisms of spatial constancy for arm motor control and their physiological implications for the brain. Taken together, the emerging picture is that the brain computes an evolving representation of three-dimensional action space, whose internal metric is updated in a nonlinear way, by optimally integrating noisy and ambiguous afferent and efferent signals. PMID:21242137

  19. Spatial constancy mechanisms in motor control

    PubMed Central

    Medendorp, W. Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The success of the human species in interacting with the environment depends on the ability to maintain spatial stability despite the continuous changes in sensory and motor inputs owing to movements of eyes, head and body. In this paper, I will review recent advances in the understanding of how the brain deals with the dynamic flow of sensory and motor information in order to maintain spatial constancy of movement goals. The first part summarizes studies in the saccadic system, showing that spatial constancy is governed by a dynamic feed-forward process, by gaze-centred remapping of target representations in anticipation of and across eye movements. The subsequent sections relate to other oculomotor behaviour, such as eye–head gaze shifts, smooth pursuit and vergence eye movements, and their implications for feed-forward mechanisms for spatial constancy. Work that studied the geometric complexities in spatial constancy and saccadic guidance across head and body movements, distinguishing between self-generated and passively induced motion, indicates that both feed-forward and sensory feedback processing play a role in spatial updating of movement goals. The paper ends with a discussion of the behavioural mechanisms of spatial constancy for arm motor control and their physiological implications for the brain. Taken together, the emerging picture is that the brain computes an evolving representation of three-dimensional action space, whose internal metric is updated in a nonlinear way, by optimally integrating noisy and ambiguous afferent and efferent signals. PMID:21242137

  20. The AMBEGUJAS phenomenon and colour constancy.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Sten Sture

    2004-01-01

    The AMBEGUJAS phenomenon is a reversible flat figure that is spontaneously shifting between two apparent 3-D shapes-'tile' and 'roof'. 2-D perceptions have very rarely been reported. Tied to the shifts between the tile and roof shapes are remarkable changes of perceived colour. In our example, the tile appears to have orange (top half) and blue-green (bottom half) surface colours in white light. The roof appears grey but in an orange illumination and with a blue-green shadow. This phenomenon appears whether a grey display is presented in two coloured illuminations, or a chromatic display with two surface colours (orange and blue-green) is presented in white light. In the coloured illuminations the tile is an example of non-constancy, since its colours are non-veridical colour perceptions. The centre stripe of the display appears to have the same orange and blue-green colours as the lateral stripes but in a shadow. This seems like a colour constancy in a non-constancy situation. An alternative to the classical definition of colour constancy is discussed.

  1. Color constancy influenced by unnatural spatial structure.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Yoko; Yaguchi, Hirohisa

    2014-04-01

    The recognition of spatial structures is important for color constancy because we cannot identify an object's color under different illuminations without knowing which space it is in and how that space is illuminated. To show the importance of the natural structure of environments on color constancy, we investigated the way in which color appearance was affected by unnatural viewing conditions in which a spatial structure was distorted. Observers judged the color of a test patch placed in the center of a small room illuminated by white or reddish lights, as well as two rooms illuminated by white and reddish light, respectively. In the natural viewing condition, an observer saw the room(s) through a viewing window, whereas in an unnatural viewing condition, the scene structure was scrambled by a kaleidoscope-type viewing box. Results of single room condition with one illuminant color showed little difference in color constancy between the two viewing conditions. However, it decreased in the two-rooms condition with a more complex arrangement of space and illumination. The patch's appearance under the unnatural viewing condition was more influenced by simultaneous contrast than its appearance under the natural viewing condition. It also appears that color appearance under white illumination is more stable compared to that under reddish illumination. These findings suggest that natural spatial structure plays an important role for color constancy in a complex environment.

  2. Color constancy enhancement under poor illumination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Shao, Zhenfeng; Cheng, Qimin

    2011-12-15

    In this Letter, the color constancy and its realization were studied and a novel color constancy image enhancement algorithm under poor illumination was presented. The purpose of this algorithm is to maintain the hue of an image during the processing so that the change of saturation can be minimized. The original image was first multiplied by a scale parameter obtained by the adaptive quadratic function to enhance the luminance, and then the edge details were restored by a shifting parameter. Numerical results of the Simon Fraser University (SFU) image database indicated that the proposed algorithm performed much better in preserving the hue and saturation and avoiding color distortion compared with the existing image enhancement algorithms. PMID:22179895

  3. Motor constancy and the upsizing of handwriting.

    PubMed

    Phillips, James G; Ogeil, Rowan P; Best, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    Although handwriting can vary in size, it remains remarkably similar in form, demonstrating motor constancy (equivalence). A consideration of changes in writing size may indicate: (1) how rescaling is accomplished, and (2) those invariant features that remain constrained under size variation. In the experiment reported here nine participants wrote the word "minimum" (without dotting "i's") in cursive text, under three size conditions on a SmartBoard. The standard deviation of stroke slope did not change its relationship to mean stroke slope, but stroke durations and lengths did vary. Kinematic analysis indicated that the number of submovements, their efficiency, and their kinematic structure varied across the three writing size conditions. The results suggested that motor constancy does not merely reflect a simple change in a single parameter of scale.

  4. Constance mirror program: Progress and plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinkowstein, R. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Irby, J. H.; Smullin, L. D.; Voldman, S. H.

    1981-01-01

    The current state of the mechanics of the Constance II experiment, the physics results gathered, the motivation background, and future plans for the Constance II experiment are reviewed. Several improvements have been made and several experimental investigations have been completed. These include the construction/installation/testing of: (1) liquid-nitrogen cooled, Ioffe bars installed, (2) a diverter coil (3) the 100 kW ICRF generator, (4) the data acquisition system, and (5) the optimum hot-iron operation of the machine with Titanium and pulsed-gas plasma guns. Measurements were made of the density, temperature, and radius of the plasma. Ion-cyclotron fluctuations were observed, their bandwidth measured, and data collected demonstrating resonance heating. New X-ray diagnostics were designed and purchased, and progress on the Thomson scattering was made. Finally, a new hot cathode gun was designed and constructed.

  5. Reflectance, illumination, and appearance in color constancy.

    PubMed

    McCann, John J; Parraman, Carinna; Rizzi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    We studied color constancy using a pair of identical 3-D Color Mondrian displays. We viewed one 3-D Mondrian in nearly uniform illumination, and the other in directional, nonuniform illumination. We used the three dimensional structures to modulate the light falling on the painted surfaces. The 3-D structures in the displays were a matching set of wooden blocks. Across Mondrian displays, each corresponding facet had the same paint on its surface. We used only 6 chromatic, and 5 achromatic paints applied to 104 block facets. The 3-D blocks add shadows and multiple reflections not found in flat Mondrians. Both 3-D Mondrians were viewed simultaneously, side-by-side. We used two techniques to measure correlation of appearance with surface reflectance. First, observers made magnitude estimates of changes in the appearances of identical reflectances. Second, an author painted a watercolor of the 3-D Mondrians. The watercolor's reflectances quantified the changes in appearances. While constancy generalizations about illumination and reflectance hold for flat Mondrians, they do not for 3-D Mondrians. A constant paint does not exhibit perfect color constancy, but rather shows significant shifts in lightness, hue and chroma in response to the structure in the nonuniform illumination. Color appearance depends on the spatial information in both the illumination and the reflectances of objects. The spatial information of the quanta catch from the array of retinal receptors generates sensations that have variable correlation with surface reflectance. Models of appearance in humans need to calculate the departures from perfect constancy measured here. This article provides a dataset of measurements of color appearances for computational models of sensation. PMID:24478738

  6. Reflectance, illumination, and appearance in color constancy

    PubMed Central

    McCann, John J.; Parraman, Carinna; Rizzi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We studied color constancy using a pair of identical 3-D Color Mondrian displays. We viewed one 3-D Mondrian in nearly uniform illumination, and the other in directional, nonuniform illumination. We used the three dimensional structures to modulate the light falling on the painted surfaces. The 3-D structures in the displays were a matching set of wooden blocks. Across Mondrian displays, each corresponding facet had the same paint on its surface. We used only 6 chromatic, and 5 achromatic paints applied to 104 block facets. The 3-D blocks add shadows and multiple reflections not found in flat Mondrians. Both 3-D Mondrians were viewed simultaneously, side-by-side. We used two techniques to measure correlation of appearance with surface reflectance. First, observers made magnitude estimates of changes in the appearances of identical reflectances. Second, an author painted a watercolor of the 3-D Mondrians. The watercolor's reflectances quantified the changes in appearances. While constancy generalizations about illumination and reflectance hold for flat Mondrians, they do not for 3-D Mondrians. A constant paint does not exhibit perfect color constancy, but rather shows significant shifts in lightness, hue and chroma in response to the structure in the nonuniform illumination. Color appearance depends on the spatial information in both the illumination and the reflectances of objects. The spatial information of the quanta catch from the array of retinal receptors generates sensations that have variable correlation with surface reflectance. Models of appearance in humans need to calculate the departures from perfect constancy measured here. This article provides a dataset of measurements of color appearances for computational models of sensation. PMID:24478738

  7. The development of cognitive gender constancy and sex role preferences.

    PubMed

    Marcus, D E; Overton, W F

    1978-06-01

    The chief purpose of this study was to examine the development of stable concepts of "boy" and "girl" (gender identity constancy) in kindergartners and first and second graders. Gender constancy was explored in relation to cognitive level (assessed both by grade and conservation measures); whether the concept was applied to the subject himself or to another child; whether the concept was applied to live children or pictorial representations; and sex role preferences (games, television characters, peer preferences). In support of a cognitive-developmental position, gender constancy was found to be related to cognitive level, and most children conformed to a developmental sequence (Guttman scalogram) in which conservation preceded gender constancy. Gender constancy performance was better when the concept was applied to the self versus another child and when applied to pictorial representations versus live forms. Gender constancy was not related to sex role preferences.

  8. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  9. Development of Character Constancy of Self and Other.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotenberg, Ken J.

    1982-01-01

    Two experiments were designed to investigate among kindergarten through third-grade children the development of character constancy -- the belief that other's or self's personality characteristics are stable across time and do not change despite changes in appearance. It is proposed that character constancy of self and other is a product of both…

  10. A Retinal Mechanism Inspired Color Constancy Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Shi; Gao, Shao-Bing; Li, Ruo-Xuan; Du, Xin-Yu; Li, Chao-Yi; Li, Yong-Jie

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel model for the computational color constancy, inspired by the amazing ability of the human vision system (HVS) to perceive the color of objects largely constant as the light source color changes. The proposed model imitates the color processing mechanisms in the specific level of the retina, the first stage of the HVS, from the adaptation emerging in the layers of cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells (HCs) to the color-opponent mechanism and disinhibition effect of the non-classical receptive field in the layer of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In particular, HC modulation provides a global color correction with cone-specific lateral gain control, and the following RGCs refine the processing with iterative adaptation until all the three opponent channels reach their stable states (i.e., obtain stable outputs). Instead of explicitly estimating the scene illuminant(s), such as most existing algorithms, our model directly removes the effect of scene illuminant. Evaluations on four commonly used color constancy data sets show that the proposed model produces competitive results in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods for the scenes under either single or multiple illuminants. The results indicate that single opponency, especially the disinhibitory effect emerging in the receptive field's subunit-structured surround of RGCs, plays an important role in removing scene illuminant(s) by inherently distinguishing the spatial structures of surfaces from extensive illuminant(s). PMID:26766375

  11. Color constancy in a naturalistic, goal-directed task.

    PubMed

    Radonjic, Ana; Cottaris, Nicolas P; Brainard, David H

    2015-01-01

    In daily life, we use color information to select objects that will best serve a particular goal (e.g., pick the best-tasting fruit or avoid spoiled food). This is challenging when judgments must be made across changes in illumination as the spectrum reflected from an object to the eye varies with the illumination. Color constancy mechanisms serve to partially stabilize object color appearance across illumination changes, but whether and to what degree constancy supports accurate cross-illumination object selection is not well understood. To get closer to understanding how constancy operates in real-life tasks, we developed a paradigm in which subjects engage in a goal-directed task for which color is instrumental. Specifically, in each trial, subjects re-created an arrangement of colored blocks (the model) across a change in illumination. By analyzing the re-creations, we were able to infer and quantify the degree of color constancy that mediated subjects' performance. In Experiments 1 and 2, we used our paradigm to characterize constancy for two different sets of block reflectances, two different illuminant changes, and two different groups of subjects. On average, constancy was good in our naturalistic task, but it varied considerably across subjects. In Experiment 3, we tested whether varying scene complexity and the validity of local contrast as a cue to the illumination change modulated constancy. Increasing complexity did not lead to improved constancy; silencing local contrast significantly reduced constancy. Our results establish a novel goal-directed task that enables us to approach color constancy as it emerges in real life. PMID:26381834

  12. Color constancy in a naturalistic, goal-directed task

    PubMed Central

    Radonjić, Ana; Cottaris, Nicolas P.; Brainard, David H.

    2015-01-01

    In daily life, we use color information to select objects that will best serve a particular goal (e.g., pick the best-tasting fruit or avoid spoiled food). This is challenging when judgments must be made across changes in illumination as the spectrum reflected from an object to the eye varies with the illumination. Color constancy mechanisms serve to partially stabilize object color appearance across illumination changes, but whether and to what degree constancy supports accurate cross-illumination object selection is not well understood. To get closer to understanding how constancy operates in real-life tasks, we developed a paradigm in which subjects engage in a goal-directed task for which color is instrumental. Specifically, in each trial, subjects re-created an arrangement of colored blocks (the model) across a change in illumination. By analyzing the re-creations, we were able to infer and quantify the degree of color constancy that mediated subjects' performance. In Experiments 1 and 2, we used our paradigm to characterize constancy for two different sets of block reflectances, two different illuminant changes, and two different groups of subjects. On average, constancy was good in our naturalistic task, but it varied considerably across subjects. In Experiment 3, we tested whether varying scene complexity and the validity of local contrast as a cue to the illumination change modulated constancy. Increasing complexity did not lead to improved constancy; silencing local contrast significantly reduced constancy. Our results establish a novel goal-directed task that enables us to approach color constancy as it emerges in real life. PMID:26381834

  13. Color constancy in a naturalistic, goal-directed task.

    PubMed

    Radonjic, Ana; Cottaris, Nicolas P; Brainard, David H

    2015-01-01

    In daily life, we use color information to select objects that will best serve a particular goal (e.g., pick the best-tasting fruit or avoid spoiled food). This is challenging when judgments must be made across changes in illumination as the spectrum reflected from an object to the eye varies with the illumination. Color constancy mechanisms serve to partially stabilize object color appearance across illumination changes, but whether and to what degree constancy supports accurate cross-illumination object selection is not well understood. To get closer to understanding how constancy operates in real-life tasks, we developed a paradigm in which subjects engage in a goal-directed task for which color is instrumental. Specifically, in each trial, subjects re-created an arrangement of colored blocks (the model) across a change in illumination. By analyzing the re-creations, we were able to infer and quantify the degree of color constancy that mediated subjects' performance. In Experiments 1 and 2, we used our paradigm to characterize constancy for two different sets of block reflectances, two different illuminant changes, and two different groups of subjects. On average, constancy was good in our naturalistic task, but it varied considerably across subjects. In Experiment 3, we tested whether varying scene complexity and the validity of local contrast as a cue to the illumination change modulated constancy. Increasing complexity did not lead to improved constancy; silencing local contrast significantly reduced constancy. Our results establish a novel goal-directed task that enables us to approach color constancy as it emerges in real life.

  14. Color constancy supports cross-illumination color selection

    PubMed Central

    Radonjić, Ana; Cottaris, Nicolas P.; Brainard, David H.

    2015-01-01

    We rely on color to select objects as the targets of our actions (e.g., the freshest fish, the ripest fruit). To be useful for selection, color must provide accurate guidance about object identity across changes in illumination. Although the visual system partially stabilizes object color appearance across illumination changes, how such color constancy supports object selection is not understood. To study how constancy operates in real-life tasks, we developed a novel paradigm in which subjects selected which of two test objects presented under a test illumination appeared closer in color to a target object presented under a standard illumination. From subjects' choices, we inferred a selection-based match for the target via a variant of maximum likelihood difference scaling, and used it to quantify constancy. Selection-based constancy was good when measured using naturalistic stimuli, but was dramatically reduced when the stimuli were simplified, indicating that a naturalistic stimulus context is critical for good constancy. Overall, our results suggest that color supports accurate object selection across illumination changes when both stimuli and task match how color is used in real life. We compared our selection-based constancy results with data obtained using a classic asymmetric matching task and found that the adjustment-based matches predicted selection well for our stimuli and instructions, indicating that the appearance literature provides useful guidance for the emerging study of constancy in natural tasks. PMID:26024460

  15. Scene Context Dependency of Pattern Constancy of Time Series Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodell, Glenn A.; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental element of future generic pattern recognition technology is the ability to extract similar patterns for the same scene despite wide ranging extraneous variables, including lighting, turbidity, sensor exposure variations, and signal noise. In the process of demonstrating pattern constancy of this kind for retinex/visual servo (RVS) image enhancement processing, we found that the pattern constancy performance depended somewhat on scene content. Most notably, the scene topography and, in particular, the scale and extent of the topography in an image, affects the pattern constancy the most. This paper will explore these effects in more depth and present experimental data from several time series tests. These results further quantify the impact of topography on pattern constancy. Despite this residual inconstancy, the results of overall pattern constancy testing support the idea that RVS image processing can be a universal front-end for generic visual pattern recognition. While the effects on pattern constancy were significant, the RVS processing still does achieve a high degree of pattern constancy over a wide spectrum of scene content diversity, and wide ranging extraneousness variations in lighting, turbidity, and sensor exposure.

  16. Extending "color constancy" outside the visible region.

    PubMed

    Ratnasingam, Sivalogeswaran; Collins, Steve; Hernández-Andrés, Javier

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, the results of an investigation of the possibility of extending "color constancy" to obtain illuminant-invariant reflectance features from data in the near-ultraviolet (UV) and near-infrared (IR) wavelength regions are reported. These features are obtained by extending a blackbody-model-based color constancy algorithm proposed by Ratnasingam and Collins [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A27, 286 (2010)] to these additional wavelengths. Ratnasingam and Collins applied the model-based algorithm in the visible region to extract two illuminant-invariant features related to the wavelength-dependent reflectance of a surface from the responses of four sensors. In this paper, this model-based algorithm is extended to extract two illuminant-invariant reflectance features from the responses of sensors that cover the visible and either the near-UV or near-IR wavelength. In this investigation, test reflectance data sets are generated using the goodness-fitness coefficient (GFC). The appropriateness of the GFC for generating the test data sets is demonstrated by comparing the results obtained with these data with those obtained from data sets generated using the CIELab distance. Results based upon the GFC are then presented that suggest that the model-based algorithm can extract useful features from data from the visible and near-IR wavelengths. Finally, results are presented that show that, although the spectrum of daylight in the near UV is very different from a blackbody spectrum, the algorithm can be modified to extract useful features from visible and near-UV wavelengths. PMID:21478947

  17. Spectral sharpening of color sensors: diagonal color constancy and beyond.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Corral, Javier; Bertalmío, Marcelo

    2014-02-26

    It has now been 20 years since the seminal work by Finlayson et al. on the use of spectral sharpening of sensors to achieve diagonal color constancy. Spectral sharpening is still used today by numerous researchers for different goals unrelated to the original goal of diagonal color constancy e.g., multispectral processing, shadow removal, location of unique hues. This paper reviews the idea of spectral sharpening through the lens of what is known today in color constancy, describes the different methods used for obtaining a set of sharpening sensors and presents an overview of the many different uses that have been found for spectral sharpening over the years.

  18. The nature of instructional effects in color constancy.

    PubMed

    Radonjić, Ana; Brainard, David H

    2016-06-01

    The instructions subjects receive can have a large effect on experimentally measured color constancy, but the nature of these effects and how their existence should inform our understanding of color perception remains unclear. We used a factorial design to measure how instructional effects on constancy vary with experimental task and stimulus set. In each of 2 experiments, we employed both a classic adjustment-based asymmetric matching task and a novel color selection task. Four groups of naive subjects were instructed to make adjustments/selections based on (a) color (neutral instructions); (b) the light reaching the eye (physical spectrum instructions); (c) the actual surface reflectance of an object (objective reflectance instructions); or (d) the apparent surface reflectance of an object (apparent reflectance instructions). Across the 2 experiments we varied the naturalness of the stimuli. We find clear interactions between instructions, task, and stimuli. With simplified stimuli (Experiment 1), instructional effects were large and the data revealed 2 instruction-dependent patterns. In 1 (neutral and physical spectrum instructions) constancy was low, intersubject variability was also low, and adjustment-based and selection-based constancy were in agreement. In the other (reflectance instructions) constancy was high, intersubject variability was large, adjustment-based constancy deviated from selection-based constancy and for some subjects selection-based constancy increased across sessions. Similar patterns held for naturalistic stimuli (Experiment 2), although instructional effects were smaller. We interpret these 2 patterns as signatures of distinct task strategies-1 is perceptual, with judgments based primarily on the perceptual representation of color; the other involves explicit instruction-driven reasoning. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. The CONSTANCES cohort: an open epidemiological laboratory

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Prospective cohorts represent an essential design for epidemiological studies and allow for the study of the combined effects of lifestyle, environment, genetic predisposition, and other risk factors on a large variety of disease endpoints. The CONSTANCES cohort is intended to provide public health information and to serve as an "open epidemiologic laboratory" accessible to the epidemiologic research community. Although designed as a "general-purpose" cohort with very broad coverage, it will particularly focus on occupational and social determinants of health, and on aging. Methods/Design The CONSTANCES cohort is designed as a randomly selected representative sample of French adults aged 18-69 years at inception; 200,000 subjects will be included over a five-year period. At inclusion, the selected subjects will be invited to fill a questionnaire and to attend a Health Screening Center (HSC) for a comprehensive health examination: weight, height, blood pressure, electrocardiogram, vision, auditory, spirometry, and biological parameters; for those aged 45 years and older, a specific work-up of functional, physical, and cognitive capacities will be performed. A biobank will be set up. The follow-up includes a yearly self-administered questionnaire, and a periodic visit to an HSC. Social and work-related events and health data will be collected from the French national retirement, health and death databases. The data that will be collected include social and demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, life events, behaviors, and occupational factors. The health data will cover a wide spectrum: self-reported health scales, reported prevalent and incident diseases, long-term chronic diseases and hospitalizations, sick-leaves, handicaps, limitations, disabilities and injuries, healthcare utilization and services provided, and causes of death. To take into account non-participation at inclusion and attrition throughout the longitudinal follow-up, a cohort

  20. Crater Lake: blue through time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Buktenica, Mark; Collier, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Blue is the color of constancy, hence the term true blue. The unearthly blueness of Crater Lake reflects its pristine character and gives scientists a focal point for studying human impacts on aquatic environments over long periods of time. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Park Service, and Oregon State University have systematically studied the lake for the last two decades. Long-term monitoring of this lake is a priority of Crater Lake National Park and will continue far into the future.

  1. Color Constancy of Red-Green Dichromats and Anomalous Trichromats

    PubMed Central

    Foster, David H.; Amano, Kinjiro; Nascimento, Sérgio M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Color-vision deficiency is associated with abnormalities in color matching and color discrimination, but its impact on the ability of people to judge the constancy of surface colors under different lights (color constancy) is less clear. This work had two aims: first, to quantify the degree of color constancy in subjects with congenital red-green color deficiency; second, to test whether the degree of color constancy in anomalous trichromats can be predicted from their Rayleigh anomaloscope matches. Methods. Color constancy of red-green color-deficient subjects was tested in a task requiring the discrimination of illuminant changes from surface-reflectance changes. Mondrian-like colored patterns, generated on the screen of a computer monitor, were used as stimuli to avoid the spatial cues provided by natural objects and scenes. Spectral reflectances were taken from the Munsell Book of Color and from natural scenes. Illuminants were taken from the daylight locus. Results. Protanopes and deuteranopes performed more poorly than normal trichromats with Munsell spectral reflectances but were less impaired with natural spectral reflectances. Protanomalous and deuteranomalous trichromats performed as well as, or almost as well as, normal trichromats, independent of the type of reflectance. Individual differences were not correlated with Rayleigh anomaloscope matches. Conclusions. Despite the evidence of clinical color-vision tests, red-green color-deficient persons are less disadvantaged than might be expected in their judgments of surface colors under different lights. PMID:19892868

  2. Colour constancy: influence of viewing behaviour on grey settings.

    PubMed

    Golz, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    In numerous studies on colour constancy or colour induction subjects have to adjust a test field so that it looks achromatic. Their viewing behaviour during these settings is often not controlled or reported. Here I show that the results of grey settings depend on whether subjects visually explore the stimulus by looking around or fixate their gaze exclusively on the test field. Two different viewing instructions are compared with regard to the degree of constancy as measured by the shift of grey settings in coloured surrounds. In variegated surrounds (but not in uniform surrounds) there is a robust effect of viewing condition for all subjects and all surround chromaticities tested, in that exploration increases colour constancy compared to fixating the test field. Values of a colour constancy index are increased by as much as 20% (where 100% colour constancy means that the subject chooses as grey the mean chromaticity of the surround) with an average across all subjects and surrounds of 12.6%. Thus, if this factor is not experimentally controlled, it could inflate variance, reduce comparability between different studies, and even lead to unwarranted conclusions if viewing behaviour unpredictably differs between experimental conditions.

  3. "God Made Me a Girl": Sex-Category Constancy Judgments and Explanations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szkrybalo, Joel; Ruble, Diane N.

    1999-01-01

    Studied children's sex-category constancy judgments and accompanying explanations over three years. Found that constancy improvements were linked to explanations based on operational reasoning. Lower constancy scores were linked to explanations emphasizing gender-role norms and external appearances. Judgment-explanation relationships were stronger…

  4. Gender Constancy and Same-Sex Imitation: A Developmental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perloff, Richard M.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-one preschool children were interviewed individually to assess awareness of gender constancy and choice of same-sex models. Differences emerged between high and low gender-constant children when they were given a choice between imitating a same-sex model performing a relatively unpleasant task and imitating an opposite-sex model enacting a…

  5. Constance Mellon's "Library Anxiety": An Appreciation and a Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gremmels, Gillian S.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author recollects her memories reading Constance A. Mellon's article, "Library Anxiety: A Grounded Theory and Its Development," when it appeared in the March 1986 issue of "College & Research Libraries." She was a reference librarian at at DePauw University in Indiana at the time, helping students…

  6. Constance D'Arcy Mackay: A Historiographical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Water, Manon

    1995-01-01

    States that Constance D'Arcy Mackay was instrumental in defining the genre of children's theater in the early 20th century. Discusses her career highlights. Concludes that Mackay played a pivotal role in the "making" of the history of children's theater in the United States, and that while little of her personal history is known, her theories are…

  7. Exemplar-Based Color Constancy and Multiple Illumination.

    PubMed

    Joze, Hamid Reza Vaezi; Drew, Mark S

    2014-05-01

    Exemplar-based learning or, equally, nearest neighbor methods have recently gained interest from researchers in a variety of computer science domains because of the prevalence of large amounts of accessible data and storage capacity. In computer vision, these types of technique have been successful in several problems such as scene recognition, shape matching, image parsing, character recognition, and object detection. Applying the concept of exemplar-based learning to the problem of color constancy seems odd at first glance since, in the first place, similar nearest neighbor images are not usually affected by precisely similar illuminants and, in the second place, gathering a dataset consisting of all possible real-world images, including indoor and outdoor scenes and for all possible illuminant colors and intensities, is indeed impossible. In this paper, we instead focus on surfaces in the image and address the color constancy problem by unsupervised learning of an appropriate model for each training surface in training images. We find nearest neighbor models for each surface in a test image and estimate its illumination based on comparing the statistics of pixels belonging to nearest neighbor surfaces and the target surface. The final illumination estimation results from combining these estimated illuminants over surfaces to generate a unique estimate. We show that it performs very well, for standard datasets, compared to current color constancy algorithms, including when learning based on one image dataset is applied to tests from a different dataset. The proposed method has the advantage of overcoming multi-illuminant situations, which is not possible for most current methods since they assume the color of the illuminant is constant all over the image. We show a technique to overcome the multiple illuminant situation using the proposed method and test our technique on images with two distinct sources of illumination using a multiple-illuminant color constancy

  8. Depth perception in the framework of General Object Constancy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jiehui; Petrov, Yury

    2013-09-10

    Size constancy is a well-known example of perceptual stabilization accounting for the effect of viewing distance on retinal image size. In a recent study (Qian & Petrov, 2012), we demonstrated a similar stabilization mechanism for contrast perception and suggested that the brain accounts for effects of perceived distance on various other object features in a similar way, a hypothesis that we called General Object Constancy. Here we report a new illusion of depth further supporting this hypothesis. Pairs of disks moved across the screen in a pattern of radial optic flow. A pair comprised a small black disk floating in front of a large white disk, creating the percept of a pencil tip viewed head on. As these "pencils" moved away, they appeared to grow in contrast, in diameter, and also appeared to be getting "sharper." The contrast and size illusions replicated our previous findings, while the depth gradient (sharpness) illusion revealed a depth constancy phenomenon. We discovered that depth and size constancies were related, e.g., the two illusions were strongly correlated across observers. Whereas the illusory diameter increase could not be canceled by any degree of depth modulation, decreasing the diameter of the "pencils" during optic flow motion (thus increasing their disparity gradient) weakened the illusory depth gradient increase. This paradoxical result, as well as our other results, is explained by the General Object Constancy model: Besides using the same scaling factor to account for size, contrast, and depth variations with distance, the brain uses the apparent object size to additionally scale contrast and depth signals.

  9. Color constancy - A method for recovering surface spectral reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, L. T.; Wandell, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for estimating the surface reflectance functions of objects in a scene with incomplete knowledge of the spectral power distribution of the ambient light. An image processing system employing this algorithm can assign colors that are constant despite changes in the lighting of the scene; this capability is essential to correct color rendering in photography, TV, and in the construction of artificial visual systems for robotics. Attention is given to the way in which constraints on lights and surfaces in the environment make color-constancy possible for a visual system, and the algorithm's implications for human color vision are discussed.

  10. An Experimental Test of the Effects of Gender Constancy on Sex Typing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Andrea E.; Bigler, Rebecca S.; Ruble, Diane N.

    2009-01-01

    This study provides an experimental test of the hypothesis that level of gender constancy understanding affects children's sex typing. Preschool-age children (N = 62, mean age = 47 months) were randomly assigned to experimental lessons that taught that biological traits (including gender) are either fixed (pro-constancy condition) or mutable…

  11. Building a Twig Phylogeny

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinn, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    In this classroom activity, students build a phylogeny for woody plant species based on the morphology of their twigs. Using any available twigs, students can practice the process of cladistics to test evolutionary hypotheses for real organisms. They identify homologous characters, determine polarity through outgroup comparison, and construct a…

  12. The Development of Gender Constancy in Early Childhood and Its Relation to Time Comprehension and False-Belief Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmyj, Norbert; Bischof-Köhler, Doris

    2015-01-01

    What is the developmental course of children's gender constancy? Do other cognitive abilities such as time comprehension and false-belief understanding foster gender constancy and the subcomponents gender stability and gender consistency? We examined the development of gender constancy and its relation to time comprehension and false-belief…

  13. Constancy and diversity in the flavivirus fusion peptide

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Background Flaviviruses include the mosquito-borne dengue, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever and West Nile and the tick-borne encephalitis viruses. They are responsible for considerable world-wide morbidity and mortality. Viral entry is mediated by a conserved fusion peptide containing 16 amino acids located in domain II of the envelope protein E. Highly orchestrated conformational changes initiated by exposure to acidic pH accompany the fusion process and are important factors limiting amino acid changes in the fusion peptide that still permit fusion with host cell membranes in both arthropod and vertebrate hosts. The cell-fusing related agents, growing only in mosquitoes or insect cell lines, possess a different homologous peptide. Results Analysis of 46 named flaviviruses deposited in the Entrez Nucleotides database extended the constancy in the canonical fusion peptide sequences of mosquito-borne, tick-borne and viruses with no known vector to include more recently-sequenced viruses. The mosquito-borne signature amino acid, G104, was also found in flaviviruses with no known vector and with the cell-fusion related viruses. Despite the constancy in the canonical sequences in pathogenic flaviviruses, mutations were surprisingly frequent with a 27% prevalence of nonsynonymous mutations in yellow fever virus fusion peptide sequences, and 0 to 7.4% prevalence in the others. Six of seven yellow fever patients whose virus had fusion peptide mutations died. In the cell-fusing related agents, not enough sequences have been deposited to estimate reliably the prevalence of fusion peptide mutations. However, the canonical sequences homologous to the fusion peptide and the pattern of disulfide linkages in protein E differed significantly from the other flaviviruses. Conclusion The constancy of the canonical fusion peptide sequences in the arthropod-borne flaviviruses contrasts with the high prevalence of mutations in most individual viruses. The discrepancy may be the

  14. Constructing computer virus phylogenies

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Goldberg, P.W.; Phillips, C.A.; Sorkin, G.B.

    1996-03-01

    There has been much recent algorithmic work on the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of biological species. Computer virus specialists are interested in finding the evolutionary history of computer viruses--a virus is often written using code fragments from one or more other viruses, which are its immediate ancestors. A phylogeny for a collection of computer viruses is a directed acyclic graph whose nodes are the viruses and whose edges map ancestors to descendants and satisfy the property that each code fragment is ``invented`` only once. To provide a simple explanation for the data, we consider the problem of constructing such a phylogeny with a minimal number of edges. In general, this optimization problem cannot be solved in quasi-polynomial time unless NQP=QP; we present positive and negative results for associated approximated problems. When tree solutions exist, they can be constructed and randomly sampled in polynomial time.

  15. TARA and constance B mirror confinement experiments and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.S.; Gerver, M.; Kesner, J.; Irby, J.H.; Lane, B.G.; Mauel, M.E.; McVey, B.D.; Ram, A.; Sevillano, E.; Smatlak, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    The axisymmetric TARA central cell has been heated using aperture and double half turn ICRF antennas to produce stable plasma with ..beta.. less than or equal to 0.2%. Parameters suitable for startup of thermal barriers with n = 3.5 x 10/sup 12//cm/sup 3/ and Ti/sub perpendiculer/ approx. 30 eV have been reached. Hot electron plasmas with ..beta.. less than or equal to 15% are obtained in the TARA and Constance quadrupoles. Electron cyclotron instabilities are analyzed. A new scheme for single frequency drift pumping with stochasticity by ICRF is proposed. ICRF modulated at the electron bounce frequency is shown to yield stochastic parallel electron heating for thermal barriers.

  16. Generalized Enhanced Multivariance Product Representation for Data Partitioning: Constancy Level

    SciTech Connect

    Tunga, M. Alper; Demiralp, Metin

    2011-09-14

    Enhanced Multivariance Product Representation (EMPR) method is used to represent multivariate functions in terms of less-variate structures. The EMPR method extends the HDMR expansion by inserting some additional support functions to increase the quality of the approximants obtained for dominantly or purely multiplicative analytical structures. This work aims to develop the generalized form of the EMPR method to be used in multivariate data partitioning approaches. For this purpose, the Generalized HDMR philosophy is taken into consideration to construct the details of the Generalized EMPR at constancy level as the introductory steps and encouraging results are obtained in data partitioning problems by using our new method. In addition, to examine this performance, a number of numerical implementations with concluding remarks are given at the end of this paper.

  17. The intensity dependent spread model and color constancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurrasch, Ellie

    1990-01-01

    Odetics is investigating the use of the intensity dependent spread (IDS) model for determining color constancy. Object segmentation is performed effortlessly by the human visual systems, but creating computer vision that takes an image as input and performs object identification on the basis of color has some difficulties. The unknown aspects of the light illuminating a scene in space or anywhere can seriously interfere with the use of color for object identification. The color of an image depends not only on the physical characteristics of the object, but also on the wavelength composition of the incident illumination. IDS processing provides the extraction of edges and of reflectance changes across edges, independent of variations in scene illumination. IDS depends solely on the ratio of the reflectances on the two sides of the edge. Researchers are in the process of using IDS to recover the reflectance image.

  18. Quantitative studies of animal colour constancy: using the chicken as model.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Peter; Wilby, David; Kelber, Almut

    2016-05-11

    Colour constancy is the capacity of visual systems to keep colour perception constant despite changes in the illumination spectrum. Colour constancy has been tested extensively in humans and has also been described in many animals. In humans, colour constancy is often studied quantitatively, but besides humans, this has only been done for the goldfish and the honeybee. In this study, we quantified colour constancy in the chicken by training the birds in a colour discrimination task and testing them in changed illumination spectra to find the largest illumination change in which they were able to remain colour-constant. We used the receptor noise limited model for animal colour vision to quantify the illumination changes, and found that colour constancy performance depended on the difference between the colours used in the discrimination task, the training procedure and the time the chickens were allowed to adapt to a new illumination before making a choice. We analysed literature data on goldfish and honeybee colour constancy with the same method and found that chickens can compensate for larger illumination changes than both. We suggest that future studies on colour constancy in non-human animals could use a similar approach to allow for comparison between species and populations. PMID:27170714

  19. Quantitative studies of animal colour constancy: using the chicken as model.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Peter; Wilby, David; Kelber, Almut

    2016-05-11

    Colour constancy is the capacity of visual systems to keep colour perception constant despite changes in the illumination spectrum. Colour constancy has been tested extensively in humans and has also been described in many animals. In humans, colour constancy is often studied quantitatively, but besides humans, this has only been done for the goldfish and the honeybee. In this study, we quantified colour constancy in the chicken by training the birds in a colour discrimination task and testing them in changed illumination spectra to find the largest illumination change in which they were able to remain colour-constant. We used the receptor noise limited model for animal colour vision to quantify the illumination changes, and found that colour constancy performance depended on the difference between the colours used in the discrimination task, the training procedure and the time the chickens were allowed to adapt to a new illumination before making a choice. We analysed literature data on goldfish and honeybee colour constancy with the same method and found that chickens can compensate for larger illumination changes than both. We suggest that future studies on colour constancy in non-human animals could use a similar approach to allow for comparison between species and populations.

  20. Colour constancy as measured by least dissimilar matching.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Tokunaga, Rumi

    2011-01-01

    Although asymmetric colour matching has been widely used in experiments on colour constancy, an exact colour match between objects lit by different chromatic lights is impossible to achieve. We used a modification of this technique, instructing our observers to establish the least dissimilar pair of differently illuminated coloured papers. The stimulus display consisted of two identical sets of 22 Munsell papers illuminated independently by neutral, yellow, blue, green and red lights. The lights produced approximately the same illuminance. Four trichromatic observers participated in the experiment. The proportion of exact matches was evaluated. When both sets of papers were lit by the same light, the exact match rate was 0.92, 0.93, 0.84, 0.78 and 0.76 for the neutral, yellow, blue, green and red lights, respectively. When one illumination was neutral and the other chromatic, the exact match rate was 0.80, 0.40, 0.56 and 0.32 for the yellow, blue, green and red lights, respectively. When both lights were chromatic, the exact match rate was found to be even poorer (0.30 on average). Yet, least dissimilar matching was found to be rather systematic. Particularly, a statistical test showed it was symmetric and transitive. The exact match rate was found to be different for different papers, varying from 0.99 (black paper) to 0.12 (purple paper). Such a variation can hardly be expected if observers' judgements were based on an illuminant estimate. We argue that colour constancy cannot be achieved for all the reflecting objects because of mismatching of metamers. We conjecture that the visual system might have evolved to have colour constant perception for some ecologically valid objects at a cost of colour inconstancy for other types of objects. PMID:21902878

  1. Electron-cyclotron heating in the Constance 2 mirror experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mauel, Michael E.

    1982-09-01

    Electron cyclotron heating of a highly-ionized plasma in mirror geometry is investigated. The experimental diagnosis of the electron energy distribution and the comparison of the results of this diagnosis with a two dimensional, time-dependent Fokker-Planck simulation are accomplished in four steps. (1) First, the power balance of the heated and unheated Constance 2 plasma is analyzed experimentally. It is concluded that the heated electrons escape the mirror at a rate dominated by a combination of the influx of cool electrons from outside the mirror and the increased loss rate of the ions. (2) The microwave parameters at the resonance zones are then calculated by cold-plasma ray tracing. High N/sub parallel/ waves are launched and for these waves, strong first-pass absorption is predicted. The absorption strength is qualitatively checked in the experiment by surrounding the plasma with non-reflecting liners. (3) A simplified quasilinear theory including the effect of N/sub parallel/ is developed to model the electrons. An analytic expression is derived for the RF-induced pump-out of the magnetically-confined warm electrons. Results of the Fokker-Planck simulations show the development of the electron energy distribution for several plasma conditions and verify the scaling of the analytic expression for RF-induced diffusion into the loss cone. (4) Sample x-ray and endloss data are presented, and the overall comparison between the simulation and experiment is discussed. The x-ray signals indicate that, for greater RF power, the hot electrondensity increases more rapidly than its temperature. The time history of the endloss data, illustrating RF-enhancement, suggests the predicted scaling for warm-electron pump-out. Finally, a comparison between the measured and predicted energy distribution shows that the bulk, warm and hot components of the heated Constance 2 electrons are indeed reproduced by the simulation.

  2. Color constancy demonstrated in a photographic picture by means of a D-up viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuangsuwan, Chanprapha; Ikeda, Mitsuo; Katemake, Pichayada

    2013-01-01

    According to the recognized visual space of illumination concept, space perception is essential for color constancy. It should be possible to experience the color constancy in a picture if we perceive a three-dimensional space in the picture. A dimension-up (D-up) viewer was constructed to perceive a space for a picture. An experimental room illuminated by various color lights was used as the reference scene and the subject determined a picture in which the color impression was matched to that of the room by selecting from 13 different colored pictures of the room. The picture with the color nearest to the color of the room was selected with the D-up viewer implying the existence of color constancy in the picture. When subjects observed a picture in a normal way the picture of the room illuminated in white was selected regardless of the actual room illumination color, confirming no color constancy in the picture.

  3. Hippopotamus and whale phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Jonathan H; Theodor, Jessica M

    2009-03-19

    Thewissen et al. describe new fossils from India that apparently support a phylogeny that places Cetacea (that is, whales, dolphins, porpoises) as the sister group to the extinct family Raoellidae, and Hippopotamidae as more closely related to pigs and peccaries (that is, Suina) than to cetaceans. However, our reanalysis of a modified version of the data set they used differs in retaining molecular characters and demonstrates that Hippopotamidae is the closest extant family to Cetacea and that raoellids are the closest extinct group, consistent with previous phylogenetic studies. This topology supports the view that the aquatic adaptations in hippopotamids and cetaceans are inherited from their common ancestor.

  4. Hippopotamus and whale phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Jonathan H; Theodor, Jessica M

    2009-03-19

    Thewissen et al. describe new fossils from India that apparently support a phylogeny that places Cetacea (that is, whales, dolphins, porpoises) as the sister group to the extinct family Raoellidae, and Hippopotamidae as more closely related to pigs and peccaries (that is, Suina) than to cetaceans. However, our reanalysis of a modified version of the data set they used differs in retaining molecular characters and demonstrates that Hippopotamidae is the closest extant family to Cetacea and that raoellids are the closest extinct group, consistent with previous phylogenetic studies. This topology supports the view that the aquatic adaptations in hippopotamids and cetaceans are inherited from their common ancestor. PMID:19295550

  5. Molecular phylogeny of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, M

    1994-09-01

    Comparisons of ribosomal RNAs and various protein coding genes have contributed to a new view of eukaryote phylogeny. Analyses of paralogous protein coding genes suggest that archaebacteria and eukaryotes are sistergroups. Sequence diversity of small subunit rRNAs in protists by far exceeds that of any multicellular or prokaryote taxon. Remarkably, a group of taxa that lack mitochondria first branches off in the small subunit rRNA tree. The later radiations are formed by a series of clades that were once thought to be more ancestral. Furthermore, tracing of the evolutionary origin of secondary endobiontic events is now possible with sequence comparisons.

  6. Length and orientation constancy learning in 2-dimensions with auditory sensory substitution: the importance of self-initiated movement.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Noelle R B; Zheng, Yuqian; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    A subset of sensory substitution (SS) devices translate images into sounds in real time using a portable computer, camera, and headphones. Perceptual constancy is the key to understanding both functional and phenomenological aspects of perception with SS. In particular, constancies enable object externalization, which is critical to the performance of daily tasks such as obstacle avoidance and locating dropped objects. In order to improve daily task performance by the blind, and determine if constancies can be learned with SS, we trained blind (N = 4) and sighted (N = 10) individuals on length and orientation constancy tasks for 8 days at about 1 h per day with an auditory SS device. We found that blind and sighted performance at the constancy tasks significantly improved, and attained constancy performance that was above chance. Furthermore, dynamic interactions with stimuli were critical to constancy learning with the SS device. In particular, improved task learning significantly correlated with the number of spontaneous left-right head-tilting movements while learning length constancy. The improvement from previous head-tilting trials even transferred to a no-head-tilt condition. Therefore, not only can SS learning be improved by encouraging head movement while learning, but head movement may also play an important role in learning constancies in the sighted. In addition, the learning of constancies by the blind and sighted with SS provides evidence that SS may be able to restore vision-like functionality to the blind in daily tasks.

  7. Length and orientation constancy learning in 2-dimensions with auditory sensory substitution: the importance of self-initiated movement

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Noelle R. B.; Zheng, Yuqian; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    A subset of sensory substitution (SS) devices translate images into sounds in real time using a portable computer, camera, and headphones. Perceptual constancy is the key to understanding both functional and phenomenological aspects of perception with SS. In particular, constancies enable object externalization, which is critical to the performance of daily tasks such as obstacle avoidance and locating dropped objects. In order to improve daily task performance by the blind, and determine if constancies can be learned with SS, we trained blind (N = 4) and sighted (N = 10) individuals on length and orientation constancy tasks for 8 days at about 1 h per day with an auditory SS device. We found that blind and sighted performance at the constancy tasks significantly improved, and attained constancy performance that was above chance. Furthermore, dynamic interactions with stimuli were critical to constancy learning with the SS device. In particular, improved task learning significantly correlated with the number of spontaneous left-right head-tilting movements while learning length constancy. The improvement from previous head-tilting trials even transferred to a no-head-tilt condition. Therefore, not only can SS learning be improved by encouraging head movement while learning, but head movement may also play an important role in learning constancies in the sighted. In addition, the learning of constancies by the blind and sighted with SS provides evidence that SS may be able to restore vision-like functionality to the blind in daily tasks. PMID:26136719

  8. Chromatic Illumination Discrimination Ability Reveals that Human Colour Constancy Is Optimised for Blue Daylight Illuminations

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Bradley; Crichton, Stuart; Mackiewicz, Michal; Finlayson, Graham D.; Hurlbert, Anya

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of colour constancy in human visual perception keeps surface colours constant, despite changes in their reflected light due to changing illumination. Although colour constancy has evolved under a constrained subset of illuminations, it is unknown whether its underlying mechanisms, thought to involve multiple components from retina to cortex, are optimised for particular environmental variations. Here we demonstrate a new method for investigating colour constancy using illumination matching in real scenes which, unlike previous methods using surface matching and simulated scenes, allows testing of multiple, real illuminations. We use real scenes consisting of solid familiar or unfamiliar objects against uniform or variegated backgrounds and compare discrimination performance for typical illuminations from the daylight chromaticity locus (approximately blue-yellow) and atypical spectra from an orthogonal locus (approximately red-green, at correlated colour temperature 6700 K), all produced in real time by a 10-channel LED illuminator. We find that discrimination of illumination changes is poorer along the daylight locus than the atypical locus, and is poorest particularly for bluer illumination changes, demonstrating conversely that surface colour constancy is best for blue daylight illuminations. Illumination discrimination is also enhanced, and therefore colour constancy diminished, for uniform backgrounds, irrespective of the object type. These results are not explained by statistical properties of the scene signal changes at the retinal level. We conclude that high-level mechanisms of colour constancy are biased for the blue daylight illuminations and variegated backgrounds to which the human visual system has typically been exposed. PMID:24586299

  9. Chromatic illumination discrimination ability reveals that human colour constancy is optimised for blue daylight illuminations.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Bradley; Crichton, Stuart; Mackiewicz, Michal; Finlayson, Graham D; Hurlbert, Anya

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of colour constancy in human visual perception keeps surface colours constant, despite changes in their reflected light due to changing illumination. Although colour constancy has evolved under a constrained subset of illuminations, it is unknown whether its underlying mechanisms, thought to involve multiple components from retina to cortex, are optimised for particular environmental variations. Here we demonstrate a new method for investigating colour constancy using illumination matching in real scenes which, unlike previous methods using surface matching and simulated scenes, allows testing of multiple, real illuminations. We use real scenes consisting of solid familiar or unfamiliar objects against uniform or variegated backgrounds and compare discrimination performance for typical illuminations from the daylight chromaticity locus (approximately blue-yellow) and atypical spectra from an orthogonal locus (approximately red-green, at correlated colour temperature 6700 K), all produced in real time by a 10-channel LED illuminator. We find that discrimination of illumination changes is poorer along the daylight locus than the atypical locus, and is poorest particularly for bluer illumination changes, demonstrating conversely that surface colour constancy is best for blue daylight illuminations. Illumination discrimination is also enhanced, and therefore colour constancy diminished, for uniform backgrounds, irrespective of the object type. These results are not explained by statistical properties of the scene signal changes at the retinal level. We conclude that high-level mechanisms of colour constancy are biased for the blue daylight illuminations and variegated backgrounds to which the human visual system has typically been exposed.

  10. Chromatic illumination discrimination ability reveals that human colour constancy is optimised for blue daylight illuminations.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Bradley; Crichton, Stuart; Mackiewicz, Michal; Finlayson, Graham D; Hurlbert, Anya

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of colour constancy in human visual perception keeps surface colours constant, despite changes in their reflected light due to changing illumination. Although colour constancy has evolved under a constrained subset of illuminations, it is unknown whether its underlying mechanisms, thought to involve multiple components from retina to cortex, are optimised for particular environmental variations. Here we demonstrate a new method for investigating colour constancy using illumination matching in real scenes which, unlike previous methods using surface matching and simulated scenes, allows testing of multiple, real illuminations. We use real scenes consisting of solid familiar or unfamiliar objects against uniform or variegated backgrounds and compare discrimination performance for typical illuminations from the daylight chromaticity locus (approximately blue-yellow) and atypical spectra from an orthogonal locus (approximately red-green, at correlated colour temperature 6700 K), all produced in real time by a 10-channel LED illuminator. We find that discrimination of illumination changes is poorer along the daylight locus than the atypical locus, and is poorest particularly for bluer illumination changes, demonstrating conversely that surface colour constancy is best for blue daylight illuminations. Illumination discrimination is also enhanced, and therefore colour constancy diminished, for uniform backgrounds, irrespective of the object type. These results are not explained by statistical properties of the scene signal changes at the retinal level. We conclude that high-level mechanisms of colour constancy are biased for the blue daylight illuminations and variegated backgrounds to which the human visual system has typically been exposed. PMID:24586299

  11. The effect of exposure on MaxRGB color constancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funt, Brian; Shi, Lilong

    2010-02-01

    The performance of the MaxRGB illumination-estimation method for color constancy and automatic white balancing has been reported in the literature as being mediocre at best; however, MaxRGB has usually been tested on images of only 8-bits per channel. The question arises as to whether the method itself is inadequate, or rather whether it has simply been tested on data of inadequate dynamic range. To address this question, a database of sets of exposure-bracketed images was created. The image sets include exposures ranging from very underexposed to slightly overexposed. The color of the scene illumination was determined by taking an extra image of the scene containing 4 Gretag Macbeth mini Colorcheckers placed at an angle to one another. MaxRGB was then run on the images of increasing exposure. The results clearly show that its performance drops dramatically when the 14-bit exposure range of the Nikon D700 camera is exceeded, thereby resulting in clipping of high values. For those images exposed such that no clipping occurs, the median error in MaxRGB's estimate of the color of the scene illumination is found to be relatively small.

  12. Region Adaptive Color Demosaicing Algorithm Using Color Constancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Won; Oh, Hyun Mook; Yoo, Du Sic; Kang, Moon Gi

    2010-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel way of combining color demosaicing and the auto white balance (AWB) method, which are important parts of image processing. Performance of the AWB is generally affected by demosaicing results because most AWB algorithms are performed posterior to color demosaicing. In this paper, in order to increase the performance and efficiency of the AWB algorithm, the color constancy problem is examined during the color demosaicing step. Initial estimates of the directional luminance and chrominance values are defined for estimating edge direction and calculating the AWB gain. In order to prevent color failure in conventional edge-based AWB methods, we propose a modified edge-based AWB method that used a predefined achromatic region. The estimation of edge direction is performed region adaptively by using the local statistics of the initial estimates of the luminance and chrominance information. Simulated and real Bayer color filter array (CFA) data are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. When compared to conventional methods, the proposed method shows significant improvements in terms of visual and numerical criteria.

  13. Colour constancy across the life span: evidence for compensatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wuerger, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the peripheral visual system declines with age: the yellowing of the lens causes a selective reduction of short-wavelength light and sensitivity losses occur in the cone receptor mechanisms. At the same time, our subjective experience of colour does not change with age. The main purpose of this large-scale study (n = 185) covering a wide age range of colour-normal observers (18-75 years of age) was to assess the extent to which the human visual system is able to compensate for the changes in the optical media and at which level of processing this compensation is likely to occur. We report two main results: (1) Supra-threshold parafoveal colour perception remains largely unaffected by the age-related changes in the optical media (yellowing of the lens) whereas our ability to discriminate between small colour differences is compromised with an increase in age. (2) Significant changes in colour appearance are only found for unique green settings under daylight viewing condition which is consistent with the idea that the yellow-blue mechanism is most affected by an increase in age due to selective attenuation of short-wavelength light. The data on the invariance of hue perception, in conjunction with the age-related decline in chromatic sensitivity, provides evidence for compensatory mechanisms that enable colour-normal human observers a large degree of colour constancy across the life span. These compensatory mechanisms are likely to originate at cortical sites.

  14. Accuracy-precision trade-off in visual orientation constancy.

    PubMed

    De Vrijer, M; Medendorp, W P; Van Gisbergen, J A M

    2009-02-09

    Using the subjective visual vertical task (SVV), previous investigations on the maintenance of visual orientation constancy during lateral tilt have found two opposite bias effects in different tilt ranges. The SVV typically shows accurate performance near upright but severe undercompensation at tilts beyond 60 deg (A-effect), frequently with slight overcompensation responses (E-effect) in between. Here we investigate whether a Bayesian spatial-perception model can account for this error pattern. The model interprets A- and E-effects as the drawback of a computational strategy, geared at maintaining visual stability with optimal precision at small tilt angles. In this study, we test whether these systematic errors can be seen as the consequence of a precision-accuracy trade-off when combining a veridical but noisy signal about eye orientation in space with the visual signal. To do so, we used a psychometric approach to assess both precision and accuracy of the SVV in eight subjects laterally tilted at 9 different tilt angles (-120 degrees to 120 degrees). Results show that SVV accuracy and precision worsened with tilt angle, according to a pattern that could be fitted quite adequately by the Bayesian model. We conclude that spatial vision essentially follows the rules of Bayes' optimal observer theory.

  15. No Measured Effect of a Familiar Contextual Object on Color Constancy.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Erika; Brainard, David H

    2014-08-01

    Some familiar objects have a typical color, such as the yellow of a banana. The presence of such objects in a scene is a potential cue to the scene illumination, since the light reflected from them should on average be consistent with their typical surface reflectance. Although there are many studies on how the identity of an object affects how its color is perceived, little is known about whether the presence of a familiar object in a scene helps the visual system stabilize the color appearance of other objects with respect to changes in illumination. We used a successive color matching procedure in three experiments designed to address this question. Across the experiments we studied a total of 6 subjects (2 in Experiment 1, 3 in Experiment 2, and 4 in Experiment 3) with partial overlap of subjects between experiments. We compared measured color constancy across conditions in which a familiar object cue to the illuminant was available with conditions in which such a cue was not present. Overall, our results do not reveal a reliable improvement in color constancy with the addition of a familiar object to a scene. An analysis of the experimental power of our data suggests that if there is such an effect, it is small: less than approximately a change of 0.09 in a constancy index where an absence of constancy corresponds to an index value of 0 and perfect constancy corresponds to an index value of 1. PMID:25313267

  16. Research on color constancy computation based on YCbCr color space and gray surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Yang, Jianfeng; Xue, Bin; Yan, Xingtao; Liang, Xiaofen

    2014-11-01

    Color constancy is of important for many computer vision applications, such as image classification, color object recognition, object tracking and so on. But unlike the human visual system, imaging device cannot be able to compute color constant descriptors which do not vary with the color of the illuminant, so solving color constancy problem is necessary. In the calculation of color constancy, illuminant estimation is the key. Because grey surfaces can perfectly reflect the color of the scene illumination, many methods have been proposed to identify grey surfaces to estimate the illuminant. But they either rely on the camera's parameters, lacking universality, or work inaccurate in worse conditions. In order to solve these problems, in this paper, an iterative method is proposed. The quality of the proposed method is tested and compared to the previous color constancy methods on the Macbeth Chart and two data sets of synthetic and real images. Through MATLAB simulation, experimental pictures and quantitative data for performance evaluation were gotten. The simulated results show that the proposed algorithm is accurate and efficient in identification of the grey surfaces, even in worse condition. And it performs well in color constancy computation on both synthetic and real images.

  17. Chlorine-36 dating of saline sediments: Preliminary results from Searles Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, F.M.; Smith, G.I.; Bentley, H.W.; Elmore, D.; Gove, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the ratios of chlorine-36 to chlorine in five halite samples from Searles Lake sediments, previously dated by carbon-14, thorium-230, and magnetostratigraphic techniques. The ages calculated from the chlorine ratios are generally concordant with those from the other methods, implying the constancy of the chlorine input ratio over the last million years.

  18. Chlorine-36 dating of saline sediments: preliminary results from Searles Lake, California

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, F.M.; Smith, G.I.; Bentley, H.W.; Elmore, D.; Gove, H.E.

    1983-11-25

    Measurements have been made of the ratios of chlorine-36 to chlorine in five halite samples from Searles Lake sediments, previously dated by carbon-14, thorium-230, and magnetostratigraphic techniques. The ages calculated from the chlorine ratios are generally concordant with those from the other methods, implying the constancy of the chlorine input ratio over the last million years.

  19. Demonstration of color constancy in photographs by two techniques: Stereoscope and D-up viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuangsuwan, Chanprapha; Ikeda, Mitsuo; Shinoda, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    When we look, under daylight, at a scene in a photograph taken under an incandescent lamp, it appears very reddish, showing that color constancy is not maintained. According to the recognized visual space of illumination (RVSI) concept, color constancy should exist in a photograph if one can perceive three dimensions in it. This prediction was confirmed by applying two viewing techniques to perceive a 3D space in a 2D photograph: a stereoscope viewed with two eyes and a D-up viewer viewed with one eye. A wide range of illumination color was investigated, covering range from vivid blue through to vivid orange, and the color constancy index became larger with the 3D perception than with the 2D perception of the photographs produced by the two techniques.

  20. Determination of Sectional Constancy of Organic Coal-Water Fuel Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrienko, Margarita A.; Nyashina, Galina S.; Strizhak, Pavel A.

    2016-02-01

    To use widespreadly the waste of coals and oils processing in the great and the small-scale power generation, the key parameter, which is sectional constancy of promising organic coal-water fuels (OCWF), was studied. The compo-sitions of OCWF from brown and bituminous coals, filter cakes, used motor, turbine and dielectrical oils, water-oil emul-sion and special wetting agent (plasticizer) were investigated. Two modes of preparation were considered. They are with homogenizer and cavitator. It was established that the constancy did not exceed 5-7 days for the compositions of OCWF with brown coals, and 12-15 days for that compositions with bituminous coals and filter cakes. The injection of used oils in a composition of OCWF led to increase in viscosity of fuel compositions and their sectional constancy.

  1. Size constancy in bat biosonar? Perceptual interaction of object aperture and distance.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Melina; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Perception and encoding of object size is an important feature of sensory systems. In the visual system object size is encoded by the visual angle (visual aperture) on the retina, but the aperture depends on the distance of the object. As object distance is not unambiguously encoded in the visual system, higher computational mechanisms are needed. This phenomenon is termed "size constancy". It is assumed to reflect an automatic re-scaling of visual aperture with perceived object distance. Recently, it was found that in echolocating bats, the 'sonar aperture', i.e., the range of angles from which sound is reflected from an object back to the bat, is unambiguously perceived and neurally encoded. Moreover, it is well known that object distance is accurately perceived and explicitly encoded in bat sonar. Here, we addressed size constancy in bat biosonar, recruiting virtual-object techniques. Bats of the species Phyllostomus discolor learned to discriminate two simple virtual objects that only differed in sonar aperture. Upon successful discrimination, test trials were randomly interspersed using virtual objects that differed in both aperture and distance. It was tested whether the bats spontaneously assigned absolute width information to these objects by combining distance and aperture. The results showed that while the isolated perceptual cues encoding object width, aperture, and distance were all perceptually well resolved by the bats, the animals did not assign absolute width information to the test objects. This lack of sonar size constancy may result from the bats relying on different modalities to extract size information at different distances. Alternatively, it is conceivable that familiarity with a behaviorally relevant, conspicuous object is required for sonar size constancy, as it has been argued for visual size constancy. Based on the current data, it appears that size constancy is not necessarily an essential feature of sonar perception in bats.

  2. Phylogeny of filamentous ascomycetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumbsch, H. T.

    Phylogenetic studies of higher ascomycetes are enhanced by the introduction of molecular markers. Most studies employed sequences of the SSU rRNA gene, but recently data from additional genes (RPB2, LSU rRNA) have become available. Several groups defined by their ascoma-type, such as Pyrenomycetes, are supported while others, like the Discomycetes, appear to be paraphyletic. The Pezizales with operculate asci are basal to other eu-ascomycetes, while other Discomycetes appear to be derived eu-ascomycetes. The re-evaluation of classical characters using molecular data is discussed using three examples. Ascus types are often regarded as being of major importance in ascomycete systematics, but prototunicate asci were found to be of poor taxonomic value, since ascomycetes with prototunicate asci are polyphyletic. The independence of the Agyriales, assumed from their morphological characters, is supported by sequence data but the relationship to supposed sister groups remains dubious. The phylogeny of ascolocularous fungi and their circumscription requires further study. While a circumscription based on bitunicate asci can be rejected, it remains unclear whether fungi with ascolocularous ascoma development represent a monophyletic entity.

  3. The Significance of the Appearance-Reality Distinction for the Development of Gender Constancy. Nr. 7, 1985/1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautner, Hanns Martin

    Attainment of gender constancy is commonly asserted if gender is judged invariant despite superficial opposite-sex transformations, such as in hairstyle, clothing, or behavior. This notion suggests that the distinction between appearance and reality is crucial for gender constancy understanding. Four tasks requiring differentiation between…

  4. Discrimination of cone contrast changes as evidence for colour constancy in cerebral achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Hurlbert, A C; Bramwell, D I; Heywood, C; Cowey, A

    1998-11-01

    One proposed mechanism for underpinning colour constancy is computation of the relative activity of cones within one class--cone ratios, or cone contrasts--between surfaces in a fixed scene undergoing a change in illuminant. Although there is evidence that cone ratios do determine colour appearance under many conditions, the site or sites of their computation is unknown. Here, we report that a cerebrally achromatopsic observer, MS, displayed evidence of colour constancy in asymmetric colour matching tasks and was able to discriminate changes in cone ratios for simple, but not complex scenes. We hypothesise that the site of local cone-ratio computation is therefore early in the visual system, probably retinal.

  5. Iterative color constancy with temporal filtering for an image sequence with no relative motion between the camera and the scene.

    PubMed

    Simão, Josemar; Jörg Andreas Schneebeli, Hans; Vassallo, Raquel Frizera

    2015-11-01

    Color constancy is the ability to perceive the color of a surface as invariant even under changing illumination. In outdoor applications, such as mobile robot navigation or surveillance, the lack of this ability harms the segmentation, tracking, and object recognition tasks. The main approaches for color constancy are generally targeted to static images and intend to estimate the scene illuminant color from the images. We present an iterative color constancy method with temporal filtering applied to image sequences in which reference colors are estimated from previous corrected images. Furthermore, two strategies to sample colors from the images are tested. The proposed method has been tested using image sequences with no relative movement between the scene and the camera. It also has been compared with known color constancy algorithms such as gray-world, max-RGB, and gray-edge. In most cases, the iterative color constancy method achieved better results than the other approaches. PMID:26560917

  6. The Development of Language Constancy: Attention to Native versus Nonnative Accents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitamura, Christine; Panneton, Robin; Best, Catherine T.

    2013-01-01

    The time frame for infants' acquisition of language constancy was probed, using the phonetic variation in a rarely heard accent (South African English) or a frequently heard accent (American English). A total of 156 Australian infants were tested. Six-month-olds looked longer to Australian English than less commonly heard South African…

  7. Right Temporal Cortex is Critical for Utilization of Melodic Contextual Cues in a Pitch Constancy Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrier, Catherine M.; Zatorre, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Pitch constancy, perceiving the same pitch from tones with differing spectral shapes, requires one to extract the fundamental frequency from two sets of harmonics and compare them. We previously showed this difficult task to be easier when tonal context is present, presumably because the context creates a tonal reference point from which to judge…

  8. A Neural Model of Distance-Dependent Percept of Object Size Constancy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jiehui; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Size constancy is one of the well-known visual phenomena that demonstrates perceptual stability to account for the effect of viewing distance on retinal image size. Although theories involving distance scaling to achieve size constancy have flourished based on psychophysical studies, its underlying neural mechanisms remain unknown. Single cell recordings show that distance-dependent size tuned cells are common along the ventral stream, originating from V1, V2, and V4 leading to IT. In addition, recent research employing fMRI demonstrates that an object’s perceived size, associated with its perceived egocentric distance, modulates its retinotopic representation in V1. These results suggest that V1 contributes to size constancy, and its activity is possibly regulated by feedback of distance information from other brain areas. Here, we propose a neural model based on these findings. First, we construct an egocentric distance map in LIP by integrating horizontal disparity and vergence through gain-modulated MT neurons. Second, LIP neurons send modulatory feedback of distance information to size tuned cells in V1, resulting in a spread of V1 cortical activity. This process provides V1 with distance-dependent size representations. The model supports that size constancy is preserved by scaling retinal image size to compensate for changes in perceived distance, and suggests a possible neural circuit capable of implementing this process. PMID:26132106

  9. Morphological Constancy in Spelling: A Comparison of Children with Dyslexia and Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourassa, Derrick C.; Treiman, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    The spellings of many English words follow a principle of morphological constancy. For example, "musician" includes the c of "music", even though the pronunciation of this letter changes. With other words, such as "explanation" and "explain", the spellings of morphemes are not retained when affixes are added. We asked whether children with…

  10. Revisiting the Principle of Relative Constancy: Consumer Mass Media Expenditures in Belgium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupagne, Michel; Green, R. Jeffery

    1996-01-01

    Proposes two new econometric models for testing the principle of relative constancy (PRC). Reports on regression and cointegration analyses conducted with Belgian mass media expenditure data from 1953-91. Suggests that alternative mass media expenditure models should be developed because PRC lacks of economic foundation and sound empirical…

  11. The Relation between Gender Labelling and Gender Constancy in Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Kenneth J.; Yoannidis, Tom

    The relationship between preschool children's level of gender understanding and their ability to identify gender-linked attributes was examined. Participants were 26 3-year-old and 30 4-year-old children who were administered a single-cue gender labelling task, Slaby and Frey's (1975) gender constancy test, and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test.…

  12. Surface color perception under two illuminants: the second illuminant reduces color constancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Joong Nam; Shevell, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates color perception in a scene with two different illuminants. The two illuminants, in opposite corners, simultaneously shine on a (simulated) scene with an opaque dividing wall, which controls how much of the scene is illuminated by each source. In the first experiment, the height of the dividing wall was varied. This changed the amount of each illuminant reaching objects on the opposite side of the wall. Results showed that the degree of color constancy decreased when a region on one side of the wall had cues to both illuminants, suggesting that cues from the second illuminant are detrimental to color constancy. In a later experiment, color constancy was found to improve when the specular highlight cues from the second illuminant were altered to be consistent with the first illuminant. This corroborates the influence of specular highlights in surface color perception, and suggests that the reduced color constancy in the first experiment is due to the inconsistent, though physically correct, cues from the two illuminants.

  13. CONSTANCY OF THE RELATION BETWEEN FLOC SIZE AND DENSITY IN SAN FRANCISCO BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ganju, N.K., D.H. Schoellhamer, M.C. Murrell, J.W. Gartner and S.A. Wright. In press. Constancy of the Relation Between Floc Size and Density in San Francisco Bay. In: INTERCOH 2003: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Nearshore and Estuarine Cohesive Sediment Tran...

  14. Gender Constancy and the "Cost" of Sex-Typed Behavior: A Test of the Conflict Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Karin S.; Ruble, Diane N.

    1992-01-01

    Children between 5 and 10 years of age watched boys and girls endorse toys of varying attractiveness and then play with the toys. Boys with gender constancy spent more time than other boys in playing with unattractive sex-typed toys. Among girls, toy play was related to the toy's attractiveness. (BC)

  15. Molecular phylogeny of Daucus (Apiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the phylogeny of 22 accessions of Daucus: D. broteri, D. capillifolius, D. carota, D. carota subsp. carota, D. carota subsp. commutatus, D. carota subsp. commutatus, D. carota subsp. drepanensis, D. carota subsp. gadecaei, D. carota subsp. gummifer, D. carota subsp. halophilius, D. carota...

  16. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4) "Spirit Lake"; (5) "Lake Manawa"; (6)…

  17. Advances in estimating the climate sensibility of a large lake using scenario simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, M. M.; Schlabing, D.; Frassl, M. A.; Rinke, K.; Bárdossy, A.

    2012-04-01

    The vertical mixing behaviour of large deep lakes as e.g. Lake Constance is reflecting the long-term meteorological conditions and therefore is likely to be sensible to climate change. Today, Lake Constance does not mix completely every year, but only once in 2-3 years, which leads to the typical saw-tooth pattern in the deep water temperature. Whether complete mixing does occur is not only depending on the meteorological conditions in the respective winter period, but also on the thermal conditions in the lake and hence on the meteorological conditions in the preceding years. The lake's response to climate change thus depends on the temperature increase itself as well as on its gradient and on the inter-annual variability of the meteorological variables. Last year we showed first steps towards a model system to evaluate possible effects of climate change on Lake Constance: The Vector-Autoregressive Weathergenerator VG produces time series of meteorological data, which are used as boundary conditions for the 3D hydrodynamic lake model ELCOM (Centre of Water Research, University of Western Australia). As VG gives the opportunity to change mean and variability of selected variables, "What if?" - scenarios for process understanding can be performed. The time scales of variability turned out to be a critical point in the artificial time series for modelling the hydrodynamics of Lake Constance, as the big water body integrates over time and thus the hydrodynamics overlook the variability of air temperature on short time scales. Therefore, VG was developed further, especially with respect to the time scales of variability. While for heat input, the time scale of several days to weeks seems to be more important, wind and, when biology is modelled, short-wave radiation should be given at a sub-daily timestep. Besides producing user-defined scenario time-series, VG can also be used to stochastical downscale output of global climate model IPCC scenarios for lake modelling

  18. Molecular phylogeny: pitfalls and progress.

    PubMed

    Moreira, D; Philippe, H

    2000-03-01

    Molecular phylogeny based on nucleotide or amino acid sequence comparison has become a widespread tool for general taxonomy and evolutionary analyses. It seems the only means to establish a natural classification of microorganisms, since their phenotypic traits are not always consistent with genealogy. After an optimistic period during which comprehensive microbial evolutionary pictures appeared, the discovery of several pitfalls affecting molecular phylogenetic reconstruction challenged the general validity of this approach. In addition to biological factors, such as horizontal gene transfer, some methodological problems may produce misleading phylogenies. They are essentially (i) loss of phylogenetic signal by the accumulation of overlapping mutations, (ii) incongruity between the real evolutionary process and the assumed models of sequence evolution, and (iii) differences of evolutionary rates among species or among positions within a sequence. Here, we discuss these problems and some strategies proposed to overcome their effects.

  19. The biological significance of color constancy: an agent-based model with bees foraging from flowers under varied illumination.

    PubMed

    Faruq, Samia; McOwan, Peter W; Chittka, Lars

    2013-08-20

    The perceived color of an object depends on its spectral reflectance and the spectral composition of the illuminant. Thus when the illumination changes, the light reflected from the object also varies. This would result in a different color sensation if no color constancy mechanism is put in place-that is, the ability to form consistent representation of colors across various illuminants and background scenes. We explore the quantitative benefits of various color constancy algorithms in an agent-based model of foraging bees, where agents select flower color based on reward. Each simulation is based on 100 "meadows" with five randomly selected flower species with empirically determined spectral reflectance properties, and each flower species is associated with realistic distributions of nectar rewards. Simulated foraging bees memorize the colors of flowers that they have experienced as most rewarding, and their task is to discriminate against other flower colors with lower rewards, even in the face of changing illumination conditions. We compared the performance of von Kries, White Patch, and Gray World constancy models with (hypothetical) bees with perfect color constancy, and color-blind bees. A bee equipped with trichromatic color vision but no color constancy performed only ∼20% better than a color-blind bee (relative to a maximum improvement at 100% for perfect color constancy), whereas the most powerful recovery of reflectance in the face of changing illumination was generated by a combination of von Kries photoreceptor adaptation and a White Patch calibration (∼30% improvement relative to a bee without color constancy). However, none of the tested algorithms generated perfect color constancy.

  20. Morphological constancy in spelling: a comparison of children with dyslexia and typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Derrick C; Treiman, Rebecca

    2008-08-01

    The spellings of many English words follow a principle of morphological constancy. For example, musician includes the c of music, even though the pronunciation of this letter changes. With other words, such as explanation and explain, the spellings of morphemes are not retained when affixes are added. We asked whether children with dyslexia use root morphemes to aid their spelling of morphologically complex words. If so, they should sometimes produce misspellings such as 'explaination' for explanation. Our results suggest that children with dyslexia adhere to the principle of morphological constancy to the same extent as typically developing younger children of the same spelling level. In this and other ways, the spellings of older dyslexic children are remarkably similar to those of typical younger children. PMID:18720405

  1. The new phylogeny of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Philippe, H; Germot, A; Moreira, D

    2000-12-01

    Molecular phylogeny has been regarded as the ultimate tool for the reconstruction of relationships among eukaryotes-especially the different protist groups-given the difficulty in interpreting morphological data from an evolutionary point of view. In fact, the use of ribosomal RNA as a marker has provided the first well resolved eukaryotic phylogenies, leading to several important evolutionary hypotheses. The most significant is that several early-emerging, amitochondriate lineages, are living relics from the early times of eukaryotic evolution. The use of alternative protein markers and the recognition of several molecular phylogeny reconstruction artefacts, however, have strongly challenged these ideas. The putative early emerging lineages have been demonstrated as late-emerging ones, artefactually misplaced to the base of the tree. The present state of eukaryotic evolution is best described by a multifurcation, in agreement with the 'big bang' hypothesis that assumes a rapid diversification of the major eukaryotic phyla. For further resolution, the analysis of genomic data through improved phylogenetic methods will be required.

  2. High-Performance Phylogeny Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Tiffani L. Williams

    2004-11-10

    Under the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in Computational Biology, I have been afforded the opportunity to study phylogenetics--one of the most important and exciting disciplines in computational biology. A phylogeny depicts an evolutionary relationship among a set of organisms (or taxa). Typically, a phylogeny is represented by a binary tree, where modern organisms are placed at the leaves and ancestral organisms occupy internal nodes, with the edges of the tree denoting evolutionary relationships. The task of phylogenetics is to infer this tree from observations upon present-day organisms. Reconstructing phylogenies is a major component of modern research programs in many areas of biology and medicine, but it is enormously expensive. The most commonly used techniques attempt to solve NP-hard problems such as maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony, typically by bounded searches through an exponentially-sized tree-space. For example, there are over 13 billion possible trees for 13 organisms. Phylogenetic heuristics that quickly analyze large amounts of data accurately will revolutionize the biological field. This final report highlights my activities in phylogenetics during the two-year postdoctoral period at the University of New Mexico under Prof. Bernard Moret. Specifically, this report reports my scientific, community and professional activities as an Alfred P. Sloan Postdoctoral Fellow in Computational Biology.

  3. Molecular phylogeny of Arthrotardigrada (Tardigrada).

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Aslak; Faurby, Søren; Hansen, Jesper G; Møbjerg, Nadja; Kristensen, Reinhardt M

    2010-03-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic ecdysozoans with a worldwide distribution covering marine, limnic and terrestrial habitats. They are regarded as a neglected phylum with regard to studies of their phylogeny. During the last decade molecular data have been included in the investigation of tardigrades. However, the marine arthrotardigrades are still poorly sampled due to their relative rarity, difficult identification and minute size even for tardigrades. In the present study, we have sampled various arthrotardigrades and sequenced the 18S and partial 28S ribosomal subunits. The phylogenetic analyses based on Bayesian inference and maximum parsimony inferred Heterotardigrada (Arthrotardigrada+Echiniscoidea) and Eutardigrada to be monophyletic. Arthrotardigrada was inferred to be paraphyletic as the monophyletic Echiniscoidea is included within the arthrotardigrades. The phylogenetic positions of Stygarctidae and Batillipedidae are poorly resolved with low branch support. The Halechiniscidae is inferred to be polyphyletic as the currently recognized Styraconyxinae is not part of the family. Archechiniscus is the sister-group to the Halechiniscidae and Orzeliscus is placed as one of the basal halechiniscids. The phylogeny of the included eutardigrade taxa resembles the current molecular phylogenies. The genetic diversity within Arthrotardigrada is much larger (18S 15.1-26.5%, 28S 7.2-20.7%) than within Eutardigrada (18S 1.0-12.6%, 28S 1.3-8.2%). This can be explained by higher substitution rates in the arthrotardigrades or by a much younger evolutionary age of the sampled eutardigrades.

  4. SU-E-T-257: Output Constancy: Reducing Measurement Variations in a Large Practice Group

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, K; Fitzgerald, T; Miller, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To standardize output constancy check procedures in a large medical physics practice group covering multiple sites, in order to identify and reduce small systematic errors caused by differences in equipment and the procedures of multiple physicists. Methods: A standardized machine output constancy check for both photons and electrons was instituted within the practice group in 2010. After conducting annual TG-51 measurements in water and adjusting the linac to deliver 1.00 cGy/MU at Dmax, an acrylic phantom (comparable at all sites) and PTW farmer ion chamber are used to obtain monthly output constancy reference readings. From the collected charge reading, measurements of air pressure and temperature, and chamber Ndw and Pelec, a value we call the Kacrylic factor is determined, relating the chamber reading in acrylic to the dose in water with standard set-up conditions. This procedure easily allows for multiple equipment combinations to be used at any site. The Kacrylic factors and output results from all sites and machines are logged monthly in a central database and used to monitor trends in calibration and output. Results: The practice group consists of 19 sites, currently with 34 Varian and 8 Elekta linacs (24 Varian and 5 Elekta linacs in 2010). Over the past three years, the standard deviation of Kacrylic factors measured on all machines decreased by 20% for photons and high energy electrons as systematic errors were found and reduced. Low energy electrons showed very little change in the distribution of Kacrylic values. Small errors in linac beam data were found by investigating outlier Kacrylic values. Conclusion: While the use of acrylic phantoms introduces an additional source of error through small differences in depth and effective depth, the new standardized procedure eliminates potential sources of error from using many different phantoms and results in more consistent output constancy measurements.

  5. Temporal-envelope constancy of speech in rooms and the perceptual weighting of frequency bands.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Anthony J; Raimond, Andrew P; Makin, Simon J

    2011-11-01

    Three experiments measured constancy in speech perception, using natural-speech messages or noise-band vocoder versions of them. The eight vocoder-bands had equally log-spaced center-frequencies and the shapes of corresponding "auditory" filters. Consequently, the bands had the temporal envelopes that arise in these auditory filters when the speech is played. The "sir" or "stir" test-words were distinguished by degrees of amplitude modulation, and played in the context; "next you'll get _ to click on." Listeners identified test-words appropriately, even in the vocoder conditions where the speech had a "noise-like" quality. Constancy was assessed by comparing the identification of test-words with low or high levels of room reflections across conditions where the context had either a low or a high level of reflections. Constancy was obtained with both the natural and the vocoded speech, indicating that the effect arises through temporal-envelope processing. Two further experiments assessed perceptual weighting of the different bands, both in the test word and in the context. The resulting weighting functions both increase monotonically with frequency, following the spectral characteristics of the test-word's [s]. It is suggested that these two weighting functions are similar because they both come about through the perceptual grouping of the test-word's bands. PMID:22087906

  6. Genome downsizing and karyotype constancy in diploid and polyploid congeners: a model of genome size variation

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Lidia; Realini, María Florencia; Fourastié, María Florencia; García, Ana María; González, Graciela Esther

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary chromosome change involves significant variation in DNA amount in diploids and genome downsizing in polyploids. Genome size and karyotype parameters of Hippeastrum species with different ploidy level were analysed. In Hippeastrum, polyploid species show less DNA content per basic genome than diploid species. The rate of variation is lower at higher ploidy levels. All the species have a basic number x = 11 and bimodal karyotypes. The basic karyotypes consist of four short metacentric chromosomes and seven large chromosomes (submetacentric and subtelocentric). The bimodal karyotype is preserved maintaining the relative proportions of members of the haploid chromosome set, even in the presence of genome downsizing. The constancy of the karyotype is maintained because changes in DNA amount are proportional to the length of the whole-chromosome complement and vary independently in the long and short sets of chromosomes. This karyotype constancy in taxa of Hippeastrum with different genome size and ploidy level indicates that the distribution of extra DNA within the complement is not at random and suggests the presence of mechanisms selecting for constancy, or against changes, in karyotype morphology. PMID:24969503

  7. Measuring Asymmetry in Time-Stamped Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Dearlove, Bethany L; Frost, Simon D W

    2015-07-01

    Previous work has shown that asymmetry in viral phylogenies may be indicative of heterogeneity in transmission, for example due to acute HIV infection or the presence of 'core groups' with higher contact rates. Hence, evidence of asymmetry may provide clues to underlying population structure, even when direct information on, for example, stage of infection or contact rates, are missing. However, current tests of phylogenetic asymmetry (a) suffer from false positives when the tips of the phylogeny are sampled at different times and (b) only test for global asymmetry, and hence suffer from false negatives when asymmetry is localised to part of a phylogeny. We present a simple permutation-based approach for testing for asymmetry in a phylogeny, where we compare the observed phylogeny with random phylogenies with the same sampling and coalescence times, to reduce the false positive rate. We also demonstrate how profiles of measures of asymmetry calculated over a range of evolutionary times in the phylogeny can be used to identify local asymmetry. In combination with different metrics of asymmetry, this combined approach offers detailed insights of how phylogenies reconstructed from real viral datasets may deviate from the simplistic assumptions of commonly used coalescent and birth-death process models.

  8. RECONSTRUCTING IMMUNE PHYLOGENY: NEW PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Litman, Gary W.; Cannon, John P.; Dishaw, Larry J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies of the mammalian immune system have begun to uncover profound interrelationships, as well as fundamental differences, between the adaptive and innate systems of immune recognition. Coincident with these investigations, the increasing experimental accessibility of non-mammalian jawed vertebrates, jawless vertebrates, protochordates and invertebrates has provided intriguing new information regarding the likely patterns of emergence of immune-related molecules during metazoan phylogeny, as well as the evolution of alternative mechanisms for receptor diversification. Such findings blur traditional distinctions between adaptive and innate immunity and emphasize that, throughout evolution, the immune system has used a remarkably extensive variety of solutions to meet fundamentally similar requirements for host protection. PMID:16261174

  9. Eumetazoan cryptochrome phylogeny and evolution.

    PubMed

    Haug, Marion F; Gesemann, Matthias; Lazović, Viktor; Neuhauss, Stephan C F

    2015-02-01

    Cryptochromes (Crys) are light sensing receptors that are present in all eukaryotes. They mainly absorb light in the UV/blue spectrum. The extant Crys consist of two subfamilies, which are descendants of photolyases but are now involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. So far, knowledge about the evolution, phylogeny, and expression of cry genes is still scarce. The inclusion of cry sequences from a wide range of bilaterian species allowed us to analyze their phylogeny in detail, identifying six major Cry subgroups. Selective gene inactivations and stabilizations in multiple chordate as well as arthropod lineages suggest several sub- and/or neofunctionalization events. An expression study performed in zebrafish, the model organism harboring the largest amount of crys, showed indeed only partially overlapping expression of paralogous mRNA, supporting gene sub- and/or neofunctionalization. Moreover, the daily cry expression in the adult zebrafish retina indicated varying oscillation patterns in different cell types. Our extensive phylogenetic analysis provides for the first time an overview of cry evolutionary history. Although several, especially parasitic or blind species, have lost all cry genes, crustaceans have retained up to three crys, teleosts possess up to seven, and tetrapods up to four crys. The broad and cyclic expression pattern of all cry transcripts in zebrafish retinal layers implies an involvement in retinal circadian processes and supports the hypothesis of several autonomous circadian clocks present in the vertebrate retina. PMID:25601102

  10. Eumetazoan Cryptochrome Phylogeny and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Marion F.; Gesemann, Matthias; Lazović, Viktor; Neuhauss, Stephan C.F.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptochromes (Crys) are light sensing receptors that are present in all eukaryotes. They mainly absorb light in the UV/blue spectrum. The extant Crys consist of two subfamilies, which are descendants of photolyases but are now involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. So far, knowledge about the evolution, phylogeny, and expression of cry genes is still scarce. The inclusion of cry sequences from a wide range of bilaterian species allowed us to analyze their phylogeny in detail, identifying six major Cry subgroups. Selective gene inactivations and stabilizations in multiple chordate as well as arthropod lineages suggest several sub- and/or neofunctionalization events. An expression study performed in zebrafish, the model organism harboring the largest amount of crys, showed indeed only partially overlapping expression of paralogous mRNA, supporting gene sub- and/or neofunctionalization. Moreover, the daily cry expression in the adult zebrafish retina indicated varying oscillation patterns in different cell types. Our extensive phylogenetic analysis provides for the first time an overview of cry evolutionary history. Although several, especially parasitic or blind species, have lost all cry genes, crustaceans have retained up to three crys, teleosts possess up to seven, and tetrapods up to four crys. The broad and cyclic expression pattern of all cry transcripts in zebrafish retinal layers implies an involvement in retinal circadian processes and supports the hypothesis of several autonomous circadian clocks present in the vertebrate retina. PMID:25601102

  11. The phylogeny of amphibian metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Reiss, John O

    2002-01-01

    Frogs have one of the most extreme metamorphoses among vertebrates. How did this metamorphosis evolve? By combining the methods previously proposed by Mabee and Humphries (1993) and Velhagen (1997), I develop a phylogenetic method suited for rigorous analysis of this question. In a preliminary analysis using 12 transformation sequence characters and 36 associated event sequence characters, all drawn from the osteology of the skull, the evolution of metamorphosis is traced on an assumed phylogeny. This phylogeny has lissamphibians (frogs, salamanders, and caecilians) monophyletic, with frogs the sister group of salamanders. Successive outgroups used are temnospondyls and discosauriscids, both of which are fossil groups for which ontogenetic data are available. In the reconstruction of character evolution, an unambiguous change (synapomorphy) along the branch leading to lissamphibians is a delay in the lengthening of the maxilla until metamorphosis, in accordance with my previous suggestion (Reiss, 1996). However, widening of the interpterygoid vacuity does not appear as a synapomophy of lissamphibians, due to variation in the character states in the outgroups. From a more theoretical perspective, the reconstructed evolution of amphibian metamorphosis involves examples of heterochrony, through the shift of ancestral premetamorphic events to the metamorphic period, caenogenesis, through the origin of new larval features, and terminal addition, through the origin of new adult features. Other changes don't readily fit these categories. This preliminary study provides evidence that metamorphic changes in frogs arose as further modifications of changes unique to lissamphibians, as well as a new method by which such questions can be examined. PMID:16351859

  12. Contrast constancy revisited: the perceived contrast of sinusoidal gratings above threshold.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wayne S

    2015-01-01

    The contrast sensitivity function of the human visual system, measured with sinusoidal luminance gratings, has an inverted U shape with a peak around 2-4 c/deg. Above threshold, it is thought that luminance gratings of equal physical contrasts but of distinguishably different spatial frequencies are all perceived as having similar contrasts, a phenomenon that has been termed contrast constancy. However, when suprathreshold contrast matches were measured for pairs of luminance gratings whose spatial frequencies were indistinguishable, the matching curves were not flat and followed a similar inverted U shape form as the contrast sensitivity function at threshold. It was therefore suggested that contrast constancy may only be revealed when matching the contrasts of clearly distinguishable spatial frequencies. Here, observers matched the perceived contrasts of suprathreshold luminance gratings of similar but visibly different spatial frequencies between 0.25 and 16 c/deg. The results show that, much like the contrast sensitivity function at threshold, observers are more sensitive to intermediate spatial frequencies (1-6 c/deg) than they are to either higher or to lower spatial frequencies. This tuning is evident when matching reference contrasts of 30-80%, implying a significant role in everyday vision. To demonstrate that these results were not due to local adaptation, the experiment was repeated with shorter stimulus duration, producing the same results. The extent of departure from contrast constancy found in the present study is compared to previously reported suprathreshold measurements. The results are also discussed with consideration to limitations with display apparatus such as monitor blur.

  13. Constance Pascal's Chagrins d'amour et psychoses (1935): a French psychiatrist's views on psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Felicia

    2015-03-01

    In 1935 Constance Pascal (1877-1937), France's first woman psychiatrist, published Chagrins d'amour et psychoses (The Sorrows of Love and Psychosis). My analysis of her monograph will consider: her major article leading up to Chagrins; Pascal's debts to her predecessors, particularly Morel and Kretschmer; her relationship to the French psychoanalytic movement; her co-option of psychoanalysis as a tool in her own therapeutic work with patients in the state psychiatric system; and her social/cultural interpretations of her woman patients. The literary and philosophic aspects of her work are emphasized as well as her contribution to French psychiatry.

  14. Reconciling molecular phylogenies with the fossil record.

    PubMed

    Morlon, Hélène; Parsons, Todd L; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2011-09-27

    Historical patterns of species diversity inferred from phylogenies typically contradict the direct evidence found in the fossil record. According to the fossil record, species frequently go extinct, and many clades experience periods of dramatic diversity loss. However, most analyses of molecular phylogenies fail to identify any periods of declining diversity, and they typically infer low levels of extinction. This striking inconsistency between phylogenies and fossils limits our understanding of macroevolution, and it undermines our confidence in phylogenetic inference. Here, we show that realistic extinction rates and diversity trajectories can be inferred from molecular phylogenies. To make this inference, we derive an analytic expression for the likelihood of a phylogeny that accommodates scenarios of declining diversity, time-variable rates, and incomplete sampling; we show that this likelihood expression reliably detects periods of diversity loss using simulation. We then study the cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), a group for which standard phylogenetic inferences are strikingly inconsistent with fossil data. When the cetacean phylogeny is considered as a whole, recently radiating clades, such as the Balaneopteridae, Delphinidae, Phocoenidae, and Ziphiidae, mask the signal of extinctions. However, when isolating these groups, we infer diversity dynamics that are consistent with the fossil record. These results reconcile molecular phylogenies with fossil data, and they suggest that most extant cetaceans arose from four recent radiations, with a few additional species arising from clades that have been in decline over the last ~10 Myr. PMID:21930899

  15. Eubacterial phylogeny based on translational apparatus proteins.

    PubMed

    Brochier, Céline; Bapteste, Eric; Moreira, David; Philippe, Hervé

    2002-01-01

    Lateral gene transfers are frequent among prokaryotes, although their detection remains difficult. If all genes are equally affected, this questions the very existence of an organismal phylogeny. The complexity hypothesis postulates the existence of a core of genes (those involved in numerous interactions) that are unaffected by transfers. To test the hypothesis, we studied all the proteins involved in translation from 45 eubacterial taxa, and developed a new phylogenetic method to detect transfers. Few of the genes studied show evidence for transfer. The phylogeny based on the genes devoid of transfer is very consistent with the ribosomal RNA tree, suggesting that an eubacterial phylogeny does exist.

  16. Development of Phonological Constancy: 19-Month-Olds, but Not 15-Month-Olds, Identify Words in a Non-Native Regional Accent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulak, Karen E.; Best, Catherine T.; Tyler, Michael D.; Kitamura, Christine; Irwin, Julia R.

    2013-01-01

    By 12 months, children grasp that a phonetic change to a word can change its identity ("phonological distinctiveness"). However, they must also grasp that some phonetic changes do "not" ("phonological constancy"). To test development of phonological constancy, sixteen 15-month-olds and sixteen 19-month-olds completed…

  17. Israeli Kindergarten Children's Gender Constancy for Others' Counter-Stereotypic Toy Play and Appearance: The Role of Sibling Gender and Relative Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karniol, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    To test divergent theoretical predictions as to the impact of having a younger or older, same-sex sibling or opposite-sex sibling on other gender constancy, Israeli kindergarten children in two-child families responded to a gender constancy task in which a male and female picture target engaged in counter-stereotypic toy play and adopted…

  18. Low levels of specularity support operational color constancy, particularly when surface and illumination geometry can be inferred

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Smithson, Hannah E.

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether surface specularity alone supports operational color constancy – the ability to discriminate changes in illumination or reflectance. Observers viewed short animations of illuminant or reflectance changes in rendered scenes containing a single spherical surface, and were asked to classify the change. Performance improved with increasing specularity, as predicted from regularities in chromatic statistics. Peak performance was impaired by spatial rearrangements of image pixels that disrupted the perception of illuminated surfaces, but was maintained with increased surface complexity. The characteristic chromatic transformations that are available with non-zero specularity are useful for operational color constancy, particularly if accompanied by appropriate perceptual organisation. PMID:26974938

  19. Spatial and temporal constancy of seismic strain release along an evolving segment of the Pacific-North America plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Kurt L.; Dolan, James F.; Owen, Lewis A.; Ganev, Plamen; Finkel, Robert C.

    2011-04-01

    Three new slip rates from the Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley (DVFLV) fault contribute to an exceptionally detailed record of lateral rate variations on this 300-km-long system. From south to north, these three new sites are: South Mud Canyon, Cucomongo Canyon, and Indian Creek. Slip rates were determined by combining offsets measured with 1-m-resolution airborne lidar data with 10Be cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure and optically stimulated luminescence ages from displaced alluvial fans. The offset fans date to 17.4 ± 2.3 ka at South Mud Canyon, 39 ± 3 ka at Cucomongo Canyon, and 6.3 ± 1.8 ka at Indian Creek, yielding slip rates of 2.1 + 0.5/-0.4 mm/yr, 6.1 + 1.3/-1.0 mm/yr and 2.2 + 0.8/-0.6 mm/yr, respectively. At Indian Creek, the Holocene (~ 6 ka) and late Quaternary (~ 70 ka) slip rates are the same, within uncertainty, suggesting temporal constancy of seismic strain release along the northern DVFLV fault zone over these time spans. When combined with slip rates determined in earlier companion studies, these results show that the late Quaternary slip rate decreases northward and southward from the central part of the fault, as slip is transferred onto north-trending zones of distributed normal faulting towards the northeast and southwest of the central zone of rapid deformation. This complex pattern of strain accommodation may reflect structural evolution towards a straighter, structurally simpler zone of dextral shear that locally utilizes well-established dextral faults that are linked where necessary by nascent zones of deformation. Summation of the rates of all major faults in the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) at the 37°N latitude of Red Wall Canyon in northern Death Valley shows that the cumulative geologic rate of ~ 8.5-10 mm/yr is indistinguishable from the ~ 9 mm/yr geodetic rate. Although the cumulative rate on the major faults of the ECSZ is slower to the north and south, this probably reflects more distributed deformation in these areas

  20. Laboratory evolution of population stability in Drosophila: constancy and persistence do not necessarily coevolve.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sutirth; Prasad, N G; Shakarad, Mallikarjun; Joshi, Amitabh

    2008-07-01

    1. Despite considerable theoretical work, the evolution of population stability has rarely been investigated empirically. Moreover, it is not clear whether different stability properties of a population evolve together, or independently. 2. We investigate the evolution of two aspects of population stability using laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster selected for faster preadult development and early reproduction, and their matched controls. 3. We show that the constancy stability of the selected populations is significantly higher than their controls, confirming a previous observation that population stability can evolve as a by-product of life-history evolution. This enhanced constancy stability is due to a reduced maximal per capita growth rate, brought about by a reduction in fecundity of the selected populations as a result of the trade-off between developmental rate and fecundity. 4. Persistence stability, as reflected by the probability of extinction, does not differ significantly between selected and control populations. 5. We also show how seemingly trivial experimental details, such as the protocol for restarting extinct populations, can interact with life-history traits to alter the manifestation of the stability properties of a population.

  1. Modelling colour constancy in fish: implications for vision and signalling in water.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Lucas; Marshall, N Justin; Johnsen, Sönke; Osorio, D

    2016-06-15

    Colour vision and colour signals are important to aquatic animals, but light scattering and absorption by water distorts spectral stimuli. To investigate the performance of colour vision in water, and to suggest how photoreceptor spectral sensitivities and body colours might evolve for visual communication, we model the effects of changes in viewing distance and depth on the appearance of fish colours for three teleosts: a barracuda, Sphyraena helleri, which is dichromatic and two damselfishes, Chromis verater and Chromis hanui, which are trichromatic. We assume that photoreceptors light-adapt to the background, thereby implementing the von Kries transformation, which can largely account for observed colour constancy in humans and other animals, including fish. This transformation does not, however, compensate for light scattering over variable viewing distances, which in less than a metre seriously impairs dichromatic colour vision, and makes judgement of colour saturation unreliable for trichromats. The von Kries transformation does substantially offset colour shifts caused by changing depth, so that from depths of 0 to 30 m modelled colour changes (i.e. failures of colour constancy) are sometimes negligible. However, the magnitudes and directions of remaining changes are complex, depending upon the specific spectral sensitivities of the receptors and the reflectance spectra. This predicts that when judgement of colour is important, the spectra of signalling colours and photoreceptor spectral sensitivities should be evolutionarily linked, with the colours dependent on photoreceptor spectral sensitivities, and vice versa. PMID:27045090

  2. Disparity-defined objects moving in depth do not elicit three-dimensional shape constancy.

    PubMed

    Scarfe, P; Hibbard, P B

    2006-05-01

    Observers generally fail to recover three-dimensional shape accurately from binocular disparity. Typically, depth is overestimated at near distances and underestimated at far distances [Johnston, E. B. (1991). Systematic distortions of shape from stereopsis. Vision Research, 31, 1351-1360]. A simple prediction from this is that disparity-defined objects should appear to expand in depth when moving towards the observer, and compress in depth when moving away. However, additional information is provided when an object moves from which 3D Euclidean shape can be recovered, be this through the addition of structure from motion information [Richards, W. (1985). Structure from stereo and motion. Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 2, 343-349], or the use of non-generic strategies [Todd, J. T., & Norman, J. F. (2003). The visual perception of 3-D shape from multiple cues: Are observers capable of perceiving metric structure? Perception and Psychophysics, 65, 31-47]. Here, we investigated shape constancy for objects moving in depth. We found that to be perceived as constant in shape, objects needed to contract in depth when moving toward the observer, and expand in depth when moving away, countering the effects of incorrect distance scaling (Johnston, 1991). This is a striking example of the failure of shape constancy, but one that is predicted if observers neither accurately estimate object distance in order to recover Euclidean shape, nor are able to base their responses on a simpler processing strategy.

  3. Wide-dynamic-range APS-based silicon retina with brightness constancy.

    PubMed

    Shimonomura, Kazuhiro; Kameda, Seiji; Iwata, Atsushi; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2011-09-01

    A silicon retina is an intelligent vision sensor that can execute real-time image preprocessing by using a parallel analog circuit that mimics the structure of the neuronal circuits in the vertebrate retina. For enhancing the sensor's robustness to changes in illumination in a practical environment, we have designed and fabricated a silicon retina on the basis of a computational model of brightness constancy. The chip has a wide-dynamic-range and shows a constant response against changes in the illumination intensity. The photosensor in the present chip approximates logarithmic illumination-to-voltage transfer characteristics as a result of the application of a time-modulated reset voltage technique. Two types of image processing, namely, Laplacian-Gaussian-like spatial filtering and computing the frame difference, are carried out by using resistive networks and sample/hold circuits in the chip. As a result of these processings, the chip exhibits brightness constancy over a wide range of illumination. The chip is fabricated by using the 0.25- μm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor image sensor technology. The number of pixels is 64 × 64, and the power consumption is 32 mW at the frame rate of 30 fps. We show that our chip not only has a wide-dynamic-range but also shows a constant response to the changes in illumination.

  4. Modelling colour constancy in fish: implications for vision and signalling in water.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Lucas; Marshall, N Justin; Johnsen, Sönke; Osorio, D

    2016-06-15

    Colour vision and colour signals are important to aquatic animals, but light scattering and absorption by water distorts spectral stimuli. To investigate the performance of colour vision in water, and to suggest how photoreceptor spectral sensitivities and body colours might evolve for visual communication, we model the effects of changes in viewing distance and depth on the appearance of fish colours for three teleosts: a barracuda, Sphyraena helleri, which is dichromatic and two damselfishes, Chromis verater and Chromis hanui, which are trichromatic. We assume that photoreceptors light-adapt to the background, thereby implementing the von Kries transformation, which can largely account for observed colour constancy in humans and other animals, including fish. This transformation does not, however, compensate for light scattering over variable viewing distances, which in less than a metre seriously impairs dichromatic colour vision, and makes judgement of colour saturation unreliable for trichromats. The von Kries transformation does substantially offset colour shifts caused by changing depth, so that from depths of 0 to 30 m modelled colour changes (i.e. failures of colour constancy) are sometimes negligible. However, the magnitudes and directions of remaining changes are complex, depending upon the specific spectral sensitivities of the receptors and the reflectance spectra. This predicts that when judgement of colour is important, the spectra of signalling colours and photoreceptor spectral sensitivities should be evolutionarily linked, with the colours dependent on photoreceptor spectral sensitivities, and vice versa.

  5. Variability in constancy of the perceived surface reflectance across different illumination statistics.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, Isamu; Matoba, Hiroaki

    2012-01-15

    In contrast to the classical findings of lightness constancy, recent psychophysical studies show the strong dependency of the perceived reflectance of a surface on the structure of the natural illumination. The present study examined this inconstancy for systematic variations in the light field and an image-based explanation for it. Observers matched the specular and diffuse reflectance of a three-dimensional object in a complex scene under a fixed light field to that in the scene under different light fields with variable mean, contrast, and gamma. For the both specular and diffuse components, the matched reflectance was relatively constant against changes in the mean illuminance but varied extensively with changes in the contrast and gamma of the light field. We found that the matching data were well predicted by the similarity of the subband histograms of the images. The results support the notion that early spatial filtering can provide a unified account of both the constancy in the perceived surface reflectance against mean illuminance and the inconstancy for higher-order illumination statistics.

  6. Lack of depth constancy for grasping movements in both virtual and real environments.

    PubMed

    Bozzacchi, Chiara; Domini, Fulvio

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies on visuomotor processes using virtual setups have suggested that actions are affected by similar biases as perceptual tasks. In particular, a strong lack of depth constancy is revealed, resembling biases in perceptual estimates of relative depth. With this study we aim to understand whether these findings are mostly caused by a lack of metric accuracy of the visuomotor system or by the limited cues provided by the use of virtual reality. We addressed this issue by comparing grasping movements towards a spherical object located at four distances (420, 450, 480, and 510 mm) performed in three conditions: 1) virtual, in which the target was a virtual object defined by binocular cues, 2) glow-in-the-dark, in which the object was painted with luminous paint but no other cue was provided, and 3) full-cue, in which the movement was performed with the lights on and all the environmental information was available. Results revealed a striking effect of object distance on grip aperture equally in all three conditions. Specifically, grip aperture gradually decreased with increase in object distance, proving a consistent lack of depth constancy. These findings clearly demonstrate that systematic biases in grasping actions are not induced by the use of virtual environments and that action and perception may involve the same visual information, which does not engage a metric reconstruction of the scene.

  7. Dodging the cosmic curvature to probe the constancy of the speed of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Yang, Tao

    2016-08-01

    We develop a new model-independent method to probe the constancy of the speed of light c. In our method, the degeneracy between the cosmic curvature and the speed of light can be eliminated, which makes the test more natural and general. Combining the independent observations of Hubble parameter H(z) and luminosity distance dL(z), we use the model-independent smoothing technique, Gaussian processes, to reconstruct them and then detect variation of the speed of light. We find no signal of deviation from the present value of the speed of light c0. Moreover, to demonstrate the improvement in probing the constancy of the speed of light from future experiments, we produce a series of simulated data. The Dark Energy Survey will be able to detect Δc/c0 ~ 1% at ~ 1.5σ confidence level and Δc/c0 ~ 2% at ~ 3σ confidence level. If the errors are reduced to one-tenth of the expected DES ones, it can detect a Δc/c0 ~ 0.1% variation at ~ 2σ confidence level.

  8. Untangling the phylogeny of amoeboid protists.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Jan; Burki, Fabien

    2009-01-01

    The amoebae and amoeboid protists form a large and diverse assemblage of eukaryotes characterized by various types of pseudopodia. For convenience, the traditional morphology-based classification grouped them together in a macrotaxon named Sarcodina. Molecular phylogenies contributed to the dismantlement of this assemblage, placing the majority of sarcodinids into two new supergroups: Amoebozoa and Rhizaria. In this review, we describe the taxonomic composition of both supergroups and present their small subunit rDNA-based phylogeny. We comment on the advantages and weaknesses of these phylogenies and emphasize the necessity of taxon-rich multigene datasets to resolve phylogenetic relationships within Amoebozoa and Rhizaria. We show the importance of environmental sequencing as a way of increasing taxon sampling in these supergroups. Finally, we highlight the interest of Amoebozoa and Rhizaria for understanding eukaryotic evolution and suggest that resolving their phylogenies will be among the main challenges for future phylogenomic analyses.

  9. Untangling the phylogeny of amoeboid protists.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Jan; Burki, Fabien

    2009-01-01

    The amoebae and amoeboid protists form a large and diverse assemblage of eukaryotes characterized by various types of pseudopodia. For convenience, the traditional morphology-based classification grouped them together in a macrotaxon named Sarcodina. Molecular phylogenies contributed to the dismantlement of this assemblage, placing the majority of sarcodinids into two new supergroups: Amoebozoa and Rhizaria. In this review, we describe the taxonomic composition of both supergroups and present their small subunit rDNA-based phylogeny. We comment on the advantages and weaknesses of these phylogenies and emphasize the necessity of taxon-rich multigene datasets to resolve phylogenetic relationships within Amoebozoa and Rhizaria. We show the importance of environmental sequencing as a way of increasing taxon sampling in these supergroups. Finally, we highlight the interest of Amoebozoa and Rhizaria for understanding eukaryotic evolution and suggest that resolving their phylogenies will be among the main challenges for future phylogenomic analyses. PMID:19335771

  10. The importance of protistan phylogeny for macroevolution.

    PubMed

    Brooks, D R

    1988-01-01

    Explicit estimates of protist phylogeny should play a key role in the development of macroevolutionary theory. Nearly half the evolutionary history of living systems involved only protists, and many trends and traits of macroevolutionary significance originated in protist groups. Special areas of research that can make use of protist phylogenies include: (1) origin of life studies, (2) biotic aspects of the evolution of the environment, (3) developmental biology and evolution, and (4) macroevolutionary trends in the diversification of life.

  11. Investigations on the caesium-137 household of Lake Lugano, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drissner, J.; Klemt, E.; Klenk, T.; Miller, R.; Zibold, G.; Burger, M.; Jakob, A.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment samples were taken from different basins of Lake Lugano, and the caesium 137 inventory and vertical distribution was measured. In all samples, a distinct maximum at a depth of 5 to 10 cm can be attributed to the 1986 Chernobyl fallout. Relatively high specific activities of 500 to 1,000 Bq/kg can still be found in the top layer of the sediment. 5 step extraction experiments on sediment samples resulted in percentages of extracted caesium which are a factor of 2 to 8 higher than those of Lake Constance, where caesium is strongly bound to illites. The activity concentration of the water of 3 main tributaries, of the outflow and of the lake water was in the order of 5 to 10 mBq/l.

  12. Messages for Educational Leadership: The Constance E. Clayton Lectures 1998-2007. Black Studies and Critical Thinking. Volume 34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter-Defoe, Diana T., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Urban education is an interdisciplinary field, characterized by introducing many perspectives to research pertaining to educational policy and to the practice of educating youth whose lives unfold in densely populated urban metropolitan areas. This book celebrates Constance Clayton's eleven-year tenure as superintendent of the School District of…

  13. Phylogeny of the Genus Flavivirus

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Goro; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Tsuchiya, K. Richard; Karabatsos, Nick; Cropp, C. Bruce

    1998-01-01

    We undertook a comprehensive phylogenetic study to establish the genetic relationship among the viruses of the genus Flavivirus and to compare the classification based on molecular phylogeny with the existing serologic method. By using a combination of quantitative definitions (bootstrap support level and the pairwise nucleotide sequence identity), the viruses could be classified into clusters, clades, and species. Our phylogenetic study revealed for the first time that from the putative ancestor two branches, non-vector and vector-borne virus clusters, evolved and from the latter cluster emerged tick-borne and mosquito-borne virus clusters. Provided that the theory of arthropod association being an acquired trait was correct, pairwise nucleotide sequence identity among these three clusters provided supporting data for a possibility that the non-vector cluster evolved first, followed by the separation of tick-borne and mosquito-borne virus clusters in that order. Clades established in our study correlated significantly with existing antigenic complexes. We also resolved many of the past taxonomic problems by establishing phylogenetic relationships of the antigenically unclassified viruses with the well-established viruses and by identifying synonymous viruses. PMID:9420202

  14. French psychiatry and the new woman: the case of Dr Constance Pascal, 1877-1937.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Felicia

    2006-06-01

    This article traces the connections between the public career and private life of Constance Pascal (1877-1937), the first woman psychiatrist in France, in the social context of the Belle Epoque. Pascal, of Romanian origin, attained professional success at the cost of suppressing her personal life. Best known for her work on dementia praecox, she researched the social as well as the biological causes of mental illness. She founded one of the first 'medical-pedagogic' institutes in France. Her monograph, Chagrins d'amour et psychoses (1935) reflects her wide cultural interests. Until recently, Pascal has been neglected by historians of psychiatry and of French women's history. Her life exemplified many of the conflicts experienced by women entering hitherto all-male professions.

  15. Verification of a novel method for tube voltage constancy measurement of orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chu; Belley, Matthew D.; Chao, Nelson J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: For orthovoltage x-ray irradiators, the tube voltage is one of the most fundamental system parameters as this directly relates to the dosimetry in radiation biology studies; however, to the best of our knowledge, there is no commercial portable quality assurance (QA) tool to directly test the constancy of the tube voltage greater than 160 kV. The purpose of this study is to establish the Beam Quality Index (BQI), a quantity strongly correlated to the tube voltage, as an alternative parameter for the verification of the tube voltage as part of the QA program of orthovoltage x-ray irradiators. Methods: A multipurpose QA meter and its associated data acquisition software were used to customize the measurement parameters to measure the BQI and collect its time-plot. BQI measurements were performed at 320 kV with four filtration levels on three orthovoltage x-ray irradiators of the same model, one of which had been recently energy-calibrated at the factory. Results: For each of the four filtration levels, the measured BQI values were in good agreement (<5%) between the three irradiators. BQI showed filtration-specificity, possibly due to the difference in beam quality. Conclusions: The BQI has been verified as a feasible alternative for monitoring the constancy of the tube voltage for orthovoltage irradiators. The time-plot of BQI offers information on the behavior of beam energy at different phases of the irradiation time line. In addition, this would provide power supply performance characteristics from initial ramp-up to plateau, and finally, the sharp drop-off at the end of the exposure. PMID:25086562

  16. Verification of a novel method for tube voltage constancy measurement of orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chu; Belley, Matthew D.; Chao, Nelson J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: For orthovoltage x-ray irradiators, the tube voltage is one of the most fundamental system parameters as this directly relates to the dosimetry in radiation biology studies; however, to the best of our knowledge, there is no commercial portable quality assurance (QA) tool to directly test the constancy of the tube voltage greater than 160 kV. The purpose of this study is to establish the Beam Quality Index (BQI), a quantity strongly correlated to the tube voltage, as an alternative parameter for the verification of the tube voltage as part of the QA program of orthovoltage x-ray irradiators. Methods: A multipurpose QA meter and its associated data acquisition software were used to customize the measurement parameters to measure the BQI and collect its time-plot. BQI measurements were performed at 320 kV with four filtration levels on three orthovoltage x-ray irradiators of the same model, one of which had been recently energy-calibrated at the factory. Results: For each of the four filtration levels, the measured BQI values were in good agreement (<5%) between the three irradiators. BQI showed filtration-specificity, possibly due to the difference in beam quality. Conclusions: The BQI has been verified as a feasible alternative for monitoring the constancy of the tube voltage for orthovoltage irradiators. The time-plot of BQI offers information on the behavior of beam energy at different phases of the irradiation time line. In addition, this would provide power supply performance characteristics from initial ramp-up to plateau, and finally, the sharp drop-off at the end of the exposure.

  17. [Research on developping the spectral dataset for Dunhuang typical colors based on color constancy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Wan, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Zhen; Li, Chan; Liang, Jin-Xing

    2013-11-01

    The present paper aims at developping a method to reasonably set up the typical spectral color dataset for different kinds of Chinese cultural heritage in color rendering process. The world famous wall paintings dating from more than 1700 years ago in Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes was taken as typical case in this research. In order to maintain the color constancy during the color rendering workflow of Dunhuang culture relics, a chromatic adaptation based method for developping the spectral dataset of typical colors for those wall paintings was proposed from the view point of human vision perception ability. Under the help and guidance of researchers in the art-research institution and protection-research institution of Dunhuang Academy and according to the existing research achievement of Dunhuang Research in the past years, 48 typical known Dunhuang pigments were chosen and 240 representative color samples were made with reflective spectral ranging from 360 to 750 nm was acquired by a spectrometer. In order to find the typical colors of the above mentioned color samples, the original dataset was devided into several subgroups by clustering analysis. The grouping number, together with the most typical samples for each subgroup which made up the firstly built typical color dataset, was determined by wilcoxon signed rank test according to the color inconstancy index comprehensively calculated under 6 typical illuminating conditions. Considering the completeness of gamut of Dunhuang wall paintings, 8 complementary colors was determined and finally the typical spectral color dataset was built up which contains 100 representative spectral colors. The analytical calculating results show that the median color inconstancy index of the built dataset in 99% confidence level by wilcoxon signed rank test was 3.28 and the 100 colors are distributing in the whole gamut uniformly, which ensures that this dataset can provide reasonable reference for choosing the color with highest

  18. Lake Eyre

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...   View Larger Image Lake Eyre is a large salt lake situated between two deserts in one of Australia's driest regions. ... the effect of sunglint at the nadir camera view angle. Dry, salt encrusted parts of the lake appear bright white or gray. Purple areas have ...

  19. Molecular phylogeny: reconstructing the forest.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Phylogeny, be it morphological or molecular, has long tried to explain the extant biodiversity by the Tree of Species, which is a logical consequence of strict Darwinian evolutionary principles. Through constant improvement of both methods and data sets, some parts of this diversity have actually been demonstrated to be the result of a tree-like process. For some other parts, and especially for prokaryotes, different molecular markers have, however, produced different evolutionary trees, preventing the reconstruction of such a Tree. While technical artifacts could be blamed for these discrepancies, Lateral Gene Transfers are now largely held for responsible, and their existence requires an extension of the Darwinian framework, since genetic material is not always vertically inherited from parents to offspring. Through a variety of biological processes, sometimes large parts of DNA are exchanged between phylogenetically distant contemporary organisms, especially between those sharing the same environment. While mainly concerning prokaryotes, Lateral Gene Transfers have been also demonstrated to affect eukaryotes, and even multicellular ones, like plants or animals. Most of the time, these transfers allow important adaptations and the colonisation of new niches. The quantitative and qualitative importance of genetic transfers has thus severely challenged the very existence of a universal Tree of Species, since genetic connections, at least for microbes, seem more reticulated than tree-like. Even traditional biological concepts, like the concept of species, need to be re-evaluated in the light of recent discoveries. In short, instead of focusing on a elusive universal tree, biologists are now considering the whole forest corresponding to the multiple processes of inheritance, both vertical and horizontal. This constitutes the major challenge of evolutionary biology for the years to come.

  20. Molecular phylogeny of the Entomophthoromycota.

    PubMed

    Gryganskyi, Andrii P; Humber, Richard A; Smith, Matthew E; Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Miadlikovska, Jolanta; Wu, Steven; Voigt, Kerstin; Walther, Grit; Anishchenko, Iryna M; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2012-11-01

    The Entomophthoromycota is a ubiquitous group of fungi best known as pathogens of a wide variety of economically important insect pests, and other soil invertebrates. This group of fungi also includes a small number of parasites of reptiles, vertebrates (including humans), macromycetes, fern gametophytes, and desmid algae, as well as some saprobic species. Here we report on recent studies to resolve the phylogenetic relationships within the Entomophthoromycota and to reliably place this group among other basal fungal lineages. Bayesian Interference (BI) and Maximum Likelihood (ML) analyses of three genes (nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA, mitochondrial 16S, and the protein-coding RPB2) as well as non-molecular data consistently and unambiguously identify 31 taxa of Entomophthoromycota as a monophyletic group distinct from other Zygomycota and flagellated fungi. Using the constraints of our multi-gene dataset we constructed the most comprehensive rDNA phylogeny yet available for Entomophthoromycota. The taxa studied here belong to five distinct, well-supported lineages. The Basidiobolus clade is the earliest diverging lineage, comprised of saprobe species of Basidiobolus and the undescribed snake parasite Schizangiella serpentis nom. prov. The Conidiobolus lineage is represented by a paraphyletic grade of trophically diverse species that include saprobes, insect pathogens, and facultative human pathogens. Three well supported and exclusively entomopathogenic lineages in the Entomophthoraceae center around the genera Batkoa, Entomophthora and Zoophthora, although several genera within this crown clade are resolved as non-monophyletic. Ancestral state reconstruction suggests that the ancestor of all Entomophthoromycota was morphologically similar to species of Conidiobolus. Analyses using strict, relaxed, and local molecular clock models documented highly variable DNA substitution rates among lineages of Entomophthoromycota. Despite the complications caused by different rates

  1. Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

  2. Juvenile morphology in baleen whale phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R. Ewan

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions are sensitive to the influence of ontogeny on morphology. Here, we use foetal/neonatal specimens of known species of living baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti) to show how juvenile morphology of extant species affects phylogenetic placement of the species. In one clade (sei whale, Balaenopteridae), the juvenile is distant from the usual phylogenetic position of adults, but in the other clade (pygmy right whale, Cetotheriidae), the juvenile is close to the adult. Different heterochronic processes at work in the studied species have different influences on juvenile morphology and on phylogenetic placement. This study helps to understand the relationship between evolutionary processes and phylogenetic patterns in baleen whale evolution and, more in general, between phylogeny and ontogeny; likewise, this study provides a proxy how to interpret the phylogeny when fossils that are immature individuals are included. Juvenile individuals in the peramorphic acceleration clades would produce misleading phylogenies, whereas juvenile individuals in the paedomorphic neoteny clades should still provide reliable phylogenetic signals.

  3. Ribosomal RNA: a key to phylogeny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    As molecular phylogeny increasingly shapes our understanding of organismal relationships, no molecule has been applied to more questions than have ribosomal RNAs. We review this role of the rRNAs and some of the insights that have been gained from them. We also offer some of the practical considerations in extracting the phylogenetic information from the sequences. Finally, we stress the importance of comparing results from multiple molecules, both as a method for testing the overall reliability of the organismal phylogeny and as a method for more broadly exploring the history of the genome.

  4. Radiographic film dosimetry of proton beams for depth-dose constancy check and beam profile measurement.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Inhwan J; Teran, Anthony; Ghebremedhin, Abiel; Johnson, Matt; Patyal, Baldev

    2015-05-08

    Radiographic film dosimetry suffers from its energy dependence in proton dosimetry. This study sought to develop a method of measuring proton beams by the film and to evaluate film response to proton beams for the constancy check of depth dose (DD). It also evaluated the film for profile measurements. To achieve this goal, from DDs measured by film and ion chamber (IC), calibration factors (ratios of dose measured by IC to film responses) as a function of depth in a phantom were obtained. These factors imply variable slopes (with proton energy and depth) of linear characteristic curves that relate film response to dose. We derived a calibration method that enables utilization of the factors for acquisition of dose from film density measured at later dates by adapting to a potentially altered processor condition. To test this model, the characteristic curve was obtained by using EDR2 film and in-phantom film dosimetry in parallel with a 149.65 MeV proton beam, using the method. An additional validation of the model was performed by concurrent film and IC measurement perpendicular to the beam at various depths. Beam profile measurements by the film were also evaluated at the center of beam modulation. In order to interpret and ascertain the film dosimetry, Monte Carlos simulation of the beam was performed, calculating the proton fluence spectrum along depths and off-axis distances. By multiplying respective stopping powers to the spectrum, doses to film and water were calculated. The ratio of film dose to water dose was evaluated. Results are as follows. The characteristic curve proved the assumed linearity. The measured DD approached that of IC, but near the end of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), a spurious peak was observed due to the mismatch of distal edge between the calibration and measurement films. The width of SOBP and the proximal edge were both reproducible within a maximum of 5mm; the distal edge was reproducible within 1 mm. At 5 cm depth, the dose was

  5. Radiographic film dosimetry of proton beams for depth-dose constancy check and beam profile measurement.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Inhwan J; Teran, Anthony; Ghebremedhin, Abiel; Johnson, Matt; Patyal, Baldev

    2015-01-01

    Radiographic film dosimetry suffers from its energy dependence in proton dosimetry. This study sought to develop a method of measuring proton beams by the film and to evaluate film response to proton beams for the constancy check of depth dose (DD). It also evaluated the film for profile measurements. To achieve this goal, from DDs measured by film and ion chamber (IC), calibration factors (ratios of dose measured by IC to film responses) as a function of depth in a phantom were obtained. These factors imply variable slopes (with proton energy and depth) of linear characteristic curves that relate film response to dose. We derived a calibration method that enables utilization of the factors for acquisition of dose from film density measured at later dates by adapting to a potentially altered processor condition. To test this model, the characteristic curve was obtained by using EDR2 film and in-phantom film dosimetry in parallel with a 149.65 MeV proton beam, using the method. An additional validation of the model was performed by concurrent film and IC measurement perpendicular to the beam at various depths. Beam profile measurements by the film were also evaluated at the center of beam modulation. In order to interpret and ascertain the film dosimetry, Monte Carlos simulation of the beam was performed, calculating the proton fluence spectrum along depths and off-axis distances. By multiplying respective stopping powers to the spectrum, doses to film and water were calculated. The ratio of film dose to water dose was evaluated. Results are as follows. The characteristic curve proved the assumed linearity. The measured DD approached that of IC, but near the end of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), a spurious peak was observed due to the mismatch of distal edge between the calibration and measurement films. The width of SOBP and the proximal edge were both reproducible within a maximum of 5mm; the distal edge was reproducible within 1 mm. At 5 cm depth, the dose was

  6. Retrospective analysis of linear accelerator output constancy checks using process control techniques.

    PubMed

    Sanghangthum, Taweap; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Srisatit, Somyot; Pawlicki, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Shewhart control charts have previously been suggested as a process control tool for use in routine linear accelerator (linac) output verifications. However, a comprehensive approach to process control has not been investigated for linac output verifications. The purpose of this work is to investigate a comprehensive process control approach to linac output constancy quality assurance (QA). The RBA-3 dose constancy check was used to verify outputs of photon beams and electron beams delivered by a Varian Clinac 21EX linac. The data were collected during 2009 to 2010. Shewhart-type control charts, exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) charts, and capability indices were applied to these processes. The Shewhart-type individuals chart (X-chart) was used and the number of data points used to calculate the control limits was varied. The parameters tested for the EWMA charts (smoothing parameter (λ) and the control limit width (L)) were λ = 0.05, L = 2.492; λ = 0.10, L = 2.703; and λ = 0.20, L = 2.860, as well as the number of points used to estimate the initial process mean and variation. Lastly, the number of in-control data points used to determine process capability (C(p)) and acceptability (C(pk)) were investigated, comparing the first in-control run to the longest in-control run of the process data. C(p) and C(pk) values greater than 1.0 were considered acceptable. The 95% confidence intervals were reported. The X-charts detected systematic errors (e.g., device setup errors). In-control run lengths on the X-charts varied from 5 to 30 output measurements (about one to seven months). EWMA charts showed in-control runs ranging from 9 to 33 output measurements (about two to eight months). The C(p) and C(pk) ratios are higher than 1.0 for all energies, except 12 and 20 MeV. However, 10 MV and 6, 9, and 16 MeV were in question when considering the 95% confidence limits. The X-chart should be calculated using 8-12 data points. For EWMA chart, using 4 data points

  7. Hot electron plasma equilibrium and stability in the Constance B mirror experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xing

    1988-04-01

    An experimental study of the equilibrium and macroscopic stability property of an electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) generated plasma in a minimum-B mirror is presented. The Constance B mirror is a single cell quadrupole magnetic mirror in which high beta (..beta.. less than or equal to 0.3) hot electron plasmas (T/sub e/approx. =400 keV) are created with up to 4 kW of ECRH power. The plasma equilibrium profile is hollow and resembles the baseball seam geometry of the magnet which provides the confining magnetic field. This configuration coincides with the drift orbit of deeply trapped particles. The on-axis hollowness of the hot electron density profile is 50 /+-/ 10%, and the pressure profile is at least as hollow as, if not more than, the hot electron density profile. The hollow plasma equilibrium is macroscopically stable and generated in all the experimental conditions in which the machine has been operated. The hollowness of the plasma pressure profile is not limited by the marginal stability condition. Small macroscopic plasma fluctuations in the range of the hot electron curvature drift frequency sometimes occur but their growth rate is small (..omega../sub i//..omega../sub r/ less than or equal to 10/sup -2/) and saturate at very low level (deltaB//bar B/ less than or equal to 10/sup -3/). Particle drift reversal is predicted to occur for the model pressure profile which best fits the experimental data under the typical operating conditions. No strong instability is observed when the plasma is near the drift reversal parameter regime, despite a theoretical prediction of instability under such conditions. The experiment shows that the cold electron population has no stabilizing effect to the hot electrons, which disagrees with current hot electron stability theories and results of previous maximum-B experiments. A theoretical analysis using MHD theory shows that the compressibility can stabilize a plasma with a hollowness of 20--30% in the

  8. Trial of a proposed protocol for constancy control of digital mammography systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, Kristin; Landmark, Ingrid Dypvik

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Evaluate the utility of tests in a proposed protocol for constancy control of digital mammography systems. Methods: The protocol contained tests for image acquisition, mechanical function and safety, monitors and printers, and viewing conditions. Nine sites with digital systems from four equipment manufacturers were recruited. Dedicated PMMA test objects and Excel spreadsheets were developed. Quantitative measurements were done on processed images for systems where these images were the ones most readily available. For daily assessment of the automatic exposure control system, a homogeneous PMMA phantom was exposed under clinical conditions. The mAs and signal to noise ratio (SNR) were recorded, the deviation from a target value calculated, and the resulting image inspected for artifacts. For thickness tracking, the signal difference to noise ratio obtained for three thicknesses was calculated. Detector uniformity was assessed through comparison of SNR values for regions of interest in the center and corners of an image of a homogeneous test object. Mechanical function and safety control included a compression test, a checklist for mechanical aspects, and control of field alignment. Monitor performance was evaluated by visual inspection of the AAPM TG 18 QC test image [E. Samei et al., ''Assessment of display performance for medical imaging systems,'' Task Group 18 (Madison, WI, April 2005)]. Results: For quantitative parameters, target values and tolerance limits were established. Test results exceeding the limits were registered. Most systems exhibited stable mAs values, indicating that the tolerance limit of {+-}10% was readily achievable. The SNR also showed little variation, indicating that the tolerance limit of {+-}20% was too wide. At one site, a defective grid caused artifacts that were visible in the test images. The monitor controls proved more difficult to implement due to both difficulties importing and displaying the test image, and the

  9. Does phylogeny control U37K -temperature sensitivity? Implications for lacustrine alkenone paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, William J.; Theroux, Susanna; Bradley, Raymond S.; Huang, Xiaohui

    2016-02-01

    Alkenone paleothermometry (via the U37K and U37K‧ indices) has long been used to reconstruct sea surface temperature and has more recently been proven effective in lacustrine settings. Genetic analyses indicate that there is a diversity of different alkenone-producing lacustrine haptophytes, and differences among U37K -temperature calibrations suggest that unique calibrations might be required to quantify past temperature variation from individual lakes. The only term necessary to quantify U37K -inferred temperature relative to a reference period (e.g., modern temperature 20th Century mean) is the slope of the calibration regression, the U37K -temperature sensitivity (i.e., the change in U37K per °C temperature change). Here, we bring together all of the existing U37K -temperature calibrations in order to compare the variability among U37K -temperature sensitivities. We also report a new in situ U37K -temperature calibration along with environmental genomic analysis based on the 18S rRNA gene of an alkenone producing haptophyte from lake Vikvatnet in Norway. We propose and test the hypothesis that U37K -temperature sensitivity is controlled by phylogeny and that this term can be used to quantify past temperature variation from lake sediments if the genetic identity of the lake's alkenone-producer is known. Using the existing calibration data sets, we determine four phylotype-specific U37K -temperature sensitivities for use in cases where in situ calibration is unavailable but the phylogeny of the alkenone producers is known.

  10. Detection of IMRT delivery errors based on a simple constancy check of transit dose by using an EPID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Tae Seong; Chung, Eun Ji; Son, Jaeman; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2015-11-01

    Beam delivery errors during intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were detected based on a simple constancy check of the transit dose by using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Twenty-one IMRT plans were selected from various treatment sites, and the transit doses during treatment were measured by using an EPID. Transit doses were measured 11 times for each course of treatment, and the constancy check was based on gamma index (3%/3 mm) comparisons between a reference dose map (the first measured transit dose) and test dose maps (the following ten measured dose maps). In a simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom, the average passing rate of the tested transit dose was 100% for three representative treatment sites (head & neck, chest, and pelvis), indicating that IMRT was highly constant for normal beam delivery. The average passing rate of the transit dose for 1224 IMRT fields from 21 actual patients was 97.6% ± 2.5%, with the lower rate possibly being due to inaccuracies of patient positioning or anatomic changes. An EPIDbased simple constancy check may provide information about IMRT beam delivery errors during treatment.

  11. Recent results from the Tara tandem mirror and Constance-B mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.S.; Brau, K.; Casey, J.; Chen, X.; Coleman, J.; Garner, R.; Golovato, S.; Gerver, M.; Goodman, D.; Guss, W.

    1986-11-01

    The Tara tandem mirror program has studied anchor and ponderomotive stabilization, axicell plugging with ECH and ICRF, sloshing ion buildup in the axicells, and halo formation and stabilization by an axisymmetric divertor. Central cell plasma parameters achieved by midplane fueling and slow wave ICRF heating from a local magnetic hill are ..beta.. = 1.2%, n/sub e/ = 3 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/. The plasma is stabilized both by anchor ion ..beta.. and by ponderomotive stabilization with the central cell ICRF in combination with a magnetic divertor, realizing a completely axisymmetric configuration. Anchor ICRF creates non-Boltzman potential plugging of central cell ions. Neutral beam injection establishes a sloshing ion distribution for a cold dense central cell stream; the hot ion confinement is classical and dominated by electron drag. Axicell ECH plugging experiments lead to near total reduction in endloss, but also to a decrease in the central cell density, indicating increased radial losses. Single-ended ECH plugging shows no increase in opposite endloss. Single-ended plugging with axicell ICRF produces 50% reduction in ion endloss, with about half of the reflected ions observed in the opposite endloss. In the Constance-B quadrupole mirror the hot electron pressure profile is peaked off-axis and has the shape of a baseball seam.

  12. Remarks on non-Gaussian fluctuations of the inflaton and constancy of {zeta} outside the horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Namit; Rangarajan, Raghavan

    2011-02-15

    We point out that the non-Gaussianity arising from cubic self-interactions of the inflaton field is proportional to {xi}N{sub e} where {xi}{approx}V{sup '''} and N{sub e} is the number of e-foldings from horizon exit till the end of inflation. For scales of interest N{sub e}=60, and for models of inflation such as new inflation, natural inflation, and running mass inflation {xi} is large compared to the slow-roll parameter {epsilon}{approx}V{sup '2}. Therefore, the contribution from self-interactions should not be outrightly ignored while retaining other terms in the non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL}. However, the N{sub e}-dependent term seems to imply the growth of non-Gaussianities outside the horizon. Therefore, we briefly discuss the issue of the constancy of correlations of the curvature perturbation {zeta} outside the horizon. We then calculate the 3-point function of the inflaton fluctuations using the canonical formalism and further obtain the 3-point function of {zeta}{sub k}. We find that the N{sub e}-dependent contribution to f{sub NL} from self-interactions of the inflaton field is canceled by contributions from other terms associated with nonlinearities in cosmological perturbation theory.

  13. Constancy of the relation between floc size and density in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Murrell, M.C.; Gartner, J.W.; Wright, S.A.; ,

    2007-01-01

    The size and density of fine-sediment aggregates, or flocs, govern their transport and depositional properties. While the mass and volume concentrations of flocs can be measured directly or by optical methods, they must be determined simultaneously to gain an accurate density measurement. Results are presented from a tidal cycle study in San Francisco Bay, where mass concentration was determined directly, and volume concentration was measured in 32 logarithmically spaced size bins by laser-diffraction methods. The relation between floc size and density is investigated assuming a constant primary particle size and fractal floc dimension. This relation is validated with measurements from several sites throughout San Francisco Bay. The constancy of this relation implies a uniform primary particle size throughout the Bay, as well as uniform aggregation/disaggregation mechanisms (which modify fractal dimension). The exception to the relation is identified during near-bed measurements, when advected flocs mix with recently resuspended flocs from the bed, which typically have a higher fractal dimension than suspended flocs. The constant relation for suspended flocs simplifies monitoring and numerical modeling of suspended sediment in San Francisco Bay. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Julius Caesar Scaliger on plant generation and the question of species constancy.

    PubMed

    Blank, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The sixteenth-century physician and philosopher Julius Caesar Scaliger combines the view that living beings are individuated by a single substantial form with the view that the constituents of the organic body retain their identity due to the continued existence and operation of their own substantial forms. This essay investigates the implications of Scaliger's account of subordinate and dominant substantial forms for the question of the constancy of biological species. According to Scaliger, biological mutability involves not only change on the ontological level of accidents but, in some cases, also change on the level of substantial forms. While he shares the received view that substantial forms themselves cannot undergo change, he maintains that relations of domination and subordination between substantial forms can undergo change. He uses his theory of how such changes can occur to explain cases of revertible plant degeneration. Moreover, in his view plants that belong to previously unknown biological species can emerge from changes in the relations between the many forms contained in plant seeds. PMID:20695395

  15. Ostracode and Organic Biomarker Evidence for Changes in Lake Productivity and Hydrodynamics Since the Late 19th Century in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalb, A.; Hanisch, S.; Mackensen, A.; Wessels, M.

    2004-12-01

    Ostracode species assemblages and organic biomarkers from a 87 cm long core taken at 178 m water depth in Lake Constance (southern Germany) reflect the eutrophication history and changes in lake hydrodynamics. Age control is provided by flood layers, magnetic susceptibility, TOC concentrations, and lead and zinc distribution compared to other, well-dated sediment cores from Lake Constance. As in most deep lakes, the profundal ostracode community is comparatively simple; being composed of a few benthonic species living in and on the sediment (Leucocythere, Limnocythere, Fabaeformiscandona, and Cytherissa) and bentho-nektonic species that swim above it (Cypria). Organic biomarkers comprise autochthonous biomarkers such as dinosterol, brassicasterol, and tetrahymanol and allochthonous biomarkers such as sitosterol, amyrenones, and n-alkanes. Eutrophication in Lake Constance started in the 1940's and reached its maximum in the 1970's as shown by the distribution of dinosterol, tetrahymanol and brassicasterol. The ratios of long- to short-chain alkanes display high values in historical flood layers. Land-plant derived sterols and amyrenones also reflect changes in autochthonous and allochthonous sedimentation. Leucocythere shows maximum abundances during the oligotrophic stage, Limnocythere prefers oligotrophic-mesotrophic lake water. During maximum eutrophication, species diversity is reduced to two species, Fabaeformiscandona and Cypria. The return to meso-oligotrophic conditions at the beginning of the 1990's allowed Limnocythere to recolonize the profundal, and provided optimum conditions for Cytherissa. Leucocythere on the other hand has not yet been able to return to the lake bottom. Stable oxygen and carbon isotopes from Limnocythere and Leucocythere are used to reconstruct changes in oxygen supply of the bottom waters that is ultimately controlled by the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  16. Flood frequency matters: Why climate change degrades deep-water quality of peri-alpine lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Gabriel; Wessels, Martin; Wüest, Alfred

    2016-09-01

    Sediment-laden riverine floods transport large quantities of dissolved oxygen into the receiving deep layers of lakes. Hence, the water quality of deep lakes is strongly influenced by the frequency of riverine floods. Although flood frequency reflects climate conditions, the effects of climate variability on the water quality of deep lakes is largely unknown. We quantified the effects of climate variability on the potential shifts in the flood regime of the Alpine Rhine, the main catchment of Lake Constance, and determined the intrusion depths of riverine density-driven underflows and the subsequent effects on water exchange rates in the lake. A simplified hydrodynamic underflow model was developed and validated with observed river inflow and underflow events. The model was implemented to estimate underflow statistics for different river inflow scenarios. Using this approach, we integrated present and possible future flood frequencies to underflow occurrences and intrusion depths in Lake Constance. The results indicate that more floods will increase the number of underflows and the intensity of deep-water renewal - and consequently will cause higher deep-water dissolved oxygen concentrations. Vice versa, fewer floods weaken deep-water renewal and lead to lower deep-water dissolved oxygen concentrations. Meanwhile, a change from glacial nival regime (present) to a nival pluvial regime (future) is expected to decrease deep-water renewal. While flood frequencies are not expected to change noticeably for the next decades, it is most likely that increased winter discharge and decreased summer discharge will reduce the number of deep density-driven underflows by 10% and favour shallower riverine interflows in the upper hypolimnion. The renewal in the deepest layers is expected to be reduced by nearly 27%. This study underlines potential consequences of climate change on the occurrence of deep river underflows and water residence times in deep lakes.

  17. A Molecular Phylogeny of Living Primates

    PubMed Central

    Perelman, Polina; Johnson, Warren E.; Roos, Christian; Seuánez, Hector N.; Horvath, Julie E.; Moreira, Miguel A. M.; Kessing, Bailey; Pontius, Joan; Roelke, Melody; Rumpler, Yves; Schneider, Maria Paula C.; Silva, Artur; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of primates offer considerable potential to define and understand the processes that mold, shape, and transform the human genome. However, primate taxonomy is both complex and controversial, with marginal unifying consensus of the evolutionary hierarchy of extant primate species. Here we provide new genomic sequence (∼8 Mb) from 186 primates representing 61 (∼90%) of the described genera, and we include outgroup species from Dermoptera, Scandentia, and Lagomorpha. The resultant phylogeny is exceptionally robust and illuminates events in primate evolution from ancient to recent, clarifying numerous taxonomic controversies and providing new data on human evolution. Ongoing speciation, reticulate evolution, ancient relic lineages, unequal rates of evolution, and disparate distributions of insertions/deletions among the reconstructed primate lineages are uncovered. Our resolution of the primate phylogeny provides an essential evolutionary framework with far-reaching applications including: human selection and adaptation, global emergence of zoonotic diseases, mammalian comparative genomics, primate taxonomy, and conservation of endangered species. PMID:21436896

  18. Taxonomic triage and the poverty of phylogeny.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Quentin D

    2004-01-01

    Revisionary taxonomy is frequently dismissed as merely descriptive, which belies its strong intellectual content and hypothesis-driven nature. Funding for taxonomy is inadequate and largely diverted to studies of phylogeny that neither improve classifications nor nomenclature. Phylogenetic classifications are optimal for storing and predicting information, but phylogeny divorced from taxonomy is ephemeral and erodes the accuracy and information content of the language of biology. Taxonomic revisions and monographs are efficient, high-throughput species hypothesis-testing devices that are ideal for the World Wide Web. Taxonomic knowledge remains essential to credible biological research and is made urgent by the biodiversity crisis. Theoretical and technological advances and threats of mass species extinctions indicate that this is the time for a renaissance in taxonomy. Clarity of vision and courage of purpose are needed from individual taxonomists and natural history museums to bring about this evolution of taxonomy into the information age. PMID:15253345

  19. Taxonomic triage and the poverty of phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Quentin D

    2004-04-29

    Revisionary taxonomy is frequently dismissed as merely descriptive, which belies its strong intellectual content and hypothesis-driven nature. Funding for taxonomy is inadequate and largely diverted to studies of phylogeny that neither improve classifications nor nomenclature. Phylogenetic classifications are optimal for storing and predicting information, but phylogeny divorced from taxonomy is ephemeral and erodes the accuracy and information content of the language of biology. Taxonomic revisions and monographs are efficient, high-throughput species hypothesis-testing devices that are ideal for the World Wide Web. Taxonomic knowledge remains essential to credible biological research and is made urgent by the biodiversity crisis. Theoretical and technological advances and threats of mass species extinctions indicate that this is the time for a renaissance in taxonomy. Clarity of vision and courage of purpose are needed from individual taxonomists and natural history museums to bring about this evolution of taxonomy into the information age.

  20. Phylogeny and evolution of RNA structure.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Tanja; Schuster, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Darwin's conviction that all living beings on Earth are related and the graph of relatedness is tree-shaped has been essentially confirmed by phylogenetic reconstruction first from morphology and later from data obtained by molecular sequencing. Limitations of the phylogenetic tree concept were recognized as more and more sequence information became available. The other path-breaking idea of Darwin, natural selection of fitter variants in populations, is cast into simple mathematical form and extended to mutation-selection dynamics. In this form the theory is directly applicable to RNA evolution in vitro and to virus evolution. Phylogeny and population dynamics of RNA provide complementary insights into evolution and the interplay between the two concepts will be pursued throughout this chapter. The two strategies for understanding evolution are ultimately related through the central paradigm of structural biology: sequence ⇒ structure ⇒ function. We elaborate on the state of the art in modeling both phylogeny and evolution of RNA driven by reproduction and mutation. Thereby the focus will be laid on models for phylogenetic sequence evolution as well as evolution and design of RNA structures with selected examples and notes on simulation methods. In the perspectives an attempt is made to combine molecular structure, population dynamics, and phylogeny in modeling evolution.

  1. Mammalian phylogeny reveals recent diversification rate shifts.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Tanja

    2011-04-12

    Phylogenetic trees of present-day species allow investigation of the rate of evolution that led to the present-day diversity. A recent analysis of the mammalian phylogeny challenged the view of explosive mammalian evolution after the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary (65 Mya). However, due to lack of appropriate methods, the diversification (speciation minus extinction) rates in the more recent past of mammalian evolution could not be determined. In this paper, I provide a method that reveals that the tempo of mammalian evolution did not change until ∼ 33 Mya. This constant period was followed by a peak of diversification rates between 33 and 30 Mya. Thereafter, diversification rates remained high and constant until 8.55 Mya. Diversification rates declined significantly at 8.55 and 3.35 Mya. Investigation of mammalian subgroups (marsupials, placentals, and the six largest placental subgroups) reveals that the diversification rate peak at 33-30 Mya is mainly driven by rodents, cetartiodactyla, and marsupials. The recent diversification rate decrease is significant for all analyzed subgroups but eulipotyphla, cetartiodactyla, and primates. My likelihood approach is not limited to mammalian evolution. It provides a robust framework to infer diversification rate changes and mass extinction events in phylogenies, reconstructed from, e.g., present-day species or virus data. In particular, the method is very robust toward noise and uncertainty in the phylogeny and can account for incomplete taxon sampling. PMID:21444816

  2. Perception-memory interactions reveal a computational strategy for perceptual constancy.

    PubMed

    Olkkonen, Maria; Saarela, Toni P; Allred, Sarah R

    2016-01-01

    A key challenge for the visual system is to extract constant object properties from incoming sensory information. This information is ambiguous because the same sensory signal can arise from many combinations of object properties and viewing conditions and noisy because of the variability in sensory encoding. The competing accounts for perceptual constancy of surface lightness fall into two classes of model: One derives lightness estimates from border contrasts, and another explicitly infers surface reflectance. To test these accounts, we combined a novel psychophysical task with probabilistic implementations of both models. Observers compared the lightness of two stimuli under a memory demand (a delay between the stimuli), a context change (different surround luminance), or both. Memory biased perceived lightness toward the mean of the whole stimulus ensemble. Context change caused the classical simultaneous lightness contrast effect, in which a target appears lighter against a dark surround and darker against a light surround. These effects were not independent: Combined memory load and context change elicited a bias smaller than predicted assuming an independent combination of biases. Both models explain the memory bias as an effect of prior expectations on perception. Both models also produce a context effect, but only the reflectance model correctly describes the magnitude. The reflectance model, finally, captures the memory-context interaction better than the contrast model, both qualitatively and quantitatively. We conclude that (a) lightness perception is more consistent with reflectance inference than contrast coding and (b) adding a memory demand to a perceptual task both renders it more ecologically valid and helps adjudicate between competing models.

  3. On the Basis of Synaptic Integration Constancy during Growth of a Neuronal Circuit.

    PubMed

    De-La-Rosa Tovar, Adriana; Mishra, Prashant K; De-Miguel, Francisco F

    2016-01-01

    We studied how a neuronal circuit composed of two neuron types connected by chemical and electrical synapses maintains constant its integrative capacities as neurons grow. For this we combined electrophysiological experiments with mathematical modeling in pairs of electrically-coupled Retzius neurons from postnatal to adult leeches. The electrically-coupled dendrites of both Retzius neurons receive a common chemical input, which produces excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) with varying amplitudes. Each EPSP spreads to the soma, but also crosses the electrical synapse to arrive at the soma of the coupled neuron. The leak of synaptic current across the electrical synapse reduces the amplitude of the EPSPs in proportion to the coupling ratio. In addition, summation of EPSPs generated in both neurons generates the baseline action potentials of these serotonergic neurons. To study how integration is adjusted as neurons grow, we first studied the characteristics of the chemical and electrical connections onto the coupled dendrites of neuron pairs with soma diameters ranging from 21 to 75 μm. Then by feeding a mathematical model with the neuronal voltage responses to pseudorandom noise currents we obtained the values of the coupling ratio, the membrane resistance of the soma (rm ) and dendrites (r dend), the space constant (λ) and the characteristic dendritic length (L = l/λ). We found that the EPSPs recorded from the somata were similar regardless on the neuron size. However, the amplitude of the EPSPs and the firing frequency of the neurons were inversely proportional to the coupling ratio of the neuron pair, which also was independent from the neuronal size. This data indicated that the integrative constancy relied on the passive membrane properties. We show that the growth of Retzius neurons was compensated by increasing the membrane resistance of the dendrites and therefore the λ value. By solely increasing the dendrite resistance this circuit maintains

  4. On the Basis of Synaptic Integration Constancy during Growth of a Neuronal Circuit

    PubMed Central

    De-La-Rosa Tovar, Adriana; Mishra, Prashant K.; De-Miguel, Francisco F.

    2016-01-01

    We studied how a neuronal circuit composed of two neuron types connected by chemical and electrical synapses maintains constant its integrative capacities as neurons grow. For this we combined electrophysiological experiments with mathematical modeling in pairs of electrically-coupled Retzius neurons from postnatal to adult leeches. The electrically-coupled dendrites of both Retzius neurons receive a common chemical input, which produces excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) with varying amplitudes. Each EPSP spreads to the soma, but also crosses the electrical synapse to arrive at the soma of the coupled neuron. The leak of synaptic current across the electrical synapse reduces the amplitude of the EPSPs in proportion to the coupling ratio. In addition, summation of EPSPs generated in both neurons generates the baseline action potentials of these serotonergic neurons. To study how integration is adjusted as neurons grow, we first studied the characteristics of the chemical and electrical connections onto the coupled dendrites of neuron pairs with soma diameters ranging from 21 to 75 μm. Then by feeding a mathematical model with the neuronal voltage responses to pseudorandom noise currents we obtained the values of the coupling ratio, the membrane resistance of the soma (rm) and dendrites (rdend), the space constant (λ) and the characteristic dendritic length (L = l/λ). We found that the EPSPs recorded from the somata were similar regardless on the neuron size. However, the amplitude of the EPSPs and the firing frequency of the neurons were inversely proportional to the coupling ratio of the neuron pair, which also was independent from the neuronal size. This data indicated that the integrative constancy relied on the passive membrane properties. We show that the growth of Retzius neurons was compensated by increasing the membrane resistance of the dendrites and therefore the λ value. By solely increasing the dendrite resistance this circuit maintains

  5. ON THE CONSTANCY OF THE ELECTRON TEMPERATURE IN THE EXPANDING CORONA THROUGHOUT SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw; Druckmueller, Miloslav; Ding, Adalbert

    2010-03-10

    A recent analysis of Fe emission lines observed during the total solar eclipses of 2006 March 29 and 2008 August 1 established the first empirical link between the electron temperature in the expanding corona and Fe charge states measured in interplanetary space. In this Letter, we use this link to infer this temperature throughout solar cycle 23 from in situ charge state measurements from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and on Ulysses. The distribution of the SWICS/ACE Fe charge states, which span cycle 23 from 1998 to 2009, is skewed with a peak centered on Fe{sup 8+}, Fe{sup 9+}, and Fe{sup 10+} and a tail spanning Fe{sup 12+} to Fe{sup 20+}. An iterative process based on this distribution and on the Fe ion fraction as a function of electron temperature yields a narrow peak at 1.1 x 10{sup 6} K. The tail in the measured charge state distribution is attributed to the sporadic release of material hotter than 2 x 10{sup 6} K from closed magnetic structures within the bulges of streamers. The Fe Ulysses charge state measurements between 1992 and 1997 from cycle 22 peaked at Fe{sup 11+}, indicative of a slightly higher temperature of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} K. The relative constancy of the electron temperature in the expanding corona throughout solar cycle 23 points to the presence of an unknown mechanism regulating the energy input to electrons in the acceleration region of the solar wind at all latitudes during this cycle.

  6. Extinction rates can be estimated from molecular phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Nee, S; Holmes, E C; May, R M; Harvey, P H

    1994-04-29

    Molecular phylogenies can be used to reject null models of the way we think evolution occurred, including patterns of lineage extinction. They can also be used to provide maximum likelihood estimates of parameters associated with lineage birth and death rates. We illustrate: (i) how molecular phylogenies provide information about the extent to which particular clades are likely to be under threat from extinction; (ii) how cursory analyses of molecular phylogenies can lead to incorrect conclusions about the evolutionary processes that have been at work; and (iii) how different evolutionary processes leave distinctive marks on the structure of reconstructed phylogenies.

  7. Target recognitions in multiple-camera closed-circuit television using color constancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soori, Umair; Yuen, Peter; Han, Ji Wen; Ibrahim, Izzati; Chen, Wentao; Hong, Kan; Merfort, Christian; James, David; Richardson, Mark

    2013-04-01

    People tracking in crowded scenes from closed-circuit television (CCTV) footage has been a popular and challenging task in computer vision. Due to the limited spatial resolution in the CCTV footage, the color of people's dress may offer an alternative feature for their recognition and tracking. However, there are many factors, such as variable illumination conditions, viewing angles, and camera calibration, that may induce illusive modification of intrinsic color signatures of the target. Our objective is to recognize and track targets in multiple camera views using color as the detection feature, and to understand if a color constancy (CC) approach may help to reduce these color illusions due to illumination and camera artifacts and thereby improve target recognition performance. We have tested a number of CC algorithms using various color descriptors to assess the efficiency of target recognition from a real multicamera Imagery Library for Intelligent Detection Systems (i-LIDS) data set. Various classifiers have been used for target detection, and the figure of merit to assess the efficiency of target recognition is achieved through the area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUROC). We have proposed two modifications of luminance-based CC algorithms: one with a color transfer mechanism and the other using a pixel-wise sigmoid function for an adaptive dynamic range compression, a method termed enhanced luminance reflectance CC (ELRCC). We found that both algorithms improve the efficiency of target recognitions substantially better than that of the raw data without CC treatment, and in some cases the ELRCC improves target tracking by over 100% within the AUROC assessment metric. The performance of the ELRCC has been assessed over 10 selected targets from three different camera views of the i-LIDS footage, and the averaged target recognition efficiency over all these targets is found to be improved by about 54% in AUROC after the data are processed by

  8. Principles of lake sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Janasson, L.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive outline on the basic sedimentological principles for lakes, and focuses on environmental aspects and matters related to lake management and control-on lake ecology rather than lake geology. This is a guide for those who plan, perform and evaluate lake sedimentological investigations. Contents abridged: Lake types and sediment types. Sedimentation in lakes and water dynamics. Lake bottom dynamics. Sediment dynamics and sediment age. Sediments in aquatic pollution control programmes. Subject index.

  9. [Phylogeny and divergence time estimation of Schizothoracinae fishes in Xinjiang].

    PubMed

    Ayelhan, Haysa; Guo, Yan; Meng, Wei; Yang, Tianyan; Ma, Yanwu

    2014-10-01

    Based on combined data of mitochondrial COI, ND4 and 16S RNA genes, molecular phylogeny of 4 genera, 10 species or subspecies of Schizothoracinae fishes distributed in Xinjiang were analyzed. The molecular clock was calibrated by divergence time of Cyprininae and geological segregation event between the upper Yellow River and Qinghai Lake. Divergence time of Schizothoracinae fishes was calculated, and its relationship with the major geological events and the climate changes in surrounding areas of Tarim Basin was discussed. The results showed that genus Aspiorhynchus did not form an independent clade, but clustered with Schizothorax biddulphi and S. irregularis. Kimura 2-parameter model was used to calculate the genetic distance of COI gene, the genetic distance between genus Aspiorhynchus and Schizothorax did not reach genus level, and Aspiorhynchus laticeps might be a specialized species of genus Schizothorax. Cluster analysis showed a different result with morphological classification method, and it did not support the subgenus division of Schizothorax fishes. Divergence of two groups of primitive Schizothoracinae (8.18Ma) and divergence of Gymnodiptychus dybowskii and Diptychus maculates (7.67Ma) occurred in late Miocene, which might be related with the separation of Kunlun Mountain and north Tianshan Mountain River system that was caused by the uplift of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and Tianshan Mountain, and the aridification of Tarim Basin. The terrain of Tarim Basin that was affected by Quaternary Himalayan movement was high in west but low in east, as a result, Lop Nor became the center of surrounding mountain rivers in Tarim Basin, which shaped the distribution pattern of genus Schizothorax. PMID:25406249

  10. [Phylogeny and divergence time estimation of Schizothoracinae fishes in Xinjiang].

    PubMed

    Ayelhan, Haysa; Guo, Yan; Meng, Wei; Yang, Tianyan; Ma, Yanwu

    2014-10-01

    Based on combined data of mitochondrial COI, ND4 and 16S RNA genes, molecular phylogeny of 4 genera, 10 species or subspecies of Schizothoracinae fishes distributed in Xinjiang were analyzed. The molecular clock was calibrated by divergence time of Cyprininae and geological segregation event between the upper Yellow River and Qinghai Lake. Divergence time of Schizothoracinae fishes was calculated, and its relationship with the major geological events and the climate changes in surrounding areas of Tarim Basin was discussed. The results showed that genus Aspiorhynchus did not form an independent clade, but clustered with Schizothorax biddulphi and S. irregularis. Kimura 2-parameter model was used to calculate the genetic distance of COI gene, the genetic distance between genus Aspiorhynchus and Schizothorax did not reach genus level, and Aspiorhynchus laticeps might be a specialized species of genus Schizothorax. Cluster analysis showed a different result with morphological classification method, and it did not support the subgenus division of Schizothorax fishes. Divergence of two groups of primitive Schizothoracinae (8.18Ma) and divergence of Gymnodiptychus dybowskii and Diptychus maculates (7.67Ma) occurred in late Miocene, which might be related with the separation of Kunlun Mountain and north Tianshan Mountain River system that was caused by the uplift of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and Tianshan Mountain, and the aridification of Tarim Basin. The terrain of Tarim Basin that was affected by Quaternary Himalayan movement was high in west but low in east, as a result, Lop Nor became the center of surrounding mountain rivers in Tarim Basin, which shaped the distribution pattern of genus Schizothorax.

  11. Detecting Macroevolutionary Self-Destruction from Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Bromham, Lindell; Hua, Xia; Cardillo, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses have lent support to the concept of lineage selection: that biological lineages can have heritable traits that influence their capacity to persist and diversify, and thereby affect their representation in biodiversity. While many discussions have focused on "positive" lineage selection, where stably heritable properties of lineages enhance their diversification rate, there are also intriguing examples that seem to represent "negative" lineage selection, where traits reduce the likelihood that a lineage will persist or speciate. In this article, we test whether a particular pattern of negative lineage selection is detectable from the distributions of the trait on a phylogeny. "Self-destructive" traits are those that arise often but then disappear again because they confer either a raised extinction rate or they are prone to a high rate of trait loss. For such a trait, the reconstructed origins will tend to be dispersed across the tips of the phylogeny, rather than defining large clades of related lineages that all share the trait. We examine the utility of four possible measures of "tippiness" as potential indicators of macroevolutionary self-destruction, applying them to phylogenies on which trait evolution has been simulated under different combinations of parameters for speciation, extinction, trait gain, and trait loss. We use an efficient simulation approach that starts with the required number of tips with and without the trait and uses a model to work "backwards" to construct different possible trees that result in that set of tips. We then apply these methods to a number of case studies: salt tolerance in grasses, color polymorphism in birds of prey, and selfing in nightshades. We find that the relative age of species, measured from tip length, can indicate a reduced speciation rate but does not identify traits that increase the extinction rate or the trait loss rate. We show that it is possible to detect cases of macroevolutionary self

  12. Detecting Macroevolutionary Self-Destruction from Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Bromham, Lindell; Hua, Xia; Cardillo, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses have lent support to the concept of lineage selection: that biological lineages can have heritable traits that influence their capacity to persist and diversify, and thereby affect their representation in biodiversity. While many discussions have focused on "positive" lineage selection, where stably heritable properties of lineages enhance their diversification rate, there are also intriguing examples that seem to represent "negative" lineage selection, where traits reduce the likelihood that a lineage will persist or speciate. In this article, we test whether a particular pattern of negative lineage selection is detectable from the distributions of the trait on a phylogeny. "Self-destructive" traits are those that arise often but then disappear again because they confer either a raised extinction rate or they are prone to a high rate of trait loss. For such a trait, the reconstructed origins will tend to be dispersed across the tips of the phylogeny, rather than defining large clades of related lineages that all share the trait. We examine the utility of four possible measures of "tippiness" as potential indicators of macroevolutionary self-destruction, applying them to phylogenies on which trait evolution has been simulated under different combinations of parameters for speciation, extinction, trait gain, and trait loss. We use an efficient simulation approach that starts with the required number of tips with and without the trait and uses a model to work "backwards" to construct different possible trees that result in that set of tips. We then apply these methods to a number of case studies: salt tolerance in grasses, color polymorphism in birds of prey, and selfing in nightshades. We find that the relative age of species, measured from tip length, can indicate a reduced speciation rate but does not identify traits that increase the extinction rate or the trait loss rate. We show that it is possible to detect cases of macroevolutionary self

  13. Transformation of the Visual Afterimage Under Subject's Eye and Body Movements and the Visual Field Constancy Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zenkin, Gary M; Petrov, Alexander P

    2015-01-01

    Two types of positive afterimages differing in their structural complexity--called poor and rich--were used to investigate the visual field constancy mechanisms during eye and head movements. In the case of a poor afterimage, consistent with Emmert's law, every eye and head movement caused the afterimage to appear moving (in exactly the same way), unlike a real object, which appeared to remain stationary during those same eye and head movements (although its retinal image moved opposite to the eye movement). However, in the case of a rich afterimage, the afterimage appeared stationary during eye movements, while a small stationary test light in the real space appeared to move, violating Emmert's law. It is suggested that, in these two cases, the different apparent transformations reflected functioning of different constancy mechanisms. Both mechanisms implement projection of retinal images upon a hypothetical constant visual screen in strict accordance with the subject's movements but in two different ways. The experiments have indicated that, during binocular fusion, the visual afferent system is able to use information from the structural organization of the visual flow to implement the visual field stability and to calculate gaze direction independently of proprioceptive signals. PMID:26562912

  14. Optical angular constancy is maintained as a navigational control strategy when pursuing robots moving along complex pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; McBeath, Michael K; Sugar, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    The optical navigational control strategy used to intercept moving targets was explored using a real-world object that travels along complex, evasive pathways. Fielders ran across a gymnasium attempting to catch a moving robot that varied in speed and direction, while ongoing position was measured using an infrared motion-capture system. Fielder running paths were compared with the predictions of three lateral control models, each based on maintaining a particular optical angle relative to the robotic target: (a) constant alignment angle (CAA), (b) constant eccentricity angle (CEA), and (c) linear optical trajectory (LOT). Findings reveal that running pathways were most consistent with maintenance of LOT and least consistent with CEA. This supports that fielders use the same optical control strategy of maintaining angular constancy using a LOT when navigating toward targets moving along complex pathways as when intercepting simple ballistic trajectories. In those cases in which a target dramatically deviates from its optical path, fielders appear to simply reset LOT parameters using a new constant angle value. Maintenance of such optical angular constancy has now been shown to work well with ballistic, complex, and evasive moving targets, confirming the LOT strategy as a robust, general-purpose optical control mechanism for navigating to intercept catchable targets, both airborne and ground based. PMID:25805176

  15. Illuminant estimation for color constancy: why spatial-domain methods work and the role of the color distribution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dongliang; Prasad, Dilip K; Brown, Michael S

    2014-05-01

    Color constancy is a well-studied topic in color vision. Methods are generally categorized as (1) low-level statistical methods, (2) gamut-based methods, and (3) learning-based methods. In this work, we distinguish methods depending on whether they work directly from color values (i.e., color domain) or from values obtained from the image's spatial information (e.g., image gradients/frequencies). We show that spatial information does not provide any additional information that cannot be obtained directly from the color distribution and that the indirect aim of spatial-domain methods is to obtain large color differences for estimating the illumination direction. This finding allows us to develop a simple and efficient illumination estimation method that chooses bright and dark pixels using a projection distance in the color distribution and then applies principal component analysis to estimate the illumination direction. Our method gives state-of-the-art results on existing public color constancy datasets as well as on our newly collected dataset (NUS dataset) containing 1736 images from eight different high-end consumer cameras.

  16. Optical angular constancy is maintained as a navigational control strategy when pursuing robots moving along complex pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; McBeath, Michael K; Sugar, Thomas G

    2015-03-24

    The optical navigational control strategy used to intercept moving targets was explored using a real-world object that travels along complex, evasive pathways. Fielders ran across a gymnasium attempting to catch a moving robot that varied in speed and direction, while ongoing position was measured using an infrared motion-capture system. Fielder running paths were compared with the predictions of three lateral control models, each based on maintaining a particular optical angle relative to the robotic target: (a) constant alignment angle (CAA), (b) constant eccentricity angle (CEA), and (c) linear optical trajectory (LOT). Findings reveal that running pathways were most consistent with maintenance of LOT and least consistent with CEA. This supports that fielders use the same optical control strategy of maintaining angular constancy using a LOT when navigating toward targets moving along complex pathways as when intercepting simple ballistic trajectories. In those cases in which a target dramatically deviates from its optical path, fielders appear to simply reset LOT parameters using a new constant angle value. Maintenance of such optical angular constancy has now been shown to work well with ballistic, complex, and evasive moving targets, confirming the LOT strategy as a robust, general-purpose optical control mechanism for navigating to intercept catchable targets, both airborne and ground based.

  17. Lake Powell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The white ring around Lake Powell tells the story. The surface is down 98 feet. This is critical, because Powell, Lake Mead, and other lakes along the Colorado River provide water for millions of people in five states. We are in the eighth year of a drought on the Colorado River. This year was the driest year ever reported in Southern California, and there is a severe drought in Northern California, down to less than 30-percent of snow pack. This ASTER image of part of Lake Powell was acquired in 2001. The gray area depicts the shrunken, reduced 2007 lake extent compared to the extended, larger black area in 2001.

    The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km, and is centered near 37.1 degrees north latitude, 111.3 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  18. Minimum Contradiction Matrices in Whole Genome Phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Thuillard, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Minimum contradiction matrices are a useful complement to distance-based phylogenies. A minimum contradiction matrix represents phylogenetic information under the form of an ordered distance matrix Yi, jn. A matrix element corresponds to the distance from a reference vertex n to the path (i, j). For an X-tree or a split network, the minimum contradiction matrix is a Robinson matrix. It therefore fulfills all the inequalities defining perfect order: Yi, jn ≥ Yi,kn, Yk jn ≥ Yk, In, i ≤ j ≤ k < n. In real phylogenetic data, some taxa may contradict the inequalities for perfect order. Contradictions to perfect order correspond to deviations from a tree or from a split network topology. Efficient algorithms that search for the best order are presented and tested on whole genome phylogenies with 184 taxa including many Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota. After optimization, taxa are classified in their correct domain and phyla. Several significant deviations from perfect order correspond to well-documented evolutionary events. PMID:19204821

  19. Towards a mitogenomic phylogeny of Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Lees, David C; Simonsen, Thomas J

    2014-10-01

    The backbone phylogeny of Lepidoptera remains unresolved, despite strenuous recent morphological and molecular efforts. Molecular studies have focused on nuclear protein coding genes, sometimes adding a single mitochondrial gene. Recent advances in sequencing technology have, however, made acquisition of entire mitochondrial genomes both practical and economically viable. Prior phylogenetic studies utilised just eight of 43 currently recognised lepidopteran superfamilies. Here, we add 23 full and six partial mitochondrial genomes (comprising 22 superfamilies of which 16 are newly represented) to those publically available for a total of 24 superfamilies and ask whether such a sample can resolve deeper lepidopteran phylogeny. Using recoded datasets we obtain topologies that are highly congruent with prior nuclear and/or morphological studies. Our study shows support for an expanded Obtectomera including Gelechioidea, Thyridoidea, plume moths (Alucitoidea and Pterophoroidea; possibly along with Epermenioidea), Papilionoidea, Pyraloidea, Mimallonoidea and Macroheterocera. Regarding other controversially positioned higher taxa, Doidae is supported within the new concept of Drepanoidea and Mimallonidae sister to (or part of) Macroheterocera, while among Nymphalidae butterflies, Danainae and not Libytheinae are sister to the remainder of the family. At the deepest level, we suggest that a tRNA rearrangement occurred at a node between Adeloidea and Ditrysia+Palaephatidae+Tischeriidae.

  20. Molecular phylogeny of the blowfly genus Chrysomya.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Kurahashi, H; Wells, J D

    2011-06-01

    Chrysomya Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Calliphoridae) is a genus of blowfly commonly observed in tropical and subtropical countries of the Old World. Species in this genus are vectors of bacteria, protozoans and helminths, cause myiasis, are predators of other carrion insects, and are important forensic indicators. Hypotheses concerning the evolution of sex determination, larval anatomy and genome size in Chrysomya have been difficult to evaluate because a robust phylogeny of the genus was lacking. Similarly, the monophyly of subgenera was uncertain. The phylogeny of Chrysomya spp. was reconstructed based on 2386 bp of combined mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and nuclear carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS) genes. Maximum parsimony (MP), maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian analysis (BA) differed only slightly in the resulting tree topology. Chrysomya was monophyletic. Monogenic reproduction is almost certainly derived rather than, as has been suggested, primitive within the genus, and tuberculate larvae probably evolved twice. Genome size is more likely to have decreased over evolutionary time rather than, as has been suggested, increased within the genus, but its correlation with developmental time was not observed. The subgenera Microcalliphora, Eucompsomyia and Achoetandrus were recovered as monophyletic.

  1. A molecular phylogeny of two extinct sloths.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, A D; Castresana, J; Feldmaier-Fuchs, G; Pääbo, S

    2001-01-01

    Xenarthra (Edentata) is an extremely diverse mammalian order whose modern representatives are the armadillos, anteaters, and sloths. The phylogeny of these groups is poorly resolved. This is particularly true for the sloths (phyllophagans), originally a large and diverse group now reduced to two genera in two different families. Both morphological analyses and molecular analyses of rDNA genes of living and extinct sloths have been used with limited success to elucidate their phylogeny. In an attempt to clarify relationships among the sloths, DNA was extracted and mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences were determined from representatives of two extinct groups of sloths (Mylodontidae and Megatheriidae), their two living relatives (two-toed sloths [Megalonychidae], three-toed sloths [Bradypodidae]), anteaters and armadillos. A consistent feature of the latter two species was the nuclear copies of cytochrome b gene sequences. Several methods of phylogenetic reconstruction were applied to the sequences determined, and the results were compared with 12S rDNA sequences obtained in previous studies. The cytochrome b gene exhibited a phylogenetic resolving power similar to that of the 12S rDNA sequences. When both data sets were combined, they tended to support the grouping of two-toed sloths with mylodontids and three-toed sloths with megatheriids. The results strengthen the view that the two families of living sloths adapted independently to an arboreal life-style.

  2. Progress in nemertean biology: development and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Turbeville, J M

    2002-07-01

    This paper reviews progress in developmental biology and phylogeny of the Nemertea, a common but poorly studied spiralian taxon of considerable ecological and evolutionary significance. Analyses of reproductive biology (including calcium dynamics during fertilization and oocyte maturation), larval morphology and development and developmental genetics have significantly extended our knowledge of spiralian developmental biology. Developmental genetics studies have in addition provided characters useful for reconstructing metazoan phylogeny. Reinvestigation of the cell lineage of Cerebratulus lacteus using fluorescent tracers revealed that endomesoderm forms from the 4d cell as in other spiralians and that ectomesoderm is derived from the 3a and 3b cells as in annelids, echiurans and molluscs. Studies examining blastomere specification show that cell fates are established precociously in direct developers and later in indirect developers. Morphological characters used to estimate the phylogenetic position of nemerteans are critically re-evaluated, and cladistic analyses of morphology reveal that conflicting hypotheses of nemertean relationships result because of different provisional homology statements. Analyses that include disputed homology statements (1, gliointerstitial cell system 2, coelomic circulatory system) suggest that nemerteans form the sister taxon to the coelomate spiralian taxa rather than the sister taxon to Platyhelminthes. Analyses of small subunit rRNA (18S rDNA) sequences alone or in combination with morphological characters support the inclusion of the nemerteans in a spiralian coelomate clade nested within a more inclusive lophotrochozoan clade. Ongoing evaluation of nemertean relationships with mitochondrial gene rearrangements and other molecular characters is discussed.

  3. Progress in understanding the phylogeny of flagellates.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, M A

    1995-01-01

    Heterotrophic free-living flagellates appear to provide the ancestry for all other eukaryote groups. Not only are the oldest surviving anaerobic eukaryotes flagellated protists, but also there appear to be survivors of a lineage of flagellate forms which could have been close to the sources of the main branches of eukaryote evolution. These 'stem' forms of flagellates developed more complex flagellation with anchoring fibres which became the main components of the cytoskeleton and supported the cytostome; by their phagotrophic activities these flagellates established symbiotic relationships, first with aerobic bacteria to form mitochondria, and later with various forms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic algal cells to form chloroplasts of a variety of types having different pigments, different structure and different food storage patterns. The specific patterns of flagellation, cytoskeleton, cytostome, secreted surface structures and cell aggregation into colonies enable groups of organisms to be recognised, whose most primitive survivors in almost all cases are heterotrophic flagellates. The current view of the phylogeny of eukaryotes suggests that heterotrophic flagellates have provided the origins of all major eukaryote groups, and that the phylogeny of these flagellates is the key to understanding the evolution of all eukaryotes. We anticipate that further rRNA analyses, supported by ultrastructural data, will confirm the central role played by these flagellates in eukaryote evolution.

  4. Phylogeny, host-parasite relationship and zoogeography

    PubMed Central

    1999-01-01

    Phylogeny is the evolutionary history of a group or the lineage of organisms and is reconstructed based on morphological, molecular and other characteristics. The genealogical relationship of a group of taxa is often expressed as a phylogenetic tree. The difficulty in categorizing the phylogeny is mainly due to the existence of frequent homoplasies that deceive observers. At the present time, cladistic analysis is believed to be one of the most effective methods of reconstructing a phylogenetic tree. Excellent computer program software for phylogenetic analysis is available. As an example, cladistic analysis was applied for nematode genera of the family Acuariidae, and the phylogenetic tree formed was compared with the system used currently. Nematodes in the genera Nippostrongylus and Heligmonoides were also analyzed, and the validity of the reconstructed phylogenetic trees was observed from a zoogeographical point of view. Some of the theories of parasite evolution were briefly reviewed as well. Coevolution of parasites and humans was discussed with special reference to the evolutionary relationship between Enterobius and primates. PMID:10634036

  5. Evolution, phylogeny, and molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Alexandra; Gomes, João P

    2014-04-01

    The Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular bacteria characterized by a unique biphasic developmental cycle. It encompasses the single genus Chlamydia, which involves nine species that affect a wide range of vertebral hosts, causing infections with serious impact on human health (mainly due to Chlamydia trachomatis infections) and on farming and veterinary industries. It is believed that Chlamydiales originated ∼700mya, whereas C. trachomatis likely split from the other Chlamydiaceae during the last 6mya. This corresponds to the emergence of modern human lineages, with the first descriptions of chlamydial infections as ancient as four millennia. Chlamydiaceae have undergone a massive genome reduction, on behalf of the deletional bias "use it or lose it", stabilizing at 1-1.2Mb and keeping a striking genome synteny. Their phylogeny reveals species segregation according to biological properties, with huge differences in terms of host range, tissue tropism, and disease outcomes. Genome differences rely on the occurrence of mutations in the >700 orthologous genes, as well as on events of recombination, gene loss, inversion, and paralogous expansion, affecting both a hypervariable region named the plasticity zone, and genes essentially encoding polymorphic and transmembrane head membrane proteins, type III secretion effectors and some metabolic pathways. Procedures for molecular typing are still not consensual but have allowed the knowledge of molecular epidemiology patterns for some species as well as the identification of outbreaks and emergence of successful clones for C. trachomatis. This manuscript intends to provide a comprehensive review on the evolution, phylogeny, and molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia.

  6. A Guide to the Natural History of Freshwater Lake Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Ryan J.; Jones, Stuart E.; Eiler, Alexander; McMahon, Katherine D.; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Freshwater bacteria are at the hub of biogeochemical cycles and control water quality in lakes. Despite this, little is known about the identity and ecology of functionally significant lake bacteria. Molecular studies have identified many abundant lake bacteria, but there is a large variation in the taxonomic or phylogenetic breadths among the methods used for this exploration. Because of this, an inconsistent and overlapping naming structure has developed for freshwater bacteria, creating a significant obstacle to identifying coherent ecological traits among these groups. A discourse that unites the field is sorely needed. Here we present a new freshwater lake phylogeny constructed from all published 16S rRNA gene sequences from lake epilimnia and propose a unifying vocabulary to discuss freshwater taxa. With this new vocabulary in place, we review the current information on the ecology, ecophysiology, and distribution of lake bacteria and highlight newly identified phylotypes. In the second part of our review, we conduct meta-analyses on the compiled data, identifying distribution patterns for bacterial phylotypes among biomes and across environmental gradients in lakes. We conclude by emphasizing the role that this review can play in providing a coherent framework for future studies. PMID:21372319

  7. Interracial Contact and Racial Constancy: A Multi-Site Study of Racial Intergroup Bias in 3-5 Year Old Anglo-British Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutland, Adam; Cameron, Lindsey; Bennett, Laura; Ferrell, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This paper examined the influence of interracial contact and racial constancy on the racial intergroup bias of young Anglo-British children. This multi-site study was conducted in areas of Great Britain that varied in terms of racial diversity. The study also investigated whether preschool children express bias on positive, but not negative,…

  8. Investigation of Color Constancy in 4.5-Month-Old Infants under a Strict Control of Luminance Contrast for Individual Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jiale; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Kuriki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined color constancy in infants using a familiarization paradigm. We first obtained isoluminance in each infant as defined by the minimum motion paradigm and used these data to control the luminance of stimuli in the main experiments. In the familiarization phase of the main experiment, two identical smiling face patterns…

  9. Molecular phylogeny of extant equids and effects of ancestral polymorphism in resolving species-level phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Cynthia C; Mitelberg, Anna; Tursi, Rosanna; Ryder, Oliver A

    2012-11-01

    Short divergence times and processes such as incomplete lineage sorting and species hybridization are known to hinder the inference of species-level phylogenies due to the lack of sufficient informative genetic variation or the presence of shared but incongruent polymorphism among taxa. Extant equids (horses, zebras, and asses) are an example of a recently evolved group of mammals with an unresolved phylogeny, despite a large number of molecular studies. Previous surveys have proposed trees with rather poorly supported nodes, and the bias caused by genetic introgression or ancestral polymorphism has not been assessed. Here we studied the phylogenetic relationships of all extant species of Equidae by analyzing 22 partial mitochondrial and nuclear genes using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inferences that account for heterogeneous gene histories. We also examined genetic signatures of lineage sorting and/or genetic introgression in zebras by evaluating patterns of intraspecific genetic variation. Our study improved the resolution and support of the Equus phylogeny and in particular the controversial positions of the African wild ass (E. asinus) and mountain zebra (E. zebra): the African wild ass is placed as a sister species of the Asiatic asses and the mountain zebra as the sister taxon of Grevy's and Burchell's zebras. A shared polymorphism (indel) detected among zebra species in the Estrogen receptor 1 gene was likely due to incomplete lineage sorting and not genetic introgression as also indicated by other mitochondrial (Cytochrome b) and nuclear (Y chromosome and microsatellites) markers. Ancestral polymorphism in equids might have contributed to the long-standing lack of clarity in the phylogeny of this highly threatened group of mammals.

  10. Biomass Size Spectra and Plankton Diversity in a Shallow Eutrophic Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaedke, Ursula; Seifried, Angelika; Adrian, Rita

    2004-01-01

    Biomass size spectra collate structural and functional attributes of plankton communities enabling standardised temporal and cross-system comparisons and may be rapidly obtained by automated particle counters. To examine how differences in plankton communities from highly eutrophic and more oligotrophic lakes are reflected in size spectra, a three-year time series of biomass size spectra was established for polymictic, eutrophic Lake Müggelsee, based on approximately weekly sampling and microscopic enumeration. The continuous but often bumpy size spectra reflected appropriately the seasonal and trophy-related variations in the plankton composition and growth conditions and the potential impact of daphnids on smaller plankton. We tested the hypothesis that more diverse plankton communities have smoother size spectra than impoverished ones. The spectra of Lake Müggelsee and other more or less eutrophic lakes covaried roughly with the functional diversity in total plankton composition but were unrelated to taxonomical diversity within the phyto- or mesozooplankton. The slopes of the normalised size spectra of Lake Müggelsee were generally more negative than -1, exhibited a recurrent seasonal pattern and were strongly correlated with crustacean biomass. In contrast to less eutrophic systems, slopes could not be used to quantify energy fluxes within the food web due to highly variable algal P/B ratios and frequently bumpy size distributions. The latter indicated stronger deviations from the ideal concept of a steady energy flow along the size gradient than found in e.g. large, mesotrophic Lake Constance. (

  11. New culturing studies of various haptophyte algae: The role of phylogeny on the alkenone paleothermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker Karega, I. I.; D'Andrea, W. J.; Juhl, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Alkenone paleothermometry (via the Uk37and UK'37 indices) is widely used to reconstruct sea surface temperature and, more recently, lake water temperature. Genetic analyses indicate that there is a diversity of different alkenone-producing lacustrine haptophytes, and differences among UK37-temperature calibrations suggest that unique calibrations might be required to quantify past temperature variation from individual lakes. The only term needed to quantify UK37-inferred temperature relative to a reference period (e.g., modern temperature, or 20th Century mean temperature) is the slope of the calibration regression: UK37-temperature sensitivity (i.e., the change in UK37 per °C temperature change). Here, we present new data developed by culturing four different species of alkenone-producing haptophyte algae across a range of temperatures (6-30 °C) and light levels (20-200 mE). The simultaneous culture of four distinct species allows direct comparison of the absolute quantities of alkenones and alkenoates, as well as other lipids, produced by different species of haptophytes under identical environmental conditions. Our results indicate that algal growth rate, when controlled by light intensity, has no impact on values. As expected, we find that growth temperature controls both the degree of alkenone unsaturation and the relative production of alkenones vs. alkenoates in all four species. Importantly, comparison of the four UK37-temperature calibrations resulting from our experiments with preexisting calibrations supports the hypothesis that UK37-temperature sensitivity is controlled by phylogeny. Therefore, even in the absence of a site-specific calibration, this term can be used to quantify past temperature variation from lake sediments if the genetic identity of the lake's alkenone-producer is known.

  12. Conquest of the deep, old and cold: an exceptional limpet radiation in Lake Baikal

    PubMed Central

    Stelbrink, Björn; Shirokaya, Alena A.; Clewing, Catharina; Sitnikova, Tatiana Y.; Prozorova, Larisa A.; Albrecht, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest, oldest and most speciose ancient lake in the world. The lake is characterized by high levels of molluscan species richness and endemicity, including the limpet family Acroloxidae with 25 endemic species. Members of this group generally inhabit the littoral zone, but have been recently found in the abyssal zone at hydrothermal vents and oil-seeps. Here, we use mitochondrial and nuclear data to provide a first molecular phylogeny of the Lake Baikal limpet radiation, and to date the beginning of intra-lacustrine diversification. Divergence time estimates suggest a considerably younger age for the species flock compared with lake age estimates, and the beginning of extensive diversification is possibly related to rapid deepening and cooling during rifting. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence time estimates do not clearly indicate when exactly the abyssal was colonized but suggest a timeframe coincident with the formation of the abyssal in the northern basin (Middle to Late Pleistocene). PMID:26202427

  13. Constancy of target velocity as a critical factor in the emergence of auditory and visual representational momentum.

    PubMed

    Getzmann, Stephan; Lewald, Jörg

    2009-03-01

    Representational momentum refers to the tendency to displace the judged final position of a moving auditory or visual target as being too far forward along the path of motion. This phenomenon was investigated here by comparing apparent displacements in final position with constant or with irregularly varying target velocities. Final positions of auditory or visual targets, moving along the horizontal plane, were indicated by manual pointing. In both modalities, we found a significantly smaller displacement magnitude with varying velocities compared to constant velocity. The reduction in displacement occurred irrespective of whether or not the participants pursued the visual targets with their eyes. These findings indicate that the emergence of representational momentum critically depends on the constancy of target velocity. The results are compatible with a model in which changes in the motion signal can override the extrapolation mechanism that usually causes the forward displacement of representational momentum.

  14. Cosmic ray exposure ages of iron meteorites, complex irradiation and the constancy of cosmic ray flux in the past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Lavielle, B.; Regnier, S.

    1984-01-01

    While previous calculations of potassium ages assumed a constant cosmic ray flux and a single stage (no change in size) exposure of iron meteorites, present calculations relaxed these constancy assumptions and the results reveal multistage irradiations for some 25% of the meteorites studied, implying multiple breakup in space. The distribution of exposure ages suggests several major collisions (based on chemical composition and structure), although the calibration of age scales is not yet complete. It is concluded that shielding-corrected (corrections which depend on size and position of sample) production rates are consistent for the age bracket of 300 to 900 years. These production rates differ in a systematic way from those calculated for present day fluxes of cosmic rays (such as obtained for the last few million years).

  15. Partitional Classification: A Complement to Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Marc; Dassy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The tree of life is currently an active object of research, though next to vertical gene transmission non vertical gene transfers proved to play a significant role in the evolutionary process. To overcome this difficulty, trees of life are now constructed from genes hypothesized vital, on the assumption that these are all transmitted vertically. This view has been challenged. As a frame for this discussion, we developed a partitional taxonomical system clustering taxa at a high taxonomical rank. Our analysis (1) selects RNase P RNA sequences of bacterial, archaeal, and eucaryal genera from genetic databases, (2) submits the sequences, aligned, to k-medoid analysis to obtain clusters, (3) establishes the correspondence between clusters and taxa, (4) constructs from the taxa a new type of taxon, the genetic community (GC), and (5) classifies the GCs: Archaea–Eukaryotes contrastingly different from the six others, all bacterial. The GCs would be the broadest frame to carry out the phylogenies. PMID:27346943

  16. Simulating the effect of meteorological variability on a lake ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassl, M. A.; Schlabing, D.; Eder, M. M.; Rothhaupt, K.-O.; Rinke, K.

    2012-04-01

    Water temperature is a main driver of phytoplankton development. On the one hand, temperature directly affects cell metabolism. On the other hand, the hydrodynamic regime with annual cycles of stratification and mixis affects the light and nutrient supply of the algae and thus governs cardinal events of phytoplankton development. This could be the timing of the spring bloom or the maximum biomass attained. However, the response of lake ecosystems dynamics to a changing climate is not only linked to a rising temperature, but also to inter-annual and -seasonal meteorological variability. Ecological models have proven to provide a useful tool for quantifying effects of a changing climate on lake ecosystems. Especially lake models are convenient for climate change studies as the meteorological input data directly drive the hydrodynamics of the lake, which, in turn, govern ecosystem dynamics. To account for the effect of rising temperature and increased variability, different meteorological time series are needed. A Vector-Autoregressive Weathergenerator is able to provide reliable time-series that sustain dependencies between different meteorological variables. Furthermore, it offers the possibility to run Monte Carlo simulations with past climatic conditions in comparison to scenarios of possible future climatic conditions. It thus provides a tool for both, including statistical properties of meteorological data and assessing uncertainties inherent in deterministic models. In this study, we applied a one-dimensional hydrodynamic-ecological lake model (DYRESM-CAEDYM) to a large monomictic lake. We ran Monte Carlo simulations with four different "what-if" scenarios (unchanged climate, increased mean temperature, higher variability and the combination of higher temperature and variability) and analysed changes in water temperature and cardinal events in phytoplankton dynamics. A detailed study on the hydrodynamic response of Lake Constance to climate change is presented

  17. Archaebacterial phylogeny: perspectives on the urkingdoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Olsen, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Comparisons of complete 16S ribosomal RNA sequences have been used to confirm, refine and extend earlier concepts of archaebacterial phylogeny. The archaebacteria fall naturally into two major branches or divisions, I--the sulfur-dependent thermophilic archaebacteria, and II--the methanogenic archaebacteria and their relatives. Division I comprises a relatively closely related and phenotypically homogeneous collection of thermophilic sulfur-dependent species--encompassing the genera Sulfolobus, Thermoproteus, Pyrodictium and Desulfurococcus. The organisms of Division II, however, form a less compact grouping phylogenetically, and are also more diverse in phenotype. All three of the (major) methanogen groups are found in Division II, as are the extreme halophiles and two types of thermoacidophiles, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Thermococcus celer. This last species branches sufficiently deeply in the Division II line that it might be considered to represent a separate, third Division. However, both the extreme halophiles and Tp. acidophilum branch within the cluster of methanogens. The extreme halophiles are specifically related to the Methanomicrobiales, to the exclusion of both the Methanococcales and the Methanobacteriales. Tp. acidophilum is peripherally related to the halophile-Methanomicrobiales group. By 16S rRNA sequence measure the archaebacteria constitute a phylogenetically coherent grouping (clade), which excludes both the eubacteria and the eukaryotes--a conclusion that is supported by other sequence evidence as well. Alternative proposals for archaebacterial phylogeny, not based upon sequence evidence, are discussed and evaluated. In particular, proposals to rename (reclassify) various subgroups of the archaebacteria as new kingdoms are found wanting, for both their lack of proper experimental support and the taxonomic confusion they introduce.

  18. Phylogeny and forelimb disparity in waterbirds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Clarke, Julia A

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has shown that the relative proportions of wing components (i.e., humerus, ulna, carpometacarpus) in birds are related to function and ecology, but these have rarely been investigated in a phylogenetic context. Waterbirds including "Pelecaniformes," Ciconiiformes, Procellariiformes, Sphenisciformes, and Gaviiformes form a highly supported clade and developed a great diversity of wing forms and foraging ecologies. In this study, forelimb disparity in the waterbird clade was assessed in a phylogenetic context. Phylogenetic signal was assessed via Pagel's lambda, Blomberg's K, and permutation tests. We find that different waterbird clades are clearly separated based on forelimb component proportions, which are significantly correlated with phylogeny but not with flight style. Most of the traditional contents of "Pelecaniformes" (e.g., pelicans, cormorants, and boobies) cluster with Ciconiiformes (herons and storks) and occupy a reduced morphospace. These taxa are closely related phylogenetically but exhibit a wide range of ecologies and flight styles. Procellariiformes (e.g., petrels, albatross, and shearwaters) occupy a wide range of morphospace, characterized primarily by variation in the relative length of carpometacarpus and ulna. Gaviiformes (loons) surprisingly occupy a wing morphospace closest to diving petrels and penguins. Whether this result may reflect wing proportions plesiomorphic for the waterbird clade or a functional signal is unclear. A Bayesian approach detecting significant rate shifts across phylogeny recovered two such shifts. At the base of the two sister clades Sphenisciformes + Procellariiformes, a shift to an increase evolutionary rate of change is inferred for the ulna and carpometacarpus. Thus, changes in wing shape begin prior to the loss of flight in the wing-propelled diving clade. Several shifts to slower rate of change are recovered within stem penguins.

  19. Reconstructing contact network parameters from viral phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Rosemary M.; Liang, Richard H.; Poon, Art F.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Models of the spread of disease in a population often make the simplifying assumption that the population is homogeneously mixed, or is divided into homogeneously mixed compartments. However, human populations have complex structures formed by social contacts, which can have a significant influence on the rate of epidemic spread. Contact network models capture this structure by explicitly representing each contact which could possibly lead to a transmission. We developed a method based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), a likelihood-free inference strategy, for estimating structural parameters of the contact network underlying an observed viral phylogeny. The method combines adaptive sequential Monte Carlo for ABC, Gillespie simulation for propagating epidemics though networks, and a kernel-based tree similarity score. We used the method to fit the Barabási-Albert network model to simulated transmission trees, and also applied it to viral phylogenies estimated from ten published HIV sequence datasets. This model incorporates a feature called preferential attachment (PA), whereby individuals with more existing contacts accumulate new contacts at a higher rate. On simulated data, we found that the strength of PA and the number of infected nodes in the network can often be accurately estimated. On the other hand, the mean degree of the network, as well as the total number of nodes, was not estimable with ABC. We observed sub-linear PA power in all datasets, as well as higher PA power in networks of injection drug users. These results underscore the importance of considering contact structures when performing phylodynamic inference. Our method offers the potential to quantitatively investigate the contact network structure underlying viral epidemics.

  20. Homology and phylogeny and their automated inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuellen, Georg

    2008-06-01

    The analysis of the ever-increasing amount of biological and biomedical data can be pushed forward by comparing the data within and among species. For example, an integrative analysis of data from the genome sequencing projects for various species traces the evolution of the genomes and identifies conserved and innovative parts. Here, I review the foundations and advantages of this “historical” approach and evaluate recent attempts at automating such analyses. Biological data is comparable if a common origin exists (homology), as is the case for members of a gene family originating via duplication of an ancestral gene. If the family has relatives in other species, we can assume that the ancestral gene was present in the ancestral species from which all the other species evolved. In particular, describing the relationships among the duplicated biological sequences found in the various species is often possible by a phylogeny, which is more informative than homology statements. Detecting and elaborating on common origins may answer how certain biological sequences developed, and predict what sequences are in a particular species and what their function is. Such knowledge transfer from sequences in one species to the homologous sequences of the other is based on the principle of ‘my closest relative looks and behaves like I do’, often referred to as ‘guilt by association’. To enable knowledge transfer on a large scale, several automated ‘phylogenomics pipelines’ have been developed in recent years, and seven of these will be described and compared. Overall, the examples in this review demonstrate that homology and phylogeny analyses, done on a large (and automated) scale, can give insights into function in biology and biomedicine.

  1. Migration of 137Cs in tributaries, lake water and sediment of Lago Maggiore (Italy, Switzerland) - analysis and comparison with Lago di Lugano and other lakes.

    PubMed

    Putyrskaya, Victoria; Klemt, Eckehard; Röllin, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the behaviour of 137Cs in Lago Maggiore and other pre-alpine lakes as a consequence of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing fallout and the fallout from the nuclear accident in Chernobyl. It presents data on the 137Cs distribution in tributaries, lake water, bottom sediments and reveals the role of (137)Cs as a marker of the sedimentation processes. The run-off of 137Cs from the watershed to the lake is described with a simple compartment model. Measurements of the activity concentration of (137)Cs in sediments are compared with the output of a model (diffusion-convection type) which describes the input of 137Cs into and its vertical distribution within the sediment. Varying sedimentation rates (0.05-0.90g(cm2y)(-1)) in Lago Maggiore are compared with data of other authors. Sedimentation rates and total distribution coefficients (of about 10(5) Lkg(-1)) in Lago Maggiore are discussed and compared with those of Lago di Lugano, Lake Constance, and Lake Vorsee. PMID:19019505

  2. Migration of 137Cs in tributaries, lake water and sediment of Lago Maggiore (Italy, Switzerland) - analysis and comparison with Lago di Lugano and other lakes.

    PubMed

    Putyrskaya, Victoria; Klemt, Eckehard; Röllin, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the behaviour of 137Cs in Lago Maggiore and other pre-alpine lakes as a consequence of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing fallout and the fallout from the nuclear accident in Chernobyl. It presents data on the 137Cs distribution in tributaries, lake water, bottom sediments and reveals the role of (137)Cs as a marker of the sedimentation processes. The run-off of 137Cs from the watershed to the lake is described with a simple compartment model. Measurements of the activity concentration of (137)Cs in sediments are compared with the output of a model (diffusion-convection type) which describes the input of 137Cs into and its vertical distribution within the sediment. Varying sedimentation rates (0.05-0.90g(cm2y)(-1)) in Lago Maggiore are compared with data of other authors. Sedimentation rates and total distribution coefficients (of about 10(5) Lkg(-1)) in Lago Maggiore are discussed and compared with those of Lago di Lugano, Lake Constance, and Lake Vorsee.

  3. Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Mac, Michael J.; Opler, Paul A.; Puckett Haecker, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    The wild plants and animals and the natural systems that support them in the Great Lakes region are valuable resources of considerable local, regional, and national interest. They are also, in part, transboundary resources that the U.S. shares with its Canadian neighbors to the north. The way these resources are changing over time is inadequately known and is a concern for resource users and for those charged with managing and protecting these unique and valuable resources. This chapter describes the wild plants and animals and the systems that support them in the Great Lakes region; addresses their condition; and points out the gaps in our knowledge about them that, if filled, would aid in their conservation and appropriate use.

  4. The shape of mammalian phylogeny: patterns, processes and scales

    PubMed Central

    Purvis, Andy; Fritz, Susanne A.; Rodríguez, Jesús; Harvey, Paul H.; Grenyer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian phylogeny is far too asymmetric for all contemporaneous lineages to have had equal chances of diversifying. We consider this asymmetry or imbalance from four perspectives. First, we infer a minimal set of ‘regime changes’—points at which net diversification rate has changed—identifying 15 significant radiations and 12 clades that may be ‘downshifts’. We next show that mammalian phylogeny is similar in shape to a large set of published phylogenies of other vertebrate, arthropod and plant groups, suggesting that many clades may diversify under a largely shared set of ‘rules’. Third, we simulate six simple macroevolutionary models, showing that those where speciation slows down as geographical or niche space is filled, produce more realistic phylogenies than do models involving key innovations. Lastly, an analysis of the spatial scaling of imbalance shows that the phylogeny of species within an assemblage, ecoregion or larger area always tends to be more unbalanced than expected from the phylogeny of species at the next more inclusive spatial scale. We conclude with a verbal model of mammalian macroevolution, which emphasizes the importance to diversification of accessing new regions of geographical or niche space. PMID:21807729

  5. Inferring the origin of metastases from cancer phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Woo Suk; Shpak, Max; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the evolutionary history of metastases is a key problem in cancer biology. Several recent studies have presented inferences regarding the origin of metastases based on phylogenies of cancer lineages. Many of these studies have concluded that the observed monophyly of metastatic subclones favored metastasis-to-metastasis spread (“a metastatic cascade” rather than parallel metastases from the primary tumor). In this article, we argue that identifying a monophyletic clade of metastatic subclones does not provide sufficient evidence to unequivocally establish a history of metastatic cascades. In the absence of a complete phylogeny of the subclones within the primary tumor, a scenario of parallel metastatic events from the primary tumor is an equally plausible interpretation. Future phylogenetic studies on the origin of metastases should obtain a complete phylogeny of subclones within the primary tumor. This complete phylogeny may be obtainable by ultra-deep sequencing and phasing of large sections or by targeted sequencing of many small, spatially heterogeneous sections, followed by phylogenetic reconstruction using well-established molecular evolutionary models. In addition to resolving the evolutionary history of metastases, a complete phylogeny of subclones within the primary tumor facilitates the identification of driver mutations by application of phylogeny-based tests of natural selection. PMID:26260528

  6. Phylogeny of the Paracalanidae Giesbrecht, 1888 (Crustacea: Copepoda: Calanoida).

    PubMed

    Cornils, Astrid; Blanco-Bercial, Leocadio

    2013-12-01

    The Paracalanidae are ecologically-important marine planktonic copepods that occur in the epipelagic zone in temperate and tropical waters. They are often the dominant taxon - in terms of biomass and abundance - in continental shelf regions. As primary consumers, they form a vital link in the pelagic food web between primary producers and higher trophic levels. Despite the ecological importance of the taxon, evolutionary and systematic relationships within the family remain largely unknown. A multigene phylogeny including 24 species, including representatives for all seven genera, was determined based on two nuclear genes, small-subunit (18S) ribosomal RNA and Histone 3 (H3) and one mitochondrial gene, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI). The molecular phylogeny was well supported by Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analysis; all genera were found to be monophyletic, except for Paracalanus, which was separated into two distinct clades: the Paracalanus aculeatus group and Paracalanus parvus group. The molecular phylogeny also confirmed previous findings that Mecynocera and Calocalanus are genera of the family Paracalanidae. For comparison, a morphological phylogeny was created for 35 paracalanid species based on 54 morphological characters derived from published descriptions. The morphological phylogeny did not resolve all genera as monophyletic and bootstrap support was not strong. Molecular and morphological phylogenies were not congruent in the positioning of Bestiolina and the Paracalanus species groups, possibly due to the lack of sufficient phylogenetically-informative morphological characters.

  7. Evolutionary History of Lake Tanganyika's Predatory Deepwater Cichlids

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Paul C.; Sefc, Kristina M.; Sturmbauer, Christian; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization among littoral cichlid species in Lake Tanganyika was inferred in several molecular phylogenetic studies. The phenomenon is generally attributed to the lake level-induced shoreline and habitat changes. These allow for allopatric divergence of geographically fragmented populations alternating with locally restricted secondary contact and introgression between incompletely isolated taxa. In contrast, the deepwater habitat is characterized by weak geographic structure and a high potential for gene flow, which may explain the lower species richness of deepwater than littoral lineages. For the same reason, divergent deepwater lineages should have evolved strong intrinsic reproductive isolation already in the incipient stages of diversification, and, consequently, hybridization among established lineages should have been less frequent than in littoral lineages. We test this hypothesis in the endemic Lake Tanganyika deepwater cichlid tribe Bathybatini by comparing phylogenetic trees of Hemibates and Bathybates species obtained with nuclear multilocus AFLP data with a phylogeny based on mitochondrial sequences. Consistent with our hypothesis, largely congruent tree topologies and negative tests for introgression provided no evidence for introgressive hybridization between the deepwater taxa. Together, the nuclear and mitochondrial data established a well-supported phylogeny and suggested ecological segregation during speciation. PMID:22675652

  8. A retroposon analysis of Afrotherian phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Hidenori; Satta, Yoko; Nikaido, Masato; Thewissen, J G M; Stanhope, Michael J; Okada, Norihiro

    2005-09-01

    Recent comprehensive studies of DNA sequences support the monophyly of Afrotheria, comprising elephants, sirenians (dugongs and manatees), hyraxes, tenrecs, golden moles, aardvarks, and elephant shrews, as well as that of Paenungulata, comprising elephants, sirenians, and hyraxes. However, phylogenetic relationships among paenungulates, as well as among nonpaenungulates, have remained ambiguous. Here we applied an extensive retroposon analysis to these problems to support the monophyly of aardvarks, tenrecs, and golden moles, with elephant shrews as their sister group. Regarding phylogenetic relationships in Paenungulata, we could characterize only one informative locus, although we could isolate many insertions specific to each of three lineages, namely, Proboscidea, Sirenia, and Hyracoidea. These data prompted us to reexamine phylogenetic relationships among Paenungulata using 19 nuclear gene sequences resulting in three different analyses, namely, short interspersed element (SINE) insertions, nuclear sequence analyses, and morphological cladistics, supporting different respective phylogenies. We concluded that these three lineages diverged very rapidly in a very short evolutionary period, with the consequence that ancestral polymorphism present in the last common ancestor of Paenungulata results in such incongruence. Our results suggest the rapid fixation of many large-scale morphological synapomorphies for Tethytheria; implications of this in relation to the morphological evolution in Paenungulata are discussed. PMID:15930154

  9. A transcriptome approach to ecdysozoan phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Borner, Janus; Rehm, Peter; Schill, Ralph O; Ebersberger, Ingo; Burmester, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    The monophyly of Ecdysozoa, which comprise molting phyla, has received strong support from several lines of evidence. However, the internal relationships of Ecdysozoa are still contended. We generated expressed sequence tags from a priapulid (penis worm), a kinorhynch (mud dragon), a tardigrade (water bear) and five chelicerate taxa by 454 transcriptome sequencing. A multigene alignment was assembled from 63 taxa, which comprised after matrix optimization 24,249 amino acid positions with high data density (2.6% gaps, 19.1% missing data). Phylogenetic analyses employing various models support the monophyly of Ecdysozoa. A clade combining Priapulida and Kinorhyncha (i.e. Scalidophora) was recovered as the earliest branch among Ecdysozoa. We conclude that Cycloneuralia, a taxon erected to combine Priapulida, Kinorhyncha and Nematoda (and others), are paraphyletic. Rather Arthropoda (including Onychophora) are allied with Nematoda and Tardigrada. Within Arthropoda, we found strong support for most clades, including monophyletic Mandibulata and Pancrustacea. The phylogeny within the Euchelicerata remained largely unresolved. There is conflicting evidence on the position of tardigrades: While Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of only slowly evolving genes recovered Tardigrada as a sister group to Arthropoda, analyses of the full data set, and of subsets containing genes evolving at fast and intermediate rates identified a clade of Tardigrada and Nematoda. Notably, the latter topology is also supported by the analyses of indel patterns.

  10. Phylogeny and diversification patterns among vesicomyid bivalves.

    PubMed

    Decker, Carole; Olu, Karine; Cunha, Regina L; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Vesicomyid bivalves are among the most abundant and diverse symbiotic taxa in chemosynthetic-based ecosystems: more than 100 different vesicomyid species have been described so far. In the present study, we investigated the phylogenetic positioning of recently described vesicomyid species from the Gulf of Guinea and their western Atlantic and Pacific counterparts using mitochondrial DNA sequence data. The maximum-likelihood (ML) tree provided limited support for the recent taxonomic revision of vesicomyids based on morphological criteria; nevertheless, most of the newly sequenced specimens did not cluster with their morphological conspecifics. Moreover, the observed lack of geographic clustering suggests the occurrence of independent radiations followed by worldwide dispersal. Ancestral character state reconstruction showed a significant correlation between the characters "depth" and "habitat" and the reconstructed ML phylogeny suggesting possible recurrent events of 'stepwise speciation' from shallow to deep waters in different ocean basins. This is consistent with genus or species bathymetric segregation observed from recent taxonomic studies. Altogether, our results highlight the need for ongoing re-evaluation of the morphological characters used to identify vesicomyid bivalves.

  11. Effects of recombination on densovirus phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Martynova, Elena U; Schal, Coby; Mukha, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    Densoviruses are a group of arthropod-infecting viruses with a small single-stranded linear DNA genome. These viruses constitute the subfamily Densovirinae of the family Parvoviridae. While recombination in between vertebrate-infecting parvoviruses has been investigated, to date, no systematic analysis of recombination has been carried out for densoviruses. The aim of the present work was to study possible recombination events in the evolutionary history of densoviruses and to assess possible effects of recombination on phylogenies inferred using amino acid sequences of nonstructural (NS) and capsid (viral protein, VP) proteins. For this purpose, the complete or nearly complete genome nucleotide sequences of 40 densoviruses from the GenBank database were used to construct a phylogenetic cladogram. The viruses under study clustered into five distinct groups corresponding to the five currently accepted genera. Recombination within each group was studied independently. The RDP4 software revealed three statistically highly credible recombination events, two of which involved viruses of the genus Ambidensovirus, and the other, viruses from the genus Iteradensovirus. These recombination events led to mismatches between phylogenetic trees constructed using comparison of amino acid sequences of proteins encoded by genome regions of recombinant and non-recombinant origin (regulatory NS1 and NS3 proteins and capsid VP protein).

  12. Phylogeny and Diversification Patterns among Vesicomyid Bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Carole; Olu, Karine; Cunha, Regina L.; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Vesicomyid bivalves are among the most abundant and diverse symbiotic taxa in chemosynthetic-based ecosystems: more than 100 different vesicomyid species have been described so far. In the present study, we investigated the phylogenetic positioning of recently described vesicomyid species from the Gulf of Guinea and their western Atlantic and Pacific counterparts using mitochondrial DNA sequence data. The maximum-likelihood (ML) tree provided limited support for the recent taxonomic revision of vesicomyids based on morphological criteria; nevertheless, most of the newly sequenced specimens did not cluster with their morphological conspecifics. Moreover, the observed lack of geographic clustering suggests the occurrence of independent radiations followed by worldwide dispersal. Ancestral character state reconstruction showed a significant correlation between the characters “depth” and “habitat” and the reconstructed ML phylogeny suggesting possible recurrent events of ‘stepwise speciation’ from shallow to deep waters in different ocean basins. This is consistent with genus or species bathymetric segregation observed from recent taxonomic studies. Altogether, our results highlight the need for ongoing re-evaluation of the morphological characters used to identify vesicomyid bivalves. PMID:22511920

  13. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of Legionella.

    PubMed

    Khodr, A; Kay, E; Gomez-Valero, L; Ginevra, C; Doublet, P; Buchrieser, C; Jarraud, S

    2016-09-01

    Legionella are opportunistic pathogens that develop in aquatic environments where they multiply in protozoa. When infected aerosols reach the human respiratory tract they may accidentally infect the alveolar macrophages leading to a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease (LD). The ability of Legionella to survive within host-cells is strictly dependent on the Dot/Icm Type 4 Secretion System that translocates a large repertoire of effectors into the host cell cytosol. Although Legionella is a large genus comprising nearly 60 species that are worldwide distributed, only about half of them have been involved in LD cases. Strikingly, the species Legionella pneumophila alone is responsible for 90% of all LD cases. The present review summarizes the molecular approaches that are used for L. pneumophila genotyping with a major focus on the contribution of whole genome sequencing (WGS) to the investigation of local L. pneumophila outbreaks and global epidemiology studies. We report the newest knowledge regarding the phylogeny and the evolution of Legionella and then focus on virulence evolution of those Legionella species that are known to have the capacity to infect humans. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary forces and adaptation mechanisms acting on the Dot/Icm system itself as well as the role of mobile genetic elements (MGE) encoding T4ASSs and of gene duplications in the evolution of Legionella and its adaptation to different hosts and lifestyles. PMID:27180896

  14. Molecular phylogeny of Triatomini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Triatomini and Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) tribes include the most diverse Chagas disease vectors; however, the phylogenetic relationships within the tribes remain obscure. This study provides the most comprehensive phylogeny of Triatomini reported to date. Methods The relationships between all of the Triatomini genera and representatives of the three Rhodniini species groups were examined in a novel molecular phylogenetic analysis based on the following six molecular markers: the mitochondrial 16S; Cytochrome Oxidase I and II (COI and COII) and Cytochrome B (Cyt B); and the nuclear 18S and 28S. Results Our results show that the Rhodnius prolixus and R. pictipes groups are more closely related to each other than to the R. pallescens group. For Triatomini, we demonstrate that the large complexes within the paraphyletic Triatoma genus are closely associated with their geographical distribution. Additionally, we observe that the divergence within the spinolai and flavida complex clades are higher than in the other Triatoma complexes. Conclusions We propose that the spinolai and flavida complexes should be ranked under the genera Mepraia and Nesotriatoma. Finally, we conclude that a thorough morphological investigation of the paraphyletic genera Triatoma and Panstrongylus is required to accurately assign queries to natural genera. PMID:24685273

  15. Primate jumping genes elucidate strepsirrhine phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Christian; Schmitz, Jürgen; Zischler, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Transposable elements provide a highly informative marker system for analyzing evolutionary histories. To solve controversially discussed topics in strepsirrhine phylogeny, we characterized 61 loci containing short interspersed elements (SINEs) and determined the SINE presence–absence pattern at orthologous loci in a representative strepsirrhine panel. This SINE monolocus study was complemented by a Southern blot analysis tracing multiple loci of two different strepsirrhine specific SINEs. The results thereof were combined with phylogenetic trees reconstructed on the basis of complete mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences from all recognized strepsirrhine genera. Here we present evidence for (i) a sister group relationship of Malagasy Chiromyiformes and Lemuriformes, (ii) Lorisidae being a monophyletic sister clade to the Galagidae, and (iii) common ancestry of African and Asian lorisids. Based on these findings, we conclude that strepsirrhines originated in Africa and that Madagascar and Asia were colonized by respective single immigration events. In agreement with paleocontinental data, the molecular analyses suggest a crossing of the Mozambique channel by rafting between the late Cretaceous and the middle Eocene, whereas Asia was most likely colonized between the early Eocene and the middle Oligocene on a continental route. Furthermore, one SINE integration links the two Lemuriformes families, Lemuridae and Indriidae, indicating a common origin of diurnality or cathemerality and a later reversal to nocturnality by the indriid genus Avahi. PMID:15249661

  16. Phylogeny of the Highly Divergent Echinosteliales (Amoebozoa).

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Martin; Kuhnt, Andreas; Bonkowski, Michael; Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria

    2016-07-01

    Myxomycetes or plasmodial slime molds are widespread and very common soil amoebae with the ability to form macroscopic fruiting bodies. Even if their phylogenetic position as a monophyletic group in Amoebozoa is well established, their internal relationships are still not entirely resolved. At the base of the most intensively studied dark-spored clade lies the order Echinosteliales, whose highly divergent small subunit ribosomal (18S) RNA genes represent a challenge for phylogenetic reconstructions. This is because they are characterized by unusually long variable helices of unknown secondary structure and a high inter- and infraspecific divergence. Current classification recognizes two families: the monogeneric Echinosteliaceae and the Clastodermataceae with the genera Barbeyella and Clastoderma. To better resolve the phylogeny of the Echinosteliales, we obtained three new small subunit ribosomal (18S) RNA gene sequences of Clastoderma and Echinostelium corynophorum. Our phylogenetic analyses suggested the polyphyly of the family Clastodermataceae, as Barbeyella was more closely related to Echinostelium arboreum than to Clastoderma, while Clastoderma debaryanum was the earliest branching clade in Echinosteliales. We also found that E. corynophorum was the closest relative of the enigmatic Semimorula liquescens, a stalkless-modified Echinosteliales. We discuss possible evolutionary pathways in dark-spored Myxomycetes and propose a taxonomic update.

  17. Bacterial phylogeny structures soil resistomes across habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, Kevin J.; Patel, Sanket; Gibson, Molly K.; Lauber, Christian L.; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah; Dantas, Gautam

    2014-05-01

    Ancient and diverse antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have previously been identified from soil, including genes identical to those in human pathogens. Despite the apparent overlap between soil and clinical resistomes, factors influencing ARG composition in soil and their movement between genomes and habitats remain largely unknown. General metagenome functions often correlate with the underlying structure of bacterial communities. However, ARGs are proposed to be highly mobile, prompting speculation that resistomes may not correlate with phylogenetic signatures or ecological divisions. To investigate these relationships, we performed functional metagenomic selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from 18 agricultural and grassland soils. The 2,895 ARGs we discovered were mostly new, and represent all major resistance mechanisms. We demonstrate that distinct soil types harbour distinct resistomes, and that the addition of nitrogen fertilizer strongly influenced soil ARG content. Resistome composition also correlated with microbial phylogenetic and taxonomic structure, both across and within soil types. Consistent with this strong correlation, mobility elements (genes responsible for horizontal gene transfer between bacteria such as transposases and integrases) syntenic with ARGs were rare in soil by comparison with sequenced pathogens, suggesting that ARGs may not transfer between soil bacteria as readily as is observed between human pathogens. Together, our results indicate that bacterial community composition is the primary determinant of soil ARG content, challenging previous hypotheses that horizontal gene transfer effectively decouples resistomes from phylogeny.

  18. A transcriptome approach to ecdysozoan phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Borner, Janus; Rehm, Peter; Schill, Ralph O; Ebersberger, Ingo; Burmester, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    The monophyly of Ecdysozoa, which comprise molting phyla, has received strong support from several lines of evidence. However, the internal relationships of Ecdysozoa are still contended. We generated expressed sequence tags from a priapulid (penis worm), a kinorhynch (mud dragon), a tardigrade (water bear) and five chelicerate taxa by 454 transcriptome sequencing. A multigene alignment was assembled from 63 taxa, which comprised after matrix optimization 24,249 amino acid positions with high data density (2.6% gaps, 19.1% missing data). Phylogenetic analyses employing various models support the monophyly of Ecdysozoa. A clade combining Priapulida and Kinorhyncha (i.e. Scalidophora) was recovered as the earliest branch among Ecdysozoa. We conclude that Cycloneuralia, a taxon erected to combine Priapulida, Kinorhyncha and Nematoda (and others), are paraphyletic. Rather Arthropoda (including Onychophora) are allied with Nematoda and Tardigrada. Within Arthropoda, we found strong support for most clades, including monophyletic Mandibulata and Pancrustacea. The phylogeny within the Euchelicerata remained largely unresolved. There is conflicting evidence on the position of tardigrades: While Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of only slowly evolving genes recovered Tardigrada as a sister group to Arthropoda, analyses of the full data set, and of subsets containing genes evolving at fast and intermediate rates identified a clade of Tardigrada and Nematoda. Notably, the latter topology is also supported by the analyses of indel patterns. PMID:25124096

  19. Phylogeny of the Highly Divergent Echinosteliales (Amoebozoa).

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Martin; Kuhnt, Andreas; Bonkowski, Michael; Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria

    2016-07-01

    Myxomycetes or plasmodial slime molds are widespread and very common soil amoebae with the ability to form macroscopic fruiting bodies. Even if their phylogenetic position as a monophyletic group in Amoebozoa is well established, their internal relationships are still not entirely resolved. At the base of the most intensively studied dark-spored clade lies the order Echinosteliales, whose highly divergent small subunit ribosomal (18S) RNA genes represent a challenge for phylogenetic reconstructions. This is because they are characterized by unusually long variable helices of unknown secondary structure and a high inter- and infraspecific divergence. Current classification recognizes two families: the monogeneric Echinosteliaceae and the Clastodermataceae with the genera Barbeyella and Clastoderma. To better resolve the phylogeny of the Echinosteliales, we obtained three new small subunit ribosomal (18S) RNA gene sequences of Clastoderma and Echinostelium corynophorum. Our phylogenetic analyses suggested the polyphyly of the family Clastodermataceae, as Barbeyella was more closely related to Echinostelium arboreum than to Clastoderma, while Clastoderma debaryanum was the earliest branching clade in Echinosteliales. We also found that E. corynophorum was the closest relative of the enigmatic Semimorula liquescens, a stalkless-modified Echinosteliales. We discuss possible evolutionary pathways in dark-spored Myxomycetes and propose a taxonomic update. PMID:26663217

  20. Phylogeny of the gudgeons (Teleostei: Cyprinidae: Gobioninae).

    PubMed

    Tang, Kevin L; Agnew, Mary K; Chen, Wei-Jen; Vincent Hirt, M; Raley, Morgan E; Sado, Tetsuya; Schneider, Leah M; Yang, Lei; Bart, Henry L; He, Shunping; Liu, Huanzhang; Miya, Masaki; Saitoh, Kenji; Simons, Andrew M; Wood, Robert M; Mayden, Richard L

    2011-10-01

    The members of the cyprinid subfamily Gobioninae, commonly called gudgeons, form one of the most well-established assemblages in the family Cyprinidae. The subfamily is a species-rich group of fishes, these fishes display diverse life histories, appearances, and behavior. The phylogenetic relationships of Gobioninae are examined using sequence data from four loci: cytochrome b, cytochrome c oxidase I, opsin, and recombination activating gene 1. This investigation produced a data matrix of 4114 bp for 162 taxa that was analyzed using parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference methods. The phylogenies our analyses recovered corroborate recent studies on the group. The subfamily Gobioninae is monophyletic and composed of three major lineages. We find evidence for a Hemibarbus-Squalidus group, and the tribes Gobionini and Sarcocheilichthyini, with the Hemibarbus-Squalidus group sister to a clade of Gobionini-Sarcocheilichthyini. The Hemibarbus-Squalidus group includes those two genera; the tribe Sarcocheilichthyini includes Coreius, Coreoleuciscus, Gnathopogon, Gobiocypris, Ladislavia, Paracanthobrama, Pseudorasbora, Pseudopungtungia, Pungtungia, Rhinogobio, and Sarcocheilichthys; the tribe Gobionini includes Abbottina, Biwia, Gobio, Gobiobotia, Huigobio, Microphysogobio, Platysmacheilus, Pseudogobio, Romanogobio, Saurogobio, and Xenophysogobio. The monotypic Acanthogobio is placed into the synonymy of Gobio. We tentatively assign Belligobio to the Hemibarbus-Squalidus group and Mesogobio to Gobionini; Paraleucogobio and Parasqualidus remain incertae sedis. Based on the topologies presented, the evolution of swim bladder specializations, a distinctive feature among cyprinids, has occurred more than once within the subfamily. PMID:21672635

  1. A Framework for Studying Emotions Across Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David J.; Adolphs, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Since the 19th century, there has been disagreement over the fundamental question of whether “emotions” are cause or consequence of their associated behaviors. This question of causation is most directly addressable in genetically tractable model organisms, including invertebrates such as Drosophila. Yet there is ongoing debate about whether such species even have “emotions,” since emotions are typically defined with reference to human behavior and neuroanatomy. Here we argue that emotional behaviors are a class of behaviors that express internal emotion states. These emotion states exhibit certain general functional and adaptive properties that apply across any specific human emotions like fear or anger, as well as across phylogeny. These general properties, which can be thought of as “emotion primitives”, can be modeled and studied in evolutionarily distant model organisms, allowing functional dissection of their mechanistic bases, and tests of their causal relationships to behavior. More generally, our approach aims not only at better integration of such studies in model organisms with studies of emotion in humans, but also suggests a revision of how emotion should be operationalized within psychology and psychiatry. PMID:24679535

  2. Partitioning the Relative Importance of Phylogeny and Environmental Conditions on Phytoplankton Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Aaron W E; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA), which are primarily generated by phytoplankton, limit growth and reproduction in diverse heterotrophs. The biochemical composition of phytoplankton is well-known to be governed both by phylogeny and environmental conditions. Nutrients, light, salinity, and temperature all affect both phytoplankton growth and fatty acid composition. However, the relative importance of taxonomy and environment on algal fatty acid content has yet to be comparatively quantified, thus inhibiting predictions of changes to phytoplankton food quality in response to global environmental change. We compiled 1145 published marine and freshwater phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, consisting of 208 species from six major taxonomic groups, cultured in a wide range of environmental conditions, and used a multivariate distance-based linear model to quantify the total variation explained by each variable. Our results show that taxonomic group accounts for 3-4 times more variation in phytoplankton fatty acids than the most important growth condition variables. The results underscore that environmental conditions clearly affect phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, but also show that conditions account for relatively low variation compared to phylogeny. This suggests that the underlying mechanism determining basal food quality in aquatic habitats is primarily phytoplankton community composition, and allows for prediction of environmental-scale EFA dynamics based on phytoplankton community data. We used the compiled dataset to calculate seasonal dynamics of long-chain EFA (LCEFA; ≥C20 ɷ-3 and ɷ-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid) concentrations and ɷ-3:ɷ-6 EFA ratios in Lake Washington using a multi-decadal phytoplankton community time series. These analyses quantify temporal dynamics of algal-derived LCEFA and food quality in a freshwater ecosystem that has undergone large community changes as a result of shifting resource management practices, highlighting diatoms

  3. Partitioning the Relative Importance of Phylogeny and Environmental Conditions on Phytoplankton Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Aaron W. E.; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA), which are primarily generated by phytoplankton, limit growth and reproduction in diverse heterotrophs. The biochemical composition of phytoplankton is well-known to be governed both by phylogeny and environmental conditions. Nutrients, light, salinity, and temperature all affect both phytoplankton growth and fatty acid composition. However, the relative importance of taxonomy and environment on algal fatty acid content has yet to be comparatively quantified, thus inhibiting predictions of changes to phytoplankton food quality in response to global environmental change. We compiled 1145 published marine and freshwater phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, consisting of 208 species from six major taxonomic groups, cultured in a wide range of environmental conditions, and used a multivariate distance-based linear model to quantify the total variation explained by each variable. Our results show that taxonomic group accounts for 3-4 times more variation in phytoplankton fatty acids than the most important growth condition variables. The results underscore that environmental conditions clearly affect phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, but also show that conditions account for relatively low variation compared to phylogeny. This suggests that the underlying mechanism determining basal food quality in aquatic habitats is primarily phytoplankton community composition, and allows for prediction of environmental-scale EFA dynamics based on phytoplankton community data. We used the compiled dataset to calculate seasonal dynamics of long-chain EFA (LCEFA; ≥C20 ɷ-3 and ɷ-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid) concentrations and ɷ-3:ɷ-6 EFA ratios in Lake Washington using a multi-decadal phytoplankton community time series. These analyses quantify temporal dynamics of algal-derived LCEFA and food quality in a freshwater ecosystem that has undergone large community changes as a result of shifting resource management practices, highlighting diatoms

  4. On simulated annealing phase transitions in phylogeny reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Strobl, Maximilian A R; Barker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Phylogeny reconstruction with global criteria is NP-complete or NP-hard, hence in general requires a heuristic search. We investigate the powerful, physically inspired, general-purpose heuristic simulated annealing, applied to phylogeny reconstruction. Simulated annealing mimics the physical process of annealing, where a liquid is gently cooled to form a crystal. During the search, periods of elevated specific heat occur, analogous to physical phase transitions. These simulated annealing phase transitions play a crucial role in the outcome of the search. Nevertheless, they have received comparably little attention, for phylogeny or other optimisation problems. We analyse simulated annealing phase transitions during searches for the optimal phylogenetic tree for 34 real-world multiple alignments. In the same way in which melting temperatures differ between materials, we observe distinct specific heat profiles for each input file. We propose this reflects differences in the search landscape and can serve as a measure for problem difficulty and for suitability of the algorithm's parameters. We discuss application in algorithmic optimisation and as a diagnostic to assess parameterisation before computationally costly, large phylogeny reconstructions are launched. Whilst the focus here lies on phylogeny reconstruction under maximum parsimony, it is plausible that our results are more widely applicable to optimisation procedures in science and industry.

  5. When integration fails: Prokaryote phylogeny and the tree of life.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Maureen A

    2013-12-01

    Much is being written these days about integration, its desirability and even its necessity when complex research problems are to be addressed. Seldom, however, do we hear much about the failure of such efforts. Because integration is an ongoing activity rather than a final achievement, and because today's literature about integration consists mostly of manifesto statements rather than precise descriptions, an examination of unsuccessful integration could be illuminating to understand better how it works. This paper will examine the case of prokaryote phylogeny and its apparent failure to achieve integration within broader tree-of-life accounts of evolutionary history (often called 'universal phylogeny'). Despite the fact that integrated databases exist of molecules pertinent to the phylogenetic reconstruction of all lineages of life, and even though the same methods can be used to construct phylogenies wherever the organisms fall on the tree of life, prokaryote phylogeny remains at best only partly integrated within tree-of-life efforts. I will examine why integration does not occur, compare it with integrative practices in animal and other eukaryote phylogeny, and reflect on whether there might be different expectations of what integration should achieve. Finally, I will draw some general conclusions about integration and its function as a 'meta-heuristic' in the normative commitments guiding scientific practice.

  6. Longevity of Lake Superior lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schram, Stephen T.; Fabrizio, Mary C.

    1998-01-01

    The age structure of mature lake trout Salvelinus namaycush from the Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior increased following a population recovery that has taken place since the 1960s. As the population aged, it became apparent that scales were unreliable aging structures. Beginning in 1986, we examined both scale and sagittal otolith ages from tagged fish with a known period at liberty. We found large discrepancies in scale and sagittal otolith ages of mature fish, such that scale ages were biased low. We estimated lake trout living up to 42 years, which is greater than previously reported from Lake Superior. Investigators studying lake trout population dynamics in the Great Lakes should be aware that lake trout can live longer than previously thought.

  7. Lake Volta, Ghana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Lake Volta in Ghana was acquired March 31, 2002 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Lake Volta is one of the world's largest artificially created lakes. Lake Volta is actually a reservoir formed from the damming of the Volta River, and extends 250 miles north of the Akosombo Dam. The lake covers an area of 8,482 square km. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  8. Constancy of local spread rates for buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare L.) in the Arizona Upland of the Sonoran Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsson, Aaryn D.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Crimmins, Michael A.; Marsh, Stuart E.

    2012-01-01

    In North American deserts, grass invasions threaten native vegetation via competition and altered fire regimes. Accurate prediction and successful mitigation of these invasions hinge on estimation of spread rates and their degree of constancy in time and space. We used high-resolution aerial photographs from 11 sites in the Santa Catalina Mountains, southern Arizona to reconstruct the spread of buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare), a C4 perennial bunchgrass, since 1980. The total area infested was fit to a logistic model and residuals of the model were compared to climatic factors of the corresponding and lagged time periods. Infestations grew from small colonizing patches in the 1980s to 66 ha in 2008, doubling every 2.26–7.04 years since 1988. Although buffelgrass germination, establishment and distribution are favored by wet summers and warm winters, climate variables did not predict spread rates. Buffelgrass has grown at a constant rate, at least since 1988, when much of its expansion took place. In the study area, minimum requirements are met almost every year for germination and reproduction, establishing a consistent baseline for spread that manifests as a constant spread rate.

  9. On the constancy of solar particle fluxes from track, thermoluminescence and solar wind measurements in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, E.

    1980-01-01

    Evidence contained within lunar rocks concerning possible variations in solar activity over the last 1 to 2 million years is reviewed. The effects of solar wind particles, which are implanted at shallow depths, solar flare protons, which produce thermoluminescence as well as stable and radionuclides, and solar flare heavy nuclei, which produce tracks, are considered, and the quality and limitations of nuclear tracks measurements as indicators of solar flare flux histories are discussed. Methods used for the determination of the solar flare track production rate, which must be known in order to measure lunar rock surface exposure times, are compared, and it is concluded that most of the evidence favors the rate obtained by Blanford et al. (1975). Information on the constancy of the solar flare particle flux obtained by comparison of the effects of different surface phenomena with solar particle effects is then illustrated for the cases of comparisons between solar flare tracks and microcrater densities, solar flare particle fluxes measured over different periods, and comparisons of the solar flare track production rate with the solar wind flux and microcratering rate. It is noted that these studies provide no evidence for a change in solar particle flux by more than a factor of two over the last 10,000 to 1 million years, or for a change in the solar flare Fe/H ratio in the last 2 million years.

  10. ION KINETIC ENERGY CONSERVATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH CONSTANCY IN MULTI-FLUID SOLAR WIND ALFVÉNIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, L.; Horbury, T. S.; Schwartz, S. J.; Pantellini, F.; Velli, M.

    2015-03-20

    We investigate the properties of plasma fluid motion in the large-amplitude, low-frequency fluctuations of highly Alfvénic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles which, due to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low-frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform the proton velocity into the frame of Alfvénic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfvénic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfvénic turbulence, is the origin of the observed constancy of the magnetic field; while the constant velocity corresponding to constant energy can only be observed in the frame of the fluctuations, the corresponding constant total magnetic field, invariant for Galilean transformations, remains the observational signature in the spacecraft frame of the constant total energy in the Alfvén turbulence frame.

  11. Phylogeny of culturable cyanobacteria from Brazilian mangroves.

    PubMed

    Silva, Caroline Souza Pamplona; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Vaz, Marcelo Gomes Marçal Vieira; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2014-03-01

    The cyanobacterial community from Brazilian mangrove ecosystems was examined using a culture-dependent method. Fifty cyanobacterial strains were isolated from soil, water and periphytic samples collected from Cardoso Island and Bertioga mangroves using specific cyanobacterial culture media. Unicellular, homocytous and heterocytous morphotypes were recovered, representing five orders, seven families and eight genera (Synechococcus, Cyanobium, Cyanobacterium, Chlorogloea, Leptolyngbya, Phormidium, Nostoc and Microchaete). All of these novel mangrove strains had their 16S rRNA gene sequenced and BLAST analysis revealed sequence identities ranging from 92.5 to 99.7% when they were compared with other strains available in GenBank. The results showed a high variability of the 16S rRNA gene sequences among the genotypes that was not associated with the morphologies observed. Phylogenetic analyses showed several branches formed exclusively by some of these novel 16S rRNA gene sequences. BLAST and phylogeny analyses allowed for the identification of Nodosilinea and Oxynema strains, genera already known to exhibit poor morphological diacritic traits. In addition, several Nostoc and Leptolyngbya morphotypes of the mangrove strains may represent new generic entities, as they were distantly affiliated with true genera clades. The presence of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, polyketide synthase, microcystin and saxitoxin genes were detected in 20.5%, 100%, 37.5% and 33.3%, respectively, of the 44 tested isolates. A total of 134 organic extracts obtained from 44 strains were tested against microorganisms, and 26% of the extracts showed some antimicrobial activity. This is the first polyphasic study of cultured cyanobacteria from Brazilian mangrove ecosystems using morphological, genetic and biological approaches.

  12. The evolutionary phylogeny of the oomycete "fungi".

    PubMed

    Beakes, Gordon W; Glockling, Sally L; Sekimoto, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Molecular sequencing has helped resolve the phylogenetic relationships amongst the diverse groups of algal, fungal-like and protist organisms that constitute the Chromalveolate "superkingdom" clade. It is thought that the whole clade evolved from a photosynthetic ancestor and that there have been at least three independent plastid losses during their evolutionary history. The fungal-like oomycetes and hyphochytrids, together with the marine flagellates Pirsonia and Developayella, form part of the clade defined by Cavalier-Smith and Chao (2006) as the phylum "Pseudofungi", which is a sister to the photosynthetic chromistan algae (phylum Ochrophyta). Within the oomycetes, a number of predominantly marine holocarpic genera appear to diverge before the main "saprolegnian" and "peronosporalean" lines, into which all oomycetes had been traditionally placed. It is now clear that oomycetes have their evolutionary roots in the sea. The earliest diverging oomycete genera so far documented, Eurychasma and Haptoglossa, are both obligate parasites that show a high degree of complexity and sophistication in their host parasite interactions and infection structures. Key morphological and cytological features of the oomycetes will be reviewed in the context of our revised understanding of their likely phylogeny. Recent genomic studies have revealed a number of intriguing similarities in host-pathogen interactions between the oomycetes with their distant apicocomplexan cousins. Therefore, the earlier view that oomycetes evolved from the largely saprotrophic "saprolegnian line" is not supported and current evidence shows these organisms evolved from simple holocarpic marine parasites. Both the hyphal-like pattern of growth and the acquisition of oogamous sexual reproduction probably developed largely after the migration of these organisms from the sea to land. PMID:21424613

  13. The reticulating phylogeny of island biogeography theory.

    PubMed

    Lomolino, Mark V; Brown, James H

    2009-12-01

    Biogeographers study all patterns in the geographic variation of life, from the spatial variation in genetic and physiological characteristics of cells and individuals, to the diversity and dynamics of biological communities among continental biotas or across oceanic archipelagoes. The field of island biogeography, in particular, has provided some genuinely transformative insights for the biological sciences, especially ecology and evolutionary biology. Our purpose here is to review the historical development of island biogeography theory during the 20th century by identifying the common threads that run through four sets of contributions made during this period, including those by Eugene Gordon Munroe (1948, 1953), Edward O. Wilson (1959, 1961), Frank W. Preston (1962a,b), and the seminal collaborations between Wilson and Robert H. MacArthur (1963, 1967), which revolutionized the field and served as its paradigm for nearly four decades. This epistemological account not only reviews the intriguing history of island theory, but it also includes fundamental lessons for advancing science through transformative integrations. Indeed, as is likely the case with many disciplines, island theory advanced not as a simple accumulation of facts and an orderly succession of theories and paradigms, but rather in fits and starts through a reticulating phylogeny of ideas and alternating periods of specialization and reintegration. We conclude this review with a summary of the salient features of this scientific revolution in the contest of Kuhn's structure, which strongly influenced theoretical advances during this period, and we then describe some of the fundamental assumptions and tenets of an emerging reintegration of island biogeography theory. PMID:20039528

  14. The reticulating phylogeny of island biogeography theory.

    PubMed

    Lomolino, Mark V; Brown, James H

    2009-12-01

    Biogeographers study all patterns in the geographic variation of life, from the spatial variation in genetic and physiological characteristics of cells and individuals, to the diversity and dynamics of biological communities among continental biotas or across oceanic archipelagoes. The field of island biogeography, in particular, has provided some genuinely transformative insights for the biological sciences, especially ecology and evolutionary biology. Our purpose here is to review the historical development of island biogeography theory during the 20th century by identifying the common threads that run through four sets of contributions made during this period, including those by Eugene Gordon Munroe (1948, 1953), Edward O. Wilson (1959, 1961), Frank W. Preston (1962a,b), and the seminal collaborations between Wilson and Robert H. MacArthur (1963, 1967), which revolutionized the field and served as its paradigm for nearly four decades. This epistemological account not only reviews the intriguing history of island theory, but it also includes fundamental lessons for advancing science through transformative integrations. Indeed, as is likely the case with many disciplines, island theory advanced not as a simple accumulation of facts and an orderly succession of theories and paradigms, but rather in fits and starts through a reticulating phylogeny of ideas and alternating periods of specialization and reintegration. We conclude this review with a summary of the salient features of this scientific revolution in the contest of Kuhn's structure, which strongly influenced theoretical advances during this period, and we then describe some of the fundamental assumptions and tenets of an emerging reintegration of island biogeography theory.

  15. Phylogeny of culturable cyanobacteria from Brazilian mangroves.

    PubMed

    Silva, Caroline Souza Pamplona; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Vaz, Marcelo Gomes Marçal Vieira; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2014-03-01

    The cyanobacterial community from Brazilian mangrove ecosystems was examined using a culture-dependent method. Fifty cyanobacterial strains were isolated from soil, water and periphytic samples collected from Cardoso Island and Bertioga mangroves using specific cyanobacterial culture media. Unicellular, homocytous and heterocytous morphotypes were recovered, representing five orders, seven families and eight genera (Synechococcus, Cyanobium, Cyanobacterium, Chlorogloea, Leptolyngbya, Phormidium, Nostoc and Microchaete). All of these novel mangrove strains had their 16S rRNA gene sequenced and BLAST analysis revealed sequence identities ranging from 92.5 to 99.7% when they were compared with other strains available in GenBank. The results showed a high variability of the 16S rRNA gene sequences among the genotypes that was not associated with the morphologies observed. Phylogenetic analyses showed several branches formed exclusively by some of these novel 16S rRNA gene sequences. BLAST and phylogeny analyses allowed for the identification of Nodosilinea and Oxynema strains, genera already known to exhibit poor morphological diacritic traits. In addition, several Nostoc and Leptolyngbya morphotypes of the mangrove strains may represent new generic entities, as they were distantly affiliated with true genera clades. The presence of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, polyketide synthase, microcystin and saxitoxin genes were detected in 20.5%, 100%, 37.5% and 33.3%, respectively, of the 44 tested isolates. A total of 134 organic extracts obtained from 44 strains were tested against microorganisms, and 26% of the extracts showed some antimicrobial activity. This is the first polyphasic study of cultured cyanobacteria from Brazilian mangrove ecosystems using morphological, genetic and biological approaches. PMID:24461713

  16. THE RETICULATING PHYLOGENY OF ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY THEORY

    PubMed Central

    Lomolino, Mark V.; Brown, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Biogeographers study all patterns in the geographic variation of life, from the spatial variation in genetic and physiological characteristics of cells and individuals, to the diversity and dynamics of biological communities among continental biotas or across oceanic archipelagoes. The field of island biogeography, in particular, has provided some genuinely transformative insights for the biological sciences, especially ecology and evolutionary biology. Our purpose here is to review the historical development of island biogeography theory during the 20th century by identifying the common threads that run through four sets of contributions made during this period, including those by Eugene Gordon Munroe (1948, 1953), Edward O. Wilson (1959, 1961), Frank W. Preston (1962a,b), and the seminal collaborations between Wilson and Robert H. MacArthur (1963, 1967), which revolutionized the field and served as its paradigm for nearly four decades. This epistemological account not only reviews the intriguing history of island theory, but it also includes fundamental lessons for advancing science through transformative integrations. Indeed, as is likely the case with many disciplines, island theory advanced not as a simple accumulation of facts and an orderly succession of theories and paradigms, but rather in fits and starts through a reticulating phylogeny of ideas and alternating periods of specialization and reintegration. We conclude this review with a summary of the salient features of this scientific revolution in the context of Kuhn’s structure, which strongly influenced theoretical advances during this period, and we then describe some of the fundamental assumptions and tenets of an emerging reintegration of island biogeography theory. PMID:20039528

  17. Ontogeny tends to recapitulate phylogeny in digital organisms.

    PubMed

    Clune, Jeff; Pennock, Robert T; Ofria, Charles; Lenski, Richard E

    2012-09-01

    Biologists have long debated whether ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny and, if so, why. Two plausible explanations are that (i) changes to early developmental stages are selected against because they tend to disrupt later development and (ii) simpler structures often precede more complex ones in both ontogeny and phylogeny if the former serve as building blocks for the latter. It is difficult to test these hypotheses experimentally in natural systems, so we used a computational system that exhibits evolutionary dynamics. We observed that ontogeny does indeed recapitulate phylogeny; traits that arose earlier in a lineage's history also tended to be expressed earlier in the development of individuals. The relative complexity of traits contributed substantially to this correlation, but a significant tendency toward recapitulation remained even after accounting for trait complexity. This additional effect provides evidence that selection against developmental disruption also contributed to the conservation of early stages in development. PMID:22854085

  18. Diversity dynamics: molecular phylogenies need the fossil record.

    PubMed

    Quental, Tiago B; Marshall, Charles R

    2010-08-01

    Over the last two decades, new tools in the analysis of molecular phylogenies have enabled study of the diversification dynamics of living clades in the absence of information about extinct lineages. However, computer simulations and the fossil record show that the inability to access extinct lineages severely limits the inferences that can be drawn from molecular phylogenies. It appears that molecular phylogenies can tell us only when there have been changes in diversification rates, but are blind to the true diversity trajectories and rates of origination and extinction that have led to the species that are alive today. We need to embrace the fossil record if we want to fully understand the diversity dynamics of the living biota. PMID:20646780

  19. Are most species small? Not within species-level phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Orme, C David L; Isaac, Nick J B; Purvis, Andy

    2002-06-22

    The robust macro-ecological observation that there are more small-bodied species implies that small-bodied organisms have experienced elevated net rates of diversification. We investigate the role of body size in creating non-random differences in rates of cladogenesis using a set of 38 species-level phylogenies drawn from a range of animal groups. We use independent contrasts to explore the relationship between body size and species richness within individual phylogenies and across related sets of phylogenies. We also carry out a meta-analysis looking for associations between body size and species richness across the taxa. We find little evidence for increased cladogenesis among small-bodied organisms within taxa, and no evidence for any consistent differences between taxa. We explore possible explanations for the inconsistency of our findings with macro-ecological patterns.

  20. A molecular phylogeny of aquatic gastropods provides a new perspective on biogeographic history of the Snake River Region.

    PubMed

    Hershler, Robert; Liu, Hsiu-Ping

    2004-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences of aquatic gastropods of the subgenus Pyrgulopsis (Natricola) were analyzed to test a commonly accepted hypothesis concerning the early history of the Snake River in the northwestern US. Distributions of Natricola and other regional biota were previously used to infer that the Snake River flowed to the Pacific through southeastern Oregon and northern California during the Neogene prior to its capture by the Columbia River in the late Pliocene (2 Ma). A molecular phylogeny based on partial sequences of COI and NDI (1149 bp) indicates that the Natricola clade is restricted to the modern Snake-Columbia River Basin and the Oregon Lakes region whereas northern California populations previously assigned to this subgenus belong to other lineages. The Natricola clade is not deeply subdivided into Oregon Lakes and Snake River Basin units consistent with late Pliocene fragmentation of the hypothesized paleodrainage, but instead is shallowly structured and contains multiple transitions among these two geographic areas. The strongly supported sister relationship between Natricola and a species from northwest Nevada (P. imperialis) is consistent with a recent proposal that the ancestral Snake River did not flow through southeast Oregon but instead flowed south to the Humboldt River. Within the context of this hypothesis, the multiple transitions between the Snake River Basin and the Oregon Lakes region that occurred within Natricola may be attributed to a late Pleistocene connection between these areas that was unrelated to the early course of the Snake River.

  1. Introduction--development and phylogeny of the arthropods: Darwin's legacy.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Jean S

    2006-01-01

    In the present essay, I first recall the genealogical concept of classification settled by Charles Darwin in the "Origin of Species". Darwin tightly linked what we now call phylogeny and development. He often insisted to take into account embryonic and larval characters, most often using as examples his favourite animals, the cirripedes. Then I discuss remaining problems, and also perspectives, to address the link between phylogeny and development in the modern terms of molecular and cladistic phylogenetics and of molecular and genetic developmental biology. PMID:16841233

  2. Efficient Recycled Algorithms for Quantitative Trait Models on Phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Hiscott, Gordon; Fox, Colin; Parry, Matthew; Bryant, David

    2016-01-01

    We present an efficient and flexible method for computing likelihoods for phenotypic traits on a phylogeny. The method does not resort to Monte Carlo computation but instead blends Felsenstein’s discrete character pruning algorithm with methods for numerical quadrature. It is not limited to Gaussian models and adapts readily to model uncertainty in the observed trait values. We demonstrate the framework by developing efficient algorithms for likelihood calculation and ancestral state reconstruction under Wright’s threshold model, applying our methods to a data set of trait data for extrafloral nectaries across a phylogeny of 839 Fabales species. PMID:27056412

  3. Correlation between strand asymmetry and phylogeny in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Barral P, J; Cantini, L; Hasmy, A; Jiménez, J; Marcano, A

    2005-10-21

    An evolutionary distance is introduced in order to propose an efficient and feasible procedure for phylogeny studies. Our analysis are based on the strand asymmetry property of mitochondrial DNA, but can be applied to other genomes. Comparison of our results with those reported in conventional phylogenetic trees, gives confidence about our approximation. Our findings support the hypotheses about the origin of the skew and its dependence upon evolutionary pressures, and improves previous efforts on using the strand asymmetry property of genomes for phylogeny inference. For the evolutionary distance introduced here, we observe that the more adequate technique for tree reconstructions correspond to an average link method which employs a sequential clustering algorithm.

  4. Introduction--development and phylogeny of the arthropods: Darwin's legacy.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Jean S

    2006-01-01

    In the present essay, I first recall the genealogical concept of classification settled by Charles Darwin in the "Origin of Species". Darwin tightly linked what we now call phylogeny and development. He often insisted to take into account embryonic and larval characters, most often using as examples his favourite animals, the cirripedes. Then I discuss remaining problems, and also perspectives, to address the link between phylogeny and development in the modern terms of molecular and cladistic phylogenetics and of molecular and genetic developmental biology.

  5. [Genosystematics and new insight on phylogeny and taxonomy of liverworts].

    PubMed

    Vil'net, A A; Konstantinova, N A; Troitskiĭ, A V

    2009-01-01

    The paper covers a current state of molecular studies of liverworts including new data from authors. The traditional conceptions of liverwort phylogeny and systematics were changed greatly in a result of recent molecular researches. The phylogenetic inferences from studies of different DNA loci and species sampling are mainly congruent. The phylogeny and systematics of one of the largest and taxonomically difficult suborder Jungermaniineae was discussed based on analyses of internal transcribed spacer ITS1-2 of nuclear rDNA and chloroplast trnL-F of large species number.

  6. Phylogeny, culturing, and metagenomics of the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alan W; Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2014-05-01

    The human intestinal tract is colonised by a complex community of microbes, which can have major impacts on host health. Recent research on the gut microbiota has largely been driven by the advent of modern sequence-based techniques, such as metagenomics. Although these are powerful and valuable tools, they have limitations. Traditional culturing and phylogeny can mitigate some of these limitations, either by expanding reference databases or by assigning functionality to specific microbial lineages. As such, culture and phylogeny will continue to have crucially important roles in human microbiota research, and will be required for the development of novel therapeutics.

  7. SHOT: a web server for the construction of genome phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Korbel, Jan O; Snel, Berend; Huynen, Martijn A; Bork, Peer

    2002-03-01

    With the increasing availability of genome sequences, new methods are being proposed that exploit information from complete genomes to classify species in a phylogeny. Here we present SHOT, a web server for the classification of genomes on the basis of shared gene content or the conservation of gene order that reflects the dominant, phylogenetic signal in these genomic properties. In general, the genome trees are consistent with classical gene-based phylogenies, although some interesting exceptions indicate massive horizontal gene transfer. SHOT is a useful tool for analysing the tree of life from a genomic point of view. It is available at http://www.Bork.EMBL-Heidelberg.de/SHOT.

  8. Lake Nasser and Toshka Lakes, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Nasser (center) and the Toshka Lakes (center left) glow emerald green and black in this MODIS true-color image acquired March 8, 2002. Located on and near the border of Egypt and Norther Sudan, these lakes are an oasis of water in between the Nubian (lower right) and Libyan Deserts (upper left). Also visible are the Red Sea (in the upper right) and the Nile River (running north from Lake Nasser). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. Top-down modulation of visual processing and knowledge after 250 ms supports object constancy of category decisions

    PubMed Central

    Schendan, Haline E.; Ganis, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    People categorize objects more slowly when visual input is highly impoverished instead of optimal. While bottom-up models may explain a decision with optimal input, perceptual hypothesis testing (PHT) theories implicate top-down processes with impoverished input. Brain mechanisms and the time course of PHT are largely unknown. This event-related potential study used a neuroimaging paradigm that implicated prefrontal cortex in top-down modulation of occipitotemporal cortex. Subjects categorized more impoverished and less impoverished real and pseudo objects. PHT theories predict larger impoverishment effects for real than pseudo objects because top-down processes modulate knowledge only for real objects, but different PHT variants predict different timing. Consistent with parietal-prefrontal PHT variants, around 250 ms, the earliest impoverished real object interaction started on an N3 complex, which reflects interactive cortical activity for object cognition. N3 impoverishment effects localized to both prefrontal and occipitotemporal cortex for real objects only. The N3 also showed knowledge effects by 230 ms that localized to occipitotemporal cortex. Later effects reflected (a) word meaning in temporal cortex during the N400, (b) internal evaluation of prior decision and memory processes and secondary higher-order memory involving anterotemporal parts of a default mode network during posterior positivity (P600), and (c) response related activity in posterior cingulate during an anterior slow wave (SW) after 700 ms. Finally, response activity in supplementary motor area during a posterior SW after 900 ms showed impoverishment effects that correlated with RTs. Convergent evidence from studies of vision, memory, and mental imagery which reflects purely top-down inputs, indicates that the N3 reflects the critical top-down processes of PHT. A hybrid multiple-state interactive, PHT and decision theory best explains the visual constancy of object cognition. PMID:26441701

  10. Mitochondrial data are not suitable for resolving placental mammal phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Claire C; Creevey, Christopher J; O'Connell, Mary J

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial data have traditionally been used in reconstructing a variety of species phylogenies. The low rates of recombination and thorough characterization of mitochondrial data across vertebrate species make it a particularly attractive phylogenetic marker. The relatively low number of fully sequenced mammal genomes and the lack of extensive sampling within Superorders have posed a serious problem for reaching agreement on the placement mammal species. The use of mitochondrial data sequences from large numbers of mammals could serve to circumvent the taxon-sampling deficit. Here we assess the suitability of mitochondrial data as a phylogenetic marker in mammal phylogenetics. MtDNA datasets of mammal origin have been filtered as follows: (i) we have sampled sparsely across the phylogenetic tree, (ii) we have constrained our sampling to genes with high taxon coverage, (iii) we have categorised rates across sites in a phylogeny independent manner and have removed fast evolving sites, and (iv), we have sampled from very shallow divergence times to reduce phylogenetic conflict. However, topologies obtained using these filters are not consistent with previous studies and are discordant across different genes. Individual mitochondrial genes, and indeed all mitochondrial genes analysed as a supermatrix, resulted in poor resolution of the species phylogeny. Overall, our study highlights the limitations of mitochondrial data, not only for resolving deep divergences and but also for shallow divergences in the mammal phylogeny.

  11. Phylogeny and life histories of the 'Insectivora': controversies and consequences.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Matthew R E

    2005-02-01

    The evolutionary relationships of the eutherian order Insectivora (Lipotyphla sensu stricto) are the subject of considerable debate. The difficulties in establishing insectivore phylogeny stem from their lack of many shared derived characteristics. The grouping is therefore something of a 'wastebasket' taxon. Most of the older estimates of phylogeny, based on morphological evidence, assumed insectivore monophyly. More recently, molecular phylogenies argue strongly against monophyly, although they differ in the extent of polyphyly inferred for the order. I review the history of insectivore phylogenetics and systematics, focussing on the relationships between the six extant families (Erinaceidae--hedgehogs and moonrats, Talpidae - moles and desmans, Soricidae - shrews, Solenodontidae--solenodons, Tenrecidae--tenrecs and otter-shrews and Chrysochloridae--golden moles). I then examine how these various phylogenetic hypotheses influence the results of comparative analyses and our interpretation of insectivore life-history evolution. I assess which particular controversies have the greatest effect on results, and discuss the implications for comparative analyses where the phylogeny is controversial. I also explore and suggest explanations for certain insectivore life-history trends: increased gestation length and litter size in tenrecs, increased encephalization in moles, and the mixed fast and slow life-history strategies in solenodons. Finally, I consider the implications for comparative analyses of the recent strongly supported phylogenetic hypothesis of an endemic African clade of mammals that includes the insectivore families of tenrecs and golden moles.

  12. Ontogeny and Phylogeny from an Epigenetic Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovtrup, Soren

    1984-01-01

    The correlation between ontogeny and phylogeny is analyzed through the discussion of four theories on the reality, history, epigenetic, and ecological aspects of the mechanism of evolution. Also discussed are historical and creative aspects of evolution and three epigenetic mechanisms instantiated in the case of the amphibian embryo. (Author/RH)

  13. Phylogeny and adaptation shape the teeth of insular mice.

    PubMed

    Ledevin, Ronan; Chevret, Pascale; Ganem, Guila; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Hardouin, Emilie A; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Pisanu, Benoit; da Luz Mathias, Maria; Schlager, Stefan; Auffray, Jean-Christophe; Renaud, Sabrina

    2016-02-10

    By accompanying human travels since prehistorical times, the house mouse dispersed widely throughout the world, and colonized many islands. The origin of the travellers determined the phylogenetic source of the insular mice, which encountered diverse ecological and environmental conditions on the various islands. Insular mice are thus an exceptional model to disentangle the relative role of phylogeny, ecology and climate in evolution. Molar shape is known to vary according to phylogeny and to respond to adaptation. Using for the first time a three-dimensional geometric morphometric approach, compared with a classical two-dimensional quantification, the relative effects of size variation, phylogeny, climate and ecology were investigated on molar shape diversity across a variety of islands. Phylogeny emerged as the factor of prime importance in shaping the molar. Changes in competition level, mostly driven by the presence or absence of the wood mouse on the different islands, appeared as the second most important effect. Climate and size differences accounted for slight shape variation. This evidences a balanced role of random differentiation related to history of colonization, and of adaptation possibly related to resource exploitation. PMID:26842576

  14. The effects of island ontogeny on species diversity and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Valente, Luis M; Etienne, Rampal S; Phillimore, Albert B

    2014-06-01

    A major goal of island biogeography is to understand how island communities are assembled over time. However, we know little about the influence of variable area and ecological opportunity on island biotas over geological timescales. Islands have limited life spans, and it has been posited that insular diversity patterns should rise and fall with an island's ontogeny. The potential of phylogenies to inform us of island ontogenetic stage remains unclear, as we lack a phylogenetic framework that focuses on islands rather than clades. Here, we present a parsimonious island-centric model that integrates phylogeny and ontogeny into island biogeography and can incorporate a negative feedback of diversity on species origination. This framework allows us to generate predictions about species richness and phylogenies on islands of different ages. We find that peak richness lags behind peak island area, and that endemic species age increases with island age on volcanic islands. When diversity negatively affects rates of immigration and cladogenesis, our model predicts speciation slowdowns on old islands. Importantly, we find that branching times of in situ radiations can be informative of an island's ontogenetic stage. This novel framework provides a quantitative means of uncovering processes responsible for island biogeography patterns using phylogenies.

  15. Phylogeny and adaptation shape the teeth of insular mice.

    PubMed

    Ledevin, Ronan; Chevret, Pascale; Ganem, Guila; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Hardouin, Emilie A; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Pisanu, Benoit; da Luz Mathias, Maria; Schlager, Stefan; Auffray, Jean-Christophe; Renaud, Sabrina

    2016-02-10

    By accompanying human travels since prehistorical times, the house mouse dispersed widely throughout the world, and colonized many islands. The origin of the travellers determined the phylogenetic source of the insular mice, which encountered diverse ecological and environmental conditions on the various islands. Insular mice are thus an exceptional model to disentangle the relative role of phylogeny, ecology and climate in evolution. Molar shape is known to vary according to phylogeny and to respond to adaptation. Using for the first time a three-dimensional geometric morphometric approach, compared with a classical two-dimensional quantification, the relative effects of size variation, phylogeny, climate and ecology were investigated on molar shape diversity across a variety of islands. Phylogeny emerged as the factor of prime importance in shaping the molar. Changes in competition level, mostly driven by the presence or absence of the wood mouse on the different islands, appeared as the second most important effect. Climate and size differences accounted for slight shape variation. This evidences a balanced role of random differentiation related to history of colonization, and of adaptation possibly related to resource exploitation.

  16. Ecological interaction and phylogeny, studying functionality on composed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Claudia P. T.; Fonseca, Carlos Roberto; Corso, Gilberto

    2012-02-01

    We study a class of composed networks that are formed by two tree networks, TP and TA, whose end points touch each other through a bipartite network BPA. We explore this network using a functional approach. We are interested in how much the topology, or the structure, of TX (X=A or P) determines the links of BPA. This composed structure is a useful model in evolutionary biology, where TP and TA are the phylogenetic trees of plants and animals that interact in an ecological community. We make use of ecological networks of dispersion of fruits, which are formed by frugivorous animals and plants with fruits; the animals, usually birds, eat fruits and disperse their seeds. We analyse how the phylogeny of TX determines or is correlated with BPA using a Monte Carlo approach. We use the phylogenetic distance among elements that interact with a given species to construct an index κ that quantifies the influence of TX over BPA. The algorithm is based on the assumption that interaction matrices that follows a phylogeny of TX have a total phylogenetic distance smaller than the average distance of an ensemble of Monte Carlo realisations. We find that the effect of phylogeny of animal species is more pronounced in the ecological matrix than plant phylogeny.

  17. A phylogeny of Cenozoic macroperforate planktonic foraminifera from fossil data.

    PubMed

    Aze, Tracy; Ezard, Thomas H G; Purvis, Andy; Coxall, Helen K; Stewart, Duncan R M; Wade, Bridget S; Pearson, Paul N

    2011-11-01

    We present a complete phylogeny of macroperforate planktonic foraminifer species of the Cenozoic Era (∼65 million years ago to present). The phylogeny is developed from a large body of palaeontological work that details the evolutionary relationships and stratigraphic (time) distributions of species-level taxa identified from morphology ('morphospecies'). Morphospecies are assigned to morphogroups and ecogroups depending on test morphology and inferred habitat, respectively. Because gradual evolution is well documented in this clade, we have identified many instances of morphospecies intergrading over time, allowing us to eliminate 'pseudospeciation' and 'pseudoextinction' from the record and thereby permit the construction of a more natural phylogeny based on inferred biological lineages. Each cladogenetic event is determined as either budding or bifurcating depending on the pattern of morphological change at the time of branching. This lineage phylogeny provides palaeontologically calibrated ages for each divergence that are entirely independent of molecular data. The tree provides a model system for macroevolutionary studies in the fossil record addressing questions of speciation, extinction, and rates and patterns of evolution.

  18. Monophyly of Rhizaria and multigene phylogeny of unicellular bikonts.

    PubMed

    Burki, Fabien; Pawlowski, Jan

    2006-10-01

    Reconstructing a global phylogeny of eukaryotes is an ongoing challenge of molecular phylogenetics. The availability of genomic data from a broad range of eukaryotic phyla helped in resolving the eukaryotic tree into a topology with a rather small number of large assemblages, but the relationships between these "supergroups" are yet to be confirmed. Rhizaria is the most recently recognized "supergroup," but, in spite of this important position within the tree of life, their representatives are still missing in global phylogenies of eukaryotes. Here, we report the first large-scale analysis of eukaryote phylogeny including data for 2 rhizarian species, the foraminiferan Reticulomyxa filosa and the chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans. Our results confirm the monophyly of Rhizaria (Foraminifera + Cercozoa), with very high bootstrap supports in all analyses. The overall topology of our trees is in agreement with the current view of eukaryote phylogeny with basal division into "unikonts" (Opisthokonts and Ameobozoa) and "bikonts" (Plantae, alveolates, stramenopiles, and excavates). As expected, Rhizaria branch among bikonts; however, their phylogenetic position is uncertain. Depending on the data set and the type of analysis, Rhizaria branch as sister group to either stramenopiles or excavates. Overall, the relationships between the major groups of unicellular bikonts are poorly resolved, despite the use of 85 proteins and the largest taxonomic sampling for this part of the tree available to date. This may be due to an acceleration of evolutionary rates in some bikont phyla or be related to their rapid diversification in the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  19. Phylogeny and classification of tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phylogeny and classification of tribe Aedini are delineated based on a cladistic analysis of 336 characters from eggs, fourth-instar larvae, pupae, adult females and males, and immature stage habitat coded for 270 exemplar species, including an outgroup of four species from different non-aedine ...

  20. A phylogeny of Cenozoic macroperforate planktonic foraminifera from fossil data.

    PubMed

    Aze, Tracy; Ezard, Thomas H G; Purvis, Andy; Coxall, Helen K; Stewart, Duncan R M; Wade, Bridget S; Pearson, Paul N

    2011-11-01

    We present a complete phylogeny of macroperforate planktonic foraminifer species of the Cenozoic Era (∼65 million years ago to present). The phylogeny is developed from a large body of palaeontological work that details the evolutionary relationships and stratigraphic (time) distributions of species-level taxa identified from morphology ('morphospecies'). Morphospecies are assigned to morphogroups and ecogroups depending on test morphology and inferred habitat, respectively. Because gradual evolution is well documented in this clade, we have identified many instances of morphospecies intergrading over time, allowing us to eliminate 'pseudospeciation' and 'pseudoextinction' from the record and thereby permit the construction of a more natural phylogeny based on inferred biological lineages. Each cladogenetic event is determined as either budding or bifurcating depending on the pattern of morphological change at the time of branching. This lineage phylogeny provides palaeontologically calibrated ages for each divergence that are entirely independent of molecular data. The tree provides a model system for macroevolutionary studies in the fossil record addressing questions of speciation, extinction, and rates and patterns of evolution. PMID:21492379

  1. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Eckert, Thomas H.; Schaner, Ted; Bowlby, James N.; Schleen, Larry P.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to maintain the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population in Lake Ontario by stocking fry failed and the species was extirpated by the 1950s. Hatchery fish stocked in the 1960s did not live to maturity because of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) predation and incidental commercial harvest. Suppression of sea lampreys began with larvicide treatments of Lake Ontario tributaries in 1971 and was enhanced when the tributaries of Oneida Lake and Lake Erie were treated in the 1980s. Annual stocking of hatchery fish was resumed with the 1972 year class and peaked at about 1.8 million yearlings and 0.3 million fingerlings from the 1985–1990 year classes. Survival of stocked yearlings declined over 50% in the 1980 s and was negatively correlated with the abundance of lake trout > 550 mm long (r = −0.91, P < 0.01, n = 12). A slot length limit imposed by the State of New York for the 1988 fishing season reduced angler harvest. Angler harvest in Canadian waters was 3 times higher in eastern Lake Ontario than in western Lake Ontario. For the 1977–1984 year classes, mean annual survival rate of lake trout age 6 and older was 0.45 (range: 0.35–0.56). In U.S. waters during 1985–1992, the total number of lake trout harvested by anglers was about 2.4 times greater than that killed by sea lampreys. The number of unmarked lake trout < 250 mm long in trawl catches in 1978–1992 was not different from that expected due to loss of marks and failure to apply marks at the hatchery, and suggested that recruitment of naturally-produced fish was nil. However, many of the obstacles which may have impeded lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario during the 1980s are slowly being removed, and there are signs of a general ecosystem recovery. Significant recruitment of naturally produced lake trout by the year 2000, one interim objective of the rehabilitation plan for the Lake, may be achieved.

  2. Lakes Ecosystem Services Online

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northeastern lakes provide valuable ecosystem services that benefit residents and visitors and are increasingly important for provisioning of recreational opportunities and amenities. Concurrently, however, population growth threatens lakes by, for instance, increasing nutrient ...

  3. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  4. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This book contains lesson plans that provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into elementary subjects. The book is divided into three subject areas: (1) History, which includes the origins of the Great Lakes, Great Lakes people, and shipwrecks; (2) Social Studies, which covers government, acid rain as a…

  5. A Killer Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In 1986, Lake Nyos, a volcanic lake in Cameroon, released a huge amount of carbon dioxide gas, killing over 1,700 people in the surrounding area. This case study, developed for use in a limnology or aquatic biology course, explores that event, introducing students to concepts relating to lake formation, thermal stratification, and dissolved gases.…

  6. Great Lakes: Chemical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tenth Great Lakes Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society met to assess current Chemical Research activity in the Great Lakes Basin, and addressed to the various aspects of the theme, Chemistry of the Great Lakes. Research areas reviewed included watershed studies, atmospheric and aquatic studies, and sediment studies. (BT)

  7. Lake Layers: Stratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Chris; And Others

    This teacher guide and student workbook set contains two learning activities, designed for fifth through ninth grade students, that concentrate on lake stratification and water quality. In the activities students model the seasonal temperature changes that occur in temperate lakes and observe the resulting stratification of lake waters. Students…

  8. Food of lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dryer, William R.; Erkkila, Leo F.; Tetzloff, Clifford L.

    1965-01-01

    Stomachs were examined from 1,492 lake trout and 83 siscowets collected from Lake Superior. Data are given on the food of lake trout of legal size (17 inches or longer) by year, season, and depth of water, and on the relation between food and size among smaller lake trout. Fish contributed 96.7 to 99.9 per cent of the total volume of food in the annual samples. Ciscoes (Coregonus spp.) were most common (52.2 to 87.5 per cent of the volume) in 1950 to 1953 and American smelt ranked first (65.6 per cent of the volume) in 1963. Cottids were in 8.9 to 12.3 per cent of the stomachs in 1950 to 1953 but in only 4.3 per cent in 1963. Insects ranked second to fish in occurrence (9.6 per cent for the combined samples) and crustaceans followed at 3.9 per cent. The greatest seasonal changes in the food of lake trout were among fish caught at 35 fathoms and shallower. The occurrence of Coregonus increased from 34.6 per cent in February-March to 71.1 per cent in October-December. Smelt were in 76.9 per cent of the stomachs in February-March but in only 2.2 per cent in October-December. Cottids, Mysis relicta, and insects were most common in the July-September collections. Lake trout taken at depths greater than 35 fathoms had eaten a higher percentage of Cottidae and Coregonus than had those captured in shallower water. Smelt, ninespine sticklebacks, Mysis, and insects were more frequent in stomachs of lake trout from less than 35 fathoms. Crustaceans comprised more than 70 per cent of the total volume of food for 4.0- to 7.9-inch lake trout but their importance decreased as the lake trout grew larger. Pontoporeia affinis was the most common in the stomachs of 4.0- to 6.9-inch lake trout and Mysis held first rank at 7.0 to 12.9 inches. Ostracods were important only to 4.0- to 4.9-inch lake trout. As the lake trout became larger, the importance of fish grew from 4.4-per cent occurrence at 5.0 to 5.9 inches to 93.9 per cent at 16.0 to 16.9 inches. Smelt were most commonly eaten by

  9. Identification in situ and dynamics of bacteria on limnetic organic aggregates (lake snow).

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, P; Schweitzer, B; Amann, R; Simon, M

    1996-01-01

    Microbial assemblages on large organic aggregates (lake snow) of Lake Constance, Germany, were analyzed with rRNA-directed fluorescent oligonucleotide probes specific for the domain Bacteria and the alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Lake snow aggregates were either collected in situ by SCUBA diving or in a sediment trap at 50 m or formed of natural lake water incubated in rolling cylinders under simulated in situ conditions. For the latter aggregates, the time course of the microbial colonization was also examined. The natural aggregates and those made in rolling cylinders were composed of the particulate organic material present in the lake and thus reflected the composition of the ambient plankton community. All types of lake snow aggregates examined were heavily colonized by microbial cells and harbored between 0.5 x 10(6) and > 2 x 10(6) cells aggregate -1. Between 55 and 100% of the microbial cells stained with 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) could be visualized with the domain Bacteria-specific probe. In most samples, beta-subclass proteobacteria dominated the microbial community, constituting 27 to 42% of total cells as counted by DAPI staining, irrespective of the composition of the aggregates. During the time course experiments with the laboratory-made aggregates, the fraction of beta-subclass proteobacteria usually increased over time. Except for a few samples, alpha- and gamma-subclass proteobacteria were far less abundant than beta-subclass proteobacteria, constituting 11 to 25 and 9 to 33% of total cells, respectively. Therefore, we assume that a specific aggregate-adapted microbial community was established on the aggregates. Because the compositions of the microbial assemblages on natural and laboratory-made aggregates were similar, we conclude that aggregates made in rolling cylinders are good model system with which to examine the formation and microbial colonization of macroscopic organic aggregates. PMID

  10. Identification in situ and dynamics of bacteria on limnetic organic aggregates (lake snow).

    PubMed

    Weiss, P; Schweitzer, B; Amann, R; Simon, M

    1996-06-01

    Microbial assemblages on large organic aggregates (lake snow) of Lake Constance, Germany, were analyzed with rRNA-directed fluorescent oligonucleotide probes specific for the domain Bacteria and the alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Lake snow aggregates were either collected in situ by SCUBA diving or in a sediment trap at 50 m or formed of natural lake water incubated in rolling cylinders under simulated in situ conditions. For the latter aggregates, the time course of the microbial colonization was also examined. The natural aggregates and those made in rolling cylinders were composed of the particulate organic material present in the lake and thus reflected the composition of the ambient plankton community. All types of lake snow aggregates examined were heavily colonized by microbial cells and harbored between 0.5 x 10(6) and > 2 x 10(6) cells aggregate -1. Between 55 and 100% of the microbial cells stained with 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) could be visualized with the domain Bacteria-specific probe. In most samples, beta-subclass proteobacteria dominated the microbial community, constituting 27 to 42% of total cells as counted by DAPI staining, irrespective of the composition of the aggregates. During the time course experiments with the laboratory-made aggregates, the fraction of beta-subclass proteobacteria usually increased over time. Except for a few samples, alpha- and gamma-subclass proteobacteria were far less abundant than beta-subclass proteobacteria, constituting 11 to 25 and 9 to 33% of total cells, respectively. Therefore, we assume that a specific aggregate-adapted microbial community was established on the aggregates. Because the compositions of the microbial assemblages on natural and laboratory-made aggregates were similar, we conclude that aggregates made in rolling cylinders are good model system with which to examine the formation and microbial colonization of macroscopic organic aggregates.

  11. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, F.L.; Wells, F.C.; Shelby, W.J.; McPherson, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Lake Austin and Town Lake are impoundments on the Colorado River in Travis County, central Texas, and are a source of water for municipal industrial water supplies, electrical-power generation, and recreation for more than 500,000 people in the Austin metropolitan area. Small vertical temperature variations in both lakes were attributed to shallow depths in the lakes and short retention times of water in the lakes during the summer months. The largest areal variations in dissolved oxygen generally occur in Lake Austin during the summer as a result of releases of water from below the thermocline in Lake Travis. Except for iron, manganese, and mercury, dissolved concentrations of trace elements in water collected from Lake Austin and Town Lake did not exceed the primary or secondary drinking water standards set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Little or no effect of stormwater runoff on temperature, dissolved oxygen, or minor elements could be detected in either Lake Austin or Town Lake. Little seasonal or areal variation was noted in nitrogen concentrations in Lake Austin or Town lake. Total phosphorus concentrations generally were small in both lakes. Increased concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were detected after storm runoff inflow in Town Lake, but not in Lake Austin; densities of fecal-coliform bacteria increased in Lake Austin and Town Lake, but were substantially greater in Town Lake than in Lake Austin. 18 refs., 38 figs., 59 tabs.

  12. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Payne, N. Robert; Johnson, James E.; Bowen, Charles; Ebener, Mark P.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to restore lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Huron after their collapse in the 1940s were underway in the early 1970s with completion of the first round of lampricide applications in tributary streams and the stocking of several genotypes. We assess results of rehabilitation and establish a historical basis for comparison by quantifying the catch of spawning lake trout from Michigan waters in 1929-1932. Sixty-eight percent of this catch occurred in northern waters (MH-1) and most of the rest (15%) was from remote reefs in the middle of the main basin. Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) increased in the early 1980s in the main basin and depressed spawning populations of lake trout. This increase was especially severe in northern waters and appeared to be associated with untreated populations in the St. Marys River. Excessive commercial fishing stemming from unresolved treaty rights also contributed to loss of spawning fish in northern Michigan waters. Seneca-strain lake trout did not appear to be attacked by sea lampreys until they reached a size > 532 mm. At sizes > 632 mm, Seneca trout were 40-fold more abundant than the Marquette strain in matched-planting experiments. Natural reproduction past the fry stage has occurred in Thunder Bay and South Bay, but prospects for self-sustaining populations of lake trout in the main basin are poor because sea lampreys are too abundant, only one side of the basin is stocked, and stocking is deferred to allow commercial gillnetting in areas where most of the spawning occurred historically. Backcross lake trout, a lake trout x splake (s. Fontinalis x s. Namaycush) hybrid, did not reproduce in Georgian Bay, but this genotype is being replaced with pure-strain lake trout, whose early performance appears promising.

  13. Phylogenies support out-of-equilibrium models of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Manceau, Marc; Lambert, Amaury; Morlon, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    There is a long tradition in ecology of studying models of biodiversity at equilibrium. These models, including the influential Neutral Theory of Biodiversity, have been successful at predicting major macroecological patterns, such as species abundance distributions. But they have failed to predict macroevolutionary patterns, such as those captured in phylogenetic trees. Here, we develop a model of biodiversity in which all individuals have identical demographic rates, metacommunity size is allowed to vary stochastically according to population dynamics, and speciation arises naturally from the accumulation of point mutations. We show that this model generates phylogenies matching those observed in nature if the metacommunity is out of equilibrium. We develop a likelihood inference framework that allows fitting our model to empirical phylogenies, and apply this framework to various mammalian families. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that biodiversity dynamics are out of equilibrium.

  14. Congruence of morphologically-defined genera with molecular phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, David; Finarelli, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Morphologically-defined mammalian and molluscan genera (herein “morphogenera”) are significantly more likely to be monophyletic relative to molecular phylogenies than random, under 3 different models of expected monophyly rates: ≈63% of 425 surveyed morphogenera are monophyletic and 19% are polyphyletic, although certain groups appear to be problematic (e.g., nonmarine, unionoid bivalves). Compiled nonmonophyly rates are probably extreme values, because molecular analyses have focused on “problem” taxa, and molecular topologies (treated herein as error-free) contain contradictory groupings across analyses for 10% of molluscan morphogenera and 37% of mammalian morphogenera. Both body size and geographic range, 2 key macroevolutionary and macroecological variables, show significant rank correlations between values for morphogenera and molecularly-defined clades, even when strictly monophyletic morphogenera are excluded from analyses. Thus, although morphogenera can be imperfect reflections of phylogeny, large-scale statistical treatments of diversity dynamics or macroevolutionary variables in time and space are unlikely to be misleading. PMID:19416868

  15. Toward image phylogeny forests: automatically recovering semantically similar image relationships.

    PubMed

    Dias, Zanoni; Goldenstein, Siome; Rocha, Anderson

    2013-09-10

    In the past few years, several near-duplicate detection methods appeared in the literature to identify the cohabiting versions of a given document online. Following this trend, there are some initial attempts to go beyond the detection task, and look into the structure of evolution within a set of related images overtime. In this paper, we aim at automatically identify the structure of relationships underlying the images, correctly reconstruct their past history and ancestry information, and group them in distinct trees of processing history. We introduce a new algorithm that automatically handles sets of images comprising different related images, and outputs the phylogeny trees (also known as a forest) associated with them. Image phylogeny algorithms have many applications such as finding the first image within a set posted online (useful for tracking copyright infringement perpetrators), hint at child pornography content creators, and narrowing down a list of suspects for online harassment using photographs. PMID:23890634

  16. Toward image phylogeny forests: automatically recovering semantically similar image relationships.

    PubMed

    Dias, Zanoni; Goldenstein, Siome; Rocha, Anderson

    2013-09-10

    In the past few years, several near-duplicate detection methods appeared in the literature to identify the cohabiting versions of a given document online. Following this trend, there are some initial attempts to go beyond the detection task, and look into the structure of evolution within a set of related images overtime. In this paper, we aim at automatically identify the structure of relationships underlying the images, correctly reconstruct their past history and ancestry information, and group them in distinct trees of processing history. We introduce a new algorithm that automatically handles sets of images comprising different related images, and outputs the phylogeny trees (also known as a forest) associated with them. Image phylogeny algorithms have many applications such as finding the first image within a set posted online (useful for tracking copyright infringement perpetrators), hint at child pornography content creators, and narrowing down a list of suspects for online harassment using photographs.

  17. Whole Genome Phylogeny of Bacillus by Feature Frequency Profiles (FFP)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aisuo; Ash, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Fifty complete Bacillus genome sequences and associated plasmids were compared using the “feature frequency profile” (FFP) method. The resulting whole-genome phylogeny supports the placement of three Bacillus species (B. thuringiensis, B. anthracis and B. cereus) as a single clade. The monophyletic status of B. anthracis was strongly supported by the analysis. FFP proved to be more effective in inferring the phylogeny of Bacillus than methods based on single gene sequences [16s rRNA gene, GryB (gyrase subunit B) and AroE (shikimate-5-dehydrogenase)] analyses. The findings of FFP analysis were verified using kSNP v2 (alignment-free sequence analysis method) and Harvest suite (core genome sequence alignment method).

  18. Stage fluctuations of Wisconsin lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, Leo B.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes lake-stage fluctuations of 83 gaged lakes in Wisconsin and presents techniques for estimating stage fluctuation at ungaged lakes. Included are stage information at 83 lakes and stage-frequency data for 32 of these lakes that had sufficient record for analysis. Lakes are classified by a hydrologic-topographic lake classification scheme as ground-water flowthrough (GWF) lakes, surface-water drainage (SWD) lakes, and surface-water flow-through (SWF) lakes. Lakes within the same class were found to have similar water-level fluctuations. The lake-stage records indicate that most annual maximums occur during the months of May and June for all three classes. Annual minimum lake levels generally occur in September for surface-water drainage lakes, in March for surface-water flowthrough lakes, and in November for ground-water flow-through lakes. Data for each lake include location, period of water-level record, hydrologic classification, drainage area, surface area, lake volume, maximum depth, long-term mean stage and its standard deviation, maximum and minimum observed lake stage, and the average annual lake-stage fluctuation.

  19. Deep phylogeny and evolution of sponges (phylum Porifera).

    PubMed

    Wörheide, G; Dohrmann, M; Erpenbeck, D; Larroux, C; Maldonado, M; Voigt, O; Borchiellini, C; Lavrov, D V

    2012-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are a diverse taxon of benthic aquatic animals of great ecological, commercial, and biopharmaceutical importance. They are arguably the earliest-branching metazoan taxon, and therefore, they have great significance in the reconstruction of early metazoan evolution. Yet, the phylogeny and systematics of sponges are to some extent still unresolved, and there is an on-going debate about the exact branching pattern of their main clades and their relationships to the other non-bilaterian animals. Here, we review the current state of the deep phylogeny of sponges. Several studies have suggested that sponges are paraphyletic. However, based on recent phylogenomic analyses, we suggest that the phylum Porifera could well be monophyletic, in accordance with cladistic analyses based on morphology. This finding has many implications for the evolutionary interpretation of early animal traits and sponge development. We further review the contribution that mitochondrial genes and genomes have made to sponge phylogenetics and explore the current state of the molecular phylogenies of the four main sponge lineages (Classes), that is, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, Calcarea, and Homoscleromorpha, in detail. While classical systematic systems are largely congruent with molecular phylogenies in the class Hexactinellida and in certain parts of Demospongiae and Homoscleromorpha, the high degree of incongruence in the class Calcarea still represents a challenge. We highlight future areas of research to fill existing gaps in our knowledge. By reviewing sponge development in an evolutionary and phylogenetic context, we support previous suggestions that sponge larvae share traits and complexity with eumetazoans and that the simple sedentary adult lifestyle of sponges probably reflects some degree of secondary simplification. In summary, while deep sponge phylogenetics has made many advances in the past years, considerable efforts are still required to achieve a

  20. Multigene phylogeny of the red algal subclass Nemaliophycidae.

    PubMed

    Lam, Daryl W; Verbruggen, Heroen; Saunders, Gary W; Vis, Morgan L

    2016-01-01

    The red algae (Rhodophyta) are a lineage of primary endosymbionts whose ancestors represent some of the first photosynthetic eukaryotes on the planet. They primarily inhabit marine ecosystems, with only ∼5% of species found in freshwater systems. The subclass Nemaliophycidae is very diverse in ecological and life history features and therefore a useful model to study these traits, but the phylogenetic relationships among the orders are, for the most part, poorly resolved. To elucidate the phylogeny of the Nemaliophycidae, we constructed a nine-gene dataset comprised of nuclear, plastid, and mitochondrial markers for 67 red algal specimens. The resulting maximum likelihood (ML) phylogeny confirmed the monophyly of all orders. The sister relationship of the Acrochaetiales and Palmariales received high support and the relationship of the Balliales with Balbianiales and Entwisleiales with Colaconematales was moderately supported. The Nemaliales, Entwisleiales, Colaconematales, Palmariales and Acrochaetiales formed a highly supported clade. Unfortunately, all other relationships among the orders had low bootstrap support. Although the ML analysis did not resolve many of the relationships, further analyses suggested that a resolution is possible. A Phycas analysis supported a dichotomously branching tree and Bayesian analysis showed a similar topology with all relationships highly supported. Simulations extrapolating the number of nucleotide characters beyond the current size of the dataset suggested that most nodes in the phylogeny would be resolved if more data become available. Phylogenomic approaches will be necessary to provide a well-supported phylogeny of this subclass with all relationships resolved such that the evolution of freshwater species from marine ancestors as well as reproductive traits can be explored.

  1. The constancy of physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, J. M.; Humphreys, R.

    Evidence restricting the secular variation of the coupling constants of nature is reviewed. The nature of "natural" units is discussed and possible forms of gravitational coupling examined. Particular attention is paid to data obtained from a study of the prehistoric natural reactor at Oklo and the restrictions which present day isotopic abundances place on interaction strengths and mass parameters during the era of primordial nucleosynthesis.

  2. Heavy metal resistant strains are widespread along Streptomyces phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Analía; Catalano, Santiago A; Amoroso, María Julia

    2013-03-01

    The genus Streptomyces comprises a group of bacteria species with high economic importance. Several of these species are employed at industrial scale for the production of useful compounds. Other characteristic found in different strains within this genus is their capability to tolerate high level of substances toxic for humans, heavy metals among them. Although several studies have been conducted in different species of the genus in order to disentangle the mechanisms associated to heavy metal resistance, little is known about how they have evolved along Streptomyces phylogeny. In this study we built the largest Streptomyces phylogeny generated up to date comprising six genes, 113 species of Streptomyces and 27 outgroups. The parsimony-based phylogenetic analysis indicated that (i) Streptomyces is monophyletic and (ii) it appears as sister clade of a group formed by Kitasatospora and Streptacidiphilus species, both genera also monophyletic. Streptomyces strains resistant to heavy metals are not confined to a single lineage but widespread along Streptomyces phylogeny. Our result in combination with genomic, physiological and biochemical data suggest that the resistance to heavy metals originated several times and by different mechanisms in Streptomyces history. PMID:23247041

  3. Sciurid phylogeny and the paraphyly of Holarctic ground squirrels (Spermophilus).

    PubMed

    Herron, Matthew D; Castoe, Todd A; Parkinson, Christopher L

    2004-06-01

    The squirrel family, Sciuridae, is one of the largest and most widely dispersed families of mammals. In spite of the wide distribution and conspicuousness of this group, phylogenetic relationships remain poorly understood. We used DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of 114 species in 21 genera to infer phylogenetic relationships among sciurids based on maximum parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic methods. Although we evaluated more complex alternative models of nucleotide substitution to reconstruct Bayesian phylogenies, none provided a better fit to the data than the GTR+G+I model. We used the reconstructed phylogenies to evaluate the current taxonomy of the Sciuridae. At essentially all levels of relationships, we found the phylogeny of squirrels to be in substantial conflict with the current taxonomy. At the highest level, the flying squirrels do not represent a basal divergence, and the current division of Sciuridae into two subfamilies is therefore not phylogenetically informative. At the tribal level, the Neotropical pygmy squirrel, Sciurillus, represents a basal divergence and is not closely related to the other members of the tribe Sciurini. At the genus level, the sciurine genus Sciurus is paraphyletic with respect to the dwarf squirrels (Microsciurus), and the Holarctic ground squirrels (Spermophilus) are paraphyletic with respect to antelope squirrels (Ammospermophilus), prairie dogs (Cynomys), and marmots (Marmota). Finally, several species of chipmunks and Holarctic ground squirrels do not appear monophyletic, indicating a need for reevaluation of alpha taxonomy. PMID:15120398

  4. PhyloGenie: automated phylome generation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Frickey, Tancred; Lupas, Andrei N

    2004-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction is the method of choice to determine the homologous relationships between sequences. Difficulties in producing high-quality alignments, which are the basis of good trees, and in automating the analysis of trees have unfortunately limited the use of phylogenetic reconstruction methods to individual genes or gene families. Due to the large number of sequences involved, phylogenetic analyses of proteomes preclude manual steps and therefore require a high degree of automation in sequence selection, alignment, phylogenetic inference and analysis of the resulting set of trees. We present a set of programs that automates the steps from seed sequence to phylogeny and a utility to extract all phylogenies that match specific topological constraints from a database of trees. Two example applications that show the type of questions that can be answered by phylome analysis are provided. The generation and analysis of the Thermoplasma acidophilum phylome with regard to lateral gene transfer between Thermoplasmata and Sulfolobus, showed best BLAST hits to be far less reliable indicators of lateral transfer than the corresponding protein phylogenies. The generation and analysis of the Danio rerio phylome provided more than twice as many proteins as described previously, supporting the hypothesis of an additional round of genome duplication in the actinopterygian lineage.

  5. Mitogenomic perspectives on the origin and phylogeny of living amphibians.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Yue-Qin; Liu, Yi-Fei; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2005-06-01

    Establishing the relationships among modern amphibians (lissamphibians) and their ancient relatives is necessary for our understanding of early tetrapod evolution. However, the phylogeny is still intractable because of the highly specialized anatomy and poor fossil record of lissamphibians. Paleobiologists are still not sure whether lissamphibians are monophyletic or polyphyletic, and which ancient group (temnospondyls or lepospondyls) is most closely related to them. In an attempt to address these problems, eight mitochondrial genomes of living amphibians were determined and compared with previously published amphibian sequences. A comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences yields a highly resolved tree congruent with the traditional hypotheses (Batrachia). By using a molecular clock-independent approach for inferring dating information from molecular phylogenies, we present here the first molecular timescale for lissamphibian evolution, which suggests that lissamphibians first emerged about 330 million years ago. By observing the fit between molecular and fossil times, we suggest that the temnospondyl-origin hypothesis for lissamphibians is more credible than other hypotheses. Moreover, under this timescale, the potential geographic origins of the main living amphibian groups are discussed: (i) advanced frogs (neobatrachians) may possess an Africa-India origin; (ii) salamanders may have originated in east Asia; (iii) the tropic forest of the Triassic Pangaea may be the place of origin for the ancient caecilians. An accurate phylogeny with divergence times can be also helpful to direct the search for "missing" fossils, and can benefit comparative studies of amphibian evolution.

  6. Phylogeny of metabolic networks: a spectral graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Deyasi, Krishanu; Banerjee, Anirban; Deb, Bony

    2015-10-01

    Many methods have been developed for finding the commonalities between different organisms in order to study their phylogeny. The structure of metabolic networks also reveals valuable insights into metabolic capacity of species as well as into the habitats where they have evolved. We constructed metabolic networks of 79 fully sequenced organisms and compared their architectures. We used spectral density of normalized Laplacian matrix for comparing the structure of networks. The eigenvalues of this matrix reflect not only the global architecture of a network but also the local topologies that are produced by different graph evolutionary processes like motif duplication or joining. A divergence measure on spectral densities is used to quantify the distances between various metabolic networks, and a split network is constructed to analyse the phylogeny from these distances. In our analysis, we focused on the species that belong to different classes, but appear more related to each other in the phylogeny. We tried to explore whether they have evolved under similar environmental conditions or have similar life histories. With this focus, we have obtained interesting insights into the phylogenetic commonality between different organisms. PMID:26564980

  7. Higher-level crustacean phylogeny: consensus and conflicting hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Ronald A

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of current hypotheses of higher-level crustacean phylogeny in order to assist and help focus further research. It concentrates on hypotheses proposed or debated in the recent literature based on morphological, molecular and combined evidence phylogenetic analyses. It can be concluded that crustacean phylogeny remains essentially unresolved. Conflict is rife, irrespective of whether one compares different morphological studies, molecular studies, or both. Using the number of recently proposed alternative sister group hypotheses for each of the major tetraconatan taxa as a rough estimate of phylogenetic uncertainty, it can be concluded that the phylogenetic position of Malacostraca remains the most problematic, closely followed by Branchiopoda, Cephalocarida, Remipedia, Ostracoda, Branchiura, Copepoda and Hexapoda. Future progress will depend upon a broader taxon sampling in molecular analyses, and the further exploration of new molecular phylogenetic markers. However, the need for continued revision and expansion of morphological datasets remains undiminished given the conspicuous lack of agreement between molecules and morphology for positioning several taxa. In view of the unparalleled morphological diversity of Crustacea, and the likely nesting of Hexapoda somewhere within Crustacea, working out a detailed phylogeny of Tetraconata is a crucial step towards understanding arthropod body plan evolution.

  8. Phylogeny of metabolic networks: a spectral graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Deyasi, Krishanu; Banerjee, Anirban; Deb, Bony

    2015-10-01

    Many methods have been developed for finding the commonalities between different organisms in order to study their phylogeny. The structure of metabolic networks also reveals valuable insights into metabolic capacity of species as well as into the habitats where they have evolved. We constructed metabolic networks of 79 fully sequenced organisms and compared their architectures. We used spectral density of normalized Laplacian matrix for comparing the structure of networks. The eigenvalues of this matrix reflect not only the global architecture of a network but also the local topologies that are produced by different graph evolutionary processes like motif duplication or joining. A divergence measure on spectral densities is used to quantify the distances between various metabolic networks, and a split network is constructed to analyse the phylogeny from these distances. In our analysis, we focused on the species that belong to different classes, but appear more related to each other in the phylogeny. We tried to explore whether they have evolved under similar environmental conditions or have similar life histories. With this focus, we have obtained interesting insights into the phylogenetic commonality between different organisms.

  9. Phylogeny versus body size as determinants of food web structure

    PubMed Central

    Naisbit, Russell E.; Rohr, Rudolf P.; Rossberg, Axel G.; Kehrli, Patrik; Bersier, Louis-Félix

    2012-01-01

    Food webs are the complex networks of trophic interactions that stoke the metabolic fires of life. To understand what structures these interactions in natural communities, ecologists have developed simple models to capture their main architectural features. However, apparently realistic food webs can be generated by models invoking either predator–prey body-size hierarchies or evolutionary constraints as structuring mechanisms. As a result, this approach has not conclusively revealed which factors are the most important. Here we cut to the heart of this debate by directly comparing the influence of phylogeny and body size on food web architecture. Using data from 13 food webs compiled by direct observation, we confirm the importance of both factors. Nevertheless, phylogeny dominates in most networks. Moreover, path analysis reveals that the size-independent direct effect of phylogeny on trophic structure typically outweighs the indirect effect that could be captured by considering body size alone. Furthermore, the phylogenetic signal is asymmetric: closely related species overlap in their set of consumers far more than in their set of resources. This is at odds with several food web models, which take only the view-point of consumers when assigning interactions. The echo of evolutionary history clearly resonates through current food webs, with implications for our theoretical models and conservation priorities. PMID:22628467

  10. Phylogeny versus body size as determinants of food web structure.

    PubMed

    Naisbit, Russell E; Rohr, Rudolf P; Rossberg, Axel G; Kehrli, Patrik; Bersier, Louis-Félix

    2012-08-22

    Food webs are the complex networks of trophic interactions that stoke the metabolic fires of life. To understand what structures these interactions in natural communities, ecologists have developed simple models to capture their main architectural features. However, apparently realistic food webs can be generated by models invoking either predator-prey body-size hierarchies or evolutionary constraints as structuring mechanisms. As a result, this approach has not conclusively revealed which factors are the most important. Here we cut to the heart of this debate by directly comparing the influence of phylogeny and body size on food web architecture. Using data from 13 food webs compiled by direct observation, we confirm the importance of both factors. Nevertheless, phylogeny dominates in most networks. Moreover, path analysis reveals that the size-independent direct effect of phylogeny on trophic structure typically outweighs the indirect effect that could be captured by considering body size alone. Furthermore, the phylogenetic signal is asymmetric: closely related species overlap in their set of consumers far more than in their set of resources. This is at odds with several food web models, which take only the view-point of consumers when assigning interactions. The echo of evolutionary history clearly resonates through current food webs, with implications for our theoretical models and conservation priorities.

  11. Molecular phylogeny and morphological evolution of the Acantharia (Radiolaria).

    PubMed

    Decelle, Johan; Suzuki, Noritoshi; Mahé, Fredéric; de Vargas, Colomban; Not, Fabrice

    2012-05-01

    Acantharia are ubiquitous and abundant rhizarian protists in the world ocean. The skeleton made of strontium sulphate and the fact that certain harbour microalgal endosymbionts make them key planktonic players for the ecology of marine ecosystems. Based on morphological criteria, the current taxonomy of Acantharia was established by W.T. Schewiakoff in 1926, since when no major revision has been undertaken. Here, we established the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny from single morphologically-identified acantharian cells, isolated from various oceans. Our phylogenetic analyses based on 78 18S rDNA and 107 partial 28S rDNA revealed the existence of 6 main clades, sub-divided into 13 sub-clades. The polyphyletic nature of acantharian families and genera demonstrates the need for revision of the current taxonomy. This molecular phylogeny, which highlights the taxonomic relevance of specific morphological criteria, such as the presence of a shell and the organisation of the central junction, provides a robust phylogenetic framework for future taxonomic emendation. Finally, mapping all the existing environmental sequences available to date from different marine ecosystems onto our reference phylogeny unveiled another 3 clades and improved the understanding of the biogeography and ecology of Acantharia.

  12. Host Phylogeny Determines Viral Persistence and Replication in Novel Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Longdon, Ben; Hadfield, Jarrod D.; Webster, Claire L.

    2011-01-01

    Pathogens switching to new hosts can result in the emergence of new infectious diseases, and determining which species are likely to be sources of such host shifts is essential to understanding disease threats to both humans and wildlife. However, the factors that determine whether a pathogen can infect a novel host are poorly understood. We have examined the ability of three host-specific RNA-viruses (Drosophila sigma viruses from the family Rhabdoviridae) to persist and replicate in 51 different species of Drosophilidae. Using a novel analytical approach we found that the host phylogeny could explain most of the variation in viral replication and persistence between different host species. This effect is partly driven by viruses reaching a higher titre in those novel hosts most closely related to the original host. However, there is also a strong effect of host phylogeny that is independent of the distance from the original host, with viral titres being similar in groups of related hosts. Most of this effect could be explained by variation in general susceptibility to all three sigma viruses, as there is a strong phylogenetic correlation in the titres of the three viruses. These results suggest that the source of new emerging diseases may often be predictable from the host phylogeny, but that the effect may be more complex than simply causing most host shifts to occur between closely related hosts. PMID:21966271

  13. Mitogenomic perspectives on the origin and phylogeny of living amphibians.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Yue-Qin; Liu, Yi-Fei; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2005-06-01

    Establishing the relationships among modern amphibians (lissamphibians) and their ancient relatives is necessary for our understanding of early tetrapod evolution. However, the phylogeny is still intractable because of the highly specialized anatomy and poor fossil record of lissamphibians. Paleobiologists are still not sure whether lissamphibians are monophyletic or polyphyletic, and which ancient group (temnospondyls or lepospondyls) is most closely related to them. In an attempt to address these problems, eight mitochondrial genomes of living amphibians were determined and compared with previously published amphibian sequences. A comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences yields a highly resolved tree congruent with the traditional hypotheses (Batrachia). By using a molecular clock-independent approach for inferring dating information from molecular phylogenies, we present here the first molecular timescale for lissamphibian evolution, which suggests that lissamphibians first emerged about 330 million years ago. By observing the fit between molecular and fossil times, we suggest that the temnospondyl-origin hypothesis for lissamphibians is more credible than other hypotheses. Moreover, under this timescale, the potential geographic origins of the main living amphibian groups are discussed: (i) advanced frogs (neobatrachians) may possess an Africa-India origin; (ii) salamanders may have originated in east Asia; (iii) the tropic forest of the Triassic Pangaea may be the place of origin for the ancient caecilians. An accurate phylogeny with divergence times can be also helpful to direct the search for "missing" fossils, and can benefit comparative studies of amphibian evolution. PMID:16012106

  14. PhyloPars: estimation of missing parameter values using phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Jorn; Heringa, Jaap; Brandt, Bernd W

    2009-07-01

    A wealth of information on metabolic parameters of a species can be inferred from observations on species that are phylogenetically related. Phylogeny-based information can complement direct empirical evidence, and is particularly valuable if experiments on the species of interest are not feasible. The PhyloPars web server provides a statistically consistent method that combines an incomplete set of empirical observations with the species phylogeny to produce a complete set of parameter estimates for all species. It builds upon a state-of-the-art evolutionary model, extended with the ability to handle missing data. The resulting approach makes optimal use of all available information to produce estimates that can be an order of magnitude more accurate than ad-hoc alternatives. Uploading a phylogeny and incomplete feature matrix suffices to obtain estimates of all missing values, along with a measure of certainty. Real-time cross-validation provides further insight in the accuracy and bias expected for estimated values. The server allows for easy, efficient estimation of metabolic parameters, which can benefit a wide range of fields including systems biology and ecology. PhyloPars is available at: http://www.ibi.vu.nl/programs/phylopars/.

  15. Contribution of genosystematics to current concepts of phylogeny and classification of bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Troitsky, A V; Ignatov, M S; Bobrova, V K; Milyutina, I A

    2007-12-01

    This paper is a survey of the current state of molecular studies on bryophyte phylogeny. Molecular data have greatly contributed to developing a phylogeny and classification of bryophytes. The previous traditional systems of classification based on morphological data are being significantly revised. New data of the authors are presented on phylogeny of Hypnales pleurocarpous mosses inferred from nucleotide sequence data of the nuclear DNA internal transcribed spacers ITS1-2 and the trnL-F region of the chloroplast genome.

  16. Hydrology of Indiana lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perrey, Joseph Irving; Corbett, Don Melvin

    1956-01-01

    The stabilization of lake levels often requires the construction of outlet control structures. A detailed study of past lake-level elevations and other hydologic date is necessary to establish a level that can be maintained and to determine the means necessary for maintaining the established level. Detailed lake-level records for 28 lakes are included in the report, and records for over 100 other lakes data are available in the U.S. Geological Survey Office, Indianapolis, Ind. Evaporation data from the four Class A evaporation station of the U. S. Weather Bureau have been compiled in this report. A table showing the established legal lake level and related data is included.

  17. Origins of rainbow smelt in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.

    1983-01-01

    The first rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) to enter Lake Ontario were probably migrants from an anadromous strain introduced into New York's Finger Lakes. Since the upper Great Lakes were originally stocked with a landlocked strain from Green Lake, Maine, subsequent migration to Lake Ontario from Lake Erie makes Lake Ontario unique among the Great Lakes in probably having received introductions from two distinct populations.

  18. David Morrison on Lake Vostok

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. David Morrison discusses the implications of research possibilities at Lake Vostok, one of the largest subglacial lakes located over two miles beneath the ice in Antarctica. The lake has been c...

  19. Great Lakes Literacy Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Manzo, Lyndsey

    2011-03-01

    Lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, and Erie together form North America's Great Lakes, a region that contains 20% of the world's fresh surface water and is home to roughly one quarter of the U.S. population (Figure 1). Supporting a $4 billion sport fishing industry, plus $16 billion annually in boating, 1.5 million U.S. jobs, and $62 billion in annual wages directly, the Great Lakes form the backbone of a regional economy that is vital to the United States as a whole (see http://www.miseagrant.umich.edu/downloads/economy/11-708-Great-Lakes-Jobs.pdf). Yet the grandeur and importance of this freshwater resource are little understood, not only by people in the rest of the country but also by many in the region itself. To help address this lack of knowledge, the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Great Lakes, supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, developed literacy principles for the Great Lakes to serve as a guide for education of students and the public. These “Great Lakes Literacy Principles” represent an understanding of the Great Lakes' influences on society and society's influences on the Great Lakes.

  20. Intrinsic breaking of internal solitary waves in a deep lake.

    PubMed

    Preusse, Martina; Stastna, Marek; Freistühler, Heinrich; Peeters, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Based on simulations with the Dubreil-Jacotin-Long (DJL) equation, the limiting amplitude and the breaking mechanisms of internal solitary waves of depression (ISWs) are predicted for different background stratifications. These theoretical predictions are compared to the amplitude and the stability of the leading internal solitary waves of more than 200 trains of ISWs observed in the centre of a sub-basin of Lake Constance. The comparison of the model results with the field observations indicates that the simulated limiting amplitude of the ISWs provides an excellent prediction of the critical wave height above which ISWs break in the field. Shear instabilities and convective instabilities are each responsible for about half of the predicted wave breaking events. The data suggest the presence of core-like structures within the convectively unstable waves, but fully developed and stable cores were not observed. The lack of stable trapped cores in the field can be explained by the results from dynamic simulations of ISWs with trapped cores which demonstrate that even slight disturbances of the background stratification cause trapped cores to become unstable.

  1. Replicated evolution of trophic specializations in an endemic cichlid fish lineage from Lake Tanganyika

    PubMed Central

    Rüber, Lukas; Verheyen, Erik; Meyer, Axel

    1999-01-01

    The current phylogenetic hypothesis for the endemic Lake Tanganyika cichlid fishes of the tribe Eretmodini is based solely on morphology and suggests that more complex trophic morphologies derived only once from a less specialized ancestral condition. A molecular phylogeny of eretmodine cichlids based on partial mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b and control-region sequences was used to reconstruct the evolutionary sequence of trophic adaptations and to test alternative models of morphological divergence. The six mitochondrial lineages found disagree with the current taxonomy and the morphology-based phylogeny. Mitochondrial lineages with similar trophic morphologies are not grouped monophyletically but are typically more closely related to lineages with different trophic phenotypes currently assigned to other genera. Our results indicate multiple independent origins of similar trophic specializations in these cichlids. A pattern of repeated divergent morphological evolution becomes apparent when the phylogeography of the mitochondrial haplotypes is analyzed in the context of the geological and paleoclimatological history of Lake Tanganyika. In more than one instance within Lake Tanganyika, similar morphological divergence of dentitional traits occurred in sympatric species pairs. Possibly, resource-based divergent selective regimes led to resource partitioning and brought about similar trophic morphologies independently and repeatedly. PMID:10468591

  2. Lakes, Lagerstaetten, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, E. G.; Park, L. E.

    2001-12-01

    The diversity of terrestrial systems is estimated to be greater than in the marine realm. However no hard data yet exists to substantiate this claim. Ancient lacustrine deposits may preserve an exceptionally diverse fossil fauna and aid in determining continental faunal diversities. Fossils preserved in lake deposits, especially those with exceptional preservation (i.e. Konservat Lagerstaetten), may represent a dependable method for determining species diversity changes in the terrestrial environment because of their faunal completeness. Important Konservat Lagerstaetten, such as the Green River Formation (US) and Messel (Germany), both Eocene in age, are found in lake sediments and show a remarkable faunal diversity for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To date information from nearly 25 lake lagerstaetten derived from different types of lake basins from the Carboniferous to the Miocene have been collected and described. Carboniferous sites derive from the cyclothems of Midcontinent of the US while many Cenozoic sites have been described from North and South America as well as Europe and Australia. Asian sites contain fossils from the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. With this data, insight into the evolutionary processes associated with lake systems can be examined. Do lakes act as unique evolutionary crucibles in contrast to marine systems? The speciation of cichlid fishes in present-day African lakes appears to be very high and is attributed to the diversity of environments found in large rift lakes. Is this true of all ancient lakes or just large rift lakes? The longevity of a lake system may be an important factor in allowing speciation and evolutionary processes to occur; marine systems are limited only in the existence of environments as controlled by tectonics and sea level changes, on the order of tens of millions of years. Rift lakes are normally the longest lived in the millions of years. Perhaps there are only certain types of lakes in which speciation of

  3. Lessons from a Lake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goethals, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study that included classroom lessons on hydroelectric power, the history and construction of a nearby lake, data recording, the use of field guides, and methods of counting natural populations. The study culminated in a field trip to the lake. (JRH)

  4. The Great Lakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seasons, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reserviors of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. These lakes and their relationship with people of Canada and the United States can be useful as a subject for teaching the impact of human…

  5. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  6. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... backdrops for the 2002 Winter Olympics, to be held in Salt Lake City, Utah. The mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for ... western edge of the Rocky Mountains and eastern rim of the Great Basin. This early-winter image pair was acquired by the Multi-angle ...

  7. The lakes of Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stofan, E.R.; Elachi, C.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.D.; Stiles, B.; Mitchell, K.L.; Ostro, S.; Soderblom, L.; Wood, C.; Zebker, H.; Wall, S.; Janssen, M.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Paillou, P.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2007-01-01

    The surface of Saturn's haze-shrouded moon Titan has long been proposed to have oceans or lakes, on the basis of the stability of liquid methane at the surface. Initial visible and radar imaging failed to find any evidence of an ocean, although abundant evidence was found that flowing liquids have existed on the surface. Here we provide definitive evidence for the presence of lakes on the surface of Titan, obtained during the Cassini Radar flyby of Titan on 22 July 2006 (T16). The radar imaging polewards of 70?? north shows more than 75 circular to irregular radar-dark patches, in a region where liquid methane and ethane are expected to be abundant and stable on the surface. The radar-dark patches are interpreted as lakes on the basis of their very low radar reflectivity and morphological similarities to lakes, including associated channels and location in topographic depressions. Some of the lakes do not completely fill the depressions in which they lie, and apparently dry depressions are present. We interpret this to indicate that lakes are present in a number of states, including partly dry and liquid-filled. These northern-hemisphere lakes constitute the strongest evidence yet that a condensable-liquid hydrological cycle is active in Titan's surface and atmosphere, in which the lakes are filled through rainfall and/or intersection with the subsurface 'liquid methane' table. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  8. Great Lakes: Great Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Sea Grant Inst., Albany, NY.

    This folder contains 12 fact sheets designed to improve the quality of gardens near the Great Lakes. The titles are: (1) "Your Garden and the Great Lakes"; (2) "Organic Gardening"; (3) "Fruit and Vegetable Gardening"; (4) "Composting Yard Wastes"; (5) "Herbicides and Water Quality"; (6) "Watering"; (7) "Soil Erosion by Water"; (8) "Soil…

  9. Lake Wobegon Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraleda, Jorge; Stork, David G.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce Lake Wobegon dice, where each die is "better than the set average." Specifically, these dice have the paradoxical property that on every roll, each die is more likely to roll greater than the set average on the roll, than less than this set average. We also show how to construct minimal optimal Lake Wobegon sets for all "n" [greater…

  10. Great Lakes Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ron

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reservoirs of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. They are also a magnificent resource for the teachers of Ontario. Study of the Great Lakes can bring to life the factors that shape the ecology…

  11. Lake Superior revisited 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCallum, Wayne R.; Selgeby, James H.

    1987-01-01

    The Lake Superior fish community has changed substantially since the early 1960s, when control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) became effective. Self-reproducing stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) have been reestablished in many inshore areas, although they have not yet reached pre-sea lamprey abundance; offshore lake trout are probably at or near pre-sea lamprey abundance. Stocks of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) appear to have fully recovered; commercial catches are at or above historical levels. Lake herring (Coregonus artedii) are recovering rapidly in U.S. waters and are abundant in western Canadian waters. The population of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), which declined in the 1970s, is recovering. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus) are becoming more abundant as a result of increased stocking in U.S. waters and are reproducing in most suitable tributaries; they have become significant in anglers' creels.

  12. Lakes and reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Taub, F.B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume in the Ecosystems of the World series studies lakes and reservoirs. The book opens with a discussion of the ecosystem processes that are common to all lakes and reservoirs and then proceeds to a description of mathematical models of these processes. The chapters concentrate on lakes and reservoirs in different parts of the world, ranging from polar to tropical lakes, and in many of the chapters the effects of human activities such as dam construction, increased nutrient inputs, toxic contaminants and fish introduction, are also considered. The book concludes with a summary of the efforts at lake restoration that are being undertaken in many communities in an attempt to undo the damage that has resulted from some of these activities.

  13. Lake trout in northern Lake Huron spawn on submerged drumlins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Stephen C.; Binder, Thomas; Wattrus, Nigel J.; Faust, Matthew D.; Janssen, John; Menzies, John; Marsden, J. Ellen; Ebener, Mark P.; Bronte, Charles R.; He, Ji X.; Tucker, Taaja R.; Hansen, Michael J.; Thompson, Henry T.; Muir, Andrew M.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of spawning lake trout Salvelinus namaycush near Drummond Island in northern Lake Huron indicate that lake trout use drumlins, landforms created in subglacial environments by the action of ice sheets, as a primary spawning habitat. From these observations, we generated a hypothesis that may in part explain locations chosen by lake trout for spawning. Most salmonines spawn in streams where they rely on streamflows to sort and clean sediments to create good spawning habitat. Flows sufficient to sort larger sediment sizes are generally lacking in lakes, but some glacial bedforms contain large pockets of sorted sediments that can provide the interstitial spaces necessary for lake trout egg incubation, particularly if these bedforms are situated such that lake currents can penetrate these sediments. We hypothesize that sediment inclusions from glacial scavenging and sediment sorting that occurred during the creation of bedforms such as drumlins, end moraines, and eskers create suitable conditions for lake trout egg incubation, particularly where these bedforms interact with lake currents to remove fine sediments. Further, these bedforms may provide high-quality lake trout spawning habitat at many locations in the Great Lakes and may be especially important along the southern edge of the range of the species. A better understanding of the role of glacially-derived bedforms in the creation of lake trout spawning habitat may help develop powerful predictors of lake trout spawning locations, provide insight into the evolution of unique spawning behaviors by lake trout, and aid in lake trout restoration in the Great Lakes.

  14. Spatial patterns in PCB concentrations of Lake Michigan lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.; Brown, Edward H.; Eck, Gary W.; Schmidt, Larry J.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Chernyak, Sergei M.; Passino-Reader, Dora R.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the PCB body burden in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) of the Great Lakes is from their food. PCB concentrations were determined in lake trout from three different locations in Lake Michigan during 1994–1995, and lake trout diets were analyzed at all three locations. The PCB concentrations were also determined in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), bloater (Coregonus hoyi), slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), and deepwater sculpin (Myoxocephalus thompsoni), five species of prey fish eaten by lake trout in Lake Michigan, at three nearshore sites in the lake. Despite the lack of significant differences in the PCB concentrations of alewife, rainbow smelt, bloater, slimy sculpin, and deepwater sculpin from the southeastern nearshore site near Saugatuck (Michigan) compared with the corresponding PCB concentrations from the northwestern nearshore site near Sturgeon Bay (Wisconsin), PCB concentrations in lake trout at Saugatuck were significantly higher than those at Sturgeon Bay. The difference in the lake trout PCB concentrations between Saugatuck and Sturgeon Bay could be explained by diet differences. The diet of lake trout at Saugatuck was more concentrated in PCBs than the diet of Sturgeon Bay lake trout, and therefore lake trout at Saugatuck were more contaminated in PCBs than Sturgeon Bay lake trout. These findings were useful in interpreting the long-term monitoring series for contaminants in lake trout at both Saugatuck and the Wisconsin side of the lake.

  15. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Freeman L.; Wells, Frank C.; Shelby, Wanda J.; McPherson, Emma

    1988-01-01

    Water-quality data collected from Lake Austin and Town Lake, following runoff, generally were not adequate to fully determine the effects of runoff on the lakes. Data collection should not to be limited to fixed-station sampling following runoff, and both lakes need to be sampled simultaneously as soon as possible following significant precipitation.

  16. Phylogeny, rate variation, and genome size evolution of Pelargonium (Geraniaceae).

    PubMed

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Gibby, Mary; Jansen, Robert K

    2012-09-01

    The phylogeny of 58 Pelargonium species was estimated using five plastid markers (rbcL, matK, ndhF, rpoC1, trnL-F) and one mitochondrial gene (nad5). The results confirmed the monophyly of three major clades and four subclades within Pelargonium but also indicate the need to revise some sectional classifications. This phylogeny was used to examine karyotype evolution in the genus: plotting chromosome sizes, numbers and 2C-values indicates that genome size is significantly correlated with chromosome size but not number. Accelerated rates of nucleotide substitution have been previously detected in both plastid and mitochondrial genes in Pelargonium, but sparse taxon sampling did not enable identification of the phylogenetic distribution of these elevated rates. Using the multigene phylogeny as a constraint, we investigated lineage- and locus-specific heterogeneity of substitution rates in Pelargonium for an expanded number of taxa and demonstrated that both plastid and mitochondrial genes have had accelerated substitution rates but with markedly disparate patterns. In the plastid, the exons of rpoC1 have significantly accelerated substitution rates compared to its intron and the acceleration was mainly due to nonsynonymous substitutions. In contrast, the mitochondrial gene, nad5, experienced substantial acceleration of synonymous substitution rates in three internal branches of Pelargonium, but this acceleration ceased in all terminal branches. Several lineages also have dN/dS ratios significantly greater than one for rpoC1, indicating that positive selection is acting on this gene, whereas the accelerated synonymous substitutions in the mitochondrial gene are the result of elevated mutation rates.

  17. Phylogeny and evolution of glass sponges (porifera, hexactinellida).

    PubMed

    Dohrmann, Martin; Janussen, Dorte; Reitner, Joachim; Collins, Allen G; Worheide, Gert

    2008-06-01

    Reconstructing the phylogeny of sponges (Porifera) is one of the remaining challenges to resolve the metazoan Tree of Life and is a prerequisite for understanding early animal evolution. Molecular phylogenetic analyses for two of the three extant classes of the phylum, Demospongiae and Calcarea, are largely incongruent with traditional classifications, most likely because of a paucity of informative morphological characters and high levels of homoplasy. For the third class, Hexactinellida (glass sponges)--predominantly deep-sea inhabitants with unusual morphology and biology--we present the first molecular phylogeny, along with a cladistic analysis of morphological characters. We collected 18S, 28S, and mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences of 34 glass sponge species from 27 genera, 9 families, and 3 orders and conducted partitioned Bayesian analyses using RNA secondary structure-specific substitution models (paired-sites models) for stem regions. Bayes factor comparisons of different paired-sites models against each other and conventional (independent-sites) models revealed a significantly better fit of the former but, contrary to previous predictions, the least parameter-rich of the tested paired-sites models provided the best fit to our data. In contrast to Demospongiae and Calcarea, our rDNA phylogeny agrees well with the traditional classification and a previously proposed phylogenetic system, which we ascribe to a more informative morphology in Hexactinellida. We find high support for a close relationship of glass sponges and Demospongiae sensu stricto, though the latter may be paraphyletic with respect to Hexactinellida. Homoscleromorpha appears to be the sister group of Calcarea. Contrary to most previous findings from rDNA, we recover Porifera as monophyletic, although support for this clade is low under paired-sites models.

  18. Industrial applications of high-performance computing for phylogeny reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, David A.; Moret, Bernard M.; Vawter, Lisa

    2001-07-01

    Phylogenies (that is, tree-of-life relationships) derived from gene order data may prove crucial in answering some fundamental open questions in biomolecular evolution. Real-world interest is strong in determining these relationships. For example, pharmaceutical companies may use phylogeny reconstruction in drug discovery for discovering synthetic pathways unique to organisms that they wish to target. Health organizations study the phylogenies of organisms such as HIV in order to understand their epidemiologies and to aid in predicting the behaviors of future outbreaks. And governments are interested in aiding the production of such foodstuffs as rice, wheat and potatoes via genetics through understanding of the phylogenetic distribution of genetic variation in wild populations. Yet few techniques are available for difficult phylogenetic reconstruction problems. Appropriate tools for analysis of such data may aid in resolving some of the phylogenetic problems that have been analyzed without much resolution for decades. With the rapid accumulation of whole genome sequences for a wide diversity of taxa, especially microbial taxa, phylogenetic reconstruction based on changes in gene order and gene content is showing promise, particularly for resolving deep (i.e., ancient) branch splits. However, reconstruction from gene-order data is even more computationally expensive than reconstruction from sequence data, particularly in groups with large numbers of genes and highly-rearranged genomes. We have developed a software suite, GRAPPA, that extends the breakpoint analysis (BPAnalysis) method of Sankoff and Blanchette while running much faster: in a recent analysis of chloroplast genome data for species of Campanulaceae on a 512-processor Linux supercluster with Myrinet, we achieved a one-million-fold speedup over BPAnalysis. GRAPPA can use either breakpoint or inversion distance (computed exactly) for its computation and runs on single-processor machines as well as

  19. Probing protistan phylogenies with an anti-tubulin antibody.

    PubMed

    Brugerolle, G; Adoutte, A

    1988-01-01

    Representatives from most of the protist phyla were probed by immunofluorescence or by immunoblotting with an anti-tubulin antibody of sharp specificity previously raised against Paramecium axonemal tubulin. Excellent intra-phylum homogeneity of results was recorded except for chlorophytes. All ciliates, dinoflagellates and cryptomonads tested were strongly positive while actinopods, Euglenozoa and parabasalids were negative. All representatives of the broad chromophyte assemblage were positive while all rhizopods were negative. This simple binary immunological character was superimposed on a number of published protist phylogenies and seen to fit very well with some of them. Other immunological approaches to protist taxonomy and evolution are briefly reviewed. PMID:2456108

  20. The phylogeny of yeasts—A cladistic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiuqin; Wu, Baoling

    1992-12-01

    Cladistic analysis was used to clarify the phylogeny of 16 genera of yeasts whose great morphological differences and inclusion in different classification systems resulted in controversies over the taxonomy of seven genera such as Crypeococcus. etc. Some scholars suggest that they belong to Ascomycetes, but others think they belong to fungi imperfecti. After comprehensive cladistic analysis of many genetic characters, the authors consider that the above-mentioned seven genera of yeasts developed in parallel with Ascomycetes so that they should belong to one and the same developmental system.

  1. Phylogeny: a non-hyperthermophilic ancestor for bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brochier, Céline; Philippe, Hervé

    2002-05-16

    The first phyla that emerge in the tree of life based on ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences are hyperthermophilic, which led to the hypothesis that the universal ancestor, and possibly the original living organism, was hyperthermophilic. Here we reanalyse the bacterial phylogeny based on rRNA using a more reliable approach, and find that hyperthermophilic bacteria (such as Aquificales and Thermotogales) do not emerge first, suggesting that the Bacteria had a non-hyperthermophilic ancestor. It seems that Planctomycetales, a phylum with numerous peculiarities, could be the first emerging bacterial group.

  2. Phylogeny of Vibrio cholerae Based on recA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Stine, O. Colin; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Gou, Qing; Zheng, Siqen; Morris, J. Glenn; Johnson, Judith A.

    2000-01-01

    We sequenced a 705-bp fragment of the recA gene from 113 Vibrio cholerae strains and closely related species. One hundred eighty-seven nucleotides were phylogenetically informative, 55 were phylogenetically uninformative, and 463 were invariant. Not unexpectedly, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus strains formed out-groups; we also identified isolates which resembled V. cholerae biochemically but which did not cluster with V. cholerae. In many instances, V. cholerae serogroup designations did not correlate with phylogeny, as reflected by recA sequence divergence. This observation is consistent with the idea that there is horizontal transfer of O-antigen biosynthesis genes among V. cholerae strains. PMID:11083852

  3. Phylogeny of the Ants: Diversification in the Age of Angiosperms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Corrie S.; Bell, Charles D.; Vila, Roger; Archibald, S. Bruce; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2006-04-01

    We present a large-scale molecular phylogeny of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), based on 4.5 kilobases of sequence data from six gene regions extracted from 139 of the 288 described extant genera, representing 19 of the 20 subfamilies. All but two subfamilies are recovered as monophyletic. Divergence time estimates calibrated by minimum age constraints from 43 fossils indicate that most of the subfamilies representing extant ants arose much earlier than previously proposed but only began to diversify during the Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene. This period also witnessed the rise of angiosperms and most herbivorous insects.

  4. Evidence of offshore lake trout reproduction in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Bowen, Charles A., II

    2003-01-01

    Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef, an offshore reef complex, was an historically important spawning area believed to represent some of the best habitat for the rehabilitation of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Lake Huron. Since 1986, lake trout have been stocked on these offshore reefs to reestablish self-sustaining populations. We sampled with beam trawls to determine the abundance of naturally reproduced age-0 lake trout on these offshore reefs during May-July in 1994-1998 and 2000-2002. In total, 123 naturally reproduced lake trout fry were caught at Six Fathom Bank, and 2 naturally reproduced lake trout fry were caught at nearby Yankee Reef. Our findings suggest that this region of Lake Huron contains suitable habitat for lake trout spawning and offers hope that lake trout rehabilitation can be achieved in the main basin of Lake Huron.

  5. Lake whitefish and lake herring population structure and niche in ten south-central Ontario lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carl, Leon M.; McGuiness, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This study compares simple fish communities of ten oligotrophic lakes in south-central Ontario. Species densities and population size structure vary significantly among these lake communities depending on fish species present beyond the littoral zone. Lake whitefish are fewer and larger in the presence of lake herring than in their absence. Diet analysis indicates that lake whitefish shift from feeding on both plankton and benthic prey when lake herring are absent to a primarily benthic feeding niche in the presence of lake herring. When benthic round whitefish are present, lake whitefish size and density decline and they move lower in the lake compared to round whitefish. Burbot are also fewer and larger in lakes with lake herring than in lakes without herring. Burbot, in turn, appear to influence the population structure of benthic coregonine species. Lower densities of benthic lake whitefish and round whitefish are found in lakes containing large benthic burbot than in lakes with either small burbot or where burbot are absent. Predation on the pelagic larvae of burbot and lake whitefish by planktivorous lake herring alters the size and age structure of these populations. As life history theory predicts, those species with poor larval survival appear to adopt a bet-hedging life history strategy of long-lived individuals as a reproductive reserve.

  6. Lake sturgeon population characteristics in Rainy Lake, Minnesota and Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, W.E.; Kallemeyn, L.W.; Willis, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rainy Lake contains a native population of lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens that has been largely unstudied. The aims of this study were to document the population characteristics of lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake and to relate environmental factors to year-class strength for this population. Gill-netting efforts throughout the study resulted in the capture of 322 lake sturgeon, including 50 recaptures. Lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake was relatively plump and fast growing compared with a 32-population summary. Population samples were dominated by lake sturgeon between 110 and 150 cm total length. Age–structure analysis of the samples indicated few younger (<10 years) lake sturgeon, but the smallest gill net mesh size used for sampling was 102 mm (bar measure) and would not retain small sturgeon. Few lake sturgeon older than age 50 years were captured, and maximum age of sampled fish was 59 years. Few correlations existed between lake sturgeon year-class indices and both annual and monthly climate variables, except that mean June air temperature was positively correlated with year-class strength. Analysis of Rainy Lake water elevation and resulting lake sturgeon year-class strength indices across years yielded consistent but weak negative correlations between late April and early June, when spawning of lake sturgeon occurs. The baseline data collected in this study should allow Rainy Lake biologists to establish more specific research questions in the future.

  7. Yellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E.; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P.; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations. PMID:24062731

  8. Whiting in Lake Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Satellites provide a view from space of changes on the Earth's surface. This series of images from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) aboard the Orbview-2 satellite shows the dramatic change in the color of Lake Michigan during the summer. The bright color that appears in late summer is probably caused by calcium carbonate-chalk-in the water. Lake Michigan always has a lot of calcium carbonate in it because the floor of the lake is limestone. During most of the year the calcium carbonate remains dissolved in the cold water, but at the end of summer the lake warms up, lowering the solubility of calcium carbonate. As a result, the calcium carbonate precipitates out of the water, forming clouds of very small solid particles that appear as bright swirls from above. The phenomenon is appropriately called a whiting event. A similar event occured in 1999, but appears to have started later and subsided earlier. It is also possible that a bloom of the algae Microcystis is responsible for the color change, but unlikely because of Lake Michigan's depth and size. Microcystis blooms have occured in other lakes in the region, however. On the shore of the lake it is possible to see the cities of Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Both appear as clusters of gray-brown pixels. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  9. Yellowstone lake nanoarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  10. Ecology of playa lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haukos, David A.; Smith, Loren M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 25,000 and 30,000 playa lakes are in the playa lakes region of the southern high plains (Fig. 1). Most playas are in west Texas (about 20,000), and fewer, in New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Colorado. The playa lakes region is one of the most intensively cultivated areas of North America. Dominant crops range from cotton in southern areas to cereal grains in the north. Therefore, most of the native short-grass prairie is gone, replaced by crops and, recently, grasses of the Conservation Reserve Program. Playas are the predominant wetlands and major wildlife habitat of the region.More than 115 bird species, including 20 species of waterfowl, and 10 mammal species have been documented in playas. Waterfowl nest in the area, producing up to 250,000 ducklings in wetter years. Dominant breeding and nesting species are mallards and blue-winged teals. During the very protracted breeding season, birds hatch from April through August. Several million shorebirds and waterfowl migrate through the area each spring and fall. More than 400,000 sandhill cranes migrate through and winter in the region, concentrating primarily on the larger saline lakes in the southern portion of the playa lakes region.The primary importance of the playa lakes region to waterfowl is as a wintering area. Wintering waterfowl populations in the playa lakes region range from 1 to 3 million birds, depending on fall precipitation patterns that determine the number of flooded playas. The most common wintering ducks are mallards, northern pintails, green-winged teals, and American wigeons. About 500,000 Canada geese and 100,000 lesser snow geese winter in the playa lakes region, and numbers of geese have increased annually since the early 1980’s. This chapter describes the physiography and ecology of playa lakes and their attributes that benefit waterfowl.

  11. The geological record and phylogeny of the Myriapoda.

    PubMed

    Shear, William A; Edgecombe, Gregory D

    2010-01-01

    We review issues of myriapod phylogeny, from the position of the Myriapoda amongst arthropods to the relationships of the orders of the classes Chilopoda and Diplopoda. The fossil record of each myriapod class is reviewed, with an emphasis on developments since 1997. We accept as working hypotheses that Myriapoda is monophyletic and belongs in Mandibulata, that the classes of Myriapoda are monophyletic, and that they are related as (Chilopoda (Symphyla (Diplopoda+Pauropoda))). The most pressing challenges to these hypotheses are some molecular and developmental evidence for an alliance between myriapods and chelicerates, and the attraction of symphylans to pauropods in some molecular analyses. While the phylogeny of the orders of Chilopoda appears settled, the relationships within Diplopoda remain unclear at several levels. Chilopoda and Diplopoda have a relatively sparse representation as fossils, and Symphyla and Pauropoda fossils are known only from Tertiary ambers. Fossils are difficult to place in trees based on living forms because many morphological characters are not very likely to be preserved in the fossils; as a consequence, most diplopod fossils have been placed in extinct higher taxa. Nevertheless, important information from diplopod fossils includes the first documented occurrence of air-breathing, and the first evidence for the use of a chemical defense. Stem-group myriapods are unknown, but evidence suggests the group must have arisen in the Early Cambrian, with a major period of cladogenesis in the Late Ordovician and early Silurian. Large terrestrial myriapods were on land at least by mid-Silurian.

  12. An experimental phylogeny to benchmark ancestral sequence reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Ryan N.; Radford, Caelan E.; Roof, Kelsey A.; Natarajan, Divya K.; Gaucher, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is a still-burgeoning method that has revealed many key mechanisms of molecular evolution. One criticism of the approach is an inability to validate its algorithms within a biological context as opposed to a computer simulation. Here we build an experimental phylogeny using the gene of a single red fluorescent protein to address this criticism. The evolved phylogeny consists of 19 operational taxonomic units (leaves) and 17 ancestral bifurcations (nodes) that display a wide variety of fluorescent phenotypes. The 19 leaves then serve as ‘modern' sequences that we subject to ASR analyses using various algorithms and to benchmark against the known ancestral genotypes and ancestral phenotypes. We confirm computer simulations that show all algorithms infer ancient sequences with high accuracy, yet we also reveal wide variation in the phenotypes encoded by incorrectly inferred sequences. Specifically, Bayesian methods incorporating rate variation significantly outperform the maximum parsimony criterion in phenotypic accuracy. Subsampling of extant sequences had minor effect on the inference of ancestral sequences. PMID:27628687

  13. A novel methodology for large-scale phylogeny partition.

    PubMed

    Prosperi, Mattia C F; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Fanti, Iuri; Saladini, Francesco; Pecorari, Monica; Borghi, Vanni; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Bruzzone, Bianca; Capetti, Amedeo; Vivarelli, Angela; Rusconi, Stefano; Re, Maria Carla; Gismondo, Maria Rita; Sighinolfi, Laura; Gray, Rebecca R; Salemi, Marco; Zazzi, Maurizio; De Luca, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the determinants of virus transmission is a fundamental step for effective design of screening and intervention strategies to control viral epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis can be a valid approach for the identification of transmission chains, and very-large data sets can be analysed through parallel computation. Here we propose and validate a new methodology for the partition of large-scale phylogenies and the inference of transmission clusters. This approach, on the basis of a depth-first search algorithm, conjugates the evaluation of node reliability, tree topology and patristic distance analysis. The method has been applied to identify transmission clusters of a phylogeny of 11,541 human immunodeficiency virus-1 subtype B pol gene sequences from a large Italian cohort. Molecular transmission chains were characterized by means of different clinical/demographic factors, such as the interaction between male homosexuals and male heterosexuals. Our method takes an advantage of a flexible notion of transmission cluster and can become a general framework to analyse other epidemics.

  14. An experimental phylogeny to benchmark ancestral sequence reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Randall, Ryan N; Radford, Caelan E; Roof, Kelsey A; Natarajan, Divya K; Gaucher, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is a still-burgeoning method that has revealed many key mechanisms of molecular evolution. One criticism of the approach is an inability to validate its algorithms within a biological context as opposed to a computer simulation. Here we build an experimental phylogeny using the gene of a single red fluorescent protein to address this criticism. The evolved phylogeny consists of 19 operational taxonomic units (leaves) and 17 ancestral bifurcations (nodes) that display a wide variety of fluorescent phenotypes. The 19 leaves then serve as 'modern' sequences that we subject to ASR analyses using various algorithms and to benchmark against the known ancestral genotypes and ancestral phenotypes. We confirm computer simulations that show all algorithms infer ancient sequences with high accuracy, yet we also reveal wide variation in the phenotypes encoded by incorrectly inferred sequences. Specifically, Bayesian methods incorporating rate variation significantly outperform the maximum parsimony criterion in phenotypic accuracy. Subsampling of extant sequences had minor effect on the inference of ancestral sequences. PMID:27628687

  15. Refining the Y chromosome phylogeny with southern African sequences.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Chiara; Hübner, Alexander; Macholdt, Enrico; Ni, Shengyu; Lippold, Sebastian; Schröder, Roland; Mpoloka, Sununguko Wata; Purps, Josephine; Roewer, Lutz; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    The recent availability of large-scale sequence data for the human Y chromosome has revolutionized analyses of and insights gained from this non-recombining, paternally inherited chromosome. However, the studies to date focus on Eurasian variation, and hence the diversity of early-diverging branches found in Africa has not been adequately documented. Here, we analyze over 900 kb of Y chromosome sequence obtained from 547 individuals from southern African Khoisan- and Bantu-speaking populations, identifying 232 new sequences from basal haplogroups A and B. We identify new clades in the phylogeny, an older age for the root, and substantially older ages for some individual haplogroups. Furthermore, while haplogroup B2a is traditionally associated with the spread of Bantu speakers, we find that it probably also existed in Khoisan groups before the arrival of Bantu speakers. Finally, there is pronounced variation in branch length between major haplogroups; in particular, haplogroups associated with Bantu speakers have significantly longer branches. Technical artifacts cannot explain this branch length variation, which instead likely reflects aspects of the demographic history of Bantu speakers, such as recent population expansion and an older average paternal age. The influence of demographic factors on branch length variation has broader implications both for the human Y phylogeny and for similar analyses of other species. PMID:27043341

  16. First insights into fern matK phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Yaung; Li, Fay-Wei; Chiou, Wen-Liang; Wang, Chun-Neng

    2011-06-01

    MatK, the only maturase gene in the land plant plastid genome, is a very popular phylogenetic marker that has been extensively applied in reconstructing angiosperm phylogeny. However, the use of matK in fern phylogeny is largely unknown, due to difficulties with amplification: ferns have lost the flanking trnK exons, typically the region used for designing stable priming sites. We developed primers that are either universal or lineage-specific that successfully amplify matK across all fern families. To evaluate whether matK is as powerful a phylogenetic marker in ferns as in angiosperms, we compared its sequence characteristics and phylogenetic performance to those of rbcL and atpA. Among these three genes, matK has the highest variability and substitution evenness, yet shows the least homoplasy. Most importantly, applying matK in fern phylogenetics better resolved relationships among families, especially within eupolypods I and II. Here we demonstrate the power of matK for fern phylogenetic reconstruction, as well as provide primers and extensive sequence data that will greatly facilitate future evolutionary studies of ferns.

  17. Phylogeny congruence analysis and isozyme classification: the pyruvate kinase system.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Fournier, P; Auclair, J C

    1989-09-22

    As the isozymes of pyruvate kinase (PK) are best known in rats, the characteristics of the rat isozymes are generally used to classify the PK isozymes in other species. Given the discrepancies generated by this classification by analogy, we evaluated a classification using a phylogeny congruence analysis of the compositional relatedness of vertebrate PK's. While our phylogenetic analysis confirmed the well established separation of the L and R isozymes from the K and M isozymes, its power became most evident in the identification of non-orthologous (or variant) forms of PK. Our analysis emphasized the uniqueness of chicken liver PK which cannot be classified either as a K or an L isozyme, confirmed that tumors express a variety of forms of PK, and indicated that lungs systematically express PK's which are not orthologous with PK's from other tissues. The determination of orthology by the phylogeny congruence analysis assumes that the structural data from different sources are subject to similar methodological error. However, we cannot reject the possibility that an apparent lack of orthology be due to artifacts during purification and analysis. PMID:2615396

  18. Deep metazoan phylogeny: when different genes tell different stories.

    PubMed

    Nosenko, Tetyana; Schreiber, Fabian; Adamska, Maja; Adamski, Marcin; Eitel, Michael; Hammel, Jörg; Maldonado, Manuel; Müller, Werner E G; Nickel, Michael; Schierwater, Bernd; Vacelet, Jean; Wiens, Matthias; Wörheide, Gert

    2013-04-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analyses have produced a plethora of controversial hypotheses regarding the patterns of diversification of non-bilaterian animals. To unravel the causes for the patterns of extreme inconsistencies at the base of the metazoan tree of life, we constructed a novel supermatrix containing 122 genes, enriched with non-bilaterian taxa. Comparative analyses of this supermatrix and its two non-overlapping multi-gene partitions (including ribosomal and non-ribosomal genes) revealed conflicting phylogenetic signals. We show that the levels of saturation and long branch attraction artifacts in the two partitions correlate with gene sampling. The ribosomal gene partition exhibits significantly lower saturation levels than the non-ribosomal one. Additional systematic errors derive from significant variations in amino acid substitution patterns among the metazoan lineages that violate the stationarity assumption of evolutionary models frequently used to reconstruct phylogenies. By modifying gene sampling and the taxonomic composition of the outgroup, we were able to construct three different yet well-supported phylogenies. These results show that the accuracy of phylogenetic inference may be substantially improved by selecting genes that evolve slowly across the Metazoa and applying more realistic substitution models. Additional sequence-independent genomic markers are also necessary to assess the validity of the phylogenetic hypotheses. PMID:23353073

  19. A synthetic phylogeny of freshwater crayfish: insights for conservation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Christopher L; Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Stern, David; Crandall, Keith A

    2015-02-19

    Phylogenetic systematics is heading for a renaissance where we shift from considering our phylogenetic estimates as a static image in a published paper and taxonomies as a hardcopy checklist to treating both the phylogenetic estimate and dynamic taxonomies as metadata for further analyses. The Open Tree of Life project (opentreeoflife.org) is developing synthesis tools for harnessing the power of phylogenetic inference and robust taxonomy to develop a synthetic tree of life. We capitalize on this approach to estimate a synthesis tree for the freshwater crayfish. The crayfish make an exceptional group to demonstrate the utility of the synthesis approach, as there recently have been a number of phylogenetic studies on the crayfishes along with a robust underlying taxonomic framework. Importantly, the crayfish have also been extensively assessed by an IUCN Red List team and therefore have accurate and up-to-date area and conservation status data available for analysis within a phylogenetic context. Here, we develop a synthesis phylogeny for the world's freshwater crayfish and examine the phylogenetic distribution of threat. We also estimate a molecular phylogeny based on all available GenBank crayfish sequences and use this tree to estimate divergence times and test for divergence rate variation. Finally, we conduct EDGE and HEDGE analyses and identify a number of species of freshwater crayfish of highest priority in conservation efforts.

  20. Phylogeny of the Gondwanan beetle family Ulodidae (Tenebrionoidea).

    PubMed

    Leschen, Richard A B; Escalona, Hermes E; Elgueta, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ulodidae is a small family of saproxylic and fungus feeding beetles restricted to New Zealand, Australia, Chile and New Caledonia. The phylogeny of this family is presented for the first time, based on a cladistic analysis of 53 adult characters from 16 ulodid genera, rooted with Parahelops Waterhouse (Promecheilidae). The topology shows Arthopus Sharp at the base of the tree and confirms the placement of Meryx Latreille as a member of Ulodidae and closely related to the Chilean genus Trachyderas Philippi & Philippi. The extinct New Zealand genus Waitomophylax Leschen & Rhode was placed among a clade consisting of Brouniphylax Strand, Exohadrus Broun, and Pteroderes Germain. Two new genera and two new species are described: Ulobostrichus gen. n. (type species: Ulobostrichus monteithi sp. n.) and Ulocyphaleus gen. n. (type species: Cyphaleus valdivianus Philippi & Philippi, 1864, now U. valdivianus (Philippi & Philippi) n. comb.; U. laetus sp. n.). Dipsaconia pyritosa Pascoe is designated as the type species of Dipsaconia Pascoe and a lectotype was designated for C. valdivianus. A fully illustrated key to the genera and a checklist of the 16 genera and 42 species is included. Based on the phylogeny, the following characters are derived in the family: tuberculate body surface and the presence of scales and /or encrustations. The presence of pore-fields in the abdominal cuticle has evolved at least three times in Meryx Latreille (Australia), Syrphetodes Pascoe (New Zealand) and Trachyderastes Kaszab (New Caledonia). PMID:27470774

  1. Molecular Phylogeny of the Bamboo Sharks (Chiloscyllium spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Masstor, Noor Haslina; Samat, Abdullah; Nor, Shukor Md; Md-Zain, Badrul Munir

    2014-01-01

    Chiloscyllium, commonly called bamboo shark, can be found inhabiting the waters of the Indo-West Pacific around East Asian countries such as Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, Singapore, and Indonesia. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List has categorized them as nearly threatened sharks out of their declining population status due to overexploitation. A molecular study was carried out to portray the systematic relationships within Chiloscyllium species using 12S rRNA and cytochrome b gene sequences. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian were used to reconstruct their phylogeny trees. A total of 381 bp sequences' lengths were successfully aligned in the 12S rRNA region, with 41 bp sites being parsimony-informative. In the cytochrome b region, a total of 1120 bp sites were aligned, with 352 parsimony-informative characters. All analyses yield phylogeny trees on which C. indicum has close relationships with C. plagiosum. C. punctatum is sister taxon to both C. indicum and C. plagiosum while C. griseum and C. hasseltii formed their own clade as sister taxa. These Chiloscyllium classifications can be supported by some morphological characters (lateral dermal ridges on the body, coloring patterns, and appearance of hypobranchials and basibranchial plate) that can clearly be used to differentiate each species. PMID:25013766

  2. Refining the Y chromosome phylogeny with southern African sequences.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Chiara; Hübner, Alexander; Macholdt, Enrico; Ni, Shengyu; Lippold, Sebastian; Schröder, Roland; Mpoloka, Sununguko Wata; Purps, Josephine; Roewer, Lutz; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    The recent availability of large-scale sequence data for the human Y chromosome has revolutionized analyses of and insights gained from this non-recombining, paternally inherited chromosome. However, the studies to date focus on Eurasian variation, and hence the diversity of early-diverging branches found in Africa has not been adequately documented. Here, we analyze over 900 kb of Y chromosome sequence obtained from 547 individuals from southern African Khoisan- and Bantu-speaking populations, identifying 232 new sequences from basal haplogroups A and B. We identify new clades in the phylogeny, an older age for the root, and substantially older ages for some individual haplogroups. Furthermore, while haplogroup B2a is traditionally associated with the spread of Bantu speakers, we find that it probably also existed in Khoisan groups before the arrival of Bantu speakers. Finally, there is pronounced variation in branch length between major haplogroups; in particular, haplogroups associated with Bantu speakers have significantly longer branches. Technical artifacts cannot explain this branch length variation, which instead likely reflects aspects of the demographic history of Bantu speakers, such as recent population expansion and an older average paternal age. The influence of demographic factors on branch length variation has broader implications both for the human Y phylogeny and for similar analyses of other species.

  3. The geological record and phylogeny of the Myriapoda.

    PubMed

    Shear, William A; Edgecombe, Gregory D

    2010-01-01

    We review issues of myriapod phylogeny, from the position of the Myriapoda amongst arthropods to the relationships of the orders of the classes Chilopoda and Diplopoda. The fossil record of each myriapod class is reviewed, with an emphasis on developments since 1997. We accept as working hypotheses that Myriapoda is monophyletic and belongs in Mandibulata, that the classes of Myriapoda are monophyletic, and that they are related as (Chilopoda (Symphyla (Diplopoda+Pauropoda))). The most pressing challenges to these hypotheses are some molecular and developmental evidence for an alliance between myriapods and chelicerates, and the attraction of symphylans to pauropods in some molecular analyses. While the phylogeny of the orders of Chilopoda appears settled, the relationships within Diplopoda remain unclear at several levels. Chilopoda and Diplopoda have a relatively sparse representation as fossils, and Symphyla and Pauropoda fossils are known only from Tertiary ambers. Fossils are difficult to place in trees based on living forms because many morphological characters are not very likely to be preserved in the fossils; as a consequence, most diplopod fossils have been placed in extinct higher taxa. Nevertheless, important information from diplopod fossils includes the first documented occurrence of air-breathing, and the first evidence for the use of a chemical defense. Stem-group myriapods are unknown, but evidence suggests the group must have arisen in the Early Cambrian, with a major period of cladogenesis in the Late Ordovician and early Silurian. Large terrestrial myriapods were on land at least by mid-Silurian. PMID:19944188

  4. A synthetic phylogeny of freshwater crayfish: insights for conservation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Christopher L; Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Stern, David; Crandall, Keith A

    2015-02-19

    Phylogenetic systematics is heading for a renaissance where we shift from considering our phylogenetic estimates as a static image in a published paper and taxonomies as a hardcopy checklist to treating both the phylogenetic estimate and dynamic taxonomies as metadata for further analyses. The Open Tree of Life project (opentreeoflife.org) is developing synthesis tools for harnessing the power of phylogenetic inference and robust taxonomy to develop a synthetic tree of life. We capitalize on this approach to estimate a synthesis tree for the freshwater crayfish. The crayfish make an exceptional group to demonstrate the utility of the synthesis approach, as there recently have been a number of phylogenetic studies on the crayfishes along with a robust underlying taxonomic framework. Importantly, the crayfish have also been extensively assessed by an IUCN Red List team and therefore have accurate and up-to-date area and conservation status data available for analysis within a phylogenetic context. Here, we develop a synthesis phylogeny for the world's freshwater crayfish and examine the phylogenetic distribution of threat. We also estimate a molecular phylogeny based on all available GenBank crayfish sequences and use this tree to estimate divergence times and test for divergence rate variation. Finally, we conduct EDGE and HEDGE analyses and identify a number of species of freshwater crayfish of highest priority in conservation efforts. PMID:25561670

  5. [Ethology and phylogeny of the family Belontiidae (Anabantoidei, pisces)].

    PubMed

    Vierke, J

    1975-09-01

    1. The behavioural patterns of the following species of the family Belontiidae were qualitatively examined and compared with each other: Colisa lalia, C. fasciata, C. chuna, Trichogaster trichopterus, T. leeri, T. microlepis, Macropodu, opercularis, Pseudosphromenus (Macropodus) cupanus cupanus, Betta splendens, Trichopsis pumilus, T. vittatus vittatus, T. vittatus schalleri, Belontia signata and the hybrids Colisa fasciata X lalia. 2. Among other points the paper puts some emphasis on the description of the reproductive behaviour of the various species (nest building, mating, parental behaviour). In addition aspects of feeding and fighting behaviour are described. 3. The subfamilies established by Liem (1963) on the basis of osteological characteristics can also be substantiated ethologically. 4. Liem's conception of the phylogeny of Belontiidae is criticized. His system conceiving phylogeny as a process of branching off successively is contrasted with a phylogenetic fan. The subfamilies Belontiinae, Trichogasterinae and Macropodinae differentiated almost at the same time. 5. The genus of Macropodus has a very isolated position within the sub-family of Macropodinae. The remaining genera are on a higher level of development regarding their reproductive behaviour. As a result of the paper Pseudosphromenus (Macropodus) cupanus has to be eliminated from the genus of Macropodus.

  6. Phylogeny of Basal Iguanodonts (Dinosauria: Ornithischia): An Update

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    The precise phylogenetic relationships of many non-hadrosaurid members of Iguanodontia, i.e., basal iguanodonts, have been unclear. Therefore, to investigate the global phylogeny of basal iguanodonts a comprehensive data matrix was assembled, including nearly every valid taxon of basal iguanodont. The matrix was analyzed in the program TNT, and the maximum agreement subtree of the resulting most parsimonious trees was then calculated in PAUP. Ordering certain multistate characters and omitting taxa through safe taxonomic reduction did not markedly improve resolution. The results provide some new information on the phylogeny of basal iguanodonts, pertaining especially to obscure or recently described taxa, and support some recent taxonomic revisions, such as the splitting of traditional “Camptosaurus” and “Iguanodon”. The maximum agreement subtree also shows a close relationship between the Asian Probactrosaurus gobiensis and the North American Eolambia, supporting the previous hypothesis of faunal interchange between Asia and North America in the early Late Cretaceous. Nevertheless, the phylogenetic relationships of many basal iguanodonts remain ambiguous due to the high number of taxa removed from the maximum agreement subtree and poor resolution of consensus trees. PMID:22629328

  7. Neocortical Expansion: An Attempt toward Relating Phylogeny and Ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Killackey, H P

    1990-01-01

    The neocortex is the most characteristic feature of the human brain. On gross inspection, its convoluted surfaces can be seen to have overgrown and covered most other brain structures. In the functional sphere, it is to the neocortex that we attribute those behaviors assumed to be most uniquely human such as cognition and linguistic behavior. This essay is an attempt to understand how this structure expanded during the course of mammalian evolution. At present, any attempt must be more speculative than definitive, but it is offered in the hope that it will generate more discussion on a topic that is central to all neurobiology, as well as a number of allied disciplines. I will proceed by outlining current views on the evolution of the brain, briefly review the organization of the somatosensory cortex in several mammalian forms, and then discuss in some detail ontogenetic mechanisms that may have some bearing on neocortical phylogeny. The primary proposition put forth is that the mammalian neocortex is relatively unspecified by strict genetic means, and that this allowed the neocortex to expand and adapt to a variety of circumstances during the course of phylogeny. PMID:23964719

  8. Re-examining alveolate evolution using multiple protein molecular phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Fast, Naomi M; Xue, Lingru; Bingham, Scott; Keeling, Patrick J

    2002-01-01

    Alveolates are a diverse group of protists that includes three major lineages: ciliates, apicomplexa, and dinoflagellates. Among these three, it is thought that the apicomplexa and dinoflagellates are more closely related to one another than to ciliates. However, this conclusion is based almost entirely on results from ribosomal RNA phylogeny because very few morphological characters address this issue and scant molecular data are available from dinoflagellates. To better examine the relationships between the three major alveolate groups, we have sequenced six genes from the non-photosynthetic dinoflagellate, Crypthecodinium cohnii: actin, beta-tubulin, hsp70, BiP, hsp90, and mitochondrial hsp10. Beta-tubulin, hsp70, BiP, and hsp90 were found to be useful for intra-alveolate phylogeny, and trees were inferred from these genes individually and in combination. Trees inferred from individual genes generally supported the apicomplexa-dinoflagellate grouping, as did a combined analysis of all four genes. However, it was also found that the outgroup had a significant effect on the topology within alveolates when using certain methods of phylogenetic reconstruction, and an alternative topology clustering dinoflagellates and ciliates could not be rejected by the combined data. Altogether, these results support the sisterhood of apicomplexa and dinoflagellates, but point out that the relationship is not as strong as is often assumed.

  9. A synthetic phylogeny of freshwater crayfish: insights for conservation

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Christopher L.; Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Stern, David; Crandall, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic systematics is heading for a renaissance where we shift from considering our phylogenetic estimates as a static image in a published paper and taxonomies as a hardcopy checklist to treating both the phylogenetic estimate and dynamic taxonomies as metadata for further analyses. The Open Tree of Life project (opentreeoflife.org) is developing synthesis tools for harnessing the power of phylogenetic inference and robust taxonomy to develop a synthetic tree of life. We capitalize on this approach to estimate a synthesis tree for the freshwater crayfish. The crayfish make an exceptional group to demonstrate the utility of the synthesis approach, as there recently have been a number of phylogenetic studies on the crayfishes along with a robust underlying taxonomic framework. Importantly, the crayfish have also been extensively assessed by an IUCN Red List team and therefore have accurate and up-to-date area and conservation status data available for analysis within a phylogenetic context. Here, we develop a synthesis phylogeny for the world's freshwater crayfish and examine the phylogenetic distribution of threat. We also estimate a molecular phylogeny based on all available GenBank crayfish sequences and use this tree to estimate divergence times and test for divergence rate variation. Finally, we conduct EDGE and HEDGE analyses and identify a number of species of freshwater crayfish of highest priority in conservation efforts. PMID:25561670

  10. Phylogeny and biogeography of the fruit doves (Aves: Columbidae).

    PubMed

    Cibois, Alice; Thibault, Jean-Claude; Bonillo, Céline; Filardi, Christopher E; Watling, Dick; Pasquet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We reconstruct the phylogeny of fruit doves (genus Ptilinopus) and allies with a dense sampling that includes almost all species, based on mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data. We evaluate the most likely biogeographic scenario for the evolution of this group that colonized many islands of the Pacific Ocean. We also investigate the evolution of one of the main plumage character of fruit doves (the color of the crown), and we propose several revisions of the group's systematics. All Ptilinopus taxa formed a monophyletic group that includes two morphologically distinct genera, Alectroenas and Drepanoptila, confirming a previous result found with less species and genes. The divergence time analysis suggests that the basal divergences within Ptilinopus dated to the Early Oligocene, and the biogeographic analysis indicates that fruit doves originated most probably from the proto New Guinea region. The earliest dispersals from the New Guinea region to Oceania occurred with the colonization of New Caledonia and Fiji. A large group of Polynesian species (Central and Eastern), as well as the three taxa found in Micronesia and four species from the Guinean-Moluccan region, form the "purpuratus" clade, the largest diversification of fruit doves within Oceania, which also has a New Guinean origin. However, the eastbound colonization of fruit doves was not associated with a significant increase of their diversification rate. Overall, the Melanesian region did not act as a cradle for fruit doves, in contrast to the New Guinea region which is found as the ancestral area for several nodes within the phylogeny.

  11. Phylogeny of bovine species based on AFLP fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Buntjer, J B; Otsen, M; Nijman, I J; Kuiper, M T R; Lenstra, J A

    2002-01-01

    The Bovini species comprise both domestic and wild cattle species. Published phylogenies of this tribe based on mitochondrial DNA contain anomalies, while nuclear sequences show only low variation. We have used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting in order to detect variation in loci distributed over the nuclear genome. Computer-assisted scoring of electrophoretic fingerprinting patterns yielded 361 markers, which provided sufficient redundancy to suppress stochastic effects of intraspecies polymorphisms and length homoplasies (comigration of non-homologous fragments). Tree reconstructions reveal three clusters: African buffalo with water buffalo, ox with zebu, and bison with wisent. Similarity values suggest a clustering of gaur and banteng, but bifurcating clustering algorithms did not assign consistent positions to these species and yak. We propose that because of shared polymorphisms and reticulations, tree topologies are only partially adequate to represent the phylogeny of the Bovini. Principal-coordinate analysis positions zebu between a gaur/banteng cluster and taurine cattle. This correlates with the region of origin of these species and suggests that genomic distances between the cattle species have been influenced by genetic exchange between neighbouring ancestral populations.

  12. Mixed integer linear programming for maximum-parsimony phylogeny inference.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Srinath; Lam, Fumei; Blelloch, Guy E; Ravi, R; Schwartz, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees is a fundamental problem in computational biology. While excellent heuristic methods are available for many variants of this problem, new advances in phylogeny inference will be required if we are to be able to continue to make effective use of the rapidly growing stores of variation data now being gathered. In this paper, we present two integer linear programming (ILP) formulations to find the most parsimonious phylogenetic tree from a set of binary variation data. One method uses a flow-based formulation that can produce exponential numbers of variables and constraints in the worst case. The method has, however, proven extremely efficient in practice on datasets that are well beyond the reach of the available provably efficient methods, solving several large mtDNA and Y-chromosome instances within a few seconds and giving provably optimal results in times competitive with fast heuristics than cannot guarantee optimality. An alternative formulation establishes that the problem can be solved with a polynomial-sized ILP. We further present a web server developed based on the exponential-sized ILP that performs fast maximum parsimony inferences and serves as a front end to a database of precomputed phylogenies spanning the human genome.

  13. A molecular phylogeny of Hemiptera inferred from mitochondrial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Song, Nan; Liang, Ai-Ping; Bu, Cui-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Classically, Hemiptera is comprised of two suborders: Homoptera and Heteroptera. Homoptera includes Cicadomorpha, Fulgoromorpha and Sternorrhyncha. However, according to previous molecular phylogenetic studies based on 18S rDNA, Fulgoromorpha has a closer relationship to Heteroptera than to other hemipterans, leaving Homoptera as paraphyletic. Therefore, the position of Fulgoromorpha is important for studying phylogenetic structure of Hemiptera. We inferred the evolutionary affiliations of twenty-five superfamilies of Hemiptera using mitochondrial protein-coding genes and rRNAs. We sequenced three mitogenomes, from Pyrops candelaria, Lycorma delicatula and Ricania marginalis, representing two additional families in Fulgoromorpha. Pyrops and Lycorma are representatives of an additional major family Fulgoridae in Fulgoromorpha, whereas Ricania is a second representative of the highly derived clade Ricaniidae. The organization and size of these mitogenomes are similar to those of the sequenced fulgoroid species. Our consensus phylogeny of Hemiptera largely supported the relationships (((Fulgoromorpha,Sternorrhyncha),Cicadomorpha),Heteroptera), and thus supported the classic phylogeny of Hemiptera. Selection of optimal evolutionary models (exclusion and inclusion of two rRNA genes or of third codon positions of protein-coding genes) demonstrated that rapidly evolving and saturated sites should be removed from the analyses.

  14. The Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassibe, W.R.; Keck, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    The western part of the conterminous United States is often thought of as being a desert without any large bodies of water. In the desert area of western Utah, however, lies Great Salt Lake, which in 1986 covered approximately 2,300 square miles and contained 30 million acre-feet of water (an acre-foot is the amount of water necessary to cover 1 acre of land with water 1 foot in depth or about 326,000 gallons). To emphasize its size, the Great Salt Lake is the largest lake west of the Mississippi River, larger than the states of Rhode Island and Delaware.

  15. Phylogeny and temporal diversification of darters (Percidae: Etheostomatinae).

    PubMed

    Near, Thomas J; Bossu, Christen M; Bradburd, Gideon S; Carlson, Rose L; Harrington, Richard C; Hollingsworth, Phillip R; Keck, Benjamin P; Etnier, David A

    2011-10-01

    Discussions aimed at resolution of the Tree of Life are most often focused on the interrelationships of major organismal lineages. In this study, we focus on the resolution of some of the most apical branches in the Tree of Life through exploration of the phylogenetic relationships of darters, a species-rich clade of North American freshwater fishes. With a near-complete taxon sampling of close to 250 species, we aim to investigate strategies for efficient multilocus data sampling and the estimation of divergence times using relaxed-clock methods when a clade lacks a fossil record. Our phylogenetic data set comprises a single mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene and two nuclear genes sampled from 245 of the 248 darter species. This dense sampling allows us to determine if a modest amount of nuclear DNA sequence data can resolve relationships among closely related animal species. Darters lack a fossil record to provide age calibration priors in relaxed-clock analyses. Therefore, we use a near-complete species-sampled phylogeny of the perciform clade Centrarchidae, which has a rich fossil record, to assess two distinct strategies of external calibration in relaxed-clock divergence time estimates of darters: using ages inferred from the fossil record and molecular evolutionary rate estimates. Comparison of Bayesian phylogenies inferred from mtDNA and nuclear genes reveals that heterospecific mtDNA is present in approximately 12.5% of all darter species. We identify three patterns of mtDNA introgression in darters: proximal mtDNA transfer, which involves the transfer of mtDNA among extant and sympatric darter species, indeterminate introgression, which involves the transfer of mtDNA from a lineage that cannot be confidently identified because the introgressed haplotypes are not clearly referable to mtDNA haplotypes in any recognized species, and deep introgression, which is characterized by species diversification within a recipient clade subsequent to the transfer of

  16. A RAD-based phylogenetics for Orestias fishes from Lake Titicaca.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsumi; Moreno, Edmundo

    2015-12-01

    The fish genus Orestias is endemic to the Andes highlands, and Lake Titicaca is the centre of the species diversity of the genus. Previous phylogenetic studies based on a single locus of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA strongly support the monophyly of a group composed of many of species endemic to the Lake Titicaca basin (the Lake Titicaca radiation), but the relationships among the species in the radiation remain unclear. Recently, restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing, which can produce a vast number of short sequences from various loci of nuclear DNA, has emerged as a useful way to resolve complex phylogenetic problems. To propose a new phylogenetic hypothesis of Orestias fishes of the Lake Titicaca radiation, we conducted a cluster analysis based on morphological similarities among fish samples and a molecular phylogenetic analysis based on RAD sequencing. From a morphological cluster analysis, we recognised four species groups in the radiation, and three of the four groups were resolved as monophyletic groups in maximum-likelihood trees based on RAD sequencing data. The other morphology-based group was not resolved as a monophyletic group in molecular phylogenies, and some members of the group were diverged from its sister group close to the root of the Lake Titicaca radiation. The evolution of these fishes is discussed from the phylogenetic relationships.

  17. Can lake sensitivity to desiccation be predicted from lake geometry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi Haghighi, Ali; Menberu, Meseret Walle; Aminnezhad, Mousa; Marttila, Hannu; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-08-01

    Declining lake levels (Aral Sea syndrome) can be caused by changes in climate, increased water use or changed regulation patterns. This paper introduces a novel lake geometry index (LGI) to quantify lake hydrological characteristics. The index was developed using a large representative dataset of lake hypsographic characteristics from 152 lakes and man-made reservoirs. Using the LGI index, lakes can be classified into five groups: groups 1-4 when LGI is 0.5-2.5, 2.5-4.5, 4.5-6.5 and 6.5-8.5, respectively, and group 5 when LGI is >8.5. Naturally shallow and vast lakes and wetlands fall into the first group and deep man-made reservoirs in narrow valleys are in group 5. The response of three different lake systems (LGI 0.75, 2.75 and 6.5) to different water flow scenarios was then simulated using the water balance equation. From this, the index 'potential lake area' (Apot) was developed to show lake responses to changed hydro-climatological conditions. Apot and LGI can be used to classify lakes into open or closed systems. Simulations showed that lakes with low LGI have a shorter response time to flow and climate changes. As a result, the impact of water balance restoration is faster for lakes with low LGI than for lakes with high LGI. The latter are also more vulnerable to climate variation and change.

  18. Challenges to the Lake

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade we have extensively studied coastal ecosystems in the Great Lakes. Some research efforts have linked coastal receiving systems to conditions in their contributing watersheds; others have focused on developing invasive species detection and monitoring strat...

  19. Is Lake Tahoe Terminal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, R. N.; Reuter, J.; Heyvaert, A.; Lewis, J.; Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, G.; Thorne, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Tahoe, an iconic ultra-oligotrophic lake in the central Sierra Nevada, has been studied intensively since 1968, with the goal of understanding and ultimately controlling its eutrophication and loss of clarity. Research on the lake has included a) periodic profiles of primary productivity, nutrients, temperature, and plankton; b) Secchi depth; c) nutrient limitation experiments; d) analysis of sediment cores; e) radiocarbon dating of underwater in-place tree stumps; g) analysis of long-term temperature trends. Work in its watershed has included a) monitoring of stream discharge, sediment and nutrients at up to 20 stream gaging stations; b) monitoring of urban runoff water quality at selected sites; c) development of a GIS data base, including soils, vegetation, and land use. Based on these studies, we know that a) primary productivity in the lake is limited by phosphorus, and continues to increase; b) the loss of clarity continues, but at a declining rate; c) the lake has been warming since 1970, and its resistance to deep mixing is increasing; d) historically the lake level drops below the outlet elevation about one year in seven; e) 6300 to 4300 yrs BP lake level was below the present outlet elevation long enough for large trees to grow; f) the date of the peak snowmelt runoff is shifting toward earlier dates; g) after accounting for annual runoff, loads of nutrients and suspended sediment have declined significantly in some basin streams since 1980. Downscaled outputs from GCM climatic models have recently been used to drive hydrologic models and a lake clarity model, projecting future trends in the lake and watersheds. Results show a) the temperature and thermal stability will likely continue to increase, with deep mixing shutting down in the latter half of this century; b) the lake may drop below the outlet for an extended period beginning about 2085; c) the annual snowpack will continue to decline, with earlier snowmelt and shift from snowfall to rain; d

  20. Lake Superior, Duluth, MN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This view shows the west end of Lake Superior and Duluth, MN (47.0N, 91.0W). Portions of Minnesota, Michigan and Ontario, Canada are in the scene. The Duluth metropolitan area is at the west end of the lake. The discoloration plume in the water at Duluth is the result of tailings from the iron ore smelters that process the iron ore from the nearby open pit mines seen near the upper left corner of the photo.

  1. Lake Chad, Chad, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fluctuating water levels of Lake Chad, (13.0N, 15.0E) at the intersection of the borders of Chad, Niger and Cameroon in the Sahara Desert, is an index of the drought in Africa. The lake level continues to decrease as indicated by the growing number and extent of emerging islands as previously submerged ancient sand dunes become visible. The water impounded between the dunes is probably because of local rainfall rather than a reversal of desertification.

  2. Overview: Ancient Lake Creede

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bethke, Philip M.; Hay, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    Lake Creede was moderately saline closed-basin lake that developed in the 26.9 Ma Creede caldera in the San Juan Mountains in the southwest Colorado. The volcaniclastic sediments deposited within the late Oligocene lake were first described and named as the Creede Formation by Emmons and Larsen (1923). The lake and its sedimentary fill are of interest first as representatives of a caldera-hosted lake in a silicic volcanic terrane, and second because of the likely involvement of lake fluids or related pore waters in the deposition of the 25 Ma silver and base-metal ores of the Creede mining district north of the Creede caldera (Fig. 1), as proposed Bethke and Rye (1979). Much of the material presented in this volume is based on observation of core samples and on downhole geophysical measurements obtained as part of a U.S. Continental Scientific Drilling Program in the moat of the Creede caldera. These core and downhole studies are supplemented by outcrop studies, some initiated in support of the drilling program (Bethke and Lipman, 1987), and by conceptual studies of the evolution of the Creede caldera and its surrounding landscape. Not surprisingly, not all authors agree on all interpretation. Most disagreements are pointed out in this overview chapter, and may present opportunities for future study.

  3. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  4. Abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in sediments of trophic end members of the Laurentian Great Lakes, Erie and Superior.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Annette; Bullerjahn, George S; McKay, Robert Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification carried out by ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB). Lake Superior and Erie are part of the Great Lakes system differing in trophic status with Lake Superior being oligotrophic and Lake Erie meso- to eutrophic. Sediment samples were collected from both lakes and used to characterize abundance and diversity of AOA and AOB based on the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene. Diversity was accessed by a pyro-sequencing approach and the obtained sequences were used to determine the phylogeny and alpha and beta diversity of the AOA and AOB populations. In Lake Erie copy numbers of bacterial amoA genes were in the same order of magnitude or even higher than the copy numbers of the archaeal amoA genes, while in Lake Superior up to 4 orders of magnitude more archaeal than bacterial amoA copies were detected. The AOB detected in the samples from Lake Erie belonged to AOB that are frequently detected in freshwater. Differences were detected between the phylogenetic affiliations of the AOA from the two lakes. Most sequences detected in Lake Erie clustered in the Nitrososphaera cluster (Thaumarchaeal soil group I.1b) where as most of the sequences in Lake Superior were found in the Nitrosopumilus cluster (Thaumarchaeal marine group I.1a) and the Nitrosotalea cluster. Pearson correlations and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that the differences in abundance and diversity of AOA are very likely related to the sampling location and thereby to the different trophic states of the lakes.

  5. Multigenic phylogeny and analysis of tree incongruences in Triticeae (Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Introgressive events (e.g., hybridization, gene flow, horizontal gene transfer) and incomplete lineage sorting of ancestral polymorphisms are a challenge for phylogenetic analyses since different genes may exhibit conflicting genealogical histories. Grasses of the Triticeae tribe provide a particularly striking example of incongruence among gene trees. Previous phylogenies, mostly inferred with one gene, are in conflict for several taxon positions. Therefore, obtaining a resolved picture of relationships among genera and species of this tribe has been a challenging task. Here, we obtain the most comprehensive molecular dataset to date in Triticeae, including one chloroplastic and 26 nuclear genes. We aim to test whether it is possible to infer phylogenetic relationships in the face of (potentially) large-scale introgressive events and/or incomplete lineage sorting; to identify parts of the evolutionary history that have not evolved in a tree-like manner; and to decipher the biological causes of gene-tree conflicts in this tribe. Results We obtain resolved phylogenetic hypotheses using the supermatrix and Bayesian Concordance Factors (BCF) approaches despite numerous incongruences among gene trees. These phylogenies suggest the existence of 4-5 major clades within Triticeae, with Psathyrostachys and Hordeum being the deepest genera. In addition, we construct a multigenic network that highlights parts of the Triticeae history that have not evolved in a tree-like manner. Dasypyrum, Heteranthelium and genera of clade V, grouping Secale, Taeniatherum, Triticum and Aegilops, have evolved in a reticulated manner. Their relationships are thus better represented by the multigenic network than by the supermatrix or BCF trees. Noteworthy, we demonstrate that gene-tree incongruences increase with genetic distance and are greater in telomeric than centromeric genes. Together, our results suggest that recombination is the main factor decoupling gene trees from

  6. Chromosome phylogenies of man, great apes, and Old World monkeys.

    PubMed

    De Grouchy, J

    1987-08-31

    The karyotypes of man and of the closely related Pongidae--chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan--differ by a small number of well known rearrangements, mainly pericentric inversions and one fusion which reduced the chromosome number from 48 in the Pongidae to 46 in man. Dutrillaux et al. (1973, 1975, 1979) reconstructed the chromosomal phylogeny of the entire primate order. More and more distantly related species were compared thus moving backward in evolution to the common ancestors of the Pongidae, of the Cercopithecoidae, the Catarrhini, the Platyrrhini, the Prosimians, and finally the common ancestor of all primates. Descending the pyramid it becomes possible to assign the rearrangements that occurred in each phylum, and the one that led to man in particular. The main conclusions are that this phylogeny is compatible with the occurrence during evolution of simple chromosome rearrangements--inversions, fusions, reciprocal translocation, acquisition or loss of heterochromatin--and that it is entirely consistent with the known primate phylogeny based on physical morphology and molecular evolution. If heterochromatin is not taken into account, man has in common with the other primates practically all of his chromosomal material as determined by chromosome banding. However, it is arranged differently, according to species, on account of chromosome rearrangements. This interpretation has been confirmed by comparative gene mapping, which established that the same chromosome segments, identified by banding, carry the same genes (Finaz et al., 1973; Human Gene Mapping 8, 1985). A remarkable observation made by Dutrillaux is that different primate phyla seem to have adopted different chromosome rearrangements in the course of evolution: inversions for the Pongidae, Robertsonian fusions for the lemurs, etc. This observation may raise many questions, among which is that of an organized evolution. Also, the breakpoints of chromosomal rearrangements observed during evolution

  7. Echinothurioid phylogeny and the phylogenetic significance of Kamptosoma (Echinoidea: Echinodermata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooi, Rich; Constable, Heather; Lockhart, Susanne; Pearse, John

    2004-07-01

    The Echinothurioida is an unusual group of regular sea urchins that are characterized by soft, flexible tests and in some cases, hoof-shaped spines used for locomotion across soft, deep-sea sediments. As far as is known, all species are armed with venom-bearing spines that have been known to cause serious injury in humans. There are 50 species of echinothurioids arranged in 11 extant genera. Their fossil record is very poor, being limited to two additional fossil taxa (one of which is only tentatively considered an echinothurioid), two assigned to extant taxa, and three of more dubious affinity. With very few exceptions, only disjointed plates are preserved—and those very rarely. Today, echinothurioids are found around the globe from as far north as the Arctic Circle and as far south as Antarctica, with a bathymetric distribution ranging from inshore on coral reefs to depths of almost 5000 m. The majority of species are characteristic of the deep sea, and consequently little is known about these urchins. Many are known only from type and associated material. Their fragile tests, deep benthic habitat, and rarity make it difficult to develop a complete picture of their morphology, and as we demonstrate, breakage of the test can lead to misinterpretations of plate architecture in some taxa. The sole Antarctic species, Kamptosoma asterias, is usually considered an echinothurioid, but its unusual morphology has made its position difficult to ascertain. In addition, previous genus-level phylogenies do not test the monophyly of the genera, and some studies even suggest that the echinothurioids themselves do not constitute a monophyletic group. This study focuses on finding a species level phylogeny of the echinothurioids in order to perform these tests, and to place the enigmatic Kamptosoma in a phylogenetic context that determines whether it is indeed an echinothurioid, and if so, to which clade it is most closely related. The present analysis surveys ambulacral

  8. Is Lake Chabot Eutrophic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, K.; Logan, J.; Esterlis, P.; Lew, A.; Nguyen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction/Abstract: Lake Chabot is an integral part of the East Bay watershed that provides habitats for animals and recreation for humans year-round. Lake Chabot has been in danger of eutrophication due to excessive dumping of phosphorous and nitrogen into the water from the fertilizers of nearby golf courses and neighboring houses. If the lake turned out to be eutrophified, it could seriously impact what is currently the standby emergency water supply for many Castro Valley residents. Eutrophication is the excessive richness of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus in a lake, usually as a result of runoff. This buildup of nutrients causes algal blooms. The algae uses up most of the oxygen in the water, and when it dies, it causes the lake to hypoxify. The fish in the lake can't breathe, and consequently suffocate. Other oxygen-dependant aquatic creatures die off as well. Needless to say, the eutrophication of a lake is bad news for the wildlife that lives in or around it. The level of eutrophication in our area in Northern California tends to increase during the late spring/early summer months, so our crew went out and took samples of Lake Chabot on June 2. We focused on the area of the lake where the water enters, known on the map as Honker Bay. We also took readings a ways down in deeper water for comparison's sake. Visually, the lake looked in bad shape. The water was a murky green that glimmered with particulate matter that swirled around the boat as we went by. In the Honker Bay region where we focused our testing, there were reeds bathed in algae that coated the surface of the lake in thick, swirling patterns. Surprisingly enough, however, our test results didn't reveal any extreme levels of phosphorous or nitrogen. They were slightly higher than usual, but not by any significant amount. The levels we found were high enough to stimulate plant and algae growth and promote eutrophication, but not enough to do any severe damage. After a briefing with a

  9. TOXAPHENE STUDY OF GREAT LAKES TRIBUTARY SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Product is the paper "Pulp and Paper Mills as Sources of Toxaphene to Lake Superior and Northern Lake Michigan" published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research, 25(2):383-394 International Association of Great Lakes 1999.

  10. Availability of lake trout reproductive habitat in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Kennedy, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    A decades-long program to reestablish self-sustaining stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the four lower Great Lakes produced excellent fisheries supported by stocked fish. These fish spawned widely and small numbers of their offspring were collected intermittently from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario, but no self-sustaining stocks were established. Irt this paper we address habitat sufficiency as a factor in the failure of stocked lake trout to established self-sustaining populations in the four lower Great Lakes. We present the previously unpublished results of lake trout spawning habitat surveys conducted at seven sites in the Great Lakes since 1987 and we compare them with the published results of similar surveys conducted at 24 other sites in the four lower lakes since 1981. Our evaluation indicates all but two of these sites can support the production of viable fry from spawnings by the shallow-water strains of lake trout that are stocked in the Great Lakes. However, some of the best spawning, egg, and fry habitat in the lower Great Lakes seems to be at deeper offshore sites that may be unattractive to these shallow-water strains. Thus, we suggest also stocking the lower four lakes with strains from Lake Superior that might more fully exploit the best spawning habitat at these deeper, offshore sites.

  11. Contaminants in American alligator eggs from Lake Apopka, Lake Griffin, and Lake Okeechobee, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Percival, H.F.; Jennings, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Residues of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and 16 elements were measured in American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) eggs collected in 1984 from Lakes Apopka, Griffin, and Okeechobee in central and south Florida. Organochlorine pesticides were highest in eggs from Lake Apopka. None of the elements appeared to be present at harmful concentrations in eggs from any of the lakes. A larger sample of eggs was collected in 1985, but only from Lakes Griffin, a lake where eggs were relatively clean, and Apopka, where eggs were most contaminated. In 1985, hatching success of artificially incubated eggs was lower for Lake Apopka, and several organochlorine pesticides were higher than in eggs from Lake Griffin. However, within Lake Apopka, higher levels of pesticides in chemically analyzed eggs were not associated with reduced hatching success of the remaining eggs in the clutch. Therefore, it did not appear that any of the pesticides we measured were responsible for the reduced hatching of Lake Apopka eggs.

  12. Evidence of Lake Trout reproduction at Lake Michigan's mid-lake reef complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janssen, J.; Jude, D.J.; Edsall, T.A.; Paddock, R.W.; Wattrus, N.; Toneys, M.; McKee, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Mid-Lake Reef Complex (MLRC), a large area of deep (> 40 m) reefs, was a major site where indigenous lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan aggregated during spawning. As part of an effort to restore Lake Michigan's lake trout, which were extirpated in the 1950s, yearling lake trout have been released over the MLRC since the mid-1980s and fall gill net censuses began to show large numbers of lake trout in spawning condition beginning about 1999. We report the first evidence of viable egg deposition and successful lake trout fry production at these deep reefs. Because the area's existing bathymetry and habitat were too poorly known for a priori selection of sampling sites, we used hydroacoustics to locate concentrations of large fish in the fall; fish were congregating around slopes and ridges. Subsequent observations via unmanned submersible confirmed the large fish to be lake trout. Our technological objectives were driven by biological objectives of locating where lake trout spawn, where lake trout fry were produced, and what fishes ate lake trout eggs and fry. The unmanned submersibles were equipped with a suction sampler and electroshocker to sample eggs deposited on the reef, draw out and occasionally catch emergent fry, and collect egg predators (slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus). We observed slimy sculpin to eat unusually high numbers of lake trout eggs. Our qualitative approaches are a first step toward quantitative assessments of the importance of lake trout spawning on the MLRC.

  13. Big lake records preserved in a little lake's sediment: An example from Silver Lake, Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, T.G.; Loope, W.L.; Pierce, W.; Jol, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    We reconstruct postglacial lake-level history within the Lake Michigan basin using soil stratigraphy, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), sedimentology and 14C data from the Silver Lake basin, which lies adjacent to Lake Michigan. Stratigraphy in nine vibracores recovered from the floor of Silver Lake appears to reflect fluctuation of water levels in the Lake Michigan basin. Aeolian activity within the study area from 3,000 years (cal yr. B.P.) to the present was inferred from analysis of buried soils, an aerial photograph sequence, and GPR. Sediments in and around Silver Lake appear to contain a paleoenvironmental record that spans the entire post-glacial history of the Lake Michigan basin. We suggest that (1) a pre-Nipissing rather than a Nipissing barrier separated Silver Lake basin from the Lake Michigan basin, (2) that the Nipissing transgression elevated the water table in the Silver Lake basin about 6,500 cal yr. B.P., resulting in reestablishment of a lake within the basin, and (3) that recent dune migration into Silver Lake is associated with levels of Lake Michigan.

  14. Hemiplasy and homoplasy in the karyotypic phylogenies of mammals.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Terence J; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Avise, John C

    2008-09-23

    Phylogenetic reconstructions are often plagued by difficulties in distinguishing phylogenetic signal (due to shared ancestry) from phylogenetic noise or homoplasy (due to character-state convergences or reversals). We use a new interpretive hypothesis, termed hemiplasy, to show how random lineage sorting might account for specific instances of seeming "phylogenetic discordance" among different chromosomal traits, or between karyotypic features and probable species phylogenies. We posit that hemiplasy is generally less likely for underdominant chromosomal polymorphisms (i.e., those with heterozygous disadvantage) than for neutral polymorphisms or especially for overdominant rearrangements (which should tend to be longer-lived), and we illustrate this concept by using examples from chiropterans and afrotherians. Chromosomal states are especially powerful in phylogenetic reconstructions because they offer strong signatures of common ancestry, but their evolutionary interpretations remain fully subject to the principles of cladistics and the potential complications of hemiplasy. PMID:18787123

  15. Overly simplistic substitution models obscure green plant phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Endymion D

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic analysis is an increasingly common and valuable component of plant science. Knowledge of the phylogenetic relationships between plant groups is a prerequisite for understanding the origin and evolution of important plant features, and phylogenetic analysis of individual genes and gene families provides fundamental insights into how those genes and their functions evolved. However, despite an active research community exploring and improving phylogenetic methods, the analytical methods commonly used, and the phylogenetic results they produce, are accorded far more confidence than they warrant. In this opinion article, I emphasise that important parts of the green plant phylogeny are inconsistently resolved and I argue that the lack of consistency arises due to inadequate modelling of changes in the substitution process. PMID:25023343

  16. Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2011-03-14

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota, make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important from the perspectives of forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, plant pathogenic rusts and smuts, and some human pathogens. To better understand these important fungi, we have undertaken a comparative genomic analysis of the Basidiomycetes with available sequenced genomes. We report a phylogeny that sheds light on previously unclear evolutionary relationships among the Basidiomycetes. We also define a `core proteome? based on protein families conserved in all Basidiomycetes. We identify key expansions and contractions in protein families that may be responsible for the degradation of plant biomass such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Finally, we speculate as to the genomic changes that drove such expansions and contractions.

  17. Comparing nodal versus bony metastatic spread using tumour phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Mangiola, Stefano; Hong, Matthew K. H.; Cmero, Marek; Kurganovs, Natalie; Ryan, Andrew; Costello, Anthony J.; Corcoran, Niall M.; Macintyre, Geoff; Hovens, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The role of lymph node metastases in distant prostate cancer dissemination and lethality is ill defined. Patients with metastases restricted to lymph nodes have a better prognosis than those with distant metastatic spread, suggesting the possibility of distinct aetiologies. To explore this, we traced patterns of cancer dissemination using tumour phylogenies inferred from genome-wide copy-number profiling of 48 samples across 3 patients with lymph node metastatic disease and 3 patients with osseous metastatic disease. Our results show that metastatic cells in regional lymph nodes originate from evolutionary advanced extraprostatic tumour cells rather than less advanced central tumour cell populations. In contrast, osseous metastases do not exhibit such a constrained developmental lineage, arising from either intra or extraprostatic tumour cell populations, at early and late stages in the evolution of the primary. Collectively, this comparison suggests that lymph node metastases may not be an intermediate developmental step for distant osseous metastases, but rather represent a distinct metastatic lineage. PMID:27653089

  18. Ectocranial suture fusion in primates: pattern and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Cooper, Gregory M; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2014-03-01

    Patterns of ectocranial suture fusion among Primates are subject to species-specific variation. In this study, we used Guttman Scaling to compare modal progression of ectocranial suture fusion among Hominidae (Homo, Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo), Hylobates, and Cercopithecidae (Macaca and Papio) groups. Our hypothesis is that suture fusion patterns should reflect their evolutionary relationship. For the lateral-anterior suture sites there appear to be three major patterns of fusion, one shared by Homo-Pan-Gorilla, anterior to posterior; one shared by Pongo and Hylobates, superior to inferior; and one shared by Cercopithecidae, posterior to anterior. For the vault suture pattern, the Hominidae groups reflect the known phylogeny. The data for Hylobates and Cercopithecidae groups is less clear. The vault suture site termination pattern of Papio is similar to that reported for Gorilla and Pongo. Thus, it may be that some suture sites are under larger genetic influence for patterns of fusion, while others are influenced by environmental/biomechanic influences.

  19. Brief communication: Ectocranial suture closure in Pongo: pattern and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Cooper, Gregory M; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2010-11-01

    Ectocranial suture fusion patterns have been shown to contain biological and phylogenetic information. Previously the patterns of Homo, Pan, and Gorilla have been described. These data reflect the phylogenetic relationships among these species. In this study, we applied similar methodology to Pongo to determine the suture synostosis progression of this genus, and to allow comparison to previously reported data on other large-bodied hominoids. We hypothesized these data would strengthen the argument that suture synostosis patterns reflect the phylogeny of primate taxa. Results indicate that the synostosis of vault sutures in Pongo is similar to that reported for Gorilla (excluding Pan and Homo). However, the lateral-anterior pattern of fusion, in which there is a strong superior to inferior pattern, for Pongo is unique among these species, reflecting its phylogenetic distinctness among great ape taxa.

  20. Reconstructing phylogeny from the multifractal spectrum of mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazier, James A.; Raghavachari, Sridhar; Berthelsen, Cheryl L.; Skolnick, Mark H.

    1995-03-01

    Conventional methods of phylogenetic reconstruction from DNA sequences require simplified models of evolutionary dynamics. We present a method based on fractal analysis to reconstruct the evolutionary history of organisms from mitochondrial DNA sequences. We map animal mtDNA into four-dimensional random walks and estimate their long range correlations using multifractal spectra. We see systematic changes in correlations in mtDNA sequences across taxonomic lines, which translate into changes in the scaling of the random walks. We use cluster analysis to group the multifractal spectra and obtain the phylogeny of the organisms. Though our method uses no a priori assumptions and is independent of gene order, it yields phylogenetic relationships broadly consistent with established results. Several recent papers have analyzed DNA using fractal analysis and have found long range correlations. However, no one has succeeded in using them to deduce biologically significant relationships.

  1. Evolution of consciousness: phylogeny, ontogeny, and emergence from general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mashour, George A; Alkire, Michael T

    2013-06-18

    Are animals conscious? If so, when did consciousness evolve? We address these long-standing and essential questions using a modern neuroscientific approach that draws on diverse fields such as consciousness studies, evolutionary neurobiology, animal psychology, and anesthesiology. We propose that the stepwise emergence from general anesthesia can serve as a reproducible model to study the evolution of consciousness across various species and use current data from anesthesiology to shed light on the phylogeny of consciousness. Ultimately, we conclude that the neurobiological structure of the vertebrate central nervous system is evolutionarily ancient and highly conserved across species and that the basic neurophysiologic mechanisms supporting consciousness in humans are found at the earliest points of vertebrate brain evolution. Thus, in agreement with Darwin's insight and the recent "Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness in Non-Human Animals," a review of modern scientific data suggests that the differences between species in terms of the ability to experience the world is one of degree and not kind.

  2. Molecular cladistic markers in New World monkey phylogeny (Platyrrhini, Primates).

    PubMed

    Singer, Silke S; Schmitz, Jürgen; Schwiegk, Claudia; Zischler, Hans

    2003-03-01

    Transpositions of primate-specific Alu elements were applied as molecular cladistic markers in a phylogenetic analysis of South American primates. Seventy-four human and platyrrhine loci containing intronic Alu elements were PCR screened in various New World monkeys and the human outgroup to detect the presence of orthologous retrotransposons informative of New World monkey phylogeny. Six loci revealed size polymorphism in the amplification pattern, indicating a shared derived character state due to the presence of orthologous Alu elements confirmed by subsequent sequencing. Three markers corroborate (1) New World monkey monophyly and one marker supports each of the following callitrichine relationships: (2) Callithrix and Cebuella are more closely related to each other than to any other callitrichine, (3) the callitrichines form a monophyletic clade including Callimico, and (4) the next living relatives to the callitrichines are Cebus, Saimiri, and Aotus.

  3. Reliable amplification of actin genes facilitates deep-level phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Voigt, K; Wöstemeyer, J

    2000-09-01

    The gene for actin as a highly conserved and functionally essential genetic element is developing into a major tool for phylogenetic analysis within a broad organismic range. We therefore propose a set of universally applicable primers that allow reliable amplification of actin genes. For primer construction the amino acid sequences of 57 actin genes comprising fungi, animals, plants and protists were analysed, aligned and used for the definition of six well-conserved regions which are suitable as priming sites in PCR amplification experiments. Ten primers were designed for specific in vitro amplification of actin gene fragments from a wide range of microorganisms. The corresponding gene fragments provide a strong basis to isolate nearly complete actin genes for further molecular characterization and for establishing phylogenies based on actin gene trees.

  4. Quantifying Age-dependent Extinction from Species Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Helen K; Lambert, Amaury; Stadler, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Several ecological factors that could play into species extinction are expected to correlate with species age, i.e., time elapsed since the species arose by speciation. To date, however, statistical tools to incorporate species age into likelihood-based phylogenetic inference have been lacking. We present here a computational framework to quantify age-dependent extinction through maximum likelihood parameter estimation based on phylogenetic trees, assuming species lifetimes are gamma distributed. Testing on simulated trees shows that neglecting age dependence can lead to biased estimates of key macroevolutionary parameters. We then apply this method to two real data sets, namely a complete phylogeny of birds (class Aves) and a clade of self-compatible and -incompatible nightshades (Solanaceae), gaining initial insights into the extent to which age-dependent extinction may help explain macroevolutionary patterns. Our methods have been added to the R package TreePar. PMID:26405218

  5. Winter Lake Breezes near the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Case studies of lake breezes during wintertime cold air pools in Utah's Salt Lake Valley are examined. While summer breezes originating from the Great Salt Lake are typically deeper, of longer duration, and have higher wind speeds than winter breezes, the rate of inland penetration and cross-frontal temperature differences can be higher during the winter. The characteristics of winter breezes and the forcing mechanisms controlling them (e.g., snow cover, background flow, vertical stability profile, clouds, lake temperature, lake sheltering, and drainage pooling) are more complex and variable than those evident in summer. During the afternoon in the Salt Lake Valley, these lake breezes can lead to elevated pollution levels due to the transport of fine particle pollutants from over the Great Salt Lake, decreased vertical mixing depth, and increased vertical stability.

  6. Movements of adult lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rahrer, Jerold F.

    1968-01-01

    Returns from mature lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) tagged in western Lake Superior in 1959 and 1962-65 described here suggest that trout disperse widely from the spawning grounds after spawning and return in subsequent years. Although the data were not extensive, returns from lake trout tagged near Keweenaw Point in 1950 and off Marquette, Michigan, in 1952 suggested similar movement. Loftus stated that river-spawning lake trout of eastern Lake Superior returned annually to the same spawning streams. Movements of lake trout must be understood to manage and evaluate the rehabilitation of lake trout stocks in Lake Superior, especially when the trout move across interstate and international boundaries and are subject to different fishing regulations and fishing pressures.

  7. COI barcodes and phylogeny of doves (Columbidae family).

    PubMed

    Khan, Haseeb Ahmad; Arif, Ibrahim Abdulwahid

    2013-12-01

    Cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene has been recognized as an authentic tool for species identification. Besides its potential barcoding capacity, COI sequences have also been used for inferring the phylogeny. Phylogenetic relationships among genera of Columbidae (pigeons and doves family) have not been fully resolved because of scarce sampling of taxa and limited availability of sequence data. In this study, we have evaluated the efficiency of COI barcodes for species identification and phylogenetic analysis of various doves. We sequenced the 693 bp region of COI gene of three species of doves including Oena capensis, Streptopelia decaocto, and Streptopelia senegalensis. After retrieving the relevant sequences from the GenBank, the entire data-set of 85 sequences represented 25 dove species from 11 different genera of the family Columbidae. The COI sequences of four species including Chalcophaps indica (two specimens), Columbina inca (five specimens), Geopelia striata (three specimens), and Macropygia phasianella (three specimens) were identical. The mean intraspecific base differences ranged from 0 to 37 while the P-distances ranged between 0 and 0.058. For most of the species, the P-distances were ≤ 0.008. Phylogenetic analysis differentiated the taxa into three major clusters. One of the clusters grouped five genera including Claravis, Columbina, Gallicolumba, Geopelia, and Geotrygon. The remaining two clusters grouped three genera each including Chalcophaps, Oena, and Turtur in one cluster and Macropygia, Streptopelia, and Zenaida in another cluster. Further sub-clustering clearly separated all the genera into individual clusters except two discrepancies for the genera Streptopelia and Turtur. Species-level cladistics clearly separated all the species into distinctive clades. In conclusion, COI barcoding is a powerful tool for species identification with added information on phylogenetic inference. The finding of this study will help to understand the

  8. Estimating divergence dates and substitution rates in the Drosophila phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Obbard, Darren J; Maclennan, John; Kim, Kang-Wook; Rambaut, Andrew; O'Grady, Patrick M; Jiggins, Francis M

    2012-11-01

    An absolute timescale for evolution is essential if we are to associate evolutionary phenomena, such as adaptation or speciation, with potential causes, such as geological activity or climatic change. Timescales in most phylogenetic studies use geologically dated fossils or phylogeographic events as calibration points, but more recently, it has also become possible to use experimentally derived estimates of the mutation rate as a proxy for substitution rates. The large radiation of drosophilid taxa endemic to the Hawaiian islands has provided multiple calibration points for the Drosophila phylogeny, thanks to the "conveyor belt" process by which this archipelago forms and is colonized by species. However, published date estimates for key nodes in the Drosophila phylogeny vary widely, and many are based on simplistic models of colonization and coalescence or on estimates of island age that are not current. In this study, we use new sequence data from seven species of Hawaiian Drosophila to examine a range of explicit coalescent models and estimate substitution rates. We use these rates, along with a published experimentally determined mutation rate, to date key events in drosophilid evolution. Surprisingly, our estimate for the date for the most recent common ancestor of the genus Drosophila based on mutation rate (25-40 Ma) is closer to being compatible with independent fossil-derived dates (20-50 Ma) than are most of the Hawaiian-calibration models and also has smaller uncertainty. We find that Hawaiian-calibrated dates are extremely sensitive to model choice and give rise to point estimates that range between 26 and 192 Ma, depending on the details of the model. Potential problems with the Hawaiian calibration may arise from systematic variation in the molecular clock due to the long generation time of Hawaiian Drosophila compared with other Drosophila and/or uncertainty in linking island formation dates with colonization dates. As either source of error will

  9. Phylogeny and biogeography of the carnivorous plant family Sarraceniaceae.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Aaron M; Butler, Elena D; Hicks, Emily Jean; Naczi, Robert F C; Calie, Patrick J; Bell, Charles D; Davis, Charles C

    2012-01-01

    The carnivorous plant family Sarraceniaceae comprises three genera of wetland-inhabiting pitcher plants: Darlingtonia in the northwestern United States, Sarracenia in eastern North America, and Heliamphora in northern South America. Hypotheses concerning the biogeographic history leading to this unusual disjunct distribution are controversial, in part because genus- and species-level phylogenies have not been clearly resolved. Here, we present a robust, species-rich phylogeny of Sarraceniaceae based on seven mitochondrial, nuclear, and plastid loci, which we use to illuminate this family's phylogenetic and biogeographic history. The family and genera are monophyletic: Darlingtonia is sister to a clade consisting of Heliamphora+Sarracenia. Within Sarracenia, two clades were strongly supported: one consisting of S. purpurea, its subspecies, and S. rosea; the other consisting of nine species endemic to the southeastern United States. Divergence time estimates revealed that stem group Sarraceniaceae likely originated in South America 44-53 million years ago (Mya) (highest posterior density [HPD] estimate = 47 Mya). By 25-44 (HPD = 35) Mya, crown-group Sarraceniaceae appears to have been widespread across North and South America, and Darlingtonia (western North America) had diverged from Heliamphora+Sarracenia (eastern North America+South America). This disjunction and apparent range contraction is consistent with late Eocene cooling and aridification, which may have severed the continuity of Sarraceniaceae across much of North America. Sarracenia and Heliamphora subsequently diverged in the late Oligocene, 14-32 (HPD = 23) Mya, perhaps when direct overland continuity between North and South America became reduced. Initial diversification of South American Heliamphora began at least 8 Mya, but diversification of Sarracenia was more recent (2-7, HPD = 4 Mya); the bulk of southeastern United States Sarracenia originated co-incident with Pleistocene glaciation, <3 Mya

  10. Phylogeny and biogeography of the carnivorous plant family Sarraceniaceae.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Aaron M; Butler, Elena D; Hicks, Emily Jean; Naczi, Robert F C; Calie, Patrick J; Bell, Charles D; Davis, Charles C

    2012-01-01

    The carnivorous plant family Sarraceniaceae comprises three genera of wetland-inhabiting pitcher plants: Darlingtonia in the northwestern United States, Sarracenia in eastern North America, and Heliamphora in northern South America. Hypotheses concerning the biogeographic history leading to this unusual disjunct distribution are controversial, in part because genus- and species-level phylogenies have not been clearly resolved. Here, we present a robust, species-rich phylogeny of Sarraceniaceae based on seven mitochondrial, nuclear, and plastid loci, which we use to illuminate this family's phylogenetic and biogeographic history. The family and genera are monophyletic: Darlingtonia is sister to a clade consisting of Heliamphora+Sarracenia. Within Sarracenia, two clades were strongly supported: one consisting of S. purpurea, its subspecies, and S. rosea; the other consisting of nine species endemic to the southeastern United States. Divergence time estimates revealed that stem group Sarraceniaceae likely originated in South America 44-53 million years ago (Mya) (highest posterior density [HPD] estimate = 47 Mya). By 25-44 (HPD = 35) Mya, crown-group Sarraceniaceae appears to have been widespread across North and South America, and Darlingtonia (western North America) had diverged from Heliamphora+Sarracenia (eastern North America+South America). This disjunction and apparent range contraction is consistent with late Eocene cooling and aridification, which may have severed the continuity of Sarraceniaceae across much of North America. Sarracenia and Heliamphora subsequently diverged in the late Oligocene, 14-32 (HPD = 23) Mya, perhaps when direct overland continuity between North and South America became reduced. Initial diversification of South American Heliamphora began at least 8 Mya, but diversification of Sarracenia was more recent (2-7, HPD = 4 Mya); the bulk of southeastern United States Sarracenia originated co-incident with Pleistocene glaciation, <3 Mya

  11. Molecular phylogeny of the burying beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae: Nicrophorinae).

    PubMed

    Sikes, Derek S; Venables, Chandra

    2013-12-01

    Burying beetles (Silphidae: Nicrophorus) are well-known for their monopolization of small vertebrate carcasses in subterranean crypts and complex biparental care behaviors. They have been the focus of intense behavioral, ecological, and conservation research since the 1980s yet no thorough phylogenetic estimate for the group exists. Herein, we infer relationships, test past hypotheses of relationships, and test biogeographic scenarios among 55 of the subfamily Nicrophorinae's currently valid and extant 72 species. Two mitochondrial genes, COI and COII, and two nuclear genes, the D2 region of 28S, and the protein coding gene CAD, provided 3,971 nucleotides for 58 nicrophorine and 5 outgroup specimens. Ten partitions, with each modeled by GTR+I+G, were used for a 100 M generation MrBayes analysis and maximum likelihood bootstrapping with Garli. The inferred Bayesian phylogeny was mostly well-resolved with only three weak branches of biogeographic relevance. The common ancestor of the subfamily and of the genus Nicrophorus was reconstructed as Old World with four separate transitions to the New World and four reverse colonizations of the Old World from the New. Divergence dating from analysis with BEAST indicate the genus Nicrophorus originated in the Cretaceous, 127-99 Ma. Most prior, pre-cladistic hypotheses of relationships were strongly rejected while most modern hypotheses were largely congruent with monophyletic groups in our estimated phylogeny. Our results reject a recent hypothesis that Nicrophorus morio Gebler, 1817 (NEW STATUS as valid species) is a subspecies of N. germanicus (L., 1758). Two subgenera of Nicrophorus are recognized: NecroxenusSemenov-Tian-Shanskij, 1933, and NicrophorusFabricius, 1775.

  12. Estimating Divergence Dates and Substitution Rates in the Drosophila Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Obbard, Darren J.; Maclennan, John; Kim, Kang-Wook; Rambaut, Andrew; O’Grady, Patrick M.; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2012-01-01

    An absolute timescale for evolution is essential if we are to associate evolutionary phenomena, such as adaptation or speciation, with potential causes, such as geological activity or climatic change. Timescales in most phylogenetic studies use geologically dated fossils or phylogeographic events as calibration points, but more recently, it has also become possible to use experimentally derived estimates of the mutation rate as a proxy for substitution rates. The large radiation of drosophilid taxa endemic to the Hawaiian islands has provided multiple calibration points for the Drosophila phylogeny, thanks to the "conveyor belt" process by which this archipelago forms and is colonized by species. However, published date estimates for key nodes in the Drosophila phylogeny vary widely, and many are based on simplistic models of colonization and coalescence or on estimates of island age that are not current. In this study, we use new sequence data from seven species of Hawaiian Drosophila to examine a range of explicit coalescent models and estimate substitution rates. We use these rates, along with a published experimentally determined mutation rate, to date key events in drosophilid evolution. Surprisingly, our estimate for the date for the most recent common ancestor of the genus Drosophila based on mutation rate (25–40 Ma) is closer to being compatible with independent fossil-derived dates (20–50 Ma) than are most of the Hawaiian-calibration models and also has smaller uncertainty. We find that Hawaiian-calibrated dates are extremely sensitive to model choice and give rise to point estimates that range between 26 and 192 Ma, depending on the details of the model. Potential problems with the Hawaiian calibration may arise from systematic variation in the molecular clock due to the long generation time of Hawaiian Drosophila compared with other Drosophila and/or uncertainty in linking island formation dates with colonization dates. As either source of error will

  13. A molecular phylogeny of the cotingas (Aves: Cotingidae).

    PubMed

    Ohlson, Jan I; Prum, Richard O; Ericson, Per G P

    2007-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of members of Cotingidae were investigated using >2100 bp of sequence data from two nuclear introns (myoglobin intron 2 and G3PDH intron 11) and one protein-coding mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b). Strong support was found for a monophyletic clade including 23 traditional cotingid genera, corresponding to the Cotingidae sensu [Remsen, J.V. Jr., Jaramillo, A., Nores, M., Pacheco, J.F., Robbins, M.B., Schulenberg, T.S., Stiles, F.G., da Silva, J.M.C., Stotz, D.F., Zimmer, K.J., 2005. Version 2005-11-15. A classification of the bird species of South America. American Ornithologists' Union. ]. Neither Oxyruncus nor any of the genera in Tityrinae sensu [Prum, R.O, Lanyon, W.E., 1989. Monophyly and phylogeny of the Schiffornis group (Tyrannoidea). Condor 91, 444-461.] are members of Cotingidae. Within Cotingidae a polytomy of four well-supported clades was recovered: (1) the fruiteaters Pipreola and Ampelioides; (2) the Ampelion group, including Phytotoma; (3) Rupicola and Phoenicircus; and (4) the 'core cotingas' consisting of the remainder of the Cotingas (e.g. fruitcrows, Cotinga, Procnias, Lipaugus, and Carpodectes), with Snowornis in a basal position. The separation of Snowornis from Lipaugus [Prum, R.O, Lanyon, W.E., 1989. Monophyly and phylogeny of the Schiffornis group (Tyrannoidea). Condor 91, 444-461.] was strongly supported, as were the close relationships between Gymnoderus and Conioptilon, and between Tijuca and Lipaugus. However, basal relationships among 'core cotinga' clades were not resolved. PMID:16876441

  14. An alu-based phylogeny of lemurs (infraorder: Lemuriformes).

    PubMed

    McLain, Adam T; Meyer, Thomas J; Faulk, Christopher; Herke, Scott W; Oldenburg, J Michael; Bourgeois, Matthew G; Abshire, Camille F; Roos, Christian; Batzer, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    LEMURS (INFRAORDER: Lemuriformes) are a radiation of strepsirrhine primates endemic to the island of Madagascar. As of 2012, 101 lemur species, divided among five families, have been described. Genetic and morphological evidence indicates all species are descended from a common ancestor that arrived in Madagascar ∼55-60 million years ago (mya). Phylogenetic relationships in this species-rich infraorder have been the subject of debate. Here we use Alu elements, a family of primate-specific Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs), to construct a phylogeny of infraorder Lemuriformes. Alu elements are particularly useful SINEs for the purpose of phylogeny reconstruction because they are identical by descent and confounding events between loci are easily resolved by sequencing. The genome of the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) was computationally assayed for synapomorphic Alu elements. Those that were identified as Lemuriformes-specific were analyzed against other available primate genomes for orthologous sequence in which to design primers for PCR (polymerase chain reaction) verification. A primate phylogenetic panel of 24 species, including 22 lemur species from all five families, was examined for the presence/absence of 138 Alu elements via PCR to establish relationships among species. Of these, 111 were phylogenetically informative. A phylogenetic tree was generated based on the results of this analysis. We demonstrate strong support for the monophyly of Lemuriformes to the exclusion of other primates, with Daubentoniidae, the aye-aye, as the basal lineage within the infraorder. Our results also suggest Lepilemuridae as a sister lineage to Cheirogaleidae, and Indriidae as sister to Lemuridae. Among the Cheirogaleidae, we show strong support for Microcebus and Mirza as sister genera, with Cheirogaleus the sister lineage to both. Our results also support the monophyly of the Lemuridae. Within Lemuridae we place Lemur and Hapalemur together to the exclusion of

  15. An Alu-Based Phylogeny of Lemurs (Infraorder: Lemuriformes)

    PubMed Central

    McLain, Adam T.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Faulk, Christopher; Herke, Scott W.; Oldenburg, J. Michael; Bourgeois, Matthew G.; Abshire, Camille F.

    2012-01-01

    Lemurs (infraorder: Lemuriformes) are a radiation of strepsirrhine primates endemic to the island of Madagascar. As of 2012, 101 lemur species, divided among five families, have been described. Genetic and morphological evidence indicates all species are descended from a common ancestor that arrived in Madagascar ∼55–60 million years ago (mya). Phylogenetic relationships in this species-rich infraorder have been the subject of debate. Here we use Alu elements, a family of primate-specific Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs), to construct a phylogeny of infraorder Lemuriformes. Alu elements are particularly useful SINEs for the purpose of phylogeny reconstruction because they are identical by descent and confounding events between loci are easily resolved by sequencing. The genome of the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) was computationally assayed for synapomorphic Alu elements. Those that were identified as Lemuriformes-specific were analyzed against other available primate genomes for orthologous sequence in which to design primers for PCR (polymerase chain reaction) verification. A primate phylogenetic panel of 24 species, including 22 lemur species from all five families, was examined for the presence/absence of 138 Alu elements via PCR to establish relationships among species. Of these, 111 were phylogenetically informative. A phylogenetic tree was generated based on the results of this analysis. We demonstrate strong support for the monophyly of Lemuriformes to the exclusion of other primates, with Daubentoniidae, the aye-aye, as the basal lineage within the infraorder. Our results also suggest Lepilemuridae as a sister lineage to Cheirogaleidae, and Indriidae as sister to Lemuridae. Among the Cheirogaleidae, we show strong support for Microcebus and Mirza as sister genera, with Cheirogaleus the sister lineage to both. Our results also support the monophyly of the Lemuridae. Within Lemuridae we place Lemur and Hapalemur together to the exclusion of

  16. Nuclear and mitochondrial genes for inferring Trichuris phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Callejón, Rocío; Cutillas, Cristina; Nadler, Steven A

    2015-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) gene (624 bp) and mitochondrial cytochrome b (cob) gene (520 bp) were obtained by PCR and evaluated for utility in inferring the phylogenetic relationships among Trichuris species. Published sequences of one other nuclear gene (18S or SSU rRNA, 1816-1846 bp) and one additional mitochondrial (mtDNA) gene (cytochrome oxidase 1, cox1, 342 bp) were also analyzed. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods were used to infer phylogenies for each gene separately but also for the combined mitochondrial data (two genes), the combined nuclear data (two genes), and the total evidence (four gene) dataset. Few Trichuris clades were uniformly resolved across separate analyses of individual genes. For the mtDNA, the cob gene trees had greater phylogenetic resolution and tended to have higher support values than the cox1 analyses. For nuclear genes, the SSU gene trees had slightly greater resolution and support values than the TPI analyses, but TPI was the only gene with reliable support for the deepest nodes in the tree. Combined analyses of genes yielded strongly supported clades in most cases, with the exception of the relationship among Trichuris clades 1, 2, and 3, which showed conflicting results between nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Both the TPI and cob genes proved valuable for inferring Trichuris relationships, with greatest resolution and support values achieved through combined analysis of multiple genes. Based on the phylogeny of the combined analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial genes, parsimony mapping of definitive host utilization depicts artiodactyls as the ancestral hosts for these Trichuris, with host-shifts into primates, rodents, and Carnivora.

  17. Phylogeny and Biogeography of the Carnivorous Plant Family Sarraceniaceae

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Aaron M.; Butler, Elena D.; Hicks, Emily Jean; Naczi, Robert F. C.; Calie, Patrick J.; Bell, Charles D.; Davis, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    The carnivorous plant family Sarraceniaceae comprises three genera of wetland-inhabiting pitcher plants: Darlingtonia in the northwestern United States, Sarracenia in eastern North America, and Heliamphora in northern South America. Hypotheses concerning the biogeographic history leading to this unusual disjunct distribution are controversial, in part because genus- and species-level phylogenies have not been clearly resolved. Here, we present a robust, species-rich phylogeny of Sarraceniaceae based on seven mitochondrial, nuclear, and plastid loci, which we use to illuminate this family's phylogenetic and biogeographic history. The family and genera are monophyletic: Darlingtonia is sister to a clade consisting of Heliamphora+Sarracenia. Within Sarracenia, two clades were strongly supported: one consisting of S. purpurea, its subspecies, and S. rosea; the other consisting of nine species endemic to the southeastern United States. Divergence time estimates revealed that stem group Sarraceniaceae likely originated in South America 44–53 million years ago (Mya) (highest posterior density [HPD] estimate = 47 Mya). By 25–44 (HPD = 35) Mya, crown-group Sarraceniaceae appears to have been widespread across North and South America, and Darlingtonia (western North America) had diverged from Heliamphora+Sarracenia (eastern North America+South America). This disjunction and apparent range contraction is consistent with late Eocene cooling and aridification, which may have severed the continuity of Sarraceniaceae across much of North America. Sarracenia and Heliamphora subsequently diverged in the late Oligocene, 14–32 (HPD = 23) Mya, perhaps when direct overland continuity between North and South America became reduced. Initial diversification of South American Heliamphora began at least 8 Mya, but diversification of Sarracenia was more recent (2–7, HPD = 4 Mya); the bulk of southeastern United States Sarracenia originated co-incident with Pleistocene

  18. Crater Lake revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, David W.; Dartnell, Peter; Bacon, Charles R.; Robinson, Joel E.; Gardner, James V.

    2003-01-01

    Around 500,000 people each year visit Crater Lake National Park in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. Volcanic peaks, evergreen forests, and Crater Lake’s incredibly blue water are the park’s main attractions. Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago by the eruption and subsequent collapse of a 12,000-foot volcano called Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama drastically changed the landscape all around the volcano and spread a blanket of volcanic ash at least as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000 year history of cone building activity like that of other Cascade volcanoes such as Mount Shasta. Since the climactic eruption, there have been several less violent, smaller postcaldera eruptions within the caldera itself. However, relatively little was known about the specifics of these eruptions because their products were obscured beneath Crater Lake’s surface. As the Crater Lake region is still potentially volcanically active, understanding past eruptive events is important to understanding future eruptions, which could threaten facilities and people at Crater Lake National Park and the major transportation corridor east of the Cascades. Recently, the lake bottom was mapped with a high-resolution multibeam echo sounder. The new bathymetric survey provides a 2m/pixel view of the lake floor from its deepest basins virtually to the shoreline. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, the bathymetry data can be visualized and analyzed to shed light on the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of Crater Lake.

  19. The Wandering Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In the area at the very far eastern corner of China's Taklimakan Desert, Lop Nor Lake was located up until some years ago. Lop Nor, also called the 'the heart of the heart' of Asia, was the place where the waters of the largest inner basin (i.e., not flowing into the sea) of the world-including the Tarim and Kum-daria Rivers-were collected. Depending on the balance between rainfall water yield and evaporation, both position and size of the lake were strongly variable, thus giving rise to the legend of the Wandering Lake. 'Lop City' was the place where Marco Polo took his last rest before facing the one-year long crossing of the Gobi Desert. Starting from the end of the 19th century, several explorers tried to find the legendary place. One such explorer was Sven Hedin, who was commissioned by the Governor of Nanjing to lead an expedition to find the lake. In 1937, the Swedish explorer published his book entitled The Wandering Lake. Comparing this very precise map from Sven Hedin's book with the above Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) false-color image (acquired on October 28, 2001), one can find a faint sign on the soil where the Lop Nor was located. This image, derived using a combination of MODIS' near-infrared and red channels (vegetation in red), shows where the Tarim River waters currently end their flow. The Wandering Lake does not exist anymore. The combination of climate change and human exploitation of water resources for agriculture caused the disappearance of the lake. This image was processed by Telespazio, Earth Observation division, new products development facility in Rome, Italy. The MODIS sensor flies aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, launched in December 1999. Caption and image courtesy Luca Pietranera, Telespazio, Rome, Italy, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  20. Examining indirect effects of lake trout recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the recovery of lake trout populations in Lake Superior, there are indications of decreased forage fish abundance and density-dependence in lake trout. In Lake Superior, lean lake trout historically occupied depths < 60 m, and siscowet lake trout occupied depths > 60 m...

  1. 42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to peaks of Outter Lodge, completed in 1964. Construction of the lake got underway in 1964. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  2. National Lakes Assessment: A Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Lakes Assessment A Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Lakes presents the results of an unprecedented assessment of the nation’s lakes. This report is part of the National Aquatic Resource Surveys, a series of statistically based surveys designed to provide the pub...

  3. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents th...

  4. Comparative evolutionary diversity and phylogenetic structure across multiple forest dynamics plots: a mega-phylogeny approach.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David L; Jones, Frank A; Swenson, Nathan G; Pei, Nancai; Bourg, Norman A; Chen, Wenna; Davies, Stuart J; Ge, Xue-Jun; Hao, Zhanqing; Howe, Robert W; Huang, Chun-Lin; Larson, Andrew J; Lum, Shawn K Y; Lutz, James A; Ma, Keping; Meegaskumbura, Madhava; Mi, Xiangcheng; Parker, John D; Fang-Sun, I; Wright, S Joseph; Wolf, Amy T; Ye, W; Xing, Dingliang; Zimmerman, Jess K; Kress, W John

    2014-01-01

    Forest dynamics plots, which now span longitudes, latitudes, and habitat types across the globe, offer unparalleled insights into the ecological and evolutionary processes that determine how species are assembled into communities. Understanding phylogenetic relationships among species in a community has become an important component of assessing assembly processes. However, the application of evolutionary information to questions in community ecology has been limited in large part by the lack of accurate estimates of phylogenetic relationships among individual species found within communities, and is particularly limiting in comparisons between communities. Therefore, streamlining and maximizing the information content of these community phylogenies is a priority. To test the viability and advantage of a multi-community phylogeny, we constructed a multi-plot mega-phylogeny of 1347 species of trees across 15 forest dynamics plots in the ForestGEO network using DNA barcode sequence data (rbcL, matK, and psbA-trnH) and compared community phylogenies for each individual plot with respect to support for topology and branch lengths, which affect evolutionary inference of community processes. The levels of taxonomic differentiation across the phylogeny were examined by quantifying the frequency of resolved nodes throughout. In addition, three phylogenetic distance (PD) metrics that are commonly used to infer assembly processes were estimated for each plot [PD, Mean Phylogenetic Distance (MPD), and Mean Nearest Taxon Distance (MNTD)]. Lastly, we examine the partitioning of phylogenetic diversity among community plots through quantification of inter-community MPD and MNTD. Overall, evolutionary relationships were highly resolved across the DNA barcode-based mega-phylogeny, and phylogenetic resolution for each community plot was improved when estimated within the context of the mega-phylogeny. Likewise, when compared with phylogenies for individual plots, estimates of

  5. Next-Generation Anchor Based Phylogeny (NexABP): Constructing phylogeny from Next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury, Tanmoy; Vishnoi, Anchal; Bhattacharya, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequences are ideally suited for deriving evolutionary relationship among organisms. With the availability of Next Generation sequencing (NGS) datasets in an unprecedented scale, it will be highly desirable if phylogenetic analysis can be carried out using short read NGS data. We described here an anchor based approach NexABP for phylogenetic construction of closely related strains/isolates from NGS data. This approach can be used even in the absence of a fully assembled reference genome and works by reducing the complexity of the datasets without compromising results. NexABP was used for constructing phylogeny of different strains of some of the common pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Vibrio cholera and Escherichia coli. In addition to classification into distinct lineages, NexABP could resolve inner branches and also allow statistical testing using bootstrap analysis. We believe that there are some clear advantages of using NexABP based phylogenetic analysis as compared to other methods. PMID:24022334

  6. Microplastic pollution in lakes and lake shoreline sediments - A case study on Lake Bolsena and Lake Chiusi (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elke Kerstin; Paglialonga, Lisa; Czech, Elisa; Tamminga, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Rivers and effluents have been identified as major pathways for microplastics of terrestrial sources. Moreover, lakes of different dimensions and even in remote locations contain microplastics in striking abundances. This study investigates concentrations of microplastic particles at two lakes in central Italy (Lake Bolsena, Lake Chiusi). A total number of six Manta Trawls have been carried out, two of them one day after heavy winds occurred on Lake Bolsena showing effects on particle distribution of fragments and fibers of varying size categories. Additionally, 36 sediment samples from lakeshores were analyzed for microplastic content. In the surface waters 2.68 to 3.36 particles/m(3) (Lake Chiusi) and 0.82 to 4.42 particles/m(3) (Lake Bolsena) were detected, respectively. Main differences between the lakes are attributed to lake characteristics such as surface and catchment area, depth and the presence of local wind patterns and tide range at Lake Bolsena. An event of heavy winds and moderate rainfall prior to one sampling led to an increase of concentrations at Lake Bolsena which is most probable related to lateral land-based and sewage effluent inputs. The abundances of microplastic particles in sediments vary from mean values of 112 (Lake Bolsena) to 234 particles/kg dry weight (Lake Chiusi). Lake Chiusi results reveal elevated fiber concentrations compared to those of Lake Bolsena what might be a result of higher organic content and a shift in grain size distribution towards the silt and clay fraction at the shallow and highly eutrophic Lake Chiusi. The distribution of particles along different beach levels revealed no significant differences. PMID:27104923

  7. Microplastic pollution in lakes and lake shoreline sediments - A case study on Lake Bolsena and Lake Chiusi (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elke Kerstin; Paglialonga, Lisa; Czech, Elisa; Tamminga, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Rivers and effluents have been identified as major pathways for microplastics of terrestrial sources. Moreover, lakes of different dimensions and even in remote locations contain microplastics in striking abundances. This study investigates concentrations of microplastic particles at two lakes in central Italy (Lake Bolsena, Lake Chiusi). A total number of six Manta Trawls have been carried out, two of them one day after heavy winds occurred on Lake Bolsena showing effects on particle distribution of fragments and fibers of varying size categories. Additionally, 36 sediment samples from lakeshores were analyzed for microplastic content. In the surface waters 2.68 to 3.36 particles/m(3) (Lake Chiusi) and 0.82 to 4.42 particles/m(3) (Lake Bolsena) were detected, respectively. Main differences between the lakes are attributed to lake characteristics such as surface and catchment area, depth and the presence of local wind patterns and tide range at Lake Bolsena. An event of heavy winds and moderate rainfall prior to one sampling led to an increase of concentrations at Lake Bolsena which is most probable related to lateral land-based and sewage effluent inputs. The abundances of microplastic particles in sediments vary from mean values of 112 (Lake Bolsena) to 234 particles/kg dry weight (Lake Chiusi). Lake Chiusi results reveal elevated fiber concentrations compared to those of Lake Bolsena what might be a result of higher organic content and a shift in grain size distribution towards the silt and clay fraction at the shallow and highly eutrophic Lake Chiusi. The distribution of particles along different beach levels revealed no significant differences.

  8. Determination of Flower Constancy in Bombus atratus Franklin and Bombus bellicosus Smith (Hymenoptera: Apidae) through Palynological Analysis of Nectar and Corbicular Pollen Loads.

    PubMed

    Rossi, N; Santos, E; Salvarrey, S; Arbulo, N; Invernizzi, C

    2015-12-01

    The flower constancy (the visit to a single plant species during a foraging trip) in pollinator insects is a theme widely discussed in behavioral ecology and has an important implication in the evolution of angiosperms. This behavior was studied in the bumblebees Bombus atratus Franklin and Bombus bellicosus Smith through palynological analysis of the nectar and pollen loads of individuals captured while foraging in a restricted area. In both species, there were more individuals with constant flights than with non-constant ones, although in the nectar loads of B. atratus there were no significant differences between individuals with each flight types. It was verified that the nectar loads of the individuals that made either constant or non-constant flights did not differ in the number of pollen grains they contained. Considering this measurement as an estimate for flight duration, the results would indicate that the probability of changing between plant species during nectar collection is independent of the foraging trip duration. In both species, most individuals who collected nectar and/or pollen from more than one plant species visited just two plant species. In these cases, the pollen of one plant species was predominant. In the bumblebees in which it was possible to analyze nectar and pollen loads, the botanical origin of both resources was the same or they shared the principal species (with the exception of two individuals), showing that bumblebees do not often use a botanical source in an exclusive way to collect nectar and another to collect pollen.

  9. Sanctuaries for lake trout in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Jon G.; Eshenroder, Randy L.; Hartman, Wilbur L.

    1987-01-01

    Populations of lake trout, severely depleted in Lake Superior and virtually extirpated from the other Great Lakes because of sea lamprey predation and intense fishing, are now maintained by annual plantings of hatchery-reared fish in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario and parts of Lake Superior. The extensive coastal areas of the Great Lakes and proximity to large populations resulted in fishing pressure on planted lake trout heavy enough to push annual mortality associated with sport and commercial fisheries well above the critical level needed to reestablish self-sustaining stocks. The interagency, international program for rehabilitating lake trout includes controlling sea lamprey abundance, stocking hatchery-reared lake trout, managing the catch, and establishing sanctuaries where harvest is prohibited. Three lake trout sanctuaries have been established in Lake Michigan: the Fox Island Sanctuary of 121, 500 ha, in the Chippewa-Ottawa Treaty fishing zone in the northern region of the lake; the Milwaukee Reef Sanctuary of 160, 000 ha in midlake, in boundary waters of Michigan and Wisconsin; and Julian's Reef Sanctuary of 6, 500 ha, in Illinois waters. In northern Lake Huron, Drummond Island Sanctuary of 55, 000 ha is two thirds in Indian treaty-ceded waters in Michigan and one third in Ontario waters of Canada. A second sanctuary, Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef Sanctuary, in central Lake Huron contains 168, 000 ha. Sanctuary status for the Canadian areas remains to be approved by the Provincial government. In Lake Superior, sanctuaries protect the spawning grounds of Gull Island Shoal (70, 000 ha) and Devils Island Shoal (44, 000 ha) in Wisconsin's Apostle Island area. These seven sanctuaries, established by the several States and agreed upon by the States, Indian tribes, the U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Province of Ontario, contribute toward solving an interjurisdictional fishery problem.

  10. Plant DNA barcodes and a community phylogeny of a tropical forest dynamics plot in Panama

    PubMed Central

    Kress, W. John; Erickson, David L.; Jones, F. Andrew; Swenson, Nathan G.; Perez, Rolando; Sanjur, Oris; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2009-01-01

    The assembly of DNA barcode libraries is particularly relevant within species-rich natural communities for which accurate species identifications will enable detailed ecological forensic studies. In addition, well-resolved molecular phylogenies derived from these DNA barcode sequences have the potential to improve investigations of the mechanisms underlying community assembly and functional trait evolution. To date, no studies have effectively applied DNA barcodes sensu strictu in this manner. In this report, we demonstrate that a three-locus DNA barcode when applied to 296 species of woody trees, shrubs, and palms found within the 50-ha Forest Dynamics Plot on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama, resulted in >98% correct identifications. These DNA barcode sequences are also used to reconstruct a robust community phylogeny employing a supermatrix method for 281 of the 296 plant species in the plot. The three-locus barcode data were sufficient to reliably reconstruct evolutionary relationships among the plant taxa in the plot that are congruent with the broadly accepted phylogeny of flowering plants (APG II). Earlier work on the phylogenetic structure of the BCI forest dynamics plot employing less resolved phylogenies reveals significant differences in evolutionary and ecological inferences compared with our data and suggests that unresolved community phylogenies may have increased type I and type II errors. These results illustrate how highly resolved phylogenies based on DNA barcode sequence data will enhance research focused on the interface between community ecology and evolution. PMID:19841276

  11. Genomic signatures of divergent selection and speciation patterns in a 'natural experiment', the young parallel radiations of Nicaraguan crater lake cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Kautt, Andreas F; Elmer, Kathryn R; Meyer, Axel

    2012-10-01

    Divergent selection is the main driving force in sympatric ecological speciation and may also play a strong role in divergence between allopatric populations. Characterizing the genome-wide impact of divergent selection often constitutes a first step in unravelling the genetic bases underlying adaptation and ecological speciation. The Midas cichlid fish (Amphilophus citrinellus) species complex in Nicaragua is a powerful system for studying evolutionary processes. Independent colonizations of isolated young crater lakes by Midas cichlid populations from the older and great lakes of Nicaragua resulted in the repeated evolution of adaptive radiations by intralacustrine sympatric speciation. In this study we performed genome scans on two repeated radiations of crater lake species and their great lake source populations (1030 polymorphic AFLPs, n ∼ 30 individuals per species). We detected regions under divergent selection (0.3% in the crater lake Xiloá flock and 1.7% in the older crater lake Apoyo radiation) that might be responsible for the sympatric diversifications. We find no evidence that the same genomic regions have been involved in the repeated evolution of parallel adaptations across crater lake flocks. However, there is some genetic parallelism apparent (seven out of 51 crater lake to great lake outlier loci are shared; 13.7%) that is associated with the allopatric divergence of both crater lake flocks. Interestingly, our results suggest that the number of outlier loci involved in sympatric and allopatric divergence increases over time. A phylogeny based on the AFLP data clearly supports the monophyly of both crater lake species flocks and indicates a parallel branching order with a primary split along the limnetic-benthic axis in both radiations.

  12. Lake v. Arnold.

    PubMed

    2000-01-01

    Court Decision: 232 Federal Reporter, 3d Series 360, 2000 Nov 7 (date of decision). The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit agreed with the lower court that the husband of a mentally disabled woman who was involuntarily sterilized by her parents at age 16 was not entitled to a loss of consortium claim because the injury occurred before the couple was married, both he and his wife were aware of the injury before they married and there was not subsequent harm from the initial injury (sterilization) after the Lakes' marriage. At age 16, Lake, a mentally disabled woman, was taken to a hospital by her father and stepmother and was permanently sterilized. The claim by Lake and her husband against her parents, hospital, and physicians that her civil rights were violated because the sterilization was nonconsensual was dismissed by the court on statute of limitation grounds.

  13. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  14. Michigan: The Great Lakes State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Sandra Lee; La Luzerne-Oi, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Although Michigan is often called the "Wolverine State," its more common nickname is the "Great Lakes State." This name comes from the fact that Michigan is the only state in the United States that borders four of the five Great Lakes. Also referred to as the "Water Wonderland," Michigan has 11,000 additional lakes, 36,000 miles of streams, and…

  15. Hidden biodiversity in an ancient lake: phylogenetic congruence between Lake Tanganyika tropheine cichlids and their monogenean flatworm parasites

    PubMed Central

    Vanhove, Maarten P. M.; Pariselle, Antoine; Van Steenberge, Maarten; Raeymaekers, Joost A. M.; Hablützel, Pascal I.; Gillardin, Céline; Hellemans, Bart; Breman, Floris C.; Koblmüller, Stephan; Sturmbauer, Christian; Snoeks, Jos; Volckaert, Filip A. M.; Huyse, Tine

    2015-01-01

    The stunning diversity of cichlid fishes has greatly enhanced our understanding of speciation and radiation. Little is known about the evolution of cichlid parasites. Parasites are abundant components of biodiversity, whose diversity typically exceeds that of their hosts. In the first comprehensive phylogenetic parasitological analysis of a vertebrate radiation, we study monogenean parasites infecting tropheine cichlids from Lake Tanganyika. Monogeneans are flatworms usually infecting the body surface and gills of fishes. In contrast to many other parasites, they depend only on a single host species to complete their lifecycle. Our spatially comprehensive combined nuclear-mitochondrial DNA dataset of the parasites covering almost all tropheine host species (N = 18), reveals species-rich parasite assemblages and shows consistent host-specificity. Statistical comparisons of host and parasite phylogenies based on distance and topology-based tests demonstrate significant congruence and suggest that host-switching is rare. Molecular rate evaluation indicates that species of Cichlidogyrus probably diverged synchronically with the initial radiation of the tropheines. They further diversified through within-host speciation into an overlooked species radiation. The unique life history and specialisation of certain parasite groups has profound evolutionary consequences. Hence, evolutionary parasitology adds a new dimension to the study of biodiversity hotspots like Lake Tanganyika. PMID:26335652

  16. Hidden biodiversity in an ancient lake: phylogenetic congruence between Lake Tanganyika tropheine cichlids and their monogenean flatworm parasites.

    PubMed

    Vanhove, Maarten P M; Pariselle, Antoine; Van Steenberge, Maarten; Raeymaekers, Joost A M; Hablützel, Pascal I; Gillardin, Céline; Hellemans, Bart; Breman, Floris C; Koblmüller, Stephan; Sturmbauer, Christian; Snoeks, Jos; Volckaert, Filip A M; Huyse, Tine

    2015-01-01

    The stunning diversity of cichlid fishes has greatly enhanced our understanding of speciation and radiation. Little is known about the evolution of cichlid parasites. Parasites are abundant components of biodiversity, whose diversity typically exceeds that of their hosts. In the first comprehensive phylogenetic parasitological analysis of a vertebrate radiation, we study monogenean parasites infecting tropheine cichlids from Lake Tanganyika. Monogeneans are flatworms usually infecting the body surface and gills of fishes. In contrast to many other parasites, they depend only on a single host species to complete their lifecycle. Our spatially comprehensive combined nuclear-mitochondrial DNA dataset of the parasites covering almost all tropheine host species (N = 18), reveals species-rich parasite assemblages and shows consistent host-specificity. Statistical comparisons of host and parasite phylogenies based on distance and topology-based tests demonstrate significant congruence and suggest that host-switching is rare. Molecular rate evaluation indicates that species of Cichlidogyrus probably diverged synchronically with the initial radiation of the tropheines. They further diversified through within-host speciation into an overlooked species radiation. The unique life history and specialisation of certain parasite groups has profound evolutionary consequences. Hence, evolutionary parasitology adds a new dimension to the study of biodiversity hotspots like Lake Tanganyika.

  17. The Great Lakes whitefish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John; Elliot, Charles

    1942-01-01

    In every one of the Great Lakes- Ontario, Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior- the most valuable fishes are declining, and there is no evidence that this trend will be reversed. Under existing conditions of a diversity of regulations that vary between states and between the two countries, and with the present methods of fishing, the Great Lakes fisheries are doomed. This chapter deals with the common whitefish, a valuable species which many believe to be the next that will go unless positive action is forthcoming soon.

  18. Transient Tsunamis in Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L.; Mei, C.; Alam, M.

    2013-12-01

    A large number of lakes are surrounded by steep and unstable mountains with slopes prone to failure. As a result, landslides are likely to occur and impact water sitting in closed reservoirs. These rare geological phenomena pose serious threats to dam reservoirs and nearshore facilities because they can generate unexpectedly large tsunami waves. In fact, the tallest wave experienced by contemporary humans occurred because of a landslide in the narrow bay of Lituya in 1958, and five years later, a deadly landslide tsunami overtopped Lake Vajont's dam, flooding and damaging villages along the lakefront and in the Piave valley. If unstable slopes and potential slides are detected ahead of time, inundation maps can be drawn to help people know the risks, and mitigate the destructive power of the ensuing waves. These maps give the maximum wave runup height along the lake's vertical and sloping boundaries, and can be obtained by numerical simulations. Keeping track of the moving shorelines along beaches is challenging in classical Eulerian formulations because the horizontal extent of the fluid domain can change over time. As a result, assuming a solid slide and nonbreaking waves, here we develop a nonlinear shallow-water model equation in the Lagrangian framework to address the problem of transient landslide-tsunamis. In this manner, the shorelines' three-dimensional motion is part of the solution. The model equation is hyperbolic and can be solved numerically by finite differences. Here, a 4th order Runge-Kutta method and a compact finite-difference scheme are implemented to integrate in time and spatially discretize the forced shallow-water equation in Lagrangian coordinates. The formulation is applied to different lake and slide geometries to better understand the effects of the lake's finite lengths and slide's forcing mechanism on the generated wavefield. Specifically, for a slide moving down a plane beach, we show that edge-waves trapped by the shoreline and free

  19. Reevaluation of lake trout and lake whitefish bioenergetics models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Pothoven, Steve A.; Kao, Yu-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Using a corrected algorithm for balancing the energy budget, we reevaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the laboratory and for lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in the laboratory and in the field. For lake trout, results showed that the bioenergetics model slightly overestimated food consumption by the lake trout when they were fed low and intermediate rations, whereas the model predicted food consumption by lake trout fed ad libitum without any detectable bias. The slight bias in model predictions for lake trout on restricted rations may have been an artifact of the feeding schedule for these fish, and we would therefore recommend application of the Wisconsin lake trout bioenergetics model to lake trout populations in the field without any revisions to the model. Use of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for coregonids resulted in overestimation of food consumption by lake whitefish both in the laboratory and in the field by between 20 and 30%, on average. This overestimation of food consumption was most likely due to overestimation of respiration rate. We therefore adjusted the respiration component of the bioenergetics model to obtain a good fit to the observed consumption in our laboratory tanks. The adjusted model predicted the consumption in the laboratory and the field without any detectable bias. Until a detailed lake whitefish respiration study can be conducted, we recommend application of our adjusted version of the Wisconsin generalized coregonid bioenergetics model to lake whitefish populations in the field.

  20. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  1. Lake whitefish diet, condition, and energy density in Lake Champlain and the lower four Great Lakes following dreissenid invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbst, Seth J.; Marsden, J. Ellen; Lantry, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis support some of the most valuable commercial freshwater fisheries in North America. Recent growth and condition decreases in Lake Whitefish populations in the Great Lakes have been attributed to the invasion of the dreissenid mussels, zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and quagga mussels D. bugensis, and the subsequent collapse of the amphipod, Diporeia, a once-abundant high energy prey source. Since 1993, Lake Champlain has also experienced the invasion and proliferation of zebra mussels, but in contrast to the Great Lakes, Diporeia were not historically abundant. We compared the diet, condition, and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain after the dreissenid mussel invasion to values for those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario. Lake Whitefish were collected using gill nets and bottom trawls, and their diets were quantified seasonally. Condition was estimated using Fulton's condition factor (K) and by determining energy density. In contrast to Lake Whitefish from some of the Great Lakes, those from Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish did not show a dietary shift towards dreissenid mussels, but instead fed primarily on fish eggs in spring, Mysis diluviana in summer, and gastropods and sphaeriids in fall and winter. Along with these dietary differences, the condition and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain were high compared with those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario after the dreissenid invasion, and were similar to Lake Whitefish from Lake Erie; fish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario consumed dreissenids, whereas fish from Lake Erie did not. Our comparisons of Lake Whitefish populations in Lake Champlain to those in the Great Lakes indicate that diet and condition of Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish were not negatively affected by the dreissenid mussel invasion.

  2. Temperature Trends in Montane Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Sadro, S.; Jellison, R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term temperature trends in lakes integrate hydrological and meteorological factors. We examine temperature trends in a small montane lake with prolonged ice-cover and large seasonal snowfall and in a large saline lake. Emerald Lake, located in the Sierra Nevada (California), is representative of high-elevation lakes throughout the region. No significant trend in outflow temperature was apparent from 1991to 2012. Snowfall in the watershed accounted for 93% of the variability in average summer lake temperatures. Mono Lake (California) lies in a closed, montane basin and is hypersaline and monomictic or meromictic. Temperature profiles have been collected from 1982 to 2010. In the upper water column, the July-August-September water temperatures increased 0.8-1.0°C over the 29 years. This rate of warming is less than published estimates based on satellite-derived skin temperatures and will discussed in the context of general limnological interpretation of temperature trends.

  3. Lake Michigan: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey in the nearshore of Lake Michigan at a 20 meter contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The nearly 1200 km survey was conducted Sep 8-15, 2010. We also conducted six cross-contour tows. Along the survey tracks we sampled fixed stat...

  4. Lake Ontario: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey with towed electronic instrumentation along the Lake Ontario nearshore (720 km) at a 20 meter contour. The survey was conducted September 6-10, 2008 with a shorter 300 km survey conducted August 14-15 for comparing of temporal variability. ...

  5. The People's Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Karen Townsend

    1975-01-01

    Citizen action to stop the disposal of taconite tailings into Lake Superior was unsuccessful when the courts settled in the favor of industry. Although citizen research revealed a form of asbestos, as well as other toxic chemicals in the discharged wastes, company representatives stated that there were no health hazards. (MA)

  6. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This booklet introduces an environmental curriculum for use in a variety of elementary subjects. The lesson plans provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into the subjects of history, social studies, and environmental sciences. Each of these sections contains background information, discussion points, and a…

  7. Temperate Lakes Discovered on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vixie, Graham; Barnes, Jason W.; Jackson, Brian; Wilson, Paul

    2012-04-01

    We have discovered two temperate lakes on Titan using Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Three key features help to identify these surface features as lakes: morphology, albedo, and specular reflection. The presence of lakes at the mid-latitudes mean liquid can accumulate and remain stable outside of the poles. We first identify a lake surface by looking for possible shorelines with a lacustrine morphology. Then, we apply a simple atmospheric correction that produces an approximate surface albedo. Next, we prepare cylindrical projection maps of the brightness of the sky as seen from any points on the surface to identify specular reflections. Our techniques can then be applied to other areas, such as Arrakis Planitia, to test for liquid. Currently, all the known lakes on Titan are concentrated at the poles. Lakes have been suggested in the tropic zone by Griffith et al. Our discovery of non-transient, temperate lakes has important implications for Titan's hydrologic cycle. Clouds have been recorded accumulating in the mid-latitudes and areas have been darkened by rainfall but later brightened after evaporation (Turtle et al. 2011). Stable temperate lakes would affect total rainfall, liquid accumulation, evaporation rates, and infiltration. Polaznik Macula (Figure 1) is a great candidate for lake filling, evaporation rates, and stability. References: Griffith, C., et al.: "Evidence for Lakes on Titan's Tropical Surface". AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts #42, Vol. 42, pp. 1077, 2010. Turtle, E. P., et al.: "Rapid and Extensive Surface Changes Near Titan's Equator: Evidence of April Showers". Science, Vol. 331, pp. 1414-, 2011. Figure 1: Polaznik Macula is the large, dark area central to the figure. The encircled dark blue areas represent positively identified lake regions in the T66 flyby. The light blue areas represent lake candidates still under analysis. The green circle marks a non-lake surface feature enclosed by a

  8. Phylogeny.fr: robust phylogenetic analysis for the non-specialist

    PubMed Central

    Dereeper, A.; Guignon, V.; Blanc, G.; Audic, S.; Buffet, S.; Chevenet, F.; Dufayard, J.-F.; Guindon, S.; Lefort, V.; Lescot, M.; Gascuel, O.

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses are central to many research areas in biology and typically involve the identification of homologous sequences, their multiple alignment, the phylogenetic reconstruction and the graphical representation of the inferred tree. The Phylogeny.fr platform transparently chains programs to automatically perform these tasks. It is primarily designed for biologists with no experience in phylogeny, but can also meet the needs of specialists; the first ones will find up-to-date tools chained in a phylogeny pipeline to analyze their data in a simple and robust way, while the specialists will be able to easily build and run sophisticated analyses. Phylogeny.fr offers three main modes. The ‘One Click’ mode targets non-specialists and provides a ready-to-use pipeline chaining programs with recognized accuracy and speed: MUSCLE for multiple alignment, PhyML for tree building, and TreeDyn for tree rendering. All parameters are set up to suit most studies, and users only have to provide their input sequences to obtain a ready-to-print tree. The ‘Advanced’ mode uses the same pipeline but allows the parameters of each program to be customized by users. The ‘A la Carte’ mode offers more flexibility and sophistication, as users can build their own pipeline by selecting and setting up the required steps from a large choice of tools to suit their specific needs. Prior to phylogenetic analysis, users can also collect neighbors of a query sequence by running BLAST on general or specialized databases. A guide tree then helps to select neighbor sequences to be used as input for the phylogeny pipeline. Phylogeny.fr is available at: http://www.phylogeny.fr/ PMID:18424797

  9. Phylogeny.fr: robust phylogenetic analysis for the non-specialist.

    PubMed

    Dereeper, A; Guignon, V; Blanc, G; Audic, S; Buffet, S; Chevenet, F; Dufayard, J-F; Guindon, S; Lefort, V; Lescot, M; Claverie, J-M; Gascuel, O

    2008-07-01

    Phylogenetic analyses are central to many research areas in biology and typically involve the identification of homologous sequences, their multiple alignment, the phylogenetic reconstruction and the graphical representation of the inferred tree. The Phylogeny.fr platform transparently chains programs to automatically perform these tasks. It is primarily designed for biologists with no experience in phylogeny, but can also meet the needs of specialists; the first ones will find up-to-date tools chained in a phylogeny pipeline to analyze their data in a simple and robust way, while the specialists will be able to easily build and run sophisticated analyses. Phylogeny.fr offers three main modes. The 'One Click' mode targets non-specialists and provides a ready-to-use pipeline chaining programs with recognized accuracy and speed: MUSCLE for multiple alignment, PhyML for tree building, and TreeDyn for tree rendering. All parameters are set up to suit most studies, and users only have to provide their input sequences to obtain a ready-to-print tree. The 'Advanced' mode uses the same pipeline but allows the parameters of each program to be customized by users. The 'A la Carte' mode offers more flexibility and sophistication, as users can build their own pipeline by selecting and setting up the required steps from a large choice of tools to suit their specific needs. Prior to phylogenetic analysis, users can also collect neighbors of a query sequence by running BLAST on general or specialized databases. A guide tree then helps to select neighbor sequences to be used as input for the phylogeny pipeline. Phylogeny.fr is available at: http://www.phylogeny.fr/

  10. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Erie: a case history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornelius, Floyd C.; Muth, Kenneth M.; Kenyon, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) once thrived in the deep waters of eastern Lake Erie. The impact of nearly 70 years of unregulated exploitation and over 100 years of progressively severe cultural eutrophication resulted in the elimination of lake trout stocks by 1950. Early attempts to restore lake trout by stocking were unsuccessful in establishing a self-sustaining population. In the early 1980s, New York's Department of Environmental Conservation, Pennsylvania's Fish and Boat Commission, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service entered into a cooperative program to rehabilitate lake trout in the eastern basin of Lake Erie. After 11 years of stocking selected strains of lake trout in U.S. waters, followed by effective sea lamprey control, lake trout appear to be successfully recolonizing their native habitat. Adult stocks have built up significantly and are expanding their range in the lake. Preliminary investigations suggest that lake trout reproductive habitat is still adequate for natural reproduction, but natural recruitment has not been documented. Future assessments will be directed toward evaluation of spawning success and tracking age-class cohorts as they move through the fishery.

  11. Movements of hatchery-reared lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pycha, Richard L.; Dryer, William R.; King, George R.

    1965-01-01

    The history of stocking of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the Great Lakes is reviewed. The study of movements is based on capture of 24,275 fin-clipped lake trout taken in experimental gill nets and trawls and commercial gill nets. Yearling lake trout planted from shore dispersed to 15-fath (27-m) depths in 3A? hr. Most fish remained within 2 miles (3.2 km) of the planting site 2 months, but within 4 months some fish had moved as much as 17 miles (27 km). The highest abundance of planted lake trout was in areas 2-4 miles (3.2-6.4 km) from the planting site even 3 years after release. Distance moved and size of fish were not correlated. Dispersal of lake trout begins at planting and probably continues until the fish are mature. Most movement was eastward in southern Lake Superior and followed the counterclockwise surface currents. Movement is most rapid in areas of strong currents and slowest in areas of weak currents or eddies. Movement to areas west of the Keweenaw Peninsula was insignificant from plantings in Keweenaw Bay and nil from other plantings farther east. Lake trout planted in the eastern third of the lake dispersed more randomly than those planted farther west. Few fish moved farther offshore than the 50-fath (91-m) contour. Lake trout planted in Canadian waters made insignificant contributions to populations in US waters.

  12. Microbiology of Lonar Lake and other soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Kumaresan, Deepak; Hunger, Sindy; Drake, Harold L; Murrell, J Colin; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-03-01

    Soda lakes are saline and alkaline ecosystems that are believed to have existed throughout the geological record of Earth. They are widely distributed across the globe, but are highly abundant in terrestrial biomes such as deserts and steppes and in geologically interesting regions such as the East African Rift valley. The unusual geochemistry of these lakes supports the growth of an impressive array of microorganisms that are of ecological and economic importance. Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria and Archaea belonging to all major trophic groups have been described from many soda lakes, including lakes with exceptionally high levels of heavy metals. Lonar Lake is a soda lake that is centered at an unusual meteorite impact structure in the Deccan basalts in India and its key physicochemical and microbiological characteristics are highlighted in this article. The occurrence of diverse functional groups of microbes, such as methanogens, methanotrophs, phototrophs, denitrifiers, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers and syntrophs in soda lakes, suggests that these habitats harbor complex microbial food webs that (a) interconnect various biological cycles via redox coupling and (b) impact on the production and consumption of greenhouse gases. Soda lake microorganisms harbor several biotechnologically relevant enzymes and biomolecules (for example, cellulases, amylases, ectoine) and there is the need to augment bioprospecting efforts in soda lake environments with new integrated approaches. Importantly, some saline and alkaline lake ecosystems around the world need to be protected from anthropogenic pressures that threaten their long-term existence.

  13. Microbiology of Lonar Lake and other soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Kumaresan, Deepak; Hunger, Sindy; Drake, Harold L; Murrell, J Colin; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-03-01

    Soda lakes are saline and alkaline ecosystems that are believed to have existed throughout the geological record of Earth. They are widely distributed across the globe, but are highly abundant in terrestrial biomes such as deserts and steppes and in geologically interesting regions such as the East African Rift valley. The unusual geochemistry of these lakes supports the growth of an impressive array of microorganisms that are of ecological and economic importance. Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria and Archaea belonging to all major trophic groups have been described from many soda lakes, including lakes with exceptionally high levels of heavy metals. Lonar Lake is a soda lake that is centered at an unusual meteorite impact structure in the Deccan basalts in India and its key physicochemical and microbiological characteristics are highlighted in this article. The occurrence of diverse functional groups of microbes, such as methanogens, methanotrophs, phototrophs, denitrifiers, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers and syntrophs in soda lakes, suggests that these habitats harbor complex microbial food webs that (a) interconnect various biological cycles via redox coupling and (b) impact on the production and consumption of greenhouse gases. Soda lake microorganisms harbor several biotechnologically relevant enzymes and biomolecules (for example, cellulases, amylases, ectoine) and there is the need to augment bioprospecting efforts in soda lake environments with new integrated approaches. Importantly, some saline and alkaline lake ecosystems around the world need to be protected from anthropogenic pressures that threaten their long-term existence. PMID:23178675

  14. Deep phylogeny, ancestral groups and the four ages of life.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2010-01-12

    Organismal phylogeny depends on cell division, stasis, mutational divergence, cell mergers (by sex or symbiogenesis), lateral gene transfer and death. The tree of life is a useful metaphor for organismal genealogical history provided we recognize that branches sometimes fuse. Hennigian cladistics emphasizes only lineage splitting, ignoring most other major phylogenetic processes. Though methodologically useful it has been conceptually confusing and harmed taxonomy, especially in mistakenly opposing ancestral (paraphyletic) taxa. The history of life involved about 10 really major innovations in cell structure. In membrane topology, there were five successive kinds of cell: (i) negibacteria, with two bounding membranes, (ii) unibacteria, with one bounding and no internal membranes, (iii) eukaryotes with endomembranes and mitochondria, (iv) plants with chloroplasts and (v) finally, chromists with plastids inside the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Membrane chemistry divides negibacteria into the more advanced Glycobacteria (e.g. Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria) with outer membrane lipolysaccharide and primitive Eobacteria without lipopolysaccharide (deserving intenser study). It also divides unibacteria into posibacteria, ancestors of eukaryotes, and archaebacteria-the sisters (not ancestors) of eukaryotes and the youngest bacterial phylum. Anaerobic eobacteria, oxygenic cyanobacteria, desiccation-resistant posibacteria and finally neomura (eukaryotes plus archaebacteria) successively transformed Earth. Accidents and organizational constraints are as important as adaptiveness in body plan evolution. PMID:20008390

  15. Morphology and phylogeny of Reticulitermes sp. (Isoptera, Rhinotermitidae) from Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Ghesini, S; Marini, M

    2012-12-01

    Taxonomy and phylogeny of termites of the genus Reticulitermes in central and eastern Mediterranean lands are poorly understood, partly due to insufficient sampling. This study aims to contribute to the knowledge of east Mediterranean termites by presenting morphological and molecular data on Reticulitermes from Cyprus. Samples from 15 colonies were collected throughout the island. Qualitative and quantitative morphological characters were analyzed for alate and soldier castes. Partial sequences of the mitochondrial genes COII and 16S were used to evaluate genetic diversity of Cypriot colonies and to determine their phylogenetic relationships with taxa from central and eastern Mediterranean areas. Cypriot alates have some morphological features in common with the Israeli R. clypeatus: an enlarged postclypeus and a wide unpigmented margin of the eye. They are larger than R. clypeatus but smaller than western European species, such as R. banyulensis, R. lucifugus corsicus and R. grassei. For Cypriot soldiers, two size groups were identified, possibly in relation with the age of their mother colonies. Phylogenetic analysis shows that, contrary to what might be expected, the samples with the highest affinity with Cypriot samples are not those from the nearby mainland (south Turkey, Israel), but from north-eastern Greece. Comprehensive sampling in the nearby mainland is lacking, so the possibility that populations exist it that region with an affinity towards Cypriot Reticulitermes sp. cannot be ruled out. Together with samples from the Halkidiki peninsula, north-eastern Greece, northern Turkey and Crete, Cypriot Reticulitermes form a well-supported north-eastern Mediterranean clade. PMID:22647386

  16. Family level phylogenies reveal modes of macroevolution in RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Andrew; Shackelton, Laura A.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the patterns and processes of microevolution in RNA viruses, little is known about the determinants of viral diversification at the macroevolutionary scale. In particular, the processes by which viral lineages assigned as different “species” are generated remain largely uncharacterized. To address this issue, we use a robust phylogenetic approach to analyze patterns of lineage diversification in five representative families of RNA viruses. We ask whether the process of lineage diversification primarily occurs when viruses infect new host species, either through cross-species transmission or codivergence, and which are defined here as analogous to allopatric speciation in animals, or by acquiring new niches within the same host species, analogous to sympatric speciation. By mapping probable primary host species onto family level viral phylogenies, we reveal a strong clustering among viral lineages that infect groups of closely related host species. Although this is consistent with lineage diversification within individual hosts, we argue that this pattern more likely represents strong biases in our knowledge of viral biodiversity, because we also find that better-sampled human viruses rarely cluster together. Hence, although closely related viruses tend to infect related host species, it is unlikely that they often infect the same host species, such that evolutionary constraints hinder lineage diversification within individual host species. We conclude that the colonization of new but related host species may represent the principle mode of macroevolution in RNA viruses. PMID:21173251

  17. A mitogenomic phylogeny and genetic history of sable (Martes zibellina).

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina

    2014-10-15

    We assessed phylogeny of sable (Martes zibellina, Linnaeus, 1758) by sequence analysis of nearly complete, new mitochondrial genomes in 36 specimens from different localities in northern Eurasia (Primorye, Khabarovsk and Krasnoyarsk regions, the Kamchatka Peninsula, the Kuril Islands and the Urals). Phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA sequences demonstrates that two clades, A and BC, radiated about 200-300 thousandyears ago (kya) according to results of Bayesian molecular clock and RelTime analyses of different mitogenome alignments (nearly complete mtDNA sequences, protein-coding region, and synonymous sites), while the age estimates of clades A, B and C fall within the Late Pleistocene (~50-140 kya). Bayesian skyline plots (BSPs) of sable population size change based on analysis of nearly complete mtDNAs show an expansion around 40 kya in the warm Karganian time, without a decline of population size around the Last Glacial Maximum (21 kya). The BSPs based on synonymous clock rate indicate that M. zibellina experienced demographic expansions later, approximately 22 kya. The A2a clade that colonized Kamchatka ~23-50 kya (depending on the mutation rate used) survived the last glaciation there as demonstrated by the BSP analysis. In addition, we have found evidence of positive selection acting at ND4 and cytochrome b genes, thereby suggesting adaptive evolution of the A2a clade in Kamchatka.

  18. Molecular phylogeny of the forensically important genus Cochliomyia (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Yusseff-Vanegas, Sohath; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2016-01-01

    Cochliomyia Townsend includes several abundant and one of the most broadly distributed, blow flies in the Americas, and is of significant economic and forensic importance. For decades, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) and Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius) have received attention as livestock parasites and primary indicator species in forensic entomology. However, Cochliomyia minima Shannon and Cochliomyia aldrichi Del Ponte have only been subject to basic taxonomy and faunistic studies. Here we present the first complete phylogeny of Cochliomyia including numerous specimens per species, collected from 13 localities in the Caribbean. Four genes, the mitochondrial COI and the nuclear EF-1α, 28S rRNA, and ITS2, were analyzed. While we found some differences among gene trees, a concatenated gene matrix recovered a robustly supported monophyletic Cochliomyia with Compsomyiops Townsend as its sister group and recovered the monophyly of Cochliomyia hominivorax, Cochliomyia macellaria and Cochliomyia minima. Our results support a close relationship between Cochliomyia minima and Cochliomyia aldrichi. However, we found Cochliomyia aldrichi containing Cochliomyia minima, indicating recent speciation, or issues with the taxonomy of the group. We provide basic information on habitat preference, distribution and feeding habits of Cochliomyia minima and Cochliomyia aldrichi that will be useful for future forensic studies in the Caribbean. PMID:27563274

  19. The biochemical properties and phylogenies of phosphofructokinases from extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Ronimus, R S; Morgan, H W

    2001-12-01

    The enzyme phosphofructokinase (PFK) is a defining activity of the highly conserved glycolytic pathway, and is present in the domains Bacteria, Eukarya, and Archaea. PFK subtypes are now known that utilize either ATP, ADP, or pyrophosphate as the primary phosphoryl donor and share the ability to catalyze the transfer of phosphate to the 1-position of fructose-6-phosphate. Because of the crucial position in the glycolytic pathway of PFKs, their biochemical characteristics and phylogenies may play a significant role in elucidating the origins of glycolysis and, indeed, of metabolism itself. Despite the shared ability to phosphorylate fructose-6-phosphate, PFKs that have been characterized to date now fall into three sequence families: the PFKA family, consisting of the well-known higher eukaryotic ATP-dependent PFKs together with their ATP- and pyrophosphate-dependent bacterial cousins (including the crenarchaeal pyrophosphate-dependent PFK of Thermoprotetus tenax) and plant pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinases; the PFKB family, exemplified by the minor ATP-dependent PFK activity of Escherichia coli (PFK 2), but which also includes at least one crenarchaeal enzyme in Aeropyrum pernix; and the tentatively named PFKC family, which contains the unique ADP-dependent PFKs from the euryarchaeal genera of Pyrococcus and Thermococcus, which are indicated by sequence analysis to be present also in the methanogenic species Methanococcus jannaschii and Methanosarcina mazei.

  20. Evaluating topological conflict in centipede phylogeny using transcriptomic data sets.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Rosa; Laumer, Christopher E; Vahtera, Varpu; Libro, Silvia; Kaluziak, Stefan; Sharma, Prashant P; Pérez-Porro, Alicia R; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2014-06-01

    Relationships between the five extant orders of centipedes have been considered solved based on morphology. Phylogenies based on samples of up to a few dozen genes have largely been congruent with the morphological tree apart from an alternative placement of one order, the relictual Craterostigmomorpha, consisting of two species in Tasmania and New Zealand. To address this incongruence, novel transcriptomic data were generated to sample all five orders of centipedes and also used as a test case for studying gene-tree incongruence. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian mixture model analyses of a data set composed of 1,934 orthologs with 45% missing data, as well as the 389 orthologs in the least saturated, stationary quartile, retrieve strong support for a sister-group relationship between Craterostigmomorpha and all other pleurostigmophoran centipedes, of which the latter group is newly named Amalpighiata. The Amalpighiata hypothesis, which shows little gene-tree incongruence and is robust to the influence of among-taxon compositional heterogeneity, implies convergent evolution in several morphological and behavioral characters traditionally used in centipede phylogenetics, such as maternal brood care, but accords with patterns of first appearances in the fossil record.

  1. Phylogeny and systematics of the anamorphic, entomopathogenic genus Beauveria.

    PubMed

    Rehner, Stephen A; Minnis, Andrew M; Sung, Gi-Ho; Luangsa-ard, J Jennifer; Devotto, Luis; Humber, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    Beauveria is a cosmopolitan anamorphic genus of arthropod pathogens that includes the agronomically important species, B. bassiana and B. brongniartii, which are used as mycoinsecticides for the biological control of pest insects. Recent phylogenetic evidence demonstrates that Beauveria is monophyletic within the Cordycipitaceae (Hypocreales), and both B. bassiana and B. brongniartii have been linked developmentally and phylogenetically to Cordyceps species. Despite recent interest in the genetic diversity and molecular ecology of Beauveria, particularly as it relates to their role as pathogens of insects in natural and agricultural environments, the genus has not received critical taxonomic review for several decades. A multilocus phylogeny of Beauveria based on partial sequences of RPB1, RPB2, TEF and the nuclear intergenic region, Bloc, is presented and used to assess diversity within the genus and to evaluate species concepts and their taxonomic status. B. bassiana and B. brongniartii, both which represent species complexes and which heretofore have lacked type specimens, are redescribed and types are proposed. In addition six new species are described including B. varroae and B. kipukae, which form a biphyletic, morphologically cryptic sister lineage to B. bassiana, B. pseudobassiana, which also is morphologically similar to but phylogenetically distant from B. bassiana, B. asiatica and B. australis, which are sister lineages to B. brongniartii, and B. sungii, an Asian species that is linked to an undetermined species of Cordyceps. The combination B. amorpha is validly published and an epitype is designated. PMID:21482632

  2. A multilocus phylogeny of the Sulidae (Aves: Pelecaniformes).

    PubMed

    Patterson, S A; Morris-Pocock, J A; Friesen, V L

    2011-02-01

    Gene trees will often differ from the true species history, the species tree, as a result of processes such as incomplete lineage sorting. New methods such as Bayesian Estimation of the Species Tree (BEST) use the multispecies coalescent to model lineage sorting, and directly infer the species tree from multilocus DNA sequence data. The Sulidae (Aves: Pelecaniformes) is a family of ten booby and gannet species with a global distribution. We sequenced five nuclear intron loci and one mitochondrial locus to estimate a species tree for the Sulidae using both BEST and by concatenating nuclear loci. We also used fossil calibrated strict and relaxed molecular clocks in BEAST to estimate divergence times for major nodes in the sulid phylogeny. Individual gene trees showed little phylogenetic conflict but varied in resolution. With the exception of the mitochondrial gene tree, no gene tree was completely resolved. On the other hand, both the BEST and concatenated species trees were highly resolved, strongly supported, and topologically consistent with each other. The three sulid genera (Morus, Sula, Papasula) were monophyletic and the relationships within genera were mostly consistent with both a previously estimated mtDNA gene tree and the mtDNA gene tree estimated here. However, our species trees conflicted with the mtDNA gene trees in the relationships among the three genera. Most notably, we find that the endemic and endangered Abbott's booby (Papasula abbotti) is likely basal to all other members of the Sulidae and diverged from them approximately 22 million years ago.

  3. Phylogeny of the Zygomycota based on nuclear ribosomal sequence data.

    PubMed

    White, Merlin M; James, Timothy Y; O'Donnell, Kerry; Cafaro, Matías J; Tanabe, Yuuhiko; Sugiyama, Junta

    2006-01-01

    The Zygomycota is an ecologically heterogenous assemblage of nonzoosporic fungi comprising two classes, Zygomycetes and Trichomycetes. Phylogenetic analyses have suggested that the phylum is polyphyletic; two of four orders of Trichomycetes are related to the Mesomycetozoa (protists) that diverged near the fungal/animal split. Current circumscription of the Zygomycota includes only orders with representatives that produce zygospores. We present a molecular-based phylogeny including recognized representatives of the Zygomycetes and Trichomycetes with a combined dataset for nuclear rRNA 18S (SSU), 5.8S and 28S (LSU) genes. Tree reconstruction by Bayesian analyses suggests the Zygomycota is paraphyletic. Although 12 clades were identified only some of these correspond to the nine orders of Zygomycota currently recognized. A large superordinal clade, comprising the Dimargaritales, Harpellales, Kickxellales and Zoopagales, grouping together many symbiotic fungi, also is identified in part by a unique septal structure. Although Harpellales and Kickxellales are not monophyletic, these lineages are distinct from the Mucorales, Endogonales and Mortierellales, which appear more closely related to the Ascomycota + Basidiomycota + Glomeromycota. The final major group, the insect-associated Entomophthorales, appears to be polyphyletic. In the present analyses Basidiobolus and Neozygites group within Zygomycota but not with the Entomophthorales. Clades are discussed with special reference to traditional classifications, mapping morphological characters and ecology, where possible, as a snapshot of our current phylogenetic perspective of the Zygomycota.

  4. Phylogeny, niche conservatism and the latitudinal diversity gradient in mammals.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Lauren B; Davies, T Jonathan; Ackerly, David D; Kraft, Nathan J B; Harrison, Susan P; Anacker, Brian L; Cornell, Howard V; Damschen, Ellen I; Grytnes, John-Avid; Hawkins, Bradford A; McCain, Christy M; Stephens, Patrick R; Wiens, John J

    2010-07-22

    Biologists have long searched for mechanisms responsible for the increase in species richness with decreasing latitude. The strong correlation between species richness and climate is frequently interpreted as reflecting a causal link via processes linked to energy or evolutionary rates. Here, we investigate how the aggregation of clades, as dictated by phylogeny, can give rise to significant climate-richness gradients without gradients in diversification or environmental carrying capacity. The relationship between climate and species richness varies considerably between clades, regions and time periods in a global-scale phylogenetically informed analysis of all terrestrial mammal species. Many young clades show negative richness-temperature slopes (more species at cooler temperatures), with the ages of these clades coinciding with the expansion of temperate climate zones in the late Eocene. In carnivores, we find steeply positive richness-temperature slopes in clades with restricted distributions and tropical origins (e.g. cat clade), whereas widespread, temperate clades exhibit shallow, negative slopes (e.g. dog-bear clade). We show that the slope of the global climate-richness gradient in mammals is driven by aggregating Chiroptera (bats) with their Eutherian sister group. Our findings indicate that the evolutionary history should be accounted for as part of any search for causal links between environment and species richness. PMID:20335205

  5. Multigene phylogeny reveals eusociality evolved twice in vespid wasps.

    PubMed

    Hines, Heather M; Hunt, James H; O'Connor, Timothy K; Gillespie, Joseph J; Cameron, Sydney A

    2007-02-27

    Eusocial wasps of the family Vespidae are thought to have derived their social behavior from a common ancestor that had a rudimentary caste-containing social system. In support of this behavioral scenario, the leading phylogenetic hypothesis of Vespidae places the eusocial wasps (subfamilies Stenogastrinae, Polistinae, and Vespinae) as a derived monophyletic clade, thus implying a single origin of eusocial behavior. This perspective has shaped the investigation and interpretation of vespid social evolution for more than two decades. Here we report a phylogeny of Vespidae based on data from four nuclear gene fragments (18S and 28S ribosomal DNA, abdominal-A and RNA polymerase II) and representatives from all six extant subfamilies. In contrast to the current phylogenetic perspective, our results indicate two independent origins of vespid eusociality, once in the clade Polistinae+Vespinae and once in the Stenogastrinae. The stenogastrines appear as an early diverging clade distantly related to the vespines and polistines and thus evolved their distinctive form of social behavior from a different ancestor than that of Polistinae+Vespinae. These results support earlier views based on life history and behavior and have important implications for interpreting transitional stages in vespid social evolution.

  6. Phylogeny, evolution, and biogeography of Asiatic Salamanders (Hynobiidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yue-Qin; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Yi-Fei; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Papenfuss, Theodore J; Wake, David B; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2006-05-01

    We sequenced 15 complete mitochondrial genomes and performed comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analyses to study the origin and phylogeny of the Hynobiidae, an ancient lineage of living salamanders. Our phylogenetic analyses show that the Hynobiidae is a clade with well resolved relationships, and our results contrast with a morphology-based phylogenetic hypothesis. These salamanders have low vagility and are limited in their distribution primarily by deserts, mountains, and oceans. Our analysis suggests that the relationships among living hynobiids have been shaped primarily by geography. We show that four-toed species assigned to Batrachuperus do not form a monophyletic group, and those that occur in Afghanistan and Iran are transferred to the resurrected Paradactylodon. Convergent morphological characters in different hynobiid lineages are likely produced by similar environmental selective pressures. Clock-independent molecular dating suggests that hynobiids originated in the Middle Cretaceous [ approximately 110 million years ago (Mya)]. We propose an "out of North China" hypothesis for hynobiid origins and hypothesize an ancestral stream-adapted form. Given the particular distributional patterns and our molecular dating estimates, we hypothesize that: (i) the interior desertification from Mongolia to Western Asia began approximately 50 Mya; (ii) the Tibetan plateau (at least on the eastern fringe) experienced rapid uplift approximately 40 Mya and reached an altitude of at least 2,500 m; and (iii) the Ailao-Red River shear zone underwent the most intense orogenic movement approximately 24 Mya.

  7. Moss Phylogeny Reconstruction Using Nucleotide Pangenome of Complete Mitogenome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Goryunov, D V; Nagaev, B E; Nikolaev, M Yu; Alexeevski, A V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    Stability of composition and sequence of genes was shown earlier in 13 mitochondrial genomes of mosses (Rensing, S. A., et al. (2008) Science, 319, 64-69). It is of interest to study the evolution of mitochondrial genomes not only at the gene level, but also on the level of nucleotide sequences. To do this, we have constructed a "nucleotide pangenome" for mitochondrial genomes of 24 moss species. The nucleotide pangenome is a set of aligned nucleotide sequences of orthologous genome fragments covering the totality of all genomes. The nucleotide pangenome was constructed using specially developed new software, NPG-explorer (NPGe). The stable part of the mitochondrial genome (232 stable blocks) is shown to be, on average, 45% of its length. In the joint alignment of stable blocks, 82% of positions are conserved. The phylogenetic tree constructed with the NPGe program is in good correlation with other phylogenetic reconstructions. With the NPGe program, 30 blocks have been identified with repeats no shorter than 50 bp. The maximal length of a block with repeats is 140 bp. Duplications in the mitochondrial genomes of mosses are rare. On average, the genome contains about 500 bp in large duplications. The total length of insertions and deletions was determined in each genome. The losses and gains of DNA regions are rather active in mitochondrial genomes of mosses, and such rearrangements presumably can be used as additional markers in the reconstruction of phylogeny. PMID:26615445

  8. Mitochondrial Genome Sequences Effectively Reveal the Phylogeny of Hylobates Gibbons

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yi-Chiao; Roos, Christian; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Inoue, Eiji; Shih, Chih-Chin; Pei, Kurtis Jai-Chyi; Vigilant, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Background Uniquely among hominoids, gibbons exist as multiple geographically contiguous taxa exhibiting distinctive behavioral, morphological, and karyotypic characteristics. However, our understanding of the evolutionary relationships of the various gibbons, especially among Hylobates species, is still limited because previous studies used limited taxon sampling or short mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. Here we use mtDNA genome sequences to reconstruct gibbon phylogenetic relationships and reveal the pattern and timing of divergence events in gibbon evolutionary history. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of 51 individuals representing 11 species belonging to three genera (Hylobates, Nomascus and Symphalangus) using the high-throughput 454 sequencing system with the parallel tagged sequencing approach. Three phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, Bayesian analysis and neighbor-joining) depicted the gibbon phylogenetic relationships congruently and with strong support values. Most notably, we recover a well-supported phylogeny of the Hylobates gibbons. The estimation of divergence times using Bayesian analysis with relaxed clock model suggests a much more rapid speciation process in Hylobates than in Nomascus. Conclusions/Significance Use of more than 15 kb sequences of the mitochondrial genome provided more informative and robust data than previous studies of short mitochondrial segments (e.g., control region or cytochrome b) as shown by the reliable reconstruction of divergence patterns among Hylobates gibbons. Moreover, molecular dating of the mitogenomic divergence times implied that biogeographic change during the last five million years may be a factor promoting the speciation of Sundaland animals, including Hylobates species. PMID:21203450

  9. Phylogeny and classification of Prunus sensu lato (Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuo; Li, Jinlu; Sun, Jiahui; Yu, Jing; Zhou, Shiliang

    2013-11-01

    The classification of the economically important genus Prunus L. sensu lato (s.l.) is controversial due to the high levels of convergent or the parallel evolution of morphological characters. In the present study, phylogenetic analyses of fifteen main segregates of Prunus s.l. represented by eighty-four species were conducted with maximum parsimony and Bayesian approaches using twelve chloroplast regions (atpB-rbcL, matK, ndhF, psbA-trnH, rbcL, rpL16, rpoC1, rps16, trnS-G, trnL, trnL-F and ycf1) and three nuclear genes (ITS, s6pdh and SbeI) to explore their infrageneric relationships. The results of these analyses were used to develop a new, phylogeny-based classification of Prunus s.l. Our phylogenetic reconstructions resolved three main clades of Prunus s.l. with strong supports. We adopted a broad-sensed genus, Prunus, and recognised three subgenera corresponding to the three main clades: subgenus Padus, subgenus Cerasus and subgenus Prunus. Seven sections of subgenus Prunus were recognised. The dwarf cherries, which were previously assigned to subgenus Cerasus, were included in this subgenus Prunus. One new section name, Prunus L. subgenus Prunus section Persicae (T. T. Yü & L. T. Lu) S. L. Zhou and one new species name, Prunus tianshanica (Pojarkov) S. Shi, were proposed. PMID:23945216

  10. Arthropod phylogeny based on eight molecular loci and morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giribet, G.; Edgecombe, G. D.; Wheeler, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    The interrelationships of major clades within the Arthropoda remain one of the most contentious issues in systematics, which has traditionally been the domain of morphologists. A growing body of DNA sequences and other types of molecular data has revitalized study of arthropod phylogeny and has inspired new considerations of character evolution. Novel hypotheses such as a crustacean-hexapod affinity were based on analyses of single or few genes and limited taxon sampling, but have received recent support from mitochondrial gene order, and eye and brain ultrastructure and neurogenesis. Here we assess relationships within Arthropoda based on a synthesis of all well sampled molecular loci together with a comprehensive data set of morphological, developmental, ultrastructural and gene-order characters. The molecular data include sequences of three nuclear ribosomal genes, three nuclear protein-coding genes, and two mitochondrial genes (one protein coding, one ribosomal). We devised new optimization procedures and constructed a parallel computer cluster with 256 central processing units to analyse molecular data on a scale not previously possible. The optimal 'total evidence' cladogram supports the crustacean-hexapod clade, recognizes pycnogonids as sister to other euarthropods, and indicates monophyly of Myriapoda and Mandibulata.

  11. Molecular phylogeny of the forensically important genus Cochliomyia (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Yusseff-Vanegas, Sohath; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cochliomyia Townsend includes several abundant and one of the most broadly distributed, blow flies in the Americas, and is of significant economic and forensic importance. For decades, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) and Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius) have received attention as livestock parasites and primary indicator species in forensic entomology. However, Cochliomyia minima Shannon and Cochliomyia aldrichi Del Ponte have only been subject to basic taxonomy and faunistic studies. Here we present the first complete phylogeny of Cochliomyia including numerous specimens per species, collected from 13 localities in the Caribbean. Four genes, the mitochondrial COI and the nuclear EF-1α, 28S rRNA, and ITS2, were analyzed. While we found some differences among gene trees, a concatenated gene matrix recovered a robustly supported monophyletic Cochliomyia with Compsomyiops Townsend as its sister group and recovered the monophyly of Cochliomyia hominivorax, Cochliomyia macellaria and Cochliomyia minima. Our results support a close relationship between Cochliomyia minima and Cochliomyia aldrichi. However, we found Cochliomyia aldrichi containing Cochliomyia minima, indicating recent speciation, or issues with the taxonomy of the group. We provide basic information on habitat preference, distribution and feeding habits of Cochliomyia minima and Cochliomyia aldrichi that will be useful for future forensic studies in the Caribbean. PMID:27563274

  12. Is your phylogeny informative? Measuring the power of comparative methods.

    PubMed

    Boettiger, Carl; Coop, Graham; Ralph, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Phylogenetic comparative methods may fail to produce meaningful results when either the underlying model is inappropriate or the data contain insufficient information to inform the inference. The ability to measure the statistical power of these methods has become crucial to ensure that data quantity keeps pace with growing model complexity. Through simulations, we show that commonly applied model choice methods based on information criteria can have remarkably high error rates; this can be a problem because methods to estimate the uncertainty or power are not widely known or applied. Furthermore, the power of comparative methods can depend significantly on the structure of the data. We describe a Monte Carlo-based method which addresses both of these challenges, and show how this approach both quantifies and substantially reduces errors relative to information criteria. The method also produces meaningful confidence intervals for model parameters. We illustrate how the power to distinguish different models, such as varying levels of selection, varies both with number of taxa and structure of the phylogeny. We provide an open-source implementation in the pmc ("Phylogenetic Monte Carlo") package for the R programming language. We hope such power analysis becomes a routine part of model comparison in comparative methods. PMID:22759299

  13. Molecular phylogeny and ultrastructure of Aphelidium aff. melosirae (Aphelida, Opisthosporidia)

    PubMed Central

    Karpov, Sergey A.; Mamkaeva, Maria A.; Benzerara, Karim; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación

    2014-01-01

    Aphelids are a poorly known group of parasitoids of algae that have raised considerable interest due to their pivotal phylogenetic position. Together with Cryptomycota and the highly derived Microsporidia, they have been recently re-classified as Opisthosporidia, being the sister group to fungi. Despite their huge diversity, as revealed by molecular environmental studies, and their phylogenetic interest, only three genera have been described (Aphelidium, Amoeboaphelidium, and Pseudaphelidium), from which 18S rRNA gene sequences exist only for Amoeboaphelidium species. Here, we describe the life cycle and ultrastructure of Aphelidium aff. melosirae, and provide the first 18S rRNA gene sequence obtained for this genus. Molecular phylogeny analysis indicates that Aphelidium is very distantly related to Amoebaphelidium, highlighting the wide genetic diversity of the aphelids. The parasitoid encysts and penetrates the host alga, Tribonema gayanum through an infection tube. Cyst germination leads to a young trophont that phagocytes the algal cell content and progressively develops a plasmodium, which becomes a zoospore-producing sporangium. Aphelidium aff. melosirae has amoeboflagellate zoospores, tubular/lamellar mitochondrial cristae, a metazoan type of centrosome, and closed orthomitosis with intranuclear spindle. These features together with trophont phagocytosis distinguish Aphelidium from fungi and support the erection of the new superphylum Opisthosporidia as sister to fungi. PMID:24995586

  14. Angiosperm phylogeny based on matK sequence information.

    PubMed

    Hilu, Khidir W; Borsch, Thomas; Müller, Kai; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Savolainen, Vincent; Chase, Mark W; Powell, Martyn P; Alice, Lawrence A; Evans, Rodger; Sauquet, Hervé; Neinhuis, Christoph; Slotta, Tracey A B; Rohwer, Jens G; Campbell, Christopher S; Chatrou, Lars W

    2003-12-01

    Plastid matK gene sequences for 374 genera representing all angiosperm orders and 12 genera of gymnosperms were analyzed using parsimony (MP) and Bayesian inference (BI) approaches. Traditionally, slowly evolving genomic regions have been preferred for deep-level phylogenetic inference in angiosperms. The matK gene evolves approximately three times faster than the widely used plastid genes rbcL and atpB. The MP and BI trees are highly congruent. The robustness of the strict consensus tree supercedes all individual gene analyses and is comparable only to multigene-based phylogenies. Of the 385 nodes resolved, 79% are supported by high jackknife values, averaging 88%. Amborella is sister to the remaining angiosperms, followed by a grade of Nymphaeaceae and Austrobaileyales. Bayesian inference resolves Amborella + Nymphaeaceae as sister to the rest, but with weak (0.42) posterior probability. The MP analysis shows a trichotomy sister to the Austrobaileyales representing eumagnoliids, monocots + Chloranthales, and Ceratophyllum + eudicots. The matK gene produces the highest internal support yet for basal eudicots and, within core eudicots, resolves a crown group comprising Berberidopsidaceae/Aextoxicaceae, Santalales, and Caryophyllales + asterids. Moreover, matK sequences provide good resolution within many angiosperm orders. Combined analyses of matK and other rapidly evolving DNA regions with available multigene data sets have strong potential to enhance resolution and internal support in deep level angiosperm phylogenetics and provide additional insights into angiosperm evolution.

  15. Dated molecular phylogenies indicate a Miocene origin for Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Beilstein, Mark A; Nagalingum, Nathalie S; Clements, Mark D; Manchester, Steven R; Mathews, Sarah

    2010-10-26

    Dated molecular phylogenies are the basis for understanding species diversity and for linking changes in rates of diversification with historical events such as restructuring in developmental pathways, genome doubling, or dispersal onto a new continent. Valid fossil calibration points are essential to the accurate estimation of divergence dates, but for many groups of flowering plants fossil evidence is unavailable or limited. Arabidopsis thaliana, the primary genetic model in plant biology and the first plant to have its entire genome sequenced, belongs to one such group, the plant family Brassicaceae. Thus, the timing of A. thaliana evolution and the history of its genome have been controversial. We bring previously overlooked fossil evidence to bear on these questions and find the split between A. thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata occurred about 13 Mya, and that the split between Arabidopsis and the Brassica complex (broccoli, cabbage, canola) occurred about 43 Mya. These estimates, which are two- to threefold older than previous estimates, indicate that gene, genomic, and developmental evolution occurred much more slowly than previously hypothesized and that Arabidopsis evolved during a period of warming rather than of cooling. We detected a 2- to 10-fold shift in species diversification rates on the branch uniting Brassicaceae with its sister families. The timing of this shift suggests a possible impact of the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction on their radiation and that Brassicales codiversified with pierid butterflies that specialize on mustard-oil-producing plants.

  16. Integrating fossils with molecular phylogenies improves inference of trait evolution.

    PubMed

    Slater, Graham J; Harmon, Luke J; Alfaro, Michael E

    2012-12-01

    Comparative biologists often attempt to draw inferences about tempo and mode in evolution by comparing the fit of evolutionary models to phylogenetic comparative data consisting of a molecular phylogeny with branch lengths and trait measurements from extant taxa. These kinds of approaches ignore historical evidence for evolutionary pattern and process contained in the fossil record. In this article, we show through simulation that incorporation of fossil information dramatically improves our ability to distinguish among models of quantitative trait evolution using comparative data. We further suggest a novel Bayesian approach that allows fossil information to be integrated even when explicit phylogenetic hypotheses are lacking for extinct representatives of extant clades. By applying this approach to a comparative dataset comprising body sizes for caniform carnivorans, we show that incorporation of fossil information not only improves ancestral state estimates relative to those derived from extant taxa alone, but also results in preference of a model of evolution with trend toward large body size over alternative models such as Brownian motion or Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes. Our approach highlights the importance of considering fossil information when making macroevolutionary inference, and provides a way to integrate the kind of sparse fossil information that is available to most evolutionary biologists.

  17. Molecular phylogeny of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Slattery, J P; O'Brien, S J

    1995-01-01

    The phylogenetic placement of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) has been an evolutionary enigma since their original descriptions in the nineteenth century. A series of recent molecular analyses led to a consensus that the giant panda's ancestors were derived from early bears (Ursidae), but left unsettled the phylogenetic relationship of the red panda. Previous molecular and morphological phylogenies were inconclusive and varied among placement of the red panda within the raccoon family (Procyonidae), within the bear family (Ursidae), or in a separate family of carnivores equidistant between the two. To examine a relatively ancient (circa 20-30 million years before the present, MYBP) phylogenetic divergence, we used two slowly evolving genetic markers: mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequence and 592 fibroblast proteins resolved by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. Four different carnivore outgroup species, including dog (Canidae: Canis familiaris), cat (Felidae: Felis catus), fanaloka (Viverridae: Fossa fossa), and mongoose (Herpestidae: Galidia elegans), were selected to identify the root of the phylogenetic topologies. Phylogenetic reconstruction by distance-based methods, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood clearly indicate a distinct bifurcation forming the Ursidae and the Procyonidae. Further, our data consistently place the red panda as an early divergence within the Procyonidae radiation and confirm the inclusion of giant panda in the Ursidae lineage.

  18. Phylogeny and Biogeography of Cyanobacteria and Their Produced Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Cristiana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Phylogeny is an evolutionary reconstruction of the past relationships of DNA or protein sequences and it can further be used as a tool to assess population structuring, genetic diversity and biogeographic patterns. In the microbial world, the concept that everything is everywhere is widely accepted. However, it is much debated whether microbes are easily dispersed globally or whether they, like many macro-organisms, have historical biogeographies. Biogeography can be defined as the science that documents the spatial and temporal distribution of a given taxa in the environment at local, regional and continental scales. Speciation, extinction and dispersal are proposed to explain the generation of biogeographic patterns. Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of microorganisms that inhabit a wide range of ecological niches and are well known for their toxic secondary metabolite production. Knowledge of the evolution and dispersal of these microorganisms is still limited, and further research to understand such topics is imperative. Here, we provide a compilation of the most relevant information regarding these issues to better understand the present state of the art as a platform for future studies, and we highlight examples of both phylogenetic and biogeographic studies in non-symbiotic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins. PMID:24189276

  19. Evolution of consciousness: Phylogeny, ontogeny, and emergence from general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Mashour, George A.; Alkire, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Are animals conscious? If so, when did consciousness evolve? We address these long-standing and essential questions using a modern neuroscientific approach that draws on diverse fields such as consciousness studies, evolutionary neurobiology, animal psychology, and anesthesiology. We propose that the stepwise emergence from general anesthesia can serve as a reproducible model to study the evolution of consciousness across various species and use current data from anesthesiology to shed light on the phylogeny of consciousness. Ultimately, we conclude that the neurobiological structure of the vertebrate central nervous system is evolutionarily ancient and highly conserved across species and that the basic neurophysiologic mechanisms supporting consciousness in humans are found at the earliest points of vertebrate brain evolution. Thus, in agreement with Darwin’s insight and the recent “Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness in Non-Human Animals,” a review of modern scientific data suggests that the differences between species in terms of the ability to experience the world is one of degree and not kind. PMID:23754370

  20. The origin of the cancer cell: oncogeny reverses phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Johnston, R N; Pai, S B; Pai, R B

    1992-01-01

    The formulation in 1874 of the biogenetic law by Ernst Haeckel as "ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny" emphasized the structural similarities detected in metazoans between their developmental and ancestral forms. More recently, many workers have independently commented on the similarities observed between the behaviours displayed by dedifferentiated cancer cells and their embryonic precursors. This review will explore a possible linkage between these disparate observations and will suggest that cancer cells behave in ways that are reminiscent of primitive eukaryotic cells. In particular, we suggest that the acquisition of a multicellular level of organization during early metazoan evolution required a critical and difficult change in growth strategy as germ line and somatic cells became distinct. Whereas unicellular free living eukaryotes follow a simple strategy of rapid division as long as conditions permit, the elaboration of powerful growth inhibitory pathways must have been necessary in primitive multicellular organisms to enable some but not all sister cells to stop dividing, even under conditions of nutrient abundance. This limitation on cellular growth would than have permitted the appearance of tissues and organs with differentiated characteristics, ultimately enabling the enhanced survival of the meiotic lineage. Cancer cells might therefore be considered to represent, with their loss of tumor suppressor inhibitory activity and elevation of oncogene stimulatory activity, a reversion to a more primitive evolutionary state capable of indeterminate growth at the expense of the host. By this analogy, the growth phenotypes displayed by cancer cells, embryonic cells, and free-living eukaryotes are fundamentally similar. PMID:1297348

  1. Phylogeny of kangaroo apples (Solanum subg. Archaesolanum, Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Poczai, Péter; Hyvönen, Jaakko; Symon, David E

    2011-11-01

    Kangaroo apples, subgenus Archaesolanum, are a unique and still poorly known group within the genus Solanum. Here we aimed to reveal phylogeny, historical biogeography and age of diversification of Archaesolanum. We sampled all recognized species of the group and sequenced three chloroplast regions, the trnT-trnL spacer, trnL intron and trnL-trnF spacer to calibrate a molecular clock to estimate the age of the group. Distributional data were combined with the results of phylogenetic analysis to track the historical processes responsible for the current range of the group. Our analysis supported the monophyly of the kangaroo apples and the biogeographical disjunction between the two subclades within the group. Based on the divergence time estimates the most recent common ancestor of kangaroo apples is from the late Miocene age (~9 MYA). Based on the age estimate the common ancestors of the kangaroo apples are presumed to have arrived in Australia by long-distance dispersal. The two distinct lineages within the group have separated during the aridification of the continent and further speciated in the brief resurgence of rainforests during the Pliocene.

  2. Molecular phylogeny of North American Branchiobdellida (Annelida: Clitellata).

    PubMed

    Williams, Bronwyn W; Gelder, Stuart R; Proctor, Heather C; Coltman, David W

    2013-01-01

    Branchiobdellidans, or crayfish worms, are ectosymbiotic clitellate annelids associated primarily with freshwater crayfishes. The main objectives of our study were to infer a molecular phylogeny for the North American Branchiobdellida, examine its congruence with morphology-based hypotheses of relationships at the subfamily and genus level, and use our dataset to assess consistency of GenBank-archived branchiobdellidan sequences. We used nucleotide sequence data from two mtDNA genes (COI and 16S rDNA) and three nuclear genes (28S rDNA, 18S rDNA, and ITS1) to estimate phylogenetic relationships among 47 described and one undescribed species of Branchiobdellida. We recovered a monophyletic branchiobdellidan clade with generally short branch lengths, suggesting that a large portion of the taxon has likely undergone a recent and rapid radiation in North America. Results from our phylogenetic analyses indicate that current taxonomic groupings are largely unsupported by the molecular data. All four subfamilies are either paraphyletic or polyphyletic, and only three of seven sampled non-monotypic genera were monophyletic. We found a high rate (49%) of inconsistency in GenBank-archived sequences, over 70% of which can be attributed to field- or laboratory-based error.

  3. Reconstructing Histories of Complex Gene Clusters on a Phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa; Song, Giltae; Siepel, Adam

    Clusters of genes that have evolved by repeated segmental duplication present difficult challenges throughout genomic analysis, from sequence assembly to functional analysis. These clusters are one of the major sources of evolutionary innovation, and they are linked to multiple diseases, including HIV and a variety of cancers. Understanding their evolutionary histories is a key to the application of comparative genomics methods in these regions of the genome. We propose a probabilistic model of gene cluster evolution on a phylogeny, and an MCMC algorithm for reconstruction of duplication histories from genomic sequences in multiple species. Several projects are underway to obtain high quality BAC-based assemblies of duplicated clusters in multiple species, and we anticipate use of our methods in their analysis. Supplementary materials are located at http://compbio.fmph.uniba.sk/suppl/09recombcg/

  4. Shedding light on vampires: the phylogeny of vampyrellid amoebae revisited.

    PubMed

    Hess, Sebastian; Sausen, Nicole; Melkonian, Michael

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of molecular phylogenetic techniques the polyphyly of naked filose amoebae has been proven. They are interspersed in several supergroups of eukaryotes and most of them already found their place within the tree of life. Although the 'vampire amoebae' have attracted interest since the middle of the 19th century, the phylogenetic position and even the monophyly of this traditional group are still uncertain. In this study clonal co-cultures of eight algivorous vampyrellid amoebae and the respective food algae were established. Culture material was characterized morphologically and a molecular phylogeny was inferred using SSU rDNA sequence comparisons. We found that the limnetic, algivorous vampyrellid amoebae investigated in this study belong to a major clade within the Endomyxa Cavalier-Smith, 2002 (Cercozoa), grouping together with a few soil-dwelling taxa. They split into two robust clades, one containing species of the genus Vampyrella Cienkowski, 1865, the other containing the genus Leptophrys Hertwig & Lesser, 1874, together with terrestrial members. Supported by morphological data these clades are designated as the two families Vampyrellidae Zopf, 1885, and Leptophryidae fam. nov. Furthermore the order Vampyrellida West, 1901 was revised and now corresponds to the major vampyrellid clade within the Endomyxa, comprising the Vampyrellidae and Leptophryidae as well as several environmental sequences. In the light of the presented phylogenetic analyses morphological and ecological aspects, the feeding strategy and nutritional specialization within the vampyrellid amoebae are discussed. PMID:22355342

  5. A multilocus phylogeny of the Sulidae (Aves: Pelecaniformes).

    PubMed

    Patterson, S A; Morris-Pocock, J A; Friesen, V L

    2011-02-01

    Gene trees will often differ from the true species history, the species tree, as a result of processes such as incomplete lineage sorting. New methods such as Bayesian Estimation of the Species Tree (BEST) use the multispecies coalescent to model lineage sorting, and directly infer the species tree from multilocus DNA sequence data. The Sulidae (Aves: Pelecaniformes) is a family of ten booby and gannet species with a global distribution. We sequenced five nuclear intron loci and one mitochondrial locus to estimate a species tree for the Sulidae using both BEST and by concatenating nuclear loci. We also used fossil calibrated strict and relaxed molecular clocks in BEAST to estimate divergence times for major nodes in the sulid phylogeny. Individual gene trees showed little phylogenetic conflict but varied in resolution. With the exception of the mitochondrial gene tree, no gene tree was completely resolved. On the other hand, both the BEST and concatenated species trees were highly resolved, strongly supported, and topologically consistent with each other. The three sulid genera (Morus, Sula, Papasula) were monophyletic and the relationships within genera were mostly consistent with both a previously estimated mtDNA gene tree and the mtDNA gene tree estimated here. However, our species trees conflicted with the mtDNA gene trees in the relationships among the three genera. Most notably, we find that the endemic and endangered Abbott's booby (Papasula abbotti) is likely basal to all other members of the Sulidae and diverged from them approximately 22 million years ago. PMID:21144905

  6. Phylogeny-aware identification and correction of taxonomically mislabeled sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Alexey M.; Zhang, Jiajie; Yilmaz, Pelin; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Stamatakis, Alexandros

    2016-01-01

    Molecular sequences in public databases are mostly annotated by the submitting authors without further validation. This procedure can generate erroneous taxonomic sequence labels. Mislabeled sequences are hard to identify, and they can induce downstream errors because new sequences are typically annotated using existing ones. Furthermore, taxonomic mislabelings in reference sequence databases can bias metagenetic studies which rely on the taxonomy. Despite significant efforts to improve the quality of taxonomic annotations, the curation rate is low because of the labor-intensive manual curation process. Here, we present SATIVA, a phylogeny-aware method to automatically identify taxonomically mislabeled sequences (‘mislabels’) using statistical models of evolution. We use the Evolutionary Placement Algorithm (EPA) to detect and score sequences whose taxonomic annotation is not supported by the underlying phylogenetic signal, and automatically propose a corrected taxonomic classification for those. Using simulated data, we show that our method attains high accuracy for identification (96.9% sensitivity/91.7% precision) as well as correction (94.9% sensitivity/89.9% precision) of mislabels. Furthermore, an analysis of four widely used microbial 16S reference databases (Greengenes, LTP, RDP and SILVA) indicates that they currently contain between 0.2% and 2.5% mislabels. Finally, we use SATIVA to perform an in-depth evaluation of alternative taxonomies for Cyanobacteria. SATIVA is freely available at https://github.com/amkozlov/sativa. PMID:27166378

  7. Bayesian Inference of Reticulate Phylogenies under the Multispecies Network Coalescent

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dingqiao; Yu, Yun; Nakhleh, Luay

    2016-01-01

    The multispecies coalescent (MSC) is a statistical framework that models how gene genealogies grow within the branches of a species tree. The field of computational phylogenetics has witnessed an explosion in the development of methods for species tree inference under MSC, owing mainly to the accumulating evidence of incomplete lineage sorting in phylogenomic analyses. However, the evolutionary history of a set of genomes, or species, could be reticulate due to the occurrence of evolutionary processes such as hybridization or horizontal gene transfer. We report on a novel method for Bayesian inference of genome and species phylogenies under the multispecies network coalescent (MSNC). This framework models gene evolution within the branches of a phylogenetic network, thus incorporating reticulate evolutionary processes, such as hybridization, in addition to incomplete lineage sorting. As phylogenetic networks with different numbers of reticulation events correspond to points of different dimensions in the space of models, we devise a reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) technique for sampling the posterior distribution of phylogenetic networks under MSNC. We implemented the methods in the publicly available, open-source software package PhyloNet and studied their performance on simulated and biological data. The work extends the reach of Bayesian inference to phylogenetic networks and enables new evolutionary analyses that account for reticulation. PMID:27144273

  8. Phylogeny and disjunct distribution: evolution of Saintpaulia (Gesneriaceae).

    PubMed

    Möller, M; Cronk, Q C

    1997-12-22

    The molecular phylogeny of African violets (Saintpaulia H. Wendl.), based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, follows the disjunct biogeography of the genus. Sequence analysis by parsimony of 19 accessions, representing 17 currently recognized Saintpaulia species, resulted in four trees of 182 steps. The first major division is between S. goetzeana, from the Uluguru Mts, Tanzania, and the rest of the genus. The basal position of S. goetzeana, and its putative primitive characters, may indicate an Uluguru origin for Saintpaulia and subsequent colonization of the more northerly mountains. Of the remainder, S. teitensis, from the Teita Hills of Kenya, is sister taxon to the other species (which occur mainly in the Usambara Mts of north-east Tanzania). A group of nine Usambaran species that we call the 'ionantha complex' show minimal ITS genetic differentiation and are also taxonomically critical. Species diversity in the Usambara Mts appears to be the result of rapid, recent (possibly Pleistocene) radiation. This study reveals the limitations of ITS sequences for elucidating the radiation of poorly differentiated species (the ionantha complex). However, the molecular data strongly suggest that conservation of the Uluguru and Teita populations is essential for the protection of the full range of diversity within the genus. PMID:9447739

  9. Phylogeny of the caniform carnivora: evidence from multiple genes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2006-05-01

    The monophyletic group Caniformia in the order Carnivora currently comprises seven families whose relationships remain contentious. The phylogenetic positions of the two panda species within the Caniformia have also been evolutionary puzzles over the past decades, especially for Ailurus fulgens (the red panda). Here, new nuclear sequences from two introns of the beta-fibrinogen gene (beta-fibrinogen introns 4 and 7) and a complete mitochondrial (mt) gene (ND2) from 17 caniform representatives were explored for their utilities in resolving higher-level relationships in the Caniformia. In addition, two previously available nuclear (IRBP exon 1 and TTR intron 1) data sets were also combined and analyzed simultaneously with the newly obtained sequence data in this study. Combined analyses of four nuclear and one mt genes (4417 bp) recover a branching order in which almost all nodes were strongly supported. The present analyses provide evidence in favor of Ailurus fulgens as the closest taxon to the procyonid-mustelid (i.e., Musteloidea sensu stricto) clade, followed by pinnipeds (i.e., Otariidae and Phocidae), Ursidae (including Ailuropoda melanoleuca), and Canidae, the most basal lineage in the Caniformia. The potential utilities of different genes in the context of caniform phylogeny were also evaluated, with special attention to the previously unexplored beta-fibrinogen intron 4 and 7 genes.

  10. Molecular phylogeny of elasmobranchs inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear markers.

    PubMed

    Pavan-Kumar, A; Gireesh-Babu, P; Babu, P P Suresh; Jaiswar, A K; Hari Krishna, V; Prasasd, K Pani; Chaudhari, Aparna; Raje, S G; Chakraborty, S K; Krishna, Gopal; Lakra, W S

    2014-01-01

    The elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates) being the extant survivors of one of the earliest offshoots of the vertebrate evolutionary tree are good model organisms to study the primitive vertebrate conditions. They play a significant role in maintaining the ecological balance and have high economic value. Due to over-exploitation and illegal fishing worldwide, the elasmobranch stocks are being decimated at an alarming rate. Appropriate management measures are necessary for restoring depleted elasmobranch stocks. One approach for restoring stocks is implementation of conservation measures and these measures can be formulated effectively by knowing the evolutionary relationship among the elasmobranchs. In this study, a total of 30 species were chosen for molecular phylogeny studies using mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, 12S ribosomal RNA gene and nuclear Internal Transcribed Spacer 2. Among different genes, the combined dataset of COI and 12S rRNA resulted in a well resolved tree topology with significant bootstrap/posterior probabilities values. The results supported the reciprocal monophyly of sharks and batoids. Within Galeomorphii, Heterodontiformes (bullhead sharks) formed as a sister group to Lamniformes (mackerel sharks): Orectolobiformes (carpet sharks) and to Carcharhiniformes (ground sharks). Within batoids, the Myliobatiformes formed a monophyly group while Pristiformes (sawfishes) and Rhinobatiformes (guitar fishes) formed a sister group to all other batoids. PMID:24293104

  11. Inferring Stabilizing Mutations from Protein Phylogenies: Application to Influenza Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.; Glassman, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    One selection pressure shaping sequence evolution is the requirement that a protein fold with sufficient stability to perform its biological functions. We present a conceptual framework that explains how this requirement causes the probability that a particular amino acid mutation is fixed during evolution to depend on its effect on protein stability. We mathematically formalize this framework to develop a Bayesian approach for inferring the stability effects of individual mutations from homologous protein sequences of known phylogeny. This approach is able to predict published experimentally measured mutational stability effects (ΔΔG values) with an accuracy that exceeds both a state-of-the-art physicochemical modeling program and the sequence-based consensus approach. As a further test, we use our phylogenetic inference approach to predict stabilizing mutations to influenza hemagglutinin. We introduce these mutations into a temperature-sensitive influenza virus with a defect in its hemagglutinin gene and experimentally demonstrate that some of the mutations allow the virus to grow at higher temperatures. Our work therefore describes a powerful new approach for predicting stabilizing mutations that can be successfully applied even to large, complex proteins such as hemagglutinin. This approach also makes a mathematical link between phylogenetics and experimentally measurable protein properties, potentially paving the way for more accurate analyses of molecular evolution. PMID:19381264

  12. Phylogeny and the hierarchical organization of plant diversity.

    PubMed

    Silvertown, Jonathan; Dodd, Mike; Gowing, David; Lawson, Clare; McConway, Kevin

    2006-07-01

    R. H. Whittaker's idea that plant diversity can be divided into a hierarchy of spatial components from alpha at the within-habitat scale through beta for the turnover of species between habitats to gamma along regional gradients implies the underlying existence of alpha, beta, and gamma niches. We explore the hypothesis that the evolution of alpha, beta, and gamma niches is also hierarchical, with traits that define the alpha niche being labile, while those defining beta and gamma niches are conservative. At the alpha level we find support for the hypothesis in the lack of close significant phylogenetic relationship between meadow species that have similar alpha niches. In a second test, alpha niche overlap based on a variety of traits is compared between congeners and noncongeners in several communities; here, too, there is no evidence of a correlation between alpha niche and phylogeny. To test whether beta and gamma niches evolve conservatively, we reconstructed the evolution of relevant traits on evolutionary trees for 14 different clades. Tests against null models revealed a number of instances, including some in island radiations, in which habitat (beta niche) and elevational maximum (an aspect of the gamma niche) showed evolutionary conservatism.

  13. Big cat phylogenies, consensus trees, and computational thinking.

    PubMed

    Sul, Seung-Jin; Williams, Tiffani L

    2011-07-01

    Phylogenetics seeks to deduce the pattern of relatedness between organisms by using a phylogeny or evolutionary tree. For a given set of organisms or taxa, there may be many evolutionary trees depicting how these organisms evolved from a common ancestor. As a result, consensus trees are a popular approach for summarizing the shared evolutionary relationships in a group of trees. We examine these consensus techniques by studying how the pantherine lineage of cats (clouded leopard, jaguar, leopard, lion, snow leopard, and tiger) evolved, which is hotly debated. While there are many phylogenetic resources that describe consensus trees, there is very little information, written for biologists, regarding the underlying computational techniques for building them. The pantherine cats provide us with a small, relevant example to explore the computational techniques (such as sorting numbers, hashing functions, and traversing trees) for constructing consensus trees. Our hope is that life scientists enjoy peeking under the computational hood of consensus tree construction and share their positive experiences with others in their community.

  14. Evaluating topological conflict in centipede phylogeny using transcriptomic data sets.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Rosa; Laumer, Christopher E; Vahtera, Varpu; Libro, Silvia; Kaluziak, Stefan; Sharma, Prashant P; Pérez-Porro, Alicia R; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2014-06-01

    Relationships between the five extant orders of centipedes have been considered solved based on morphology. Phylogenies based on samples of up to a few dozen genes have largely been congruent with the morphological tree apart from an alternative placement of one order, the relictual Craterostigmomorpha, consisting of two species in Tasmania and New Zealand. To address this incongruence, novel transcriptomic data were generated to sample all five orders of centipedes and also used as a test case for studying gene-tree incongruence. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian mixture model analyses of a data set composed of 1,934 orthologs with 45% missing data, as well as the 389 orthologs in the least saturated, stationary quartile, retrieve strong support for a sister-group relationship between Craterostigmomorpha and all other pleurostigmophoran centipedes, of which the latter group is newly named Amalpighiata. The Amalpighiata hypothesis, which shows little gene-tree incongruence and is robust to the influence of among-taxon compositional heterogeneity, implies convergent evolution in several morphological and behavioral characters traditionally used in centipede phylogenetics, such as maternal brood care, but accords with patterns of first appearances in the fossil record. PMID:24674821

  15. The chaos prevails: molecular phylogeny of the Haptoria (Ciliophora, Litostomatea).

    PubMed

    Vďačný, Peter; Breiner, Hans-Werner; Yashchenko, Varvara; Dunthorn, Micah; Stoeck, Thorsten; Foissner, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    The Haptoria are free-living predatory ciliates living in terrestrial and aquatic habitats all around the world. They belong to a highly diverse class, Litostomatea, whose morphological and molecular classifications harmonize poorly since both approaches produce rather different frameworks. In the present study, we analyzed the genealogy of the litostomateans, including eight new haptorian 18S rRNA gene sequences. Apart from traditional tree-building methods, we also applied phylogenetic networks, split spectrum analysis and quartet likelihood mapping to assess the information content of alignments. These analyses show that: (1) there are several strongly supported monophyletic litostomatean lineages--Rhynchostomatia, Trichostomatia, Haptorida, Lacrymariida, Pleurostomatida, and Didiniida; (2) the Rhynchostomatia are the best candidates for a basal litostomatean group; (3) sister relationship of the Trichostomatia and Haptoria is very likely, which well corroborates the traditional morphology-based classifications; (4) molecular phylogeny of the order Spathidiida is only poorly resolved very likely due to one or several rapid radiation events or due to the incomplete lineage sorting at the rRNA locus; and (5) the basal position of the genera Chaenea and Trachelotractus in molecular trees and phylogenetic networks is very likely a result of class III long-branch effects.

  16. Shedding light on vampires: the phylogeny of vampyrellid amoebae revisited.

    PubMed

    Hess, Sebastian; Sausen, Nicole; Melkonian, Michael

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of molecular phylogenetic techniques the polyphyly of naked filose amoebae has been proven. They are interspersed in several supergroups of eukaryotes and most of them already found their place within the tree of life. Although the 'vampire amoebae' have attracted interest since the middle of the 19th century, the phylogenetic position and even the monophyly of this traditional group are still uncertain. In this study clonal co-cultures of eight algivorous vampyrellid amoebae and the respective food algae were established. Culture material was characterized morphologically and a molecular phylogeny was inferred using SSU rDNA sequence comparisons. We found that the limnetic, algivorous vampyrellid amoebae investigated in this study belong to a major clade within the Endomyxa Cavalier-Smith, 2002 (Cercozoa), grouping together with a few soil-dwelling taxa. They split into two robust clades, one containing species of the genus Vampyrella Cienkowski, 1865, the other containing the genus Leptophrys Hertwig & Lesser, 1874, together with terrestrial members. Supported by morphological data these clades are designated as the two families Vampyrellidae Zopf, 1885, and Leptophryidae fam. nov. Furthermore the order Vampyrellida West, 1901 was revised and now corresponds to the major vampyrellid clade within the Endomyxa, comprising the Vampyrellidae and Leptophryidae as well as several environmental sequences. In the light of the presented phylogenetic analyses morphological and ecological aspects, the feeding strategy and nutritional specialization within the vampyrellid amoebae are discussed.

  17. Shedding Light on Vampires: The Phylogeny of Vampyrellid Amoebae Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Sebastian; Sausen, Nicole; Melkonian, Michael

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of molecular phylogenetic techniques the polyphyly of naked filose amoebae has been proven. They are interspersed in several supergroups of eukaryotes and most of them already found their place within the tree of life. Although the ‘vampire amoebae’ have attracted interest since the middle of the 19th century, the phylogenetic position and even the monophyly of this traditional group are still uncertain. In this study clonal co-cultures of eight algivorous vampyrellid amoebae and the respective food algae were established. Culture material was characterized morphologically and a molecular phylogeny was inferred using SSU rDNA sequence comparisons. We found that the limnetic, algivorous vampyrellid amoebae investigated in this study belong to a major clade within the Endomyxa Cavalier-Smith, 2002 (Cercozoa), grouping together with a few soil-dwelling taxa. They split into two robust clades, one containing species of the genus Vampyrella Cienkowski, 1865, the other containing the genus Leptophrys Hertwig & Lesser, 1874, together with terrestrial members. Supported by morphological data these clades are designated as the two families Vampyrellidae Zopf, 1885, and Leptophryidae fam. nov. Furthermore the order Vampyrellida West, 1901 was revised and now corresponds to the major vampyrellid clade within the Endomyxa, comprising the Vampyrellidae and Leptophryidae as well as several environmental sequences. In the light of the presented phylogenetic analyses morphological and ecological aspects, the feeding strategy and nutritional specialization within the vampyrellid amoebae are discussed. PMID:22355342

  18. Bayesian Inference of Reticulate Phylogenies under the Multispecies Network Coalescent.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dingqiao; Yu, Yun; Nakhleh, Luay

    2016-05-01

    The multispecies coalescent (MSC) is a statistical framework that models how gene genealogies grow within the branches of a species tree. The field of computational phylogenetics has witnessed an explosion in the development of methods for species tree inference under MSC, owing mainly to the accumulating evidence of incomplete lineage sorting in phylogenomic analyses. However, the evolutionary history of a set of genomes, or species, could be reticulate due to the occurrence of evolutionary processes such as hybridization or horizontal gene transfer. We report on a novel method for Bayesian inference of genome and species phylogenies under the multispecies network coalescent (MSNC). This framework models gene evolution within the branches of a phylogenetic network, thus incorporating reticulate evolutionary processes, such as hybridization, in addition to incomplete lineage sorting. As phylogenetic networks with different numbers of reticulation events correspond to points of different dimensions in the space of models, we devise a reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) technique for sampling the posterior distribution of phylogenetic networks under MSNC. We implemented the methods in the publicly available, open-source software package PhyloNet and studied their performance on simulated and biological data. The work extends the reach of Bayesian inference to phylogenetic networks and enables new evolutionary analyses that account for reticulation. PMID:27144273

  19. A mitogenomic phylogeny and genetic history of sable (Martes zibellina).

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina

    2014-10-15

    We assessed phylogeny of sable (Martes zibellina, Linnaeus, 1758) by sequence analysis of nearly complete, new mitochondrial genomes in 36 specimens from different localities in northern Eurasia (Primorye, Khabarovsk and Krasnoyarsk regions, the Kamchatka Peninsula, the Kuril Islands and the Urals). Phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA sequences demonstrates that two clades, A and BC, radiated about 200-300 thousandyears ago (kya) according to results of Bayesian molecular clock and RelTime analyses of different mitogenome alignments (nearly complete mtDNA sequences, protein-coding region, and synonymous sites), while the age estimates of clades A, B and C fall within the Late Pleistocene (~50-140 kya). Bayesian skyline plots (BSPs) of sable population size change based on analysis of nearly complete mtDNAs show an expansion around 40 kya in the warm Karganian time, without a decline of population size around the Last Glacial Maximum (21 kya). The BSPs based on synonymous clock rate indicate that M. zibellina experienced demographic expansions later, approximately 22 kya. The A2a clade that colonized Kamchatka ~23-50 kya (depending on the mutation rate used) survived the last glaciation there as demonstrated by the BSP analysis. In addition, we have found evidence of positive selection acting at ND4 and cytochrome b genes, thereby suggesting adaptive evolution of the A2a clade in Kamchatka. PMID:25110108

  20. The homology and phylogeny of chondrichthyan tooth enameloid.

    PubMed

    Gillis, J Andrew; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2007-01-01

    A systematic SEM survey of tooth microstructure in (primarily) fossil taxa spanning chondrichthyan phylogeny demonstrates the presence of a superficial cap of single crystallite enameloid (SCE) on the teeth of several basal elasmobranchs, as well as on the tooth plates of Helodus (a basal holocephalan). This suggests that the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions required for the development of enameloid during odontogenesis are plesiomorphic in chondrichthyans, and most likely in toothed gnathostomes, and provides phylogenetic support for the homology of chondrichthyan and actinopterygian enameloid. Along the neoselachian stem, we see a crownward progression, possibly modulated by heterochrony, from a monolayer of SCE lacking microstructural differentiation to the complex triple-layered tooth enameloid fabric of neoselachians. Finally, the occurrence of fully-differentiated neoselachian enameloid microstructure (including compression-resistant tangle fibered enameloid and bending-resistant parallel fibered enameloid) in Chlamydoselachus anguineus, a basal Squalean with teeth that are functionally "cladodont," is evidence that triple-layered enameloid microstructure was a preadaption to the cutting and gouging function of many neoselachian teeth, and thus may have played an integral role in the Mesozoic radiation of the neoselachian crown group.