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Sample records for lake roosevelt pelagic

  1. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part C; Lake Roosevelt Pelagic Fish Study: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt; Bonar, Scott

    2002-11-01

    Pelagic fishes, such as kokanee and rainbow trout, provide an important fishery in Lake Roosevelt; however, spawner returns and creel results have been below management goals in recent years. Our objective was to identify factors that potentially limit pelagic fish production in Lake Roosevelt including entrainment, food limitation, piscivory, and other abiotic factors. We estimated the ratio of total fish entrained through Grand Coulee Dam to the pelagic fish abundance for September and October, 1998. If the majority of these fish were pelagic species, then entrainment averaged 10-13% of pelagic fish abundance each month. This rate of entrainment could impose considerable losses to pelagic fish populations on an annual basis. Therefore, estimates of species composition of entrained fish will be important in upcoming years to estimate the proportion of stocked pelagic fish lost through the dam. Food was not limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout populations since growth rates were high and large zooplankton were present in the reservoir. Estimates of survival for kokanee were low (< 0.01 annual) and unknown for rainbow trout. We estimated that the 1997 standing stock biomass of large (>1.1 mm) Daphnia could have supported 0.08 annual survival by kokanee and rainbow trout before fish consumption would have exceeded available biomass during late winter and early spring. Therefore, if recruitment goals are met in the future there may be a bottleneck in food supply for pelagic planktivores. Walleye and northern pikeminnow were the primary piscivores of salmonids in 1996 and 1997. Predation on salmonid prey was rare for rainbow trout and not detected for burbot or smallmouth bass. Northern pikeminnow had the greatest individual potential as a salmonid predator due to their high consumptive demand; however, their overall impact was limited because of their low relative abundance. We modeled the predation impact of 273,524 walleye in 1996, and 39,075 northern pikeminnow in

  2. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Lake Roosevelt Fisheries and Limnological Research; 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John

    1996-08-01

    This project began collecting biological data from Lake Roosevelt starting in 1991, with a long term goal of developing a computer model which accurately predicts biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review Program. In conjunction with the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project, this study collected limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, creel, net-pen rainbow trout and kokanee tagging data in 1994. Results obtained from current and past years data allow for the quantification of impacts to lake limnology, zooplankton, fish species and fisherman caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times. in Lake Roosevelt, reservoir operations influence lake morphology as well as habitat availability for fish and their food. Lake elevations reached a yearly low of 1,263.90 feet above sea level in April and a yearly high of 1,288.50 feet in October. Lake Roosevelt experienced a peak in Daphnia spp. densities during July and August including the peak density of nearly 9,000 organisms per m{sup 3}. High densities of zooplankton were found in the lower end of the reservoir which supports the hypothesis that flushing of reservoir water increases downstream plankton densities and biomass as well as increasing entrainment of fishes. In 1994, a total of 26,975 net-pen rainbow trout were tagged at locations throughout the reservoir. Anglers fishing in Lake Roosevelt or below returned 448 tags, of which 399 tags were from fish tagged in 1994. Trends in tag returns continue to indicate that entrainment of Lake Roosevelt net-pen fish are influenced by water retention times and release times. Creel surveys of Rufus Woods were conducted over a six month period in 1993 and seven months in 1994 to estimate entrainment loss of tagged fish, however no tags were observed. Harvest estimates for the creel period were 46, 0 and 55 fish for rainbow trout, kokanee and walleye in 1993 and 384, 5 and 4,856 fish per year respectively in 1994.

  3. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries and Limnological Research : 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cichosz, Thomas A.; Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John; Scholz, Allan; Tilson, Mary Beth

    1997-05-01

    The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program resulted from a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project. This project will model biological responses to reservoir operations, evaluate the effects of releasing hatchery origin kokanee salmon and rainbow trout on the fishery, and evaluate the success of various stocking strategies. In 1996, limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, and tagging data were collected. Mean reservoir elevation, storage volume and water retention time were reduced in 1996 relative to the last five years. In 1996, Lake Roosevelt reached a yearly low of 1,227 feet above mean sea level in April, a yearly high of 1,289 feet in July, and a mean yearly reservoir elevation of 1,271.4 feet. Mean monthly water retention times in Lake Roosevelt during 1996 ranged from 15.7 days in May to 49.2 days in October. Average zooplankton densities and biomass were lower in 1996 than 1995. Daphnia spp. and total zooplankton densities peaked during the summer, whereas minimum densities occurred during the spring. Approximately 300,000 kokanee salmon and 400,000 rainbow trout were released into Lake Roosevelt in 1996. The authors estimated 195,628 angler trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1996 with an economic value of $7,629,492.

  4. USGS Activities at Lake Roosevelt and the Upper Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Cynthia; Turney, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    Lake Roosevelt (Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake) is the impoundment of the upper Columbia River behind Grand Coulee Dam, and is the largest reservoir within the Bureau of Reclamation's Columbia Basin Project (CBP). The reservoir is located in northeastern Washington, and stretches 151 miles from Grand Coulee Dam north to the Canadian border. The 15-20 miles of the Columbia River downstream of the border are riverine and are under small backwater effects from the dam. Grand Coulee Dam is located on the mainstem of the Columbia River about 90 miles northwest of Spokane. Since the late 1980s, trace-element contamination has been known to be widely present in Lake Roosevelt. Trace elements of concern include arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc. Contaminated sediment carried by the Columbia River is the primary source of the widespread occurrence of trace-element enrichment present in Lake Roosevelt. In 2001, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a preliminary assessment of environmental contamination of the Lake Roosevelt area (also referred to as Upper Columbia River, UCR site, or UCR/LR site) and has subsequently begun remedial investigations of the UCR site.

  5. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part B; Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, John; Spotts, Jim; Underwood, Keith

    2002-11-01

    The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. The 1998 Annual Report, Part B. Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington examined the limnology, primary production, and zooplankton at eleven locations throughout the reservoir. The 1998 research protocol required a continuation of the more complete examination of limnological parameters in Lake Roosevelt that began in 1997. Phytoplankton and periphyton speciation, phytoplankton and periphyton chlorophyll a analysis, complete zooplankton biomass analysis by taxonomic group, and an increased number of limnologic parameters (TDG, TDS, etc.) were examined and compared with 1997 results. Total dissolved gas levels were greatly reduced in 1998, compared with 1997, likely resulting from the relatively normal water year experienced in 1998. Mean water temperatures were similar to what was observed in past years, with a maximum of 22.7 C and a minimum of 2.6 C. Oxygen concentrations were also relatively normal, with a maximum of 16.6 mg/L, and a minimum of 0.9 mg/L. Phytoplankton in Lake Roosevelt was primarily composed of microplankton (29.6%), Cryptophyceae (21.7%), and Bacillriophyceae (17.0 %). Mean total phytoplankton chlorophyll a maximum concentration occurred in May (3.53 mg/m{sup 3}), and the minimum in January (0.39 mg/m{sup 3}). Phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations appear to be influenced by hydro-operations and temperature. Trophic status as indicated by phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations place Lake Roosevelt in the oligomesotrophic range. Periphyton colonization rates and biovolume were significantly greater at a depth

  6. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations : Final Report 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Voeller, Amy C.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect biological data from Lake Roosevelt to be used in the design of a computer model that will predict biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review Program. This study worked in conjunction with Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project which investigated the effectiveness of two kokanee salmon hatcheries. This report summarized the data collected from Lake Roosevelt from 1993 and includes limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrate, experimental trawling, and net-pen rainbow trout tagging data. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times.

  7. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Assessment of the Lake Roosevelt Walleye Population 1998 Annual Report, Part D.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason G.; Moffatt, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1999-08-01

    A walleye mark-recapture experiment was initiated on Lake Roosevelt in 1997, with the primary objective of estimating the size of the walleye population. The project was continued in 1998 with a revised sampling regime. The primary goals during 1998 were to estimate the size of the walleye population in Lake Roosevelt, estimate the size of the spawning run in the Spokane River Arm, and describe the age structure of the population for use in managing the population and developing a kokanee bioenergetics model. Secondary objectives included: determining walleye movements, back-calculating growth rates, estimating mortality rates, determining walleye condition, and estimating walleye young-of-the-year (YOY) production in the Spokane River Arm. All walleye, {ge} 150 mm TL, were marked with individually numbered Floy{reg_sign} tags, during five passes through the reservoir. The passes occurred between April 1st and September 16th, 1998. The most unbiased estimate of walleye abundance in Lake Roosevelt, 186,482 (40,113 {le} N {le} 943,213), was obtained using the Mtb model of the CAPTURE program. The most unbiased estimate of the size of the walleye spawning run in the Spokane River Arm, 27,345 (1,535 {le} N {le} 57,519), was calculated using the Jolly-Seber model. The abundance estimates appeared reasonable, but they had wide 95 % confidence intervals. Wide confidence intervals were attributed to low capture probabilities. Coefficient of variation (CV) values for both estimates indicated that they were not acceptable for general management, not to mention research. Despite the CV value, we felt that the reservoir estimate was reasonable and that it was the best possible, without a large increase in effort and money. The spawning run estimate could have been improved by a small increase in effort. Ages of walleye in Lake Roosevelt ranged from 0 to 13 years. Growth, mortality, and condition were all average when compared to other walleye producing waters. We recommended

  8. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

    1990-10-01

    In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

  9. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1991-09-01

    As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the

  10. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Holly

    2003-03-01

    Lake Whatcom, Washington kokanee have been stocked in Lake Roosevelt since 1987 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining fishery. Success has been limited by low recruitment to the fishery, low adult returns to hatcheries, and a skewed sex ratio. It was hypothesized that a stock native to the upper Columbia River might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom stock. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Post smolts from each stock were released from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance was evaluated using three measures; (1) number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to 86 tributaries sampled and, (3) the number of returns to the creel. In two repeated experiments, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appeared to be capable of providing a run of three-year old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. Less than 10 three-years olds from either stock were collected during the study period. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek and to other tributaries in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Lake Whatcom stock in both 2000 and 2001. However, preliminary data from the Spokane Tribe of Indians indicated that a large number of both stocks were precocial before they were stocked. The small number of hatchery three-year olds collected indicated that the current hatchery rearing and stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year olds. No kokanee from the study were collected during standard lake wide creel surveys. Supplemental creel data, including fishing derbies, test fisheries, and angler diaries, indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee a month after release. The majority of the two-year old kokanee harvested

  11. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Holly; Scholz, Allan

    2002-03-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Lake Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a stock of kokanee, native to the upper Columbia River, might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom strain. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated using three performance measures; (1) the number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to other tributaries and (3) the number of returns to the creel. Kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir via electrofishing, which included 87 tributary mouths during the fall of 2000 and 2001. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Whatcom stock in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 736.6; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 156.2; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries of age two kokanee had similar results in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 735.3; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 150.1; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Six Lake Whatcom and seven Meadow Creek three year olds were collected in 2001. The sample size of three year olds was too small for statistical analysis. No kokanee were collected during creel surveys in 2000, and two (age three kokanee) were collected in 2001. Neither of the hatchery kokanee collected were coded wire tagged, therefore stock could not be distinguished. After two years of monitoring, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appear to be capable of providing a run of three-year-old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. The small number of

  12. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Movements and Growth of Marked Walleye Recaptured in Lake Roosevelt, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Holly; Scholz, Allan

    2002-03-01

    Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) have been marked with floy tags in Lake Roosevelt since 1997 to estimate abundance, distribution and movement trends. In 2000, walleye were collected and marked during the spawning run in the Spokane River through electrofishing and angling to supplement movement and growth data collected in previous years. Walleye were also collected and marked during the 2000 and 2001 Kettle Falls Governor's Cup Walleye Tournaments. Seventy-six tag returns were recovered in 2000 and twenty-three in 2001. Walleye migrated into the Spokane River to spawn in mid April and early May. The majority of marked walleye were recovered within 25 km of their original marking location, with a few traveling long distances between recovery locations. Data also verified earlier results that walleye establish summer home ranges. Some walleye remained in the Spokane River, while others moved downstream, or upstream after entering the mainstem of Lake Roosevelt. Those moving upstream moved as far north as Keenlyside Dam in British Columbia (245 km). Growth data indicated similar trends exhibited in the past. Walleye growth and mortality rates were consistent with other walleye producing waters. Walleye condition was slightly below average when compared to other systems.

  13. Lake Roosevelt Volunteer Net Pens, Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pens, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gene

    2003-11-01

    The completion of Grand Coulee Dam for power production, flood control, and irrigation resulted in the creation of a blocked area above the dam and in the loss of anadromous fish. Because of lake level fluctuations required to meet the demands for water release or storage, native or indigenous fish were often threatened. For many years very little effort was given to stocking the waters above the dam. However, studies by fish biologists showed that there was a good food base capable of supporting rainbow and kokanee (Gangmark and Fulton 1949, Jagielo 1984, Scholz etal 1986, Peone etal 1990). Further studies indicated that artificial production might be a way of restoring or enhancing the fishery. In the 1980's volunteers experimented with net pens. The method involved putting fingerlings in net pens in the fall and rearing them into early summer before release. The result was an excellent harvest of healthy fish. The use of net pens to hold the fingerlings for approximately nine months appears to reduce predation and the possibility of entrainment during draw down and to relieve the hatcheries to open up available raceways for future production. The volunteer net pen program grew for a few years but raising funds to maintain the pens and purchase food became more and more difficult. In 1995 the volunteer net pen project (LRDA) was awarded a grant through the Northwest Power Planning Council's artificial production provisions.

  14. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Lake Whatcom Kokanee Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) : Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 1999-2000.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.; McLellan, Jason G.; Tilson, Mary Beth

    2001-07-01

    Lake Whatcom stock kokanee have been planted in Lake Roosevelt since 1988 with the primary goal of establishing a self-sustaining fishery. Returns of hatchery kokanee to egg collection facilities and recruitment to the creel have been minimal. Therefore, four experiments were conducted to determine the most appropriate release strategy that would increase kokanee returns. The first experiment compared morpholine and non-morpholine imprinted kokanee return rates, the second experiment compared early and middle run Whatcom kokanee, the third experiment compared early and late release dates, and the fourth experiment compared three net pen release strategies: Sherman Creek hatchery vs. Sherman Creek net pens, Colville River net pens vs. Sherman Creek net pens, and upper vs. lower reservoir net pen releases. Each experiment was tested in three ways: (1) returns to Sherman Creek, (2) returns to other tributaries throughout the reservoir, and (3) returns to the creel. Chi-square analysis of hatchery and tributary returns indicated no significant difference between morpholine imprinted and non-imprinted fish, early run fish outperformed middle run fish, early release date outperformed late release fish, and the hatchery outperformed all net pen releases. Hatchery kokanee harvest was estimated at 3,323 fish, which was 33% of the total harvest. Return rates (1998 = 0.52%) of Whatcom kokanee were low indicating an overall low performance that could be caused by high entrainment, predation, and precocity. A kokanee stock native to the upper Columbia, as opposed to the coastal Whatcom stock, may perform better in Lake Roosevelt.

  15. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Artificial Imprinting and Smoltification in Juvenile Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1994 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.

    1995-02-01

    At the kokanee salmon hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt, constructed as partial mitigation for effects from Grand Coulee Dam, adult returns have been poor. The reason may be in the imprinting or in the smoltification. A study was initiated in 1992 to determine if there was a critical period for thyroxine induced alfactory imprinting in kokanee salmon; experiments were conducted on imprinting to morpholine and phenethyl alcohol. Other results showed that chemical imprinting coincided with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992. In this report, imprinting experiments were repeated; results showed that imprinting occurred concomitant with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992 and tested in 1994 as age 3 spawners. Imprinting also occurred at the same time as thyroxine peaks in 1992 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1993 and tested as age 2 spawners. In both groups fish that had the highest whole body thyroxine content (swimup stage) also had the highest percentage of fish that were attracted to their exposure odor in behavioral tests. So, kokanee salmon imprinted to chemical cues during two sensitive periods during development, at the alevin/swimup and smolt stages. A field test was conducted in Lake Roosevelt on coded wire tagged fish. Smoltification experiments were conducted from 1992 to 1994. Recommendations are made for the Lake Roosevelt kokanee hatcheries.

  16. Currents and Undercurrents: An Administrative History of Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Kathryn L.; Renk, Nancy F.

    The 1,259-mile Columbia River flows out of Canada and across eastern Washington state, forming the border between Washington and Oregon. In 1941 the federal government dammed the Columbia River at the north end of Grand Coulee, creating a man-made reservoir named Lake Roosevelt that inundated homes, farms, and businesses, and disrupted the lives…

  17. Sediment-quality assessment of Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake and the upstream reach of the Columbia River, Washington, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bortleson, Gilbert Carl; Cox, S.E.; Munn, M.D.; Schumaker, R.J.; Block, E.K.

    2001-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of trace elements were found in bed sediment of Lake Roosevelt and the Columbia River, its principal source of inflow. Trace-element concentrations in whole water samples did not exceed criteria for freshwater organisms. Bed sediments of Lake Roosevelt were analyzed for organic compounds associated with wood-pulp waste. Dioxins and furans were found in suspended sediment and water of the Columbia River. Abundance and diversity of benthic invertebrate communities were analyzed.

  18. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to collect data to model resident fish requirements for Lake Roosevelt as part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BoR), and U.S. Army Corps of Engineer`s (ACE) System Operation Review. The System Operation Review (SOR) is a tri-agency team functioning to review the use and partitioning of Columbia Basin waters. User groups of the Columbia have been defined as power, irrigation, flood control, anadromous fish, resident fish, wildlife, recreation, water quality, navigation, and cultural resources. Once completed the model will predict biological responses to different reservoir operation strategies. The model being developed for resident fish is based on Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks model for resident fish requirements within Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs. While the Montana model predicts fish growth based on the impacts of reservoir operation and flow conditions on primary and secondary production levels, the Lake Roosevelt model will also factor in the affects of water retention time on zooplankton production levels and fish entrainment. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include: (1) quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; (3) determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and (4) quantification of entrainment levels of fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report contains the results of the resident fish system operation review program for Lake Roosevelt from January through December 1992.

  19. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect biological data from Lake Roosevelt to be used in the design of a computer model that would predict biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review program. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model included: quantification of impacts to phytoplankton, zooplanktons, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and quantification of entrainment levels of zooplankton and fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report summarized the data collected on Lake Roosevelt for 1991 and includes limnological, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrate, fishery, and reservoir operation data. Discussions cover reservoir operation affect upon zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. Reservoir operations brought reservoir elevations to a low of 1,221.7 in April, the result of power operations and a flood control shift from Dworshak Dam, in Idaho, to Grand Coulee Dam. Water retention times were correspondingly low reaching a minimum of 14.7 days on April 27th.

  20. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    1999-08-01

    The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of

  1. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Assessment of the Lake Roosevelt Walleye Population: Compilation of 1997-1999 Data, 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason; McLellan, Holly; Scholz, Allan

    2002-03-01

    A walleye mark-recapture study was conducted on Lake Roosevelt between 1997 and 1999. The primary objective of the study was to describe the status and biological characteristics of the walleye population in Lake Roosevelt by determining its abundance, movement patterns, age structure, growth, condition, and mortality. The abundance estimates were also to be used to estimate the consumptive impact of walleye on stocked kokanee and rainbow trout. Walleye were collected by electrofishing and angling. Each walleye was tagged with an individually numbered Floy tag. The Jolly-Seber model was used to estimate the size of the walleye population in 1999, using each year of the study as a mark-recapture occasion. Mark-recapture data collected in 1998 was re-analyzed in 1999 with the data pooled in various combinations, using closed and open population models, in an attempt to provide an estimate of walleye abundance that was unbiased, accurate, and more precise. Minimum distances traveled between mark and recapture location by tagged walleye were determined from tag returns. Over the three study years, a total of 12,343 walleye {ge} 150 mm TL were collected by Eastern Washington University (EWU), Spokane Tribe of Indians, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and of those, 10,770 were tagged and released. Of the 10,770 walleye marked and released, 775 were recaptured and returned to EWU. The 1999 abundance estimate ({+-} standard error) for walleye {ge} 150 mm TL was 129,183 ({+-} 45,578) and the estimated abundance ({+-} standard error) of walleye {ge} 200 mm TL was 101,508 ({+-} 35,603). A total of 38 population estimates were calculated for 1998. The estimates of the abundance of walleye {ge} 150 mm TL in Lake Roosevelt ranged from 84,335 to 180,568 fish. Estimates of the size of the walleye population {ge} 200 mm TL ranged from 14,971 to 173,702. The 1999 estimate, which used each study year as a mark-recapture occasion, was biased due to unequal capture

  2. Resident Fish Planning: Dworshak Reservoir, Lake Roosevelt and Lake Pend Oreille.

    SciTech Connect

    Fickeisen, Duane H.; Geist, David R.

    1994-01-01

    Research projects are presently being conducted to reduce the amount of uncertainty in how reservoir operations within the Columbia River federal power system affect resident fish. Many of these research projects are being conducted to better define operation strategies being proposed under the Columbia River System Operation Review (SOR). This project provides a basis for understanding the potential effects of different operating strategies being considered under the SOR in reservoir fisheries at Lake Roosevelt, Dworshak Reservoir, and Lake Pend Oreille. The methodological framework used here was adapted from the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP), a project framework used for evaluating supplementation strategies for anadromous fish. RASP attempts to diagnose the factors that limit production of fishes and outlines a process that can be followed to systematically reduce uncertainty while achieving the objective. In all three reservoirs concerns exist about protecting sensitive species, particularly bull trout and cutthroat trout. In all three reservoirs a need exists for additional baseline information to provide an adequate understanding of the populations of interest.

  3. Methane efflux from the pelagic regions of four lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S. )

    1988-09-01

    Methane emission to the atmosphere was studied in the deepest, central (pelagic) regions of one freshwater and three meromictic, alkaline saline lakes. The range of methane emissions was 0.004 to 2.916 mmol/sq m/hr (n=41). Outward flux was dominated by bubble ebullition only in the freshwater lake. Diffusive gas exchange was the sole mechanism of transfer in the meromictic lakes, and flux from these lakes was equivalent to or lower than that from the freshwater lake during its periods of ebullition. A comparison of measured flux with flux calculated using a model of gas exchange in Mono Lake suggested that floating chambers provide reasonable estimates of the magnitude of methane emissions from diffusion-dominated systems. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Biological and chemical characterization of metal bioavailability in sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Columbia River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Moran, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the bioavailability and toxicity of copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, and lead in sediments from Lake Roosevelt (LR), a reservoir on the Columbia River in Washington, USA that receives inputs of metals from an upstream smelter facility. We characterized chronic sediment toxicity, metal bioaccumulation, and metal concentrations in sediment and pore water from eight study sites: one site upstream in the Columbia River, six sites in the reservoir, and a reference site in an uncontaminated tributary. Total recoverable metal concentrations in LR sediments generally decreased from upstream to downstream in the study area, but sediments from two sites in the reservoir had metal concentrations much lower than adjacent reservoir sites and similar to the reference site, apparently due to erosion of uncontaminated bank soils. Concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide in LR sediments were too low to provide strong controls on metal bioavailability, and selective sediment extractions indicated that metals in most LR sediments were primarily associated with iron and manganese oxides. Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) accumulated greatest concentrations of copper from the river sediment, and greatest concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, and lead from reservoir sediments. Chronic toxic effects on amphipods (Hyalella azteca; reduced survival) and midge larvae (Chironomus dilutus; reduced growth) in whole-sediment exposures were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity based on empirical and equilibrium partitioning-based sediment quality guidelines. Elevated metal concentrations in pore waters of some LR sediments suggested that metals released from iron and manganese oxides under anoxic conditions contributed to metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. Results of both chemical and biological assays indicate that metals in sediments from both riverine and reservoir habitats of Lake Roosevelt are available to benthic invertebrates. These findings will be used as

  5. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

    2001-07-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 to mitigate for anadromous salmon losses caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The primary objective of the hatchery plantings was to create a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a native stock of kokanee might perform better than the coastal Whatcom strain. Therefore, kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Whatcom stock and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek in late June 2000. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated through three performance measures (1) returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) returns to other tributaries, indicating availability for angler harvest, and (3) returns to the creel. A secondary objective was to evaluate the numbers collected at downstream fish passage facilities. Age 2 kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir, which included 89 tributaries between August 17th and November 7th, 2000. Sherman Creek was sampled once a week because it was the primary egg collection location. A total of 2,789 age 2 kokanee were collected, in which 2,658 (95%) were collected at Sherman Creek. Chi-square analysis indicated the Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers compared to the Whatcom stock ({chi}{sup 2} = 734.4; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries indicated similar results ({chi}{sup 2} = 733.1; P < 0.01). No age 2 kokanee were collected during creel surveys. Age 3 kokanee are expected to recruit to the creel in 2001. No age 2 kokanee were collected at the fish passage facilities due to a 170 mm size restriction at the fish passage centers. Age 3 kokanee are expected to be collected at the fish passage centers during 2001. Stock performance cannot be properly evaluated until 2001, when

  6. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Sear, Sheri

    2001-02-01

    Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI

  7. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Charles D.

    2000-02-01

    Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI

  8. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project : Annual Report 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Charles D.

    1999-02-01

    Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Personnel of three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and

  9. Status of pelagic prey fishes in Lake Michigan, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, David M.; Farha, Steven A.; O'Brien, Timothy P.; Ogilvie, Lynn; Claramunt, Randall M.; Hanson, Dale

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic surveys were conducted in late summer/early fall during the years 1992-1996 and 2001-2013 to estimate pelagic prey fish biomass in Lake Michigan. Midwater trawling during the surveys as well as target strength provided a measure of species and size composition of the fish community for use in scaling acoustic data and providing species-specific abundance estimates. The 2013 survey consisted of 27 acoustic transects (546 km total) and 31 midwater trawl tows. Mean prey fish biomass was 6.1 kg/ha (relative standard error, RSE = 11%) or 29.6 kilotonnes (kt = 1,000 metric tons), which was similar to the estimate in 2012 (31.1 kt) and 23.5% of the long-term (18 years) mean. The numeric density of the 2013 alewife year class was 6% of the time series average and this year-class contributed 4% of total alewife biomass (5.2 kg/ha, RSE = 12%). Alewife ≥age-1 comprised 96% of alewife biomass. In 2013, alewife comprised 86% of total prey fish biomass, while rainbow smelt and bloater were 4 and 10% of total biomass, respectively. Rainbow smelt biomass in 2013 (0.24 kg/ha, RSE = 17%) was essentially identical to the rainbow smelt biomass in 2012 and was 6% of the long term mean. Bloater biomass in 2013 was 0.6 kg/ha, only half the 2012 biomass, and 6% of the long term mean. Mean density of small bloater in 2013 (29 fish/ha, RSE = 29%) was lower than peak values observed in 2007-2009 and was 23% of the time series mean. In 2013, pelagic prey fish biomass in Lake Michigan was similar to Lake Huron, but pelagic community composition differs in the two lakes, with Lake Huron dominated by bloater.

  10. Lake Roosevelt White Sturgeon Recovery Project : Annual Progress Report, January 2003 – March 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Matthew D.; McLellan, Jason G.

    2009-07-15

    This report summarizes catch data collected from white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus in Lake Roosevelt during limited setlining and gill netting activities in the fall of 2003, and documents progress toward development of a U.S. white sturgeon conservation aquaculture program for Lake Roosevelt. From 27-30 October, 42 overnight small mesh gill net sets were made between Marcus and Northport, WA for a total catch of 15 juvenile white sturgeon (275-488 mm FL). All sturgeon captured were of Canadian hatchery origin. These fish had been previously released as sub-yearlings into the Canadian portion (Keenleyside Reach) of the Transboundary Reach of the Columbia River during 2002 and 2003. Most sturgeon (n=14) were caught in the most upstream area sampled (Northport) in low velocity eddy areas. Five fish exhibited pectoral fin deformities (curled or stunted). Growth rates were less than for juvenile sturgeon captured in the Keenleyside Reach but condition factor was similar. Condition factor was also similar to that observed in juvenile sturgeon (ages 1-8) captured in the unimpounded Columbia River below Bonneville Dam between 1987-92. From 10-14 November, 28 overnight setline sets were made in the Roosevelt Reach between the confluence of the Spokane River and Marcus Island for a total catch of 17 white sturgeon (94-213 cm FL). Catch was greatest in the most upstream areas sampled, a distribution similar to that observed during a WDFW setline survey in Lake Roosevelt in 1998. The mean W{sub r} index of 110% for fish captured this year was higher than the mean W{sub r} of 91% for fish captured in 1998. Excellent fish condition hindered surgical examination of gonads as lipid deposits made the ventral body wall very thick and difficult to penetrate with available otoscope specula. Acoustic tags (Vemco model V16 coded pingers, 69 kHz, 48-month life expectancy) were internally applied to 15 fish for subsequent telemetry investigations of seasonal and reproductively

  11. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part A; Fisheries Creel Survey and Population Status Analysis, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Spotts, Jim; Shields, John; Underwood, Keith

    2002-05-01

    The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Creel and angler surveys estimated that anglers made 196,775 trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1998, with an economic value of $8.0 million dollars, based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In 1998 it was estimated that 9,980 kokanee salmon, 226,809 rainbow trout, 119,346 walleye, and over 14,000 smallmouth bass and other species were harvested. Creel data indicates that hatchery reared rainbow trout contribute substantially to the Lake Roosevelt fishery. The contribution of kokanee salmon to the creel has not met the expectations of fishery managers to date, and is limited by entrainment from the reservoir, predation, and possible fish culture obstacles. The 1998 Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Creel and Population Analysis Annual Report includes analyses of the relative abundance of fish species, and reservoir habitat relationships (1990-1998). Fisheries surveys (1990-1998) indicate that walleye and burbot populations appear to be increasing, while yellow perch, a preferred walleye prey species, and other prey species are decreasing in abundance. The long term decreasing abundance of yellow perch and other prey species are suspected to be the result of the lack of suitable multiple reservoir elevation spawning and rearing refugia for spring spawning reservoir prey species, resulting from seasonal spring-early summer reservoir elevation manipulations, and walleye predation. Reservoir water management is both directly, and indirectly influencing the success of mitigation hatchery production of kokanee salmon and rainbow trout. Tag return data suggested excessive entrainment occurred in

  12. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Evaluation of Limiting Factors for Stocked Kokanee and Rainbow Trout in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt

    2009-03-01

    Hatchery supplementation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka and rainbow trout O. mykiss has been the primary mitigation provided by Bonneville Power Administration for loss of anadromous fish to the waters above Grand Coulee Dam (GCD). The hatchery program for rainbow trout has consistently met management goals and provided a substantial contribution to the fishery; however, spawner returns and creel survey results for kokanee have been below management goals. Our objective was to identify factors that limit limnetic fish production in Lake Roosevelt by evaluating abiotic conditions, food limitations, piscivory, and entrainment. Dissolved oxygen concentration was adequate throughout most of the year; however, levels dropped to near 6 mg/L in late July. For kokanee, warm water temperatures during mid-late summer limited their nocturnal distribution to 80-100 m in the lower section of the reservoir. Kokanee spawner length was consistently several centimeters longer than in other Pacific Northwest systems, and the relative weights of rainbow trout and large kokanee were comparable to national averages. Large bodied daphnia (> 1.7 mm) were present in the zooplankton community during all seasons indicating that top down effects were not limiting secondary productivity. Walleye Stizostedion vitreum were the primary piscivore of salmonids in 1998 and 1999. Burbot Lota lota smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, and northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis preyed on salmonids to a lesser degree. Age 3 and 4 walleye were responsible for the majority (65%) of the total walleye consumption of salmonids. Bioenergetics modeling indicated that reservoir wide consumption by walleye could account for a 31-39% loss of stocked kokanee but only 6-12% of rainbow trout. Size at release was the primary reason for differential mortality rates due to predation. Entrainment ranged from 2% to 16% of the monthly abundance estimates of limnetic fish, and could account for 30% of total

  13. Mercury in the Pelagic Food Web of Lake Champlain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Celia; Kamman, Neil; Shanley, James; Chalmers, Ann; Jackson, Brian; Taylor, Vivien; Smeltzer, Eric; Stangel, Pete; Shambaugh, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Lake Champlain continues to experience mercury contamination resulting in public advisories to limit human consumption of top trophic level fish such as walleye. Prior research suggested that mercury levels in biota could be modified by differences in ecosystem productivity as well as mercury loadings. We investigated relationships between mercury in different trophic levels in Lake Champlain. We measured inorganic and methyl mercury in water, seston, and two size fractions of zooplankton from 13 sites representing a range of nutrient loading conditions and productivity. Biomass varied significantly across lake segments in all measured ecosystem compartments in response to significant differences in nutrient levels. Local environmental factors such as alkalinity influenced the partitioning of mercury between water and seston. Mercury incorporation into biota was influenced by the biomass and mercury content of different ecosystem strata. Pelagic fish tissue mercury was a function of fish length and the size of the mercury pool associated with large zooplankton. We used these observations to parameterize a model of mercury transfers in the Lake Champlain food web that accounts for ecosystem productivity effects. Simulations using the mercury trophic transfer model suggest that reductions of 25 to 75% in summertime dissolved eplimnetic total mercury will likely allow fish tissue mercury concentrations to drop to the target level of 0.3 µg g−1 in a 40-cm fish in all lake segments. Changes in nutrient loading and ecosystem productivity in eutrophic segments may delay any response to reduced dissolved mercury and may result in increases in fish tissue mercury. PMID:22193540

  14. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations Appendices; 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1995-08-01

    This report consists of appendices A-F containing the biological data which were collected from Lake Roosevelt, Washington. The data are to be used in the design of a computer model that would predict biological responses of reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review program. Major components of the model included: Quantification of impacts to phytoplankton, zooplanktons, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and quantification of entrainment levels of zooplankton and fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times.

  15. Movements of White Sturgeon in Lake Roosevelt : Final Report 1988-1991.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, E.L.; Setter, Ann L.

    1992-06-01

    Historically, white sturgeon moved throughout the Columbia River system, ranging freely from the estuary to the headwaters, with the possible exception of limited passage at Cascades, Celilo and Kettle Falls during spring floods. Construction of Rock Island Dam in 1933, followed by Bonneville in 1938 and Grand Coulee in 1941, completely disrupted sturgeon migratory opportunity, and with the 17 successive Columbia and Snake river dams constructed over the next 32 years an entirely different river system was created for the species. Sturgeon caught between dams were essentially isolated populations with severely limited reproduction potential. Some reservoirs ran from dam to dam with no river habitat remaining, while other reaches had various lengths of free running river, but drastically reduced from historical situations. However, if reservoirs provide habitat for sturgeon use, and therefore compensate to some degree for river loss, the major limiting factors associated with population viability may be reduced spawning success, either from lack of suitable area or poor incubation environments. The most upstream impoundment of the Columbia River in the United States is Lake Roosevelt, behind Grand Coulee Dam. If sturgeon don`t use Lake Roosevelt the capacity of the system to sustain a large sturgeon population would be understandably limited, and much reduced from the pre-dam era. In general this study found that sturgeon spawner aggregations from early spring to mid- summer depend most heavily on the timing of increasing water temperature. In the spring the water temperatures seem to stimulate the fish to start feeding and leave deep pools. The summer provides access to broader and shallower areas for food. The study on sturgeon movement was an attempt to define habitat use in such a reservoir/river system.

  16. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T.

    1994-06-01

    In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

  17. Status of Pelagic Prey Fishes in Lake Michigan, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, David M.; Farha, Steven A.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Hanson, Dale; O'Brien, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic surveys were conducted in late summer/early fall during the years 1992-1996 and 2001-2014 to estimate pelagic prey fish biomass in Lake Michigan. Midwater trawling during the surveys as well as target strength provided a measure of species and size composition of the fish community for use in scaling acoustic data and providing species-specific abundance estimates. The 2014 survey consisted of 27 acoustic transects (603 km total) and 31 midwater trawl tows. Four additional transects were sampled in Green Bay but were not included in lakewide estimates. Mean prey fish biomass was 6.5 kg/ha [31.7 kilotonnes (kt = 1,000 metric tons)], equivalent to 69.9 million pounds, which was similar to the estimate in 2013 (29.6 kt) and 25% of the long-term (19 years) mean. The numeric density of the 2014 alewife year-class was 3% of the time series average and was the lowest observed in the 19 years of sampling. This year-class contributed <1% of total alewife biomass (4.6 kg/ha). Alewife ≥age-1 comprised 99.5% of alewife biomass. Numeric density of alewife in Green Bay was more than three times that of the main lake. In 2014, alewife comprised 71% of total prey fish biomass, while rainbow smelt and bloater were 1% and 28% of total biomass, respectively. Rainbow smelt biomass in 2014 (0.08 kg/ha) was 66% lower than in 2013, 2% of the long-term mean, and lower than in any previous year. Bloater biomass in 2014 was 1.8 kg/ha, nearly three times more than the 2013 biomass, and 20% of the long-term mean. Mean density of small bloater in 2014 (122 fish/ha) was lower than peak values observed in 2007-2009 but was similar to the time series mean (124 fish/ha). In 2014, pelagic prey fish biomass in Lake Michigan was 71% of that in Lake Huron (all basins), where the community is dominated by bloater.

  18. Bathymetric and sediment facies maps for China Bend and Marcus Flats, Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Washington, 2008 and 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weakland, Rhonda J.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Williams, Marshall L.; Barton, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) created bathymetric and sediment facies maps for portions of two reaches of Lake Roosevelt in support of an interdisciplinary study of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and their habitat areas within Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Washington. In October 2008, scientists from the USGS used a boat-mounted multibeam echo sounder (MBES) to describe bathymetric data to characterize surface relief at China Bend and Marcus Flats, between Northport and Kettle Falls, Washington. In March 2009, an underwater video camera was used to view and record sediment facies that were then characterized by sediment type, grain size, and areas of sand deposition. Smelter slag has been identified as having the characteristics of sand-sized black particles; the two non-invasive surveys attempted to identify areas containing black-colored particulate matter that may be elements and minerals, organic material, or slag. The white sturgeon population in Lake Roosevelt is threatened by the failure of natural recruitment, resulting in a native population that consists primarily of aging fish and that is gradually declining as fish die and are not replaced by nonhatchery reared juvenile fish. These fish spawn and rear in the riverine and upper reservoir reaches where smelter slag is present in the sediment of the river lake bed. Effects of slag on the white sturgeon population in Lake Roosevelt are largely unknown. Two recent studies demonstrated that copper and other metals are mobilized from slag in aqueous environments with concentrations of copper and zinc in bed sediments reaching levels of 10,000 and 30,000 mg/kg due to the presence of smelter slag. Copper was found to be highly toxic to 30-day-old white sturgeon with 96-h LC50 concentrations ranging from 3 to 5 (u or mu)g copper per liter. Older juvenile and adult sturgeons commonly ingest substantial amounts of sediment while foraging. Future study efforts in Lake Roosevelt should include sampling of

  19. Functional convergence among pelagic sculpins of Lake Baikal and deepwater ciscoes of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Sideleva, Valentina G.; Todd, Thomas N.

    1999-01-01

    The vast, well-oxygenated hypolimnia of Lake Baikal and the Great Lakes were both dominated by endemic planktivorous fishes. These dominants, two species of sculpins (Comephorus, Comephoridae) in Lake Baikal and six species of deepwater ciscoes (Coregonus, Salmonidae) in the Great Lakes, although distant taxonomically, have morphologies suggesting a surprising degree of functional convergence. Here it is proposed that the same two buoyancy-regulation strategies observed in Baikal sculpins also arose in the deepwater ciscoes of the Great Lakes. One strategy favors hydrostatic lift (generated by low specific gravity) and is characterized by fatter, larger-bodied fish with smaller paired fins; the second strategy favors hydrodynamic lift (generated by swimming) and is characterized by leaner, smaller-bodied fish with larger paired fins. Both types likely evolved to feed on a single species of ecologically analogous, vertically migrating macrozooplankter: Macrohectopus branickii in Lake Baikal and Mysis relicta in the Great Lakes. It is suggested that Coregonus did not diversify and proliferate in Lake Baikal as they did in the Great Lakes because by the time Coregonus colonized Lake Baikal, pelagic sculpins were already dominant.

  20. Big Soda Lake (Nevada). 2. Pelagic sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard L.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    The epilimnion of hypersaline, alkaline, meromictic Big Soda Lake contains an average 58 mmol sulfate liter−1 and 0.4 µmol dissolved iron liter−1. The monimolimnion, which is permanently anoxic, has a sulfide concentration ranging seasonally from 4 to 7 mmol liter−1. Depth profiles of sulfate reduction in the monimolimnion, assayed with a 35S tracer technique and in situ incubations, demonstrated that sulfate reduction occurs within the water column of this extreme environment. The average rate of reduction in the monimolimnion was 3 µmol sulfate liter−1 d−1in May compared to 0.9 in October. These values are comparable to rates of sulfate reduction reported for anoxic waters of more moderate environments. Sulfate reduction also occurred in the anoxic zone of the mixolimnion, though at significantly lower rates (0.025–0.090 µmol liter−1 d−1 at 25 m). Additions of FeS (1.0 mmol liter−1) doubled the endogenous rate of sulfate reduction in the monimolimnion, while MnS and kaolinite had no effect. These results suggest that sulfate reduction in Big Soda Lake is iron limited and controlled by seasonal variables other than temperature. Estimates of the organic carbon mineralized by sulfate reduction exceed measured fluxes of particulate organic carbon sinking from the mixolimnion. Thus, additional sources of electron donors (other than those derived from the sinking of pelagic autotrophs) may also fuel monimolimnetic sulfate reduction in the lake.

  1. Differential bioaccumulation of potentially toxic elements in benthic and pelagic food chains in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Tomasz M; Pastukhov, Mikhail V; Leeves, Sara A; Farkas, Julia; Lierhagen, Syverin; Poletaeva, Vera I; Jenssen, Bjørn M

    2016-08-01

    Lake Baikal is located in eastern Siberia in the center of a vast mountain region. Even though the lake is regarded as a unique and pristine ecosystem, there are existing sources of anthropogenic pollution to the lake. In this study, the concentrations of the potentially toxic trace elements As, Cd, Pb, Hg, and Se were analyzed in water, plankton, invertebrates, and fish from riverine and pelagic influenced sites in Lake Baikal. Concentrations of Cd, Hg, Pb and Se in Lake Baikal water and biota were low, while concentrations of As were similar or slightly higher compared to in other freshwater ecosystems. The bioaccumulation potential of the trace elements in both the pelagic and the benthic ecosystems differed between the Selenga Shallows (riverine influence) and the Listvenichnyĭ Bay (pelagic influence). Despite the one order of magnitude higher water concentrations of Pb in the Selenga Shallows, Pb concentrations were significantly higher in both pelagic and benthic fish from the Listvenichnyĭ Bay. A similar trend was observed for Cd, Hg, and Se. The identified enhanced bioavailability of contaminants in the pelagic influenced Listvenichnyĭ Bay may be attributed to a lower abundance of natural ligands for contaminant complexation. Hg was found to biomagnify in both benthic and pelagic Baikal food chains, while As, Cd, and Pb were biodiluted. At both locations, Hg concentrations were around seven times higher in benthic than in pelagic fish, while pelagic fish had two times higher As concentrations compared to benthic fish. The calculated Se/Hg molar ratios revealed that, even though Lake Baikal is located in a Se-deficient region, Se is still present in excess over Hg and therefore the probability of Hg induced toxicity in the endemic fish species of Lake Baikal is assumed to be low.

  2. Release of elements to natural water from sediments of Lake Roosevelt, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Cox, Stephen E.

    2007-01-01

    Reservoir sediments from Lake Roosevelt (WA, USA) that were contaminated with smelter waste discharged into the Columbia River (BC, Canada) were examined using three measures of elemental release reflecting varying degrees of physical mixing and time scales. Aqueous concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the interstitial water of reservoir sediments, in the gently stirred overlying waters of incubated sediment cores, and in supernatants of aggressively tumbled slurries of reservoir sediments generally were higher than the concentrations from a reference site. When compared to chronic water-quality criteria, all three measures of release suggest that slag-contaminated sediments near the U.S.-Canadian border are potentially toxic as a result of Cu release and Pb release in two of the three measures. All three measures of Cd release suggest potential toxicity for one site farther down the reservoir, probably contaminated as a result of transport and adsorption of Cd from smelter liquid waste. Releases of Zn and As did not appear to be potentially toxic. Carbonate geochemistry indirectly affects the potential toxicity by increasing water hardness.

  3. Viruses in subarctic lakes and their impact on benthic and pelagic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Säwström, Christin; Ask, Jenny; Karlsson, Jan

    2009-12-01

    Virus-bacterium interactions were investigated in the pelagic and benthic habitats in a set of lakes along an altitudinal gradient in the subarctic northern Sweden. Viral and bacterial abundances showed a significant variation between the lakes, with the highest benthic microbial abundances recorded in a high-altitude lake [993 m above sea level (a.s.l.)], whereas the highest pelagic microbial abundances were found in a low-altitude lake (270 m a.s.l.). In the pelagic habitat, there was also a distinct difference in microbial abundances between the summer-autumn and the winter sampling occasion. A positive relationship was noted between viruses and bacteria in both the pelagic and the benthic habitats. Visibly virus-infected bacterial cells were uncommon in the pelagic habitat and undetectable in the benthos. Both lytic and lysogenic pelagic viral production rates were undetectable or low; thus, a possible explanation for the relative high viral abundances found in the water column could be an allochthonous input of viruses or release of sediment-derived viruses. Overall, our results provide novel information about the relevance of viruses in the subarctic region and indicate that viruses play only a minor role in the nutrient and carbon cycling in the microbial communities of subarctic lakes.

  4. Persistence of an unusual pelagic zooplankton assemblage in a clear mountain lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Hoffman, Robert L.; McIntire, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    The planktonic zooplankton assemblage in Mowich Lake, Mount Rainier National Park (MORA), was composed almost entirely of rotifers in 1966 and 1967. Adult pelagic crustacean taxa were rare. Their paucity was attributed to predation by kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), which had been stocked in 1961. During a park-wide survey of 24 lakes in 1988, Mowich Lake was the only one that did not contain at least one planktonic crustacean species. Given the apparent persistence of the unusual pelagic zooplankton assemblage in Mowich Lake, the first objective of this study was to document the interannual variation in the taxonomic structure of the zooplankton assemblages in the lake from 1988 through 1999. A second objective was to determine if it was possible to predict the taxonomic composition of the pelagic crustacean zooplankton assemblage in Mowich Lake prior to the stocking of kokanee salmon. The Mowich Lake zooplankton assemblages in 1988a??1999 were consistent with those in 1966 and 1967. Crustacean taxa were extremely rare, but they included most of the primary taxa collected from 23 MORA lakes surveyed in 1988. Nonetheless, the 1988 collections showed that the September rotifer assemblage in Mowich Lake was similar to 10 of the 24 lakes sampled. Seven of the 10 lakes were dominated by cladocerans, primarily Daphnia rosea and Holopedium gibberum. Therefore, it appeared that either one or both of these species may have numerically dominated the crustacean zooplankton assemblage in the lake prior to 1961.

  5. Persistence of an unusual pelagic zooplankton assemblage in a clear, mountain lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, G.L.; Hoffman, R.L.; David, McIntire C.

    2002-01-01

    The planktonic zooplankton assemblage in Mowich Lake, Mount Rainier National Park (MORA), was composed almost entirely of rotifers in 1966 and 1967. Adult pelagic crustacean taxa were rare. Their paucity was attributed to predation by kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), which had been stocked in 1961. During a park-wide survey of 24 lakes in 1988, Mowich Lake was the only one that did not contain at least one planktonic crustacean species. Given the apparent persistence of the unusual pelagic zooplankton assemblage in Mowich Lake, the first objective of this study was to document the interannual variation in the taxonomic structure of the zooplankton assemblages in the lake from 1988 through 1999. A second objective was to determine if it was possible to predict the taxonomic composition of the pelagic crustacean zooplankton assemblage in Mowich Lake prior to the stocking of kokanee salmon. The Mowich Lake zooplankton assemblages in 1988-1999 were consistent with those in 1966 and 1967. Crustacean taxa were extremely rare, but they included most of the primary taxa collected from 23 MORA lakes surveyed in 1988. Nonetheless, the 1988 collections showed that the September rotifer assemblage in Mowich Lake was similar to 10 of the 24 lakes sampled. Seven of the 10 lakes were dominated by cladocerans, primarily Daphnia rosea and Holopedium gibberum. Therefore, it appeared that either one or both of these species may have numerically dominated the crustacean zooplankton assemblage in the lake prior to 1961.

  6. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Sheryl

    2004-01-01

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated

  7. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated

  8. Genetic population structure indicates sympatric speciation of Lake Malawi pelagic cichlids.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, P W; Turner, G F; Idid, M R; Robinson, R L; Carvalho, G R

    2000-01-01

    Allopatric processes of speciation have routinely been presented to explain the extraordinary radiation of the East African Great Lakes cichlid fish species flocks. The 21 or more species of pelagic cichlids within the Lake Malawi flock appear to have lake-wide distributions that challenge such a concept. Data from six microsatellite DNA loci indicate single, panmictic populations across the lake of three Diplotaxodon species. Levels of variability at these loci suggest that populations have been large and stable. Mitochondrial DNA sequence data (872 bp of control region + 981 bp of the NADH-2) from 90 species, representing all major clades within the Lake Malawi flock, indicate reciprocal monophyly of the pelagic clade. We suggest that these data support a hypothesis that speciation in sympatry is more plausible (and widespread) within the cichlid species flocks than previously thought. PMID:11413643

  9. Concentrations and Distribution of Slag-Related Trace Elements and Mercury in Fine-Grained Beach and Bed Sediments of Lake Roosevelt, Washington, April-May 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, Michael S.; Kahle, Sue C.; Ebbert, James C.; Josberger, Edward G.

    2003-01-01

    A series of studies have documented elevated concentrations of trace elements such as arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc in the water, bed sediment, or fish of Lake Roosevelt and the upstream reach of the Columbia River. Elevated concentrations of some trace elements in this region are largely attributable to the transport of slag and metallurgical waste discharged into the Columbia River from a smelter in Canada. Although most recent studies have focused on contamination levels in water, bed sediment, and fish, there is growing concern in the region over the potential threat of airborne contaminants to human health. In response to these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted an assessment of trace-element concentrations in the relatively shallow fine-grained sediment along the shore of Lake Roosevelt that is exposed annually during periods of reservoir drawdown. During each winter and spring, the water level of Lake Roosevelt is lowered as much as about 80 feet to provide space to capture high river flows from spring runoff, exposing vast expanses of lake-bottom sediment for a period of several months. Upon drying, these exposed areas provide an extremely large source for wind-blown dust. This study concluded that trace elements associated with slag and metallurgical waste are present in the fine-grained fraction (less than 63 micrometers) of bed sediments along the length of Lake Roosevelt, and as such, could be components of the airborne dust resulting from exposure, drying, and wind mobilization of the sediments exposed during the annual drawdowns of the reservoir. Trace-element concentrations in the surficial bed sediment varied, but the major components in slag?arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc?showed generally pronounced gradients of decreasing concentrations from near the International Border to the Grand Coulee Dam. The results of this study provide base-line information needed to plan and conduct air monitoring of trace

  10. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring, Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    2003-03-01

    A slightly dryer than normal year yielded flows in Lake Roosevelt that were essentially equal to the past ten year average. Annual mean inflow and outflow were 3,160.3 m3/s and 3,063.4 m3/s respectively. Mean reservoir elevation was 387.2 m above sea level at the Grand Coulee Dam forebay. The forebay elevation was below the mean elevation for a total of 168 days. During the first half of the 2000 forebay elevation changed at a rate of 0.121 m/d and during the last half changed at a rate of 0.208 m/d. The higher rate of elevation change earlier in the year is due to the drawdown to accommodate spring runoff. Mean annual water retention time was 40 days. Annual mean total dissolved gas was 108%. Total dissolved gas was greatest at upriver locations (110% = US/Canada Border annual mean) and decreased moving toward Grand Coulee Dam (106% = Grand Coulee Dam Forebay annual mean). Total dissolved gas was greatest in May (122% reservoir wide monthly mean). Gas bubble trauma was observed in 16 fish primarily largescale suckers and was low in severity. Reservoir wide mean temperatures were greatest in August (19.5 C) and lowest in January (5.5 C). The Spokane River and Sanpoil River Arms experienced higher temperatures than the mainstem reservoir. Brief stratification was observed at the Sanpoil River shore location in July. Warm water temperatures in the Spokane Arm contributed to low dissolved oxygen concentrations in August (2.6 mg/L at 33 m). However, decomposition of summer algal biomass was likely the main cause of depressed dissolved oxygen concentrations. Otherwise, dissolved oxygen profiles were relatively uniform throughout the water column across other sampling locations. Annual mean Secchi depth throughout the reservoir was 5.7 m. Nutrient concentrations were generally low, however, annual mean total phosphorus (0.016 mg/L) was in the mesotrophic range. Annual mean total nitrogen was in the meso-oligotrophic range. Total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratios were

  11. A trophic position model of pelagic food webs: Impact on contaminant bioaccumulation in lake trout

    SciTech Connect

    Zanden, M.J.V.; Rasmussen, J.B.

    1996-11-01

    To test how well use of discrete trophic levels represents pelagic trophic structure, dietary data from > 200 lake trout and pelagic forage fish populations was compiled and calculated a continuous (fractional) measure of trophic position for each population. Lake trout trophic position, which ranged from 3.0 to 4.6, explained 85% of the between-lake variability in mean PCB levels in lake trout muscle tissue, providing a significant improvement over the use of discrete trophic levels as a predictor of contaminant levels. Having demonstrated the utility of trophic position, a generalized {open_quotes}trophic position model{close_quotes} of lake trout food webs was developed. This approach eliminates minor trophic linkages, calculates a fractional measure of each species` trophic position, and aggregates species of similar trophic position into trophic guilds. This {open_quotes}realized{close_quotes} model represents trophic structure in terms of mass transfer and accounts for the complexity and omnivory that characterize aquatic food webs. In our trophic position model, smelt (a species of pelagic forage fish) were designated a trophic guild separate from other pelagic forage fish, due to their elevated trophic position. Separate consideration of smelt was supported by elevated lake trout trophic position, PCB, and Hg levels in lakes containing smelt. Consideration of omnivory caused biomagnification factors (BMFs) to be many times higher than BMFs that ignored omnivory. These omnivory-corrected BMF estimates appeared to be more consistent with values calculated using stable nitrogen isotopes ({delta}{sup 15}N), an alternative continuous measure of trophic position. {delta}{sup 15}N, an alternative continuous measure of trophic position. {delta}{sup 15}N provided trophic position estimates that generally corresponded with our diet-derived estimates. 186 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Sediment-quality assessment of Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake and the upstream reach of the Columbia River, Washington, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bortleson, Gilbert Carl; Cox, S.E.; Munn, M.D.; Schumaker, R.J.; Block, E.K.; Bucy, L.R.; Cornelius, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of trace elements and of wood-pulp-related compounds in the sediments of Lake Roosevelt and the upstream reache sampler of the Columbia River were studied in 1992. In addition, an analysis ofbenthic invertebrate community structure and tests of sediment toxicity were conducted. Concentrations of trace elements were elevated, relative to background reference sites, in samples of bed sediment. Copper, lead, and zinc most often exceeded the sediment-quality guidelines for benthic organisms. In whole-water samples, trace-element concentrations did not exceed criteria for freshwater organisms. These concen- trations were relatively small, reflecting the small suspended-sediment concentrations and the large water-diluting capacity of the Columbia River. Elevated concentrations of trace elements in sediments are attributable to the transport of metallurgical waste from a smelter discharging to the Columbia River in Canada. Dioxins and furans were found in Columbia River water, but only a few isomers were detected. A furan isomer common in effluent from pulp and paper mills was found in suspended sediment. Dioxins and furans in the water phase were isolated using solid-phase extraction to concentrate these compounds from large volumes of water. Few of the many other organic compounds associated with wood-pulp waste were detected in the bed sediments of Lake Roosevelt. Benthic invertebrate communities in the Columbia River showed effects from trace elements in bed sediments or from loss of physical habitat. Lethal and sublethal effects were observed in toxicity tests of selected aquatic organisms exposed to bed sediments from the Columbia River near the international boundary.

  13. Benthic and Pelagic Contributions to Mysis Nutrition across Lake Superior

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantification of the sources of nutrition to Mysis diluviana is needed to better understand the basis for production in Mysis lakes and to improve models of migration-driven nutrient and contaminant transport. We collected Mysis, plankton, and benthos across Lake Superior using ...

  14. Hydroacoustic estimates of abundance and spatial distribution of pelagic prey fishes in western Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, Doran M.; Johnson, Timothy B.; Harvey, Chris J.; Kitchell, James F.; Schram, Stephen T.; Bronte, Charles R.; Hoff, MIchael H.; Lozano, Stephen J.; Trebitz, Anett S.; Schreiner, Donald R.; Lamon, E. Conrad; Hrabik, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    Lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) are a valuable prey resource for the recovering lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Superior. However, prey biomass may be insufficient to support the current predator demand. In August 1997, we assessed the abundance and spatial distribution of pelagic coregonines and rainbow smelt in western Lake Superior by combining a 120 kHz split beam acoustics system with midwater trawls. Coregonines comprised the majority of the midwater trawl catches and the length distributions for trawl caught fish coincided with estimated sizes of acoustic targets. Overall mean pelagic prey fish biomass was 15.56 kg ha−1 with the greatest fish biomass occurring in the Apostle Islands region (27.98 kg ha−1), followed by the Duluth Minnesota region (20.22 kg ha−1), and with the lowest biomass occurring in the open waters of western Lake Superior (9.46 kg ha−1). Biomass estimates from hydroacoustics were typically 2–134 times greater than estimates derived from spring bottom trawl surveys. Prey fish biomass for Lake Superior is about order of magnitude less than acoustic estimates for Lakes Michigan and Ontario. Discrepancies observed between bioenergetics-based estimates of predator consumption of coregonines and earlier coregonine biomass estimates may be accounted for by our hydroacoustic estimates.

  15. Land Use Affects Carbon Sources to the Pelagic Food Web in a Small Boreal Lake

    PubMed Central

    Rinta, Päivi; van Hardenbroek, Maarten; Jones, Roger I.; Kankaala, Paula; Rey, Fabian; Szidat, Sönke; Wooller, Matthew J.; Heiri, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Small humic forest lakes often have high contributions of methane-derived carbon in their food webs but little is known about the temporal stability of this carbon pathway and how it responds to environmental changes on longer time scales. We reconstructed past variations in the contribution of methanogenic carbon in the pelagic food web of a small boreal lake in Finland by analyzing the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C values) of chitinous fossils of planktivorous invertebrates in sediments from the lake. The δ13C values of zooplankton remains show several marked shifts (approx. 10 ‰), consistent with changes in the proportional contribution of carbon from methane-oxidizing bacteria in zooplankton diets. The results indicate that the lake only recently (1950s) obtained its present state with a high contribution of methanogenic carbon to the pelagic food web. A comparison with historical and palaeobotanical evidence indicates that this most recent shift coincided with agricultural land-use changes and forestation of the lake catchment and implies that earlier shifts may also have been related to changes in forest and land use. Our study demonstrates the sensitivity of the carbon cycle in small forest lakes to external forcing and that the effects of past changes in local land use on lacustrine carbon cycling have to be taken into account when defining environmental and ecological reference conditions in boreal headwater lakes. PMID:27487044

  16. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Measurement of Thyroxin Concentration as an Indicator of the Critical Period for Imprinting in the Kokanee Salmon (Orcorhynchus Nerka) Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Hatcheries; 1991 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.; Koehler, Valerie A.

    1992-05-01

    Previous investigations have determined that thyroid hormone surges activate olfactory imprinting in anadromous salmonid smolts. The mechanism of action appears to require binding of thyroid hormones to receptors in brain cell nuclei, which stimulates neuron differentiation and wires a pattern of neuron circuitry that allows for the permanent storage of the imprinted olfactory memory. In this study, thyroxine concentrations [T{sub 4}] were measured in 487 Lake Whatcom stock and 70 Lake Roosevelt stock Kokanee salmon to indicate the critical period for imprinting. Eggs, alevins and fry, reared at the Spokane Indian Kokanee Hatchery, were collected from January through August 1991. Sampled fish were flash frozen on dry ice and stored at {minus}80{degrees}C until T{sub 4} was extracted and concentrations determined by radioimmunassay. Mean concentration {+-} SEM of 10--20 individual fish (assayed in duplicate) were determined for each time period. T{sub 4} concentration peaked on the day of hatch at 16.8 ng/g body weight and again at swim-up at 16.0 {+-} 4.7 ng/g body weight. T{sub 4} concentration was 12.5 to 12.9 ng/g body weight in eggs, 7.1 to 15.2 ng/g body weight in. alevins, 4.5 to 11.4 ng/g body weight in 42 to 105 day old fry and 0.1 to 2.9 ng/g body weight in 112 to 185 day old fry. T{sub 4} concentrations were highest in eggs at 13.3 {+-} 2.8 ng/g body weight, then steadily decreased to 0.1 {+-} 0.1 ng/g body weight in older fry. Fry were released in Lake Roosevelt tributaries in July and August 1991, at about 170--180 days post hatching, in order to imprint them to those sites. The results of this study indicate that the time of release was not appropriate for imprinting. If T{sub 4} levels are an accurate guide for imprinting in kokanee, our results suggest that the critical period for imprinting in kokanee is at hatching or swim-up stages.

  17. Spatial heterogeneity of mercury bioaccumulation by walleye in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake and the upper Columbia River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, M.D.; Short, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    We examined mercury concentration in muscle of walleye Stizostedion vitreum from three reaches in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, a reservoir on the Columbia River, and from the upper Columbia River, an area contaminated by wastes from metal mining and associated processing activities. Our objectives were to describe the relation between size and age of walleyes and tissue concentrations of mercury and to compare mercury concentrations within a single reservoir system among spatially segregated cohorts. Overall, mercury concentrations in walleye muscle ranged from 0.11 to 0.44 mg/kg (wet weight) and were positively correlated with age, weight, and length of the fish. Mercury concentrations in walleyes varied spatially within the system; the highest concentrations were in fish from the lower and middle reaches of the reservoir. Condition factor of age-2+ fish was inversely related to tissue concentration of mercury and was lower in fish from the lower and middle reaches than in fish from the upper reach. Spatial patterns in condition factor and mercury in walleyes were unrelated to concentrations of total mercury in surficial bed sediments, which ranged from less than 0.05 to 2.8 mg/kg (dry weight). We suggest that the observed spatial differences in the concentrations of mercury in walleyes may be attributed to the fish preferring to spawn and forage in specific areas where the bioavailability of mercury varies due to local differences in the physical and chemical environment.

  18. Big Soda Lake (Nevada). 1. Pelagic bacterial heterotrophy and biomass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehr, Jon P.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Cloern, James E.; George, Leah H.; Lane, Judith L.

    1987-01-01

    Bacterial activities and abundance were measured seasonally in the water column of meromictic Big Soda Lake which is divided into three chemically distinct zones: aerobic mixolimnion, anaerobic mixolimnion, and anaerobic monimolimnion. Bacterial abundance ranged between 5 and 52 x 106 cells ml−1, with highest biomass at the interfaces between these zones: 2–4 mg C liter−1 in the photosynthetic bacterial layer (oxycline) and 0.8–2.0 mg C liter−1 in the chemocline. Bacterial cell size and morphology also varied with depth: small coccoid cells were dominant in the aerobic mixolimnion, whereas the monimolimnion had a more diverse population that included cocci, rods, and large filaments. Heterotrophic activity was measured by [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation and [14C]glutamate uptake. Highest uptake rates were at or just below the photosynthetic bacterial layer and were attributable to small (<1 µm) heterotrophs rather than the larger photosynthetic bacteria. These high rates of heterotrophic uptake were apparently linked with fermentation; rates of other mineralization processes (e.g. sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, denitrification) in the anoxic mixolimnion were insignificant. Heterotrophic activity in the highly reduced monimolimnion was generally much lower than elsewhere in the water column. Therefore, although the monimolimnion contained most of the bacterial abundance and biomass (∼60%), most of the cells there were inactive.

  19. Genetic structure of pelagic and littoral cichlid fishes from Lake Victoria.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Miyuki; Kusumi, Junko; Mizoiri, Shinji; Aibara, Mitsuto; Mzighani, Semvua Isa; Sato, Tetsu; Terai, Yohey; Okada, Norihiro; Tachida, Hidenori

    2013-01-01

    The approximately 700 species of cichlids found in Lake Victoria in East Africa are thought to have evolved over a short period of time, and they represent one of the largest known examples of adaptive radiation. To understand the processes that are driving this spectacular radiation, we must determine the present genetic structure of these species and elucidate how this structure relates to the ecological conditions that caused their adaptation. We analyzed the genetic structure of two pelagic and seven littoral species sampled from the southeast area of Lake Victoria using sequences from the mtDNA control region and 12 microsatellite loci as markers. Using a Bayesian model-based clustering method to analyze the microsatellite data, we separated these nine species into four groups: one group composed of pelagic species and another three groups composed mainly of rocky-shore species. Furthermore, we found significant levels of genetic variation between species within each group at both marker loci using analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), although the nine species often shared mtDNA haplotypes. We also found significant levels of genetic variation between populations within species. These results suggest that initial groupings, some of which appear to have been related to habitat differences, as well as divergence between species within groups took place among the cichlid species of Lake Victoria.

  20. Spatial distribution of pelagic fish larvae in the northern main basin of Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseman, Edward F.; O'Brien, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Larval fish occurrence in inshore and offshore zones in the northern main basin of Lake Huron was assessed during 2007 as part of a larger ecological examination of Lake Huron foodwebs and habitats. Day and night collections using neuston and conical nets at inshore (1.5–15 m depths) and offshore (37 and 91 m depths) locations at De Tour and Hammond Bay to assess the abundance, phenology, and spatial distribution of pelagic ichthyoplankton during spring and early summer were made. In general, densities of larval fishes were higher at De Tour than Hammond Bay during daytime neuston net collections, with the exception of Longnose Sucker, which were only collected at Hammond Bay. Lake Whitefish, Burbot, and Rainbow Smelt dominated inshore catches in early spring with Cisco, Deepwater Sculpin, Emerald Shiner, Bloater, Slimy Sculpin, Ninespine Stickleback, and Yellow Perch larvae also collected. Nighttime nearshore and offshore sampling revealed that Rainbow Smelt and Burbot larvae were present in relatively high abundances compared to inshore densities. Concentrations of larvae of deepwater demersal fishes such as Lake Whitefish and Deepwater Sculpin suggest that inshore zones in northern Lake Huron are important nursery habitats emphasizing a critical production and recruitment linkage between inshore and deepwater zones.

  1. Contaminant trends in sport fish from Lake Roosevelt and the upper Columbia River, Washington, 1994-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    Fish from Lake Roosevelt were first reported to contain elevated concentrations of contaminants in the early 1980?s, with mercury, dioxins and furans, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) identified as being of most concern to human health. Over the following years there were a series of studies by United States and Canadian agencies addressing contaminants in fish from both a human and environmental perspective. In the early 1990?s, industrial discharges to the Columbia River above the international boundary decreased. The dominant changes in industrial practices included a reduction in slag and effluent discharges from a lead-zinc smelter, and a reduction in dioxins and furans due to processing changes at a Canadian pulp mill. It is believed that these two alterations in industrial practices may have greatly reduced the loading of selected contaminants to the Columbia River system. In response to these recent changes, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated this present study for the purpose of determining the present concentrations of mercury, dioxins and furans, and PCBs in fish, and, if possible, to determine if concentrations have changed since the 1994 studies. All contaminant analysis was done on fish fillets in order to address human health concerns. Our study concluded that the concentrations of contaminants in fish that were identified as a potential threat to human health have either not changed since the 1994 studies, or have decreased. PCBs, as determined by Aroclor 1254, do not appear to have changed between 1994 and 1998; sources of PCBs are presently unknown. In contrast, dioxins and furans, as indicated by 2,3,7,8-TCDF, did show a significant decrease in rainbow trout fillets from 1994 to 1998. However, there was no apparent change in the average 2,3,7,8-TCDF concentrations in mountain whitefish, with the reason uncertain at this time. Average concentrations of 2,3,7,8-TCDF were higher in mountain whitefish than in rainbow trout. Toxicity equivalence

  2. Epiphyton as a niche for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria: detailed comparison with benthic and pelagic compartments in shallow freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Coci, M; Bodelier, P L E; Laanbroek, H J

    2008-04-01

    Next to the benthic and pelagic compartments, the epiphyton of submerged macrophytes may offer an additional niche for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in shallow freshwater lakes. In this study, we explored the potential activities and community compositions of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria of the epiphytic, benthic, and pelagic compartments of seven shallow freshwater lakes which differed in their trophic status, distribution of submerged macrophytes, and restoration history. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses demonstrated that the epiphytic compartment was inhabited by species belonging to cluster 3 of the Nitrosospira lineage and to the Nitrosomonas oligotropha lineage. Both the ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community compositions and the potential activities differed significantly between compartments. Interestingly, both the ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community composition and potential activity were influenced by the restoration status of the different lakes investigated.

  3. Use of classification trees to apportion single echo detections to species: Application to the pelagic fish community of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yule, Daniel L.; Adams, Jean V.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Vinson, Mark R.; Woiak, Zebadiah; Ahrenstroff, Tyler D.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic methods are used to estimate the density of pelagic fish in large lakes with results of midwater trawling used to assign species composition. Apportionment in lakes having mixed species can be challenging because only a small fraction of the water sampled acoustically is sampled with trawl gear. Here we describe a new method where single echo detections (SEDs) are assigned to species based on classification tree models developed from catch data that separate species based on fish size and the spatial habitats they occupy. During the summer of 2011, we conducted a spatially-balanced lake-wide acoustic and midwater trawl survey of Lake Superior. A total of 51 sites in four bathymetric depth strata (0–30 m, 30–100 m, 100–200 m, and >200 m) were sampled. We developed classification tree models for each stratum and found fish length was the most important variable for separating species. To apply these trees to the acoustic data, we needed to identify a target strength to length (TS-to-L) relationship appropriate for all abundant Lake Superior pelagic species. We tested performance of 7 general (i.e., multi-species) relationships derived from three published studies. The best-performing relationship was identified by comparing predicted and observed catch compositions using a second independent Lake Superior data set. Once identified, the relationship was used to predict lengths of SEDs from the lake-wide survey, and the classification tree models were used to assign each SED to a species. Exotic rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) were the most common species at bathymetric depths 100 m (384 million; 6.0 kt). Cisco (Coregonus artedi) were widely distributed over all strata with their population estimated at 182 million (44 kt). The apportionment method we describe should be transferable to other large lakes provided fish are not tightly aggregated, and an appropriate TS-to-L relationship for abundant pelagic fish species can be determined.

  4. Comparing nearshore benthic and pelagic prey as mercury sources to lake fish: the importance of prey quality and mercury content.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Roxanne; Chen, Celia Y; Folt, Carol L

    2016-09-15

    Mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation in fish poses well-known health risks to wildlife and humans through fish consumption. Yet fish Hg concentrations are highly variable, and key factors driving this variability remain unclear. One little studied source of variation is the influence of habitat-specific feeding on Hg accumulation in lake fish. However, this is likely important because most lake fish feed in multiple habitats during their lives, and the Hg and caloric content of prey from different habitats can differ. This study used a three-pronged approach to investigate the extent to which habitat-specific prey determine differences in Hg bioaccumulation in fish. This study first compared Hg concentrations in common nearshore benthic invertebrates and pelagic zooplankton across five lakes and over the summer season in one lake, and found that pelagic zooplankton generally had higher Hg concentrations than most benthic taxa across lakes, and over a season in one lake. Second, using a bioenergetics model, the effects of prey caloric content from habitat-specific diets on fish growth and Hg accumulation were calculated. This model predicted that the consumption of benthic prey results in lower fish Hg concentrations due to higher prey caloric content and growth dilution (high weight gain relative to Hg from food), in addition to lower prey Hg levels. Third, using data from the literature, links between fish Hg content and the degree of benthivory, were examined, and showed that benthivory was associated with reduced Hg concentrations in lake fish. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that higher Hg content and lower caloric content make pelagic zooplankton prey greater sources of Hg for fish than nearshore benthic prey in lakes. Hence, habitat-specific foraging is likely to be a strong driver of variation in Hg levels within and between fish species.

  5. A review of abiotic and biotic interactions in pelagic communities: Processes relevant to L Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a state-of-the-art review of structural and functional processes in pelagic communities and extrapolate these empirical and theoretical results to L Lake, the once-through cooling reservoir at the Savannah River Plant. Man-made reservoirs differ from natural lakes in their origins, hydrodynamics, sedimentation patterns, and general eutrophication histories. Phosphorus and nitrogen limitation of phytoplankton productivity controls the rate of eutrophication, while also determining algal community structure. Here the Lean and Monod models of nutrient fluxing and uptake kinetics provide useful constructs for predictive purposes. Much of the reduced carbon synthesized by primary production is shunted through the microbial loop where heterotrophic flagellates and protozoans pass this carbon on to the macrozooplankton. This recently discovered pathway is common to eutrophic reservoirs where blue-green species dominate phytoplankton assemblages. Through selective grazing and tactile oriented predation, the crustacean zooplankton partially regulates the relative abundance of algae and microzooplankton species. 194 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Vertical distribution of trace-element concentrations and occurrence of metallurgical slag particles in accumulated bed sediments of Lake Roosevelt, Washington, September 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, S.E.; Bell, P.R.; Lowther, J.S.; Van Metre, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment cores were collected from six locations in Lake Roosevelt to determine the vertical distributions of trace-element concentrations in the accumulated sediments of Lake Roosevelt. Elevated concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc occurred throughout much of the accumulated sediments. Concentrations varied greatly within the sediment core profiles, often covering a range of 5 to 10 fold. Trace-element concentrations typically were largest below the surficial sediments in the lower one-half of each profile, with generally decreasing concentrations from the 1964 horizon to the surface of the core. The trace-element profiles reflect changes in historical discharges of trace elements to the Columbia River by an upstream smelter. All samples analyzed exceeded clean-up guidelines adopted by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation for cadmium, lead, and zinc and more than 70 percent of the samples exceeded cleanup guidelines for mercury, arsenic, and copper. Although 100 percent of the samples exceeded sediment guidelines for cadmium, lead, and zinc, surficial concentrations of arsenic, copper, and mercury in some cores were less than the sediment-quality guidelines. With the exception of copper, the trace-element profiles of the five cores collected along the pre-reservoir Columbia River channel typically showed trends of decreasing concentrations in sediments deposited after the 1964 time horizon. The decreasing concentrations of trace elements in the upper half of cores from along the pre-reservoir Columbia River showed a pattern of decreasing concentrations similar to reductions in trace-element loading in liquid effluent from an upstream smelter. Except for arsenic, trace-element concentrations typically were smaller at downstream reservoir locations along the pre-reservoir Columbia River. Trace-element concentration in sediments from the Spokane Arm of the reservoir showed distinct differences compared to the similarities

  7. Seasonal Community and Population Dynamics of Pelagic Bacteria and Archaea in a High Mountain Lake

    PubMed Central

    Pernthaler, Jakob; Glöckner, Frank-Oliver; Unterholzner, Stefanie; Alfreider, Albin; Psenner, Roland; Amann, Rudolf

    1998-01-01

    The seasonal variations in community structure and cell morphology of pelagic procaryotes from a high mountain lake (Gossenköllesee, Austria) were studied by in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes (FISH) and image-analyzed microscopy. Compositional changes and biomass fluctuations within the assemblage were observed both in summer and beneath the winter ice cover and are discussed in the context of physicochemical and biotic parameters. Proteobacteria of the beta subclass (beta-proteobacteria) formed a dominant fraction of the bacterioplankton (annual mean, 24% of the total counts), whereas alpha-proteobacteria were of similar relative importance only during spring (mean, 11%). Bacteria of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster, although less abundant, constituted the largest fraction of the filamentous morphotypes during most of the year, thus contributing significantly to the total microbial biomass. Successive peaks of threadlike and rod-shaped archaea were observed during autumn thermal mixing and the period of ice cover formation, respectively. A set of oligonucleotide probes targeted to single phylotypes was constructed from 16S rRNA-encoding gene clone sequences. Three distinct populations of uncultivated microbes, affiliated with the alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, were subsequently monitored by FISH. About one-quarter of all of the beta-proteobacteria (range, 6 to 53%) could be assigned to only two phylotypes. The bacterial populations studied were annually recurrent, seasonally variable, and vertically stratified, except during the periods of lake overturn. Their variability clearly exceeded the fluctuations of the total microbial assemblage, suggesting that the apparent stability of total bacterioplankton abundances may mask highly dynamic community fluctuations. PMID:9797280

  8. The Lake Huron pelagic fish community: persistent spatial pattern along biomass and species composition gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, D.M.; Schaeffer, J.S.; O'Brien, T. P.

    2009-01-01

    Spatial patterns in the biomass of pelagic fish in Lake Huron have persisted over 10 years even though biomass decreased 86% and the fish community shifted from dominance by non-native species (rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax) to dominance by native species (bloater, Coregonus hoyi). Based on multivariate analyses of acoustic biomass data and abiotic variables from the years 1997, 2004, 2005, and 2007, the strength of relationships between abiotic variables (primarily bottom depth) and fish community composition gradients decreased with fish biomass, suggesting that at high biomass, the influence of the measured abiotic variables is minimal. We observed consistently higher biomass in the North Channel and Georgian Bay than in the Main Basin, and as a result, we conclude that these smaller basins are likely important contributors to lakewide fish biomass, production, and dynamics. These results suggest that at current biomass levels, efforts to understand ecology, population dynamics, and lakewide abundance need to incorporate the effects of depth and geographic variation on fish distributions and ecology.

  9. Food web topology and parasites in the pelagic zone of a subarctic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amundsen, P.-A.; Lafferty, K.D.; Knudsen, R.; Primicerio, R.; Klemetsen, A.; Kuris, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Parasites permeate trophic webs with their often complex life cycles, but few studies have included parasitism in food web analyses. Here we provide a highly resolved food web from the pelagic zone of a subarctic lake and explore how the incorporation of parasites alters the topology of the web. 2. Parasites used hosts at all trophic levels and increased both food-chain lengths and the total number of trophic levels. Their inclusion in the network analyses more than doubled the number of links and resulted in an increase in important food-web characteristics such as linkage density and connectance. 3. More than half of the parasite taxa were trophically transmitted, exploiting hosts at multiple trophic levels and thus increasing the degree of omnivory in the trophic web. 4. For trophically transmitted parasites, the number of parasite-host links exhibited a positive correlation with the linkage density of the host species, whereas no such relationship was seen for nontrophically transmitted parasites. Our findings suggest that the linkage density of free-living species affects their exposure to trophically transmitted parasites, which may be more likely to adopt highly connected species as hosts during the evolution of complex life cycles. 5. The study supports a prominent role for parasites in ecological networks and demonstrates that their incorporation may substantially alter considerations of food-web structure and functioning. ?? 2009 British Ecological Society.

  10. Benthic‐pelagic coupling drives non‐seasonal zooplankton blooms and restructures energy flows in shallow tropical lakes

    PubMed Central

    Schagerl, Michael; Yasindi, Andrew; Singer, Gabriel; Kaggwa, Mary Nakabungo; Winder, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Zooplankton blooms are a frequent phenomenon in tropical systems. However, drivers of bloom formation and the contribution of emerging resting eggs are largely unexplored. We investigated the dynamics and the triggers of rotifer blooms in African soda‐lakes and assessed their impact on other trophic levels. A meta‐analysis of rotifer peak densities including abundances of up to 6 × 105 individuals L−1 demonstrated that rotifer bloom formation was uncoupled from the food environment and the seasonality of climatic conditions. A time series with weekly sampling intervals from Lake Nakuru (Kenya) revealed that intrinsic growth factors (food quality and the physicochemical environment) significantly affected rotifer population fluctuations, but were of minor importance for bloom formation. Instead, rotifer bloom formation was linked to sediment resuspension, a prerequisite for hatching of resting‐eggs. Population growth rates exceed pelagic birth rates and simulations of rotifer dynamics confirmed the quantitative importance of rotifer emergence from the sediment egg‐bank and signifying a decoupling of bloom formation from pelagic reproduction. Rotifer blooms led to a top‐down control of small‐sized algae and facilitated a switch to more grazing‐resistant, filamentous cyanobacteria. This shift in phytoplankton composition cascaded up the food chain and triggered the return of filter‐feeding flamingos. Calculations of consequent changes in the lake's energy budget and export of aquatic primary production to terrestrial ecosystems demonstrated the large potential impact of nonseasonal disturbances on the functioning of shallow tropical lakes. PMID:27587899

  11. Benthic-pelagic coupling drives non-seasonal zooplankton blooms and restructures energy flows in shallow tropical lakes.

    PubMed

    Burian, Alfred; Schagerl, Michael; Yasindi, Andrew; Singer, Gabriel; Kaggwa, Mary Nakabungo; Winder, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Zooplankton blooms are a frequent phenomenon in tropical systems. However, drivers of bloom formation and the contribution of emerging resting eggs are largely unexplored. We investigated the dynamics and the triggers of rotifer blooms in African soda-lakes and assessed their impact on other trophic levels. A meta-analysis of rotifer peak densities including abundances of up to 6 × 10(5) individuals L(-1) demonstrated that rotifer bloom formation was uncoupled from the food environment and the seasonality of climatic conditions. A time series with weekly sampling intervals from Lake Nakuru (Kenya) revealed that intrinsic growth factors (food quality and the physicochemical environment) significantly affected rotifer population fluctuations, but were of minor importance for bloom formation. Instead, rotifer bloom formation was linked to sediment resuspension, a prerequisite for hatching of resting-eggs. Population growth rates exceed pelagic birth rates and simulations of rotifer dynamics confirmed the quantitative importance of rotifer emergence from the sediment egg-bank and signifying a decoupling of bloom formation from pelagic reproduction. Rotifer blooms led to a top-down control of small-sized algae and facilitated a switch to more grazing-resistant, filamentous cyanobacteria. This shift in phytoplankton composition cascaded up the food chain and triggered the return of filter-feeding flamingos. Calculations of consequent changes in the lake's energy budget and export of aquatic primary production to terrestrial ecosystems demonstrated the large potential impact of nonseasonal disturbances on the functioning of shallow tropical lakes.

  12. Characterization of the contents and histology of the gastrointestinal tracts of White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) captured from Upper Lake Roosevelt, Washington, October 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsley, Michael J.; van der Leeuw, Bjorn K.; Elliott, Diane G.

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of 37 juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) captured from the upper part of Lake Roosevelt during October 2008, were examined to identify prey taxa and to determine if the fish were consuming smelter slag along with other sediments. Histological examination of the gastrointestinal tract tissues and comparison with similar tissues from hatchery-reared fish also was performed. The contents of the gastro-intestinal tracts (guts) indicated that white sturgeon were actively foraging on various benthic invertebrates and the diet was quite diverse, with more than 50 percent of the fish feeding on five or more different taxa. Slag was present in 76 percent of the guts examined. Although not all guts contained slag particles, larger fish tended to have greater amounts of slag in their guts. Histology of the gut tissues showed the presence of a chronic inflammatory response, and the severity of the response had a significant positive correlation (P = 0.01) with fish length and weight suggesting that the inflammation represented a response to long-term exposure to one or more stressors. However, additional work is needed to determine if the physical or chemical properties of slag contributed to this response.

  13. Higher mass-independent isotope fractionation of methylmercury in the pelagic food web of Lake Baikal (Russia).

    PubMed

    Perrot, Vincent; Pastukhov, Mikhail V; Epov, Vladimir N; Husted, Søren; Donard, Olivier F X; Amouroux, David

    2012-06-05

    Mercury undergoes several transformations that influence its stable isotope composition during a number of environmental and biological processes. Measurements of Hg isotopic mass-dependent (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in food webs may therefore help to identify major sources and processes leading to significant bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg). In this work, δ(13)C, δ(15)N, concentration of Hg species (MeHg, inorganic Hg), and stable isotopic composition of Hg were determined at different trophic levels of the remote and pristine Lake Baikal ecosystem. Muscle of seals and different fish as well as amphipods, zooplankton, and phytoplankton were specifically investigated. MDF during trophic transfer of MeHg leading to enrichment of heavier isotopes in the predators was clearly established by δ(202)Hg measurements in the pelagic prey-predator system (carnivorous sculpins and top-predator seals). Despite the low concentrations of Hg in the ecosystem, the pelagic food web reveals very high MIF Δ(199)Hg (3.15-6.65‰) in comparison to coastal fish (0.26-1.65‰) and most previous studies in aquatic organisms. Trophic transfer does not influence MIF signature since similar Δ(199)Hg was observed in sculpins (4.59 ± 0.55‰) and seal muscles (4.62 ± 0.60‰). The MIF is suggested to be mainly controlled by specific physical and biogeochemical characteristics of the water column. The higher level of MIF in pelagic fish of Lake Baikal is mainly due to the bioaccumulation of residual MeHg that is efficiently turned over and photodemethylated in deep oligotrophic and stationary (i.e., long residence time) freshwater columns.

  14. Field experiments investigating the Benthic Pelagic coupling over a zebra mussel be in the western basin of Lake Erie

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, M.R.; Cozzi, P.; Hamblin, P.F.; Ackerman, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Unlike the relatively well-known unidirectional tidal flows in coastal marine environments, mixing in freshwater lakes is likely to be primarily wind driven and intermittent. Moreover, recent data indicates that flow rate affects zebra mussel filter feeding in a ramp-like manner not predicted by conventional static-flow models. Both of these outcomes indicate that direct measurements of the physical transport processes and the resultant biology of filter feeding must be made in situ to begin to understand the impact of zebra mussels on the pelagic foodwebs. The purpose of the following paper is to report the results of a preliminary study of the biophysical factors that relate to the benthic-pelagic coupling in a zebra mussel bed within the western basin of Lake Erie. Althoug work is still in progress, our preliminary results indicate a complex flow field over the zebra mussel bed. By means of a simple model, we have demonstrated that the extrapolation of individual laboratory-based feeding rates to a field situation leads to a significant overestimation of the actual feeding rates. Further work is in progress to refine the model to allow for vertical variability in organic concentration, a more accurate prescription of the turbulent transport or organic material above the bed and to validate other model assumptions such as the assumption of two-dimensional flow over the bed.

  15. Energy density and size of pelagic prey fishes in Lake Ontario, 1978-1990: Implications for salmonine energetics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rand, Peter S.; Lantry, Brian F.; O'Gorman, R.; Owens, Randall W.; Stewart, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    We describe dynamics of energy density and size of Lake Ontario alewife Alosa pseudoharengus and rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, and we use a bioenergetics model of a common pelagic piscivore, chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, to demonstrate the effect of these factors on piscivore daily ration during 1978–1990. The energy density of alewives varied more than twofold between peaks in September (age 1) or October–November (age ≥2) and the lows in May (age 1) or July–September (age≥2). The previously described seasonal pattern of energy density of Lake Michigan alewives was similar except that energy density of older alewives (age≥3) was markedly higher in Lake Michigan. During 1978–1990, the spring energy density of Lake Ontario alewives peaked in 1979 (6,259 J/g wet weight), declined irregularly until 1985, and then remained stable through 1990 (at approximately 4,600 J/g). The initial decline may have been a density-dependent response to a burgeoning alewife population, but the lack of an increase in alewife condition in the late 1980s, when alewife biomass fell, suggests a decline in lake productivity. Energy density of rainbow smelt increased with age in Lake Ontario and condition was invariant during 1978–1990 despite a threefold change in rainbow smelt biomass. Rainbow smelt energy density was lower and fluctuated less seasonally in Lake Ontario than in Lake Michigan. Mean weight of alewives aged 2 and older dropped from 41 g in 1978 to 19 g in 1989 in Lake Ontario. Rainbow smelt aged 2 and older showed a drop in mean weight from 13–17 g in 1978–1982 to 8 g in 1990. This downward trend in mean size of alewives was correlated with the sizes of alewives consumed by Lake Ontario chinook salmon during 1983–1987. For adult chinook salmon to maintain a constant growth rate during 1978–1990, mean individual daily ration during June–October had to increase from a low of 2.2% body weight/d (or 1.5 prey fish/d) in 1979 to 3.1% body

  16. HYDROACOUSTIC ESTIMATES OF ABUNDANCE AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF PELAGIC PREY FISHES IN WESTERN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) are a valuable prey resource for the recovering lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). However, their respective biomasses may be insufficient to support the current predator demand. In August 1977, we assessed the ...

  17. Concentrations of Elements in Sediments and Selective Fractions of Sediments, and in Natural Waters in Contact with Sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Washington, September 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Wagner, Richard J.; Sanzolone, Richard F.; Cox, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-eight composite and replicate sediment samples from 8 Lake Roosevelt sites were collected and analyzed for 10 alkali and alkaline earth elements, 2 non-metals, 20 metals, and 4 lanthanide and actinide elements. All elements were detected in all sediment samples except for silver (95 percent of the elements detected for 1,008 analyses), which was detected only in 4 samples. Sequential selective extraction procedures were performed on single composite samples from the eight sites. The percentage of detections for the 31 elements analyzed ranged from 76 percent for the first extraction fraction using a weak extractant to 93 percent for the four-acid dissolution of the sediments remaining after the third sequential selective extraction. Water samples in various degrees of contact with the sediment were analyzed for 10 alkali and alkaline earth elements, 5 non-metals, 25 metals, and 16 lanthanide and actinide elements. The filtered water samples included 10 samples from the reservoir water column at 8 sites, 32 samples of porewater, 55 samples from reservoir water overlying sediments in 8 cores from the site incubated in a field laboratory, and 24 water samples that were filtered after being tumbled with sediments from 8 sites. Overall, the concentrations of only 37 percent of the 6,776 analyses of the 121 water samples were greater than the reporting limit. Selenium, bismuth, chromium, niobium, silver, and zirconium were not detected in any water samples. The percentage of concentrations for the water samples that were above the reporting limit ranged from 14 percent for the lanthanide and actinide elements to 77 percent for the alkali and alkaline earth elements. Concentrations were greater than reporting limits in only 23 percent of the analyses of reservoir water and 29 percent of the analyses of reservoir water overlying incubation cores. In contrast, 47 and 48 percent of the concentrations of porewater and water samples tumbled with sediments, respectively

  18. Terrestrial, benthic, and pelagic resource use in lakes: Results from a three-isotope Bayesian mixing model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solomon, C.T.; Carpenter, S.R.; Clayton, M.K.; Cole, J.J.; Coloso, J.J.; Pace, M.L.; Vander Zanden, M. J.; Weidel, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Fluxes of organic matter across habitat boundaries are common in food webs. These fluxes may strongly influence community dynamics, depending on the extent to which they are used by consumers. Yet understanding of basal resource use by consumers is limited, because describing trophic pathways in complex food webs is difficult. We quantified resource use for zooplankton, zoobenthos, and fishes in four low-productivity lakes, using a Bayesian mixing model and measurements of hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope ratios. Multiple sources of uncertainty were explicitly incorporated into the model. As a result, posterior estimates of resource use were often broad distributions; nevertheless, clear patterns were evident. Zooplankton relied on terrestrial and pelagic primary production, while zoobenthos and fishes relied on terrestrial and benthic primary production. Across all consumer groups terrestrial reliance tended to be higher, and benthic reliance lower, in lakes where light penetration was low due to inputs of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon. These results support and refine an emerging consensus that terrestrial and benthic support of lake food webs can be substantial, and they imply that changes in the relative availability of basal resources drive the strength of cross-habitat trophic connections. ?? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

  19. SPATIAL PATTERNS IN ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURES OF PELAGIC FORAGE FISH AND ZOOPLANKTON IN WESTERN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript reports on the spatial distribution of zooplankton and forage fish in western Lake Superior. Fish and zooplankton assemblages are shown to differ substantially in abundance and size structure both between the open lake and nearshore regions and between two differe...

  20. Spatial patterns in assemblage structures of pelagic forage fish and zooplankton in western Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Timothy B.; Hoff, Michael H.; Trebitz, Anett S.; Bronte, Charles R.; Corry, Timothy D.; Kitchell, James F.; Lozano, Stephen J.; Mason, Doran M.; Scharold, Jill V.; Schram, Stephen T.; Schreiner, Donald R.

    2004-01-01

    We assessed abundance, size, and species composition of forage fish and zooplankton communities of western Lake Superior during August 1996 and July 1997. Data were analyzed for three ecoregions (Duluth-Superior, Apostle Islands, and the open lake) differing in bathymetry and limnological and biological patterns. Zooplankton abundance was three times higher in the Duluth-Superior and Apostle Islands regions than in the open lake due to the large numbers of rotifers. Copepods were far more abundant than Cladocera in all ecoregions. Mean zooplankton size was larger in the open lake due to dominance by large calanoid copepods although size of individual taxa was similar among ecoregions. Forage fish abundance and biomass was highest in the Apostle Islands region and lowest in the open lake ecoregion. Lake herring (Coregonus artedi), rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) and deepwater ciscoes (Coregonus spp.) comprised over 90% of the abundance and biomass of fishes caught in midwater trawls and recorded with hydroacoustics. Growth and condition of fish was good, suggesting they were not resource limited. Fish and zooplankton assemblages differed among the three ecoregions of western Lake Superior, due to a combination of physical and limnological factors related to bathymetry and landscape position.

  1. Effects of deposit-feeding tubificid worms and filter-feeding bivalves on benthic-pelagic coupling: implications for the restoration of eutrophic shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiufeng; Liu, Zhengwen; Jeppesen, Erik; Taylor, William D

    2014-03-01

    Benthic-pelagic coupling is a key factor in the dynamics of shallow lakes. A 12-week mesocosm experiment tested the hypothesis that deposit-feeding tubificid worms stimulate the growth of pelagic algae while filter-feeding bivalves promote the growth of benthic algae, using the deposit-feeding tubificid Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri and the filter-feeding bivalve Anodonta woodiana. A tube-microcosm experiment using a (32)P radiotracer tested for differential effects of tubificids and bivalves on the release of sediment phosphorus (P). In this experiment A. woodiana was replaced by Corbicula fluminea, a smaller bivalve from the same functional group whose size was more appropriate to the experimental tubes needed for the tracer study. The first experiment recorded greater nutrient concentrations in the overlying water, higher biomass of pelagic algae as measured by chlorophyll a (Chl a), lower light intensity at the sediment and lower biomass of benthic algae in the worm treatments than in the controls, while nutrients and Chl a of pelagic algae were lower and the light intensity and Chl a of benthic algae were higher in the bivalve treatments than in the controls. In the second experiment, (32)P activity in the overlying water was higher in both treatments than in the controls, but highest in the worm treatment indicating that both animals accelerated P release from the sediment, with the biggest effect associated with the presence of worms. Our study demonstrates that worms promote pelagic algal growth by enhancing the release of sediment nutrients, while bivalves, likely through their grazing on pelagic algae increasing available light levels, stimulate benthic algal growth despite enhanced P release from the sediment and thus aid the establishment of clear water states. The rehabilitation of native bivalve populations may therefore enhance the recovery of eutrophic shallow lakes.

  2. Development of a Multimetric Indicator of Pelagic Zooplankton Assemblage Condition for the 2012 National Lakes Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used zooplankton data collected for the 2012 National Lakes Assessment (NLA) to develop multimetric indices (MMIs) for five aggregated ecoregions of the conterminous USA (Coastal Plains, Eastern Highlands, Plains, Upper Midwest, and Western Mountains and Xeric [“West&rsq...

  3. Feeding ecology of pelagic larval Burbot in Northern Lake Huron, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Ellen M.; Roseman, Edward F.; Davis, Bruce M.; O'Brien, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Burbot Lota lota are a key demersal piscivore across the Laurentian Great Lakes whose populations have declined by about 90% in recent decades. Larval Burbot typically hatch in the early spring and rely on abundant crustacean zooplankton prey. We examined the stomach contents of larval Burbot from inshore (≤15 m) and offshore sites (37 and 91 m) in northern Lake Huron, Michigan. Concurrent zooplankton vertical tows at the same sites showed that the prey community was dominated by calanoid copepods, dreissenid mussel veligers, and rotifers. Burbot consumed mostly cyclopoid copepods, followed by copepod nauplii and calanoid copepods. Chesson's index of selectivity was calculated and compared among sites and months for individual Burbot. According to this index, larval Burbot exhibited positive selection for cyclopoid copepods and copepod nauplii and negative selection for calanoid copepods, cladocerans, rotifers, and dreissenid veligers. This selectivity was consistent across sites and throughout the sampling period. Burbot displayed little variation in their prey preferences during the larval stage, which suggests that the recent shifts in zooplankton abundance due to the invasion of the predatory zooplankter Bythotrephes longimanus and competition from invasive Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax could negatively impact larval Burbot populations.

  4. Foraging mechanisms of siscowet lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush siscowet) on pelagic prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keyler, Trevor D.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Austin, C. Lee; Gorman, Owen T.; Mensinger, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    The reaction distance, angle of attack, and foraging success were determined for siscowet lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush siscowet) during laboratory trials under lighting conditions that approximated downwelling spectral irradiance and intensity (9.00 × 108–1.06 × 1014 photons m− 2 s− 1) at daytime depths. Siscowet reaction distance in response to golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) was directly correlated with increasing light intensity until saturation at 1.86 × 1011 photons m− 2 s− 1, above which reaction distance was constant within the range of tested light intensities. At the lowest tested light intensity, sensory detection was sufficient to locate prey at 25 ± 2 cm, while increasing light intensities increased reaction distance up to 59 ± 2 cm at 1.06 × 1014 photons m− 2 s− 1. Larger prey elicited higher reaction distances than smaller prey at all light intensities while moving prey elicited higher reaction distances than stationary prey at the higher light intensities (6.00 × 109 to 1.06 × 1014 photons m− 2 s− 1). The capture and consumption of prey similarly increased with increasing light intensity while time to capture decreased with increasing light intensity. The majority of orientations toward prey occurred within 120° of the longitudinal axis of the siscowet's eyes, although reaction distances among 30° increments along the entire axis were not significantly different. The developed predictive model will help determine reaction distances for siscowet in various photic environments and will help identify the mechanisms and behavior that allow for low light intensity foraging within freshwater systems.

  5. Can pelagic forage fish and spawning cisco (Coregonus artedi) biomass in the western arm of Lake Superior be assessed with a single summer survey?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yule, D.L.; Stockwell, J.D.; Schreiner, D.R.; Evrard, L.M.; Balge, M.; Hrabik, T.R.

    2009-01-01

    Management efforts to rehabilitate lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Lake Superior have been successful and the recent increase in their numbers has led to interest in measuring biomass of pelagic prey fish species important to these predators. Lake Superior cisco Coregonus artedi currently support roe fisheries and determining the sustainability of these fisheries is an important management issue. We conducted acoustic and midwater trawl surveys of the western arm of Lake Superior during three periods: summer (July-August), October, and November 2006 to determine if a single survey can be timed to estimate biomass of both prey fish and spawning cisco. We evaluated our methods by comparing observed trawl catches of small (<250 mm total length) and large fish to expected trawl catches based on acoustic densities in the trawl path. We found the relationship between observed and expected catches approached unity over a wide range of densities, suggesting that our acoustic method provided reasonable estimates of fish density, and that midwater trawling methods were free of species- and size-selectivity issues. Rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax was by number the most common species captured in the nearshore (<80 m bathymetric depth) stratum during all three surveys, while kiyi Coregonus kiyi was predominant offshore except during November. Total biomass estimates of rainbow smelt in the western arm were similar during all three surveys, while total biomass of kiyi was similar between summer and October, but was lower in November. Total biomass of large cisco increased substantially in November, while small bloater Coregonus hoyi biomass was lower. We compared our summer 2006 estimates of total fish biomass to the results of a summer survey in 1997 and obtained similar results. We conclude that the temporal window for obtaining biomass estimates of pelagic prey species in the western arm of Lake Superior is wide (July through October), but estimating spawning cisco abundance

  6. Incorporation of inorganic mercury (Hg2+) in pelagic food webs of ultraoligotrophic and oligotrophic lakes: the role of different plankton size fractions and species assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soto Cárdenas, Carolina; Diéguez, Maria C.; Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Queimaliños, Claudia P.

    2014-01-01

    In lake food webs, pelagic basal organisms such as bacteria and phytoplankton incorporate mercury (Hg2+) from the dissolved phase and pass the adsorbed and internalized Hg to higher trophic levels. This experimental investigation addresses the incorporation of dissolved Hg2+ by four plankton fractions (picoplankton: 0.2–2.7 μm; pico + nanoplankton: 0.2–20 μm; microplankton: 20–50 μm; and mesoplankton: 50–200 μm) obtained from four Andean Patagonian lakes, using the radioisotope 197Hg2+. Species composition and abundance were determined in each plankton fraction. In addition, morphometric parameters such as surface and biovolume were calculated using standard geometric models. The incorporation of Hg2+ in each plankton fraction was analyzed through three concentration factors: BCF (bioconcentration factor) as a function of cell or individual abundance, SCF (surface concentration factor) and VCF (volume concentration factor) as functions of individual exposed surface and biovolume, respectively. Overall, this investigation showed that through adsorption and internalization, pico + nanoplankton play a central role leading the incorporation of Hg2+ in pelagic food webs of Andean lakes. Larger planktonic organisms included in the micro- and mesoplankton fractions incorporate Hg2+ by surface adsorption, although at a lesser extent. Mixotrophic bacterivorous organisms dominate the different plankton fractions of the lakes connecting trophic levels through microbial loops (e.g., bacteria–nanoflagellates–crustaceans; bacteria–ciliates–crustaceans; endosymbiotic algae–ciliates). These bacterivorous organisms, which incorporate Hg from the dissolved phase and through their prey, appear to explain the high incorporation of Hg2+ observed in all the plankton fractions.

  7. Incorporation of inorganic mercury (Hg²⁺) in pelagic food webs of ultraoligotrophic and oligotrophic lakes: the role of different plankton size fractions and species assemblages.

    PubMed

    Soto Cárdenas, Carolina; Diéguez, Maria C; Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Queimaliños, Claudia P

    2014-10-01

    In lake food webs, pelagic basal organisms such as bacteria and phytoplankton incorporate mercury (Hg(2+)) from the dissolved phase and pass the adsorbed and internalized Hg to higher trophic levels. This experimental investigation addresses the incorporation of dissolved Hg(2+) by four plankton fractions (picoplankton: 0.2-2.7 μm; pico+nanoplankton: 0.2-20 μm; microplankton: 20-50 μm; and mesoplankton: 50-200 μm) obtained from four Andean Patagonian lakes, using the radioisotope (197)Hg(2+). Species composition and abundance were determined in each plankton fraction. In addition, morphometric parameters such as surface and biovolume were calculated using standard geometric models. The incorporation of Hg(2+) in each plankton fraction was analyzed through three concentration factors: BCF (bioconcentration factor) as a function of cell or individual abundance, SCF (surface concentration factor) and VCF (volume concentration factor) as functions of individual exposed surface and biovolume, respectively. Overall, this investigation showed that through adsorption and internalization, pico+nanoplankton play a central role leading the incorporation of Hg(2+) in pelagic food webs of Andean lakes. Larger planktonic organisms included in the micro- and mesoplankton fractions incorporate Hg(2+) by surface adsorption, although at a lesser extent. Mixotrophic bacterivorous organisms dominate the different plankton fractions of the lakes connecting trophic levels through microbial loops (e.g., bacteria-nanoflagellates-crustaceans; bacteria-ciliates-crustaceans; endosymbiotic algae-ciliates). These bacterivorous organisms, which incorporate Hg from the dissolved phase and through their prey, appear to explain the high incorporation of Hg(2+) observed in all the plankton fractions.

  8. Franklin D. Roosevelt at Langley 1940

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited Langley Field on July 29, 1940. View of President Roosevelt in a car inside a NACA hangar, two unidentified men stand behind the car, and the wing of a plane is visible in the background.

  9. A multispecies statistical age-structured model to assess predator-prey balance: application to an intensively managed Lake Michigan pelagic fish community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsehaye, Iyob; Jones, Michael L.; Bence, James R.; Brenden, Travis O.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Warner, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a Bayesian model fitting approach, we developed a multispecies statistical catch-at-age model to assess trade-offs between predatory demands and prey productivities, focusing on the Lake Michigan pelagic fish community. We assessed these trade-offs in terms of predation mortalities and productivities of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) and functional responses of salmonines. Our predation mortality estimates suggest that salmonine consumption has been a major driver of historical fluctuations in prey abundance, with sharp declines in alewife abundance in the 1980s and 2000s coinciding with estimated increases in predation mortalities. While Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were food limited during periods of low alewife abundance, other salmonines appeared to maintain a (near) maximum per-predator consumption across all observed prey densities, suggesting that feedback mechanisms are unlikely to help maintain a balance between predator consumption and prey productivity in Lake Michigan. This study demonstrates that a multispecies modeling approach that combines stock assessment methods with explicit consideration of predator–prey interactions could provide the basis for tactical decision-making from a broader ecosystem perspective.

  10. Eleanor Roosevelt and Civil Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood-Tucker, Toni Fuss

    2011-01-01

    Eleanor Roosevelt's support of African American rights was one of the highlights of her activities as first lady. Her fearless advocacy for justice pulled her into political controversies that were unprecedented for the wife of a president. The first lady's initiatives in support of the rights of African Americans offer students an excellent…

  11. 77. ROOSEVELT POWER CANAL LOCATION MAP, WORK TO BE DONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. ROOSEVELT POWER CANAL LOCATION MAP, WORK TO BE DONE BY CONTRACT Courtesy of Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Salt River Project - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  12. The effects of biomanipulation on the biogeochemistry, carbon isotopic composition and pelagic food web relations of a shallow lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontes, B. M.; Pel, R.; Ibelings, B. W.; Boschker, H. T. S.; Middelburg, J. J.; Van Donk, E.

    2006-03-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of experimental biomanipulation on community structure, ecosystem metabolism, carbon biogeochemistry and stable isotope composition of a shallow eutrophic lake in the Netherlands. Three different biomanipulation treatments were applied. In two parts of the lake, isolated from the rest, fish was removed and one part was used as a reference treatment in which no biomanipulation was applied. Stable isotopes have proved useful to trace trophic interactions at higher food web levels but until now methodological limitations have restricted species specific isotope analysis in the plankton community. We applied a new approach based on the combination of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to trace carbon flow through the planktonic food web. With this method we aimed at obtaining group specific δ13C signatures of phytoplankton and to trace possible shifts in δ13C resulting from fish removal.

    Biomanipulation led to an increase in transparency and macrophyte biomass and decrease in phytoplankton abundance, but zooplankton numbers did not increase. Fish removal also resulted in high pH, high O2, low CO2 and more negative δ13CDIC values than expected, which is attributed to chemical enhanced diffusion with large negative fractionation. Despite high temporal variation we detected differences between the isotopic signatures of the primary producers and between the different treatments. The fractionation values of green algae (~21) and diatoms (~23) were similar and independent of treatment, while fractionation factors of filamentous cyanobacteria were variable between the treatments that differed in CO2 availability. 13C-labeling of the phytoplankton groups showed that biomanipulation led to increased growth rates of green algae and diatoms at the expense of cyanobacteria. Finally, consumers seemed generalists to the available food sources.

  13. Franklin D. Roosevelt at Langley 1940

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited Langley Field on 29 July 1940. View of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in a car inside a NACA hangar, two unidentified men stand behind the car, and the wing of a plane is visible in the background. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen (page 147).

  14. The effects of biomanipulation on the biogeochemistry, carbon isotopic composition and pelagic food web relations of a shallow turf lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontes, B. M.; Pel, R.; Ibelings, B. W.; Boschker, H. T. S.; Middelburg, J. J.; van Donk, E.

    2005-08-01

    The effects of fish removal on the biogeochemistry and lower-trophic level food web relations were studied in a shallow eutrophied turf lake. Biomanipulation led to an increase in transparency and macrophyte biomass and decrease in phytoplankton abundance, but zooplankton numbers did not increase. Moreover, fish removal resulted in high pH, high O2, low CO2, and more negative δ13CDIC values than expected, which is proposed to be the likely result of chemical enhanced diffusion with large negative fractionation (-13). By combining fluorescence activated cell sorting and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) of fatty acids we were able to obtain group specific δ13C signatures and to trace possible shifts in δ13C resulting from fish removal. Fractionation values of green algae (20) and diatoms (22) were uniform and independent of treatment, while fractionation factors of filamentous cyanobacteria were variable between the treatments that differed in CO2 availability. 13C-labeling of the phytoplankton groups showed that biomanipulation led to increased growth rates of green algae and diatoms at the expense of cyanobacteria. Finally, the primary consumer Chydorus appeared to prefer cyanobacteria, whilst Asplanchna grazed predominantly upon eukaryotes.

  15. Einstein/Roosevelt Letters: A Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodle, Walter S.

    1985-01-01

    The letters in this unit of study intended for secondary students are facsimile reproductions of the correspondence between Albert Einstein and President Roosevelt on the possibility of constructing an atomic bomb. Classroom activities are also suggested. (RM)

  16. Eleanor Roosevelt and the Wartime Campaign against Jim Crow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Allida M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes Eleanor Roosevelt's efforts to correct institutional racism. Mrs. Roosevelt worked continually in support of civil rights for African Americans in employment, housing, and the armed services. Her efforts often were met with vehement and venomous opposition. (MJP)

  17. VIEW OF ROOSEVELT BASE TAKEN FROM ARCADE (BUILDING 234), FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ROOSEVELT BASE TAKEN FROM ARCADE (BUILDING 234), FACING EAST LOOKING DOWN PRATT AVENUE TOWARD BUILDING 1 - Roosevelt Base, Bounded by Ocean Boulevard, Pennsylvania Avenue, Richardson Avenue, & Idaho Street, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 82. ROOSEVELT POWER CANAL, SUGGESTED ARRANGEMENT FOR ELECTRICAL OPERATION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. ROOSEVELT POWER CANAL, SUGGESTED ARRANGEMENT FOR ELECTRICAL OPERATION OF SLUICE GATES AND CANAL INTAKE GATES AT DIVERSION DAM Courtesy of Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Salt River Project, Arizona - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  19. Roosevelt's First Inaugural: A Study of Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Halford Ross

    1979-01-01

    Examines three rhetorical techniques that Franklin D. Roosevelt used in his "First Inaugural Address" to announce and implement his New Deal. The various speech drafts examined reveal that he purposefully used military metaphor, the scapegoat, and the carrot-and-stick approach to accomplish certain persuasive goals. (JMF)

  20. Eleanor Roosevelt: First Lady as Radio Pioneer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Maurine H.; Belgrade, Paul

    Eleanor Roosevelt's commercial radio broadcasts during her White House years (1933-1945) were significant for three reasons. First, she was one of the few women who performed as a news commentator during this period. Her ability to pursue such a career owed much to her position as First Lady and represented the merging of the roles of celebrity…

  1. Resources for Teaching the Roosevelt Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouch, Fred; Sears, John F.

    1996-01-01

    Lists and briefly describes an array of educational resources relating to Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal. Includes notable books, organizations, videos, audio cassettes, software, educational kits, and simulations. Collections of art, photographs, and cartoons also are available. Includes price and ordering information. (MJP)

  2. Franklin Delano Roosevelt: a famous patient.

    PubMed

    Hart, Curtis W

    2014-08-01

    Franklin Delano Roosevelt is arguably one of the greatest of American Presidents. His encounter with the polio that crippled him at an early age and its transformative impact upon him are here discussed with particular reference to his relationship with his physician, Dr. George Draper. This transformation liberated energy in Roosevelt to lead and to show empathy for others in ways that both challenged the political and social status quo in the U.S.A. as well as helped save the world from the threat of Fascism in World War II. This essay seeks to demonstrate how an investigation of the life and struggles of this famous patient is one avenue for relating the study of the humanities to medical education. An earlier version of this paper was presented as the Heberden Lecture in the History of Medicine at the New York Academy of Medicine in 2012.

  3. 36 CFR 7.54 - Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Theodore Roosevelt National Park. 7.54 Section 7.54 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.54 Theodore Roosevelt National Park....

  4. 36 CFR 7.54 - Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Theodore Roosevelt National Park. 7.54 Section 7.54 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.54 Theodore Roosevelt National Park....

  5. 36 CFR 7.54 - Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Theodore Roosevelt National Park. 7.54 Section 7.54 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.54 Theodore Roosevelt National Park....

  6. 36 CFR 7.54 - Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Theodore Roosevelt National Park. 7.54 Section 7.54 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.54 Theodore Roosevelt National Park....

  7. 36 CFR 7.54 - Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Theodore Roosevelt National Park. 7.54 Section 7.54 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.54 Theodore Roosevelt National Park....

  8. Theodore Roosevelt Chloroforming Uncle Sam "In the Hopeless Ward".

    PubMed

    Drew, Benjamin A; Bause, George S

    2016-10-01

    In March of 1905 in Judge magazine, Louis Dalrymple published his political cartoon of Theodore Roosevelt chloroforming "Uncle Sam." Having sampled a host of Democratic remedies, the 125-year-old Sam can expect that Roosevelt's chloroform will either cure him with major Republican surgery or kill him with Osler-linked euthanasia.

  9. PEDESTRIAN UNDERPASS AT CRESCENT ROAD AND ROOSEVELT CENTER FROM NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PEDESTRIAN UNDERPASS AT CRESCENT ROAD AND ROOSEVELT CENTER FROM NORTH. NOTE DALE WINLING, 2005 SALLY KRESS TOMPKINS FELLOW, WALKING THROUGH UNDERPASS. - Old Greenbelt, Crescent Road and Southway, Greenbelt, Prince George's County, MD

  10. PCB concentrations in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) are correlated to habitat use and lake characteristics.

    PubMed

    Guildford, S J; Muir, D C G; Houde, M; Evans, M S; Kidd, K A; Whittle, D M; Drouillard, K; Wang, X; Anderson, M R; Bronte, C R; Devault, D S; Haffner, D; Payne, J; Kling, H J

    2008-11-15

    This study considers the importance of lake trout habitat as a factor determining persistent organochlorine (OC) concentration. Lake trout is a stenothermal, cold water species and sensitive to hypoxia. Thus, factors such as lake depth, thermal stratification, and phosphorus enrichment may determine not only which lakes can support lake trout but may also influence among-lake variability in lake trout population characteristics including bioaccumulation of OCs. A survey of 23 lakes spanning much of the natural latitudinal distribution of lake trout provided a range of lake trout habitat to test the hypothesis that lake trout with greater access to littoral habitat for feeding will have lower concentrations of OCs than lake trout that are more restricted to pelagic habitat. Using the delta13C stable isotope signature in lake trout as an indicator of influence of benthic littoral feeding, we found a negative correlation between lipid-corrected delta13C and sigmaPCB concentrations supporting the hypothesis that increasing accessto littoral habitat results in lower OCs in lake trout. The prominence of mixotrophic phytoplankton in lakes with more contaminated lake trout indicated the pelagic microbial food web may exacerbate the biomagnification of OCs when lake trout are restricted to pelagic feeding. A model that predicted sigmaPCB in lake trout based on lake area and latitude (used as proximate variables for proportion of littoral versus pelagic habitat and accessibility to littoral habitat respectively) explained 73% of the variability in sigmaPCBs in lake trout in the 23 lakes surveyed.

  11. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  12. Establishing the Rhetorical Presidency through Presidential Rhetoric: Theodore Roosevelt and the Brownsville Raid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuckey, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Theodore Roosevelt was an important figure in the development of the presidency as a primary and authoritative source for definitions of national identity. Through an analysis of three specific rhetorical moves Roosevelt made in arguments over the "proper" interpretation of the Brownsville Raid, this essay examines how Roosevelt both justified his…

  13. Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site: Birthplace of the Modern Presidency. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brogan-Linnabery, Ann Marie

    In 1901, while vacationing in New York's Adirondack Mountains, Vice President Theodore Roosevelt received news that President McKinley had been shot and was not expected to live. By the time Roosevelt arrived at the home of his friend Ansley Wilcox in Buffalo (New York), the President was dead. Roosevelt was inaugurated in the library of his…

  14. 77 FR 56808 - Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland; Larimer County, CO; Middle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland... Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland is preparing an environmental impact statement to... Supervisor for the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland. Nature of...

  15. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John

    1996-06-01

    The first three years of this study were used to collect pre-hatchery baseline data on the fishery. The Spokane Tribal Hatchery began stocking kokanee and rainbow trout in 1991 and Sherman Creek Hatchery began stocking by 1992. The estimated number of kokanee (13,986) harvested in 1993 was similar to harvest numbers in the previous years, but the number of rainbow trout (403,277) and walleye (337,413) harvested doubled from estimates made in past years. The stocking of yearling kokanee began in1992, totaling approximately 140,000 yearlings. The yearlings were not expected to begin entering the creel until 1993 with the main harvest in 1994. As a result, it was too early to speculate on the effect of stocking yearlings instead of fry on the creel. The 1993 rainbow trout harvest escalated. The increased number of walleye harvested was believed to be from the increased angler pressure. Kokanee salmon and rainbow trout growth appeared to be similar to previous years. The growth of walleye was less than in year past, but the average size of walleye in the creel increased. The feeding habits of kokanee, rainbow trout and walleye in 1993 were similar to previous years.

  16. 36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... following locations: (i) Upper Hawk Creek from the waterfall near the campground through the area known as... launch ramps, marina facilities, campground areas, water skiers, beaches occupied by swimmers, or...

  17. 36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Bridge. (2) Launch and retrieval of PWC are permitted only at designated launch ramps. Launching and retrieval of PWC at Napoleon Bridge launch ramp is prohibited. (3) PWC may land anywhere along the...

  18. 36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Bridge. (2) Launch and retrieval of PWC are permitted only at designated launch ramps. Launching and retrieval of PWC at Napoleon Bridge launch ramp is prohibited. (3) PWC may land anywhere along the...

  19. 36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Bridge. (2) Launch and retrieval of PWC are permitted only at designated launch ramps. Launching and retrieval of PWC at Napoleon Bridge launch ramp is prohibited. (3) PWC may land anywhere along the...

  20. 36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... showing the waters where aircraft may be operated will be available in the office of the superintendent... persons in the water. (iii) The stretch of the Spokane Arm from 200 feet west of the Two Rivers Marina...

  1. Wolf Point Substation, Roosevelt County, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western), an agency of the United States Department of Energy, is proposing to construct the 115-kV Wolf Point Substation near Wolf Point in Roosevelt County, Montana (Figure 1). As part of the construction project, Western's existing Wolf Point Substation would be taken out of service. The existing 115-kV Wolf Point Substation is located approximately 3 miles west of Wolf Point, Montana (Figure 2). The substation was constructed in 1949. The existing Wolf Point Substation serves as a Switching Station'' for the 115-kV transmission in the region. The need for substation improvements is based on operational and reliability issues. For this environmental assessment (EA), the environmental review of the proposed project took into account the removal of the old Wolf Point Substation, rerouting of the five Western lines and four lines from the Cooperatives and Montana-Dakota Utilities Company, and the new road into the proposed substation. Reference to the new proposed Wolf Point Substation in the EA includes these facilities as well as the old substation site. The environmental review looked at the impacts to all resource areas in the Wolf Point area. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Presidential Science Advising from Roosevelt to Reagan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herken, Gregg

    2004-05-01

    The relationship between American presidents and science has always been surprisingly idiosyncratic. Chief executives from Franklin Roosevelt to Ronald Reagan have adopted very different approaches to dealing with the scientific community. The early history of presidential science advising is the story of a few energetic individuals who sought to influence government policy when there was no established method for scientists to approach the White House. President Eisenhower created such a channel in 1957 with the President's Science Advisory Committee [PSAC]. Under Ike, advising the president became for the first time a systematic and formal enterprise for scientists. But the decades after Sputnik witnesses a steady waning of the importance of the president's scientists. This decline was accelerated by the Vietnam war and controversies over anti-ballistic missile defense and the supersonic transport, culminating in the abolition of PSAC by the Nixon administration in 1973. To some observers, science advising reached its nadir a decade later, with President Reagan's announcement of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). The advent of "Star Wars" demonstrated the influence of a small, select group of politically-active scientists: a consultative process reminscient of the ad hoc situation pre-PSAC.

  3. Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Successful Selling of the Destroyer Deal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Thomas E.; Morgan, Hugh

    One of the most evident examples of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's mastery of the press and his manipulation of public opinion was the 1940 arrangement of the transfer of 50 United States naval destroyers to Great Britain while that nation was at war with Germany and Italy and while noninterventionist sentiment was quite strong in the United…

  4. The strokes that killed Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rohaid; Connolly, Ian D; Li, Amy; Choudhri, Omar A; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Steinberg, Gary K

    2016-07-01

    From February 4 to 11, 1945, President Franklin D. Roosevelt of the United States, Soviet Union Premier Joseph Stalin, and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill met near Yalta in Crimea to discuss how post-World War II (WWII) Europe should be organized. Within 2 decades of this conference, all 3 men had died. President Roosevelt died 2 months after the Yalta Conference due to a hemorrhagic stroke. Premier Stalin died 8 years later, also due to a hemorrhagic stroke. Finally, Prime Minister Churchill died 20 years after the conference because of complications due to stroke. At the time of Yalta, these 3 men were the leaders of the most powerful countries in the world. The subsequent deterioration of their health and eventual death had varying degrees of historical significance. Churchill's illness forced him to resign as British prime minister, and the events that unfolded immediately after his resignation included Britain's mismanagement of the Egyptian Suez Crisis and also a period of mistrust with the United States. Furthermore, Roosevelt was still president and Stalin was still premier at their times of passing, so their deaths carried huge political ramifications not only for their respective countries but also for international relations. The early death of Roosevelt, in particular, may have exacerbated post-WWII miscommunication between America and the Soviet Union-miscommunication that may have helped precipitate the Cold War.

  5. Modelling pelagic biogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Donald B.; Hood, Raleigh R.

    Various combinations of physical and biological models are used to explore factors that determine the distribution of organisms in the world's oceans. The physical models examined include simple box models with parameterized inter-box exchanges that take into account variable box geometries, and specified continuous flows either in the Eulerian frame as stream-functions or as Lagrangian trajectories. A 1-dimensional mixed-layer model and a primitive equation channel model are introduced as examples of dynamical models depicting ocean physics. Biological models are discussed starting with a simple nitrogen (N), phytoplankton (P), zooplankton (Z) and detritus (D), NPZD formulation. The equilibria of this model is explored analytically as an example of computing steady state solutions, and then considering where in parameter space extinction occurs. Nonlinearities and expansion of NPZD to multi-species models are also treated. This is followed by the introduction of a nonlinear three-component food chain model, multi-species Lotka-Voltera competition models, and finally a discussion of structured population models including a derivation of a genetics model written in terms of genotypes. The physical models are then coupled with the biological ones in a series of examples. Both the box model with Lotka-Voltera multi-species population dynamics, and the 1-dimensional mixed-layer model with NPZD are used to demonstrate how the existence of spatial and temporal niches can allow a large number of species to coexist within biogeographic domains even though conditions at most sites and times are not conducive to supporting such diversity. These models recreate the basic diversity patterns observed in the pelagic ecosystem at various latitudes. The box model simulations also demonstrate the tendency for diffusive models to overestimate the dispersion of a species. In order to explore the dynamics of the edges of biogeographic domains a three species food chain model is

  6. Lake Pend Oreille Predation Research, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Bassista, Thomas

    2004-02-01

    During August 2002 we conducted a hydroacoustic survey to enumerate pelagic fish >406 mm in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho. The purpose of this survey was to determine a collective lakewide biomass estimate of pelagic bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and lake trout S. namaycush and compare it to pelagic prey (kokanee salmon O. nerka) biomass. By developing hydroacoustic techniques to determine the pelagic predator to prey ratio, we can annually monitor their balance. Hydroacoustic surveys were also performed during December 2002 and February 2003 to investigate the effectiveness of autumn and winter surveys for pelagic predators. The inherent problem associated with hydroacoustic sampling is the inability to directly identify fish species. Therefore, we utilized sonic tracking techniques to describe rainbow trout and lake trout habitat use during our winter hydroacoustic survey to help identify fish targets from the hydroacoustic echograms. During August 2002 we estimated there were 39,044 pelagic fish >406 mm in Lake Pend Oreille (1.84 f/ha). Based on temperature and depth utilization, two distinct groups of pelagic fish >406 mm were located during August; one group was located between 10 and 35 m and the other between 40 and 70 m. The biomass for pelagic fish >406 mm during August 2002 was 73 t (metric ton). This would account for a ratio of 1 kg of pelagic predator for every 2.63 kg of kokanee prey, assuming all pelagic fish >406 mm are predators. During our late fall and winter hydroacoustic surveys, pelagic fish >406 mm were observed at lake depths between 20 and 90 m. During late fall and winter, we tracked three rainbow trout (168 habitat observations) and found that they mostly occupied pelagic areas and predominantly stayed within the top 10 m of the water column. During late fall (one lake trout) and winter (four lake trout), we found that lake trout (184 habitat observations) utilized benthic-nearshore areas 65% of the time

  7. Carbon dynamics in eutrophic, temperate lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Riemann, B.; Sondergaard

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers dealing with pools, pathways, fluxes and transformation of organic matter in the pelagic zone of eutrophic, temperate lakes. It is a direct result of the work of a research group during the period 1981-85, whose aim was to summarize current understanding and specify gas in pelagic carbon metabolism.

  8. Area development plan of the geothermal potential in planning region 8, Roosevelt - Custer area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Geothermal resource data, the Roosevelt-Custer Region development plan, and energy, economic, and institutional considerations are presented. Environmental considerations and water availability are discussed. (MHR)

  9. Carbon in weathered ordinary chondrites from Roosevelt County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. D.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    A suite of Roosevelt County ordinary chondrites of known terrestrial age have been analyzed for carbon content and isotopic composition. Initial results indicate that significant carbon contamination is evident only in samples with a terrestrial age greater than 40 ka. These samples are of weathering grade D and E and contain three times more carbon than the less weathered samples. The soil in which they were preserved has a carbon content of ca. 1.5 percent. Over 200 meteorites have been recovered from a series of soil depleted areas of New Mexico and West Texas. Most have been recovered from blowouts near Clovis in Roosevelt County (RC) on the high plains of New Mexico. The mineralogical and petrologic Al effects of weathering upon these samples have been studied previously and show that the degree of weathering is largely depend ant upon the terrestrial residence time. The study was undertaken to determine the effects of prolonged exposure to the soil and climate of Roosevelt County upon ordinary chondrites in the hope that this will enable a better understanding of the problems associated with the collection of meteoritic falls. A suite of ten grade 4 to 6 H, L, and LL ordinary chondrites were analyzed for carbon content and isotopic composition.

  10. Bridge to the Future: Franklin Roosevelt's Speech at the Dedication of the Triborough Bridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, David L.

    2009-01-01

    When President Franklin D. Roosevelt took office on March 4, 1933, 15 million Americans, or one quarter of the nation's workers, were jobless. Hope faded as despair spread. Three years later, on July 10, 1936, Roosevelt took a special overnight train from Washington, D.C., to New York City for the dedication of the Triborough Bridge. The next day,…

  11. Springwood: Birthplace and Home to Franklin D. Roosevelt. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholl, Charlotte Ofca

    Springwood, the birthplace and home of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, is a large, rambling structure faced with stucco and fieldstone, situated in a landscaped clearing on a bluff overlooking the Hudson River. Roosevelt was born there to a family of wealth and position on January 30, 1882. It is the only site in the U.S. where a president was born,…

  12. First Lady of the World: Eleanor Roosevelt at Val-Kill. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoeberl, Todd

    This lesson traces the use of Eleanor Roosevelt's retreat, Val-Kill, a "shack" (actually a stone cottage) built in 1925 on the grounds of the Roosevelt family estate at Hyde Park (New York), and how it nurtured her spirit, personal style, and humanitarian efforts. The lesson explains that Eleanor and her women friends later expanded the…

  13. The age of the meteorite recovery surfaces of Roosevelt County, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Rendell, Helen M.; Wilson, Ivan; Wells, Gordon L.

    1992-01-01

    We have obtained minimum age estimates for the sand units underlying the two largest meteorite deflation surfaces in Roosevelt County, New Mexico, USA, using thermoluminescence dating techniques. The dates obtained ranged from 53.5 (+/- 5.4) to 95.2 (+/- 9.5) ka, and must be considered lower limits for the terrestrial ages of the meteorites found within these specific deflation surfaces. These ages greatly exceed previous measurements from adjacent meteorite-producing deflation basins. We find that Roosevelt County meteorites are probably terrestrial contemporaries of the meteorites found at most accumulation zones in Antarctica. The apparent high meteorite accumulation rate reported for Roosevelt County by Zolensky et al. (1990) is incorrect, as it used an age of 16 ka for all Roosevelt County recovery surfaces. We conclude that the extreme variability of terrestrial ages of the Roosevelt County deflation surfaces effectively precludes their use for calculations of the meteorite accumulation rate at the Earth's surface.

  14. Water analysis methods at the integrated Lake Watershed Acidification Study Laboratory, Raquette Lake, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Tokos, J.

    1980-09-01

    The materials, equipment, and methods used by Brookhaven National Laboratory personnel for routine chemical and biological analyses in the three lakes of the Integrated Lake Watershed Acidification Study are described. The procedures apply to pelagic samples taken from Panther, Sagamore, and Woods Lakes. Separate sections outlining benthic primary production and inlet-outlet methods are included.

  15. The Roosevelt years: crucial milieu for Carl Rogers' innovation.

    PubMed

    Barrett-Lennard, Godfrey T

    2012-02-01

    This study explores broad features of political culture and event of the 1930s and World War 2 years, viewed in relation to the emergence and rapid early growth of the new therapy of Carl Rogers. The paper traces Rogers' early professional life and examines distinctive emphases in sociopolitical thought and development during Franklin D. Roosevelt's leadership as President over the prolonged emergency of the Great Depression and the crisis of the War. The study includes a focus on the President's own outlook and style, pertinent New Deal innovations, and wartime needs. Twelve features of this larger context are discriminated as together having vital importance for the new therapy and its founder. The congruent courses of the macrocontext and of Rogers' innovation are followed to the ending of Roosevelt's life. Direct causation is not attributed, but the evidence adduced newly points to particular contours of a larger environment favorable for the expression of Rogers' values and rare ability. In sum, the author concludes that a synergy of highly conducive historical circumstance and individual exceptionality contributed to the philosophical underpinnings, attitudinal values and early momentum of Rogers' client-centered therapy.

  16. Lake whitefish and lake herring population structure and niche in ten south-central Ontario lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carl, Leon M.; McGuiness, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This study compares simple fish communities of ten oligotrophic lakes in south-central Ontario. Species densities and population size structure vary significantly among these lake communities depending on fish species present beyond the littoral zone. Lake whitefish are fewer and larger in the presence of lake herring than in their absence. Diet analysis indicates that lake whitefish shift from feeding on both plankton and benthic prey when lake herring are absent to a primarily benthic feeding niche in the presence of lake herring. When benthic round whitefish are present, lake whitefish size and density decline and they move lower in the lake compared to round whitefish. Burbot are also fewer and larger in lakes with lake herring than in lakes without herring. Burbot, in turn, appear to influence the population structure of benthic coregonine species. Lower densities of benthic lake whitefish and round whitefish are found in lakes containing large benthic burbot than in lakes with either small burbot or where burbot are absent. Predation on the pelagic larvae of burbot and lake whitefish by planktivorous lake herring alters the size and age structure of these populations. As life history theory predicts, those species with poor larval survival appear to adopt a bet-hedging life history strategy of long-lived individuals as a reproductive reserve.

  17. A Raven in a Coal Scuttle: Theodore Roosevelt & the Animal Coloration Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrick, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Recounts a debate between Theodore Roosevelt and Abbott Thayer in 1909-12 over whether animal coloration was an adaptation resulting from natural selection or whether the animal's environment acted directly on it to form its color patterns. (ZWH)

  18. 77 FR 42695 - Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland; Boulder and Gilpin County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland; Boulder and Gilpin... Pawnee National Grassland, Boulder. BILLING CODE 3410-11-P...

  19. DEEPWATER AND NEARSHORE FOOD WEB CHARACTERIZATIONS IN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the difficulty associated with sampling deep aquatic systems, food web relationships among deepwater fauna are often poorly known. We are characterizing nearshore versus offshore habitats in the Great Lakes and investigating food web linkages among profundal, pelagic, and ...

  20. President Franklin D Roosevelt (1882-1945) and Doctor Frank Howard Lahey's (1880-1953) dilemma: The complexities of medical confidentiality with World Leaders.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, David

    2016-02-01

    In the months before the Presidential Election of November 1944, there were serious concerns about the health of President Franklin D Roosevelt. He had lost considerable weight and his once robust appearance had given way to a tired and haggard look. Despite these worrisome observations, Vice-Admiral Ross T McIntire, who served as Franklin Roosevelt's personal physician from 1933 until Roosevelt's death, lied when he proclaimed Roosevelt to be in 'excellent condition for a man of his age'. The truth about Roosevelt's health was further obscured when Roosevelt's medical records disappeared.

  1. LAKE HERRING (COREGONUS ARTEDI) AND RAINBOW SMELT (OSMERUS MORDAX) DIETS IN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript reports on the diets of lake herring and rainbow smelt, currently the two dominant forage fish species (fish that are food for game fishes) in western Lake Superior. Despite the pelagic nature of both these species, they have substantially different diets and henc...

  2. Computational visual ecology in the pelagic realm.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-E; Warrant, Eric; Johnsen, Sönke

    2014-01-01

    Visual performance and visual interactions in pelagic animals are notoriously hard to investigate because of our restricted access to the habitat. The pelagic visual world is also dramatically different from benthic or terrestrial habitats, and our intuition is less helpful in understanding vision in unfamiliar environments. Here, we develop a computational approach to investigate visual ecology in the pelagic realm. Using information on eye size, key retinal properties, optical properties of the water and radiance, we develop expressions for calculating the visual range for detection of important types of pelagic targets. We also briefly apply the computations to a number of central questions in pelagic visual ecology, such as the relationship between eye size and visual performance, the maximum depth at which daylight is useful for vision, visual range relations between prey and predators, counter-illumination and the importance of various aspects of retinal physiology. We also argue that our present addition to computational visual ecology can be developed further, and that a computational approach offers plenty of unused potential for investigations of visual ecology in both aquatic and terrestrial habitats.

  3. Patterns in benthic biodiversity link lake trophic status to structure and potential function of three large, deep lakes.

    PubMed

    Hayford, Barbara L; Caires, Andrea M; Chandra, Sudeep; Girdner, Scott F

    2015-01-01

    Relative to their scarcity, large, deep lakes support a large proportion of the world's freshwater species. This biodiversity is threatened by human development and is in need of conservation. Direct comparison of biodiversity is the basis of biological monitoring for conservation but is difficult to conduct between large, insular ecosystems. The objective of our study was to conduct such a comparison of benthic biodiversity between three of the world's largest lakes: Lake Tahoe, USA; Lake Hövsgöl, Mongolia; and Crater Lake, USA. We examined biodiversity of common benthic organism, the non-biting midges (Chironomidae) and determined lake trophic status using chironomid-based lake typology, tested whether community structure was similar between the three lakes despite geographic distance; and tested whether chironomid diversity would show significant variation within and between lakes. Typology analysis indicated that Lake Hövsgöl was ultra-oligotrophic, Crater Lake was oligotrophic, and Lake Tahoe was borderline oligotrophic/mesotrophic. These results were similar to traditional pelagic measures of lake trophic status for Lake Hövsgöl and Crater Lake but differed for Lake Tahoe, which has been designated as ultra-oligotrophic by traditional pelagic measures such as transparency found in the literature. Analysis of similarity showed that Lake Tahoe and Lake Hövsgöl chironomid communities were more similar to each other than either was to Crater Lake communities. Diversity varied between the three lakes and spatially within each lake. This research shows that chironomid communities from these large lakes were sensitive to trophic conditions. Chironomid communities were similar between the deep environments of Lake Hövsgöl and Lake Tahoe, indicating that chironomid communities from these lakes may be useful in comparing trophic state changes in large lakes. Spatial variation in Lake Tahoe's diversity is indicative of differential response of chironomid

  4. [Roosevelt and Hopkins: a paretic president with a chronically ill adviser leading the United States during World War II].

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    Succeeding Herbert Hoover in 1933 as President of the United States Franklin D. Roosevelt of The Democratic Party did not hesitate to make Congress immediately endorse his New Deal relief and recovery measures to help the depression-stricken Americans. Doing this, and during the rest of his life, Roosevelt had to cope with severe paralysis of his legs resulting from poliomyelitis infection in 1921 necessitating the use of leg braces and crutches, or a wheel chair. Before and during World War II Roosevelt leaned on Harry Hopkins, a former director of various health agencies with a penetrating mind and ability to discuss and implement Roosevelt's decisions. In spite of Hopkins suffering from the sequels of surgery for stomach cancer, he rendered invaluable support to the president. Franklin D. Roosevelt died 63 years old in April 1945 from a cerebral haemorrhage, and Harry Hopkins died 56 years old in 1946 from haemochromatosis.

  5. Vegetation changes associated with a population irruption by Roosevelt elk

    PubMed Central

    Starns, Heath D; Weckerly, Floyd W; Ricca, Mark A; Duarte, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between large herbivores and their food supply are central to the study of population dynamics. We assessed temporal and spatial patterns in meadow plant biomass over a 23-year period for meadow complexes that were spatially linked to three distinct populations of Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) in northwestern California. Our objectives were to determine whether the plant community exhibited a tolerant or resistant response when elk population growth became irruptive. Plant biomass for the three meadow complexes inhabited by the elk populations was measured using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which was derived from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper imagery. Elk populations exhibited different patterns of growth through the time series, whereby one population underwent a complete four-stage irruptive growth pattern while the other two did not. Temporal changes in NDVI for the meadow complex used by the irruptive population suggested a decline in forage biomass during the end of the dry season and a temporal decline in spatial variation of NDVI at the peak of plant biomass in May. Conversely, no such patterns were detected in the meadow complexes inhabited by the nonirruptive populations. Our findings suggest that the meadow complex used by the irruptive elk population may have undergone changes in plant community composition favoring plants that were resistant to elk grazing. PMID:25628868

  6. Vegetation changes associated with a population irruption by Roosevelt elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starns, H D; Weckerly, Floyd W.; Ricca, Mark; Duarte, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between large herbivores and their food supply are central to the study of population dynamics. We assessed temporal and spatial patterns in meadow plant biomass over a 23-year period for meadow complexes that were spatially linked to three distinct populations of Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) in northwestern California. Our objectives were to determine whether the plant community exhibited a tolerant or resistant response when elk population growth became irruptive. Plant biomass for the three meadow complexes inhabited by the elk populations was measured using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which was derived from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper imagery. Elk populations exhibited different patterns of growth through the time series, whereby one population underwent a complete four-stage irruptive growth pattern while the other two did not. Temporal changes in NDVI for the meadow complex used by the irruptive population suggested a decline in forage biomass during the end of the dry season and a temporal decline in spatial variation of NDVI at the peak of plant biomass in May. Conversely, no such patterns were detected in the meadow complexes inhabited by the nonirruptive populations. Our findings suggest that the meadow complex used by the irruptive elk population may have undergone changes in plant community composition favoring plants that were resistant to elk grazing.

  7. Vegetation changes associated with a population irruption by Roosevelt elk.

    PubMed

    Starns, Heath D; Weckerly, Floyd W; Ricca, Mark A; Duarte, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between large herbivores and their food supply are central to the study of population dynamics. We assessed temporal and spatial patterns in meadow plant biomass over a 23-year period for meadow complexes that were spatially linked to three distinct populations of Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) in northwestern California. Our objectives were to determine whether the plant community exhibited a tolerant or resistant response when elk population growth became irruptive. Plant biomass for the three meadow complexes inhabited by the elk populations was measured using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which was derived from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper imagery. Elk populations exhibited different patterns of growth through the time series, whereby one population underwent a complete four-stage irruptive growth pattern while the other two did not. Temporal changes in NDVI for the meadow complex used by the irruptive population suggested a decline in forage biomass during the end of the dry season and a temporal decline in spatial variation of NDVI at the peak of plant biomass in May. Conversely, no such patterns were detected in the meadow complexes inhabited by the nonirruptive populations. Our findings suggest that the meadow complex used by the irruptive elk population may have undergone changes in plant community composition favoring plants that were resistant to elk grazing.

  8. The hypertension of president Franklin Roosevelt. The president as casualty of war.

    PubMed

    Maloney, William James; Resillez-Urioste, Frank; Maloney, Maura

    2012-11-01

    Franklin Delano Roosevelt led the United States for four terms as president. He served during a period of unparalleled turmoil in American history. Roosevelt's blood pressure rose steadily as he presided over the Great Depression and much of World War II. He refused to decrease his workload, even as his health steadily declined. Roosevelt willingly and knowingly sacrificed his health, and, ultimately, his life fulfilling his desire to provide America with continuous and inspiring leadership. The medical community's understanding of hypertension was in its infancy during his presidency. Today, healthcare professionals understand the importance of the proper diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. Dentists play a vital role in detecting hypertension in individuals and, when necessary, referring the patient to the proper medical professional for evaluation.

  9. Dr Ross McIntire, otolaryngologist, and his care of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Robert J

    2009-07-01

    The role that otolaryngologist Ross McIntire, MD, played in the care of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 32nd President of the United States, was documented by reviewing primary source material pertaining to the relationship of McIntire and Roosevelt. This included material from various archives including the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library at Hyde Park, New York; United States National Archives; and numerous autobiographies and diaries. McIntire's belief in the value of confidentiality and to provide information only on a need-to-know basis is consistent with the strategy that he had devised earlier for protecting his patient's privacy. In the context of his time and his position, Dr McIntire served his patient and his country well by making appropriate medical and wise personal judgments. The career of Dr Ross T. McIntire, otolaryngologist and personal physician to the 32nd president of the United States, engenders a sense of honor to our profession.

  10. Depth gradients in food-web processes linking habitats in large lakes: Lake Superior as an exemplar ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sierszen, Michael E.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Stockwell, Jason D.; Cotter, Anne M; Hoffman, Joel C.; Yule, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Support of whole-lake food webs through trophic linkages among pelagic, profundal and littoral habitats appears to be integral to the functioning of large lakes. These linkages can be disrupted though ecosystem disturbance such as eutrophication or the effects of invasive species and should be considered in native species restoration efforts.

  11. 77 FR 73974 - Information Collection: Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest Visitor Surveys for Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... Forest Service Information Collection: Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest Visitor Surveys for Recreation Transportation System Alternatives Study AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; request for comment. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Forest Service is seeking...

  12. 78 FR 70414 - Pricing for the 2013 Coin and Chronicles Set-Theodore Roosevelt

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2013 Coin and Chronicles Set--Theodore Roosevelt AGENCY: United States...: Marc Landry, Acting Associate Director for Sales and Marketing; United States Mint; 801 9th Street...

  13. 77 FR 39987 - Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland; Boulder and Gilpin County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Forest Service Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland; Boulder and Gilpin... and Pawnee National Grassland is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to consider and... Pawnee National Grassland, located at 2140 Yarmouth Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301; and one on July 19,...

  14. Reforming the International Monetary System: From Roosevelt to Reagan. Headline Series No. 281.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hormats, Robert D.

    This book examines the changed, and changing, international monetary system. It describes how the system has evolved under nine Presidents, from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Ronald Reagan. It also discusses the broader evolution of the world economy during this period, including the trade and investment issues to which international monetary policy is…

  15. 75 FR 44977 - General Management Plan/Abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement, Roosevelt-Vanderbilt...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... Doc No: 2010-18705] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service General Management Plan/Abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement, Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historic Sites, Hyde Park, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability of...

  16. "Maybe You Could Help?" Letters to Eleanor Roosevelt, 1934-1942

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Mary Mason

    2005-01-01

    Eleanor Roosevelt could be called a Superstar First Lady. In the era when women's suffrage was first being exercised, she was "pushing the envelope" of what the President's wife, and women in general, might be expected to do in civic life. She wrote syndicated columns for magazines and newspapers, the most famous of which was entitled "My Day," a…

  17. 77 FR 2975 - Roosevelt Water Conservation District; Notice of Termination of Exemption by Implied Surrender...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Roosevelt Water Conservation District; Notice of Termination of Exemption by Implied Surrender and Soliciting Comments, Protests, and Motions To Intervene Take notice that the following hydroelectric proceeding has...

  18. Baseball and World War II: A Study of the Landis-Roosevelt Correspondence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percoco, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan using original documents of the wartime correspondence between President Franklin Roosevelt and baseball commissioner Kenesaw Landis. Explores the status of baseball during World War II to determine the importance of sports in U.S. culture. Includes background information and copies of the correspondence. (DK)

  19. Seasonal habitat selection by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in a small Canadian shield lake: Constraints imposed by winter conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchfield, P.J.; Tate, L.S.; Plumb, J.M.; Acolas, M.-L.; Beaty, K.G.

    2009-01-01

    The need for cold, well-oxygenated waters significantly reduces the habitat available for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) during stratification of small temperate lakes. We examined the spatial and pelagic distribution of lake trout over two consecutive summers and winters and tested whether winter increased habitat availability and access to littoral regions in a boreal shield lake in which pelagic prey fish are absent. In winter, lake trout had a narrowly defined pelagic distribution that was skewed to the upper 3 m of the water column and spatially situated in the central region of the lake. Individual core areas of use (50% Kernel utilization distributions) in winter were much reduced (75%) and spatially non-overlapping compared to summer areas, but activity levels were similar between seasons. Winter habitat selection is in contrast to observations from the stratified season, when lake trout were consistently located in much deeper waters (>6 m) and widely distributed throughout the lake. Winter distribution of lake trout appeared to be strongly influenced by ambient light levels; snow depth and day length accounted for up to 69% of the variation in daily median fish depth. More restricted habitat use during winter than summer was in contrast to our original prediction and illustrates that a different suite of factors influence lake trout distribution between these seasons. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  20. Evaluating analytical approaches for estimating pelagic fish biomass using simulated fish communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yule, Daniel L.; Adams, Jean V.; Warner, David M.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Weidel, Brian C.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Sullivan, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Pelagic fish assessments often combine large amounts of acoustic-based fish density data and limited midwater trawl information to estimate species-specific biomass density. We compared the accuracy of five apportionment methods for estimating pelagic fish biomass density using simulated communities with known fish numbers that mimic Lakes Superior, Michigan, and Ontario, representing a range of fish community complexities. Across all apportionment methods, the error in the estimated biomass generally declined with increasing effort, but methods that accounted for community composition changes with water column depth performed best. Correlations between trawl catch and the true species composition were highest when more fish were caught, highlighting the benefits of targeted trawling in locations of high fish density. Pelagic fish surveys should incorporate geographic and water column depth stratification in the survey design, use apportionment methods that account for species-specific depth differences, target midwater trawling effort in areas of high fish density, and include at least 15 midwater trawls. With relatively basic biological information, simulations of fish communities and sampling programs can optimize effort allocation and reduce error in biomass estimates.

  1. Fate of Heterotrophic Microbes in Pelagic Habitats: Focus on Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pernthaler, Jakob; Amann, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    Major biogeochemical processes in the water columns of lakes and oceans are related to the activities of heterotrophic microbes, e.g., the mineralization of organic carbon from photosynthesis and allochthonous influx or its transport to the higher trophic levels. During the last 15 years, cultivation-independent molecular techniques have substantially contributed to our understanding of the diversity of the microbial communities in different aquatic systems. In parallel, the complexity of aquatic habitats at a microscale has inspired research on the ecophysiological properties of uncultured microorganisms that thrive in a continuum of dissolved to particulate organic matter. One possibility to link these two aspects is to adopt a “Gleasonian” perspective, i.e., to study aquatic microbial assemblages in situ at the population level rather than looking at microbial community structure, diversity, or function as a whole. This review compiles current knowledge about the role and fate of different populations of heterotrophic picoplankton in marine and inland waters. Specifically, we focus on a growing suite of techniques that link the analysis of bacterial identity with growth, morphology, and various physiological activities at the level of single cells. An overview is given of the potential and limitations of methodological approaches, and factors that might control the population sizes of different microbes in pelagic habitats are discussed. PMID:16148306

  2. Lake size and fish diversity determine resource use and trophic position of a top predator in high-latitude lakes.

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Antti P; Kahilainen, Kimmo K; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Knudsen, Rune; Harrod, Chris; Jones, Roger I

    2015-04-01

    Prey preference of top predators and energy flow across habitat boundaries are of fundamental importance for structure and function of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, as they may have strong effects on production, species diversity, and food-web stability. In lakes, littoral and pelagic food-web compartments are typically coupled and controlled by generalist fish top predators. However, the extent and determinants of such coupling remains a topical area of ecological research and is largely unknown in oligotrophic high-latitude lakes. We analyzed food-web structure and resource use by a generalist top predator, the Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus (L.), in 17 oligotrophic subarctic lakes covering a marked gradient in size (0.5-1084 km(2)) and fish species richness (2-13 species). We expected top predators to shift from littoral to pelagic energy sources with increasing lake size, as the availability of pelagic prey resources and the competition for littoral prey are both likely to be higher in large lakes with multispecies fish communities. We also expected top predators to occupy a higher trophic position in lakes with greater fish species richness due to potential substitution of intermediate consumers (prey fish) and increased piscivory by top predators. Based on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses, the mean reliance of Arctic charr on littoral energy sources showed a significant negative relationship with lake surface area, whereas the mean trophic position of Arctic charr, reflecting the lake food-chain length, increased with fish species richness. These results were supported by stomach contents data demonstrating a shift of Arctic charr from an invertebrate-dominated diet to piscivory on pelagic fish. Our study highlights that, because they determine the main energy source (littoral vs. pelagic) and the trophic position of generalist top predators, ecosystem size and fish diversity are particularly important factors influencing function and

  3. Terrestrial carbon and intraspecific size-variation shape lake ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Mats; Persson, Lennart; De Roos, André M; Jones, Roger I; Tranvik, Lars J

    2007-06-01

    Conceptual models of lake ecosystem structure and function have generally assumed that energy in pelagic systems is derived from in situ photosynthesis and that its use by higher trophic levels depends on the average properties of individuals in consumer populations. These views are challenged by evidence that allochthonous subsidies of organic carbon greatly influence energy mobilization and transfer and the trophic structure of pelagic food webs, and that size variation within consumer species has major ramifications for lake community dynamics and structure. These discoveries represent conceptual shifts that have yet to be integrated into current views on lake ecosystems. Here, we assess key aspects of energy mobilization and size-structured community dynamics, and show how these processes are intertwined in pelagic food webs.

  4. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations : Appendices 1992.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.

    1996-01-01

    These appendices include: A RESERVOIR ELEVATION AND WATER RETENTION TIME: Daily reservoir levels and water retention time in 1992, Elevation vs area, Elevation vs gross storage; B ZOOPLANKTON: Zooplankton density, Zooplanktion biomass; C BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE DATA: Benthic sampling record, Benthic sampling depths, Benthic orders identified, Mean weight values obtained for benthics, D WATER COLUMN PROFILE: Monthly water profiles.

  5. CONCORDANCE OF TAXONOMIC COMPOSITION PATTERNS ACROSS MULTIPLE LAKE ASSEMBLAGES: EFFECTS OF SCALE, BODY SIZE, AND LAND USE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed environmental gradients and the extent to which they induced concordant patterns of taxonomic composition among benthic macroinvertebrate, riparian bird, sedimentary diatom, fish, and pelagic zooplankton assemblages in 186 northeastern U.S.A. lakes. Human population ...

  6. Seismic baseline and induction studies: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Zandt, G.; McPherson, L.; Schaff, S.; Olsen, S.

    1982-05-01

    Local seismic networks were established at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area, utah and at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho to monitor the background seismicity prior to initiation of geothermal power production. The Raft River study area is currently seismically quiet down to the level of approximately magnitude one. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area has low-level seismic activity for M/sub L/ greater than about two; however, microearthquake (M/sub L/ less than or equal to 2) swarms appear to be relatively common. One swarm occurred adjacent to the Roosevelt geothermal area during the summer of 1981. From June 27 to August 28, 1044 microearthquakes (M/sub L/ less than or equal to 1.5) were recorded from which 686 earthquakes were located and analysed. The main cluster of microearthquakes was located about 2 km east of the production field at a depth of about 5 km. A few small events were located in the production field at shallow depths (< 2 km). Three of the four largest earthquakes in the swarm (M/sub L/ 1.5-2.0) were located 4 to 5 km further east along a n-NW trend beneath the flank of the adjacent Mineral Mountains. Focal mechanism solutions indicate primarily normal faulting due to the regional E-W extension which characterizes this portion of the eastern Basin and Range province. Hence, the Mineral Mountain swarm appears to be a natural release of tectonic stress in this area. Nevertheless, the occurrence of natural earthquake swarms indicates a potential for induced seismicity at Roosevelt Hot Springs after major production operations are initiated.

  7. Annual layers in the Roosevelt Island (coastal Antarctica) ice core determined from conductivity and calcium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Marius; Vallelonga, Paul; Kjær, Helle; Neff, Peter; Bertler, Nancy; Svensson, Anders; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Riis, Marie

    2015-04-01

    The Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) Project aims to determine the stability of the Ross Ice Shelf and thus the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in a warming world. A 764 m ice core (79.36° S, 161.71° W) was drilled in 2011-13 at the summit of the Roosevelt Island ice dome, a location surrounded by the Ross Ice Shelf. The site has high accumulation (0.26 m ice equivalent) and a mean annual temperature of -23 °C. From 2012 to 2014, continuous flow analysis (CFA) of the ice core enabled continuous measurements of conductivity, acidity, calcium and insoluble dust particle concentrations along the core. The RICE ice core features high background levels of sulphate and marine salts, due to the low altitude of the site (550 m asl) and its proximity to open ocean. At Roosevelt Island, calcium is influenced by both dust and marine salt inputs. By investigating the residual offset between conductivity and calcium, it has been possible to calculate non-sea salt conductivity and hence determine impurity layers deriving from volcanic eruptions. We present a preliminary chronology for the last 2000 years of deposition in the RICE ice core, composed of counted impurity layers and constrained by a limited number of large, well-dated volcanic eruptions.

  8. Title: Biogenic Magnetite Prevails in Oxic Pelagic Red Clay Core in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimono, T.; Yamazaki, T.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have been observed in wide variety of environments, including soils, freshwater lakes, and marine sediments, since Blakemore (1975) first described in 1975. Magnetotactic bacteria, which most commonly live within the oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) of aquatic environments, produce intracellular crystals of magnetic minerals, specifically magnetite or greigite. It is considered that the magnetite/greigite crystals facilitate the bacteria's search for optimal conditions within the sharp chemical gradients of the OATZ. Petermann and Bleil (1993) reported living magnetotactic bacteria in pelagic and hemipelagic sediments near OATZ in the eastern South Atlantic at water depths to about 3,000 m, but they couldn't find actively swimming magnetotactic bacteria in sediments of deeper water depths. The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is far from continents and the lowest productivity region on Earth. IODP site U1365 (water depth ~5,700 m) cored pelagic red clay of 75.5 m thick above ~100 Ma basement (except for the chart layer from ~42 to 63.5 m) in the western edge of the SPG. The core mainly consists of iron rich clay. The color is dark reddish and/or dark brown throughout the core. We conducted a paleomagnetic and environmental rock magnetic study of the pelagic clay core. The magnetostratigraphy revealed the top 5 m sediments cover the last 5 My, and sedimentation rate decreases downward from 1.7 to 0.6 m/m.y. Geochemical measurements of pore water indicate that dissolved oxygen was present throughout the core (>50 μM). Thus oxygen penetrates through the entire sediment column to the sediment/basalt interface, and there is no OATZ. Magnetic mineral assemblage of this core is dominated by biogenic magnetite despite no OATZ. First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams of all specimens have a narrow central ridge along the Hc axis with very small vertical spread. This indicates very weak magnetostatic interaction (Roberts et al., 2000), and is the

  9. Illegal, Unethical or Just Fattening? A Revisionist Look at the FTC Hearings on Electric Utility Public Relations and Franklin Roosevelt's 1932 Public Power Pledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Myron K.

    Did President Franklin D. Roosevelt's condemnation of electric utility public relations represent a fair interpretation of the findings of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) investigation into the electric utility industry as authorized by Senate Resolution 83 in February, 1928, or were Roosevelt's statements simply campaign hyperbole that met the…

  10. IN-SITU DUOX™ CHEMICAL OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO TREAT CHLORINATED ORGANICS AT THE ROOSEVELT MILLS SITE, VERNON, CT: SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND TREATABILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was performed investigating the feasibility of applying the DUOX™ chemical oxidation technology to chlorinated solvent contaminated media at the Roosevelt Mills site in Vernon, Connecticut. The Roosevelt Mills site is a former woolen mill that included dry cleaning operat...

  11. Viral and grazer regulation of prokaryotic growth efficiency in temperate freshwater pelagic environments.

    PubMed

    Pradeep Ram, A S; Colombet, Jonathan; Perriere, Fanny; Thouvenot, Antoine; Sime-Ngando, Telesphore

    2015-02-01

    In aquatic systems, limited data exists on the impact of mortality forces such as viral lysis and flagellate grazing when seeking to explain factors regulating prokaryotic metabolism. We explored the relative influence of top-down factors (viral lysis and heterotrophic nanoflagellate grazing) on prokaryotic mortality and their subsequent impact on their community metabolism in the euphotic zone of 21 temperate freshwater lakes located in the French Massif Central. Prokaryotic growth efficiency (PGE, index of prokaryotic community metabolism) determined from prokaryotic production and respiration measurements varied from 5 to 74% across the lakes. Viral and potential grazer-induced mortality of prokaryotes had contrasting impact on PGE. Potential flagellate grazing was found to enhance PGE whereas viral lysis had antagonistic impacts on PGE. The average PGE value in the grazing and viral lysis dominated lake water samples was 35.4% (±15.2%) and 17.2% (±8.1%), respectively. Selective viral lysis or flagellate grazing on prokaryotes together with the nature of contrasted substrates released through mortality processes can perhaps explain for the observed variation and differences in PGE among the studied lakes. The influences of such specific top-down processes on PGE can have strong implications on the carbon and nutrient fluxes in freshwater pelagic environments.

  12. Aggregation of organic matter by pelagic tunicates

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.; Deibel, D.

    1980-07-01

    Three genera of pelagic tunicates were fed concentrates of natural seston and an axenic diatom culture. Fresh and up to 4-day-old feces resemble flocculent organic aggregates containing populations of microorganisms, as described from highly productive parts of the ocean, and older feces resemble the nearly sterile flocculent aggregates which are ubiquitous in surface waters. Fresh feces consist of partially digested phytoplankton and other inclusions in an amorphous gelatinous matrix. After 18 to 36 h, a population of large bacteria develops in the matrix and in some of the remains of phytoplankton contained in the feces. From 48 to 96 h, protozoan populations arise which consume the bacteria and sometimes the remains of the phytoplankton in the feces. Thereafter only a sparse population of microorganisms remains, and the particles begin to fragment. Water samples taken in or below dense populations of salps and doliolids contained greater numbers of flocculent aggregates than did samples from adjacent stations.

  13. Roosting ecology and the evolution of pelage markings in bats.

    PubMed

    Santana, Sharlene E; Dial, Thomas O; Eiting, Thomas P; Alfaro, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Multiple lineages of bats have evolved striking facial and body pelage makings, including spots, stripes and countershading. Although researchers have hypothesized that these markings mainly evolved for crypsis, this idea has never been tested in a quantitative and comparative context. We present the first comparative study integrating data on roosting ecology (roost type and colony size) and pelage coloration patterns across bats, and explore the hypothesis that the evolution of bat pelage markings is associated with roosting ecologies that benefit from crypsis. We find that lineages that roost in the vegetation have evolved pelage markings, especially stripes and neck collars, which may function in crypsis through disruptive coloration and a type of countershading that might be unique to bats. We also demonstrate that lineages that live in larger colonies and are larger in size tend not to have pelage markings, possibly because of reduced predation pressures due to the predator dilution effect and a lower number of potential predators. Although social functions for pelage color patterns are also possible, our work provides strong support for the idea that roosting ecology has driven the evolution of pelage markings in bats.

  14. Patterns in Benthic Biodiversity Link Lake Trophic Status to Structure and Potential Function of Three Large, Deep Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Hayford, Barbara L.; Caires, Andrea M.; Chandra, Sudeep; Girdner, Scott F.

    2015-01-01

    Relative to their scarcity, large, deep lakes support a large proportion of the world’s freshwater species. This biodiversity is threatened by human development and is in need of conservation. Direct comparison of biodiversity is the basis of biological monitoring for conservation but is difficult to conduct between large, insular ecosystems. The objective of our study was to conduct such a comparison of benthic biodiversity between three of the world’s largest lakes: Lake Tahoe, USA; Lake Hövsgöl, Mongolia; and Crater Lake, USA. We examined biodiversity of common benthic organism, the non-biting midges (Chironomidae) and determined lake trophic status using chironomid-based lake typology, tested whether community structure was similar between the three lakes despite geographic distance; and tested whether chironomid diversity would show significant variation within and between lakes. Typology analysis indicated that Lake Hövsgöl was ultra-oligotrophic, Crater Lake was oligotrophic, and Lake Tahoe was borderline oligotrophic/mesotrophic. These results were similar to traditional pelagic measures of lake trophic status for Lake Hövsgöl and Crater Lake but differed for Lake Tahoe, which has been designated as ultra-oligotrophic by traditional pelagic measures such as transparency found in the literature. Analysis of similarity showed that Lake Tahoe and Lake Hövsgöl chironomid communities were more similar to each other than either was to Crater Lake communities. Diversity varied between the three lakes and spatially within each lake. This research shows that chironomid communities from these large lakes were sensitive to trophic conditions. Chironomid communities were similar between the deep environments of Lake Hövsgöl and Lake Tahoe, indicating that chironomid communities from these lakes may be useful in comparing trophic state changes in large lakes. Spatial variation in Lake Tahoe’s diversity is indicative of differential response of chironomid

  15. Presidents and health reform: from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Barack Obama.

    PubMed

    Morone, James A

    2010-06-01

    The health care reforms that President Barack Obama signed into law in March 2010 were seventy-five years in the making. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt, U.S. presidents have struggled to enact national health care reform; most failed. This article explores the highly charged political landscape in which Obama maneuvered and the skills he brought to bear. It contrasts his accomplishments with the experiences of his Oval Office predecessors. Going forward, implementation poses formidable challenges for Democrats, Republicans, and the political process itself.

  16. Bathythermal habitat use by strains of Great Lakes- and Finger Lakes-origin lake trout in Lake Huron after a change in prey fish abundance and composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.; Argyle, Ray L.; Krueger, Charles C.; Taylor, William W.

    2012-01-01

    A study conducted in Lake Huron during October 1998–June 2001 found that strains of Great Lakes-origin (GLO) lake trout Salvelinus namaycush occupied significantly higher temperatures than did Finger Lakes-origin (FLO; New York) lake trout based on data from archival (or data storage) telemetry tags that recorded only temperature. During 2002 and 2003, we implanted archival tags that recorded depth as well as temperature in GLO and FLO lake trout in Lake Huron. Data subsequently recorded by those tags spanned 2002–2005. Based on those data, we examined whether temperatures and depths occupied by GLO and FLO lake trout differed during 2002–2005. Temperatures occupied during those years were also compared with occupied temperatures reported for 1998–2001, before a substantial decline in prey fish biomass. Temperatures occupied by GLO lake trout were again significantly higher than those occupied by FLO lake trout. This result supports the conclusion of the previous study. The GLO lake trout also occupied significantly shallower depths than FLO lake trout. In 2002–2005, both GLO and FLO lake trout occupied significantly lower temperatures than they did in 1998–2001. Aside from the sharp decline in prey fish biomass between study periods, the formerly abundant pelagic alewife Alosa pseudoharengus virtually disappeared and the demersal round goby Neogobius melanostomus invaded the lake and became locally abundant. The lower temperatures occupied by lake trout in Lake Huron during 2002–2005 may be attributable to changes in the composition of the prey fish community, food scarcity (i.e., a retreat to cooler water could increase conversion efficiency), or both.

  17. 50 CFR 622.274 - Pelagic longline closed areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.274 Pelagic longline closed areas. (a) If... dolphin or wahoo— (1) In the Northeastern United States closed area from June 1 through June 30 each...

  18. 50 CFR 622.274 - Pelagic longline closed areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.274 Pelagic longline closed areas. (a) If... dolphin or wahoo— (1) In the Northeastern United States closed area from June 1 through June 30 each...

  19. Percentage of microbeads in pelagic microplastics within Japanese coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Atsuhiko

    2016-09-15

    To compare the quantity of microbeads with the quantity of pelagic microplastics potentially degraded in the marine environment, samples were collected in coastal waters of Japan using neuston nets. Pelagic spherical microbeads were collected in the size range below 0.8mm at 9 of the 26 stations surveyed. The number of pelagic microbeads smaller than 0.8mm accounted for 9.7% of all microplastics collected at these 9 stations. This relatively large percentage results from a decrease in the abundance of microplastics smaller than 0.8mm in the upper ocean, as well as the regular loading of new microbeads from land areas, in this size range. In general, microbeads in personal care and cosmetic products are not always spherical, but rather are often a variety of irregular shapes. It is thus likely that this percentage is a conservative estimate, because of the irregular shapes of the remaining pelagic microbeads.

  20. Near shore-wetland fish movements in the Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linkages of Great Lakes coastal wetlands and near shore habitats are under-explored, yet 90 species of fish are known to utilize wetlands for spawning and/or nursery habitat. The duration and frequency of wetland use for pelagic species with mobile adult stages is also poorly un...

  1. A new look at the Lake Superior biomass size spectrum

    EPA Science Inventory

    We synthesized data from multiple sampling programs and years to describe the Lake Superior pelagic biomass size structure for two time periods separated by 5 years. The data consisted of water analyzed on a Coulter counter for algae, in situ measurements with a laser optical pl...

  2. Food Web Topology in High Mountain Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Hernández, Javier; Cobo, Fernando; Amundsen, Per-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Although diversity and limnology of alpine lake systems are well studied, their food web structure and properties have rarely been addressed. Here, the topological food webs of three high mountain lakes in Central Spain were examined. We first addressed the pelagic networks of the lakes, and then we explored how food web topology changed when benthic biota was included to establish complete trophic networks. We conducted a literature search to compare our alpine lacustrine food webs and their structural metrics with those of 18 published lentic webs using a meta-analytic approach. The comparison revealed that the food webs in alpine lakes are relatively simple, in terms of structural network properties (linkage density and connectance), in comparison with lowland lakes, but no great differences were found among pelagic networks. The studied high mountain food webs were dominated by a high proportion of omnivores and species at intermediate trophic levels. Omnivores can exploit resources at multiple trophic levels, and this characteristic might reduce competition among interacting species. Accordingly, the trophic overlap, measured as trophic similarity, was very low in all three systems. Thus, these alpine networks are characterized by many omnivorous consumers with numerous prey species and few consumers with a single or few prey and with low competitive interactions among species. The present study emphasizes the ecological significance of omnivores in high mountain lakes as promoters of network stability and as central players in energy flow pathways via food partitioning and enabling energy mobility among trophic levels. PMID:26571235

  3. Food Web Topology in High Mountain Lakes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Javier; Cobo, Fernando; Amundsen, Per-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Although diversity and limnology of alpine lake systems are well studied, their food web structure and properties have rarely been addressed. Here, the topological food webs of three high mountain lakes in Central Spain were examined. We first addressed the pelagic networks of the lakes, and then we explored how food web topology changed when benthic biota was included to establish complete trophic networks. We conducted a literature search to compare our alpine lacustrine food webs and their structural metrics with those of 18 published lentic webs using a meta-analytic approach. The comparison revealed that the food webs in alpine lakes are relatively simple, in terms of structural network properties (linkage density and connectance), in comparison with lowland lakes, but no great differences were found among pelagic networks. The studied high mountain food webs were dominated by a high proportion of omnivores and species at intermediate trophic levels. Omnivores can exploit resources at multiple trophic levels, and this characteristic might reduce competition among interacting species. Accordingly, the trophic overlap, measured as trophic similarity, was very low in all three systems. Thus, these alpine networks are characterized by many omnivorous consumers with numerous prey species and few consumers with a single or few prey and with low competitive interactions among species. The present study emphasizes the ecological significance of omnivores in high mountain lakes as promoters of network stability and as central players in energy flow pathways via food partitioning and enabling energy mobility among trophic levels.

  4. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea

    PubMed Central

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Sheehy, Coleman M.; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-01-01

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans. PMID:24648228

  5. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Sheehy, Coleman M; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-05-07

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans.

  6. Range contraction in large pelagic predators

    PubMed Central

    Worm, Boris; Tittensor, Derek P.

    2011-01-01

    Large reductions in the abundance of exploited land predators have led to significant range contractions for those species. This pattern can be formalized as the range–abundance relationship, a general macroecological pattern that has important implications for the conservation of threatened species. Here we ask whether similar responses may have occurred in highly mobile pelagic predators, specifically 13 species of tuna and billfish. We analyzed two multidecadal global data sets on the spatial distribution of catches and fishing effort targeting these species and compared these with available abundance time series from stock assessments. We calculated the effort needed to reliably detect the presence of a species and then computed observed range sizes in each decade from 1960 to 2000. Results suggest significant range contractions in 9 of the 13 species considered here (between 2% and 46% loss of observed range) and significant range expansions in two species (11–29% increase). Species that have undergone the largest declines in abundance and are of particular conservation concern tended to show the largest range contractions. These include all three species of bluefin tuna and several marlin species. In contrast, skipjack tuna, which may have increased its abundance in the Pacific, has also expanded its range size. These results mirror patterns described for many land predators, despite considerable differences in habitat, mobility, and dispersal, and imply ecological extirpation of heavily exploited species across parts of their range. PMID:21693644

  7. Acord 1-26 hot, dry well, Roosevelt Hot Springs hot dry rock prospect, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Pettitt, R.; Rowley, J.; Goff, F.; Mathews, M.; Jacobson, J.J.

    1983-08-01

    The Acord 1-26 well is a hot, dry well peripheral to the Roosevelt Hot Springs known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in southwestern Utah. The bottom-hole temperature in this 3854-m-deep well is 230/sup 0/C, and the thermal gradient is 54/sup 0/C/km. The basal 685 m, comprised of biotite monzonite and quartz schist and gneiss, is a likely hot, dry rock (HDR) prospect. The hole was drilled in a structural low within the Milford Valley graben and is separated from the Roosevelt KGRA to the east by the Opal Mound Fault and other basin faults. An interpretation of seismic data approximates the subsurface structure around the well using the lithology in the Acord 1-26 well. The hole was drilled with a minimum of difficulty, and casing was set to 2411 m. From drilling and geophysical logs, it is deduced that the subsurface blocks of crystalline rock in the vicinity of the Acord 1-26 well are tight, dry, shallow, impermeable, and very hot. A hydraulic fracture test of the crystalline rocks below 3170 m is recommended. Various downhole tools and techniques could be tested in promising HDR regimes within the Acord 1-26 well.

  8. Hot dry rock geothermal potential of Roosevelt Hot Springs area: review of data and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    East, J.

    1981-05-01

    The Roosevelt Hot Springs area in west-central Utah possesses several features indicating potential for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. The area is characterized by extensional tectonics and a high regional heat flow of greater than 105 mW/m/sup 2/. The presence of silicic volcanic rocks as young as 0.5 to 0.8 Myr and totaling 14 km/sup 3/ in volume indicates underlying magma reservoirs may be the heat source for the thermal anomaly. Several hot dry wells have been drilled on the periphery of the geothermal field. Information obtained on three of these deep wells shows that they have thermal gradients of 55 to 60/sup 0/C/km and bottom in impermeable Tertiary granitic and Precambrian gneissic units. The Tertiary granite is the preferred HDR reservoir rock because Precambrian gneissic rocks possess a well-developed banded foliation, making fracture control over the reservoir more difficult. Based on a fairly conservative estimate of 160 km/sup 2/ for the thermal anomaly present at Roosevelt Hot Springs, the area designated favorable for HDR geothermal exploration may be on the order of seven times or more than the hydrogeothermal area currently under development.

  9. Roosevelt elk density and social segregation: Foraging behavior and females avoiding larger groups of males

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weckerly, F.; McFarland, K.; Ricca, M.; Meyer, K.

    2004-01-01

    Intersexual social segregation at small spatial scales is prevalent in ruminants that are sexually dimorphic in body size. Explaining social segregation, however, from hypotheses of how intersexual size differences affects the foraging process of males and females has had mixed results. We studied whether body size influences on forage behavior, intersexual social incompatibility or both might influence social segregation in a population of Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelt) that declined 40% over 5 y. Most males and females in the population occurred in the same forage patches, meadows, but occupied different parts of meadows and most groups were overwhelming comprised of one sex. The extent of segregation varied slightly with changing elk density. Cropping rate, our surrogate of forage ingestion, of males in mixed-sex groups differed from males in male-only groups at high, but not low, elk density. In a prior study of intersexual social interactions it was shown that females avoided groups containing ???6 males. Therefore, we predicted that females should avoid parts of meadows where groups of males ???6 were prevalent. Across the 5 y of study this prediction held because ???5% of all females were found in parts of meadows where median aggregation sizes of males were ???6. Social segregation was coupled to body size influences on forage ingestion at high density and social incompatibility was coupled to social segregation regardless of elk density.

  10. RICE ice core: Black Carbon reflects climate variability at Roosevelt Island, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Aja; Edwards, Ross; Bertler, Nancy; Winton, Holly; Goodwin, Ian; Neff, Peter; Tuohy, Andrea; Proemse, Bernadette; Hogan, Chad; Feiteng, Wang

    2015-04-01

    The Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) project successfully drilled a deep ice core from Roosevelt Island during the 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 seasons. Located in the Ross Ice Shelf in West Antarctica, the site is an ideal location for investigating climate variability and the past stability of the Ross Ice Shelf. Black carbon (BC) aerosols are emitted by both biomass burning and fossil fuels, and BC particles emitted in the southern hemisphere are transported in the atmosphere and preserved in Antarctic ice. The past record of BC is expected to be sensitive to climate variability, as it is modulated by both emissions and transport. To investigate BC variability over the past 200 years, we developed a BC record from two overlapping ice cores (~1850-2012) and a high-resolution snow pit spanning 2010-2012 (cal. yr). Consistent results are found between the snow pit profiles and ice core records. Distinct decadal trends are found with respect to BC particle size, and the record indicates a steady rise in BC particle size over the last 100 years. Differences in emission sources and conditions may be a possible explanation for changes in BC size. These records also show a significant increase in BC concentration over the past decade with concentrations rising over 1.5 ppb (1.5*10^-9 ng/g), suggesting a fundamental shift in BC deposition to the site.

  11. An assessment, using stable isotopes, of the importance of allochthonous organic carbon sources to the pelagic food web in Loch Ness

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R. I.; Grey, J.; Sleep, D.; Quarmby, C.

    1998-01-01

    The natural abundance of stable isotopes (δ13C and δ1315N) was determined for components of the pelagic food web in Loch Ness, a deep oligotrophic lake in northern Scotland, and compared with values from the inflow rivers and the catchment vegetation. Phytoplankton δ13C was low compared to values reported from other lakes, possibly reflecting a high use of 13C-depleted carbon dioxide from respired organic matter before further isotopic fractionation during photosynthesis. Phytoplankton δ13C was appreciably lower than that of dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM) in the loch. The DOM and POM were evidently overwhelmingly of allochthonous origin and ultimately derived from terrestrial plant detritus. The distinctive δ13C values for phytoplankton and detritus in the loch allowed the use of food sources by grazing crustacean zooplankton to be assessed, and the contributions of phytoplankton carbon and detrital carbon to zooplankton total body carbon appeared to be about equal. Comparison of δ13C and δ15N values for zooplankton and fish allowed assessment of trophic structure in the loch. The very high dependence of the pelagic food web in Loch Ness on allochthonous organic matter inputs from the catchment may be exceptional in a large lake, but has important implications for our understanding of lake ecosystem processes as well as for lake management.

  12. Carbon dioxide supersaturation promotes primary production in lakes.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Mats; Karlsson, Jan; Jonsson, Anders

    2012-06-01

    A majority of the world's lakes are supersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide (CO(2) ). By experimental manipulation of the CO(2) concentration in supersaturated boreal lakes, we demonstrate that phytoplankton primary production was up to 10 times higher in supersaturated lake water in comparison with water with CO(2) at equilibrium concentrations and that CO(2) , together with nutrients, explained most of the variation in pelagic primary production and phytoplankton biomass over a wide variety of unproductive lakes. These results suggest that phytoplankton can be co-limited by CO(2) and nutrients in unproductive lakes. As import of terrestrial organic carbon and its subsequent microbial mineralisation in lakes is a driving force of CO(2) -supersaturation our results suggest that lake productivity and carbon cycling may respond to variations in terrestrial organic carbon export, (e.g. caused by land use or climate change) in ways not described before.

  13. "A Date Which Will Live in Infamy": The First Typed Draft of Franklin D. Roosevelt's War Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamel, Wynell Burroughs; West, Jean

    1991-01-01

    Presents suggestions for teaching activities and student projects using Franklin Roosevelt's war address following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Recommends vocabulary emphasis, class discussion, and classroom listening to a recording of the speech. Suggests comparing the speech to Patrick Henry's famous speech and interviewing individuals…

  14. A Comparative Case Study of Self-Actualization in Eleanor Roosevelt and Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyska, Cynthia Ann

    Eleanor Roosevelt and Antoine de Saint-Exupery are described as strongly developed self-actualizing people. They were selected as subjects of this study because they are generally believed to possess self-actualizing characteristics and because their positions as public figures made it more likely that data on them would be accessible.…

  15. 77 FR 60981 - TGP Granada, LLC and Roosevelt Wind Ranch, LLC v. Public Service Company of New Mexico, Tortoise...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. EL12-42-000, EL12-42-001; EL12-43-000, EL12-43-001 TGP Granada, LLC and Roosevelt Wind Ranch, LLC v. Public Service Company of New Mexico, Tortoise Capital...

  16. Continuous and discrete measurements of atmospheric methane from an ice core from Roosevelt Island, East Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunier, T.; Simonsen, M. F.; Brook, E.; Lee, J.; Vallelonga, P. T.; Bertler, N. A. N.

    2014-12-01

    A new ice core from Roosevelt Island was drilled for the Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) project to establish the history of deglaciation of the Ross Sea. Evidence of glacial retreat in the Ross Sea Embayment shows that deglaciation happened in several stages of rapid collapse and persisted well after the melting of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets was complete. The drill location on a small island surrounded by sea ice makes dating the core a challenge. We present a timescale for Roosevelt Island using mixing ratios of methane in air preserved within the ice core measured continuously with a Picarro laser spectrometer as well as in high-resolution with gas chromatography (GC). Discrete data from GC analysis over the top 400m of core replicate both the magnitude and variations from other high-resolution ice core records from WAIS Divide, Law Dome, GISP2 and NEEM S1. Both the continuous and discrete methane records of the RICE core were matched to these established records and provide an accurate and consistent depth-age relationship for the past 3.6kyr. The deeper part of the core was measured continuously in July 2014. First inspection of the data suggests that the oldest section of the core reaches into the previous interglacial (Eemian). We will present preliminary evaluated continuous methane data for the deeper part of the core together with a first time scale for the Roosevelt Island ice core.

  17. Geochemistry of sericite and chlorite in well 14-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal system and in mineralized hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ballantyne, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    Chemical compositions of chlorite and sericite from one production well in the Roosevelt geothermal system have been determined by electron probe methods and compared with compositions of chlorite and sericite from porphyry copper deposits. Modern system sericite and chlorite occur over a depth interval of 2 km and a temperature interval of 250/sup 0/C.

  18. Letters from George Washington and Samuel Cabble, and Speeches by Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author uses several primary sources to demonstrate that George Washington, Samuel Cabble, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and John F. Kennedy stated their awareness of contemporary challenges, but looked to the future with hope and optimism. When they envisioned the future, their words indicated that they did not just imagine it, but…

  19. Dealing with Disaster through Compassionate Giving: San Francisco Earthquake Survivors Write to President Theodore Roosevelt, January 3, 1909

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussey, Michael

    2011-01-01

    On January 3, 1909, Emily Hamilton and Louis Overstreet wrote to President Theodore Roosevelt begging his "leave to work under your Committee for the relief of the sufferers of Italy." The two were engaged and were willing to rush their marriage plans if the president needed them. Their letter was prompted by the powerful earthquake that…

  20. Evaluation of methods to estimate lake herring spawner abundance in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yule, D.L.; Stockwell, J.D.; Cholwek, G.A.; Evrard, L.M.; Schram, S.; Seider, M.; Symbal, M.

    2006-01-01

    Historically, commercial fishers harvested Lake Superior lake herring Coregonus artedi for their flesh, but recently operators have targeted lake herring for roe. Because no surveys have estimated spawning female abundance, direct estimates of fishing mortality are lacking. The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using acoustic techniques in combination with midwater trawling to estimate spawning female lake herring densities in a Lake Superior statistical grid (i.e., a 10′ latitude × 10′ longitude area over which annual commercial harvest statistics are compiled). Midwater trawling showed that mature female lake herring were largely pelagic during the night in late November, accounting for 94.5% of all fish caught exceeding 250 mm total length. When calculating acoustic estimates of mature female lake herring, we excluded backscattering from smaller pelagic fishes like immature lake herring and rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax by applying an empirically derived threshold of −35.6 dB. We estimated the average density of mature females in statistical grid 1409 at 13.3 fish/ha and the total number of spawning females at 227,600 (95% confidence interval = 172,500–282,700). Using information on mature female densities, size structure, and fecundity, we estimate that females deposited 3.027 billion (109) eggs in grid 1409 (95% confidence interval = 2.356–3.778 billion). The relative estimation error of the mature female density estimate derived using a geostatistical model—based approach was low (12.3%), suggesting that the employed method was robust. Fishing mortality rates of all mature females and their eggs were estimated at 2.3% and 3.8%, respectively. The techniques described for enumerating spawning female lake herring could be used to develop a more accurate stock–recruitment model for Lake Superior lake herring.

  1. Lake morphometry and wind exposure may shape the plankton community structure in acidic mining lakes.

    PubMed

    Weithoff, Guntram; Moser, Michael; Kamjunke, Norbert; Gaedke, Ursula; Weisse, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Acidic mining lakes (pH <3) are specific habitats exhibiting particular chemical and biological characteristics. The species richness is low and mixotrophy and omnivory are common features of the plankton food web in such lakes. The plankton community structure of mining lakes of different morphometry and mixing type but similar chemical characteristics (Lake 130, Germany and Lake Langau, Austria) was investigated. The focus was laid on the species composition, the trophic relationship between the phago-mixotrophic flagellate Ochromonas sp. and bacteria and the formation of a deep chlorophyll maximum along a vertical pH-gradient. The shallow wind-exposed Lake 130 exhibited a higher species richness than Lake Langau. This increase in species richness was made up mainly by mero-planktic species, suggesting a strong benthic/littoral - pelagic coupling. Based on the field data from both lakes, a nonlinear, negative relation between bacteria and Ochromonas biomass was found, suggesting that at an Ochromonas biomass below 50 μg C L(-1), the grazing pressure on bacteria is low and with increasing Ochromonas biomass bacteria decline. Furthermore, in Lake Langau, a prominent deep chlorophyll maximum was found with chlorophyll concentrations ca. 50 times higher than in the epilimnion which was build up by the euglenophyte Lepocinclis sp. We conclude that lake morphometry, and specific abiotic characteristics such as mixing behaviour influence the community structure in these mining lakes.

  2. Deglacial and lake level fluctuation history recorded in cores, Beaver Lake, Upper Peninsula, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Whitman, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment cores collected from the littoral and pelagic zones of Beaver Lake, Michigan record fluctuations in the water level of Lake Superior. Beaver Lake is a small 300 ha lake in Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (PRNL) now separated from Lake Superior by a dune-capped barrier bar. Cores were collected using a vibracorer from a lake-ice platform in February 1997. A 2.85 m long core in 10 m of water contains well-sorted sand, rhythmites, peat, interbedded sand and gyttja, and is capped with 1 m of massive gyttja. A 9480 BP AMS age from the basal sand provides a minimum deglacial date for the area. Further analysis indicates a sand-dominated depositional environment from a low lake stand at approximately 8500 BP to present. An approximate 8800 BP red to gray sediment color transition records either the cessation of meltwater input from Lake Agassiz or receding ice, while a younger similarly colored transition, 6600 BP in age, likely records sediment reworking in the coastal zone. Four AMS ages on peat range from 8520 to 7340 BP and are indicative of the Houghton low phase. Burial of the peat by stratified sand and gyttja after 7340 BP indicates a rising lake level. Peat at a higher level in the lake basin, encountered in shallow littoral cores, ranges in age from 6800 to 6420 BP, which estimates a 0.91 m rise/century in lake level to the Nipissing level by 5000 BP.

  3. The Ecological History of Lake Ontario According to Phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allinger, L. E.; Reavie, E. D.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Ontario's water quality has fluctuated since European settlement and our understanding of the cause-and-effect linkages between observed ecosystem shifts and stressors are evolving and improving. Changes in the physical and chemical environment of the lake due to non-indigenous species, pollution, sedimentation, turbidity and climate change altered the pelagic primary producers, so algal assessments have been valuable for tracking long-term conditions. We present a chronological account of pelagic algal assessments and some nearshore areas to summarize past and present environmental conditions in Lake Ontario. This review particularly focuses on diatom-based assessments as their fossils in sediments have revealed the combined effects of environmental insults and recovery. This review recaps the long-term trends according to three unique regions: Hamilton Harbor, the main lake basin and the Bay of Quinte. We summarize pre-European settlement, eutrophication throughout most of the 20th century, subsequent water quality improvement due to nutrient reductions and filter-feeding dreissenid colonization and contemporary pelagic, shoreline and embayment impairments. Recent pelagic phytoplankton data suggest that although phytoplankton biovolume remains stable, species composition has shifted to an increase in spring eutrophic diatoms and summer blue-green algae. Continued monitoring and evaluation of historical data will assist in understanding and responding to the natural and anthropogenic drivers of Lake Ontario's environmental conditions. As such we have initiated a new paleolimnological investigation, supported by the Environmental Protection Agency-Great Lakes National Program Office, to reconstruct the long-term environmental history of Lake Ontario and will present preliminary results.

  4. The Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) Project - Did the Ross Ice Shelf Collapse During MIS 5e?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertler, N. A. N.; Conway, H.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Blunier, T.; Brook, E.; Dadic, R.; Delmonte, B.; Dongqi, Z.; Edwards, R.; Emanuelsson, D. B.; Fudge, T. J.; Golledge, N.; Hindmarsh, R. C. A.; Hawley, R. L.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Kjær, H. A.; Kurbatov, A.; Lee, J.; Mayewski, P. A.; Naish, T.; Neff, P. D.; Scherer, R. P.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Simonsen, M. F.; Steig, E. J.; Tuohy, A.; Vallelonga, P. T.; Waddington, E. D.

    2014-12-01

    Geological evidence and modelling experiments suggest that the removal of ice shelves from marine based ice sheets can lead to catastrophic collapse. Roosevelt and Ross Islands are thought to be key stabilization anchors for the Ross Ice Shelf and thus the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. As part of the Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) project, a 763m deep ice core was recovered during 2011-2013 from Roosevelt Island, at the northern edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. The ice at Roosevelt Island is grounded 210m below sea level and accumulates in situ, with the Ross Ice Shelf flowing around the rise. High resolution radar surveys show a well developed Raymond Bump at the divide of the ice dome. With the conclusion of the RICE core processing campaign in July 2014, a preliminary age model is developed using annual layer count, volcanic ash layers; and high resolution methane data tied to the WAIS Divide ice core record, and a glacial flow model. Here we show preliminary data spanning over 100 ka including evidence of ice from the Eemian period (MIS 5e) at the base of the core. The presence of Eemian ice in the RICE record raises the question: how much of the Ross Ice Shelf and West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapsed during the last interglacial, when global sea level was 4-8m higher than today? We discuss reconstructions of sea surface and air temperature, sea ice extent, atmospheric circulation patterns, and ice shelf retreat. An ensemble of sensitivity modelling experiments is used to determine thresholds for the removal of ice on Roosevelt Island and correlated grounding line and ice volume changes of the Ross Ice Shelf and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

  5. Restoring piscivorous fish populations in the Laurentian Great Lakes causes seabird dietary change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hebert, C.E.; Weseloh, D.V.C.; Idrissi, A.; Arts, M.T.; O'Gorman, R.; Gorman, O.T.; Locke, B.; Madenjian, C.P.; Roseman, E.F.

    2008-01-01

    Ecosystem change often affects the structure of aquatic communities thereby regulating how much and by what pathways energy and critical nutrients flow through food webs. The availability of energy and essential nutrients to top predators such as seabirds that rely on resources near the water's surface will be affected by changes in pelagic prey abundance. Here, we present results from analysis of a 25-year data set documenting dietary change in a predatory seabird from the Laurentian Great Lakes. We reveal significant declines in trophic position and alterations in energy and nutrient flow over time. Temporal changes in seabird diet tracked decreases in pelagic prey fish abundance. As pelagic prey abundance declined, birds consumed less aquatic prey and more terrestrial food. This pattern was consistent across all five large lake ecosystems. Declines in prey fish abundance may have primarily been the result of predation by stocked piscivorous fishes, but other lake-specific factors were likely also important. Natural resource management activities can have unintended consequences for nontarget ecosystem components. Reductions in pelagic prey abundance have reduced the capacity of the Great Lakes to support the energetic requirements of surface-feeding seabirds. In an environment characterized by increasingly limited pelagic fish resources, they are being offered a Hobsonian choice: switch to less nutritious terrestrial prey or go hungry. ?? 2008 by the Ecological Society of America.

  6. Consistency in trophic magnification factors of cyclic methyl siloxanes in pelagic freshwater food webs leading to brown trout.

    PubMed

    Borgå, Katrine; Fjeld, Eirik; Kierkegaard, Amelie; McLachlan, Michael S

    2013-12-17

    Cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) concentrations were analyzed in the pelagic food web of two Norwegian lakes (Mjøsa, Randsfjorden), and in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) collected in a reference lake (Femunden), in 2012. Lakes receiving discharge from wastewater treatment plants (Mjøsa and Randsfjorden) had cVMS concentrations in trout that were up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those in Femunden, where most samples were close to the limit of quantification (LOQ). Food web biomagnification of cVMS in Mjøsa and Randsfjorden was quantified by estimation of trophic magnification factors (TMFs). TMF for legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were analyzed for comparison. Both decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) biomagnified with TMFs of 2.9 (2.1-4.0) and 2.3 (1.8-3.0), respectively. Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) was below the LOQ in the majority of samples and had substantially lower biomagnification than for D5 and D6. The cVMS TMFs did not differ between the lakes, whereas the legacy POP TMFs were higher in Mjøsa than inRandsfjorden. Whitefish had lower cVMS bioaccumulation compared to legacy POPs, and affected the TMF significance for cVMS, but not for POPs. TMFs of D5 and legacy contaminants in Lake Mjøsa were consistent with those previously measured in Mjøsa.

  7. Investigation of XoxF methanol dehydrogenases reveals new methylotrophic bacteria in pelagic marine and freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Arthi; Walsh, David A

    2015-10-01

    The diversity and distribution of methylotrophic bacteria have been investigated in the oceans and lakes using the methanol dehydrogenase mxaF gene as a functional marker. However, pelagic marine (OM43) and freshwater (LD28 and PRD01a001B) methylotrophs within the Betaproteobacteria lack mxaF, instead possessing a related xoxF4-encoded methanol dehydrogenase. Here, we developed and employed xoxF4 as a complementary functional gene marker to mxaF for studying methylotrophs in aquatic environment. Using xoxF4, we detected OM43-related and LD28-related methylotrophs in the ocean and freshwaters of North America, respectively, and showed the coexistence of these two lineages in a large estuarine system (St Lawrence Estuary). Gene expression patterns of xoxF4 supported a positive relationship between xoxF4-containing methylotroph activity and spring time productivity, suggesting phytoplankton blooms are a source of methylotrophic substrates. Further investigation of methanol dehydrogenase diversity in pelagic ecosystems using comparative metagenomics provided strong support for a widespread distribution of xoxF4 (as well as several distinct xoxF5) containing methylotrophs in marine and freshwater surface waters. In total, these results demonstrate a geographical distribution of OM43/LD28-related methylotrophs that includes marine and freshwaters and suggest that methylotrophy occurring in the water column is an important component of lake and estuary carbon cycling and biogeochemistry.

  8. Population attributes of lake trout in Tennessee reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, Drew; Bettoli, Phillip William

    2013-01-01

    We sampled stocked Salvelinus namaycush (Lake Trout) in Watauga Lake and South Holston Lake, TN using experimental gill nets in 2009-2010 to describe their growth, longevity, and condition. Annuli in sagittal otoliths formed once a year in early spring in both reservoirs. South Holston Lake (n = 99 Lake Trout) has been stocked since 2006, and the oldest fish was age 4. Watauga Lake has been stocked since the mid-1980s, and we collected 158 Lake Trout up to age 20. Annual mortality for age-3 and older fish in Watauga Lake was 24%. When compared to Lake Trout in northern lakes, Tennessee Lake Trout exhibited average to above-average growth and longevity. Condition of Lake Trout in both reservoirs varied seasonally and tended to be lowest in fall, but rebounded in winter and spring. Lake Trout in both reservoirs appeared to be spatially segregated from pelagic prey fishes during summer stratification, but growth rates and body condition were high enough to suggest that neither system was being overstocked.

  9. Trends in Littoral Zone Turbidty at Lake Tahoe During the Previous Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirick, C. M.; McConnell, J. R.; Taylor, K.; Panorska, A. K.

    2001-12-01

    A marked decrease in lake clarity over the past 3 decades at Lake Tahoe has caused both policy makers and scientists to focus their attention on preserving the exceptional clarity of the lake. It has been well established that clarity in the pelagic zone has declined by 30% during this time. However, it is unclear if similar changes have occurred in the littoral zone. While biologic activity appears to be responsible for declines in pelagic zone clarity, other factors may be influencing near-shore clarity and its inverse, turbidity. These include changes in suspended sediment loading from variations in stream discharge, wave action, lake level, and precipitation. In this study, turbidity data from a number of sites in the littoral zone of Lake Tahoe have been analyzed using stochastic methods. The analysis focused on determining if long term trends in turbidity levels in the last decade as well as relationships between environmental and climatological factors and turbidity are statistically significant.

  10. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Lawson, Gareth L.

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function.

  11. Pelagic crinoids (Roveacrinida, Crinoidea) discovered in the Neogene of Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorzelak, Przemysław; Salamon, Mariusz A.; Ferré, Bruno

    2011-10-01

    Until recently, it has been assumed that pelagic crinoids, the roveacrinids (Roveacrinida, Crinoidea), became extinct during the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary event. Recent finds of well-preserved roveacrinidal remains (brachials and radials) in the Danian (Early Paleogene) of Poland showed that they survived into the earliest Cenozoic. This group was thus characterized as a "dead clade walking". Here, we present fossil evidence that these pelagic crinoids survived in Poland until at least the Middle Miocene (Badenian, ca. 14 Myr ago)—more than 50 Myr after their supposed extinction. These Miocene roveacrinids constitute the first documented evidence of Roveacrinida in strata of Neogene age, thus prolonging the stratigraphic range of pelagic crinoids. This find characterizes the order as a "Lazarus taxon" rather than a "dead clade walking" group.

  12. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Lawson, Gareth L

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function.

  13. Nearshore energy subsidies support Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates following major changes in food web structure.

    PubMed

    Turschak, Benjamin A; Bunnell, David; Czesny, Sergiusz; Höök, Tomas O; Janssen, John; Warner, David; Bootsma, Harvey A

    2014-05-01

    Aquatic food webs that incorporate multiple energy channels (e.g., nearshore benthic and pelagic) with varying productivity and turnover rates convey stability to biological communities by providing independent energy sources. Within the Lake Michigan food web, invasive dreissenid mussels have caused rapid changes to food web structure and potentially altered the channels through which consumers acquire energy. We used stable C and N isotopes to determine how Lake Michigan food web structure has changed in the past decade, coincident with the expansion of dreissenid mussels, decreased pelagic phytoplankton production, and increased nearshore benthic algal production. Fish and invertebrate samples collected from sites around Lake Michigan were analyzed to determine taxa-specific 13C:12C (delta13C) and 15N:14N (delta15N) ratios. Sampling took place during two distinct periods, 2002-2003 and 2010-2012, that spanned the period of dreissenid expansion, and included nearshore, pelagic and profundal fish and invertebrate taxa. The magnitude and direction of the delta13C shift indicated significantly greater reliance upon nearshore benthic energy sources among nearly all fish taxa as well as profundal invertebrates following dreissenid expansion. Although the mechanisms underlying this delta13C shift likely varied among species, possible causes include the transport of benthic algal production to offshore waters and increased feeding on nearshore prey items by pelagic and profundal species. delta15N shifts were more variable and of smaller magnitude across taxa, although declines in delta15N among some pelagic fishes suggest a shift to alternative prey resources. Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates appear to have responded to dreissenid-induced changes in nutrient and energy pathways by switching from pelagic to alternative nearshore energy subsidies. Although large shifts in energy allocation (i.e., pelagic to nearshore benthic) resulting from invasive species appear

  14. A new age constraint on the deglaciation of the Ross Sea from an ice core from Roosevelt Island, East Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. E.; Brook, E.; Blunier, T.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Vallelonga, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    A new ice core from Roosevelt Island was drilled for the Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) project to establish the history of deglaciation of the Ross Sea through the Holocene. Evidence of glacial retreat in the Ross Sea Embayment shows that deglaciation happened in several stages of rapid collapse and persisted well after the melting of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets was complete. The ice rise on Roosevelt Island should record the timing of the recession of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) past Roosevelt Island. The transition between ice originating from WAIS and ice originating local to Roosevelt Island could, in principle, be identified in the RICE ice core by the Total Air Content (TAC), which depends on surface air pressure and climate. Because the accumulation zone of WAIS is at a higher altitude than Roosevelt Island, it is expected that TAC will record a sharp drop during the transition. Existing data back to 3.7 ka show a relatively constant air content, probably implying only small elevation changes over that time. New results from deeper sections will be discussed at the meeting.

  15. Sedimentary DNA Reveals Cyanobacterial Community Diversity over 200 Years in Two Perialpine Lakes.

    PubMed

    Monchamp, Marie-Eve; Walser, Jean-Claude; Pomati, Francesco; Spaak, Piet

    2016-11-01

    We reconstructed cyanobacterial community structure and phylogeny using DNA that was isolated from layers of stratified sediments spanning 200 years of lake history in the perialpine lakes Greifensee and Lake Zurich (Switzerland). Community analysis based on amplification and sequencing of a 400-nucleotide (nt)-long 16S rRNA fragment specific to Cyanobacteria revealed operational taxonomic units (OTUs) capturing the whole phylum, including representatives of a newly characterized clade termed Melainabacteria, which shares common ancestry with Cyanobacteria and has not been previously described in lakes. The reconstruction of cyanobacterial richness and phylogenetic structure was validated using a data set consisting of 40 years of pelagic microscopic counts from each lake. We identified the OTUs assigned to common taxa known to be present in Greifensee and Lake Zurich and found a strong and significant relationship (adjusted R(2) = 0.89; P < 0.001) between pelagic species richness in water and OTU richness in the sediments. The water-sediment richness relationship varied between cyanobacterial orders, indicating that the richness of Chroococcales and Synechococcales may be underestimated by microscopy. PCR detection of the microcystin synthetase gene mcyA confirmed the presence of potentially toxic cyanobacterial taxa over recent years in Greifensee and throughout the last century in Lake Zurich. The approach presented in this study demonstrates that it is possible to reconstruct past pelagic cyanobacterial communities in lakes where the integrity of the sedimentary archive is well preserved and to explore changes in phylogenetic and functional diversity over decade-to-century timescales.

  16. Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Faulder, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir.

  17. 16-year trends in elements of lichens at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, ND

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Wetmore, C.M.

    2000-01-01

    An epiphytic lichen and a soil lichen in two very closely related genera (Parmelia sulcata and Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa, respectively) were sampled 16 years apart at Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota and measured for their elemental content. Mercury and cadmium decreased approximately 30% over the time period in both species. Sulfur decreased 8% in the epiphytic species, but increased 20% in the soil lichen. Factor analysis revealed that soil elements were higher in the soil lichen, indicating there was some soil contamination in that species. A relationship between iron and titanium was found only in the soil lichen. Sulfur and mercury were highly enriched in both species relative to the soil, which suggests that the atmosphere is a contributing source of these elements. New baseline values were calculated, 22 elements for both species, although it is not recommended that the soil lichen be sampled in the future.

  18. Geothermal environmental assessment baseline study: vegetation and soils of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.W.; Wiersma, G.B.

    1981-07-01

    Identification and elemental concentrations of indigenous soil and plant systems found on the Roosevelt Hot Spring KGRA are described. Twenty-three different soils and five separate plant communities are geographically mapped and identified. One hundred forty-seven plant species were identified. Forbs, shrubs, and grasses are represented by 58, 53, and 36 species respectively. Three sites, each measuring 25 hectares, were selected for long-term vegetative assessment. At these locations a permanent enclosure measuring 24.4 meters x 24.4 meters was constructed to assess long-term effects of livestock grazing. Biomass, plant species, percentage composition, ground cover and livestock carrying capacities were determined at each site. Surface soils and Artemisia tridentata leaf tissue were collected for elemental analysis.

  19. Climatic and density influences on recruitment in an irruptive population of Roosevelt elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starns, Heath D.; Ricca, Mark A.; Duarte, Adam; Weckerly, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    Current paradigms of ungulate population ecology recognize that density-dependent and independent mechanisms are not always mutually exclusive. Long-term data sets are necessary to assess the relative strength of each mechanism, especially when populations display irruptive dynamics. Using an 18-year time series of population abundances of Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) inhabiting Redwood National Park in northwestern California we assessed the influence of population size and climatic variation on elk recruitment and whether irruptive dynamics occurred. An information-theoretic model selection analysis indicated that abundance lagged 2 years and neither climatic factors nor a mix of abundance and climatic factors influenced elk recruitment. However, density-dependent recruitment differed between when the population was declining and when the population increased and then stabilized at an abundance lower than at the start of the decline. The population displayed irruptive dynamics.

  20. Initial Continuous Chemistry Results From The Roosevelt Island Ice Core (RICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, H. A.; Vallelonga, P. T.; Simonsen, M. F.; Neff, P. D.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Svensson, A.; Dahl-Jensen, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Roosevelt Island ice core (79.36° S, -161.71° W) was drilled in 2011-13 at the top of the Roosevelt Island ice dome, a location surrounded by the Ross ice shelf. The RICE ice core provides a unique opportunity to look into the past evolution of the West Antarctic Ice sheet. Further the site has high accumulation; 0.26 m of ice equivalent is deposited annually allowing annual layer determination for many chemical parameters. The RICE core was drilled to bedrock and has a total length of 763 metres. Preliminary results derived from water isotopes suggest that the oldest ice reaches back to the Eemian, with the last glacial being compressed in the bottom 60 metres. We present preliminary results from the RICE ice core including continuous measurements of acidity using an optical dye method, insoluble dust particles, conductivity and calcium. The core was analyzed at the New Zealand National Ice Core Research Facility at GNS Science in Wellington. The analytical set up used to determine climate proxies in the ice core was a modified version of the Copenhagen CFA system (Bigler et al., 2011). Key volcanic layers have been matched to those from the WAIS record (Sigl et al., 2013). A significant anti-correlation between acidity and calcium was seen in the Holocene part of the record. Due to the proximity to the ocean a large fraction of the calcium originates from sea salt and is in phase with total conductivity and sodium. In combination with the insoluble dust record, calcium has been apportioned into ocean-related and dust-related sources. Variability over the Holocene is presented and attributed to changing inputs of marine and dust aerosols.

  1. Mineralogical characterization of diamonds from Roosevelt Indigenous Reserve, Brazil, using non-destructive methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, M. P. A. C.; Moura, M. A.; Lenharo, S. L. R.; Smith, C. B.; Araujo, D. P.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, 660 diamonds from Igarapé Lajes Diggings (Roosevelt and Aripuanã Park indigenous areas), in Amazonian craton, Rondônia State, Brazil, were investigated. Their morphological, optical and surface characteristics were described using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cathodoluminescence (CL) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results demonstrated a predominance of resorbed crystals with many surface corrosion features, generally colorless, and led to the identification of four distinct groups: G1, G2, G3 and G4. Group G1 presents features of secondary sources while G2 and G4 show only primary features, some of which are not described in literature. Group G3 is similar to the other groups, however, is composed of less resorbed specimens with primary octahedral morphology relatively well preserved, indicating shorter time of exposure to dissolution effects. Cathodoluminescence in G2 is attributed to features of plastic deformation and to low contents of nitrogen (< 100 ppm, Type II) and high aggregation (IaB). G4 shows homogeneous blue CL, high contents of nitrogen (700 to 1000 ppm) and intermediate aggregation (IaAB). G1 presents luminescence influenced by radiation effects and populations with N contents and aggregation in the same ranges of G2 and G4, suggesting that the primary sources of the three groups can be the same. The relationship of nitrogen content versus aggregation state indicates higher temperatures of formation for G2 and lower for G4. The obtained data suggests that diamonds of G2 originated in sublithospheric mantle as has also been reported in nearby deposits (Machado River and Juína). The employed techniques were also effective in distinguishing diamonds from Roosevelt Reserve and from other localities, indicating that they could be used for improvement of certification procedures of diamonds of unknown origin.

  2. Accretion rate of extraterrestrial particles determined from osmium isotope systematics of pacific pelagic clay and manganese nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, B.K.; Turekian, K.K. )

    1988-06-01

    Pelagic clay and Mn nodules from DOMES sites in the North Pacific and a varved glacial lake deposit from Connecticut were analyzed for Os concentration and isotopic composition by isotope-dilution secondary ion mass spectrometry after treatment by NiS fusion of oxalic acid leaching. Bulk pelagic clay from DOMES site C has {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 6.5 and Os = 0.14 ng/g. Oxalic acid leaches of this same sediment and of Mn nodules for DOMES sites A and C have more radiogenic {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os ratios which average 8.3. Bulk glacial Lake Hitchcock sediment has {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 12.5 and Os = 0.06 ng/g. The total Os flux to North Pacific pelagic clay is 7 to 10 ng Os/cm{sup 2}/10{sup 6} y. Lake Hitchcock sediment provides an integrated value for the local crustal {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os ratio. The oxalic acid leaches are assumed to attack hydrogenous phases selectively. A simple model in which the only sources of Os to the ocean are continental crust with the isotopic composition of Lake Hitchcock and extraterrestrial particles with {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 1.1 results in a cosmic flux of osmium to the sediment of 4.9 ng Os/cm{sup 2}/10{sub 6} y of which 20% is hydrogenous. A model in which the sources of Os to the ocean are continental crust with an {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os ratio of 30, oceanic mantle or crust with {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 1.04 and extraterrestrial particles with {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 1.1 results in a cosmic flux of Os to the sediment of 5.7 ng Os/cm{sup 2}/10{sup 6} y of which none is hydrogenous. These extraterrestrial Os fluxes correspond to maximum C-1 chondrite accretion rates of between 4.9 {times} 10{sub 4} and 5.6 {times}10{sub 4} tonnes/y.

  3. 50 CFR 229.36 - Atlantic Pelagic Longline Take Reduction Plan (PLTRP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the U.S. east coast, a component of the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico large pelagics... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Atlantic Pelagic Longline Take Reduction... Regulations § 229.36 Atlantic Pelagic Longline Take Reduction Plan (PLTRP). (a) Purpose and scope. The...

  4. 50 CFR 229.36 - Atlantic Pelagic Longline Take Reduction Plan (PLTRP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the U.S. east coast, a component of the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico large pelagics... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Atlantic Pelagic Longline Take Reduction... Regulations § 229.36 Atlantic Pelagic Longline Take Reduction Plan (PLTRP). (a) Purpose and scope. The...

  5. Characterizations of Minerogenic Particles in Support of Modeling Light Scattering in Lake Superior Through a Two-Component Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    GOLDMAN. 2006. Water clarity modeling in Lake Tahoe : Linking suspended matter characteristics to Secchi depth. Aquat. Sci. 68: 1-15, doi:10.1007/s00027... water light fields of Lake Superior, and included an inorganic particulate component in the development of a semi-empirical model. Recently, an...b^ and [Chi], for pelagic near-surface waters of oligotrophic Lake Superior and one of its major embayments. The SAX-Mie-based estimate: of bm and

  6. Lack of significant changes in the herpetofauna of Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota, since the 1920s

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hossack, B.R.; Corn, P.S.; Pilliod, D.S.

    2005-01-01

    We surveyed 88 upland wetlands and 12 1-km river sections for amphibians in Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota, during 2001–2002 to gather baseline data for future monitoring efforts and to evaluate changes in the distribution of species. We compared our results to collections of herpetofauna made during 1920–1922, 1954 and 1978–1979. The boreal chorus frog (Pseudacris maculata) was the most common amphibian in upland wetlands, followed by the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), Woodhouse's toad (Bufo woodhousii), northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens), plains spadefoot (Spea bombifrons) and the Great Plains toad (B. cognatus). Bufo woodhousii was the only species that bred in the river. Our records for reptiles are less complete than for amphibians but no losses from the community are evident. The herpetofauna in Theodore Roosevelt National Park seems unchanged during at least the last half-century and likely since 1920–1922.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Pelagic Photoferrotroph Chlorobium phaeoferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Aria S.; Morgan-Lang, Connor; Thompson, Katherine J.; Simister, Rachel L.; Llirós, Marc; Hirst, Martin; Hallam, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Chlorobium phaeoferrooxidans, a photoferrotrophic member of the genus Chlorobium in the phylum Chlorobi. This genome sequence provides insight into the metabolic capacity that underpins photoferrotrophy within low-light-adapted pelagic Chlorobi. PMID:28360175

  8. Olfaction Contributes to Pelagic Navigation in a Coastal Shark.

    PubMed

    Nosal, Andrew P; Chao, Yi; Farrara, John D; Chai, Fei; Hastings, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    How animals navigate the constantly moving and visually uniform pelagic realm, often along straight paths between distant sites, is an enduring mystery. The mechanisms enabling pelagic navigation in cartilaginous fishes are particularly understudied. We used shoreward navigation by leopard sharks (Triakis semifasciata) as a model system to test whether olfaction contributes to pelagic navigation. Leopard sharks were captured alongshore, transported 9 km offshore, released, and acoustically tracked for approximately 4 h each until the transmitter released. Eleven sharks were rendered anosmic (nares occluded with cotton wool soaked in petroleum jelly); fifteen were sham controls. Mean swimming depth was 28.7 m. On average, tracks of control sharks ended 62.6% closer to shore, following relatively straight paths that were significantly directed over spatial scales exceeding 1600 m. In contrast, tracks of anosmic sharks ended 37.2% closer to shore, following significantly more tortuous paths that approximated correlated random walks. These results held after swimming paths were adjusted for current drift. This is the first study to demonstrate experimentally that olfaction contributes to pelagic navigation in sharks, likely mediated by chemical gradients as has been hypothesized for birds. Given the similarities between the fluid three-dimensional chemical atmosphere and ocean, further research comparing swimming and flying animals may lead to a unifying paradigm explaining their extraordinary navigational abilities.

  9. Seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity in the open ocean

    PubMed Central

    Morato, Telmo; Hoyle, Simon D.; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    The identification of biodiversity hotspots and their management for conservation have been hypothesized as effective ways to protect many species. There has been a significant effort to identify and map these areas at a global scale, but the coarse resolution of most datasets masks the small-scale patterns associated with coastal habitats or seamounts. Here we used tuna longline observer data to investigate the role of seamounts in aggregating large pelagic biodiversity and to identify which pelagic species are associated with seamounts. Our analysis indicates that seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Higher species richness was detected in association with seamounts than with coastal or oceanic areas. Seamounts were found to have higher species diversity within 30–40 km of the summit, whereas for sets close to coastal habitat the diversity was lower and fairly constant with distance. Higher probability of capture and higher number of fish caught were detected for some shark, billfish, tuna, and other by-catch species. The study supports hypotheses that seamounts may be areas of special interest for management for marine pelagic predators. PMID:20448197

  10. Trophic structure of pelagic species in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albo-Puigserver, Marta; Navarro, Joan; Coll, Marta; Layman, Craig A.; Palomera, Isabel

    2016-11-01

    Ecological knowledge of food web interactions within pelagic marine communities is often limited, impairing our capabilities to manage these ecologically and economically important marine fish species. Here we used stable isotope analyses to investigate trophic interactions in the pelagic ecosystem of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea during 2012 and 2013. Our results suggest that European sardine, Sardina pilchardus, and anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, are consumers located at relatively low levels of the pelagic food web. Unexpectedly, the round sardinella, Sardinella aurita, appeared to be located at a higher trophic level than the other small pelagic fish species, although previous studies found similarity in their diets. Isotope data suggested that trophic niches of species within the genera Trachurus spp. and Scomber spp., were distinct. Atlantic bonito Sarda sarda, European hake Merluccius merluccius and European squid Loligo vulgaris, appeared to feed at higher trophic levels than other species. Despite some intraspecific seasonal variability for some species, community trophic structure appeared relatively stable through the year. These data provide an important step for developing models of food web dynamics in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

  11. Seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity in the open ocean.

    PubMed

    Morato, Telmo; Hoyle, Simon D; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J

    2010-05-25

    The identification of biodiversity hotspots and their management for conservation have been hypothesized as effective ways to protect many species. There has been a significant effort to identify and map these areas at a global scale, but the coarse resolution of most datasets masks the small-scale patterns associated with coastal habitats or seamounts. Here we used tuna longline observer data to investigate the role of seamounts in aggregating large pelagic biodiversity and to identify which pelagic species are associated with seamounts. Our analysis indicates that seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Higher species richness was detected in association with seamounts than with coastal or oceanic areas. Seamounts were found to have higher species diversity within 30-40 km of the summit, whereas for sets close to coastal habitat the diversity was lower and fairly constant with distance. Higher probability of capture and higher number of fish caught were detected for some shark, billfish, tuna, and other by-catch species. The study supports hypotheses that seamounts may be areas of special interest for management for marine pelagic predators.

  12. Olfaction Contributes to Pelagic Navigation in a Coastal Shark

    PubMed Central

    Nosal, Andrew P.; Chao, Yi; Farrara, John D.; Chai, Fei; Hastings, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    How animals navigate the constantly moving and visually uniform pelagic realm, often along straight paths between distant sites, is an enduring mystery. The mechanisms enabling pelagic navigation in cartilaginous fishes are particularly understudied. We used shoreward navigation by leopard sharks (Triakis semifasciata) as a model system to test whether olfaction contributes to pelagic navigation. Leopard sharks were captured alongshore, transported 9 km offshore, released, and acoustically tracked for approximately 4 h each until the transmitter released. Eleven sharks were rendered anosmic (nares occluded with cotton wool soaked in petroleum jelly); fifteen were sham controls. Mean swimming depth was 28.7 m. On average, tracks of control sharks ended 62.6% closer to shore, following relatively straight paths that were significantly directed over spatial scales exceeding 1600 m. In contrast, tracks of anosmic sharks ended 37.2% closer to shore, following significantly more tortuous paths that approximated correlated random walks. These results held after swimming paths were adjusted for current drift. This is the first study to demonstrate experimentally that olfaction contributes to pelagic navigation in sharks, likely mediated by chemical gradients as has been hypothesized for birds. Given the similarities between the fluid three-dimensional chemical atmosphere and ocean, further research comparing swimming and flying animals may lead to a unifying paradigm explaining their extraordinary navigational abilities. PMID:26735492

  13. Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

    1987-12-01

    On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Latitudinal and photic effects on diel foraging and predation risk in freshwater pelagic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Adam G; Beauchamp, David A

    2015-03-01

    . Model results show that diel-seasonal foraging and predation risk in freshwater pelagic ecosystems changes considerably with latitude, turbidity and cloud cover. These changes alter the structure of pelagic predator-prey interactions, and in turn, the broader role of pelagic consumers in habitat coupling in lakes.

  15. Latitudinal and photic effects on diel foraging and predation risk in freshwater pelagic ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Adam G.; Beauchamp, David A.

    2014-01-01

    summer into autumn. 4. Model results show that diel-seasonal foraging and predation risk in freshwater pelagic ecosystems changes considerably with latitude, turbidity and cloud cover. These changes alter the structure of pelagic predator–prey interactions, and in turn, the broader role of pelagic consumers in habitat coupling in lakes

  16. Lake morphometry and resource polymorphism determine niche segregation between cool- and cold-water-adapted fish.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Brian; Harrod, Chris; Kahilaineni, Kimmo K

    2014-02-01

    Climate change is increasing ambient temperatures in Arctic and subarctic regions, facilitating latitudinal range expansions of freshwater fishes adapted to warmer water temperatures. The relative roles of resource availability and interspecific interactions between resident and invading species in determining the outcomes of such expansions has not been adequately evaluated. Ecological interactions between a cool-water adapted fish, the perch (Perca fluviatilis), and the cold-water adapted European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus), were studied in both shallow and deep lakes with fish communities dominated by (1) monomorphic whitefish, (2) monomorphic whitefish and perch, and (3) polymorphic whitefish and perch. A combination of stomach content, stable-isotope, and invertebrate prey availability data were used to identify resource use and niche overlap among perch, the trophic generalist large sparsely rakered (LSR) whitefish morph, and the pelagic specialist densely rakered (DR) whitefish morph in 10 subarctic lakes at the contemporary distribution limit of perch in northern Scandinavia. Perch utilized its putative preferred littoral niche in all lakes. LSR whitefish utilized both littoral and pelagic resources in monomorphic whitefish-dominated lakes. When found in sympatry with perch, LSR whitefish exclusively utilized pelagic prey in deep lakes, but displayed niche overlap with perch in shallow littoral lakes. DR whitefish was a specialist zooplanktivore, relegating LSR whitefish from pelagic habitats, leading to an increase in niche overlap between LSR whitefish and perch in deep lakes. Our results highlight how resource availability (lake depth and fish community) governs ecological interactions between native and invading species, leading to different outcomes even at the same latitudes. These findings suggest that lake morphometry and fish community structure data should be included in bioclimate envelope-based models of species distribution shifts

  17. The ecology of pelagic freshwater methylotrophs assessed by a high-resolution monitoring and isolation campaign.

    PubMed

    Salcher, Michaela M; Neuenschwander, Stefan M; Posch, Thomas; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2015-11-01

    Methylotrophic planktonic bacteria fulfill a particular role in the carbon cycle of lakes via the turnover of single-carbon compounds. We studied two planktonic freshwater lineages (LD28 and PRD01a001B) affiliated with Methylophilaceae (Betaproteobacteria) in Lake Zurich, Switzerland, by a combination of molecular and cultivation-based approaches. Their spatio-temporal distribution was monitored at high resolution (n=992 samples) for 4 consecutive years. LD28 methylotrophs constituted up to 11 × 10(7) cells l(-1) with pronounced peaks in spring and autumn-winter, concomitant with blooms of primary producers. They were rare in the warm water layers during summer but abundant in the cold hypolimnion, hinting at psychrophilic growth. Members of the PRD01a001B lineage were generally less abundant but also had maxima in spring. More than 120 axenic strains from these so far uncultivated lineages were isolated from the pelagic zone by dilution to extinction. Phylogenetic analysis separated isolates into two distinct genotypes. Isolates grew slowly (μmax=0.4 d(-1)), were of conspicuously small size, and were indeed psychrophilic, with higher growth yield at low temperatures. Growth was enhanced upon addition of methanol and methylamine to sterile lake water. Genomic analyses of two strains confirmed a methylotrophic lifestyle with a reduced set of genes involved in C1 metabolism. The very small and streamlined genomes (1.36 and 1.75 Mb) shared several pathways with the marine OM43 lineage. As the closest described taxa (Methylotenera sp.) are only distantly related to either set of isolates, we propose a new genus with two species, that is, 'Candidatus Methylopumilus planktonicus' (LD28) and 'Candidatus Methylopumilus turicensis' (PRD01a001B).

  18. The ecology of pelagic freshwater methylotrophs assessed by a high-resolution monitoring and isolation campaign

    PubMed Central

    Salcher, Michaela M; Neuenschwander, Stefan M; Posch, Thomas; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Methylotrophic planktonic bacteria fulfill a particular role in the carbon cycle of lakes via the turnover of single-carbon compounds. We studied two planktonic freshwater lineages (LD28 and PRD01a001B) affiliated with Methylophilaceae (Betaproteobacteria) in Lake Zurich, Switzerland, by a combination of molecular and cultivation-based approaches. Their spatio-temporal distribution was monitored at high resolution (n=992 samples) for 4 consecutive years. LD28 methylotrophs constituted up to 11 × 107 cells l−1 with pronounced peaks in spring and autumn–winter, concomitant with blooms of primary producers. They were rare in the warm water layers during summer but abundant in the cold hypolimnion, hinting at psychrophilic growth. Members of the PRD01a001B lineage were generally less abundant but also had maxima in spring. More than 120 axenic strains from these so far uncultivated lineages were isolated from the pelagic zone by dilution to extinction. Phylogenetic analysis separated isolates into two distinct genotypes. Isolates grew slowly (μmax=0.4 d−1), were of conspicuously small size, and were indeed psychrophilic, with higher growth yield at low temperatures. Growth was enhanced upon addition of methanol and methylamine to sterile lake water. Genomic analyses of two strains confirmed a methylotrophic lifestyle with a reduced set of genes involved in C1 metabolism. The very small and streamlined genomes (1.36 and 1.75 Mb) shared several pathways with the marine OM43 lineage. As the closest described taxa (Methylotenera sp.) are only distantly related to either set of isolates, we propose a new genus with two species, that is, ‘Candidatus Methylopumilus planktonicus' (LD28) and ‘Candidatus Methylopumilus turicensis' (PRD01a001B). PMID:25942006

  19. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4)…

  20. Bioaccumulation of toxaphene congeners in the lake superior food web

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muir, D.C.G.; Whittle, D.M.; De Vault, D. S.; Bronte, C.R.; Karlsson, H.; Backus, S.; Teixeira, C.

    2004-01-01

    The bioaccumulation and biotransformation of toxaphene was examined in the food webs of Lake Superior and Siskiwit Lake (Isle Royale) using congener specific analysis as well as stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen to characterize food webs. Toxaphene concentrations (calculated using technical toxaphene) in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the western basin of Lake Superior (N = 95) averaged (±SD) 889 ± 896 ng/g wet wt and 60 ± 34 ng/g wet wt in Siskiwit Lake. Major congeners in lake trout were B8-789 (P38), B8-2226 (P44), B9-1679 (P50), and B9-1025 (P62). Toxaphene concentrations were found to vary seasonally, especially in lower food web organisms in Lake Superior and to a lesser extent in Siskiwit Lake. Toxaphene concentrations declined significantly in lake herring (Coregonus artedii), rainbow smelt (Omerus mordax), and slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) as well as in zooplankton (> 102 &mn;m) and Mysis (Mysis relicta) between May and October. The seasonal variation may reflect seasonal shifts in the species abundance within the zooplankton community. Trophic magnification factors (TMF) derived from regressions of toxaphene congener concentrations versus δ15N were > 1 for most octa- and nonachlorobornanes in Lake Superior except B8-1413 (P26) and B9-715. Log bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for toxaphene congeners in lake trout (ng/g lipid/ng/L dissolved) ranged from 4.54 to 9.7 and were significantly correlated with log octanol-water partition coefficients. TMFs observed for total toxaphene and congener B9-1679 in Lake Superior were similar to those in Arctic lakes, as well as to previous studies in the Great Lakes, which suggests that the bioaccumulation behavior of toxaphene is similar in pelagic food webs of large, cold water systems. However, toxaphene concentrations were lower in lake trout from Siskiwit Lake and lakes in northwestern Ontario than in Lake Superior possibly because of shorter food chains and greater reliance on zooplankton or

  1. The jellification of north temperate lakes

    PubMed Central

    Jeziorski, Adam; Tanentzap, Andrew J.; Yan, Norman D.; Paterson, Andrew M.; Palmer, Michelle E.; Korosi, Jennifer B.; Rusak, James A.; Arts, Michael T.; Keller, Wendel (Bill); Ingram, Ron; Cairns, Allegra; Smol, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) concentrations are decreasing in softwater lakes across eastern North America and western Europe. Using long-term contemporary and palaeo-environmental field data, we show that this is precipitating a dramatic change in Canadian lakes: the replacement of previously dominant pelagic herbivores (Ca-rich Daphnia species) by Holopedium glacialis, a jelly-clad, Ca-poor competitor. In some lakes, this transformation is being facilitated by increases in macro-invertebrate predation, both from native (Chaoborus spp.) and introduced (Bythotrephes longimanus) zooplanktivores, to which Holopedium, with its jelly coat, is relatively invulnerable. Greater representation by Holopedium within cladoceran zooplankton communities will reduce nutrient transfer through food webs, given their lower phosphorus content relative to daphniids, and greater absolute abundances may pose long-term problems to water users. The dominance of jelly-clad zooplankton will likely persist while lakewater Ca levels remain low. PMID:25411451

  2. The jellification of north temperate lakes.

    PubMed

    Jeziorski, Adam; Tanentzap, Andrew J; Yan, Norman D; Paterson, Andrew M; Palmer, Michelle E; Korosi, Jennifer B; Rusak, James A; Arts, Michael T; Keller, Wendel Bill; Ingram, Ron; Cairns, Allegra; Smol, John P

    2015-01-07

    Calcium (Ca) concentrations are decreasing in softwater lakes across eastern North America and western Europe. Using long-term contemporary and palaeo-environmental field data, we show that this is precipitating a dramatic change in Canadian lakes: the replacement of previously dominant pelagic herbivores (Ca-rich Daphnia species) by Holopedium glacialis, a jelly-clad, Ca-poor competitor. In some lakes, this transformation is being facilitated by increases in macro-invertebrate predation, both from native (Chaoborus spp.) and introduced (Bythotrephes longimanus) zooplanktivores, to which Holopedium, with its jelly coat, is relatively invulnerable. Greater representation by Holopedium within cladoceran zooplankton communities will reduce nutrient transfer through food webs, given their lower phosphorus content relative to daphniids, and greater absolute abundances may pose long-term problems to water users. The dominance of jelly-clad zooplankton will likely persist while lakewater Ca levels remain low.

  3. Identification of toxic Cyanobacteria in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Belykh, O I; Gladkikh, A S; Sorokovikova, E G; Tikhonova, I V; Butina, T V

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria of the genera Anabaena and Microcystis, containing genes for the synthesis of-microcystins (hepatotoxic cyanotoxins) were found for the first time in the coastal zone of Lake Baikal near-the village of Turka, where a tourism and recreational complex were constructed. According to the enzyme-immunoassay, microcystin concentration in water was 0.17 ± 0.01 µg/L. Using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, we found 3936 sequences in the eubacterial community of central basin of Lake Baikal. The summer bacterioplankton in both littoral and pelagic areas of the lake was dominated by the phylum Cyanobacteria, whereas a higher diversity of cyanobacteria was recorded in the plankton of the littoral zone. Moreover, the-potentially toxic Anabaena and Microcystis were detected in this area.

  4. Nearshore energy subsidies support Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates following major changes in food web structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turschak, Benjamin A; Bunnell, David B.; Czesny, Sergiusz J.; Höök, Tomas O.; Janssen, John; Warner, David M.; Bootsma, Harvey A

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic food webs that incorporate multiple energy channels (e.g. nearshore benthic or pelagic) with varying productivity and turnover rates convey stability to biological communities by providing multiple independent energy sources. Within the Lake Michigan food web, invasive dreissenid mussels have caused rapid changes to food web structure and potentially altered the channels through which consumers acquire energy. We used stable C and N isotopes to determine how Lake Michigan food web structure has changed in the past decade, coincident with the expansion of dreissenid mussels, decreased pelagic phytoplankton production and increased nearshore benthic algal production. Fish and invertebrate samples collected from sites around Lake Michigan were analyzed to determine taxa-specific 13C:12C (delta 13C) and 15N:14N (delta 15N) ratios. Sampling took place during two distinct periods, 2002-2003 and 2010-2012, that spanned the period of dreissenid expansion, and included nearshore, pelagic and profundal fish and invertebrate taxa. Magnitude and direction of the 13C shift indicated significantly greater reliance upon nearshore benthic energy sources among nearly all fish taxa as well as profundal invertebrates. Although the mechanisms underlying this 13C shift likely varied among species, possible causes include the transport of benthic algal production to offshore waters and an increased reliance on nearshore prey items. Delta 15N shifts were more variable and of smaller magnitude across taxa although declines in delta 15N among some pelagic fishes may indicate a shift to alternative prey resources. Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates appear to have responded to dreissenid induced changes in nutrient and energy pathways by switching from pelagic to alternative nearshore energy subsidies. Although large shifts in energy allocation (i.e. pelagic to nearshore benthic) resulting from invasive species appear to have affected total production at upper trophic

  5. A new look at the Lake Superior biomass size-spectrum

    EPA Science Inventory

    We combined data from multiple sampling programs to describe the Lake Superior pelagic biomass size structure. The data represented phytoplankton, zooplankton and prey-fish that spanned over 10 orders of magnitude in size and two time periods separated by five years. The biomas...

  6. Stable isotopes and organochlorines in the food webs of Lakes Baikal and Superior

    SciTech Connect

    Kucklick, J.R.; Baker, J.E.; Ostrom, N.E.; Ostrom, P.H.; Lee, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    Quantifying organochlorine biomagnification in aquatic ecosystems is traditionally accomplished by assigning discreet trophic levels, which does not adequately describe feeding relationships except in well defined systems. {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 13}C, particularly {delta}{sup 15}N values, measured in aquatic food webs provide additional information on trophic position such that it may be treated as a continuous variable. To evaluate this technique, samples were collected from the pelagic zone of Lake Baikal in August and September, 1993 for organochlorine (PCBs, DDTs, chlordanes and HCHS) and stable isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N) analyzed. These included high volume water samples, seston, net plankton, two species of pelagic sculpin Comephorus dybowskii, C. baikalensis, the omul, (Coregonus autumnalis migratorious), and 9 seal (Phoca siberica) samples of known sex and age. Food web samples from Lake Superior will be collected in June, 1994 to include benthic infauna, sculpins, Mysis and surface phytoplankton and zooplankton. Results from this study will provide a comparison of organochlorine trophodynamics between a system with a predominant pelagic food web (Lake Baikal) to one with substantial benthic/pelagic coupling (Lake Superior).

  7. Light stable isotope study of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrs D.T.; Bowman, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The isotopic composition of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon has been determined for regional cold springs, thermal fluids, and rocks and minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area. The geothermal system has developed within plutonic granitic rocks and amphibolite facies gneiss, relying upon fracture-controlled permeability for the migration of the thermal fluids. Probably originating as meteoric waters in the upper elevations of the Mineral Mountains, the thermal waters sampled in the production wells display an oxygen isotopic shift of at least +1.2. Depletions of delta /sup 18/O in wole rock, K-feldspar, and biotite have a positive correlation with alteration intensity. W/R mass ratios, calculated from the isotopic shifts of rock and water, range up to 3.0 in a producing horizon of one well, although the K-feldspar has experienced only 30% exchange with the thermal waters. While veinlet quartz has equilibrated with the thermal waters, the /sup 18/O values of K-mica clay, an alteration product of plagioclase, mimic the isotopic composition of K-feldspar and whole rock. This suggests that locally small W/R ratios enable plagioclase to influence its alteration products by isotopic exchange.

  8. Sexual segregation in Roosevelt Elk: Cropping rates and aggression in mixed sex groups

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weckerly, Floyd F.; Ricca, Mark A.; Meyer, Katherin P.

    2001-01-01

    Few studies of sexual segregation in ruminants have tested widely invoked mechanisms of segregation in mixed-sex groups. In a sexually segregated population of Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti), we examined if adult males had reduced intake of forage when in mixed-sex groups and if intersexual differences in aggression caused females to avoid males. Based on a mechanistic model of forage intake, animals with lower instantaneous feed intake should have higher cropping rates. Focal animal sampling indicated that adult males and females in summer and winter had similar cropping rates in mixed-sex groups, whereas males in male-only groups had lower rates of cropping than males in mixed-sex groups. Outside the mating season, males in male groups spent proportionally less time ≤1 body length of congenders than females in female groups, and the rate of aggression ≤1 body length was higher for males. Female–female aggression was higher in mixed-sex groups that contained more males than the median proportion of males in mixed-sex groups. Female and mixed-sex groups walked away when groups of males numbering >6 were ≤50 m but did not walk away when male groups ≤50 m had ≤5 individuals. Sexual segregation was associated with behaviors of sexes in mixed-sex groups: reduced intake of forage by males and increased female–female aggression with more males.

  9. Severe hoof disease in free-ranging Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) in southwestern Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Han, Sushan; Mansfield, Kristin G

    2014-04-01

    Reports of free-ranging Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) with abnormal hooves and lameness increased significantly in southwestern Washington, USA, during winter 2008. In March 2009 we examined five severely affected elk with clinical lameness from this region to characterize hoof lesions, examine the general health of affected elk, and potentially identify etiologies causing hoof disease. Three clinically normal elk from an adjacent but unaffected region were also collected as normal controls. Grossly, affected elk had deformed hooves that were asymmetrical, markedly elongated, and curved or broken, as well as hooves with sloughed horn. Most affected elk had severe sole ulcers with extensive laminar necrosis and pedal osteomyelitis. Histopathology of normal and abnormal hooves identified acute and chronic laminitis in all affected elk and one control elk. Hepatic copper and selenium levels in all affected and control elk were also deficient, and hoof keratin copper levels were low. No significant underlying systemic or musculoskeletal disease was detected in the affected elk, and attempts to isolate bacterial and viral pathogens were unsuccessful. A primary cause of hoof deformity was not definitively identified in this chronically affected group. Studies to identify infectious hoof disease and to characterize acute and subacute lesions are underway.

  10. Investigation of the Roosevelt Road Transmitter Site, Fort Richardson, Alaska, using ground penetrating radar

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, L.E.; Delaney, A.J.; Lawson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    The Roosevelt Road Transmitter Site is the location of a decommissioned bunker on Fort Richardson, near Anchorage, Alaska. The site was used from World War II to the Korean War as part of an Alaskan communications network. The bunker and support buildings were vandalized following its decommissioning in the mid-1960s, resulting in PCB contamination of the bunker and soils around the above-ground transmitter annex. CRREL conducted a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) investigation of the site in June 1996, at the request of the Directorate of Public Works on Fort Richardson. Nine transect lines were established, each being profiled with 100- and 400-MHz antennas. Both antennas systems defined the extent of the bunker and identified the presence of buried utilities. The 100-MHz antenna provided large-scale resolution of the bunker, limits of site excavation, and large stratigraphic horizons in the undisturbed sediments. The 400-MHz antenna provided finer resolution that allowed identification of steel reinforcement in the bunker ceiling, utility walls and floor, and the walls of the inner and outer bunker. High amplitude resonance and hyperbolas in the record characterize the response from the Transmitter Annex foundation, buried pipes, and utilities. The GPR survey shows its utility for detecting the extent of abandoned underground structures and identifying the extent of original ground excavations.

  11. Chlorinated organic compounds in ground water at Roosevelt Field, Nassau County, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckhardt, D.A.; Pearsall, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have been detected in water from five public-supply wells and six cooling-water wells that tap the Magothy aquifer at Roosevelt Field, a 200-acre area that is now a large shopping mall and office-building complex. The cooling water is discharged after use to the water table (upper glacial) aquifer through a nearby recharge basin and a subsurface drain field. Three plumes of TCE in groundwater have been delineated--the source plume, which has penetrated both aquifers , and two more recent plumes emanating from the two discharge sites in the water-table aquifer. Concentrations of inorganic constituents in the three plumes are the same as those in ambient water in the area. The two secondary plumes discharged cooling water extended at least 1,000 ft south-southeastward in the direction of regional groundwater flow. Pumping at wells screened in the middle and basal sections of the Magothy aquifers, where clay layers are absent and sandy zones provide good vertical hydraulic connection within the aquifer system, has increased the rate of downward contaminant advection. The transient increases in downward movement are cumulative over time and have brought TCE to the bottom of the Magothy aquifer, 500 ft below land surface. (USGS)

  12. Vulnerability of the Oceanic Whitetip Shark to Pelagic Longline Fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Tolotti, Mariana Travassos; Bach, Pascal; Hazin, Fábio; Travassos, Paulo; Dagorn, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    A combination of fisheries dependent and independent data was used to assess the vulnerability of the oceanic whitetip shark to pelagic longline fisheries. The Brazilian tuna longline fleet, operating in the equatorial and southwestern Atlantic, is used as a case study. Fisheries dependent data include information from logbooks (from 1999 to 2011) and on-board observers (2004 to 2010), totaling 65,277 pelagic longline sets. Fisheries independent data were obtained from 8 oceanic whitetip sharks tagged with pop-up satellite archival tags in the area where longline fleet operated. Deployment periods varied from 60 to 178 days between 2010 and 2012. Tagging and pop-up sites were relatively close to each other, although individuals tended to travel long distances before returning to the tagging area. Some degree of site fidelity was observed. High utilization hotspots of tagged sharks fell inside the area under strongest fishing pressure. Despite the small sample size, a positive correlation between tag recorded information and catch data was detected. All sharks exhibited a strong preference for the warm and shallow waters of the mixed layer, spending on average more than 70% of the time above the thermocline and 95% above 120 m. Results indicate that the removal of shallow hooks on longline gear might be an efficient mitigation measure to reduce the bycatch of this pelagic shark species. The work also highlights the potential of tagging experiments to provide essential information for the development of spatio-temporal management measures. PMID:26492091

  13. Vulnerability of the Oceanic Whitetip Shark to Pelagic Longline Fisheries.

    PubMed

    Tolotti, Mariana Travassos; Bach, Pascal; Hazin, Fábio; Travassos, Paulo; Dagorn, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    A combination of fisheries dependent and independent data was used to assess the vulnerability of the oceanic whitetip shark to pelagic longline fisheries. The Brazilian tuna longline fleet, operating in the equatorial and southwestern Atlantic, is used as a case study. Fisheries dependent data include information from logbooks (from 1999 to 2011) and on-board observers (2004 to 2010), totaling 65,277 pelagic longline sets. Fisheries independent data were obtained from 8 oceanic whitetip sharks tagged with pop-up satellite archival tags in the area where longline fleet operated. Deployment periods varied from 60 to 178 days between 2010 and 2012. Tagging and pop-up sites were relatively close to each other, although individuals tended to travel long distances before returning to the tagging area. Some degree of site fidelity was observed. High utilization hotspots of tagged sharks fell inside the area under strongest fishing pressure. Despite the small sample size, a positive correlation between tag recorded information and catch data was detected. All sharks exhibited a strong preference for the warm and shallow waters of the mixed layer, spending on average more than 70% of the time above the thermocline and 95% above 120 m. Results indicate that the removal of shallow hooks on longline gear might be an efficient mitigation measure to reduce the bycatch of this pelagic shark species. The work also highlights the potential of tagging experiments to provide essential information for the development of spatio-temporal management measures.

  14. Longitudinal differentiation among pelagic populations in a planktic foraminifer.

    PubMed

    Ujiié, Yurika; Asami, Takahiro; de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Liu, Hui; Ishitani, Yoshiyuki; de Vargas, Colomban

    2012-07-01

    Evolutionary processes in marine plankton have been assumed to be dependent on the oceanic circulation system, which transports plankton between populations in marine surface waters. Gene flow facilitated by oceanic currents along longitudinal gradients may efficiently impede genetic differentiation of pelagic populations in the absence of confounding marine environmental effects. However, how responsible oceanic currents are for the geographic distribution and dispersal of plankton is poorly understood. We examined the phylogeography of the planktic foraminifer Pulleniatina obliquiloculata in the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) by using partial small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequences. We found longitudinal clines in the frequencies of three distinct genetic types in the IPWP area. These frequencies were correlated with environmental factors that are characteristic of three water masses in the IPWP. Noteworthy, populations inhabiting longitudinally distant water masses at the Pacific and Indian sides of the IPWP were genetically different, despite transportation of individuals via oceanic currents. These results demonstrate that populations of pelagic plankton have diverged genetically among different water masses within a single climate zone. Changes of the oceanic circulation system could have impacted the geographic patterns of dispersal and divergence of pelagic plankton.

  15. Species succession and sustainability of the Great Lakes fish community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Burnham-Curtis, Mary K.; Taylor, William W.; Ferreri, C. Paola

    1999-01-01

    This article concentrates on the sustainability of the offshore pelagic and deepwater fish communities that were historically dominated by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). The causes of alteration in these fish communities (i.e., overfishing, introductions, and cultural eutrophication) were identified by Loftus and Regier (1972). Here we look at the ecology of these altered communities in relation to sustainability and discuss the need for restoration.

  16. Diet and habitat use by age-0 deepwater sculpins in northern Lake Huron, Michigan and the Detroit River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseman, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    Deepwater sculpins (Myoxocephalus thompsonii) are an important link in deepwater benthic foodwebs of the Great Lakes. Little information exists about deepwater sculpin spawning habits and early life history ecology due to difficulty in sampling deep offshore habitats. Larval and age-0 deepwater sculpins collected in northern Lake Huron and the Detroit River during 2007 were used to improve our understanding of their habitat use, diet, age, and growth. Peak larval density reached 8.4/1000 m3 in the Detroit River during April and was higher than that in Lake Huron. Offshore bottom trawls at DeTour and Hammond Bay first collected benthic age-0 deepwater sculpins in early September when fish were ≥ 25 mm TL. Otolith analysis revealed that hatch dates for pelagic larvae occurred during late March and larvae remained pelagic for 40 to 60 days. Diet of pelagic larvae (10–21 mm TL) was dominated by calanoid copepods at all sample locations. Diets of benthic age-0 fish varied by location and depth: Mysis and chironomids were prevalent in fish from Hammond Bay and the 91 m site at DeTour, but only chironomids were found in fish from the 37 m DeTour site. This work showed that nearshore epilimnetic sites were important for pelagic larvae and an ontogenetic shift from pelagic planktivore to benthivore occurred at about 25 mm TL in late summer. Age analysis showed that larvae remained pelagic long enough to be transported through the St. Clair–Detroit River system, Lake Erie, and the Niagara River, potentially contributing to populations in Lake Ontario.

  17. Lake Tahoe

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, list of partner agencies.

  18. Status of rainbow smelt in the U.S. waters of Lake Ontario, 2013: Section 12 of NYSDEC Lake Ontario Unit annual report 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weidel, Brian C.; Connerton, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax are the second most abundant pelagic prey fish in Lake Ontario after Alewife Alosa psuedoharengus. The 2013, USGS/NYSDEC bottom trawl assessment indicated the abundance of Lake Ontario age-1 and older Rainbow Smelt decreased by 69% relative to 2012. Length frequency-based age analysis indicated that age-1 Rainbow Smelt constituted approximately 50% of the population, which is similar to recent trends where the proportion of age-1 has ranged from 95% to 42% of the population. While they constituted approximately half of the catch, the overall abundance index for age 1 was one of the lowest observed in the time series, potentially a result of cannibalism from the previous year class. Combined data from all bottom trawl assessments along the southern shore and eastern basin indicate the proportion of the fish community that is Rainbow Smelt has declined over the past 30 years. In 2013 the proportion of the pelagic fish catch (only pelagic species) that was Rainbow Smelt was the second lowest in the time series at 3.1%. Community diversity indices, based on bottom trawl catches, indicate that Lake Ontario fish community diversity, as assessed by bottom trawls, has sharply declined over the past 36 years and in 2013 the index was the lowest value in the time series. Much of this community diversity decline is driven by changes in the pelagic fish community and dominance of Alewife.

  19. The Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) ice core: climate and ice dynamics of the Ross Sea, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. E.; Brook, E.; Blunier, T.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Waddington, E. D.; Vallelonga, P. T.; Conway, H.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Buizert, C.; Fudge, T. J.; Parrenin, F.

    2015-12-01

    Ice cores drilled in Antarctica have proven to be remarkable archives of past climate, but most have been recovered from the remote Antarctic interior. In contrast, little is known about the climate history of coastal ice domes despite their relevance to ocean-ice interaction and sea level rise. The Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution project (RICE) recovered a 763 m ice core in 2013 from Roosevelt Island, West Antarctica. Located at the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf and grounded below sea level, Roosevelt Island is sensitive to oceanic forcing and may provide new information about potential drivers of abrupt interhemispheric climate connections and its location is ideal for exploring the retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) from its glacial maximum through the Ross Sea. Here we present a continuous chronology for the RICE Ice Core covering the last 40,000 years with additional evidence of ice dating to at least 80,000 years near the bottom of the core. Both the depth-age relationship and reconstructed profile of annual layer thicknesses can be used to infer changes in climate and the glacial history of the East Ross Sea Embayment. The most striking feature of the record occurred during the Antarctic Cold Reversal. At this time a combination of data including thin annual layers, abrupt lowering of δ15N of N2 and δ40Ar in trapped air, and strongly depleted δD of ice suggest either a pronounced change in cyclonic activity and regional storm tracks and/or adjustment in the configuration of the Ross Ice Sheet during this period of rapid climate change and sea level rise.

  20. Comprehensive study of LASL Well C/T-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah, and applications to geothermal well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, W.E.; Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

    1981-02-01

    Utah State Geothermal Well 9-1 in the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Beaver County, Utah, has been donated by Phillips Petroleum Company for calibration and testing of well-logging equipment in the hot, corrosive, geothermal environment. It is the second Calibration/Test Well (C/T-2) in the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. A study of cuttings and well logs from Well C/T-2 was completed. This synthesis and data presentation contains most of the subsurface geologic information needed to effect the total evaluation of geophysical logs acquired in this geothermal calibration/test well, C/T-2.

  1. Roosevelt County 075: A petrologic chemical and isotopic study of the most unequilibrated known H chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, T. J.; Keil, K.; Ash, R. D.; Morse, A. D.; Pillinger, C. T.; Wieler, R.; Mayeda, T. K.; Clayton, R. N.; Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Roosevelt County (RC) 075 was recovered in 1990 as a single 258-gram stone. Classification of this meteorite is complicated by its highly unequilibrated nature and its severe terrestrial weathering, but we favor H classification. This is supported by O isotopes and estimates of the original Fe, Ni metal content. The O isotopic composition is similar to that of a number of reduced ordinary chondrites (e.g., Cerro los Calvos, Willaroy), although RC 075 exhibits no evidence of reduced mineral compositions. Chondrule diameters are consistent with classification as an L chondrite, but large uncertainties in chondrule diameters of RC 075 and poorly constrained means of H, L and LL chondrites prevent use of this parameter for reliable classification. Other parameters are compromised by severe weathering (e.g., siderophile element abundances) or unsuitable for discrimination between unequilibrated H, L and LL chondrites (e.g., Co in kamacite delta C-13). Petrologic subtype 3.2 +/- 0.1 is suggested by the degree of olivine heterogeneity, the compositions of chondrule olivines, the thermoluminescence sensitivity, the abundances and types of chondrules mapped on cathodoluminescence mosaics, and the amount of presolar SiC. The meteorite is very weakly shocked (S2), with some chondrules essentially unshocked and, thus, is classified as an H3.2(S2) chondrite. Weathering is evident by a LREE enrichment due to clay contamination, reduced levels of many siderophile elements, the almost total loss of Fe, Ni metal and troilite, and the reduced concentrations of noble gases. Some components of the meteorite (e.g., type IA chondrules, SiC) appear to preserve their nebular states, with little modification from thermal metamorphism. We conclude that RC 075 is the most equilibrated H chondrite yet recovered and may provide additional insights into the origin of primitive materials in the solar nebula.

  2. Using presence of sign to measure habitats used by Roosevelt elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weckerly, Floyd W.; Ricca, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    tract Radiotelemetry and pellet-group surveys are methods used commonly to measure habi- tat use by large ungulates. However, telemetry can be expensive and analysis of data col- lected from pellet-group surveys is restricted to rank analysis. We explored the feasibil- ity of recording the presence of Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti) sign to identify habitats used by elk. We surveyed stations (1-ha circular plots) about 0.72 km apart for the presence of 0- to 4-day-old elk sign (tracks and feces) from October to April 1994-1997 at 2 sites in northwestern California. Our objectives were to: 1) measure errors in detecting and classifying elk presence at stations from sign, 2) determine auto- correlation of elk sign at stations to assess what is an independent data point, 3) examine the effect of 2 station sizes on the rate of sign detections, and 4) determine sample sizes needed to detect habitat use. We detected elk sign 96.6% of the time (n=68) when elk were observed at stations within 0-4 days. Elk sign was misclassified only 3 times (n= 70). No autocorrelations in sign detections across time or space were detected because observed data were similar to sign generated randomly at stations. The proportion of 1-ha (0.12) and 2-ha stations (0.13) with sign was similar. Sample sizes >400 were need- ed to have power >0.8 to detect relationships among habitat variables and frequency of sign at stations. Recording the presence of sign in stations appears to be a reliable and feasible technique to measure habitats used by elk.

  3. Geographical distribution of pelagic decapod shrimp in the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Judkins, David C

    2014-12-16

    Ninety-one species of pelagic decapod shrimp were identified in 938 midwater-trawl collections taken between 1963 and 1974 from the North and South Atlantic. Distributional maps are provided for the most frequently occurring species. Nighttime abundance of most species was greatest within the upper 200 m. Degree of geographical overlap was estimated using the geometric mean of the proportion of joint occurrences with a value ≥ 0.5 deemed significant. Geographical distributions tended to be unique, and only 31 species had values ≥ 0.5 with one or more other species. Species within genera and within phylogenetic subgroups of Sergia were generally parapatric or partially overlapping in distribution. Five geographical groupings of co-occurring species across genera were identified: Subpolar-Temperate, Southern Hemisphere, Central, Tropical, Eastern Tropical and Western Tropical. The two species of the Southern Hemisphere group are circumpolar at temperate latitudes. The 12 species of the Central group occurred throughout the subtropical and tropical North and South Atlantic. The eight species of the Tropical group occurred broadly across the equatorial Atlantic and Caribbean with ranges usually extending into the Gulf of Mexico and northward in the Gulf Stream. The two species of the Western Tropical group occurred most often in the western tropics, but there were scattered occurrences at subtropical latitudes. The four species of the Eastern Tropical group were endemic to the Mauritanian Upwelling and the Angola-Benguela Frontal zones off western Africa. Two of the three species in the Subpolar-Temperate group had bipolar distributions, and all three occurred in the Mediterranean and in the Mauritanian Upwelling zone. Most Central, Tropical and Western Tropical species were present in the in the Gulf of Mexico. The 10 species from the Mediterranean were a mixture of Subpolar-Temperate, Central and benthopelagic species. Patterns of distribution in Atlantic pelagic

  4. Unexpected hydrogen isotope variation in oceanic pelagic seabirds.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Peggy H; Wiley, Anne E; Rossman, Sam; Stricker, Craig A; James, Helen F

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen isotopes have significantly enhanced our understanding of the biogeography of migratory animals. The basis for this methodology lies in predictable, continental patterns of precipitation δD values that are often reflected in an organism's tissues. δD variation is not expected for oceanic pelagic organisms whose dietary hydrogen (water and organic hydrogen in prey) is transferred up the food web from an isotopically homogeneous water source. We report a 142‰ range in the δD values of flight feathers from the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), an oceanic pelagic North Pacific species, and inquire about the source of that variation. We show δD variation between and within four other oceanic pelagic species: Newell's shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newellii), Black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) and Buller's shearwater (Puffinus bulleri). The similarity between muscle δD values of hatch-year Hawaiian petrels and their prey suggests that trophic fractionation does not influence δD values of muscle. We hypothesize that isotopic discrimination is associated with water loss during salt excretion through salt glands. Salt load differs between seabirds that consume isosmotic squid and crustaceans and those that feed on hyposmotic teleost fish. In support of the salt gland hypothesis, we show an inverse relationship between δD and percent teleost fish in diet for three seabird species. Our results demonstrate the utility of δD in the study of oceanic consumers, while also contributing to a better understanding of δD systematics, the basis for one of the most commonly utilized isotope tools in avian ecology.

  5. Unexpected hydrogen isotope variation in oceanic pelagic seabirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostrom, Peggy H.; Wiley, Anne E.; Rossman, Sam; Stricker, Craig A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes have significantly enhanced our understanding of the biogeography of migratory animals. The basis for this methodology lies in predictable, continental patterns of precipitation δD values that are often reflected in an organism's tissues. δD variation is not expected for oceanic pelagic organisms whose dietary hydrogen (water and organic hydrogen in prey) is transferred up the food web from an isotopically homogeneous water source. We report a 142% range in the δD values of flight feathers from the Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), an oceanic pelagic North Pacific species, and inquire about the source of that variation. We show δD variation between and within four other oceanic pelagic species: Newell's shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newellii), Black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) and Buller's shearwater (Puffinus bulleri). The similarity between muscle δD values of hatch-year Hawaiian petrels and their prey suggests that trophic fractionation does not influence δD values of muscle. We hypothesize that isotopic discrimination is associated with water loss during salt excretion through salt glands. Salt load differs between seabirds that consume isosmotic squid and crustaceans and those that feed on hyposmotic teleost fish. In support of the salt gland hypothesis, we show an inverse relationship between δD and percent teleost fish in diet for three seabird species. Our results demonstrate the utility of δD in the study of oceanic consumers, while also contributing to a better understanding of δD systematics, the basis for one of the most commonly utilized isotope tools in avian ecology.

  6. Selective transfer of polyunsaturated fatty acids from phytoplankton to planktivorous fish in large boreal lakes.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Ursula; Hiltunen, Minna; Jelkänen, Elli; Taipale, Sami J; Kainz, Martin J; Brett, Michael T; Kankaala, Paula

    2015-12-01

    Lake size influences various hydrological parameters, such as water retention time, circulation patterns and thermal stratification that can consequently affect the plankton community composition, benthic-pelagic coupling and the function of aquatic food webs. Although the socio-economical (particularly commercial fisheries) and ecological importance of large lakes has been widely acknowledged, little is known about the availability and trophic transfer of polyunsaturated fatty (PUFA) in large lakes. The objective of this study was to investigate trophic trajectories of PUFA in the pelagic food web (seston, zooplankton, and planktivorous fish) of six large boreal lakes in the Finnish Lake District. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA) were the most abundant PUFA in pelagic organisms, particularly in the zooplanktivorous fish. Our results show that PUFA from the n-3 family (PUFAn-3), often associated with marine food webs, are also abundant in large lakes. The proportion of DHA increased from ~4±3% in seston to ~32±6% in vendace (Coregonus albula) and smelt (Osmerus eperlanus), whereas ALA showed the opposite trophic transfer pattern with the highest values observed in seston (~11±2%) and the lowest in the opossum shrimp (Mysis relicta) and fish (~2±1%). The dominance of diatoms and cryptophytes at the base of the food web in the study lakes accounted for the high amount of PUFAn-3 in the planktonic consumers. Furthermore, the abundance of copepods in the large lakes explains the effective transfer of DHA to planktivorous fish. The plankton community composition in these lakes supports a fishery resource (vendace) that is very high nutritional quality (in terms of EPA and DHA contents) to humans.

  7. [Genetic Differentiation of Balkhash Perch Perca schrenki Kessler, 1874 from Lake Balkhash and Alakol Lake System of Kazakhstan].

    PubMed

    Barmintseva, A E; Shalgimbayeva, G M; Asylbekova, S Z; Isbekov, K B; Danko, E K; Mugue, N S

    2015-09-01

    The genetic differentiation of two populations of Balkhash perch Perca schrenki Kessler, 1874 was examined. The study included (1) the population of Lake Balkhash and the Ili River delta, where this species is protected and it is prohibited to catch them and (2) the population of Alakol Lake system, where it is the main commercial species and forms two morphotypes--pelagic and coastal. Analysis of the mitochondrial DNA COI gene and. six microsatellite loci revealed genetic differentiation at the population level, while no statistically significant differences were found at the morphotype level. The results of this study make it possible with high probability to determine the belonging of caught fish to either the commercial (Alakol Lake system) or protected (Lake Balkhash) population.

  8. "A Date Which Will Live in Infamy"--The First Typed Draft of Franklin D. Roosevelt's War Address. Teaching with Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.

    Early in the afternoon of December 7, 1941, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his chief foreign policy aide, Harry Hopkins, were interrupted by a telephone call from Secretary of War, Henry Stimson, and told that the Japanese had attacked Pearl Harbor (Hawaii). At about 5:00 p.m., following meetings with his military advisers, the president…

  9. Rapid Stable Isotope Turnover of Larval Fish in a Lake Superior Coastal Wetland: Implications for Diet and Life History Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trophic linkages of larval fish in Lake Superior coastal wetlands, rivers and embayments can be identified using naturally occurring differences in the stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (15N:14N, ?15N) and carbon (13C:12C, ?13C). We sampled pelagic fish larvae weekly during sprin...

  10. Recruitment of Total Phytoplankton, Chlorophytes and Cyanobacteria from Lake Sediments Recorded by Photosynthetic Pigments in a Large, Shallow Lake (Lake Taihu, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Huan-Sheng; Kong, Fan-Xiang; Tan, Jian-Kang; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Tao, Yi; Yang, Zhou

    2005-08-01

    Recruitment of total phytoplankton, chlorophytes and cyanobacteria from lake sediments to the water column was studied using photosynthetic pigments at one site (1.5 m) in Lake Taihu, a large shallow lake in China. Samples were taken weekly from the migration traps installed on the bottom from March to May 2004. Abundance of total phytoplankton, chlorophytes and cyanobacteria were represented by Chlorophyll (Chl) a, b, and phycocyanin (PC), respectively. Over the three months, total phytoplankton, chlorophytes, and cyanobacteria corresponding to 48.9%, 68.9% and 316.2% of their initial concentrations in surface sediments were recruited in Lake Taihu. However, compared with their increase in pelagic abundance over the same period, the recruitment accounted for a rather small inoculum. Accompanying the recruitment, total phytoplankton and chlorophytes declined and cyanobacteria increased in the upper 0-2 cm sediments; colonies of Microcystis aeruginosa in the water column enlarged from small size with several cells to large colonies with hundreds of cells. Thus, overwintering and subsequent growth renewal of pelagic phytoplankton merits further study and comparison with benthic survival and recruitment.

  11. Dehydration and drinking responses in a pelagic sea snake.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Brischoux, François; Sheehy, Coleman M; Pfaller, Joseph B

    2012-08-01

    Recent investigations of water balance in sea snakes demonstrated that amphibious sea kraits (Laticauda spp.) dehydrate in seawater and require fresh water to restore deficits in body water. Here, we report similar findings for Pelamis platurus, a viviparous, pelagic, entirely marine species of hydrophiine ("true") sea snake. We sampled snakes at Golfo de Papagayo, Guanacaste, Costa Rica and demonstrated they do not drink seawater but fresh water at variable deficits of body water incurred by dehydration. The threshold dehydration at which snakes first drink fresh water is -18.3 ± 1.1 % (mean ± SE) loss of body mass, which is roughly twice the magnitude of mass deficit at which sea kraits drink fresh water. Compared to sea kraits, Pelamis drink relatively larger volumes of water and make up a larger percentage of the dehydration deficit. Some dehydrated Pelamis also were shown to drink brackish water up to 50% seawater, but most drank at lower brackish values and 20% of the snakes tested did not drink at all. Like sea kraits, Pelamis dehydrate when kept in seawater in the laboratory. Moreover, some individuals drank fresh water immediately following capture, providing preliminary evidence that Pelamis dehydrate at sea. Thus, this widely distributed pelagic species remains subject to dehydration in marine environments where it retains a capacity to sense and to drink fresh water. In comparison with sea kraits, however, Pelamis represents a more advanced stage in the evolutionary transition to a fully marine life and appears to be less dependent on fresh water.

  12. Pelagic photoferrotrophy and iron cycling in a modern ferruginous basin.

    PubMed

    Llirós, Marc; García-Armisen, Tamara; Darchambeau, François; Morana, Cédric; Triadó-Margarit, Xavier; Inceoğlu, Özgül; Borrego, Carles M; Bouillon, Steven; Servais, Pierre; Borges, Alberto V; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Canfield, Don E; Crowe, Sean A

    2015-09-08

    Iron-rich (ferruginous) ocean chemistry prevailed throughout most of Earth's early history. Before the evolution and proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis, biological production in the ferruginous oceans was likely driven by photoferrotrophic bacteria that oxidize ferrous iron {Fe(II)} to harness energy from sunlight, and fix inorganic carbon into biomass. Photoferrotrophs may thus have fuelled Earth's early biosphere providing energy to drive microbial growth and evolution over billions of years. Yet, photoferrotrophic activity has remained largely elusive on the modern Earth, leaving models for early biological production untested and imperative ecological context for the evolution of life missing. Here, we show that an active community of pelagic photoferrotrophs comprises up to 30% of the total microbial community in illuminated ferruginous waters of Kabuno Bay (KB), East Africa (DR Congo). These photoferrotrophs produce oxidized iron {Fe(III)} and biomass, and support a diverse pelagic microbial community including heterotrophic Fe(III)-reducers, sulfate reducers, fermenters and methanogens. At modest light levels, rates of photoferrotrophy in KB exceed those predicted for early Earth primary production, and are sufficient to generate Earth's largest sedimentary iron ore deposits. Fe cycling, however, is efficient, and complex microbial community interactions likely regulate Fe(III) and organic matter export from the photic zone.

  13. Pelagic photoferrotrophy and iron cycling in a modern ferruginous basin

    PubMed Central

    Llirós, Marc; García–Armisen, Tamara; Darchambeau, François; Morana, Cédric; Triadó–Margarit, Xavier; Inceoğlu, Özgül; Borrego, Carles M.; Bouillon, Steven; Servais, Pierre; Borges, Alberto V.; Descy, Jean–Pierre; Canfield, Don E.; Crowe, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron-rich (ferruginous) ocean chemistry prevailed throughout most of Earth’s early history. Before the evolution and proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis, biological production in the ferruginous oceans was likely driven by photoferrotrophic bacteria that oxidize ferrous iron {Fe(II)} to harness energy from sunlight, and fix inorganic carbon into biomass. Photoferrotrophs may thus have fuelled Earth’s early biosphere providing energy to drive microbial growth and evolution over billions of years. Yet, photoferrotrophic activity has remained largely elusive on the modern Earth, leaving models for early biological production untested and imperative ecological context for the evolution of life missing. Here, we show that an active community of pelagic photoferrotrophs comprises up to 30% of the total microbial community in illuminated ferruginous waters of Kabuno Bay (KB), East Africa (DR Congo). These photoferrotrophs produce oxidized iron {Fe(III)} and biomass, and support a diverse pelagic microbial community including heterotrophic Fe(III)-reducers, sulfate reducers, fermenters and methanogens. At modest light levels, rates of photoferrotrophy in KB exceed those predicted for early Earth primary production, and are sufficient to generate Earth’s largest sedimentary iron ore deposits. Fe cycling, however, is efficient, and complex microbial community interactions likely regulate Fe(III) and organic matter export from the photic zone. PMID:26348272

  14. 77 FR 15284 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... the coastal migratory pelagic fishery for king mackerel in the Florida east coast subzone. This closure is necessary to protect the Gulf king mackerel resource. DATES: This rule is effective 12:01 a.m...: The fishery for coastal migratory pelagic fish (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, and cobia) is...

  15. 77 FR 11411 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... component of the commercial sector of the coastal migratory pelagic fishery for king mackerel in the southern Florida west coast subzone. This closure is necessary to protect the Gulf king mackerel resource... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The fishery for coastal migratory pelagic fish ] (king mackerel, Spanish...

  16. 78 FR 57348 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ..., 2014. This rule is proposed according to the Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP... for incidental landings in other CPS fisheries and other sources of mortality. This rule is intended... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Management Team (Team),...

  17. 78 FR 6794 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... according to the Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The proposed 2013 maximum HG... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Management Team (Team), the Council's CPS Advisory Subpanel (Subpanel) and the Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee...

  18. 77 FR 19991 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... according to the Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The proposed 2012 maximum HG... Management Council's (Council) Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Management Team (Team), the Council's CPS... sardine in the U.S. EEZ off the Pacific coast. The CPS FMP and its implementing regulations require...

  19. Repeated Lake-Stream Divergence in Stickleback Life History within a Central European Lake Basin

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Dario; Roesti, Marius; Berner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Life history divergence between populations inhabiting ecologically distinct habitats might be a potent source of reproductive isolation, but has received little attention in the context of speciation. We here test for life history divergence between threespine stickleback inhabiting Lake Constance (Central Europe) and multiple tributary streams. Otolith analysis shows that lake fish generally reproduce at two years of age, while their conspecifics in all streams have shifted to a primarily annual life cycle. This divergence is paralleled by a striking and consistent reduction in body size and fecundity in stream fish relative to lake fish. Stomach content analysis suggests that life history divergence might reflect a genetic or plastic response to pelagic versus benthic foraging modes in the lake and the streams. Microsatellite and mitochondrial markers further reveal that life history shifts in the different streams have occurred independently following the colonization by Lake Constance stickleback, and indicate the presence of strong barriers to gene flow across at least some of the lake-stream habitat transitions. Given that body size is known to strongly influence stickleback mating behavior, these barriers might well be related to life history divergence. PMID:23226528

  20. Investigating aquatic ecosystems of small lakes in Khorezm, Uzbekistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saito, L.; Scott, J.; Rosen, M.; Nishonov, Bakhriddin; Chandra, S.; Lamers, John P.A.; Fayzieva, Dilorom; Shanafield, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Khorezm province of Uzbekistan, located in the Aral Sea Basin, suffers from severe environmental and human health problems due to decades of unsustainable land and water management. Agriculture is the dominant land use in Khorezm, and agricultural runoff water has impacted many small lakes. In this water-scarce region, these lakes may provide a water source for irrigation or fish production. Samples have been collected from 13 of these lakes since 2006 to assess water quality, the aquatic food web, and possible limits to aquatic production. Lake salinity varied from 1 to >10 g/L both between and within lakes. Although hydrophobic contaminants concentrations were low (82-241 pg toxic equivalents/mL in June 2006, October 2006, and June 2007), aquatic species diversity and relative density were low in most lakes. Ongoing work is focused on 4 lakes with pelagic food webs to estimate fish production and assess anthropogenic impacts on the food web. Lake sediment cores are also being examined for organic contaminants, and hydrology is being assessed with stable isotopes. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  1. Years are not brothers: Two-year comparison of greenhouse gas fluxes in large shallow Lake Võrtsjärv, Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rõõm, Eva-Ingrid; Nõges, Peeter; Feldmann, Tõnu; Tuvikene, Lea; Kisand, Anu; Teearu, Helis; Nõges, Tiina

    2014-11-01

    Two-year comparison of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes from different habitat zones in Lake Võrtsjärv revealed strong zonal, seasonal and annual variabilities. On average, largest emissions of both gases per unit area occurred in the helophyte zone. Fluxes of CO2 exceeded those of CH4 in both pelagic and littoral zones. In both years, emission peaks occurred in early spring and late autumn, but were considerably higher in 2010, which caused a more than twenty times higher net efflux. Annual differences in carbon emission were mostly accounted for by variable pelagic CO2 fluxes caused by different ice and snow conditions in spring and phytoplankton growth patterns in summer and autumn. On an annual basis, carbon uptake predominated over release in the pelagic zone in 2009, whereas an opposite balance occurred in 2010. An almost continuous emission from the helophyte zone outbalanced the pelagic uptake in 2009, resulting in a positive net efflux from the lake as a whole. In 2010, when the pelagic area was also mostly emitting carbon, the efflux from the helophyte zone constituted 36% of the total. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the pelagic flux of CO2 could be best described by opposite changes in phytoplankton biomass and pH (R2 = 0.68), whereas the best descriptors for the whole lake methane emission (R2 = 0.52) were sediment temperature (positive), saturation level of dissolved oxygen and depth (both negative). Strong annual differences in net C emissions of Võrtsjärv confirm the necessity of inclusion longer observation period, compared to widely used one year/ice-free period, in cases of lakes in climate zones with large seasonal variabilities. The results also confirm the need for including GHG emissions from helophytes (e.g. Phragmites australis) to the lake's net GHG budget, even if they cover a relatively small area.

  2. An algal carbon budget for pelagic-benthic coupling in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzgerald, S.A.; Gardner, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Assimilation and respiration rates of Diporeia sp., an abundant benthic amphipod, and of sediment microheterotrophs were measured in a microcosm study. Release of radioisotope in the form of dissolved organic compounds was much lower than that incorporated and respired for both Diporeia and sediment bacteria. Of the 61 mmol C m-2 of algal C estimated to be deposited during the spring bloom. -from Authors

  3. Diet niches of major forage fish in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, B.M.; Savino, J.F.; Ogilvie, L.M.; ,

    2007-01-01

    A large complex of coregonine species historically dominated the fish community of Lake Michigan. The current species complex is simplified with one remaining coregonine, bloater (Coregonus hoyi), deepwater sculpin (Myoxocephalus thompsoni), slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), and two dominant invaders, alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax). To better understand the diet relationships of the major offshore forage fishes now in Lake Michigan, diets of bloater, alewife, rainbow smelt, deepwater sculpin, and slimy sculpin were compared. The three sites, chosen to represent northern, central, and southern components of the lake, were sampled during spring, summer, and fall in 1994, and spring and fall in 1995. Forage fishes had diverse and variable diets, with niches differentiated by prey type or location. Diporeia hoyi, Mysis relicta, and zooplankton were the major diet items. The index of relative importance showed benthic (slimy and deepwater sculpins) and pelagic (alewife, rainbow smelt) feeding strategies with opportunistic bloaters incorporating both feeding strategies. Highest diet overlaps were between species of sculpin, and between large and small bloaters; both groups partitioned food by size. Though competition for food may be minimized by spatial segregation of potential competitors, the forage fish in Lake Michigan apparently partition food resources. Fishery management models incorporating food habits of pelagic forage fish would need to take into account diet variation associated with location and season. ?? 2007 E. Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung.

  4. Sources and flux of natural gases from Mono lake, California

    SciTech Connect

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G. ); Whiticar, M.J. )

    1987-11-01

    The ability to identify a formation mechanism for natural gas in a particular environment requires consideration of several geochemical factors when there are multiple sources present. Four primary sources of methane have been identified in Mono Lake. Two of these sources were associated with numerous natural gas seeps which occur at various locations in the lake and extend beyond its present boundary; the two other gas sources result from current microbiological processes. Current microbiological processes responsible for sources of natural gas in the lake included pelagic methanogenesis and decomposition of terrestrial grasses in the littoral zone. Methanogenesis in the pelagic sediments resulted in methane saturation. Interstitial sulfate decreased from 133 mM at the surface to 35 mM by 110 cm depth, indicating that sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis operated concurrently. Methane diffused out of the sediments resulting in concentrations of about 50 {mu}M in the anoxic bottom waters. Methane oxidation in the oxic/anoxic boundary lowered the concentration by > 98%, but values in surface waters were supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere. The {delta}{sup 13}CH{sub 4} of this unoxidized residual methane was enriched in {sup 13}C relative to methane in the bottom water and sediments. Average outward flux of this methane was 2.77 {times} 10{sup 7} moles yr{sup {minus}1}. A fourth, but minor source of methane was associated with the decomposition of terrestrial grasses taking place in the lake's recently expanded littoral zone.

  5. Horizontal differences in ecosystem metabolism of a large shallow lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrizaj, Agron; Laas, Alo; Anijalg, Urmas; Nõges, Peeter

    2016-04-01

    The causes of horizontal differences in metabolic activities between lake zones are still poorly understood. We carried out a two-year study of lake metabolism in two contrasting parts of a large shallow lake using the open-water technique based on high-frequency measurements of dissolved oxygen concentrations. We expected that the more sheltered and macrophyte-rich southern part of the lake receiving a high hydraulic load from the main inflow will exhibit equal or higher rate of metabolic processes compared to the open pelagic zone, and higher temporal variability, including anomalous metabolic estimates such as negative gross primary production (GPP) or community respiration (CR) due to rapid water exchange. Our results showed that anomalous metabolic estimates occurred at both stations with a similar frequency and were related rather to certain wind directions, which likely contributed to stronger water exchange between the littoral and pelagic zones. Periods of auto- and heterotrophy (daily mean NEP> or <0) had a 50:50 distribution at the Central Station while the proportions were 30:70 at the Southern Station. High areal GPP estimated in our study exceeding nearly twice the long-term average 14C primary production, showed the advantages of the free-water technique in integrating the metabolism of all communities, a large part of which has remained undetected by the traditional bottle or chamber incubation techniques.

  6. Sediment oxygen demand in a constructed lake in south-eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Todd A; Ganf, George G; Brookes, Justin D

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of hypoxia and anoxia in aquatic environments is increasing, driven by changes in land use and alteration of flow regimes. Periods of low oxygen impact biodiversity and water quality for both recreational and consumptive users. We use the Torrens Lake as a case study to assess pelagic, benthic and resuspended sediment oxygen demand, and the release of sediment bound phosphorus to determine the relative role of internal and external loading on water quality in a lake within a heavily urbanised landscape. Our results indicate temporal shifts in the dominant oxygen demanding process in the lake. During periods of no-inflow, sediment oxygen demand is the dominant process; during periods of inflow resulting from wet weather conditions, pelagic rather than sediment derived oxygen demand becomes the governing process. The inlet end of the lake is a depositional zone for stormwater borne sediments. Resuspended sediments at the inlet end of the lake exert a higher oxygen demand than those from the outlet, and represent a larger pool of potentially mobile phosphorus compared to sediments at the outlet end of the lake. However, external rather than internal loading appears to be the dominant driver of water quality in this lake.

  7. Lake Constance

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... Swiss shores of Lake Constance at the town of Rorschach. Eutrophication, or the process of nutrient enrichment, is rapidly accelerated ... of the value of Lake Constance, efforts to mitigate eutrophication were initiated in the 1970's. MISR was built and is managed ...

  8. East Asian seas: A hot spot of pelagic microplastics.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Atsuhiko; Uchida, Keiichi; Tokai, Tadashi; Iwasaki, Shinsuke

    2015-12-30

    To investigate concentrations of pelagic micro- (<5mm in size) and mesoplastics (>5mm) in the East Asian seas around Japan, field surveys using two vessels were conducted concurrently in summer 2014. The total particle count (pieces km(-2)) was computed based on observed concentrations (pieces m(-3)) of small plastic fragments (both micro- and mesoplastics) collected using neuston nets. The total particle count of microplastics within the study area was 1,720,000 pieces km(-2), 16 times greater than in the North Pacific and 27 times greater than in the world oceans. The proportion of mesoplastics increased upstream of the northeastward ocean currents, such that the small plastic fragments collected in the present surveys were considered to have originated in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea southwest of the study area.

  9. Assimilation of Diazotrophic Nitrogen into Pelagic Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Woodland, Ryan J.; Holland, Daryl P.; Beardall, John; Smith, Jonathan; Scicluna, Todd; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2013-01-01

    The fate of diazotrophic nitrogen (ND) fixed by planktonic cyanobacteria in pelagic food webs remains unresolved, particularly for toxic cyanophytes that are selectively avoided by most herbivorous zooplankton. Current theory suggests that ND fixed during cyanobacterial blooms can enter planktonic food webs contemporaneously with peak bloom biomass via direct grazing of zooplankton on cyanobacteria or via the uptake of bioavailable ND (exuded from viable cyanobacterial cells) by palatable phytoplankton or microbial consortia. Alternatively, ND can enter planktonic food webs post-bloom following the remineralization of bloom detritus. Although the relative contribution of these processes to planktonic nutrient cycles is unknown, we hypothesized that assimilation of bioavailable ND (e.g., nitrate, ammonium) by palatable phytoplankton and subsequent grazing by zooplankton (either during or after the cyanobacterial bloom) would be the primary pathway by which ND was incorporated into the planktonic food web. Instead, in situ stable isotope measurements and grazing experiments clearly documented that the assimilation of ND by zooplankton outpaced assimilation by palatable phytoplankton during a bloom of toxic Nodularia spumigena Mertens. We identified two distinct temporal phases in the trophic transfer of ND from N. spumigena to the plankton community. The first phase was a highly dynamic transfer of ND to zooplankton with rates that covaried with bloom biomass while bypassing other phytoplankton taxa; a trophic transfer that we infer was routed through bloom-associated bacteria. The second phase was a slowly accelerating assimilation of the dissolved-ND pool by phytoplankton that was decoupled from contemporaneous variability in N. spumigena concentrations. These findings provide empirical evidence that ND can be assimilated and transferred rapidly throughout natural plankton communities and yield insights into the specific processes underlying the propagation of ND

  10. Synchronous marine pelagic regime shifts in the Northern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Beaugrand, G.; Conversi, A.; Chiba, S.; Edwards, M.; Fonda-Umani, S.; Greene, C.; Mantua, N.; Otto, S. A.; Reid, P. C.; Stachura, M. M.; Stemmann, L.; Sugisaki, H.

    2015-01-01

    Regime shifts are characterized by sudden, substantial and temporally persistent changes in the state of an ecosystem. They involve major biological modifications and often have important implications for exploited living resources. In this study, we examine whether regime shifts observed in 11 marine systems from two oceans and three regional seas in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) are synchronous, applying the same methodology to all. We primarily infer marine pelagic regime shifts from abrupt shifts in zooplankton assemblages, with the exception of the East Pacific where ecosystem changes are inferred from fish. Our analyses provide evidence for quasi-synchronicity of marine pelagic regime shifts both within and between ocean basins, although these shifts lie embedded within considerable regional variability at both year-to-year and lower-frequency time scales. In particular, a regime shift was detected in the late 1980s in many studied marine regions, although the exact year of the observed shift varied somewhat from one basin to another. Another regime shift was also identified in the mid- to late 1970s but concerned less marine regions. We subsequently analyse the main biological signals in relation to changes in NH temperature and pressure anomalies. The results suggest that the main factor synchronizing regime shifts on large scales is NH temperature; however, changes in atmospheric circulation also appear important. We propose that this quasi-synchronous shift could represent the variably lagged biological response in each ecosystem to a large-scale, NH change of the climatic system, involving both an increase in NH temperature and a strongly positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. Further investigation is needed to determine the relative roles of changes in temperature and atmospheric pressure patterns and their resultant teleconnections in synchronizing regime shifts at large scales.

  11. Life history of lake herring of Green Bay, Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Stanford H.

    1956-01-01

    Although the lake herring has been an important contributor to the commercial fish production of Green Bay, little has been known about it. This study is based on field observations and data from about 6,500 lake herring collected over the period 1948 to 1952. Relatively nonselective commercial pound nets were a primary source of material for the study of age and growth. Commercial and experimental gill nets were used to obtain data on gear selectivity and vertical distribution. Scales were employed to investigate age and growth. Age group IV normally dominated commercial catches during the first half of the calendar year and age group III the last half. At these ages the fish averaged about 10.5 inches in length. The season's growth started in May, was most rapid in July, and terminated near the end of October. The sexes grew at the same rate. Selectivity of fishing gear was found to influence the estimation of growth. Geographical and annual differences in growth are shown. Factors that might contribute to discrepancies in calculated growth are evaluated. Possible real and apparent causes of growth compensation are given. The relation between length and weight is shown to vary with sex, season, year, and method of capture. Females were relatively more plentiful in commercial catches in February than in May through December. The percentage of females decreased with increase in age in pound-net catches but increased with age in gill-net samples. Within a year class the percentage of females decreased with increase in age. Most Green Bay lake herring mature during their second or third year of life. They are pelagic spawners with most intensive spawning over shallow areas. Spawning takes place between mid-November and mid-December, and eggs hatch in April and May. Lake herring ovaries contained from 3,500 to 11,200 eggs (averaged 6,375). Progress of spawning by age, sex, and length is given. Lake herring were distributed at all depths in Green Bay in early May, were

  12. Accommodating Dynamic Oceanographic Processes and Pelagic Biodiversity in Marine Conservation Planning

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, Hedley S.; Game, Edward T.; Lombard, Amanda T.; Hobday, Alistair J.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Beckley, Lynnath E.; Pressey, Robert L.; Huggett, Jenny A.; Coetzee, Janet C.; van der Lingen, Carl D.; Petersen, Samantha L.; Merkle, Dagmar; Possingham, Hugh P.

    2011-01-01

    Pelagic ecosystems support a significant and vital component of the ocean's productivity and biodiversity. They are also heavily exploited and, as a result, are the focus of numerous spatial planning initiatives. Over the past decade, there has been increasing enthusiasm for protected areas as a tool for pelagic conservation, however, few have been implemented. Here we demonstrate an approach to plan protected areas that address the physical and biological dynamics typical of the pelagic realm. Specifically, we provide an example of an approach to planning protected areas that integrates pelagic and benthic conservation in the southern Benguela and Agulhas Bank ecosystems off South Africa. Our aim was to represent species of importance to fisheries and species of conservation concern within protected areas. In addition to representation, we ensured that protected areas were designed to consider pelagic dynamics, characterized from time-series data on key oceanographic processes, together with data on the abundance of small pelagic fishes. We found that, to have the highest likelihood of reaching conservation targets, protected area selection should be based on time-specific data rather than data averaged across time. More generally, we argue that innovative methods are needed to conserve ephemeral and dynamic pelagic biodiversity. PMID:21311757

  13. The effect of light on lake herring (Coregonus artedi) reactive volume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, Jason; Edsall, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    The lake herring (Coregonus artedi) is an important coldwater planktivore in the Laurentian Great Lakes and in smaller inland lakes in portions of Canada and the northern United States. Lake herring cruise the pelagia and feed selectively in both gulping and particulate modes. They are visual predators in environments with adequate illumination. Visual predation by fish consists of a series of discrete steps. We studied the first step in the predation sequence, reaction to prey, at light intensities of 2–1500 Lx in a simulated pelagic environment at 10–13°C. We measured lake herring reactive distances, the distance at which a prey item will be detected and attacked, to liveLimnocalanus macrurus, a natural prey of lake herring in Lake Superior. We used the reactive distances and associated angles of bearing and elevation, which described the location of the prey relative to the lake herring, to calculate reactive volume. This reactive volume can be envisioned as an irregular sphere surrounding the fish, within which prey are detected and attacked. All of the attacks on prey occurred in the anterior portions of the sagittal and lateral planes of the lake herring, as would be expected for a pelagic, cruising fish. The reactive volume surrounding the lake herring was generally spherical, but was more irregular than the simple spheres, hemispheres, cylinders, cones or other geometries assumed in previous studies. The reactive distances and the reactive volume changed with light intensity and were significantly smaller at 2–10 Lx than at 40–1500 Lx. At 40–1500 Lx, the reactive volume was expanded over that observed at 2–10 Lx laterally and caudally. Collectively our results indicate that lake herring can visually forage most effectively in environments with light levels >10 Lx.

  14. Accretion, metamorphism, and brecciation of ordinary chondrites - Evidence from petrologic studies of meteorites from Roosevelt County, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Edward R. D.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Keil, Klaus

    1986-01-01

    The olivines and pyroxenes from twenty-nine ordinary chondrites from Roosevelt County, New Mexico are examined. The mineralogical properties of the chondrites studied are described. Correlations between mineral compositions and petrologic type and between petrologic type and bulk chemistry are analyzed. It is observed that mean CaO concentrations in olivine show significant variations among equilibrated chondrites, but these are not correlated with petrologic type; the degree of heterogeneity of FeO concentrations in olivines of types 4-6 is not correlated with the degree of metamorphism; and mean FeO concentrations of silicates show average increases of 3-5 percent from type 4 to type 6 in each group.

  15. Spatial Variability of Benthic-Pelagic Coupling in an Estuary Ecosystem: Consequences for Microphytobenthos Resuspension Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Ubertini, Martin; Lefebvre, Sébastien; Gangnery, Aline; Grangeré, Karine; Le Gendre, Romain; Orvain, Francis

    2012-01-01

    The high degree of physical factors in intertidal estuarine ecosystem increases material processing between benthic and pelagic compartments. In these ecosystems, microphytobenthos resuspension is a major phenomenon since its contribution to higher trophic levels can be highly significant. Understanding the sediment and associated microphytobenthos resuspension and its fate in the water column is indispensable for measuring the food available to benthic and pelagic food webs. To identify and hierarchize the physical/biological factors potentially involved in MPB resuspension, the entire intertidal area and surrounding water column of an estuarine ecosystem, the Bay des Veys, was sampled during ebb tide. A wide range of physical parameters (hydrodynamic regime, grain size of the sediment, and suspended matter) and biological parameters (flora and fauna assemblages, chlorophyll) were analyzed to characterize benthic-pelagic coupling at the bay scale. Samples were collected in two contrasted periods, spring and late summer, to assess the impact of forcing variables on benthic-pelagic coupling. A mapping approach using kriging interpolation enabled us to overlay benthic and pelagic maps of physical and biological variables, for both hydrological conditions and trophic indicators. Pelagic Chl a concentration was the best predictor explaining the suspension-feeders spatial distribution. Our results also suggest a perennial spatio-temporal structure of both benthic and pelagic compartments in the ecosystem, at least when the system is not imposed to intense wind, with MPB distribution controlled by both grain size and bathymetry. The benthic component appeared to control the pelagic one via resuspension phenomena at the scale of the bay. Co-inertia analysis showed closer benthic-pelagic coupling between the variables in spring. The higher MPB biomass observed in summer suggests a higher contribution to filter-feeders diets, indicating a higher resuspension effect in

  16. The accumulation rate of meteorite falls at the earth's surface - The view from Roosevelt County, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Wells, Gordon L.; Rendell, Helen M.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of 154 meteorite fragments within an 11-sq km area of wind-excavated basins in Roosevelt County, New Mexico, permits a new calculation of the accumulation rate of meteorite falls at the earth's surface. Thermoluminescence dating of the coversand unit comprising the prime recovery surface suggests the maximum terrestrial age of the meteorites to be about 16.0 ka. The 68 meteorite fragments subjected to petrological analyses represent a minimum of 49 individual falls. Collection bias has largely excluded carbonaceous chondrites and achondrites, requiring the accumulation rate derived from the recovered samples to be increased by a factor of 1.25. Terrestrial weathering destroying ordinary chondrites can be modeled as a first-order decay process with an estimated half-life of 3.5 + or - 1.9 ka on the semiarid American High Plains. Having accounted for the age of the recovery surface, area of field searches, pairing of finds, collection bias and weathering half-life, an accumulation rate of 940 falls/a per 10 to the 6th sq km is calculated for falls greater than 10 g total mass. This figure exceeds the best-constrained previous estimate by more than an order of magnitude. One possible reason for this disparity may be the extraordinary length of the fall record preserved in the surficial geology of Roosevelt County. The high accumulation rate determined for the past 16 ka may point to the existence of periods when the meteorite fall rate was significantly greater than at present.

  17. Global Lakes Sentinel Services: Evaluation of Chl-a Trends in Deep Clear Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, Ilaria; Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano; Poser, Kathrin; Peters, Steef; Hommersom, Annelies; Schenk, Karin; Heege, Thomas; Philipson, Petra; Ruescas, Ana; Bottcher, Martin; Stelzer, Kerstin

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is the analysis of trend in the trophic level evolution in clear deep lakes which, being characterised by good quality state, are important socio- economic resources for their regions. The selected lakes are situated in Europe (Garda, Maggiore, Constance and Vättern), North America (Michigan) and Africa (Malawi and Tanganyika) and cover a range of eco- regions (continental, perialpine, boreal, rift valley) distributed globally.To evaluate trophic level tendency we mainly focused on chlorophyll-a concentrations (chl-a) which is a direct proxy of trophic status. The chl-a concentrations were obtained from 5216 cloud-free MERIS imagery from 2002 to 2012.The 'GLaSS RoIStats tool' available within the GLaSS project was used to extract chl-a in a number of region of interests (ROI) located in pelagic waters as well as some few other stations depending on lakes morphology. For producing the time-series trend, these extracted data were analysed with the Seasonal Kendall test.The results overall show almost stable conditions with a slight increase in concentration for lakes Maggiore, Constance, and the Green Bay of Lake Michigan; a slight decrease for lakes Garda and Tanganyika and absolutely stable conditions for lakes Vättern and Malawi.The results presented in this work show the great capability of MERIS to perform trend tests analysis on trophic status with focus on chl-a concentration. Being chl-a also a key parameter in water quality monitoring plans, this study also supports the managing practices implemented worldwide for using the water of the lakes.

  18. The most acidified Austrian lake in comparison to a neutralized mining lake

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Michael; Weisse, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated two mining lakes located in the north of Lower Austria. These lakes arose 45 years ago when open cast lignite mining ceased. The lakes are separated by a 7-m wide dam. Due to the oxidation of pyrite, both lakes have been acidified and exhibit iron, sulphate, and heavy metal concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than in circumneutral lakes. The water column of both lakes is divided into two layers by a pronounced chemocline. The smaller mining lake (AML), with pH close to of 2.6, is the most acidic lake in Austria, whereas flooding with stream water and by drainage from the surrounding fields neutralized the adjacent larger pit lake. The goal of our study was to investigate the effect of flooding on its physical, chemical and biological properties, in comparison to the pristine AML. Even relative to other extremely acidic lakes, the flora and fauna in the AML was reduced and composed of only two flagellate, one ciliate, and one rotifer species. The simplified pelagic food web in the mixolimnion consisted of heterotrophic bacteria, the mixotrophic flagellates Chlamydomonas acidophila and Ochromonas sp., the ciliate Oxytricha sp., and the rotifer Cephalodella sp. The latter two are as yet undescribed new species. The heliozoan Actinophrys sp. that may act as top predator occurred only in low abundance. The euglenid Lepocinclis buetschlii formed a stable deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) at 7 m depth. Highest cell numbers of L. buetschlii in the DCM exceeded 108 L−1. The neutralized mining lake harboured higher plankton diversity similar to that of natural circumneutral lakes. A peak of at least 16 different phytoplankton taxa was observed during summer. The zooplankton consisted of several copepod species, daphnids and other cladocerans, and at least six different rotifer species. Several fish species occurred in the neutralized lake. Although the effect of non-permanent flooding was largely sustainable, interannual fluctuations of

  19. The most acidified Austrian lake in comparison to a neutralized mining lake.

    PubMed

    Moser, Michael; Weisse, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated two mining lakes located in the north of Lower Austria. These lakes arose 45 years ago when open cast lignite mining ceased. The lakes are separated by a 7-m wide dam. Due to the oxidation of pyrite, both lakes have been acidified and exhibit iron, sulphate, and heavy metal concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than in circumneutral lakes. The water column of both lakes is divided into two layers by a pronounced chemocline. The smaller mining lake (AML), with pH close to of 2.6, is the most acidic lake in Austria, whereas flooding with stream water and by drainage from the surrounding fields neutralized the adjacent larger pit lake. The goal of our study was to investigate the effect of flooding on its physical, chemical and biological properties, in comparison to the pristine AML. Even relative to other extremely acidic lakes, the flora and fauna in the AML was reduced and composed of only two flagellate, one ciliate, and one rotifer species. The simplified pelagic food web in the mixolimnion consisted of heterotrophic bacteria, the mixotrophic flagellates Chlamydomonas acidophila and Ochromonas sp., the ciliate Oxytricha sp., and the rotifer Cephalodella sp. The latter two are as yet undescribed new species. The heliozoan Actinophrys sp. that may act as top predator occurred only in low abundance. The euglenid Lepocinclis buetschlii formed a stable deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) at 7 m depth. Highest cell numbers of L. buetschlii in the DCM exceeded 10(8) L(-1). The neutralized mining lake harboured higher plankton diversity similar to that of natural circumneutral lakes. A peak of at least 16 different phytoplankton taxa was observed during summer. The zooplankton consisted of several copepod species, daphnids and other cladocerans, and at least six different rotifer species. Several fish species occurred in the neutralized lake. Although the effect of non-permanent flooding was largely sustainable, interannual fluctuations

  20. Stock structure of Lake Baikal omul as determined by whole-body morphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bronte, Charles R.; Fleischer, G.W.; Maistrenko, S.G.; Pronin, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    In Lake Baikal, three morphotypes of omul Coregonus autumnalis migratorius are recognized; the littoral, pelagic, and deep-water forms. Morphotype assignment is difficult, and similar to that encountered in pelagic and deep-water coregonines in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Principal component analysis revealed separation of all three morphotypes based on caudal peduncle length and depth, length and depth of the body between the dorsal and anal fin, and distance between the pectoral and the pelvic fins. Strong negative loadings were associated with head measurements. Omul of the same morphotype captured at different locations were classified to location of capture using step-wise discriminant function analysis. Jackknife correct classifications ranged from 43 to 78% for littoral omul from five locations, and 45–86% for pelagic omul from four locations. Patterns of location misclassification of littoral omul suggested that the sub-population structure, hence stock affinity, may be influenced by movements and intermixing of individuals among areas that are joined bathymetrically. Pelagic omul were more distinguishable by site and may support a previous hypothesis of a spawning-based rather than a foraging-based sub-population structure. Omul morphotypes may reflect adaptations to both ecological and local environmental conditions, and may have a genetic basis.

  1. New Method for the Quantitative Analysis of Smear Slides in Pelagic and Hemi-Pelagic Sediments of the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, M. K.; Aiello, I. W.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Petrographic microscopy of smear slides is the standard method to initially investigate marine sediments in core sediment studies (e.g. IODP expeditions). The technique is not commonly used in more complex analysis due to concerns over the subjectivity of the method and variability in operator training and experience. Two initiatives sponsored by Ocean Leadership, a sedimentology training workshop and a digital reference of smear slide components (Marsaglia et al., 2013) have been implemented to address the need for advanced training. While the influence of subjectivity on the quality of data has yet to be rigorously tested, the lack of standardization in the current method of smear slide analysis (SSA) remains a concern. The relative abundance of the three main components, (total diatoms, silt-to-sand sized siliciclastics, and clay minerals) of high and low density Bering Sea hemi-pelagic sediments from the ocean margin (Site U144; Site U1339) and pelagic sediments from the open-ocean (Site U1340) were analyzed. Our analyses show visual estimation is a reproducible method to quantify the relative abundance of the main sediment components. Furthermore, we present a modified method for SSA, with procedural changes objectively guided by statistical analyses, including constraints to increase randomness and precision in both the preparation and analysis of the smear slide. For example, repeated measure ANOVAs found a smear slide could be accurately quantified by counting three fields of view. Similarly, the use of replicate smear slides to quantify a sample was analyzed. Finally, the data produced from this modified SSA shows a strong correlation to continuously logged physical parameters of sediment such as gamma ray attenuation (Site U1339 r2= 0.41; Site U1340 r2= 0.36). Therefore, the modified SSA combined with other independent methods (e.g. laser particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and physical properties) can be a very effective tool for the

  2. Lake Level Fluctuations Boost Toxic Cyanobacterial “Oligotrophic Blooms”

    PubMed Central

    Callieri, Cristiana; Bertoni, Roberto; Contesini, Mario; Bertoni, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Global warming has been shown to strongly influence inland water systems, producing noticeable increases in water temperatures. Rising temperatures, especially when combined with widespread nutrient pollution, directly favour the growth of toxic cyanobacteria. Climate changes have also altered natural water level fluctuations increasing the probability of extreme events as dry periods followed by heavy rains. The massive appearance of Dolichospermum lemmermannii ( = planktonic Anabaena), a toxic species absent from the pelagic zone of the subalpine oligotrophic Lake Maggiore before 2005, could be a consequence of the unusual fluctuations of lake level in recent years. We hypothesized that these fluctuations may favour the cyanobacterium as result of nutrient pulses from the biofilms formed in the littoral zone when the lake level is high. To help verify this, we exposed artificial substrates in the lake, and evaluated their nutrient enrichment and release after desiccation, together with measurements of fluctuations in lake level, precipitation and D.lemmermannii population. The highest percentage of P release and the lowest C∶P molar ratio of released nutrients coincided with the summer appearance of the D.lemmermannii bloom. The P pulse indicates that fluctuations in level counteract nutrient limitation in this lake and it is suggested that this may apply more widely to other oligotrophic lakes. In view of the predicted increase in water level fluctuations due to climate change, it is important to try to minimize such fluctuations in order to mitigate the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:25295866

  3. Fractal Hypothesis of the Pelagic Microbial Ecosystem-Can Simple Ecological Principles Lead to Self-Similar Complexity in the Pelagic Microbial Food Web?

    PubMed

    Våge, Selina; Thingstad, T Frede

    2015-01-01

    Trophic interactions are highly complex and modern sequencing techniques reveal enormous biodiversity across multiple scales in marine microbial communities. Within the chemically and physically relatively homogeneous pelagic environment, this calls for an explanation beyond spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Based on observations of simple parasite-host and predator-prey interactions occurring at different trophic levels and levels of phylogenetic resolution, we present a theoretical perspective on this enormous biodiversity, discussing in particular self-similar aspects of pelagic microbial food web organization. Fractal methods have been used to describe a variety of natural phenomena, with studies of habitat structures being an application in ecology. In contrast to mathematical fractals where pattern generating rules are readily known, however, identifying mechanisms that lead to natural fractals is not straight-forward. Here we put forward the hypothesis that trophic interactions between pelagic microbes may be organized in a fractal-like manner, with the emergent network resembling the structure of the Sierpinski triangle. We discuss a mechanism that could be underlying the formation of repeated patterns at different trophic levels and discuss how this may help understand characteristic biomass size-spectra that hint at scale-invariant properties of the pelagic environment. If the idea of simple underlying principles leading to a fractal-like organization of the pelagic food web could be formalized, this would extend an ecologists mindset on how biological complexity could be accounted for. It may furthermore benefit ecosystem modeling by facilitating adequate model resolution across multiple scales.

  4. Fractal Hypothesis of the Pelagic Microbial Ecosystem—Can Simple Ecological Principles Lead to Self-Similar Complexity in the Pelagic Microbial Food Web?

    PubMed Central

    Våge, Selina; Thingstad, T. Frede

    2015-01-01

    Trophic interactions are highly complex and modern sequencing techniques reveal enormous biodiversity across multiple scales in marine microbial communities. Within the chemically and physically relatively homogeneous pelagic environment, this calls for an explanation beyond spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Based on observations of simple parasite-host and predator-prey interactions occurring at different trophic levels and levels of phylogenetic resolution, we present a theoretical perspective on this enormous biodiversity, discussing in particular self-similar aspects of pelagic microbial food web organization. Fractal methods have been used to describe a variety of natural phenomena, with studies of habitat structures being an application in ecology. In contrast to mathematical fractals where pattern generating rules are readily known, however, identifying mechanisms that lead to natural fractals is not straight-forward. Here we put forward the hypothesis that trophic interactions between pelagic microbes may be organized in a fractal-like manner, with the emergent network resembling the structure of the Sierpinski triangle. We discuss a mechanism that could be underlying the formation of repeated patterns at different trophic levels and discuss how this may help understand characteristic biomass size-spectra that hint at scale-invariant properties of the pelagic environment. If the idea of simple underlying principles leading to a fractal-like organization of the pelagic food web could be formalized, this would extend an ecologists mindset on how biological complexity could be accounted for. It may furthermore benefit ecosystem modeling by facilitating adequate model resolution across multiple scales. PMID:26648929

  5. 75 FR 33733 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION... as part of the live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of...

  6. Bioaccumulation of mercury in pelagic fishes from the northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yang J.; Rooker, Jay R.; Gill, Gary A.; Turner, Jason P.

    2007-03-30

    Total mercury (Hg) concentration was determined in the tissues of 10 pelagic fishes in the northern Golf of Mexico, and dietary tracers (stable isotopes and fatty acids) were used to evaluate the relationship between Hg and feeding history.

  7. ZOOPLANKTON LIFE CYCLES: DIRECT DOCUMENTATION OF PELAGIC BIRTHS AND DEATHS RELATIVE TO DIAPAUSING EGG PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Full-season demographics (pelagic births and deaths, diapause egg production) provide valuable insights into species persistence and dispersal success. The spiny cladoceran (Bythotrephes) possesses morphological adaptations (spines and thick-walled diapause eggs) that lessen impa...

  8. 78 FR 70015 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Large Pelagic Fishing Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Pelagic Fishing Survey AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork...

  9. Contrasting time trends of organic contaminants in Antarctic pelagic and benthic food webs.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Nico W; Riddle, Martin J; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine; van Franeker, Jan Andries

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that pelagic Antarctic seabirds show significant decreases in concentrations of some persistent organic pollutants. Trends in Adélie penguins and Southern fulmars fit in a general pattern revealed by a broad literature review. Downward trends are also visible in pelagic fish, contrasting sharply with steady or increasing concentrations in Antarctic benthic organisms. Transfer of contaminants between Antarctic pelagic and benthic food webs is associated with seasonal sea-ice dynamics which may influence the balance between the final receptors of contaminants under different climatic conditions. This complicates the predictability of future trends of emerging compounds in the Antarctic ecosystem, such as of the brominated compounds that we detected in Antarctic petrels. The discrepancy in trends between pelagic and benthic organisms shows that Antarctic biota are still final receptors of globally released organic contaminants and it remains questionable whether the total environmental burden of contaminants in the Antarctic ecosystem is declining.

  10. White Lake AOC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    White Lake is in Muskegon County along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. It was named an Area of Concern on the Great Lakes under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1987 and delisted in 2014.

  11. Development of a Multimetric Indicator of Pelagic Zooplankton ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We used zooplankton data collected for the 2012 National Lakes Assessment (NLA) to develop multimetric indices (MMIs) for five aggregated ecoregions of the conterminous USA (Coastal Plains, Eastern Highlands, Plains, Upper Midwest, and Western Mountains and Xeric [“West’]). We classified candidate metrics into six categories: We evaluated the performance of candidate metrics, and used metrics that had passed these screens to calculate all possible candidate MMIs that included at least one metric from each category. We selected the candidate MMI that had high responsiveness, a reasonable value for repeatability, low mean pairwise correlation among component metrics, and, when possible, a maximum pairwise correlation among component metrics that was <0.7. We were able to develop MMIs that were sufficiently responsive and repeatable to assess ecological condition for the NLA without the need to reduce the effects of natural variation using models. We did not observe effects of either lake size, lake origin, or site depth on the MMIs. The MMIs appear to respond more strongly to increased nutrient concentrations than to shoreline habitat conditions. Improving our understanding of how zooplankton assemblages respond to increased human disturbance, and obtaining more complete autecological information for zooplankton taxa would likely improve MMIs developed for future assessments. Using zooplankton assemblage data from the 2012 National Lakes Assessment (NLA),

  12. Paleoceanography in Pelagic Clay of the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S.

    2014-12-01

    A spatially and temporally expansive record of early Cenozoic high-latitude ocean history resides in the pelagic clay of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG). At the beginning of the Cenozoic, four sites drilled during IODP Expedition 329 were located between 40-62°S, which may have been the center of an ancient polar gyre. As the Pacific Plate migrated northward, these sites were subjected to major paleoceanographic changes including the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, Australian desertification, and Southern Hemisphere volcanism. The SPG sediment is homogenous brown, zeolitic, metalliferous pelagic clay. Such sediment can be challenging for paleooceanographic research due its ultrafine grain size, slow accumulation rate, post-depositional alteration, and lack of biogenic material. However, our geochemical techniques embrace the authigenic nature of SPG clay to develop a constant-Co age model and track variations in sediment origin and accumulation. By combining sedimentation patterns with backtracked site paths, we produce an unprecedented characterization of the Cenozoic paleoceanographic evolution of the SPG. We analyzed 47 major, trace, REE concentrations in 206 bulk sediment samples from 7 sites across the SPG, deposited as long ago as 100 Ma. For each sample, traditional geochemical partitioning techniques, Q-mode factor analyses, and multiple linear regressions allowed us to quantify contributions of six end-members: post-Archean average Australian shale (PAAS), Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides, apatite, biogenic Si, and two distinct types of altered volcanic ash. Mass accumulation of the PAAS end-member increased 12-18% throughout the Cenozoic, with the most rapid increase occurring just after the mid-Miocene when Australia became more arid. The Paleogene/Neogene boundary also marks a change in sedimentation, likely caused by a change in eolian activity and/or a change in authigenic processes due to changing bottom water conditions. Contributions from one kind of

  13. The Gulf of Cádiz pelagic ecosystem: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Lafuente, Jesús; Ruiz, Javier

    2007-08-01

    The Gulf of Cádiz, strategically situated between the North Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, has been the focus of attention of a few oceanographic studies dealing with the deep circulation in order to understand the dynamics of the dense plume of Mediterranean water. Much less attention has been paid to the surface pelagic layer which holds important living resources of commercial and ecological interest. This overview summarizes the recent advances that have been made concerning the regional oceanography of the northern half of this important basin from an interdisciplinary point of view. Probably the most relevant oceanographic feature of the basin is its strong seasonality, which is linked to the meteorologically-induced seasonality of the eastern boundary current system of the North Atlantic. The prominent cape Santa Maria divides the continental shelf off the southern Iberian Peninsula in two shelves of different shape that hold different oceanographic processes, which in turn determine the characteristics of the pelagic ecosystem. Mass and energy inputs from land as well as tidally-driven processes makes the wider eastern shelf be more productive while the narrower western shelf, cut by a sharp submarine canyon, is under the influence of the almost-permanent upwelling spot off cape San Vicente. Under easterlies, the west-going, warm coastal countercurrent that is observed in the eastern shelf may invade the western shelf thus connecting biologically both shelves in an east-to-west direction. Westerlies induce generalised upwelling off the southern Iberia Peninsula, which adds to the almost-permanent one off cape San Vicente and generates an upwelling jet that moves eastwards. Cape Santa Maria may deflect this flow by generating a cold filament that extends southward and diverts water from the western shelf to the open ocean. This pattern of circulation hampers the biological connection between shelves in the west-to-east direction, which is

  14. Abundance and tidal behaviour of pelagic fish in the gateway to the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couperus, Bram; Gastauer, Sven; Fässler, Sascha M. M.; Tulp, Ingrid; van der Veer, Henk W.; Poos, Jan Jaap

    2016-03-01

    The shallow coast of The Netherlands is an important habitat for small pelagic fish. They form one of the major links between plankton and the higher trophic levels. Predatory fish, sea mammals and birds rely on small pelagic fish as a major food source. Currently, monitoring of fish in the Dutch coastal zone mainly focuses on demersal species, using bottom trawls and fykes. Four hydro-acoustic surveys were carried out in May and October 2010/2011 in the Marsdiep area, a relatively deep tidal inlet in the western Wadden Sea, to quantify abundances of pelagic fish. The aims of this study were to (1) describe temporal and vertical variations in fish distribution and school dimensions in relation to tide, and (2) estimate biomass of pelagic fish and their proportion to total fish biomass. The biomass of pelagic fish in the Marsdiep area ranged between 23 and 411 kg/ha. These were mainly sprat, but also young herring, anchovy and pilchard. The fish was scattered in small schools with volumes smaller than 5m3 and concentrated in the top 10 m below the surface. There was a clear effect of tidal cycle on school volume and fish abundance, with larger densities and larger schools at high tide compared to low tide. In May, sandeel contributed substantially to the pelagic assemblage, whereas in October sandeel was absent in the trawl catches, most likely because they stayed buried in the seabed from late summer to spring. The presence of pilchard and anchovy confirmed their re-establishment in the Southern North Sea and Wadden Sea. The abundance of pelagic fish exceeded the biomass of demersal fish in the western Wadden Sea by an order of magnitude. This finding is relevant for ecosystem studies. The fact that this study suggests that small pelagics outnumber demersal species to such a large extent calls for a rethinking of the allocation of monitoring effort in the Dutch coastal zone.

  15. Explosive diversification following a benthic to pelagic shift in freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interspecific divergence along a benthic to pelagic habitat axis is ubiquitous in freshwater fishes inhabiting lentic environments. In this study, we examined the influence of this habitat axis on the macroevolution of a diverse, lotic radiation using mtDNA and nDNA phylogenies for eastern North America’s most species-rich freshwater fish clade, the open posterior myodome (OPM) cyprinids. We used ancestral state reconstruction to identify the earliest benthic to pelagic transition in this group and generated fossil-calibrated estimates of when this shift occurred. This transition could have represented evolution into a novel adaptive zone, and therefore, we tested for a period of accelerated lineage accumulation after this historical habitat shift. Results Ancestral state reconstructions inferred a similar and concordant region of our mtDNA and nDNA based gene trees as representing the shift from benthic to pelagic habitats in the OPM clade. Two independent tests conducted on each gene tree suggested an increased diversification rate after this inferred habitat transition. Furthermore, lineage through time analyses indicated rapid early cladogenesis in the clade arising after the benthic to pelagic shift. Conclusions A burst of diversification followed the earliest benthic to pelagic transition during the radiation of OPM cyprinids in eastern North America. As such, the benthic/pelagic habitat axis has likely influenced the generation of biodiversity across disparate freshwater ecosystems. PMID:24341464

  16. Pelagic nekton abundance and distribution in the northern Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feyrer, Frederick; Slater, Steven B.; Portz, Donald E.; Odom, Darren; Morgan-King, Tara L.; Brown, Larry R.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the habitats occupied by species is fundamental for the development of effective conservation and management actions. The collapse of pelagic fish species in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California, has triggered a need to better understand factors that drive their distribution and abundance. A study was conducted in summer–fall 2014 in an attempt to identify physical and biological habitat conditions that drive the abundance and distribution of pelagic species in the northern region of the system. The study was conducted in the three largest channels in the northern Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta by dimension, volume, and flow capacity. The pelagic community was dominated by three nonnative species, Siberian prawn Exopalaemon modestus, which comprised 56% of the total number of organisms, and two fish species, Threadfin Shad Dorosoma petenense and Mississippi Silversides Menidia audens, which together comprised 43% of the total number of organisms. Total fish and total shrimp abundance were sensitive to the most extreme values of turbidity and temperature encountered and positively associated with total zooplankton biomass. The results suggested that habitat conditions in terminal channels, historically a common feature on the landscape, support higher abundances of pelagic species and zooplankton than open-ended channels. These results provide resource managers with useful information on the habitat associations of pelagic species and on how the future distribution and abundance of pelagic species will likely change in response to climate or other ecological factors.

  17. Defining a pelagic typology of the eastern English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavenne, Juliette; Marchal, Paul; Vaz, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    Classifying marine habitats is a growing research field and is of increasing interest to spatial planners and managers. Most studies have predominantly focused on the seabed to determine benthic habitat types, and only limited attention has been paid to the water column. Classification projects aim at identifying candidate management units for the application of various regional or national regulations such as the European Water Framework Directive. Here, we propose a seasonal classification of the water column in the eastern English Channel, which we validated with biological data. For the three tested compartments, phytoplankton, zooplankton and pelagic fishes, the validation results were satisfactory, with recall values (i.e. percentage of observations correctly assigned in a given water type) ranging from 0.5 to 1. This validation was a crucial step to verify that the proposed typology was ecologically relevant and to use it as a biodiversity surrogate in management and conservation plans. Because management plans are generally set on an annual rather than a seasonal basis, we also produced a "multi-seasonal" typology encompassing seasonal variability, which can be used as an appropriate all year round description of the water column attributes in the eastern English Channel. The "multi-seasonal" typology reflected the relative stability of the French waters and the central part of the eastern English Channel and the strongest variability of the English coastal waters and the Dover strait.

  18. Hydrocarbons and surfactants: Ecotoxicology in a marine pelagic food chain

    SciTech Connect

    Skadsheim, A.; Hoivangli, V.; Labes-Carrier, C.

    1996-12-31

    Accidental spills and production lead to discharges of petroleum hydrocarbons and surface active agents to the sea. The Norwegian government has set guidelines adopted from the OSPAR commission for assessment and studies of the environmental load from these discharges. The free water masses are poorly studied compared to the benthic processes in this context and we question how oil and surfactants might bioaccumulate in a simplified marine pelagic food chain comprised of algae, crustaceans and fish. When test methods and species recommended for initial water based acute toxicity studies are to be implemented in more comprehensive studies like assessment of bioaccumulation various problems arose. An improvement of the OSPAR method for the production of Water Accommodated Fractions (WAFs) of oil is presented. Emphasis is on control of oil concentration and distribution in water, and on applicability for studies where larger volumes of WAF are required than for the demand in acute toxicity tests. Acute toxicity assessments of one oil, Blended Arabian Light topped at 150{degrees}C, and two non-ionic dispersants, hexaetoxyparanonylphenol and a sophorolipid, were conducted on OSPAR recommended species. The toxicity responses were in line with observations made by others. At a given concentration the oil particle size during WAF preparation might influence subsequent expression of toxic effects. The same applied for the presence of emulsified oil particles in the WAR where the organisms were exposed. Reasons for selecting other test organisms than those officially recommended for continued studies on bioaccumulation are presented and discussed.

  19. Improved management of small pelagic fisheries through seasonal climate prediction.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Désirée; Stock, Charles A; Pegion, Kathleen; Vecchi, Gabriel A; Methot, Richard D; Alexander, Michael A; Checkley, David M

    2017-03-01

    Populations of small pelagic fish are strongly influenced by climate. The inability of managers to anticipate environment-driven fluctuations in stock productivity or distribution can lead to overfishing and stock collapses, inflexible management regulations inducing shifts in the functional response to human predators, lost opportunities to harvest populations, bankruptcies in the fishing industry, and loss of resilience in the human food supply. Recent advances in dynamical global climate prediction systems allow for sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly predictions at a seasonal scale over many shelf ecosystems. Here we assess the utility of SST predictions at this "fishery relevant" scale to inform management, using Pacific sardine as a case study. The value of SST anomaly predictions to management was quantified under four harvest guidelines (HGs) differing in their level of integration of SST data and predictions. The HG that incorporated stock biomass forecasts informed by skillful SST predictions led to increases in stock biomass and yield, and reductions in the probability of yield and biomass falling below socioeconomic or ecologically acceptable levels. However, to mitigate the risk of collapse in the event of an erroneous forecast, it was important to combine such forecast-informed harvest controls with additional harvest restrictions at low biomass.

  20. Reconciling conflicts in pelagic fisheries under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobday, Alistair J.; Bell, Johann D.; Cook, Timothée R.; Gasalla, Maria A.; Weng, Kevin C.

    2015-03-01

    Fishing in the open ocean often results in unwanted effects on target species, and interactions with non-target species (direct interactions) or influences on the prey or habitat of target and non-target species (indirect interactions). A number of conflicts and trade-offs exist in the harvesting of pelagic species, including (i) maximizing future food production given the depleted state of some stocks; (ii) minimizing bycatch of non-target species, (iii) setting ecosystem allocation rules for non-target top predators, such as seabirds, and (iv) maximizing value and livelihoods for local economies. Climate change can be expected to exacerbate some of these conflicts as the ranges of species and their habitats change over varying geographic, depth and temporal scales. Understanding the distribution of these impacts can be difficult due to the scarcity of observational data on species and ecosystems. Resolving all these conflicts is achievable with current approaches and technologies. Nevertheless, managing fishery production systems to provide fish for food security and conserving biodiversity will be particularly challenging. The complexity added by climate change can be managed with greater use of early warning systems and precautionary management.

  1. Methylmercury biomagnification in an Arctic pelagic food web.

    PubMed

    Ruus, Anders; Øverjordet, Ida B; Braaten, Hans Fredrik V; Evenset, Anita; Christensen, Guttorm; Heimstad, Eldbjørg S; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Borgå, Katrine

    2015-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that enters the biosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources, and emitted gaseous Hg enters the Arctic from lower latitudes by long-range transport. In aquatic systems, anoxic conditions favor the bacterial transformation of inorganic Hg to methylmercury (MeHg), which has a greater potential for bioaccumulation than inorganic Hg and is the most toxic form of Hg. The main objective of the present study was to quantify the biomagnification of MeHg in a marine pelagic food web, comprising species of zooplankton, fish, and seabirds, from the Kongsfjorden system (Svalbard, Norway), by use of trophic magnification factors. As expected, tissue concentrations of MeHg increased with increasing trophic level in the food web, though at greater rates than observed in several earlier studies, especially at lower latitudes. There was strong correlation between MeHg and total Hg concentrations through the food web as a whole. The concentration of MeHg in kittiwake decreased from May to October, contributing to seasonal differences in trophic magnification factors. The ecology and physiology of the species comprising the food web in question may have a large influence on the magnitude of the biomagnification. A significant linear relationship was also observed between concentrations of selenium and total Hg in birds but not in zooplankton, suggesting the importance of selenium in Hg detoxification for individuals with high Hg concentrations.

  2. Key Arctic pelagic mollusc (Limacina helicina) threatened by ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comeau, S.; Gorsky, G.; Jeffree, R.; Teyssié, J.-L.; Gattuso, J.-P.

    2009-02-01

    Thecosome pteropods (shelled pelagic molluscs) can play an important role in the food web of various ecosystems and play a key role in the cycling of carbon and carbonate. Since they harbor an aragonitic shell, they could be very sensitive to ocean acidification driven by the increase of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The impact of changes in the carbonate chemistry was investigated on Limacina helicina, a key species of Arctic ecosystems. Pteropods were kept in culture under controlled pH conditions corresponding to pCO2 levels of 350 and 760 μatm. Calcification was estimated using a fluorochrome and the radioisotope 45Ca. It exhibits a 28% decrease at the pH value expected for 2100 compared to the present pH value. This result supports the concern for the future of pteropods in a high-CO2 world, as well as of those species dependent upon them as a food resource. A decline of their populations would likely cause dramatic changes to the structure, function and services of polar ecosystems.

  3. A microarray for assessing transcription from pelagic marine microbial taxa

    PubMed Central

    Shilova, Irina N; Robidart, Julie C; James Tripp, H; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Wawrik, Boris; Post, Anton F; Thompson, Anne W; Ward, Bess; Hollibaugh, James T; Millard, Andy; Ostrowski, Martin; J Scanlan, David; Paerl, Ryan W; Stuart, Rhona; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches have revealed unprecedented genetic diversity within microbial communities across vast expanses of the world's oceans. Linking this genetic diversity with key metabolic and cellular activities of microbial assemblages is a fundamental challenge. Here we report on a collaborative effort to design MicroTOOLs (Microbiological Targets for Ocean Observing Laboratories), a high-density oligonucleotide microarray that targets functional genes of diverse taxa in pelagic and coastal marine microbial communities. MicroTOOLs integrates nucleotide sequence information from disparate data types: genomes, PCR-amplicons, metagenomes, and metatranscriptomes. It targets 19 400 unique sequences over 145 different genes that are relevant to stress responses and microbial metabolism across the three domains of life and viruses. MicroTOOLs was used in a proof-of-concept experiment that compared the functional responses of microbial communities following Fe and P enrichments of surface water samples from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. We detected transcription of 68% of the gene targets across major taxonomic groups, and the pattern of transcription indicated relief from Fe limitation and transition to N limitation in some taxa. Prochlorococcus (eHLI), Synechococcus (sub-cluster 5.3) and Alphaproteobacteria SAR11 clade (HIMB59) showed the strongest responses to the Fe enrichment. In addition, members of uncharacterized lineages also responded. The MicroTOOLs microarray provides a robust tool for comprehensive characterization of major functional groups of microbes in the open ocean, and the design can be easily amended for specific environments and research questions. PMID:24477198

  4. Total and organic mercury in Barents sea pelagic fish

    SciTech Connect

    Joiris, C.R.; Ali, I.B.; Hoisbeek, L. Bossicart, M.; Tapia, G.

    1995-11-01

    One of the main questions, when studying mercury levels in natural samples, is to define how far the measured concentrations correspond to natural- or background-levels or to actual contamination due to human activities. To establish background pristine levels of Hg in the marine environment, areas of very low human activities are often proposed. Arctic and Antarctic waters, together with deep oceans waters, are best suited and provide themselves for such studies. Barents Sea areas were used in this study, even if the existence of an important atmospheric transport of Hg probably caused an increase of Hg levels at a global scale. Instead of analyzing mercury from the very low concentrations in sea water, it is much easier to identify it from the higher concentrations which organisms, used as bioindicators, have built up in their tissues. By using these bioindicators to study the bioavailable fraction of the stable residues, one also integrates small scale temporal and spatial variations. Pelagic fish were used in this work to study the ecotoxicology of Hg in the Barents Sea. This study has been made possible due to recent access of the Barents Sea to western scientists and it is to serve as a complement to existing studies by the same team in the Greenland and Norwegian seas, and the southwestern part of the Barents Sea. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Dispersal in marine organisms without a pelagic larval phase.

    PubMed

    Winston, Judith E

    2012-10-01

    In contrast to marine organisms whose offspring go through an extended planktonic stage, the young of others develop directly into benthic juveniles or into yolky nonfeeding larvae that spend only a few hours in the plankton before settling. Yet, paradoxically, many such species have geographic distributions that are comparable to those with a pelagic dispersal stage. This article reviews some of the ways in which these organisms can expand their distributions: drifting, rafting, hitchhiking, creeping, and hopping. Drifting applies to species in which larvae may be short-lived, but adults can detach or be detached from their benthic substratum and be passively carried to new areas, floating at the water's surface or below it. Many encrusting species and mobile species can spread by rafting, settling on natural or artificial floating substrata which are propelled by wind and currents to new regions. Hitchhiking applies to those attaching to vessels or being carried in ballast water of ships to a distant region in which their offspring can survive. Other marine species extend their distributions by hopping from one island of hard substratum or favorable sedimentary microhabitat to another, while creeping species extend their distributions along shores or shelves where habitats remain similar for long distances.

  6. Population Density of the Crayfish, Orconectes limosus, in Relation to Fish and Macroinvertebrate Densities in a Small Mesotrophic Lake - Implications for the Lake's Food Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haertel-Borer, Susanne S.; Zak, Dominik; Eckmann, Reiner; Baade, Ulrich; Hölker, Franz

    2005-12-01

    The population density of Orconectes limosus in a mesotrophic lake was assessed in the context of fish and macroinvertebrate biomasses, and crayfish consumption by fish. The average O. limosus (6 cm total length) abundance and biomass in the littoral zone was 2200 ind ha-1 and 32.2 kg ha1, respectively. O. limosus biomass accounted for a large percentage (49%) of the lake's macroinvertebrate biomass. O. limosus was equal to 35% of the non-predatory fish biomass and to 81% of the predatory fish biomass. O. limosus comprised 15 and 48% of the annual consumption of pike and predatory perch, respectively. Altogether, O. limosus was identified as quantitatively important for the lake's littoral food web, and might also subsidize the pelagic food web. This strengthens the need for an integrated view on lake food webs.

  7. Lake Powell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The white ring around Lake Powell tells the story. The surface is down 98 feet. This is critical, because Powell, Lake Mead, and other lakes along the Colorado River provide water for millions of people in five states. We are in the eighth year of a drought on the Colorado River. This year was the driest year ever reported in Southern California, and there is a severe drought in Northern California, down to less than 30-percent of snow pack. This ASTER image of part of Lake Powell was acquired in 2001. The gray area depicts the shrunken, reduced 2007 lake extent compared to the extended, larger black area in 2001.

    The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km, and is centered near 37.1 degrees north latitude, 111.3 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. Prey selection by the Lake Superior fish community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isaac, Edmund J.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Stockwell, Jason D.; Gamble, Allison E.

    2012-01-01

    Mysis diluviana is an important prey item to the Lake Superior fish community as found through a recent diet study. We further evaluated this by relating the quantity of prey found in fish diets to the quantity of prey available to fish, providing insight into feeding behavior and prey preferences. We describe the seasonal prey selection of major fish species collected across 18 stations in Lake Superior in spring, summer, and fall of 2005. Of the major nearshore fish species, bloater (Coregonus hoyi), rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) consumed Mysis, and strongly selected Mysis over other prey items each season. However, lake whitefish also selected Bythotrephes in the fall when Bythotrephes were numerous. Cisco (Coregonus artedi), a major nearshore and offshore species, fed largely on calanoid copepods, and selected calanoid copepods (spring) and Bythotrephes (summer and fall). Cisco also targeted prey similarly across bathymetric depths. Other major offshore fish species such as kiyi (Coregonus kiyi) and deepwater sculpin (Myoxocephalus thompsoni) fed largely on Mysis, with kiyi targeting Mysis exclusively while deepwater sculpin did not prefer any single prey organism. The major offshore predator siscowet lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush siscowet) consumed deepwater sculpin and coregonines, but selected deepwater sculpin and Mysis each season, with juveniles having a higher selection for Mysis than adults. Our results suggest that Mysis is not only a commonly consumed prey item, but a highly preferred prey item for pelagic, benthic, and piscivorous fishes in nearshore and offshore waters of Lake Superior.

  9. Ecology of the Lake Huron fish community, 1970-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dobiesz, Norine E.; McLeish, David A.; Eshenroder, Randy L.; Bence, James R.; Mohr, Lloyd C.; Ebener, Mark P.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Woldt, Aaron P.; Johnson, James E.; Argyle, Ray L.; Makarewicz, Joseph C.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status of the Lake Huron fish community between 1970 and 1999 and explore the effects of key stressors. Offshore waters changed little in terms of nutrient enrichment, while phosphorus levels declined in inner Saginaw Bay. Introduced mussels (Dreissena spp.) proliferated and may have caused a decline in Diporeia spp. This introduction could have caused a decline in lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) growth and condition, with serious repercussions for commercial fisheries. Bythotrephes, an exotic predatory cladoceran, and other new exotics may be influencing the fish community. Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) remained prevalent, but intensive control efforts on the St. Mary's River may reduce their predation on salmonines. Overfishing was less of a problem than in the past, although fishing continued to reduce the amount of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) spawning biomass resulting from hatchery-reared fish planted to rehabilitate this species. Massive stocking programs have increased the abundance of top predators, but lake trout were rehabilitated in only one area. Successful lake trout rehabilitation may require lower densities of introduced pelagic prey fish than were seen in the 1990s, along with continued stocking of hatchery-reared lake trout and control of sea lamprey. Such reductions in prey fish could limit Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) fisheries.

  10. Status of coregonine fishes in the Laurentian Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, Guy W.

    1992-01-01

    The post-glacial coregonine assemblage in the Great Lakes included several species of the genera Prosopium and Coregonus. Overfishing, habitat degradation, and competition with various exotic fish species severely reduced coregonine abundance and altered their distribution by the mid to latter part of the 20th century. Most of the original Coregonus species, some which were endemic to the Great Lakes, are now extinct or are extremely rare. The prevailing coregonines are mostly benthic and deep-water species, contrasted to the original assemblage dominated by pelagic, nearshore species. Lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) populations have recovered and now support record fisheries in Lakes Superior, Michigan, and Huron. Bloaters (C. hoyi) have recovered to dominate the planktivorous fish community in Lake Michigan and are rapidly increasing in Lake Huron. The recent resurgence in some coregonine populations are linked to declines in exotic fish populations and favorable climatic changes. The reduced diversity of the coregonines may explain the dominance of the remaining species. The stability of this simplified coregonine community is uncertain but the existing coregonines have demonstrated resiliency.

  11. Lake acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, J.E.; Peplies, R.W.; Rush, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    This paper examined a National Research Council (NRC) report called Acid Deposition: Long-Term Trends. The report has been the final word on acid deposition as the cause of acidification of lakes. The authors considered it important that the tentative nature of this report be kept in perspective so that the work of the NRC would promote rather than inhibit scientific inquiry on the lake acidification issue. In this spirit, this report proposed that degradation of storm damaged trees could increase the acidity of the forest humus and as a result the ground water which would fed local streams and lakes. They proposed that extensive forest blowdown could be a factor in acidification of surface waters.

  12. Systematically variable planktonic carbon metabolism along a land-to-lake gradient in a Great Lakes coastal zone

    PubMed Central

    Weinke, Anthony D.; Kendall, Scott T.; Kroll, Daniel J.; Strickler, Eric A.; Weinert, Maggie E.; Holcomb, Thomas M.; Defore, Angela A.; Dila, Deborah K.; Snider, Michael J.; Gereaux, Leon C.; Biddanda, Bopaiah A.

    2014-01-01

    During the summers of 2002–2013, we measured rates of carbon metabolism in surface waters of six sites across a land-to-lake gradient from the upstream end of drowned river-mouth Muskegon Lake (ML) (freshwater estuary) to 19 km offshore in Lake Michigan (LM) (a Great Lake). Despite considerable inter-year variability, the average rates of gross production (GP), respiration (R) and net production (NP) across ML (604 ± 58, 222 ± 22 and 381 ± 52 µg C L−1 day−1, respectively) decreased steeply in the furthest offshore LM site (22 ± 3, 55 ± 17 and −33 ± 15 µg C L−1day−1, respectively). Along this land-to-lake gradient, GP decreased by 96 ± 1%, whereas R only decreased by 75 ± 9%, variably influencing the carbon balance along this coastal zone. All ML sites were consistently net autotrophic (mean GP:R = 2.7), while the furthest offshore LM site was net heterotrophic (mean GP:R = 0.4). Our study suggests that pelagic waters of this Great Lakes coastal estuary are net carbon sinks that transition into net carbon sources offshore. Reactive and dynamic estuarine coastal zones everywhere may contribute similarly to regional and global carbon cycles. PMID:25954055

  13. Systematically variable planktonic carbon metabolism along a land-to-lake gradient in a Great Lakes coastal zone.

    PubMed

    Weinke, Anthony D; Kendall, Scott T; Kroll, Daniel J; Strickler, Eric A; Weinert, Maggie E; Holcomb, Thomas M; Defore, Angela A; Dila, Deborah K; Snider, Michael J; Gereaux, Leon C; Biddanda, Bopaiah A

    2014-11-01

    During the summers of 2002-2013, we measured rates of carbon metabolism in surface waters of six sites across a land-to-lake gradient from the upstream end of drowned river-mouth Muskegon Lake (ML) (freshwater estuary) to 19 km offshore in Lake Michigan (LM) (a Great Lake). Despite considerable inter-year variability, the average rates of gross production (GP), respiration (R) and net production (NP) across ML (604 ± 58, 222 ± 22 and 381 ± 52 µg C L(-1) day(-1), respectively) decreased steeply in the furthest offshore LM site (22 ± 3, 55 ± 17 and -33 ± 15 µg C L(-1)day(-1), respectively). Along this land-to-lake gradient, GP decreased by 96 ± 1%, whereas R only decreased by 75 ± 9%, variably influencing the carbon balance along this coastal zone. All ML sites were consistently net autotrophic (mean GP:R = 2.7), while the furthest offshore LM site was net heterotrophic (mean GP:R = 0.4). Our study suggests that pelagic waters of this Great Lakes coastal estuary are net carbon sinks that transition into net carbon sources offshore. Reactive and dynamic estuarine coastal zones everywhere may contribute similarly to regional and global carbon cycles.

  14. Chinook salmon foraging patterns in a changing Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobs, Gregory R.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Bunnell, David B.; Warner, David M.; Claramunt, Randall M.

    2013-01-01

    Since Pacific salmon stocking began in Lake Michigan, managers have attempted to maintain salmon abundance at high levels within what can be sustained by available prey fishes, primarily Alewife Alosa pseudoharengus. Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha are the primary apex predators in pelagic Lake Michigan and patterns in their prey selection (by species and size) may strongly influence pelagic prey fish communities in any given year. In 1994–1996, there were larger Alewives, relatively more abundant alternative prey species, fewer Chinook Salmon, and fewer invasive species in Lake Michigan than in 2009–2010. The years 2009–2010 were instead characterized by smaller, leaner Alewives, fewer alternative prey species, higher abundance of Chinook Salmon, a firmly established nonnative benthic community, and reduced abundance of Diporeia, an important food of Lake Michigan prey fish. We characterized Chinook Salmon diets, prey species selectivity, and prey size selectivity between 1994–1996 and 2009–2010 time periods. In 1994–1996, Alewife as prey represented a smaller percentage of Chinook Salmon diets than in 2009–2010, when alewife comprised over 90% of Chinook Salmon diets, possibly due to declines in alternative prey fish populations. The size of Alewives eaten by Chinook Salmon also decreased between these two time periods. For the largest Chinook Salmon in 2009–2010, the average size of Alewife prey was nearly 50 mm total length shorter than in 1994–1996. We suggest that changes in the Lake Michigan food web, such as the decline in Diporeia, may have contributed to the relatively low abundance of large Alewives during the late 2000s by heightening the effect of predation from top predators like Chinook Salmon, which have retained a preference for Alewife and now forage with greater frequency on smaller Alewives.

  15. Mercury trophic transfer in a eutrophic lake: the importance of habitat-specific foraging.

    PubMed

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Suchanek, Thomas H; Colwell, Arthur E; Anderson, Norman L

    2008-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) trophic transfer and bioaccumulation in fish from a mine-impacted, eutrophic lake were examined in relation to foraging habitat, trophic position, and size. Diet analysis indicated that there were clear ontogenetic shifts in foraging habitats and trophic position. Pelagic diet decreased and benthic diet increased with increasing fish length in bluegill, black crappie, inland silverside, and largemouth bass, whereas there was no shift for prickly sculpin or threadfin shad. Stable carbon isotope values (delta13C) were inversely related to the proportion of pelagic prey items in the diet, but there was no clear relationship with benthic foraging. There were distinct differences between pelagic and benthic prey basal delta13C values, with a range of approximately -28 per thousand in pelagic zooplankton to approximately -20 per thousand in benthic caddisflies. Profundal prey such as chironomid larvae had intermediate delta13C values of approximately -24 per thousand, reflecting the influence of pelagic detrital subsidies and suppressing the propagation of the benthic carbon isotope signal up the food chain. Fish total mercury (TotHg) concentrations varied with habitat-specific foraging, trophic position, and size; however, the relationships differed among species and ages. When controlling for the effects of species, length, and trophic position, TotHg and delta13C were positively correlated, indicating that Hg trophic transfer is linked to benthic foraging. When examined on a species-specific basis, TotHg was positively correlated with delta13C only for bluegill, largemouth bass, and threadfin shad. However, diet-based multiple regression analyses suggested that TotHg also increased with benthic foraging for inland silverside and black crappie. In both species, benthic prey items were dominated by chironomid larvae, explaining the discrepancy with delta13C. These results illustrate the importance of foraging habitat to Hg bioaccumulation and indicate that

  16. A pelagic ecosystem model calibrated with BATS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtt, George C.; Armstrong, Robert A.

    Mechanistic models of ocean ecosystem dynamics are of fundamental importance to understanding and predicting the role of marine ecosystems in the oceanic uptake of carbon. In this paper, a new pelagic ecosystem model that is descended from the model of Fasham et al. (Journal of Marine Research, 99 (1990) 591-639) (FDM model) is presented. During model development, the FDM model was first simplified to reduce the number of variables unconstrained by data and to reduce the number of parameters to be estimated. Many alternative simplified model formulations were tested in an attempt to fit 1988-1991 Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) data. The model presented here incorporates the changes found to be important. (i) A feature of the FDM physics that gives rise to a troublesome fall bloom was replaced. (ii) A biodiversity effect was added: the addition of larger algal and detrital size classes as phytoplankton and detrital biomasses increase. (iii) A phytoplankton physiological effect was also added: the adjustment of the chlorophyll-to-nitrogen ratio by phytoplankton in response to light and nutrient availabilities. The new model has only four state variables and a total of 11 biological parameters; yet it fits the average annual cycle in BATS data better than the FDM model. The new model also responds reasonably well to interannual variability in physical forcing. Based on the justification for changes (i)--(iii) from empirical studies and the success of this simple model at fitting BATS data, it is argued that these changes may be generally important. It is also shown that two alternative assumptions about ammonium concentrations lead to very different model calibrations, emphasizing the need for time series data on ammonium.

  17. Mitigating seabird bycatch during hauling by pelagic longline vessels.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Eric; Chaloupka, Milani; Wiedoff, Brett; Willson, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    to nearly eliminate seabird bycatch. Globally, findings fill a gap in knowledge of methods to mitigate seabird bycatch during pelagic longline hauling.

  18. Towards an integrated forecasting system for pelagic fisheries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, A.; Butenschön, M.; Gürkan, Z.; Allen, I. J.

    2012-03-01

    First results of a coupled modeling and forecasting system for the pelagic fisheries are being presented. The system consists currently of three mathematically fundamentally different model subsystems: POLCOMS-ERSEM providing the physical-biogeochemical environment implemented in the domain of the North-West European shelf and the SPAM model which describes sandeel stocks in the North Sea. The third component, the SLAM model, connects POLCOMS-ERSEM and SPAM by computing the physical-biological interaction. Our major experience by the coupling model subsystems is that well-defined and generic model interfaces are very important for a successful and extendable coupled model framework. The integrated approach, simulating ecosystem dynamics from physics to fish, allows for analysis of the pathways in the ecosystem to investigate the propagation of changes in the ocean climate and lower trophic levels to quantify the impacts on the higher trophic level, in this case the sandeel population, demonstrated here on the base of hindcast data. The coupled forecasting system is tested for some typical scientific questions appearing in spatial fish stock management and marine spatial planning, including determination of local and basin scale maximum sustainable yield, stock connectivity and source/sink structure. Our presented simulations indicate that sandeels stocks are currently exploited close to the maximum sustainable yield, but large uncertainty is associated with determining stock maximum sustainable yield due to stock eigen dynamics and climatic variability. Our statistical ensemble simulations indicates that the predictive horizon set by climate interannual variability is 2-6 yr, after which only an asymptotic probability distribution of stock properties, like biomass, are predictable.

  19. Global diversity and biogeography of deep-sea pelagic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Guillem; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Benítez-Barrios, Verónica; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Álvarez-Salgado, X Antón; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-03-01

    The deep-sea is the largest biome of the biosphere, and contains more than half of the whole ocean's microbes. Uncovering their general patterns of diversity and community structure at a global scale remains a great challenge, as only fragmentary information of deep-sea microbial diversity exists based on regional-scale studies. Here we report the first globally comprehensive survey of the prokaryotic communities inhabiting the bathypelagic ocean using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. This work identifies the dominant prokaryotes in the pelagic deep ocean and reveals that 50% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belong to previously unknown prokaryotic taxa, most of which are rare and appear in just a few samples. We show that whereas the local richness of communities is comparable to that observed in previous regional studies, the global pool of prokaryotic taxa detected is modest (~3600 OTUs), as a high proportion of OTUs are shared among samples. The water masses appear to act as clear drivers of the geographical distribution of both particle-attached and free-living prokaryotes. In addition, we show that the deep-oceanic basins in which the bathypelagic realm is divided contain different particle-attached (but not free-living) microbial communities. The combination of the aging of the water masses and a lack of complete dispersal are identified as the main drivers for this biogeographical pattern. All together, we identify the potential of the deep ocean as a reservoir of still unknown biological diversity with a higher degree of spatial complexity than hitherto considered.

  20. Metal accumulation rates in northwest Atlantic pelagic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J.; Carpenter, M. S. N.; Colley, S.; Wilson, T. R. S.; Elderfield, H.; Kennedy, H.

    1984-10-01

    Measurements of 230Th, 87Sr /86Sr and twenty-four metals were made on cores from the Nares Abyssal Plain. The sediment is characterized by slowly-accumulating (0.3-0.7 g/cm 2 10 3 yr) pelagic red clays and rapidly deposited grey clays transported by turbidity currents. Despite their colour differences and the enrichment of Mn, Fe, Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, V and, to a lesser degree, the rare earths in the red clays, Sr isotope evidence demonstrates that the clays have the same terrigenous origin. The excesses of metals in the red clays have been attributed to metal removal from the water column and a comparison with the grey clays has enabled the authigenic fluxes of metals to be estimated. The fluxes obtained are in the ranges 20-50 μmol/cm 2 10 3 yr for Mn and Fe, 0.1-0.4 μmol/cm 2 10 3 yr for Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, V, Sr and Ce, 10-20 nmol/cm 2 10 3 yr for La and Nd, and 0.5-3 nmol/cm 2 10 3 yr for Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Er and Yb. Authigenic fluxes of Y, Nb, Cr, Zr, Rb, U and Th were not resolvable. Fluxes appear to be near constant on the Plain but comparison with other areas shows that they are quite variable both between and within ocean basins. The chief factor controlling authigenic fluxes is the geochemical abundances of the elements but fractionation within both the transition element and rare earth series can be recognized from inter-element comparisons and from differences in fluxes between Atlantic and Pacific red clays corresponding to the oceanic reactivities of the elements.

  1. Global diversity and biogeography of deep-sea pelagic prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Guillem; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Benítez-Barrios, Verónica; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Álvarez-Salgado, X Antón; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-01-01

    The deep-sea is the largest biome of the biosphere, and contains more than half of the whole ocean's microbes. Uncovering their general patterns of diversity and community structure at a global scale remains a great challenge, as only fragmentary information of deep-sea microbial diversity exists based on regional-scale studies. Here we report the first globally comprehensive survey of the prokaryotic communities inhabiting the bathypelagic ocean using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. This work identifies the dominant prokaryotes in the pelagic deep ocean and reveals that 50% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belong to previously unknown prokaryotic taxa, most of which are rare and appear in just a few samples. We show that whereas the local richness of communities is comparable to that observed in previous regional studies, the global pool of prokaryotic taxa detected is modest (~3600 OTUs), as a high proportion of OTUs are shared among samples. The water masses appear to act as clear drivers of the geographical distribution of both particle-attached and free-living prokaryotes. In addition, we show that the deep-oceanic basins in which the bathypelagic realm is divided contain different particle-attached (but not free-living) microbial communities. The combination of the aging of the water masses and a lack of complete dispersal are identified as the main drivers for this biogeographical pattern. All together, we identify the potential of the deep ocean as a reservoir of still unknown biological diversity with a higher degree of spatial complexity than hitherto considered. PMID:26251871

  2. High-levels of microplastic pollution in a large, remote, mountain lake.

    PubMed

    Free, Christopher M; Jensen, Olaf P; Mason, Sherri A; Eriksen, Marcus; Williamson, Nicholas J; Boldgiv, Bazartseren

    2014-08-15

    Despite the large and growing literature on microplastics in the ocean, little information exists on microplastics in freshwater systems. This study is the first to evaluate the abundance, distribution, and composition of pelagic microplastic pollution in a large, remote, mountain lake. We quantified pelagic microplastics and shoreline anthropogenic debris in Lake Hovsgol, Mongolia. With an average microplastic density of 20,264 particles km(-2), Lake Hovsgol is more heavily polluted with microplastics than the more developed Lakes Huron and Superior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Fragments and films were the most abundant microplastic types; no plastic microbeads and few pellets were observed. Household plastics dominated the shoreline debris and were comprised largely of plastic bottles, fishing gear, and bags. Microplastic density decreased with distance from the southwestern shore, the most populated and accessible section of the park, and was distributed by the prevailing winds. These results demonstrate that without proper waste management, low-density populations can heavily pollute freshwater systems with consumer plastics.

  3. Lake Bonneville

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, Grove Karl

    1890-01-01

    This volume is a contribution to the later physical history of the Great Basin. As a geographic province the Great Basin is characterized by a dry climate, changes of drainage, volcanic eruption, and crustal displacement. Lake Bonneville, the special theme of the volume, was a phenomenon of climate and drainage, but its complete history includes an account of contemporaneous eruption and displacement.

  4. Long-term studies (1871-2000) on acidification and recovery of lakes in the Bohemian Forest (central Europe).

    PubMed

    Vrba, Jaroslav; Kopácek, Jirí; Fott, Jan; Kohout, Leos; Nedbalová, Linda; Prazáková, Miroslava; Soldán, Tomás; Schaumburg, Jochen

    2003-07-01

    This paper evaluates long-term changes in the atmospheric depositions of S and N compounds, lake water quality, and biodiversity at eight glacial lakes in the Bohemian Forest over the past 130 years. This time interval covers (i) the 'background' pre-acidification status of the lakes, (ii) a period of changes in the communities that can be partly explained by introduction of fish, (iii) a period of strong lake acidification with its adverse impacts on the communities, (iv) the lake reversal from acidity, which includes the recent status of the lakes. The lake water chemistry has followed-with a characteristic hysteresis-both the sharp increase and decline in the deposition trends of strong anions. Remarkable changes in biota have mirrored the changing water quality. Fish became extinct and most species of zooplankton (Crustacea) and benthos (Ephemeroptera and Plecoptera) retreated due to the lake water acidification. Independent of ongoing chemical reversal, microorganisms remain dominant in the recent plankton biomass as well as in controlling the pelagic food webs. The first signs of the forthcoming biological recovery have already been evidenced in some lakes, such as the population of Ceriodaphnia quadrangula (Cladocera) returning into the pelagial of one lake or the increase in both phytoplankton biomass and rotifer numbers in another lake.

  5. Habitat coupling in a large lake system: delivery of an energy subsidy by an offshore planktivore to the nearshore zone of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockwell, Jason D.; Yule, Daniel L.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Sierszen, Michael E.; Isaac, Edmund J.

    2014-01-01

    1. We hypothesised that the autumn spawning migration of Lake Superior cisco (Coregonus artedi) provides a resource subsidy, in the form of energy-rich cisco eggs, from the offshore pelagic to the nearshore benthic community over winter, when alternate prey production is likely to be low. 2. We tested this hypothesis using fish and macroinvertebrate surveys, fish population demographics, diet and stable isotope analyses, and bioenergetics modelling. 3. The benthic, congeneric lake whitefish (C. clupeaformis) was a clear beneficiary of cisco spawning. Cisco eggs represented 16% of lake whitefish annual consumption in terms of biomass, but 34% of energy (because of their high energy density: >10 kJ g wet mass−1). Stable isotope analyses were consistent with these results and suggest that other nearshore fish species may also rely on cisco eggs. 4. The lipid content of lake whitefish liver almost doubled from 26 to 49% between November and March, while that of muscle increased from 14 to 26% over the same period, suggesting lake whitefish were building, rather than depleting, lipid reserves during winter. 5. In the other Laurentian Great Lakes, where cisco populations remain very low and rehabilitation efforts are underway, the offshore-to-nearshore ecological link apparent in Lake Superior has been replaced by non-native planktivorous species. These non-native species spawn in spring have smaller eggs and shorter incubation periods. The rehabilitation of cisco in these systems should reinstate the onshore subsidy as it has in Lake Superior.

  6. Ichnology of pelagic carbonate in New Zealand and Denmark: Shelf Sea or Deep Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdale, A.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Today, pelagic carbonate ooze is an exclusive feature of deep-sea environments 1 km or more in depth. In contrast, the extensive epicratonic seas that characterized the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary received great thicknesses of pelagic carbonate sediment in environments only a few hundred meters deep. Distinguishing between deep-sea and shelf-sea carbonate is not an easy task, but ichnologic investigation helps. Biogenic sedimentary structures, ichnofacies, and ichnofabrics in Cretaceous-Tertiary epicratonic pelagic deposits display many similarities to those in deep-sea sediment. Ichnologic features in shelf-sea chalk and limestone in both New Zealand and northern Europe reveal some interesting paleobathymetric trends. These trends include a general decrease in crustacean traces (Thalassinoides, etc.) and bioerosion traces (Trypanites, etc.) with increasing water depth, accompanied by a concomitant increase in worm burrows (Zoophycos, etc.). Maastrichtian-Oligocene pelaic limestone in New Zealand and Maastrichtian-Paleocene chalk in Denmark neither of which represent a truly deep-sea setting, exhibit similar ichnofacies and ichnofabrics. Some notable differences exist because the New Zealand platform was less extensive and more tectonically active than the northern European shelf. Pelagic strata in New Zealand are associated with shallow-water quartzose sandstone beneath and fossiliferous calcarenite above, as well as deep-water bedded chert within, the pelagic carbonate sequence. In New Zealand strata Zoophycos-rich facies dominate Thalassinoides-rich facies, and bored hardgrounds are uncommon; in Danish chalk sequences the opposite is true in both cases.

  7. Relative importance of pelagic and sediment respiration in causing hypoxia in a deep estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgault, D.; Cyr, F.; Galbraith, P. S.; Pelletier, E.

    2012-08-01

    Oxygen depletion in the 100-m thick bottom layer of the deep Lower St. Lawrence Estuary is currently thought to be principally caused by benthic oxygen demand overcoming turbulent oxygenation from overlying layers, with pelagic respiration playing a secondary role. This conception is revisited with idealized numerical simulations, historical oxygen observations and new turbulence measurements. Results indicate that a dominant sediment oxygen demand, over pelagic, is incompatible with the shape of observed oxygen profiles. It is further argued that to sustain oxygen depletion, the turbulent diffusivity in the bottom waters should be ≪10-4 m2 s-1, consistent with direct measurements but contrary to previous model results. A new model that includes an Arrhenius-type function for pelagic respiration and a parameterization for turbulence diffusivity is developed. The model demonstrates the importance of the bottom boundary layer in reproducing the shape of oxygen profiles and reproduces to within 14% the observed change in oxygen concentration in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary. The analysis indicates that turbulent oxygenation represents about 8% of the sum of sediment and pelagic oxygen demand, consistent with the low turbulent oxygenation required to maintain oxygen depletion. However, contrary to previous hypotheses, it is concluded that pelagic oxygen demand needs to be five time larger than sediment oxygen demand to explain hypoxia in the 100-m thick bottom layer of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary.

  8. Benthic algal production across lake size gradients: interactions among morphometry, nutrients, and light.

    PubMed

    Vadeboncoeur, Yvonne; Peterson, Garry; Vander Zanden, M Jake; Kalff, Jacob

    2008-09-01

    Attached algae play a minor role in conceptual and empirical models of lake ecosystem function but paradoxically form the energetic base of food webs that support a wide variety of fishes. To explore the apparent mismatch between perceived limits on contributions of periphyton to whole-lake primary production and its importance to consumers, we modeled the contribution of periphyton to whole-ecosystem primary production across lake size, shape, and nutrient gradients. The distribution of available benthic habitat for periphyton is influenced by the ratio of mean depth to maximum depth (DR = z/ z(max)). We modeled total phytoplankton production from water-column nutrient availability, z, and light. Periphyton production was a function of light-saturated photosynthesis (BPmax) and light availability at depth. The model demonstrated that depth ratio (DR) and light attenuation strongly determined the maximum possible contribution of benthic algae to lake production, and the benthic proportion of whole-lake primary production (BPf) declined with increasing nutrients. Shallow lakes (z < or =5 m) were insensitive to DR and were dominated by either benthic or pelagic primary productivity depending on trophic status. Moderately deep oligotrophic lakes had substantial contributions by benthic primary productivity at low depth ratios and when maximum benthic photosynthesis was moderate or high. Extremely large, deep lakes always had low fractional contributions of benthic primary production. An analysis of the world's largest lakes showed that the shapes of natural lakes shift increasingly toward lower depth ratios with increasing depth, maximizing the potential importance of littoral primary production in large-lake food webs. The repeatedly demonstrated importance of periphyton to lake food webs may reflect the combination of low depth ratios and high light penetration characteristic of large, oligotrophic lakes that in turn lead to substantial contributions of periphyton

  9. Fishing for feed or fishing for food: increasing global competition for small pelagic forage fish.

    PubMed

    Tacon, Albert G J; Metian, Marc

    2009-09-01

    At present, small pelagic forage fish species (includes anchovies, herring, mackerel, sardines, etc.) represent the largest landed species group in capture fisheries (27.3 million t or 29.7% of total capture fisheries landings in 2006). They also currently constitute the major species group actively fished and targeted for nonfood uses, including reduction into fishmeal and fish oil for use within compound animal feeds, or for direct animal feeding; the aquaculture sector alone consumed the equivalent of about 23.8 million t of fish (live weight equivalent) or 87% in the form of feed inputs in 2006. This article attempts to make a global analysis of the competition for small pelagic forage fish for direct human consumption and nonfood uses, particularly concerning the important and growing role played by small pelagic forage fish in the diet and food security of the poor and needy, especially within the developing countries of Africa and the Sub-Saharan region.

  10. Trace elements in oceanic pelagic communities in the western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Nathalie; Lesperance, Dora; Albert, Rona; Hollanda, Stephanie; Michaud, Philippe; Degroote, Maxime; Churlaud, Carine; Bustamante, Paco

    2017-05-01

    The mineral composition of target and non-target pelagic fish caught by purse-seiners and longliners in the western-central Indian Ocean was determined. From the 10 essential elements analysed, selenium and zinc showed the highest concentrations in swordfish and blue marlin while Indian mackerel appeared as a good source of copper, iron and chrome. All catch had levels of lead and cadmium, two toxic elements, below the maximum sanitary limits. Although some concerns were raised regarding mercury concentrations in the largest species (wahoo, swordfish and blue marlin), molar ratios of mercury and selenium indicate that all oceanic pelagic fish from the western-central Indian Ocean are safe for human consumption. This study also gives insights on the relationships between the levels of essential and toxic elements in fish muscle and the size, trophic position and diet sources of the studied pelagic species.

  11. Potential for large-bodied zooplankton and dreissenids to alter the productivity and autotrophic structure of lakes.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Scott N; Althouse, B; Devlin, S P; Vadeboncoeur, Y; Vander Zanden, M J

    2014-08-01

    While limnological studies have emphasized the importance of grazers on algal biomass and primary production in pelagic habitats, few studies have examined their potential role in altering total ecosystem primary production and it's partitioning between pelagic and benthic habitats. We modified an existing ecosystem production model to include biotic feedbacks associated with two groups of large-bodied grazers of phytoplankton (large-bodied zooplankton and dreissenid mussels) and estimated their effects on total ecosystem production (TEP), and the partitioning of TEP between phytoplankton and periphyton (autotrophic structure) across large gradients in lake size and total phosphorus (TP) concentration. Model results indicated that these filter feeders were capable of reducing whole-lake phytoplankton production by 20-70%, and increasing whole-lake benthic production between 0% and 600%. Grazer effects on TEP were constrained by lake size, trophic status, and potential feedbacks between grazing and maximum rates of benthic photosynthesis (BP(MAX)). In small (mean depth Z < 10 m) oligotrophic and mesotrophic (TP < 100 mg P/m2) lakes, both large-bodied zooplankton and dreissenids were capable of increasing the benthic fraction (Bf) by 10-50% of TEP. Small lakes were also the only systems where TEP had the potential to increase in the presence of large-bodied grazers, but such increases only occurred if grazer-induced changes in water clarity, macrophyte coverage, or nutrient availability stimulated specific growth rates of periphyton. In other scenarios, TEP declined by a maximum of 50%. In very large lakes (Z > 100 m), Bf was minor (< 10%) in the presence or absence of grazers, but increases in littoral habitat and the stimulation of benthic production in these ecosystems could be of ecological relevance because littoral zones in large lakes contain a relatively high proportion of within-lake biodiversity and are important for whole-lake food webs.

  12. Ecological consequences of long-term browning in lakes

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Craig E.; Overholt, Erin P.; Pilla, Rachel M.; Leach, Taylor H.; Brentrup, Jennifer A.; Knoll, Lesley B.; Mette, Elizabeth M.; Moeller, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in terrestrially-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) have led to the browning of inland waters across regions of northeastern North America and Europe. Short-term experimental and comparative studies highlight the important ecological consequences of browning. These range from transparency-induced increases in thermal stratification and oxygen (O2) depletion to changes in pelagic food web structure and alteration of the important role of inland waters in the global carbon cycle. However, multi-decadal studies that document the net ecological consequences of long-term browning are lacking. Here we show that browning over a 27 year period in two lakes of differing transparency resulted in fundamental changes in vertical habitat gradients and food web structure, and that these responses were stronger in the more transparent lake. Surface water temperatures increased by 2–3 °C in both lakes in the absence of any changes in air temperature. Water transparency to ultraviolet (UV) radiation showed a fivefold decrease in the more transparent lake. The primary zooplankton grazers decreased, and in the more transparent lake were largely replaced by a two trophic level zooplankton community. These findings provide new insights into the net effects of the complex and contrasting mechanisms that underlie the ecosystem consequences of browning. PMID:26690504

  13. Metal dynamics in Lake Vanda (Wright Valley, Antarctica)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, W. J.; Ferdelman, T. G.; Canfield, D. E.; DeVincenzi, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Data are reported for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Cd in the Onyx River, and for Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Cd in Lake Vanda, a closed-basin Antarctic lake. Oxic water concentrations for Co, Ni, Cu and Cd were quite low and approximate pelagic ocean values. Scavenging of these metals by sinking particles is strongly indicated. Deep-lake profiles reveal a sharp peak in the concentrations of Mn, Fe and Co at the oxic-anoxic boundary at 60 m. Maxima for Ni, Cu and Cd occur higher in the water column, in the vicinity of a Mn submaximum, suggesting early release of these metals from sinking manganese oxide-coated particles. A rough steady-state model leads to the conclusion that there is a large downward flux of Mn into the deep lake and that this flux is sufficient to explain the annual loss of Co, Ni, Cu and Cd. A pronounced geochemical separation between Fe and Mn apparently occurs in this system--Fe being best lost in near-shore environments and Mn being lost in deeper waters. Comparison of metal residence times in Lake Vanda with those in the oceans shows that in both systems Mn, Fe and Co are much more reactive than Ni, Cu and Cd. Energetically favorable inclusion of the more highly charged metals, Mn(IV), Fe(III) and Co(III), into oxide-based lattices is a plausible explanation.

  14. Widespread kelp-derived carbon in pelagic and benthic nearshore fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Biela, Vanessa R.; Newsome, Seth D.; Bodkin, James L.; Kruse, Gordon H.; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2016-01-01

    Kelp forests provide habitat for diverse and abundant fish assemblages, but the extent to which kelp provides a source of energy to fish and other predators is unclear. To examine the use of kelp-derived energy by fishes we estimated the contribution of kelp- and phytoplankton-derived carbon using carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes measured in muscle tissue. Benthic-foraging kelp greenling (Hexagrammos decagrammus) and pelagic-foraging black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) were collected at eight sites spanning ∼35 to 60°N from the California Current (upwelling) to Alaska Coastal Current (downwelling) in the northeast Pacific Ocean. Muscle δ13C values were expected to be higher for fish tissue primarily derived from kelp, a benthic macroalgae, and lower for tissue primarily derived from phytoplankton, pelagic microalgae. Muscle δ13C values were higher in benthic-feeding kelp greenling than in pelagic-feeding black rockfish at seven of eight sites, indicating more kelp-derived carbon in greenling as expected. Estimates of kelp carbon contributions ranged from 36 to 89% in kelp greenling and 32 to 65% in black rockfish using carbon isotope mixing models. Isotopic evidence suggests that these two nearshore fishes routinely derive energy from kelp and phytoplankton, across coastal upwelling and downwelling systems. Thus, the foraging mode of nearshore predators has a small influence on their ultimate energy source as energy produced by benthic macroalgae and pelagic microalgae were incorporated in fish tissue regardless of feeding mode and suggest strong and widespread benthic-pelagic coupling. Widespread kelp contributions to benthic- and pelagic-feeding fishes suggests that kelp energy provides a benefit to nearshore fishes and highlights the potential for kelp and fish production to be linked.

  15. Feeding ecology of pelagic fish larvae and juveniles in slope waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Wells, R J D; Rooker, J R

    2009-11-01

    Stable isotope ratios of carbon (delta13C) and nitrogen (delta15N) were used to investigate feeding patterns of larval and early juvenile pelagic fishes in slope waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Contribution of organic matter supplied to fishes and trophic position within this pelagic food web was estimated in 2007 and 2008 by comparing dietary signatures of the two main producers in this ecosystem: phytoplankton [based on particulate organic matter (POM)] and Sargassum spp. Stable isotope ratios of POM and pelagic Sargassum spp. were significantly different from one another with delta13C values of POM depleted by 3-6 per thousand and delta15N values enriched by 2 relative to Sargassum spp. Stable isotope ratios were significantly different among the five pelagic fishes examined: blue marlin Makaira nigricans, dolphinfish Coryphaena hippurus, pompano dolphinfish Coryphaena equiselis, sailfish Istiophorus platypterus and swordfish Xiphias gladius. Mean delta13C values ranged almost 2 among fishes and were most depleted in I. platypterus. In addition, mean delta15N values ranged 4-5 with highest mean values found for both C. hippurus and C. equiselis and the lowest mean value for M. nigricans during both years. Increasing delta13C or delta15N with standard length suggested that shifts in trophic position and diet occurred during early life for several species examined. Results of a two-source mixing model suggest approximately an equal contribution of organic matter by both sources (POM=55%; pelagic Sargassum spp.=45%) to the early life stages of pelagic fishes examined. Contribution of organic matter, however, varied among species, and sensitivity analyses indicated that organic source estimates changed from 2 to 13% for a delta(13)C fractionation change of +/-0.25 per thousand or a delta15N fractionation change of +/-1.0 per thousand relative to original fractionation values.

  16. Widespread kelp-derived carbon in pelagic and benthic nearshore fishes suggested by stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Biela, Vanessa R.; Newsome, Seth D.; Bodkin, James L.; Kruse, Gordon H.; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2016-11-01

    Kelp forests provide habitat for diverse and abundant fish assemblages, but the extent to which kelp provides a source of energy to fish and other predators is unclear. To examine the use of kelp-derived energy by fishes we estimated the contribution of kelp- and phytoplankton-derived carbon using carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes measured in muscle tissue. Benthic-foraging kelp greenling (Hexagrammos decagrammus) and pelagic-foraging black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) were collected at eight sites spanning ∼35 to 60°N from the California Current (upwelling) to Alaska Coastal Current (downwelling) in the northeast Pacific Ocean. Muscle δ13C values were expected to be higher for fish tissue primarily derived from kelp, a benthic macroalgae, and lower for tissue primarily derived from phytoplankton, pelagic microalgae. Muscle δ13C values were higher in benthic-feeding kelp greenling than in pelagic-feeding black rockfish at seven of eight sites, indicating more kelp-derived carbon in greenling as expected. Estimates of kelp carbon contributions ranged from 36 to 89% in kelp greenling and 32 to 65% in black rockfish using carbon isotope mixing models. Isotopic evidence suggests that these two nearshore fishes routinely derive energy from kelp and phytoplankton, across coastal upwelling and downwelling systems. Thus, the foraging mode of nearshore predators has a small influence on their ultimate energy source as energy produced by benthic macroalgae and pelagic microalgae were incorporated in fish tissue regardless of feeding mode and suggest strong and widespread benthic-pelagic coupling. Widespread kelp contributions to benthic- and pelagic-feeding fishes suggests that kelp energy provides a benefit to nearshore fishes and highlights the potential for kelp and fish production to be linked.

  17. 50 CFR 622.373 - Limited access system for charter vessel/headboat permits for Gulf coastal migratory pelagic fish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Coastal Migratory Pelagic Resources (Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.373 Limited access system for charter vessel/headboat permits.../headboat permits for Gulf coastal migratory pelagic fish. 622.373 Section 622.373 Wildlife and...

  18. 50 CFR 622.373 - Limited access system for charter vessel/headboat permits for Gulf coastal migratory pelagic fish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Coastal Migratory Pelagic Resources (Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.373 Limited access system for charter vessel/headboat permits.../headboat permits for Gulf coastal migratory pelagic fish. 622.373 Section 622.373 Wildlife and...

  19. 75 FR 39861 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pelagic Shelf Rockfish in the Western...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... exceeding the 2010 total allowable catch (TAC) of pelagic shelf rockfish in the Western Regulatory Area of... CFR part 679. The 2010 TAC of pelagic shelf rockfish in the Western Regulatory Area of the GOA is 650...), the Administrator, Alaska Region, NMFS (Regional Administrator), has determined that the 2010 TAC...

  20. Multielement geochemistry of solid materials in geothermal systems and its applications. Part 1. Hot-water system at the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.; Capuano, R.M.

    1980-02-01

    Geochemical studies of the geothermal system at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, have led to development of chemical criteria for recognition of major features of the system and to a three-dimensional model for chemical zoning in the system. Based on this improved level of understanding several new or modified geochemical exploration and assessment techniques have been defined and are probably broadly applicable to evaluation of hot-water geothermal systems. The main purpose of this work was the development or adaptation of solids geochemical exploration techniques for use in the geothermal environment. (MHR)

  1. A new look at the Lake Superior biomass size spectrum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yurista, Peder M.; Yule, Daniel L.; Balge, Matt; VanAlstine, Jon D.; Thompson, Jo A.; Gamble, Allison E.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Kelly, John R.; Stockwell, Jason D.; Vinson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized data from multiple sampling programs and years to describe the Lake Superior pelagic biomass size structure. Data consisted of Coulter counts for phytoplankton, optical plankton counts for zooplankton, and acoustic surveys for pelagic prey fish. The size spectrum was stable across two time periods separated by 5 years. The primary scaling or overall slope of the normalized biomass size spectra for the combined years was −1.113, consistent with a previous estimate for Lake Superior (−1.10). Periodic dome structures within the overall biomass size structure were fit to polynomial regressions based on the observed sub-domes within the classical taxonomic positions (algae, zooplankton, and fish). This interpretation of periodic dome delineation was aligned more closely with predator–prey size relationships that exist within the zooplankton (herbivorous, predacious) and fish (planktivorous, piscivorous) taxonomic positions. Domes were spaced approximately every 3.78 log10 units along the axis and with a decreasing peak magnitude of −4.1 log10 units. The relative position of the algal and herbivorous zooplankton domes predicted well the subsequent biomass domes for larger predatory zooplankton and planktivorous prey fish.

  2. Reappearance of deepwater sculpin in Lake Ontario: Resurgence or last gasp of a doomed population?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; O'Gorman, R.; Walsh, M.G.; Casselman, J.M.; Hoyle, J.A.; Keir, M.J.; Lantry, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    Deepwater sculpin (Myoxocephalus thompsonii) were abundant in Lake Ontario in the 1920s and at least common into the 1940s. By the 1960s they were rare and, thereafter, some considered the population extirpated even though a synoptic survey of the lake in 1972 produced three, relatively large (148–165 mm total length, TL), and presumably old, specimens from the northern half of the lake. Deepwater sculpin were absent from annual survey catches in the 1980s and did not reappear until 1996, when three were caught in northern Lake Ontario. Isolated collections of deepwater sculpin continued during 1998–2004. Catches during 1996–2004 included five smaller individuals, 89–118 mm TL. In 2005, catches increased sharply, with 18 deepwater sculpin collected from southern waters and one from northern waters. Moreover, young, small sculpin were dominant in 2005—16 of the 19 sculpins averaged 68 ± 12 mm total length (± 1 s.d.). The young fish observed since 1996 could have originated from reproduction by the small in-lake population, from downstream drift of planktonic larvae from Lake Huron, or both. The presence of juveniles is a clear sign that conditions for survival of young deepwater sculpin are becoming more favorable, perhaps because of reduced abundance of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), a pelagic planktivore linked to depression of deepwater sculpin in Lake Michigan, and also low abundances of burbot (Lota lota) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), benthic piscivores.

  3. Biogeochemistry of natural gases in three alkaline, permanently stratified (meromictic) lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G. )

    1993-01-01

    Methane and associated light hydrocarbons are present as dissolved gases in the water columns of three alkaline, permanently stratified (meromictic) lakes: Big Soda Lake (Nevada), Mono Lake (California), and Soap Lake (Washington). Methane originates in the bottom sediments, but higher gaseous hydrocarbons (that is, gaseous hydrocarbons of higher molecular weight) have either microbial or thermal sources in the different lakes. Stable isotopic composition, hydrocarbon indices, radiocarbon dating, abundance-versus-depth profiles, and biological experiments indicate that methane is formed in the sediments by microbial processes. Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction have much higher activity in the shallow littoral sediments than in the colder, more saline pelagic sediments of all three lakes. Methane-rich gas seeps are common in Mono Lake and emanate from a natural-gas deposit underlying the current lakebed. Seeps do not occur in either Big Soda Lake or Soap Lake. Ethane and higher alkanes are present in Big Soda Lake and Mono Lake, but are not present in significant quantities in Soap Lake. It is not clear if the presence of these higher alkanes is a consequence of biological activity, a result of mixing with thermogenic gases, or a combination of both factors. These results indicate the potential complexity and diversity encountered in studying light-hydrocarbon biogeochemistry in thermally and microbially active systems. Hence, in the case of methane, detailed multidisciplinary studies are often needed to determine its origin. For ethane and higher alkanes, there is currently a paucity of basic scientific information to allow for unequivocal identification of microbial and thermogenetic sources. 61 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Effects of food web changes on Mysis diluviana diet in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Malley, Brian P.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Watkins, James M.; Holda, Toby J.; Weidel, Brian C.

    2017-01-01

    Mysids are important benthic-pelagic omnivores in many deep-lake food webs, yet quantitative data on their diet are limited. We explored the trophic role of Mysis diluviana in offshore Lake Ontario using samples collected in May, July, and September 2013 with a focus on seasonal and ontogenetic patterns in herbivory and zooplanktivory using two approaches. We hypothesized that Mysis diet in 2013 differs from the last investigation in 1995 in response to changes in pelagic prey over 1995 to 2013. Gut fluorescence indicated high grazing by adult and juvenile Mysis in May 2013. In July, smaller mysids were more herbivorous than larger individuals, a pattern that was less pronounced in September. Microscopic gut analysis showed copepods, including Limnocalanus, were common in diets of both size groups in May. In July, mainly cladocerans were consumed, including Cercopagis pengoi which represents a change from a past investigation that preceded Cercopagis invasion in the lake. Our results are consistent with earlier observations of a larger proportion of algae in mysid diets in spring, transitioning to relatively more zooplanktivory and use of cladocerans in the summer and fall. Higher chlorophyll content in small mysids in July than in September may be associated with the presence of a deep chlorophyll layer in July that had largely dissipated by September. Overall, Mysis in Lake Ontario continues to be a generalist omnivore, incorporating new prey items and exhibiting higher herbivory in spring.

  5. Age estimates for an adaptive lake fish radiation, its mitochondrial introgression, and an unexpected sister group: Sailfin silversides of the Malili Lakes system in Sulawesi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Malili Lakes system in central Sulawesi (Indonesia) is a hotspot of freshwater biodiversity in the Wallacea, characterized by endemic species flocks like the sailfin silversides (Teleostei: Atherinomorpha: Telmatherinidae) radiation. Phylogenetic reconstructions of these freshwater fishes have previously revealed two Lake Matano Telmatherina lineages (sharpfins and roundfins) forming an ancient monophyletic group, which is however masked by introgressive hybridization of sharpfins with riverine populations. The present study uses mitochondrial data, newly included taxa, and different external calibration points, to estimate the age of speciation and hybridization processes, and to test for phylogeographic relationships between Kalyptatherina from ancient islands off New Guinea, Marosatherina from SW Sulawesi, and the Malili Lakes flock. Results Contrary to previous expectations, Kalyptatherina is the closest relative to the Malili Lakes Telmatherinidae, and Marosatherina is the sister to this clade. Palaeogeographic reconstructions of Sulawesi suggest that the closer relationship of the Malili Lakes radiation to Kalyptatherina might be explained by a 'terrane-rafting’ scenario, while proto-Marosatherina might have colonized Sulawesi by marine dispersal. The most plausible analysis conducted here implies an age of c. 1.9 My for the onset of divergence between the two major clades endemic to Lake Matano. Diversification within both lineages is apparently considerably more recent (c. 1.0 My); stream haplotypes present in the sharpfins are of even more recent origin (c. 0.4 My). Conclusions Sulawesi’s Telmatherinidae have most likely originated in the Sahul Shelf area, have possibly reached the island by both, marine dispersal and island/terrane-rafting, and have colonized the Malili Lakes system from rivers. Estimates for the split between the epibenthic sharpfins and the predominantly pelagic to benthopelagic roundfins in Lake Matano widely

  6. 76 FR 40836 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XA554 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  7. 75 FR 59156 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XY79 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine is limited...

  8. 76 FR 58720 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XA709 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine is limited...

  9. 75 FR 42610 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XX54 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  10. 78 FR 51097 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XC783 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  11. 75 FR 1023 - International Fisheries Regulations; Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Hawaii...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... CFR Part 665 [Docket No. 080225267-91393-03] RIN 0648-AW49 International Fisheries Regulations; Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Hawaii-based Shallow-set Longline Fishery; Correction AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  12. 77 FR 50952 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XC166 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  13. Continental-pelagic carbonate partitioning and the global carbonate-silicate cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, K.; Rampino, M. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    A carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle model is developed and used to explore dynamic and climatic consequences of constraints on shallow-water carbonate burial and possible carbon loss to the mantle associated with sea-floor subduction. The model partitions carbonate deposition between shallow-water and deep-water environments and includes carbon fluxes between the mantle and lithosphere. When total lithospheric carbonate mass is constant, there are two stable steady states, one in which the carbonate burial flux is mostly continental and another in which it is mostly pelagic. The continental steady state is characterized by a low metamorphic CO2 flux to the atmosphere and predominantly shallow-water carbonate burial. The pelagic steady state is characterized by a high metamorphic CO2 flux and predominantly deep-water carbonate burial. For reasonable parameter values, when total lithospheric carbonate mass is allowed to vary, the model oscillates between predominantly continental and predominantly pelagic modes. Model results suggest that carbonate deposition patterns established during the Cenozoic may be pushing the Earth system from the continental to the pelagic mode on a time scale of 10(8) yr, with a possible consequent order-of-magnitude increase in the metamorphic CO2 flux to the atmosphere.

  14. 76 FR 10778 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... king mackerel in the Florida east coast subzone. This closure is necessary to protect the Gulf king... coastal migratory pelagic fish ] (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, cero, cobia, little tunny, and, in the... 2.25 million lb (1.02 million kg) for the eastern zone (Florida) of the Gulf migratory group of...

  15. 75 FR 4705 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... king mackerel in the Florida east coast subzone. This closure is necessary to protect the Gulf king... coastal migratory pelagic fish (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, cero, cobia, little tunny, and, in the... 2.25 million lb (1.02 million kg) for the eastern zone (Florida) of the Gulf migratory group of...

  16. 75 FR 7402 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ...-line fishery for king mackerel in the southern Florida west coast subzone. This closure is necessary to protect the Gulf king mackerel resource. DATES: This rule is effective 12:01 a.m., local time, February 15... migratory pelagic fish (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, cero, cobia, little tunny, and, in the Gulf...

  17. 76 FR 56659 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) to commercial king mackerel fishing in the exclusive economic zone (EEZ). This closure is necessary to protect the Gulf king mackerel resource. DATES: The closure is effective noon... INFORMATION: The fishery for coastal migratory pelagic fish (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, cero,...

  18. 76 FR 62309 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... coast subzone to the commercial harvest of king mackerel in or from the exclusive economic zone (EEZ). This closure is necessary to protect the Gulf king mackerel resource. DATES: This rule is effective 12... pelagic fish ] (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, cero, cobia, little tunny, dolphin, and, in the Gulf...

  19. 76 FR 16547 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... component of the commercial sector for king mackerel in the southern Florida west coast subzone. This closure is necessary to protect the Gulf king mackerel resource. DATES: This rule is effective 12:01 a.m...: The fishery for coastal migratory pelagic fish (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, cero, cobia,...

  20. 76 FR 18415 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... coast subzone to the commercial harvest of king mackerel in or from the exclusive economic zone (EEZ). This closure is necessary to protect the Gulf king mackerel resource. DATES: This rule is effective 12... pelagic fish (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, cero, cobia, little tunny, and, in the Gulf of Mexico...

  1. 76 FR 7118 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) to commercial king mackerel fishing in the exclusive economic zone (EEZ). This closure is necessary to protect the Gulf king mackerel resource. DATES: The closure is effective noon... INFORMATION: The fishery for coastal migratory pelagic fish (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, cero,...

  2. 78 FR 7279 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ...: NMFS increases the trip limit in the commercial sector for king mackerel in the Florida east coast... pelagic fish (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, and cobia) is managed under the Fishery Management Plan for... implemented a commercial quota of 1,215,228 lb (551,218 kg) for Gulf migratory group king mackerel in...

  3. Population structure of flounder (Platichthys flesus) in the Baltic Sea: differences among demersal and pelagic spawners.

    PubMed

    Florin, A-B; Höglund, J

    2008-07-01

    We found significant population structure and isolation by distance among samples of flounder (Platichthys flesus) in the Baltic, Kattegat and Skagerrak seas using microsatellite genetic markers. This pattern was almost entirely due to a difference between flounder that have demersal spawning in the northern Baltic, as compared to pelagic spawners in the southern Baltic and on the west coast of Sweden. Among demersal spawners we found neither genetic differentiation nor any isolation by distance among sampling sites. We speculate that demersal flounder are descendants of a population that colonized the Baltic previous to pelagic spawners. The demersal flounder may thus have had longer time to adapt to the low salinity in the Baltic, and accordingly display egg characteristics that make it possible to reproduce at the low salinity levels in the northern Baltic. Among pelagic spawners significant isolation by distance was detected. Pelagic spawners have previously been shown to display clinal variation in egg size, which allows them to float also at the moderate salinity levels up to the region north of the island Bornholm. Management units for harvesting should ideally be based on true biological populations, and for the commercially important flounder up to 15 different management stocks in the Baltic have been suggested. We could not find a population genetic foundation for such a high number of management units, and our data suggest three management units: the northern Baltic (demersal populations), southern Baltic with the Oresund straits and the most northwestern sampling sites (Skagerrak, Kattegat and North Sea).

  4. 50 CFR 229.36 - Atlantic Pelagic Longline Take Reduction Plan (PLTRP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Atlantic Pelagic Longline Take Reduction Plan (PLTRP). 229.36 Section 229.36 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL... FISHERIES UNDER THE MARINE MAMMAL PROTECTION ACT OF 1972 Take Reduction Plan Regulations and...

  5. 75 FR 41142 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; American Samoa Pelagic Longline Limited Entry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... permits of various class sizes will be available for 2010. This notice is intended to announce the... American Samoa pelagic longline limited entry program if the number of permits in a size class falls below... sized vessel will receive the highest priority for obtaining permits in any size class, followed...

  6. 76 FR 2664 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; American Samoa Pelagic Longline Limited Entry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... seven permits of various class sizes will be available for 2011. This notice announces the availability... American Samoa pelagic longline limited entry program if the number of permits in a size class falls below... highest priority for obtaining permits in any size class, followed by persons with the earliest...

  7. Ecological diversification associated with the benthic-to-pelagic transition by North American minnows.

    PubMed

    Burress, E D; Holcomb, J M; Tan, M; Armbruster, J W

    2017-03-01

    Ecological opportunity is often regarded as a key factor that explains why diversity is unevenly distributed across life. Colonization of novel environments or adaptive zones may promote diversification. North American minnows exhibit an ancestral benthic-to-pelagic habitat shift that coincided with a burst in diversification. Here, we evaluate the phenotypic and ecological implications of this habitat shift by assessing craniofacial and dietary traits among 34 species and testing for morphology-diet covariation, convergence and adaptive optima. There were several instances of morphology-diet covariation such as correlations between mouth angle and the consumption of terrestrial insects and between relative gut length and the consumption of algae. After accounting for size and phylogenetic nonindependence, benthic species had longer heads, longer snouts, eyes positioned higher on their head, smaller mouth angles and longer digestive tracts than pelagic minnows. Benthic minnows also consumed more algae but less terrestrial insects, by volume, than pelagic minnows. Lastly, there were three distinct evolutionary regimes and more convergence in morphology and dietary characteristics than expected under a Brownian motion model of evolution. These findings indicate that colonization of the pelagic zone by minnows involved myriad phenotypic and dietary changes associated with exploitation of terrestrial subsidies. Thus, minnows exhibit phenotype-dietary covariation, an expansion of ecological roles and a burst in diversification rates in response to the ecological opportunity afforded by the colonization of a novel habitat.

  8. Understanding the structure and functioning of polar pelagic ecosystems to predict the impacts of change

    PubMed Central

    Drinkwater, K. F.; Grant, S. M.; Heymans, J. J.; Hofmann, E. E.; Hunt, G. L.; Johnston, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    The determinants of the structure, functioning and resilience of pelagic ecosystems across most of the polar regions are not well known. Improved understanding is essential for assessing the value of biodiversity and predicting the effects of change (including in biodiversity) on these ecosystems and the services they maintain. Here we focus on the trophic interactions that underpin ecosystem structure, developing comparative analyses of how polar pelagic food webs vary in relation to the environment. We highlight that there is not a singular, generic Arctic or Antarctic pelagic food web, and, although there are characteristic pathways of energy flow dominated by a small number of species, alternative routes are important for maintaining energy transfer and resilience. These more complex routes cannot, however, provide the same rate of energy flow to highest trophic-level species. Food-web structure may be similar in different regions, but the individual species that dominate mid-trophic levels vary across polar regions. The characteristics (traits) of these species are also different and these differences influence a range of food-web processes. Low functional redundancy at key trophic levels makes these ecosystems particularly sensitive to change. To develop models for projecting responses of polar ecosystems to future environmental change, we propose a conceptual framework that links the life histories of pelagic species and the structure of polar food webs. PMID:27928038

  9. 76 FR 52888 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; American Samoa Longline Gear Modifications To Reduce Turtle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... Fisheries; American Samoa Longline Gear Modifications To Reduce Turtle Interactions AGENCY: National Marine... Pacific green sea turtles. This final rule also makes administrative clarifications to the names of..., and other pelagic fish. The fishery interacts with (hooks or entangles) Pacific green sea...

  10. 78 FR 907 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... reduces the commercial trip limit of Atlantic migratory group Spanish mackerel in or from the exclusive... coastal migratory pelagic fish (king mackerel, Spanish mackerel, and cobia) is managed under the Fishery... million lb (1.42 million kg) for the Atlantic migratory group of Spanish mackerel. Atlantic...

  11. 76 FR 3539 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... implementing the Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP) and establishes allowable harvest... incidental trip allowance for landing Pacific mackerel with other CPS will be implemented, with the exception that 1 mt may be landed per trip without any other CPS. DATES: Effective February 22, 2011,...

  12. 76 FR 30276 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The 2011 maximum HG for Pacific sardine is 50..., Southwest Region, NMFS, (562) 980-4034. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The CPS FMP, which was implemented by... year, the estimated biomass for each actively managed species within the CPS FMP is presented to...

  13. 75 FR 56976 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... regulations implementing the Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP) and establishes...: Amber Morris, Southwest Region, NMFS, (562) 980-3231. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The CPS FMP, which is... each actively managed species within the CPS FMP are reviewed every year by the Pacific...

  14. 77 FR 73005 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... rule is proposed according to the Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The... for incidental landings in other CPS fisheries and other sources of mortality. This rule is intended... Species (CPS) Management Team (Team), the Council's CPS Advisory Subpanel (Subpanel) and the...

  15. 77 FR 21958 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... rule is proposed according to the Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The... for incidental landings in other CPS fisheries and other sources of mortality. This rule is intended... Species (CPS) Management Team (Team), the Council's CPS Advisory Subpanel (Subpanel) and the...

  16. 75 FR 1745 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The proposed 2010 acceptable biological catch... Lindsay, Southwest Region, NMFS, (562) 980-4034. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The CPS FMP, which was... actively managed species within the CPS FMP is presented to the Pacific Fishery Management...

  17. 77 FR 36192 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for Pacific mackerel off the Pacific coast. The ACL...-aside for incidental landings in other CPS fisheries. This final rule is intended to conserve and manage... the estimated biomass for Pacific mackerel to the Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council)...

  18. 75 FR 932 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP) and establishes allowable harvest levels for... CONTACT: Joshua Lindsay, Southwest Region, NMFS, (562) 980-4034. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The CPS FMP... meetings each year, the biomass for each actively managed species within the CPS FMP is presented to...

  19. 76 FR 4854 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The proposed 2011 maximum HG for Pacific..., Southwest Region, NMFS, (562) 980-4034. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The CPS FMP, which was implemented by... year, the estimated biomass for each actively managed species within the CPS FMP is presented to...

  20. 75 FR 12169 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ...This notice announces that the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council) is considering additional management measures to further limit the number of participants or levels of participation in the commercial king and Spanish mackerel components of the coastal migratory pelagic fishery operating in the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of the Gulf of Mexico. If such management measures......

  1. Vertical ecology of the pelagic ocean: classical patterns and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sutton, T T

    2013-12-01

    Applications of acoustic and optical sensing and intensive, discrete-depth sampling, in concert with collaborative international research programmes, have substantially advanced knowledge of pelagic ecosystems in the 17 years since the 1996 Deepwater Fishes Symposium of the Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Although the epipelagic habitat is the best-known, and remote sensing and high-resolution modelling allow near-synoptic investigation of upper layer biophysical dynamics, ecological studies within the mesopelagic and deep-demersal habitats have begun to link lower and upper trophic level processes. Bathypelagic taxonomic inventories are far from complete, but recent projects (e.g. MAR-ECO and CMarZ, supported by the Census of Marine Life programme) have quantitatively strengthened distribution patterns previously described for fishes and have provided new perspectives. Synthesis of net and acoustic studies suggests that the biomass of deep-pelagic fishes may be two to three orders of magnitude greater than the total global commercial fisheries landings. Discrete-depth net sampling has revealed relatively high pelagic fish biomass below 1000 m in some regions, and that gelatinous zooplankton may be key energy vectors for deep-pelagic fish production. Lastly, perhaps, the most substantive paradigm shift is that vertical connectivity among fishes across classical depth zones is prevalent- suggesting that a whole-water column approach is warranted for deep ocean conservation and management.

  2. 75 FR 53874 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pelagic Shelf Rockfish for Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pelagic Shelf Rockfish for Vessels Participating in the Rockfish Entry Level... participating in the rockfish entry level fishery in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA... rockfish allocated to vessels participating in the rockfish entry level fishery in the Central...

  3. 78 FR 36117 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ...), with the annual biomass estimate being the primary determinant in both these levels. Classification The... States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries.... SUMMARY: NMFS issues this final rule to implement the annual catch limit (ACL), harvest guideline...

  4. Microalgal productivity in an estuarine lake during a drought cycle: The St. Lucia Estuary, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, Johan S.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-03-01

    The St. Lucia estuarine lake on the north coast of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, is one of the largest estuarine systems in Africa and of unique importance for the adjacent marine and terrestrial ecosystems. The area regularly experiences periods of drought, resulting in hypersaline conditions in its shallow lakes and the closure of the estuarine mouth. This study aimed to assess the primary production rates of phytoplankton and microphytobenthos throughout an annual cycle of this drought phase. Primary production rates were assessed at representative sites, namely the Mouth, Narrows, South and North Lakes from June 2006 to May 2007. Because of the drought, the salinity gradient from the mouth to the head of the estuary was reversed by comparison to estuarine systems with a steady freshwater inflow and regular marine exchange. In March 2007, during the study, the mouth opened as a result of rough seas, and the marine influence broke the existing reversed gradient, producing a marine salinity throughout the system. Microphytobenthic primary productivity varied between 0 and 34 mg C m -2 h -1 and showed strong correlations with salinity, DIN:DIP ratios and irradiance. Benthic productivity was high across the system after breaching of the mouth. Pelagic primary productivity (between 0 and 180 mg C m -2 h -1), showed a correlation with temperature and irradiance and was highest across the system in February 2007 when the mouth was still closed. There was no significant correlation between production rates and biomass (chl-a) in either the benthic or pelagic habitats. The negative correlation between DIN:DIP ratio and benthic primary productivity indicated that phosphorus was the limiting nutrient. This study shows that salinity, along with seasonally dependent parameters such as temperature and irradiance, correlates with the rate of microalgal production. Hence, in these shallow lakes, the largest primary productivity can occur in either the pelagic or benthic

  5. The importance of benthic-pelagic coupling for marine ecosystem functioning in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Jennifer R; Kadin, Martina; Nascimento, Francisco J A; Tamelander, Tobias; Törnroos, Anna; Bonaglia, Stefano; Bonsdorff, Erik; Brüchert, Volker; Gårdmark, Anna; Järnström, Marie; Kotta, Jonne; Lindegren, Martin; Nordström, Marie C; Norkko, Alf; Olsson, Jens; Weigel, Benjamin; Žydelis, Ramunas; Blenckner, Thorsten; Niiranen, Susa; Winder, Monika

    2017-01-28

    Benthic-pelagic coupling is manifested as the exchange of energy, mass, or nutrients between benthic and pelagic habitats. It plays a prominent role in aquatic ecosystems, and it is crucial to functions from nutrient cycling to energy transfer in food webs. Coastal and estuarine ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by anthropogenic pressures; however, there are large gaps in our understanding of the responses of inorganic nutrient and organic matter fluxes between benthic habitats and the water column. We illustrate the varied nature of physical and biological benthic-pelagic coupling processes and their potential sensitivity to three anthropogenic pressures - climate change, nutrient loading, and fishing - using the Baltic Sea as a case study and summarize current knowledge on the exchange of inorganic nutrients and organic material between habitats. Traditionally measured benthic-pelagic coupling processes (e.g., nutrient exchange and sedimentation of organic material) are to some extent quantifiable, but the magnitude and variability of biological processes are rarely assessed, preventing quantitative comparisons. Changing oxygen conditions will continue to have widespread effects on the processes that govern inorganic and organic matter exchange among habitats while climate change and nutrient load reductions may have large effects on organic matter sedimentation. Many biological processes (predation, bioturbation) are expected to be sensitive to anthropogenic drivers, but the outcomes for ecosystem function are largely unknown. We emphasize how improved empirical and experimental understanding of benthic-pelagic coupling processes and their variability are necessary to inform models that can quantify the feedbacks among processes and ecosystem responses to a changing world.

  6. Theodore Roosevelt High School. Project SUCCESS: Striving Upward through College and Career Education for Spanish Speakers. E.S.E.A. Title VII Final Evaluation Report, 1980-1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima, Ed.; And Others

    Project SUCCESS, a combined bilingual education and college/career orientation program for Spanish speaking and Asian high school students of limited English proficiency, is described in this report. Located at Theodore Roosevelt High School in New York City, the program, in 1980-81, provided courses in English as a second language, English…

  7. Climate warming reduces fish production and benthic habitat in Lake Tanganyika, one of the most biodiverse freshwater ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Gergurich, Elizabeth L.; Kraemer, Benjamin M.; McGlue, Michael M.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Russell, James M.; Simmons, Jack D.; Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Warming climates are rapidly transforming lake ecosystems worldwide, but the breadth of changes in tropical lakes is poorly documented. Sustainable management of freshwater fisheries and biodiversity requires accounting for historical and ongoing stressors such as climate change and harvest intensity. This is problematic in tropical Africa, where records of ecosystem change are limited and local populations rely heavily on lakes for nutrition. Here, using a ∼1,500-y paleoecological record, we show that declines in fishery species and endemic molluscs began well before commercial fishing in Lake Tanganyika, Africa’s deepest and oldest lake. Paleoclimate and instrumental records demonstrate sustained warming in this lake during the last ∼150 y, which affects biota by strengthening and shallowing stratification of the water column. Reductions in lake mixing have depressed algal production and shrunk the oxygenated benthic habitat by 38% in our study areas, yielding fish and mollusc declines. Late-20th century fish fossil abundances at two of three sites were lower than at any other time in the last millennium and fell in concert with reduced diatom abundance and warming water. A negative correlation between lake temperature and fish and mollusc fossils over the last ∼500 y indicates that climate warming and intensifying stratification have almost certainly reduced potential fishery production, helping to explain ongoing declines in fish catches. Long-term declines of both benthic and pelagic species underscore the urgency of strategic efforts to sustain Lake Tanganyika’s extraordinary biodiversity and ecosystem services. PMID:27503877

  8. Climate warming reduces fish production and benthic habitat in Lake Tanganyika, one of the most biodiverse freshwater ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Andrew S.; Gergurich, Elizabeth L.; Kraemer, Benjamin M.; McGlue, Michael M.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Russell, James M.; Simmons, Jack D.; Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Warming climates are rapidly transforming lake ecosystems worldwide, but the breadth of changes in tropical lakes is poorly documented. Sustainable management of freshwater fisheries and biodiversity requires accounting for historical and ongoing stressors such as climate change and harvest intensity. This is problematic in tropical Africa, where records of ecosystem change are limited and local populations rely heavily on lakes for nutrition. Here, using a ∼1,500-y paleoecological record, we show that declines in fishery species and endemic molluscs began well before commercial fishing in Lake Tanganyika, Africa’s deepest and oldest lake. Paleoclimate and instrumental records demonstrate sustained warming in this lake during the last ∼150 y, which affects biota by strengthening and shallowing stratification of the water column. Reductions in lake mixing have depressed algal production and shrunk the oxygenated benthic habitat by 38% in our study areas, yielding fish and mollusc declines. Late-20th century fish fossil abundances at two of three sites were lower than at any other time in the last millennium and fell in concert with reduced diatom abundance and warming water. A negative correlation between lake temperature and fish and mollusc fossils over the last ∼500 y indicates that climate warming and intensifying stratification have almost certainly reduced potential fishery production, helping to explain ongoing declines in fish catches. Long-term declines of both benthic and pelagic species underscore the urgency of strategic efforts to sustain Lake Tanganyika’s extraordinary biodiversity and ecosystem services.

  9. Lake Volta, Ghana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Lake Volta in Ghana was acquired March 31, 2002 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Lake Volta is one of the world's largest artificially created lakes. Lake Volta is actually a reservoir formed from the damming of the Volta River, and extends 250 miles north of the Akosombo Dam. The lake covers an area of 8,482 square km. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  10. Binational ecological risk assessment of bigheaded carps (Hypophthalmichthys spp.) for the Great Lakes Basin.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cudmore, B.; Mandrak, N.E.; Dettmers, J.; Chapman, D.C.; Kolar, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Bigheaded carps (Bighead and Silver carps) are considered a potential threat to the Great Lakes basin. A binational ecological risk assessment was conducted to provide scientifically defensible advice for managers and decision-makers in Canada and the United States. This risk assessment looked at the likelihood of arrival, survival, establishment, and spread of bigheaded carps to obtain an overall probability of introduction. Arrival routes assessed were physical connections and human-mediated releases. The risk assessment ranked physical connections (specifically the Chicago Area Waterway System) as the most likely route for arrival into the Great Lakes basin. Results of the risk assessment show that there is enough food and habitat for bigheaded carp survival in the Great Lakes, especially in Lake Erie and productive embayments in the other lakes. Analyses of tributaries around the Canadian Great Lakes and the American waters of Lake Erie indicate that there are many suitable tributaries for bigheaded carp spawning. Should bigheaded carps establish in the Great Lakes, their spread would not likely be limited and several ecological consequences can be expected to occur. These consequences include competition for planktonic food leading to reduced growth rates, recruitment and abundance of planktivores. Subsequently this would lead to reduced stocks of piscivores and abundance of fishes with pelagic, early life stages. Overall risk is highest for lakes Michigan, Huron, and Erie, followed by Lake Ontario then Lake Superior. To avoid the trajectory of the invasion process and prevent or minimize anticipated consequences, it is important to continue to focus efforts on reducing the probability of introduction of these species at either the arrival, survival, establishment, or spread stage (depending on location).

  11. Metal and proton toxicity to lake zooplankton: a chemical speciation based modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, Anthony; Tipping, Edward; Lofts, Stephen; Fott, Jan; Garmo, Oyvind A; Hruska, Jakub; Keller, Bill; Löfgren, Stefan; Maberly, Stephen C; Majer, Vladimir; Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A; Persson, Gunnar; Schartau, Ann-Kristin; Thackeray, Stephen J; Valois, Amanda; Vrba, Jaroslav; Walseng, Bjørn; Yan, Norman

    2014-03-01

    The WHAM-FTOX model quantifies the combined toxic effects of protons and metal cations towards aquatic organisms through the toxicity function (FTOX), a linear combination of the products of organism-bound cation and a toxic potency coefficient for each cation. We describe the application of the model to predict an observable ecological field variable, species richness of pelagic lake crustacean zooplankton, studied with respect to either acidification or the impacts of metals from smelters. The fitted results give toxic potencies increasing in the order H(+) < Al < Cu < Zn < Ni. In general, observed species richness is lower than predicted, but in some instances agreement is close, and is rarely higher than predictions. The model predicts recovery in agreement with observations for three regions, namely Sudbury (Canada), Bohemian Forest (Czech Republic) and a subset of lakes across Norway, but fails to predict observed recovery from acidification in Adirondack lakes (USA).

  12. Lake trout consumption and recent changes in the fish assemblage of Flaming Gorge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, D.L. ); Luecke, C. )

    1993-11-01

    Bioenergetics modeling was used to quantify the consumption dynamics of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Flaming Gorge Reservoir, Utah-Wyoming. Analysis of diet and population estimates of different size-classes of lake trout indicated that kokanees Oncorhynchus nerka made up the greatest proportion of prey biomass. Examination of growth rates of forage fish and predator-prey size ratios indicated that Utah chub Gila atraria were more vulnerable than kokanees to lake trout predation. Utah chub grow slower than kokanees and thus were susceptible to piscivores over a longer age span. The authors conclude the kokanees will make up an even large proportion of the pelagic fish assemblage of Flaming Gorge Reservoir in future years. 44 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Toxicity of smelter slag-contaminated sediments from Upper Lake Roosevelt and associated metals to early life stage White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus Richardson, 1836)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.D.; Linder, G.

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of five smelter slag-contaminated sediments from the upper Columbia River and metals associated with those slags (cadmium, copper, zinc) was evaluated in 96-h exposures of White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus Richardson, 1836) at 8 and 30 days post-hatch. Leachates prepared from slag-contaminated sediments were evaluated for toxicity. Leachates yielded a maximum aqueous copper concentration of 11.8 μg L−1 observed in sediment collected at Dead Man's Eddy (DME), the sampling site nearest the smelter. All leachates were nonlethal to sturgeon that were 8 day post-hatch (dph), but leachates from three of the five sediments were toxic to fish that were 30 dph, suggesting that the latter life stage is highly vulnerable to metals exposure. Fish maintained consistent and prolonged contact with sediments and did not avoid contaminated sediments when provided a choice between contaminated and uncontaminated sediments. White Sturgeon also failed to avoid aqueous copper (1.5–20 μg L−1). In water-only 96-h exposures of 35 dph sturgeon with the three metals, similar toxicity was observed during exposure to water spiked with copper alone and in combination with cadmium and zinc. Cadmium ranging from 3.2 to 41 μg L−1 or zinc ranging from 21 to 275 μg L−1 was not lethal, but induced adverse behavioral changes including a loss of equilibrium. These results suggest that metals associated with smelter slags may pose an increased exposure risk to early life stage sturgeon if fish occupy areas contaminated by slags.

  14. Spatial and temporal changes in the Barents Sea pelagic compartment during the recent warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Elena; Skjoldal, Hein Rune; Gjøsæter, Harald; Primicerio, Raul

    2017-02-01

    The Barents Sea has experienced substantial warming over the last few decades with expansion of relatively warm Atlantic water and reduction in sea ice. Based on a review of relevant literature and additional analyses, we report changes in the pelagic compartment associated with this warming using data from autumn surveys (acoustic capelin, 0-group fish, and ecosystem surveys). We estimated biomass for 25 components of the pelagic community, including macroplankton, 0-group fish, and juvenile and adult pelagic fish, were examined for spatial and temporal variation over the period 1993-2013. The estimated total biomass of the investigated pelagic compartment, not including mesozooplankton, ranged between about 6 and 30 million tonnes wet weight with an average of 17 million tonnes over the 21-years period. Krill was the dominant biomass component (63%), whereas pelagic fish (capelin, polar cod and herring) made up 26% and 0-group fish 11% of the biomass on average. The spatial distribution of biomass showed a broad-scale pattern reflecting differences in distribution of the main pelagic fishes (capelin in the north, polar cod in the east, and herring in the south) and transport of krill and 0-group fish with the Atlantic water flowing into the southern Barents Sea. Dividing the Barents Sea into six regions, the highest average biomass values were found in the Southwestern and South-Central subareas (about 4 million tonnes in each), with krill as the main component. Biomass was also high in the North-Central subarea (about 3 million tonnes) where capelin was the major contributor. The total estimated biomass of the pelagic compartment remained relatively stable during each of two main periods (before and after 2004), but increased by a factor of two from around 11 million tonnes in the first to around 23 million tonnes in the last period. The pronounced increase reflected the warming between the relatively cold 1990s and the warmer 2000s and was driven mainly by an

  15. Social-value maps for Arapaho, Roosevelt, Medicine Bow, Routt, and White River National Forests, Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ancona, Zachary H.; Semmens, Darius J.; Sherrouse, Benson C.

    2016-03-25

    Executive SummaryThe continued pressures of population growth on the life-sustaining, economic, and cultural ecosystem services provided by our national forests, particularly those located near rapidly growing urban areas, present ongoing challenges to forest managers. Achieving an effective assessment of these ecosystem services includes a proper accounting of the ecological, economic, and social values attributable to them. However, assessments of ecosystem goods and services notably lack information describing the spatial distribution and relative intensity of social values—the perceived, nonmarket values derived particularly from cultural ecosystem services. A geographic information system (GIS) tool developed to fill this need, Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES; http://solves.cr.usgs.gov), now provides the capability to generate social-value maps at a range of spatial scales. This report presents some of the methods behind SolVES, procedures needed to apply the tool, the first formal map products resulting from its application at a regional scale, and a discussion of the management implications associated with this type of information.In this study, we use SolVES to identify the location and relative intensity of social values as derived from survey responses gathered from residents living in counties adjacent to Arapaho, Roosevelt, Medicine Bow, Routt, and White River National Forests. The results, presented as a series of social-value maps, represent the first publicly available spatial data on social-value intensity for the southern Rocky Mountain region. Our analysis identified high-value areas for social values including aesthetic, biodiversity, and life sustaining within wilderness areas. Other values, like recreation, show high-value areas both within wilderness and throughout the general forest areas, which can be attributed to people using the forests for a diverse set of recreational activities. The economic social-value type was lower

  16. Lower respiration in the littoral zone of a subtropical shallow lake.

    PubMed

    They, Ng Haig; da Motta Marques, David; Souza, Rafael Siqueira

    2012-01-01

    Macrophytes are important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to littoral zones of lakes, but this DOC is believed to be mostly refractory to bacteria, leading to the hypothesis that bacterial metabolism is different in littoral and pelagic zones of a large subtropical shallow lake. We tested this hypothesis by three approaches: (I) dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) accumulation in littoral and pelagic water; (II) O(2) consumption estimate for a cloud of points (n = 47) covering the entire lake; (III) measurement of O(2) consumption and CO(2) accumulation in dark bottles, pCO(2) in the water, lake-atmosphere fluxes of CO(2) (fCO(2)) and a large set of limnological variables at 19 sampling points (littoral and pelagic zones) during seven extensive campaigns. For the first two approaches, DIC and O(2) consumption were consistently lower in the littoral zone, and O(2) consumption increased marginally with the distance to the nearest shore. For the third approach, we found in the littoral zone consistently lower DOC, total phosphorus (TP), and chlorophyll a, and a higher proportion of low-molecular-weight substances. Regression trees confirmed that high respiration (O(2) consumption and CO(2) production) was associated to lower concentration of low-molecular-weight substances, while pCO(2) was associated to DOC and TP, confirming that CO(2) supersaturation occurs in an attempt to balance phosphorus deficiency of macrophyte substrates. Littoral zone fCO(2) showed a tendency to be a CO(2) sink, whereas the pelagic zone showed a tendency to act as CO(2) source to the atmosphere. The high proportion of low-molecular-weight, unreactive substances, together with lower DOC and TP may impose lower rates of respiration in littoral zones. This effect of perennial stands of macrophytes may therefore have important, but not yet quantified implications for the global carbon metabolism of these lakes, but other issues still need to be carefully addressed before rejecting

  17. Lower Respiration in the Littoral Zone of a Subtropical Shallow Lake

    PubMed Central

    They, Ng Haig; da Motta Marques, David; Souza, Rafael Siqueira

    2013-01-01

    Macrophytes are important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to littoral zones of lakes, but this DOC is believed to be mostly refractory to bacteria, leading to the hypothesis that bacterial metabolism is different in littoral and pelagic zones of a large subtropical shallow lake. We tested this hypothesis by three approaches: (I) dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) accumulation in littoral and pelagic water; (II) O2 consumption estimate for a cloud of points (n = 47) covering the entire lake; (III) measurement of O2 consumption and CO2 accumulation in dark bottles, pCO2 in the water, lake-atmosphere fluxes of CO2 (fCO2) and a large set of limnological variables at 19 sampling points (littoral and pelagic zones) during seven extensive campaigns. For the first two approaches, DIC and O2 consumption were consistently lower in the littoral zone, and O2 consumption increased marginally with the distance to the nearest shore. For the third approach, we found in the littoral zone consistently lower DOC, total phosphorus (TP), and chlorophyll a, and a higher proportion of low-molecular-weight substances. Regression trees confirmed that high respiration (O2 consumption and CO2 production) was associated to lower concentration of low-molecular-weight substances, while pCO2 was associated to DOC and TP, confirming that CO2 supersaturation occurs in an attempt to balance phosphorus deficiency of macrophyte substrates. Littoral zone fCO2 showed a tendency to be a CO2 sink, whereas the pelagic zone showed a tendency to act as CO2 source to the atmosphere. The high proportion of low-molecular-weight, unreactive substances, together with lower DOC and TP may impose lower rates of respiration in littoral zones. This effect of perennial stands of macrophytes may therefore have important, but not yet quantified implications for the global carbon metabolism of these lakes, but other issues still need to be carefully addressed before rejecting the general belief that

  18. Redox condition of the late Neoproterozoic pelagic deep ocean: 57Fe Mössbauer analyses of pelagic mudstones in the Ediacaran accretionary complex, Wales, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomohiko; Sawaki, Yusuke; Asanuma, Hisashi; Fujisaki, Wataru; Okada, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Shigenori; Isozaki, Yukio; Shozugawa, Katsumi; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Windley, Brian F.

    2015-11-01

    We report geological and geochemical analysis of Neoproterozoic pelagic deep-sea mudstones in an accretionary complex in Lleyn, Wales, UK. Ocean plate stratigraphy at Porth Felen, NW Lleyn, consists of mid-ocean ridge basalt (> 4 m), bedded dolostone (2 m), black mudstone (5 m), hemipelagic siliceous mudstone (1 m,) and turbiditic sandstone (15 m), in ascending order. The absence of terrigenous clastics confirms that the black and siliceous mudstone was deposited in a pelagic deep-sea. Based on the youngest U-Pb age (564 Ma) of detrital zircons separated from overlying sandstone, the deep-sea black mudstone was deposited in the late Ediacaran. The 5 m-thick black mudstone contains the following distinctive lithologies: (i) black mudstone with thin pyritic layers (0.8 m), (ii) alternation of black mudstone and gray/dark gray siliceous mudstone (2.4 m), (iii) thinly-laminated dark gray shale (1 m), and (iv) black mudstone with thin pyritic layers (1 m). 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy confirms that these black mudstones contain pyrite without hematite. In contrast, red bedded claystones (no younger than 542 Ma) in the neighboring Braich section contain hematite as their main iron mineral. These deep-sea mudstones in the Lleyn Peninsula record a change of redox condition on the pelagic deep-sea floor during the Ediacaran. The black mudstone at Porth Felen shows that deep-sea anoxia existed in the late Ediacaran. The eventual change from a reducing to an oxidizing deep-sea environment likely occurred in the late Ediacaran (ca. 564-542 Ma).

  19. Stable isotope evaluation of population- and individual-level diet variability in a large, oligotrophic lake with non-native lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ng, Elizabeth L.; Fredericks, Jim P.; Quist, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-native piscivores can alter food web dynamics; therefore, evaluating interspecific relationships is vital for conservation and management of ecosystems with introduced fishes. Priest Lake, Idaho, supports a number of introduced species, including lake troutSalvelinus namaycush, brook trout S. fontinalis and opossum shrimp Mysis diluviana. In this study, we used stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) to describe the food web structure of Priest Lake and to test hypotheses about apparent patterns in lake trout growth. We found that isotopic niches of species using pelagic-origin carbon did not overlap with those using more littoral-origin carbon. Species using more littoral-origin carbon, such as brook trout and westslope cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi, exhibited a high degree of isotopic niche overlap and high intrapopulation variability in resource use. Although we hypothesised that lake trout would experience an ontogenetic diet shift, no such patterns were apparent in isotopic signatures. Lake trout growth rates were not associated with patterns in δ15N, indicating that variation in adult body composition may not be related to adult diet. Understanding trophic relationships at both the individual and species levels provides a more complete understanding of food webs altered by non-native species.

  20. Habitat use by fishes of Lake Superior. II. Consequences of diel habitat use for habitat linkages and habitat coupling in nearshore and offshore waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorman, Owen T.; Yule, Daniel L.; Stockwell, Jason D.

    2012-01-01

    Diel migration patterns of fishes in nearshore (15–80 m depth) and offshore (>80 m) waters of Lake Superior were examined to assess the potential for diel migration to link benthic and pelagic, and nearshore and offshore habitats. In our companion article, we described three types of diel migration: diel vertical migration (DVM), diel bank migration (DBM), and no diel migration. DVM was expressed by fishes migrating from benthopelagic to pelagic positions and DBM was expressed by fishes migrating horizontally from deep to shallow waters at night. Fishes not exhibiting diel migration typically showed increased activity by moving from benthic to benthopelagic positions within demersal habitat. The distribution and biomass of fishes in Lake Superior was characterized by examining 704 bottom trawl samples collected between 2001 and 2008 from four depth zones: ≤40, 41–80, 81–160, and >160 m. Diel migration behaviors of fishes described in our companion article were applied to estimates of areal biomass (kg ha−1) for each species by depth zone. The relative strength of diel migrations were assessed by applying lake area to areal biomass estimates for each species by depth zone to yield estimates of lake-wide biomass (metric tonnes). Overall, species expressing DVM accounted for 83%, DBM 6%, and non-migration 11% of the total lake-wide community biomass. In nearshore waters, species expressing DVM represented 74% of the biomass, DBM 25%, and non-migration 1%. In offshore waters, species expressing DVM represented 85%, DBM 1%, and non-migration 14% of the biomass. Of species expressing DVM, 83% of total biomass occurred in offshore waters. Similarly, 97% of biomass of non-migrators occurred in offshore waters while 83% of biomass of species expressing DBM occurred in nearshore waters. A high correlation (R2 = 0.996) between lake area and community biomass by depth zone resulted in 81% of the lake-wide biomass occurring in offshore waters. Accentuating this

  1. Towards an integrated view of benthic and pelagic processes in the southern North Sea (German Bight)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Neumann, Andreas; Naderipour, Celine

    2015-04-01

    The North Sea can be classified as a semi-enclosed shelf on the western-European continent. Atlantic influences are mainly through the Fair Isle current Channel in the North, and through the Strait of Dover in the South. An anti-clockwise circulation prevails, driven by mainly semi-diurnal tides and winds. The German Bight is located in the south-eastern part of the North Sea, and is strongly influenced by continental rivers. The outflow from the rivers Scheldt, Maas and Rhine is carried towards the German Bight with the residual currents. The German rivers Ems, Weser and Elbe directly debouche into the German Bight. On the shallow shelf, the water column is completely mixed by tidal forces and wind, largely preventing downward flux of particles and instead fostering temporary deposition and resuspension, which influences benthic mineralization. Hence, complex interactions between pelagic and benthic processes occur. Previous budget calculations indicate that the nutrient inventory has to be processed several times to support observed primary production, and, depending on water depth; only 10-20% remineralisation occurs in sediments of the German Bight whereas about 50% of organic matter is remineralised in the sediments of the shallow Wadden Sea. In this presentation, we use in-situ and ex-situ field data on pelagic and benthic oxygen respiration and benthic nutrient fluxes to assess the intense mineralization activity in the German Bight, the partitioning of benthic and pelagic processes and the factors influencing organic matter mineralization. Measurements of pelagic oxygen respiration based on Winkler titration, in-situ benthic oxygen uptake measurements based on flux-chamber landers and ex-situ incubations of intact sediment cores revealed that benthic remineralisation rates are about an order of magnitude smaller than pelagic rates, in agreement with previous budget estimates. Both benthic and pelagic oxygen respiration show a strong seasonality; with higher

  2. Urban microbial ecology of a freshwater estuary of Lake Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jenny C.; Newton, Ryan J.; Dila, Deborah K.

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater estuaries throughout the Great Lakes region receive stormwater runoff and riverine inputs from heavily urbanized population centers. While human and animal feces contained in this runoff are often the focus of source tracking investigations, non-fecal bacterial loads from soil, aerosols, urban infrastructure, and other sources are also transported to estuaries and lakes. We quantified and characterized this non-fecal urban microbial component using bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences from sewage, stormwater, rivers, harbor/estuary, and the lake surrounding Milwaukee, WI, USA. Bacterial communities from each of these environments had a distinctive composition, but some community members were shared among environments. We used a statistical biomarker discovery tool to identify the components of the microbial community that were most strongly associated with stormwater and sewage to describe an “urban microbial signature,” and measured the presence and relative abundance of these organisms in the rivers, estuary, and lake. This urban signature increased in magnitude in the estuary and harbor with increasing rainfall levels, and was more apparent in lake samples with closest proximity to the Milwaukee estuary. The dominant bacterial taxa in the urban signature were Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, and Pseudomonas, which are organisms associated with pipe infrastructure and soil and not typically found in pelagic freshwater environments. These taxa were highly abundant in stormwater and sewage, but sewage also contained a high abundance of Arcobacter and Trichococcus that appeared in lower abundance in stormwater outfalls and in trace amounts in aquatic environments. Urban signature organisms comprised 1.7% of estuary and harbor communities under baseflow conditions, 3.5% after rain, and >10% after a combined sewer overflow. With predicted increases in urbanization across the Great Lakes, further alteration of freshwater communities is likely to occur with

  3. Urban microbial ecology of a freshwater estuary of Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jenny C; Newton, Ryan J; Dila, Deborah K; McLellan, Sandra L

    Freshwater estuaries throughout the Great Lakes region receive stormwater runoff and riverine inputs from heavily urbanized population centers. While human and animal feces contained in this runoff are often the focus of source tracking investigations, non-fecal bacterial loads from soil, aerosols, urban infrastructure, and other sources are also transported to estuaries and lakes. We quantified and characterized this non-fecal urban microbial component using bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences from sewage, stormwater, rivers, harbor/estuary, and the lake surrounding Milwaukee, WI, USA. Bacterial communities from each of these environments had a distinctive composition, but some community members were shared among environments. We used a statistical biomarker discovery tool to identify the components of the microbial community that were most strongly associated with stormwater and sewage to describe an "urban microbial signature," and measured the presence and relative abundance of these organisms in the rivers, estuary, and lake. This urban signature increased in magnitude in the estuary and harbor with increasing rainfall levels, and was more apparent in lake samples with closest proximity to the Milwaukee estuary. The dominant bacterial taxa in the urban signature were Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, and Pseudomonas, which are organisms associated with pipe infrastructure and soil and not typically found in pelagic freshwater environments. These taxa were highly abundant in stormwater and sewage, but sewage also contained a high abundance of Arcobacter and Trichococcus that appeared in lower abundance in stormwater outfalls and in trace amounts in aquatic environments. Urban signature organisms comprised 1.7% of estuary and harbor communities under baseflow conditions, 3.5% after rain, and >10% after a combined sewer overflow. With predicted increases in urbanization across the Great Lakes, further alteration of freshwater communities is likely to occur with potential

  4. IMPORTANCE OF MATERNAL TRANSFER OF THE PHOTOREACTIVE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FLUORANTHENE FROM BENTHIC ADULT BIVALVES TO THEIR PELAGIC LARVAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if maternal transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from benthic adult bivalves could result in phototoxicity to their pelagic larvae when exposed to ultraviolet light (UV). In these experiments, adult bivalves were e...

  5. The collapse of pelagic fishes in the upper San Francisco estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sommer, T.; Armor, C.; Baxter, R.; Breuer, R.; Brown, L.; Chotkowski, M.; Culberson, S.; Feyrer, F.; Gingras, M.; Herbold, B.; Kimmerer, W.; Mueller-Solger, A.; Nobriga, M.; Souza, K.

    2007-01-01

    Although the pelagic fish community of the upper San Francisco Estuary historically has shown substantial variability, a recent collapse has captured the attention of resource managers, scientists, legislators, and the general public. The ecological and management consequences of the decline are most serious for delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus), a threatened species whose narrow range overlaps with large water diversions that supply water to over 25 million people. The decline occurred despite recent moderate hydrology, which typically results in at least modest recruitment, and investments of hundreds of millions of dollars in habitat restoration and environmental water allocations to support native fishes. In response to the pelagic fish collapse, an ambitious multi-agency research team has been working since 2005 to evaluate the causes of the decline, which likely include a combination of factors: stock-recruitment effects, a decline in habitat quality, increased mortality rates, and reduced food availability due to invasive species.

  6. Potential impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on large pelagic fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frias-Torres, Sarrah; Bostater, Charles R., Jr.

    2011-11-01

    Biogeographical analyses provide insights on how the Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted large pelagic fishes. We georeferenced historical ichthyoplankton surveys and published literature to map the spawning and larval areas of bluefin tuna, swordfish, blue marlin and whale shark sightings in the Gulf of Mexico with daily satellite-derived images detecting surface oil. The oil spill covered critical areas used by large pelagic fishes. Surface oil was detected in 100% of the northernmost whale shark sightings, in 32.8 % of the bluefin tuna spawning area and 38 % of the blue marlin larval area. No surface oil was detected in the swordfish spawning and larval area. Our study likely underestimates the extend of the oil spill due to satellite sensors detecting only the upper euphotic zone and the use of dispersants altering crude oil density, but provides a previously unknown spatio-temporal analysis.

  7. Sediment creep on slopes in pelagic limestones: Upper Jurassic of Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, Hugo; Kilian, Sinah

    2016-10-01

    Slump structures in Upper Jurassic pelagic limestones of the Northern Calcareous Alps were studied using methods of ductile structural geology. The early deformation observed cannot be explained by conventional models for slumping, commonly describing slump complexes with an extending upper and contracting lower part. Instead, the structures suggest distributed bedding-parallel surficial stretching, and folding localized by roll-over normal faulting. The initially isoclinal and recumbent folds are pervasively overprinted by stretching, causing reorientation of fold axes into the downslope direction. Transport of folds separates antiformal and synformal hinges, and the resulting isolated hinges resemble intrafolial folds in metamorphic terranes. Only folds formed late in the process of lithification allow insight in the early stages of fold evolution. We suggest that this type of early deformation represents sediment creep that may be characteristic for slump structures in pelagic carbonates.

  8. Groups travel further: pelagic metamorphosis and polyp clustering allow higher dispersal potential in sun coral propagules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, Damián; Navarrete, Sergio A.; Flores, Augusto A. V.

    2014-06-01

    We report that planulae produced by Tubastraea coccinea can metamorphose and aggregate in groups of up to eight polyps in the water column, without previous settlement on benthic substrate. We also evaluated the survival of propagules to test whether different levels of aggregation allowed for longer planktonic life and, therefore, higher dispersal potential. Our results show that pelagic polyps live longer than planulae, probably because they can feed and meet the presumably high-energy demands of swimming. Clusters of two or more individuals lived longer than solitary polyps. However, mortality did not differ between small (2-3 polyps) and large (4-8 polyps) clusters, suggesting the existence of an upper limit to cluster size. Most swimming clusters (80 %) remained alive after 6 months, suggesting that pelagic metamorphosis and cluster formation can be a key life-history feature increasing dispersal potential, population connectivity, and the colonization of new habitats in this invasive species.

  9. Platform collapse and pelagic seamount facies: Jurassic development of central Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soussi, M.; Ben Ismaı̈l, M. H.

    2000-06-01

    In central Tunisia, the Lower Liassic facies consists of peritidal carbonates deposited on a wide platform which has been broken into irregular tilted blocks in the Early Pliensbachian. Black shale was deposited in some of the down-faulted blocks during the Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event. The Bajocian-Bathonian deposits are represented by ironstones and hemipelagic ammonite and Zoophycos-rich marl-limestones. The upper Jurassic is composed by pelagic limestones and debris flow deposits. The middle Jurassic deep marine sedimentation was frequently associated with condensed sections, submarine erosion leading to stratigraphic hiatuses. The latter results from the interaction between global sea-level fluctuations and regional tectonic activity generating an uplifted block in Central Tunisia in relation with Early Mesozoic rifting and associated distensional drifting of the North-African Tethyan margin. This horst block has acted as a starved pelagic shoal on which sedimentation has been recorded especially during retrogradational and the aggradational phases.

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of the pelagic stingray Pteroplatytrygon violacea (Myliobatiformes: Dasyatidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Pin; Zhi, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Shuai; Yan, Shuai; Yang, Tingbao

    2016-01-01

    The pelagic stingray Pteroplatytrygon violacea is the only pelagic species of the Dasyatidae (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii), which is widely distributed in all tropical, subtropical and temperate oceans. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Pteroplatytrygon violacea was determined. It is 17,665 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 control region, with the typical gene order and direction of transcription of vertebrates. The overall nucleotide compositions of the whole mitogenome are 30.8% A, 26.9% C, 28.6% T and 13.7% G. The ND2 and CO1 sequences are highly similar to the corresponding sequences of this species available in NCBI collected from the Atlantic sea.

  11. Lake Nasser and Toshka Lakes, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Nasser (center) and the Toshka Lakes (center left) glow emerald green and black in this MODIS true-color image acquired March 8, 2002. Located on and near the border of Egypt and Norther Sudan, these lakes are an oasis of water in between the Nubian (lower right) and Libyan Deserts (upper left). Also visible are the Red Sea (in the upper right) and the Nile River (running north from Lake Nasser). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  12. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Crypsis Based on Color, Reflection, and Bioluminescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    public release; distribution is unlimited. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods : An interdisciplinary approach to crypsis based on...several species of benthic and pelagic cephalopods , the aspects of their optical environment that affect their camouflage behavior, the characterization...To determine the visual abilities of several species of cephalopod and model both the shallow and deep-water world from the animals’ points of view

  13. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Crypsis Based on Color, Reflection, and Bioluminescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods : An...environment. In particular, we plan to characterize and understand the perceptual abilities of several species of benthic and pelagic cephalopods (which...2. To determine the visual abilities of several species of cephalopod and model both the shallow and deep-water world from the animals’ points

  14. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Crypsis Based on Color, Reflection, and Bioluminescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods : An...In particular, we plan to characterize and understand the perceptual abilities of several species of benthic and pelagic cephalopods , the aspects... cephalopod and model both the shallow and deep-water world from the animals’ points of view. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No

  15. Large, omega-3 rich, pelagic diatoms under Arctic sea ice: sources and implications for food webs.

    PubMed

    Duerksen, Steven W; Thiemann, Gregory W; Budge, Suzanne M; Poulin, Michel; Niemi, Andrea; Michel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Pelagic primary production in Arctic seas has traditionally been viewed as biologically insignificant until after the ice breakup. There is growing evidence however, that under-ice blooms of pelagic phytoplankton may be a recurrent occurrence. During the springs of 2011 and 2012, we found substantial numbers (201-5713 cells m-3) of the large centric diatom (diameter >250 µm) Coscinodiscus centralis under the sea ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago near Resolute Bay, Nunavut. The highest numbers of these pelagic diatoms were observed in Barrow Strait. Spatial patterns of fatty acid profiles and stable isotopes indicated two source populations for C. centralis: a western origin with low light conditions and high nutrients, and a northern origin with lower nutrient levels and higher irradiances. Fatty acid analysis revealed that pelagic diatoms had significantly higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (mean ± SD: 50.3 ± 8.9%) compared to ice-associated producers (30.6 ± 10.3%) in our study area. In particular, C. centralis had significantly greater proportions of the long chain omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), than ice algae (24.4 ± 5.1% versus 13.7 ± 5.1%, respectively). Thus, C. centralis represented a significantly higher quality food source for local herbivores than ice algae, although feeding experiments did not show clear evidence of copepod grazing on C. centralis. Our results suggest that C. centralis are able to initiate growth under pack ice in this area and provide further evidence that biological productivity in ice-covered seas may be substantially higher than previously recognized.

  16. Deepwater Horizon crude oil impacts the developing hearts of large predatory pelagic fish.

    PubMed

    Incardona, John P; Gardner, Luke D; Linbo, Tiffany L; Brown, Tanya L; Esbaugh, Andrew J; Mager, Edward M; Stieglitz, John D; French, Barbara L; Labenia, Jana S; Laetz, Cathy A; Tagal, Mark; Sloan, Catherine A; Elizur, Abigail; Benetti, Daniel D; Grosell, Martin; Block, Barbara A; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2014-04-15

    The Deepwater Horizon disaster released more than 636 million L of crude oil into the northern Gulf of Mexico. The spill oiled upper surface water spawning habitats for many commercially and ecologically important pelagic fish species. Consequently, the developing spawn (embryos and larvae) of tunas, swordfish, and other large predators were potentially exposed to crude oil-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Fish embryos are generally very sensitive to PAH-induced cardiotoxicity, and adverse changes in heart physiology and morphology can cause both acute and delayed mortality. Cardiac function is particularly important for fast-swimming pelagic predators with high aerobic demand. Offspring for these species develop rapidly at relatively high temperatures, and their vulnerability to crude oil toxicity is unknown. We assessed the impacts of field-collected Deepwater Horizon (MC252) oil samples on embryos of three pelagic fish: bluefin tuna, yellowfin tuna, and an amberjack. We show that environmentally realistic exposures (1-15 µg/L total PAH) cause specific dose-dependent defects in cardiac function in all three species, with circulatory disruption culminating in pericardial edema and other secondary malformations. Each species displayed an irregular atrial arrhythmia following oil exposure, indicating a highly conserved response to oil toxicity. A considerable portion of Gulf water samples collected during the spill had PAH concentrations exceeding toxicity thresholds observed here, indicating the potential for losses of pelagic fish larvae. Vulnerability assessments in other ocean habitats, including the Arctic, should focus on the developing heart of resident fish species as an exceptionally sensitive and consistent indicator of crude oil impacts.

  17. Large, Omega-3 Rich, Pelagic Diatoms under Arctic Sea Ice: Sources and Implications for Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Duerksen, Steven W.; Thiemann, Gregory W.; Budge, Suzanne M.; Poulin, Michel; Niemi, Andrea; Michel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Pelagic primary production in Arctic seas has traditionally been viewed as biologically insignificant until after the ice breakup. There is growing evidence however, that under-ice blooms of pelagic phytoplankton may be a recurrent occurrence. During the springs of 2011 and 2012, we found substantial numbers (201–5713 cells m−3) of the large centric diatom (diameter >250 µm) Coscinodiscus centralis under the sea ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago near Resolute Bay, Nunavut. The highest numbers of these pelagic diatoms were observed in Barrow Strait. Spatial patterns of fatty acid profiles and stable isotopes indicated two source populations for C. centralis: a western origin with low light conditions and high nutrients, and a northern origin with lower nutrient levels and higher irradiances. Fatty acid analysis revealed that pelagic diatoms had significantly higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (mean ± SD: 50.3±8.9%) compared to ice-associated producers (30.6±10.3%) in our study area. In particular, C. centralis had significantly greater proportions of the long chain omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), than ice algae (24.4±5.1% versus 13.7±5.1%, respectively). Thus, C. centralis represented a significantly higher quality food source for local herbivores than ice algae, although feeding experiments did not show clear evidence of copepod grazing on C. centralis. Our results suggest that C. centralis are able to initiate growth under pack ice in this area and provide further evidence that biological productivity in ice-covered seas may be substantially higher than previously recognized. PMID:25473949

  18. Temporal variation in regulation of production in a pelagic food web model

    SciTech Connect

    Bartell, S.M.; Brenkert, A.L.; O'Neill, R.V.; Gardner, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    We examined the implications of differential resource use and predator-prey relations in a seasonal environment, formalized as a pelagic food web model, on temporal changes in the relative importance of bottom-up and top-down structuring of the phytoplankton. Detailed analyses of the model's behavior were used to identify periods when control of production shifted from interspecific interactions among the phytoplankton to cascading trophic interactions.

  19. Deepwater Horizon crude oil impacts the developing hearts of large predatory pelagic fish

    PubMed Central

    Incardona, John P.; Gardner, Luke D.; Linbo, Tiffany L.; Brown, Tanya L.; Esbaugh, Andrew J.; Mager, Edward M.; Stieglitz, John D.; French, Barbara L.; Labenia, Jana S.; Laetz, Cathy A.; Tagal, Mark; Sloan, Catherine A.; Elizur, Abigail; Benetti, Daniel D.; Grosell, Martin; Block, Barbara A.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.

    2014-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon disaster released more than 636 million L of crude oil into the northern Gulf of Mexico. The spill oiled upper surface water spawning habitats for many commercially and ecologically important pelagic fish species. Consequently, the developing spawn (embryos and larvae) of tunas, swordfish, and other large predators were potentially exposed to crude oil-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Fish embryos are generally very sensitive to PAH-induced cardiotoxicity, and adverse changes in heart physiology and morphology can cause both acute and delayed mortality. Cardiac function is particularly important for fast-swimming pelagic predators with high aerobic demand. Offspring for these species develop rapidly at relatively high temperatures, and their vulnerability to crude oil toxicity is unknown. We assessed the impacts of field-collected Deepwater Horizon (MC252) oil samples on embryos of three pelagic fish: bluefin tuna, yellowfin tuna, and an amberjack. We show that environmentally realistic exposures (1–15 µg/L total PAH) cause specific dose-dependent defects in cardiac function in all three species, with circulatory disruption culminating in pericardial edema and other secondary malformations. Each species displayed an irregular atrial arrhythmia following oil exposure, indicating a highly conserved response to oil toxicity. A considerable portion of Gulf water samples collected during the spill had PAH concentrations exceeding toxicity thresholds observed here, indicating the potential for losses of pelagic fish larvae. Vulnerability assessments in other ocean habitats, including the Arctic, should focus on the developing heart of resident fish species as an exceptionally sensitive and consistent indicator of crude oil impacts. PMID:24706825

  20. Biogeochemical significance of pelagic ecosystem function: an end-Cretaceous case study.

    PubMed

    Henehan, Michael J; Hull, Pincelli M; Penman, Donald E; Rae, James W B; Schmidt, Daniela N

    2016-05-19

    Pelagic ecosystem function is integral to global biogeochemical cycling, and plays a major role in modulating atmospheric CO2 concentrations (pCO2). Uncertainty as to the effects of human activities on marine ecosystem function hinders projection of future atmospheric pCO2 To this end, events in the geological past can provide informative case studies in the response of ecosystem function to environmental and ecological changes. Around the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) boundary, two such events occurred: Deccan large igneous province (LIP) eruptions and massive bolide impact at the Yucatan Peninsula. Both perturbed the environment, but only the impact coincided with marine mass extinction. As such, we use these events to directly contrast the response of marine biogeochemical cycling to environmental perturbation with and without changes in global species richness. We measure this biogeochemical response using records of deep-sea carbonate preservation. We find that Late Cretaceous Deccan volcanism prompted transient deep-sea carbonate dissolution of a larger magnitude and timescale than predicted by geochemical models. Even so, the effect of volcanism on carbonate preservation was slight compared with bolide impact. Empirical records and geochemical models support a pronounced increase in carbonate saturation state for more than 500 000 years following the mass extinction of pelagic carbonate producers at the K-Pg boundary. These examples highlight the importance of pelagic ecosystems in moderating climate and ocean chemistry.

  1. Picky, hungry eaters in the cold: persistent substrate selectivity among polar pelagic microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Andrew D.; Arnosti, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Polar pelagic microbial communities access a narrower range of polysaccharide substrates than communities at lower latitudes. For example, the glucose-containing polysaccharide pullulan is typically not hydrolyzed in fjord waters of Svalbard, even though pullulan is rapidly hydrolyzed in sediments from Svalbard fjords, other polysaccharides are hydrolyzed rapidly in Svalbard waters, and pullulan is hydrolyzed rapidly in temperate waters. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential factors preventing hydrolysis of pullulan in Svalbard fjord waters. To this end, in two separate years, water from Isfjorden, Svalbard, was amended with different carbon sources and/or additional nutrients in order to determine whether increasing the concentration of these potentially-limiting factors would lead to measurable enzymatic activity. Addition of nitrate, phosphate, glucose, or amino acids did not yield detectable pullulan hydrolysis. The only treatment that led to detectable pullulan hydrolysis was extended incubation after the addition of maltotriose (a subunit of pullulan, and potential inducer of pullulanase). In these fjords, the ability to enzymatically access pullulan is likely confined to numerically minor members of the pelagic microbial community. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that pelagic microbial communities at high latitudes exhibit streamlined functionality, focused on a narrower range of substrates, than their temperate counterparts. PMID:25339946

  2. Increased oceanic microplastic debris enhances oviposition in an endemic pelagic insect

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Miriam C.; Rosenberg, Marci; Cheng, Lanna

    2012-01-01

    Plastic pollution in the form of small particles (diameter less than 5 mm)—termed ‘microplastic’—has been observed in many parts of the world ocean. They are known to interact with biota on the individual level, e.g. through ingestion, but their population-level impacts are largely unknown. One potential mechanism for microplastic-induced alteration of pelagic ecosystems is through the introduction of hard-substrate habitat to ecosystems where it is naturally rare. Here, we show that microplastic concentrations in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) have increased by two orders of magnitude in the past four decades, and that this increase has released the pelagic insect Halobates sericeus from substrate limitation for oviposition. High concentrations of microplastic in the NPSG resulted in a positive correlation between H. sericeus and microplastic, and an overall increase in H. sericeus egg densities. Predation on H. sericeus eggs and recent hatchlings may facilitate the transfer of energy between pelagic- and substrate-associated assemblages. The dynamics of hard-substrate-associated organisms may be important to understanding the ecological impacts of oceanic microplastic pollution. PMID:22573831

  3. Influence of variable rates of neritic carbonate deposition on atmospheric carbon dioxide and pelagic sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C.; Opdyke, B. C.

    1995-01-01

    Short-term imbalances in the global cycle of shallow water calcium carbonate deposition and dissolution may be responsible for much of the observed Pleistocene change in atmospheric carbon dioxide content. However, any proposed changes in the alkalinity balance of the ocean must be reconciled with the sedimentary record of deep-sea carbonates. The possible magnitude of the effect of shallow water carbonate deposition on the dissolution of pelagic carbonate can be tested using numerical simulations of the global carbon cycle. Boundary conditions can be defined by using extant shallow water carbonate accumulation data and pelagic carbonate deposition/dissolution data. On timescales of thousands of years carbonate deposition versus dissolution is rarely out of equilibrium by more than 1.5 x 10(13) mole yr-1. Results indicate that the carbonate chemistry of the ocean is rarely at equilibrium on timescales less than 10 ka. This disequilibrium is probably due to sea level-induced changes in shallow water calcium carbonate deposition/dissolution, an interpretation that does not conflict with pelagic sedimentary data from the central Pacific.

  4. Bio-irrigation impacts on benthic-pelagic coupling in the Northern Adriatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capet, Arthur; Solidoro, Cosimo; De Vittor, Cinzia; Cibic, Tamara; Del Negro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    In the process of setting up a 3D benthic-pelagic coupled model for the northern Adriatic Sea, the 1D diagenetic OMEXDIA model was used to analyze pore-water profiles and in-situ flux data through model calibration. We tested two approach to represent bioirrigation in the model: the enhanced-biodiffusive formalism (initially used in OMEXDIA) and the non-local exchange formalism. Solutes profiles depicted shapes that could not be rendered by the biodiffusive formalism. Furthermore, calibration procedures stressed that only the non-local exchange formalism allows to render simultaneously the pore water solute profiles and the fluxes measured at the sediment water interface when carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and phosphate dynamics are considered jointly. While the enhanced-biodiffusive formalism is convenient in empirical studies comparing diffusive and total benthic fluxes for a single variable (derived from solutes profiles and incubation chambers respectively), it is not suited for multivariate modelling purposes. We evidence that the modeled impact of bioirrigation on benthic-pelagic coupling strongly differ following the adopted formalism, in particular in terms of the N:P ratio of remineralized fluxes. Calibrated parameters obtained for various stations are used to assess how bioirrigation impacts on benthic-pelagic coupling in the northern Adriatic.

  5. The influence of depth on mercury levels in pelagic fishes and their prey.

    PubMed

    Choy, C Anela; Popp, Brian N; Kaneko, J John; Drazen, Jeffrey C

    2009-08-18

    Mercury distribution in the oceans is controlled by complex biogeochemical cycles, resulting in retention of trace amounts of this metal in plants and animals. Inter- and intra-specific variations in mercury levels of predatory pelagic fish have been previously linked to size, age, trophic position, physical and chemical environmental parameters, and location of capture; however, considerable variation remains unexplained. In this paper, we focus on differences in ecology, depth of occurrence, and total mercury levels in 9 species of commercially important pelagic fish (Thunnus obesus, T. albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis, Xiphias gladius, Lampris guttatus, Coryphaena hippurus, Taractichthys steindachneri, Tetrapturus audax, and Lepidocybium flavobrunneum) and in numerous representatives (fishes, squids, and crustaceans) of their lower trophic level prey sampled from the central North Pacific Ocean. Results indicate that total mercury levels of predatory pelagic fishes and their prey increase with median depth of occurrence in the water column and mimic concentrations of dissolved organic mercury in seawater. Stomach content analysis results from this study and others indicate a greater occurrence of higher-mercury containing deeper-water prey organisms in the diets of the deeper-ranging predators, X. gladius, T. obesus, and L. guttatus. While present in trace amounts, dissolved organic mercury increases with depth in the water column suggesting that the mesopelagic habitat is a major entry point for mercury into marine food webs. These data suggest that a major determinant of mercury levels in oceanic predators is their depth of forage.

  6. The influence of depth on mercury levels in pelagic fishes and their prey

    PubMed Central

    Choy, C. Anela; Popp, Brian N.; Kaneko, J. John; Drazen, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury distribution in the oceans is controlled by complex biogeochemical cycles, resulting in retention of trace amounts of this metal in plants and animals. Inter- and intra-specific variations in mercury levels of predatory pelagic fish have been previously linked to size, age, trophic position, physical and chemical environmental parameters, and location of capture; however, considerable variation remains unexplained. In this paper, we focus on differences in ecology, depth of occurrence, and total mercury levels in 9 species of commercially important pelagic fish (Thunnus obesus, T. albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis, Xiphias gladius, Lampris guttatus, Coryphaena hippurus, Taractichthys steindachneri, Tetrapturus audax, and Lepidocybium flavobrunneum) and in numerous representatives (fishes, squids, and crustaceans) of their lower trophic level prey sampled from the central North Pacific Ocean. Results indicate that total mercury levels of predatory pelagic fishes and their prey increase with median depth of occurrence in the water column and mimic concentrations of dissolved organic mercury in seawater. Stomach content analysis results from this study and others indicate a greater occurrence of higher-mercury containing deeper-water prey organisms in the diets of the deeper-ranging predators, X. gladius, T. obesus, and L. guttatus. While present in trace amounts, dissolved organic mercury increases with depth in the water column suggesting that the mesopelagic habitat is a major entry point for mercury into marine food webs. These data suggest that a major determinant of mercury levels in oceanic predators is their depth of forage. PMID:19666614

  7. Increased oceanic microplastic debris enhances oviposition in an endemic pelagic insect.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Miriam C; Rosenberg, Marci; Cheng, Lanna

    2012-10-23

    Plastic pollution in the form of small particles (diameter less than 5 mm)--termed 'microplastic'--has been observed in many parts of the world ocean. They are known to interact with biota on the individual level, e.g. through ingestion, but their population-level impacts are largely unknown. One potential mechanism for microplastic-induced alteration of pelagic ecosystems is through the introduction of hard-substrate habitat to ecosystems where it is naturally rare. Here, we show that microplastic concentrations in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) have increased by two orders of magnitude in the past four decades, and that this increase has released the pelagic insect Halobates sericeus from substrate limitation for oviposition. High concentrations of microplastic in the NPSG resulted in a positive correlation between H. sericeus and microplastic, and an overall increase in H. sericeus egg densities. Predation on H. sericeus eggs and recent hatchlings may facilitate the transfer of energy between pelagic- and substrate-associated assemblages. The dynamics of hard-substrate-associated organisms may be important to understanding the ecological impacts of oceanic microplastic pollution.

  8. Do Eurasian beavers smear their pelage with castoreum and anal gland secretion?

    PubMed

    Rosell, Frank

    2002-08-01

    The scent-matching hypothesis postulates that scent marks provide an olfactory link between a resident owner and his territory, and that this enables intruding animals to recognize the chance of escalated conflicts. However, it is unclear if Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber) mark their own pelage with castoreum from their castor sacs (i.e., the same material used in territorial marking); and/or if beavers mark their pelage with anal gland secretion (AGS) from the anal glands to waterproof the pelage and to act as a "living-scent mark." Chemical analysis (gas chromatography and mass spectrometry) of hair samples from 22 live-trapped beavers revealed that castoreum compounds were not present in any samples, AGS compounds were found from 3 animals (13.6%) around the cloaca, and the compound squalene was found in all the samples. Beavers may release castoreum directly into the water when it meets an intruder. Thereby, the "scent mark" in the water can provide an olfactory link between a resident owner and his territory. Squalene, in contrast to AGS, may be essential for keeping beaver pelts water-repellant.

  9. Climate change impacts on leatherback turtle pelagic habitat in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis-Norton, Ellen; Hazen, Elliott L.; Fossette, Sabrina; Shillinger, George; Rykaczewski, Ryan R.; Foley, David G.; Dunne, John P.; Bograd, Steven J.

    2015-03-01

    Eastern Pacific populations of the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) have declined by over 90% during the past three decades. The decline is primarily attributed to human pressures, including unsustainable egg harvest, development on nesting beaches, and by-catch mortality. In particular, the effects of climate change may impose additional stresses upon already threatened leatherback populations. This study analyzes how the pelagic habitat of Eastern Pacific leatherbacks may be affected by climate change over the next century. This population adheres to a persistent migration pattern; following nesting at Playa Grande, Costa Rica, individuals move rapidly through equatorial currents and into foraging habitat within the oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre. Forty-six nesting females were fitted with satellite tags. Based on the turtle positions, ten environmental variables were sampled along the tracks. Presence/absence habitat models were created to determine the oceanographic characteristics of the preferred turtle habitat. Core pelagic habitat was characterized by relatively low sea surface temperatures and chlorophyll-a. Based on these habitat models, we predicted habitat change using output from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory prototype Earth System Model under the Special Report on Emissions Scenario A2 (business-as-usual). Although the model predicted both habitat losses and gains throughout the region, we estimated that overall the core pelagic habitat of the Eastern Pacific leatherback population will decline by approximately 15% within the next century. This habitat modification might increase pressure on a critically endangered population, possibly forcing distributional shifts, behavioral changes, or even extinction.

  10. Gyre formation within embayments of a large lake (Lake Geneva, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razmi, A.; Barry, D.; Bouffard, D.; Le Dantec, N.; Lemmin, U.; Wuest, A.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out to examine gyre formation within open, wide lacustrine embayments. The present study was motivated by observed differences in gyre formation within two open and wide embayments (located at Vidy and Morges in Lake Geneva, Switzerland). These two embayments are located within about 3 km of each other on the northern shore of Lake Geneva, and are subjected to similar pelagic currents. Vidy is deeper and has a greater aspect ratio than Morges. The flow field in the embayments was modeled using a previously validated 3D hydrodynamic model (Delft3D-FLOW). The model solved the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, combined with a k-ɛ turbulence closure in σ (lakebed-following) coordinates. Our study focused on the influence of the embayment geometry on the (uniform) longshore (pelagic) current, specifically the occurrence and magnitude of circulation within the embayment. We built a set of numerical experiments using synthetic embayments, and systematically examined embayment geometry, thereby capturing the differences between the Vidy and Morges embayments. The numerical experiments considered single rectilinear embayments with different aspect ratios (i.e., 1-6), depth, shore-parallel flow rates, and embayment corner angle between 0°-50°. The circulation magnitude changes abruptly for an angle of about 40°. Embayments with angles greater than 40° have much greater circulation then those with lesser angles, other factors remaining the same. Of the factors considered (i.e., aspect ratio, offshore current velocity, corner angle, bottom slope, and viscosity), bottom slope and the viscosity have almost no impact on embayment circulation. For uniform offshore current patterns, gyres form in embayments with large aspect ratios (up to ~3). For the Vidy and Morges embayments, the results showed that gyre formation is more likely in Morges due to its smaller aspect ratio, a finding that is supported by field data gathered in

  11. Seasonal and geothermal production variations in concentrations of He and CO2 in soil gases, Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area, Utah, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    To increase understanding of natural variations in soil gas concentrations, CO2, He, O2 and N2 were measured in soil gases collected regularly for several months from four sites at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area, Utah. Soil temperature, air temperature, per cent relative humidity, barometric pressure and amounts of rain and snowfall were also monitored to determine the effect of meteorological parameters on concentrations of the measured gases. Considerable seasonal variation existed in concentrations of CO2 and He. The parameters that most affected the soil-gas concentrations were soil and air temperatures. Moisture from rain and snow probably affected the soil-gas concentrations also. However, annual variations in meteorological parameters did not appear to affect measurements of anomalous concentrations in samples collected within a time period of a few days. Production from some of the geothermal wells probably affected the soil-gas concentrations. ?? 1990.

  12. Lakes Ecosystem Services Online

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northeastern lakes provide valuable ecosystem services that benefit residents and visitors and are increasingly important for provisioning of recreational opportunities and amenities. Concurrently, however, population growth threatens lakes by, for instance, increasing nutrient ...

  13. National Lakes Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Lakes Assessment is a collaborative, statistical survey of the nation's lakes. It is one of four national surveys that EPA and its partners conduct to assess the condition and health of the nation's water resources.

  14. Lake Huron LAMPs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The approach in Lake Huron differs from the Lakewide Management Plans of the other Great Lakes: no formal binational designation of lakewide beneficial use impairments, nor extensive lakewide modeling of chemical loadings

  15. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  16. The Great Lakes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Great Lakes form the largest surface freshwater system on Earth. The U.S. and Canada work together to restore and protect the environment in the Great Lakes Basin. Top issues include contaminated sediments, water quality and invasive species.

  17. About Lake Tahoe

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate, change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, list of partner agencies.

  18. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Eckert, Thomas H.; Schaner, Ted; Bowlby, James N.; Schleen, Larry P.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to maintain the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population in Lake Ontario by stocking fry failed and the species was extirpated by the 1950s. Hatchery fish stocked in the 1960s did not live to maturity because of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) predation and incidental commercial harvest. Suppression of sea lampreys began with larvicide treatments of Lake Ontario tributaries in 1971 and was enhanced when the tributaries of Oneida Lake and Lake Erie were treated in the 1980s. Annual stocking of hatchery fish was resumed with the 1972 year class and peaked at about 1.8 million yearlings and 0.3 million fingerlings from the 1985–1990 year classes. Survival of stocked yearlings declined over 50% in the 1980 s and was negatively correlated with the abundance of lake trout > 550 mm long (r = −0.91, P < 0.01, n = 12). A slot length limit imposed by the State of New York for the 1988 fishing season reduced angler harvest. Angler harvest in Canadian waters was 3 times higher in eastern Lake Ontario than in western Lake Ontario. For the 1977–1984 year classes, mean annual survival rate of lake trout age 6 and older was 0.45 (range: 0.35–0.56). In U.S. waters during 1985–1992, the total number of lake trout harvested by anglers was about 2.4 times greater than that killed by sea lampreys. The number of unmarked lake trout < 250 mm long in trawl catches in 1978–1992 was not different from that expected due to loss of marks and failure to apply marks at the hatchery, and suggested that recruitment of naturally-produced fish was nil. However, many of the obstacles which may have impeded lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario during the 1980s are slowly being removed, and there are signs of a general ecosystem recovery. Significant recruitment of naturally produced lake trout by the year 2000, one interim objective of the rehabilitation plan for the Lake, may be achieved.

  19. Inferior adaptation of bay sediments in a eutrophic shallow lake to winter season for organic matter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Song, Na; He, Yu-Hong; Jiang, He-Long

    2016-12-01

    Sediments in lake bays receive the greatest external pollutants mainly including terrestrial plants and river macrophyte detritus. This work investigated response and adaptation of bay sediments to organic matter (OM) decomposition under cold and hot seasons. After three month and incubated at 5 °C, it was found that the total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiencies ranged from 15.4 to 13.1% in bay sediments to 22.6-25.7% in pelagic zone. These results determined that poorer OM decomposition occurred in the bay zone during the winter months compared to pelagic zone in a eutrophic shallow lake. High-throughput sequencing and network interactions revealed that the reactions were mainly due to the changing microbial community structure and species interaction at selected areas during different seasons. The bay zone communities are poorly adapted to utilizing the more recalcitrant carbon pool than the pelagic communities. Also, even though more taxa reside in bay communities, less co-occurrences interaction between taxa occurs, which mean that less inter taxa competition for the same resource. In consideration of our study, the potential harm, such as the terrestrialization process speeding up and water quality worsening will be happened, we need to exploit ways to enhance litter biodegradation in the bay zone in winter.

  20. Long-term trends in habitat use of offshore demersal fishes in western Lake Huron suggest large-scale ecosystem change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Stephen C.; Adams, Jean V.

    2010-01-01

    We estimated mean depths of capture for offshore demersal fish species, grouped into three habitat-based guilds (shallow benthic, pelagic, and deep benthic), using fall bottom trawl data (27–73 m) in the western main basin of Lake Huron from 1976 to 2007. The mean depth of capture of the shallow and deep benthic guilds initially exhibited a trend toward capture in shallower water, switched to a trend toward capture in deeper water in 1991, and changed back to a trend toward capture in shallower water in 2001–2002. Species in the pelagic guild showed a similar pattern, but the initial change point occurred in 1981 for this guild. Individual species in these guilds showed variable patterns of depth distribution, but a feature common to all guilds and all pelagic and deep benthic species was a change to a trend toward capturing fish in shallower water that occurred nearly simultaneously (1999–2002). These common trends suggest that large-scale factors are affecting the habitat use of offshore demersal fish species in Lake Huron. The depth distributions of the three guilds have converged in recent years, indicating that the locations of suitable habitat for offshore demersal fishes may be changing. Our results indicate that the benthic ecology of the western main basin of Lake Huron is undergoing profound changes across a large spatial scale that are affecting the habitat use of offshore demersal fishes. We suggest that these changes are related to recent invasions of exotic species.

  1. A Killer Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In 1986, Lake Nyos, a volcanic lake in Cameroon, released a huge amount of carbon dioxide gas, killing over 1,700 people in the surrounding area. This case study, developed for use in a limnology or aquatic biology course, explores that event, introducing students to concepts relating to lake formation, thermal stratification, and dissolved gases.…

  2. Lake Layers: Stratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Chris; And Others

    This teacher guide and student workbook set contains two learning activities, designed for fifth through ninth grade students, that concentrate on lake stratification and water quality. In the activities students model the seasonal temperature changes that occur in temperate lakes and observe the resulting stratification of lake waters. Students…

  3. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This book contains lesson plans that provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into elementary subjects. The book is divided into three subject areas: (1) History, which includes the origins of the Great Lakes, Great Lakes people, and shipwrecks; (2) Social Studies, which covers government, acid rain as a…

  4. Great Lakes: Chemical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tenth Great Lakes Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society met to assess current Chemical Research activity in the Great Lakes Basin, and addressed to the various aspects of the theme, Chemistry of the Great Lakes. Research areas reviewed included watershed studies, atmospheric and aquatic studies, and sediment studies. (BT)

  5. Impact of El Niño events on pelagic fisheries in Peruvian waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ñiquen, Miguel; Bouchon, Marilú

    2004-03-01

    Using data from stock assesment surveys on pelagic resources during El Niño events of 1972/73, 1982/83, 1997/98, we analyze biological changes on pelagic ecosystems and pelagic fisheries during different stages of development of El Niño phenomenon: emergence, full, final and post-Niño. Results indicate changes in spatial distribution of resources, their concentration and size structure. In anchovy (Engraulis ringens) a decrease in biomass was observed, which was estimated at 1.2 million tons in September 1998, the lowest throughout the 1990s. This resource showed an asymmetric distribution towards the south of Peru. Other pelagic resources increased their biomass during or after Niño events, primarily sardine (Sardinops sagax), jack mackerel (Trachurus murphyi), pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), and longnose anchovy (Anchoa nasus). At the end of the El Niño phenomenon we found less productivity but more diversity in the pelagic ecosystem. During the 1997/98 El Niño, the diversity index (Manual de Ecologia, 1a Edition, Editorial Trillas, Mexico, 267pp) increased from 0.87 to 1.23-1.70. In both the emergence stage and fully developed stages of El Niño we found large numbers of sardine and longnose anchovy present simultaneously. Size structure of sardine, jack mackerel, and pacific mackerel showed an increase in juveniles. Anchovy during El Niño showed a single modal group composed of adults, but the post-Niño phase indicated an increase in juveniles with an average length of 6-7 cm. In El Niño conditions spawning among anchovy was low, but among sardine and pacific mackerel it was high. We observed, for the first time during full spawning, juvenile sardines with a total length of 18-20 cm. The anchovy spawning season during the post-Niño phase was considerably lengthened, from April to December 1998. Drastic change occurred in fisheries when monospecific fisheries, based on anchovy before El Niño, became multispecific fisheries based on sardine, jack

  6. Lake Effects: The Lake Superior Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beery, Tom; And Others

    This curriculum guide was launched in response to a need for Lake Superior-specific educational materials and contains lessons and activities that can be used to teach about Lake Superior. The lessons in this book are divided into four sections. Each of the first three sections has a background section that provides basic information about Lake…

  7. Roosevelt Regional Landfill Decision

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Petition Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-petition-database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Food web efficiency differs between humic and clear water lake communities in response to nutrients and light.

    PubMed

    Faithfull, C L; Mathisen, P; Wenzel, A; Bergström, A K; Vrede, T

    2015-03-01

    This study demonstrates that clear and humic freshwater pelagic communities respond differently to the same environmental stressors, i.e. nutrient and light availability. Thus, effects on humic communities cannot be generalized from existing knowledge about these environmental stressors on clear water communities. Small humic lakes are the most numerous type of lake in the boreal zone, but little is known about how these lakes will respond to increased inflows of nutrients and terrestrial dissolved organic C (t-DOC) due to climate change and increased human impacts. Therefore, we compared the effects of nutrient addition and light availability on pelagic humic and clear water lake communities in a mesocosm experiment. When nutrients were added, phytoplankton production (PPr) increased in both communities, but pelagic energy mobilization (PEM) and bacterial production (BP) only increased in the humic community. At low light conditions, the addition of nutrients led to increased PPr only in the humic community, suggesting that, in contrast to the clear water community, humic phytoplankton were already adapted to lower ambient light levels. Low light significantly reduced PPr and PEM in the clear water community, but without reducing total zooplankton production, which resulted in a doubling of food web efficiency (FWE = total zooplankton production/PEM). However, total zooplankton production was not correlated with PEM, PPr, BP, PPr:BP or C:nutrient stoichiometry for either community type. Therefore, other factors such as food chain length, food quality, ultra-violet radiation or duration of the experiment, must have determined total zooplankton production and ultimately FWE.

  9. Metabolic and physiochemical responses to a whole-lake experimental increase in dissolved organic carbon in a north-temperate lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zwart, Jacob A.; Craig, Nicola; Kelly, Patrick T.; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Solomon, Christopher T.; Weidel, Brian C.; Jones, Stuart E.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last several decades, many lakes globally have increased in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), calling into question how lake functions may respond to increasing DOC. Unfortunately, our basis for making predictions is limited to spatial surveys, modeling, and laboratory experiments, which may not accurately capture important whole-ecosystem processes. In this article, we present data on metabolic and physiochemical responses of a multiyear experimental whole-lake increase in DOC concentration. Unexpectedly, we observed an increase in pelagic gross primary production, likely due to a small increase in phosphorus as well as a surprising lack of change in epilimnetic light climate. We also speculate on the importance of lake size modifying the relationship between light climate and elevated DOC. A larger increase in ecosystem respiration resulted in an increased heterotrophy for the treatment basin. The magnitude of the increase in heterotrophy was extremely close to the excess DOC load to the treatment basin, indicating that changes in heterotrophy may be predictable if allochthonous carbon loads are well-constrained. Elevated DOC concentration also reduced thermocline and mixed layer depth and reduced whole-lake temperature. Results from this experiment were quantitatively different, and sometimes even in the opposite direction, from expectations based on cross-system surveys and bottle experiments, emphasizing the importance of whole-ecosystem experiments in understanding ecosystem response to environmental change.

  10. The trophodynamics of PCBs in the Lake Ontario food web

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T.L.; Metcalfe, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    Samples of water, sediment, invertebrates, fish, and herring gull eggs were collected in north-central Lake Ontario and were analyzed to determine the concentrations of PCBs, including non-ortho substituted PCB congeners, in the benthic and pelagic components of the Lake Ontario food web. There was biomagnification of PCBs in the food web from benthic and planktonic invertebrates through to lake trout and gulls. However, all of the fish species had about the same lipid-normalized concentrations of PCBs. The relative proportions of the PCB congeners changed as they passed through the food web. An index of metabolism for each PCB congener was calculated by comparing the concentrations of PCB congeners in various predator/prey groupings within the food web. These data indicate that invertebrates, fish and gulls have different capabilities in metabolizing and eliminating specific PCB congeners. While tri and tetrachlorinated congeners with no chlorine substitution at meta-para carbons on the biphenyl ring were readily metabolized by all taxa, only gulls appeared to be capable of metabolizing the PCBs with no chlorine substitution at ortho-meta positions. The trophodynamics of nonortho substituted (coplanar) PCBs did not differ from other PCB congeners of similar chlorine number, which indicates that non-ortho congeners are not any more persistent in biota than other PCBs.

  11. Hazardous crater lakes studied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Minoru

    Crater lakes usually sit on top of volcanic conduits and act as condensers of magmatic vapor. Studies of crater lakes can therefore provide information on both deep magmatic activity and variations in the degassing state of a shallow magmatic body. The Lake Nyos gas disaster of August 1986 and a similar event in August 1984 at Lake Monoun, both in Cameroon, resulted from the accumulation of magmatic CO2 in the bottom layers of the lakes. Geochemical monitoring of crater lakes is a promising tool for forecasting not only limnic but also volcanic eruptions. Acid-mineralized waters formed by condensation of hot magmatic volatiles in crater lakes are thought to bear some resemblance to hydrothermal fluids acting in the genesis of acid-sulfate alteration and Au-Cu-Ag mineralization of volcanic-hosted precious metal deposits.

  12. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Payne, N. Robert; Johnson, James E.; Bowen, Charles; Ebener, Mark P.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to restore lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Huron after their collapse in the 1940s were underway in the early 1970s with completion of the first round of lampricide applications in tributary streams and the stocking of several genotypes. We assess results of rehabilitation and establish a historical basis for comparison by quantifying the catch of spawning lake trout from Michigan waters in 1929-1932. Sixty-eight percent of this catch occurred in northern waters (MH-1) and most of the rest (15%) was from remote reefs in the middle of the main basin. Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) increased in the early 1980s in the main basin and depressed spawning populations of lake trout. This increase was especially severe in northern waters and appeared to be associated with untreated populations in the St. Marys River. Excessive commercial fishing stemming from unresolved treaty rights also contributed to loss of spawning fish in northern Michigan waters. Seneca-strain lake trout did not appear to be attacked by sea lampreys until they reached a size > 532 mm. At sizes > 632 mm, Seneca trout were 40-fold more abundant than the Marquette strain in matched-planting experiments. Natural reproduction past the fry stage has occurred in Thunder Bay and South Bay, but prospects for self-sustaining populations of lake trout in the main basin are poor because sea lampreys are too abundant, only one side of the basin is stocked, and stocking is deferred to allow commercial gillnetting in areas where most of the spawning occurred historically. Backcross lake trout, a lake trout x splake (s. Fontinalis x s. Namaycush) hybrid, did not reproduce in Georgian Bay, but this genotype is being replaced with pure-strain lake trout, whose early performance appears promising.

  13. Source and trophic transfer of mercury in plankton from an ultraoligotrophic lacustrine system (Lake Nahuel Huapi, North Patagonia).

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Andrea; Arcagni, Marina; Campbell, Linda; Koron, Neža; Pavlin, Majda; Arribére, María A; Horvat, Milena; Guevara, Sergio Ribeiro

    2014-09-01

    The incorporation and trophic transfer of total and methyl mercury (THg, MeHg) were examined in three size classes of plankton (10-53, 53-200, and >200 μm size range) and a small planktivorous fish, Galaxias maculatus, from the large multi-branched Lake Nahuel Huapi (North Patagonia, Argentina). Three sites representing a large range of lake benthic-pelagic structures (based on depth and shoreline characteristics) and precipitation regimes were sampled. Nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ(15)N, δ(13)C) were analyzed to assess Hg trophodynamics. Selenium concentrations were determined together with THg in order to consider its potential effect on Hg trophodynamics. High THg concentrations (0.1-255 µg g(-1) dry weight (DW)) were measured in plankton, largely in inorganic form (MeHg: 3-29 ng g(-1) DW, 0.02-7% of THg, in the two larger size classes). A trend of increasing THg concentrations, varying in two to three orders of magnitude, with decreasing plankton size was associated with precipitation measured prior to each sampling event. Passive adsorption of dissolved Hg(2+) from wet deposition and runoff is considered to be the principal Hg uptake mechanism at the base of the pelagic food web. Despite the initially high THg uptake in the smaller plankton classes, the transfer to G. maculatus, and consequently to the entire food web, is likely limited due to low proportion of MeHg to THg in plankton. Furthermore, evidence of G. maculatus with benthic feeding habits having higher impact on MeHg trophic transfer compared to the same species with more pelagic (e.g., zooplankton) feeding habits, was observed. Although there is a high THg uptake in plankton, limited amounts are incorporated in the entire food web from the pelagic compartment.

  14. Modern state of the pelagic ecosystem of the Large Aral Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arashkevich, E. G.; Nikishina, A. B.; Soloviev, K. A.; Zhitina, L. S.; Sergeeva, V. M.

    2009-04-01

    During the last five decades, zooplankton of the Aral Sea has been undergoing dramatic changes. Mineralization in the western Large Aral increased from 10 ppt in 1960 to 116 ppt and 211 ppt in the western and eastern basins, correspondingly, in 2008. Concurrently the crucial changes have been occurring in zooplankton community manifesting in the disappearance of most native species and significant decline of biodiversity of the pelagic community. During this period, the number of phytoplankton species dropped more than in order of magnitude. In June 2008, only 29 species were identified in the western basin of Aral Sea, Bacillariophyta - 17 species, Chlorophyta - 5 species, Cryptophyta, Dinophyta, and Cyanophyta - 2 species of each division, and one species of Flagellatae. The average concentration of phytoplankton in terms of number was 2.3*106 cells l-1, in terms of biomass 231 µg C l-1. In the eastern basin, 14 species of Bacillariophyta were found; the dominant species were Amphora coffeaeformis, Fragilaria brevistriata, and Navicula spp. Chlorophyta was presented by only unidentified species. The total number of phytoplankton was 0.9*106 cells l-1, biomass was 93 µg C l-1. Composition of phytoplankton community changed depending on the site and depth. In the eastern basin, where mineralization reached 211 ppt, the community was dominated by diatoms and green algae while in the western basin, with mineralization of 119 ppt, all divisions of algae were presented. The vertical distribution of phytoplankton reflected the light and temperature preferences of the different groups. Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta, and Cryptophyta peaked at the 20 m depth with the temperature of about of 2°C and low irradiation. Warm-water and light-requiring Cyanophyta inhabited mainly the upper 5-m layer. The number of zooplankton species decreased from 42 species in 1971 to 1 species, the brine shrimp Artemia parthenogenetica, in 2008. Artemia, a typical resident of hypersaline

  15. Salting our freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Hilary A; Bartlett, Sarah L; Burke, Samantha M; Doubek, Jonathan P; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E; Skaff, Nicholas K; Summers, Jamie C; Farrell, Kaitlin J; McCullough, Ian M; Morales-Williams, Ana M; Roberts, Derek C; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2017-04-10

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L(-1)), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue.

  16. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Boezaart, Arnold; Edmonson, James; Standridge, Charles; Pervez, Nahid; Desai, Neel; Williams, Bruce; Clark, Aaron; Zeitler, David; Kendall, Scott; Biddanda, Bopi; Steinman, Alan; Klatt, Brian; Gehring, J. L.; Walter, K.; Nordman, Erik E.

    2014-06-30

    project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in

  17. Larval assemblages of large and medium-sized pelagic species in the Straits of Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, David E.; Llopiz, Joel K.; Guigand, Cedric M.; Cowen, Robert K.

    2010-07-01

    Critical gaps in our understanding of the distributions, interactions, life histories and preferred habitats of large and medium-size pelagic fishes severely constrain the implementation of ecosystem-based, spatially structured fisheries management approaches. In particular, spawning distributions and the environmental characteristics associated with the early life stages are poorly documented. In this study, we consider the diversity, assemblages, and associated habitat of the larvae of large and medium-sized pelagic species collected during 2 years of monthly surveys across the Straits of Florida. In total, 36 taxa and 14,295 individuals were collected, with the highest diversity occurring during the summer and in the western, frontal region of the Florida Current. Only a few species (e.g. Thunnus obesus, T. alalunga, Tetrapturus pfluegeri) considered for this study were absent. Small scombrids (e.g. T. atlanticus, Katsuwonus pelamis, Auxis spp.) and gempylids dominated the catch and were orders of magnitude more abundant than many of the rare species (e.g. Thunnus thynnus,Kajikia albida). Both constrained (CCA) and unconstrained (NMDS) multivariate analyses revealed a number of species groupings including: (1) a summer Florida edge assemblage (e.g. Auxis spp., Euthynnus alleterattus, Istiophorus platypterus); (2) a summer offshore assemblage (e.g. Makaira nigricans, T. atlanticus, Ruvettus pretiosus, Lampris guttatus); (3) an ubiquitous assemblage (e.g. K. pelamis, Coryphaena hippurus, Xiphias gladius); and (4) a spring/winter assemblage that was widely dispersed in space (e.g. trachipterids). The primary environmental factors associated with these assemblages were sea-surface temperature (highest in summer-early fall), day length (highest in early summer), thermocline depth (shallowest on the Florida side) and fluorescence (highest on the Florida side). Overall, the results of this study provide insights into how a remarkable diversity of pelagic species

  18. Internal waves and modern and ancient hiatuses in pelagic caps of Pacific guyots and seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Neil; Simmons, Harper; Lear, Carrie

    2013-04-01

    Locations of recent non-deposition and ancient hiatuses in the pelagic caps of guyots and seamounts are compared with paleotemperature and physiographic information to speculate on the character of internal tidal waves in the upper Pacific Ocean through the Cenozoic. Internal tidal waves are generated where the ocean barotropic tide passes over the Hawaiian and other major ridges in the Pacific basin. Drill core and geophysical evidence for sediment accumulation, non-deposition or erosion are used to classify broadly sites as either accumulating or eroding/non-depositing in the recent geological past. When these classified sites are compared against results of a numerical model of the internal tide field (Simmons, Ocean Mod. 2008), the sites accumulating particles over the past few million years are all found to lie away from beams of the modeled internal tide, while those that have not been accumulating are in areas of high internal wave energy. Given the correspondence to modern internal wave conditions, we examine whether internal tides can explain ancient hiatuses at the drill sites. For example, Late Cenozoic pelagic caps on guyots among the Marshall Islands contain two hiatuses of broadly similar age, but the dates of the first pelagic sediments deposited following each hiatus do not correlate between guyots, suggesting that they originate not from universal factors (e.g., water chemistry) but local, probably physical factors, such as internal tides. We investigate how changing boundary conditions such as ocean temperature and basin physiography may have affected the geometry and vigour of internal tides through the Cenozoic. Changes in the geometry of ridges underlying the Solomon, Bonin and Marianas Island chains caused by plate tectonics and subsidence may be responsible for sediment hiatuses at these far-field guyot sites.

  19. Internal waves and modern and ancient hiatuses in pelagic caps of Pacific guyots and seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, N. C.; Simmons, H. L.; Lear, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    Locations of recent non-deposition and ancient hiatuses in the pelagic caps of guyots and seamounts are compared with paleotemperature and physiographic information to speculate on the character of internal tidal waves in the upper Pacific Ocean through the Cenozoic. Internal tidal waves are generated where the ocean barotopic tide passes over the Hawaiian and other major ridges in the Pacific basin. Drill core and geophysical evidence for sediment accumulation, non-deposition or erosion are used to classify broadly sites as either accumulating or eroding/non-depositing in the recent geological past. When these classified sites are compared against results of a numerical model of the internal tide field (Simmons, Ocean Mod. 2008), the sites accumulating particles over the past few million years are all found to lie away from beams of the modeled internal tide, while those that have not been accumulating are in areas of high internal wave energy. Given the correspondence to modern internal wave conditions, we examine whether internal tides can explain ancient hiatuses at the drill sites. For example, Late Cenozoic pelagic caps on guyots among the Marshall Islands contain two hiatuses of broadly similar age, but the dates of the first pelagic sediments deposited following each hiatus do not correlate between guyots, suggesting that they originate not from universal factors (e.g., water chemistry) but local, probably physical factors, such as internal tides. We investigate how changing boundary conditions such as ocean temperature and basin physiography may have affected the geometry and vigour of internal tides through the Cenozoic. Changes in the geometry of ridges underlying the Solomon, Bonin and Marianas Island chains caused by plate tectonics and subsidence may be responsible for sediment hiatuses at these far-field guyot sites.

  20. Distal deltaic deposits document hydrological variability during the past 30 kyrBP in Lake Towuti, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Hendrik; Russell, James M.; Yudawati Cahyarini, Sri; Bijaksana, Satria; Wattrus, Nigel; Rethemeyer, Janet; Melles, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Lake Towuti (2.75°S, 121.5°E; 318 m a.s.l.) is a, 560 km2, 200-m deep tectonic lake at the downstream end of the Malili lake system, a set of five, ancient (1-2 MYr) tectonic lakes in central Sulawesi, Indonesia. The Mahalona River constitutes the largest tributary and connects Lake Towuti with the two upstream lakes Matano and Mahalona. The Mahalona River Delta is prograding into the >200m deep northern basin of Lake Towuti. Tracing past variability of Mahalona River discharge is therefore an important puzzle piece for the understanding of depositional dynamics in Lake Towuti as well as catchment hydrology and hydrological connectivity between the Malili Lakes. Distal deltaic deposits can help identifying past variability in river discharge and delta dynamics. Using highly resolved seismic reflection data collected between 2007-2013 we identified a stack of acoustically laminated reflections in Towuti's extensive and morphologically flat deep northern basin. For detailed characterization of these acoustic features we collected a c. 20m long piston core from the basin centre at 200 m water depth reaching back to c. 30 kyrBP. Sediments in this piston core consist to 75% of mass wasting deposits (MWD) of variable thickness that are intercalated with pelagic muds (25%). MWD appear mostly homogenous (silt- to finesand-sized siliciclastics with high amounts of terrestrial plant macrofossils) with only thin (1-3 cm) basal sand layers and clay caps (<1 cm). Pelagic muds appear as thin to medium bedded slightly silty clays that are clearly distinguishable from MWD. The position of MWD identified in our piston core nicely correlates with acoustically laminated reflections identified in seismic profiles crossing the coring site. Based on these combined sedimentological and acoustic datasets we interpret MWD in Towuti's northern basin as distal deltaic deposits originating from the Mahalona River Delta. Frequencies and percentages (in terms of lithofacies contribution) of

  1. Characterizing driver-response relationships in marine pelagic ecosystems for improved ocean management.

    PubMed

    Hunsicker, Mary E; Kappel, Carrie V; Selkoe, Kimberly A; Halpern, Benjamin S; Scarborough, Courtney; Mease, Lindley; Amrhein, Alisan

    2016-04-01

    Scientists and resource managers often use methods and tools that assume ecosystem components respond linearly to environmental drivers and human stressors. However, a growing body of literature demonstrates that many relationships are-non-linear, where small changes in a driver prompt a disproportionately large ecological response. We aim to provide a comprehensive assessment of the relationships between drivers and ecosystem components to identify where and when non-linearities are likely to occur. We focused our analyses on one of the best-studied marine systems, pelagic ecosystems, which allowed us to apply robust statistical techniques on a large pool of previously published studies. In this synthesis, we (1) conduct a wide literature review on single driver-response relationships in pelagic systems, (2) use statistical models to identify the degree of non-linearity in these relationships, and (3) assess whether general patterns exist in the strengths and shapes of non-linear relationships across drivers. Overall we found that non-linearities are common in pelagic ecosystems, comprising at least 52% of all driver-response relation- ships. This is likely an underestimate, as papers with higher quality data and analytical approaches reported non-linear relationships at a higher frequency (on average 11% more). Consequently, in the absence of evidence for a linear relationship, it is safer to assume a relationship is non-linear. Strong non-linearities can lead to greater ecological and socioeconomic consequences if they are unknown (and/or unanticipated), but if known they may provide clear thresholds to inform management targets. In pelagic systems, strongly non-linear relationships are often driven by climate and trophodynamic variables but are also associated with local stressors, such as overfishing and pollution, that can be more easily controlled by managers. Even when marine resource managers cannot influence ecosystem change, they can use information

  2. Pelagic larval duration predicts extinction risk in a freshwater fish clade.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Morgan; Keck, Benjamin P; Ruble, Crystal; Petty, Melissa; Shute, J R; Rakes, Patrick; Hulsey, C Darrin

    2013-01-01

    Pelagic larval duration (PLD) can influence evolutionary processes ranging from dispersal to extinction in aquatic organisms. Using estimates of PLD obtained from species of North American darters (Percidae: Etheostomatinae), we demonstrate that this freshwater fish clade exhibits surprising variation in PLD. Comparative analyses provide some evidence that higher stream gradients favour the evolution of shorter PLD. Additionally, similar to patterns in the marine fossil record in which lower PLD is associated with greater extinction probability, we found a reduced PLD in darter lineages was evolutionarily associated with extinction risk. Understanding the causes and consequences of PLD length could lead to better management and conservation of organisms in our increasingly imperiled aquatic environments.

  3. Hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid-soluble and -insoluble fractions of pelagic sediment: Readsorption revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.; Wandless, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The extraction of the rare earth elements (REE) from deep-ocean pelagic sediment, using hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid, leads to the separation of approximately 70% of the bulk REE content into the soluble fraction and 30% into the insoluble fraction. The REE pattern of the soluble fraction, i.e., the content of REE normalized to average shale on an element-by-element basis and plotted against atomic number, resembles the pattern for seawater, whereas the pattern, as well as the absolute concentrations, in the insoluble fraction resembles the North American shale composite. These results preclude significant readsorption of the REE by the insoluble phases during the leaching procedure.

  4. Projecting future changes in distributions of pelagic fish species of Northeast Pacific shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, William W. L.; Brodeur, Richard D.; Okey, Thomas A.; Pauly, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Marine life is being affected by changes in ocean conditions resulting from changes in climate and chemistry triggered by combustion of fossil fuels. Shifting spatial distributions of fish species is a major observed and predicted impact of these oceanographic changes, and such shifts may modify fish community structure considerably in particular locations and regions. We projected future range shifts of pelagic marine fishes of the Northeast Pacific shelf seas by 2050 relative to the present. We combined published data, expert knowledge, and pelagic fish survey data to predict current species distribution ranges of 28 fish species of the Northeast Pacific shelf seas that occur in the epipelagic zone and are well-represented in pelagic fish surveys. These represent a wide spectrum of sub-tropical to sub-polar species, with a wide range of life history characteristics. Using projected ocean condition changes from three different Earth System Models, we simulated changes in the spatial distribution of each species. We show that Northeast Pacific shelf seas may undergo considerable changes in the structure of its pelagic marine communities by mid-21st century. Ensembles of model projections suggest that the distribution centroids of the studied species are expected to shift poleward at an average rate of 30.1 ± 2.34 (S.E.) km decade-1 under the SRES A2 scenario from 2000 to 2050. The projected species range shifts result in a high rate of range expansion of this group of species into the Gulf of Alaska and the Bering Sea. Rate of range contraction of these species is highest at the Aleutian Islands, and in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. We also predict increasing dominance of warmer water species in all regions. The projected changes in species assemblages may have large ecological and socio-economic implications through mismatches of co-evolved species, unexpected trophic effects, and shifts of fishing grounds. These results provide hypotheses of

  5. Nearshore Pelagic Microbial Community Abundance Affects Recruitment Success of Giant Kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Megan M.; Haggerty, John M.; Papudeshi, Bhavya N.; Vega, Alejandro A.; Edwards, Matthew S.; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Marine microbes mediate key ecological processes in kelp forest ecosystems and interact with macroalgae. Pelagic and biofilm-associated microbes interact with macroalgal propagules at multiple stages of recruitment, yet these interactions have not been described for Macrocystis pyrifera. Here we investigate the influence of microbes from coastal environments on recruitment of giant kelp, M. pyrifera. Through repeated laboratory experiments, we tested the effects of altered pelagic microbial abundance on the settlement and development of the microscopic propagules of M. pyrifera during recruitment. M. pyrifera zoospores were reared in laboratory microcosms exposed to environmental microbial communities from seawater during the complete haploid stages of the kelp recruitment cycle, including zoospore release, followed by zoospore settlement, to gametophyte germination and development. We altered the microbial abundance states differentially in three independent experiments with repeated trials, where microbes were (a) present or absent in seawater, (b) altered in community composition, and (c) altered in abundance. Within the third experiment, we also tested the effect of nearshore versus offshore microbial communities on the macroalgal propagules. Distinct pelagic microbial communities were collected from two southern California temperate environments reflecting contrasting intensity of human influence, the nearshore Point Loma kelp forest and the offshore Santa Catalina Island kelp forest. The Point Loma kelp forest is a high impacted coastal region adjacent to the populous San Diego Bay; whereas the kelp forest at Catalina Island is a low impacted region of the Channel Islands, 40 km offshore the southern California coast, and is adjacent to a marine protected area. Kelp gametophytes reared with nearshore Point Loma microbes showed lower survival, growth, and deteriorated morphology compared to gametophytes with the offshore Catalina Island microbial community

  6. Benthic-Pelagic Coupling in Biogeochemical and Climate Models: Existing Approaches, Recent developments and Roadblocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediments are key components in the Earth System. They host the largest carbon reservoir on Earth, provide the only long term sink for atmospheric CO2, recycle nutrients and represent the most important climate archive. Biogeochemical processes in marine sediments are thus essential for our understanding of the global biogeochemical cycles and climate. They are first and foremost, donor controlled and, thus, driven by the rain of particulate material from the euphotic zone and influenced by the overlying bottom water. Geochemical species may undergo several recycling loops (e.g. authigenic mineral precipitation/dissolution) before they are either buried or diffuse back to the water column. The tightly coupled and complex pelagic and benthic process interplay thus delays recycling flux, significantly modifies the depositional signal and controls the long-term removal of carbon from the ocean-atmosphere system. Despite the importance of this mutual interaction, coupled regional/global biogeochemical models and (paleo)climate models, which are designed to assess and quantify the transformations and fluxes of carbon and nutrients and evaluate their response to past and future perturbations of the climate system either completely neglect marine sediments or incorporate a highly simplified representation of benthic processes. On the other end of the spectrum, coupled, multi-component state-of-the-art early diagenetic models have been successfully developed and applied over the past decades to reproduce observations and quantify sediment-water exchange fluxes, but cannot easily be coupled to pelagic models. The primary constraint here is the high computation cost of simulating all of the essential redox and equilibrium reactions within marine sediments that control carbon burial and benthic recycling fluxes: a barrier that is easily exacerbated if a variety of benthic environments are to be spatially resolved. This presentation provides an integrative overview of

  7. Sea surface thermal structure associated to the small pelagic fish resources distribution in Central Chile

    SciTech Connect

    Yanez, E.; Barbieri, M.A.; Catasti, V.

    1997-06-01

    A survey study was conducted to assess the possibility of introducing the use of sea surface temperatures (SST), obtained from NOAA satellite data, for the small pelagic fisheries resources in Central Chile. Relationships between species yields and thermics gradients (GRT) were found significant. Jack mackerel (Trachuru murphyi) yields were largely related with a strong thermal gradient next to oceanic waters, while anchovy (Engraulis ringens) and common sardine (Clupea bentincki) yields were mainly associated to the development of coastal upwelling events. It is concluded that the use of SST-NOAA images can play an important role in fleet operations, particularly in the case of the kind of boats considered in this paper.

  8. 9. GRANT LAKE AND MONO LAKE IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GRANT LAKE AND MONO LAKE IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. In-lake Modeling Recommendation Report for Lake Champlain TMDL

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report describes the recommended modeling approach for the in-lake modeling component of the Lake Champlain TMDL project. The report was prepared by Tetra Tech, with input from the Lake Champlain modeling workgroup. (TetraTech, 2012b)

  10. View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ridge showing spillway at photo center, view southwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  11. Laurentian Great Lakes phytoplankton and their water quality characteristics, including a diatom-based model for paleoreconstruction of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Reavie, Euan D; Heathcote, Adam J; Shaw Chraïbi, Victoria L

    2014-01-01

    Recent shifts in water quality and food web characteristics driven by anthropogenic impacts on the Laurentian Great Lakes warranted an examination of pelagic primary producers as tracers of environmental change. The distributions of the 263 common phytoplankton taxa were related to water quality variables to determine taxon-specific responses that may be useful in indicator models. A detailed checklist of taxa and their environmental optima are provided. Multivariate analyses indicated a strong relationship between total phosphorus (TP) and patterns in the diatom assemblages across the Great Lakes. Of the 118 common diatom taxa, 90 (76%) had a directional response along the TP gradient. We further evaluated a diatom-based transfer function for TP based on the weighted-average abundance of taxa, assuming unimodal distributions along the TP gradient. The r(2) between observed and inferred TP in the training dataset was 0.79. Substantial spatial and environmental autocorrelation within the training set of samples justified the need for further model validation. A randomization procedure indicated that the actual transfer function consistently performed better than functions based on reshuffled environmental data. Further, TP was minimally confounded by other environmental variables, as indicated by the relatively large amount of unique variance in the diatoms explained by TP. We demonstrated the effectiveness of the transfer function by hindcasting TP concentrations using fossil diatom assemblages in a Lake Superior sediment core. Passive, multivariate analysis of the fossil samples against the training set indicated that phosphorus was a strong determinant of historical diatom assemblages, verifying that the transfer function was suited to reconstruct past TP in Lake Superior. Collectively, these results showed that phytoplankton coefficients for water quality can be robust indicators of Great Lakes pelagic condition. The diatom-based transfer function can be used in

  12. Sources and flux of natural gases from Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G.; Whiticar, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The ability to identify a formation mechanism for natural gas in a particular environment requires consideration of several geochemical factors when there are multiple sources present. Four primary sources of methane have been identified in Mono Lake. Two of these sources were associated with numerous natural gas seeps which occur at various locations in the lake and extend beyond its present boundary; the two other gas sources result from current microbiological processes. In the natural gas seeps, we observed flow rates as high as 160 moles CH4 day-1, and estimate total lakewide annual seep flux to be 2.1 ?? 106 moles CH4. Geochemical parameters (??13CH4,??DCH4,CH4/[C2H6+ C3H8]) and ??14CH4measurements revealed that most of the seeps originate from a paleo-biogenic (??13CH4 = about -70%.). natural gas deposit of Pleistocene age which underlies the current and former lakebed. Gas seeps in the vicinity of hot springs had, in combination with the biogenic gas, a prominent thermogenic gas component resulting from hydrothermal alteration of buried organic matter. Current microbiological processes responsible for sources of natural gas in the lake included pelagic meth- anogenesis and decomposition of terrestrial grasses in the littoral zone. Methanogenesis in the pelagic sediments resulted in methane saturation (2-3 mM at 50 cm; ??13CH4 = about -85%.). Interstitial sulfate decreased from 133 mM at the surface to 35 mM by 110 cm depth, indicating that sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis operated concurrently. Methane diffused out of the sediments resulting in concentrations of about 50 ??M in the anoxic bottom waters. Methane oxidation in the oxic/anoxic boundry lowered the concentration by >98%, but values in surface waters (0.1-1.3??M) were supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere. The ??13CH4 (range = -21.8 to -71.8%.) of this unoxidized residual methane was enriched in 13C relative to methane in the bottom water and sediments. Average outward flux of this

  13. Assessment of groundwater/surface-water interaction and simulation of potential streamflow depletion induced by groundwater withdrawal, Uinta River near Roosevelt, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, P.M.; Marston, T.; Kimball, B.A.; Stolp, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    Roosevelt City, Utah, asserts a need for an additional supply of water to meet municipal demands and has identified a potential location for additional groundwater development at the Sprouse well field near the West Channel of the Uinta River. Groundwater is commonly hydraulically linked to surface water and, under some conditions, the pumpage of groundwater can deplete water in streams and other water bodies. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Roosevelt City, the Utah Department of Natural Resources, and the Ute Indian Tribe, began a study to improve understanding of the local interconnection between groundwater and surface water and to assess the potential for streamflow depletion from future groundwater withdrawals at a potential Roosevelt City development location-the Sprouse well field near the West Channel of the Uinta River. In the study, streamflow gains and losses at the river/aquifer boundary near the well field and changes in those conditions over time were assessed through (1) synoptic measurement of discharge in the stream at multiple sites using tracer-dilution methods, (2) periodic measurement of the vertical hydraulic gradient across the streambed, and (3) continuous measurement of stream and streambed water temperature using heat as a tracer of flow across the streambed. Although some contradictions among the results of the three assessment methods were observed, results of the approaches generally indicated (1) losing streamflow conditions on the West Channel of the Uinta River north of and upstream from the Sprouse well field within the study area, (2) gaining streamflow conditions south of and downstream from the well field, and (3) some seasonal changes in those conditions that correspond with seasonal changes in stream stage and local water-table altitudes. A numerical groundwater flow model was developed on the basis of previously reported observations and observations made during this study, and was used to estimate

  14. Origins of rainbow smelt in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.

    1983-01-01

    The first rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) to enter Lake Ontario were probably migrants from an anadromous strain introduced into New York's Finger Lakes. Since the upper Great Lakes were originally stocked with a landlocked strain from Green Lake, Maine, subsequent migration to Lake Ontario from Lake Erie makes Lake Ontario unique among the Great Lakes in probably having received introductions from two distinct populations.

  15. Speciation in ancient lakes.

    PubMed

    Martens, K

    1997-05-01

    About a dozen lakes in the world are up to three orders of magnitude older than most others. Lakes Tanganyika (East Africa) and Baikal (Siberia) have probably existed in some form for 12-20 million years, maybe more. Such lakes can have different origins, sizes, shapes, depths and limnologies, but, in contrast to short-lived (mostly post-glacial) lakes, they have exceptionally high faunal diversity and levels of endemicity. A multitude of and processes accounting for these explosive radiations have recently been documented, most of them based on particular groups in certain lakes, but comparative research can detect repeated patterns. No special speciafion mechanism, exclusive to ancient lakes has been demonstrated, although cases of ultra-rapid speciation have been documented. Extant diversity results not by simple accumulation, but by a complex process of immigration, speciation and extinction.

  16. Hydrology of Indiana lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perrey, Joseph Irving; Corbett, Don Melvin

    1956-01-01

    The stabilization of lake levels often requires the construction of outlet control structures. A detailed study of past lake-level elevations and other hydologic date is necessary to establish a level that can be maintained and to determine the means necessary for maintaining the established level. Detailed lake-level records for 28 lakes are included in the report, and records for over 100 other lakes data are available in the U.S. Geological Survey Office, Indianapolis, Ind. Evaporation data from the four Class A evaporation station of the U. S. Weather Bureau have been compiled in this report. A table showing the established legal lake level and related data is included.

  17. Fluctuation history of Great Salt Lake, Utah, during the last 13,000 years, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchison, Stuart B.

    1989-01-01

    Great Salt Lake level fluctuations from 13,000 yr B.P. to the present were interpreted by examination of shoreline geomorphic features, shoreline deposits, archeologic sites, isotopic data, and palynologic data. After the conclusion of the Bonneville paleolake cycle, between 13,000 and 12,000 yr B.P. the lake regressed to levels low enough to deposit a littoral oxidized red bed stratum and a pelagic Glauber's salt layer. A late Pleistocene lake cycle occurred between 12,000 and 10,000 yr B.P. depositing several beaches, the highest reaching an altitude of about 4250 ft (1295.3 m). The lake regressed after 10,000 yr B.P., only to rise to 4230 ft (1289.2 m) between 9700 and 9400 yr B.P. and then gradually lower at least 15 ft (4.5 m) or more. Lake levels fluctuated between 4212 and 4180 ft (1284 and 1274 m) for the next 4000 years. A late Holocene lake cycle, constrained by radiocarbon ages between 3440 and 1400 yr B.P., is reported at a highest static level of 4221 ft (1286.5 m). After a lake level drop to altitudes ranging between 4210 and 4205 ft (1283.2 and 1281.6 m), a 4217 ft (1285.7 m) level was reached after 400 yr B.P. This level lowered to 4214 ft (1284.4 m) in the mid to late 1700 s A.D. The lake levels have since stabilized aroung a 4200 ft (1280 m) mean.

  18. Ecological factors affecting Rainbow Smelt recruitment in the main basin of Lake Huron, 1976-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, Timothy P.; Taylor, William W.; Roseman, Edward F.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Riley, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax are native to northeastern Atlantic and Pacific–Arctic drainages and have been widely introduced throughout North America. In the Great Lakes region, Rainbow Smelt are known predators and competitors of native fish and a primary prey species in pelagic food webs. Despite their widespread distribution, importance as a prey species, and potential to negatively interact with native fish species, there is limited information concerning stock–recruitment relationships for Rainbow Smelt. To better understand recruitment mechanisms, we evaluated potential ecological factors determining recruitment dynamics for Rainbow Smelt in Lake Huron using data from bottom trawl catches. We specifically evaluated influence of stock size, environmental factors (water temperature, lake levels, and precipitation), and salmonine predation on the production of age-0 recruits from 1976 to 2010. Rainbow Smelt recruitment was negatively related to stock size exceeding 10 kg/ha, indicating that compensatory, density-dependent mortality from cannibalism or intraspecific competition was an important factor related to the production of age-0 recruits. Recruitment was positively related to spring precipitation suggesting that the amount of stream-spawning habitat as determined by precipitation was important for the production of strong Rainbow Smelt recruitment. Additionally, density of age-0 Rainbow Smelt was positively related to Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush abundance. However, spawning stock biomass of Rainbow Smelt, which declined substantially from 1989 to 2010, was negatively associated with Lake Trout catch per effort suggesting predation was an important factor related to the decline of age-2 and older Rainbow Smelt in Lake Huron. As such, we found that recruitment of Rainbow Smelt in Lake Huron was regulated by competition with or cannibalism by older conspecifics, spring precipitation influencing stream spawning habitats, and predation by Lake Trout on

  19. Status of rainbow smelt in U.S. waters of Lake Ontario, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weidel, Brian C.; Connerton, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax are the second most abundant pelagic prey fish in Lake Ontario. The abundance and weight indices for Lake Ontario age-1 and older rainbow smelt declined in 2011 and represented a 64% and 54% decrease respectively from 2010 levels. Length frequency-based age analysis indicated that age-1 rainbow smelt constituted 44% of the estimated population however age 1 abundance was 72% lower than age 1 abundance in 2010 and was 50% lower than the 10 year average age 1 abundance. Proportionally, large rainbow smelt (≥150 mm), were more common in 2011, making up approximately 7% of the population, substantially higher than the 10 year average of 2%. Based on the most recent time series data, rainbow smelt abundance peaks appear to follow a 4-5 year cycle.

  20. Status of rainbow smelt in the U.S. waters of Lake Ontario, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weidel, Brian C.; Connerton, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax are the second most abundant pelagic prey fish in Lake Ontario. The abundance and weight indices for Lake Ontario age-1 and older rainbow smelt declined in 201l and represented a 64% and 54% decrease respectively from 2010 levels. Length frequency-based age analysis indicated that age-1 rainbow smelt constituted 44% of the estimated population however age 1 abundance was 72% lower than age 1 abundance in 2010 and was 50% lower than the 10 year average age 1 abundance. Proportionally, large rainbow smelt (≥150 mm), were more common in 2011, making up approximately 7% of the population, substantially higher than the 10 year average of 2%. Based on the most recent time series data, rainbow smelt abundance peaks appear to follow a 4-5 year cycle.