Science.gov

Sample records for lakes waters radiation

  1. Vertical distribution of radiation dose rates in the water of a brackish lake in Aomori Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Iyogi, Takashi; Ueda, Shinji; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2015-11-01

    Seasonal radiation dose rates were measured with glass dosemeters housed in watertight cases at various depths in the water of Lake Obuchi, a brackish lake in Aomori Prefecture, Japan, during fiscal years 2011-2013 to assess the background external radiation dose to aquatic biota in the lake. The mean radiation dose in the surface water of the lake was found to be 27 nGy h(-1), which is almost the same as the absorption dose rate due to cosmic ray reported in the literature. Radiation dose rates decreased exponentially with water depth down to a depth of 1 m above the bottom sediment. In the water near the sediment, the dose rate increased with depth owing to the emission of γ-rays from natural radionuclides in the sediment.

  2. Ultraviolet radiation affects invasibility of lake ecosystems by warm-water fish.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Andrew J; Williamson, Craig E; Rose, Kevin C; Oris, James T; Connelly, Sandra J; Olson, Mark H; Mitchell, David L

    2010-03-01

    Predicting where species invasions will occur remains a substantial challenge in ecology, but identifying factors that ultimately constrain the distribution of potential invaders could facilitate successful prediction. Whereas ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is recognized as an important factor controlling species distribution and community composition, the role of UVR in a habitat invasibility context has not been explored. Here we examine how underwater UVR can regulate warm-water fish invasion. In Lake Tahoe, California and Nevada, USA, established populations of exotic bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) are currently limited to turbid, low-UVR embayments. An in situ incubation experiment that manipulated incident UVR exposure of larval bluegill, combined with an assessment of UVR exposure levels in nearshore habitats around Lake Tahoe, demonstrates that UVR can mediate habitat invasibility. Our findings suggest that the susceptibility to invasion by UVR sensitive species may increase in transparent aquatic systems threatened by declining water quality, and they highlight the importance of abiotic factors as regulators of invasion risk in ecosystems.

  3. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, F.L.; Wells, F.C.; Shelby, W.J.; McPherson, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Lake Austin and Town Lake are impoundments on the Colorado River in Travis County, central Texas, and are a source of water for municipal industrial water supplies, electrical-power generation, and recreation for more than 500,000 people in the Austin metropolitan area. Small vertical temperature variations in both lakes were attributed to shallow depths in the lakes and short retention times of water in the lakes during the summer months. The largest areal variations in dissolved oxygen generally occur in Lake Austin during the summer as a result of releases of water from below the thermocline in Lake Travis. Except for iron, manganese, and mercury, dissolved concentrations of trace elements in water collected from Lake Austin and Town Lake did not exceed the primary or secondary drinking water standards set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Little or no effect of stormwater runoff on temperature, dissolved oxygen, or minor elements could be detected in either Lake Austin or Town Lake. Little seasonal or areal variation was noted in nitrogen concentrations in Lake Austin or Town lake. Total phosphorus concentrations generally were small in both lakes. Increased concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were detected after storm runoff inflow in Town Lake, but not in Lake Austin; densities of fecal-coliform bacteria increased in Lake Austin and Town Lake, but were substantially greater in Town Lake than in Lake Austin. 18 refs., 38 figs., 59 tabs.

  4. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Freeman L.; Wells, Frank C.; Shelby, Wanda J.; McPherson, Emma

    1988-01-01

    Water-quality data collected from Lake Austin and Town Lake, following runoff, generally were not adequate to fully determine the effects of runoff on the lakes. Data collection should not to be limited to fixed-station sampling following runoff, and both lakes need to be sampled simultaneously as soon as possible following significant precipitation.

  5. Water quality in Lake Lanier

    SciTech Connect

    Callaham, M.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Thirteen water quality tests measuring five categories of pollution were conducted twice monthly from May, 1987 to April, 1990 at eight locations on Lake Sidney Lanier to establish baseline data and detect trends. Additionally, sediment and water samples were analyzed for ten toxic metals. Sampling stations were located at or near the point of entry of streams into the Lake. Oxygen demanding pollutants were highest in urban streams and phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations were highest in streams having poultry processing operations within their watersheds. Indicators of siltation increased coincidentally with highway construction in one watershed. Fecal coliform bacteria counts decreased at Flat Creek and increased in the Chattahoochee River. Zinc and copper occurred in water samples at levels of detectability. Sediment samples from several locations contained metal concentrations which warrant further study.

  6. Spirit Lake Water Resource Management NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit ND-0031101, Spirit Lake Water Resource Management is authorized to discharge to an unnamed intermittent tributary to Devils Lake which is tributary to Sheyenne River in North Dakota.

  7. Lake Tahoe Water Quality Improvement Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate, change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, list of partner agencies.

  8. Effects of Changes in Meteorological Conditions on Lake Evaporation, Water Temperature, and Heat Budget in a Deep Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yuji; Momii, Kazuro

    To reveal effects of changes in meteorological conditions on lake evaporation, water temperature, and heat budget in a deep lake, sensitivity analyses have been performed for Lake Ikeda, Kagoshima prefecture. In the study, the sensitivities of three aspects to the 10%-increased solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed were estimated based on numerical calculations for 1981-2005 with the verified one-dimensional mathematical model that computes thermal transfer in the lake. The results demonstrated that the meteorological component which gives the largest evaporation-promoting effect was solar radiation and the component which brings the largest lake-heating was air temperature. When solar radiation was increased, the vapor pressure difference between lake-surface and atmosphere was increased and the atmospheric stability was decreased, which present the desirable condition for evaporation. Air temperature being higher, the lake-surface was intensively heated by increased atmospheric radiation. As for the humidity case, lake evaporation was decreased in any season due to decrease in vapor pressure difference. Although rise in water temperature was caused by decrease in latent heat, it was inhibited with cooling by sensible heat. Wind being up, water temperature was fallen at the lake-surface and risen around the 20 m depth by vertical thermal mixing effect. The mixing effect prevented from releasing heat to atmosphere, resulting in the secondary large lake-heating but smaller than air temperature case.

  9. Lake water quality mapping from Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherz, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    In the project described remote sensing was used to check the quality of lake waters. The lakes of three Landsat scenes were mapped with the Bendix MDAS multispectral analysis system. From the MDAS color coded maps, the lake with the worst algae problem was easily located. The lake was closely checked, and the presence of 100 cows in the springs which fed the lake could be identified as the pollution source. The laboratory and field work involved in the lake classification project is described.

  10. Microbial Diversity in Water and Sediment of Lake Chaka, an Athalassohaline Lake in Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongchen; Dong, Hailiang; Zhang, Gengxin; Yu, Bingsong; Chapman, Leah R.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2006-01-01

    We employed culture-dependent and -independent techniques to study microbial diversity in Lake Chaka, a unique hypersaline lake (32.5% salinity) in northwest China. It is situated at 3,214 m above sea level in a dry climate. The average water depth is 2 to 3 cm. Halophilic isolates were obtained from the lake water, and halotolerant isolates were obtained from the shallow sediment. The isolates exhibited resistance to UV and gamma radiation. Microbial abundance in the sediments ranged from 108 cells/g at the water-sediment interface to 107 cells/g at a sediment depth of 42 cm. A major change in the bacterial community composition was observed across the interface. In the lake water, clone sequences affiliated with the Bacteroidetes were the most abundant, whereas in the sediments, sequences related to low G+C gram-positive bacteria were predominant. A similar change was also present in the archaeal community. While all archaeal clone sequences in the lake water belonged to the Halobacteriales, the majority of the sequences in the sediments were related to those previously obtained from methanogenic soils and sediments. The observed changes in the microbial community structure across the water-sediment interface were correlated with a decrease in salinity from the lake water (32.5%) to the sediments (approximately 4%). Across the interface, the redox state also changed from oxic to anoxic and may also have contributed to the observed shift in the microbial community. PMID:16751487

  11. Influence of lake morphology on water quality.

    PubMed

    Moses, Sheela A; Janaki, Letha; Joseph, Sabu; Justus, J; Vimala, Sheeja Ramakrishnan

    2011-11-01

    Lakes are seriously affected due to urban pollution. The study of the morphological features of a lake system helps to identify its environmental status. The objective of the present study is to analyse the influence of morphometry on water quality in a lake (Akkulam-Veli Lake, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala). The morphological features namely mean depth, surface area, volume, shoreline length, shoreline development and index of basin permanence have been evaluated. Correlation analysis has been conducted to determine the relationship between morphological features and water quality. Regression analysis has been conducted to find out the extent of influence of morphometric features on water quality. The study revealed that the lake is less affected by wind-induced wave action due to various reasons. The depth and volume have significant role in the water quality. The nitrogen fixation of blue green algae can be observed from the morphological features. The morphology has greater role in the water quality of a lake system.

  12. Lake-level variability and water availability in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, Douglas A.; Thompson, Todd A.; Booth, Robert K.; Nicholas, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    years ago. Within that record is a quasi-periodic rise and fall of about 160 ? 40 years in duration and a shorter fluctuation of 32 ? 6 years that is superimposed on the 160-year fluctuation. Recorded lake-level history from 1860 to the present falls within the longer-term pattern and appears to be a single 160-year quasi-periodic fluctuation. Independent investigations of past climate change in the basin over the long-term period of record confirm that most of these changes in lake level were responses to climatically driven changes in water balance, including lake-level highstands commonly associated with cooler climatic conditions and lows with warm climate periods. The mechanisms underlying these large hydroclimatic anomalies are not clear, but they may be related to internal dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere system or dynamical responses of the ocean-atmosphere system to variability in solar radiation or volcanic activity. The large capacities of the Great Lakes allow them to store great volumes of water. As calculated at chart datum, Lake Superior stores more water (2,900 mi3) than all the other lakes combined (2,539 mi3). Lake Michigan's storage is 1,180 mi3; Lake Huron's, 850 mi3; Lake Ontario's, 393 mi3; and Lake Erie's, 116 mi3. Seasonal lake-level changes alter storage by as much as 6 mi3 in Lake Superior and as little as 2.1 mi3 in Lake Erie. The extreme high and low lake levels measured in recorded lake-level history have altered storage by as much as 31 mi3 in Lake Michigan-Huron and as little as 9 mi3 in Lake Ontario. Diversions of water into and out of the lakes are very small compared to the total volume of water stored in the lakes. The water level of Lake Superior has been regulated since about 1914 and levels of Lake Ontario since about 1960. The range of Lake Superior water-level fluctuations and storage has not been altered greatly by regulation. However, fluctuations on Lake Ontario have been reduced from 6.6 ft preregulation

  13. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, S.J.; Elder, J.F.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Kammerer, P.A.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information about the physical, che-nical, and biological characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected includes measurements of lake stage and in-lake water quality. Graphs of Secchi depths, and total-phosphorus and chlorophyll-a concentrations versus time are included for lakes with two or more years of data. Descriptive information for each lake includes location of the lake, drainage area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in two other volunres: "Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 1994, St. Lawrence River Basin" (Volume 1) and "Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 1994, Upper Mississippi River Basin" (Volume 2). 

  14. Ultraviolet radiation and bio-optics in Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hargreaves, B.R.; Girdner, S.F.; Buktenica, M.W.; Collier, R.W.; Urbach, E.; Larson, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    Crater Lake, Oregon, is a mid-latitude caldera lake famous for its depth (594 m) and blue color. Recent underwater spectral measurements of solar radiation (300-800 nm) support earlier observations of unusual transparency and extend these to UV-B wavelengths. New data suggest that penetration of solar UVR into Crater Lake has a significant ecological impact. Evidence includes a correlation between water column chlorophyll-a and stratospheric ozone since 1984, the scarcity of organisms in the upper water column, and apparent UV screening pigments in phytoplankton that vary with depth. The lowest UV-B diffuse attenuation coefficients (K d,320) were similar to those reported for the clearest natural waters elsewhere, and were lower than estimates for pure water published in 1981. Optical proxies for UVR attenuation were correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration (0-30 m) during typical dry summer months from 1984 to 2002. Using all proxies and measurements of UV transparency, decadal and longer cycles were apparent but no long-term trend since the first optical measurement in 1896. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement between the U.S. and Canada addresses critical environmental health issues in the Great Lakes region. It's a model of binational cooperation to protect water quality. It was first signed in 1972 and amended in 2012.

  16. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information about the physical and chemical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected includes measurements of lake stage and in-lake water quality. Graphs of Secchi depths, surface totalphosphorus and chlorophyll-a concentrations versus time are included for lakes with two or more years of data. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, drainage area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: "Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 1996."

  17. Water balance for Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1992-01-01

    A water balance for Crater Lake, Oregon, is calculated using measured lake levels and precipitation data measured at Park Headquarters and at a gage on the North Rim. Total water supply to the lake from precipitation and inflow from the crater walls is found to be 224 cm/y over the area of the lake. The ratio between water supply to the lake and precipitation at Park Headquarters is calculated as 1.325. Using leakage determined by Phillips (1968) and Redmond (1990), evaporation from the lake is approximately 85 cm/y. Calculations show that water balances with precipitation data only from Park Headquarters are unable to accurately define the water-level variation, whereas the addition of yearly precipitation data from the North Rim reduces the average absolute deviation between calculated and modeled water levels by one half. Daily precipitation and water-level data are modeled assuming that precipitation is stored on the rim as snow during fall and winter and released uniformly during the spring and early summer. Daily data do not accurately define the water balance, but they suggest that direct precipitation on the lake is about 10 % higher than that measured at Park Headquarters and that about 17 % of the water supply is from inflow from the rim.

  18. Lakes and lake-like waters of the Hawaiian Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maciolek, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This summary of Hawaiian lacustrine limnology is based on 12 years of field and literature surveys of archipelagic inland waters. Lakes here are distinguished from other standing waters by limits on surface oceanic area (> 0.1 ha) and depth (> 2 m), and by the absence of flatural surface oceanic connection. A variety of extinct and existing water bodies, sometimes referred to as lakes, are noted. Six lakes are described. Five of them are in crater basins, 3 are freshwater, and 2 are elevated (highest = 3969 m). The scarcity of elevated lakes results from general permeability of the substrata. Among the 6 lakes, surface areas range from 0.22 to 88 ha and maximum depths from 3 to 248 m. Naturally occurring aquatic biota generally is low in species diversity except for phytoplankton; fishes and submersed vascular plants are absent. Two lowland lakes, freshwater Green (Wai a Pele) and saline Kauhak6, are described for the first time. Profundal Kauhak6, 248 m deep, has a surface area of only 0.35 ha, which results in an extraordinary relative depth of 370%. It is permanently stratified, a condition apparently due primarily to the unique morphometry of its basin. 

  19. Establishment patterns of water-elm at Catahoula Lake, Louisiana

    Treesearch

    Karen S. Doerr; Sanjeev Joshi; Richard F. Keim

    2015-01-01

    At Catahoula Lake in central Louisiana, an internationally important lake for water fowl, hydrologic alterations to the surrounding rivers and the lake itself have led to an expansion of water-elm (Planera aquatic J.F. Gmel.) into the lake bed. In this study, we used dendrochronology and aerial photography to quantify the expansion of water-elm in the lake and identify...

  20. 33 CFR 162.140 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. 162.140 Section 162.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.140 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. (a...

  1. 33 CFR 162.140 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. 162.140 Section 162.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.140 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. (a...

  2. 33 CFR 162.140 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. 162.140 Section 162.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.140 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. (a...

  3. Michigan lakes: An assessment of water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minnerick, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Michigan has more than 11,000 inland lakes, that provide countless recreational opportunities and are an important resource that makes tourism and recreation a $15-billion-dollar per-year industry in the State (Stynes, 2002). Knowledge of the water-quality characteristics of inland lakes is essential for the current and future management of these resources.Historically the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) jointly have monitored water quality in Michigan's lakes and rivers. During the 1990's, however, funding for surface-water-quality monitoring was reduced greatly. In 1998, the citizens of Michigan passed the Clean Michigan Initiative to clean up, protect, and enhance Michigan's environmental infrastructure. Because of expanding water-quality-data needs, the MDEQ and the USGS jointly redesigned and implemented the Lake Water-Quality Assessment (LWQA) Monitoring Program (Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, 1997).

  4. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    lead by Rose, W. J.; Elder, J.F.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Mergener, E.A.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available throught the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin District's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the Wisconsin District's Lakes Program is found at wi.water.usgs.gov/lake/index.html.

  5. Water-quality and lake stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available throught the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin District's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the Wisconsin District's Lakes Program is found atwi.water.usgs.gov/lake/index.html.

  6. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.L.; Elder, J.F.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Mergener, E.A.; Robertson, D.M.; Rose, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available throught the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin District's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the Wisconsin District's Lakes Program is found at wi.water.usgs.gov/lake/index.html.

  7. Water-Quality and Lake-Stage Data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wisconsin Water Science Center Lake-Studies Team: Rose, W. J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2007 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2007 is called 'water year 2007.' The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake?s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 2007.'

  8. Atmospheric radiation model for water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Gaskill, D. W.; Lierzer, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric correction model was extended to account for various atmospheric radiation components in remotely sensed data. Components such as the atmospheric path radiance which results from singly scattered sky radiation specularly reflected by the water surface are considered. A component which is referred to as the virtual Sun path radiance, i.e. the singly scattered path radiance which results from the solar radiation which is specularly reflected by the water surface is also considered. These atmospheric radiation components are coded into a computer program for the analysis of multispectral remote sensor data over the Great Lakes of the United States. The user must know certain parameters, such as the visibility or spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere and the geometry of the sensor with respect to the Sun and the target elements under investigation.

  9. Energy and water in the Great Lakes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2011-11-01

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  10. Great Lakes Energy-Water Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent

    2014-09-18

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region’s energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decision-making is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  11. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.M.; Elder, J.F.; Garn, H.S.; Goodard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Rose, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The location of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 1997 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997 is called 'water year 1997'. The purpose of this report is to provide information about the physical and chemical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of lake stage and in-lake water quality. Graphs of Secchi depths, surface total-phosphorus and chlorophyll-a concentrations versus time are usually included for lakes with two or more years of data. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 1997'.

  12. Survival of lake trout eggs and fry reared in water from the upper Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Edsall, Carol Cotant; Seelye, James G.

    1985-01-01

    As part of continuing studies of the reproductive failure of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan, we measured the survival of lake trout eggs and fry of different origins and reared in different environments. Eggs and milt were stripped from spawning lake trout collected in the fall of 1980 from southeastern Lake Michigan, northwestern Lake Huron, south central Lake Superior, and from hatchery brood stock. Eggs from all sources were incubated, and the newly hatched fry were reared for 139 days in lake water from each of the three upper Great Lakes and in well water. Survival of eggs to hatching at all sites was lowest for those from Lake Michigan (70% of fertilized eggs) and highest for eggs from Lake Superior (96%). Comparisons of incubation water from the different lakes indicated that hatching success of eggs from all sources was highest in Lake Huron water, and lowest in Lake Michigan water. The most notable finding was the nearly total mortality of fry from eggs of southeastern Lake Michigan lake trout. At all sites, the mean survival of Lake Michigan fry through 139 days after hatching was only 4% compared to near 50% for fry from the other three sources. In a comparison of the rearing sites, little influence of water quality on fry survival was found. Thus, the poor survival was associated with the source of eggs and sperm, not the water in which the fry were reared.

  13. Water-Quality and Lake-Stage Data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    and Crystal Lakes and the shallow ground-water system, Dane County, Wisconsin: USGS Water- Resources Investigations Report 02–20. Krohelski, J.T... alum treatment using apparent settling velocities: Lakes and Reservoir Management, vol. 15, no. 1, p. 28–38. 1998 Hunt, R.J, Anderson, M.P., and

  14. Water-Quality and Lake-Stage Data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2006 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006 is called 'water year 2006.' The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 2006.' Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available through the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin Water Science Center's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the

  15. The effects of using ground water to maintain water levels of Cedar Lake, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLeod, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    There were no identifiable changes in measured physical and chemical characteristics of lake water during sustained pumping of ground water into the lake, nor were there identifiable changes in the number or makeup of the phytoplankton community. Differences in physical and chemical characteristics of lake water and ground water added to the lake probably were not great enough to cause changes within the lake.

  16. 2008 Water Quality Analysis of Otisco Lake, New York.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfman, J. D.; Hoering, K. A.

    2008-12-01

    Water quality and trophic status of the Finger Lakes in western and central New York State is critical because these lakes serve as drinking water supplies to the local communities and are critical for the tourist, recreational and agricultural economy of the region. A 2008 limnological survey of the eight largest Finger Lakes indicated that the water quality of Otisco Lake was the worst compared to Honeoye, Canandaigua, Keuka, Seneca, Cayuga, Owasco and Skaneateles Lakes base on the measured parameters. Surface and bottom water were collected from at least two sites in each lake on a monthly basis during the May to October field season. The water was analyzed for total suspended sediment (TSS), total phosphate (TP), soluble reactive phosphate (SRP), nitrates, dissolved silica, chlorophyll-a, pH, conductivity, alkalinity and major ions following standard limnological techniques. In addition, secchi disk depths, plankton tows and CTD profiles were collected at each site. Our SeaBird SBE-25 CTD collected profiles of conductivity, temperature, depth, pH, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), dissolved oxygen, fluorescence and turbidity. The 2008 data collected by September 1 revealed that Otisco Lake has the lowest mean secchi disk depths (2.9m vs. 4.4, 7.2, 6.8, 3.6, 3.6, 3.9, 7.5; mean values in order of the lake listing above) of the studied lakes. High mean TSS (2.5 mg/L vs. 1.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.9, 1.7, 1.3, 0.6), high mean TP (13 ug/L vs. 17.6, 8.5, 6.2, 10.3, 8.3, 8.1, 3.8), and moderate mean SRP (0.3 ug/L vs. 2.3, 1.0, 0.5, 1.0, 0.8, 0.7, 0.7) concentrations contribute to and correlate with high mean chlorophyll-a concentrations (3.6 ug/L vs. 2.9, 1.2, 1.5, 5.1, 4.0, 2.2, 0.6), fluorescence peak concentrations, and seasonally anoxic bottom waters. Honeoye was the only other lake with an anoxic hypolimnion (bottom waters). The highest concentration of SRP and TSS were measured on June 3 and correlated with a significant rain event four days prior to sampling

  17. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin Lakes, water year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available throught the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin District's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the Wisconsin District's Lakes Program is found at wi.water.usgs.gov/lake/index.html and wi.water.usgs.gov/projects/ index.html.

  18. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water years 2008−2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Olson, Daniel L.; Robertson, Dale M.; Goddard, Gerald L.

    2016-09-30

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series.The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes during water years 2008–2011. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2007 through September 30, 2008 is called "water year 2008." Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are presented in this report for water years from 2008–2011. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are available via the "USGS Annual Water Data Report" Web site: http://wdr.water.usgs.gov/.

  19. A Global Observatory of Lake Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Andrew N.; Hunter, Peter D.; Spyrakos, Evangelos; Neil, Claire; Simis, Stephen; Groom, Steve; Merchant, Chris J.; Miller, Claire A.; O'Donnell, Ruth; Scott, E. Marian

    2017-04-01

    Our planet's surface waters are a fundamental resource encompassing a broad range of ecosystems that are core to global biogeochemical cycling, biodiversity and food and energy security. Despite this, these same waters are impacted by multiple natural and anthropogenic pressures and drivers of environmental change. The complex interaction between physical, chemical and biological processes in surface waters poses significant challenges for in situ monitoring and assessment and this often limits our ability to adequately capture the dynamics of aquatic systems and our understanding of their status, functioning and response to pressures. Recent developments in the availability of satellite platforms for Earth observation (including ESA's Copernicus Programme) offers an unprecedented opportunity to deliver measures of water quality at a global scale. The UK NERC-funded GloboLakes project is a five-year research programme investigating the state of lakes and their response to climatic and other environmental drivers of change through the realization of a near-real time satellite based observatory (Sentinel-3) and archive data processing (MERIS, SeaWiFS) to produce a 20-year time-series of observed ecological parameters and lake temperature for more than 1000 lakes globally. However, the diverse and complex optical properties of lakes mean that algorithm performance often varies markedly between different water types. The GloboLakes project is overcoming this challenge by developing a processing chain whereby algorithms are dynamically selected according to the optical properties of the lake under observation. The development and validation of the GloboLakes processing chain has been supported by access to extensive in situ data from more than thirty partners around the world that are now held in the LIMNADES community-owned data repository developed under the auspices of GloboLakes. This approach has resulted in a step-change in our ability to produce regional and

  20. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water years 2012–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Robertson, Dale M.

    2017-05-25

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2012 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012, is called “water year 2012.”The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published online at http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/wi/nwis.Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available online. The Wisconsin Water Science Center’s home page is at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/wisconsin-water-science-center. Information on

  1. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Robertson, Dale M.

    2017-05-25

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a database for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2014 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the periodOctober 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014, is called “water year 2014.”The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus, and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during nonfrozen periods are included for many lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes the location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published online at http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/wi/nwis.Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available online. The Wisconsin Water Science Center’s home page is at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/wisconsin-water-science-center. Information

  2. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical charac-teristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measure-ments of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series graphs of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive infor-mation for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks.

  3. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Elder, J.F.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Rose, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are usually included for lakes with two or more years of data. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: "Water Resources Data- Wisconsin, 1998."

  4. Adaptive radiation and ecological diversification of Sulawesi's ancient lake shrimps.

    PubMed

    Von Rintelen, Kristina; Glaubrecht, Matthias; Schubart, Christoph D; Wessel, Andreas; Von Rintelen, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Ancient lakes are natural laboratories for the study of adaptive radiation. Recently, two lake systems on the Indonesian island Sulawesi have emerged as promising new model systems. A species flock of atyid freshwater shrimps in the Malili lake system comprises 15 colorful endemic taxa. Mitochondrial DNA data suggest two independent colonizations by riverine ancestors. Only one colonization event led to subsequent radiation into 14 species, while the second clade comprises just one species. The vast majority of species (n= 12) are habitat specialists, which are confined to the larger Malili clade and include all taxa with species-specific color patterns and a restricted distribution within the five connected Malili lakes. Morphological, genetic, and ecological data are consistent with the existence of an adaptive radiation in the Malili lakes, involving the habitat-specific diversification of trophic morphology. In addition to testing criteria for the recognition of an adaptive radiation, an ancestral state reconstruction reveals an equal probability for either a riverine generalist or a lacustrine specialist as ancestor of the large Malili clade, which is interpreted as indicative of an early stage of habitat specialization within this radiation. Finally, our results suggest that species diversification may have been primarily driven by ecological specialization and allopatric speciation.

  5. Water Level Fluctuations of Lake Enriquillo and Lake Saumatre in Response to Environmental Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteau, D.; Romero Luna, E. J.; Walter, M. T.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    The water levels of Lake Saumatre in Haiti and Lake Enriquillo in the Dominican Republic have been increasing continuously for the past 5-10 years. As result roads and lake shore agriculture are flooded and there is an interest in determining the causes of the continuous lake growth and finding solutions to reverse the trend Various theories haven proposed for growth of the lakes such as climate change and deforestation. Deforestation would affect the hydrological balance by means of changing infiltration rates. To examine the temporal variations in the lake, the lake surface areas during the past 30 years were obtained from available satellite data and converted into volumes. These lake surface areas showed a steady increase starting in 2003 for Lake Saumatre and in 2008 for Lake Enriquillo. Land cover change obtained by means of remote sensing for the years of 1986 and 2010 showed no significant change and could therefore be ruled out as a cause for the lake levels increases. A simple water balance model that had been validated for monsoon climates matched the lake level volumes fluctuations well for the last 30 years including the recent rise in lake levels. Thus the lake level increases could be directly related to the greater precipitation starting some 10 years ago. The difference in starting time of lake level rise between the two lakes could be explained by a larger storage capacity in the a Lake Enriquillo watershed compared to the Lake Saumatre watershed

  6. Radiative temperature measurements at Kupaianaha lava lake, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Luke P.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Gradie, Jonathan C.; Lucey, Paul G.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative temperature of the surface of Kupaianaha lava lake is computed using field spectroradiometer data. Observations were made during periods of active overturning. The lake surface exhibits three stages of activity. Magma fountaining and overturning events characterize stage 1, which exhibits the hottest crustal temperatures and the largest fractional hot areas. Rifting events between plates of crust mark stage 2; crustal temperatures in this stage are between 100 C and 340 C, and fractional hot areas are at least an order of magnitude smaller than those in stage 1. Stage 3 is characterized by quiescent periods when the lake is covered by a thick crust. This stage dominates the activity of the lake more than 90 percent of the time. The results of this study are relevant for satellite and airborne measurement of the thermal characteristics of active volcanoes, and indicate that the thermal output of a lava lake varies on a time scale of seconds to minutes.

  7. Radiative temperature measurements at Kupaianaha lava lake, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Luke P.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Gradie, Jonathan C.; Lucey, Paul G.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative temperature of the surface of Kupaianaha lava lake is computed using field spectroradiometer data. Observations were made during periods of active overturning. The lake surface exhibits three stages of activity. Magma fountaining and overturning events characterize stage 1, which exhibits the hottest crustal temperatures and the largest fractional hot areas. Rifting events between plates of crust mark stage 2; crustal temperatures in this stage are between 100 C and 340 C, and fractional hot areas are at least an order of magnitude smaller than those in stage 1. Stage 3 is characterized by quiescent periods when the lake is covered by a thick crust. This stage dominates the activity of the lake more than 90 percent of the time. The results of this study are relevant for satellite and airborne measurement of the thermal characteristics of active volcanoes, and indicate that the thermal output of a lava lake varies on a time scale of seconds to minutes.

  8. Ballast Water Discharges into the Great Lakes from Overseas Vessels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Analysis of Ballast Water Discharges into the Great Lakes from Overseas Vessels from 2010 to 2013 - An assessment of the volume, location, and global port origins of ballast water discharges in the Great Lakes (May 2015).

  9. Specific conductance identifies perched and ground water lakes.

    Treesearch

    Clarence F. Hawkinson; Elon S. Verry

    1975-01-01

    Shows that lakes can be classified into perched, ground water, and transitional categories according to specific conductance values. Confirms the classification with 10 years of water table measurements in 29 wells and discusses several applications of lake specific conductance values.

  10. Labeling lake water with tritium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, B.J.

    1963-01-01

    A method of packaging tritiated water in a manner that facilitates safe handling in environmental labeling operations, and procedures followed in labeling a large body of water with a small volume of tritiated water are described. ?? 1963.

  11. Analysis of Poyang Lake water balance and its indication of river-lake interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zengxin; Huang, Yuhan; Xu, Chong-Yu; Chen, Xi; Moss, Elica M; Jin, Qiu; Bailey, Alisha M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, water shortage is becoming one of the most serious problems in the Poyang Lake. In this paper, the long-term water balance items of the Poyang Lake have been analyzed to reveal the coupling effects of Three Gorges Dam (TGD) and droughts on the water balance of Poyang Lake. The results indicate that: (1) the water balance items of Poyang Lake vary greatly, e.g. lake precipitation and inflow decrease during the past several decades while evaporation and water consumption increase significantly; (2) the water balance of Poyang Lake has been affected by the operation of TGD. Negative lake water balance in recent years leads to a serious water shortage problem in the Poyang Lake. Moreover, the operation of TGD also changed the river-lake relationship in the lower Yangtze River basin; (3) the coupling effects of drought and TGD on the lake water balance has been analyzed by using composite analysis method and it can be found that the operation of TGD has significantly altered the lake water balance. But it is not the only factor that affects the lake water balance, and the droughts might cause their relations to be much more complicated.

  12. Integrated Ecosystem Assessment: Lake Ontario Water Management

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Mark B.; Singkran, Nuanchan; Mills, Katherine E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Ecosystem management requires organizing, synthesizing, and projecting information at a large scale while simultaneously addressing public interests, dynamic ecological properties, and a continuum of physicochemical conditions. We compared the impacts of seven water level management plans for Lake Ontario on a set of environmental attributes of public relevance. Methodology and Findings Our assessment method was developed with a set of established impact assessment tools (checklists, classifications, matrices, simulations, representative taxa, and performance relations) and the concept of archetypal geomorphic shoreline classes. We considered each environmental attribute and shoreline class in its typical and essential form and predicted how water level change would interact with defining properties. The analysis indicated that about half the shoreline of Lake Ontario is potentially sensitive to water level change with a small portion being highly sensitive. The current water management plan may be best for maintaining the environmental resources. In contrast, a natural water regime plan designed for greatest environmental benefits most often had adverse impacts, impacted most shoreline classes, and the largest portion of the lake coast. Plans that balanced multiple objectives and avoided hydrologic extremes were found to be similar relative to the environment, low on adverse impacts, and had many minor impacts across many shoreline classes. Significance The Lake Ontario ecosystem assessment provided information that can inform decisions about water management and the environment. No approach and set of methods will perfectly and unarguably accomplish integrated ecosystem assessment. For managing water levels in Lake Ontario, we found that there are no uniformly good and bad options for environmental conservation. The scientific challenge was selecting a set of tools and practices to present broad, relevant, unbiased, and accessible information to guide

  13. Water Budget and Salinity of Walker Lake, western Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, James M.

    1995-01-01

    Walker Lake is one of the rare perennial, terminal lakes in the Great Basin of the western United States. The lake is the terminus for all surface- water and ground-water flow in the Walker River Basin Hydrographic Region that is not consumed by evaporation, sublimation, or transpiration. The concentration of dissolved solids (salts) in the lake-surface altitude depend primarily on the amounts of water entering and evaporation from the lake. Because Walker Lake is a terminal sink--it has no documented surface- or ground-water outflow--dissolved solids that enter it accumulate as the lake water evaporates. Declining lake levels, owing to natural and anthropogenic processes, have resulted in most Great Basin terminal lakes being too saline to support fish. In Nevada, the only terminal lakes that contain fish are Pyramid Lake, Ruby Lake, and Walker Lake. Dissolved-solids concentration in Walker Lake increased from about 2,500 milligrams per liter in 1882 to 13,300 milli- grams per liter in July 1994 (U.S. Geological Survey analysis), as the lake-surface altitude declined from about 4,080 to 3,944 feet above sea level. This dramatic increase in dissolved-solids concentration threatens the Walker Lake ecosystem and the fish that depend on this ecosystem.

  14. Water Flow and Lake Drainage Beneath Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, I. C.; Long, S. M.; Peters, N. J.; Arnold, N. S.

    2008-12-01

    We use 5 km resolution surface and bed DEMs of Antarctica to calculate the subglacial hydraulic potential, and location of drainage catchments and major drainage pathways for the Antarctic Ice Sheet. We find close correlations between sinks in the hydraulic potential, the location of major drainage pathways and the position of known subglacial lakes. We use a thermo-mechanical ice sheet dynamics model with an assumed geothermal heat-flux to calculate energy supply and melt rates beneath the ice sheet. Accumulating this water along the drainage pathways allows us to calculate the steady state water flux to all known lakes (which range between ~ 0.1 and ~ 10m3 s-1) and in the drainage pathways as they enter the ocean (which range from ~ 1 to ~ 100m3 s-1). For different assumed lake drainage event discharges, we estimate a range of jokulhlaup frequencies for each lake. For the observed 1996-8 Adventure Subglacial Trench lake drainage event of ~ 1.8 km3, we estimate a flood frequency of 25 years. Finally, we use Nye's (1976) theory to model the time dependent discharge associated with the Adventure Trench jokulhlaup and can match theory to the observed surface altimetry data for realistic values of initial conduit diameter and roughness.

  15. The Role of Ecological Research in Great Lakes Water Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk will present some current ecological research in the Great Lakes. It will focus on how research examines aspects of water quality that relate to Basin-Lake and Human-Water interactions in the context of water sustainability issues for the Great Lakes.

  16. The Role of Ecological Research in Great Lakes Water Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk will present some current ecological research in the Great Lakes. It will focus on how research examines aspects of water quality that relate to Basin-Lake and Human-Water interactions in the context of water sustainability issues for the Great Lakes.

  17. Subglacial Lake Vostok not expected to discharge water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Popov, Sergey V.; Schröder, Ludwig; Schwabe, Joachim; Ewert, Heiko; Scheinert, Mirko; Horwath, Martin; Dietrich, Reinhard

    2014-10-01

    The question whether Antarctica's largest lake, subglacial Lake Vostok, exchanges water is of interdisciplinary relevance but has been undecided so far. We present the potential pathway, outlet location, and threshold height of subglacial water discharge from this lake based on a quantitative evaluation of the fluid potential. If water left Lake Vostok, it would flow toward Ross Ice Shelf. Discharge would occur first to the east of the southern tip of the lake. At this location the bedrock threshold is 91 ± 23 m higher than the hydrostatic equipotential level of Lake Vostok. It is concluded that Lake Vostok is not likely to reach this level within climatic timescales and that no discharge of liquid water is to be expected. We show that in absence of the ice sheet the Lake Vostok depression would harbor a lake significantly deeper and larger than the present aquifer.

  18. 33 CFR 162.134 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; traffic rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to Lake Erie; traffic rules. 162.134 Section 162.134 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.134 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; traffic rules. (a) Detroit River. The following traffic rules apply in the Detroit River: (1) The West Outer Channel is restricted to downbound...

  19. Estimation of lake water - groundwater interactions in meromictic mining lakes by modelling isotope signatures of lake water.

    PubMed

    Seebach, Anne; Dietz, Severine; Lessmann, Dieter; Knoeller, Kay

    2008-03-01

    A method is presented to assess lake water-groundwater interactions by modelling isotope signatures of lake water using meteorological parameters and field data. The modelling of delta(18)O and deltaD variations offers information about the groundwater influx into a meromictic Lusatian mining lake. Therefore, a water balance model is combined with an isotope water balance model to estimate analogies between simulated and measured isotope signatures within the lake water body. The model is operated with different evaporation rates to predict delta(18)O and deltaD values in a lake that is only controlled by weather conditions with neither groundwater inflow nor outflow. Comparisons between modelled and measured isotope values show whether the lake is fed by the groundwater or not. Furthermore, our investigations show that an adaptation of the Craig and Gordon model [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen-18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperature, Spoleto, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] to specific conditions in temperate regions seems necessary.

  20. Peculiarities of Lake Baikal water level regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabaeva, Darima B.; Tsydypov, Bair Z.; Ayurzhanaev, Alexander A.; Andreev, Sergey G.; Garmaev, Yendon Zh

    2016-11-01

    A 15-year-old low-water period in the basin of Lake Baikal established an endurance record in the entire history of observations. It began in the mid 90s of the last century. With some probability it may continue in the following years. An analysis of meteorological series of air temperature and precipitation in the region is conducted. A statistically significant trend of increasing temperature and decreasing rainfall is revealed. Atmospheric precipitation affects the long-term fluctuations in the river run-off to a greater extent than the other elements of the water balance. An analysis of the inflow of water into Lake Baikal is performed. It is found that the water level of the lake almost directly depends on the water content of the Selenga River. The minimal run-off in dry periods, as well as the annual run-off, tends to decrease. It is a continuous series of low run-off, which provided the negative trend in the minimal run-off. A dendrochronological reconstruction of the Selenga River run-off is made. A statistically significant trend of decreasing Selenga River run-off is revealed in the recent decades, and an analysis of temperature and precipitation for the basin on the Russian side is made.

  1. Tropical high-altitude Andean lakes located above the tree line attenuate UV-A radiation more strongly than typical temperate alpine lakes.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Ximena; Lazzaro, Xavier; Coronel, Jorge S

    2013-09-01

    Tropical high-altitude Andean lakes are physically harsh ecosystems. Located above the treeline (≥4000 m a.s.l.), they share common features with temperate alpine lakes, which impose extreme conditions on their aquatic organisms: e.g., strong winds, broad diel variations in water temperature, and intense solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). However, because of their latitude, they differ in two major ecological characteristics: they lack ice cover during the winter and they do not present summer water column stratification. We sampled 26 tropical high-altitude Andean lakes from three regions of the Bolivian Eastern Andes Cordillera during the wet period (austral summer). We performed an ordination to better describe the typology of Andean lakes in relation to the environmental variables, and we assessed the relationships among them, focussing on the UV-A transparency (360 nm) throughout the water column. We found a positive correlation between UV-A transparency calculated as Z(1%) (the depth which reaches 1% of the surface UV-A), the lake maximum depth and Secchi transparency (r = 0.61). Z(1%) of UV-A was smaller in shallow lakes than in deep lakes, indicating that shallow lakes are less transparent to UV-A than deep lakes. We hypothesize that, compared to shallow lakes, deep lakes (maximum depth > 10 m) may have lower dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (that absorb UV radiation) due to lower temperature and reduced macrophyte cover. Based on our data, tropical high-altitude Andean lakes are less transparent to UV-A (K(d) range = 1.4-11.0 m(-1); Z(1%) depth range = 0.4-3.2 m) than typical temperate alpine lakes (1-6 m(-1), 3-45 m, respectively). Moreover, they differ in vertical profiles of UV-A, chlorophyll-a, and temperature, suggesting that they may have a distinct ecological functioning. Such peculiarities justify treating tropical high-altitude Andean lakes as a separate category of alpine lakes. Tropical high-altitude Andean lakes have been poorly

  2. LANDSAT-BASED WATER QUALITY MONITORING OF PYRAMID LAKE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT) in cooperation with federal, state and local entities has been able to increase stream flow, establish water quality standards and improve fish habitat in the Truckee River, a primary source of water for pyramid Lake. In the past, pyramid Lake wat...

  3. LANDSAT-BASED WATER QUALITY MONITORING OF PYRAMID LAKE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT) in cooperation with federal, state and local entities has been able to increase stream flow, establish water quality standards and improve fish habitat in the Truckee River, a primary source of water for pyramid Lake. In the past, pyramid Lake wat...

  4. Long-term energy flux and radiation balance observations over Lake Ngoring, Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoguo; Lyu, Shihua; Ao, Yinhuan; Wen, Lijuan; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shaoying

    2015-03-01

    It remains unclear what are the characteristics of the surface energy budget and the radiation balance over the lake at high altitudes. Here we report a nearly two-year ice-free time measurement (2011-2012) of energy flux and radiation balance using the eddy covariance method over Lake Ngoring, Tibetan Plateau. A persistent unstable atmospheric boundary layer was maintained over the lake, caused by a higher water surface temperature compared with the overlying atmosphere. As a result, the positive sensible heat (H) and latent heat (LE) fluxes almost lasted throughout the entire observation period. The heat storage period of the lake could last until September, and the strongest heating occurred in October from the lake to the atmosphere. Compared with the subtropical lake, Bowen ratios were larger in Lake Ngoring, caused by a large temperature difference and a small specific humidity difference between the water surface and the overlying air. The patterns of H versus the atmospheric stability differed from those of LE. H was large under unstable stratification conditions and significantly decreased in the nearly neutral and stable atmospheric stratification. By contrast, the large LE concentrated in the weak unstable to the nearly neutral atmospheric stratification, and clearly declined with increased atmospheric instability. Overall, the vertical specific humidity difference contributed more to LE than the wind speed. As regards H, the major contributors varied with the atmospheric stability. The intrusion of dry, cold air with strong wind could result in significant increases in H and LE (approximately 2.0-4.5 times as much as those of normal days); during this period, the stored energy in water dramatically decreased and even could provide 70% of the energy for H and LE.

  5. Great Lakes Water Protection Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Kirk, Mark Steven [R-IL

    2013-03-14

    07/16/2014 Committee on Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Water and Wildlife. Hearings held. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Uncertainty in the Great Lakes water balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, Brian P.; Nicholas, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the Great Lakes hydrologic system and methods used to quantify individual components of the water balance. Potential sources of uncertainty are identified and, where appropriate, alternate or additional data, models, and estimation methods suitable for reducing uncertainties are discussed. Finally, approximate uncertainties of all components are identified, compared, and assessed within the context of net basin supply. Results indicate that average uncertainties in monthly estimates of individual water-balance components may range from 1.5 percent to 45 percent. These uncertainties may cause uncertainties in monthly net basin supply estimates of approximately 2,600 ft3/s to 33,500 ft3/s for individual Great Lakes.

  7. Fertilization of eggs of Lake Michigan lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in lake water: Effect of PCBs (Aroclor 1254)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, N.R.; Berlin, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Various studies indicate that PCBs appear to have an adverse effect on the viability of fertilized eggs and subsequent early life stages of lake trout and related species. Our tests detected no impairment of fertilization of lake trout eggs in PCB-dosed lake water. The concentration of PCBs in the fertilization medium that we used was more than 20 times as high as estimated ambient levels in southeastern Lake Michigan and it appears unlikley that ambient levels of PCBs in the water at fertilization would contribute significantly to the apparent widespread reproductive failure of lake trout there.

  8. Patterns of organochlorine contamination in lake trout from Wisconsin waters of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Michael A.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Masnado, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate spatial and temporal patterns of organochlorine contamination in lake trout from Wisconsin waters of the Great Lakes, we examined laboratory contaminant analysis data of muscle tissue samples from Lake Michigan (n=317) and Lake Superior (n=53) fish. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlordane, and dieldrin, reported as mg/kg wet weight in 620 mm to 640 mm mean length Lake Michigan lake trout, decreased over time. Mean total PCB concentration declined exponentially from 9.7 in 1975 to 1.9 in 1990. Total chlordane concentration declined 63 percent from 0.48 in 1983 to 0.18 in 1990, and dieldrin declined 52 percent during this same period, from 0.21 to 0.10. The bioaccumulation rate of PCBs is significantly lower for lake trout inhabiting Lake Michigan's midlake reef complex, compared to lake trout from the nearshore waters of western Lake Michigan. Organochlorine compound concentrations were greater in Lake Michigan lake trout than Lake Superior fish. Lake Superior lean lake trout and siscowet exhibited similar rates of PCB bioaccumulation despite major differneces in muscle tissue lipid content between the two subspecies. The lack of a significant difference in the PCB bioaccumulation rates of lean trout and siscowet suggests that lipid content may not be an important factor influencing PCB bioaccumulation in lake trout, within the range of lipid concentrations observed. Relative concentrations of the various organochlorine contaminants found in lake trout were highly correlated, suggesting similar mass balance processes for these compounds. Evidence presented revealing spatial and temporal patterns of organochlorine contamination may be of value in reestablishing self-sustaining populations of lake trout in Lake Michigan.

  9. Great Lakes Water Protection Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Kirk, Mark Steven [R-IL

    2013-03-14

    07/16/2014 Committee on Environment and Public Works Senate Subcommittee on Water and Wildlife. Hearings held. With printed Hearing: S.Hrg. 113-772. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Great Lakes Water Protection Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Kirk, Mark Steven [R-IL

    2013-03-14

    Senate - 07/16/2014 Committee on Environment and Public Works Senate Subcommittee on Water and Wildlife. Hearings held. With printed Hearing: S.Hrg. 113-772. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. The effects of simulated solar UVB radiation on early developmental stages of the Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile) from three lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, Robin D.; Little, Edward E.; Pearl, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) has received much attention as a factor that could play a role in amphibian population declines. UV can be hazardous to some amphibians, but the resultant effects depend on a variety of environmental and behavioral factors. In this study, the potential effects of UV on the Northwestern Salamander, Ambystoma gracile, from three lakes were assessed in the laboratory using a solar simulator. We measured the survival of embryos and the survival and growth of larvae exposed to four UV treatments in controlled laboratory studies, the UV absorbance of egg jelly, oviposition depths in the lakes, and UV absorbance in water samples from the three lakes. Hatching success of embryos decreased in the higher UV treatments as compared to the control treatments, and growth of surviving larvae was significantly reduced in the higher UVB irradiance treatments. The egg jelly exhibited a small peak of absorbance within the UVB range (290–320 nm). The magnitude of UV absorbance differed among egg jellies from the three lakes. Oviposition depths at the three sites averaged 1.10 m below the water surface. Approximately 66% of surface UVB radiation was attenuated at 10-cm depth in all three lakes. Results of this study indicate that larvae may be sensitive to UVB exposure under laboratory conditions; however, in field conditions the depths of egg deposition in the lakes, absorbance of UV radiation by the water column, and the potential for behavioral adjustments may mitigate severe effects of UV radiation.

  12. Hydrology, water quality, and nutrient loads to Lake Catherine and Channel Lake, near Antioch, Lake County, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, Robert T.; Johnson, Gary P.; Schrader, David L.

    2000-01-01

    From April 21, 1998, through April 30, 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Fox Waterway Agency, conducted an investigation designed to characterize the hydrology, water quality, hydrologic budget, sediment budget, and nutrient budget of Lake Catherine and Channel Lake, Lake County, Illinois. These lakes are the northernmost lakes of the Fox Chain of Lakes. Lake Catherine and Channel Lake are divided into two basins by a submerged ridge but are continuous at the surface. The lakes are marginally to moderately eutrophic. Lake Catherine and Channel Lake have a combined volume of 7,098 acre-feet at a stage of about 736.5 feet above sea level. Lake Catherine and Channel Lake are subject to thermal stratification. Although most of the water in the lakes is well oxidized, nearly anoxic conditions were present at the bottom of Lake Catherine and Channel Lake during part of the summer in 1998. Water enters Lake Catherine and Channel Lake as inflow from surface water in the watershed (61.9 percent), inflow through the State Highway 173 bridge openings (20.7 percent), direct precipitation (8.2 percent), inflow from storm drains (7.2 percent), and inflow of ground water (2.0 percent). Water exits Lake Catherine and Channel Lake as outflow through the State Highway 173 bridge openings (87.8 percent), evaporation (7.2 percent), and as outflow to ground water (5.0 percent). About 5,200 pounds of phosphorus and 107,200 pounds of nitrogen compounds were added to the lakes during the period of investigation. Phosphorus compounds were derived from primarily internal regeneration (40.2 percent), inflow from surface water in the watershed (30.9 percent), inflow from storm drains (12.5 percent), and inflow through the State Highway 173 bridge openings (9.8 percent). Inflowing ground water, waterfowl excrement, precipitation, and atmospheric deposition of particulate matter account for 6.6 percent of the phosphorus load. Nitrogen was derived from inflow of surface

  13. Water quality of Rogers Lake, Dakota County, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Have, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    Analyses of water from Rogers Lake suggest that sodium and chloride concentrations were higher than in ground water or in water in some surrounding lakes . Sodium ranged from 7.2 to 55 milligrams per liter, and chloride ranged from 15 to 30 milligrams per liter. Concentrations were highest in March 1978, when most of the lake water was frozen. Much of the sodium and chloride may have been derived from road salts used for deicing.

  14. Rapid and highly variable warming of lake surface waters around the globe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Catherine; Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek; Hampton, Stephanie; Read, Jordan S.; Rowley, Rex J.; Schneider, Philipp; Lenters, John D.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Kraemer, Benjamin M.; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Straile, Dietmar; Dong, Bo; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew G.; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John L.; Baron, Jill S.; Brookes, Justin D; de Eyto, Elvira; Dokulil, Martin T.; Hamilton, David P.; Havens, Karl; Hetherington, Amy L.; Higgins, Scott N.; Hook, Simon; Izmest'eva, Lyubov R.; Jöhnk, Klaus D.; Kangur, Külli; Kasprzak, Peter; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; Livingstone, David M.; MacIntyre, Sally; May, Linda; Melack, John M.; Mueller-Navara, Doerthe C.; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; North, Ryan P.; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Rudstam, Lars G.; Rusak, James A.; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Schladow, Geoffrey; Schmid, Martin; Schmidt, Silke R.; Silow, Eugene A.; Soylu, M. Evren; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Williamson, Craig E.; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    In this first worldwide synthesis of in situ and satellite-derived lake data, we find that lake summer surface water temperatures rose rapidly (global mean = 0.34°C decade−1) between 1985 and 2009. Our analyses show that surface water warming rates are dependent on combinations of climate and local characteristics, rather than just lake location, leading to the counterintuitive result that regional consistency in lake warming is the exception, rather than the rule. The most rapidly warming lakes are widely geographically distributed, and their warming is associated with interactions among different climatic factors—from seasonally ice-covered lakes in areas where temperature and solar radiation are increasing while cloud cover is diminishing (0.72°C decade−1) to ice-free lakes experiencing increases in air temperature and solar radiation (0.53°C decade−1). The pervasive and rapid warming observed here signals the urgent need to incorporate climate impacts into vulnerability assessments and adaptation efforts for lakes.

  15. Rapid and highly variable warming of lake surface waters around the globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Catherine M.; Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek K.; Hampton, Stephanie E.; Read, Jordan S.; Rowley, Rex J.; Schneider, Philipp; Lenters, John D.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Kraemer, Benjamin M.; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Straile, Dietmar; Dong, Bo; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew G.; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John L.; Baron, Jill S.; Brookes, Justin D.; Eyto, Elvira; Dokulil, Martin T.; Hamilton, David P.; Havens, Karl; Hetherington, Amy L.; Higgins, Scott N.; Hook, Simon; Izmest'eva, Lyubov R.; Joehnk, Klaus D.; Kangur, Kulli; Kasprzak, Peter; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; Livingstone, David M.; MacIntyre, Sally; May, Linda; Melack, John M.; Mueller-Navarra, Doerthe C.; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; North, Ryan P.; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Rudstam, Lars G.; Rusak, James A.; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Schladow, S. Geoffrey; Schmid, Martin; Schmidt, Silke R.; Silow, Eugene; Soylu, M. Evren; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Williamson, Craig E.; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-12-01

    In this first worldwide synthesis of in situ and satellite-derived lake data, we find that lake summer surface water temperatures rose rapidly (global mean = 0.34°C decade-1) between 1985 and 2009. Our analyses show that surface water warming rates are dependent on combinations of climate and local characteristics, rather than just lake location, leading to the counterintuitive result that regional consistency in lake warming is the exception, rather than the rule. The most rapidly warming lakes are widely geographically distributed, and their warming is associated with interactions among different climatic factors—from seasonally ice-covered lakes in areas where temperature and solar radiation are increasing while cloud cover is diminishing (0.72°C decade-1) to ice-free lakes experiencing increases in air temperature and solar radiation (0.53°C decade-1). The pervasive and rapid warming observed here signals the urgent need to incorporate climate impacts into vulnerability assessments and adaptation efforts for lakes.

  16. 33 CFR 162.140 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. 162.140 Section 162.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND...

  17. 33 CFR 162.140 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; miscellaneous rules. 162.140 Section 162.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND...

  18. 33 CFR 162.132 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Report. Stag Island Upper Light Report. Report Marine City Salt Dock Light Report. Report Grande Pointe... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules. 162.132 Section 162.132 Navigation and Navigable Waters...

  19. Physicochemical and analytical data for tributary water, lake water, and lake sediment, Lake Arrowhead, Clay and Archer Counties, Texas, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jennifer T.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Haynie, Monti M.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Lake Arrowhead is a reservoir about 24 kilometers southeast of Wichita Falls, Texas, that provides drinking water for the city of Wichita Falls and surrounding areas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Wichita Falls, did a study in 2006 to assess conditions contributing to elevated arsenic concentrations in Lake Arrowhead. This report describes the sampling and analytical methods, quality assurance, and physicochemical and analytical data. Physiochemical properties were measured in and water samples were collected from five tributaries to Lake Arrowhead (Little Wichita River, West Little Post Oak Creek, East Little Post Oak Creek, Deer Creek, and an unnamed tributary) immediately after storms. Lake water measuring and sampling were done approximately monthly from January through September 2006 at three deep-water sites and seasonally, in January and August 2006, at three shallow-water sites. Cores of lake bottom sediment were collected from five sites on August 30, 2006. Arsenic concentrations in tributary water samples ranged from 1.5 to 6.3 and 0.5 to 4.8 micrograms per liter for unfiltered and filtered samples, respectively. The highest arsenic concentrations were in samples collected from the West Little Post Oak Creek sampling site. Physicochemical properties in lake water varied with depth and season. Dissolved arsenite plus arsenate concentrations in lake water samples generally were between 3 and 5 micrograms per liter. Arsenite concentrations typically were below the laboratory reporting level of 0.6 microgram per liter. There were no detections of monomethylarsonate or dimethylarsinate. The concentration of arsenic in lake sediment samples ranged from 4.4 to 11.2 milligrams per kilogram, with a median of 6.4 milligrams per kilogram. The median arsenic concentration of the five top-interval sediment samples was 8.8 milligrams per kilogram, which generally is higher than the concentrations estimated to be on suspended sediment in

  20. Drainage water phosphorus losses in the great lakes basin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The great lakes are one of the most important fresh water resources on the planet. While forestry is a primary land use throughout much of the great lakes basin, there are portions of the basin, such as much of the land that drains directly to Lake Erie, that are primarily agricultural. The primary ...

  1. Methane oxidation in anoxic lake waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guangyi; Zopfi, Jakob; Niemann, Helge; Lehmann, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater habitats such as lakes are important sources of methante (CH4), however, most studies in lacustrine environments so far provided evidence for aerobic methane oxidation only, and little is known about the importance of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 (AOM) in anoxic lake waters. In marine environments, sulfate reduction coupled to AOM by archaea has been recognized as important sinks of CH4. More recently, the discorvery of anaerobic methane oxidizing denitrifying bacteria represents a novel and possible alternative AOM pathway, involving reactive nitrogen species (e.g., nitrate and nitrite) as electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen. We investigate anaerobic methane oxidation in the water column of two hydrochemically contrasting sites in Lake Lugano, Switzerland. The South Basin displays seasonal stratification, the development of a benthic nepheloid layer and anoxia during summer and fall. The North Basin is permanently stratified with anoxic conditions below 115m water depth. Both Basins accumulate seasonally (South Basin) or permanently (North Basin) large amounts of CH4 in the water column below the chemocline, providing ideal conditions for methanotrophic microorganisms. Previous work revealed a high potential for aerobic methane oxidation within the anoxic water column, but no evidence for true AOM. Here, we show depth distribution data of dissolved CH4, methane oxidation rates and nutrients at both sites. In addition, we performed high resolution phylogenetic analyses of microbial community structures and conducted radio-label incubation experiments with concentrated biomass from anoxic waters and potential alternative electron acceptor additions (nitrate, nitrite and sulfate). First results from the unamended experiments revealed maximum activity of methane oxidation below the redoxcline in both basins. While the incubation experiments neither provided clear evidence for NOx- nor sulfate-dependent AOM, the phylogenetic analysis revealed the

  2. Eutrophication of lake waters in China: cost, causes, and control.

    PubMed

    Le, C; Zha, Y; Li, Y; Sun, D; Lu, H; Yin, B

    2010-04-01

    Lake water eutrophication has become one of the most important factors impeding sustainable economic development in China. Knowledge of the current status of lake water eutrophication and determination of its mechanism are prerequisites to devising a sound solution to the problem. Based on reviewing the literature, this paper elaborates on the evolutional process and current state of shallow inland lake water eutrophication in China. The mechanism of lake water eutrophication is explored from nutrient sources. In light of the identified mechanism strategies are proposed to control and tackle lake water eutrophication. This review reveals that water eutrophication in most lakes was initiated in the 1980s when the national economy underwent rapid development. At present, the problem of water eutrophication is still serious, with frequent occurrence of damaging algal blooms, which have disrupted the normal supply of drinking water in shore cities. Each destructive bloom caused a direct economic loss valued at billions of yuan. Nonpoint pollution sources, namely, waste discharge from agricultural fields and nutrients released from floor deposits, are identified as the two major sources of nitrogen and phosphorus. Therefore, all control and rehabilitation measures of lake water eutrophication should target these nutrient sources. Biological measures are recommended to rehabilitate eutrophied lake waters and restore the lake ecosystem in order to bring the problem under control.

  3. Eutrophication of Lake Waters in China: Cost, Causes, and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, C.; Zha, Y.; Li, Y.; Sun, D.; Lu, H.; Yin, B.

    2010-04-01

    Lake water eutrophication has become one of the most important factors impeding sustainable economic development in China. Knowledge of the current status of lake water eutrophicatoin and determination of its mechanism are prerequisites to devising a sound solution to the problem. Based on reviewing the literature, this paper elaborates on the evolutional process and current state of shallow inland lake water eutrophication in China. The mechanism of lake water eutrophication is explored from nutrient sources. In light of the identified mechanism strategies are proposed to control and tackle lake water eutrophication. This review reveals that water eutrophication in most lakes was initiated in the 1980s when the national economy underwent rapid development. At present, the problem of water eutrophication is still serious, with frequent occurrence of damaging algal blooms, which have disrupted the normal supply of drinking water in shore cities. Each destructive bloom caused a direct economic loss valued at billions of yuan. Nonpoint pollution sources, namely, waste discharge from agricultural fields and nutrients released from floor deposits, are identified as the two major sources of nitrogen and phosphorus. Therefore, all control and rehabilitation measures of lake water eutrophication should target these nutrient sources. Biological measures are recommended to rehabilitate eutrophied lake waters and restore the lake ecosystem in order to bring the problem under control.

  4. Remote sensing water observation for supporting Lake Victoria weed management.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Laneve, Giovanni; Fusilli, Lorenzo; Pignatti, Stefano; Santini, Federico

    2009-05-01

    This paper aims to assess the suitability of remote sensing for enhancing the management of water body resources and for providing an inexpensive way to gather, on a wide area, weed infestation extent and optical parameter linked to the water body status. Remotely sensed satellite images and ancillary ground true data were used to produce land cover maps, trough classification techniques, and water compounds maps, applying radiative transfer models. The study proposed within the framework of the cooperation between Italian Foreign Affair Ministry (through the University of Rome) and Kenyan Authorities has been carried out on the Kenyan part of the Lake Victoria. This lake is one of the largest freshwater bodies of the world where, over the last few years environmental challenges and human impact have perturbed the ecological balance affecting the biodiversity. The objective of this research study is to define the thematic products, retrievable from satellite images, like weed abundance maps and water compound concentrations. These products, if provided with an appropriate time frequency, are useful to identify the preconditions for the occurrence of hazard events like abnormal macrophyte proliferation and to develop an up-to-date decision support system devoted to an apprised territory, environment and resource management.

  5. Comparison of the hydrogeology and water quality of a ground-water augmented lake with two non-augmented lakes in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Patricia A.; Sacks, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrologic effects associated with augmenting a lake with ground water from the Upper Floridan aquifer were examined in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida, from June 1996 through May 1999. The hydrogeology, ground-water flow patterns, water budgets, and water-quality characteristics were compared between a lake that has been augmented for more than 30 years (Round Lake) and two nearby non-augmented lakes (Dosson Lake and Halfmoon Lake). Compared to the other study lakes, Round Lake is in a more leakage-dominated hydrogeologic setting. The intermediate confining unit is thin or highly breached, which increases the potential for vertical ground-water flow. Round Lake has the least amount of soft, organic lake-bottom sediments and the lake bottom has been dredged deeper and more extensively than the other study lakes, which could allow more leakage from the lake bottom. The area around Round Lake has experienced more sinkhole activity than the other study lakes. During this study, three sinkholes developed around the perimeter of the lake, which may have further disrupted the intermediate confining unit. Ground-water flow patterns around Round Lake were considerably different than the non-augmented lakes. For most of the study, ground-water augmentation artificially raised the level of Round Lake to about 2 to 3 feet higher than the adjacent water table. As a result, lake water recharged the surficial aquifer around the entire lake perimeter, except during very wet periods when ground-water inflow occurred around part of the lake perimeter. The non-augmented lakes typically had areas of ground-water inflow and areas of lake leakage around their perimeter, and during wet periods, ground-water inflow occurred around the entire lake perimeter. Therefore, the area potentially contributing ground water to the non-augmented lakes is much larger than for augmented Round Lake. Vertical head loss within the surficial aquifer was greater at Round Lake than the other

  6. Genotoxicity of drinking water from Chao Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.; Jiao, Q.C.; Huang, X.M.; Jiang, J.P.; Cui, S.Q.; Yao, G.H.; Jiang, Z.R.; Zhao, H.K.; Wang, N.Y.

    1999-02-01

    Genotoxic activity appears to originate primarily from reactions of chlorine with humic substances in the source waters. Comparisons of extracts of settled versus chlorinated water have confirmed that chlorinating during water treatment produces mutagenic activity in the mutagenicity tests. Present work on XAD-2 extracts of raw, chlorinated (treated), and settled water from the Chao Lake region of China has involved a battery of mutagenicity assays for various genetic endpoints: the Salmonella test, the sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) induction in Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cells, and the micronucleus (MN) induction in the peripheral blood erythrocytes of silver carp. Extracts of raw and treated water but not the settled water are mutagenic in the Salmonella assay. On the other hand, extracts of three water samples show activity in the SCE and MN assays, especially the raw and treated water. These data show that contamination and chlorinating contribute mutagens to drinking water and suggest that the mammalian assays may be more sensitive for detecting mutagenicity in aquatic environment than the Salmonella test.

  7. Monitoring and modeling water temperature and trophic status of a shallow Mediterranean lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giadrossich, Filippo; Bueche, Thomas; Pulina, Silvia; Marrosu, Roberto; Padedda, Bachisio Mario; Mariani, Maria Antonietta; Vetter, Mark; Cohen, Denis; Pirastru, Mario; Niedda, Marcello; Lugliè, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    Lakes are sensitive to changes in climate and human activities. Over the last few decades, Mediterranean lakes have experienced various problems due to the current climate change (drought, flood, warming, salt accumulation, water quality changes, etc.), often amplified by water use, intensification of land use activities, and pollution. The overall impact of these changes on water resources is still an open question. In this study we monitor the trophic status and the dynamics of water temperature of Lake Baratz, the only natural lake in Sardinia, Italy, characterized by high salinity and shallow depth. We extend the research carried out in the past 8 years by integrating new physical, chemical and biological data using a multidisciplinary approach that combines hydrological and biological dynamics. In particular, the lake water balance and the thermal and hydrochemical regime are studied with a lake dynamic model (the General Lake Model or GLM) which combine the energy budget method for estimating lake evaporation, and a physically-based rainfall-runoff simulator for estimating lake inflow, calibrated with measurements at the cross section of the main inlet stream. The trophic state of the lake was evaluated applying the OCDE Probability Distribution Diagrams method, which requires nutrient concentrations in the lake (total phosphorus), phytoplankton chlorophyll a and Secchi disk transparency data. We collected field data from a raft station and a land station, measuring net solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity, precipitation, wind velocity, atmospheric pressure, and temperature from thermistors submerged in the uppermost three centimeters of water and beneath the lake surface at depths of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 m. Samples for nutrients and chlorophyll a analyses were collected at the same above mentioned depths close to the raft station using a Niskin bottle. Temperature, salinity, pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured using a multi

  8. Water quality of selected lakes in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington, with respect to lake acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Turney, G.L.; Dion, N.P.; Sumioka, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen lakes in Mount Rainier National park were evaluated for general chemical characteristics, sensitivity to acidification by acidic precipitation, and degree of existing acidification. The lakes studies were Allen, one of the Chenuis group, Crescent, Crystal, Eleanor, Fan, one of the Golfen group, Marsh, Mowich, Mystic, Shriner, and two unnamed lakes. The lakes were sampled in August 1983. The major cations were calcium and sodium, and the major anion was bicarbonate. Alkalinity concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 9.0 mg/L in 12 of the lakes. Allen Lake was the exception, having an alkalinity concentration of 27 mg/L. The pH values for all of the lakes ranged from 5.8 to 6.5. In most of the lakes, vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance were relatively uniform. Exceptions to general water quality patterns were observed in three lakes. Allen Lake had a specific conductance value of 58 Microsiemens/cm. The lake of the Golfen group was anaerobic at the bottom and had relatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved metals, and a lower light transmission than the other lakes studied. One of the unnamed lakes had relatively high concentrations of phytoplankton and dissolved organic carbon and relatively low levels of light transmission. Comparisons of lake data to acid-sensitivity thresholds for specific conductance and alkalinity indicated that all of the lakes except Allen would be sensitive to acidic precipitation. The small sizes of the lakes, and their locations in basins of high precipitation and weathering-resistant rock types, enhance their sensitivity. None of the lakes in this study appeared to be presently acidified.

  9. Effects of water clarity on lake stratification and lake-atmosphere heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiskanen, Jouni J.; Mammarella, Ivan; Ojala, Anne; Stepanenko, Victor; Erkkilä, Kukka-Maaria; Miettinen, Heli; Sandström, Heidi; Eugster, Werner; Leppäranta, Matti; Järvinen, Heikki; Vesala, Timo; Nordbo, Annika

    2015-08-01

    Recent progress of including lake subroutines in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models has led to more accurate forecasts. In lake models, one essential parameter is water clarity, parameterized via the light extinction coefficient, Kd, for which a global constant value is usually used. We used direct eddy covariance fluxes and basic meteorological measurements coupled with lake water temperature and clarity measurements from a boreal lake to estimate the performance of two lake models, LAKE and FLake. These models represent two 1-D modeling frameworks broadly used in NWP. The results show that the lake models are very sensitive to changes in Kd when it is lower than 0.5 m-1. The progress of thermal stratification depended strongly on Kd. In dark-water simulations the mixed layer was shallower, longwave and turbulent heat losses higher, and therefore the average water column temperatures lower than in clear-water simulations. Thus, changes in water clarity can also affect the onset of ice cover. The more complex LAKE modeled the seasonal thermocline deepening, whereas it remained virtually constant during summer in the FLake model. Both models overestimated the surface water temperatures by about 1°C and latent heat flux by >30%, but the variations in heat storage and sensible heat flux were adequately simulated. Our results suggest that, at least for humic lakes, a lake-specific, but not time-depending, constant value for Kd can be used and that a global mapping of Kd would be most beneficial in regions with relatively clear lakes, e.g., in lakes at high altitudes.

  10. Continuous water-quality monitoring to improve lake management at Lake Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge

    Treesearch

    Michelle Moorman; Tom Augspurger

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has partnered with U.S. Geological Survey to establish 2 continuous water-quality monitoring stations at Lake Mattamuskeet. Stations on the east and west side of the lake measure water level, clarity, dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, salinity, and conductivity.

  11. Water Budget for Sebago Lake, Maine, 1996-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dudley, Robert W.; Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Nielsen, Joseph P.

    2001-01-01

    Annual water budgets were developed for Sebago Lake in southwestern Maine. The inflow components of the water budget are direct precipitation to the surface of the lake and surface-water inflow. Mean annual inflow to Sebago Lake during water years 1996-99 was 35,100 million cubic feet. The outflow components of the water budget are evaporation from the surface of the lake, municipal water-supply withdrawals by the Portland Water District, and surface-water outflow. Mean annual outflow during water years 1996-99 was 28,200 million cubic feet. The two largest components of the water budgets are the surface-water components - surface-water inflow was 84.0 percent of the mean annual inflow budget and surface-water outflow was 87.3 percent of the mean annual outflow budget. Changes in lake storage also were included in the water budgets. The sum of inflow minus outflow volumes, adjusted for changes in lake storage, do not balance for each water year. This remainder volume is the residual in the water budget calculation. The mean annual residual for the 4 years is 5,860 million cubic feet and is relatively consistent in magnitude and sign (positive) each water year, indicating either a systematic overestimation of inflows to or underestimation of outflows from Sebago Lake. The residual also could be partially composed of ground-water flow, a budget component not accounted for in this study. Errors associated with budgeting precipitation, evaporation, and net changes in storage are relatively small. The largest potential errors in calculating the water budget for Sebago Lake are those associated with surface-water inflow and outflow, because they are the two largest elements of the budget, and ground-water flow (net in or out) because it was not computed.

  12. Investigating microbial diversity and UV radiation impact at the high-altitude Lake Aguas Calientes, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Lorena; Chong, Guillermo; Demergasso, Cecilia; Farías, María Eugenia; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Grin, Edmond; Minkley, Edwin, Jr.; Yu, Yeoungeob

    2007-09-01

    The High-Lakes Project is funded by the NAI and explores the highest perennial volcanic lakes on Earth in the Bolivian and Chilean Andes, including several lakes ~6,000 m elevation. These lakes represent an opportunity to study the evolution of microbial organisms in relatively shallow waters not providing substantial protection against UV radiation. Aguas Calientes (5,870 m) was investigated (November 2006) and samples of water and sediment collected at 1, 3, 5, and 10 cm depth. An Eldonet UV dosimeter positioned on the shore records UV radiation and temperature, and is logging data year round. A UV SolarLight sensor allowed acquisition of point measurements in all channels at the time of the sampling. UVA, UVB, and PAR peaks between 11:00 am and 1:00 pm reached 7.7 mW/cm2, 48.5 μW/cm2, and 511 W/m2, respectively. The chemical composition of the water sample was analyzed. DNA was extracted and DGGE analyses with bacterial and archaeal 16S fragments were performed to describe microbial diversity. Antibiotic resistances were established previously in similar environments in Argentine Andean wetlands. In order to determine these resistances in our samples, they were inoculated onto LB and R2A media and onto R2A medium containing either chloramphenicol, ampicillin or tetracycline. Bacterial was higher than archeal cell number determined by RT-PCR in all the samples, reaching maximum total values of 5x10 5 cell mL-1. DGGE results from these samples and Licancabur summit lake (5,916 m) samples were also compared. Eight antibiotic-resistant Gram negative strains have been isolated with distinct resistance patterns.

  13. Lake Erie Water Level Study. Appendix C. Coastal Zone.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    ACCESION NO 3.RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE Of REPORT &PERIOD COVERED Lake Erie Water Level Study , Appendix C,Fia Coasta...10 N1000 N N N N N N N N N N A2. 57 AD-AIN 586 INTERNATIONAL LAKE ERIE REGULATION STUDY BOARD FIG 13/2 LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL STUDY . APPENDIX C

  14. Water Quality Studies: Richard B. Russell and Clarks Hill Lakes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    studies at Richard B. Russell and Clarks Hill lakes , Georgia and South Carolina. The study objectives were to document water quality conditions in each...Monitoring Program - Richard B. Russell Dam and Lake , Georgia and South Carolina" (Intra-Army Order No. PD-EI-84-07). Portions of these studies were...by the U. S. Army Corps of Engi- neers, is situated between Hartwell and Clarks Hill Lakes . 7. Concerns over the potential environmental and water

  15. Ultraviolet radiation induces filamentation in bacterial assemblages from North Andean Patagonian lakes.

    PubMed

    Modenutti, Beatriz; Balseiro, Esteban; Corno, Gianluca; Callieri, Cristiana; Bertoni, Roberto; Caravati, Emanuele

    2010-01-01

    Through laboratory experiments, we tested whether UV radiation (UVR) induces filamentation in natural bacteria assemblages from North Andean Patagonian lakes. We incubated water from three different lakes for 72 h in four separate treatments: (1) UVR + PAR (photosynthetically active radiation), (2) 50% UVR + PAR, (3) PAR and (4) 50% PAR. The irradiance levels used in the experiments were equivalent to those registered at the epilimnion of the lakes. In the UVR treatments filamentation was induced after the first 24 h and the proportion continued to increase for the next 48-72 h. A comparison of the gross composition and diversity of the entire community (cells >0.2 microm) with bacterial filaments alone (>5.0 microm) showed that UVR-induced filamentation is not a feature of any particular cluster. By sequencing part of the 16S rRNA gene of the taxonomic units obtained using denaturing gels, we observed that strains in the beta-Proteobacteria group were of relatively high importance in filament formation, followed by Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides, gamma-Proteobacteria and alpha-Proteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria were almost nonexistent in the filaments. We propose that UVR doses equivalent to those of Andean lakes produce bacterial morphological changes, and that all bacterial groups except Actinobacteria can potentially form filaments.

  16. Improvements in lake water budget computations using Landsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gervin, J. C.; Shih, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    A supervised multispectral classification was performed on Landsat data for Lake Okeechobee's extensive littoral zone to provide two types of information. First, the acreage of a given plant species as measured by satellite was combined with a more accurate transpiration rate to give a better estimate of evapotranspiration from the littoral zone. Second, the surface area coupled by plant communities was used to develop a better estimate of the water surface as a function of lake stage. Based on this information, more detailed representations of evapotranspiration and total water surface (and hence total lake volume) were provided to the water balance budget model for lake volume predictions. The model results based on information derived from satellite demonstrated a 94 percent reduction in cumulative lake stage error and a 70 percent reduction in the maximum deviation of the lake stage.

  17. Improvements in lake water budget computations using Landsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gervin, J. C.; Shih, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    A supervised multispectral classification was performed on Landsat data for Lake Okeechobee's extensive littoral zone to provide two types of information. First, the acreage of a given plant species as measured by satellite was combined with a more accurate transpiration rate to give a better estimate of evapotranspiration from the littoral zone. Second, the surface area coupled by plant communities was used to develop a better estimate of the water surface as a function of lake stage. Based on this information, more detailed representations of evapotranspiration and total water surface (and hence total lake volume) were provided to the water balance budget model for lake volume predictions. The model results based on information derived from satellite demonstrated a 94 percent reduction in cumulative lake stage error and a 70 percent reduction in the maximum deviation of the lake stage.

  18. Lake water quality mapping from LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherz, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The lakes in three LANDSAT scenes were mapped by the Bendix MDAS multispectral analysis system. Field checking the maps by three separate individuals revealed approximately 90-95% correct classification for the lake categories selected. Variations between observers was about 5%. From the MDAS color coded maps the lake with the worst algae problem was easily located. This lake was closely checked and a pollution source of 100 cows was found in the springs which fed this lake. The theory, lab work and field work which made it possible for this demonstration project to be a practical lake classification procedure are presented.

  19. Watershed land use effects on lake water quality in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anders; Trolle, Dennis; Søndergaard, Martin; Lauridsen, Torben L; Bjerring, Rikke; Olesen, Jørgen E; Jeppesen, Erik

    2012-06-01

    Mitigating nutrient losses from anthropogenic nonpoint sources is today of particular importance for improving the water quality of numerous freshwater lakes worldwide. Several empirical relationships between land use and in-lake water quality variables have been developed, but they are often weak, which can in part be attributed to lack of detailed information about land use activities or point sources. We examined a comprehensive data set comprising land use data, point-source information, and in-lake water quality for 414 Danish lakes. By excluding point-source-influenced lakes (n = 210), the strength in relationship (R2) between in-lake total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations and the proportion of agricultural land use in the watershed increased markedly, from 10-12% to 39-42% for deep lakes and from 10-12% to 21-23% for shallow lakes, with the highest increase for TN. Relationships between TP and agricultural land use were even stronger for lakes with rivers in their watershed (55%) compared to lakes without (28%), indicating that rivers mediate a stronger linkage between landscape activity and lake water quality by providing a "delivery" mechanism for excess nutrients in the watershed. When examining the effect of different near-freshwater land zones in contrast to the entire watershed, relationships generally improved with size of zone (25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 m from the edge of lake and streams) but were by far strongest using the entire watershed. The proportion of agricultural land use in the entire watershed was best in explaining lake water quality, both relative to estimated nutrient surplus at agricultural field level and near-lake land use, which somewhat contrasts typical strategies of management policies that mainly target agricultural nutrient applications and implementation of near-water buffer zones. This study suggests that transport mechanisms within the whole catchment are important for the nutrient export to lakes

  20. Water balance and irrigation water pumping of Lake Merdada for potato farming in Dieng Highland, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Fadlillah, Lintang N; Widyastuti, M

    2016-08-01

    Lakes provide water resources for domestic use, livestock, irrigational use, etc. Water availability of lakes can be estimated using lake water balance. Lake water balance is calculated from the water input and output of a lake. Dieng Highland has several volcanic lakes in its surroundings. Lake Merdada in Dieng Highland has been experiencing extensive water pumping for several years more than other lakes in the surrounding area. It provides irrigation water for potato farming in Dieng Highland. The hydrological model of this lake has not been studied. The modeled water balance in this research uses primary data, i.e., bathymetric data, soil texture, and outflow discharge, as well as secondary data, i.e., rainfall, temperature, Landsat 7 ETM+ band 8 image, and land use. Water balance input components consist of precipitation on the surface area, surface (direct) runoff from the catchment area, and groundwater inflow and outflow (G net), while the output components consist of evaporation, river outflow, and irrigation. It shows that groundwater is the dominant input and output of the lake. On the other hand, the actual irrigation water pumping plays the leading role as human-induced alteration of outflow discharge. The maximum irrigation pumping modeling shows that it will decrease lake storage up to 37.14 % per month and may affect the ecosystem inside the lake.

  1. Water Quality of Eight Finger Lakes, New York: Changes from 2005 Through 2008.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oneill, K.; Halfman, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    A comparative study of eight Finger Lakes in central and western New York State, Honeoye, Canandaigua, Keuka, Seneca, Cayuga, Owasco, Skaneateles, and Otisco, revealed a strong correlation of water quality to the percentage of agricultural land in the watershed and varying rates of change in water quality over a four year period. The eight lakes were sampled monthly from May through October since 2005 with Otisco added in 2008. Surface and bottom water samples were collected at a minimum of two, deep-water sites in each lake, with additional sites in Owasco, Seneca and Cayuga. The samples were analyzed in the laboratory for total phosphorous (TP), soluble reactive phosphate (SRP), dissolved silica (SRSi), nitrates, chlorophyll-a, total suspended solids (TSS), and major ion concentrations following standard limnological techniques. CTD profiles of conductivity, depth, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, photosynthetically active radiation, fluorescence and turbidity were also collected at each site, as well as secchi disk depths, plankton, and titrations for dissolved oxygen and alkalinity. Water quality rankings were assigned to each lake by comparing annual averages of dissolved nitrates, dissolved phosphorous, total phosphates, chlorophyll a, total suspended sediments and secchi disk depths resulting in a separate ranking for each year and each lake in the study. The percent of agricultural land in each watershed correlates more strongly to water quality than the size of or population in each watershed. Seneca Lake has gradually but steadily declined in water quality over the past four years, suggesting that nutrient loading is a critical problem in this watershed. Keuka, Skaneateles, Owasco, and to a lesser extent Canandaigua and Cayuga remained constant or improved slightly, most likely due to more stringent enforcement of water quality legislation in these watersheds. In 2007, water quality improved in Skaneateles and Owasco Lakes. At Owasco Lake, this observed

  2. Plutonium speciation in water from Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cleveland, J.M.; Rees, T.F.; Nash, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    The solubility of plutonium in Mono Lake water is enhanced by the presence of large concentrations of indigenous carbonate ions and moderate concentrations of fluoride ions. In spite of the complex chemical composition of this water, only a few ions govern the behavior of plutonium, as demonstrated by the fact that it was possible to duplicate plutonium speciation in a synthetic water containing only the principal components of Mono Lake water.

  3. Plutonium speciation in water from Mono Lake, California

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.M.; Rees, T.F.; Nash, K.L.

    1983-12-23

    The solubility of plutonium in Mono Lake water is enhanced by the presence of large concentrations of indigenous carbonate ions and moderate concentrations of fluoride ions. In spite of the complex chemical composition of this water, only a few ions govern the behavior of plutonium, as demonstrated by the fact that it was possible to duplicate plutonium speciation in a synthetic water containing only the principal components of Mono Lake water.

  4. A combined heat and water budget approach to quantify the groundwater inflow to a meromictic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Anthony; Back, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater exchange may have an important role in the mixing dynamics of certain lakes, and this may be comparable with near-surface mixing due to conventionally-defined surface radiation and turbulent heat fluxes. However, the heat and mass fluxes associated with groundwater input to a lake are often difficult to measure and are poorly constrained. Permanent bottom anoxia in meromictic lakes is sometimes associated with significant inputs of subsurface water, which creates a permanent upwelling system for phytoplankton blooms. This contribution presents the results of a 17 month experimental investigation of the heat and water budget of a meromictic lake in upstate New York. Fayetteville Green Lake is a good model system to conduct a combined heat and water budget analysis. It is a comparatively simple mass exchange system with one outflow stream and one significant inflow stream in addition to an important subsurface groundwater source. The lake is contained in a relatively deep (~50m) flat-bottomed basin with a groundwater injection depth at ~20m at the base of the mixolimnion. The heat budget was formulated from data from regional meteorological stations and a vertical array of temperature sensors on a subsurface mooring. The mass budget was created from continuous measurements of lake stage and precipitation data. The results highlight that groundwater input has an important effect on the overall heat budget of the lake, with an important role on the timing of the overturning of the mixolimnion in the spring and late autumn. Although lake heat budget studies have formerly been conducted to constrain the poorly-constrained evaporative term (latent heat) in the surface heat budget, the results of this study suggest that groundwater exchange may more important than the surface latent heat flux of certain lakes.

  5. Clarks Hill Lake Water Quality Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    MACROINVERTEBRATE TAXONOMIC LIST CLARKS HILL LAKE 1981 Phylum Platyhelminthes Order Diptera Class Turbellaria Ablabesmyia parajanta unidentified Planariidae A...HILL LAKE 1981 Phylum Platyhelminthes Order Diptera (continued) Planaria sp.,’ Bezzia sp. 2 unidentified Planariidae Chaoborus punctipennis unidentified

  6. Rock, Water, Critters: Lake Huron’s Groundwater-Fueled Submerged Sinkhole Ecosystems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddanda, B. A.; Ruberg, S. A.; Kendall, S.; Nold, S.; Hawley, N.

    2009-12-01

    Dissolution of the Paleozoic (~400 mya) carbonate bedrock in the Lake Huron Basin has produced numerous underwater karst sinkholes through which groundwater emerges onto the lake floor at various depths. Some of these submerged sinkholes adjacent to the coastline are visible from space (e.g., go to 45 5.181’N, 83 19.065’W or 45 11.921’N, 83 19.661’W in Google Earth). Recent underwater explorations have revealed unique hotspots of biogeochemical activity at several such submerged groundwater vents in Lake Huron. On average, the inflowing water is ten-fold higher in specific conductivity than ambient lake water (1.8 mS/cm in groundwater vs. 0.1 mS/cm in lake water) suggesting active groundwater venting to the lake floor. Fueled by venting groundwater containing high sulfate (>1000 mg/L in groundwater vs. <20mg/L in lake water) and low dissolved oxygen (<2 mg/L in groundwater vs. >8mg/L in lake water), these underwater ecosystems are characterized by sharp physical and chemical gradients and spectacularly colorful benthic microbial mats that overly carbon-rich sediments. Here, typical lake inhabitants are replaced by communities dominated by microorganisms - Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya that perform unique ecosystem functions. Lake Huron’s sinkhole ecosystems bear many similarities to geographically distant ecosystems such as deep-sea marine vents, subsurface sulfur springs and permanently ice-covered Antarctic lakes. In Lake Huron, shallow sunlit sinkholes are dominated by photosynthetic microorganisms and processes, while food webs in deep aphotic sinkholes are supported primarily by chemosynthesis. Metabolic processes occurring in sediment cores overlaid by purple cyanobacterial benthic mats from intermediate depth sinkholes receiving ~10-20% of surface solar radiation include oxygenic photosysnthesis, anoxygenic photosynthesis, chemosynthesis, sulfate reduction, sulfur oxidation, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation. Additional data from flow rates of

  7. Determining the water age of Lake Taihu during the water transfer from Yangtze River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiping; Acharya, Kumud; Zhu, Jianting; Yu, Zhongbo

    2010-05-01

    To improve water quality and alleviate the eutrophication problem for Lake Taihu, the third largest shallow lake in China, water transfer project from Yangtze River, was initiated to dilute the polluted water and export pollutants out of the lake in 2002. The impact of water transfer on transport processes of dissolved substance in the lake is studied by using the concept of water age using a three-dimensional numerical model, Environmental Fluid dynamic Code (EFDC). Influences of inflow tributaries and wind forcing on water age distribution are investigated. Model results show that the effect of water transfer on transport processes in the lake is strongly affected by hydrodynamic conditions induced by wind and inflow/outflow tributaries. Water age in Lake Taihu has highly spatial and temporal heterogeneity, with the mean water age of approximately 130 days in summer and 230 days in other seasons during the simulation year. Southeastly wind, the dominant wind direction in summer, could improve eastern areas of the lake which provide drinking water source and Meiliang Bay, the most polluted bay in the lake. The most efficient flow discharge of transferred water for diluting the lake could be approximately 100 m3/s while considering benefit/cost ratio. Additionally, the water transfer project just minor effects on parts of the lake rather than the entire lake, unless nutrient concentrations in the transferred water are reduced to a reasonable level. This study provides useful information for better understanding the complex hydrodynamic and mass transport processes in the lake, which is important for developing and implementing effective lake management strategies. Keywords: water transfer; water age; EFDC; Lake Taihu; Yangtze River

  8. The effects of water levels on Two Lake Ontario Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busch, Wolf-Dieter N.; Osborn, Ronald G.; Auble, Gregor T.

    1990-01-01

    Lake Ontario's water levels have been regulated since 1959, after the completion of the St. Lawrence River navigation and hydropower development project. The plan used to guide the regulation (1958-D) has been in effect since 1963 (Bryce, 1982). The purpose of the regulation was to prevent extreme high-water levels which increased erosion on the south shore of Lake Ontario, while protecting the interests of commercial navigation and hydropower production in the St. Lawrence River (T. Brown, personal communication, member of the Board of Control). Major user groups have sought further reductions in the range of lake level fluctuations. However, the biological resources, especially the lake influenced wetlands, benefit from the waterlevel fluctuations. Great Lakes wetlands are the most important habitat for wildlife of the region (Tilton and Schwegler, 1978). We provide information here on the responses of wetland plant communities in two wetlands to changes in lake levels over time.

  9. Quality of ground water around Vadnais Lake and in Lambert Creek watershed, and interaction of ground water with Vadnais Lake, Ramsey County, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the seepage analysis and ground-water quality evaluation indicate that the effect of the quality of the surrounding ground water on the quality of Vadnais Lake probably was small. Ground water that discharged to the lake generally had lower concentrations of calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and total dissolved solids than the lake. The mixing of ground water with the lake slightly diluted the lake with respect to these constituents.

  10. Simulating ground water-lake interactions: approaches and insights.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Randall J; Haitjema, Henk M; Krohelski, James T; Feinstein, Daniel T

    2003-01-01

    Approaches for modeling lake-ground water interactions have evolved significantly from early simulations that used fixed lake stages specified as constant head to sophisticated LAK packages for MODFLOW. Although model input can be complex, the LAK package capabilities and output are superior to methods that rely on a fixed lake stage and compare well to other simple methods where lake stage can be calculated. Regardless of the approach, guidelines presented here for model grid size, location of three-dimensional flow, and extent of vertical capture can facilitate the construction of appropriately detailed models that simulate important lake-ground water interactions without adding unnecessary complexity. In addition to MODFLOW approaches, lake simulation has been formulated in terms of analytic elements. The analytic element lake package had acceptable agreement with a published LAKI problem, even though there were differences in the total lake conductance and number of layers used in the two models. The grid size used in the original LAKI problem, however, violated a grid size guideline presented in this paper. Grid sensitivity analyses demonstrated that an appreciable discrepancy in the distribution of stream and lake flux was related to the large grid size used in the original LAKI problem. This artifact is expected regardless of MODFLOW LAK package used. When the grid size was reduced, a finite-difference formulation approached the analytic element results. These insights and guidelines can help ensure that the proper lake simulation tool is being selected and applied.

  11. Simulating ground water-lake interactions: Approaches and insights

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, R.J.; Haitjema, H.M.; Krohelski, J.T.; Feinstein, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Approaches for modeling lake-ground water interactions have evolved significantly from early simulations that used fixed lake stages specified as constant head to sophisticated LAK packages for MODFLOW. Although model input can be complex, the LAK package capabilities and output are superior to methods that rely on a fixed lake stage and compare well to other simple methods where lake stage can be calculated. Regardless of the approach, guidelines presented here for model grid size, location of three-dimensional flow, and extent of vertical capture can facilitate the construction of appropriately detailed models that simulate important lake-ground water interactions without adding unnecessary complexity. In addition to MODFLOW approaches, lake simulation has been formulated in terms of analytic elements. The analytic element lake package had acceptable agreement with a published LAK1 problem, even though there were differences in the total lake conductance and number of layers used in the two models. The grid size used in the original LAK1 problem, however, violated a grid size guideline presented in this paper. Grid sensitivity analyses demonstrated that an appreciable discrepancy in the distribution of stream and lake flux was related to the large grid size used in the original LAK1 problem. This artifact is expected regardless of MODFLOW LAK package used. When the grid size was reduced, a finite-difference formulation approached the analytic element results. These insights and guidelines can help ensure that the proper lake simulation tool is being selected and applied.

  12. Flame retardants and legacy chemicals in Great Lakes' water.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Dove, Alice; Romanak, Kevin; Backus, Sean; Hites, Ronald

    2014-08-19

    The Great Lakes have been the focus of extensive environmental research, but recent data on the aquatic concentrations of emerging compounds, such as flame retardants, are scarce. Water samples from 18 stations on the five Great Lakes were collected in 2011 and 2012 using XAD-2 resin adsorption and analyzed for PCBs, organochlorine pesticides, PAHs, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and emerging flame retardants, including organophosphate flame retardants (OPEs). Total PCB concentrations ranged from 117 ± 18 pg/L in Lake Superior to 623 ± 113 pg/L in Lake Ontario. Among the organochlorine pesticides, the most abundant was dieldrin, with the highest average concentration of 99 ± 26 pg/L in Lake Erie, followed by p,p'-DDD with an average concentration of 37 ± 8 pg/L in Lake Ontario. Total PAH concentrations were higher in Lakes Erie and Ontario than in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Superior. Total PBDE concentrations were highest in Lake Ontario (227 ± 75 pg/L), and the most abundant congeners were BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-209. Total OPE concentrations ranged between 7.3 ± 4.5 ng/L in Lake Huron to 96 ± 43 ng/L in Lake Erie.

  13. Exploding lakes and maleficent water in Grassfields legends and myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanklin, Eugenia

    1989-11-01

    In August 1984 Lake Manoun 'exploded', killing 37 people. In August 1986 Lake Nyos 'exploded', killing more than 1700 people. Both explosions occurred in the rainy season, two years and six days apart. Have there been similar explosions in the Cameroon Grassfields in the past? This paper argues that such explosions have occurred, and have been recorded in area folklore in the form of migration stories that point unmistakably to the 'maleficent' activities of lakes and other bodies of water. Two migration stories are considered and compared: an ephemeral exploding lake that destroys the Bamessi people in the Kom story, and a crater lake in the Oku story, in which the lake is said to have 'left its bed' to destroy the people of Kijem. In examining the category of 'maleficent water', several types of potentially maleficent water are considered, including indigenous classifications of lakes as 'good' or 'bad', and stories about devils or witches associated with water. All suggest that the folklore motif of dangerous, destructive water may have its basis in observed fact. While this evidence is not conclusive, it is highly suggestive and, in combination with evidence that the area around Nyos is very recently settled, it lends credence to the supposition that the crater lakes of the area may have a 'life cycle' that involves changes of sometimes stupendous, often dangerous, proportions.

  14. Pore water chemistry of an alkaline rift valley lake: Lake Turkana, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Cerling, T.E.; Johnson, T.C.; Halfman, J.D.; Lister, G.

    1985-01-01

    Lake Turkana is the largest closed basin lake in the African rift system. It has evolved through the past 5000 years to become a moderately alkaline lake. Previous mass balance argument suggest that sulfate is removed from the lake by sulfate reduction in the sediments, and that the lake is accumulating in chloride, sodium, and alkalinity. Studies of pore water from 12 meter cores collected in November 1984 show that sulfate is reduced in the sediment column with a net production of alkalinity. Some sodium is lost from the lake and diffuses into the sediment to maintain charge balance. At several meters depth, organic matter is destroyed by methanogenic bacteria, as shown by the high delta /sup 13/C values for dissolved inorganic carbon. Magnesium and calcium molar ratios change with depth; chloride, sodium, and alkalinity also change with depth.

  15. Perchlorate in Lake Water from an Operating Diamond Mine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lianna J D; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W; Groza, Laura G; Moncur, Michael C

    2015-07-07

    Mining-related perchlorate [ClO4(-)] in the receiving environment was investigated at the operating open-pit and underground Diavik diamond mine, Northwest Territories, Canada. Samples were collected over four years and ClO4(-) was measured in various mine waters, the 560 km(2) ultraoligotrophic receiving lake, background lake water and snow distal from the mine. Groundwaters from the underground mine had variable ClO4(-) concentrations, up to 157 μg L(-1), and were typically an order of magnitude higher than concentrations in combined mine waters prior to treatment and discharge to the lake. Snow core samples had a mean ClO4(-) concentration of 0.021 μg L(-1) (n=16). Snow and lake water Cl(-)/ClO4(-) ratios suggest evapoconcentration was not an important process affecting lake ClO4(-) concentrations. The multiyear mean ClO4(-) concentrations in the lake were 0.30 μg L(-1) (n = 114) in open water and 0.24 μg L(-1) (n = 107) under ice, much below the Canadian drinking water guideline of 6 μg L(-1). Receiving lake concentrations of ClO4(-) generally decreased year over year and ClO4(-) was not likely [biogeo]chemically attenuated within the receiving lake. The discharge of treated mine water was shown to contribute mining-related ClO4(-) to the lake and the low concentrations after 12 years of mining were attributed to the large volume of the receiving lake.

  16. The adaptive radiation of cichlid fish in lake tanganyika: a morphological perspective.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsumi; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika is the oldest of the Great Ancient Lakes in the East Africa. This lake harbours about 250 species of cichlid fish, which are highly diverse in terms of morphology, behaviour, and ecology. Lake Tanganyika's cichlid diversity has evolved through explosive speciation and is treated as a textbook example of adaptive radiation, the rapid differentiation of a single ancestor into an array of species that differ in traits used to exploit their environments and resources. To elucidate the processes and mechanisms underlying the rapid speciation and adaptive radiation of Lake Tanganyika's cichlid species assemblage it is important to integrate evidence from several lines of research. Great efforts have been, are, and certainly will be taken to solve the mystery of how so many cichlid species evolved in so little time. In the present review, we summarize morphological studies that relate to the adaptive radiation of Lake Tanganyika's cichlids and highlight their importance for understanding the process of adaptive radiation.

  17. The Adaptive Radiation of Cichlid Fish in Lake Tanganyika: A Morphological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tetsumi; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika is the oldest of the Great Ancient Lakes in the East Africa. This lake harbours about 250 species of cichlid fish, which are highly diverse in terms of morphology, behaviour, and ecology. Lake Tanganyika's cichlid diversity has evolved through explosive speciation and is treated as a textbook example of adaptive radiation, the rapid differentiation of a single ancestor into an array of species that differ in traits used to exploit their environments and resources. To elucidate the processes and mechanisms underlying the rapid speciation and adaptive radiation of Lake Tanganyika's cichlid species assemblage it is important to integrate evidence from several lines of research. Great efforts have been, are, and certainly will be taken to solve the mystery of how so many cichlid species evolved in so little time. In the present review, we summarize morphological studies that relate to the adaptive radiation of Lake Tanganyika's cichlids and highlight their importance for understanding the process of adaptive radiation. PMID:21716857

  18. Comparison of the hydrogeology and water quality of a ground-water augmented lake with two non-augmented lakes in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Patricia A.; Sacks, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrologic effects associated with augmenting a lake with ground water from the Upper Floridan aquifer were examined in northwest Hillsborough County, Florida, from June 1996 through May 1999. The hydrogeology, ground-water flow patterns, water budgets, and water-quality characteristics were compared between a lake that has been augmented for more than 30 years (Round Lake) and two nearby nonaugmented lakes (Dosson Lake and Halfmoon Lake). Compared to the other study lakes, Round Lake is in a more leakage-dominated hydrogeologic setting. The intermediate confining unit is thin or highly breached, which increases the potential for vertical ground-water flow. Round Lake has the least amount of soft, organic lake-bottom sediments and the lake bottom has been dredged deeper and more extensively than the other study lakes, which could allow more leakage from the lake bottom. The area around Round Lake has experienced more sinkhole activity than the other study lakes. During this study, three sinkholes developed around the perimeter of the lake, which may have further disrupted the intermediate confining unit.Ground-water flow patterns around Round Lake were considerably different than the nonaugmented lakes. For most of the study, groundwater augmentation artificially raised the level of Round Lake to about 2 to 3 feet higher than the adjacent water table. As a result, lake water recharged the surficial aquifer around the entire lake perimeter, except during very wet periods when ground-water inflow occurred around part of the lake perimeter. The non-augmented lakes typically had areas of ground-water inflow and areas of lake leakage around their perimeter, and during wet periods, ground-water inflow occurred around the entire lake perimeter. Therefore, the area potentially contributing ground water to the non-augmented lakes is much larger than for augmented Round Lake. Vertical head loss within the surficial aquifer was greater at Round Lake than the other study

  19. Water Quality Assessment Dale Hollow Lake and Its Inflows,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    NATIONAL BUREAU Of STANDARDS-1963-A I B US Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Water Quality Assessment Dale Hollow Lake and Its Inflows March...PERIOD COVERED Water Quality Assessment Final Report Dale Hollow Lake and Its Inflows 6. PERFORMING ORO. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(a) 6. CONTRACT OR... Water Resources Center, Tennessee Tech. Univ. Box 5082 Cookeville, TN 38505 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE U.S. Army Engineer

  20. Does water hyacinth on East African lakes promote cholera outbreaks?

    PubMed

    Feikin, Daniel R; Tabu, Collins W; Gichuki, John

    2010-08-01

    Cholera outbreaks continue to occur regularly in Africa. Cholera has been associated with proximity to lakes in East Africa, and Vibrio cholerae has been found experimentally to concentrate on the floating aquatic plant, water hyacinth, which is periodically widespread in East African lakes since the late 1980s. From 1994 to 2008, Nyanza Province, which is the Kenyan province bordering Lake Victoria, accounted for a larger proportion of cholera cases than expected by its population size (38.7% of cholera cases versus 15.3% of national population). Yearly water-hyacinth coverage on the Kenyan section of Lake Victoria was positively associated with the number of cholera cases reported in Nyanza Province (r = 0.83; P = 0.0010). Water hyacinth on freshwater lakes might play a role in initiating cholera outbreaks and causing sporadic disease in East Africa.

  1. Preliminary water-quality characterization of lakes in Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bortleson, Gilbert Carl

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for comparing and characterizing lakes in Washington on the basis of water quality. The method can aid in selecting lakes for lake-restoration efforts. To simplify comparisons, a characteristic value (CV) was developed for each of 617 lakes in Washington using principal-component analysis. Three of 14 water-quality properties measured were used in this analysis because the principal component of the three properties accounted for 63 percent of the variance in the correlation matrix. The three properties were Secchi-disc visibility and concentrations of phosphorus and organic nitrogen. The significance of the derived CV 's was evaluated by regression of chlorophyll a concentration against CV. The resulting standard error of estimate of + or - 1.8 micrograms per liter of chlorophyll a indicated that the CV can be a useful index in assessing relative water-quality and trophic conditions among lakes. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Does Water Hyacinth on East African Lakes Promote Cholera Outbreaks?

    PubMed Central

    Feikin, Daniel R.; Tabu, Collins W.; Gichuki, John

    2010-01-01

    Cholera outbreaks continue to occur regularly in Africa. Cholera has been associated with proximity to lakes in East Africa, and Vibrio cholerae has been found experimentally to concentrate on the floating aquatic plant, water hyacinth, which is periodically widespread in East African lakes since the late 1980s. From 1994 to 2008, Nyanza Province, which is the Kenyan province bordering Lake Victoria, accounted for a larger proportion of cholera cases than expected by its population size (38.7% of cholera cases versus 15.3% of national population). Yearly water-hyacinth coverage on the Kenyan section of Lake Victoria was positively associated with the number of cholera cases reported in Nyanza Province (r = 0.83; P = 0.0010). Water hyacinth on freshwater lakes might play a role in initiating cholera outbreaks and causing sporadic disease in East Africa. PMID:20682884

  3. Physicochemical Characterization of Lake Spray Aerosol Generated from Great Lakes Water Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Axson, J. L.; May, N.; Pratt, K.

    2014-12-01

    Wave breaking across bodies of water releases particles into the air which can impact climate and human health. Similar to sea spray aerosols formed through marine wave breaking, freshwater lakes generate lake spray aerosol (LSA). LSA can impact climate directly through scattering/absorption and indirectly through cloud nucleation. In addition, these LSA are suggested to impact human health through inhalation of these particles during algal bloom periods characterized by toxic cyanobacteria. Few studies have been conducted to assess the physical and chemical properties of freshwater LSA. Herein, we discuss constructing a LSA generation system and preliminary physical and chemical characterization of aerosol generated from water samples collected at various sites across Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, and Lake Michigan. Information on aerosol size distributions, number concentrations, and chemical composition will be discussed as a function of lake water blue-green algae concentration, dissolved organic carbon concentration, temperature, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen concentration. These studies represent a first step towards evaluating the potential for LSA to impact climate and health in the Great Lakes region.

  4. Long-Term Variability of Satellite Lake Surface Water Temperatures in the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierach, M. M.; Matsumoto, K.; Holt, B.; McKinney, P. J.; Tokos, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Great Lakes are the largest group of freshwater lakes on Earth that approximately 37 million people depend upon for fresh drinking water, food, flood and drought mitigation, and natural resources that support industry, jobs, shipping and tourism. Recent reports have stated (e.g., the National Climate Assessment) that climate change can impact and exacerbate a range of risks to the Great Lakes, including changes in the range and distribution of certain fish species, increased invasive species and harmful algal blooms, declining beach health, and lengthened commercial navigation season. In this study, we will examine the impact of climate change on the Laurentian Great Lakes through investigation of long-term lake surface water temperatures (LSWT). We will use the ATSR Reprocessing for Climate: Lake Surface Water Temperature & Ice Cover (ARC-Lake) product over the period 1995-2012 to investigate individual and interlake variability. Specifically, we will quantify the seasonal amplitude of LSWTs, the first and last appearances of the 4°C isotherm (i.e., an important identifier of the seasonal evolution of the lakes denoting winter and summer stratification), and interpret these quantities in the context of global interannual climate variability such as ENSO.

  5. Water quality of selected lakes in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington with respect to lake acidification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turney, G.L.; Dion, N.P.; Sumioka, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen lakes in Mount Rainier National Park were evaluated for general chemical characteristics, sensitivity to acidification by acidic precipitation, and degree of existing acidification. The lakes studies were Allen, one of the Chenuis group, Crescent , Crystal, Eleanor, Fan, one of the Golden group, Marsh, Mowich, Mystic, Shriner, and two unnamed lakes. The lakes were sampled in August 1983. Specific conductance values were generally 21 microsiemens/cm at 25 C or less, and dissolved solids concentrations were generally 20 mg/L or less. The major cations were calcium and sodium, and the major anion was bicarbonate. Alkalinity concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 9.0 mg/L in 12 of the lakes. Allen Lake was the exception, having an alkalinity concentration of 27 mg/L. The pH values for all of the lakes ranged from 5.8 to 6.5. In most of the lakes, vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance were relatively uniform. In the deeper lakes, temperature decreased with depth and dissolved-oxygen concentrations increased to about 20 feet, remained constant to 80 ft, then decreased with increasing depth. Exceptions to general water quality patterns were observed in three lakes. Allen Lake had a specific conductance value of 58 Microsiemens/cm. The lake of the Golden group was anaerobic at the bottom and had relatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved metals, and a lower light transmission than the other lakes studied. One of the unnamed lakes had relatively high concentrations of phytoplankton and dissolved organic carbon and relatively low levels of light transmission. Comparisons of lake data to acid-sensitivity thresholds for specific conductance and alkalinity indicated that all of the lakes except Allen would be sensitive to acidic precipitation. The small sizes of the lakes, and their locations in basins of high precipitation and weathering-resistant rock types, enhance their sensitivity. None of the

  6. Effects of simulated solar UVB radiation on early developmental stages of the northwestern salamander (Ambystoma gracile) from three lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, R.D.; Little, E.E.; Pearl, C.A.; Hoffman, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) has received much attention as a factor that could play a role in amphibian population declines. UV can be hazardous to some amphibians, but the resultant effects depend on a variety of environmental and behavioral factors. In this study, the potential effects of UV on the Northwestern Salamander, Ambystoma gracile, from three lakes were assessed in the laboratory using a solar simulator. We measured the survival of embryos and the survival and growth of larvae exposed to four UV treatments in controlled laboratory studies, the UV absorbance of egg jelly, oviposition depths in the lakes, and UV absorbance in water samples from the three lakes. Hatching success of embryos decreased in the higher UV treatments as compared to the control treatments, and growth of surviving larvae was significantly reduced in the higher UVB irradiance treatments. The egg jelly exhibited a small peak of absorbance within the UVB range (290-320 nm). The magnitude of UV absorbance differed among egg jellies from the three lakes. Oviposition depths at the three sites averaged 1.10 m below the water surface. Approximately 66 of surface UVB radiation was attenuated at 10-cm depth in all three lakes. Results of this study indicate that larvae may be sensitive to UVB exposure under laboratory conditions; however, in field conditions the depths of egg deposition in the lakes, absorbance of UV radiation by the water column, and the potential for behavioral adjustments may mitigate severe effects of UV radiation. Copyright 2010 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  7. Characterization of lake water and ground water movement in the littoral zone of Williams Lake, a closed-basin lake in North central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M.; LaBaugh, J.W.; Parkhurst, R.S.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Winter, T.C.; Antweiler, R.C.; Dean, W.E.

    2003-01-01

    Williams Lake, Minnesota is a closed-basin lake that is a flow-through system with respect to ground water. Ground-water input represents half of the annual water input and most of the chemical input to the lake. Chemical budgets indicate that the lake is a sink for calcium, yet surficial sediments contain little calcium carbonate. Sediment pore-water samplers (peepers) were used to characterize solute fluxes at the lake-water-ground-water interface in the littoral zone and resolve the apparent disparity between the chemical budget and sediment data. Pore-water depth profiles of the stable isotopes ??18O and ??2H were non-linear where ground water seeped into the lake, with a sharp transition from lake-water values to ground-water values in the top 10 cm of sediment. These data indicate that advective inflow to the lake is the primary mechanism for solute flux from ground water. Linear interstitial velocities determined from ??2H profiles (316 to 528 cm/yr) were consistent with velocities determined independently from water budget data and sediment porosity (366 cm/yr). Stable isotope profiles were generally linear where water flowed out of the lake into ground water. However, calcium profiles were not linear in the same area and varied in response to input of calcium carbonate from the littoral zone and subsequent dissolution. The comparison of pore-water calcium profiles to pore-water stable isotope profiles indicate calcium is not conservative. Based on the previous understanding that 40-50 % of the calcium in Williams Lake is retained, the pore-water profiles indicate aquatic plants in the littoral zone are recycling the retained portion of calcium. The difference between the pore-water depth profiles of calcium and ??18O and ??2H demonstrate the importance of using stable isotopes to evaluate flow direction and source through the lake-water-ground-water interface and evaluate mechanisms controlling the chemical balance of lakes. Published in 2003 by John Wiley

  8. Preliminary evaluation of lake susceptibility to water-quality degradation by recreational use, Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilliom, Robert J.; Dethier, D.P.; Safioles, S.A.; Heller, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The relative susceptibility of lakes in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area to water-quality degradation was evaluated from two perspectives: (1) water-quality sensitivity, which is the tendency of a lake 's water quality to degrade in response to pollutant loading, and (2) pollutant-loading likelihood, which is determined by the presence of drainage-basin features that enhance the transport of pollutants to a lake. Water-quality sensitivity was evaluated for 60 lakes, using a mass-balance phosphorus model to predict the response of each lake to a hypothetical ' worst-case ' increase in phosphorus loading. This evaluation suggested that lakes in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area generally are not sensitive to foreseeable increases in phosphorus loading because of their high rate of dilution and flushing. Pollutant-loading likelihood was evaluated according to the amount of seasonal ' wet area ' near a lake and in the drainage basin. Of 298 lakes evaluated for pollutant-loading likelihood, 74 lakes were rated moderate to high. On the basis of these findings, lakes in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area are generally not considered susceptible to long-term degradation as a result of recreational use, but some lakes are probably susceptible to temporary local pollution. The nature of this potential problem, and knowledge of natural features of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area, suggest an approach for managing recreation so that the risk of water-quality degradation is minimized. (USGS)

  9. Assessment of water availability and demand in Lake Guiers , Senegal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambou, D.; Weihrauch, D.; Hellwing, V.; Diekkrüger, B.; Höllermann, B.; Gaye, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Assessment of water availability and demand in Lake Guiers, SenegalWater resources are critical to economic growth and social development. In most African countries, supply of drinking water to satisfy population needs is a key issue because of population growth and climate and land use change. During the last three decades, increasing population, changing patterns of water demand, and concentration of population and economic activities in urban areas has pressurize Senegal's freshwater resources. To overcome this deficit, Senegal turned, to the exploitation of the Lake Guiers. It is the sole water reservoir which can be used extensively as a stable freshwater. Its water is use for irrigating crops and sugar refinery and as a drinking water resource for urban centres, including Dakar, the capital city of Senegal, as well as for the local population and animal herds. To ensure sustainability, a greater understanding of Lake Guiers's water resources and effective management of its use will be required. In this study we developed and quantified future water situation (water availability and demand) in Lake Guiers under scenarios of climate change and population growth until 2050, using the water management model WEAP (Water Evaluation And Planning system). The results show that the pressure on Lake Guiers's water resources will increase, leading to greater competition between agriculture and municipal demand site. Decreasing inflows due to climate change will aggravate this situation. WEAP results offer basis to assister lake Guiers water resources manager for an efficient long-term planning and management. Keywords: climate change, population growth , IWRM, Lake Guiers, Senegal

  10. Water Quality Investigations at Lake Merritt in Oakland, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, G.; Casino, C.; Johnson, K.; Huang, J.; Le, A.; Truisi, V. M.; Turner, D.; Yanez, F.; Yu, J. F.; Unigarro, M.; Vue, G.; Garduno, L.; Cuff, K.

    2005-12-01

    Lake Merritt is a saltwater tidal lagoon that forms a portion of a wildlife refuge in downtown Oakland, California. The general area was designated as the nation's first wildlife refuge in 1869, and is currently the home to over 90 species of migrating waterfowl, as well as a variety of aquatic wildlife. Situated within an area composed of compacted marine sediment located near the center of Oakland, Lake Merritt also serves as a major local catchment basin, receiving significant urban runoff from a 4,650 acre local watershed through 60 storm drains and four culverted creeks. Due to factors related to its geographical location, Lake Merritt has suffered from poor water quality at various times throughout its history. In fact, in May of 1999 the US Environmental Protection Agency designated Lake Merritt as a body of water whose beneficial uses are impaired, mainly due to high levels of trash and low levels of dissolved oxygen. As a contribution to continuing efforts to monitor and assess water quality of the Lake, we began a water quality investigation during the Summer of 2005, which included the measurement of dissolved oxygen concentrations of samples collected near its surface at over 85 different locations. These measurements were made using a sensor attached to a PASCO data- logger. The sensor measures the electric current produced by a chemical reaction in its probe, which is composed of a platinum cathode and a silver anode surrounded by an electrolyte solution. Results of these measurements were statistically analyzed, mapped, and then used in assessing the quality of Lake Merritt's water, particularly in relation to supporting aquatic biota. Preliminary analysis of results obtained so far indicates that the highest quality waters in Lake Merritt occur in areas that are closest to a source of San Francisco Bay water, as well as those areas nearby where water circulation is robust. Significantly high levels of dissolved oxygen were measured in an area that

  11. Water quality of four lakes in Lakeville, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tornes, L.H.; Have, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    Water-quality characteristics were determined for four selected lakes to provide background data for evaluating changes that may occur in the lakes because of urbanization. Precipitation of calcium carbonate is suggested by high pH values and a decrease in the calcium concentration when magnesium, sodium, and chloride concentrations increase. Pollution is indicated by chloride concentrations that increased from 18 to 57 milligrams per liter in 1978. The eutrophic state of the lakes is suggested by dissolved oxygen supersaturated near the surface and less than 0.1 milligram per liter near the deepest parts of the lakes. Determination of the trophic state of the lakes provided trophic state indices as high as 69-2. Phosphorus concentrations were significantly higher in two of the lakes sampled. Anacystic and Oscillatoria were the dominant phytoplankton genera. Phytoplankton blooms occurred throughout the year with the highest sampled concentration yielding 890,000 cells per milliliter.

  12. Effects of UVB radiation on grazing of two cladocerans from high-altitude Andean lakes

    PubMed Central

    Rejas, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Climate change and water extraction may result in increased exposition of the biota to ultraviolet-B radiation (UVB) in high-altitude Andean lakes. Although exposition to lethal doses in these lakes is unlikely, sub-lethal UVB doses may have strong impacts in key compartments such as zooplankton. Here, we aimed at determining the effect of sub-lethal UVB doses on filtration rates of two cladoceran species (Daphnia pulicaria and Ceriodaphnia dubia). We firstly estimated the Incipient Limiting Concentration (ILC) and the Gut Passage Time (GPT) for both species. Thereafter we exposed clones of each species to four increasing UVB doses (treatments): i) DUV-0 (Control), ii) DUV-1 (0.02 MJ m2), iii) DUV-2 (0.03 MJ m2) and iv) DUV-3 (0.15 MJ m2); and estimated their filtration rates using fluorescent micro-spheres. Our results suggest that increasing sub-lethal doses of UVB radiation may strongly disturb the structure and functioning of high-altitude Andean lakes. Filtration rates of D. pulicaria were not affected by the lowest dose applied (DUV-1), but decreased by 50% in treatments DUV-2 and DUV-3. Filtration rates for C. dubia were reduced by more than 80% in treatments DUV-1 and DUV-2 and 100% of mortality occurred at the highest UVB dose applied (DUV-3). PMID:28379975

  13. Effects of UVB radiation on grazing of two cladocerans from high-altitude Andean lakes.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Carla Eloisa; Rejas, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Climate change and water extraction may result in increased exposition of the biota to ultraviolet-B radiation (UVB) in high-altitude Andean lakes. Although exposition to lethal doses in these lakes is unlikely, sub-lethal UVB doses may have strong impacts in key compartments such as zooplankton. Here, we aimed at determining the effect of sub-lethal UVB doses on filtration rates of two cladoceran species (Daphnia pulicaria and Ceriodaphnia dubia). We firstly estimated the Incipient Limiting Concentration (ILC) and the Gut Passage Time (GPT) for both species. Thereafter we exposed clones of each species to four increasing UVB doses (treatments): i) DUV-0 (Control), ii) DUV-1 (0.02 MJ m2), iii) DUV-2 (0.03 MJ m2) and iv) DUV-3 (0.15 MJ m2); and estimated their filtration rates using fluorescent micro-spheres. Our results suggest that increasing sub-lethal doses of UVB radiation may strongly disturb the structure and functioning of high-altitude Andean lakes. Filtration rates of D. pulicaria were not affected by the lowest dose applied (DUV-1), but decreased by 50% in treatments DUV-2 and DUV-3. Filtration rates for C. dubia were reduced by more than 80% in treatments DUV-1 and DUV-2 and 100% of mortality occurred at the highest UVB dose applied (DUV-3).

  14. Monitoring water quality in Lake Atitlan, Guatemala using Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Cordova, A. I.; Christopher, S. A.; Griffin, R.; Limaye, A. S.; Irwin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Frequent and spatially continuous water quality monitoring is either unattainable or challenging for developing nations if only standard methods are used. Such standard methods rely on in situ water sampling, which is expensive, time-consuming and point specific. Through the Regional Visualization and Monitoring System (SERVIR), Lake Atitlan's water quality was first monitored in 2009 using Earth observation satellites. Lake Atitlan is a source of drinking water for the towns located nearby and a major touristic attraction for the country. Several multispectral sensors were used to monitor the largest algal bloom known to date for the lake, which covered 40% of the lake's 137 square kilometer surface. Red and Near-Infrared bands were used to isolate superficial algae from clean water. Local authorities, media, universities and local communities, broadly used the information provided by SERVIR for this event. It allowed estimating the real extent of the algal bloom and prompted immediate response for the government to address the event. However, algal blooms have been very rare in this lake. The lake is considered oligotrophic given its relatively high transparency levels that can reach 15 m in the dry season. To continue the support provided by SERVIR in the algal bloom event, an algorithm to monitor chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration under normal conditions was developed with the support of local institutions. Hyperspectral data from Hyperion on board EO-1 and in situ water quality observations were used to develop a semi-empirical algorithm for the lake. A blue to green band ratio successfully modeled Chl a concentration in Lake Atitlan with a relative error of 33%. This presentation will explain the process involved from providing an emergency response to developing a tailored tool for monitoring water quality in Lake Atitlan, Guatemala.

  15. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Antidegradation Policy

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY GUIDANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. E Appendix E to Part 132—Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Antidegradation Policy Great Lakes States and...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Antidegradation Policy

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY GUIDANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. E Appendix E to Part 132—Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Antidegradation Policy Great Lakes States and...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Antidegradation Policy

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY GUIDANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. E Appendix E to Part 132—Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Antidegradation Policy Great Lakes States and...

  18. Water quality of Fremont Lake and New Fork Lakes, western Wyoming; a progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.A.; Averett, R.C.; Mora, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Fremont Lake and New Fork Lakes in the New Fork River drainage of western Wyoming were selected for a comprehensive study of hydrologic processes affecting mountain lakes in the Rocky Mountains. Information is needed about lakes in this area to assess their response to existing and planned development. The concerns include regional issues such as acid precipitation from gas-sweetening plants, coal-fired powerplants, and smelters, as well as local issues, such as shoreline development and raising outlet control structures. Onsite measurements indicated strong thermal stratification in the lakes during the summer. Isothermal conditions occurred during December 1983 and May 1984. Mean phytoplankton concentrations were less than 5,000 cells/ml, and chlorophyll a concentrations were weakly correlated with phytoplankton concentrations. Zooplankton concentrations were small, less than 6 organisms/L. The numbers of benthic invertebrates/unit area in Fremont Lake were extremely small. The lake waters and inflow and outflow streams were chemically dilute solutions. Mean dissolved-solids concentrations were 13 mg/L in Fremont Lake and 24 mg/L in New Fork Lakes. Calcium and bicarbonate were the predominant ions. Concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen usually were less than detection limits. Trace-metals concentrations in the lakes were similar to those in precipitation and generally were small. Dissolved organic-carbon concentrations were about 1 mg/L. Concentrations of fulvic and humic acids were relatively large in the inlet of Fremont Lake during the spring. Pine Creek has deposited 800 metric tons of sediment, on an annual average, to the delta of Fremont Lake. Most sediment is deposited during spring runoff. (USGS)

  19. Water quality of Fremont Lake and New Fork Lakes, western Wyoming: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.A.; Averett, R.C.; Mora, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Fremont Lake and New Fork Lakes in the New Fork River drainage of western Wyoming were selected for a comprehensive study of hydrologic processes affecting mountain lakes in the Rocky Mountains. Information is needed about lakes in this area to assess their response to existing and planned development. The concerns include regional issues such as acid precipitation from gas-sweetening plants, coal-fired power plants, and smelters, as well as local issues, such as shoreline development and raising outlet control structures. Onsite measurements indicated strong thermal stratification in the lakes during the summer. Isothermal conditions occurred during December 1983 and May 1984. Mean phytoplankton concentrations were less than 5,000 cells/ml, and chlorophyll a concentrations were weakly correlated with phytoplankton concentrations. Zooplankton concentrations were small, less than 6 organisms/L. The numbers of benthic invertebrates/unit area in Fremont Lake were extremely small. The lake waters and inflow and outflow streams were chemically dilute solutions. Mean dissolved-solids concentrations were 13 mg/L in Fremont Lake and 24 mg/L in New Fork Lakes. Calcium and bicarbonate were the predominant ions. Concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen usually were less than detection limits. Trace-metals concentrations in the lakes were similar to those in precipitation and generally were small. Dissolved organic-carbon concentrations were about 1 mg/L. Concentrations of fulvic and humic acids were relatively large in the inlet of Fremont Lake during the spring. Pine Creek has deposited 800 metric tons of sediment, on an annual average, to the delta of Fremont Lake. Most sediment is deposited during spring runoff. 32 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Evaluation of water quality projects in the Lake Tahoe basin.

    PubMed

    Schuster, S; Grismer, M E

    2004-01-01

    Lake Tahoe is a large sub alpine lake located in the Sierra Nevada Range in the states of California and Nevada. The Lake Tahoe watershed is relatively small (800 km(20) and is made up of soils with a very low nutrient content and when combined with the Lake's enormous volume (156 km(3)) produces water of unparalleled clarity. However, urbanization around the Lake during the past 50 yr has greatly increased nutrient flux into the Lake resulting in increased algae production and rapidly declining water clarity. Lake transition from nitrogen limiting to phosphorous limiting during the last 30 yr suggests the onset of cultural eutrophication of Lake Tahoe. Protecting Lake Tahoe's water quality has become a major public concern and much time, effort, and money has been, and will be, spent on this undertaking. The effectiveness of remedial actions is the subject of some debate. Local regulatory agencies have mandated implementation of best management practices (BMPs) to mitigate the effects of development, sometimes at great additional expense for developers and homeowners who question their effectiveness. Conclusive studies on the BMP effectiveness are also expensive and can be difficult to accomplish such that very few such studies have been completed. However, several project evaluations have been completed and more are underway. Such study usually demonstrates support of the project's effectiveness in decreasing nutrient flux to Lake Tahoe. Here, we review the existing state of knowledge of nutrient loading to the Lake and to highlight the need for further evaluative investigations of BMPs in order to improve their performance in present and future regulatory actions.

  1. Effects of river-lake interactions in water and sediment on phosphorus in Dongting Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zebin; Zheng, Binghui; Wang, Lijing; Li, Hong; Wang, Xing

    2017-08-22

    As a large river connected lake, Dongting Lake is influenced by anthropogenic activities and the discharge from its upstream tributaries in the lake basin and by the water recharge via a connection to the Yangtze River (YR) outside the basin. This makes the lake phosphorous cycle more complex than that in other disconnected lakes. Here, we calculated section fluxes and ran a hydrodynamic model to investigate the phosphorus (P) variations in response to the changing interactions in the water and sediment between the YR, four tributaries, and the lake. Results show that particulate P was the dominant form with a significant linear relationship with suspended sediment (r (2) = 0.906). The sediment input reduction from the YR through three water inlets, which is closely related to the Three Gorges Reservoir operation since 2003, led to a decrease in the total P (TP) concentration in the western Dongting Lake. However, the impact and range of this decrease were fairly limited. Compared with the limited effect of the YR, the raised TP flux from the Yuanjiang tributary controlled the TP concentration at the outlet of the western Dongting Lake. Apart from the influence of the YR and the tributaries, anthropogenic activities (sand dredging) in the eastern Dongting Lake also contributed to a high TP concentration around the S10 area through sediment resuspension. We suggest that, compared with the reduction in TP flux and sediment load from the connected Yangtze River outside the basin, the elements within the basin (increased TP input from tributaries and sand dredging) have a greater effect on the variations of TP in Dongting Lake.

  2. SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA A.K. Mohanty, K. Mahesh Kumar, B. A. Prakash and V.V.S. Gurunadha Rao Ecology and Environment Group National Geophysical Research Institute, (CSIR) Hyderabad - 500 606, India E-mail:atulyakumarmohanty@yahoo.com Abstract: Hyderabad Metropolitan Development Authority has taken up restoration of urban lakes around Hyderabad city under Green Hyderabad Environment Program. Restoration of Mir Alam Tank, Durgamcheruvu, Patel cheruvu, Pedda Cheruvu and Nallacheruvu lakes have been taken up under the second phase. There are of six lakes viz., RKPuramcheruvu, Nadimicheruvu (Safilguda), Bandacheruvu Patelcheruvu, Peddacheruvu, Nallacheruvu, in North East Musi Basin covering 38 sq km. Bimonthly monitoring of lake water quality for BOD, COD, Total Nitrogen, Total phosphorous has been carried out for two hydrological cycles during October 2002- October 2004 in all the five lakes at inlet channels and outlets. The sediments in the lake have been also assessed for nutrient status. The nutrient parameters have been used to assess eutrophic condition through computation of Trophic Status Index, which has indicated that all the above lakes under study are under hyper-eutrophic condition. The hydrogeological, geophysical, water quality and groundwater data base collected in two watersheds covering 4 lakes has been used to construct groundwater flow and mass transport models. The interaction of lake-water with groundwater has been computed for assessing the lake water budget combining with inflow and outflow measurements on streams entering and leaving the lakes. Individual lake water budget has been used for design of appropriate capacity of Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) on the inlet channels of the lakes for maintaining Full Tank Level (FTL) in each lake. STPs are designed for tertiary treatment i.e. removal of nutrient load viz., Phosphates and Nitrates. Phosphates are

  3. Influence of Lake Stratification Onset on Summer Surface Water Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolway, R. I.; Merchant, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Summer lake surface water temperatures (LSSWT) are sensitive to climatic warming and have previously been shown to increase at a faster rate than surface air temperatures in some lakes, as a response to thermal stratification occurring earlier in spring. We explore this relationship using a combination of in situ, satellite derived, and simulated temperatures from 144 lakes. Our results demonstrate that LSSWTs of high-latitude and large deep lakes are particularly sensitive to changes in stratification onset and can be expected to display an amplified response to climatic changes in summer air temperature. Climatic modification of LSSWT has numerous consequences for water quality and lake ecosystems, so quantifying this amplified response is important.

  4. Evaluation of water quality and management of Hongze Lake and Gaoyou Lake along the Grand Canal in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuheng; Guo, Wei; Mitchell, Bruce

    2011-05-01

    Hongze Lake and Gaoyou Lake are the source of water for the Grand Canal and the eastern route of the South-to-North Water Transfer (SNWT) project. With the accelerating pace of construction of the SNWT and the initiative to achieve "World Heritage " status for the canal, the water quality and management of the lakes have gained attention in China. Based on analysis of water samples, monitoring data, and the content of heavy metal elements in surface sediments, the water quality of Gaoyou Lake and Hongze Lake have been examined. According to the analysis of the water samples taken in 2003, the content of the heavy metals met the water demands for Hongze Lake and Gaoyou Lake. However, monitoring data of 2004 indicate that the water quality of Hongze Lake and Gaoyou Lake both were worse than grade III which cannot meet the required standard. The heavy metal elements of sediment samples also were above the acceptable environmental standard values. Some projects were launched to promote the lake environment by controlling wastewater emissions, standardizing the types of boats and introducing regulations to protect the lakes. However, problems of vertical and horizontal fragmentation and insufficient public participation in the current management system still exist in the area. Considering the problems confronting the lakes, Integrated Water Resource Management is discussed as an effective approach to overcome the problems.

  5. Water quality of Belton Lake, central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendieta, H.B.; Pate, Dale L.

    1982-01-01

    The maximum concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides or their degradation products detected in bottom sediments collected from the lake during four lake surveys included 1.1 micrograms per kilogram of DDT, 3.0 micrograms per kilogram of DDD, 11 micrograms per kilogram of DDE, and 2 micrograms per kilogram of chlordane.

  6. Water: Wisconsin lakes, streams and wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wisconsin has a tremendous diversity of aquatic habitat: headwater streams, large rivers, inland lakes, and two Great Lakes. Knowing the fundamentals of aquatic ecosystem science is critical to understand how these ecosystems function and to predict how they will respond to human...

  7. Water: Wisconsin lakes, streams and wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wisconsin has a tremendous diversity of aquatic habitat: headwater streams, large rivers, inland lakes, and two Great Lakes. Knowing the fundamentals of aquatic ecosystem science is critical to understand how these ecosystems function and to predict how they will respond to human...

  8. Stable water isotopic composition of the Antarctic subglacial Lake Vostok: implications for understanding the lake's hydrology.

    PubMed

    Ekaykin, Alexey A; Lipenkov, Vladimir Y; Kozachek, Anna V; Vladimirova, Diana O

    2016-01-01

    We estimated the stable isotopic composition of water from the subglacial Lake Vostok using two different sets of samples: (1) water frozen on the drill bit immediately after the first lake unsealing and (2) water frozen in the borehole after the unsealing and re-drilled one year later. The most reliable values of the water isotopic composition are: -59.0 ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18, -455 ± 1 ‰ for deuterium and 17 ± 1 ‰ for d-excess. This result is also confirmed by the modelling of isotopic transformations in the water which froze in the borehole, and by a laboratory experiment simulating this process. A comparison of the newly obtained water isotopic composition with that of the lake ice (-56.2 ‰ for oxygen-18, -442.4 ‰ for deuterium and 7.2 ‰ for d-excess) leads to the conclusion that the lake ice is very likely formed in isotopic equilibrium with water. In turn, this means that ice is formed by a slow freezing without formation of frazil ice crystals and/or water pockets. This conclusion agrees well with the observed physical and chemical properties of the lake's accreted ice. However, our estimate of the water's isotopic composition is only valid for the upper water layer and may not be representative for the deeper layers of the lake, so further investigations are required.

  9. Conflict for Resources: Water in the Lake Chad Basin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    lake. 110 Odaba , 75. 111 Ibid, 80. 112 Fred Pearce, When the Rivers Run Dry: Water-The Defining Crisis of the Twenty-First Century (Boston...International Organizations in Dealing with International Waters." Water Resoures Development, 1997: 367-382. Odaba , Eric O., Lekan Oyebande, and Johnson A

  10. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative B... WATER QUALITY GUIDANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. B Appendix B to Part 132—Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Methodology for Deriving Bioaccumulation Factors Great Lakes States and Tribes...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative B... WATER QUALITY GUIDANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. B Appendix B to Part 132—Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Methodology for Deriving Bioaccumulation Factors Great Lakes States and Tribes...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative B... WATER QUALITY GUIDANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. B Appendix B to Part 132—Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Methodology for Deriving Bioaccumulation Factors Great Lakes States and Tribes...

  13. Will hypolimnetic waters become anoxic in all deep tropical lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Takehiko; Matsushita, Bunkei; Subehi, Luki; Setiawan, Fajar; Wibowo, Hendro

    2017-03-01

    To elucidate trends of hypolimnetic oxygen concentrations, vertical distributions of dissolved oxygen were measured in eight deep tropical bodies of water (one natural lake with two basins, five natural lakes, and one reservoir) in Indonesia. A comparison of those concentrations with previously reported data revealed that shoaling of hypolimnetic oxygen-deficient (around a few decimeters to a few meter per year) water had occurred in all of the lakes. Calculated areal hypolimnetic oxygen depletion rates were 0.046-5.9 g m-2 y-1. The oligomictic or meromictic characteristics of the bodies of water suppressed circulation and mixing in the hypolimnions and thus resulted in continuous shoaling of the uppermost oxygen-deficient layers. In some lakes, millions of fish sometimes died suddenly, probably owing to upward movement of oxygen-deficient water to near the surface during periods of strong winds. In the future, the rate of shoaling will be accelerated by human impacts in the basins and by climate warming, the influence of which has already been manifested by rising water temperatures in these lakes. Appropriate monitoring and discussions of future restoration challenges are urgently needed to prevent the hypolimnions of the lakes from becoming completely anoxic.

  14. Will hypolimnetic waters become anoxic in all deep tropical lakes?

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Takehiko; Matsushita, Bunkei; Subehi, Luki; Setiawan, Fajar; Wibowo, Hendro

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate trends of hypolimnetic oxygen concentrations, vertical distributions of dissolved oxygen were measured in eight deep tropical bodies of water (one natural lake with two basins, five natural lakes, and one reservoir) in Indonesia. A comparison of those concentrations with previously reported data revealed that shoaling of hypolimnetic oxygen-deficient (around a few decimeters to a few meter per year) water had occurred in all of the lakes. Calculated areal hypolimnetic oxygen depletion rates were 0.046–5.9 g m−2 y−1. The oligomictic or meromictic characteristics of the bodies of water suppressed circulation and mixing in the hypolimnions and thus resulted in continuous shoaling of the uppermost oxygen-deficient layers. In some lakes, millions of fish sometimes died suddenly, probably owing to upward movement of oxygen-deficient water to near the surface during periods of strong winds. In the future, the rate of shoaling will be accelerated by human impacts in the basins and by climate warming, the influence of which has already been manifested by rising water temperatures in these lakes. Appropriate monitoring and discussions of future restoration challenges are urgently needed to prevent the hypolimnions of the lakes from becoming completely anoxic.

  15. Morphological stasis in an ongoing gastropod radiation from Lake Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Van Bocxlaer, Bert; Hunt, Gene

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary processes leading to adaptive radiation regularly occur too fast to be accurately recorded in the fossil record but too slowly to be readily observed in living biota. The study of evolutionary radiations is thereby confronted with an epistemological gap between the timescales and approaches used by neontologists and paleontologists. Here we report on an ongoing radiation of extant Bellamya species (n = 4) from the African Rift Lake Malawi that provides an unusual opportunity to bridge this gap. The substantial molecular differentiation in this monophyletic Bellamya clade has arisen since Late Pleistocene megadroughts in the Malawi Basin caused by climate change. Morphological time-series analysis of a high-resolution, radiocarbon-dated sequence of 22 faunas spanning the Holocene documents stasis up to the middle Holocene in all traits studied (shell height, number of whorls, and two variables obtained from geometric morphometrics). Between deposition of the last fossil fauna (∼5 ka) and the present day, a drastic increase in morphological disparity was observed (3.7–5.8 times) associated with an increase in species diversity. Comparison of the rates of morphological evolution obtained from the paleontological time-series with phylogenetic rates indicates that the divergence in two traits could be reconstructed with the slow rates documented in the fossils, that one trait required a rate reduction (stabilizing selection), and the other faster rates (divergent selection). The combined paleontological and comparative approach taken here allows recognition that morphological stasis can be the dominant evolutionary pattern within species lineages, even in very young and radiating clades. PMID:23924610

  16. A drinking water crisis in Lake Taihu, China: linkage to climatic variability and lake management.

    PubMed

    Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Guangwei; Gao, Guang; Zhang, Yunlin; Li, Wei; Paerl, Hans W; Carmichael, Wayne W

    2010-01-01

    In late May, 2007, a drinking water crisis took place in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China, following a massive bloom of the toxin producing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. in Lake Taihu, China's third largest freshwater lake. Taihu was the city's sole water supply, leaving approximately two million people without drinking water for at least a week. This cyanobacterial bloom event began two months earlier than previously documented for Microcystis blooms in Taihu. This was attributed to an unusually warm spring. The prevailing wind direction during this period caused the bloom to accumulate at the shoreline near the intake of the water plant. Water was diverted from the nearby Yangtze River in an effort to flush the lake of the bloom. However, this management action was counterproductive, because it produced a current which transported the bloom into the intake, exacerbating the drinking water contamination problem. The severity of this microcystin toxin containing bloom and the ensuing drinking water crisis were attributable to excessive nutrient enrichment; however, a multi-annual warming trend extended the bloom period and amplified its severity, and this was made worse by unanticipated negative impacts of water management. Long-term management must therefore consider both the human and climatic factors controlling these blooms and their impacts on water supply in this and other large lakes threatened by accelerating eutrophication.

  17. A Drinking Water Crisis in Lake Taihu, China: Linkage to Climatic Variability and Lake Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Guangwei; Gao, Guang; Zhang, Yunlin; Li, Wei; Paerl, Hans W.; Carmichael, Wayne W.

    2010-01-01

    In late May, 2007, a drinking water crisis took place in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China, following a massive bloom of the toxin producing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. in Lake Taihu, China’s third largest freshwater lake. Taihu was the city’s sole water supply, leaving approximately two million people without drinking water for at least a week. This cyanobacterial bloom event began two months earlier than previously documented for Microcystis blooms in Taihu. This was attributed to an unusually warm spring. The prevailing wind direction during this period caused the bloom to accumulate at the shoreline near the intake of the water plant. Water was diverted from the nearby Yangtze River in an effort to flush the lake of the bloom. However, this management action was counterproductive, because it produced a current which transported the bloom into the intake, exacerbating the drinking water contamination problem. The severity of this microcystin toxin containing bloom and the ensuing drinking water crisis were attributable to excessive nutrient enrichment; however, a multi-annual warming trend extended the bloom period and amplified its severity, and this was made worse by unanticipated negative impacts of water management. Long-term management must therefore consider both the human and climatic factors controlling these blooms and their impacts on water supply in this and other large lakes threatened by accelerating eutrophication.

  18. Hydrogeomorphic and Anthropogenic Influences on Water Quality, Habitat, and Fish of Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Great Lakes coastal wetlands represent a dynamic interface between coastal watersheds and the open lake. Compared to the adjacent lakes, these wetlands have generally warmer water, reduced wave energy, shallow bathymetry, higher productivity, and structurally complex vegetated h...

  19. Hydrogeomorphic and Anthropogenic Influences on Water Quality, Habitat, and Fish of Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Great Lakes coastal wetlands represent a dynamic interface between coastal watersheds and the open lake. Compared to the adjacent lakes, these wetlands have generally warmer water, reduced wave energy, shallow bathymetry, higher productivity, and structurally complex vegetated h...

  20. Assessing heat fluxes and water quality trends in subalpine lakes from EO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, Ilaria; Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano; Elli, Chiara; Valerio, Giulia; Pilotti, Marco

    2017-04-01

    ones. The atmospherically corrected L8 data were then processed through a site-specific parameterised bio-optical model for water constituents' concentration retrieval. The EO products thus obtained were then analysed as follows. 1) Statistical analyses of water reflectance, a new Essential Climate Variables within the ESA CCI+ initiative, and chl-a concentration, a proxy of trophic status, were performed. Both water reflectance and chl-a concentration were obtained from the MERIS 10-years time series and were analyzed to identify spatial patterns, temporal trends and the onset of phytoplankton growth. 2) Combination of field shortwave and longwave radiation data with the one estimated from L8 OLI and TIRS atmospherically corrected imagery, was exploited to assess the heat fluxes and evaporation rates. In both cases, the analysis was supported by field data to highlight the accuracy of measurements obtained from EO technology. A comparative analysis among the lakes is finally presented. In addition, future work aimed at extending the MERIS time series to the new Sentinel-3-OLCI time series (2016-on going) is discussed, in expectation that EO technology will augment information for lake management and geosciences (lake's ecology and climate, in particular).

  1. The water regime of the lake Kolon watersystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellei, L.; Tamás, E. A.; Sziebert, J.; Tóth, Sz.

    2009-04-01

    Lake Kolon is one of the important freshwater marshes of Hungary, with its extensive reedbeds, meadows and forests. The natural development process of the lake was interrupted in 1930. The events which happened later give a typical cross-section of Hungarian water management practices. The interventions started with draining a considerable part of the lake and taking it into agricultural usage. In order to get the waters of the Danube floodplains under control, the building of the Danube-Valley Channel started in 1912. The channel, which is 107 kms long, was ready in 1929, and the subordinated channel system was established in the beginning of the 1930's. Connected to these works, the lake Kolon was declared as an excess water reservoir after its draining in 1927-28. So the reservoir had to be kept on minimal waterlevel in order to be able to host the arriving waters any time. This kind of management has changed from 1987 to 1996 for a more preferable management which is ruled by the actual conditions in order to maintain the water resources. With the analysis of the water resources of the lake we showed that there is a significant supply from subsurface runoff, and we determined the statistical characteristics of the quantitative indices of the water regime. The high waterlevel which is favourable from the viewpoint of nature conservation has proven to be sustainable even if the receiver is in its design status.

  2. The springs of Lake Pátzcuaro: chemistry, salt-balance, and implications for the water balance of the lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.; Israde-Alcántara, Isabel; Garduno-Monroy, Victor H.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2004-01-01

    Lake Pa??tzcuaro, the center of the ancient Tarascan civilization located in the Mexican altiplano west of the city of Morelia, has neither river input nor outflow. The relatively constant lake-salinity over the past centuries indicates the lake is in chemical steady state. Springs of the south shore constitute the primary visible input to the lake, so influx and discharge must be via sub-lacustrine ground water. The authors report on the chemistry and stable isotope composition of the springs, deeming them representative of ground-water input. The springs are dominated by Ca, Mg and Na, whereas the lake is dominated by Na. Combining these results with previously published precipitation/rainfall measurements on the lake, the authors calculate the chemical evolution from spring water to lake water, and also calculate a salt balance of the ground-water-lake system. Comparing Cl and ??18O compositions in the springs and lake water indicates that 75-80% of the spring water is lost evaporatively during evolution toward lake composition. During evaporation Ca and Mg are lost from the water by carbonate precipitation. Each liter of spring water discharging into the lake precipitates about 18.7 mg of CaCO3. Salt balance calculations indicate that ground water input to the lake is 85.9??106 m3/a and ground water discharge from the lake is 23.0??106 m3/a. Thus, the discharge is about 27% of the input, with the rest balanced by evaporation. A calculation of time to reach steady-state ab initio indicates that the Cl concentration of the present day lake would be reached in about 150 a. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Comparison of Alternative Strategies for Cost-Effective Water Quality Management in Lakes

    Treesearch

    Daniel Boyd Kramer; Stephen Polasky; Anthony Starfield; Brian Palik; Lynn Westphal; Stephanie Snyder; Pamela Jakes; Rachel Hudson; Eric Gustafson

    2006-01-01

    Roughly 45% of the assessed lakes in the United States are impaired for one or more reasons. Eutrophication due to excess phosphorus loading is common in many impaired lakes. Various strategies are available to lake residents for addressing declining lake water quality, including septic system upgrades and establishing riparian buffers. This study examines 25 lakes to...

  4. Water quality of Lake Tuscaloosa and streamflow and water quality of selected tributaries to Lake Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 1982-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Lake Tuscaloosa, created in 1969 by the impoundment of North River, provides the primary water supply for Tuscaloosa, Alabama , and surrounding areas. This report describes the percent contribution of major tributaries to the mean inflow to the lake; water quality; and changes in water quality in the lake and selected tributaries. During base flow, about 60% of the total flow into Lake Tuscaloosa is contributed by Binion and Carroll Creeks, which drain only 22% of the Lake Tuscaloosa basin. Binion and Carroll Creek basins are underlain primarily by sand and gravel deposits of the Coker Formation. Mean inflow to the lake was 1,150 cu ft/sec during 1983, a wet year, and 450 cu ft/sec during 1985, a relatively dry year. More than 80% of the total inflow during both years was contributed by North River and Binion, Cripple, and Carroll Creeks. About 59% was contributed by North River during those years. Except for pH, sulfate, and dissolved and total recoverable iron and manganese, the water quality of the tributaries is generally within drinking water limits and acceptable for most uses. The water quality of Lake Tuscaloosa is generally within drinking water limits and acceptable for most uses. The maximum and median concentrations of sulfate increased every year at the dam from 1979 to 1985 (7.2 to 18 mg/L and 6.2 to 14 mg/L, respectively). The dissolved solids concentrations for water at the dam have varied (1979-86) from 27 to 43 mg/L; the sulfate, 5.2 to 18 mg/L; and the dissolved iron, 10 to 250 micrograms/L--all within the recommended drinking water limits. However, concentrations of dissolved manganese and total recoverable iron and manganese at the dam commonly exceeded the recommended drinking water limits. In November 1985, after the summer warmup and increase in biological activity, the water quality at five depth profiles sites on Lake Tuscaloosa was acceptable for most uses, generally. However, a dissolved oxygen concentration of 1 mg/L or less was

  5. Ikaite precipitation by mixing of shoreline springs and lake water, Mono Lake, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Stine, S.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Fitzpatrick, J.A.; Stafford, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    Metastable ikaite (CaCO3??6H2O) forms abundantly during winter months along the south shoreline of Mono Lake where shoreline springs mix with lake water. Ikaite precipitates because of its decreased solubility at low temperature and because of orthophosphate-ion inhibition of calcite and aragonite. During the spring some of the ikaite is transformed to anhydrous CaCO3 and is incorporated into tufa, but most is dispersed by wave action into the lake where it reacts to form gaylussite (Na2Ca(CO3)2?? 5H2O). Spring waters have low pH values, are dominantly Ca-Na-HCO3, have low radiocarbon activities, and are mixtures of deep-seated geothermal and cold groundwaters. Chemical modeling reveals that precipitation of CaCO3 can occur over a broad range of mixtures of spring and lake water with a maximum production occurring at 96% spring water and 4% lake water. Under these conditions all the Ca and a significant fraction of the CO3 of the precipitate is spring supplied. A radiocarbon age of 19,580 years obtained on a natural ikaite sample supports this conclusion. With the springs supplying a large and probably variable portion of the carbonate, and with apparent 14C age of the carbonate varying from spring to spring, tufa of similar actual antiquity may yield significantly different 14C dates, making tufa at this location unsuitable for absolute age dating by the radiocarbon method. ?? 1993.

  6. Trout Lake, Wisconsin: A water, energy, and biogeochemical budgets program site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, John F.; Bullen, Thomas D.

    2000-01-01

    The Trout Lake Watershed is in the Northern Highlands Lake District in north-central Wisconsin. The study area includes four subbasins with five lakes and two bog lakes. The objectives of the Trout Lake WEBB project are to (1) describe processes controlling water and solute fluxes in the Trout Lake watershed, (2) examine interactions among those processes and (3) improve the capability to predict changes in water and solute fluxes for a range of spatial and temporal scales (Elder and others, 1992).

  7. 33 CFR 162.130 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Light to the lakeward limits of the improved navigation channels at the head of Lake Erie. District... vessel. River Rouge means the waters of the Short Cut Canal and the River Rouge from Detroit Edison Cell Light 1 to the head of navigation. St. Clair River means the connecting waters from the lakeward...

  8. NASA Images Show Decreased Clarity in Lake Tahoe Water

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-06

    Images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer aboard NASA's Terra satellite, launched in 1999, illustrate the state of gradually decreasing water clarity at Lake Tahoe, one of the clearest lakes in the world. The images are available at: http://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/default.htm. In the image on the left, acquired in November 2000, vegetation can be seen in red. The image on the right, acquired at the same time by a different spectral band of the instrument, is color-coded to show the bottom of the lake around the shoreline. Where the data are black, the bottom cannot be seen. Scientists monitoring the lake's water clarity from boat measurements obtained since 1965 have discovered that the lake along the California-Nevada border has lost more than one foot of visibility each year, according to the Lake Tahoe Watershed Assessment, a review of scientific information about the lake undertaken at the request of President Clinton and published in February 2000. The most likely causes are increases in algal growth, sediment washed in from surrounding areas and urban growth and development. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03854

  9. Gill net saturation by lake trout in Michigan waters of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.; Schorfhaar, Richard G.; Selgeby, James H.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted experimental fishing for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Michigan waters of Lake Superior to determine the importance of soak time on catch per effort (CPE) in numbers per kilometer of standard gill net. We modeled CPE as a nonlinear function of the number of nights between setting and lifting (soak time), in which the nets fill at a certain rate toward some maximum after which the nets cannot hold more fish. We found that lake trout CPE increased with soak time at a rate that varied with lake trout density toward a saturation level that was independent of lake trout density. The CPE values of nets soaked 2–5 nights divided by the CPE of nets soaked 1 night were significantly lower than would be expected had CPE increased as a linear function of the number of nights soaked. We derived a means for correcting gill-net CPE values for differing soak times to a common base of 1 night soaked. We concluded that it is inappropriate to assume lake trout catches in gill nets will increase in direct proportion to the number of nights soaked and recommend that CPE of lake trout in gill nets be corrected for soak time.

  10. Water-quality reconnaissance of surface inflow to Utah Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mundorff, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    This report on the quality of the major surface-water inflow to Utah Lake was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights. The purpose of the reconnaissance on which the report is based was to obtain information about (1) the general inorganic chemical characteristics of surface water throughout the drainage basins of the major streams that contribute to Utah Lake, (2) the effects of the natural environment and of present water use on the chemical characteristics, and (3) general characteristics of the sediment discharge of selected streams in the basin. This information will be useful in the operation of present water systems and in planning future water development and use.The reconnaissance of inflow to Utah Lake was limited in scope; it did not include intensive study of the effects of municipal sewage, irrigation, industry, or mining on water quality. The principal objective of the study was a general definition of water-quality characteristics throughout the major drainage areas tributary to Utah Lake. A secondary objective was the definition of specific problem areas or stream reaches in which deterioration in water quality was evident.

  11. Lacustrine mollusc radiations in the Lake Malawi Basin: experiments in a natural laboratory for evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Damme, D.; Gautier, A.

    2013-09-01

    In terminal Pliocene-early Pleistocene times, part of the Malawi Basin was occupied by paleo-lake Chiwondo. Molluscan biostratigraphy situates this freshwater lake either in the East African wet phase between 2.7-2.4 Ma or that of 2.0-1.8 Ma. In-lake divergent evolution remained restricted to a few molluscan taxa and was very modest. The lacustrine Chiwondo fauna went extinct at the beginning of the Pleistocene. The modern Lake Malawi malacofauna is depauperate and descends from ubiquistic southeast African taxa and some Malawi basin endemics that invaded the present lake after the Late Pleistocene mega-droughts. The Pleistocene aridity crises caused dramatic changes, affecting the malacofauna of all East African lakes. All lacustrine endemic faunas that had evolved in the Pliocene rift lakes, such as paleo-lake Chiwondo, became extinct. In Lake Tanganyika, the freshwater ecosystem did not crash as in other lakes, but the environmental changes were sufficiently important to trigger a vast radiation. All African endemic lacustrine molluscan clades that are the result of in-lake divergence are hence geologically young, including the vast Lavigeria clade in Lake Tanganyika (ca. 43 species).

  12. Consumptive Water Use in the Great Lakes Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, Kimberly H.

    2008-01-01

    Great Lakes state agencies and organizations view understanding consumptive water use as a critical component in water-resource management. To assist them in developing a better understanding of the factors involved in consumptive use, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has completed an inventory of consumptive-use coefficients for the Great Lakes Basin. This fact sheet highlights findings and data from a comprehensive report resulting from that inventory. This fact sheet includes information on water-use categories used to compile and organize consumptive-use coefficients, summary statistics for consumptive-use coefficients by category, and estimated water withdrawals and consumptive-use amounts for the Great Lakes States for 2000.

  13. Climate-driven changes in grassland vegetation, snow cover, and lake water of the Qinghai Lake basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuelu; Liang, Tiangang; Xie, Hongjie; Huang, Xiaodong; Lin, Huilong

    2016-07-01

    Qinghai Lake basin and the lake have undergone significant changes in recent decades. We examine MODIS-derived grassland vegetation and snow cover of the Qinghai Lake basin and their relations with climate parameters during 2001 to 2010. Results show: (1) temperature and precipitation of the Qinghai Lake basin increased while evaporation decreased; (2) most of the grassland areas improved due to increased temperature and growing season precipitation; (3) weak relations between snow cover and precipitation/vegetation; (4) a significantly negative correlation between lake area and temperature (r=-0.9, p<0.05) and (5) a positive relation between lake level (lake-level difference) and temperature (precipitation). Compared with Namco Lake (located in the inner Tibetan Plateau) where the primary water source of lake level increases was the accelerated melt of glacier/perennial snow cover in the lake basin, for the Qinghai Lake, however, it was the increased precipitation. Increased precipitation explained the improvement of vegetation cover in the Qinghai Lake basin, while accelerated melt of glacier/perennial snow cover was responsible for the degradation of vegetation cover in Namco Lake basin. These results suggest different responses to the similar warming climate: improved (degraded) ecological condition and productive capacity of the Qinghai Lake basin (Namco Lake basin).

  14. Opportunistic fungi in lake water and fungal infections in associated human population in Dal Lake, Kashmir.

    PubMed

    Bandh, Suhaib A; Kamili, Azra N; Ganai, Bashir A; Lone, Bashir A

    2016-04-01

    Natural habitats of opportunistic fungal pathogens are outside of the host; therefore, it is critically important to understand their ecology and routes of transmission. In this study, we investigated the presence of human pathogenic opportunistic fungi in lake water and incidence of fungal infections in associated population in Kashmir, India. Six hundred forty water samples were taken on seasonal basis from a wide network of sampling stations of the lake for an extended period of two years for screening their occurrence. The samples were inoculated onto rose bengal agar, malt extract agar, potato dextrose agar and other specified culture media supplemented with Chloramphenicol and Streptomycin followed by incubation at 37 °C. All the samples were positive for fungi, which were later identified by sequencing the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region aided by classical morphological culture techniques and physiological profiling. The whole process led to the isolation of sixteen species of opportunistic fungal pathogens belonging to genus Aspergillus, Candida, Penicillium, Cryptococcus, Fusarium, Rhizopus and Mucor in decreasing order of prevalence. Furthermore, 20% population (n = 384) of Dal inhabitants was examined for possible fungal infections and it was observed that only 8.07% individuals were positive for fungal infections with 4.68% skin infection cases, 2.34% onychomycosis cases and 1.04% candidiasis cases. Scrapings from onychomycosis and candidiasis patients showed the presence of Aversicolor and Calbicans respectively, resembling exactly the strains isolated from the lake water. However, the skin infection was because of a dermatophyte not isolated for the lake water. Higher prevalence of infection (6.77%) was seen in people using lake water followed by a positive prevalence of 1.30% using tap water. The results of present study suggest that the lake inhabitants are at a greater risk of getting life threatening fungal diseases which may lead to

  15. Spatial and Temporal Water Quality Patterns in Open-Water Lake Michigan from the 2015 CSMI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality patterns in the Laurentian Great Lakes broadly reflect climate, surficial geography, and landuse but are also shaped by limnological and biological processes. Open-water sampling conducted as part of the 2015 Lake Michigan interagency coordinated science and monito...

  16. Analysis of the water balance of Lake Victoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossent, J.; de Brabanter, W.; Bauwens, W.

    2009-04-01

    Lake Victoria is situated within an elevated plateau in the western part of Africa's Great Rift Valley and lies within the territory of three countries: Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya. It is Africa's largest lake and the second widest fresh water lake in the world in terms of surface area. It is also the source of the longest branch of the River Nile, the White Nile. The lake's shallowness, limited river inflow, and large surface area relative to its volume make it vulnerable to climate changes and fluctuations of the water level. This affects the surrounding countries and their people a lot, especially in terms of their food supply and economy. The aim of this study was to get more information on the causes of these fluctuations by analysing the water balance of the lake for the period 1970-1974. It was based both on historical data and measurements and new calculations, and compared with previous studies (e.g. Suttcliffe and Parks, 1999). Precipitation and evaporation over the lake surface were calculated with the Thiessen Polygons method, using measurements from stations around the lake and on the islands. The total inflow of the lake is the sum of the contributions of twelve subbasins. One of these subcatchments, the Nzoia-catchment, was modeled with SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool), a physically based, semi-distributed river basin simulator, as a contribution to the development of a water balance model for Lake Victoria. To calculate the outflow at the Owen Falls Dam in Jinja (Uganda), gauge heights of the lake were used in combination with the "Agreed Curve" (the relationship between water level and flow that was set by the policy makers). As the lake is assumed to be a system with a closed mass balance, the combination of the variations in the above mentioned components resulted in changes of the lake's storage, leading to fluctuations of the water level. For the period 1970-1974 the calculated mean monthly evaporation is 133 mm, with a standard deviation

  17. Forest harvesting and water: the Lake States experience

    Treesearch

    Elon S. Verry

    1986-01-01

    The impact of forests on water has been a subject of argument for more than a century. It still is; and many studies conform that there is no single right answer in the debate. In the Lake States, clearcutting natural peatlands will not change annual streamflow nor will it seriously impact water quality if logging is done on frozen soils. However, clearcutting will...

  18. GROUND WATER QUALITY SURROUNDING LAKE TEXOMA DURING DROUGHT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality data from 55 producing monitoring wells during drought conditions surrounding Lake Texoma, located on the border of Oklahoma and Texas, was compared to assess the influence of drought on groundwater quality. The main water quality parameter measured was nitrate, an...

  19. WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF LAKE TEXOMA BEACHES, 1999-2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biological and inorganic assessment of five beaches on Lake Texoma was conducted from September 1999 through July 2001. Water samples for each beach site were divided into two groups, a swimming season and non-swimming season. Water properties such as temperature, alkalinity,...

  20. WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF LAKE TEXOMA BEACHES, 1999-2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biological and inorganic assessment of five beaches on Lake Texoma was conducted from September 1999 through July 2001. Water samples for each beach site were divided into two groups, a swimming season and non-swimming season. Water properties such as temperature, alkalinity,...

  1. Great Lakes nearshore-offshore: Distinct water quality regions

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared water quality of nearshore regions in the Laurentian Great Lakes to water quality in offshore regions. Sample sites for the nearshore region were from the US EPA National Coastal Condition Assessment and based on a criteria or sample-frame of within the 30-m depth co...

  2. Limnological and water-quality data from Wonder Lake, Chilchukabena Lake, and Lake Minchumina, Denali National Park and Preserve and surrounding area, Alaska, June 2006-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, D.A.; Arp, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Growing visitor traffic and resource use, as well as natural and anthropogenic land and climatic changes, can place increasing stress on lake ecosystems in Denali National Park and Preserve. Baseline data required to substantiate impact assessment in this sub-arctic region is sparse to non-existent. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, conducted a water-quality assessment of several large lakes in and around the Park from June 2006 to August 2008. Discrete water-quality samples, lake profiles of pH, specific conductivity, dissolved-oxygen concentration, water temperature, turbidity, and continuous-record temperature profile data were collected from Wonder Lake, Chilchukabena Lake, and Lake Minchumina. In addition, zooplankton, snow chemistry data, fecal coliform, and inflow/outflow water-quality samples also were collected from Wonder Lake.

  3. Radiation tolerance in water bears.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, D. D.; Sakashita, T.; Katagiri, C.; Watanabe, M.; Nakahara, Y.; Okuda, T.; Hamada, N.; Wada, S.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    Tardigrades water bears are tiny invertebrates forming a phylum and inhabit various environments on the earth Terrestrial tardigrades enter a form called as anhydrobiosis when the surrounding water disappears Anhyydrobiosis is defined as an ametabolic dry state and followed by recovering their activity when rehydrated Anhydrobiotic tardigrades show incredible tolerance to a variety of extreme environmental conditions such as temperatures -273 r C to 151 r C vacuum high pressure 600 MPa and chemicals that include alcohols and methyl bromide In these views there have been some discussions about their potential for surviving outer space In the present study we demonstrated the survival limit not merely against gamma-rays but against heavy ions in the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum in order to evaluate the effects of radiations on them The animals were exposure to 500 to 7000 Gy of gamma-rays or 500 to 8000 Gy of heavy ions 4 He in their hydrated or anhydrobiotic state The results showed that both of hydrated and anhydrobiotic animals have high radio-tolerance median lethal dose LD50 48 h of gamma-rays or heavy ions in M tardigradum was more than 4000 Gy indicating that this species is categorized into the most radio-tolerant animals We suggest that tardigrades will be suitable model animals for extremophilic multicellular organisms and may provide a survival strategy in extraterrestrial environments

  4. Extreme drought causes distinct water acidification and eutrophication in the Lower Lakes (Lakes Alexandrina and Albert), Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T.; Mao, Rong; Xiong, Lihua; Ye, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Droughts are set to increase in frequency and magnitude with climate change and water extraction, and understanding their influence on ecosystems is urgent in the Holocene. Low rainfall across the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia resulted in an unprecedented water level decline in the Lower Lakes (Lakes Alexandrina and Albert) at the downstream end of the river system. A comprehensive data covering pre-drought (2004-2006), drought (2007-2010) and post-drought (2010-2013) was firstly used to unravel drought effects on water quality in the contrasting main parts and margins of the two Lakes, particularly following water acidification resulting from acid sulfate soil oxidation. Salinity, nutrients and Chl-a significantly increased during the drought in the Lake main waterbody, while pH remained stable or showed minor shifts. In contrast to the Lake Alexandrina, total dissolved solid (TDS) and electrical conductivity (EC) during the post-drought more than doubled the pre-drought period in the Lake Albert as being a terminal lake system with narrow and shallow entrance. Rewetting of the exposed pyrite-containing sediment resulted in very low pH (below 3) in Lake margins, which positively contributed to salinity increases via SO42- release and limestone dissolution. Very acidic water (pH 2-3) was neutralised naturally by lake refill, but aerial limestone dosing was required for neutralisation of water acidity during the drought period. The Lower Lakes are characterized as hypereutrophic with much higher salinity, nutrient and algae concentrations than guideline levels for aquatic ecosystem. These results suggest that, in the Lower Lakes, drought could cause water quality deterioration through water acidification and increased nutrient and Chl-a concentrations, more effective water management in the lake catchment is thus crucial to prevent the similar water quality deterioration since the projected intensification of droughts. A comparative assessment on lake

  5. Water-quality and Llake-stage data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2004 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004 is called 'water year 2004.' The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 2004.' Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available throught the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin Water Science Center's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the

  6. Mercury and water level fluctuations in lakes of northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Maki, Ryan P; Christensen, Victoria G.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; LeDuc, Jaime F.; Kissane, Claire; Knights, Brent C.

    2017-01-01

    Large lake ecosystems support a variety of ecosystem services in surrounding communities, including recreational and commercial fishing. However, many northern temperate fisheries are contaminated by mercury. Annual variation in mercury accumulation in fish has previously been linked to water level (WL) fluctuations, opening the possibility of regulating water levels in a manner that minimizes or reduces mercury contamination in fisheries. Here, we compiled a long-term dataset (1997-2015) of mercury content in young-of-year Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) from six lakes on the border between the U.S. and Canada and examined whether mercury content appeared to be related to several metrics of WL fluctuation (e.g., spring WL rise, annual maximum WL, and year-to-year change in maximum WL). Using simple correlation analysis, several WL metrics appear to be strongly correlated to Yellow Perch mercury content, although the strength of these correlations varies by lake. We also used many WL metrics, water quality measurements, temperature and annual deposition data to build predictive models using partial least squared regression (PLSR) analysis for each lake. These PLSR models showed some variation among lakes, but also supported strong associations between WL fluctuations and annual variation in Yellow Perch mercury content. The study lakes underwent a modest change in WL management in 2000, when winter WL minimums were increased by about 1 m in five of the six study lakes. Using the PLSR models, we estimated how this change in WL management would have affected Yellow Perch mercury content. For four of the study lakes, the change in WL management that occurred in 2000 likely reduced Yellow Perch mercury content, relative to the previous WL management regime.

  7. Water-quality reconnaissance of selected water-supply lakes in eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, L.M.; Arruda, J.A.; Vahsholtz, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Data collected for 19 public water-supply lakes in eastern Kansas during spring-fall 1983 were statistically analyzed to describe relationships between water-quality constituents and lake and watershed physical characteristics. A large range was observed in mean concentrations of total nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total ammonia nitrogen, total phosphorus, total organic carbon, and chlorophyll a and in lake and watershed physical characteristics, such as age, surface area, watershed area, watershed-to-lake surface-area ratio, and average maximum depth. Pesticides were detected in 8 of the 19 lakes. Atrazine and Alachlor were the most commonly detected pesticides. Spearman rank-order correlation analyses showed possible relationships between mean concentrations of total nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total ammonia nitrogen, total phosphorus, total organic carbon, and chlorophyll a, and certain lake and watershed physical characteristics. Multiple-regression analysis produced significant relations between mean concentrations of total nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen and percentage of watershed in protected cropland and age of lake (0.62 coefficient of determination), and between mean concentrations of total organic carbon and lake average maximum depth, lake-surface area, age of lake, and watershed-to-lake surface-area ratio (0.76 coefficient of determination). (USGS)

  8. 1981 Hartwell Lake Water Quality Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Herein are reported the results of a one-year detailed investigation into the existing biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of Hartwell...investigation into the existing biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of Hartwell Lake, an impoundment located in northwestern South Carolina...w 0 ".4 cI~I0 Ř- TABLE I Station Description and Location Station # Type Description Latitude

  9. Ground-water movement and water quality in Lake Point, Tooele County, Utah, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenney, T.A.; Wright, S.J.; Stolp, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    Water-level and water-quality data in Lake Point, Tooele County, Utah, were collected during August 1999 through August 2003. Water levels in Lake Point generally declined about 1 to 2 feet from July 2001 to July 2003, likely because of less-than-average precipitation. Ground water generally flows in two directions from the Oquirrh Mountains. One component flows north toward the regional topographic low, Great Salt Lake. The other component generally flows southwest toward a substantial spring complex, Factory/Dunne's Pond. This southwest component flows through a coarse gravel deposit believed to be a shoreline feature of historic Lake Bonneville. The dominant water-quality trend in Lake Point is an increase in dissolved-solids concentration with proximity to Great Salt Lake. The water type changes from calcium-bicarbonate adjacent to the Oquirrh Mountains to sodium-chloride with proximity to Great Salt Lake. Evaluation of chloride-bromide weight ratios indicates a mixture of fresher recharge waters with a brine similar to what currently exists in Great Salt Lake.

  10. Microbial Metabolic Activity and Bioavailability of Dissolved Organic Matter Under the Impact of Intense UV Radiation in Pony Lake, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieser, M.; Foreman, C. M.; McKnight, D. M.; Miller, P. L.; Chin, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Pony Lake is a saline and hypereutrophic coastal pond located on Cape Royds in the McMurdo Sound area of Antarctica. This shallow lake is ice-covered except in midsummer, when strong winds typically cause thorough mixing of the water column. The source of water appears to be accumulated snow; water is lost by ablation of the ice cover and evaporation of lake water in midsummer. In the west the pond is bordered by an Adelie penguin rookery. Previous studies have shown that Pony Lake can have very high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (~ 100 mg C liter -1). Furthermore, Pony Lake is unique because it lacks terrestrial carbon inputs in the watershed, which makes this an excellent example of a system containing autochthonous microbially (algae, cyanobacteria, bacteria and viruses) derived organic matter. From an ecological perspective dissolved organic matter (DOM) acts as a carbon source for microorganisms, absorbs harmful ultraviolet radiation, and can participate in biogeochemical redox reactions, whereas different fractions and chemical characteristics influence the bioavailability and chemical reactivity of DOM in aquatic ecosystems. While the DOM concentration in Pony Lake is high, the percentage of DOC accounted for by fulvics acid is low, as is observed in other lakes with algal derived DOC sources. Algal derived fulvic acids are yellowish in color, and absorb light to a lesser extend compared to terrestrially derived fulvic acids. Fulvic acids from Pony Lake are enriched with nitrogen. Over two field seasons we have investigated the influence of photolytic processes on the microbial utilization of DOM from Pony Lake, Antarctica. We have determined that the intense ultraviolet radiation in Antarctica rapidly photo-bleaches DOM, resulting in the loss of UV absorbing compounds, and rendering fractions of the DOM pool less biologically available to microbes. We monitored microbial community structure, abundance and primary and secondary production

  11. Causes of declining survival of lake trout stocked in U.S. waters of Lake Superior in 1963-1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.; Ebener, Mark P.; Schorfhaar, Richard G.; Schram, Stephen T.; Schreiner, Donald R.; Selgeby, James H.; Taylor, William W.

    1996-01-01

    Survival of the 1963-1982 year-classes of stocked yearling lake trout Salvelinus namaycush declined significantly over time in Lake Superior. To investigate possible causes of this decline, a Ricker model of stock-recruitment was used to describe the catch per effort (CPE) of age-7 stocked lake trout in the Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior as functions of the numbers of yearlings stocked 6 years earlier (an index of density dependence), the density (CPE) of wild adult lake trout (an index of predation), and large-mesh (a?Y 114-mm stretch-measure) gill-net fishing effort (an index of fishing mortality). Declining CPE of stocked lake trout in Michigan and Wisconsin was significantly associated with increasing large-mesh gillnet fishing effort. Declining CPE of stocked lake trout in Minnesota was significantly associated with increasing density of wild lake trout. Declining survival of stocked lake trout may therefore have been caused by increased mortality in large-mesh gill-net fisheries in Michigan and Wisconsin, and by predation by wild lake trout that recently recolonized the Minnesota area. We recommend that experimental management be pursued to determine the relative importance of large-mesh gillnet fishing effort and of predation by wild lake trout on the survival of stocked lake trout in U.S. waters of Lake Superior.

  12. An environmental assessment of water replenishment to a floodplain lake.

    PubMed

    Lóczy, Dénes; Dezső, József; Czigány, Szabolcs; Prokos, Hedvig; Tóth, Gabriella

    2017-01-20

    There are numerous wetland rehabilitation projects worldwide, but their efficiency is seldom assessed comprehensively. Oxbow lakes are wetlands of particular sensitivity. Within a large-scale floodplain rehabilitation project in Hungary, the Old Drava Programme, water replenishment was first carried out for the Cún-Szaporca oxbow lakes, a key area in the project. To assess its sustainability, the entire hydrological system has been monitored. From the data of hydrological monitoring (infiltration, soil moisture, groundwater/lakewater interaction) it is claimed that water replenishment involves significant losses through seepage (4.1 and 1.46 mm d(-1)) and evaporation (3.01 and 1.44 mm d(-1)) in the studied pre-intervention and replenishment periods, resp. Infiltration alone is insufficient to replenish groundwater and raise oxbow lake levels. In the critical summer half-year evaporation is intensive in the neighbouring agricultural fields. Groundwater table dynamics are controlled by hyporheic and groundwater flow. Major impact on the water balance of the oxbow lakes is exerted by the regime of the Drava River. A deepened lakebed is recommended to ensure more effective water retention in the oxbow lake. From the local study conclusions are drawn for the feasibility of rehabilitation at floodplain scale and in areas with similar hydromorphological conditions.

  13. Water footprint concept for a sustainable water resources management in Urmia Lake basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, Anahita; Jarihani, Ben; Rezaie, Hossein; Aligholiniya, Tohid; Rasouli, Negar

    2015-04-01

    The fast shrinkage of Urmia Lake in West Azerbaijan, Iran is one of the most important environmental change hotspots. The dramatic water level reduction (up to 6 meters) has influential environmental, socio-economic and health impacts on Urmia plain and its habitants. The decline is generally blamed on a combination of drought, increased water diversion for irrigated agriculture within the lake's watershed and land use mismanagement. The Urmia Lake sub basins are the agricultural cores of the region and the agricultural activities are the major water consuming sections of the basin. Land use changes and mismanagement in the land use decisions and policies is one of the most important factors in lake shrinkage in recent decades. Fresh water is the main source of water for agricultural usages in the basin. So defining a more low water consuming land use pattern will put less pressure on limited water resources. The above mentioned fact in this study has been assessed through water footprint concept. The water footprint concept (as a quantitative measure showing the appropriation of natural resources) is a comprehensive indicator that can have a crucial role in efficient land use management. In order to evaluate the water use patterns, the water footprint of wheat (as a traditional crop) and apple (recently most popular) have been compared and the results have been discussed in the aspect of the impacts on Lake Urmia demands and its dramatic drying process. Results showed that, higher blue water consumption in such a regions that have severe blue water scarcity, is a major issue and the water consuming pattern must be modified to meet the lake demands. Lower blue water consumption through regionalizing crops for each area is an efficient solution to meet lake demands and consume lower amounts of blue water. So the proper land use practices can be an appropriate method to rescue the lake in a long time period.

  14. Projecting Future Water Levels of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, V.; Notaro, M.; Holman, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes are the largest freshwater system on Earth, containing 84% of North America's freshwater. The lakes are a valuable economic and recreational resource, valued at over 62 billion in annual wages and supporting a 7 billion fishery. Shipping, recreation, and coastal property values are significantly impacted by water level variability, with large economic consequences. Great Lakes water levels fluctuate both seasonally and long-term, responding to natural and anthropogenic climate changes. Due to the integrated nature of water levels, a prolonged small change in any one of the net basin supply components: over-lake precipitation, watershed runoff, or evaporation from the lake surface, may result in important trends in water levels. We utilize the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics's Regional Climate Model Version 4.5.6 to dynamically downscale three global global climate models that represent a spread of potential future climate change for the region to determine whether the climate models suggest a robust response of the Laurentian Great Lakes to anthropogenic climate change. The Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate Version 5 (MIROC5), the National Centre for Meteorological Research Earth system model (CNRM-CM5), and the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) project different regional temperature increases and precipitation change over the next century and are used as lateral boundary conditions. We simulate the historical (1980-2000) and late-century periods (2080-2100). Upon model evaluation we will present dynamically downscaled projections of net basin supply changes for each of the Laurentian Great Lakes.

  15. Discharge, water temperature, and selected meteorological data for Vancouver Lake, Vancouver, Washington, water years 2011-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, James R.; Marshall, Cameron A.; Sheibley, Rich W.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey partnered with the Vancouver Lake Watershed Partnership in a 2-year intensive study to quantify the movement of water and nutrients through Vancouver Lake in Vancouver, Washington. This report is intended to assist the Vancouver Lake Watershed Partnership in evaluating potential courses of action to mitigate seasonally driven blooms of harmful cyanobacteria and to improve overall water quality of the lake. This report contains stream discharge, lake water temperature, and selected meteorological data for water years 2011, 2012, and 2013 that were used to develop the water and nutrient budgets for the lake.

  16. Summary of surface-water quality, ground-water quality, and water withdrawals for the Spirit Lake Reservation, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vining, Kevin C.; Cates, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    Available surface-water quality, ground-water quality, and water-withdrawal data for the Spirit Lake Reservation were summarized. The data were collected intermittently from 1948 through 2004 and were compiled from U.S. Geological Survey databases, North Dakota State Water Commission databases, and Spirit Lake Nation tribal agencies. Although the quality of surface water on the reservation generally is satisfactory, no surface-water sources are used for consumable water supplies. Ground water on the reservation is of sufficient quality for most uses. The Tokio and Warwick aquifers have better overall water quality than the Spiritwood aquifer. Water from the Spiritwood aquifer is used mostly for irrigation. The Warwick aquifer provides most of the consumable water for the reservation and for the city of Devils Lake. Annual water withdrawals from the Warwick aquifer by the Spirit Lake Nation ranged from 71 million gallons to 122 million gallons during 2000-04.

  17. 46 CFR 11.430 - Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. 11... Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. Any license or MMC endorsement issued for service on the Great Lakes and inland waters is valid on all of the inland waters of the United States as defined in...

  18. 46 CFR 11.430 - Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. 11... Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. Any license or MMC endorsement issued for service on the Great Lakes and inland waters is valid on all of the inland waters of the United States as defined in...

  19. 46 CFR 11.430 - Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. 11... Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. Any license or MMC endorsement issued for service on the Great Lakes and inland waters is valid on all of the inland waters of the United States as defined in...

  20. 46 CFR 11.430 - Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. 11... Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. Any license or MMC endorsement issued for service on the Great Lakes and inland waters is valid on all of the inland waters of the United States as defined in...

  1. Combined approach of isotope mass balance and hydrological water balance methods to constrain the sources of lake water as exemplified on the small dimictic lake Silbersee, northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Elmarami, Hatem; Meyer, Hanno; Massmann, Gudrun

    2017-05-01

    Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen are often used for water balance calculations of lakes. We present an approach combining the lake water balance with an isotope mass balance to constrain the sources and sinks of the water of a small dimictic lake subjected to eutrophication. Meteorological and hydraulic data in combination with measured isotope signatures of the different water compartments enabled to assess the degree of surface water/groundwater interaction and the amount of overland flow into the lake. Groundwater could be excluded as a lake water source, as its water level was always below the lake water level. In the absence of a channelled inflow, precipitation and overland flow were the remaining options, whereby the latter was only active during periods of exceptionally high rainfall. While the groundwater signatures adjacent to the lake showed an influence of lake water, the lake water balance itself indicated that the associated volumetric water loss to groundwater is rather negligible. In the present case, only a combined assessment of hydrological and isotopic data allowed for an accurate characterization of the studied lake and a quantification of its water sources and sinks, highlighting the importance of using more than one methodological approach for such a purpose.

  2. Microbial water quality of recreational lakes near Tbilisi, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Jaiani, Ekaterine; Kokashvili, Tamar; Mitaishvili, Nino; Elbakidze, Tinantin; Janelidze, Nino; Lashkhi, Nino; Kalandadze, Rusudan; Mikashavidze, Eteri; Natroshvili, Gulnara; Whitehouse, Chris A; Huq, Anwar; Tediashvili, Marina

    2013-06-01

    Microbial safety of recreational water is one of the major human public health issues in developing countries. Three water bodies, the Tbilisi Sea, Kumisi and Lisi lakes, in the South Caucasus region near Tbilisi, Georgia, were monitored in 2006-2009 to determine microbiological quality using standard methods. Microbial pollution indicators were determined in parallel with phytoplankton abundance and measurement of a number of physical-chemical parameters. Kumisi Lake, a brackish water body in an active agricultural area, appeared to be the most polluted, whereas the Tbilisi Sea, a freshwater reservoir was the least polluted. High values for fecal indicators in all three lakes in summer and early autumn were revealed. In our study, total enterococci counts (TEC) appeared to be a better indicator than either fecal or total coliform counts for the evaluation of fresh and brackish microbial water quality. We found significant correlation between total Vibrio counts and TEC for all three water bodies. Prevalence of somatic coliphages and V. cholerae-specific phages as additional water pollution indicator significantly correlated with abundance of the host bacteria. Particular phytoplankton groups in the lakes responded to the changes of fecal indicators; however, no correlation was observed between dominant zooplankton taxonomic groups and microbial parameters.

  3. Sediment Transport and Water Quality Model of Cedar Lake, Indiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. C.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J. D.; Ahlmann, M.; Bucaro, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The EPA-supported Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code, EFDC, is used to model hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality in coastal regions, estuaries, rivers, and lakes. However, the empirical formulations used for sediment transport are not always adequate to accurately characterize cohesive sediment erosion and transport. New sediment transport subroutines have been incorporated into EFDC and the new model is called SNL-EFDC. The updated model provides an improved, coupled hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality framework. The newly incorporated sediment transport subroutines facilitate direct use of measured erosion rate data from the Sediment Erosion with Depth Flume (SEDflume). Erosion rates are included as functions of both depth within the sediment bed and applied shear stresses. This bypasses problems associated with empirical erosion formulations often based on disaggregated particle size. Restoration alternatives are under consideration for Cedar Lake in Indiana and SNL-EFDC models its hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality. The water quality model as implemented on Cedar Lake tracks algae, oxygen, temperature, carbon, phosphorous, and nitrogen kinetics, as well as, sediment bed diagenesis. Environmental conditions, wind, temperature, rainfall, and sunlight, were based on data collected in 2005. Tributary loading was modeled using L-THIA and provided influxes of water, nutrients (phosphorous, nitrogen, etc.), and sediments. The calibrated model was used to simulate a nine month period from March to November 2005. Results suggest that the model simulates sediments transport and associated water quality correctly. The calibrated model is being used to evaluate several restoration measures throughout the lake and watershed and their effect on water quality. Because Cedar Lake is a nitrogen limited lake, changes in the level of eutrophication from each measure are being tracked by calculating the Carlson trophic state index

  4. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  5. Measurement of Mercury Methylation in Lake Water and Sediment Samples

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Akira; Rudd, John W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Biological mercury methylation was assayed by a new radiochemical technique in the water column and sediments of a mercury-contaminated lake. In 24 weeks during 1979, there were three episodes of methylating activity in surface floc and in water, each lasting 3 to 5 weeks. Periods of methylation in the water column coincided with surface sediment methylation and appeared to be related to overall microbial activity. Mercury was actively methylated in the presence of bound sulfide. PMID:16345649

  6. Numerical methods for assessing water quality in lakes and reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mahamah, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    Water quality models are used as tools for predicting both short-term and long-term trends in water quality. They are generally classified into two groups based on the degree of empiricism. The two groups consists of the purely empirical types known as black-box models and the theoretical types called ecosystem models. This dissertation deals with both types of water quality models. The first part deals with empirical phosphorus models. The theory behind this class of models is discussed, leading to the development of an empirical phosphorus model using data from 79 western US lakes. A new approach to trophic state classification is introduced. The data used for the model was obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency National Eutrophication Study (EPA-NES) of western US lakes. The second portion of the dissertation discusses the development of an ecosystem model for culturally eutrophic Liberty Lake situated in eastern Washington State. The model is capable of simulating chlorophyll-a, phosphorus, and nitrogen levels in the lake on a weekly basis. For computing sediment release rates of phosphorus and nitrogen, equations based on laboratory bench-top studies using sediment samples from Liberty Lake are used. The model is used to simulate certain hypothetical nutrient control techniques such as phosphorus flushing, precipitation, and diversion.

  7. Determining lake surface water temperatures worldwide using a tuned one-dimensional lake model (FLake, v1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layden, Aisling; MacCallum, Stuart N.; Merchant, Christopher J.

    2016-06-01

    A tuning method for FLake, a one-dimensional (1-D) freshwater lake model, is applied for the individual tuning of 244 globally distributed large lakes using observed lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) derived from along-track scanning radiometers (ATSRs). The model, which was tuned using only three lake properties (lake depth, snow and ice albedo and light extinction coefficient), substantially improves the measured mean differences in various features of the LSWT annual cycle, including the LSWTs of saline and high altitude lakes, when compared to the observed LSWTs. Lakes whose lake-mean LSWT persists below 1 °C for part of the annual cycle are considered to be seasonally ice-covered. For trial seasonally ice-covered lakes (21 lakes), the daily mean and standard deviation (2σ) of absolute differences between the modelled and observed LSWTs are reduced from 3.07 °C ± 2.25 °C to 0.84 °C ± 0.51 °C by tuning the model. For all other trial lakes (14 non-ice-covered lakes), the improvement is from 3.55 °C ± 3.20 °C to 0.96 °C ± 0.63 °C. The post tuning results for the 35 trial lakes (21 seasonally ice-covered lakes and 14 non-ice-covered lakes) are highly representative of the post-tuning results of the 244 lakes. For the 21 seasonally ice-covered lakes, the modelled response of the summer LSWTs to changes in snow and ice albedo is found to be statistically related to lake depth and latitude, which together explain 0.50 (R2adj, p = 0.001) of the inter-lake variance in summer LSWTs. Lake depth alone explains 0.35 (p = 0.003) of the variance. Lake characteristic information (snow and ice albedo and light extinction coefficient) is not available for many lakes. The approach taken to tune the model, bypasses the need to acquire detailed lake characteristic values. Furthermore, the tuned values for lake depth, snow and ice albedo and light extinction coefficient for the 244 lakes provide some guidance on improving FLake LSWT modelling.

  8. Effects of conservation reserve program on runoff and lake water quality in an oxbow lake watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sediment and its associated pollutants entering a water body can be destructive to the ecological health of the system. Best Management Practices (BMPs) can be used to reduce these pollutants, but understanding the most effective practices is difficult. A case study of Beasley Lake Watershed, typica...

  9. The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement with an emphasis on annex 4 nutrients -and Lake Erie

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented will be an overview of the Great Lakes Water Quality Act of 2012 including a general description of the Annexes and the new Binational Governance. The talk will focus on the Annex 4 Nutrients Subcommittee and the Objectives and Targets Task Team efforts that have been ...

  10. The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement with an emphasis on annex 4 nutrients -and Lake Erie

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented will be an overview of the Great Lakes Water Quality Act of 2012 including a general description of the Annexes and the new Binational Governance. The talk will focus on the Annex 4 Nutrients Subcommittee and the Objectives and Targets Task Team efforts that have been ...

  11. Reduction of Waste Water in Erhai Lake Based on MIKE21 Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changjun; Liang, Qinag; Yan, Feng; Hao, Wenlong

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the ecological water environment in Erhai Lake, different monitoring sections were set to research the change of hydrodynamics and water quality. According to the measured data, MIKE21 Ecolab, the water quality simulation software developed by DHI, is applied to simulate the water quality in Erhai Lake. The hydrodynamics model coupled with water quality is established by MIKE21FM software to simulate the current situation of Erhai Lake. Then through the comparison with the monitoring data, the model parameters are calibrated and the simulation results are verified. Based on this, water quality is simulated by the two-dimensional hydrodynamics and water quality coupled model. The results indicate that the level of water quality in the north and south of lake is level III, while in the center of lake, the water quality is level II. Finally, the water environment capacity and total emmision reduction of pollutants are filtered to give some guidance for the water resources management and effective utilization in the Erhai Lake. PMID:23997684

  12. Reduction of waste water in Erhai Lake based on MIKE21 hydrodynamic and water quality model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changjun; Liang, Qinag; Yan, Feng; Hao, Wenlong

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the ecological water environment in Erhai Lake, different monitoring sections were set to research the change of hydrodynamics and water quality. According to the measured data, MIKE21 Ecolab, the water quality simulation software developed by DHI, is applied to simulate the water quality in Erhai Lake. The hydrodynamics model coupled with water quality is established by MIKE21FM software to simulate the current situation of Erhai Lake. Then through the comparison with the monitoring data, the model parameters are calibrated and the simulation results are verified. Based on this, water quality is simulated by the two-dimensional hydrodynamics and water quality coupled model. The results indicate that the level of water quality in the north and south of lake is level III, while in the center of lake, the water quality is level II. Finally, the water environment capacity and total emmision reduction of pollutants are filtered to give some guidance for the water resources management and effective utilization in the Erhai Lake.

  13. Surface Water Quality Monitoring Site Optimization for Poyang Lake, the Largest Freshwater Lake in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Wu, Mengan; Deng, Yanqing; Tang, Chunyan; Yang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a coupled method to optimize the surface water quality monitoring sites for a huge freshwater lake based on field investigations, mathematical analysis, and numerical simulation tests. Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, was selected as the research area. Based on the field investigated water quality data in the 5 years from 2008 to 2012, the water quality inter-annual variation coefficients at all the present sites and the water quality correlation coefficients between adjacent sites were calculated and analyzed to present an optimization scheme. A 2-D unsteady water quality model was established to get the corresponding water quality data at the optimized monitoring sites, which were needed for the rationality test on the optimized monitoring network. We found that: (1) the water quality of Piaoshan (No. 10) fluctuated most distinguishably and the inter-annual variation coefficient of NH3-N and TP could reach 99.77% and 73.92%, respectively. The four studied indexes were all closely related at Piaoshan (No. 10) and Tangyin (No. 11), and the correlation coefficients of COD and NH3-N could reach 0.91 and 0.94 separately. (2) It was suggested that the present site No. 10 be removed to avoid repeatability, and it was suggested that the three sites of Changling, Huzhong, and Nanjiang be added to improve the representativeness of the monitoring sites. (3) According to the rationality analysis, the 21 optimized water quality monitoring sites could scientifically replace the primary network, and the new monitoring network could better reflect the water quality of the whole lake. PMID:25407419

  14. Lake Surface Water Temperature of European Lakes retrieved from AVHRR Data - Time Series and Quality Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderle, S.; Lieberherr, G.; Riffler, M.

    2016-12-01

    Data analysis of the recent years showed an increase of lake surface water temperature for many lakes around the world. But due to sparse in-situ measurements, which are often not well documented, only satellite data can provide the needed information of the last decades. The importance of lakes for climate research was also highlighted by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) defining lakes as Essential Climate Variables (ECVs). Within the frame of a research project funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation a procedure was developed to retrieve lake surface water temperature with high accuracy based on our archived AVHRR data at the University of Bern, Switzerland. The data archive starts in 1985 and is continuously filled with NOAA-/MetOp-AVHRR data received by our antenna resulting in a time series of more than 30 years (WMO definition of a climate period). The data set covering Europe is also used by other teams for climate related studies resulting in improved pre-processing to guarantee precise calibration and geocoding. The first part of our presentation will be dedicated to the quality of the LSWT retrieval comparing various in-situ measurements from lakes in Switzerland with varying sizes (150km2 - 9km2). The quality of the used split-window approach is sensitive to the derived split-window coefficients. The influence of water vapor, view angle, temporal and spatial validity and day vs. night data will be shown. In addition, some information will be presented about the influence of topography and climatic regions (e.g. Scandinavia vs. Greece) on the quality of the LSWT product. Based on these findings compiling time series for different lakes in Europe will be the focus of the second part of our presentation with details of the applied quality assessment to avoid erroneous signals. Hence, some information is given about hierarchical quality checks which are needed to guarantee a dataset without artefacts. Finally, some results of time series

  15. Abundance and diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in lakes exposed to Chernobyl-derived ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J F; Nagorskaya, L L; Smith, J T

    2011-07-01

    Littoral (lake shore) macroinvertebrate communities were studied in eight natural lakes affected by fallout from the Chernobyl accident. The lakes spanned a range in (137)Cs contamination from 100 to 15500 kBq m(-2) and estimated external dose rates ranged from 0.13 to 30.7 μGy h(-1). General linear models were used to assess whether abundance of individuals, taxon richness, Berger-Parker dominance and Shannon-Wiener diversity varied across the lakes. Step-wise multiple regressions were used to relate variation in total abundance, taxon richness, Berger-Parker dominance, Shannon-Wiener diversity, taxon richness within major groups of macroinvertebrates and abundance of the more common individual taxa to the measured environmental characteristics (conductivity, pH, total hardness and phosphate; lake area, lake maximum depth and total external dose) of the lakes. No evidence was found in this study that the ecological status of lake communities has been influenced by radioactive contamination from the Chernobyl accident. Indeed, the most contaminated lake, Glubokoye, contained the highest richness of aquatic invertebrates. Taxon richness in the eight study lakes varied from 22 (Svyatskoe #7) to 42 (Glubokoye) which spans a range typical for uncontaminated lakes in the region. Since (90)Sr is readily-absorbed by Mollusca, estimated dose rates to this group exceeded those for other invertebrate groups in two lakes (Perstok and Glubokoye). However this study found no association between mollusc diversity or abundance of individual snail species and variation between lakes in the external radiation dose. Indeed Glubokoye, the lake most contaminated by (90)Sr, had the highest richness of freshwater snails per sample (an average of 8.9 taxa per sample). 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrology, water quality, and phosphorus loading of Kirby Lake, Barron County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, William J.; Robertson, Dale M.

    1998-01-01

    In 1992, residents near Kirby Lake, located about five miles northwest of Cumberland, in Barron County, Wisconsin, formed the Kirby Lake Management District. The Lake District immediately began to gather information needed for the preparation of a comprehensive lake-management plan that would be used to protect the natural and recreational assets of the lake. The Lake District completed a land-use inventory of the watershed and an evaluation of available lake water-quality data. The land-use data were used to assess the potential contribution of nutrients to the lake from the watershed. The evaluation of lake water-quality data, which were collected as part of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) Self-Help Monitoring Program, indicated the lake has relatively good water quality. Before a comprehensive lake-management plan could be prepared, however, a better understanding of several aspects of the lake and its surroundings was needed. To address those aspects including the definition of the lake's hydrology and the principal sources of nutrients, and the relation of the lake's water quality to nutrient loading the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lake District and the WDNR (through a Lake Management Planning Grant), conducted a study of Kirby Lake and its watershed. This Fact Sheet presents the results of that study.

  17. Spatial distribution and temporal variability of stable water isotopes in a large and shallow lake.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Wen, Xuefa; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Qitao; Xu, Jingzheng; Cao, Chang; Xu, Jiaping; Hu, Cheng; Shen, Jing; Liu, Shoudong; Lee, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopic compositions of lake water provide additional information on hydrological, meteorological and paleoclimate processes. In this study, lake water isotopic compositions were measured for more than three years in Lake Taihu, a large and shallow lake in southern China, to investigate the isotopic spatial and seasonal variations. The results indicated that (1) the whole-lake mean δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of the lake water varied seasonally from -48.4 ± 5.8 to -25.1 ± 3.2 ‰ and from -6.5 ± 0.9 to -3.5 ± 0.8 ‰, respectively, (2) the spatial pattern of the lake water isotopic compositions was controlled by the direction of water flow and not by local evaporation rate, and (3) using a one-site isotopic measurement to represent the whole-lake mean may result in unreasonable estimates of the isotopic composition of lake evaporation and the lake water residence time in poorly mixed lakes. The original data, documented here as an online supplement, provides a good reference for testing sensitivity of lake water budget to various isotopic sampling strategies. We propose that detailed spatial measurement of lake water isotopic compositions provides a good proxy for water movement and pollutant and alga transports, especially over big lakes.

  18. Investigating the Impact of UV Radiation on High-Altitude Shallow Lake Habitats, Life Diversity, and Life Survival Strategies: Clues for Mars' Past Habitability Potential?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrol, A.; Grin, E. A.; Hock, A.; Kiss, A.; Borics, G.; Kiss, K.; Acs, E.; Kovacs, G.; Chong, G.; Demergasso, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present data and results from an ongoing project of astrobiological high-altitude expeditions investigating the highest and least explored perennial lakes on Earth in the Bolivian and Chilean Andes, including several volcanic crater lakes nearing and beyond 6,000 m in elevation. In the next five years, they will provide the first integrated long-term astrobiological characterization and monitoring of lacustrine environments and their biology for such altitude. These extreme lakes are natural laboratories. They provide the field data missing beyond 4,000 m to complete our understanding of terrestrial lakes and biota. Research on the effects of UV has been performed in lower altitude lakes and models of UV flux over time are being developed. Lakes showing a high content of dissolved organic material (DOM) shield organisms from UV. DOM acts as a natural sunscreen as it influences the water transparency, therefore is a determinant of photic zone depth. In sparsely vegetated alpine areas, lakes are clearer and offer less protection from UV to organisms living in the water. Transparent water and high UV irradiance may maximize the penetration and effect of UV radiation. Shallow-water communities in these lakes are particularly sensitive to UV radiation. The periphyton can live on various susbtrates. While on rocks, it includes immobile species that cannot seek low UV refuges unlike sediment-dwelling periphyton or alpine phytoflagellates which undergo vertical migration. Inhibition of algal photosynthesis by UV radiation has been documented in laboratory and showed that phytoplankton production is reduced by formation of nucleic acid lesions or production of peroxides and free oxygen radicals. of peroxides and free oxygen radicals. Our project is providing the field data that is missing from natural laboratories beyond 4,000 m and will complement the vision of the effects of UV on life and its adaptation modes (or lack thereof).

  19. Investigating the Impact of UV Radiation on High-Altitude Shallow Lake Habitats, Life Diversity, and Life Survival Strategies: Clues for Mars' Past Habitability Potential?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrol, A.; Grin, E. A.; Hock, A.; Kiss, A.; Borics, G.; Kiss, K.; Acs, E.; Kovacs, G.; Chong, G.; Demergasso, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present data and results from an ongoing project of astrobiological high-altitude expeditions investigating the highest and least explored perennial lakes on Earth in the Bolivian and Chilean Andes, including several volcanic crater lakes nearing and beyond 6,000 m in elevation. In the next five years, they will provide the first integrated long-term astrobiological characterization and monitoring of lacustrine environments and their biology for such altitude. These extreme lakes are natural laboratories. They provide the field data missing beyond 4,000 m to complete our understanding of terrestrial lakes and biota. Research on the effects of UV has been performed in lower altitude lakes and models of UV flux over time are being developed. Lakes showing a high content of dissolved organic material (DOM) shield organisms from UV. DOM acts as a natural sunscreen as it influences the water transparency, therefore is a determinant of photic zone depth. In sparsely vegetated alpine areas, lakes are clearer and offer less protection from UV to organisms living in the water. Transparent water and high UV irradiance may maximize the penetration and effect of UV radiation. Shallow-water communities in these lakes are particularly sensitive to UV radiation. The periphyton can live on various susbtrates. While on rocks, it includes immobile species that cannot seek low UV refuges unlike sediment-dwelling periphyton or alpine phytoflagellates which undergo vertical migration. Inhibition of algal photosynthesis by UV radiation has been documented in laboratory and showed that phytoplankton production is reduced by formation of nucleic acid lesions or production of peroxides and free oxygen radicals. of peroxides and free oxygen radicals. Our project is providing the field data that is missing from natural laboratories beyond 4,000 m and will complement the vision of the effects of UV on life and its adaptation modes (or lack thereof).

  20. Water Quality and Hydrology of Silver Lake, Barron County, Wisconsin, With Special Emphasis on Responses of a Terminal Lake to Changes in Phosphorus Loading and Water Level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.

    2009-01-01

    Silver Lake is typically an oligotrophic-to-mesotrophic, soft-water, terminal lake in northwestern Wisconsin. A terminal lake is a closed-basin lake with surface-water inflows but no surface-water outflows to other water bodies. After several years with above-normal precipitation, very high water levels caused flooding of several buildings near the lake and erosion of soil around much of the shoreline, which has been associated with a degradation in water quality (increased phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations and decreased water clarity). To gain a better understanding of what caused the very high water levels and degradation in water quality and collect information to better understand the lake and protect it from future degradation, the U.S. Geological Survey did a detailed study from 2004 to 2008. This report describes results of the study; specifically, lake-water quality, historical changes in water level, water and phosphorus budgets for the two years monitored in the study, results of model simulations that demonstrate how changes in phosphorus inputs affect lake-water quality, and the relative importance of changes in hydrology and changes in the watershed to the water quality of the lake. From 1987 to about 1996, water quality in Silver Lake was relatively stable. Since 1996, however, summer average total phosphorus concentrations increased from about 0.008 milligrams per liter (mg/L) to 0.018 mg/L in 2003, before decreasing to 0.011 mg/L in 2008. From 1996 to 2003, Secchi depths decreased from about 14 to 7.4 feet, before increasing to about 19 feet in 2008. Therefore, Silver Lake is typically classified as oligotrophic to mesotrophic; however, during 2002-4, the lake was classified as mesotrophic to eutrophic. Because productivity in Silver Lake is limited by phosphorus, phosphorus budgets for the lake were constructed for monitoring years 2005 and 2006. The average annual input of phosphorus was 216 pounds: 78 percent from tributary and

  1. Air-water gas exchange of toxaphene in Lake Superior.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Bidleman, Terry F

    2003-06-01

    Parallel air and water samples were collected in Lake Superior during August 1996 and May 1997, to determine the levels and air-water exchange direction of toxaphene. Concentration of toxaphene in water did not vary across Lake Superior or between seasons (averaging 918 +/- 218 pg/L) but atmospheric levels were lower in May (12 +/- 4.6 pg/m3) than in August (28 +/- 10 pg/m3). Two recalcitrant congeners, Parlar 26 and 50, also were determined. These congeners were enriched in the air samples, compared to a standard of technical toxaphene, but not in the water. Water-air fugacity ratios varied from 1.4 to 2.6 in August and 1.3 to 4.7 in May, implying volatilization of toxaphene from the lake. Estimated net fluxes ranged from 5.4 to 13 and 1.8 to 6.4 nm/m2d, respectively. The temperature dependence of toxaphene partial pressure (P) in air was log P/Pa = -3.291/T(a) + 1.67, where T(a) is air temperature. By using this relationship, the atmospheric levels of toxaphene, fugacity ratios, and net fluxes were estimated for the entire year. Fugacity ratios were highest in the winter and lowest in the summer; thus toxaphene was predicted to undergo net volatilization from the lake during all months. A net removal of approximately 220 kg/year by gas exchange was estimated.

  2. Water quality studies: Hartwell lake 1992 summary report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Huffstetler, C.J.; Carroll, J.H.; Jabour, W.E.

    1993-10-01

    This report documents the results of comprehensive water quality studies performed in Hartwell Lake (HW) during the period January through December 1992. Presented in this report are summaries and comparisons of water quality conditions observed during monthly in situ sampling trips and biannual chemical sampling trips within the main stem and two major embayments on Hartwell Lake. The onset of thermal stratification began in Hartwell Lake during early March and by mid-April, extensive stratification was present from the headwaters of each major embayment to the forebay. Anoxic conditions were observed in the middle reaches of the Seneca and Tugaloo Rivers during the July sampling trip. The greatest concentrations of chemical constituents within the two embayments were also recorded during the mid-July sampling period. By mid-October, stratification in the upstream regions had diminished due to normal seasonal cooling, but persisted in the deeper waters of the forebay until early November. Intensive physicochemical sampling during July, revealed increased concentrations of specific nutrients and organic carbons normally associated with anoxic conditions in the bottom waters of an embayment. Dissolved oxygen, Savannah River, Lake Hartwell, Water quality, Limnology.

  3. Unexpected response of high Alpine Lake waters to climate warming.

    PubMed

    Thies, Hansjörg; Nickus, Ulrike; Mair, Volkmar; Tessadri, Richard; Tait, Danilo; Thaler, Bertha; Psenner, Roland

    2007-11-01

    Over the past two decades, we have observed a substantial rise in solute concentration at two remote high mountain lakes in catchments of metamorphic rocks in the European Alps. At Rasass See, the electrical conductivity increased 18-fold. Unexpectedly high nickel concentrations at Rasass See, which exceeded the limit in drinking water by more than 1 order of magnitude, cannot be related to catchment geology. We attribute these changes in lake water quality to solute release from the ice of an active rock glacier in the catchment as a response to climate warming. Similar processes occurred at the higher elevation lake Schwarzsee ob Sölden, where electrical conductivity has risen 3-fold during the past two decades.

  4. Retrieval of lake water temperature based on LandSat TM imagery: A case study in East Lake of Wuhan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bo; Kang, Ling; Yang, Shengmei

    2013-10-01

    Lake water temperature is one of the most important parameters determining ecological conditions in lake water. With the recent development of satellite remote sensing, remotely sensed data instead of traditional sampling measurement can be used to retrieve the lake surface temperature. The East Lake located in the Wuhan city was selected as research region in this paper. The mono window algorithm has been applied to retrieve the lake water temperature of East lake basin with Landsat TM data. Through three groups of field survey data, the outcome shows that the retrieval results using the mono window model are quite approximate to the same period of the experimental region historical temperature data. So, it is feasible to utilize the remote sensing method to obtain the lake temperature. Meanwhile, the retrieval results also demonstrate that the East Lake surface temperatures from different years have the similar distribution regularity. Generally speaking, the temperature of the lake center is higher than the surrounding area. The west of lake is mostly higher than the east mainly due to the vegetation density and urbanization distribution condition. This conclusion is important to the further study on monitoring the East Lake temperature particularly in large scale.

  5. Biotic and abiotic factors related to lake herring recruitment in the Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior, 1984-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoff, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Lake Superior lake herring (Coregonus artedi) recruitment to 13-14 months of age in the Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior varied by a factor of 5,233 during 1984-1998. Management agencies have sought models that accurately predict recruitment, but no satisfactory model had previously been developed. Lake herring recruitment was modeled to determine which factors most explained recruitment variability. The Ricker stock-recruitment model derived from only the paired stock and recruit data explained 35% of the variability in the recruitment data. The functional relationship that explained the greatest amount of recruitment variation (93%) included lake herring stock size, lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population size, slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) biomass, the interaction of mean daily wind speed in April (month of hatch) and lake herring stock size, and mean air temperature in April (when lake herring are 12-months old). Model results were interpreted to mean that lake herring recruitment was affected negatively by: slimy sculpin predation on lake herring ova; predation on age-0 lake herring by lake trout; and adult cannibalism on lake herring larvae, which was reduced by increased wind speed. April temperature was the variable that explained the least amount of variability in recruitment, but lake herring recruitment was positively affected by a warm April, which shortened winter and apparently reduced first-winter mortality. Stock size caused compensatory, density-dependent mortality on lake herring recruits. Management efforts appear best targeted at stock size protection, and empirical data implies that stock size in the Wisconsin waters of the lake should be maintained at 2.1-15.0 adults/ha in spring, bottom-trawl surveys.

  6. Depressions and other lake-floor morphologic features in deep water, southern Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Foster, D.S.; Harrison, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    The most common features are subcircular depressions, commonly compound, that are irregularly distributed across the lake floor. The depressions are most common in the southern basin of the lake where lacustrine sediments are more than a few meters thick, corresponding to water depths greater than about 90 m. We have divided the depressions into three types on the basis of their internal structure seen in seismic-reflection profiles. The depressions show varying degrees of muting, ranging from fresh to completely buried, suggesting a range in the time of their formation. The origin of the depressions is problematic, but their structure suggests collapse and(or) subsidence. -from Authors

  7. Recovery and decline of lake whitefish in U.S. waters of eastern Lake Ontario, 1980-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owens, Randall W.; O'Gorman, Robert; Eckert, Thomas H.; Lantry, Brian F.; Dittman, Dawn E.

    2005-01-01

    The lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) was an important member of the native fish community and a valued commercial species in Lake Ontario. Lake whitefish were common in U.S. waters of the lake until 1965 and very abundant in Canadian waters through the early 1970s, although their numbers declined shortly thereafter. During 1975-1985, lake whitefish stocks remained depressed throughout the lake as a result of the combined effects of degraded water quality, overfishing, and predation. Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) probably preyed on whitefish fry, and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) preyed on adults. During 1985-1987, lake whitefish stocks began to recover in eastern Lake Ontario, and their buildup continued into the mid-1990s. Reasons for the recovery likely included control of the sea lamprey population and a reduction in the number of piscivorous rainbow smelt. By 1997, lake whitefish abundance had declined severely again; some fish appeared to have dispersed from the northeastern to the southeastern regions of the lake, and the depth of capture increased. We believe that the collapse of Diporeia spp. populations during 1992-1999 was responsible for the decline in the lake whitefish populations and the shifts in geographic and bathymetric distribution because lake whitefish fed primarily on Diporeia spp. After the collapse of Diporeia spp. populations, lake whitefish in southeastern Lake Ontario fed on Mysis relicta and quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis). Changing from a diet of high-lipid Diporeia spp to low-lipid dreissenids and foraging on Mysis relicta at lower temperatures are apparently hampering the rebuilding of lake whitefish stocks.

  8. Reconnaissance of water quality of Lake Henry and Lake Meredith Reservoir, Crowley County, Southeastern Colorado, April-October 1987. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The report describes the water-quality characteristics of Lake Henry and Lake Meredith, Reservoir and the comparison between the characteristics and the water-quality standards established for these reservoirs. Measurements of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, and light transparency are reported for numerous sites in each lake. In addition, analyses of samples collected for nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), major chemical constituents, trace elements, phytoplankton densities, and chlorophyll a concentrations in Lake Henry and Lake Meredith are included in the report.

  9. Lake water levels across the U.S.: What are the spatial patterns and drivers of water level change?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Lake water-level changes affect the physical, chemical, and biological condition of lakes; and we expect that disturbances such as land use conversion, water withdrawal, and climate change may alter water-level regimes and impact lake integrity. However, we have a poor...

  10. Human influences on water quality in Great Lakes coastal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Morrice, John A; Danz, Nicholas P; Regal, Ronald R; Kelly, John R; Niemi, Gerald J; Reavie, Euan D; Hollenhorst, Tom; Axler, Richard P; Trebitz, Anett S; Cotter, Anne M; Peterson, Gregory S

    2008-03-01

    A better understanding of relationships between human activities and water chemistry is needed to identify and manage sources of anthropogenic stress in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. The objective of the study described in this article was to characterize relationships between water chemistry and multiple classes of human activity (agriculture, population and development, point source pollution, and atmospheric deposition). We also evaluated the influence of geomorphology and biogeographic factors on stressor-water quality relationships. We collected water chemistry data from 98 coastal wetlands distributed along the United States shoreline of the Laurentian Great Lakes and GIS-based stressor data from the associated drainage basin to examine stressor-water quality relationships. The sampling captured broad ranges (1.5-2 orders of magnitude) in total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), total suspended solids (TSS), chlorophyll a (Chl a), and chloride; concentrations were strongly correlated with stressor metrics. Hierarchical partitioning and all-subsets regression analyses were used to evaluate the independent influence of different stressor classes on water quality and to identify best predictive models. Results showed that all categories of stress influenced water quality and that the relative influence of different classes of disturbance varied among water quality parameters. Chloride exhibited the strongest relationships with stressors followed in order by TN, Chl a, TP, TSS, and DIN. In general, coarse scale classification of wetlands by morphology (three wetland classes: riverine, protected, open coastal) and biogeography (two ecoprovinces: Eastern Broadleaf Forest [EBF] and Laurentian Mixed Forest [LMF]) did not improve predictive models. This study provides strong evidence of the link between water chemistry and human stress in Great Lakes coastal wetlands and can be used to inform management efforts to improve water

  11. Impacts of population growth and economic development on water quality of a lake: case study of Lake Victoria Kenya water.

    PubMed

    Juma, Dauglas Wafula; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Fengting

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic-induced water quality pollution is a major environmental problem in freshwater ecosystems today. As a result of this, eutrophication of lakes occurs. Population and economic development are key drivers of water resource pollution. To evaluate how growth in the riparian population and in the gross domestic product (GDP) with unplanned development affects the water quality of the lake, this paper evaluates Lake Victoria Kenyan waters basin. Waters quality data between 1990 and 2012 were analyzed along with reviews of published literature, papers, and reports. The nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N), soluble phosphorus (PO4-P), chlorophyll a, and Secchi transparencies were evaluated as they are key water quality indicators. The NO3-N increased from 10 μg l(-1) in 1990 to 98 μg 1(-1) in 2008, while PO4-P increased from 4 μg l(-1) in 1990 to 57 μg l(-1) in 2008. The population and economic growth of Kenya are increasing with both having minimums in 1990 of 24.143 million people and 12.18 billion US dollars, to maximums in 2010 of 39.742 million people and 32.163 billion US dollars, respectively. A Secchi transparency is reducing with time, indicating an increasing pollution. This was confirmed by an increase in aquatic vegetation using an analysis of moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) images of 2000 and 2012 of Kenyan waters. This study found that increasing population and GDP increases pollution discharge thus polluting lakes. One of major factors causing lake water pollution is the unplanned or poor waste management policy and service.

  12. Pleistocene desiccation in East Africa bottlenecked but did not extirpate the adaptive radiation of Lake Victoria haplochromine cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Kathryn R; Reggio, Chiara; Wirth, Thierry; Verheyen, Erik; Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    2009-08-11

    The Great Lakes region of East Africa, including Lake Victoria, is the center of diversity of the mega-diverse cichlid fishes (Perciformes: Teleostei). Paleolimnological evidence indicates dramatic desiccation of this lake ca. 18,000-15,000 years ago. Consequently, the hundreds of extant endemic haplochromine species in the lake must have either evolved since then or refugia must have existed, within that lake basin or elsewhere, from which Lake Victoria was recolonized. We studied the population history of the Lake Victoria region superflock (LVRS) of haplochromine cichlids based on nuclear genetic analysis (12 microsatellite loci from 400 haplochomines) of populations from Lake Kivu, Lake Victoria, and the connected and surrounding rivers and lakes. Population genetic analyses confirmed that Lake Kivu haplochromines colonized Lake Victoria. Coalescent analyses show a 30- to 50-fold decline in the haplochromine populations of Lake Victoria, Lake Kivu, and the region ca. 18,000-15,000 years ago. We suggest that this coincides with drastic climatic and geological changes in the late Pleistocene. The most recent common ancestor of the Lake Victoria region haplochromines was estimated to have existed about 4.5 million years ago, which corresponds to the first radiation of cichlids in Lake Tanganyika and the origin of the tribe Haplochrominii. This relatively old evolutionary origin may explain the high levels of polymorphism still found in modern haplochromines. This degree of polymorphism might have acted as a "genetic reservoir" that permitted the explosive radiation of hundreds of haplochromines and their array of contemporary adaptive morphologies.

  13. Human land uses enhance sediment denitrification and N2O production in Yangtze lakes primarily by influencing lake water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Yao, L.; Wang, Z.; Xiong, Z.; Liu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Sediment denitrification in lakes alleviates the effects of eutrophication through the removal of nitrogen to the atmosphere as N2O and N2. However, N2O contributes notably to the greenhouse effect and global warming. Human land uses (e.g. agricultural and urban areas) strongly affect lake water quality and sediment characteristics, which, in turn, may regulate lake sediment denitrification and N2O production. In this study, we investigated sediment denitrification and N2O production and their relationships to within-lake variables and watershed land uses in 20 lakes from the Yangtze River basin in China. The results indicated that both lake water quality and sediment characteristics were significantly influenced by watershed land uses. N2O production rates increased with increasing background denitrification rates. Background denitrification and N2O production rates were positively related to water nitrogen concentrations but were not significantly correlated with sediment characteristics and plant community structure. A significant positive relationship was observed between background denitrification rate and percentage of human-dominated land uses (HDL) in watersheds. Structural equation modelling revealed that the indirect effects of HDL on sediment denitrification and N2O production in Yangtze lakes were mediated primarily through lake water quality. Our findings also suggest that although sediments in Yangtze lakes can remove large quantities of nitrogen through denitrification, they may also be an important source of N2O, especially in lakes with high nitrogen content.

  14. ARSENIC CYCLING WITHIN THE WATER COLUMN OF A SMALL LAKE RECEIVING CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER DISCHARGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of arsenic discharged from contaminated ground water to a small, shallow lake at a hazardous waste site is controlled, in part, by the rate of ferrous iron oxidation-precipitation and arsenic sorption occurring near the lake chemocline. Laboratory experiments were condu...

  15. ARSENIC CYCLING WITHIN THE WATER COLUMN OF A SMALL LAKE RECEIVING CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER DISCHARGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of arsenic discharged from contaminated ground water to a small, shallow lake at a hazardous waste site is controlled, in part, by the rate of ferrous iron oxidation-precipitation and arsenic sorption occurring near the lake chemocline. Laboratory experiments were condu...

  16. 46 CFR 11.430 - Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. 11... Endorsements § 11.430 Endorsements for the Great Lakes and inland waters. (a) Any officer endorsement issued for service on Great Lakes and inland waters self-propelled vessels, excluding towing vessels, is...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WATER QUALITY GUIDANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. B Appendix B to Part 132—Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Methodology for Deriving Bioaccumulation Factors Great Lakes States and Tribes... system. For log KOW, the log of the octanol-water partition coefficient is a base 10 logarithm. Uptake...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WATER QUALITY GUIDANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. B Appendix B to Part 132—Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Methodology for Deriving Bioaccumulation Factors Great Lakes States and Tribes... system. For log KOW, the log of the octanol-water partition coefficient is a base 10 logarithm. Uptake...

  19. What caused the decline of China's largest freshwater lake? Attribution analysis on Poyang Lake water level variations in recent years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xuchun; Xu, Chong-Yu; Zhang, Qi

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, dramatic decline of water level of the Poyang Lake, China's largest freshwater lake, has raised wide concerns about the water security and wetland ecosystem. This remarkable hydrological change coincided with several factors like the initial operation of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) in 2003, the big change of lake bottom topography due to extensive sand mining in the lake since 2000, and also climate change and other human activities in the Yangtze River basin may add to this complexity. Questions raised to what extent that the lake hydrological changes is caused by climate change and/or human activities. In this study, quantitative assessment was conducted to clarify the magnitude and mechanism of specific influencing factors on recent lake decline (2003-2014), with reference to the period of 1980-1999. The attempts were achieved through the reconstruction of lake water level scenarios by the framework of neural network. Major result indicates that the effect of lake bottom topography change due to sand mining activities has became the dominant factor for the recent lake decline, especially in winter season with low water level. However, the effect of TGD regulation shows strong seasonal features, its effect can accounts for 33%-42% of the average water level decline across the lake during the impoundment period of September-October. In addition, the effect of climate change and other human activities over the Yangtze River basin needs to be highly addressed, which is particularly prominent on reducing lake water level during the summer flood season and autumn recession period. The result also revealed that due to different mechanism, the responses of the lake water level to the three influencing factors are not consistent and show great spatial and temporal differences.

  20. An extant cichlid fish radiation emerged in an extinct Pleistocene lake.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Domino A; Lunt, David H; Bills, Roger; Turner, George F; Katongo, Cyprian; Duftner, Nina; Sturmbauer, Christian; Seehausen, Ole

    2005-05-05

    The haplochromine cichlid fish of the East African Great Lakes represent some of the fastest and most species-rich adaptive radiations known, but rivers in most of Africa accommodate only a few morphologically similar species of haplochromine cichlid fish. This has been explained by the wealth of ecological opportunity in large lakes compared with rivers. It is therefore surprising that the rivers of southern Africa harbour many, ecologically diverse haplochromines. Here we present genetic, morphological and biogeographical evidence suggesting that these riverine cichlids are products of a recent adaptive radiation in a large lake that dried up in the Holocene. Haplochromine species richness peaks steeply in an area for which geological data reveal the historical existence of Lake palaeo-Makgadikgadi. The centre of this extinct lake is now a saltpan north of the Kalahari Desert, but it once hosted a rapidly evolving fish species radiation, comparable in morphological diversity to that in the extant African Great Lakes. Importantly, this lake seeded all major river systems of southern Africa with ecologically diverse cichlids. This discovery reveals how local evolutionary processes operating during a short window of ecological opportunity can have a major and lasting effect on biodiversity on a continental scale.

  1. Assessments of Water Quality in Mississippi Delta Lake Watersheds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper summarizes watershed scale research by USDA-ARS National Sedimentation Laboratory scientists on the effects of conservation management on water quality and ecology in oxbow lakes of the Mississippi Delta Region, USA. The Mississippi Delta Region is located in the central portion of the U...

  2. Microbiology of the subglacial Lake Vostok: first results of borehole-frozen lake water analysis and prospects for searching for lake inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Sergey A

    2016-01-28

    This article examines the question of the possible existence of microbial life inhabiting the subglacial Lake Vostok buried beneath a 4 km thick Antarctic ice sheet. It represents the results of analysis of the only available frozen lake water samples obtained upon the first lake entry and subsequent re-coring the water frozen within the borehole. For comparison, results obtained by earlier molecular microbiological studies of accretion ice are included in this study, with the focus on thermophiles and an unknown bacterial phylotype. A description of two Lake Vostok penetrations is presented for the first time from the point of view of possible clean water sampling. Finally, the results of current studies of Lake Vostok frozen water samples are presented, with the focus on the discovery of another unknown bacterial phylotype w123-10 distantly related to the above-mentioned unknown phylotype AF532061 detected in Vostok accretion ice, both successfully passing all possible controls for contamination. The use of clean-room facilities and the establishment of a contaminant library are considered to be prerequisites for research on microorganisms from Lake Vostok. It seems that not yet recorded microbial life could exist within the Lake Vostok water body. In conclusion, the prospects for searching for lake inhabitants are expressed with the intention to sample the lake water as cleanly as possible in order to make sure that further results will be robust.

  3. Water resources of Lake and Moody counties, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    The primary sources of surface water in Lake and Moody Counties are the Big Sioux River and its intermittent tributaries, and Lakes Herman, Madison, and Brant. Seasonal variations in streamflow and lake levels are directly related to seasonal variations in precipitation. Dissolved-solids concentration in water from streams and lakes increases as streamflow decreases and lake levels decline. Eight glacial aquifers and four bedrock aquifers were delineated in Lake and Moody Counties. The Big Sioux, North Skunk Creek, Pipestone Creek, Battle Creek, and East Fork Vermillion aquifers are composed of glacial outwash. These aquifers are less than 60 feet below land surface, and are in hydraulic connection with the river or creek of the same name. The Rutland, Ramona, and Howard aquifers are composed of glacial outwash and are overlain by 50 to 470 feet of till. The four bedrock aquifers are the Niobrara, Codell, Dakota, and Quartzite wash. The average thickness of the Big Sioux, Pipestone Creek, North Skunk Creek, Battle Creek, and East Fork Vermillion aquifers ranges from 14 feet for the Battle Creek aquifer to 39 feet for the North Skunk Creek aquifer. The average thickness of the Rutland, Ramona, and Howard aquifers ranges from 18 feet for the Ramona aquifer to 40 feet for the Howard aquifer. Predominant chemical constituents in water from the Big Sioux, North Skunk Creek, and Pipestone Creek aquifers are calcium and bicarbonate. Predominant chemical constituents in the Battle Creek and East Fork Vermillion aquifers are calcium and sulfate. Predominant chemical constituents in water from the Rutland, Ramona, and Howard aquifers are calcium, sulfate and biocarbonate. The average thickness of the four bedrock aquifers ranges from 60 to 400 feet. The aquifers are under artesian conditions. Predominant chemical constituents in water from the Niobrara aquifer are calcium, sodium, and sulfate; from the Codell and Dakota aquifers are sodium and sulfate; and from the Quartzite

  4. Monitoring Lake Simcoe water quality using Landsat TM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xian

    Inland lakes are important resources to humans, while the eutrophication effect caused by an overload of nutrients is a significant problem. This study focuses on utilizing the satellite remote sensing to monitor the water quality of Lake Simcoe, Ontario, Canada, which has been suffering from the overload of Total Phosphorus (TP) and therefore eutrophication for decades. The data employed in this study includes 22 cloud-free Landsat 5 TM images, as well as the nearly simultaneous in-situ data from 15 observation stations on the lake. Compared to the generally used model, an improved model is developed in this study to estimate the Secchi Disk Transparency (SDT), a parameter for water clarity measurements, using the TM images. Models based on different band combinations are compared to estimate the chlorophyll- a (chl-a) concentration. The results of these estimations are validated using the in-situ data by the linear regression analysis, and the accuracies are measured by the correlation coefficients R 2. The results reveal that the improved SDT model provides higher prediction accuracies than the general model when applied to 68.2% (15 out of 22) of the images. The majority of the SDT predictions show high R 2, whereas some of the estimated chl-a concentrations have weak relationships with the in-situ data. The possible reasons for this are the geo-location of stations, as well as the influences of chl- a and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC). The resultant concentration maps indicate that the eutrophic water is normally distributed at the near-shore areas and the northeastern part of Lake Simcoe. In addition, the southern Cook's Bay has always been suffering from an extremely serious water quality problem even until now. Meanwhile, the water quality of the southwestern part of Lake Simcoe is much better than the other parts of this lake. The results also show that the water quality of Lake Simcoe was at its worst in August and September for the past 22 years while

  5. Polarization Lidar for Shallow Water Supraglacial Lake Depth Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, S.; Adler, J.; Thayer, J. P.; Hayman, M.

    2010-12-01

    A bathymetric, polarization lidar system transmitting at 532 nanometers and using a single photomultiplier tube is developed for applications of shallow water depth measurement, in particular those often found in supraglacial lakes of the ablation zone on the Greenland Ice Sheet. The technique exploits polarization attributes of the probed water body to isolate surface and floor returns, enabling constant fraction detection schemes to determine depth. The minimum resolvable water depth is no longer dictated by the system’s laser or detector pulse width and can achieve better than an order of magnitude improvement over current water depth determination techniques. In laboratory tests, a Nd:YAG microchip laser coupled with polarization optics, a photomultiplier tube, a constant fraction discriminator and a time to digital converter are used to target various water depths, using ice as the floor to simulate a supraglacial lake. Measurement of 1 centimeter water depths with an uncertainty of ±3 millimeters are demonstrated using the technique. This novel technique enables new approaches to designing laser bathymetry systems for shallow depth determination from remote platforms while not compromising deep water depth measurement, and will support comprehensive hydrodynamic studies of supraglacial lakes. Additionally, the compact size and low weight (<15 kg) of the field system currently in development presents opportunities for use in small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for large areal surveys of the ablation zone.

  6. Lake Chad basin water balance using multi-sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frappart, F.; Syed, T. H.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Ramillien, G.; Cazenave, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Lake Chad basin, which covers 8% of the surface of Africa, is one of the largest fresh water bodies of the African continent. In the last decades, it has dramatically decreased in size due to climate change and human water consumption, from approximately 25000 km2 in 1973 to less than 2000 km2 in the 1990s. Freshwater shortage is a major concern for this region. Remote sensing offers new opportunities to monitor and better understand the hydrological cycle of major basins. On the one hand, satellite radar altimetry is currently used to construct water level time series. Spatio- temporal variations of surface water volume can be estimated by combining information from these sensors. On the other hand, the delivery of monthly Earth gravity field by the GRACE project allows the determination of small time-variations of the Earth gravity and particularly the variations of land water storage. We have estimated surface water volume variations over the Lake Chad for 15 years of Topex/Poseidon, Jason-1 and ENVISAT/RA-2 altimeter data. The results obtained are then compared with water volume variations derived from GRACE measurements over a four year time span (April 2002 to March 2006) for the entire Lake Chad basin.

  7. Determining lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) worldwide using a tuned 1-dimensional lake model (FLake, v1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layden, A.; MacCallum, S.; Merchant, C.

    2015-10-01

    FLake, a 1-dimensional freshwater lake model, is tuned for 244 globally distributed large lakes using lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) derived from Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSRs). The model, tuned using only 3 lake properties; lake depth, albedo (snow and ice) and light extinction co-efficient, substantially improves the measured biases in various features of the LSWT annual cycle, including the LSWTs of saline and high altitude lakes. The daily mean absolute differences (MAD) and the spread of differences (±2 standard deviations) across the trial seasonally ice covered lakes (lakes with a lake-mean LSWT remaining below 1 °C for part of the annual cycle) is reduced from 3.01± 2.25 °C (pre-tuning) to 0.84 ± 0.51 °C (post-tuning). For non-seasonally ice-covered trial lakes (lakes with a lake-mean LSWT remaining above 1 °C throughout its annual cycle), the average daily mean absolute difference (MAD) is reduced from 3.55 ± 3.20 °C to 0.96 ± 0.63 °C. The post tuning results for the trial lakes (35 lakes) are highly representative of the post tuning results of the 244 lakes. The sensitivity of the summer LSWTs of deeper lakes to changes in the timing of ice-off is demonstrated. The modelled summer LSWT response to changes in ice-off timing is found to be strongly affected by lake depth and latitude, explaining 0.50 (R2adj, p = 0.001) of the inter-lake variance in summer LSWTs. Lake depth alone explains 0.35 (p =0.003) of the variance. The tuning approach undertaken in this study, overcomes the obstacle of the lack of available lake characteristic information (snow and ice albedo and light extinction co-efficient) for individual lakes. Furthermore, the tuned values for lake depth, snow and ice albedo and light extinction co-efficient for the 244 lakes provide guidance for improving LSWTs modelling in FLake.

  8. Vertical profiles of water and sediment denitrifiers in two plateau freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Guozhu; Chen, Ling; Yang, Yuyin; Wu, Zhen; Tong, Tianli; Liu, Yong; Xie, Shuguang

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the abundance, richness, diversity, and community composition of denitrifiers (based on nirS and nosZ genes) in the stratified water columns and sediments in eutrophic Dianchi Lake and mesotrophic Erhai Lake using quantitative PCR assay and high-throughput sequencing analysis. Both nirS- and nosZ denitrifiers were detected in waters of these two lakes. Surface water showed higher nosZ gene density than bottom water, and Dianchi Lake waters had larger nirS gene abundance than Erhai Lake waters. The abundance of sediment nirS- and nosZ denitrifiers in Dianchi Lake was larger than that in Erhai Lake. nirS richness and diversity and nosZ richness tended to increase with increasing sediment layer depth in both lakes. The distinct structure difference of sediment nirS- and nosZ denitrifier communities was found between in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake. These two lakes also differed greatly in water denitrifier community structure. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis indicated the presence of several different groups of nirS- or nosZ denitrifiers in both lakes. The novel nirS denitrifiers were abundant in both Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake, while most of the obtained nosZ sequences could be affiliated with known genera.

  9. Multiscale Drivers of Water Chemistry of Boreal Lakes and Streams

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard K.

    2006-01-01

    The variability in surface water chemistry within and between aquatic ecosystems is regulated by many factors operating at several spatial and temporal scales. The importance of geographic, regional-, and local-scale factors as drivers of the natural variability of three water chemistry variables representing buffering capacity and the importance of weathering (acid neutralizing capacity, ANC), nutrient concentration (total phosphorus, TP), and importance of allochthonous inputs (total organic carbon, TOC) were studied in boreal streams and lakes using a method of variance decomposition. Partial redundancy analysis (pRDA) of ANC, TP, and TOC and 38 environmental variables in 361 lakes and 390 streams showed the importance of the interaction between geographic position and regional-scale variables. Geographic position and regional-scale factors combined explained 15.3% (streams) and 10.6% (lakes) of the variation in ANC, TP, and TOC. The unique variance explained by geographic, regional, and local-scale variables alone was <10%. The largest amount of variance was explained by the pure effect of regional-scale variables (9.9% for streams and 7.8% for lakes), followed by local-scale variables (2.9% and 5.8%) and geographic position (1.8% and 3.7%). The combined effect of geographic position, regional-, and local-scale variables accounted for between 30.3% (lakes) and 39.9% (streams) of the variance in surface water chemistry. These findings lend support to the conjecture that lakes and streams are intimately linked to their catchments and have important implications regarding conservation and restoration (management) endeavors. PMID:16955233

  10. Water resources of the Lake Erie shore region in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, John William; Van Tuyl, Donald W.; White, Walter F.

    1952-01-01

    An abundant supply of water is available to the Lake Erie Shore region in Pennsylvania. Lake i£rie furnishes an almost inexhaustible supply of water of satisfactory chemical quality. Small quantities of water are available from small streams in the area and from the ground. A satisfactory water supply is one of the factors that affect the economic growth of a region. Cities and towns must have adequate amounts of pure water for human consumption. Industries must have suitable water ih sufficient quantities for all purposes. In order to assure. success and economy, the development of water resources should be based on adequate knowledge of the quantity and quality of the water. As a nation, we can not afford to run the risk of dissipating our resources, especially in times of national emergency, by building projects that are not founded on sound engineering and adequate water-resources information. The purpose of this report is to summarize and interpret all available water-resources information for the Lake Erie Shore region in Pennsylvania. The report will be useful for initial guidance in the location or expansion of water facilities for defense and nondefense industries and the municipalities upon which they are dependent. It will also be useful in evaluating the adequacy of the Geological Survey's part of the basic research necessary to plan the orderly development of the water resources of the Lake Erie Shore region. Most of the data contained inthis report have been obtained'by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Forests and Waters, the Pennsylvania Department of Internal Affairs, and the Pennsylvania State Planning Board, Department of Commerce. The Pennsylv~nia Department of Health furnished information on water pollution. The report was prepared in the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey b:y John W. Mangan (Surface Water). Donald W. VanTuyl (Ground Water). and Walter F. White, Jr. (Quality of

  11. Evidence of widespread natural reproduction by lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in the Michigan waters of Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, S.C.; He, J.X.; Johnson, J.E.; O'Brien, T. P.; Schaeffer, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    Localized natural reproduction of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Lake Huron has occurred since the 1980s near Thunder Bay, Michigan. During 2004–2006, USGS spring and fall bottom trawl surveys captured 63 wild juvenile lake trout at depths ranging from 37–73 m at four of five ports in the Michigan waters of the main basin of Lake Huron, more than five times the total number captured in the previous 30-year history of the surveys. Relatively high catches of wild juvenile lake trout in bottom trawls during 2004–2006 suggest that natural reproduction by lake trout has increased and occurred throughout the Michigan waters of the main basin. Increased catches of wild juvenile lake trout in the USGS fall bottom trawl survey were coincident with a drastic decline in alewife abundance, but data were insufficient to determine what mechanism may be responsible for increased natural reproduction by lake trout. We recommend further monitoring of juvenile lake trout abundance and research into early life history of lake trout in Lake Huron.

  12. Is water age a reliable indicator for evaluating water quality effectiveness of water diversion projects in eutrophic lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Zou, Rui; Wang, Yilin; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Lei; Zhu, Xiang; Guo, Huaicheng

    2016-11-01

    Water diversion has been applied increasingly to promote the exchange of lake water and to control eutrophication of lakes. The accelerated water exchange and mass transport by water diversion can usually be represented by water age. But the responses of water quality after water diversion is still disputed. The reliability of using water age for evaluating the effectiveness of water diversion projects in eutrophic lakes should be thereby explored further. Lake Dianchi, a semi-closed plateau lake in China, has suffered severe eutrophication since the 1980s, and it is one of the three most eutrophic lakes in China. There was no significant improvement in water quality after an investment of approximately 7.7 billion USD and numerous project efforts from 1996 to 2015. After the approval of the Chinese State Council, water has been transferred to Lake Dianchi to alleviate eutrophication since December 2013. A three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model and eight scenarios were developed in this study to quantity the influence of this water diversion project on water quality in Lake Dianchi. The model results showed that (a) Water quality (TP, TN, and Chla) could be improved by 13.5-32.2%, much lower than the approximate 50% reduction in water age; (b) Water exchange had a strong positive relationship with mean TP, and mean Chla had exactly the same response to water diversion as mean TN; (c) Water level was more beneficial for improving hydrodynamic and nutrient concentrations than variation in the diverted inflowing water volume; (d) The water diversion scenario of doubling the diverted inflow rate in the wet season with the water level of 1886.5 m and 1887 m in the remaining months was the best water diversion mode for mean hydrodynamics and TP, but the scenario of doubling the diverted inflow rate in the wet season with 1887 m throughout the year was optimum for mean TN and Chla; (e) Water age influenced the effectiveness of water diversion on the

  13. Cavitation Susceptibility Measurements of Ocean Lake and Laboratory Waters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    were (.1rri ( out in Exuma Sound, the Gulf Stream off the coast of Florida, and Lake Pend rtille to provide comparative results in different bodies of...than 100 m, the water in the Gulf Stream was found to cavitate more easily than the water in Exuma Sound. At deeper depths, the opposite trend was found...Depending on the nuclei populations, variations of the cavitation inception indices with depth took different forms in Exuma Sound, the Gulf Stream

  14. 2. GORGE HIGH DAM. UNUSUALLY HIGH WATER IN GORGE LAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GORGE HIGH DAM. UNUSUALLY HIGH WATER IN GORGE LAKE DUE TO THE COMBINATION OF UNIT 24 BEING DOWN FOR REWINDING AND TWO UNITS COMING ON LINE UNEXPECTEDLY AT ROSS POWERHOUSE LED TO WATER FLOWING OVER THE SPILLGATES. EACH GATE IF 47 FEET WIDE AND 50 FEET HIGH, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Gorge High Dam, On Skagit River, 2.9 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  15. Quantifying Lake Water Quality Evolution: Coupled Geochemistry, Hydrodynamics, and Aquatic Ecology in an Acidic Pit Lake.

    PubMed

    Salmon, S Ursula; Hipsey, Matthew R; Wake, Geoffrey W; Ivey, Gregory N; Oldham, Carolyn E

    2017-09-05

    Assessment of water quality evolution in the thousands of existing and future mine pit lakes worldwide requires new numerical tools that integrate geochemical, hydrological, and biological processes. A coupled model was used to test alternative hypothesized controls on water quality in a pit lake over ∼8 years. The evolution of pH, Al, and Fe were closely linked; field observations were reproduced with generic solubility equilibrium controls on Fe(III) and Al and a commonly reported acceleration of the abiotic Fe(II) oxidation rate by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Simulations indicated an ongoing acidity loading at the site, and the depletion of Al mineral buffering capacity after ∼5 years. Simulations also supported the existence of pH limitation on nitrification, and a limitation on phytoplankton growth other than the commonly postulated P and DIC limitations. Furthermore, the model reproduced the general patterns of salinity, pH, Al, and Fe during an uncontrolled river breach in 2011, however, incorporating sediment biogeochemical feedbacks is required to reproduce the observed postbreach internal alkalinity generation in the lake. The modeling approach is applicable to the study of hydrological, geochemical, and biological interactions for a range of lake and reservoir management challenges.

  16. Dynamic lake water quality model for the evaluation of lake treatment alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    A computer model which simulates several water quality parameters in a stratified lake during the main growth season has been developed. The model is process oriented and simulates heat transfer, light penetration, mixing by wind and natural convection, inflow and outflow, settling of particles and several biological and chemical processes related to primary productivity. In the simulation, the lake is subdivided into up to 40 layers of variable thickness. Typically, layer thickness is between 0.5 and 1.0 meters. The timestep of the simulation is one day. Input to the simulation includes daily weather parameters, lake morphometry, inflow rate, and inflow quality. Output consist of daily vertical distribution of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, suspended solids, up to three forms of phytoplankton, up to three forms of phosphorus and two forms of nitrogen. Graphical output is provided in the form of profiles on particular dates or time series plots at particular depths. Application of the model to three Minnesota lakes are presented.

  17. Optical model for the water characterization of the highly turbid water of the Winam Gulf (Victoria Lake)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, F.; Cavalli, R. M.; Palombo, A.; Pignatti, S.

    2007-10-01

    The study, proposed within the framework of the cooperation with Kenyan Authorities, has been carried out on the Kenyan part of the Lake Victoria. This lake is one of the largest freshwater bodies of the world where, over the last few years, environmental challenges and human impact have perturbed the ecological balance. Pollution and sediments loads from the tributaries rivers and antrophic sources caused a worrying increase of the turbidity level of the lake water. Secchi transparency index has declined from 5 meters in the 1930s to less than one meter in the 1990s. With the aim of providing an inexpensive way to gather information linked to the water clarity and quality, a method for remotely sensed data interpretation, devoted to produce chl (chlorophyll), CDOM (coloured dissolved organic matter) and TSS (total suspended solids) maps, has been assessed. At this purpose a bio-optical model, based on radiative transfer theory in water bodies, has been refined. The method has been applied on an image acquired on January 2004 by ENVISAT/MERIS sensor just a week after an in situ campaign took place. During the in situ campaign a data set for model refinement and products validation has been collected. This data comprise surface radiometric quantity and samples for laboratory analyses. The comparison between the obtained maps and the data provided by the laboratory analysis showed a good correspondence, demonstrating the potentiality of remote observation in supporting the management of the water resources.

  18. A sediment resuspension and water quality model of Lake Okeechobee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, R.T.; Martin, J.; Wool, T.; Wang, P.-F.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of sediment resuspension on the water quality of shallow lakes is well documented. However, a search of the literature reveals no deterministic mass-balance eutrophication models that explicitly include resuspension. We modified the Lake Okeeehobee water quality model - which uses the Water Analysis Simulation Package (WASP) to simulate algal dynamics and phosphorus, nitrogen, and oxygen cycles - to include inorganic suspended solids and algorithms that: (1) define changes in depth with changes in volume; (2) compute sediment resuspension based on bottom shear stress; (3) compute partition coefficients for ammonia and ortho-phosphorus to solids; and (4) relate light attenuation to solids concentrations. The model calibration and validation were successful with the exception of dissolved inorganic nitrogen species which did not correspond well to observed data in the validation phase. This could be attributed to an inaccurate formulation of algal nitrogen preference and/or the absence of nitrogen fixation in the model. The model correctly predicted that the lake is lightlimited from resuspended solids, and algae are primarily nitrogen limited. The model simulation suggested that biological fluxes greatly exceed external loads of dissolved nutrients; and sedimentwater interactions of organic nitrogen and phosphorus far exceed external loads. A sensitivity analysis demonstrated that parameters affecting resuspension, settling, sediment nutrient and solids concentrations, mineralization, algal productivity, and algal stoichiometry are factors requiring further study to improve our understanding of the Lake Okeechobee ecosystem.

  19. Evaporation and transport of water isotopologues from Greenland lakes: The lake size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiahong; Lauder, Alex M.; Posmentier, Eric S.; Kopec, Ben G.; Virginia, Ross A.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of evaporative flux from a lake are used in many hydrological and paleoclimate studies that help constrain the water budget of a lake and/or to infer changes in climate conditions. The isotopic fluxes of evaporation from a water surface are typically computed using a zero dimensional (0-D) model originally conceptualized by Craig and Gordon (1965). Such models generally have laminar and turbulent layers, assume a steady state condition, and neglect horizontal variations. In particular, the effect of advection on isotopic variations is not considered. While this classical treatment can be used for some sections of large open surface water bodies, such as an ocean or a large lake, it may not apply to relatively small water bodies where limited fetch does not allow full equilibration between air from land and the water surface. Both horizontal and vertical gradients in water vapor concentration and isotopic ratios may develop over a lake. These gradients, in turn, affect the evaporative fluxes of water vapor and its isotopic ratios, which is not adequately predicted by a 0-D model. We observed, for the first time, the vertical as well as horizontal components of vapor and isotopic gradients as relatively dry and isotopically depleted air advected over the surfaces of several lakes up to a 5 km fetch under winds of 1-5 m/s in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. We modeled the vapor and isotopic distribution in air above the lake using a steady state 2-D model, in which vertical diffusive transport balances horizontal advection. The model was verified by our observations, and then used to calculate evaporative fluxes of vapor and its isotopic ratios. In the special case of zero wind speed, the model reduces to 1-D. Results from this 1-D model are compared with those from the 2-D model to assess the discrepancy in isotopic fluxes between advection and no advection conditions. Since wind advection above a lake alters the concentrations, gradients, and

  20. Probabilistic assessment of the influence of lake properties in long-term radiation doses to humans.

    PubMed

    Pohjola, Jari; Turunen, Jari; Lipping, Tarmo; Ikonen, Ari T K

    2016-11-01

    The assessment processes concerning the safety of nuclear waste repositories include the modelling of radionuclide transport in biosphere and the evaluation of the doses to the most affected humans. In this paper, a scenario, in which a contaminated lake is the water source for drinking water, irrigation water and watering of livestock, is presented. The objective of the paper is to probabilistically study the influence of lake properties as parameters in the assessment scenario. The properties of the lake are a result of previously conducted probabilistic studies, where the land uplift of the terrain surrounding the repositories and the formation of water bodies were studied in a 10,000-year time span using Monte Carlo simulation. The lake is formed at 3000 years from present day and the changing properties of the lake have been used in the study. The studied radionuclides (36)Cl, (135)Cs, (129)I, (237)Np, (90)Sr, (99)Tc and (238)U enter the lake with a rate of 1 Bq/year. The transport process from the lake water to humans is described and the doses (dose conversion factors) to adult humans are evaluated based on a study on average food consumption. Sensitivity analysis is used for identifying the parameters having the most influence on the outcome of the dose. Based on the results from the sensitivity analysis, the volumetric outflow rate of the lake and the volume of the lake were taken into closer consideration. The results show the influence of probabilistically derived geomorphic lake input parameters on the dose.

  1. Water clarity of the Upper Great Lakes: tracking changes between 1998-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, F.; Shuchman, R. A.; Sayers, M.; Fahnenstiel, G.; Henareh Khalyani, A.

    2016-12-01

    Water clarity trends in three upper Great Lakes, Lakes Superior, Michigan, and Huron, were assessed via satellite imagery from 1998 to 2012. Water attenuation coefficients (Kd490) from SeaWiFS and Aqua MODIS satellites compared favorably with in situ measurements. Significant temporal and spatial trends and differences in Kd490 were noted within all three of the lakes. Lake-wide average Kd490 for Lake Superior did not exhibited any changes between 1998 and 2012. Annual Kd490 values for Lake Huron, however, showed a significant negative trend during the study period using both SeaWiFS and MODIS datasets. Similarly, annual Kd490 values of Lake Michigan declined between 1998 and 2010. Additionally, Kd490 trend for depths >90m in northern Lake Michigan reversed (increased) after 2007. Photic depth increased significantly in both Lake Michigan (≃5m), and Lake Huron (≃10m) when comparing annual Kd490 for pre- (1998-2001) and post-mussel (2006-2010). At seasonal level, significant decreases in Kd490 in lakes Michigan and Huron were mainly noted for the spring/fall/winter mixing periods. After current changes in water clarity, lake-wide photic depths in lakes Michigan and Huron superseded Lake Superior; thus, making Lake Superior no longer the clearest Great Lake. Combination of several factors (filtering activities of quagga mussels [Dreissena bugensis rostriformis], phosphorus abatement, climate change, etc.) are likely responsible for these large changes.

  2. Hydrology and water quality of Geneva Lake, Walworth County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Goddard, Gerald L.; Mergener, Elizabeth A.; Rose, William J.; Garrision, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    Direct measurements and indirect measurements based on sediment-core analyses indicate that the water quality of Geneva Lake has degraded in the last 170 years, the greatest effects resulting from urbanization. Sedimentation rates were highest between 1900 to 1930, and phosphorus concentrations were highest between the 1930s to early 1980s. As a result of the recent reduction in phosphorus loading, in-lake near-surface phosphorus concentrations decreased from 20.25 ?g/L to about 10.15 ?g/L and are similar to those estimated for the lake in the early 1900s. Concentrations of other chemical constituents associated with urban areas, however, have continually increased, especially in Williams Bay and Geneva Bay.

  3. Use of isotopic data to estimate water residence times of the Finger Lakes, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, Robert L.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    Water retention times in the Finger Lakes, a group of 11 lakes in central New York with similar hydrologic and climatic characteristics, were estimated by use of a tritium-balance model. During July 1991, samples were collected from the 11 lakes and selected tributary streams and were analyzed for tritium, deuterium, and oxygen-18. Additional samples from some of the sites were collected in 1990, 1992 and 1993. Tritium concentration in lake water ranged from 24.6 Tritium Units (TU) (Otisco Lake) to 43.2 TU (Seneca Lake).The parameters in the model used to obtain water retention time (WRT) included relative humidity, evaporation rate, tritium concentrations of inflowing water and lake water, and WRT of the lake. A historical record of tritium concentrations in precipitation and runoff was obtained from rainfall data at Ottawa, Canada, analyses of local wines produced during 1977–1991, and streamflow samples collected in 1990–1991. The model was simulated in yearly steps for 1953–1991, and the WRT was varied to reproduce tritium concentrations measured in each lake in 1991. Water retention times obtained from model simulations ranged from 1 year for Otisco Lake to 12 years for Seneca Lake, and with the exception of Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake, were in agreement with earlier estimates obtained from runoff estimates and chloride balances. The sensitivity of the model to parameter changes was tested to determine possible reasons for the differences calculated for WRT's for Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake. The shorter WRT obtained from tritium data for Lake Seneca (12 years as compared to 18 years) can be explained by a yearly addition of less than 3% by lake volume of ground water to the lake, the exact percentage depending on tritium concentration in the ground water.

  4. Use of isotopic data to estimate water residence times of the Finger Lakes, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Robert L.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    Water retention times in the Finger Lakes, a group of 11 lakes in central New York with similar hydrologic and climatic characteristics, were estimated by use of a tritium-balance model. During July 1991, samples were collected from the 11 lakes and selected tributary streams and were analyzed for tritium, deuterium, and oxygen-18. Additional samples from some of the sites were collected in 1990, 1992 and 1993. Tritium concentration in lake water ranged from 24.6 Tritium Units (TU) (Otisco Lake) to 43.2 TU (Seneca Lake).The parameters in the model used to obtain water retention time (WRT) included relative humidity, evaporation rate, tritium concentrations of inflowing water and lake water, and WRT of the lake. A historical record of tritium concentrations in precipitation and runoff was obtained from rainfall data at Ottawa, Canada, analyses of local wines produced during 1977-1991, and streamflow samples collected in 1990-1991. The model was simulated in yearly steps for 1953-1991, and the WRT was varied to reproduce tritium concentrations measured in each lake in 1991. Water retention times obtained from model simulations ranged from 1 year for Otisco Lake to 12 years for Seneca Lake, and with the exception of Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake, were in agreement with earlier estimates obtained from runoff estimates and chloride balances. The sensitivity of the model to parameter changes was tested to determine possible reasons for the differences calculated for WRT's for Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake. The shorter WRT obtained from tritium data for Lake Seneca (12 years as compared to 18 years) can be explained by a yearly addition of less than 3% by lake volume of ground water to the lake, the exact percentage depending on tritium concentration in the ground water.

  5. Microbial water quality in freshwater lakes with different land use.

    PubMed

    Staley, Z R; Chase, E; Mitraki, C; Crisman, T L; Harwood, V J

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between land use (undeveloped, cattle grazing, urban), faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) levels and microbial source tracking (MST) marker detection was investigated in lakes created following phosphate mining. Faecal coliforms and enterococci were cultured, and MST markers were detected by PCR [Methanobrevibacter smithii, human polyomaviruses (HPyVs), ruminant, human (HF183) and general Bacteroidales]. FIB levels varied significantly by sampling date and were correlated with antecedent rainfall. FIB levels varied with land use category only in the case of faecal coliform levels in sediments of urban lakes, which were significantly greater than those in undeveloped or cattle-impacted lakes. Ruminant Bacteroidales were detected consistently in cattle-impacted lakes (57%) and rarely in other lakes. HPyVs was the only human source marker detected. Rainfall was more strongly associated with FIB levels than land use category. The detection frequency of only the ruminant MST marker was associated with land use. Microbial source tracking (MST) can fine-tune the assessment of human health risk from recreational use of inland waters, particularly when similar FIB levels but different surrounding land use and probable impacts exist. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Water Supply and Use, Dalton Lake, Georgia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    Manual, Appendix H, July 1979. * Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Coosa River Basin , Water Quality Management Plan, 1978. * J.S. Geological ...Water Resources Data, 1983. In addition, various maps are available for the basin . Those found to be most useful include, * U.S. Geological Survey...Application Authority Acknowledgements Low Streamflow in the Coosa Basin ....... .............. 10 USGS Water Supply Data Low-Flow Frequency Analysis

  7. Models for predicting recreational water quality at Lake Erie beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Darner, Robert A.; Bertke, Erin E.

    2006-01-01

    Data collected from four Lake Erie beaches during the recreational seasons of 2004-05 and from one Lake Erie beach during 2000-2005 were used to develop predictive models for recreational water quality by means of multiple linear regression. The best model for each beach was based on a unique combination of environmental and water-quality explanatory variables including turbidity, rainfall, wave height, water temperature, day of the year, wind direction, and lake level. Two types of outputs were produced from the models: the predicted Escherichia coli concentration and the probability that the bathing-water standard will be exceeded. The model for one of beaches, Huntington Reservation (Huntington), was validated in 2005. For 2005, the Huntington model yielded more correct responses and better predicted exceedance of the standard than did current methods for assessing recreational water quality, which are based on the previous day's E. coli concentration. Predictions based on the Huntington model have been available to the public through an Internet-based 'nowcasting' system since May 30, 2006. The other beach models are being validated for the first time in 2006. The methods used in this study to develop and test predictive models can be applied at other similar coastal beaches.

  8. Water resources of the Red Lake Indian Reservation, northwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    The quality of ground water is suitable for drinking and other household uses, and the quality of the surface water generally meets U.S. Environmental Protection Agency criteria necessary for the maintenance of aquatic life. The major ions in both ground and surface water are calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate. Lower and Upper Red Lakes are eutrophic to mesotrophic on the basis of their summer Secchi disk-transparency readings, which ranged from 2.6 to 8.2 feet. The concentration of total organic carbon in samples from Lower and Upper Red Lakes and four streams were below or, in the case of one stream, about equal to 30 milligrams per liter, which is indicative of water little affected by human activities. The sample with the highest organic carbon content was collected from a stream that drained peatlands, which were probably sources of organic matter in the runoff. The concentration of nitrite plus nitrate in samples collected from Lower and Upper Red Lakes in late summer was below 0.01 milligrams per liter, which is characteristic of water uncontaminated by animal wastes. Total phosphorus in these samples ranged from 0.01 to 0.02 milligrams per liter. Most of this phosphorus was in the particulate organic fraction because of the abundance of phytoplankton.

  9. Monitoring eastern Oklahoma lake water quality using Landsat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Clay

    The monitoring of public waters for recreational, industrial, agricultural, and drinking purposes is a difficult task assigned to many state water agencies. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) is only physically monitoring a quarter of the lakes it is charged with monitoring in any given year. The minimal sample scheme adopted by the OWRB is utilized to determine long-term trends and basic impairment but is insufficient to monitor the water quality shifts that occur following influx from rains or to detect algal blooms, which may be highly localized and temporally brief. Recent work in remote sensing calibrates reflectance coefficients between extant water quality data and Landsat imagery reflectance to estimate water quality parameters on a regional basis. Remotely-sensed water quality monitoring benefits include reduced cost, more frequent sampling, inclusion of all lakes visible each satellite pass, and better spatial resolution results. The study area for this research is the Ozark foothills region in eastern Oklahoma including the many lakes impacted by phosphorus flowing in from the Arkansas border region. The result of this research was a moderate r2 regression value for turbidity during winter (0.52) and summer (0.65), which indicates that there is a seasonal bias to turbidity estimation using this methodology and the potential to further develop an estimation equation for this water quality parameter. Refinements that improve this methodology could provide state-wide estimations of turbidity allowing more frequent observation of water quality and allow better response times by the OWRB to developing water impairments.

  10. Simulation of lakes and surface water heat exchangers for design of surface water heat pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conjeevaram Bashyam, Krishna

    Surface Water Heat Pump (SWHP) system utilize surface water bodies, such as ponds, lakes, rivers, and the sea, as heat sources and/or sinks. These systems may be open-loop, circulating water between the surface water body and a heat exchanger on dry land, or closed-loop, utilizing a submerged surface water heat exchanger (SWHE). Both types of SWHP systems have been widely used, but little in the way of design data, design procedures, or energy calculation procedures is available to aid engineers in the design and analysis of these systems. For either type of SWHP system, the ability to predict the evolution of lake temperature with time is an important aspect of needed design and energy analysis procedures. This thesis describes the development and validation of a lake model that is coupled with a surface water heat exchanger model to predict both the lake dynamics (temperature, stratification, ice/snow cover) and the heat transfer performance of different types of SWHE. This one-dimensional model utilizes a detailed surface heat balance model at the upper boundary, a sediment conduction heat transfer model at the lower boundary, and an eddy diffusion model to predict transport within the lake. The lake model is implemented as part of the developed software design tool, which can be used as an aid in the sizing of SWHE used in closed loop SWHP systems.

  11. Water Budgets for Coeur d'Alene Lake, Idaho, Water Years 2000-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maupin, Molly A.; Weakland, Rhonda J.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, calculated annual water budgets and a mean annual water budget for Coeur d'Alene Lake, Idaho, for water years 2000 through 2005. Mean annual inflow to Coeur d'Alene Lake, including precipitation, was about 167,110 million cubic feet. Mean annual outflow, including evaporation, but excluding wastewater effluent to the Spokane River, was about 167,850 million cubic feet. The amount of water lost from Coeur d'Alene Lake and the Spokane River to the Spokane Valley-Rathdrum Prairie aquifer was estimated at 7,250 million cubic feet. Mean annual precipitation into Coeur d'Alene Lake was 3,267 million cubic feet, which exceeded mean annual evaporation of 2,483 million cubic feet. Withdrawals directly from the lake and from wells within a 1,000 foot buffer of the lakeshore for domestic and municipal water uses were reported. However, only the estimate for the consumptive use part of the withdrawals, 265 million cubic feet, was considered in the budget. Mean annual change in lake storage resulted in a net loss of about 49 million cubic feet. The mean annual residual value was about -8,310 million cubic feet.

  12. Impact of net pen aquaculture on lake water quality.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, J; Nolen, S; Carroll, J; Ruiz, C

    2003-01-01

    A 3-year study was conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers assessing water quality related impacts of aquaculture of 250,000 channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) in floating net pens in the Rock Creek Arm of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma/Texas. Five large nylon nets suspended from a floating framework of galvanized metal anchored in open water 100 m offshore made up the net pens with fish stocking densities varying from 88 to 219 fish/m3. Water quality sampling was conducted biweekly from April to September and monthly from October to March at three locations. On all sampling dates field measurements of water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity were recorded at 1 m depth intervals and water samples were collected at a depth of 0.6 m and near the bottom of the water column at each site. Sample analyses included: total alkalinity, total hardness, turbidity, chloride, sulfate, orthophosphate, total phosphorus, nitrate-N, nitrite-N, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, biochemical oxygen demand, and chlorophyll a. The results showed statistically significant decreases in water temperature and dissolved oxygen and significant increases in field conductivity in surface waters near the net pens relative to other sampling sites. The most dramatic water quality effect observed during the study was decrease in dissolved oxygen levels near the net pens following lake turnover in the second year.

  13. Fleet dynamics of the commercial lake trout fishery in Michigan waters of Lake Superior during 1929-1961

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilberg, Michael J.; Bronte, Charles R.; Hansen, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding fishing fleet dynamics is important when using fishery dependent data to infer the status of fish stocks. We analyzed data from mandatory catch reports from the commercial lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) fishery in Michigan waters of Lake Superior during 1929-1961, a period when lake trout populations collapsed through the combined effects of overfishing and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) predation. The number of full-time fishermen increased during 1933-1943 and then decreased during 1943-1957. Addition of new fishermen was related to past yield, market prices, World War II draft exemptions, and lost fishing opportunities in Lake Huron and Lake Michigan. Loss of existing fishermen was related to declining lake trout density. Large mesh (a?Y 114-mm stretch-measure) gill net effort increased during 1929-1951 because fishermen fished more net inshore as lake trout density declined, even though catch per effort (CPE) was often higher in deeper waters. The most common gill net mesh size increased from 114-mm to 120-mm stretch-measure during 1929-1957, as lake trout growth increased. More effort was fished inshore than offshore and the amount of inshore effort was less variable over time than offshore effort. Relatively stable yield was maintained by increasing gill net effort and by moving some effort to better grounds. Because fishing-up caused yield and CPE to remain high despite declining lake trout abundance, caution must be used when basing goals for lake trout restoration on historical fishery indices.

  14. Water Quality, Hydrology, and Response to Changes in Phosphorus Loading of Nagawicka Lake, a Calcareous Lake in Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garn, Herbert S.; Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.; Goddard, Gerald L.; Horwatich, Judy A.

    2006-01-01

    Nagawicka Lake is a 986-acre, usually mesotrophic, calcareous lake in southeastern Wisconsin. Because of concern over potential water-quality degradation of the lake associated with further development in its watershed, a study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey from 2002 to 2006 to describe the water quality and hydrology of the lake; quantify sources of phosphorus, including those associated with urban development; and determine the effects of past and future changes in phosphorus loading on the water quality of the lake. All major water and phosphorus sources were measured directly, and minor sources were estimated to construct detailed water and phosphorus budgets for the lake. The Bark River, near-lake surface inflow, precipitation, and ground water contributed 74, 8, 12, and 6 percent of the inflow, respectively. Water leaves the lake primarily through the Bark River outlet (88 percent) or by evaporation (11 percent). The water quality of Nagawicka Lake has improved dramatically since 1980 as a result of decreasing the historical loading of phosphorus to the lake. Total input of phosphorus to the lake was about 3,000 pounds in monitoring year (MY) 2003 and 6,700 pounds in MY 2004. The largest source of phosphorus entering the lake was the Bark River, which delivered about 56 percent of the total phosphorus input, compared with about 74 percent of the total water input. The next largest contributions were from the urbanized near-lake drainage area, which disproportionately accounted for 37 percent of the total phosphorus input but only about 5 percent of the total water input. Simulations with water-quality models within the Wisconsin Lakes Modeling Suite (WiLMS) indicated the response of Nagawicka Lake to 10 phosphorus-loading scenarios. These scenarios included historical (1970s) and current (base) years (MY 2003-04) for which lake water quality and loading were known, six scenarios with percentage increases or decreases in phosphorus loading from

  15. Increasing dissolved organic carbon concentrations in northern boreal lakes: Implications for lake water transparency and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strock, Kristin E.; Theodore, Nora; Gawley, William G.; Ellsworth, Alan C.; Saros, Jasmine E.

    2017-05-01

    We evaluated trends in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and associated changes in water transparency and epilimnion thickness to better understand the implications of regional increases in DOC concentration in lakes. Long-term monitoring of a suite of physical, chemical, and biological data from six to 12 lakes in Acadia National Park in Maine was paired with high-frequency sensor monitoring of one lake as a model system. Water transparency declined across study sites since 1995 as DOC increased and chlorophyll remained stable, suggesting that this was not a signal of increased eutrophication. As clarity declined, some lakes experienced reduced epilimnion thickness. The degree to which transparency changed across the lakes was dependent on DOC concentration, with a larger decline in transparency occurring in clear water lakes (-0.3 m yr-1) than brown water lakes (-0.1 m yr-1). DOC concentration was an important explanatory variable for reduced epilimnion thickness in short-term sensor measurements. A regional decline in water transparency across all lakes and reduction in epilimnion thickness in a limited number of systems appeared to be acting as a sentinel for changes in atmospheric deposition and regional weather that modified the delivery of DOC from the watershed.

  16. [Discussion on water conservancy projects and schistosomiasis control in Poyang Lake area].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dao-Nan

    2013-02-01

    According to the schistosomiasis endemic situation in the Poyang Lake area, this paper analyzes the relationship between the water conservancy projects and schistosomiasis control, and reviews and discusses the effects of the Water Level Control Project of Poyang Lake, the Lake Dike Slope Hardening Project, and the Lifting Delta and Descending Beach Project on Oncomelania snail control.

  17. Study of the origin of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, M. Yu.; Snytko, V. A.; Marinaite, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    The concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the water of Lake Baikal is estimated. The published data on the composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial and communal emissions and in crude oils are analyzed. Anthropogenic sources of lake water contamination are revealed. It is concluded that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons enter the lake as a result of natural oil release.

  18. NASA Images Show Decreased Clarity in Lake Tahoe's Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer aboard NASA's Terra satellite, launched in 1999, illustrate the state of gradually decreasing water clarity at Lake Tahoe, one of the clearest lakes in the world. The images are available at: http://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/default.htm.

    In the image on the left, acquired in November 2000, vegetation can be seen in red. The image on the right, acquired at the same time by a different spectral band of the instrument, is color-coded to show the bottom of the lake around the shoreline. Where the data are black, the bottom cannot be seen.

    Scientists monitoring the lake's water clarity from boat measurements obtained since 1965 have discovered that the lake along the California-Nevada border has lost more than one foot of visibility each year, according to the Lake Tahoe Watershed Assessment, a review of scientific information about the lake undertaken at the request of President Clinton and published in February 2000. The most likely causes are increases in algal growth, sediment washed in from surrounding areas and urban growth and development.

    By combining historical and current ground-based measurements with space measurements from new instruments like the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, scientists are now continuously monitoring and better understanding the circulation and changes in Lake Tahoe's water clarity. Images like these from satellites, which are able to capture entire views of the lake and its 63 contributing streams, can be used to determine and monitor spatial variations in the lake's clarity over time. These images complement 'point' measurements, made by boats from one spot in the lake. Rafts and buoys verify the satellite images, and help scientists develop and test circulation models.

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer is one of five Earth-observing instruments on Terra, launched in 1999, and is its

  19. NASA Images Show Decreased Clarity in Lake Tahoe's Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer aboard NASA's Terra satellite, launched in 1999, illustrate the state of gradually decreasing water clarity at Lake Tahoe, one of the clearest lakes in the world. The images are available at: http://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/default.htm.

    In the image on the left, acquired in November 2000, vegetation can be seen in red. The image on the right, acquired at the same time by a different spectral band of the instrument, is color-coded to show the bottom of the lake around the shoreline. Where the data are black, the bottom cannot be seen.

    Scientists monitoring the lake's water clarity from boat measurements obtained since 1965 have discovered that the lake along the California-Nevada border has lost more than one foot of visibility each year, according to the Lake Tahoe Watershed Assessment, a review of scientific information about the lake undertaken at the request of President Clinton and published in February 2000. The most likely causes are increases in algal growth, sediment washed in from surrounding areas and urban growth and development.

    By combining historical and current ground-based measurements with space measurements from new instruments like the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, scientists are now continuously monitoring and better understanding the circulation and changes in Lake Tahoe's water clarity. Images like these from satellites, which are able to capture entire views of the lake and its 63 contributing streams, can be used to determine and monitor spatial variations in the lake's clarity over time. These images complement 'point' measurements, made by boats from one spot in the lake. Rafts and buoys verify the satellite images, and help scientists develop and test circulation models.

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer is one of five Earth-observing instruments on Terra, launched in 1999, and is its

  20. Is the water level during dry season in Poyang Lake really lower than before?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaolong; Yu, Meixiu; Shi, Yong; Luan, Zhenyu; Fu, Dafang

    2017-04-01

    The Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, has attracted world widely attentions in recent years due to it being dammed or not at the Lake's outlet. It was reported that the Poyang Lake water levels have been declining significantly in dry seasons, which resulted in severe water supply, irrigation and ecological flow requirement problems. The purpose of the study was to answer the question that the water level of the Poyang Lake during dry season is really lower than before or not. Based on topographical data, and long-term hydrological and meteorological data from 1950 to 2016, the relationship between the Poyang Lake and the Yangtze River before and after the completion of the Three Gorges Dam, the relationship between the Poyang Lake and its Five major tributaries (Ganjiang River, Fuhe River, Xinjiang River, Raohe River and Xiushui River), and as well as sand mining contributions to the water level in dry seasons of the Poyang Lake were investigated respectively.

  1. Estimation of total cloud cover from solar radiation observations at Lake Rotorua, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Liancong; Hamilton, David; Han, Boping

    2010-03-15

    The DYRESM-CAEDYM model is a valuable tool for simulating water temperature for biochemical studies in aquatic ecosystem. The model requires inputs of surface short-wave radiation and long-wave radiation or total cloud cover fraction (TC). Long-wave radiation is often not measured directly so a method to determine TC from commonly measured short-wave solar irradiance (E{sub 0}) and theoretical short-wave solar irradiance under a clear sky (E{sub c}) has broad application. A more than 17-year (15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009) hourly solar irradiance data set was used to estimate the peak solar irradiance for each ordinal date over one year, which was assumed to be representative of solar irradiance in the absence of cloud. Comparison between these daily observed values and the modelled clear-sky solar radiation over one year was in close agreement (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.995 and root mean squared error, RMSE = 12.54 W m{sup -2}). The downloaded hourly cloudiness measurements from 15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009 was used to calculate the daily values for this period and then the calculated daily values over the 17 years were used to calculate the average values for each ordinal date over one year. A regression equation between (1 - E{sub 0}/E{sub c}) and TC produced a correlation coefficient value of 0.99 (p > 0.01, n = 71). The validation of this cloud cover estimation model was conducted with observed short-wave solar radiation and TC at two sites. Values of TC derived from the model at the Lake Rotorua site gave a reasonable prediction of the observed values (RMSE = 0.10, r = 0.86, p > 0.01, n = 61). The model was also tested at Queenstown (South Island of New Zealand) and it provided satisfactory results compared to the measurements (RMSE = 0.16, r = 0.67, p > 0.01, n = 61). Therefore the model's good performance and broad applicability will contribute to the DYRESM-CAEDYM accuracy of water temperature simulation when long-wave radiation

  2. Land & Water Interactions in the Great Lakes. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The subject of this book is land and water interactions. Students examine how the Great Lakes were…

  3. Great Lakes Climate and Water Movement. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Heidi, Ed.; Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The theme of this book is Great Lakes climate and water movement. Students learn about land-sea…

  4. Water Optical Properties and Water Color Remote Sensing in Optically Deep and Shallow Waters of Lake Taihu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Hongyan

    In this study, Lake Taihu in Jiangsu Province of China, a typical large freshwater lake, is selected as the study area. Based on the field spectral measurements and laboratory analyses performed in October 2008, water optical properties and water color/quality remote sensing retrieval models in Lake Taihu were investigated. It was recognized that water quality varied a lot in different areas. Waters in Lake Taihu were classified as optically deep waters (ODWs) and optically shallow waters (OSWs). ODWs are the waters where the water depth is more than three times the measured Secchi Disk Depth (SDD), otherwise they are OSWs. Cyanobacteria blooms happen frequently in ODWs and the water is eutrophicated heavily. Whereas water is very clear with rare cyanobacteria blooms but many aquatic plants in OSWs. Focused on the two types of water areas respectively, the inherent optical properties (lOPs), apparent optical properties (lOPs) and reflectance spectra were analyzed, as well as their relationships to water quality parameters. Local optical parameters f and Q, which play significant roles in water quality parameters retrieval models, were also determined. Measured remote sensing reflectance data were used to establish two-band and three-band models for chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration estimation, results showed both models were suitable in ODWs. However, aquatic plants in OSWs had great influence on spectra, resulting in the inapplicability of the established models at these sites. Absorption and backscattering coefficients were used to remove those influences and simulate new set of remote sensing reflectance based on radiative transfer theory, which were proved reliable to establish Chl-a retrieval algorithms. Three-band model established by simulated spectra showed more satisfactory performance in whole ODWs, and performance of two-band model in OSWs was also enhanced much. Several models were established to estimate total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations

  5. Environmental assessment of drainage water impacts on water quality and eutrophication level of Lake Idku, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ali, Elham M; Khairy, Hanan M

    2016-09-01

    Lake Idku, northern Egypt, receives large quantities of drainage water from four main discharging drains. Ecological and biological status of Lake Idku has been monitored during (autumn 2012 to summer 2013) to examine the lake water quality and eutrophication level in response to the quality as well as the source of the discharging water. Discrete water samples were collected from the lake body and the drains. Chemical analyses revealed an excessive nutrient load goes into the lake. A range of 1.4-10.6 mg nitrites/L was determined for drain waters, however a sudden increase was observed in lake and drain water samples of up to 84 and 74.5 mg/L, respectively. Reactive silicate ranged between 2.9 and 4.8 mg/L; while inorganic phosphate fluctuated between 0.2 and 0.43 mg/L. Transparency varied from 45 cm to 134 cm with better light conditions at drain sites. Biological results indicated a hyper-eutrophic status for the lake with a range of chlorophyll-a varied from a minimum of 39.9 μg/L (at Idku Drains) and a maximum of 104.2 μg/L (at El-Khairy drain). Phytoplankton community structure revealed higher abundance at lake sites compared with the drains. Maximum phytoplankton density was detected during summer with the dominance of Bacilariophyceae (e.g. Cyclotella meneghiniana, Cyclotella comate, Melosira varians) followed by Chlorophycean taxon (e.g. Scenedesmus dimorphus, S. bijuga and Crucigenia tetrapedia). Five indices were applied to evaluate the water quality of the lake. Diversity Index (DI) indicated slight to light pollution along all sites; while Sapropic Index (SI) indicated slight pollution with acceptable oxygen conditions and an availability of sensitive species. Palmer Index (PI) gave a strong evidence of high organic pollution at some sites in the lake, while Generic Diatom Index (GDI) revealed that levels of pollution varied from average to strong. Trophic Index (TI), suggest that there are an obvious signs of eutrophication in the lake

  6. Microscopic examination of skin in native and nonnative fish from Lake Tahoe exposed to ultraviolet radiation and fluoranthene.

    PubMed

    Gevertz, Amanda K; Oris, James T

    2014-02-01

    The presence of nonnative species in Lake Tahoe (CA/NV), USA has been an ongoing concern for many decades, and the management of these species calls for an understanding of their ability to cope with the Lake's stressors and for an understanding of their potential to out-compete and reduce the populations of native species. Decreasing levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) due to eutrophication and increasing levels of phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) due to recreational activities may combine to affect the relative ability of native versus nonnative fish species to survive in the lake. Following a series of toxicity tests which exposed larvae of the native Lahontan redside minnow (Richardsonius egregius) and the nonnative warm-water bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to UVR and FLU, the occurrence of skin damage and/or physiologic defense mechanisms were studied using multiple microscopic techniques. The native minnow appeared to exhibit fewer instances of skin damage and increased instances of cellular coping mechanisms. This study supports the results of previous work conducted by the authors, who determined that the native redside minnow is the more tolerant of the two species, and that setting and adhering to a water quality standard for UVR transparency may aid in preventing the spread of the less tolerant nonnative bluegill and similar warm-water species.

  7. Characterizing lake water quality, cyanotoxins, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbick, N.; Ziniti, B.; Stommel, E.; Linder, E.; Andrew, A.; Bradley, W.; Shi, X.

    2016-12-01

    Concern over toxins and public health threats resulting from Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms (CHABs) have gained attention as reoccurring and seasonal blooms persist in many waters. Concordantly, climate change has been suggested to increase the intensity, duration, and frequency of CHAB events. Humans may be exposed to the cyanotoxins produced by cyanobacteria via the food chain, drinking water, recreational use of waterbodies and by aerosolization. Exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) that has been found in the brains of ALS patients is a hypothesized mechanism. The goals of this research initiative are to investigate spatiotemporal relationships between inland lake water quality and ALS across northern New England (NNE). Multiscale satellite remote sensing was integrated with in situ lake and toxin sampling to provide robust spatiotemporal exposure risk metrics characterizing CHAB. Semi-analytical, shape, and empirical algorithms were bldned together tp generate spatiotemporal measures of chl-a and PC with R2 ranging from 0.65-0.92 using withheld samples. Postmortem aerosolization analysis found 85% of high risk patients to express phycobillin in lung tissue using fluroesence microscopy. To scal eup to the region we employed complementing spatial statistics and a Bayesian hierarchical framework to model relationships between lake risk metrics and ALS case location across NNE. The eco-epidemiolgical modeling results show that on average poorer water quality conditions and higher measures of cyanobacteria are associated with increased odds of belonging to a normalized ALS hot spots and risk of ALS. This has broad societal impacts as the frequency, duration, and magnitude of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms are expanding and this work helps characterize lake ecosystem services and human health.

  8. Monitoring the water balance of Lake Victoria, East Africa, from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Sean; Wahr, John

    2009-05-01

    SummaryUsing satellite gravimetric and altimetric data, we examine trends in water storage and lake levels of multiple lakes in the Great Rift Valley region of East Africa for the years 2003-2008. GRACE total water storage estimates reveal that water storage declined in much of East Africa, by as much as 60 {mm}/{year}, while altimetric data show that lake levels in some large lakes dropped by as much as 1-2 m. The largest declines occurred in Lake Victoria, the Earth's second largest freshwater body. Because the discharge from the outlet of Lake Victoria is used to generate hydroelectric power, the role of human management in the lake's decline has been questioned. By comparing catchment water storage trends to lake level trends, we confirm that climatic forcing explains only about 50decline. This analysis provides an independent means of assessing the relative impacts of climate and human management on the water balance of Lake Victoria that does not depend on observations of dam discharge, which may not be publically available. In the second part of the study, the individual components of the lake water balance are estimated. Satellite estimates of changes in lake level, precipitation, and evaporation are used with observed lake discharge to develop a parameterization for estimating subsurface inflows due to changes in groundwater storage estimated from satellite gravimetry. At seasonal timescales, this approach provides closure to Lake Victoria's water balance to within 17 {mm}/{month}. The third part of this study uses the water balance of a downstream water body, Lake Kyoga, to estimate the outflow from Lake Victoria remotely. Because Lake Kyoga is roughly 20 times smaller in area than Lake Victoria, its water balance is strongly influenced by inflow from Lake Victoria. Lake Kyoga has been shown to act as a linear reservoir, where its outflow is proportional to the height of the lake. This model can be used with satellite altimetric lake levels to estimate a

  9. Differential tolerance of native and nonnative fish exposed to ultraviolet radiation and fluoranthene in Lake Tahoe (California/Nevada), USA.

    PubMed

    Gevertz, Amanda K; Tucker, Andrew J; Bowling, Anna M; Williamson, Craig E; Oris, James T

    2012-05-01

    Within Lake Tahoe (CA/NV), USA, multiple environmental stressors are present that can affect both native and nonnative fish species. Stressors include natural ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Many PAHs, such as fluoranthene (FLU) are phototoxic to aquatic organisms in the presence of UVR. Decreasing levels of UVR due to eutrophication and increasing levels of PAHs due to recreational activities may combine to affect the relative ability of native versus nonnative fish species to survive in the lake. The objective of the present study was to examine the differential effects of exposure to different levels of UVR and phototoxic FLU in native and nonnative fish species. Responses to these changes in the native Lahontan redside minnow (Richardsonius egregius) and the nonnative warm-water bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) were compared during toxicity tests, which were conducted in controlled outdoor exposures. Physiological defenses were also investigated in an attempt to elucidate ways each species may tolerate UVR and UVR + FLU exposures. It was determined that the native redside minnow is more tolerant to UVR and UVR + FLU exposure when compared to the nonnative bluegill. In addition, a natural UVR coping mechanism, increased pigmentation, is exhibited to a greater extent in the native redside. The present study will help determine the potential for a future successful invasion of the bluegill and similar species in Lake Tahoe and other oligotrophic, montane lakes that are susceptible to habitat alteration, nutrient inputs, and recreational activity.

  10. Population genomic tests of models of adaptive radiation in Lake Victoria region cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Bezault, Etienne; Mwaiko, Salome; Seehausen, Ole

    2011-12-01

    Adaptive radiation is usually thought to be associated with speciation, but the evolution of intraspecific polymorphisms without speciation is also possible. The radiation of cichlid fish in Lake Victoria (LV) is perhaps the most impressive example of a recent rapid adaptive radiation, with 600+ very young species. Key questions about its origin remain poorly characterized, such as the importance of speciation versus polymorphism, whether species persist on evolutionary time scales, and if speciation happens more commonly in small isolated or in large connected populations. We used 320 individuals from 105 putative species from Lakes Victoria, Edward, Kivu, Albert, Nabugabo and Saka, in a radiation-wide amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan to address some of these questions. We demonstrate pervasive signatures of speciation supporting the classical model of adaptive radiation associated with speciation. A positive relationship between the age of lakes and the average genomic differentiation of their species, and a significant fraction of molecular variance explained by above-species level taxonomy suggest the persistence of species on evolutionary time scales, with radiation through sequential speciation rather than a single starburst. Finally the large gene diversity retained from colonization to individual species in every radiation suggests large effective population sizes and makes speciation in small geographical isolates unlikely.

  11. Extremely acid Permian lakes and ground waters in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benison, K.C.; Goldstein, R.H.; Wopenka, B.; Burruss, R.C.; Pasteris, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporites hosted by red beds (red shales and sandstones), some 275-265 million years old, extend over a large area of the North American mid- continent. They were deposited in non-marine saline lakes, pans and mud- flats, settings that are typically assumed to have been alkaline. Here we use laser Raman microprobe analyses of fluid inclusions trapped in halites from these Permian deposits to argue for the existence of highly acidic (pH < 1) lakes and ground waters. These extremely acidic systems may have extended over an area of 200,000 km2. Modern analogues of such systems may be natural acid lake and groundwater systems (pH ~2-4) in southern Australia. Both the ancient and modern acid systems are characterized by closed drainage, arid climate, low acid-neutralizing capacity, and the oxidation of minerals such as pyrite to generate acidity. The discovery of widespread ancient acid lake and groundwater systems demands a re-evaluation of reconstructions of surface conditions of the past, and further investigations of the geochemistry and ecology of acid systems in general.

  12. Groundwater and surface-water interactions near White Bear Lake, Minnesota, through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Jackson, P. Ryan; Bode, Jenifer A.; O'Grady, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the White Bear Lake Conservation District, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and other State, county, municipal, and regional planning agencies, watershed organizations, and private organizations, conducted a study to characterize groundwater and surface-water interactions near White Bear Lake through 2011. During 2010 and 2011, White Bear Lake and other lakes in the northeastern part of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area were at historically low levels. Previous periods of lower water levels in White Bear Lake correlate with periods of lower precipitation; however, recent urban expansion and increased pumping from the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer have raised the question of whether a decline in precipitation is the primary cause for the recent water-level decline in White Bear Lake. Understanding and quantifying the amount of groundwater inflow to a lake and water discharge from a lake to aquifers is commonly difficult but is important in the management of lake levels. Three methods were used in the study to assess groundwater and surface-water interactions on White Bear Lake: (1) a historical assessment (1978-2011) of levels in White Bear Lake, local groundwater levels, and their relation to historical precipitation and groundwater withdrawals in the White Bear Lake area; (2) recent (2010-11) hydrologic and water-quality data collected from White Bear Lake, other lakes, and wells; and (3) water-balance assessments for White Bear Lake in March and August 2011. An analysis of covariance between average annual lake-level change and annual precipitation indicated the relation between the two variables was significantly different from 2003 through 2011 compared with 1978 through 2002, requiring an average of 4 more inches of precipitation per year to maintain the lake level. This shift in the linear relation between annual lake-level change and annual precipitation

  13. Multi-temporal water extent analysis of a hypersaline playa lake using Landsat Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ecenur; Kamil Yilmaz, Koray; Lutfi Suzen, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    Distinguishing inland water bodies from satellite imagery has always been one of the main practices of remote sensing. In some cases this differentiation can directly be obtained by visual interpretation. However, in case of hyper-saline playa lakes, presence of high albedo salt crust in the lake bed hampers visual interpretation and requires further attention. Lake Tuz is a hypersaline playa lake which is ranked as the second largest lake in Turkey. Spatio-temporal changes in lake water extent are important both economically and hydrologically including salt production, lake water balance, drought and over-exploitation issues. This study investigates the spatiotemporal changes in Lake Tuz water extent during the last decade using single-band thresholding and multi-band indices extracted from the multi-temporal Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 7 ETM+ images. The applicability of different satellite-derived indices including Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Modified NDWI (MNDWI), Automated Water Extraction Index (AWEI) and Tasseled Cap Wetness (TCw) were investigated for the extraction of lake water extent from Landsat imagery. Our analysis indicated that, overall, NDWI is superior to other tested indices in separating wet/dry pixels over the lake bottom covered with salt crust. Using a NDWI thresholding procedure, the annual and seasonal variation in the Lake Tuz water extent were determined and further linked to hydro-meteorological variables such as precipitation.

  14. Spatial and seasonal variations in attenuation of solar ultraviolet radiation in Lake Biwa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Sugiyama, Yuko

    2008-02-27

    Seasonal changes in diffuse ultraviolet (UV) and visible light attenuations and inherent optical properties in the lake water were monitored at the pelagic and littoral shallow zones of Lake Biwa which features a broad range of optical conditions within a single large water body. We considered the absorption factors that affect UV attenuation, and clarified the contribution of the absorption of suspended particles and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) by multiple regression analyses of the monitoring data. The variability of UV attenuations in the lake demonstrated a strong contrast between the pelagic and the shallow zones. The latter were characterized by turbid systems supplying suspended matter as well as CDOM, whereas the former was far from the turbid systems in the littoral zone or the lake bottom. In this lake, the regulation of UV and light attenuations is rendered competitive by the absorption of suspended particles and CDOM in the lake water, hence, the UV penetration has both spatial and temporal variability based on changes in the physical and biological condition of the lake.

  15. Water quality of least-impaired lakes in eastern and southern Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Justus, Billy

    2010-09-01

    A three-phased study identified one least-impaired (reference) lake for each of four Arkansas lake classifications: three classifications in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain (MAP) ecoregion and a fourth classification in the South Central Plains (SCP) ecoregion. Water quality at three of the least-impaired lakes generally was comparable and also was comparable to water quality from Kansas and Missouri reference lakes and Texas least-impaired lakes. Water quality of one least-impaired lake in the MAP ecoregion was not as good as water quality in other least-impaired lakes in Arkansas or in the three other states: a probable consequence of all lakes in that classification having a designated use as a source of irrigation water. Chemical and physical conditions for all four lake classifications were at times naturally harsh as limnological characteristics changed temporally. As a consequence of allochthonous organic material, oxbow lakes isolated within watersheds comprised of swamps were susceptible to low dissolved oxygen concentrations to the extent that conditions would be limiting to some aquatic biota. Also, pH in lakes in the SCP ecoregion was <6.0, a level exceeding current Arkansas water-quality standards but typical of black water systems. Water quality of the deepest lakes exceeded that of shallow lakes. N/P ratios and trophic state indices may be less effective for assessing water quality for shallow lakes (<2 m) than for deep lakes because there is an increased exposure of sediment (and associated phosphorus) to disturbance and light in the former.

  16. Water quality of least-impaired lakes in eastern and southern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justus, B.

    2010-01-01

    A three-phased study identified one least-impaired (reference) lake for each of four Arkansas lake classifications: three classifications in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain (MAP) ecoregion and a fourth classification in the South Central Plains (SCP) ecoregion. Water quality at three of the least-impaired lakes generally was comparable and also was comparable to water quality from Kansas and Missouri reference lakes and Texas least-impaired lakes. Water quality of one least-impaired lake in the MAP ecoregion was not as good as water quality in other least-impaired lakes in Arkansas or in the three other states: a probable consequence of all lakes in that classification having a designated use as a source of irrigation water. Chemical and physical conditions for all four lake classifications were at times naturally harsh as limnological characteristics changed temporally. As a consequence of allochthonous organic material, oxbow lakes isolated within watersheds comprised of swamps were susceptible to low dissolved oxygen concentrations to the extent that conditions would be limiting to some aquatic biota. Also, pH in lakes in the SCP ecoregion was <6.0, a level exceeding current Arkansas water-quality standards but typical of black water systems. Water quality of the deepest lakes exceeded that of shallow lakes. N/P ratios and trophic state indices may be less effective for assessing water quality for shallow lakes (<2 m) than for deep lakes because there is an increased exposure of sediment (and associated phosphorus) to disturbance and light in the former. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  17. 75 FR 45579 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Supplemental Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ..., ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters.'' This supplemental notice... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF11 Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Supplemental Notice of Data Availability and Request for Comment AGENCY: Environmental...

  18. Estimation of Lake Water Temperature with ASTER and Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS Thermal Infrared Bands: A Case Study Beysehir Lake (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sener, Sehnaz; Sener, Erhan

    2016-08-01

    Beyşehir Lake is the largest fresh water lake in our country with the 653 km2 surface area. Lake water have used for drinking water of several settlements in the basin. Beyşehir Lake is a shallow lake and, especially in recent years its water level was dropped due to unplanned usage and effects of climate change.In this study, determination of the water temperature in Lake Beyşehir is aimed using 90m resolution thermal infrared bands of ASTER (Advance Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) satellite and 30m resolution thermal infrared bands of Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS satellite. The Normalized Water Different Index (NWDI) has been applied to ASTER and Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS satellite images to determine lake surface area. Accordingly, the lake water temperature is generally proportional to the depth and it relatively higher in the shallow area.

  19. Sediment deposition and selected water-quality characteristics in Cedar Lake and Lake Olathe, Northeast Kansas, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mau, D.P.

    2002-01-01

    The Lake Olathe watershed, located in northeast Kansas, was investigated using bathymetric survey data and reservoir bottom-sediment cores to determine sediment deposition, water-quality trends, and transport of nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen species), selected trace elements, selected pesticides, and diatoms as indicators of eutrophic (organic-enriched and depleted oxygen supply) conditions. To determine sediment deposition and loads, bathymetric data from Cedar Lake and Lake Olathe, both located in the Lake Olathe watershed, were collected in 2000 and compared to historical topographic data collected when the lakes were built. Approximately 338 acre-feet of sediment deposition has occurred in Cedar Lake since dam closure in 1938, and 317 acre-feet has occurred at Lake Olathe since 1956. Mean annual sediment deposition was 5.45 acre-feet per year (0.89 acre-feet per year per square mile) for Cedar Lake and 7.0 acre-feet per year (0.42 acre-feet per year per square mile) for Lake Olathe. Mean annual sediment loads for the two reservoirs were 9.6 million pounds per year for Cedar Lake and 12.6 million pounds per year for Lake Olathe. Mean concentrations of total phosphorus in bottom-sediment samples from Cedar Lake ranged from 1,370 to 1,810 milligrams per kilogram, and concentrations in bottom-sediment samples from Lake Olathe ranged from 588 to 1,030 milligrams per kilogram. The implication of large total phosphorus concentrations in the bottom sediment of Cedar Lake is that inflow into Cedar Lake is rich in phosphorus and that adverse water-quality conditions could affect water quality in downstream Lake Olathe through discharge of water from Cedar Lake to Lake Olathe via Cedar Creek. Mean annual phosphorus loads transported from the Lake Olathe watershed were estimated to be 14,700 pounds per year for Cedar Lake and 9,720 pounds per year for Lake Olathe. The mean annual phosphorus yields were estimated to be 3.74 pounds per acre per year for Cedar Lake and 0

  20. Water quality and trace metal distribution in a pristine Lake in the Lake basin in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ochieng, E Z; Lalah, J O; Wandiga, S O

    2008-04-01

    Water and surface sediment samples taken from various locations within Lake Kanyaboli in the Lake Victoria basin were analysed to determine the concentration and distribution of heavy metals. There were wide ranges in concentrations of the metals among the sampling points analysed. Sediment concentrations (microg/g dry weight) ranged from n.d.-2.54 (Ag), 0.25-1.08 (Cd), 0.89-1.64 (Co), 3.7-7.73 (Cr), 1.80-30.27 (Cu), 1073-2627 (Mn), 22.61-55.60 (Ni), 11.42-153.9 (Pb), 40.46-154.7 (Sn) and 65.0-146.5 (Zn). Dissolved metal concentrations (microg/L) ranged from n.d.-9.22 (Ag), n.d.-5.54 (Cd), n.d.-8.30 (Co), 5.26-60.82 (Cr), 10.96-43.11 (Cu), 184.7-375.9 (Mn), 1.84-38.3 (Ni), 5.98-47.77 (Pb), n.d.-540.6 (Sn) and 14.5-55.9 (Zn). Compared with WHO standards and other freshwaters worldwide, this lake was found to be unpolluted, with all metals, except Mn, being detected at concentrations lower than the highest desirable levels and maximum permissible levels. Some of the toxic metals, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd (in sediment) and Ag, Co and Pb (in water) were detected at lower concentrations than those found in the polluted Kisumu Pier in Winam Gulf in the Lake basin, which confirms the anthropogenic influence on the latter.

  1. Multi-Elements in Waters and Sediments of Shallow Lakes: Relationships with Water, Sediment, and Watershed Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Donna L.; Hanson, Mark A.; Herwig, Brian R.; Bowe, Shane E.; Otte, Marinus L.

    2015-01-01

    We measured concentrations of multiple elements, including rare earth elements, in waters and sediments of 38 shallow lakes of varying turbidity and macrophyte cover in the Prairie Parkland (PP) and Laurentian Mixed Forest (LMF) provinces of Minnesota. PP shallow lakes had higher element concentrations in waters and sediments compared to LMF sites. Redundancy analysis indicated that a combination of site- and watershed-scale features explained a large proportion of among-lake variability in element concentrations in lake water and sediments. Percent woodland cover in watersheds, turbidity, open water area, and macrophyte cover collectively explained 65.2 % of variation in element concentrations in lake waters. Sediment fraction smaller than 63 µm, percent woodland in watersheds, open water area, and sediment organic matter collectively explained 64.2 % of variation in element concentrations in lake sediments. In contrast to earlier work on shallow lakes, our results showed the extent to which multiple elements in shallow lake waters and sediments were influenced by a combination of variables including sediment characteristics, lake morphology, and percent land cover in watersheds. These results are informative because they help illustrate the extent of functional connectivity between shallow lakes and adjacent lands within these lake watersheds. PMID:26074657

  2. Challenge to the model of lake charr evolution: Shallow- and deep-water morphs exist within a small postglacial lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavarie, Louise; Muir, Andrew M.; Zimmerman, Mara S.; Baillie, Shauna M.; Hansen, Michael J.; Nate, Nancy A.; Yule, Daniel L.; Middel, Trevor; Bentzen, Paul; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    All examples of lake charr (Salvelinus namaycush) diversity occur within the largest, deepest lakes of North America (i.e. > 2000 km2). We report here Rush Lake (1.3 km2) as the first example of a small lake with two lake charr morphs (lean and huronicus). Morphology, diet, life history, and genetics were examined to demonstrate the existence of morphs and determine the potential influence of evolutionary processes that led to their formation or maintenance. Results showed that the huronicus morph, caught in deep-water, had a deeper body, smaller head and jaws, higher eye position, greater buoyancy, and deeper peduncle than the shallow-water lean morph. Huronicus grew slower to a smaller adult size, and had an older mean age than the lean morph. Genetic comparisons showed low genetic divergence between morphs, indicating incomplete reproductive isolation. Phenotypic plasticity and differences in habitat use between deep and shallow waters associated with variation in foraging opportunities seems to have been sufficient to maintain the two morphs, demonstrating their important roles in resource polymorphism. Rush Lake expands previous explanations for lake charr intraspecific diversity, from large to small lakes and from reproductive isolation to the presence of gene flow associated with strong ecological drivers.

  3. Artificially-born "killer" lake: phytoplankton based water quality and microcystin affected fish in a reconstructed lake.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Th; Katsiapi, M; Kormas, K Ar; Moustaka-Gouni, M; Kagalou, I

    2013-05-01

    Lake Karla (Greece) is an example of a lake ecosystem which was dried in 1960's and now is restored, facing various anthropogenic pressures, whereas it is also listed in the network of Greek protected areas in terms of its conservation value. The objective of the present study was to determine the presence of microcystins (MCYST) in the lake water and their accumulation in tissues of the commercial fish species Cyprinus carpio, along with the highlighting of phytoplankton community and general limnological features of Lake Karla, a newly reconstructed lake, the first year of its refilling. MCYST concentrations in water and fish tissues were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results suggest that Lake Karla has undergone a progressive cultural eutrophication with frequent cyanobacterial blooms. The most dominant species in lake's phytoplankton were Anabaenopsis elenkinii, Sphaerospermopsis and Planktothrix agardhii. MCYST concentrations were detected in water samples comparable to those reported for other eutrophicated Mediterranean lakes while considerable amounts of MCYST were detected in the tissues of the species C. carpio in the following order: liver>kidney>brain>intestine>muscles. The presence of prominent cyanobacterial blooms dominated by toxic species highlights the need to undertake eutrophication control measures so as to avoid further toxicological problems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Implementation Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... use of this methodology may be found in the Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Technical Support... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY GUIDANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. F Appendix F to... that is freely dissolved in the ambient water is different than that used to derive the system-wide...

  5. Assessing Human Impacts on the Water Balance of Lake Victoria Using GRACE and Altimeters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, S. C.; Wahr, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    GRACE has provided global estimates of vertically integrated water storage anomalies at monthly intervals with a useful spatial resolution of 300-500 km. Water levels of large lakes are now routinely monitored by satellite altimeters. By combining these datasets, it may be possible to separate the effects of climate and human management on lake levels. During the period 2002-2006, the levels of Lake Victoria dropped about two meters. Water storage changes of Lake Victoria and other large lakes in the East African Rift Valley are compared, and the relative impacts of climate and human management are shown to be of similar magnitude.

  6. Pesticides and their breakdown products in Lake Waxahachie, Texas, and in finished drinking water from the lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ging, Patricia B.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1991, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program has collected pesticide data from streams and aquifers throughout the Nation (Gilliom and others, 1995). However, little published information on pesticides in public drinking water is available. The NAWQA Program usually collects data on the sources of drinking water but not on the finished drinking water. Therefore, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), in conjunction with the NAWQA Program, has initiated a nationwide pilot project to collect information on concentrations of pesticides and their breakdown products in finished drinking water, in source waters such as reservoirs, and in the basins that contribute water to the reservoirs. The pilot project was designed to collect water samples from finished drinking-water supplies and the associated source water from selected reservoirs that receive runoff from a variety of land uses. Lake Waxahachie, in Ellis County in north-central Texas, was chosen to represent a reservoir receiving water that includes runoff from cotton cropland. This fact sheet presents the results of pesticide sampling of source water from Lake Waxahachie and in finished drinking water from the lake. Analyses are compared to indicate differences in pesticide detections and concentrations between lake water and finished drinking water.

  7. Radium-226 in water, sediments, and fish from lakes near the city of Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Clulow, F V; Davé, N K; Lim, T P; Avadhanula, R

    1998-01-01

    Ra-226 was measured by alpha-emission spectroscopy in water, sediments, and fish (tissues and gut contents), from five lakes in a watershed containing U mining and milling operations at Elliot Lake, Ontario, and from control lakes in an adjacent non-industrialized watershed. Ra-226 transfer parameters from lake water and sediments to fish tissues, and annual intakes by humans consuming fish, were estimated. Mean dissolved 226Ra levels ranged from approximately 76 mBq litre(-1) in water of the most affected lake, to < 10 mBq litre(-1) in control lakes. Levels in summer were consistently higher than in fall or winter; no consistent variation with depth was noted. Sediment levels ranged from approximately 3000 mBq g(-1) dry wt in one study lake to < 100 mBq g(-1) dry wt of sediment in control lakes. Bone 226Ra concentrations were higher than in muscle. The lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), a predatory secondary consumer, had bone 226Ra levels (< 20 mBq g(-1) dry wt) that did not show significant site variation. In contrast, bottom feeding whitefish had significantly more 226Ra in bone tissue (to 38 mBq g(-1) dry wt in the lake whitefish, Coregonus clupeaformis, and 76 mBq g(-1) in round whitefish, Prosopium cylindraceum) in study lakes than in controls (< 20 mBq g(-1) dry wt). Ra-226 levels in lake trout muscle were low and showed erratic variation among lakes whereas levels in whitefish muscle did not vary significantly among study and control sites. Lake herring (= cisco, Coregonus artedii), a planktivorous fish taken only from Quirke Lake, had mean 226Ra levels of 18 and 1.4 mBq g(-1) dry wt in bone and muscle, respectively. Gut 226Ra levels, highest in lake trout from McCabe and Quirke Lakes (126 +/- 53, 64 +/- 44 mBq g(-1) dry wt, respectively), and just detectable in McCabe and Elliot Lake whitefish (24 +/- 2, 36 +/- 14 mBq g(-1) dry wt, respectively), were below detection in lake trout and whitefish from other lakes. Concentration ratios (CRs) of 226Ra from

  8. Water balance of selected floodplain lake basins in the Middle Bug River valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidek, J.; Ferencz, B.

    2013-08-01

    This study is the first attempt in the literature on the subject of comparing water balance equations for floodplain lake basins depending on the type of connection the lake has to its parent river. Where confluent lakes (upstream connections) were concerned, it was only possible to apply a classic water balance equation. When dealing with contrafluent lakes (downstream connections) as well as lakes with a complex recharge type (contrafluent-confluent) modified equations were created. The hydrological type of a lake is decided by high water flow conditions and, consequently, the duration of potamophase (connection with a river) and limnophase (the isolation of the lake), which determine the values of particular components and the proportion of the vertical to horizontal water exchange rate. Confluent lakes are characterised by the highest proportion of horizontal components (the inflow and runoff of river water) to the vertical ones (precipitation and evaporation). The smallest differences occur with respect to a contrafluent lake. In the case of confluent lakes, the relationship between water balance components resulted from the consequent water flow through the basin, consistent with the slope of the river channel and valley. The supplying channels of contrafluent lakes had an obsequent character, which is why the flow rate was lower. Lakes with a complex, contrafluent-confluent recharge type showed intermediate features. After a period of slow contrafluent recharge, the inflow of water through a downstream crevasse from the area of the headwater of the river was activated; this caused a radical change of flow conditions into confluent ones. The conditions of water retention in lake basins were also varied. Apart from hydrological recharge, also the orographic features of the catchment areas of the lakes played an important role here, for example, the distance from the river channel, the altitude at which a given catchment was located within the floodplain and

  9. Water quality of Somerville Lake, south-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Emma; Mendieta, H.B.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration of dissolved solids ranged from 139 to 292 milligrams per liter and averaged about 220 milligrams per liter. Dissolved chloride concentrations ranged from 20 to 68 milligrams per liter and averaged 43 milligrams per liter. Dissolved sulfate concentrations ranged from 30 to 130 milligrams per liter and averaged 63 milligrams per liter. The total hardness of the water ranged from 75 to 140 milligrams per liter, expressed as calcium carbonate, placing it in the moderately hard to hard (61 to 180 milligrams per liter) classification. The concentrations of principal dissolved constituents indicate that Somerville Lake is an excellent source of water for municipal, industrial, or agricultural use.

  10. Water quality of potential reference lakes in the Arkansas Valley and Ouachita Mountain ecoregions, Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Justus, Billy; Meredith, Bradley

    2014-06-01

    This report describes a study to identify reference lakes in two lake classifications common to parts of two level III ecoregions in western Arkansas-the Arkansas Valley and Ouachita Mountains. Fifty-two lakes were considered. A screening process that relied on land-use data was followed by reconnaissance water-quality sampling, and two lakes from each ecoregion were selected for intensive water-quality sampling. Our data suggest that Spring Lake is a suitable reference lake for the Arkansas Valley and that Hot Springs Lake is a suitable reference lake for the Ouachita Mountains. Concentrations for five nutrient constituents--orthophosphorus, total phosphorus, total kjeldahl nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total organic carbon--were lower at Spring Lake on all nine sampling occasions and transparency measurements at Spring Lake were significantly deeper than measurements at Cove Lake. For the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion, water quality at Hot Springs Lake slightly exceeded that of Lake Winona. The most apparent water-quality differences for the two lakes were related to transparency and total organic carbon concentrations, which were deeper and lower at Hot Springs Lake, respectively. Our results indicate that when nutrient concentrations are low, transparency may be more valuable for differentiating between lake water quality than chemical constituents that have been useful for distinguishing between water-quality conditions in mesotrophic and eutrophic settings. For example, in this oligotrophic setting, concentrations for chlorophyll a can be less than 5 μg/L and diurnal variability that is typically associated with dissolved oxygen in more productive settings was not evident.

  11. Water quality of potential reference lakes in the Arkansas Valley and Ouachita Mountain ecoregions, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justus, B.G.; Meredith, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a study to identify reference lakes in two lake classifications common to parts of two level III ecoregions in western Arkansas—the Arkansas Valley and Ouachita Mountains. Fifty-two lakes were considered. A screening process that relied on land-use data was followed by reconnaissance water-quality sampling, and two lakes from each ecoregion were selected for intensive water-quality sampling. Our data suggest that Spring Lake is a suitable reference lake for the Arkansas Valley and that Hot Springs Lake is a suitable reference lake for the Ouachita Mountains. Concentrations for five nutrient constituents—orthophosphorus, total phosphorus, total kjeldahl nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total organic carbon—were lower at Spring Lake on all nine sampling occasions and transparency measurements at Spring Lake were significantly deeper than measurements at Cove Lake. For the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion, water quality at Hot Springs Lake slightly exceeded that of Lake Winona. The most apparent water-quality differences for the two lakes were related to transparency and total organic carbon concentrations, which were deeper and lower at Hot Springs Lake, respectively. Our results indicate that when nutrient concentrations are low, transparency may be more valuable for differentiating between lake water quality than chemical constituents that have been useful for distinguishing between water-quality conditions in mesotrophic and eutrophic settings. For example, in this oligotrophic setting, concentrations for chlorophyll a can be less than 5 μg/L and diurnal variability that is typically associated with dissolved oxygen in more productive settings was not evident.

  12. Modeling Hydrodynamics and Heat Transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, and Implications for Water Quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Tamara M.; Cheng, Ralph T.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Hoilman, Gene R.; Lindenberg, Mary K.; Wellman, Roy E.

    2008-01-01

    The three-dimensional numerical model UnTRIM was used to model hydrodynamics and heat transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, between mid-June and mid-September in 2005 and between mid-May and mid-October in 2006. Data from as many as six meteorological stations were used to generate a spatially interpolated wind field to use as a forcing function. Solar radiation, air temperature, and relative humidity data all were available at one or more sites. In general, because the available data for all inflows and outflows did not adequately close the water budget as calculated from lake elevation and stage-capacity information, a residual inflow or outflow was used to assure closure of the water budget. Data used for calibration in 2005 included lake elevation at 3 water-level gages around the lake, water currents at 5 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) sites, and temperature at 16 water-quality monitoring locations. The calibrated model accurately simulated the fluctuations of the surface of the lake caused by daily wind patterns. The use of a spatially variable surface wind interpolated from two sites on the lake and four sites on the shoreline generally resulted in more accurate simulation of the currents than the use of a spatially invariant surface wind as observed at only one site on the lake. The simulation of currents was most accurate at the deepest site (ADCP1, where the velocities were highest) using a spatially variable surface wind; the mean error (ME) and root mean square error (RMSE) for the depth-averaged speed over a 37-day simulation from July 26 to August 31, 2005, were 0.50 centimeter per second (cm/s) and 3.08 cm/s, respectively. Simulated currents at the remaining sites were less accurate and, in general, underestimated the measured currents. The maximum errors in simulated currents were at a site near the southern end of the trench at the mouth of Howard Bay (ADCP7), where the ME and RMSE in the depth-averaged speed were 3.02 and 4.38 cm

  13. Progress report: chemical character of surface waters in the Devils Lake Basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swenson, Herbert A.

    1950-01-01

    Devils Lake in northeastern North Dakota was at one time the most popular summer resort in the state. With decline in lake level the lake has become a shallow body pf vary saline water, which scenic value and recreational appeal completely destroyed. Under the Missouri River development program, it is proposed to restore the lake level to an altitude of 1,425 feet by diversion of Missouri River water. The chemical character of the water in Devils Lake and in other surface bodies in Devils Lake Basin is determined from the analyses of 95 samples. The physical and chemical properties of lake bed deposits are also shown. Lake water in the basin vary considerable in both concentration and composition, ranging from fresh bicarbonate waters of 300 parts per million dissolved solids to sulfate waters of over 100,000 parts per million of soluble salts. Twenty-four samples indicates the chemical character of water in the Red River of the North and its tributaries. The probable concentration of dissolved solids in water of Devils Lake at altitude 1,425 feet has been estimated as ranging from 3,000 to 7,600 parts per million. Final concentration will largely depend upon the percentage of deposited salts reentering solution and the quality of the inflow water. The possible effects of lake effluents on downstream developments, with particular reference to sanitation and pollution problems, are also discussed in this report.

  14. Water quality studies: Hartwell lake 1991 summary report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jabour, W.E.; Carroll, J.H.

    1993-10-01

    Hartwell Lake, located between Georgia and South Carolina along the Savannah River basin, was the site of an extensive water quality study during 1991. Temporal and longitudinal trends were identified through monthly in situ monitoring and bi-annual chemical analyses. The onset of thermal stratification began on Hartwell Lake during late March. By May, extensive stratification was present from headwaters to the forebay. Anoxic conditions were first observed in the middle reaches of the Seneca and Tugaloo River embayments during the July sampling. The greatest concentrations of chemical constituents within the tributary embayments were recorded during the mid- to late summer period. Progression of the anoxic zone from the mid-embayments towards Hartwell Dam was observed during the July through October period. Stratification and accompanying anoxia in the upstream regions were diminished by early October due to seasonal cooling and mixing processes. In the deepwater -car-dam areas, anoxic conditions persisted until November. Dissolved oxygen, Savannah River, Lake Hartwell, Water Quality. Limnology.

  15. Hydrogeologic setting, water budget, and preliminary analysis of ground-water exchange at Lake Starr, a seepage lake in Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy; Lee, T.M.; O'Hare, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    Lake Starr, a 134-acre seepage lake of multiple-sinkhole origin on the Lake Wales Ridge of central Florida, was the subject of a detailed water-budget study from August 1996 through July 1998. The study monitored the effects of hydrogeologic setting, climate, and ground-water pumping on the water budget and lake stage. The hydrogeologic setting of the Lake Starr basin differs markedly on the two sides of the lake. Ground water from the surficial aquifer system flows into the lake from the northwest side of the basin, and lake water leaks out to the surficial aquifer system on the southeast side of the basin. Lake Starr and the surrounding surficial aquifer system recharge the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The rate of recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer is determined by the integrity of the intermediate confining unit and by the downward head gradient between the two aquifers. On the inflow side of the lake, the intermediate confining unit is more continuous, allowing ground water from the surficial aquifer system to flow laterally into the lake. Beneath the lake and on the southeast side of the basin, breaches in the intermediate confining unit enhance downward flow to the Upper Floridan aquifer, so that water flows both downward and laterally away from the lake through the ground-water flow system in these areas. An accurate water budget, including evaporation measured by the energy-budget method, was used to calculate net ground-water flow to the lake, and to do a preliminary analysis of the relation of net ground-water fluxes to other variables. Water budgets constructed over different timeframes provided insight on processes that affect ground-water interactions with Lake Starr. Weekly estimates of net ground-water flow provided evidence for the occurrence of transient inflows from the nearshore basin, as well as the short-term effects of head in the Upper Floridan aquifer on ground-water exchange with the lake. Monthly water budgets showed the effects

  16. OBIA based hierarchical image classification for industrial lake water.

    PubMed

    Uca Avci, Z D; Karaman, M; Ozelkan, E; Kumral, M; Budakoglu, M

    2014-07-15

    Water management is very important in water mining regions for the sustainability of the natural environment and for industrial activities. This study focused on Acigol Lake, which is an important wetland for sodium sulphate (Na2SO4) production, a significant natural protection area and habitat for local bird species and endemic species of this saline environment, and a stopover for migrating flamingos. By a hierarchical classification method, ponds representing the industrial part were classified according to in-situ measured Baumé values, and lake water representing the natural part was classified according to in-situ measurements of water depth. The latter is directly related to the water level, which should not exceed a critical level determined by the regulatory authorities. The resulting data, produced at an accuracy of around 80%, illustrates the status in two main regions for a single date. The output of the analysis may be meaningful for firms and environmental researchers, and authorizations can provide a good perspective for decision making for sustainable resource management in the region which has uncommon and specific ecological characteristics.

  17. Water budget determination for Northern groundwater dependent lakes using stable isotopes of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isokangas, Elina; Rossi, Pekka; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kløve, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Understanding groundwater - surface water interaction is crucial in numerous water resources management problems. Stable isotopes of water can bring understanding of this interaction especially in catchment scale questions. In this study stable isotopes were used in a Finnish esker aquifer (Lat 64.58° , Lon 26.50° ) where groundwater dependent lakes have suffered from seasonal water level declines. Esker aquifers are the main groundwater reserves in Finland used in water abstraction. In order to determine how hydrology of the lakes is dependent on groundwater, the isotopic composition of oxygen and hydrogen was studied from 36 sampling points during years 2010 to 2012. Samples were taken from 13 groundwater pipes, 11 lakes and 11 streams during winter, spring, summer and autumn. Additionally local precipitation was sampled. The CRDS-method (Picarro L2120-i analyzer) was used to analyze δ18O- and δ2H-values. The data from the study was used to define the Local Meteoric Water Line of the site (δ2H = 7.60 δ18O + 6.70) and the groundwater line of the esker aquifer (δ2H = 7.59 δ18O + 4.79). The groundwater line of the esker aquifer differs from the groundwater line of Finnish groundwaters (δ2H = 8.51 δ18O + 16.65) based on previous studies. This emphasizes the importance of using local isotopic values when stable isotopes of water are used in hydrological studies. Furthermore, the isotopic compositions of the examined lakes differed enough from the isotopic composition of the local groundwater to separate groundwater component in the lake hydrology. The results also verified that evaporation from lakes in Northern Finland can be high enough to utilize isotopic method for determination of groundwater and surface water interactions.

  18. Paleoecology of a Northern Michigan Lake and the relationship among climate, vegetation, and Great Lakes water levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, R.K.; Jackson, S.T.; Thompson, T.A.

    2002-01-01

    We reconstructed Holocene water-level and vegetation dynamics based on pollen and plant macrofossils from a coastal lake in Upper Michigan. Our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that major fluctuations in Great Lakes water levels resulted in part from climatic changes. We also used our data to provide temporal constraints to the mid-Holocene dry period in Upper Michigan. From 9600 to 8600 cal yr B.P. a shallow, lacustrine environment characterized the Mud Lake basin. A Sphagnum-dominated wetland occupied the basin during the mid-Holocene dry period (???8600 to 6600 cal yr B.P.). The basin flooded at 6600 cal yr B.P. as a result of rising water levels associated with the onset of the Nipissing I phase of ancestral Lake Superior. This flooding event occured contemporaneously with a well-documented regional expansion of Tsuga. Betula pollen increased during the Nipissing II phase (4500 cal yr B.P.). Macrofossil evidence from Mud Lake suggests that Betula alleghaniensis expansion was primarily responsible for the rising Betula pollen percentages. Major regional and local vegetational changes were associated with all the major Holocene highstands of the western Great Lakes (Nipissing I, Nipissing II, and Algoma). Traditional interpretations of Great Lakes water-level history should be revised to include a major role of climate. ?? 2002 University of Washington.

  19. Hydrology and water quality of East Lake Tohopekaliga, Osceola County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiffer, Donna M.

    1987-01-01

    East Lake Tohopekaliga, one of the major lakes in central Florida, is located in the upper Kissimmee River basin in north-east Osceola County. It is one of numerous lakes in the upper basin used for flood control, in addition to recreation and some irrigation of surrounding pasture. This report is the fourth in a series of lake reconnaissance studies in the Kissimmee River basin prepared in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. The purpose of the report is to provide government agencies and the public with a brief summary of the lake 's hydrology and water quality. Site information is given and includes map number, site name, location, and type of data available (specific conductivity, pH, alkalinity, turbidity, color, dissolved oxygen, hardness, dissolved chlorides, dissolved sodium, dissolved calcium, dissolved magnesium, dissolved potassium, nitrogen, ammonia, nitrates, carbon and phosphorus). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintained a lake stage gaging station on East Lake Tohopekaliga from 1942 to 1968. The South Florida Water Management District has recorded lake stage since 1963. Periodic water quality samples have been collected from the lake by the South Florida Water Management District and USGS. Water quality and discharge data have been collected for one major tributary to the lake, Boggy Creek. Although few groundwater data are available for the study area, results of previous studies of the groundwater resources of Osceola County are included in this report. To supplement the water quality data for East Lake Tohopekaliga, water samples were collected at selected sites in November 1982 (dry season) and in August 1983 (rainy season). Samples were taken at inflow points, and in the lake, and vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen and temperature were measured in the lake. A water budget from an EPA report on the lake is also included. (Lantz-PTT)

  20. Ground-water and surface-water flow and estimated water budget for Lake Seminole, southwestern Georgia and northwestern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalton, Melinda S.; Aulenbach, Brent T.; Torak, Lynn J.

    2004-01-01

    Lake Seminole is a 37,600-acre impoundment formed at the confluence of the Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers along the Georgia?Florida State line. Outflow from Lake Seminole through Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam provides headwater to the Apalachicola River, which is a major supply of freshwater, nutrients, and detritus to ecosystems downstream. These rivers,together with their tributaries, are hydraulically connected to karst limestone units that constitute most of the Upper Floridan aquifer and to a chemically weathered residuum of undifferentiated overburden. The ground-water flow system near Lake Seminole consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer and undifferentiated overburden. The aquifer is confined below by low-permeability sediments of the Lisbon Formation and, generally, is semiconfined above by undifferentiated overburden. Ground-water flow within the Upper Floridan aquifer is unconfined or semiconfined and discharges at discrete points by springflow or diffuse leakage into streams and other surface-water bodies. The high degree of connectivity between the Upper Floridan aquifer and surface-water bodies is limited to the upper Eocene Ocala Limestone and younger units that are in contact with streams in the Lake Seminole area. The impoundment of Lake Seminole inundated natural stream channels and other low-lying areas near streams and raised the water-level altitude of the Upper Floridan aquifer near the lake to nearly that of the lake, about 77 feet. Surface-water inflow from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers and Spring Creek and outflow to the Apalachicola River through Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam dominate the water budget for Lake Seminole. About 81 percent of the total water-budget inflow consists of surface water; about 18 percent is ground water, and the remaining 1 percent is lake precipitation. Similarly, lake outflow consists of about 89 percent surface water, as flow to the Apalachicola River through Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, about 4 percent ground water

  1. Estimation of water storage change of Lake Nasser using GRACE gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahran, Khaled

    2010-05-01

    Lake Nasser, which impounds by the High Dam, is the main water reservoir for the whole Egyptian territory. Water storage at the lake plays an essential role in water demands and affects almost the whole country. Thus, observation based information about water income, the spatial distribution and temporal variation of water storage is of great importance. We used data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission to determine the spatiotemporal variation of water stored on the Lake or beneath the crust surrounding it. Integrated gravity signals from Grace have been separated into its individual components related to mass redistribution in and around the Lake. Temporal gravity variation from GRACE correlated quiet well with the hydrological cycle of the Lake. Spectral analysis has been used to differentiate between water storage in the Lake and the spatial distribution of underground water variation. On the other hand, GRACE data enable the complete scope of the whole Nile basin and its relation to the water storage of the Lake. In this manner, filtering of the spherical harmonics from GRACE plays an important role and has been tested in the current research. Finally, global data from GRACE to the whole Nile basin together with global hydrological models give important information of the seasonal water income to the Lake and puts an important step toward for the construction of a hydrological model to predict water income to the Lake.

  2. Historic and modern abundance of wild lean lake trout in Michigan waters of Lake Superior: Implications for restoration goals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilberg, Michael J.; Hansen, Michael J.; Bronte, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Lake Superior collapsed in the late 1950s due to overfishing and predation by sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus. A binational effort to restore the lean morphotype of lake trout began with the stocking of hatchery-reared fish followed by the chemical control of sea lampreys and closure of the commercial fishery. Previous comparisons of the contemporary abundance of wild lean lake trout with that from historic commercial fishery statistics indicate that abundance was higher historically. However, this conclusion may be biased because several factors—the inclusion of siscowet (the “fat” morphotype of lake trout) in the catch statistics, the soak time of nets, seasonal effects on catch per effort, and the confounding effects of effort targeted at lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis—were not accounted for. We developed new indices of historic lean lake trout abundance that correct for these biases and compared them with the assessment data from 1984 to 1998 in Michigan waters of Lake Superior. The modern (1984–1998) abundance of wild lean lake trout is at least as high as that during 1929–1943 in six of eight management areas but lower in one area. Measures to promote and protect naturally reproducing populations have been more successful than previously realized.

  3. Hydrology, water quality, trophic status, and aquatic plants of Fowler Lake, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    The low annual phosphorus input (28 pounds per square mile) to the lake from the Oconomowoc River shows the benefit of upstream lakes on the Oconomowoc River. Fourteen percent of the phosphorus input load to Fowler Lake is deposited in the lake sediments and the rest is transported through the lake by surface-water flow to downstream Lac La Belle. Dense growths of macrophytes in the lake change in composition seasonally; chara sp. (muskgrass) and Myriophyllum sp. (milfoil) are abundant in June and Najas marina and Vallesneria Americana (wild celery) are abundant in August.

  4. District wide water resources investigation and management using LANDSAT data. Phase 1: Lake volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, S. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A technique for estimating available water storage volume using LANDSAT data was developed and applied to Lake Washington and Lake Harris in central Florida. The technique can be applied two ways. First, where the historical stage records are available, the historical LANDSAT data can be used to establish the relationship between lake volume and lake stage. In the second case, where the historical stage records are not available, the historical LANDSAT data can be used to estimate the historical lake stage after the lake volume and stage information become available in the future.

  5. ASSESSING WATER QUALITY CHANGES IN THE LAKES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES USING SEDIMENT DIATOMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diatom assemblages were selected as indicators of lake condition and to assess historical lake water quality changes in 257 lakes in the northeastern United States. The "top" (surface sediments, present-day) and "bottom" (generally from >30 cm deep, representing historical condit...

  6. Impact of backcountry recreationists on the water quality of an Adirondack lake

    Treesearch

    Robert G. Werner; Raymond E. Leonard; James O. Crevelling; James O. Crevelling

    1985-01-01

    This study reports the effects of recreational use on the water quality of an Adirondack lake. Phosphates, nitrates, conductivity, fecal coliform, transparency, and temperature were regularly measured over a period of 2 years and related to the recreational use that the lake received during that time. An adjacent lake, which was not visited by recreationists, served as...

  7. The influence of irrigation water on the hydrology and lake water budgets of two small arid-climate lakes in Khorezm, Uzbekistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.; Rosen, Michael R.; Saito, L.; Decker, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known regarding the origins and hydrology of hundreds of small lakes located in the western Uzbekistan province of Khorezm, Central Asia. Situated in the Aral Sea Basin, Khorezm is a productive agricultural region, growing mainly cotton, wheat, and rice. Irrigation is provided by an extensive canal network that conveys water from the Amu Darya River (AD) throughout the province. The region receives on average 10 cm/year of precipitation, yet potential evapotranspiration exceeds this amount by about 15 times. It was hypothesized that the perennial existence of the lakes of interest depends on periodic input of excess irrigation water. This hypothesis was investigated by studying two small lakes in the region, Tuyrek and Khodjababa. In June and July 2008, surface water and shallow groundwater samples were collected at these lake systems and surrounding communities and analyzed for δ2H, δ18O, and major ion hydrochemistry to determine water sources. Water table and lake surface elevations were monitored, and the local aquifer characteristics were determined through aquifer tests. These data and climate data from a Class A evaporation pan and meteorological stations were used to estimate water budgets for both lakes. Lake evaporation was found to be about 0.7 cm/day during the study period. Results confirm that the waters sampled at both lake systems and throughout central Khorezm were evaporated from AD water to varying degrees. Together, the water budgets and stable isotope and major ion hydrochemistry data suggest that without surface water input from some source (i.e. excess irrigation water), these and other Khorezm lakes with similar hydrology may decrease in volume dramatically, potentially to the point of complete desiccation.

  8. Hydrological drivers of record-setting water level rise on Earth's largest lake system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronewold, A. D.; Bruxer, J.; Durnford, D.; Smith, J. P.; Clites, A. H.; Seglenieks, F.; Qian, S. S.; Hunter, T. S.; Fortin, V.

    2016-05-01

    Between January 2013 and December 2014, water levels on Lake Superior and Lake Michigan-Huron, the two largest lakes on Earth by surface area, rose at the highest rate ever recorded for a 2 year period beginning in January and ending in December of the following year. This historic event coincided with below-average air temperatures and extensive winter ice cover across the Great Lakes. It also brought an end to a 15 year period of persistently below-average water levels on Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron that included several months of record-low water levels. To differentiate hydrological drivers behind the recent water level rise, we developed a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) routine for inferring historical estimates of the major components of each lake's water budget. Our results indicate that, in 2013, the water level rise on Lake Superior was driven by increased spring runoff and over-lake precipitation. In 2014, reduced over-lake evaporation played a more significant role in Lake Superior's water level rise. The water level rise on Lake Michigan-Huron in 2013 was also due to above-average spring runoff and persistent over-lake precipitation, while in 2014, it was due to a rare combination of below-average evaporation, above-average runoff and precipitation, and very high inflow rates from Lake Superior through the St. Marys River. We expect, in future research, to apply our new framework across the other Laurentian Great Lakes, and to Earth's other large freshwater basins as well.

  9. Effects of climate change on deep-water oxygen and winter mixing in a deep lake (Lake Geneva)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwefel, Robert; Alfred, Wüest; Damien, Bouffard

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen is the most important dissolved gas for lake ecosystems. Because low oxygen concentrations are an ongoing problem in many parts of the oceans and numerous lakes, oxygen depletion processes have been intensively studied over the last decades and were mainly attributed to high nutrient loads. Recently, climate-induced changes in stratification and mixing behavior were recognized as additional thread to hypolimnetic oxygen budgets in lakes and reservoirs [Matzinger et al., 2007; Zhang et al., 2015]. Observational data of Lake Geneva, a deep perialpine lake situated between France and Switzerland showed no decreasing trend in hypoxia over the last 43 years, despite an impressive reduction in nutrient input during this period. Instead, hypoxic conditions were predominantly controlled by deep mixing end of winter and in turn by winter temperatures. To test the sensitivity of Lake Geneva on future climate change and changes in water transparency, we simulated the hydrodynamics and temperature of Lake Geneva under varying conditions for atmospheric temperature and water clarity performed with the one-dimensional model SIMSTRAT [Goudsmit, 2002]. The results show, that the stratification in lakes is only weakly affected by changes in light absorption due to varying water quality. For conditions expected for the end of the century, a decrease in the annual mean deep convective mixing of up to 45 m is predicted. Also complete mixing events over the whole lake are less likely to occur. A change in the hypolimnetic oxygen concentration of up to 20% can thus be expected in the future. These results show, that changes in deep mixing have an equally strong impact as eutrophication on the deep-water oxygen development of oligomictic lakes and have to be considered in the prediction of the future development of lakes. References: Goudsmit, G. H., H. Burchard, F. Peeters, and A. Wüest (2002), Application of k-ɛ turbulence models to enclosed basins: The role of internal

  10. Comparison of selected cultural, physical, and water-quality characteristics of lakes in Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bortleson, Gilbert Carl; Dion, N.P.

    1979-01-01

    The report presents comparisons and a graphical overview of the relative magnitude and regional and statewide distribution of 19 selected cultural, physical, and water-quality characteristics measured in a reconnaissance study of several hundred lakes in Washington. Statewide, mean depth of almost one-fourth of the lakes is shallow (2.0 meters or less), and only 7 percent of the lakes have mean depths greater than 20 meters. About one-third of the lakes had Secchi-disc readings of 2.0 meters or less, a value often considered characteristic of eutrophic lakes. The poorest water clarity was observed in the Columbia Plateau, where 68 percent of the lakes had Secchi-disc readings of less than 2.0 meters. More than one-third of the lakes in the State had total phosphorus concentrations that exceeded 30 micrograms per liter, a concentration that is often considered characteristic of eutrophic lakes. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. The effects of season and sand mining activities on thermal regime and water quality in a large shallow tropical lake.

    PubMed

    Sharip, Zati; Zaki, Ahmad Taqiyuddin Ahmad

    2014-08-01

    Thermal structure and water quality in a large and shallow lake in Malaysia were studied between January 2012 and June 2013 in order to understand variations in relation to water level fluctuations and in-stream mining activities. Environmental variables, namely temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, pH, electrical conductivity, chlorophyll-A and transparency, were measured using a multi-parameter probe and a Secchi disk. Measurements of environmental variables were performed at 0.1 m intervals from the surface to the bottom of the lake during the dry and wet seasons. High water level and strong solar radiation increased temperature stratification. River discharges during the wet season, and unsustainable sand mining activities led to an increased turbidity exceeding 100 NTU, and reduced transparency, which changed the temperature variation and subsequently altered the water quality pattern.

  12. Stochastic modeling of Lake Van water level time series with jumps and multiple trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, H.; Unal, N. E.; Eris, E.; Yuce, M. I.

    2013-06-01

    In the 1990s, water level in the closed-basin Lake Van located in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey, has risen up about 2 m. Analysis of the hydrometeorological data shows that change in the water level is related to the water budget of the lake. In this study, stochastic models are proposed for simulating monthly water level data. Two models considering mono- and multiple-trend time series are developed. The models are derived after removal of trend and periodicity in the dataset. Trend observed in the lake water level time series is fitted by mono- and multiple-trend lines. In the so-called mono-trend model, the time series is treated as a whole under the hypothesis that the lake water level has an increasing trend. In the second model (so-called multiple-trend), the time series is divided into a number of segments to each a linear trend can be fitted separately. Application on the lake water level data shows that four segments, each fitted with a trend line, are meaningful. Both the mono- and multiple-trend models are used for simulation of synthetic lake water level time series under the hypothesis that the observed mono- and multiple-trend structure of the lake water level persist during the simulation period. The multiple-trend model is found better for planning the future infrastructural projects in surrounding areas of the lake as it generates higher maxima for the simulated lake water level.

  13. Pleistocene desiccation in East Africa bottlenecked but did not extirpate the adaptive radiation of Lake Victoria haplochromine cichlid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Elmer, Kathryn R.; Reggio, Chiara; Wirth, Thierry; Verheyen, Erik; Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    The Great Lakes region of East Africa, including Lake Victoria, is the center of diversity of the mega-diverse cichlid fishes (Perciformes: Teleostei). Paleolimnological evidence indicates dramatic desiccation of this lake ca. 18,000–15,000 years ago. Consequently, the hundreds of extant endemic haplochromine species in the lake must have either evolved since then or refugia must have existed, within that lake basin or elsewhere, from which Lake Victoria was recolonized. We studied the population history of the Lake Victoria region superflock (LVRS) of haplochromine cichlids based on nuclear genetic analysis (12 microsatellite loci from 400 haplochomines) of populations from Lake Kivu, Lake Victoria, and the connected and surrounding rivers and lakes. Population genetic analyses confirmed that Lake Kivu haplochromines colonized Lake Victoria. Coalescent analyses show a 30- to 50-fold decline in the haplochromine populations of Lake Victoria, Lake Kivu, and the region ca. 18,000–15,000 years ago. We suggest that this coincides with drastic climatic and geological changes in the late Pleistocene. The most recent common ancestor of the Lake Victoria region haplochromines was estimated to have existed about 4.5 million years ago, which corresponds to the first radiation of cichlids in Lake Tanganyika and the origin of the tribe Haplochrominii. This relatively old evolutionary origin may explain the high levels of polymorphism still found in modern haplochromines. This degree of polymorphism might have acted as a “genetic reservoir” that permitted the explosive radiation of hundreds of haplochromines and their array of contemporary adaptive morphologies. PMID:19651614

  14. Water and radiation use efficiencies in sorghum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increasing water and radiation use efficiencies (WUE and RUE, respectively) are critical to enhance crop production. Exploring genetic variability in WUE and RUE is necessary to improve these traits. The objectives of this research were to evaluate eight sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] genotyp...

  15. Lake Erie Water Level Study. Appendix G. Recreational Beaches and Boating.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL STUDY . APPENDIX G. RECREATIONAL BEACHES A--ETC(U...NATIONAL BUREAUJ OT 5ANDARDS 1963-A -0 Lake Erie Water Level Study Opp COW avacRe to DTIC do" "mit fay legible repzoducdaA., CD C 9 LwwMM ----wTuvreationa1...I. REPORT NUMBER GOVT ACCESSION NO 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (arut Subtitle, S. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Lake Erie Water Level Study ,

  16. State of the Middle Great Lakes: results of the 1983 water quality survey of Lakes Erie, Huron, and Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Lesht, B.M.; Rockwell, D.C.

    1985-08-01

    Results and program objewaatertives are discussed in the context of past and proposed lake surveillance activities. Surveillance methods are briefly explained. Data are evaluated and compared relative to spatial, temporal and seasonal variability within and between the three lakes sampled and in relation to water-quality assessment issues. Survey results and historical data on water-quality parameters are compared with the results of numerical simulations using two different types of model - nutrient-based eutrophication models and multisegment, mass-balance models. The authors conclude, on the basis of the 1983 surveillance program results, that water-quality conditions of the three lakes have, in general, improved since the last intensive survey in the 1970s. Recommendations are made that open-lake water-quality surveillance be conducted on an annual basis; that estimates of nutrient loading to the lakes be refined; that the role of the benthic nepheloid layer and of particle removal in general on the cycling of nutrients in the Great Lakes be studied; that refinement of water-quality modeling efforts be continued; and that research activities and methodology be incorporated into the surveillance program. Finally, raw data collected during the 1983 program are presented in tabular form and on microfiche in appendices at the end of the report. Cruise data are included on microfiche. 53 refs., 54 figs., 43 tabs.

  17. Hydrology and water quality of Park Lake, south-central Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kammerer, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Park Lake extends to the northeast from the village of Pardeeville in Columbia County (fig. 1). Local residents perceive water-quality problems in the lake that include excessive algae and aquatic plant growth. Algae and plant growth in a lake are controlled, in part, by the availability of phosphorus in the water. However, no measurements of phosphorus enter- ing the lake or of other factors that affect lake-water quality had been made, and available data on water quality were limited to 2 years of measurements at one site in the lake in 1986- 87. To obtain the data and in- formation needed to address the water-quality problems at Park Lake and to develop a management plan that would limit the input of phosphorus to the lake, the U.S. Geologi- cal Survey, in cooperation with the Park Lake Management District, studied the hydrology of the lake and collected data needed to determine sources and amount of phosphorus en- tering the lake. This Fact Sheet summarizes the results of that study. Data collected during the study were published in a separate report (Holmstrom and others, 1994, p. 70-85).

  18. Water-quality data for Sauk Lake and tributaries near Sauk Centre, Minnesota, 1988-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitton, Gregory B.

    1991-01-01

    Water-quality data were collected at 11 sites on Sauk Lake, at sites on 3 major tributaries to the lake, and at the outflow from the lake from September 1988 through August 1989. Data collected from five selected lake sites comprise alkalinity, dissolved-solids concentration, concentrations of nutrients, plankton counts, and chlorophyll a and b. Vertical profiles of specific conductance, pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, as well as transparency depths were measured at all lake sites. Discharge, specific conductance, pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen were measured at the stream sites. Water samples were collected to determine alkalinity and concentrations of suspended solids and nutrients.

  19. Hydrogeology, hydrologic budget, and water chemistry of the Medina Lake area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, Rebecca B.; Grimm, Kenneth C.; Lee, Roger W.

    2000-01-01

    A three-phase study of the Medina Lake area in Texas was done to assess the hydrogeology and hydrology of Medina and Diversion Lakes combined (the lake system) and to determine what fraction of seepage losses from the lake system might enter the regional ground-water-flow system of the Edwards and (or) Trinity aquifers. Phase 1 consisted of revising the geologic framework for the Medina Lake area. Results of field mapping show that the upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone underlies Medina Lake and the intervening stream channel from the outflow of Medina Lake to the midpoint of Diversion Lake, where the Diversion Lake fault intersects Diversion Lake. A thin sequence of strata consisting primarily of the basal nodular and dolomitic members of the Kainer Formation of the Edwards Group, is present in the southern part of the study area. On the southern side of Medina Lake, the contact between the upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone and the basal nodular member is approximately 1,000 feet above mean sea level, and the contact between the basal nodular member and the dolomitic member is approximately 1,050 feet above mean sea level. The most porous and permeable part of the basal nodular member is about 1,045 feet above mean sea level. At these altitudes, Medina Lake is in hydrologic connection with rocks in the Edwards aquifer recharge zone, and Medina Lake appears to lose more water to the ground-water system along this bedding plane contact. Hydrologic budgets calculated during phase 2 for Medina Lake, Diversion Lake, and Medina/Diversion Lakes combined indicate that: (1) losses from Medina and Diversion Lakes can be quantified; (2) a portion of those losses are entering the Edwards aquifer; and (3) losses to the Trinity aquifer in the Medina Lake area are minimal and within the error of the hydrologic budgets. Hydrologic budgets based on streamflow, precipitation, evaporation, and change in lake storage were used to quantify losses (recharge) to the ground-water

  20. What happens to near-shore habitat when lake and reservoir water levels decline?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water management and drought can lead to increased fluctuation and declines in lake and reservoir water levels. These changes can affect near-shore physical habitat and the biotic assemblages that depend upon it. Structural complexity at the land-water interface of lakes promote...

  1. 78 FR 37710 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Air and Water Show; Lake Michigan; Milwaukee, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Air and Water Show; Lake Michigan; Milwaukee... will enforce the safety zone on Lake Michigan in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for the Milwaukee Air and Water... 2013 Milwaukee Air and Water Show. During the aforementioned periods, the Coast Guard will enforce...

  2. 78 FR 37713 - Safety Zone; Chicago Air and Water Show; Lake Michigan; Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Chicago Air and Water Show; Lake Michigan; Chicago, IL... enforce the safety zone on Lake Michigan near Chicago, Illinois for the Chicago Air and Water Show. This... Chicago Air and Water Show. During the aforementioned periods, the Coast Guard will enforce restrictions...

  3. 77 FR 49349 - Safety Zone; Chicago Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Chicago Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL AGENCY... deviation to the Chicago Air and Water Show safety zone on Lake Michigan near Lincoln Park. This action is... during the Chicago Air and Water Show. This safety zone is necessary to protect spectators and vessels...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Antidegradation Policy

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... result in an increased loading of BCCs to surface waters of the Great Lakes System and for which... shall adopt an antidegradation standard applicable to all waters of the Great Lakes System and identify... pollutants which are causing the impairment; B. Where, for any parameter, the quality of the waters...

  5. What happens to near-shore habitat when lake and reservoir water levels decline?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water management and drought can lead to increased fluctuation and declines in lake and reservoir water levels. These changes can affect near-shore physical habitat and the biotic assemblages that depend upon it. Structural complexity at the land-water interface of lakes promote...

  6. Effects of residential development on the water quality of Higgins Lake, Michigan 1995-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minnerick, Russel J.

    2001-01-01

    Higgins Lake, a popular recreation area in the north-central Lower Peninsula of Michigan, drains an area of 58 square miles and is composed of two deep basins separated by a narrow channel between Flag Point and Point Detroit.The North and South Basins have a maximum depth of about 141 and 100 feet respectively. Ground-water inflow is the major source of the lake’s water supply, with precipitation and inflow from two small tributaries providing the remaining water. The quality of the lake water near shore has been affected by residential development. The concentration of chloride and turbidity in the lake water near the shore increases with increases in building and road density. Nitrogen concentration in lake water near shore also has increased the most in areas where buildings exceed a density of 0.50 building per acre. Ground water beneath the lake showed higher concentrations of phosphorus, nitrogen, chloride, and boron than the lake-water samples. Escherichia Coliform (E. coli) bacteria was found in ground water at sites where building density exceeded 0.40 building per acre, indicating that water from septic systems, is leaching to the ground water that flows to the lake. Phosphorus concentration in lake and ground water appears to be more affected by site-specific conditions, such as soil type and distance of sampling sites from individual septic systems, than by building density alone.

  7. Inflow, outflow, and water levels in Lake Michigan during the last part of the Wisconsin glaciation

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, L.; Attig, J.W. ); Mickelson, D.M. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Between about 14,000 and 10,000 B.P., water flowed to and from Lake Michigan through several channels connected with adjacent glacial lakes and the Mississippi basin. Inflow and outflow depend on lake-level fluctuations, but no known lake-level chronology for the Lake Michigan basin explains all the supposed facts. Several kinds of information can be use to construct such a chronology: elevations of beaches, elevations and locations of outlets, ice-margin positions, till stratigraphy, and glacial history relative to outlets and lake-sediment distribution. If the crustal rebound predicted by J.A. Clark (bracketed by glacial Lake Wisconsin and Door Peninsula water planes) is used as the basis for a lake-level chronology, lake elevations would have been much higher than previously recognized, beaches previously thought to be late glacial must be middle Holocene, and the predicted sequence of spillways from glacial Lake Oshkosh, in the Green Bay basin, to Lake Michigan seems incompatible with the till stratigraphy of the region. On the other hand, a hinge line model such as proposed by J.W. Goldthwait allows far less rebound than is required by their knowledge of present-day rebound and by the rebound interpreted from shore features of glacial Lake Wisconsin. Therefore major flaws exist in their understanding of the glacial chronology and stratigraphy, of the glacial lake deposits, or of the crustal rebound; the reconstructed of inflow and outflow will remain uncertain until these conflicts are resolved.

  8. Water Level Monitoring on Tibetan Lakes Based on Icesat and Envisat Data Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. W.; Qiao, G.; Wu, Y. J.; Cao, Y. J.; Mi, H.

    2017-09-01

    Satellite altimetry technique is an effective method to monitor the water level of lakes in a wide range, especially in sparsely populated areas, such as the Tibet Plateau (TP). To provide high quality data for time-series change detection of lake water level, an automatic and efficient algorithm for lake water footprint (LWF) detection in a wide range is used. Based on ICESat GLA14 Release634 data and ENVISat GDR 1Hz data, water level of 167 lakes were obtained from ICESat data series, and water level of 120 lakes were obtained from ENVISat data series. Among them, 67 lakes contained two data series. Mean standard deviation of all lakes is 0.088 meters (ICESat), 0.339 meters (ENVISat). Combination of multi-source altimetry data is helpful for us to get longer and more dense periods cover water level, study the lake level changes, manage water resources and understand the impacts of climate change better. In addition, the standard deviation of LWF elevation used to calculate the water level were analyzed by month. Based on lake data set for the TP from the 1960s, 2005, and 2014 in Scientific Data, it is found that the water level changes in the TP have a strong spatial correlation with the area changes.

  9. Estimated water and nutrient inflows and outflows, Lake Cochituate, eastern Massachusetts, 1977-79

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gay, F.B.

    1984-01-01

    Streamflow was the major source of water and nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) to Lake Cochituate, followed by ground water, and then precipitation during April 1978 through March 1979. Compared to all sources during that period, streams contributed 7,217 million gallons (a little over 82 percent) of water, 63 ,000 pounds (between 50 and 60 percent) of nitrogen, and 3,000 pounds (94 percent) of phosphorus. A little over 60 percent of all the water that entered Lake Cochituate flowed from Fisk Pond. This single source transported about 38,000 pounds of nitrogen and 2,000 pounds of phosphorus. Ground-water inflow to Lake Cochituate occurs along its shoreline except at the north end of Lake Cochituate 's North Pond where natural seepage from the lake is occurring and at locations on the lake 's Middle and South Ponds where municipal wells induce infiltration of lake water amounting to 1,228 million gallons for that period. Discharge of ground water to the lake was estimated to range from 462 to 816 million gallons and transported from 31,000 to 55,000 pounds of nitrogen and from 46 to 82 pounds of phosphorus. Bulk precipitation was estimated to contribute about the same volume of water to the lake as ground water but double its phosphorus load. However, the load of nitrogen, 8000 pounds, from bulk precipitation was the smallest of any source. (USGS)

  10. Coastal groundwater/surface-water interactions: a Great Lakes case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, Brian P.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Lundstrom, Scott C.

    2006-01-01

    Key similarities exist between marine and Great Lakes coastal environments. Water and nutrient fluxes across lakebeds in the Great Lakes are influenced by seiche and wind set-up and set-down, analogous to tidal influence in marine settings. Groundwater/surface-water interactions also commonly involve a saline-fresh water interface, although in the Great-Lakes cases, it is groundwater that is commonly saline and surface water that is fresh. Evapotranspiration also affects nearshore hydrology in both settings. Interactions between groundwater and surface water have recently been identified as an important component of ecological processes in the Great Lakes. Water withdrawals and the reversal of the groundwater/surface water seepage gradient are also common to many coastal areas around the Great Lakes. As compared to surface water, regional groundwater that discharges to western Lake Erie from Michigan is highly mineralized. Studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey at Erie State Game Area in southeastern Michigan, describe groundwater flow dynamics and chemistry, shallow lake-water chemistry, and fish and invertebrate communities. Results presented here provide an overview of recent progress of ongoing interdisciplinary studies of Great Lakes nearshore systems and describe a conceptual model that identifies relations among geologic, hydrologic, chemical, and biological processes in the coastal habitats of Lake Erie. This conceptual model is based on analysis of hydraulic head in piezometers at the study site and chemical analysis of deep and shallow coastal groundwater.

  11. Yangtze River Water Diversion into Lake Taihu for Algal Bloom Control: Is it Helping or Hurting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, K.; Li, Y.; Tang, C.; Qiu, L.; Yu, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Harmful algae blooms in Lake Taihu are getting worse every year due to excess nutrients flowing into the water, especially from the northern watershed areas. Impact of blooms on lake's ecosystem, fisheries and drinking water supply to local towns has been severe. Many efforts have been undertaken by both government entities and researchers since 1990 for restoring the lake such as dredging, wetland construction, control of watershed runoff but none has garnered more attention than the water-diversion project. In the water-diversion project, freshwater from the Yangtze River is transferred into the lake via the Wangyuhe River (in the north) and is eventually discharged from the lake via the Taipuhe River (in the south) in an attempt to dilute the polluted water and flush pollutants out of the lake. The effects of water transfer on lake water quality and ecology have drawn great attention because the effectiveness of this project is conflicting. Recent studies suggest that water transfer could only decrease the concentration of phytoplankton but may actually increase concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen in some areas of the lake where nutrient concentrations are lower than the influent water. In this study, a three dimensional Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) model was used to investigate mass balance and spatial distribution of nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) in Lake Taihu before and after transfer.

  12. Lateral and subsurface flows impact arctic coastal plain lake water budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koch, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    Arctic thaw lakes are an important source of water for aquatic ecosystems, wildlife, and humans. Many recent studies have observed changes in Arctic surface waters related to climate warming and permafrost thaw; however, explaining the trends and predicting future responses to warming is difficult without a stronger fundamental understanding of Arctic lake water budgets. By measuring and simulating surface and subsurface hydrologic fluxes, this work quantified the water budgets of three lakes with varying levels of seasonal drainage, and tested the hypothesis that lateral and subsurface flows are a major component of the post-snowmelt water budgets. A water budget focused only on post-snowmelt surface water fluxes (stream discharge, precipitation, and evaporation) could not close the budget for two of three lakes, even when uncertainty in input parameters was rigorously considered using a Monte Carlo approach. The water budgets indicated large, positive residuals, consistent with up to 70% of mid-summer inflows entering lakes from lateral fluxes. Lateral inflows and outflows were simulated based on three processes; supra-permafrost subsurface inflows from basin-edge polygonal ground, and exchange between seasonally drained lakes and their drained margins through runoff and evapotranspiration. Measurements and simulations indicate that rapid subsurface flow through highly conductive flowpaths in the polygonal ground can explain the majority of the inflow. Drained lakes were hydrologically connected to marshy areas on the lake margins, receiving water from runoff following precipitation and losing up to 38% of lake efflux to drained margin evapotranspiration. Lateral fluxes can be a major part of Arctic thaw lake water budgets and a major control on summertime lake water levels. Incorporating these dynamics into models will improve our ability to predict lake volume changes, solute fluxes, and habitat availability in the changing Arctic.

  13. Monitoring Changes in Water Resources Systems Using High Resolution Satellite Observations: Application to Lake Urmia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; AghaKouchak, A.; Madani, K.; Mirchi, A.; Farahmand, A.; Conway, C.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Urmia with its unique ecosystem in northwestern Iran is the second largest saltwater lake in the world. It is home of more than 300 species of birds, reptiles, and mammals with high salinity level of more than 300 g/l. In recent years, a significant water retreat has occurred in this lake. In this study, we tried to monitor the desiccation of the lake over more than four decades using remote sensing observations. Multi-spectral high-resolution LandSat images of the Lake Urmia region from 1972 to 2012 were acquired to derive the lake area. The composite maps of the lake were created, and a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood classification technique was used to classify land and water in the composite maps. The time series of the lake area reveals that it has shrunk by more than 40% in the past ten years. Moreover, water budget related components such as precipitation, soil moisture, and drought indices from remote sensing of the lake basin were utilized to investigate if droughts or climate change are the primary driving forces behind this phenomenon. These analyses show that the retreat of the lake is not related to droughts or global climate change as it has survived several drought events before year 2000. Similar analyses conducted on Lake Van located about 400 km west of Lake Urmia with very similar climate pattern revealed no significant areal change despite the lake's exposure to similar drought events. These results raise serious concern about the destructive role of unbridled development coupled with supply-oriented water management scheme driven by a classic upstream-downstream competition for water in the Lake Urmia region. There is an urgent need to investigate sustainable restoration initiatives for Lake Urmia in order to prevent an environmental disaster comparable to catastrophic death of Aral Sea.

  14. The role of depth in regulating water quality and fish assemblages in oxbow lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goetz, Daniel B.; Miranda, Leandro E.; Kroger, Robert; Andrews, Caroline S.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated water quality and fish assemblages in deep (> 3.0 m; N = 7) and shallow (< 1.5 m; N = 6) floodplain lakes in the intensively cultivated Yazoo River Basin (Mississippi, USA) using indirect gradient multivariate procedures. Shallow lakes displayed wide diel oxygen fluctuations, some reaching hypoxic/anoxic conditions for extended periods of time, high suspended solids, and extreme water temperatures. Conversely, deeper lakes were represented by higher visibility, stable oxygen levels, and cooler water temperatures. Fish assemblages in shallow lakes were dominated by tolerant, small-bodied fishes and those able to breathe atmospheric oxygen. Deeper lakes had a greater representation of predators and other large-bodied fishes. Our evaluation suggests fish assemblages are reflective of oxbow lakes water quality, which is shaped by depth. Understanding the interactions between depth, water quality, and fish assemblages may facilitate development of effective management plans for improving conditions necessary to sustain diverse fish assemblages in agriculturally dominated basins.

  15. Water quality indicators obtainable from aircraft and Landsat images and their use in classifying lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherz, J. P.; Van Domelen, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the interaction of sunlight and skylight with the surface of a lake, particles in the water to the depth where light is extinguished, and lake bottom are presented, and the use of aircraft and Landsat images to derive water quality indicators on the basis of these interactions is discussed. A very clear, deep lake with a backscatter signal similar to that of distilled water is used as a reference standard. The degree of turbidity of other target lakes is determined by comparing their residual radiance with the clear lake standard and with the residual radiance of a lake whose turbidity has been determined from water samples. The relative and absolute strengths of residual radiance are used to determine the type and concentration of suspended material, respectively. Oil slicks are characterized by an increased specular reflectance component, decreased signal from the underlying water, and added backscatter signal from the oil volume.

  16. Water quality indicators obtainable from aircraft and Landsat images and their use in classifying lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherz, J. P.; Van Domelen, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the interaction of sunlight and skylight with the surface of a lake, particles in the water to the depth where light is extinguished, and lake bottom are presented, and the use of aircraft and Landsat images to derive water quality indicators on the basis of these interactions is discussed. A very clear, deep lake with a backscatter signal similar to that of distilled water is used as a reference standard. The degree of turbidity of other target lakes is determined by comparing their residual radiance with the clear lake standard and with the residual radiance of a lake whose turbidity has been determined from water samples. The relative and absolute strengths of residual radiance are used to determine the type and concentration of suspended material, respectively. Oil slicks are characterized by an increased specular reflectance component, decreased signal from the underlying water, and added backscatter signal from the oil volume.

  17. Calcium Carbonate Nucleation in an Alkaline Lake Surface Water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (??) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has ?? values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high ??, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean ?? at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water ??. Calcium concentration and ?? regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower ?? than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and ?? at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (??) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (?? mM/?? min) = -0.0026 ?? + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, ?? at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors. ?? 2011 U.S. Government.

  18. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  19. Interactive effects of vertical mixing, nutrients and ultraviolet radiation: in situ photosynthetic responses of phytoplankton from high mountain lakes in Southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbling, E. W.; Carrillo, P.; Medina-Sánchez, J. M.; Durán, C.; Herrera, G.; Villar-Argaiz, M.; Villafañe, V. E.

    2013-02-01

    Global change, together with human activities, has resulted in increasing amounts of organic material (including nutrients) that water bodies receive. This input further attenuates the penetration of solar radiation, leading to the view that opaque lakes are more "protected" from solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than clear ones. Vertical mixing, however, complicates this view as cells are exposed to fluctuating radiation regimes, for which the effects have, in general, been neglected. Furthermore, the combined impacts of mixing, together with those of UVR and nutrient inputs are virtually unknown. In this study, we carried out complex in situ experiments in three high mountain lakes of Spain (Lake Enol in the National Park Picos de Europa, Asturias, and lakes Las Yeguas and La Caldera in the National Park Sierra Nevada, Granada), used as model ecosystems to evaluate the joint impact of these climate change variables. The main goal of this study was to address the question of how short-term pulses of nutrient inputs, together with vertical mixing and increased UVR fluxes modify the photosynthetic responses of phytoplankton. The experimentation consisted in all possible combinations of the following treatments: (a) solar radiation: UVR + PAR (280-700 nm) versus PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) alone (400-700 nm); (b) nutrient addition (phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N)): ambient versus addition (P to reach to a final concentration of 30 μg P L-1, and N to reach N:P molar ratio of 31); and (c) mixing: mixed (one rotation from surface to 3 m depth (speed of 1 m 4 min-1, total of 10 cycles)) versus static. Our findings suggest that under ambient nutrient conditions there is a synergistic effect between vertical mixing and UVR, increasing phytoplankton photosynthetic inhibition and excretion of organic carbon (EOC) from opaque lakes as compared to algae that received constant mean irradiance within the epilimnion. The opposite occurs in clear lakes where

  20. Climate change projections for lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) recruitment in the 1836 Treaty Waters of the Upper Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, Abigail J.; Taylor, William W.; Beard, T. Douglas; Lofgren, Brent M.

    2015-01-01

    Lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) is an ecologically, culturally, and economically important species in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Lake whitefish have been a staple food source for thousands of years and, since 1980, have supported the most economically valuable (annual catch value ≈ US$16.6 million) and productive (annual harvest ≈ 7 million kg) commercial fishery in the upper Great Lakes (Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior). Climate changes, specifically changes in temperature, wind, and ice cover, are expected to impact the ecology, production dynamics, and value of this fishery because the success of recruitment to the fishery has been linked with these climatic variables. We used linear regression to determine the relationship between fall and spring air temperature indices, fall wind speed, winter ice cover, and lake whitefish recruitment in 13 management units located in the 1836 Treaty Waters of the Upper Great Lakes ceded by the Ottawa and Chippewa nations, a culturally and commercially important region for the lake whitefish fishery. In eight of the 13 management units evaluated, models including one or more climate variables (temperature, wind, ice cover) explained significantly more variation in recruitment than models with only the stock–recruitment relationship, using corrected Akaike's Information Criterion comparisons (ΔAICc > 3). Isolating the climate–recruitment relationship and projecting recruitment with the Coupled Hydrosphere-Atmosphere Research Model (CHARM) indicated the potential for increased lake whitefish recruitment in the majority of the 1836 Treaty Waters management units. These results can inform adaptive management strategies by providing anticipated implications of climate on lake whitefish recruitment.

  1. Small-scale and mesoscale lake surface water temperature structure: Thermography and in situ measurements from Lake Geneva, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irani Rahaghi, Abolfazl; Lemmin, Ulrich; Bouffard, Damien; Riffler, Michael; Wunderle, Stefan; Barry, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Lake surface water temperature (LSWT), which varies spatially and temporarily, reflects meteorological and climatological forcing more than any other physical lake parameter. There are different data sources for LSWT mapping, including remote sensing and in situ measurements. Depending on cloud cover, satellite data can depict large-scale thermal patterns, but not the meso- or small-scale processes. Meso-scale thermography allows complementing (and hence ground-truth) satellite imagery at the sub-pixel scale. A Balloon Launched Imaging and Monitoring Platform (BLIMP) was used to measure the LSWT at the meso-scale. The BLIMP consists of a small balloon tethered to a boat and is equipped with thermal and RGB cameras, as well as other instrumentation for geo-location and communication. A feature matching-based algorithm was implemented to create composite thermal images. Simultaneous ground-truthing of the BLIMP data were achieved using an autonomous craft measuring among other in situ surface/near surface temperatures, radiation and meteorological data. Latent and sensible surface heat fluxes were calculated using the bulk parameterization algorithm based on similarity theory. Results are presented for the day-time stratified low wind speed (up to 3 ms-1) conditions over Lake Geneva for two field campaigns, each of 6 h on 18 March and 19 July 2016. The meso-scale temperature field ( 1-m pixel resolution) had a range and standard deviation of 2.4°C and 0.3°C, respectively, over a 1-km2 area (typical satellite pixel size). Interestingly, at the sub-pixel scale, various temporal and spatial thermal structures are evident - an obvious example being streaks in the along-wind direction during March, which we hypothesize are caused by the steady 3 h wind condition. The results also show that the spatial variability of the estimated total heat flux is due to the corresponding variability of the longwave cooling from the water surface and the latent heat flux.

  2. Assessment of the toxicity and mutagenic potential of water of Torch Lake, Houghton County, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Keen, R.E.; Bagley, S.T.; Barth, A.K.

    1985-08-01

    The toxicity and mutagenic potential of water of Torch Lake, Houghton County, Michigan was measured. Torch Lake is unusual in having very large levels of dissolved copper in its water due to deposition of large amounts of spent copper are (stamp sands) in over 100 years of copper-mining activity. The presence of liver neoplasms in 100% of a species of fish (saugar) from Torch Lake has been presumptively associated with some features, probably chemical, of the massive stamp sand deposits in the lake. Because both toxicity and mutagentic potential of the lake water would be most evident at the upper end of the food chains due to bioaccumulation of materials dissolved in the water, tests for these effects were conducted with concentrates of water samples from Torch Lake, and from Otter Lake (Houghton County, Michigan) as a control. Water samples were collected at four different times in the lakes annual thermal cycle, from three depths in Torch Lake and one depth in Otter Lake. The samples were filtered and concentrated using both low temperature evaporation and XAD-2 resin. Toxicity was measured using the Ceriodaphnia 7-day life-cycle chronic toxicity test. Mutagentic potential was measured using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay (Ames Test).

  3. Nonparametric Stochastic Hydroclimate Simulation for Water Temperature Modeling in Lake Shasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, B.; Sapin, J. R.; Saito, L.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoir managers on the Sacramento River are required by law to provide artificial cold water habitat downstream for endangered winter-run Chinook salmon. This is enabled at Shasta Lake via a temperature control device installed on Shasta Dam that allows selective withdrawal of reservoir water from different elevations and temperatures. Risk based decision making and planning requires ability to generate ensemble of water temperatures released from the lake - especially when the planning needs to be made under future climate conditions. To this end, we developed a stochastic hydroclimate simulation method that generates ensembles of influent lake streamflow, influent stream temperatures and air temperature over the lake. These, combined with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, CE-QUAL-W2 provides ensembles of water temperatures released from the various levels of the lake. A nonparametric K-nearest neighbor based disaggregation method is used to generate streamflow ensembles at five streams entering the lake. Then, conditionally the temperatures of water entering the lake and the air temperature over the lake are also simulated. The W2 model generates lake temperatures. The disaggregation method is also modified to generate streamflows consistent with wet and dry conditions and consequently, the lake temperature scenarios, enabling the water managers to assess various decision options.

  4. Parasites pitched against nature: Pitch Lake water protects guppies (Poecilia reticulata) from microbial and gyrodactylid infections.

    PubMed

    Schelkle, Bettina; Mohammed, Ryan S; Coogan, Michael P; McMullan, Mark; Gillingham, Emma L; VAN Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Joanne

    2012-11-01

    SUMMARY The enemy release hypothesis proposes that in parasite depleted habitats, populations will experience relaxed selection and become more susceptible (or less tolerant) to pathogenic infections. Here, we focus on a population of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) that are found in an extreme environment (the Pitch Lake, Trinidad) and examine whether this habitat represents a refuge from parasites. We investigated the efficacy of pitch in preventing microbial infections in Pitch Lake guppies, by exposing them to dechlorinated water, and reducing gyrodactylid infections on non-Pitch Lake guppies by transferring them to Pitch Lake water. We show that (i) natural prevalence of ectoparasites in the Pitch Lake is low compared to reference populations, (ii) Pitch Lake guppies transferred into aquarium water develop microbial infections, and (iii) experimentally infected guppies are cured of their gyrodactylid infections both by natural Pitch Lake water and by dechlorinated water containing solid pitch. These results indicate a role for Pitch Lake water in the defence of guppies from their parasites and suggest that Pitch Lake guppies might have undergone enemy release in this extreme environment. The Pitch Lake provides an ideal ecosystem for studies on immune gene evolution in the absence of parasites and long-term evolutionary implications of hydrocarbon pollution for vertebrates.

  5. Water-level and water-quality changes in Great Salt Lake, Utah, 1847-1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnow, Ted

    1984-01-01

    The surface level of Great Salt Lake, Utah, fluctuates continuously, primarily in response to climatic factors. During 1847-1982 the lake surface fluctuated between a low of about 4,191 feet and a high of about 4,212 feet above sea level but showed no net change. From September 18, 1982, to June 30, 1983, however, the lake rose 5.2 feet-from about 4,200 to about 4,205 feet above sea level-which is the greatest seasonal rise ever recorded. That rise resulted from considerably greater than average rainfall in 1982, greater than average snowfall during the autumn of 1982 through the spring of 1983, and unseasonably cool weather during that spring.Man's activities have had a lesser, but still important effect on the lake level. The lake surface would have been about 5 feet higher in 1983 had there been no consumptive use of water owing to man's activities in the lake basin since 1847. The lake has been divided into two parts by a railroad causeway since 1959. The causeway restricts natural circulation, resulting in a difference of salinity and surface level of the lake across the causeway. The difference in surface level between the two parts of the lake varies both seasonally and annually and was as much as 3.25 feet in 1983.The water budget for the Great Salt Lake can be expressed as:Inflow = Outflow ± Storage changeThe average annual inflow for 1931-76 was about 2.9 million acre-feet-about 1.9 million acre-feet from surface water, about 900,000 acre-feet from direct precipitation, and about 75,000 acre-feet from ground water. The average annual outflow for the same period, all by evaporation, also was about 2.9 million acre-feet. There was no net change in storage during the period.The famed buoyancy of the brine in Great Salt Lake results from a dissolved-mineral content of almost 5 billion tons. More than 2 million additional tons have been added to the lake annually in recent years. The major dissolved ions in the brine are chloride, sulfate, sodium, magnesium

  6. Aluminum polymers formed following alum treatment of lake water.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael A; Berkowitz, Jacob

    2010-11-01

    Alum (aluminum sulfate) is increasingly being used in lake management to control internal recycling of phosphorus from bottom sediments. Alum added to water undergoes rapid hydrolysis reactions, forming an amorphous Al(OH)3 floc with a high capacity for sorption of phosphorus. While it is known that the Al(OH)3 floc transforms over time to more ordered microcrystalline and crystalline gibbsite phases, there remains an incomplete understanding of the forms of Al present immediately following alum addition to lake water. A laboratory study was thus undertaken to evaluate the forms of Al present following alum addition using ferron (8-hydroxy-7-iodo-5-quinolinesulfonic acid) timed-colorimetric and 27Al-NMR measurements. A polymeric Al species with moderate reactivity with ferron (Alb2) was initially formed, although it rapidly transformed to a less ferron-reactive colloidal form (Alc) and also decomposed at low alum doses to monomeric Al (Ala) in response to pH increases associated with outgassing of CO2. The Ala fraction in these solutions could be adequately estimated based upon measured pH assuming Al solubility was controlled by an amorphous Al(OH)3 phase. Al13 was inferred from ferron measurements to be present, but only at quite low concentrations in the alum-treated waters.

  7. A Landsat study of water quality in Lake Okeechobee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gervin, J. C.; Marshall, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper uses multiple regression techniques to investigate the relationship between Landsat radiance values and water quality measurements. For a period of over one year, the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District sampled the water of Lake Okeechobee for chlorophyll, carotenoids, turbidity, and various nutrients at the time of Landsat overpasses. Using an overlay map of the sampling stations, Landsat radiance values were measured from computer compatible tapes using a GE image 100 and averaging over a 22-acre area at each station. These radiance values in four bands were used to form a number of functions (powers, logarithms, exponentials, and ratios), which were then compared with the ground measurements using multiple linear regression techniques. Several dates were used to provide generality and to study possible seasonal variations. Individual correlations were presented for the various water quality parameters and best fit equations were examined for chlorophyll and turbidity. The results and their relationship to past hydrological research were discussed.

  8. A Landsat study of water quality in Lake Okeechobee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gervin, J. C.; Marshall, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper uses multiple regression techniques to investigate the relationship between Landsat radiance values and water quality measurements. For a period of over one year, the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District sampled the water of Lake Okeechobee for chlorophyll, carotenoids, turbidity, and various nutrients at the time of Landsat overpasses. Using an overlay map of the sampling stations, Landsat radiance values were measured from computer compatible tapes using a GE image 100 and averaging over a 22-acre area at each station. These radiance values in four bands were used to form a number of functions (powers, logarithms, exponentials, and ratios), which were then compared with the ground measurements using multiple linear regression techniques. Several dates were used to provide generality and to study possible seasonal variations. Individual correlations were presented for the various water quality parameters and best fit equations were examined for chlorophyll and turbidity. The results and their relationship to past hydrological research were discussed.

  9. Viability report for the ByWater Lakes project.

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Passell, Howard David; Peplinski, William J.

    2013-10-01

    This report presents the results from the hydrological, ecological, and renewable energy assessments conducted by Sandia National Laboratories at the ByWater Lakes site in Espanola, New Mexico for ByWater Recreation LLC and Avanyu Energy Services through the New Mexico small business assistance (NMSBA) program. Sandia's role was to assess the viability and provide perspective for enhancing the site to take advantage of renewable energy resources, improve and sustain the natural systems, develop a profitable operation, and provide an asset for the local community. Integral to this work was the identification the pertinent data and data gaps as well as making general observations about the potential issues and concerns that may arise from further developing the site. This report is informational only with no consideration with regards to the business feasibility of the various options that ByWater and Avanyu may be pursuing.

  10. Chemical data for bottom sediment, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish in Mountain Creek Lake, Dallas, Texas, 1994-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.A.; Van Metre, P.C.; Moring, J.B.; Braun, C.L.; Wilson, J.T.; Mahler, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Mountain Creek Lake is a reservoir adjacent to two U.S. Department of the Navy facilities, the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant and the Naval Air Station in Dallas, Texas. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation found ground-water plumes containing chlorinated solvents on both facilities. These findings led to a U.S. Geological Survey study of Mountain Creek Lake adjacent to both facilities between June 1994 and August 1996. Bottom sediments, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish were collected for chemical analysis.

  11. Water and nutrient budgets for Vancouver Lake, Vancouver, Washington, October 2010-October 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheibley, Rich W.; Foreman, James R.; Marshall, Cameron A.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    Vancouver Lake, a large shallow lake in Clark County, near Vancouver, Washington, has been undergoing water-quality problems for decades. Recently, the biggest concern for the lake are the almost annual harmful cyanobacteria blooms that cause the lake to close for recreation for several weeks each summer. Despite decades of interest in improving the water quality of the lake, fundamental information on the timing and amount of water and nutrients entering and exiting the lake is lacking. In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 2-year field study to quantify water flows and nutrient loads in order to develop water and nutrient budgets for the lake. This report presents monthly and annual water and nutrient budgets from October 2010–October 2012 to identify major sources and sinks of nutrients. Lake River, a tidally influenced tributary to the lake, flows into and out of the lake almost daily and composed the greatest proportion of both the water and nutrient budgets for the lake, often at orders of magnitude greater than any other source. From the water budget, we identified precipitation, evaporation and groundwater inflow as minor components of the lake hydrologic cycle, each contributing 1 percent or less to the total water budget. Nutrient budgets were compiled monthly and annually for total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and orthophosphate; and, nitrogen loads were generally an order of magnitude greater than phosphorus loads across all sources. For total nitrogen, flow from Lake River at Felida, Washington, made up 88 percent of all inputs into the lake. For total phosphorus and orthophosphate, Lake River at Felida flowing into the lake was 91 and 76 percent of total inputs, respectively. Nutrient loads from precipitation and groundwater inflow were 1 percent or less of the total budgets. Nutrient inputs from Burnt Bridge Creek and Flushing Channel composed 12 percent of the total nitrogen budget, 8 percent of the total phosphorus budget, and 21 percent

  12. Water budget and vertical conductance for Lowry (Sand Hill) Lake in north-central Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motz, Louis H.; Sousa, Gregory D.; Annable, Michael D.

    2001-09-01

    Water-budget components and the vertical conductance were determined for Lowry (Sand Hill) Lake in north-central Florida, USA. In this type of lake, which interacts with both the surface-water and groundwater systems, the inflow components are precipitation, surface-water inflow, groundwater inflow, and direct runoff (i.e. overland flow), and the outflow components are evaporation, groundwater outflow, and surface-water outflow. In a lake and groundwater system that is typical of many karst lakes in Florida, a large part of the groundwater outflow occurs by means of vertical leakage through an underlying confining unit to a deeper, highly transmissive aquifer called the upper Floridan aquifer. The water-budget component that represents vertical leakage to the upper Floridan aquifer was calculated as a residual using the water-budget equation. For the 13 month period from August 1994 to August 1995, relative to the surface area of the lake, rainfall at Lowry Lake was 1.55 m yr -1, surficial aquifer inflow was 0.79 m yr -1, surface-water inflow was 1.92 m yr -1, and direct runoff was 0.01 m yr -1. Lake evaporation was 1.11 m yr -1, and surface-water outflow was 1.61 m yr -1. The lake stage increased 0.07 m yr -1, and the vertical leakage to the upper Floridan aquifer was 1.48 m yr -1. Surficial aquifer outflow from the lake was negligible. At Lowry Lake, vertical leakage is a major component of the water budget, comprising about 35% of the outflow during the study period. The vertical conductance ( KV/ b), a coefficient that represents the average of the vertical conductances of the hydrogeologic units between the bottom of a lake and the top of the upper Floridan aquifer, was determined to be 2.51 × 10 -4 day -1 for Lowry Lake.

  13. Arsenic cycling within the water column of a small lake receiving contaminated ground-water discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Robert G.; Wilkin, Richard T.; Hernandez, Gina

    2008-09-18

    The fate of arsenic discharged from contaminated ground water to a small, shallow lake at a hazardous waste site was examined to understand the role of iron (hydr)oxide precipitation-dissolution processes within the water column. Field and laboratory observations indicate that arsenic solubility was controlled, in part, by the extent of ferrous iron oxidation-precipitation and arsenic sorption occurring near the lake chemocline. Laboratory experiments were conducted using site-derived water to assess the impact of these coupled processes on the removal of dissolved arsenic from the water column. The measured concentration of organic carbon from epilimnetic and hypolimnetic water sampled from the lake was approximately 1.3 mM and 17.0 mM, respectively. Experiments conducted with these samples along with synthetic controls containing no organic carbon demonstrated that observed rates of formation and crystallinity of the precipitated iron (hydr)oxide were dependent on the concentration of organic carbon in the lake water. Increasing dissolved organic matter concentration did not significantly interfere with ferrous iron oxidation, but inhibited iron (hydr)oxide precipitation and subsequent sorption of arsenic. For experiments using water sampled from the lake hypolimnion there was a strong relationship between the fraction of precipitated iron and the fraction of sorbed arsenic. Laboratory- and field-derived iron (hydr)oxide precipitates were characterized to evaluate mineralogy and arsenic distribution. In-situ suspended solids and precipitates formed in laboratory experiments using hypolimnetic water were identified as poorly crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite. These solids were readily dissolved in the presence of dithionite indicating that elevated dissolved iron and arsenic observed in the hypolimnion resulted, in part, from in-situ reductive dissolution of settling 2-line ferrihydrite near the sediment-water interface. These observations support the contention

  14. Characterization of bottom-sediment, water, and elutriate chemistry at selected stations at Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    To better-understand and predict the potential effect of dredging on water quality at Reelfoot Lake, chemical analyses were conducted on samples of lake water, bottom sediment, and elutriate water. Chemical analyses were conducted on samples of lake water, bottom sediment, and elutriate water collected at five stations in the lake during November 1988. Lake water was of the calcium magnesium bicarbonate type with an average dissolved-solids concentration of 120 milligrams per liter. Trace constituents were present in bottom sediments at concentrations representative of their average relative abundance in the earth?s crust. Elutriate waters prepared by mixing bottom sediment and lake water had suspended-solids concentrations as high as 2,000 milligrams per liter which exerted significant oxygen demand Trace constituents in the unfiltered elutriate waters were elevated with respect to lake water; elevated concentrations were attributable to the increased suspended-solids concentrations. Concentrations of total-recoverable copper, lead., and zinc in many elutriate waters exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s water-quality criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. The toxicity of elutriate waters, as measured by a 48-hour bioassay with Ceriodaphnia dubia, was low.

  15. Methanotrophy within the water column of a large meromictic tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morana, C.; Borges, A. V.; Roland, F. A. E.; Darchambeau, F.; Descy, J.-P.; Bouillon, S.

    2015-04-01

    The permanently stratified Lake Kivu is one of the largest freshwater reservoirs of dissolved methane (CH4) on Earth. Yet CH4 emissions from its surface to the atmosphere have been estimated to be 2 orders of magnitude lower than the CH4 upward flux to the mixed layer, suggesting that microbial CH4 oxidation is an important process within the water column. A combination of natural abundance stable carbon isotope analysis (δ13C) of several carbon pools and 13CH4-labelling experiments was carried out during the rainy and dry season to quantify (i) the contribution of CH4-derived carbon to the biomass, (ii) methanotrophic bacterial production (MBP), and (iii) methanotrophic bacterial growth efficiency (MBGE), defined as the ratio between MBP and gross CH4 oxidation. We also investigated the distribution and the δ13C of specific phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs), used as biomarkers for aerobic methanotrophs. Maximal MBP rates were measured in the oxycline, suggesting that CH4 oxidation was mainly driven by oxic processes. Moreover, our data revealed that methanotrophic organisms in the water column oxidized most of the upward flux of CH4, and that a significant amount of CH4-derived carbon was incorporated into the microbial biomass in the oxycline. The MBGE was variable (2-50%) and negatively related to CH4 : O2 molar ratios. Thus, a comparatively smaller fraction of CH4-derived carbon was incorporated into the cellular biomass in deeper waters, at the bottom of the oxycline where oxygen was scarce. The aerobic methanotrophic community was clearly dominated by type I methanotrophs and no evidence was found for an active involvement of type II methanotrophs in CH4 oxidation in Lake Kivu, based on fatty acids analyses. Vertically integrated over the water column, the MBP was equivalent to 16-60% of the average phytoplankton particulate primary production. This relatively high magnitude of MBP, and the substantial contribution of CH4-derived carbon to the overall

  16. Methanotrophy within the water column of a large meromictic tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morana, C.; Borges, A. V.; Roland, F. A. E.; Darchambeau, F.; Descy, J.-P.; Bouillon, S.

    2014-11-01

    The permanently stratified Lake Kivu is one of the largest freshwater reservoirs of dissolved methane (CH4) on Earth. Yet CH4 emissions from its surface to the atmosphere has been estimated to be 2 orders of magnitude lower than the CH4 upward flux to the mixed layer, showing that microbial CH4 oxidation is an important process within the water column. A combination of natural abundance carbon stable isotope analysis (δ13C) of several inorganic and organic carbon pools and 13CH4-labelling experiments was carried out during rainy and dry season to quantify (i) the contribution of CH4-derived carbon to the biomass, (ii) methanotrophic bacterial production (MBP), and (iii) methanotrophic bacterial growth efficiency (MBGE), defined as the ratio between MBP and gross CH4 oxidation. We also investigated the distribution and the δ13C of specific phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), used as biomarkers for aerobic methanotrophs. Data revealed that methanotrophic organisms oxidized within the water column most of the upward flux of CH4 to the mixed layer and a significant amount of CH4-derived carbon was incorporated into the microbial biomass in the oxycline. Maximal MBP rates were measured in the oxycline, suggesting that CH4 oxidation was mainly driven by oxic processes. The MBGE was variable (2-50%) and negatively related to CH4 : O2 molar ratios. Thus, a comparatively smaller fraction of CH4-derived carbon was incorporated into the cellular biomass in deeper waters, at the bottom of the oxycline where oxygen was scarce. The aerobic methanotrophic community was clearly dominated by type I methanotrophs and no evidence was found for an active involvement of type II methanotrophs in CH4 oxidation in Lake Kivu. Vertically integrated over the water column, the MBP was equivalent to 16-58% of the average phytoplankton primary production. This relatively high magnitude of MBP, and the substantial contribution of CH4-derived carbon to the overall biomass in the oxycline, suggest

  17. Air-water gas exchange of chiral and achiral organochlorine pesticides in the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantunen, Liisa M.; Helm, Paul A.; Ridal, Jeffrey J.; Bidleman, Terry F.

    Parallel air and water samples were taken on lakes Superior, Huron, Erie and Ontario between 1996 and 2000 to determine the occurrence and levels of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), trans-chlordane (TC), cis-chlordane (CC), dieldrin (DIEL) and the metabolite heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX). Concentrations in the water varied greatly among the lakes, but air concentrations were similar, thus resulting fugacity ratios varied by lake and compound. The enantiomer fraction, EF = (+)/[(+) + (-)], was determined for α-HCH, TC, CC and HEPX. Enantioselective degradation of (+)α-HCH was found in water of all the lakes where the depletion was greatest for Lake Superior, which has the longest water residence time. Preferential loss of (+)TC and enrichment of (+)HEPX were found in lakes Superior and Ontario, with similar EFs in both lakes. CC was racemic in Lake Superior and showed depletion of the (+) enantiomer in Lake Ontario. Depletion of (+)α-HCH, (+)TC and enrichment of (+)HEPX was seen in all air samples. CC varied from depletion of the (+) or (-) enantiomer and was racemic in some cases. Higher concentrations of α-HCH in the air over Lake Superior were correlated with less racemic composition, providing evidence of water-to-air exchange. Fugacity ratios for the HCHs approached equilibrium conditions within a factor of 2, with slight excursions toward net volatilization or deposition, where generally higher excursions were seen for the cyclodienes.

  18. The Impact of UV Radiation on Paramecium Populations from Alpine Lakes.

    PubMed

    Kammerlander, Barbara; Tartarotti, Barbara; Sonntag, Bettina

    2017-08-21

    Paramecium populations from a clear and a glacier-fed turbid alpine lake were exposed to solar simulated ultraviolet (UVR) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) at 8 and 15 °C. The ciliates were tested for DNA damage (comet assay), behavioral changes, and mortality after UVR + PAR exposure. High DNA damage levels (~58% tail DNA) and abnormal swimming behavior were observed, although no significant changes in cell numbers were found irrespective of the lake origin (clear, turbid), and temperatures. We conclude that environmental stressors such as UVR and their effects may influence the adaptation of ciliates living in alpine lakes. © 2017 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Protistologists.

  19. Water balance of selected floodplain lake basins in the Middle Bug River valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidek, J.; Ferencz, B.

    2014-04-01

    This study is the first attempt in the literature on the subject of comparing water balance components for floodplain lake basins, depending on the type of a lake connection to the parent river. Research was carried out in the Bug River valley in 2007-2011 water years. Four types of connections were distinguished in the area under study. Simple water balance equation could only be used with regard to the lakes connected to the main river via the upstream crevasses. Detailed and individual water balance equations were developed with reference to the other types of lakes. Water gains and losses varied significantly in the lakes under study. Values of horizontal water balance components (inflow and outflow) of the floodplain lake in Wola Uhruska considerably prevailed over the vertical ones (precipitation and evaporation). Inflow of the Bug River waters was diverse during the time period under study and amounted from 600 000 to 2 200 000 m3 yr-1. Volumes of precipitation and evaporation were rather stable and amounted to approx. 30 000 m3 yr-1. The lowest disparity between horizontal and vertical water balance components was observed in the inter-levee lake. Both upstream inflow of rivers water and outflow from the lake (ranged from 0 in 2008 to 35 000 m3 yr-1 in 2009) were usually an order of magnitude higher than precipitation and evaporation from the lake surface (700-800 m3 yr-1). Study showed that the values and the proportion between aforementioned vertical and horizontal water balance elements were determined by the type of a lake connection to the Bug River. Storage volume showed no relationship to the type of connection, but resulted from individual features of the lakes (location within the valley, precipitation and evaporation volume, difference between water inflow and outflow).

  20. Finite-difference solution to the radiative-transfer equation for in-water radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helliwell, W. S.

    1985-08-01

    The radiative-transfer equation is solved using a finite-difference method. For the first time to the author's knowledge, finite-difference solutions are obtained for in-water radiance. Comparison with data is good for radiance distributions that are due to the sun at depths down to 26 attenuation lengths in a lake. Comparisons are also made with off-axis radiance measurements from an ocean laser experiment together with the solution from a small-angle approximation model.

  1. Water quality of the Malheur Lake system and Malheur River, and simulated water-quality effects of routing Malheur Lake water into Malheur River, Oregon, 1984-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuste, L.A.; McKenzie, S.W.

    1987-01-01

    Above average precipitation and runoff between 1980 and 1985 have raised the water-surface elevation of Harney, Mud, and Malheur Lakes in eastern Oregon to the highest levels recorded and have caused mixing and interflow of water among the three lakes. A 50% increase in specific conductance throughout Malheur Lake from 1984 to 1985 resulted from an increase in sodium and chloride concentrations, probably caused by the flow of saline water from Harvey Lake and dissolution of evaporites in flooded areas around it. Arsenic and boron concentrations increased during the two years. Algal productivity was highest towards the center of Malheur Lake. Concentrations of major ions in the Malheur River during the 1985 irrigation season were dilute in upstream reaches because of flow releases from reservoirs; increasing in a downstream direction because of irrigation-return flow. Concentrations also increased with time during irrigation season, with the highest concentrations occurring in October after most diversions for irrigation were discontinued. Mass-balance equations were used to simulate mixing of Malheur Lake with Malheur River water to estimate the water quality that would occur at different points along Malheur River. Simulations of sodium and chloride concentrations and specific conductance values based on August river-flows during irrigation season, show a gradual increase from the headwaters downstream to Hope and greater increases downstream of Hope. After irrigation ceases, the simulated water quality becomes uniform throughout the river, because proposed lake flows are then the principal source of Malheur River flows. Arsenic and boron concentrations increase much more than expected between Namorf and Little Valley; thermal springs could be the source of arsenic and boron in this reach. Groundwater coming in contact with arsenic rich soils may also contribute to the elevated arsenic levels found in the river. At the end of the irrigation season, arsenic

  2. Assessing river water quality using water quality index in Lake Taihu Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaoshi; Wang, Xiaolong; Chen, Yuwei; Cai, Yongjiu; Deng, Jiancai

    2017-09-05

    Lake Taihu Basin, one of the most developed regions in China, has received considerable attention due to its severe pollution. Our study provides a clear understanding of the water quality in the rivers of Lake Taihu Basin based on basin-scale monitoring and a water quality index (WQI) method. From September 2014 to January 2016, four samplings across four seasons were conducted at 96 sites along main rivers. Fifteen parameters, including water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity, turbidity (tur), permanganate index (CODMn), total nitrogen, total phosphorus, ammonium (NH4-N), nitrite, nitrate (NO3-N), calcium, magnesium, chloride, and sulfate, were measured to calculate the WQI. The average WQI value during our study period was 59.33; consequently, the water quality was considered as generally "moderate". Significant differences in WQI values were detected among the 6 river systems, with better water quality in the Tiaoxi and Nanhe systems. The water quality presented distinct seasonal variation, with the highest WQI values in autumn, followed by spring and summer, and the lowest values in winter. The minimum WQI (WQImin), which was developed based on a stepwise linear regression analysis, consisted of five parameters: NH4-N, CODMn, NO3-N, DO, and tur. The model exhibited excellent performance in representing the water quality in Lake Taihu Basin, especially when weights were fully considered. Our results are beneficial for water quality management and could be used for rapid and low-cost water quality evaluation in Lake Taihu Basin. Additionally, we suggest that weights of environmental parameters should be fully considered in water quality assessments when using the WQImin method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Linking economic water use, freshwater ecosystem impacts, and virtual water trade in a Great Lakes watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubako, S. T.; Ruddell, B. L.; Mayer, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of human water uses and economic pressures on freshwater ecosystems is of growing interest for water resource management worldwide. This case study for a water-rich watershed in the Great Lakes region links the economic pressures on water resources as revealed by virtual water trade balances to the nature of the economic water use and the associated impacts on the freshwater ecosystem. A water accounting framework that combines water consumption data and economic data from input output tables is applied to quantify localized virtual water imports and exports in the Kalamazoo watershed which comprises ten counties. Water using economic activities at the county level are conformed to watershed boundaries through land use-water use relationships. The counties are part of a region implementing the Michigan Water Withdrawal Assessment Process, including new regulatory approaches for adaptive water resources management under a riparian water rights framework. The results show that at local level, there exists considerable water use intensity and virtual water trade balance disparity among the counties and between water use sectors in this watershed. The watershed is a net virtual water importer, with some counties outsourcing nearly half of their water resource impacts, and some outsourcing nearly all water resource impacts. The largest virtual water imports are associated with agriculture, thermoelectric power generation and industry, while the bulk of the exports are associated with thermoelectric power generation and commercial activities. The methodology is applicable to various spatial levels ranging from the micro sub-watershed level to the macro Great Lakes watershed region, subject to the availability of reliable water use and economic data.

  4. Simulation of climate-change effects on streamflow, lake water budgets, and stream temperature using GSFLOW and SNTEMP, Trout Lake Watershed, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall J.; Walker, John F.; Selbig, William R.; Westenbroek, Stephen M.; Regan, R. Steve

    2013-01-01

    Although groundwater and surface water are considered a single resource, historically hydrologic simulations have not accounted for feedback loops between the groundwater system and other hydrologic processes. These feedbacks include timing and rates of evapotranspiration, surface runoff, soil-zone flow, and interactions with the groundwater system. Simulations that iteratively couple the surface-water and groundwater systems, however, are characterized by long run times and calibration challenges. In this study, calibrated, uncoupled transient surface-water and steady-state groundwater models were used to construct one coupled transient groundwater/surface-water model for the Trout Lake Watershed in north-central Wisconsin, USA. The computer code GSFLOW (Ground-water/Surface-water FLOW) was used to simulate the coupled hydrologic system; a surface-water model represented hydrologic processes in the atmosphere, at land surface, and within the soil-zone, and a groundwater-flow model represented the unsaturated zone, saturated zone, stream, and lake budgets. The coupled GSFLOW model was calibrated by using heads, streamflows, lake levels, actual evapotranspiration rates, solar radiation, and snowpack measurements collected during water years 1998–2007; calibration was performed by using advanced features present in the PEST parameter estimation software suite. Simulated streamflows from the calibrated GSFLOW model and other basin characteristics were used as input to the one-dimensional SNTEMP (Stream-Network TEMPerature) model to simulate daily stream temperature in selected tributaries in the watershed. The temperature model was calibrated to high-resolution stream temperature time-series data measured in 2002. The calibrated GSFLOW and SNTEMP models were then used to simulate effects of potential climate change for the period extending to the year 2100. An ensemble of climate models and emission scenarios was evaluated. Downscaled climate drivers for the period

  5. Assessment of microcystins in lake water and fish (Mugilidae, Liza sp.) in the largest Spanish coastal lake.

    PubMed

    Romo, Susana; Fernández, Francisca; Ouahid, Youness; Barón-Sola, Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria dominance and cyanotoxin production can become major threats to humans and aquatic life, especially in warm shallow lakes, which are often dominated by cyanobacteria. This study investigates the occurrence and distribution of microcystins (MCYST) in water, cell-bound and in the tissues of the commercial mugilid Liza sp. in the largest, coastal, Spanish Mediterranean lake (Albufera of Valencia). This is the first report concerning microcystin accumulation in tissues of mugilid fish species. Considerable amounts of microcystins were found in the water and seston, which correlated with development of Microcystis aeruginosa populations in the lake. The MCYST concentrations found in Lake Albufera (mean 1.7 and 17 μg/L and maximum 16 and 120 μg/L in water and seston, respectively) exceeded by one to two orders of magnitude the guideline levels proposed by the World Health Organization and were higher than that reported in other lakes of the Mediterranean zone. The presence of MCYST was found in all the fishes studied and accumulated differently among tissues of the commercial species Liza sp. Toxin accumulation in fish tissues showed that although the target organ for MCYST was the liver, high concentrations of microcystins were also found in other analysed tissues (liver>intestine>gills>muscle). Human tolerable daily intake for microcystins is assessed relative to the WHO guidelines, and potential toxicological risks for humans, wildlife and related ecosystems of the lake are discussed.

  6. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Methodologies for Development of Human Health Criteria and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. C Appendix C to Part 132—Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Methodologies...; or consuming fish from the water, and water-related recreation activities using the Methodologies for... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Methodologies for Development of Human Health Criteria and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. C Appendix C to Part 132—Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Methodologies...; or consuming fish from the water, and water-related recreation activities using the Methodologies for... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative...

  8. Interactive effects of vertical mixing, nutrients and ultraviolet radiation: in situ photosynthetic responses of phytoplankton from high mountain lakes of Southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbling, E. W.; Carrillo, P.; Medina-Sanchez, J. M.; Durán, C.; Herrera, G.; Villar-Argaiz, M.; Villafañe, V. E.

    2012-07-01

    Global change, together with human activities had resulted in increasing amounts of organic material (including nutrients) received by water bodies. This input further attenuates the penetration of solar radiation leading to the view that opaque lakes are more "protected" from solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than clear ones. Vertical mixing, however, complicates this view as cells are exposed to fluctuating radiation regimes, which effects have in general been neglected. Even more, the combined impacts of mixing, together with those of UVR and nutrients input are virtually unknown. In this study, we carried out in situ experiments in three high mountain lakes of Spain (Lake Enol in Asturias, and lakes Las Yeguas and La Caldera in Granada) to determine the combined effects of these three variables associated to global change on photosynthetic responses of natural phytoplankton communities. The experimentation consisted in all possible combinations of the following treatments: (a) solar radiation: UVR + PAR (280-700 nm) versus PAR alone (400-700 nm); (b) nutrient addition (phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N)): ambient versus addition (P to reach to a final concentration of 30 μg P l-1, and N to reach a N : P molar ratio of 31) and, (c) mixing: mixed (one rotation from surface to 3 m depth (speed of 1 m every 4 min, total of 10 cycles) versus static. Our findings suggest that under in situ nutrient conditions there is a synergistic effect between vertical mixing and UVR, increasing phytoplankton photosynthetic inhibition and EOC from opaque lakes as compared to algae that received constant mean irradiance within the epilimnion. The opposite occurs in clear lakes where antagonistic effects were determined, with mixing partially counteracting the negative effects of UVR. Nutrients input mimicking atmospheric pulses from Saharan dust, reversed this effect and clear lakes became more inhibited during mixing, while opaque lakes benefited from the fluctuating irradiance

  9. A WHOLE-LAKE WATER QUALITY SURVEY OF LAKE OAHE BASED ON A SPATIALLY-BALANCED PROBABILISTIC DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing conditions on large bodies of water presets multiple statistical and logistical challenges. As part of the Upper Missouri River Program of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Project (EMAP) we surveyed water quality of Lake Oahe in July-August, 2002 using a spat...

  10. Nocturnal claroteine catfishes reveal dual colonisation but a single radiation in Lake Tanganyika.

    PubMed

    Peart, Claire R; Bills, Roger; Wilkinson, Mark; Day, Julia J

    2014-04-01

    Lake Tanganyika (LT) is a biodiversity hotspot supporting many endemic radiations that provide comparative systems in which to investigate if there are common factors leading to the build-up of its considerable diversity. Despite LT containing the highest diversity of lacustrine catfishes on Earth, the evolutionary relationships of nocturnal catfishes within the sub-family Claroteinae have not been investigated and it is unknown if its constituent genera have diversified via single or independent colonisation events. We report the first molecular phylogeny of the LT claroteine catfishes based on a multigene dataset (three nuclear markers, two mitochondrial totalling 4227 bp), including 85 samples from LT and outside of the lake basin. These data support LT claroteine monophyly, with the exclusion of the LT endemic Chrysichthys brachynema that independently colonised the lake but has not radiated. Multiple sampling localities from LT and the use of Bayesian species delimitation methods reveal additional locally restricted diversity within the LT Claroteinae clade. Fossil calibrated molecular divergence dates suggest that diversification occurred within full lake conditions as demonstrated in other LT lineages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Summary of water resources of Salt Lake County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hely, A.G.; Mower, R.W.; Harr, C. Albert

    1972-01-01

    This report is a summary of a comprehensive report on the present water resources of Salt Lake County, Utah, and the potential for additional developmentThe average total annual withdrawals from surface and underground sources during 1964-68 were about 580,000 acre-feet for all uses that deplete the supply, except that used for maintenance of waterfowl-management areas. The withdrawals projected for the year 2020 are 1,200,000 acre-feet. The maximum annual firm supply that can be derived from the sources now available is about 700,000 acre-feet, of which about 200,000 acre-feet would be derived from subsurface sources. Achievement of this annual yield would require nearly complete regulation of streamflow that now is practically unregulated, larger drawdowns of ground-water levels than have been experienced, and overall management of surface and subsurface sources as parts of a single resource.

  12. Anencephalus, drinking water, geomagnetism and cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Archer, V E

    1979-01-01

    The mortality rates from anencephalus from 1950-1969 in Canadian cities are shown to be strongly correlated with city growth rate and with horizontal geomagnetic flux, which is directly related to the intensity of cosmic radiation. They are also shown to have some association with the magnesium content of drinking water. Prior work with these data which showed associations with magnesium in drinking water, mean income, latitude and longitude was found to be inadequate because it dismissed the observed geographic associations as having little biological meaning, and because the important variables of geomagnetism and city growth rate were overlooked.

  13. Conquest of the deep, old and cold: an exceptional limpet radiation in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Stelbrink, Björn; Shirokaya, Alena A; Clewing, Catharina; Sitnikova, Tatiana Y; Prozorova, Larisa A; Albrecht, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest, oldest and most speciose ancient lake in the world. The lake is characterized by high levels of molluscan species richness and endemicity, including the limpet family Acroloxidae with 25 endemic species. Members of this group generally inhabit the littoral zone, but have been recently found in the abyssal zone at hydrothermal vents and oil-seeps. Here, we use mitochondrial and nuclear data to provide a first molecular phylogeny of the Lake Baikal limpet radiation, and to date the beginning of intra-lacustrine diversification. Divergence time estimates suggest a considerably younger age for the species flock compared with lake age estimates, and the beginning of extensive diversification is possibly related to rapid deepening and cooling during rifting. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence time estimates do not clearly indicate when exactly the abyssal was colonized but suggest a timeframe coincident with the formation of the abyssal in the northern basin (Middle to Late Pleistocene). © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrology, water quality, and phosphorus loading of Little St Germain Lake, Vilas County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.

    2000-01-01

    The lake was monitored in detail again during 1991-94 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of a cooperative study with the Lake District. This study demonstrated water-quality variation among the basins of Little St. Germain Lake and extensive areas of winter anoxia (absence of oxygen). Further in-depth studies were then conducted during 1994-2000 to define the extent of winter anoxia, refine the hydrologic and phosphorus budgets of the lake, quantify the effects of annual drawdowns, and provide information needed to develop a comprehensive lake-management plan. This report presents the results of the studies since 1991.

  15. Investigating groundwater-lake interactions by hydraulic heads and a water balance.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Sebastian; Lewandowski, Jörg; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Discharge of groundwater into lakes (lacustrine groundwater discharge, LGD) can play a major role in water balances of lakes. Unfortunately, studies often neglect this input path because of methodological difficulties in its determination. Direct measurements of LGD are labor-consuming and prone to error. The present study uses both spatially variable hydraulic-head data and meteorological data to estimate groundwater input by LGD and lake water output through infiltration. The study sites are two shallow, groundwater-fed lakes without any surface inflows or outflows. Horizontally interpolated groundwater heads were combined with lake water levels to obtain vertical hydraulic gradients between the aquifer and the lake, which are separated by a thick layer of lake bed sediment which has a much lower hydraulic conductivity than the underlying aquifer. By fitting the hydraulic gradient to the results of a simple mass balance and considering the process of clogging, we were able to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of the lake bed sediments. We calculated groundwater inputs by LGD and lake water outputs by infiltration on an annual basis. Although our method requires several assumptions, the results are reasonable and provide useful information about the exchange between the aquifer and the lake, which can, for example, be used for the calculation of nutrient mass balances.

  16. Interaction of a fresh water lake and a karstic spring via a syncline fold.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Abolfazl; Zare, Mohammad; Raeisi, Ezzatollah; Ghanbari, Reza Namdar

    2013-03-01

    Kaftar Lake is a high-altitude fresh water lake located in High Zagros, south of Iran. Despite the high annual evaporation to precipitation ratio in the area, lake water electrical conductivity is usually lower than 1000 µS/cm, this may be due to high seepage from the floor of the lake. Therefore, the hypothesis of possible underground connections between Namdan Basin, where the lake is located, and the surrounding basins with lower elevation (Aspas and Dehbid Basins) was investigated. Hydrogeology, hydrochemistry, and stable isotopes data of the lake and surrounding basins along with the lake water balance study were applied to test the hypothesis. Results indicate that Kaftar Lake has no connection with Aspas Basin in south, but it is hydraulically connected to Dehbid Basin. In Dehbid Basin, "Ghasr_e_Yaghoob spring" (average discharge ≅1200 L/s) emerges from a small outcrop (about 0.8 km(2) ) of Daryan limestone Formation, where this outcrop is much smaller than the required recharge area for such average discharge rate. The study shows that this spring is recharged by Kaftar Lake and Namdan Basin aquifer, through Daryan Formation of Gandboee Syncline located to the northern part of the lake. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  17. 75 FR 26098 - Safety Zone; Under Water Clean Up of Copper Canyon, Lake Havasu, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Under Water Clean Up of Copper Canyon, Lake... establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of Lake Havasu in the Copper Canyon in support of the underwater cleanup of Copper Canyon. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide for...

  18. Development of Turbulent Diffusion Transfer Algorithms to Estimate Lake Tahoe Water Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, S. G.; Reuter, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    The evaporative loss is a dominant component in the Lake Tahoe hydrologic budget because watershed area (813km2) is very small compared to the lake surface area (501 km2). The 5.5 m high dam built at the lake's only outlet, the Truckee River at Tahoe City can increase the lake's capacity by approximately 0.9185 km3. The lake serves as a flood protection for downstream areas and source of water supply for downstream cities, irrigation, hydropower, and instream environmental requirements. When the lake water level falls below the natural rim, cessation of flows from the lake cause problems for water supply, irrigation, and fishing. Therefore, it is important to develop algorithms to correctly estimate the lake hydrologic budget. We developed a turbulent diffusion transfer model and coupled to the dynamic lake model (DLM-WQ). We generated the stream flows and pollutants loadings of the streams using the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) supported watershed model, Loading Simulation Program in C++ (LSPC). The bulk transfer coefficients were calibrated using correlation coefficient (R2) as the objective function. Sensitivity analysis was conducted for the meteorological inputs and model parameters. The DLM-WQ estimated lake water level and water temperatures were in agreement to those of measured records with R2 equal to 0.96 and 0.99, respectively for the period 1994 to 2008. The estimated average evaporation from the lake, stream inflow, precipitation over the lake, groundwater fluxes, and outflow from the lake during 1994 to 2008 were found to be 32.0%, 25.0%, 19.0%, 0.3%, and 11.7%, respectively.

  19. Estimating the Depth and Shape of Lake Vostok's Water Cavity from Aerogravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studinger, M.; Bell, R. E.; Tikku, A. A.

    2003-12-01

    The water circulation within Lake Vostok provides a viable mechanism for transporting mass and energy through the lake, enhancing the potential for the support of biota. The circulation pattern depends primarily on the geometry of the lake bathymetry. Water in shallow regions will warm more from the geothermal heat flux than in deeper parts, resulting in subtle lateral changes of water density. This temperature-induced change in water density is the primary driving force for the horizontal circulation within the lake. To date, only a few seismic soundings have provided estimates of the water depth of Lake Vostok. To determine the depth and shape of the water cavity over the entire lake we use gravity data acquired along a grid of flight lines traversing the region. The free-air gravity anomaly field reflects density variations related to both major geological and topographic structures and changes in the water depth of the lake. The gravity contribution from the deeper geological structures can be removed from the free-air anomaly by low-pass filtering of the data. The subglacial topography outside the lake and the geometry of the overlying ice sheet are well constrained from ice-penetrating radar measurements. The unknown parameter that dominates the filtered gravity anomaly is the relief of the bedrock-water interface. Assuming a constant density contrast across this boundary, the gravity data can be inverted for the bathymetry of the lake. The results show that Lake Vostok consists of two sub-basins, a northern and southern. The southern sub-basin is much deeper and approximately double the spatial area of the smaller northern sub-basin. The two sub-basins are separated by a saddle with very shallow water depths. The separation of Lake Vostok in two distinct sub-basins has important ramifications for the water circulation within the lake. The lake volume estimated from the inversion of gravity data is 5200 cubic km, three times bigger than previously thought

  20. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) thermal surface water mapping and its correlation to LANDSAT. [Lake Anna, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvocoresses, A. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Graphics are presented which show HCMM mapped water-surface temperature in Lake Anna, a 13,000 dendrically-shaped lake which provides cooling for a nuclear power plant in Virginia. The HCMM digital data, produced by NASA were processed by NOAA/NESS into image and line-printer form. A LANDSAT image of the lake illustrates the relationship between MSS band 7 data and the HCMM data as processed by the NASA image processing facility which transforms the data to the same distortion-free hotline oblique Mercator projection. Spatial correlation of the two images is relatively simple by either digital or analog means and the HCMM image has a potential accuracy approaching the 80 m of the original LANDSAT data. While it is difficult to get readings that are not diluted by radiation from cooler adjacent land areas in narrow portions of the lake, digital data indicated by the line-printer display five different temperatures for open-water areas. Where the water surface response was not diluted by land areas, the temperature difference recorded by HCMM corresponds to in situ readings with rsme on the order of 1 C.

  1. Spatial and temporal patterns in water chemistry of two high elevation lakes in southeast Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Musselman, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site (GLEES) was established to examine the effects of atmospheric deposition and climate change on alpine and subalpine ecosystems. This report documents temporal and spatial trends during 1993 in water chemistry in East and West Glacier Lakes. Data are presented on seasonal and lake depth changes in water chemistry of the two lakes. The application of the results to appropriate sampling protocols for two alpine lakes is discussed. Both lakes were sampled during the same day, at midday. Samples were kept cool, returned to the lab the same day, and filtered for analysis. Samples were analyzed for cations and anions, pH, and conductivity at the Rocky Mountain Station Water Chemistry laboratory. Silica and aluminum were also measured for some sample dates.

  2. Water-quality data collected at Lake Anne, Reston, Virginia, 1997-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conko, Kathryn M.; Kennedy, Margaret M.; Rice, Karen C.

    2000-01-01

    Samples from the Lake Anne watershed were collected and analyzed to assess the water quality from December 1997 through January 1999. Lake Anne is a stream impoundment in suburban Northern Virginia and its outflow is a sub-tributary of the Potomac River. Samples of wet deposition (precipitation), lake water, and streamwater that drain into and from Lake Anne were collected and analyzed. Trace-element clean sampling and analysis protocols were followed throughout the project. This report is a compilation of the precipitation, lake-water, and streamwater data collected in the Lake Anne watershed and the associated quality assurance/quality control data. Concentrations of the trace elements arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, manganese, nickel, strontium, vanadium, and zinc, and of the major inorganic ions, aluminum, bicarbonate, calcium, chloride, hydrogen ion, iron, magnesium, potassium, nitrate, sodium, and sulfate are reported.

  3. 33 CFR 162.132 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... monitor: (1) Channel 11 (156.55 mhz) between Lake Huron Cut Lighted Buoy 11 and Lake St. Clair Light; and (2) Channel 12 (156.60 mhz) between Lake St. Clair Light and Detroit River Light. (b) Radiotelephone... Report. Stag Island Upper Light Report. Report Marine City Salt Dock Light Report. Report Grande...

  4. Water analysis methods at the integrated Lake Watershed Acidification Study Laboratory, Raquette Lake, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Tokos, J.

    1980-09-01

    The materials, equipment, and methods used by Brookhaven National Laboratory personnel for routine chemical and biological analyses in the three lakes of the Integrated Lake Watershed Acidification Study are described. The procedures apply to pelagic samples taken from Panther, Sagamore, and Woods Lakes. Separate sections outlining benthic primary production and inlet-outlet methods are included.

  5. Developing the greatest Blue Economy: Water productivity, fresh water depletion, and virtual water trade in the Great Lakes basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A. S.; Ruddell, B. L.; Mubako, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The Great Lakes basin hosts the world's most abundant surface fresh water reserve. Historically an industrial and natural resource powerhouse, the region has suffered economic stagnation in recent decades. Meanwhile, growing water resource scarcity around the world is creating pressure on water-intensive human activities. This situation creates the potential for the Great Lakes region to sustainably utilize its relative water wealth for economic benefit. We combine economic production and trade datasets with water consumption data and models of surface water depletion in the region. We find that, on average, the current economy does not create significant impacts on surface waters, but there is some risk that unregulated large water uses can create environmental flow impacts if they are developed in the wrong locations. Water uses drawing on deep groundwater or the Great Lakes themselves are unlikely to create a significant depletion, and discharge of groundwater withdrawals to surface waters offsets most surface water depletion. This relative abundance of surface water means that science-based management of large water uses to avoid accidentally creating "hotspots" is likely to be successful in avoiding future impacts, even if water use is significantly increased. Commercial water uses are the most productive, with thermoelectric, mining, and agricultural water uses in the lowest tier of water productivity. Surprisingly for such a water-abundant economy, the region is a net importer of water-derived goods and services. This, combined with the abundance of surface water, suggests that the region's water-based economy has room to grow in the 21st century.

  6. Developing the greatest Blue Economy: Water productivity, fresh water depletion, and virtual water trade in the Great Lakes basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Alex; Mubako, Stanley; Ruddell, Benjamin L.

    2016-06-01

    The Great Lakes basin hosts the world's most abundant surface fresh water reserve. Historically an industrial and natural resource powerhouse, the region has suffered economic stagnation in recent decades. Meanwhile, growing water resource scarcity around the world is creating pressure on water-intensive human activities. This situation creates the potential for the Great Lakes region to sustainably utilize its relative water wealth for economic benefit. We combine economic production and trade datasets with water consumption data and models of surface water depletion in the region. We find that, on average, the current economy does not create significant impacts on surface waters, but there is some risk that unregulated large water uses can create environmental flow impacts if they are developed in the wrong locations. Water uses drawing on deep groundwater or the Great Lakes themselves are unlikely to create a significant depletion, and discharge of groundwater withdrawals to surface waters offsets most surface water depletion. This relative abundance of surface water means that science-based management of large water uses to avoid accidentally creating "hotspots" is likely to be successful in avoiding future impacts, even if water use is significantly increased. Commercial water uses are the most productive, with thermoelectric, mining, and agricultural water uses in the lowest tier of water productivity. Surprisingly for such a water-abundant economy, the region is a net importer of water-derived goods and services. This, combined with the abundance of surface water, suggests that the region's water-based economy has room to grow in the 21st century.

  7. The importance of lake-specific characteristics for water quality across the continental United States.

    PubMed

    Read, Emily K; Patil, Vijay P; Oliver, Samantha K; Hetherington, Amy L; Brentrup, Jennifer A; Zwart, Jacob A; Winters, Kirsten M; Corman, Jessica R; Nodine, Emily R; Woolway, R Iestyn; Dugan, Hilary A; Jaimes, Aline; Santoso, Arianto B; Hong, Grace S; Winslow, Luke A; Hanson, Paul C; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2015-06-01

    Lake water quality is affected by local and regional drivers, including lake physical characteristics, hydrology, landscape position, land cover, land use, geology, and climate. Here, we demonstrate the utility of hypothesis testing within the landscape limnology framework using a random forest algorithm on a national-scale, spatially explicit data set, the United States Environmental Protection Agency's 2007 National Lakes Assessment. For 1026 lakes, we tested the relative importance of water quality drivers across spatial scales, the importance of hydrologic connectivity in mediating water quality drivers, and how the importance of both spatial scale and connectivity differ across response variables for five important in-lake water quality metrics (total phosphorus, total nitrogen, dissolved organic carbon, turbidity, and conductivity). By modeling the effect of water quality predictors at different spatial scales, we found that lake-specific characteristics (e.g., depth, sediment area-to-volume ratio) were important for explaining water quality (54-60% variance explained), and that regionalization schemes were much less effective than lake specific metrics (28-39% variance explained). Basin-scale land use and land cover explained between 45-62% of variance, and forest cover and agricultural land uses were among the most important basin-scale predictors. Water quality drivers did not operate independently; in some cases, hydrologic connectivity (the presence of upstream surface water features) mediated the effect of regional-scale drivers. For example, for water quality in lakes with upstream lakes, regional classification schemes were much less effective predictors than lake-specific variables, in contrast to lakes with no upstream lakes or with no surface inflows. At the scale of the continental United States, conductivity was explained by drivers operating at larger spatial scales than for other water quality responses. The current regulatory practice of using

  8. Influence of lake trophic structure on iodine-131 accumulation and subsequent cumulative radiation dose to trout thyroids.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Nicole E; Johnson, Thomas E; Pinder, John E

    2014-05-01

    Iodine-131 is a major component of the atmospheric releases following reactor accidents, and the passage of (131)I through food chains from grass to human thyroids has been extensively studied. By comparison, the fate and effects of (131)I deposition onto lakes and other aquatic systems have been less studied. In this study we: (1) reanalyze 1960s data from experimental releases of (131)I into two small lakes; (2) compare the effects of differences in lake trophic structures on the accumulation of (131)I by fish; (3) relate concentrations in fish and fish tissues to that in the water column using empirically estimated uptake (L kg(-1) d(-1)) and loss (d(-1)) parameters; and (4) show that the largest concentrations in the thyroids of trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) may occur from 8 to 32 days after initial release. Iodine-131 concentration in trout thyroids at 30-days post release may be >1000 times that in the water. Estimates of cumulative radiation dose (mGy) to thyroids computed using an anatomically-appropriate model of trout thyroid structure within the Monte Carlo N-particle modeling software predicted cumulative thyroid doses that increased approximately linearly after the first 8 days and resulted in 32-day cumulative thyroid doses that ranged from 6 mGy g(-1) to 18 mGy g(-1) per 1 Bq mL(-1) of initial (131)I in the water depending upon fish size. The majority of this dose is due to beta emissions, and the dose varies with positions in the thyroid tissue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential impacts of water diversion on fishery resources in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.

    1984-01-01

    Uses of Great Lakes water within the Great Lakes basin are steadily increasing, and critical water shortages elsewhere may add to the demands for diversions of water out of the basin in the near future. The impacts of such diversions on fish in the Great Lakes must be considered in the context of in-basin uses of the water, because in-basin uses already adversely affect the fishery resources. Temporary in-basin water withdrawals from Lake Michigan by industry in 1980 equaled 260% of the total volume of water between the shoreline and the 10-meter depth - the littoral waters most heavily used by fish as spawning and nursery grounds. Nearly 100% of the fish removed by these water withdrawals were killed. Enough young alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) in Lake Michigan and young yellow perch (Perca flavescens) in western Lake Erie have been removed at water intakes in recent years to reduce the productivity and biomass of adult fish stocks. Out-of-basin diversions of water at Chicago and at the Welland Canal, channel modifications in the St. Clair River, and in-basin consumptive water withdrawals have lowered the annual mean water level of Lakes Michigan and Huron by about 27 cm and that of Lake Erie by about 10 cm, dewatering wetlands that historically served as spawning and nursery habitat for many valuable fish species. The dollar value of fish lost to water diversions and withdrawals has not yet been estimated, but water withdrawals alone have already reduced the annual economic impact of the Great Lakes fisheries, which has been estimated to be 1.16 billion dollars.

  10. Links between type E botulism outbreaks, lake levels, and surface water temperatures in Lake Michigan, 1963-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafrancois, Brenda Moraska; Riley, Stephen C.; Blehert, David S.; Ballmann, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    Relationships between large-scale environmental factors and the incidence of type E avian botulism outbreaks in Lake Michigan were examined from 1963 to 2008. Avian botulism outbreaks most frequently occurred in years with low mean annual water levels, and lake levels were significantly lower in outbreak years than in non-outbreak years. Mean surface water temperatures in northern Lake Michigan during the period when type E outbreaks tend to occur (July through September) were significantly higher in outbreak years than in non-outbreak years. Trends in fish populations did not strongly correlate with botulism outbreaks, although botulism outbreaks in the 1960s coincided with high alewife abundance, and recent botulism outbreaks coincided with rapidly increasing round goby abundance. Botulism outbreaks occurred cyclically, and the frequency of outbreaks did not increase over the period of record. Climate change scenarios for the Great Lakes predict lower water levels and warmer water temperatures. As a consequence, the frequency and magnitude of type E botulism outbreaks in the Great Lakes may increase.

  11. Effects of recharge, Upper Floridan aquifer heads, and time scale on simulated ground-water exchange with Lake Starr, a seepage lake in central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy; Lee, Terrie Mackin

    2003-01-01

    Lake Starr and other lakes in the mantled karst terrain of Florida's Central Lake District are surrounded by a conductive surficial aquifer system that receives highly variable recharge from rainfall. In addition, downward leakage from these lakes varies as heads in the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer change seasonally and with pumpage. A saturated three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water flow model was used to simulate the effects of recharge, Upper Floridan aquifer heads, and model time scale on ground-water exchange with Lake Starr. The lake was simulated as an active part of the model using high hydraulic conductivity cells. Simulated ground-water flow was compared to net ground-water flow estimated from a rigorously derived water budget for the 2-year period August 1996-July 1998. Calibrating saturated ground-water flow models with monthly stress periods to a monthly lake water budget will result in underpredicting gross inflow to, and leakage from, ridge lakes in Florida. Underprediction of ground-water inflow occurs because recharge stresses and ground-water flow responses during rainy periods are averaged over too long a time period using monthly stress periods. When inflow is underestimated during calibration, leakage also is underestimated because inflow and leakage are correlated if lake stage is maintained over the long term. Underpredicted leakage reduces the implied effect of ground-water withdrawals from the Upper Floridan aquifer on the lake. Calibrating the weekly simulation required accounting for transient responses in the water table near the lake that generated the greater range of net ground-water flow values seen in the weekly water budget. Calibrating to the weekly lake water budget also required increasing the value of annual recharge in the nearshore region well above the initial estimate of 35 percent of the rainfall, and increasing the hydraulic conductivity of the deposits around and beneath the lake. To simulate the total

  12. Ground-water, large-lake interactions in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron: A geochemical and isotopic approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolak, J.J.; Long, D.T.; Matty, J.M.; Larson, G.J.; Sibley, D.F.; Councell, T.B.

    1999-01-01

    Delineating the nature and extent of ground-water inputs is necessary to understand the hydrochemistry of large lakes. Characterizing the interaction between ground water and large lakes (e.g., the Great Lakes) is facilitated by the use of geochemical and isotopic data. In this study, pore waters were extracted from sediment cores collected from Saginaw Bay and the surrounding Saginaw lowland area; the geochemistry and stable isotope signature of these pore waters were used to identify sources for the water and solutes. Cores from Saginaw Bay and the Saginaw lowland area yielded strong vertical gradients in chloride concentrations, suggesting that a high-chloride source is present at depth. The spatial distribution of cores with elevated chloride concentrations corresponds to the regional distribution of chloride in ground water. Most of the Saginaw lowland area cores contain water with significantly lower ??18O values than modern meteoric water, suggesting that the water had been recharged during a much cooler climate. The ??18O values measured in pore waters (from Saginaw Bay cores) containing high chloride concentrations are similar to modern meteoric water; however, values lighter than modern meteoric water are encountered at depth. Chloride:bromide ratios, used to distinguish between different chloride sources, identify formation brine as the likely source for chloride. Transport models indicate that a combination of advection and diffusion is responsible for the observed Saginaw lowland area pore-water profiles. Pore-water profiles in Saginaw Bay sediments are produced primarily by diffusion and require significantly less time to evolve. An upward flux of solutes derived from formation brine could occur elsewhere within the Great Lakes region and significantly affect the geochemical cycling of chloride and other contaminants (e.g., trace metals).

  13. Stochastic modeling of Lake Van water level time series with jumps and multiple trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, H.; Unal, N. E.; Eris, E.; Yuce, M. I.

    2013-02-01

    In 1990s, water level in the closed-basin Lake Van located in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey has risen up about 2 m. Analysis of the hydrometeorological shows that change in the water level is related to the water budget of the lake. In this study, a stochastic model is generated using the measured monthly water level data of the lake. The model is derived after removal of trend and periodicity in the data set. Trend observed in the lake water level time series is fitted by mono- and multiple-trend lines. For the multiple-trend, the time series is first divided into homogeneous segments by means of SEGMENTER, segmentation software. Four segments are found meaningful practically each fitted with a trend line. Two models considering mono- and multiple-trend time series are developed. The multiple-trend model is found better for planning future development in surrounding areas of the lake.

  14. Influence of Long-Distance Climate Teleconnection on Seasonality of Water Temperature in the World's Largest Lake - Lake Baikal, Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Stephen L.; Hampton, Stephanie E.; Izmest'eva, Lyubov R.; Moore, Marianne V.

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale climate change is superimposed on interacting patterns of climate variability that fluctuate on numerous temporal and spatial scales—elements of which, such as seasonal timing, may have important impacts on local and regional ecosystem forcing. Lake Baikal in Siberia is not only the world's largest and most biologically diverse lake, but it has exceptionally strong seasonal structure in ecosystem dynamics that may be dramatically affected by fluctuations in seasonal timing. We applied time-frequency analysis to a near-continuous, 58-year record of water temperature from Lake Baikal to examine how seasonality in the lake has fluctuated over the past half century and to infer underlying mechanisms. On decadal scales, the timing of seasonal onset strongly corresponds with deviation in the zonal wind intensity as described by length of day (LOD); on shorter scales, these temperature patterns shift in concert with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Importantly, the connection between ENSO and Lake Baikal is gated by the cool and warm periods of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Large-scale climatic phenomena affecting Siberia are apparent in Lake Baikal surface water temperature data, dynamics resulting from jet stream and storm track variability in central Asia and across the Northern Hemisphere. PMID:21359207

  15. The storage and release of water from a large glacier-dammed lake; Russell Lake near Yakutat, Alaska, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seitz, H.R.; Thomas, D.S.; Tomlinson, Bud

    1986-01-01

    In May 1986, the entrance to Russell Fiord, Alaska, was blocked by the advancing Hubbard Glacier, forming a 34-mile long ice-dammed lake. Runoff to the lake, mainly runoff from melting snow and glacier ice, filled the lake to an elevation of 83 feet above sea level by October 8, when the ice dam failed. The lake level rose at an average rate of 0.6 ft/day, and average daily inflow to the lake was calculated to be 16,500 cu ft/sec. After failure of the ice dam, the water level fell to the former high tide level of Russell Fiord within 24 hours. Average discharge through the breach in the ice dam during a 4-hr period of maximum water level decline is estimated to have been 3.8 million cu ft/sec. The formation and breakout of the lake is expected to be repeated as the Hubbard Glacier continues to advance, though the timing of the phenomenon cannot be predicted with certainty. (USGS)

  16. Surficial substrates and bathymetry of five historical lake trout spawning reefs in near-shore waters of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Brown, Charles L.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; French, John R. P.

    1992-01-01

    The reestablishment of self-sustaining stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the lower four Great Lakes has been substantially impeded because planted fish do not produce enough progeny that survive and reproduce. The causes for this failure are unknown, but many historical spawning sites of lake trout have been degraded by human activities and can no longer produce viable swim-up fry. In this study, we used side-scan sonar and an underwater video camera to survey, map, and evaluate the sustainability of one reef in each of the five Great Lakes for lake trout spawning and fry production. At four of the reef sites, we found good-to-excellent substrate for spawning and fry production by the shallow-water strains of lake trout that are now being planted. These substrates were in water 6-22 m deep and were composed largely of rounded or angular rubble and cobble. Interstitial spaces in these substrates were 20 cm or deeper and would protect naturally spawned eggs and fry from predators, ice scour, and buffeting by waves and currents. Subsequent studies of egg survival by other researchers confirmed our evaluation that the best substrates at two of these sites still have the potential to produce viable swim-up fry.

  17. Annual precipitation regulates spatial and temporal drivers of lake water clarity.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kevin C; Greb, Steven R; Diebel, Matthew; Turner, Monica G

    2017-03-01

    Understanding how and why lakes vary and respond to different drivers through time and space is needed to understand, predict, and manage freshwater quality in an era of rapidly changing land use and climate. Water clarity regulates many characteristics of aquatic ecosystems and is responsive to watershed features, making it a sentinel of environmental change. However, whether precipitation alters the relative importance of features that influence lake water clarity or the spatial scales at which they operate is unknown. We used a data set of thousands of northern temperate lakes and asked (1) How does water clarity differ between a very wet vs. dry year? (2) Does the relative importance of different watershed features, or the spatial extent at which they are measured, vary between wet and dry years? (3) What lake and watershed characteristics regulate long-term water clarity trends? Among lakes, water clarity was reduced and less variable in the wet year than in the dry year; furthermore, water clarity was reduced much more in high-clarity lakes during the wet year than in low-clarity lakes. Climate, land use/land cover, and lake morphometry explained most variance in clarity among lakes in both years, but the spatial scales at which some features were important differed between the dry and wet years. Watershed percent agriculture was most important in the dry year, whereas riparian zone percent agriculture (around each lake and upstream features) was most important in the wet year. Between 1991 and 2012, water clarity declined in 23% of lakes and increased in only 6% of lakes. Conductance influenced the direction of temporal trend (clarity declined in lakes with low conductance), whereas the proportion of watershed wetlands, catchment-to-lake-area ratio, and lake maximum depth interacted with antecedent precipitation. Many predictors of water clarity, such as lake depth and landscape position, are features that cannot be readily managed. Given trends of

  18. Hydrology and water quality of Shell Lake, Washburn County, Wisconsin, with special emphasis on the effects of diversion and changes in water level on the water quality of a shallow terminal lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juckem, Paul F.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2013-01-01

    Shell Lake is a relatively shallow terminal lake (tributaries but no outlets) in northwestern Wisconsin that has experienced approximately 10 feet (ft) of water-level fluctuation over more than 70 years of record and extensive flooding of nearshore areas starting in the early 2000s. The City of Shell Lake (City) received a permit from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in 2002 to divert water from the lake to a nearby river in order to lower water levels and reduce flooding. Previous studies suggested that water-level fluctuations were driven by long-term cycles in precipitation, evaporation, and runoff, although questions about the lake’s connection with the groundwater system remained. The permit required that the City evaluate assumptions about lake/groundwater interactions made in previous studies and evaluate the effects of the water diversion on water levels in Shell Lake and other nearby lakes. Therefore, a cooperative study between the City and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was initiated to improve the understanding of the hydrogeology of the area and evaluate potential effects of the diversion on water levels in Shell Lake, the surrounding groundwater system, and nearby lakes. Concerns over deteriorating water quality in the lake, possibly associated with changes in water level, prompted an additional cooperative project between the City and the USGS to evaluate efeffects of changes in nutrient loading associated with changes in water levels on the water quality of Shell Lake. Numerical models were used to evaluate how the hydrology and water quality responded to diversion of water from the lake and historical changes in the watershed. The groundwater-flow model MODFLOW was used to simulate groundwater movement in the area around Shell Lake, including groundwater/surface-water interactions. Simulated results from the MODFLOW model indicate that groundwater flows generally northward in the area around Shell Lake, with flow locally converging

  19. Lake size and water-column stability affect the importance of methane for pelagic food webs of boreal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankaala, Paula; Lopez-Bellido, Jessica; Ojala, Anne; Tulonen, Tiina; Jones, Roger I.

    2013-04-01

    Physical forcing, related to lake size and morphometry, plays an important role in the landscape-scale biogeochemical processing and fluxes of terrestrial carbon in lakes. Boreal lakes are typically dimictic, with mixing of the water column in spring and autumn, but in small, sheltered, humic, forest lakes the spring mixing is often incomplete. This leads to a steep summer stratification and oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion of the lakes. As a result of anaerobic decomposition of organic matter, high concentrations of CH4are typical in these lakes. At the oxic-anoxic interface zone methanotrophic microbes oxidize CH4 to CO2 and partly incorporate CH4-C into microbial biomass, and thus potentially provide a diet source for pelagic consumers. We studied production at the base of the pelagic food web by methane oxidising bacteria (MOB), heterotrophic bacteria (HB) and phytoplankton (PP) in five boreal lakes with a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration varying between 7 and 25 mg C L-1 and an area ranging from 0.004 to 13.4 km2. High MOB activity was detected in the water columns of the three smallest lakes having anoxia in the hypolimnion during summer. The highest MOB activities (ca. 2-12 μmol L-1 d-1) were observed when the CH4:O2 ratio varied between ca. 0.5-12. Seasonally, the highest MOB activities were measured during late-summer mixed layer deepening and autumnal mixing of the whole water column. The proportion of MOB in the total basal production was highest in the two smallest lakes (24-56 and 13-36%), having the steepest summertime stratification. The proportion MOB in the basal production decreased with lake size being 70% of basal production was by PP. In all studied lakes HB contributed only 10-23% of the total basal production, suggesting that a transfer of allochthonous DOC via HB plays only a modest role for the nutrition of the higher trophic levels.

  20. Fluctuation of the Water Environmental Carrying Capacity in a Huge River-Connected Lake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Zhou, Yiyi; Tang, Yang; Wu, Mengan; Deng, Yanqing

    2015-01-01

    A new method, with the non-fully mixed coefficient (NFMC) considered, was put forward to calculate the water environmental carrying capacity (WECC) for huge river-connected lakes, of which the hydrological conditions always vary widely during a year. Poyang Lake, the most typical river-connected lake and the largest freshwater lake in China, was selected as the research area. Based on field investigations and numerical simulation, the monthly pollutant degradation coefficients and non-fully mixed coefficients of different lake regions were determined to explore the WECCs of COD, TN and TP of Poyang Lake in a common water year. It was found that under the hydrological conditions of a common water year the total WECCs of COD, TN and TP in the lake were respectively 181.9 × 104 t, 33.3 × 104 t and 1.86 × 104 t. Due to the varied lake water volume and self-purification ability, an evident temporal fluctuation of WECCs in Poyang Lake was observed. The dry seasons were characterized by a higher NFMCs but lower WECCs owing to the lower water level and degradation ability. Variation coefficients of COD and TN WECC were close to each other, of which the average level was about 58.5%, a little higher than that of TP. PMID:25830284

  1. Fluctuation of the water environmental carrying capacity in a huge river-connected lake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Zhou, Yiyi; Tang, Yang; Wu, Mengan; Deng, Yanqing

    2015-03-30

    A new method, with the non-fully mixed coefficient (NFMC) considered, was put forward to calculate the water environmental carrying capacity (WECC) for huge river-connected lakes, of which the hydrological conditions always vary widely during a year. Poyang Lake, the most typical river-connected lake and the largest freshwater lake in China, was selected as the research area. Based on field investigations and numerical simulation, the monthly pollutant degradation coefficients and non-fully mixed coefficients of different lake regions were determined to explore the WECCs of COD, TN and TP of Poyang Lake in a common water year. It was found that under the hydrological conditions of a common water year the total WECCs of COD, TN and TP in the lake were respectively 181.9 × 104 t, 33.3 × 104 t and 1.86 × 104 t. Due to the varied lake water volume and self-purification ability, an evident temporal fluctuation of WECCs in Poyang Lake was observed. The dry seasons were characterized by a higher NFMCs but lower WECCs owing to the lower water level and degradation ability. Variation coefficients of COD and TN WECC were close to each other, of which the average level was about 58.5%, a little higher than that of TP.

  2. Lake Recovery Through Reduced Sulfate Deposition: A New Paradigm for Drinking Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lindsay E; Krkošek, Wendy H; Stoddart, Amina K; Trueman, Benjamin F; Gagnon, Graham A

    2017-02-07

    This study examined sulfate deposition in Nova Scotia from 1999 to 2015, and its association with increased pH and organic matter in two protected surface water supplies (Pockwock Lake and Lake Major) located in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The study also examined the effect of lake water chemistry on drinking water treatment processes. Sulfate deposition in the region decreased by 68%, whereas pH increased by 0.1-0.4 units over the 16-year period. Average monthly color concentrations in Pockwock Lake and Lake Major increased by 1.7 and 3.8×, respectively. Accordingly, the coagulant demand increased by 1.5 and 3.8× for the water treatment plants supplied by Pockwock Lake and Lake Major. Not only was this coagulant increase costly for the utility, it also resulted in compromised filter performance, particularly for the direct-biofiltration plant supplied by Pockwock Lake that was found to already be operating at the upper limit of the recommended direct filtration thresholds for color, total organic carbon and coagulant dose. Additionally, in 2012-2013 geosmin occurred in Pockwock Lake, which could have been attributed to reduced sulfate deposition as increases in pH favor more diverse cyanobacteria populations. Overall, this study demonstrated the impact that ambient air quality can have on drinking water supplies.

  3. Spatial distribution and multiple sources of heavy metals in the water of Chaohu Lake, Anhui, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Guolian; Liu, Guijian; Zhou, Chuncai; Chou, Chen-Lin; Zheng, Liugen; Wang, Jizhong

    2012-05-01

    In this study, a survey for the spatial distribution of heavy metals in Chaohu Lake of China was conducted. Sixty-two surface water samples were collected from entire lake including three of its main river entrances. This is the first systematic report concerning the content, distribution, and origin of heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Cd, Hg, Zn, and Ni) in the Chaohu Lake water. The results showed that heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Zn, and Ni) concentrations in the estuary of Nanfei River were relatively higher than those in the other areas, while content of Hg is higher in the southeast lake than northwest lake. Moreover, Cd has locally concentration in the surface water from the entire Chaohu Lake. The heavy metal average concentrations, except Hg, were lower than the cutoff values for the first-grade water quality (China Environment Quality Standard) which was set as the highest standard to protect the social nature reserves. The Hg content is between the grades three and four water quality, and other heavy metals contents are higher than background values. The aquatic environment of Chaohu Lake has apparently been contaminated. Both the cluster analysis (CA) and correlation analysis provide information about the origin of heavy metals in the Lake. Our findings indicated that agricultural activities and adjacent plants chimneys may contribute the most to Cd and Hg contamination of Chaohu Lake, respectively.

  4. Relation between selected water-quality variables and lake level in Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Tamara M.; Fuhrer, Gregory J.; Morace, Jennifer L.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the analysis of data that they have been collecting for several years, the Klamath Tribes recently recommended that the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) modify the operating plan for the dam to make the minimum lake levels for the June-August period more closely resemble pre-dam conditions (Jacob Kann, written commun., 1995). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was asked to analyze the available data for the lake and to assess whether the evidence exists to conclude that year-to-year differences in certain lake water-quality variables are related to year-to-year differences in lake level. The results of the analysis will be used as scientific input in the process of developing an operating plan for the Link River Dam.

  5. The Great Lakes Water Balance: Data availability and annotated bibliography of selected references

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, Brian P.; Killian, Jason R.

    2003-01-01

    Water balance calculations for the Great Lakes have been made for several decades and are a key component of Great Lakes water management. Despite the importance of the water balance, little has been done to inventory and describe the data available for use in water balance calculations. This report provides a catalog and brief description of major datasets that are used to calculate the Great Lakes water balance. Several additional datasets are identified that could be used to calculate parts of the water balance but currently are not being used. Individual offices and web pages that are useful for attaining these datasets are included. Four specific data gaps are also identified. An annotated bibliography of important publications dealing with the Great Lakes water balance is included. The findings of this investigation permit resource managers and scientists to access data more easily, assess shortcomings of current datasets, and identify which data are not currently being utilized in water balance calculations.

  6. Impact of harmful algal blooms on several Lake Erie drinking water treatment facilities; methodology considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The propagation of cyanbacterial cells and their toxins were investigated at seven drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) on Lake Erie were investigated with regards to harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxin concentrations, water quality variations in treatment plant influents, and pr...

  7. Impact of harmful algal blooms on several Lake Erie drinking water treatment facilities; methodology considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The propagation of cyanbacterial cells and their toxins were investigated at seven drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) on Lake Erie were investigated with regards to harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxin concentrations, water quality variations in treatment plant influents, and pr...

  8. Lake Enriquillo Water Level History and Implications for future flooding in the Southwestern Dominican Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, V. D.; Hornbach, M. J.; McHugh, C. M.; Asilis, Y.; Montes, M.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Enriquillo is currently located -41m below sea-level, and is the largest lake (~350 km2) in the Caribbean. Lake levels during the past eight years have risen to anomalous highs (from -51m BSL to -41m BSL), flooding villages and displacing their inhabitants. Both the cause of lake level rise and the anticipated future change in lake level remain unclear. Seismic images revealing erosional and depositional sedimentary boundaries in the lake, however, provide insight into historic lake level trends. Here, we integrate seismic images with sediment core samples, and historical photographs to constrain lake level history with time. We used ASTER global digital elevation models combined with single beam data to determine the lake's bathymetry, drainage and surrounding geomorphology. Additionally, we used NOAA and local weather station data to assess the potential role that weather and climate patterns play in lake levels. Although yearly weather conditions play a major role in lake levels, analysis of regional seismic data indicates that tectonics may also play an important role in longer term (century-scale) lake levels. The lake's areal extent and lake level elevation depend not only on the water supply, but also the lake's bathymetry and regional topography that is defined by the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault--a strike-slip fault system that extends throughout the lake. The shallow bathymetry of much of the lake (~ 20%) implies that relatively small changes in the rain pattern cause significant (10 m) changes to lake depth. Over the past thirty years, variations in the lake's areal extent (between 160 km2 to 350km2) and elevation (between -52m BSL to -41m BSL) can be attributed to changes in weather patterns. Preliminary analysis of both core and seismic data confirm that the lake water levels generally mimic wet and dry periods in the region, consistent with recent observations, however, the longer term maximum and minimum extent of Lake Enriquillo water

  9. Seasonal and Yearly Carbon and Water Flux Changes Over Lake Mendota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flannery, A. L.; Reed, D. E.; Desai, A. R.; Thom, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Lakes have been known to serve as hotspots in local and regional carbon and water cycles and have unique projected responses from climate change relative to terrestrial ecosystems. However, few long-term continuous direct observations of these fluxes have been done to examine the movement of carbon and water from small, mid-latitude lakes. This study uses 4.5 years of eddy covariance flux tower data to examine integrated seasonal and yearly water vapor and carbon fluxes as well as potential drivers of these fluxes (air temperature, wind speed and water temperature). Additionally, we examined the effectiveness of placing an eddy covariance flux tower at the edge of the lakeshore with a mixed footprint of lake and land. After using a footprint model, only an average of 18% of the flux data were determined to be primarily influenced by the lake. Summer, as defined using water temperature, exhibited the largest average water vapor fluxes and was the primary driver of yearly water flux sums. Yearly carbon flux totals indicate that the lake can act as a net annual source or a sink for carbon depending the length and timing of seasons, particularly spring and fall turnover. Observing long-term lake flux data can provide a baseline of information and aid our understanding of lakes processes in local and regional biogeochemical cycles as lakes face increasing temperatures from climate change.

  10. Integrated simulation and assessment of water quantity and quality of a large urban lake group under the water network connection project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The water network connection project is to reestablish a hydraulic connection between lakes and rivers and to improve the water ecologysystem. Tangxun Lake, located in Wuhan, is the largest urban lake in China. With the economic development, a large group of urban lakes composed of Tangxun Lake, South Lake, Qingling Lake, Yezhi Lake, Huangjia Lake and Ye Lake have been suffering from serious water quality problems in recent years. In order to improve water quality of Tangxun Lake and determine a suitable water diversion scheme, a hydrodynamic and water quality model based on DEM grid was developed This model was designed using finite volume method for hydrodynamic and transport model dispersion, the SIMPLEC method for solving the flow field, and the pressure weighted interpolating method for the flow field modification. With the influence of point source pollution and non-point source pollution taken into consideration, indexes including CODMn, NH3-N, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were chosen to simulate the water quality variation of the lakes mentioned above, and the parameters of the model was calibrated and verified using field data. To provide an optimal diversion flow, several diversion conditions were simulated by utilizing the model. The results indicated that the proposed model can simulate the water quantity and quality of urban shallow lakes effectively, and the relative error between simulated value and observation data was less than 15%. The water network connection project can help improve water quality of lakes to some extent.

  11. Chemical quality of surface waters in Devils Lake basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swenson, Herbert; Colby, Bruce R.

    1955-01-01

    Devils Lake basin, a closed basin in northeastern North Dakota, covers about 3,900 square miles of land, the topography of which is morainal and of glacial origin. In this basin lies a chain of waterways, which begins with the Sweetwater group and extends successively through Mauvais Coulee, Devils Lake, East Bay Devils Lake, and East Devils Lake, to Stump Lake. In former years when lake levels were high, Mauvais Coulee drained the Sweetwater group and discharged considerable water into Devils Lake. Converging coulees also transported excess water to Stump Lake. For at least 70 years prior to 1941, Mauvais Coulee flowed only intermittently, and the levels of major lakes in this region gradually declined. Devils Lake, for example, covered an area of about 90,000 acres in 1867 but had shrunk to approximately 6,500 acres by 1941. Plans to restore the recreational appeal of Devils Lake propose the dilution and eventual displacement of the brackish lake water by fresh water that would be diverted from the Missouri River. Freshening of the lake water would permit restocking Devils Lake with fish. Devils and Stump Lake have irregular outlines and numerous windings and have been described as lying in the valley of a preglacial river, the main stem and tributaries of which are partly filled with drift. Prominent morainal hills along the south shore of Devils Lake contrast sharply with level farmland to the north. The mean annual temperature of Devils Lake basin ranges between 36 ? and 42 ? F. Summer temperatures above 100 ? F and winter temperatures below -30 ? Fare not uncommon. The annual precipitation for 77 years at the city of Devils Lake averaged 17.5 inches. Usually, from 75 to 80 percent of the precipitation in the basin falls during the growing season, April to September. From 1867 to 1941 the net fall of the water surface of Devils Lake was about 38 feet. By 1951 the surface had risen fully 14 feet from its lowest altitude, 1,400.9 feet. Since 1951, the level has

  12. A classification of freshwater Louisiana lakes based on water quality and user perception data.

    PubMed

    Burden, D G; Malone, R F

    1987-09-01

    An index system developed for Louisiana lakes was based on correlations between measurable water quality parameters and perceived lake quality. Support data was provided by an extensive monitoring program of 30 lakes coordinated with opinion surveys undertaken during summer 1984. Lakes included in the survey ranged from 4 to 735 km(2) in surface area with mean depths ranging from 0.5 to 8.0 m. Water quality data indicated most of these lakes are eutrophic, although many have productive fisheries and are considered recreational assets. Perception ratings of fishing quality and its associated water quality were obtained by distributing approximately 1200 surveys to Louisiana Bass Club Associaton members. The ability of Secchi disc transparency, total organic carbon, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, total phosphorus, and chlorophyll a to discriminate between perception classes was examined using probability distributions and multivariate analyses. Secchi disc and total organic carbon best reflected perceived lake conditions; however, these parameters did not provide the discrimination necessary for developing a quantitative risk assessment of lake trophic state. Consequently, an interim lakes index system was developed based on total organic carbon and perceived lake conditions. The developed index system will aid State officials in interpretating and evaluating regularly collected lake quality data, recognizing potential problem areas, and identifying proper management policies for protecting fisheries usage within the State.

  13. High-throughput sequencing of microbial eukaryotes in Lake Baikal reveals ecologically differentiated communities and novel evolutionary radiations.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhenzhen; Berney, Cedric; Hartikainen, Hanna; Mahamdallie, Shazia; Gardner, Michelle; Boenigk, Jens; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Bass, David

    2017-08-01

    We performed high-throughput 18S rDNA V9 region sequencing analyses of microeukaryote (protist) communities at seven sites with depths ranging from 0 to 1450 m in the southern part of Lake Baikal. We show that microeukaryotic diversity differed according to water column depth and sediment depth. Chrysophytes and perkinsids were diverse in subsurface samples, novel radiations of petalomonads and Ichthyobodo relatives were found in benthic samples, and a broad range of divergent OTUs were detected in deep subbenthic samples. Members of clades usually associated with marine habitats were also detected, including syndineans for the first time in freshwater systems. Fungal- and cercozoan-specific c. 1200 bp amplicon clone libraries also revealed many novel lineages in both planktonic and sediment samples at all depths, a novel radiation of aphelids in shallower benthic samples, and partitioning of sarcomonad lineages in shallow vs deep benthic samples. Putative parasitic lineages accounted for 12.4% of overall reads, including a novel radiation of Ichthyobodo (fish parasite) relatives. Micrometazoans were also analysed, including crustaceans, rotifers and nematodes. The deepest (>1000 m) subsurface sediment samples harboured some highly divergent sequence types, including heterotrophic flagellates, parasites, putative metazoans and sequences likely representing organisms originating from higher up in the water column. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of lake eutrophication responses under alternative water diversion scenarios: a water quality modeling based statistical analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Wang, Yilin; Sheng, Hu; Dong, Feifei; Zou, Rui; Zhao, Lei; Guo, Huaicheng; Zhu, Xiang; He, Bin

    2014-01-15

    China is confronting the challenge of accelerated lake eutrophication, where Lake Dianchi is considered as the most serious one. Eutrophication control for Lake Dianchi began in the mid-1980s. However, decision makers have been puzzled by the lack of visible water quality response to past efforts given the tremendous investment. Therefore, decision makers desperately need a scientifically sound way to quantitatively evaluate the response of lake water quality to proposed management measures and engineering works. We used a water quality modeling based scenario analysis approach to quantitatively evaluate the eutrophication responses of Lake Dianchi to an under-construction water diversion project. The primary analytic framework was built on a three-dimensional hydrodynamic, nutrient fate and transport, as well as algae dynamics model, which has previously been calibrated and validated using historical data. We designed 16 scenarios to analyze the water quality effects of three driving forces, including watershed nutrient loading, variations in diverted inflow water, and lake water level. A two-step statistical analysis consisting of an orthogonal test analysis and linear regression was then conducted to distinguish the contributions of various driving forces to lake water quality. The analysis results show that (a) the different ways of managing the diversion projects would result in different water quality response in Lake Dianchi, though the differences do not appear to be significant; (b) the maximum reduction in annual average and peak Chl-a concentration from the various ways of diversion project operation are respectively 11% and 5%; (c) a combined 66% watershed load reduction and water diversion can eliminate the lake hypoxia volume percentage from the existing 6.82% to 3.00%; and (d) the water diversion will decrease the occurrence of algal blooms, and the effect of algae reduction can be enhanced if diverted water are seasonally allocated such that wet

  15. Spatiotemporal Water body Change Detection Using Multi-temporal Landsat Imagery: Case Studies of Lake Enriquillo and Lake Azuei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moknatian, M.; Piasecki, M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most valuable sources of data is Landsat imagery when in-situ data is absent. The Landsat satellite observations are also among the most widely used sources of data in remote sensing of water resources. The purpose of this study is to investigate the water body changes of the two biggest lakes of Hispaniola Island for the past 30 years, using remote sensing techniques when there are no in-situ measurements available. Lake Azuei in Haiti and Lake Enriquillo in the Dominican Republic both have been changing constantly in their quality and quantity. Unexpected growth of the two lakes has been observed since 2003, leaving the area with many ecological and socio-economic complications affecting thousands of local peoples' lives during the past 12 years. Such phenomena are expected to be due to the influence of climate change on the lakes. One of the main key components to investigate this hypothesis is first to detect and map the patterns of changes of the lakes over time. 100 Landsat 4-5 TM and 192 Landsat 7-ETM+ scenes acquired from 1984 to 2014 were analyzed to investigate the surface area changes for each lake. Almost 60% of the images are fully or partially cloudy which makes it difficult to picture the full extent of the lakes and consequently calculate their surface area. Moreover, 65% of images have gaps due to the failure of the ETM+ scan line corrector (SLC) since 2003 which adds to the problem. To solve this problem, we developed an algorithm to identify and classify clouds and cloud shadows using blue and Thermal bands; remove them from the scene and then detect water body using Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) using Green and NIR bands. The next step was to fill the gaps which were created after removing clouds and stripes from the scenes. Toward this end, we decided to complete each image using the previous or next available image. 95% of the images have been processed and surface area has been calculated for both lakes. Using the

  16. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  17. Balancing Public Trust Resources of Mono Lake and Los Angeles' Water Right: An Economic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, John B.

    1987-08-01

    The contingent valuation method (CVM) is used to quantify the Public Trust values of Mono Lake at alternative lake levels. The dichotomous choice approach to contingent valuation is employed using a logit model. The economic benefit to California residents of preserving Mono Lake is estimated to be 1.5 billion. Purchase of replacement water and power would cost 26.2 million annually. On efficiency grounds, reallocation of water for maintenance of Public Trust values at Mono Lake is warranted. The CVM appears to be a useful methodology to evaluate the balancing and feasibility tests of the expanded Public Trust doctrine suggested by the California Supreme Court.

  18. A screening assessment of external radiation levels on the shore of Lake Issyk-Kyol in the Kyrghyz Republic.

    PubMed

    Hamby, D M; Tynybekov, A K

    1999-10-01

    The Kyrghyz Republic, located in the southeastern region of the former Soviet Union, holds a long history of atomic weapons development activities. Historical surveys, conducted primarily for geological exploration, have indicated that areas of shoreline on Lake Issyk-Kyol in the Kyrghyz Republic have relative radiation levels in excess of background by as much as a factor of ten. Nuclear testing in China and uranium mining operations in the mountains surrounding the lake may have resulted in the contamination of a number of areas on the lake's southern shore. The valley region maintains a population of more than one-half-million persons and is heavily dependent on the lake to draw tourists to the area and its utilization by some as a food and recreation source. In this note, we show the results of a screening assessment of relative radiation levels along the shoreline of Lake Issyk-Kyol to pin-point areas of relatively high exposure rates.

  19. Lake Storage Measurements For Water Resources Management: Combining Remotely Sensed Water Levels and Surface Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakenridge, G. R.; Birkett, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Presently operating satellite-based radar altimeters have the ability to monitor variations in surface water height for large lakes and reservoirs, and future sensors will expand observational capabilities to many smaller water bodies. Such remote sensing provides objective, independent information where in situ data are lacking or access is restricted. A USDA/NASA (http://www.pecad.fas.usda.gov/cropexplorer/global_reservoir/) program is performing operational altimetric monitoring of the largest lakes and reservoirs around the world using data from the NASA/CNES, NRL, and ESA missions. Public lake-level products from the Global Reservoir and Lake Monitor (GRLM) are a combination of archived and near real time information. The USDA/FAS utilizes the products for assessing international irrigation potential and for crop production estimates; other end-users study climate trends, observe anthropogenic effects, and/or are are involved in other water resources management and regional water security issues. At the same time, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (http://floodobservatory.colorado.edu/), its NASA GSFC partners (http://oas.gsfc.nasa.gov/floodmap/home.html), and associated MODIS data and automated processing algorithms are providing public access to a growing GIS record of the Earth's changing surface water extent, including changes related to floods and droughts. The Observatory's web site also provide both archival and near real time information, and is based mainly on the highest spatial resolution (250 m) MODIS bands. Therefore, it is now possible to provide on an international basis reservoir and lake storage change measurements entirely from remote sensing, on a frequently updating basis. The volume change values are based on standard numerical procedures used for many decades for analysis of coeval lake area and height data. We provide first results of this combination, including prototype displays for public access and data retrieval of water storage

  20. Hydrology and water quality of Lauderdale Lakes, Walworth County, Wisconsin, 1993-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garn, H.S.; Seidel, T.L.; Rose, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Ground water and precipitation are the primary water-budget inflow components, and during the study period represented 72 and 24 percent of the total annual inflow, respectively. Surface-water inflow from the small nearshore contributing drainage area accounted for only 4 percent of the inflow budget. Total annual phosphorus input to the lakes was 846 pounds. Although surface water accounted for only 4 percent of the water budget, it represented 51 percent of the total annual phosphorus input. Phosphorus input from septic systems was the second largest source, with a probable annual input of 210 pounds, accounting for 25 percent of the total. Positive ground-water gradients to the lake and phosphorus concentrations in ground water were verified by data from nearshore observation wells. Phosphorus concentrations in ground water exceeded background concentrations of 0.008 milligrams per liter in three out of six observation wells in the inflow area of the lakes. Overall, the phosphorus loading to the lakes is small and lake-water quality is good. The trophic state indices calculated for the lakes ranged from oligotrophic to mesotrophic but were in the mesotrophic class for most of the year. An equation to predict phosphorus concentration at spring turnover from loading estimates was fairly accurate in predicting the measured phosphorus concentration for Lauderdale Lakes.

  1. Water transparency distribution under varied currents in the largest river-connected lake of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Zhizhang; Pang, Yong; Liang, Dongfang

    2017-01-01

    Water transparency is an important ecological indicator for shallow lakes. The largest shallow lake, Poyang Lake, as well as the most typical river-connected lake in China was selected as the research area. In view of the complicated water-sediment conditions induced by its frequent water exchange with external rivers, the dominant factors driving water transparency were determined against the field investigated data from 2003 to 2013 and a specific driving function was established. A numerical model coupling suspended sediment, Chl-a and chemical oxygen demand was developed and validated, and the spatial water transparency distributions under three typical current structures in Poyang Lake, Gravity-style, Jacking-style and Backflow-style, were quantitatively estimated. The following results stood out: water transparency in the lake varied distinctly with the current status; Backflow-style current was basically characterized by the lowest water transparency, while that under Jacking-style was the highest due to the lower sediment carrying capacity. In some outlying regions in the lake, where the water current is hardly influenced by the mainstream, the water transparency was always kept at a stable level.

  2. Water Quality and Methane Emissions at Cave Run Lake ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is conducting an investigation of methane (CH4) dynamics in reservoirs. CH4 is a potent greenhouse gas that is produced by microorganisms in reservoir sediments. The objective is to estimate the magnitude of CH4 emissions from reservoirs in the United States. The USEPA measured CH4 emissions from 32 reservoirs in Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky during the summer of 2016. We designated a minimum of 15 sampling sites in each reservoir (depending on reservoir size), where we measured CH4 emissions and several water quality indicators. CH4 emissions were measured using a device which captures CH4-rich bubbles as they rise through the water column toward the atmosphere. A sonde was used to measure chlorophyll a, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductivity, water temperature, and turbidity just below the water surface at each site. Additionally, nutrient chemistry was analyzed at one shallow and one deep site for each reservoir. This preliminary report presents results from the USEPA 2016 measurement campaign relevant to Cave Run Lake, located in eatern Kentucky. These data will be included in a formal peer-reviewed publication to be submitted for publication in early 2018. To inform the public

  3. Effect of humic substance photodegradation on bacterial growth and respiration in lake water.

    PubMed

    Anesio, Alexandre M; Granéli, Wilhelm; Aiken, George R; Kieber, David J; Mopper, Kenneth

    2005-10-01

    This study addresses how humic substance (HS) chemical composition and photoreactivity affect bacterial growth, respiration, and growth efficiency (BGE) in lake water. Aqueous solutions of HSs from diverse aquatic environments representing different dissolved organic matter sources (autochthonous and allochthonous) were exposed to artificial solar UV radiation. These solutions were added to lake water passed through a 0.7-microm-pore-size filter (containing grazer-free lake bacteria) followed by dark incubation for 5, 43, and 65 h. For the 5-h incubation, several irradiated HSs inhibited bacterial carbon production (BCP) and this inhibition was highly correlated with H2O2 photoproduction. The H2O2 decayed in the dark, and after 43 h, nearly all irradiated HSs enhanced BCP (average 39% increase relative to nonirradiated controls, standard error = 7.5%, n = 16). UV exposure of HSs also increased bacterial respiration (by approximately 18%, standard error = 5%, n = 4), but less than BCP, resulting in an average increase in BGE of 32% (standard error = 10%, n = 4). Photoenhancement of BCP did not correlate to HS bulk properties (i.e., elemental and chemical composition). However, when the photoenhancement of BCP was normalized to absorbance, several trends with HS origin and extraction method emerged. Absorbance-normalized hydrophilic acid and humic acid samples showed greater enhancement of BCP than hydrophobic acid and fulvic acid samples. Furthermore, absorbance-normalized autochthonous samples showed approximately 10-fold greater enhancement of BCP than allochthonous-dominated samples, indicating that the former are more efficient photoproducers of biological substrates.

  4. Effect of Humic Substance Photodegradation on Bacterial Growth and Respiration in Lake Water

    PubMed Central

    Anesio, Alexandre M.; Granéli, Wilhelm; Aiken, George R.; Kieber, David J.; Mopper, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses how humic substance (HS) chemical composition and photoreactivity affect bacterial growth, respiration, and growth efficiency (BGE) in lake water. Aqueous solutions of HSs from diverse aquatic environments representing different dissolved organic matter sources (autochthonous and allochthonous) were exposed to artificial solar UV radiation. These solutions were added to lake water passed through a 0.7-μm-pore-size filter (containing grazer-free lake bacteria) followed by dark incubation for 5, 43, and 65 h. For the 5-h incubation, several irradiated HSs inhibited bacterial carbon production (BCP) and this inhibition was highly correlated with H2O2 photoproduction. The H2O2 decayed in the dark, and after 43 h, nearly all irradiated HSs enhanced BCP (average 39% increase relative to nonirradiated controls, standard error = 7.5%, n = 16). UV exposure of HSs also increased bacterial respiration (by ∼18%, standard error = 5%, n = 4), but less than BCP, resulting in an average increase in BGE of 32% (standard error = 10%, n = 4). Photoenhancement of BCP did not correlate to HS bulk properties (i.e., elemental and chemical composition). However, when the photoenhancement of BCP was normalized to absorbance, several trends with HS origin and extraction method emerged. Absorbance-normalized hydrophilic acid and humic acid samples showed greater enhancement of BCP than hydrophobic acid and fulvic acid samples. Furthermore, absorbance-normalized autochthonous samples showed ∼10-fold greater enhancement of BCP than allochthonous-dominated samples, indicating that the former are more efficient photoproducers of biological substrates. PMID:16204548

  5. Effect of humic substance photodegradation on bacterial growth and respiration in lake water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anesio, A.M.; Graneli, W.; Aiken, G.R.; Kieber, D.J.; Mopper, K.

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses how humic substance (HS) chemical composition and photoreactivity affect bacterial growth, respiration, and growth efficiency (BGE) in lake water. Aqueous solutions of HSs from diverse aquatic environments representing different dissolved organic matter sources (autochthonous and allochthonous) were exposed to artificial solar UV radiation. These solutions were added to lake water passed through a 0.7-?