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Sample records for lambda orionis cluster

  1. The Lambda Orionis association. [star cluster anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdin, P.; Penston, M. V.

    1977-01-01

    The Lambda Orionis association has the photometric properties of a typical young cluster with an age of about 4 million yr. Its distance is 400 + or - 40 pc. Attention is drawn to the lack of a dense molecular cloud and associated infrared sources in this young grouping

  2. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THE {lambda} ORIONIS CLUSTER. II. DISKS AROUND SOLAR-TYPE AND LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Jesus; Morales-Calderon, Maria; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, L.; Muzerolle, J.; Gutermuth, R.; Luhman, K. L.; Stauffer, J. E-mail: muzerol@stsci.ed

    2010-10-20

    We present IRAC/MIPS Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the solar-type and the low-mass stellar population of the young ({approx}5 Myr) {lambda} Orionis cluster. Combining optical and Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry, we identify 436 stars as probable members of the cluster. Given the distance (450 pc) and the age of the cluster, our sample ranges in mass from 2 M{sub sun} to objects below the substellar limit. With the addition of the Spitzer mid-infrared data, we have identified 49 stars bearing disks in the stellar cluster. Using spectral energy distribution slopes, we place objects in several classes: non-excess stars (diskless), stars with optically thick disks, stars with 'evolved disks' (with smaller excesses than optically thick disk systems), and 'transitional disk' candidates (in which the inner disk is partially or fully cleared). The disk fraction depends on the stellar mass, ranging from {approx}6% for K-type stars (R{sub C} - J < 2) to {approx}27% for stars with spectral-type M5 or later (R{sub C} - J>4). We confirm the dependence of disk fraction on stellar mass in this age range found in other studies. Regarding clustering levels, the overall fraction of disks in the {lambda} Orionis cluster is similar to those reported in other stellar groups with ages normally quoted as {approx}5 Myr.

  3. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THE lambda ORIONIS CLUSTER. I. THE FREQUENCY OF YOUNG DEBRIS DISKS AT 5 Myr

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Jesus; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, L.; Muzerolle, J.; Gutermuth, R.; Stauffer, J.

    2009-12-10

    We present IRAC/MIPS Spitzer observations of intermediate-mass stars in the 5 Myr old lambda Orionis cluster. In a representative sample of stars earlier than F5 (29 stars), we find a population of nine stars with varying degree of moderate 24 mum excess comparable to those produced by debris disks in older stellar groups. As expected in debris disks systems, those stars do not exhibit emission lines in their optical spectra. We also include in our study the star HD 245185, a known Herbig Ae object which displays excesses in all Spitzer bands and shows emission lines in its spectrum. We compare the disk population in the lambda Orionis cluster with the disk census in other stellar groups studied using similar methods to detect and characterize their disks and spanning a range of ages from 3 Myr to 10 Myr. We find that for stellar groups of 5 Myr or older the observed disk frequency in intermediate-mass stars (with spectral types from late B to early F) is higher than in low-mass stars (with spectral types K and M). This is in contradiction with the observed trend for primordial disk evolution, in which stars with higher stellar masses dissipate their primordial disks faster. At 3 Myr, the observed disk frequency in intermediate-mass stars is still lower than for low-mass stars indicating that second generation dusty disks start to dominate the disk population at 5 Myr for intermediate-mass stars. This result agrees with recent models of evolution of solids in the region of the disk where icy objects form (>30 AU), which suggest that at 5-10 Myr collisions start to produce large amount of dust during the transition from runaway to oligarchic growth (reaching sizes of approx500 km) and then dust production peaks at 10-30 Myr, when objects reach their maximum size (>=1000 km).

  4. A SCUBA-2 850-micron Survey of Circumstellar Disks in the λ Orionis Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, Megan; Williams, Jonathan P.; Cieza, Lucas A.

    2015-06-01

    We present results from an 850 μm survey of the ∼5 Myr old λ Orionis star-forming region. We used the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to survey a ∼0.°5-diameter circular region containing 36 (out of 59) cluster members with infrared excesses indicative of circumstellar disks. We detected only one object at \\gt 3σ significance, the Herbig Ae star HD 245185, with a flux density of ∼74 mJy beam‑1 corresponding to a dust mass of ∼150 {M}\\oplus . Stacking the individually undetected sources did not produce a significant mean signal but gives an upper limit on the average dust mass for λ Orionis disks of ∼3 {M}\\oplus . Our follow-up observations of HD 245185 with the Submillimeter Array found weak CO 2–1 line emission with an integrated flux of ∼170 mJy km s‑1 but no 13CO or C18O isotopologue emission at 30 mJy km s‑1 sensitivity, suggesting a gas mass of ≲ 1 M{}{Jup}. The implied gas-to-dust ratio is thus ≳ 50 times lower than the canonical interstellar medium value, setting HD 245185 apart from other Herbig Ae disks of similar age, which have been found to be gas rich; as HD 245185 also shows signs of accretion, we may be catching it in the final phases of disk clearing. Our study of the λ Orionis cluster places quantitative constraints on planet formation timescales, indicating that at ∼5 Myr the average disk no longer has sufficient dust and gas to form giant planets and perhaps even super-Earths; the bulk material has been mostly dispersed or is locked in pebbles/planetesimals larger than a few mm in size.

  5. A SCUBA-2 850-micron Survey of Circumstellar Disks in the λ Orionis Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, Megan; Williams, Jonathan P.; Cieza, Lucas A.

    2015-06-01

    We present results from an 850 μm survey of the ˜5 Myr old λ Orionis star-forming region. We used the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to survey a ˜0.°5-diameter circular region containing 36 (out of 59) cluster members with infrared excesses indicative of circumstellar disks. We detected only one object at \\gt 3σ significance, the Herbig Ae star HD 245185, with a flux density of ˜74 mJy beam-1 corresponding to a dust mass of ˜150 {M}\\oplus . Stacking the individually undetected sources did not produce a significant mean signal but gives an upper limit on the average dust mass for λ Orionis disks of ˜3 {M}\\oplus . Our follow-up observations of HD 245185 with the Submillimeter Array found weak CO 2-1 line emission with an integrated flux of ˜170 mJy km s-1 but no 13CO or C18O isotopologue emission at 30 mJy km s-1 sensitivity, suggesting a gas mass of ≲ 1 M{}{Jup}. The implied gas-to-dust ratio is thus ≳ 50 times lower than the canonical interstellar medium value, setting HD 245185 apart from other Herbig Ae disks of similar age, which have been found to be gas rich; as HD 245185 also shows signs of accretion, we may be catching it in the final phases of disk clearing. Our study of the λ Orionis cluster places quantitative constraints on planet formation timescales, indicating that at ˜5 Myr the average disk no longer has sufficient dust and gas to form giant planets and perhaps even super-Earths; the bulk material has been mostly dispersed or is locked in pebbles/planetesimals larger than a few mm in size.

  6. A spectroscopic census in young stellar regions: the σ Orionis cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, Jesús; Perez, Alice; Hernan, Ramírez; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Briceño, Cesar; Olguin, Lorenzo; Contreras, Maria E.; Allen, Lori; Espaillat, Catherine

    2014-10-10

    We present a spectroscopic survey of the stellar population of the σ Orionis cluster. We have obtained spectral types for 340 stars. Spectroscopic data for spectral typing come from several spectrographs with similar spectroscopic coverage and resolution. More than half of the stars in our sample are members confirmed by the presence of lithium in absorption, strong Hα in emission or weak gravity-sensitive features. In addition, we have obtained high-resolution (R ∼ 34,000) spectra in the Hα region for 169 stars in the region. Radial velocities were calculated from this data set. The radial velocity distribution for members of the cluster is in agreement with previous work. Analysis of the profile of the Hα line and infrared observations reveals two binary systems or fast rotators that mimic the Hα width expected in stars with accretion disks. On the other hand, there are stars with optically thick disks and narrow Hα profiles not expected in stars with accretion disks. This contribution constitutes the largest homogeneous spectroscopic data set of the σ Orionis cluster to date.

  7. A census of very-low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in the σ Orionis cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodieu, N.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Rebolo, R.; Martín, E. L.; Hambly, N. C.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The knowledge of the initial mass function (IMF) in open clusters constitutes one way of constraining the formation of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, along with the frequency of multiple systems and the properties of disks. Aims: The aim of the project is to determine the shape of the mass function in the low-mass and substellar regimes in the σ Orionis cluster (~3 Myr, ~352 pc, solar metallicity) as accurately as possible and compare it with the results in other clusters. Methods: We have analysed the near-infrared photometric data from the fourth data release (DR4) of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Suvey (UKIDSS) Galactic clusters survey (GCS) to derive the cluster luminosity and mass functions, evaluate the extent of the cluster, and study the distribution and variability of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs down to the deuterium-burning limit. Results: We have recovered most of the previously published members and found a total of 287 candidate members within the central 30 arcmin in the 0.5-0.009 M⊙ mass range, including new objects not previously reported in the literature. This new catalogue represents a homogeneous dataset of brown dwarf member candidates over the central 30 arcmin of the cluster. The expected photometric contamination by field objects with similar magnitudes and colours to σ Orionis members is ~15%. We present evidence of variability at the 99.5% confidence level over ~yearly timescales in 10 member candidates that exhibit signs of youth and the presence of disks. The level of variability is low (≤0.3 mag) and does not impact the derivation of the cluster luminosity and mass functions. Furthermore, we find a possible dearth of brown dwarfs within the central five arcmin of the cluster, which is not caused by a lower level of photometric sensitivity around the massive, O-type multiple star σ Ori in the GCS survey. Using state-of-the-art theoretical models, we derived the luminosity and mass functions within the central 30

  8. NEW ISOLATED PLANETARY-MASS OBJECTS AND THE STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR MASS FUNCTION OF THE {sigma} ORIONIS CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Pena Ramirez, K.; Bejar, V. J. S.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G. E-mail: vbejar@iac.es E-mail: ege@cab.inta-csic.es

    2012-07-20

    We report on our analysis of the VISTA Orion ZY JHK{sub s} photometric data (completeness magnitudes of Z = 22.6 and J = 21.0 mag) focusing on a circular area of 2798.4 arcmin{sup 2} around the young {sigma} Orionis star cluster ({approx}3 Myr, {approx}352 pc, and solar metallicity). The combination of the VISTA photometry with optical, WISE and Spitzer data allows us to identify a total of 210 {sigma} Orionis member candidates with masses in the interval 0.25-0.004 M{sub Sun }, 23 of which are new planetary-mass object findings. These discoveries double the number of cluster planetary-mass candidates known so far. One object has colors compatible with a T spectral type. The {sigma} Orionis cluster harbors about as many brown dwarfs (69, 0.072-0.012 M{sub Sun }) and planetary-mass objects (37, 0.012-0.004 M{sub Sun }) as very low mass stars (104, 0.25-0.072 M{sub Sun }). Based on Spitzer data, we derive a disk frequency of {approx}40% for very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planetary-mass objects in {sigma} Orionis. The radial density distributions of these three mass intervals are alike: all are spatially concentrated within an effective radius of 12' (1.2 pc) around the multiple star {sigma} Ori, and no obvious segregation between disk-bearing and diskless objects is observed. Using the VISTA data and the Mayrit catalog, we derive the cluster mass spectrum ({Delta}N/{Delta}M {approx} M{sup -{alpha}}) from {approx}19 to 0.006 M{sub Sun} (VISTA ZJ completeness), which is reasonably described by two power-law expressions with indices of {alpha} = 1.7 {+-} 0.2 for M > 0.35 M{sub Sun }, and {alpha} = 0.6 {+-} 0.2 for M < 0.35 M{sub Sun }. The {sigma} Orionis mass spectrum smoothly extends into the planetary-mass regime down to 0.004 M{sub Sun }. Our findings of T-type sources (<0.004 M{sub Sun }) in the VISTA {sigma} Orionis exploration appear to be smaller than what is predicted by the extrapolation of the cluster mass spectrum down to the survey J

  9. New Isolated Planetary-mass Objects and the Stellar and Substellar Mass Function of the σ Orionis Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Ramírez, K.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Martín, E. L.

    2012-07-01

    We report on our analysis of the VISTA Orion ZY JHKs photometric data (completeness magnitudes of Z = 22.6 and J = 21.0 mag) focusing on a circular area of 2798.4 arcmin2 around the young σ Orionis star cluster (~3 Myr, ~352 pc, and solar metallicity). The combination of the VISTA photometry with optical, WISE and Spitzer data allows us to identify a total of 210 σ Orionis member candidates with masses in the interval 0.25-0.004 M ⊙, 23 of which are new planetary-mass object findings. These discoveries double the number of cluster planetary-mass candidates known so far. One object has colors compatible with a T spectral type. The σ Orionis cluster harbors about as many brown dwarfs (69, 0.072-0.012 M ⊙) and planetary-mass objects (37, 0.012-0.004 M ⊙) as very low mass stars (104, 0.25-0.072 M ⊙). Based on Spitzer data, we derive a disk frequency of ~40% for very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planetary-mass objects in σ Orionis. The radial density distributions of these three mass intervals are alike: all are spatially concentrated within an effective radius of 12' (1.2 pc) around the multiple star σ Ori, and no obvious segregation between disk-bearing and diskless objects is observed. Using the VISTA data and the Mayrit catalog, we derive the cluster mass spectrum (ΔN/ΔM ~ M -α) from ~19 to 0.006 M ⊙ (VISTA ZJ completeness), which is reasonably described by two power-law expressions with indices of α = 1.7 ± 0.2 for M > 0.35 M ⊙, and α = 0.6 ± 0.2 for M < 0.35 M ⊙. The σ Orionis mass spectrum smoothly extends into the planetary-mass regime down to 0.004 M ⊙. Our findings of T-type sources (<0.004 M ⊙) in the VISTA σ Orionis exploration appear to be smaller than what is predicted by the extrapolation of the cluster mass spectrum down to the survey J-band completeness.

  10. Discovery of young, isolated planetary mass objects in the final sigma Orionis star cluster.

    PubMed

    Zapatero Osorio, M R; Béjar, V J; Martín, E L; Rebolo, R; Barrado y Navascués, D; Bailer-Jones, C A; Mundt, R

    2000-10-01

    We present the discovery by optical and near-infrared imaging of an extremely red, low-luminosity population of isolated objects in the young, nearby stellar cluster around the multiple, massive star final sigma Orionis. The proximity (352 parsecs), youth (1 million to 5 million years), and low internal extinction make this cluster an ideal site to explore the substellar domain from the hydrogen mass limit down to a few Jupiter masses. Optical and near-infrared low-resolution spectroscopy of three of these objects confirms the very cool spectral energy distribution (atmospheric effective temperatures of 1700 to 2200 kelvin) expected for cluster members with masses in the range 5 to 15 times that of Jupiter. Like the planets of the solar system, these objects are unable to sustain stable nuclear burning in their interiors, but in contrast they are not bound to stars. This new kind of isolated giant planet, which apparently forms on time scales of less than a few million years, offers a challenge to our understanding of the formation processes of planetary mass objects.

  11. Characterization of the known T-type dwarfs towards the σ Orionis cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Ramírez, K.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Béjar, V. J. S.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: The detailed study of T-type candidate members of the young σ Orionis cluster (~3 Myr, ~352 pc, solar metallicity) is fundamental to properly assess the objects' cluster membership and their contribution to the definition of the substellar mass function. Methods: A total of three T-type candidates (S Ori 70, S Ori 73, and S Ori J053804.65-021352.5) lying in the line of sight towards σ Orionis were characterized by means of near-infrared photometric, astrometric, and spectroscopic studies. H-band methane images were collected for all three sources and an additional sample of 15 field T-type dwarfs using the LIRIS instrument on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). J-band spectra of resolution of ~500 were obtained for S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 with the ISAAC spectrograph on the 8 m Very Large Telescope (VLT), and JH spectra of resolution of ~50 acquired with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were employed for the spectroscopic classification of S Ori 70 and 73. Accurate proper motions with a typical uncertainty of ±3 mas yr-1 and a time interval of ~7-9 yr were derived using old images and new data collected with ISAAC/VLT and WFC3/HST. Results: Using the LIRIS observations of the field T dwarfs, we calibrated this imager for T spectral typing via methane photometry. The three S Ori objects were spectroscopically classified as T4.5 ± 0.5 (S Ori 73), T5 ± 0.5 (S Ori J053804.65-021352.5), and T7 +0.5-1.0 (S Ori 70). These spectral types agree with the measured H-band methane colors. The similarity between the observed JH spectra and the methane colors and the data of field ultra-cool dwarfs of related classifications suggests that S Ori 70, 73, and S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 do not deviate significantly in surface gravity in relation to the field. Additionally, the detection of K I at ~1.25 μm in S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 points to a high-gravity atmosphere. Only the K-band reddish nature of S Ori 70 may be

  12. Status of known T type sources towards the σ Orionis cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena Ramirez, K.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Bejar, V. J. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the characterization of the three T type candidates (S Ori 70, S Ori 73, and S Ori J053804.65-021352.5) lying in the line of sight towards σ Orionis (˜3 Myr, ˜352 pc, solar metallicity) by means of near-infrared photometric, astrometric, and spectroscopic studies. H-band methane images were collected for all three sources using the LIRIS instrument on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. J-band spectra of resolution ˜500 were obtained for S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 with the ISAAC spectrograph on the 8 m Very Large Telescope (VLT), and public low resolution (R˜50) JH spectra obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were employed for the spectroscopic classification of S Ori 70 and 73. Accurate proper motions with a typical uncertainty of ±3 mas yr^{-1} were derived using ancient images and new data collected with ISAAC/VLT and WFC3/HST. The three objects were spectroscopically classified as T4.5 ± 0.5 (S Ori 73), T5 ± 0.5 (S Ori J053804.65-021352.5), and T7^{+0.5}_{-1.0} (S Ori 70). These spectral types agree with the H-band methane colors. The proper motions of S Ori 70 and 73 are larger than that of the cluster by >4 σ. The proper motion of S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 is consistent with a null displacement during the time interval of 7.03 yr.

  13. A SCUBA-2 850-μm survey of protoplanetary discs in the σ Orionis cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; Cieza, Lucas A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Coulson, Iain M.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Koss, Michael; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.

    2013-10-01

    We present the results from a large 850-μm survey of the σ Orionis cluster using the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The 0.5° diameter circular region we surveyed contains 297 young stellar objects with an age estimated at about 3 Myr. We detect nine of these objects, eight of which have infrared excesses from an inner disc. We also serendipitously detect three non-stellar sources at >5σ that are likely background submillimetre galaxies. The nine detected stars have inferred disc masses ranging from 5 to about 17 MJup, assuming similar dust properties as Taurus discs and an interstellar medium gas-to-dust ratio of 100. There is a net positive signal towards the positions of the individually undetected infrared excess sources indicating a mean disc mass of 0.5 MJup. Stacking the emission towards those stars without infrared excesses constrains their mean disc mass to less than 0.3 MJup, or an equivalent Earth mass in dust. The submillimetre luminosity distribution is significantly different from that in the younger Taurus region, indicating disc mass evolution as star-forming regions age and the infrared excess fraction decreases. Submillimetre Array observations reveal CO emission towards four sources demonstrating that some, but probably not much, molecular gas remains in these relatively evolved discs. These observations provide new constraints on the dust and gas mass of protoplanetary discs during the giant planet building phase and provide a reference level for future studies of disc evolution.

  14. GAS CLUMPING IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF {Lambda}CDM CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.

    2011-04-10

    Recent Suzaku X-ray observations revealed that the observed entropy profile of the intracluster medium (ICM) deviates significantly from the prediction of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters. In this work, we show that gas clumping introduces significant biases in X-ray measurements of the ICM profiles in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. Using hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation in a concordance {Lambda}CDM model, we demonstrate that gas clumping leads to an overestimate of the observed gas density and causes flattening of the entropy profile. Our results suggest that gas clumping must be taken into account when interpreting X-ray measurements of cluster outskirts.

  15. PRECISION PHOTOMETRIC MONITORING OF VERY LOW MASS {sigma} ORIONIS CLUSTER MEMBERS: VARIABILITY AND ROTATION AT A FEW Myr

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Ann Marie; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2010-12-15

    We present high-precision photometry on 107 variable low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in the {approx}3 Myr {sigma} Orionis open cluster. We have carried out I-band photometric monitoring within two fields, encompassing 153 confirmed or candidate members of the low-mass cluster population, from 0.02 to 0.5 M {sub sun}. We are sensitive to brightness changes on timescales from 10 minutes to two weeks with amplitudes as low as 0.004 mag, and find variability on these timescales in nearly 70% of cluster members. We identify both periodic and aperiodic modes of variability, as well as semi-periodic rapid fading events that are not accounted for by the standard explanations of rotational modulation of surface features or accretion. We have incorporated both optical and infrared color data to uncover trends in variability with mass and circumstellar disks. While the data confirm that the lowest-mass objects (M < 0.2 M {sub sun}) rotate more rapidly than the 0.2-0.5 M {sub sun} members, they do not support a direct connection between rotation rate and the presence of a disk. Finally, we speculate on the origin of irregular variability in cluster members with no evidence for disks or accretion.

  16. Excited states of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be and {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Be in an {alpha} cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Shoeb, Mohammad

    2006-12-15

    The energies of the degenerate spin-flip doublet (3{sup +}/2,5{sup +}/2) of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be and of the 2{sup +} state of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Be are analyzed in the {alpha} cluster model using a phenomenological dispersive three-body {lambda}{alpha}{alpha} force that reproduces the ground state energy of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be. Two types of phenomenological {lambda}{alpha} and {alpha}{alpha} potentials and a few s-state {lambda}{lambda} potentials are taken as input. The energies of the excited states of the hypernuclei, treated as three- and four-body systems, calculated using the Variational Monte Carlo method, are in good agreement with the experimental values. Our results demonstrate that the existing data are insensitive to whether one employs a dispersive {lambda}{alpha}{alpha} force along with potentials in the relative angular momentum state l=0 and 2 as in the present work or whether one uses nonlocal {lambda}{alpha} potential as in earlier analyses.

  17. BULLET CLUSTER: A CHALLENGE TO {Lambda}CDM COSMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2010-07-20

    To quantify how rare the bullet-cluster-like high-velocity merging systems are in the standard {Lambda} cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology, we use a large-volume (27 h {sup -3} Gpc{sup 3}) cosmological N-body MICE simulation to calculate the distribution of infall velocities of subclusters around massive main clusters. The infall velocity distribution is given at (1-3)R{sub 200} of the main cluster (where R{sub 200} is similar to the virial radius), and thus it gives the distribution of realistic initial velocities of subclusters just before collision. These velocities can be compared with the initial velocities used by the non-cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of 1E0657-56 in the literature. The latest parameter search carried out by Mastropietro and Burkert has shown that an initial velocity of 3000 km s{sup -1} at about 2R{sub 200} is required to explain the observed shock velocity, X-ray brightness ratio of the main and subcluster, X-ray morphology of the main cluster, and displacement of the X-ray peaks from the mass peaks. We show that such a high infall velocity at 2R{sub 200} is incompatible with the prediction of a {Lambda}CDM model: the probability of finding 3000 km s{sup -1} in (2-3)R{sub 200} is between 3.3 x 10{sup -11} and 3.6 x 10{sup -9}. A lower velocity, 2000 km s{sup -1} at 2R{sub 200}, is also rare, and moreover, Mastropietro and Burkert have shown that such a low initial velocity does not reproduce the X-ray brightness ratio of the main and subcluster or morphology of the main cluster. Therefore, we conclude that the existence of 1E0657-56 is incompatible with the prediction of a {Lambda}CDM model, unless a lower infall velocity solution for 1E0657-56 with {approx}<1800 km s{sup -1} at 2R{sub 200} is found.

  18. YOUNG BROWN DWARFS AT HIGH CADENCE: WARM SPITZER TIME SERIES MONITORING OF VERY LOW MASS {sigma} ORIONIS CLUSTER MEMBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Ann Marie; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2011-11-01

    The continuous temporal coverage and high photometric precision afforded by space observatories have opened up new opportunities for the study of variability processes in young stellar cluster members. Of particular interest is the phenomenon of deuterium-burning pulsation in brown dwarfs (BDs) and very low mass stars, whose existence on 1-4 hr timescales has been proposed but not yet borne out by observations. To investigate short-timescale variability in young, low-mass objects, we carried out high-precision, high-cadence time series monitoring with the Warm Spitzer mission on 14 low mass stars and BDs in the {approx}3 Myr {sigma} Orionis cluster. The flux in many of our raw light curves is strongly correlated with subpixel position and can vary systematically by as much as 10%. We present a new approach to disentangle true stellar variability from this 'pixel-phase effect', which is more pronounced in Warm Spitzer observations as compared to the cryogenic mission. The light curves after correction reveal that most of the sample is devoid of variability down to the few-millimagnitude (mmag) level, on the minute to day timescales probed. However, one exceptional BD displays erratic brightness changes at the 10%-15% level, suggestive of variable obscuration by dusty material. The uninterrupted 24 hr datastream and sub-1% photometric precision enable limits on pulsation in the near-infrared. If this phenomenon is present in our light curves, then its amplitude must lie below 2-3 mmag. In addition, we present three field eclipsing binaries and one pulsator for which optical ground-based data are also available.

  19. Comparison of Cluster Lensing Profiles with Lambda CDM Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhurst, Tom; Umetsu, Keiichi; Medezinski, Elinor; Oguri, Masamune; Rephaeli, Yoel; /Tel Aviv U. /San Diego, CASS

    2008-05-21

    We derive lens distortion and magnification profiles of four well known clusters observed with Subaru. Each cluster is very well fitted by the general form predicted for Cold Dark Matter (CDM) dominated halos, with good consistency found between the independent distortion and magnification measurements. The inferred level of mass concentration is surprisingly high, 8 < c{sub vir} < 15 ( = 10.39 {+-} 0.91), compared to the relatively shallow profiles predicted by the {Lambda}CDM model, c{sub vir} = 5.06 {+-} 1.10 (for = 1.25 x 10{sup 15} M{sub {circle_dot}}/h). This represents a 4{sigma} discrepancy, and includes the relatively modest effects of projection bias and profile evolution derived from N-body simulations, which oppose each other with little residual effect. In the context of CDM based cosmologies, this discrepancy implies some modification of the widely assumed spectrum of initial density perturbations, so clusters collapse earlier (z {ge} 1) than predicted (z < 0.5) when the Universe was correspondingly denser.

  20. lambda lambda. hypernuclei and the. lambda lambda. interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1986-01-01

    Variational calculations of ..cap alpha..-cluster models for /sup 6//sub ..lambda lambda../He, /sup 9//sub ..lambda lambda../Be have been made. These calculations require a knowledge of the ..cap alpha lambda.. potential which is obtained in several ways including the use of five-body Monte Carlo (MC) calculations of /sup 5//sub ..lambda../He. We discuss the ..lambda lambda.. interaction strengths and the relation between the /sup 6//sub ..lambda lambda../He and /sup 10//sub ..lambda lambda../Be binding energies and, in particular, the dependence of these on the ..cap alpha lambda.. potential. For all our ..cap alpha lambda.. potentials the binding energy of /sup 6//sub ..lambda lambda../He predicted from /sup 10//sub ..lambda lambda../Be is 1 MeV or more below the experimental value. A brief discussion is given of the implication of the phenomenological strength of ..lambda lambda.. interaction we obtain and also the implication of ..lambda lambda.. hypernuclei for the H-dibaryon. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Container structure of alpha-alpha-Lambda clusters in 9-Lambda-Beryrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, Yasuro; Yamada, Taiichi; Hiyama, Emiko; Zhou, Bo; Ikeda, Kiyomi

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of clustering is discussed in Λ hypernuclei using a new-type microscopic cluster model wave function, which has a structure in which constituent clusters are confined in a container, whose size is a variational parameter and which we refer to as a hyper-Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Röpke (hyper-THSR) wave function. By using the hyper-THSR wave function, the 2α + Λ-cluster structure in {{^9_Λ}{Be}} is investigated. We show that full microscopic solutions in the 2α + Λ-cluster system, which are given as 2α + Λ Brink-GCM (generator coordinate method) wave functions, are almost perfectly reproduced by the single configurations of the hyper-THSR wave function. The squared overlaps between both wave functions are calculated to be 99.5%, 99.4%, and 97.7% for J^π =0^+ , 2^+ , and 4^+ states, respectively. We also simulate the structural change by adding the Λ particle, by varying the Λ N interaction artificially. With the increase of the Λ N interaction, the Λ particle gets to move more deeply inside the core and strongly invokes the spatial core shrinkage. Accordingly, distinct localized 2α clusters appear in the nucleonic intrinsic density, though, in the {^8Be} nucleus, a gaslike 2α-cluster structure is shown. The origin of the localization is associated with the strong effect of the Pauli principle. We conclude that the container picture of the 2α and Λ clusters is essential in understanding the cluster structure in {^9_ΛBe}, in which the very compact spatial localization of clusters is shown in the density distribution.

  2. An {alpha}-cluster model for {sub {Lambda}}{sup 9}Be spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Filikhin, I. N. Suslov, V. M.; Vlahovic, B.

    2013-03-15

    An {alpha}-cluster model is applied to study low-lying spectrum of the {sub {Lambda}}{sup 9}Be hypernucleus. The three-body {alpha}{alpha}{Lambda} problem is numerically solved by the Faddeev equations in configuration space using phenomenological pair potentials. We found a set of the potentials that reproduces experimental data for the ground state (1/2{sup +}) binding energy and excitation energy of the 5/2{sup +} and 3/2{sup +} states, simultaneously. This set includes the Ali-Bodmer potential of the version 'e' for {alpha}{alpha} and modified Tang-Herndon potential for {alpha}{Lambda} interactions. The spin-orbit {alpha}{Lambda} interaction is given by modified Scheerbaum potential. Low-lying energy levels are evaluated applying a variant of the analytical continuation method in the coupling constant. It is shown that the spectral properties of {sub {Lambda}}{sup 9}Be can be classified as an analog of {sup 9}Be spectrum with the exception of several 'genuine hypernuclear states'. This agrees qualitatively with previous studies. The results are compared with experimental data and new interpretation of the spectral structure is discussed.

  3. Lithium and Hα in stars and brown dwarfs of sigma Orionis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Pavlenko, Ya.; Rebolo, R.; Allende Prieto, C.; Martín, E. L.; García López, R. J.

    2002-03-01

    We present intermediate- and low-resolution optical spectra around Hα and Li I lambda 6708 Åfor a sample of 25 low mass stars and 2 brown dwarfs with confirmed membership in the pre-main sequence stellar sigma Orionis cluster. Our observations are intended to investigate the age of the cluster. The spectral types derived for our target sample are found to be in the range K6-M8.5, which corresponds to a mass interval of roughly 1.2-0.02 Msun on the basis of state-of-the-art evolutionary models. Radial velocities (except for one object) are found to be consistent with membership in the Orion complex. All cluster members show considerable Hα emission and the Li I resonance doublet in absorption, which is typical of very young ages. We find that our pseudo-equivalent widths of Hα and Li I (measured relative to the observed local pseudo-continuum formed by molecular absorptions) appear rather dispersed (and intense in the case of Hα ) for objects cooler than M3.5 spectral class, occurring at the approximate mass where low mass stars are expected to become fully convective. The least massive brown dwarf in our sample, S Ori 45 (M8.5, ~ 0.02 Msun), displays variable Hα emission and a radial velocity that differs from the cluster mean velocity. Tentative detection of forbidden lines in emission indicates that this brown dwarf may be accreting mass from a surrounding disk. We also present recent computations of Li I lambda 6708 Åcurves of growth for low gravities and for the temperature interval (about 4000-2600 K) of our sample. The comparison of our observations to these computations allows us to infer that no lithium depletion has yet taken place in sigma Orionis, and that the observed pseudo-equivalent widths are consistent with a cluster initial lithium abundance close to the cosmic value. Hence, the upper limit to the sigma Orionis cluster age can be set at 8 Myr, with a most likely value around 2-4 Myr. Based on observations made with the following telescopes

  4. Low-lying spectra of {sup 9}{Lambda}Be and {sup 9}Be within three-cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Filikhin, I.; Suslov, V. M.; Vlahovic, B.

    2011-10-24

    An {alpha}-cluster model is applied to study the low-lying spectra of the {sup 9}{Lambda}Be and {sup 9}Be nuclei. The {alpha}{alpha}{Lambda} and {alpha}{alpha}n three-body problems are numerically solved by the Faddeev equations in configuration space using phenomenological pair potentials with spin-orbital {alpha}{Lambda} and {alpha}n interactions taken into account. For the {sup 9}{Lambda}Be hypernucleus we found a set of the potentials that reproduces the experimental data for the ground state (1/2 {sup +}) binding energy and excitation energy of the 5/2{sup +} and 3/2 {sup +} states, simultaneously. The LS coupling scheme is used for partial wave analysis. The total orbital momentum is fixed for each energy level. Under this assumption we calculated the {sup 9}Be spectrum within {alpha}{alpha}n model. The experiential data are well reproduced by the model, when a new classification for low-lying levels of {sup 9}Be as members of spin-flip doublets is applied.

  5. Existence of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H: A variational Monte Carlo search

    SciTech Connect

    Shoeb, Mohammad

    2005-02-01

    A variational Monte Carlo (VMC) calculation for the binding energy B{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}} of the lightest hypernucleus {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H has been performed in the four-body {lambda}{lambda}pn model. A range of input {lambda}{lambda} potentials of moderate strength produce a particle-stable {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H for the simulated NSC97e and f {lambda}N potentials, whereas the phenomenological Minnesota {lambda}N potential needs a much stronger {lambda}{lambda} potential to bind. The VMC results for B{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}} agree with the prediction of the stochastic variational model but contradict the recent Faddeev-Yakubovsky calculation. As reported earlier, B{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}} is sensitive to the triplet {lambda}N channel for a given {lambda}{lambda} potential. The B{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}} of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H in the three-body {lambda}{lambda}d cluster model is consistent with but slightly lower than the Faddeev calculation. The VMC method predicts a stable {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H system in both models and thus offers the possibility of identifying {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H in a future extension of E906 or of a related experiment at KEK, provided the simulated potentials are true representations of realistic Nijmegen potentials.

  6. Protoplanetary Formation and the FU Orionis Outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    The following three publications which reference the above grant from the NASA Origins of Solar Systems program are attached and form the final technical report for this project. The research involved comparisons of the spectral energy distributions of FU Orionis objects with theoretical models and associated studies of the structure of the outbursting accretion disks, as well as related studies on the effects of magnetic fields in disks, which will lead in the future to models of FU Orionis outbursts which include the effects of magnetic fields. The project was renewed under a new grant NAGW-4456, entitled 'Effects of FU Orionis Outbursts on Protoplanetary Disks'. Work now being prepared for publication deals more specifically with the issue of the effects of the outbursts on protoplanetary formation. Models of the spectral energy distribution of FU Orionis stars. A simple model of a buoyant magnetic dynamo in accretion disks and a numerical study of magnetic buoyancy in an accretion disk have been submitted.

  7. Triple immunoglobulin gene knockout transchromosomic cattle: bovine lambda cluster deletion and its effect on fully human polyclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/-; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/- and bIGL-/-; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ).

  8. Triple Immunoglobulin Gene Knockout Transchromosomic Cattle: Bovine Lambda Cluster Deletion and Its Effect on Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-an; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM−/−, bIGHML1−/−; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM−/−, bIGHML1−/− and bIGL−/−; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ). PMID:24603704

  9. X-ray clusters in a cold dark matter + lambda universe: A direct, large-scale, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing, hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a cold dark matter (CDM) + lambda model universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85/h Mpc, having cell size 0.31/h Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. We adopt omega = 0.45, lambda = 0.55, h identically equal to H/100 km/s/Mpc = 0.6, and then, from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) and light element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 0.77, omega(sub b) = 0.043. We identify the X-ray emitting clusters in the simulation box, compute the luminosity function at several wavelength bands, the temperature function and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. This open model succeeds in matching local observations of clusters in contrast to the standard omega = 1, CDM model, which fails. It predicts an order of magnitude decline in the number density of bright (h nu = 2-10 keV) clusters from z = 0 to z = 2 in contrast to a slight increase in the number density for standard omega = 1, CDM model. This COBE-normalized CDM + lambda model produces approximately the same number of X-ray clusters having L(sub x) greater than 10(exp 43) erg/s as observed. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters is approximately the observed background which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates that the model is consistent with observations.

  10. Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water–tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-05-21

    Water–tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with x{sub TBA} ≈ 0.03–0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at x{sub TBA} ≈ 0.05. We note that “islands” of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, x{sub TBA} ≈ 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

  11. Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water-tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-05-01

    Water-tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with xTBA ≈ 0.03-0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at xTBA ≈ 0.05. We note that "islands" of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, xTBA ≈ 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

  12. Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water-tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-05-21

    Water-tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with x(TBA) ≈ 0.03-0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at x(TBA) ≈ 0.05. We note that "islands" of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, x(TBA) ≈ 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

  13. Spitzer IRS Observations of FU Orionis Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. D.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Watson, D. M.; Ibrahimov, M.; Furlan, E.; Sargent, B.; Forrest, W. J.

    2006-09-01

    We present 5-35 μm spectra, taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope, of five FU Orionis objects: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, BBW 76, and V346 Nor. All but V346 Nor reveal amorphous silicate grains in emission at 10 and 20 μm, and show water-vapor absorption bands at 5.8 and 6.8 μm and SiO or possibly methane absorption at 8 μm. These absorption features closely match these bands in model stellar photospheres-signs of the gaseous photospheres of the inner regions of these objects' accretion disks. The continuum emission at 5-8 μm is also consistent with such disks, and, for FU Orionis and BBW 76, longer wavelength emission may be fit by a model that includes moderate disk flaring. V1057 Cyg and V1515 Cyg have much more emission at longer wavelengths than the others, perhaps evidence of a substantial remnant of their natal, infalling envelopes.

  14. The Evolution of FU Orionis Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Joel D.

    2016-06-01

    Do protoplanetary disks undergo regular (or irregular) bursts of accretion? FU Orionis objects (FUors) are the strongest direct evidence for episodic accretion in low mass young stellar objects. FUors exhibit rapid changes in disk chemistry, both because they are temporarily bright IR sources relative to their core mass, and vary on day, month, year, and decade timescales. With improved spatial and spectral resolution from FORCAST, and a ten year time baseline compared with Spitzer-IRS data, we can observe and constrain the properties of silicate dust, and disk profiles, as they are altered by the outburst. We also consider the occurrence of binarity and whether any connection exists between multiplicity and evidence of recent outburst behavior.

  15. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF V2775 Ori, AN OUTBURSTING PROTOSTAR IN L 1641: EXPLORING THE EDGE OF THE FU ORIONIS REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, William J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Kounkel, Marina; Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Henning, Thomas; Ali, Babar; Stanke, Thomas; Osorio, Mayra; Wilson, T. L.

    2012-09-01

    Individual outbursting young stars are important laboratories for studying the physics of episodic accretion and the extent to which this phenomenon can explain the luminosity distribution of protostars. We present new and archival data for V2775 Ori (HOPS 223), a protostar in the L 1641 region of the Orion molecular clouds that was discovered by Caratti o Garatti et al. to have recently undergone an order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity. Our near-infrared spectra of the source have strong blueshifted He I {lambda}10830 absorption, strong H{sub 2}O and CO absorption, and no H I emission, all typical of FU Orionis sources. With data from the Infrared Telescope Facility, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Herschel, and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment that span from 1 to 70 {mu}m pre-outburst and from 1 to 870 {mu}m post-outburst, we estimate that the outburst began between 2005 April and 2007 March. We also model the pre- and post-outburst spectral energy distributions of the source, finding it to be in the late stages of accreting its envelope with a disk-to-star accretion rate that increased from {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} to {approx}10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} during the outburst. The post-outburst luminosity at the epoch of the FU Orionis-like near-IR spectra is 28 L{sub Sun }, making V2775 Ori the least luminous documented FU Orionis outburster with a protostellar envelope. The existence of low-luminosity outbursts supports the notion that a range of episiodic accretion phenomena can partially explain the observed spread in protostellar luminosities.

  16. Lambda Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, Michael

    2014-06-01

    There is an explosion in the quantity and quality of IMINT data being captured in Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) today. While automated exploitation techniques involving computer vision are arriving, only a few architectures can manage both the storage and bandwidth of large volumes of IMINT data and also present results to analysts quickly. Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (ATL) has been actively researching in the area of applying Big Data cloud computing techniques to computer vision applications. This paper presents the results of this work in adopting a Lambda Architecture to process and disseminate IMINT data using computer vision algorithms. The approach embodies an end-to-end solution by processing IMINT data from sensors to serving information products quickly to analysts, independent of the size of the data. The solution lies in dividing up the architecture into a speed layer for low-latent processing and a batch layer for higher quality answers at the expense of time, but in a robust and fault-tolerant way. This approach was evaluated using a large corpus of IMINT data collected by a C-130 Shadow Harvest sensor over Afghanistan from 2010 through 2012. The evaluation data corpus included full motion video from both narrow and wide area field-of-views. The evaluation was done on a scaled-out cloud infrastructure that is similar in composition to those found in the Intelligence Community. The paper shows experimental results to prove the scalability of the architecture and precision of its results using a computer vision algorithm designed to identify man-made objects in sparse data terrain.

  17. Binding energy of (Lambda)He-7 and test of charge symmetry breaking in the Lambda N interaction potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, O; Honda, D; Kaneta, M; Kato, F; Kawama, D; Maruyama, N; Matsumura, A; Nakamura, S N; Nomura, H; Nonaka, K; Ohtani, A; Okayasu, Y; Osaka, M; Oyamada, M; Sumihama, M; Tamura, H; Baker, O K; Cole, L; Christy, M; Gueye, P; Keppel, C; Tang, L; Yuan, L; Acha, A; Baturin, P; Boeglin, W; Kramer, L; Markowitz, P; Pamela, P; Perez, N; Raue, B; Reinhold, J; Rivera, R; Kato, S; Sato, Y; Takahashi, T; Daniel, A; Hungerford, Ed V; Ispiryan, M; Kalantarians, N; Lan, K J; Li, Y; Miyoshi, T; Randeniya, S; Rodriguez, V M; Bosted, P; Carlini, R; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gaskell, D; Jones, M; Mack, D; Roche, J; Smith, G; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W; Wood, S; Yan, C; Asaturyan, A; Asaturyan, R; Egiyan, K; Mkrtchyan, H; Margaryan, A; Navasardyan, T; Tadevosyan, V; Zamkochian, S; Hu, B; Song, Y; Luo, W; Androic, D; Furic, M; Petkovic, T; Seva, T; Ahmidouch, A; Danagoulian, S; Gasparian, A; Halkyard, R; Johnson, K; Simicevic, N; Wells, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, M I; Gan, L; Benmokhtar, F; Horn, T; Elassar, M; Gibson, E F

    2011-09-01

    The binding energy of 7LambdaHe has been obtained for the first time with reaction spectroscopy using the (e, e'K+) reaction at Jefferson Lab's Hall C. A comparison among the binding energies of the A = 7 T = l iso-triplet hypernuclei, 7LambdaHe, 7LambdaLi*and 7LambdaBe, is made and possible charge symmetry breaking (CSB) in the LambdaN potential is discussed. For 7LambdaHe and 7LambdaBe, the shifts in binding energies are opposite to those predicted by a recent cluster model calculation, which assumes that the unexplained part of the binding energy difference between 4LambdaH and 4LambdaHe, is due to the CSB of the LambdaN potential. Further examination of CSB in light hypernuclear systems is required both experimentally and theoretically.

  18. Radio continuum from FU Orionis stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, L.F.; Hartmann, L.W.; Chavira, E. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Puebla )

    1990-12-01

    Using the very large array a sensitive search is conducted for 3.6-cm continuum emission toward four FU Orionis objects: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, and Elias 1-12. V1057 Cyg and Elias 1-12 at the level of about 0.1 mJy is detected. The association of radio continuum emission with these FU Ori objects strengthens a possible relation between FU Ori stars and objects like L 1551 IRS 5 and Z CMa that are also sources of radio continuum emission and have been proposed as post-FU Ori objects. Whether the radio continuum emission is caused by free-free emission from ionized ejecta or if it is optically thin emission from a dusty disk is discussed. It was determined that, in the archives of the Tonantzintla Observatory, a plate taken in 1957 does not show Elias 1-12. This result significantly narrows the time range for the epoch of the outburst of this source to between 1957 and 1965. 38 refs.

  19. VARIABILITY IN OPTICAL SPECTRA OF {epsilon} ORIONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Gregory B.; Morrison, Nancy D. E-mail: nmorris@utnet.utoledo.edu

    2013-04-15

    We present the results of a time series analysis of 130 echelle spectra of {epsilon} Ori (B0 Ia), acquired over seven observing seasons between 1998 and 2006 at Ritter Observatory. The equivalent widths of H{alpha} (net) and He I {lambda}5876 were measured and radial velocities were obtained from the central absorption of He I {lambda}5876. Temporal variance spectra (TVS) revealed significant wind variability in both H{alpha} and He I {lambda}5876. The He I TVS have a double-peaked profile consistent with radial velocity oscillations. A periodicity search was carried out on the equivalent width and radial velocity data, as well as on wavelength-binned spectra. This analysis has revealed several periods in the variability with timescales of two to seven days. Many of these periods exhibit sinusoidal modulation in the associated phase diagrams. Several of these periods were present in both H{alpha} and He I, indicating a possible connection between the wind and the photosphere. Due to the harmonic nature of these periods, stellar pulsations may be the origin of some of the observed variability. Periods on the order of the rotational period were also detected in the He I line in the 1998-1999 season and in both lines during the 2004-2005 season. These periods may indicate rotational modulation due to structure in the wind.

  20. The low-mass star and sub-stellar populations of the 25 Orionis group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Juan José; Briceño, César; Mateu, Cecilia; Hernández, Jesús; Vivas, Anna Katherina; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.; Allen, Lori

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a survey of the low-mass star and brown dwarf population of the 25 Orionis group. Using optical photometry from the CIDA (Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía `Francisco J. Duarte', Mérida, Venezuela) Deep Survey of Orion, near-IR photometry from the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy and low-resolution spectroscopy obtained with Hectospec at the MMT telescope, we selected 1246 photometric candidates to low-mass stars and brown dwarfs with estimated masses within 0.02 ≲ M/M⊙ ≲ 0.8 and spectroscopically confirmed a sample of 77 low-mass stars as new members of the cluster with a mean age of ˜7 Myr. We have obtained a system initial mass function of the group that can be well described by either a Kroupa power-law function with indices α3 = -1.73 ± 0.31 and α2 = 0.68 ± 0.41 in the mass ranges 0.03 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.08 and 0.08 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.5, respectively, or a Scalo lognormal function with coefficients m_c=0.21^{+0.02}_{-0.02} and σ = 0.36 ± 0.03 in the mass range 0.03 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.8. From the analysis of the spatial distribution of this numerous candidate sample, we have confirmed the east-west elongation of the 25 Orionis group observed in previous works, and rule out a possible southern extension of the group. We find that the spatial distributions of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in 25 Orionis are statistically indistinguishable. Finally, we found that the fraction of brown dwarfs showing IR excesses is higher than for low-mass stars, supporting the scenario in which the evolution of circumstellar discs around the least massive objects could be more prolonged.

  1. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas of Beta Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.; Upson, W. L., II

    1982-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectral atlas is presented for the B8 Ia star Beta Orionis, which has been scanned from 999 to 1561 A by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. From 999 to 1420 A the observations have a nominal resolution of 0.05 A. At the longer wavelengths the resolution is 0.1 A. The atlas is presented in graphs. Lines identified in the spectrum are also listed.

  2. Amorphous alumina in the extended atmosphere of α Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoelst, T.; Decin, L.; van Malderen, R.; Hony, S.; Cami, J.; Eriksson, K.; Perrin, G.; Deroo, P.; Vandenbussche, B.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper we study the extended atmosphere of the late-type supergiant α Orionis. Infrared spectroscopy of red supergiants reveals strong molecular bands, some of which do not originate in the photosphere but in a cooler layer of molecular material above it. Lately, these layers have been spatially resolved by near and mid-IR interferometry. In this paper, we try to reconcile the IR interferometric and ISO-SWS spectroscopic results on α Orionis with a thorough modelling of the photosphere, molecular layer(s) and dust shell. From the ISO and near-IR interferometric observations, we find that α Orionis has only a very low density water layer close above the photosphere. However, mid-IR interferometric observations and a narrow-slit N-band spectrum suggest much larger extra-photospheric opacity close to the photosphere at those wavelengths, even when taking into account the detached dust shell. We argue that this cannot be due to the water layer, and that another source of mid-IR opacity must be present. We show that this opacity source is probably neither molecular nor chromospheric. Rather, we present amorphous alumina (Al2O3) as the best candidate and discuss this hypothesis in the framework of dust-condensation scenarios.

  3. High resolution spectroscopy of the new FU Orionis object BBW 76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisloeffel, J.; Hessman, F. V.; Mundt, R.

    1990-06-01

    High-resolution spectra of the new FU Orionis object BBW 76 are presented. Although the photometric outburst of this FU Orionis object could not be observed, its spectral characteristics clearly identify it as belonging to this class. BBW 76 shows Balmer line profiles typical for FU Orionis stars. Its absorption line spectrum and, in particular, the line widths are strikingly similar to that of FU Ori. Other similarities to FU Ori are the presence of an arclike nebula, and the FIR luminosities and color temperatures.

  4. Evolution of the FU Orionis Object BBW 76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Hartmann, Lee; Kenyon, Scott J.; Smette, Alain; Bouchet, Patrice

    2002-10-01

    We have carried out a long-term photometric and spectroscopic monitoring program of the southern FU Orionis-type object BBW 76 spanning the period from 1982 to 1997. BBW 76 has the same radial velocity as the small cloud toward which it is projected, and for which a kinematic distance of about 1.8 kpc has been derived. We have determined a large reddening of E(B-V)~0.7 for BBW 76. Optical and infrared spectra show the change toward later spectral type with increasing wavelength characteristic of FU Orionis stars and indicative of a hot luminous disk. High-resolution echelle spectra of BBW 76 show P Cygni profiles with extended blueshifted absorption troughs at the Hα and sodium lines from a neutral, supersonic wind. Comparison of such spectra obtained at six different epochs between 1985 and 1997 reveals major changes in these Hα and sodium line profiles. For a period of 10 years from 1985, the massive absorption troughs diminished in extent and depth, until by 1994 they had all but disappeared, while at the same time the blueshifted emission peak in the Hα line increased markedly in strength. However, when observed in 1997, the absorption had increased again and the emission had diminished. We interpret this in terms of an extended period during which accretion through a circumstellar disk decreased, with a resulting decrease in wind production. But the increased activity by 1997 shows that this is not a constant decay and that the star was not about to revert to its presumably original T Tauri stage. We monitored the star with optical photometry from 1983 to 1994, during which period it decreased almost monotonically in brightness by 0.2 mag in V. Infrared J, H, and K photometry from 1983 to 1991 shows a period of monotonic fading between 1984 and 1988, followed by more irregular behavior. In a search of the Harvard plate archives we have found a plate from the year 1900 on which BBW 76 is seen at approximately its present brightness, certainly not 2 mag

  5. {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} Radiative-Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, D.V.; Antipov, Yu.M.; Artamonov, A.V.; Batarin, V.A.; Victorov, V.A.; Golovkin, S.V.; Gorin, Yu.P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kubarovsky, V.P.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.; Leontiev, V.M.; Molchanov, V.V.; Mukhin, V.A.; Patalakha, D.I.; Petrenko, S.V.; Petrukhin, A.I.; Kolganov, V.Z.

    2005-03-01

    The radiative decay {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} was recorded in the exclusive reaction p + N {yields} {lambda}(1520)K{sup +} + N at the SPHINX facility. The branching ratio for this decay and the corresponding partial width were found to be, respectively, Br[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = (1.02 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -2} and {gamma}[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = 159 {+-} 35 keV (the quoted errors are purely statistical, the systematic errors being within 15%)

  6. Energy of the ground and 2{sup +} excited states of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Be: A partial ten-body model

    SciTech Connect

    Shoeb, Mohammad; Sonika

    2009-08-15

    The energies of the ground and excited 2{sup +} states of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Be have been calculated variationally in the Monte Carlo framework. The hypernucleus is treated as a partial ten-body problem in the {lambda}{lambda}+{alpha}{alpha} model where nucleonic degrees of freedom of {alpha}'s are taken into consideration ignoring the antisymmetrization between two {alpha}'s. The central two-body {lambda}N and {lambda}{lambda} and the three-body dispersive and two-pion exchange {lambda}NN forces, constrained by the {lambda}p scattering data and the observed ground state energies of {sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He and {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He, are employed. The product-type trial wave function predicts binding energy for the ground state considerably less than for the event reported by Danysz et al.; however, it is consistent with the value deduced assuming a {gamma} ray of 3.04 MeV must have escaped undetected in the decay of the product {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be* {yields} {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be+{gamma} of the emulsion event {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Be{yields} {pi}{sup -}+p+{sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be* and for the excited 2{sup +} state closer to the value measured in the Demachi-Yanagi event. The hypernucleus {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Be has an oblate shape in the excited state. These results are consistent with the earlier four-body {alpha} cluster model approach where {alpha}'s are assumed to be structureless entities.

  7. Proplyds Around a B1 Star: 42 Orionis in NGC 1977

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Clarke, Cathie J.; Fang, Min; Facchini, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    We present the discovery of seven new proplyds (i.e., sources surrounded by cometary Hα emission characteristic of offset ionization fronts (IFs)) in NGC 1977, located about 30‧ north of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) at a distance of ˜400 pc. Each of these proplyds is situated at projected distances 0.04–0.27 pc from the B1V star 42 Orionis (c Ori), which is the main source of UV photons in the region. In all cases the IFs of the proplyds are clearly pointing toward the common ionizing source, 42 Ori, and six of the seven proplyds clearly show tails pointing away from it. These are the first proplyds to be found around a B star, with previously known examples instead being located around O stars, including those in the ONC around θ 1 Ori C. The radii of the offset IFs in our proplyds are between ˜200 and 550 au two objects also contain clearly resolved central sources that we associate with disks of radii 50–70 au. The estimated strength of the FUV radiation field impinging on the proplyds is around 10–30 times less than that incident on the classic proplyds in the ONC. We show that the observed proplyd sizes are however consistent with recent models for FUV photoevaporation in relatively weak FUV radiation fields.

  8. V346 Normae: first post-outburst observations of an FU Orionis star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, S.; Caratti o Garatti, A.; Garcia-Lopez, R.; Kreplin, A.; Aarnio, A.; Monnier, J. D.; Naylor, T.; Weigelt, G.

    2016-10-01

    During their formation phase, stars gain most of their mass in violent episodic accretion events, such as observed in FU Orionis (FUor) and EXor stars. V346 Normae is a well-studied FUor that underwent a strong outburst beginning around 1980. Here, we report on photometric and spectroscopic observations, which show that the visual/near-infrared brightness has decreased dramatically between the 1990s and 2010 (ΔR ≈ 10.9 mag, ΔJ ≈ 7.8 mag and ΔK ≈ 5.8 mag). The spectral properties of this fading event cannot be explained by variable extinction alone, but indicate a drop in accretion rate by two to three orders of magnitude. This is the first time that a member of the FUor class has been observed to switch to a very low accretion phase. Remarkably, in the last few years (2011-2015) V346 Nor has brightened again at all near-infrared wavelengths, indicating the onset of a new outburst event. The observed behaviour might be consistent with the clustered luminosity bursts that have been predicted by recent gravitational instability and fragmentation models for the early stages of protostellar evolution. Given V346 Nor's unique characteristics (concerning outburst duration, repetition frequency and spectroscopic diagnostics), our results also highlight the need to revisit the FUor/EXor classification scheme.

  9. A Light Curve of Theta-1 Orionis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. R.; Stutts, S. C.; Caton, D. B.

    2002-12-01

    Theta-1 Orionis A (V1016 Ori), a member of the Trapezium, was only discovered to be an eclipsing binary system in 1974. The study of this system has been recently summarized by Strickland and Lloyd (The Observatory, 120, 2000, pp. 141-149). We are obtaining a complete light curve in VBRI using a CCD on the 18-inch telescope at Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory. We have obtained new times of primary minimum and are searching for the undiscovered secondary eclipse as well. A status update on this project will be presented. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation, through grant AST-9731062, and the Dunham Fund for Astrophysical Research. We would also like to thank the staff of the U.S. Naval Observatory Library and acknowledge the use of the Simbad Astronomical Data Base. The instrumentation help provided by Lee Hawkins and Robert Miller is appreciated as well.

  10. Measurement of the Lambda b lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panikashvili, N; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-10-01

    We have measured the Lambda b lifetime using the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda, based on 1.2 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed Lambda b decays, where the J/psi and Lambda are identified via the decays J/psi --> mu+ mu- and Lambda --> ppi, we measured the Lambda b lifetime to be tau(Lambda b)=1.218 (+0.130)/(-0.115) (stat) +/- 0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B0 lifetime in the decay B0 --> J/psi(mu+ mu-)K(0)/(S)(pi+ pi-) to be tau(B0)=1.501 (+0.078)/(-0.074) (stat) +/- 0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of tau(Lambda b)/tau(B0)=0.811 (+0.096)/(-0.087) (stat) +/- 0.034(syst). PMID:17930660

  11. Life of Lambda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futhey, Tracy

    2005-01-01

    In this column, the author discusses the four key questions related to the National LambdaRail (NLR) networking technology. NLR uses Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) to enable multiple networks to coexist on a national fiber footprint, and is owned and operated not by carriers, but by the research and education community. The NLR Board…

  12. Highly efficient tabletop x-ray laser at {lambda}=41.8 nm in Pd-like xenon pumped by optical-field ionization in a cluster jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E. P.

    2011-10-15

    The atomic-kinetic calculations of gain at 41.8 nm in Pd-like xenon are performed. The interpretation of known experiments has proved that x-ray laser in Pd-like xenon is feasible in the extremely wide range of atomic densities: 10{sup 17}{<=}[Xe{sup 8+}]{<=} 3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. This result is due to the large cross sections (and rates) of level excitations in Pd-like xenon by electron impact. We propose a highly efficient tabletop x-ray laser pumped by optical-field ionization in a xenon cluster jet. The efficiency of {approx}0.5% is possible with a pump laser pulse energy of {>=}0.001 J and an intensity of {approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Observation of B+ --> Lambda c+ Lambda c- K+ and B0 --> Lambda c+ Lambda c- K0 decays.

    PubMed

    Gabyshev, N; Abe, K; Abe, K; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asano, Y; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bartel, W; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chen, A; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Choi, Y; Chuvikov, A; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Garmash, A; Gershon, T; Gokhroo, G; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, S; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Ikado, K; Imoto, A; Inami, K; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kang, J H; Kawasaki, T; Khan, H R; Kichimi, H; Kim, S M; Korpar, S; Krokovny, P; Kulasiri, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Leder, G; Lesiak, T; Lin, S-W; Liventsev, D; Majumder, G; Matsumoto, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ozaki, H; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, K S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sakai, Y; Sato, N; Satoyama, N; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schwanda, C; Seidl, R; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Somov, A; Soni, N; Stamen, R; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Tsukamoto, T; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Ueno, K; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Xie, Q L; Yamaguchi, A; Yamauchi, M; Ying, J; Zhang, Z P

    2006-11-17

    We report the first measurements of the doubly charmed baryonic B decays B --> Lambda c+ Lambda c- K. The B+ --> Lambda c+ Lambda c- K+ decay is observed with a branching fraction of (6.5(-0.9)(+1.0)+/-1.1+/-3.4)x10(-4) and a statistical significance of 15.4sigma. The B0 --> Lambda c+ Lambda c- K0 decay is observed with a branching fraction of (7.9(-2.3)(+2.9)+/-1.2+/-4.1)x10(-4) and a statistical significance of 6.6sigma. The branching fraction errors are statistical, systematic, and the error resulting from the uncertainty of the Lambda c+ --> pK- pi+ decay branching fraction. The analysis is based on 357 fb(-1) of data accumulated at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+ e- collider. PMID:17155677

  14. Very low-luminosity Class I/flat outflow sources in σ Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, B.; Thompson, M.; Whelan, E. T.; Lodieu, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present an optical to submillimetre multiwavelength study of two very low-luminosity Class I/flat systems, Mayrit 1701117 and Mayrit 1082188, in the σ Orionis cluster. We performed moderate-resolution (R ˜ 1000) optical (˜0.4-0.9 μm) spectroscopy with the Cassegrain Twin Spectrograph (TWIN) spectrograph at the Calar Alto 3.5-m telescope. The spectra for both sources show prominent emission in accretion- and outflow-associated lines. The mean accretion rate measured from multiple line diagnostics is 6.4 × 10-10 M⊙ yr-1 for Mayrit 1701117 and 2.5 × 10-10 M⊙ yr-1 for Mayrit 1082188. The outflow mass-loss rates for the two systems are similar and estimated to be ˜1 × 10-9 M⊙ yr-1. The activity rates are within the range observed for low-mass Class I protostars. We obtained submillimetre continuum observations with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA-2) bolometer at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Both objects are detected at a ≥5σ level in the SCUBA-2 850-μm band. The bolometric luminosity of the targets as measured from the observed spectral energy distribution over ˜0.8-850 μm is 0.18 ± 0.04 L⊙ for Mayrit 1701117 and 0.16 ± 0.03 L⊙ for Mayrit 1082188 and is in the very low mass range. The total dust+gas mass derived from submillimetre fluxes is ˜36 MJup and ˜22 MJup for Mayrit 1701117 and Mayrit 1082188, respectively. There is the possibility that some of the envelope material might be dissipated by the strong outflows driven by these sources, resulting in a final mass of the system close to or below the substellar limit.

  15. X-ray Variability in the Hot Supergiant zgr Orionis.

    PubMed

    Berghöfer, T W; Schmitt, J H

    1994-09-16

    Hot massive stars represent only a small fraction of the stellar population of the galaxy, but their enormous luminosities make them visible over large distances. Therefore, they are ideal standard candles, used to determine distances of near galaxies. Their mass loss due to supersonic winds driven by radiation pressure contributes significantly to the interstellar medium and thus to the chemical evolution of galaxies. All hot stars are soft x-ray sources; in contrast to the sun with its highly variable x-ray flux, long time scale x-ray variability is not common among hot stars. An analysis is presented here of an unusual increase in x-ray flux observed with the roentgen observatory satellite during a period of 2 days for the hot supergiant zeta Orionis, the only episode of x-ray variability that has been found in a hot star. These observations provide the most direct evidence so far for the scenario of shock-heated gas in the winds of hot stars. PMID:17770897

  16. X-ray Variability in the Hot Supergiant zgr Orionis.

    PubMed

    Berghöfer, T W; Schmitt, J H

    1994-09-16

    Hot massive stars represent only a small fraction of the stellar population of the galaxy, but their enormous luminosities make them visible over large distances. Therefore, they are ideal standard candles, used to determine distances of near galaxies. Their mass loss due to supersonic winds driven by radiation pressure contributes significantly to the interstellar medium and thus to the chemical evolution of galaxies. All hot stars are soft x-ray sources; in contrast to the sun with its highly variable x-ray flux, long time scale x-ray variability is not common among hot stars. An analysis is presented here of an unusual increase in x-ray flux observed with the roentgen observatory satellite during a period of 2 days for the hot supergiant zeta Orionis, the only episode of x-ray variability that has been found in a hot star. These observations provide the most direct evidence so far for the scenario of shock-heated gas in the winds of hot stars.

  17. Variable X-ray Emission from FU Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Steve L.; Guedel, M.; Briggs, K. R.; Lamzin, S. A.; Sokal, K. R.

    2009-05-01

    FU Orionis is the prototype of a small but remarkable class of pre-main sequence stars ('FUors') that have undergone large optical outbursts thought to be linked to episodic accretion. FU Ori increased in optical brightness by about 6 mag in 1936-37 and is still in slow decline. Because of their high accretion rates, FUors are good candidates for exploring potential effects of accretion on X-ray emission. A recently completed survey of FUors with XMM-Newton detected X-rays from FU Ori and V1735 Cyg. We present new results from a sensitive 99 ksec (1.15 day) follow-up X-ray observation of FU Ori with Chandra. The Chandra ACIS-S CCD spectrum confirms the presence of a cool plasma component (kT < 1 keV) viewed under moderate absorption and a much hotter component (kT > 3 keV), viewed under high absorption, in accord with previous XMM results. The uninterrupted Chandra light curve shows that the hot component is slowly variable on a timescale of one day, but no variability is detected in the cool component. The slow variability and high plasma temperature point to a magnetic origin for the hot component, but other mechanisms (including accretion) may be responsible for the cool non-variable component. We will discuss these new results in the context of what is known about FU Ori from previous observations, including XMM (Skinner et al. 2006, ApJ, 643, 995) and HST (Kravtsova et al. 2007, Ast. Ltrs., 33, 755).

  18. Study of the ^7_{Lambda}He hypernucleus in formalism of the Faddeev equations

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Filikhin; Vladimir M. Suslov; Branislav Vlahovic

    2006-02-01

    P-shell A = 7 hypernuclei are considered in the cluster {sub {Lambda}}{sup 5}He + N + N model. The folding procedure are applied to construct the {sub {Lambda}}{sup 5}He-N interaction. We use the OBE simulating NSC97f potential for {Lambda}N interaction and various phenomenological potentials for {alpha}{Lambda} interaction. Configuration space Faddeev calculations are performed for hyperon binding energy of the {sub {Lambda}}{sup 7}He(1/2{sup +}) and {sub {lambda}}{sup 7}Li(1/2{sup +} and 3/2{sup +}, T=0) nuclei. Predicted value for B{sub {Lambda}}({sub {Lambda}}{sup 7}He) is 5.35 MeV. This value is obtained when the {sup {Lambda}}{sup 6}He(2{sup -}) excitation energy is equal 0.26 MeV by the adjustment of pair {sub {Lambda}}{sup 5}He-N effective potential to reproduce the experimental value of the {sub {Lambda}}{sup 7}Li(3/2{sup +}) excitation energy. Our results are compared with those of E. Hiyama et al.

  19. VARIABILITY AT THE EDGE: OPTICAL NEAR/IR RAPID-CADENCE MONITORING OF NEWLY OUTBURSTING FU ORIONIS OBJECT HBC 722

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Joel D.; Robertson, Paul; Pak, Soojong; Meschiari, Stefano; Baek, Giseon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Pooley, David; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu

    2013-02-10

    We present the detection of day-timescale periodic variability in the r-band lightcurve of newly outbursting FU Orionis-type object HBC 722, taken from >42 nights of observation with the CQUEAN instrument on the McDonald Observatory 2.1 m telescope. The optical/near-IR lightcurve of HBC 722 shows a complex array of periodic variability, clustering around 5.8-day (0.044 mag amplitude) and 1.28-day (0.016 mag amplitude) periods, after removal of overall baseline variation. We attribute the unusual number of comparable strength signals to a phenomenon related to the temporary increase in accretion rate associated with FUors. We consider semi-random 'flickering', magnetic braking/field compression and rotational asymmetries in the disk instability region as potential sources of variability. Assuming that the 5.8-day period is due to stellar rotation and the 1.28-day period is indicative of Keplerian rotation at the inner radius of the accretion disk (at 2 R {sub *}), we derive a B-field strength of 2.2-2.7 kG, slightly larger than typical T Tauri stars. If instead the 5.8-day signal is from a disk asymmetry, the instability region has an outer radius of 5.4 R {sub *}, consistent with models of FUor disks. Further exploration of the time domain in this complicated source and related objects will be key to understanding accretion processes.

  20. {Lambda} single-particle energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M.

    1995-08-01

    We are continuing our work on the {Lambda} hyperon single-particle (s.p.) energies and their interpretation in terms of the basic {Lambda}-nuclear interactions. In particular we are interpreting the results obtained by S.C. Pieper, A. Usmani and Q.N. Usmani. We obtain about 30 MeV for the repulsive contribution of the three-body {Lambda}NN forces in nuclear matter. We are able to exclude purely {open_quotes}dispersive{close_quotes} {Lambda}NN forces. We are investigating the mix of dispersive and two-pion-exchange {Lambda}NN forces which provide a fit to the s.p. data. For interactions, which provide a fit to the s.p. data, the {Lambda} binding energy as a function of the nuclear matter density shows characteristic saturation features with a maximum at a density not very different from that of normal nuclear matter. We obtain a more precise measure of the space-exchange part of the {Lambda}-nuclear force than was previously available, corresponding to an exchange parameter {approx_equal} 0.32. The space-exchange force is rather directly related to the effective mass of a {Lambda} in the nuclear medium and turns out to be about 70% of its free mass. As a result, we also obtain a much better value for the p-state {Lambda}-nucleus potential which is about 40% of the s-state potential. The A binding to nuclear matter is determined to be {approx_equal} 28 MeV.

  1. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE FU ORIONIS STAR V1735 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Guedel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R.

    2009-05-01

    The variable star V1735 Cyg (=Elias 1-12) lies in the IC 5146 dark cloud and is a member of the class of FU Orionis objects whose dramatic optical brightenings are thought to be linked to episodic accretion. We report the first X-ray detections of V1735 Cyg and a deeply embedded class I protostar lying 24'' to its northeast. X-ray spectra obtained with EPIC on XMM-Newton reveal very high-temperature plasma (kT > 5 keV) in both objects, but no large flares. Such hard X-ray emission is not anticipated from accretion shocks and is a signature of magnetic processes. We place these new results into the context of what is presently known about the X-ray properties of FU Orionis stars and other accreting young stellar objects.

  2. Protoplanetary dust porosity and FU Orionis outbursts: Solving the mystery of Earth’s missing volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Alexander; Ebel, Denton S.

    2014-07-01

    The Earth is known to be depleted in volatile lithophile elements in a fashion that defies easy explanation. We resolve this anomaly with a model that combines the porosity of collisionally grown dust grains in protoplanetary disks with heating from FU Orionis events that dramatically raise protoplanetary disk temperatures. The heating from an FU Orionis event alters the aerodynamical properties of the dust while evaporating the volatiles. This causes the dust to settle, abandoning those volatiles. The success of this model in explaining the elemental composition of the Earth is a strong argument in favor of highly porous collisionally grown dust grains in protoplanetary disks outside our Solar System. Further, it demonstrates how thermal (or condensation based) alterations of dust porosity, and hence aerodynamics, can be a strong factor in planet formation, leading to the onset of rapid gravitational instabilities in the dust disk and the subsequent collapse that forms planetesimals.

  3. A THIRD MASSIVE STAR COMPONENT IN THE {sigma} ORIONIS AB SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Simon-Diaz, S.; Caballero, J. A.; Lorenzo, J.

    2011-11-20

    We report on the detection of a third massive star component in the {sigma} Orionis AB system, traditionally considered as a binary system. The system has been monitored by the IACOB Spectroscopic Survey of Northern Massive Stars program, obtaining 23 high-resolution FIES-NOT spectra with a time span of {approx}2.5 years. The analysis of the radial velocity curves of the two spectroscopic components observed in the spectra has allowed us to obtain the orbital parameters of the system, resulting in a high eccentric orbit (e {approx} 0.78) with an orbital period of 143.5 {+-} 0.5 days. This result implies the actual presence of three stars in the {sigma} Orionis AB system when combined with previous results obtained from the study of the astrometric orbit (with an estimated period of {approx}157 years).

  4. Zeeman effect in the X-ray star candidates HD 77581 and theta super 2 Orionis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, J. C.; Wolstencroft, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    The discovery of Zeeman effects is reported in HD 77581 and theta super 2 Orionis, optical candidates for the X-ray sources Vela XR-1 and 2U 0525-06, respectively. The maximum longitudinal magnetic fields recorded were -10,000 G in HD 77581 and +1500 G in theta super 2 Ori. Various polarimetric data are also given, including evidence for a variable linear polarization in HD 77581.

  5. Novel bacteriophage lambda mutation affecting lambda head assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, C P; Bisig, R; Magazin, M; Eisen, H; Court, D

    1979-01-01

    A novel phage lambda mutation, called dc10, which interferes with proper lambda head assembly has been isolated and characterized. Phage lambda carrying this mutation is (i) unable to form plaques at 30 or 37 degrees C but does so at 42 degrees C and (ii) unable to form plaques at 42 degrees C on pN-constitutive hosts. Both properties are due to dc10 since all phage revertants for one phenotype simultaneously lose the other phenotype and vice versa. The dc10 mutation has been mapped in the B gene and has been shown to be dominant over the corresponding wild-type product. At 30 degrees C the dc10 mutation results in the formation of abnormal petit lambda heads made up of pE, pB, pC, and pNu3. Under pN-constitutive conditions, the dc10 mutation results in the formation of abnormal petit lambda heads made of pE, X1, and X2 only. A model to explain the data is presented. Images PMID:430610

  6. GRAVITATIONAL LENSING CORRECTIONS IN FLAT {Lambda}CDM COSMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Kantowski, Ronald; Chen Bin; Dai Xinyu E-mail: Bin.Chen-1@ou.ed

    2010-08-01

    We compute the deflection angle to order (m/r {sub 0}){sup 2} and m/r{sub 0} x {Lambda}r {sup 2}{sub 0} for a light ray traveling in a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology that encounters a completely condensed mass region. We use a Swiss cheese model for the inhomogeneities and find that the most significant correction to the Einstein angle occurs not because of the nonlinear terms but instead occurs because the condensed mass is embedded in a background cosmology. The Swiss cheese model predicts a decrease in the deflection angle of {approx}2% for weakly lensed galaxies behind the rich cluster A1689 and that the reduction can be as large as {approx}5% for similar rich clusters at z {approx} 1. Weak-lensing deflection angles caused by galaxies can likewise be reduced by as much as {approx}4%. We show that the lowest order correction in which {Lambda} appears is proportional to m/r{sub 0} x {radical}({Lambda}r{sub 0}{sup 2}) and could cause as much as a {approx}0.02% increase in the deflection angle for light that passes through a rich cluster. The lowest order nonlinear correction in the mass is proportional to m/r{sub 0}x{radical}(m/r{sub 0}) and can increase the deflection angle by {approx}0.005% for weak lensing by galaxies.

  7. The degenerate spin-flip doublet (3{sup +}/2,5{sup +}/2) of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Shoeb, Mohammad; Sonika

    2009-05-15

    The energy of the degenerate doublet (3{sup +}/2,5{sup +}/2) of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be, treating it as a partially nine-body system in the {lambda}{alpha}{alpha} cluster model, has been calculated in the variational Monte Carlo framework. A simplified treatment, with the central two-body Urbana type {lambda}N and the three-body dispersive and two-pion exchange {lambda}NN forces along with the central two- and three-body correlations, is found to be adequate in explaining the energy of observed {gamma}-ray transition from the excited degenerate doublet to the ground state. The hypernucleus {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be is highly deformed and has an oblate shape in the excited state. The results of the present work are consistent with the earlier three-body cluster model analyzes of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be.

  8. A new three-baryon-force in {lambda}{lambda} hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nemura, Hidekatsu

    2008-04-29

    We describe a few-body calculation of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}H as well as {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H and {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He taking account fully coupled-channel two-baryon potentials acting among the octet of baryons. The wave function includes not only pnn{lambda}{lambda} and ppnn{xi}{sup -} components but also pnn{lambda}{sigma}{sup 0}, ppn{lambda}{sigma}{sup -}, pnn{sigma}{sup 0}{sigma}{sup 0} and ppn{sigma}{sup 0}{sigma}{sup -}. An effective YY potential based on Nijmegen model D is used. We find that the pnn{lambda}{sigma}{sup 0} and ppn{lambda}{sigma}{sup -} components play an important role in producing the {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 5}H bound state. The present result requires the introduction of a new coupled-channel three-body-force, N{lambda}{lambda}--NN{xi}, if the intermediate pnn{lambda}{sigma}{sup 0} and ppn{lambda}{sigma}{sup -} states are eliminated from the model space.

  9. AN ANALYSIS OF THE ENVIRONMENTS OF FU ORIONIS OBJECTS WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J. II; Merello, Manuel; Kospal, Agnes; Herczeg, Gregory; Quanz, Sascha P.; Henning, Thomas; Bouwman, Jeroen; Van Kempen, Tim A.; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Dunham, Michael M.; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Chen, Jo-hsin; Guedel, Manuel; Liebhart, Armin; Skinner, Stephen L.

    2013-08-01

    We present Herschel-HIFI, SPIRE, and PACS 50-670 {mu}m imaging and spectroscopy of six FU Orionis-type objects and candidates (FU Orionis, V1735 Cyg, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, V1331 Cyg, and HBC 722), ranging in outburst date from 1936 to 2010, from the 'FOOSH' (FU Orionis Objects Surveyed with Herschel) program, as well as ancillary results from Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. In their system properties (L{sub bol}, T{sub bol}, and line emission), we find that FUors are in a variety of evolutionary states. Additionally, some FUors have features of both Class I and II sources: warm continuum consistent with Class II sources, but rotational line emission typical of Class I, far higher than Class II sources of similar mass/luminosity. Combining several classification techniques, we find an evolutionary sequence consistent with previous mid-IR indicators. We detect [O I] in every source at luminosities consistent with Class 0/I protostars, much greater than in Class II disks. We detect transitions of {sup 13}CO (J{sub up} of 5-8) around two sources (V1735 Cyg and HBC 722) but attribute them to nearby protostars. Of the remaining sources, three (FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, and V1331 Cyg) exhibit only low-lying CO, but one (V1057 Cyg) shows CO up to J = 23 {yields} 22 and evidence for H{sub 2}O and OH emission, at strengths typical of protostars rather than T Tauri stars. Rotational temperatures for 'cool' CO components range from 20 to 81 K, for {approx} 10{sup 50} total CO molecules. We detect [C I] and [N II] primarily as diffuse emission.

  10. Long-Wavelength Excesses of FU Orionis Objects: Flared Outer Disks or Infalling Envelopes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Hernandez, Jesus; Tannirkulam, Ajay-Kumar; D'Alessio, Paola

    2008-09-01

    The mid- to far-infrared emission of the outbursting FU Orionis objects has been attributed either to a flared outer disk or to an infalling envelope. We revisit this issue using detailed radiative transfer calculations to model the recent, high signal-to-noise ratio data from the IRS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. In the case of FU Ori, we find that a physically plausible flared disk irradiated by the central accretion disk matches the observations. Building on our previous work, our accretion disk model with outer disk irradiation by the inner disk reproduces the spectral energy distribution between ~4000 Å and ~40 μm. Our model is consistent with near-infrared interferometry, but there are some inconsistencies with mid-infrared interferometric results. Including the outer disk allows us to refine our estimate of the outer radius of the outbursting, high mass accretion rate disk in FU Ori as ~0.5 AU, which is a crucial parameter in assessing theories of the FU Orionis phenomenon. We are able to place an upper limit on the mass infall rate of any remnant envelope infall rate to ~7 × 10-7 M⊙ yr -1 assuming a centrifugal radius of 200 AU. The FUor BBW 76 is also well modeled by a 0.6 AU inner disk and a flared outer disk. However, V1515 Cyg requires an envelope with an outflow cavity to adequately reproduce the IRS spectrum. In contrast with the suggestion by Green et al., we do not require a flattened envelope to match the observations; the inferred cavity shape is qualitatively consistent with typical protostellar envelopes. This variety of dusty structures suggests that the FU Orionis phase can be present at either early or late stages of protostellar evolution.

  11. Photometric Study of the FU Orionis Object BBW 76 from the Bamberg Observatory Southern Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, A.; Tsvetkova, K. P.; Tsvetkov, M. K.

    2006-04-01

    The Bamberg Observatory Southern Sky Survey provided 93 photographic plates with the FU Orionis object BBW 76, clearly detectable in the time interval 1963-1976. We perform aperture photometry of BBW 76 from the 2 x 2 degrees area near target star scanned with the Epson Expression 1640 XL flatbed scanner. For each plate a transformation of plate magnitude to the GSC 2.2 magnitudes in B photographic band was found out for selected reference stars, and used for deriving B magnitudes of BBW 76. The analysis of the photometric behaviour of BBW 76 is presented.

  12. Discovery of two distorted interstellar bubbles. [found about T Orionis variable LL Ori and Zeta Oph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T. R.; Sofia, S.

    1979-01-01

    During an extensive program of direct imagery of emission nebulae, arcuate structures have been found around two stars. A well-defined shocklike structure is found about the T Orionis variable LL Ori, located to the side of the Orion Nebula. A less extensive shocklike structure is also found about the runaway star Zeta Oph. These structures can be best described in terms of distorted interstellar bubbles. A direct consequence of this interpretation is an independent estimate of the rates of mass loss for these stars.

  13. Longitudinal Polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar Hyperons in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Sapozhnikov, M. G.

    2007-06-13

    The longitudinal polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar hyperons produced in deep-inelastic scattering of 160 GeV/c polarized positive muons is studied in the COMPASS (CERN NA58) experiment. Preliminary results on the longitudinal polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar from data collected during the 2003 run are presented.

  14. Structural studies of lambda transducing bacteriophage carrying bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid from the metBJLF region of the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, J H; Johnson, J R; Greene, R C; Dresser, M

    1981-01-01

    The structures of several lambda dmet and related lambda darg transducing phage were studied by restriction fragment mapping and electron microscopic measurements of homoduplexes and heteroduplexes. A new transducing phage (lambda dmet141), in which metF is the only functional gene of the cluster, was isolated. In contrast, lambda dmet117, which expresses the entire metBJLF cluster, has only 3 kilobases more bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) than lambda dmet141. An EcoRI restriction fragment of lambda dmet117, which carries the leftmost 6 kilobases of the bacterial DNA insert, was isolated and shown to contain a functional copy of metB. Small structural differences at the attachment sites of some of the phage were shown to result from different sites of lambda integration in the two parent insertion lysogens. Images PMID:6267016

  15. Telluric lines in the region lambda lambda 6327.5-6330.0 angstrom angstrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alikayeva, K. V.

    1973-01-01

    The solar spectrum region lambda lambda 6327.5 to 6330.0 AA was investigated. Six new telluric lines were found. The behavior of two of them (lambda 6328.51 and lambda 6328.71 A) is the same as identified molecular oxygen lines in the region. The lines lambda 6328.27, 6329.12, and 6329.29 A are more intensive when there are days with high humidity.

  16. Photoproduction of the Lambda*(1520) Hyperon

    SciTech Connect

    Z. W. Zhao, H. Y. Lu, L. Graham, K. Park, R. W. Gothe

    2010-08-01

    The photoproduction of the Lambda*(1520) on both the proton and neutron have been studied by using the CLAS eg3 run data set. The reactions are gammad-->K+Lambda*(n) and gammad-->K0Lambda*(p) with Lambda*-->pK-. Preliminary total and differential cross sections have been extracted in the photon energy region 1.75 GeVLambda*(1520) on the neutron is reported, and we will extend the results on the proton to higher energies than in previous studies.

  17. Study of the Outflow and Disk surrounding a Post-Outburst FU-Orionis Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellon, Samuel N.; Perez, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    PP 13 is a fan-shaped cometary nebula located in the constellation of Perseus and embedded in the L1473 dark cloud. At optical wavelengths this region is obscured by the surrounding dark cloud, while at infrared and longer wavelengths two northern objects (PP13Na & PP13Nb) and one southern object (PP13S) are revealed. In the past, the young stellar object inside PP13S, called PP13S*, experienced an FU-Orionis type outburst due to a massive accretion episode and is currently returning to its quiescent state. Studying the FU-Orionis phase is crucial to our understanding of how low mass stars form; it is theorized that all low-mass stars go through this outburst phase while they are forming. I used CARMA 3mm interferometric observations of the PP13 region to study the continuum and molecular line emissions from PP13. With these observations, I determined the source of the previously detected outflow and learned new information about the double star system PP13Na and PP13Nb. Although I was not able to detect the accretion disk in the gas emissions, I plan to use computer modeling to help provide constraints on the properties of PP13S* and its outflow.

  18. The Southern Flanking Fields of the 25 Orionis Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGehee, Peregrine M.

    2006-06-01

    The stellar group surrounding the Be (B1 Vpe) star 25 Ori was discovered to be a pre-main-sequence (PMS) population by the CIDA Variability Survey of Orion and subsequent spectroscopy. We analyze Sloan Digital Sky Survey multiepoch photometry to map the southern extent of the 25 Ori group and characterize its PMS population. We compare this group to the neighboring Orion OB1a and OB1b subassociations and to active star formation sites (NGC 2068/NGC 2071) within the LDN 1630 dark cloud. We find that the 25 Ori group has a radius of 1.4d, corresponding to 8-11 pc at the distances of Orion OB1a and OB1b. Given that the characteristic sizes of young open clusters are a few parsecs or less, this suggests that 25 Ori is an unbound association rather than an open cluster. Due to its PMS population having a low classical T Tauri star fraction (~10%), we conclude that the 25 Ori group is of comparable age to the 11 Myr Orion OB1a subassociation.

  19. Study of J/psi-->pp[over],LambdaLambda[over] and observation of eta(c)-->LambdaLambda[over] at Belle.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-H; Wang, M-Z; Abe, K; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Bay, A; Belous, K; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Browder, T E; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Chuvikov, A; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Eidelman, S; Gabyshev, N; Gershon, T; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Gorisek, A; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hou, S; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kang, J H; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Khan, H R; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, Y J; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kulasiri, R; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, Y-J; Lesiak, T; Lin, S-W; Liventsev, D; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Matsumoto, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mori, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Onuki, Y; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Palka, H; Park, H; Park, K S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sakai, Y; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Sidorov, V; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Soni, N; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stoeck, H; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Tsuboyama, T; Tsukamoto, T; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Ueno, K; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Varner, G; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P

    2006-10-20

    We study the baryonic charmonium decays of B mesons B+-->etacK+ and B+-->J/psiK+, where the etac and J/psi subsequently decay into a pp[over] or LambdaLambda[over] pair. We measure the J/psi-->pp[over] and LambdaLambda[over] anisotropy parameters alphaB=-0.60+/-0.13+/-0.14 (pp[over]), -0.44+/-0.51+/-0.31 (LambdaLambda[over ]) and compare to results from e;{+}e;{-}-->J/psi formation experiments. We also report the first observation of etac-->LambdaLambda[over]. The measured branching fraction is B(etac-->LambdaLambda[over ])=(0.87(+0.24)/(-0.21)(stat)(+0.09/-0.14) (syst)+/-0.27(PDG))x10-3. This study is based on a 357 fb-1 data sample recorded on the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+ e- collider. PMID:17155387

  20. Measurement of the Lambda(b) lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda(b) ---> J / psi Lambda

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2007-04-01

    We have measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime using the exclusive decay {lambda}{sub b}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}, based on 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed {lambda}{sub b} decays, where the J/{psi} and {lambda} are identified via the decays J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {lambda}{yields}p{pi}, we measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime to be {tau}({lambda}{sub b})=1.218{sub -0.115}{sup +0.130}(stat){+-}0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B{sup 0} lifetime in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}({mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})K{sub S}{sup 0}({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) to be {tau}(B{sup 0})=1.501{sub -0.074}{sup +0.078}(stat){+-}0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of {tau}({lambda}{sub b})/{tau}(B{sup 0})=0.811{sub -0.087}{sup +0.096}(stat){+-}0.034(syst = )

  1. Serologically defined V region subgroups of human lambda light chains.

    PubMed

    Solomon, A; Weiss, D T

    1987-08-01

    The availability of numerous antisera prepared against lambda-type Bence Jones proteins and lambda chains of known amino acid sequence has led to the differentiation and classification of human lambda light chains into one of five V lambda subgroups. The five serologically defined subgroups, V lambda I, V lambda II, V lambda III, V lambda IV, and V lambda VI, correspond to the chemical classification that is based on sequence homologies in the first framework region (FR1). Proteins designated by sequence as lambda V react with specific anti-lambda II antisera and are thus included in the V lambda II subgroup classification. The isotypic nature of the five V lambda subgroups was evidenced through analyses of lambda-type light chains that were isolated from the IgG of normal individuals. Based on analyses of 116 Bence Jones proteins, the frequency of distribution of the lambda I, lambda II/V, lambda III, lambda IV, and lambda VI proteins in the normal lambda chain population is estimated to be 27%, 37%, 23%, 3%, and 10%, respectively. This distribution of V lambda subgroups was comparable to that found among 82 monoclonal Ig lambda proteins. Considerable V lambda intragroup antigenic heterogeneity was also apparent. At least two sub-subgroups were identified among each of the five major V lambda subgroups, implying the existence of multiple genes in the human V lambda genome. The V lambda classification of 54 Ig lambda proteins obtained from patients with primary or multiple myeloma-associated amyloidosis substantiated the preferential association of lambda VI light chains with amyloidosis AL and the predominance of the normally rare V lambda VI subgroup in this disease. PMID:3110284

  2. Measurement of the Lambda 0(b) -> Lambda +(c) pi- branching ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Yi; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} branching ratio in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 65 pb{sup -1} data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The measurement starts from reconstructing two decay modes: {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}; and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}. The authors obtained 96 {+-} 13 {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} and 321 {+-} 22 {bar B}{sup 0} candidates from the CDF Run II Two-Track Hadronic Trigger data sample. The relative branching ratio of the two decays is then measured based on the equation: f{sub {Lambda}{sub b}} BR({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -})/f{sub d} BR({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +} {pi}{sup -}) = BR(D{sup +} {yields} K{pi}{pi}) N{sub {Lambda}{sub b}} {epsilon}{sub B{sup 0}}/BR({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{pi}) N{sub {bar B}{sup 0}} {epsilon}{sub {Lambda}{sub b}}. The measurement gives f{sub {Lambda}{sub b}} BR({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/f{sub d} BR({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 0.66 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst) {+-} 0.18(BR). The {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching ratio is then extracted, giving BR({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (6.6 {+-} 1.2(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) {+-} 2.3(BR+FR)) x 10{sup -3}. The {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} sample they reconstructed in this analysis is the largest fully reconstructed {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} sample in existence. The result they report here on the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching ratio is the world's first such measurement.

  3. Bacteriophage lambda-based expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A C

    2001-03-01

    Bacteriophage lambda has been in use as a cloning vector for over 25 years, and has been used extensively as an expression vector. The efficiency of packaging and infection, and the simplicity of plaque screening are advantages of lambda as a cloning vector. A number of ingenious modifications help overcome the disadvantages associated with its mode of growth and its size. Some lambda vectors have been designed to be readily converted into plasmids or phagemids, and there are a variety of promoters and fusions that can be used to drive expression of foreign genes. Screening lambda libraries with antibodies or ligands is a powerful way of identifying novel genes. PMID:11434310

  4. Study of Lambda+(c) Cabibbo favored decays containing a Lambda baryon in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-05-01

    Using data from the FOCUS experiment (FNAL-E831), they study the decay of {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons into final states contain a {Lambda} hyperon. The branching fractions of {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} into {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +} relative to that into pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +} are measured to be 0.217 {+-} 0.013 {+-} 0.020, 0.508 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.024 and 0.142 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.022, respectively. New measurements are also reported. Further, an analysis of the subresonant structure for the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode is presented.

  5. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production in $$p \\bar{p}$$ collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2016-02-09

    Here, we studymore » $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production asymmetries in $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, and $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^\\pm \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$ events recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV. We find an excess of $$\\Lambda$$'s ($$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$'s) produced in the proton (antiproton) direction. This forward-backward asymmetry is measured as a function of rapidity. We confirm that the $$\\bar{\\Lambda}/\\Lambda$$ production ratio, measured by several experiments with various targets and a wide range of energies, is a universal function of "rapidity loss", i.e., the rapidity difference of the beam proton and the lambda.« less

  6. Mass loss from pre-main-sequence accretion disks. I - The accelerating wind of FU Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Kenyon, Scott J.

    1993-01-01

    We present evidence that the wind of the pre-main-sequence object FU Orionis arises from the surface of the luminous accretion disk. A disk wind model calculated assuming radiative equilibrium explains the differential behavior of the observed asymmetric absorption-line profiles. The model predicts that strong lines should be asymmetric and blueshifted, while weak lines should be symmetric and double-peaked due to disk rotation, in agreement with observations. We propose that many blueshifted 'shell' absorption features are not produced in a true shell of material, but rather form in a differentially expanding wind that is rapidly rotating. The inference of rapid rotation supports the proposal that pre-main-sequence disk winds are rotationally driven.

  7. DISENTANGLING THE ENVIRONMENT OF THE FU ORIONIS CANDIDATE HBC 722 WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J. II; Merello, Manuel; Pooley, David; Kospal, Agnes; Van Kempen, Tim A.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine; Herczeg, Gregory; Quanz, Sascha P.; Henning, Thomas; Bouwman, Jeroen; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Dunham, Michael M.; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Chen, Jo-Hsin; Guedel, Manuel; Skinner, Stephen L.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Guieu, Sylvain

    2011-04-20

    We analyze the submillimeter emission surrounding the new FU Orionis-type object, HBC 722. We present the first epoch of observations of the active environs of HBC 722, with imaging and spectroscopy from PACS, SPIRE, and HIFI on board the Herschel Space Observatory, as well as CO J = 2-1 and 350 {mu}m imaging (SHARC-II) with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The primary source of submillimeter continuum emission in the region-2MASS 20581767+4353310-is located 16'' south-southeast of the optical flaring source while the optical and near-infrared emission is dominated by HBC 722. A bipolar outflow extends over HBC 722; the most likely driver is the submillimeter source. We detect warm (100 K) and hot (246 K) CO emission in the surrounding region, evidence of outflow-driven heating in the vicinity. The region around HBC 722 itself shows little evidence of heating driven by the new outbursting source itself.

  8. High Speed Optical Photometry of V1055 Orionis (=4U 0614+091)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Isaac; Mason, P. A.; Robinson, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    V1055 Orionis (=4U 0614+091) is thought to be an ultra-compact binary containing a neutron star primary with a white dwarf companion. High-speed (10s) broad-band optical observations using the McDonald Observatory, 2.1m, Otto Struve Telescope were obtained on 13 nights in 2010, 2011, and 2012. The nightly mean brightness remained quite stable over the dataset. The light curve is dominated by complex oscillatory behavior reminiscent of the beating of hidden frequencies. A variety of photometric periods have been previously reported and none are found to be coherent periods in our dataset. Rather, a given night exhibits short lived quasi-periodic variations covering a variety of timescales, especially 10-40 min and even as long as two hours. This short period variability combined with recent spectroscopic abundance studies suggests that the likely donor in this binary is a white dwarf.

  9. The First Brown Dwarf/Planetary-mass Object in the 32 Orionis Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Lopez, Mike A.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Gagné, Jonathan; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Tallis, Melisa; Choban, Caleb; Tamiya, Tomoki; Escala, Ivanna; Aganze, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The 32 Orionis group is a co-moving group of roughly 20 young (24 Myr) M3-B5 stars 100 pc from the Sun. Here we report the discovery of its first substellar member, WISE J052857.69+090104.2. This source was previously reported to be an M giant star based on its unusual near-infrared spectrum and lack of measureable proper motion. We re-analyze previous data and new moderate-resolution spectroscopy from Magellan/Folded-port InfraRed Echellette to demonstrate that this source is a young near-infrared L1 brown dwarf with very low surface gravity features. Spectral model fits indicate Teff = 1880{}-70+150 K and {log}g = 3.8{}-0.2+0.2, consistent with a 15-22 Myr object with a mass near the deuterium-burning limit. Its sky position, estimated distance, kinematics (both proper motion and radial velocity), and spectral characteristics are all consistent with membership in 32 Orionis, and its temperature and age imply a mass (M = {14}-3+4 MJ) that straddles the brown dwarf/planetary-mass object boundary. The source has a somewhat red J-W2 color compared to other L1 dwarfs, but this is likely a low-gravity-related temperature offset; we find no evidence of significant excess reddening from a disk or cool companion in the 3-5 μm waveband. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  10. Bacteriophage lambda as a cloning vector.

    PubMed

    Chauthaiwale, V M; Therwath, A; Deshpande, V V

    1992-12-01

    Extensive research has been directed toward the development of multipurpose lambda vectors for cloning ever since the potential of using coliphage lambda as a cloning vector was recognized in the late 1970s. An understanding of the intrinsic molecular organization and of the genetic events which determine lysis or lysogeny in lambda has allowed investigators to modify it to suit the specific requirements of gene manipulations. Unwanted restriction sites have been altered and arranged together into suitable polylinkers. The development of a highly efficient in vitro packaging system has permitted the introduction of chimeric molecules into hosts. Biological containment of recombinants has been achieved by introducing amber mutations into the lambda genome and by using specific amber suppressor hosts. Taking advantage of the limited range of genome size (78 to 105% of the wild-type size) for its efficient packaging, an array of vectors has been devised to accommodate inserts of a wide size range, the limit being 24 kbp in Charon 40. The central dispensable fragment of the lambda genome can be replaced by a fragment of heterologous DNA, leading to the construction of replacement vectors such as Charon and EMBL. Alternatively, small DNA fragments can be inserted without removing the dispensable region of the lambda genome, as in lambda gt10 and lambda gt11 vectors. In addition, the introduction of many other desirable properties, such as NotI and SfiI sites in polylinkers (e.g., lambda gt22), T7 and T3 promoters for the in vitro transcription (e.g., lambda DASH), and the mechanism for in vivo excision of the intact insert (e.g., lambda ZAP), has facilitated both cloning and subsequent analysis. In most cases, the recombinants can be differentiated from the parental phages by their altered phenotype. Libraries constructed in lambda vectors are screened easily with antibody or nucleic acid probes since several thousand clones can be plated on a single petri dish. Besides

  11. Typed Lambda Calculi and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curien, Pierre-Louis

    Finiteness spaces constitute a categorical model of Linear Logic (LL) whose objects can be seen as linearly topologised spaces, (a class of topological vector spaces introduced by Lefschetz in 1942) and morphisms as continuous linear maps. First, we recall definitions of finiteness spaces and describe their basic properties deduced from the general theory of linearly topologised spaces. Then we give an interpretation of LL based on linear algebra. Second, thanks to separation properties, we can introduce an algebraic notion of totality candidate in the framework of linearly topologised spaces: a totality candidate is a closed affine subspace which does not contain 0. We show that finiteness spaces with totality candidates constitute a model of classical LL. Finally, we give a barycentric simply typed lambda-calculus, with booleans ${\\mathcal{B}}$ and a conditional operator, which can be interpreted in this model. We prove completeness at type ${\\mathcal{B}}^n\\to{\\mathcal{B}}$ for every n by an algebraic method.

  12. Double Lambda and Xi hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Kazuma

    2014-09-01

    Nuclei with double strangeness (S = -2) provide the key information to understand Baryon-Baryon interaction under the SU(3)f symmetry. Therefore we have carried out the experiments at KEK for quarter a century. Recently, the interaction in S = -2 sector is noted to derive the information of the EOS of neutron star. The Lambda-Lambda interaction has been presented to be weak attractive by NAGARA event which showed the production and decay of 6He double-hypernucleus. The event also presented the lower mass limit of H dibaryon. In other five events, we obtained the knowledge about an excitation level of 10Be double-hypernucleus under the consistency with NAGARA event. Moreover, very recently, we have discovered a Xi-14N system which was deeply bound far from the atomic 3D level (0.17 MeV) for a captured Xi hyperon. Since a 8Li nucleus was associated with the decay of one of twin-hypernuclei, the event was uniquely identified as Xi- + 14N ==> 10BeL + 5HeL. The system was selected from 8 million pictures on the test running for development of ``Overall Scanning'' to be used in the coming experiment. This is the first evidence of Xi hypernucleus to be bound and it is impacting for the study of Xi-N interaction. At J-PARC facility, for the further study of hyperon-hyperon interaction, we plan to perform the E07 experiment at J-PARC. In the workshop, we will review the above knowledge obtained by the experiments at KEK-PS, and discuss developed technologies to detected 102 or more double-hypernuclei in the E07 experiment at J-PARC. Nuclei with double strangeness (S = -2) provide the key information to understand Baryon-Baryon interaction under the SU(3)f symmetry. Therefore we have carried out the experiments at KEK for quarter a century. Recently, the interaction in S = -2 sector is noted to derive the information of the EOS of neutron star. The Lambda-Lambda interaction has been presented to be weak attractive by NAGARA event which showed the production and decay of 6He

  13. Recent developments in Lambda networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, C.; Grosso, P.

    About 6 years ago the first baby-steps were made on opening up dark fiber and DWDM infrastructure for direct use by ISP's after the transformation of the old style Telecom sector into a market driven business. Since then Lambda workshops, community groups like GLIF and a number of experiments have led to many implementations of hybrid national research and education networks and lightpath-based circuit exchanges as pioneered by SURFnet in GigaPort and NetherLight in collaboration with StarLight in Chicago and Canarie in Canada. This article looks back on those developments, describes some current open issues and research developments and proposes a concept of terabit networking.

  14. Bacteriophage Lambda: a Paradigm Revisited ▿

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; Allison, Heather E.; Saunders, Jon R.; McCarthy, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda has an archetypal immunity system, which prevents the superinfection of its Escherichia coli lysogens. It is now known that superinfection can occur with toxigenic lambda-like phages at a high frequency, and here we demonstrate that the superinfection of a lambda lysogen can lead to the acquisition of additional lambda genomes, which was confirmed by Southern hybridization and quantitative PCR. As many as eight integration events were observed but at a very low frequency (6.4 × 10−4) and always as multiple insertions at the established primary integration site in E. coli. Sequence analysis of the complete immunity region demonstrated that these multiply infected lysogens were not immunity mutants. In conclusion, although lambda superinfection immunity can be confounded, it is a rare event. PMID:20375161

  15. An X-ray Survey of FU Orionis Stars andUnusual X-ray Emission from Embedded YoungStars in NGC 2071

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Steve L.; Simmons, A. E.; Audard, M.; Briggs, K. R.; Guedel, M.; Meyer, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    We present new results from the first X-ray survey of accreting FU Orionis stars (FUors) and a pointed X-ray observation of the infrared cluster near the reflection nebula NGC 2071 in the Orion B cloud. Both observations reveal unusual X-ray spectra that challenge interpretive models. FUors are low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars that have undergone optical eruptions attributed to a large increase in the disk accretion rate. The prototype FU Ori and V1735 Cyg were both detected and show high temperature plasma typical of magnetic (e.g. coronal) emission. FU Ori also reveals a cooler component at kT = 0.7 keV viewed through lower absorption that could be shock-related, but a magnetic origin seems more likely (Skinner et al. 2006, ApJ, 643, 995). The IR cluster in NGC 2071 is one of the closest star-forming regions known to contain young high-mass stars. We have detected an unusual X-ray source within 1 arcsec of IRS-1, which is thought to be an embedded high-mass star. It drives a powerful outflow and is surrounded by a dense molecular disk or ring. The X-ray spectrum shows a hard continuum extending up to at least 8 keV and a broad fluorescent Fe line at 6.43 keV. The fluorescent line likely originates in cold nearby material (possibly the surrounding disk) illuminated by the heavily-absorbed X-ray source. This work is supported by NASA grants NNG05GJ15G, NNG05GK52G, and NNX06AE93G.

  16. Bacteriophage lambda: early pioneer and still relevant

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid 1950's to mid 1980's was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives have continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle. PMID:25742714

  17. Variable cosmological term \\varLambda(t)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; D'oleire, M.; Pimentel, Luis O.

    2015-11-01

    We present the case of time-varying cosmological term \\varLambda(t). The main idea arises by proposing that as in the cosmological constant case, the scalar potential is identified as V(φ)=2\\varLambda, with \\varLambda a constant, this identification should be kept even when the cosmological term has a temporal dependence, i.e., V(φ(t))=2\\varLambda(t). We use the Lagrangian formalism for a scalar field φ with standard kinetic energy and arbitrary potential V(φ) and apply this model to the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology. Exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by a special ansatz to solve the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equation and a particular potential for the scalar field and barotropic perfect fluid. We present the evolution on this cosmological term with different scenarios.

  18. The protein interaction map of bacteriophage lambda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacteriophage lambda is a model phage for most other dsDNA phages and has been studied for over 60 years. Although it is probably the best-characterized phage there are still about 20 poorly understood open reading frames in its 48-kb genome. For a complete understanding we need to know all interactions among its proteins. We have manually curated the lambda literature and compiled a total of 33 interactions that have been found among lambda proteins. We set out to find out how many protein-protein interactions remain to be found in this phage. Results In order to map lambda's interactions, we have cloned 68 out of 73 lambda open reading frames (the "ORFeome") into Gateway vectors and systematically tested all proteins for interactions using exhaustive array-based yeast two-hybrid screens. These screens identified 97 interactions. We found 16 out of 30 previously published interactions (53%). We have also found at least 18 new plausible interactions among functionally related proteins. All previously found and new interactions are combined into structural and network models of phage lambda. Conclusions Phage lambda serves as a benchmark for future studies of protein interactions among phage, viruses in general, or large protein assemblies. We conclude that we could not find all the known interactions because they require chaperones, post-translational modifications, or multiple proteins for their interactions. The lambda protein network connects 12 proteins of unknown function with well characterized proteins, which should shed light on the functional associations of these uncharacterized proteins. PMID:21943085

  19. Calculation of two-dimensional lambda modes

    SciTech Connect

    Belchior, A. Jr. ); Moreira, J.M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A system for on-line monitoring of power distribution in small reactors (known as MAP) is under development at COPESP-IPEN. Signals of self-powered neutron detectors are input to a program that estimates the power distribution as an expansion of lambda modes. The modal coefficients are obtained from a least-mean-squares technique adequate for real-time analysis. Three-dimensional lambda modes are synthesized out of one- and two-dimensional lambda modes. As a part of this project, a modification of a computer code was carried out in order to obtain the lambda modes. The results of this effort are summarized. The lambda modes are the solutions of the time-independent multigroup neutron diffusion equation, an eigenvalue equation. Normally, the computer codes produce the fundamental mode corresponding to the largest eigenvalue; their respective interpretations are neutron flux distribution and effective multiplication factor. For calculating higher order lambda modes it is usually necessary to eliminate the contribution of the lower modes from the fission source.

  20. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, δ Orionis Aa. IV. A Multiwavelength, Non-LTE Spectroscopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenar, T.; Oskinova, L.; Hamann, W.-R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Pablo, H.; Richardson, N. D.; Waldron, W. L.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Nichols, J. S.; Todt, H.; Nazé, Y.; Hoffman, J. L.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Negueruela, I.

    2015-08-01

    Eclipsing systems of massive stars allow one to explore the properties of their components in great detail. We perform a multi-wavelength, non-LTE analysis of the three components of the massive multiple system δ Ori A, focusing on the fundamental stellar properties, stellar winds, and X-ray characteristics of the system. The primary’s distance-independent parameters turn out to be characteristic for its spectral type (O9.5 II), but usage of the Hipparcos parallax yields surprisingly low values for the mass, radius, and luminosity. Consistent values follow only if δ Ori lies at about twice the Hipparcos distance, in the vicinity of the σ-Orionis cluster. The primary and tertiary dominate the spectrum and leave the secondary only marginally detectable. We estimate the V-band magnitude difference between primary and secondary to be {{Δ }}V≈ 2\\buildrel{{m}}\\over{.} 8. The inferred parameters suggest that the secondary is an early B-type dwarf (≈B1 V), while the tertiary is an early B-type subgiant (≈B0 IV). We find evidence for rapid turbulent velocities (∼200 km s‑1) and wind inhomogeneities, partially optically thick, in the primary’s wind. The bulk of the X-ray emission likely emerges from the primary’s stellar wind ({log}{L}{{X}}/{L}{Bol}≈ -6.85), initiating close to the stellar surface at {R}0∼ 1.1 {R}*. Accounting for clumping, the mass-loss rate of the primary is found to be {log}\\dot{M}≈ -6.4 ({M}ȯ {{yr}}-1), which agrees with hydrodynamic predictions, and provides a consistent picture along the X-ray, UV, optical, and radio spectral domains.

  1. CONSTRAINING MASS RATIO AND EXTINCTION IN THE FU ORIONIS BINARY SYSTEM WITH INFRARED INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Pueyo, Laurent; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Hinkley, Sasha; Dekany, Richard; Roberts, Jenny; Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Shao, Mike; Burruss, Rick; Cady, Eric; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Brenner, Douglas; Zimmerman, Neil; Monnier, John D.; Crepp, Justin; Parry, Ian; Beichman, Charles; Soummer, Remi

    2012-09-20

    We report low-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the eruptive star FU Orionis using the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) Project 1640 installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. This work focuses on elucidating the nature of the faint source, located 0.''5 south of FU Ori, and identified in 2003 as FU Ori S. We first use our observations in conjunction with published data to demonstrate that the two stars are indeed physically associated and form a true binary pair. We then proceed to extract J- and H-band spectro-photometry using the damped LOCI algorithm, a reduction method tailored for high contrast science with IFS. This is the first communication reporting the high accuracy of this technique, pioneered by the Project 1640 team, on a faint astronomical source. We use our low-resolution near-infrared spectrum in conjunction with 10.2 {mu}m interferometric data to constrain the infrared excess of FU Ori S. We then focus on estimating the bulk physical properties of FU Ori S. Our models lead to estimates of an object heavily reddened, A{sub V} = 8-12, with an effective temperature of {approx}4000-6500 K. Finally, we put these results in the context of the FU Ori N-S system and argue that our analysis provides evidence that FU Ori S might be the more massive component of this binary system.

  2. One milliarcsecond precision studies in the regions of Delta Equulei and Chi1 Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatewood, George

    1994-02-01

    Trigonometric parallaxes for stars in the regions of the binary stars Delta Equulei (HR 8123) and Chil Orionis (HR 2047) are derived from data collected with the Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP) and the Thaw Refractor of the University of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory. The weighted mean parallax of all trigonometric studies of delta Equ is now +5.42 +/- 0.93 mas, corresponding to absolute magnitudes of 3.87 +/- 0.04 and 3.95 +/- 0.04 mag, respectively, for the primary and secondary. Using the Popper and Dworetsky orbit we find a photocentric semimajor axis of 2.9 +/- 0.8 mas and individual masses of 1.21 +/- 0.090 and 1.19 +/- 0.088 solar masses, respectively, for the primary and secondary components. The weighted mean trigonometric parallax of all studies of the binary star Chil Ori is +111.0 +/- 0.92 mas, implying an absolute visual magnitude for the dominant GO V primary of 4.63 +/- 0.018 mag. The photocentric semimajor axis, derived from a fraction of the orbit, is 96.9 +/- 5.4 mas.

  3. One milliarcsecond precision studies in the regions of Delta Equulei and Chi(sup 1) Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George

    1994-01-01

    Trigonometric parallaxes for stars in the regions of the binary stars Delta Equulei (HR 8123) and Chi(sup l) Orionis (HR 2047) are derived from data collected with the Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP) and the Thaw Refractor of the University of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory. The weighted mean parallax of all trigonometric studies of delta Equ is now +5.42 +/- 0.93 mas, corresponding to absolute magnitudes of 3.87 +/- 0.04 and 3.95 +/- 0.04 mag, respectively, for the primary and secondary. Using the Popper and Dworetsky orbit we find a photocentric semimajor axis of 2.9 +/- 0.8 mas and individual masses of 1.21 +/- 0.090 and 1.19 +/- 0.088 solar masses, respectively, for the primary and secondary components. The weighted mean trigonometric parallax of all studies of the binary star Chi(sup l) Ori is +111.0 +/- 0.92 mas, implying an absolute visual magnitude for the dominant GO V primary of 4.63 +/- 0.018 mag. The photocentric semimajor axis, derived from a fraction of the orbit, is 96.9 +/- 5.4 mas.

  4. Studying the disk of the outbursting new FU Orionis object 2MASSJ0659

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisloeffel, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    A new outbursting young stellar object of the rare FU Orionis type -- 2MASSJ06593158-0405277 -- was discovered in Nov 2014. These objects represent the extreme case of the episodic accretion during the star formation process, with accretion rates rising by factors of 100 to 1000 up to 10^-4 M_sun/yr, leading to a brightening of the source by more than a factor 100 in the optical within several months. With a DDT proposal for FORCAST and FIFI-LS we were able to obtain MIR and FIR photometry of the object in Jan/Feb 2015, while the outburst was still on its rise. This is the first time that MIR and FIR photometry are available for such a source from before the outburst (WISE, AKARI) and during the rising burst. FU Ori objects then typically take decades for a very slow decline from their maximum brightness back to the original state. Therefore we are requesting to repeat our FORCAST and FIFI-LS observations (45 min each) now to derive the spectral energy distribution of the source, while it should be in its maximum state. This constitutes an unprecedented dataset to learn more about where in the circumstellar disk such a burst starts, how it is triggered, and what its implications for planet formation may be.

  5. BVR Observations and Period Variation of the Neglected Contact Binary V343 Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.-G.

    2009-07-01

    BVR light curves of V343 Orionis were observed with the 85 cm telescope at Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in 2007 and 2008. Using the Wilson-Devinney program, the photometric solution of V343 Ori was first deduced from those observations. Photometric results indicated that V343 Ori is an A-subtype W Ursae Majoris binary, whose mass ratio and overcontact degree are q = 0.253( ± 0.004) and f = 86.9%( ± 2.1%), respectively. The asymmetric light curves (i.e., O'Connell effect) were modeled by the spot model. The spot area is up to 1.21% of the area of the more massive component. All light minimum times for V343 Ori, spanning over 80 yr, were used in analyzing the orbital period change. From the O - C, there exists a long-term orbital period increase at a rate of dP/dt = +4.32 × 10-7 d yr-1, which may be caused by the mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transfer, the orbital angular momentum decreases while the spin angular momentum increases. When Jspin > 1/3Jorb, this kind of binary (e.g., V343 Ori), with high overcontact degree and period increase, may evolve into a rapid-rotating single star.

  6. Study ofe+e- to Lambda anti-Lambda, Lambda anti-Sigma^0,Sigma^0 anti-Sigma^0 using Initial State Radiation with BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-09-14

    We study the e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda gamma, Lambda anti-Sigma0 gamma, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 gamma processes using 230 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the BaBar detector at e+e- center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. From the analysis of the baryon-antibaryon mass spectra the cross sections for e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda, Lambda anti-Sigma0, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 are measured in the dibaryon mass range from threshold up to 3 GeV/c{sup 2}. The ratio of electric and magnetic form factors, |G{sub E}/G{sub M}|, is measured for e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda, and limits on the relative phase between Lambda form factors are obtained. We also measure the J/psi --> Lambda anti-Lambda, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 and psi(2S) --> Lambda anti-Lambda branching fractions.

  7. Spectrum of class-M supergiants in the region lambda lambda 7000-6000 angstrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlov, M. Y.; Rodriguez, M. H.; Shavrina, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    A general description is given of the spectrum of four M-supergiants in the region lambda lambda 7000-6000 A from high-dispersion spectrograms (6 A/mm). The equivalent widths of several hundred lines and depths of some molecular band heads were measured.

  8. The Heavy Mass Expansion lambda(sub)b -> lambda(sub)c Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Mannel, Thomas; Roberts, Winston

    1992-11-01

    We point out that in the decays of the lambda(sub)b to lambda(sub)c one can find predictions which - in the framework of the 1/m(sub)c expansion - do not receive corrections in any order of 1/m(sub)c. We discuss QCD corrections to these predictions and examine some of the consequences for nonleptonic decays.

  9. LambdaSa1 and LambdaSa2 Prophage Lysins of Streptococcus agalactiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, David G.; Dong, Shengli; Kirk, Marion C.; Cartee, Robert T.; Baker, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Putative N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase genes from LambdaSa1 and LambdaSa2 prophages of Streptococcus agalactiae were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes lysed the cell walls of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The peptidoglycan digestion products in the cell wall lysates were not consistent with amidase activity. Instead, the structure of the muropeptide digestion fragments indicated that both the LambdaSa1 and LambdaSa2 lysins exhibited γ-d-glutaminyl-l-lysine endopeptidase activity. The endopeptidase cleavage specificity of the lysins was confirmed using a synthetic peptide substrate corresponding to a portion of the stem peptide and cross bridge of Streptococcus agalactiae peptidoglycan. The LambdaSa2 lysin also displayed β-d-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity. PMID:17905888

  10. A Spectral Atlas of lambda Bootis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Heiter, U.

    2014-06-01

    Since the discovery of lambda Bootes stars, a permanent confusion about their classification can be found in literature. This group of non-magnetic, Population I, metal-poor A to F-type stars, has often been used as some sort of trash can for "exotic" and spectroscopically dubious objects. Some attempts have been made to establish a homogeneous group of stars which share the same common properties. Unfortunately, the flood of "new" information (e.g. UV and IR data) led again to a whole zoo of objects classified as lambda Bootes stars, which, however, are apparent non-members. To overcome this unsatisfying situation, a spectral atlas of well established lambda Bootes stars for the classical optical domain was compiled. It includes intermediate dispersion (40 and 120 Å mm^{-1}) spectra of three lambda Bootes, as well as appropriate MK standard stars. Furthermore, "suspicious" objects, such as shell and Field Horizontal Branch stars, have been considered in order to provide to classifiers a homogeneous reference. As a further step, a high resolution (8 Å mm^{-1}) spectrum of one "classical" lambda Bootes star in the same wavelength region (3800-4600 Å) is presented. In total, 55 lines can be used for this particular star to derive detailed abundances for nine heavy elements (Mg, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Sr and Ba).

  11. Measurement of the Production Fraction Times Branching Fraction f(b -> \\Lambda_b) x B(\\Lambda_b -> J/\\psi \\Lambda)

    SciTech Connect

    Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; /CINVESTAV, IPN

    2011-09-01

    A new measurement of the b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b} production fraction multiplied by the {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} branching fraction was performed by the D0 experiment using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The result of this measurement, f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = [6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)] x 10{sup -5}, represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average. We give an estimate of {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}), which takes into account correlations among the different b-hadron production fractions and other weakly decaying baryons.

  12. Does lambda sub 2,2 vary?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.

    1971-01-01

    An attempt has been made to find a secular drift in lambda sub 2,2, or the phase of the low order and degree portion of the geogravity field. This portion may be associated with mass anomalies near the core-mantle boundary. From the geomagnetic evidence, such anomalies might have westward drifts on the order of 0.5 degrees/year. Tracking data on 8 synchronous satellite over a period of 6 years were examined for residual accelerations which might be explained by a drift of the lambda sub 2,2 gravity phase angle. No conclusive movement of lambda sub 2,2 was detected. But a measured upper bound on the drift of less than 0.05 degrees/year is still compatible with possible slow moving irregularities in the region of the core-mantle boundary.

  13. Preparation and assay of phage lambda.

    PubMed

    Dale, J W; Greenaway, P J

    1985-01-01

    Lambda, a temperate bacteriophage of E. coli, has two alternative modes of replication in sensitive cells, known as the lytic and lysogenic cycles. In the lytic cycle, after the lambda DNA enters the cells, various phage functions are expressed that result in the production of a large number of mature phage particles and cell lysis. In the lysogenic mode, which normally occurs in only a small proportion of the infected cells, the phage forms a more or less stable relationship with the host bacterium; this stable state is known as lysogeny. In a lysogenic cell, phage DNA is normally incorporated into the chromosomal DNA via specific attachment sites on both the phage DNA and the host chromosome. Replication of lambda DNA then occurs only during replication of the host chromosome, and the phage genome is inherited by each daughter cell at cell division. The phage is maintained in this prophage state through the action of a repressor protein, coded for by the phage gene cl. This repressor protein turns off the expression of virtually the whole of the lambda genome. If the repressor is inactivated, the expression of phage genes is initiated. This leads to the excision of lambda DNA from the host chromosome and entry into the lytic cycle. The balance between the lytic and lysogenic modes of replication is a delicate and complex one in which a key factor is the concentration of the cl gene product. Some of the many sources of further information about the basic biology of lambda phage are listed in the references to this chapter.

  14. Photometric behaviour of the FU Orionis type star, V1057 Cygni, during the last 25 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopatskaya, E. N.; Kolotilov, E. A.; Arkharov, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    The FU Orionis type of variable star (FUor), V1057 Cygni, underwent a nova-like outburst in 1969-1970. Among the FUors, V1057 Cyg is notable for having the most dramatic post-maximum decrease in brightness. Thus, photometric monitoring of this object is important for interpretations of the cause of this event. Here, we study the behaviour of V1057 Cyg over the last 25 years on the basis of our optical and infrared observations. The optical and near-infrared observations of V1057 Cyg started in 1974, and we present all our data (up to the end of 2011), including 1085 and 167 nights of optical and infrared photometry, respectively. The UBVRIJHKLM light curves for 1985-2011 show that despite the increased photometric activity, after a rapid decrease in brightness in the mid-1990s, the average level of brightness remained practically constant. After the object becomes fainter than V ≈ 11.5 mag, a swerve appears in the track of the colour-magnitude diagram. The light variability shows a different periodicity in different spectral regions. We have discovered a period of 1631 ± 60 d in the BVR bands (1995-2011) and 523 ± 40 d in the RIJHK bands (2002-2011) with amplitudes of 0.5-0.3 mag. The 523-d period is presumably correlated with the changes in the radial velocity of an emission component in Li I. We conclude that the observed properties of the FUor star V1057 Cyg are in accordance with current models of FUors involving binary or multiple systems.

  15. Long-term evolution of FU Orionis objects at infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ábrahám, P.; Kóspál, Á.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Kun, M.; Moór, A.; Prusti, T.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the brightness evolution of seven FU Orionis systems in the 1-100 μm wavelength range using data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The ISO measurements were supplemented by 2MASS and MSX observations performed in the same years as the ISO mission (1995-98). The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) based on these data points were compared with earlier ones derived from the IRAS photometry as well as from ground-based observations carried out around the epoch 1983. In three cases (Z CMa, Parsamian 21, V1331 Cyg) no difference between the two epochs was seen within the measurement uncertainties. V1057 Cyg, V1515 Cyg and V1735 Cyg have become fainter at near-infrared wavelengths while V346 Nor has become slightly brighter. V1057 Cyg exhibits a similar flux change in the mid-infrared. At λ≥ 60 μm most of the sources remained constant; only V346 Nor seems to fade. Our data on the long-term evolution of V1057 Cyg agree with the model predictions of Kenyon & Hartmann (\\cite{Kenyonh91}) and Turner et al. (\\cite{Turner97}) at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, but disagree at λ>25 μm. We discuss if this observational result at far-infrared wavelengths could be understood in the framework of the existing models. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) with participation of ISAS and NASA.

  16. ELLIPSOIDAL VARIABLE V1197 ORIONIS: ABSOLUTE LIGHT-VELOCITY ANALYSIS FOR KNOWN DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. E.; Chochol, D.; KomzIk, R.; Van Hamme, W.; Pribulla, T.; Volkov, I.

    2009-09-01

    V1197 Orionis light curves from a long-term observing program for red giant binaries show ellipsoidal variation of small amplitude in the V and R{sub C} bands, although not clearly in U and B. Eclipses are not detected. All four bands show large irregular intrinsic variations, including fleeting quasi-periodicities identified by power spectra, that degrade analysis and may be caused by dynamical tides generated by orbital eccentricity. To deal with the absence of eclipses and consequent lack of astrophysical and geometrical information, direct use is made of the Hipparcos parallax distance while the V and R{sub C} light curves and (older) radial velocity curves are analyzed simultaneously in terms of absolute flux. The red giant's temperature is estimated from new spectra. This type of analysis, called Inverse Distance Estimation for brevity, is new and can also be applied to other ellipsoidal variables. Advantages gained by utilization of definite distance and temperature are discussed in regard to how radius, fractional lobe filling, and mass ratio information are expressed in the observations. The advantages were tested in solutions of noisy synthetic data. Also discussed and tested by simulations are ideas on the optimal number of light curves to be solved simultaneously under various conditions. The dim companion has not been observed or discussed in the literature but most solutions find its mass to be well below that of the red giant. Solutions show red giant masses that are too low for evolution to the red giant stage within the age of the Galaxy, although that result is probably an artifact of the intrinsic brightness fluctuations.

  17. Catching the next bright outbursting FU Orionis object on the rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisloeffel, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    Outbursting young stellar object of the rare FU Orionis type represent the extreme case of the episodic accretion during the star formation process, with accretion rates rising by factors of 100 to 1000 up to 10^-4 M_sun/yr, leading to a brightening of the source by more than a factor 100 in the optical within several months. With a DDT proposal for FORCAST and FIFI-LS we were able to obtain MIR and FIR photometry of the newly discovered outbursting FUor 2MASSJ0659-04 in Jan/Feb 2015, while the outburst was still on its rise. This was the first time that MIR and FIR photometry were available for such a source from before the outburst (WISE, AKARI) and during the rising burst. FU Ori objects then typically take decades for a very slow decline from their maximum brightness back to the original state. With the sensitive infrared sky surveys at hand nowadays it is very likely that also for future bright FUors pre-outburst data will be available, which are allowing us to follow the changes of the circumstellar disk through the burst. Here we are requesting Target-of-Opportunity observations for the next bright outbursting FUor with FORCAST and FIFI-LS observations (1h each) while the outburst is on its rise. With these data we will derive the spectral energy distribution of the source. This constitutes an excellent dataset to learn more about where in the circumstellar disk such a burst starts, how it is triggered, and what its implications for planet formation may be.

  18. CHANDRA REVEALS VARIABLE MULTI-COMPONENT X-RAY EMISSION FROM FU ORIONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Guedel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R.; Lamzin, Sergei A.

    2010-10-20

    FU Orionis is the prototype of a class of eruptive young stars ('FUors') characterized by strong optical outbursts. We recently completed an exploratory survey of FUors using XMM-Newton to determine their X-ray properties, about which little was previously known. The prototype FU Ori and V1735 Cyg were detected. The X-ray spectrum of FU Ori was found to be unusual, consisting of a cool moderately absorbed component plus a hotter component viewed through an absorption column density that is an order of magnitude higher. We present here a sensitive (99 ks) follow-up X-ray observation of FU Ori obtained at higher angular resolution with Chandra ACIS-S. The unusual multi-component spectrum is confirmed. The hot component is centered on FU Ori and dominates the emission above 2 keV. It is variable (a signature of magnetic activity) and is probably coronal emission originating close to FU Ori's surface viewed through cool gas in FU Ori's strong wind or accretion stream. In contrast, the X-ray centroid of the soft emission below 2 keV is offset 0.''20 to the southeast of FU Ori, toward the near-IR companion (FU Ori S). This offset amounts to slightly less than half the separation between the two stars. The most likely explanation for the offset is that the companion contributes significantly to the softer X-ray emission below 2 keV (and weakly above 2 keV). The superimposed X-ray contributions from FU Ori and the companion resolve the paradox posed by XMM-Newton of an apparently single X-ray source viewed through two different absorption columns.

  19. Chandra Reveals Variable Multi-component X-ray Emission From FU Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Güdel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R.; Lamzin, Sergei A.

    2010-10-01

    FU Orionis is the prototype of a class of eruptive young stars ("FUors") characterized by strong optical outbursts. We recently completed an exploratory survey of FUors using XMM-Newton to determine their X-ray properties, about which little was previously known. The prototype FU Ori and V1735 Cyg were detected. The X-ray spectrum of FU Ori was found to be unusual, consisting of a cool moderately absorbed component plus a hotter component viewed through an absorption column density that is an order of magnitude higher. We present here a sensitive (99 ks) follow-up X-ray observation of FU Ori obtained at higher angular resolution with Chandra ACIS-S. The unusual multi-component spectrum is confirmed. The hot component is centered on FU Ori and dominates the emission above 2 keV. It is variable (a signature of magnetic activity) and is probably coronal emission originating close to FU Ori's surface viewed through cool gas in FU Ori's strong wind or accretion stream. In contrast, the X-ray centroid of the soft emission below 2 keV is offset 0farcs20 to the southeast of FU Ori, toward the near-IR companion (FU Ori S). This offset amounts to slightly less than half the separation between the two stars. The most likely explanation for the offset is that the companion contributes significantly to the softer X-ray emission below 2 keV (and weakly above 2 keV). The superimposed X-ray contributions from FU Ori and the companion resolve the paradox posed by XMM-Newton of an apparently single X-ray source viewed through two different absorption columns.

  20. Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis of Class I and Class II FU Orionis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Rodón, Javier A.; Gómez, Mercedes

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ~80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ~10-7 M ⊙ yr-1 versus ~10-5 M ⊙ yr-1 for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (~70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10-7 M ⊙ yr-1. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  1. Spectral energy distribution analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Gómez, Mercedes; Rodón, Javier A. E-mail: mercedes@oac.uncor.edu

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ∼80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} versus ∼10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (∼70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  2. General method for fine mapping of the Escherichia coli K-12 lamB gene: localization of missense mutations affecting bacteriophage lambda adsorption.

    PubMed Central

    Hofnung, M; Lepouce, E; Braun-Breton, C

    1981-01-01

    lamB is the structural gene for the bacteriophage lambda receptor, a multifunctional protein located in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12. We present a method for deletion mapping of any lamB mutations with a recognizable pheno-type. This method involves a transducing phage constructed by in vitro recombination which can also be used for complementation, deoxyribonucleic acid sequence, and in vitro protein synthesis studies with the mutated lamB gene. Using this method, we mapped 18 lamB missense mutations which confer resistance to phage lambda h+ (wild-type host range). The main results were the following. (i) None of the 18 mutations was located in the first 4 deletion intervals out of the 11 of the genetic map. (ii) These mutations were clustered according to their phenotype as follows. (a) Class I mutations, which allow growth of lambda h and lambda hh* (one-step and two-step host range mutants of lambda, respectively), were located in three regions--three in interval V, four in interval VIII-IX, and three in interval X-XI. Only the last three mutations still allowed growth of phage K10 which also uses the lambda receptor, and two of them still allowed reversible binding of lambda h+. (b) All seven class II mutations allowed only growth of lambda hh* and mapped in interval V. These results are discussed in the frame of a genetic approach to the functional topology of the lambda receptor. PMID:6458595

  3. Hypertriton and light nuclei production at Lambda-production subthreshold energy in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Zu, Z.; Chen, J.H., Ma, Y.G., Cai, X-Z, Ma, G.L., Zhong, C.

    2011-08-01

    High-energy heavy-ion collisions produce abundant hyperons and nucleons. A dynamical coalescence model coupled with the ART model is employed to study the production probabilities of light clusters, deuteron (d), triton (t), helion ({sup 3}He), and hypertriton ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H) at subthreshold energy of Aproduction ({approx} 1 GeV per nucleon). We study the dependence on the reaction system size of the coalescence penalty factor per additional nucleon and entropy per nucleon. The Strangeness Population Factor (S{sub 3} = {sup 3}{sub {Lambda}}H/({sup 3}He x {Lambda}/p)) shows an extra suppression of hypertriton comparing to light clusters of the same mass number. This model predicts a hypertriton production cross-section of a few {mu}b in {sup 36}Ar+{sup 36}Ar, {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 56}Ni+{sup 56}Ni in 1 A GeV reactions. The production rate is as high as a few hypertritons per million collisions, which shows that the fixed-target heavy-ion collisions at CSR (Lanzhou/China) at {Lambda} subthreshold energy are suitable for breaking new ground in hypernuclear physics.

  4. Lambda Station: On-demand flow based routing for data intensive Grid applications over multitopology networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bobyshev, A.; Crawford, M.; DeMar, P.; Grigaliunas, V.; Grigoriev, M.; Moibenko, A.; Petravick, D.; Rechenmacher, R.; Newman, H.; Bunn, J.; Van Lingen, F.; Nae, D.; Ravot, S.; Steenberg, C.; Su, X.; Thomas, M.; Xia, Y.; /Caltech

    2006-08-01

    Lambda Station is an ongoing project of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology. The goal of this project is to design, develop and deploy network services for path selection, admission control and flow based forwarding of traffic among data-intensive Grid applications such as are used in High Energy Physics and other communities. Lambda Station deals with the last-mile problem in local area networks, connecting production clusters through a rich array of wide area networks. Selective forwarding of traffic is controlled dynamically at the demand of applications. This paper introduces the motivation of this project, design principles and current status. Integration of Lambda Station client API with the essential Grid middleware such as the dCache/SRM Storage Resource Manager is also described. Finally, the results of applying Lambda Station services to development and production clusters at Fermilab and Caltech over advanced networks such as DOE's UltraScience Net and NSF's UltraLight is covered.

  5. Very low-luminosity Class I/Flat outflow sources in sigma Orionis: Clues to alternative formation mechanisms for very low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Basmah; Whelan, E.; Thompson, M.; Vorobyov, E.; Lodieu, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present an optical through sub-millimetre multi-wavelength study of two very low-luminosity Class I/Flat systems, Mayrit 1701117 and Mayrit 1082188, in the sigma Orionis cluster. We performed moderate resolution (R 1000) optical ( 0.4-0.9mu) spectroscopy with the TWIN spectrograph at the Calar Alto 3.5-m telescope. The spectra for both sources show prominent emission in accretion- and outflow-associated lines. The mean accretion rate measured from multiple line diagnostics is 6.4x10^{-10} Msun/yr for Mayrit 1701117, and 2.5x10^{-10} Msun/yr for Mayrit 1082188. The outflow mass loss rates for the two systems are similar and estimated to be 1x10^{-9} Msun/yr. The activity rates are within the range observed for low-mass Class I protostars. We obtained sub-millimetre continuum observations with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA-2) bolometer at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Both objects are detected at a >5-sigma level in the SCUBA-2 850mu band. The bolometric luminosity of the targets as measured from the observed spectral energy distribution over 0.8-850mu is 0.18+/-0.04 Lsun for Mayrit 1701117, and 0.16+/-0.03 Lsun for Mayrit 1082188, and is in the very low-mass range. The total dust+gas mass derived from sub-millimetre fluxes is 36 M_Jup and 22 M_Jup for Mayrit 1701117 and Mayrit 1082188, respectively. There is the possibility that some of the envelope material might be dissipated by the strong outflows driven by these sources, resulting in a final mass of the system close to or below the sub-stellar limit. Given the membership of these objects in a relatively evolved cluster of 3 Myr of age, we consider an alternate formation mechanism in the context of the `hybrid' model of disk fragmentation, followed by ejection of a gaseous clump.

  6. Analysis of the (1, lambda)-ES on the parabolic ridge.

    PubMed

    Oyman, A I; Beyer, H G; Schwefel, H P

    2000-01-01

    The progress rate of the (1,+ lambda)-ES (Evolution Strategy) is analyzed on the parabolic ridge test function. A different progress behavior is observed for the (1, lambda)-ES than for the sphere model test function. The characteristics of the progress rate picture for the plus strategy differs little from the one obtained for the sphere model, but this strategy has drastically worse progress rate values than those obtained for the comma strategy. The dynamics of the distance to the progress axis is also investigated. A theoretical formula is derived to estimate the change in this distance over generations. This formula is used to derive the expected value of the problem-specific distance to the ridge axis. The correctness of the formulae is supported by simulation results.

  7. GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter; Angus, G. W. E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu E-mail: angus.gz@gmail.com

    2013-07-20

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  8. {lambda}(1405) as a resonance in the baryon-meson scattering coupled to the q{sup 3} state in a quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Sachiko; Shimizu, Kiyotaka

    2007-09-15

    To describe {lambda}(1405) as a resonance in baryon-meson scattering, we have investigated the q{sup 3}-qq scattering system with the flavor-singlet q{sup 3}(0s){sup 2}(0p) state (the {lambda}{sup 1} pole). The scattering is treated by the quark cluster model (QCM). The {lambda}{sup 1} pole is treated as a bound state embedded in the continuum. We have found that a peak appears below the NK threshold in the spin-(1/2), isospin-0 channel even if the mass of the {lambda}{sup 1} pole is above the threshold. This peak disappears when the coupling to the {lambda}{sup 1} pole is switched off. Using the observed hadron mass in the kinetic part of QCM is also found to be important in reproducing a peak just below the NK threshold.

  9. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Lambda-bar Polarization in B0 -> Lambda-par p pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-08-03

    We present a measurement of the B{sup 0} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}p{pi}{sup -} branching fraction performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Based on a sample of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs we measure {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}p{pi}{sup -}) [3.07 {+-} 0.31(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.)] x 10{sup -6}. The measured differential spectrum as a function of the dibaryon invariant mass m({bar {Lambda}}p) shows a near-threshold enhancement similar to that observed in other baryonic B decays. We study the {bar {Lambda}} polarization as a function of {bar {Lambda}} energy in the B{sup 0} rest frame (E*{sub {bar {Lambda}}}) and compare it with theoretical expectations of fully longitudinally right-polarized {bar {Lambda}} at large E*{sub {bar {Lambda}}}.

  10. Study of the decay asymmetry parameter and CP violation parameter in the Lambda(c)+ ---> Lambda pi+ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-09-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, we present a new measurement of the weak decay-asymmetry parameter a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} in {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup +} decay. Comparing particle with antiparticle decays, we obtain the first measurement of the CP violation parameter {Alpha} {triple_bond} a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} + a{sub {ovr {Lambda}{sub c}}}/a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} - a{sub {ovr {Lambda}{sub c}}}. We obtain a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.13 and {Alpha} = -0.07 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.12 where errors are statistical and systematic.

  11. The weak magnetic field of the O9.7 supergiant ζOrionisA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouret, J.-C.; Donati, J.-F.; Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Marcolino, W.; Lanz, T.; Howarth, I. D.

    2008-09-01

    We report here the detection of a weak magnetic field of 50-100G on the O9.7 supergiant ζOrionisA (ζOriA), using spectropolarimetric observations obtained with NARVAL at the 2-m Télescope Bernard Lyot atop Pic du Midi (France). ζOriA is the third O star known to host a magnetic field (along with θ1OriC and HD191612), and the first detection on a `normal' rapidly rotating O star. The magnetic field of ζOriA is the weakest magnetic field ever detected on a massive star. The measured field is lower than the thermal equipartition limit (about 100G). By fitting non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres to our spectra, we determined that ζOriA is a 40Msolar star with a radius of 25Rsolar and an age of about 5-6Myr, showing no surface nitrogen enhancement and losing mass at a rate of about 2 × 10-6Msolaryr-1. The magnetic topology of ζOriA is apparently more complex than a dipole and involves two main magnetic polarities located on both sides of the same hemisphere; our data also suggest that ζOriA rotates in about 7.0d and is about 40° away from pole-on to an Earth-based observer. Despite its weakness, the detected magnetic field significantly affects the wind structure; the corresponding Alfvén radius is however very close to the surface, thus generating a different rotational modulation in wind lines than that reported on the two other known magnetic O stars. The rapid rotation of ζOriA with respect to θ1OriC appears as a surprise, both stars having similar unsigned magnetic fluxes (once rescaled to the same radius); it may suggest that the subequipartition field detected on ζOriA is not a fossil remnant (as opposed to that of θ1 OriC and HD191612), but the result of an exotic dynamo action produced through magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL), operated by the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France

  12. Dynamical mass of the O-type supergiant in ζ Orionis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, C. A.; Rivinius, Th.; Nieva, M.-F.; Stahl, O.; van Belle, G.; Zavala, R. T.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: A close companion of ζ Orionis A was found in 2000 with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI), and shown to be a physical companion. Because the primary is a supergiant of type O, for which dynamical mass measurements are very rare, the companion was observed with NPOI over the full 7-year orbit. Our aim was to determine the dynamical mass of a supergiant that, due to the physical separation of more than 10 AU between the components, cannot have undergone mass exchange with the companion. Methods: The interferometric observations allow measuring the relative positions of the binary components and their relative brightness. The data collected over the full orbital period allows all seven orbital elements to be determined. In addition to the interferometric observations, we analyzed archival spectra obtained at the Calar Alto, Haute Provence, Cerro Armazones, and La Silla observatories, as well as new spectra obtained at the VLT on Cerro Paranal. In the high-resolution spectra we identified a few lines that can be associated exclusively to one or the other component for the measurement of the radial velocities of both. The combination of astrometry and spectroscopy then yields the stellar masses and the distance to the binary star. Results: The resulting masses for components Aa of 14.0 ± 2.2 M⊙ and Ab of 7.4 ± 1.1 M⊙ are low compared to theoretical expectations, with a distance of 294 ± 21 pc which is smaller than a photometric distance estimate of 387 ± 54 pc based on the spectral type B0III of the B component. If the latter (because it is also consistent with the distance to the Orion OB1 association) is adopted, the mass of the secondary component Ab of 14 ± 3 M⊙ would agree with classifying a star of type B0.5IV. It is fainter than the primary by about 2.2 ± 0.1 magnitudes in the visual. The primary mass is then determined to be 33 ± 10 M⊙. The possible reasons for the distance discrepancy are most likely related to physical

  13. The Evolution of the FU Orionis Disk, and the Seeds of Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Joel D.

    2016-10-01

    Young stars form new planetary systems during the collapse of a giant cloud of gas and dust. Tiny dust particles and gas parcels collide and stick together, growing slowly into planetary cores and then full-size planets. But is this process a steady and slow one, or are there bumps in the road to planet construction? In 1936, the young star FU Orionis (FU Ori) became 100 times brighter in only a few short months. Although astronomers didn't realize at the time, FU Ori was undergoing a "burst" of accretion -- instead of a slow trickle of material falling into the central star, nearly 20 Jupiters worth of material have fallen in and burned since 1936. This sustained flow is a large fraction of the entire measureable disk mass (both gas and dust) surrounding FU Ori. FU Ori has slowly faded over the past 80 years, reducing by approximately 1 mag. in B. But what changes did this increased brightness wreak upon FU Ori's disk, and what implications would it have for any planets that might have formed or form later? Unlike most observed young stars, FU Ori and its (~ 10) brethren with similar behavior show no evidence of crystalline dust grains like forsterite (peridot), and the temperatures at an Earth-equivalent distance would have risen from room temperature to a scalding 1000 degrees Kelvin.Our study with SOFIA/FORCAST, in comparison with our previous study with Spitzer/IRS, provides the first multi-epoch infrared spectroscopic study of an FUor, as it appeared in 2004 and 2016. First, the continuum (the energy emitted by viscous heating in the disk) has decreased by 13% but is still fit by a 7200 K blackbody at 13% less strength; second, the heating source behind disk's atmosphere (similar to a stellar atmosphere, as the superheated inner disk is at the same temperature as a typical star) has also decreased, exciting less high temperature water vapor. This change has not completely propagated to the rest of the disk. The silicate dust remains unchanged. We conclude

  14. The lambda point experiment in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The motivation and potential for performing very high resolution measurements of the heat capacity singularity at the lambda point of helium in microgravity conditions was briefly discussed. It is clear that tests extending deep into the asymptotic region can be performed, where the theoretical predictions take on their simplest form. This advantageous situation should lead to a major improvement in the understanding of the range of applicability of current theoretical ideas in this field. The lambda transition holds out the prospect of giving the maximum advance of any system, and with the application of cryogenic techniques, the potential of this system can be realized. The technology for the initial experiments is already developed, and results could be obtained in 1990.

  15. The {Lambda}(1405) in Full QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Menadue, Benjamin J.; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.; Mahbub, M. Selim

    2011-12-14

    At 1405.1 MeV, the lowest-lying negative-parity state of the {Lambda} baryon lies surprising low. Indeed, this is lower than the lowest negative-parity state of the nucleon, even though the {Lambda}(1405) possesses a valence strange quark. However, previous Lattice QCD studies have been unable to identify such a low-lying state. Using the PACS-CS (2+1)-flavour full-QCD ensembles, available through the ILDG, we utilise a variational analysis with source and sink smearing to isolate this elusive state. We find three low-lying odd-parity states, and for the first time reproduce the correct level ordering with respect to the nearby scattering thresholds.

  16. AN EXPRESSION TEMPLATE AWARE LAMBDA FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    S. A. SMITH; J. STRIEGNITZ

    2000-09-19

    The authors show how the paradigms of lambda functions and expression templates fit together in order to provide a means to increase the expressiveness of existing STL algorithms. They demonstrate how the expression templates approach could be extended in order to work with built-in types. To be portable, their solution is based on the Portable Expression Template Engine (PETE), which is a framework that enables the development of expression template aware classes.

  17. Fully correlated study of {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He hypernucleus including {lambda}N space-exchange correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A. A.; Hasan, Z.

    2006-09-15

    We present a fully correlated study of the six-body {sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}{sup 6}He hypernucleus. The wave function involves all relevant dynamic correlations as well as the space-exchange correlation (SEC). Calculations for energy breakdown, {lambda}{lambda}-separation energy, nuclear core polarization, and point proton radius have been performed. The baryon density profiles have also been calculated. Effect of SEC on all these physical observables is found to be significant. The findings suggest that a study ignoring SEC would be deficient.

  18. Trivalent Iron Induced Gelation in Lambda-Carrageenan

    PubMed Central

    Running, Cordelia A.; Falshaw, Ruth; Janaswamy, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    This communication reports gelation of lambda-carrageenan, for the first time, in the presence of trivalent iron ions. Kappa-, iota- and lambda-carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides used extensively in food, pharmaceutical and medical applications. Kappa- and iota-carrageenans show gelation in the presence of mono- and di-valent ions, but lambda-carrageenan yields only viscous solutions. Our results show that gelation in lambda-carrageenan indeed is possible, but with trivalent ions. X-ray fiber diffraction patterns of iron (III)-lambda-carrageenan are characteristic of highly oriented and polycrystalline fibers containing well resolved Bragg reflections. The elastic modulus (G') of the product is far greater than the loss modulus (G") indicating the thermal stability of lambda-carrageenan in the presence of iron (III) ions. This novel finding has potential to expand lambda-carrageenan’s current utility beyond a viscosifying agent. PMID:22408280

  19. Trivalent iron induced gelation in lambda-carrageenan

    SciTech Connect

    Running, Cordelia A.; Falshaw, Ruth; Janaswamy, Srinivas

    2012-05-24

    This communication reports gelation of lambda-carrageenan, for the first time, in the presence of trivalent iron ions. Kappa-, iota- and lambda-carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides used extensively in food, pharmaceutical and medical applications. Kappa- and iota-carrageenans show gelation in the presence of mono- and di-valent ions, but lambda-carrageenan yields only viscous solutions. Our results show that gelation in lambda-carrageenan indeed is possible, but with trivalent ions. X-ray fiber diffraction patterns of iron (III)-lambda-carrageenan are characteristic of highly oriented and polycrystalline fibers containing well resolved Bragg reflections. The elastic modulus (G*) of the product is far greater than the loss modulus (G*) indicating the thermal stability of lambda-carrageenan in the presence of iron (III) ions. This novel finding has potential to expand lambda-carrageenan's current utility beyond a viscosifying agent.

  20. MASS FUNCTION PREDICTIONS BEYOND {Lambda}CDM

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Suman; Lukic, Zarija; Habib, Salman; Heitmann, Katrin; White, Martin; Wagner, Christian

    2011-05-10

    The statistics of dark matter halos is an essential component of precision cosmology. The mass distribution of halos, as specified by the halo mass function, is a key input for several cosmological probes. The sizes of N-body simulations are now such that, for the most part, results need no longer be statistics-limited, but are still subject to various systematic uncertainties. Discrepancies in the results of simulation campaigns for the halo mass function remain in excess of statistical uncertainties and of roughly the same size as the error limits set by near-future observations; we investigate and discuss some of the reasons for these differences. Quantifying error sources and compensating for them as appropriate, we carry out a high-statistics study of dark matter halos from 67 N-body simulations to investigate the mass function and its evolution for a reference {Lambda}CDM cosmology and for a set of wCDM cosmologies. For the reference {Lambda}CDM cosmology (close to WMAP5), we quantify the breaking of universality in the form of the mass function as a function of redshift, finding an evolution of as much as 10% away from the universal form between redshifts z = 0 and z = 2. For cosmologies very close to this reference we provide a fitting formula to our results for the (evolving) {Lambda}CDM mass function over a mass range of 6 x 10{sup 11}-3 x 10{sup 15} M{sub sun} to an estimated accuracy of about 2%. The set of wCDM cosmologies is taken from the Coyote Universe simulation suite. The mass functions from this suite (which includes a {Lambda}CDM cosmology and others with w {approx_equal} -1) are described by the fitting formula for the reference {Lambda}CDM case at an accuracy level of 10%, but with clear systematic deviations. We argue that, as a consequence, fitting formulae based on a universal form for the mass function may have limited utility in high-precision cosmological applications.

  1. Modelado de las Distribuciones Espectrales de Energía de tres nuevas estrellas jóvenes de tipo FU Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, L. V.; Rodón, J.; Gómez, M.; Whitney, B.

    In this work we present the modeling of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of three protostellar objects of the FU Orionis type, for which an outburst was observed in the last two years. We applied the code developed by Whitney et al. (ApJ 591, 1049, 2003) to model the SEDs. We derived physical and geometric parameters for each object, which agree with those previously obtained for other FU Orionis type stars. Furthermore, the three objects were studied in their stages of high and low activity. Our results suggest that the disk plays a key role in the outburst event, which is reflected in an increase of at least one order of magnitude of the mass accretion rate from the disk to the central object, with respect to the low activity period. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  2. Análisis y determinación de parámetros físicos de estrellas de tipo FU Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, L.; Gómez, M.; Whitney, B.

    FU Orionis stars (FUORs) are pre-main sequence objects that periodically incur in a steeply increase of brightness (outburst) of DeltaV~ 6 mag in a period of ~ 10 yr, followed by a gradual descent to the original magnitude in an interval of time of ~100 yr. In this contribution we present initial results on the modeling of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a group of 7 FU Orionis stars: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, Z CMa, BBW 76, V1735 Cyg, and V883 Ori. We initially used the grid of SEDs calculated by Robitaille et al. (2006). This solution was refined applying the code developed by Whitney et al. (2003). We derived physical and geometrical parameters for the disks of these FUORs. We compared these properties with those of ''canonical'' T Tauri disks. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  3. Differential Photoproduction Cross Sections of the Sigma0(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520)

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Kei; Schumacher, Reinhard A.

    2013-10-01

    We report the exclusive photoproduction cross sections for the Sigma(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520) in the reactions gamma + p -> K+ + Y* using the CLAS detector for energies from near the respective production thresholds up to a center-of-mass energy W of 2.85 GeV. The differential cross sections are integrated to give the total exclusive cross sections for each hyperon. Comparisons are made to current theoretical models based on the effective Lagrangian approach and fitted to previous data. The accuracy of these models is seen to vary widely. The cross sections for the Lambda(1405) region are strikingly different for the Sigma+pi-, Sigma0 pi0, and Sigma- pi+ decay channels, indicating the effect of isospin interference, especially at W values close to the threshold.

  4. A white dwarf companion to the main-sequence star 4 Omicron(1) Orionis and the binary hypothesis for the origin of peculiar red giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, Thomas B.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the peculiar red giants (PRGs) called MS stars are investigated, and the discovery of a white dwarf (WD) companion to the MS star 4 Omicron(1) Orionis is reported. The observations and data analysis are discussed and compared with those for field WDs in order to derive parameters for the WD and the luminosity of the primary. Detection limits for the other MS stars investigated are derived, and the binary hypothesis for PRGs is reviewed.

  5. T(sub lambda) Depression by a Heat Current Along the lambda-Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuanming; Larson, Melora; Iraelsson, Ulf E.

    1999-01-01

    We report measurements of the depression of the superfluid transition temperature by a heat current (1 less than or = Q less than or = 100 microW/sq cm) along the lambda-line (SVP less than or = P less than or = 21.6 bar). At P = 21.6 bar, measurements were also performed in a reduced gravity (0.2g). Experimental results show that the pressure dependence of the depression and the gravity effect on the measurements are small, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. Keywords: superfluid helium; Lambda transition; heat current

  6. Measurement of transverse {lambda} and {lambda}-bar polarization at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrero, A.

    2007-06-13

    New data on hyperon polarization in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering have been collected by the COMPASS collaboration at CERN during the years 2002-2004, using a beam of longitudinally polarized muons of 160 GeV/c and a 6LiD target that can be polarized both longitudinally and transversely. The various combinations of beam and target polarizations allow for the study of a wide variety of hyperon polarization effects. Here we present preliminary results on the transverse polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar produced both with unpolarized and transversely polarized deuteron targets.

  7. Rabi resonances in the {lambda} excitation scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo

    2002-12-01

    We consider the interaction of a three-level system with phase-modulated resonant fields in the {lambda} excitation scheme. We treat theoretically the case of a sinusoidal phase modulation, a phase step perturbation, and a stochastic phase modulation. The appearance of a Rabi resonance both in the spectrum of the optical transmitted signal (electromagnetically induced transparency) and in the spectrum of the microwave emission (coherent population trapping maser) is considered in detail. All the theoretical results are compared with the analogous ones reported for the two-level system and with our experimental observations obtained for the case of rubidium in a buffer gas.

  8. {Lambda}(1520) photoproduction with Regge contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Seung-il; Yu, Byung-Geel; Kao, Chung-Wen

    2011-10-21

    In this talk, we report our recent progresses on the {Lambda}(1520) photoproduction using the effective Lagrangian approach. In addition to the tree-level Born diagrams, we take into account the Regge-trajectories for the possible strange-meson exchanges in the t channel. We compute the angular and energy dependences of the production process, including polarization observables, such as the photon-beam asymmetry and the polarization-transfer coefficients, resulting in good qualitative agreement with current experimental data. We also compute the K{sup -} angle distribution function in the Gottfried-Jackson frame, using the polarization-transfer coefficients in the z direction.

  9. The fluxonium as a lambda system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vool, U.; Kou, A.; Smith, W. C.; Serniak, K.; Shankar, S.; Girvin, S. M.; Devoret, M. H.

    A lambda system is a 3-level system in which two low-energy states can transition to a third higher-energy state by a coherent drive but not to each other. Lambda systems are commonly implemented in systems relying on atomic transitions. In the field of superconducting quantum circuits, the fluxonium qubit, an artificial atom consisting of a Josephson junction shunted by a super-inductance, is a unique artificial atom with highly non-linear energy levels. At half-flux quantum it has two low-energy states with a long energy lifetime, but it is difficult to perform fast quantum gates in this manifold. Employing the higher 2nd excited state as an intermediate level would be much more efficient. However, selection rules in the fluxonium qubit prohibit transitions between low-energy states and higher-energy states of the same parity. In this talk, we will introduce a way to create formerly forbidden transitions between levels of the fluxonium qubit - thus creating a more interesting artificial atom and a useful tool for future superconducting quantum circuits. Work supported by ARO, ONR, AFOSR and YINQE.

  10. Consistency check of {Lambda}CDM phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Lombriser, Lucas

    2011-03-15

    The standard model of cosmology {Lambda}CDM assumes general relativity, flat space, and the presence of a positive cosmological constant. We relax these assumptions allowing spatial curvature, a time-dependent effective dark energy equation of state, as well as modifications of the Poisson equation for the lensing potential, and modifications of the growth of linear matter density perturbations in alternate combinations. Using six parameters characterizing these relations, we check {Lambda}CDM for consistency utilizing cosmic microwave background anisotropies, cross correlations thereof with high-redshift galaxies through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, the Hubble constant, supernovae, and baryon acoustic oscillation distances, as well as the relation between weak gravitational lensing and galaxy flows. In all scenarios, we find consistency of the concordance model at the 95% confidence level. However, we emphasize that constraining supplementary background parameters and parametrizations of the growth of large-scale structure separately may lead to a priori exclusion of viable departures from the concordance model.

  11. First measurement of the ratio of branching fractions BR(Lambda(b) to Lambda(c) mu nu)/BR(Lambda(b) to Lambda(c) pi) at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shin-shan

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation, we measure the properties of the lowest-mass beauty baryon, {Lambda}{sub b}. Baryons are the bound states of three quarks. Protons and neutrons, constituents of atomic nuclei, are the most common baryons. Other types of baryons can be produced and studied in the high-energy collider environment. Three-body dynamics makes baryons composed of low mass quarks difficult to study. On the other hand, baryons with one heavy quark simplify the theoretical treatment of baryon structure, since the heavy quark can be treated the same way as the nucleus in the atom. The {Lambda}{sub b} is composed of u, d, and b quarks, where the b quark is much heavier than the other two. Although, it is accessible, little is known about {Lambda}{sub b}. In 1991, UA1 [1] reconstructed 9 {+-} 1 {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{Psi}{Lambda} candidates. In 1996, ALEPH and DELPHI reconstructed the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and found only 3-4 candidates [2, 3]. ALEPH measured a {Lambda}{sub b} mass of 5614 {+-} 21 MeV/c{sup 2}, while DELPHI measured 5668 {+-} 18 MeV/c{sup 2}, about 2 {sigma} higher. Subsequently, CDF-I observed 20 {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{Psi}{Lambda} events [4], confirmed the existence of {Lambda}{sub b} unambiguously and made a more precise measurement of {Lambda}{sub b} mass, 5621 {+-} 5 MeV/c{sup 2}. A recent CDF-II measurement by Korn [5] yields 5619.7 {+-} 1.7 MeV/c{sup 2}, which will significantly improve the current world average, 5624 {+-} 9 MeV/c{sup 2}, and resolve the discrepancy of ALEPH and DELPHI.

  12. Charge-symmetry breaking {Lambda}-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Murali, M.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    Some time ago we showed that the charge-symmetry-breaking interaction, as obtained from the mass four hypernuclei ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}He), was spin-independent; a result which cannot be understood with the conventional meson-exchange models. The calculations of ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}He) are currently being extended to include noncentral nuclear and hypernuclear forces which could modify this result. At a more fundamental level we intend to study quark-structure contributions to the charge-symmetry-breaking interaction.

  13. Rare {Lambda}{sub b} decays in a quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Mott, L.; Roberts, W.

    2010-08-05

    Hadronic form factors for the rare weak transitions {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}{sup (*)} are calculated using a nonrelativistic quark model. The form factors obtained in this way are found to satisfy the relationships expecetd from the heavy quark effective theory. Differential decay rates and branching ratios are calculated for the dileptonic decays {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}, for both ground state and excited daughter baryons. Inclusion of the long distance contributions from charmonium resonances significantly enhances the decay rates. Future work is outlined.

  14. Analysis of the {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Savci, M.; Azizi, K.

    2010-03-01

    Taking into account the {Lambda} baryon distribution amplitudes and the most general form of the interpolating current of the {Lambda}{sub b}, the semileptonic {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}l{sup +}l{sup -} transition is investigated in the framework of the light cone QCD sum rules. Sum rules for all 12 form factors responsible for the {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay are constructed. The obtained results for the form factors are used to compute the branching fraction. A comparison of the obtained results with the existing predictions of the heavy quark effective theory is presented. The results of the branching ratio shows the detectability of this channel at the Large Hadron Collider beauty in the near future is quite high.

  15. {lambda}N space-exchange correlation effects in the {sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He hypernucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A.A.

    2006-01-15

    A complete realistic study of the {sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He hypernucleus is presented using a realistic Hamiltonian and a fully correlated wave function that takes into account all relevant dynamical correlations and {lambda}N space-exchange correlation (SEC). Results are sensitive to SEC, which significantly affects energy breakdown, {lambda}-separation energy, nuclear core polarization, point proton radius, and density profiles.

  16. QCD factorization for {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhenhua; Guo Xinheng; Lue Gang

    2011-02-01

    We prove that in the limit m{sub b},m{sub c}{yields}{infinity}, with m{sub c}/m{sub b} fixed, factorization holds at order {alpha}{sub s} for the decay {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. This proof is done in the infinite-momentum frame in which the momenta of {pi}, {Lambda}{sub c}, and {Lambda}{sub b} go to infinity. Our result is renormalization-scale- and scheme-independent at O({alpha}{sub s}). This is the same as the QCD factorization for B{yields}D{pi}.

  17. Environmental chemistry, ecotoxicity, and fate of lambda-cyhalothrin.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Ming; Troiano, John; Wang, Albert; Goh, Kean

    2008-01-01

    Lambda-cyhalothrin is a pyrethroid insecticide used for controlling pest insects in agriculture, public health, and in construction and households. Lambda-cyhalothrin is characterized by low vapor pressure and a low Henry's law constant but by a high octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) and high water-solid-organic carbon partition coefficient (K(oc)) values. Lambda-cyhalothrin is quite stable in water at pH < 8, whereas it hydrolyzes to form HCN and aldehyde under alkaline conditions. Although lambda-cyhalothrin is relatively photostable under natural irradiation, with a half-life > 3 wk, its photolysis process is fast under UV irradiation, with a half-life < 10 min. The fate of lambda-cyhalothrin in aquatic ecosystems depends on the nature of system components such as suspended solids (mineral and organic particulates) and aquatic organisms (algae, macrophytes, or aquatic animals). Lambda-cyhalothrin residues dissolved in water decrease rapidly if suspended solids and/or aquatic organisms are present because lambda-cyhalothrin molecules are strongly adsorbed by particulates and plants. Adsorbed lambda-cyhalothrin molecules show decreased degradation rates because they are less accessible to breakdown than free molecules in the water column. On the other hand, lambda-cyhalothrin adsorbed to suspended solids or bottom sediments may provide a mechanism to mitigate its acute toxicity to aquatic organisms by reducing their short-term bioavailability in the water column. The widespread use of lambda-cyhalothrin has resulted in residues in sediment, which have been found to be toxic to aquatic organisms including fish and amphipods. Mitigation measures have been used to reduce the adverse impact of lambda-cyhalothrin contributed from agricultural or urban runoff. Mitigation may be achieved by reducing the quantity of runoff and suspended solid content in runoff through wetlands, detention ponds, or vegetated ditches. PMID:18418954

  18. Interferons lambda, new cytokines with antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Lopušná, K; Režuchová, I; Betáková, T; Skovranová, L; Tomašková, J; Lukáčiková, L; Kabát, P

    2013-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are key cytokines in the establishment of a multifaceted antiviral response. Three distinct types of IFNs are now recognized (type I, type II, and type III) based on their receptor usage, structural features and biological activities. Although all IFNs are important mediators of antiviral protection, their roles in antiviral defence vary. Interferon lambda (IFN-λ) is a recently discovered group of small helical cytokines capable of inducing an antiviral response both in vitro as well as in vivo. They were discovered independently in 2003 by the groups of Sheppard and Kotenko. This family consists of three structurally related IFN-λ subtypes called IFN-λ1 (IL-29), IFN-λ2 (IL-28A), and IFN-λ3 (IL-28B). In this study we investigate the antiviral activities of IFN-λ1, λ2, and λ3 on some medically important viruses, influenza viruses, herpes viruses and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. PMID:23600875

  19. Image reconstruction via truncated lambda tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hengyong; Ye, Yangbo; Wang, Ge

    2006-08-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of reconstructing a Computed Tomography (CT) image from truncated Lambda Tomography (LT), a gradient-like image of it's original. An LT image can be regarded as a convolution of the object image and the point spread function (PSF) of the Calderon operator. The PSF's infinite support provides the LT image infinite support; even the original CT image is of compact support. When the support of a truncated LT image fully covers the compact support of the corresponding CT image, we develop an extrapolation method to recover the CT image more precisely. When the support of the CT image fully covers the support of the truncated LT image, we design a template-based scheme to compensate the cupping effects and reconstruct a satisfactory image. Our algorithms are evaluated in numerical simulations and the results demonstrate the feasibilities of our methods. Our approaches provide a new way to reconstruct high-quality CT images.

  20. The production of generalized transducing phage by bacteriophage lambda.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, N

    1986-01-01

    Generalized transduction has for about 30 years been a major tool in the genetic manipulation of bacterial chromosomes. However, throughout that time little progress has been made in understanding how generalized transducing particles are produced. The experiments presented in this paper use phage lambda to assess some of the factors that affect that process. The results of those experiments indicate: the production of generalized transducing particles by bacteriophage lambda is inhibited by the phage lambda exonuclease (Exo). Also inhibited by lambda Exo is the production of lambda docR particles, a class of particles whose packaging is initiated in bacterial DNA and terminated at the normal phage packaging site, cos. In contrast, the production of lambda docL particles, a class of particles whose packaging is initiated at cos and terminated in bacterial DNA, is unaffected by lambda Exo; lambda-generalized transducing particles are not detected in induced lysis-defective (S-) lambda lysogens until about 60-90 min after prophage induction. Since wild-type lambda would normally lyse cells by 60 min, the production of lambda-generalized transducing particles depends on the phage being lysis-defective; if transducing lysates are prepared by phage infection then the frequency of generalized transduction for different bacterial markers varies over a 10-20-fold range. In contrast, if transducing lysates are prepared by the induction of a lambda lysogen containing an excision-defective prophage, then the variation in transduction frequency is much greater, and markers adjacent to, and on both sides of, the prophage are transduced with much higher frequencies than are other markers; if the prophage is replication-defective then the increased transduction of prophage-proximal markers is eliminated; measurements of total DNA in induced lysogens indicate that part of the increase in transduction frequency following prophage induction can be accounted for by an increase in the

  1. Lineshape of the Lambda(1405) measured at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kei Moriya, Reinhard Schumacher, CLAS Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    The {Lambda}(1405) has been a subject of controversy for decades, and its nature as a hyperon resonance has yet to be established firmly. Its peculiar lineshape, i.e., its {Sigma}{pi} invariant mass spectrum has lead to various theoretical studies, and some of these show that it may possess strong dynamical components which are not seen in other well-known baryons. With the CLAS detector system in Hall B at Jefferson Lab, we have measured the photoproduction reaction {gamma} + p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda}(1405) with high statistics over different {Sigma}{pi} decay channels. The reconstructed invariant mass distribution has been measured, as well as the differential cross sections for the nearby {Lambda}(1405), {Sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520). Our analysis method is discussed and our near-final results for the {Lambda}(1405) lineshape is presented.

  2. Properties of the Lambda(1405) Measured at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kei Moriya, Reinhard Schumacher

    2012-04-01

    The nature of the {Lambda}(1405), and its place in the baryon spectrum has remained uncertain for decades. Theoretical studies have shown that it may possess strong dynamical components which are not seen in other well-known baryons. Using the CLAS detector system in Hall B at Jefferson Lab, we have measured the photoproduction reaction {gamma} + p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda}(1405) with high statistics and over different {Sigma}{pi} decay channels. The reconstructed invariant mass distribution (lineshape) has been measured, as well as the differential cross sections for the {Lambda}(1405), {Sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520). Our analysis method is discussed and our near-final results for the {Lambda}(1405) lineshape and differential cross section are presented.

  3. Phillips' Lambda function: Data summary and physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irisov, V.; Plant, W.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of Phillips' Lambda function describing the average length of breakers on the ocean per unit area at speed cb are summarized. An expression is developed that fits these data within reasonable bounds. A physical model for the Lambda function is derived based on the assumption that breaking occurs when the surface steepness exceeds a threshold value. The energy contained in the breaking region is related to the fifth power of the breaker speed, as Phillips showed, and from this the probability of finding a breaker with a speed cb may be determined from a simulation of the long-wave surface based on a linear superposition of Fourier components. This probability is directly related to the Lambda function so that a form for this function can be determined. The Lambda function so determined agrees in both shape and intensity with the fit to the measured Lambda functions.

  4. Simple model for lambda-doublet propensities in bimolecular reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Michael J.; Zare, Richard N.

    1990-01-01

    A simple geometric model is presented to account for lambda-doublet propensities in bimolecular reactions A + BC - AB + C. It applies to reactions in which AB is formed in a pi state, and in which the unpaired molecular orbital responsible for lambda-doubling arises from breaking the B-C bond. The lambda-doublet population ratio is predicted to be 2:1 provided that: (1) the motion of A in the transition state determines the plane of rotation of AB; (2) the unpaired pi orbital lying initially along the B-C bond may be resolved into a projection onto the AB plane of rotation and a projection perpendicular to this plane; (3) there is no preferred geometry for dissociation of ABC. The 2:1 lambda-doublet ratio is the 'unconstrained dynamics prior' lambda-doublet distribution for such reactions.

  5. High Resolution Spectroscopy of 16N_Lambda by Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cusanno, Francesco; Urciuoli, Guido; Acha Quimper, Armando; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Aniol, Konrad; Baturin, Pavlo; Bertin, Pierre; Benaoum, Hachemi; Blomqvist, Ingvar; Boeglin, Werner; Breuer, Herbert; Brindza, Paul; Bydzovsky, Petr; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Colilli, Stefano; Coman, Luminita; Craver, Brandon; de Cataldo, Giacinto; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deur, Alexandre; Ferdi, Catherine; Feuerbach, Robert; Folts, Edward; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gayou, Olivier; Giuliani, Fausto; Gomez, Javier; Gricia, Massimo; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Hayes, David; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kino, Kouichi; Kross, Brian; Lagamba, Luigi; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Lucentini, Maurizio; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; McCormick, Kathy; Michaels, Robert; Millener, D.; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Moffit, Bryan; Monaghan, Peter; Moteabbed, Maryam; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nanda, Sirish; Nappi, E.; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Okasyasu, Y.; Paschke, Kent; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Raue, Brian; Reimer, Paul; Reinhold, Joerg; Reitz, Bodo; Roche, Rikki; Rodriguez, Victor; Saha, Arunava; Santavenere, Fabio; Sarty, Adam; Segal, John; Shahinyan, Albert; Singh, Jaideep; Sirca, Simon; Snyder, Ryan; Solvignon, Patricia; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Suzuki, Tomokazu; Ueno, Hiroaki; Ulmer, Paul; Veneroni, P.P.; Voutier, Eric; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zeng, X.; Zorn, Carl

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the 16O(e, e'K+)16N_Lambda reaction has been performed at Jefferson Lab. A thin film of falling water was used as a target. This permitted a simultaneous measurement of the p(e, e'K+)Lambda,Sigma_0 exclusive reactions and a precise calibration of the energy scale. A ground-state binding energy of 13.76 ± 0.16 MeV was obtained for 16N_Lambda with better precision than previous measurements on the mirror hypernucleus 16O_Lambda. Precise energies have been determined for peaks arising from a Lambda in s and p orbits coupled to the p1/2 and p3/2 hole states of the 15N core nucleus.

  6. Measurement of the production fraction times branching fraction $\\boldsymbol{ f(b\\to\\Lambda_{b})\\cdot \\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda_{b}\\to J/\\psi \\Lambda)}$

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    The {Lambda}{sub b}(udb) baryon is observed in the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The production fraction multiplied by the branching fraction for this decay relative to that for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} is measured to be 0.345 {+-} 0.034 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.) {+-} 0.003 (PDG). Using the world average value of f(b {yields} B{sup 0}) {center_dot} {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (1.74 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -5}, they obtain f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = (6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)) x 10{sup -5}. This measurement represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average.

  7. Study of B{sup +}{yields}p{lambda}{gamma}, p{lambda}{pi}{sup 0} and B{sup 0}{yields}p{lambda}{pi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.-Z.; Lee, Y.-J.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K.-F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Lin, S.-W.; Ueno, K.; Abe, K.; Hoshi, Y.; Adachi, I.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.

    2007-09-01

    We study the following charmless baryonic three-body decays of B mesons: B{sup +}{yields}p{lambda}{gamma}, B{sup +}{yields}p{lambda}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup 0}{yields}p{lambda}{pi}{sup -}. The partial branching fractions as a function of the baryon-antibaryon mass and the polar angle distributions of the proton in the baryon-antibaryon system are presented. This study includes the first observation of B{sup +}{yields}p{lambda}{pi}{sup 0}, which is measured to have a branching fraction of (3.00{sub -0.53}{sup +0.61}{+-}0.33)x10{sup -6}. We also set upper limits on branching fractions of the two-body decays B{sup 0}{yields}p{sigma}*{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}{delta}{sup 0}{lambda}, B{sup +}{yields}p{sigma}*{sup 0}, and B{sup +}{yields}{delta}{sup +}{lambda} at the 90% confidence level. These results are obtained from a 414 fb{sup -1} data sample collected near the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  8. Tertiary structure of human {Lambda}6 light chains.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Solomon, A.; Weiss, D. T.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Tennessee Medical Center /Graduate School of Medicine

    1999-01-01

    AL amyloidosis is a disease process characterized by the pathologic deposition of monoclonal light chains in tissue. To date, only limited information has been obtained on the molecular features that render such light chains amyloidogenic. Although protein products of the major human V kappa and V lambda gene families have been identified in AL deposits, one particular subgroup--lambda 6--has been found to be preferentially associated with this disease. Notably, the variable region of lambda 6 proteins (V lambda 6) has distinctive primary structural features including the presence in the third framework region (FR3) of two additional amino acid residues that distinguish members of this subgroup from other types of light chains. However, the structural consequences of these alterations have not been elucidated. To determine if lambda 6 proteins possess unique tertiary structural features, as compared to light chains of other V lambda subgroups, we have obtained x-ray diffraction data on crystals prepared from two recombinant V lambda 6 molecules. These components, isolated from a bacterial expression system, were generated from lambda 6-related cDNAs cloned from bone marrow-derived plasma cells from a patient (Wil) who had documented AL amyloidosis and another (Jto) with multiple myeloma and tubular cast nephropathy, but no evident fibrillar deposits. The x-ray crystallographic analyses revealed that the two-residue insertion located between positions 68 and 69 (not between 66 and 67 as previously surmised) extended an existing loop region that effectively increased the surface area adjacent to the first complementarity determining region (CDR1). Further, an unusual interaction between the Arg 25 and Phe 2 residues commonly found in lambda 6 molecules was noted. However, the structures of V lambda 6 Wil and Jto also differed from each other, as evidenced by the presence in the latter of certain ionic and hydrophobic interactions that we posit increased protein

  9. A Simple Calculation in Service of Constraining the Rate of FU Orionis Outburst Events from Photometric Monitoring Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Findeisen, Krzysztof P.

    2015-07-01

    The FU Orionis class of young stellar objects is enigmatic and rare. The members are interpreted to be “outbursting,” that is, they are currently in a state of enhanced accretion by several orders of magnitude relative to the more modest disk-to-star accretion rates measured in typical T Tauri stars. They are key to our understanding of the history of stellar mass assembly and pre-main-sequence evolution, and are also critical when considering the chemical and physical evolution of the circumstellar environment—where planets form. A common supposition is that all T Tauri stars repeatedly undergo such outbursts, more frequently in their earlier evolutionary stages when the disks are more massive, so as to build up the requisite amount of stellar mass on the required timescale. However, the actual data supporting this traditional picture of episodically enhanced disk accretion are limited, and the observational properties of the known sample of FU Ori objects are quite diverse. To improve our understanding of these rare objects, we outline the logic used to meaningfully constrain the rate of FU Ori outbursts and present numbers to guide parameter choices in the analysis of time domain surveys.

  10. pp-bar->LAMBDA{sub c}LAMBDA-bar{sub c} within a Handbag Picture - Section and Spin Observables

    SciTech Connect

    Goritschnig, A. T.; Schweiger, W.; Kroll, P.

    2009-08-04

    We study the process pp-bar->LAMBDA{sub c}LAMBDA-bar{sub c} within the generalized parton picture. Our starting point is the double handbag diagram which factorizes into soft generalized parton distributions and a hard subprocess amplitude for uu-bar->cc-bar. Our cross-section predictions may become interesting in view of forthcoming experiments at FAIR in Darmstadt.

  11. Exclusive semileptonic decays of {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}l{sup +}l{sup -} in supersymmetric theories

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, M. Jamil; Wang Yuming; Lue Caidian

    2008-12-01

    The weak decays of {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}l{sup +}l{sup -} (l=e, {mu}) are investigated in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and also in supersymmetric (SUSY) SO(10) grand unified models. In the MSSM special attention is paid to the neutral Higgs bosons (NHBs) as they make quite a large contribution in exclusive B{yields}X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} decays at large tan{beta} regions of parameter space of SUSY models, since part of SUSY contributions is proportional to tan{sup 3}{beta}. The analysis of decay rate, forward-backward asymmetries, lepton polarization asymmetries, and the polarization asymmetries of the {lambda} baryon in {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}l{sup +}l{sup -} show that the values of these physical observables are greatly modified by the effects of NHBs. In the SUSY SO(10) grand unified theory model, the new physics contribution comes from the operators which are induced by the NHBs' penguins and also from the operators having chirality opposite to that of the corresponding standard model (SM) operators. SUSY SO(10) effects show up only in the decay {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}+{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} where the longitudinal and transverse lepton polarization asymmetries deviate significantly from the SM value while the effects in the decay rate, forward-backward asymmetries, and polarization asymmetries of final state {lambda} baryon are very mild. The transverse lepton polarization asymmetry in {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}+{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} is almost zero in the SM and in the MSSM model. However, it can reach to -0.1 in the SUSY SO(10) grand unified theory model and could be seen at the future colliders; hence this asymmetry observable will provide us useful information to probe new physics and discriminate between different models.

  12. [Extraction of lambda-cyhalothrin from aqueous dioxan solutions].

    PubMed

    Shormanov, V K; Chigareva, E N; Belousova, O V

    2011-01-01

    The results of extraction of lambda-cigalotrin from dioxan aqueous solutions by hydrophobic organic solvents are presented. It is shown that the degree of extraction depends on the nature of the extractant, the water to dioxan ratio, and saturation of the water-dioxan layer with the electrolyte. The highest efficiency of lambda-cigalotrin extraction was achieved using chlorophorm as a solvent under desalination conditions. The extraction factor was calculated necessary to obtain the desired amount of lambda-cigalotrin from the water-dioxan solution (4:1) with the help of the extractants being used.

  13. Acoustics of the Lambda Transition in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megson, Peter; Meichle, David; Lathrop, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Liquid Helium undergoes a phase transition and becomes a quantum superfluid when cooled below the Lambda transition temperature of 2.17 Kelvin. The superfluid, which is a partial Bose Einstein Condensate, exhibits unique macroscopic properties such as flow without viscosity and ballistic temperature propagation. We have recorded striking audio-frequency sounds using a micro electromechanical microphone (MEMS) present as the Helium goes through the Lambda transition. Characterization of this sound, as well as its relevance to theories of the Lambda transition will be presented.

  14. Observation of the Baryonic B decay B0bar to Lambda_c^+ anti-Lambda K-

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Sassari U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-11-08

    The authors report the observation of the baryonic B decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} with a significance larger than 7 standard deviations based on 471 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at SLAC. They measure the branching fraction for the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} to be (3.8 {+-} 0.8{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub sys} {+-} 1.0 {sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}}) x 10{sup -5}. The uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty in the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} branching fraction. They find that the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} invariant mass distribution shows an enhancement above 3.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. Suppression of the {Lambda}-{Sigma} coupling in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    We initiated a study of the modification of the coupling of the {Lambda}N to the {Sigma}N channel in nuclear matter with the Fermi hypernetted-chain variational approach. This modification of the {Lambda}N-{Sigma}N coupling is a central problem in hypernuclear physics and is related closely to the strongly repulsive three-body forces which are needed to account for hypernuclear binding energies. All earlier calculations have only considered this problem in the so-called G-matrix approximation which neglects important higher-order effects. An important result of this work will be a better understanding of the density dependence of {Lambda} binding in nuclear matter, which can then be tested in the calculation of the {Lambda} single-particle energies.

  16. Photometric properties for selected Algol-type binaries. VI. The newly discovered oEA star FR Orionis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Wei, J.-Y.; Li, H.-L.

    2014-02-01

    New photometry of the neglected eclipsing binary FR Orionis was obtained in 2012 November and December. Using the updated Wilson-Devinney program, the photometric elements were deduced from two-color light curves. The results indicate that this system is a semi-detached binary, with a mass ratio of 0.325(± 0.002) and a fill-out factor of the primary of f{sub p} = 73.5(± 0.2)%. The oscillating light curves imply that FR Ori may be an oscillating EA (oEA)-type star with a rapidly pulsating, mass-accreting primary component. After we removed the theoretical light curves from the observations, Fourier analysis revealed that the more massive component possibly shows a δ Scuti type pulsation with four detected frequencies. The dominant frequency is f {sub 1} = 38.6c day{sup –1} (i.e., P {sub puls} = 37.3 minutes), and the pulsation constant is Q = 0.014 days. Based on all available eclipsing times, the orbital period is undergoing a secular period increase with a rate of dP/dt = +8.85(±0.66) × 10{sup –8} day yr {sup –1}, which may be interpreted by mass transfer from the secondary to the primary. We expect that the more massive component will fill its Roche lobe due to mass transfer of the secondary. Therefore, the oEA star FR Ori may evolve into a contact configuration.

  17. RESOLVING THE GAP AND AU-SCALE ASYMMETRIES IN THE PRE-TRANSITIONAL DISK OF V1247 ORIONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Stefan; Espaillat, Catherine; Wilner, David J.; Ireland, Michael J.; Sitko, Michael L.; Swearingen, Jeremy R.; Werren, Chelsea; Monnier, John D.; Calvet, Nuria; Grady, Carol A.; Harries, Tim J.; Hoenig, Sebastian F.; Russell, Ray W.

    2013-05-01

    Pre-transitional disks are protoplanetary disks with a gapped disk structure, potentially indicating the presence of young planets in these systems. In order to explore the structure of these objects and their gap-opening mechanism, we observed the pre-transitional disk V1247 Orionis using the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, the Keck Interferometer, Keck-II, Gemini South, and IRTF. This allows us to spatially resolve the AU-scale disk structure from near- to mid-infrared wavelengths (1.5-13 {mu}m), tracing material at different temperatures and over a wide range of stellocentric radii. Our observations reveal a narrow, optically thick inner-disk component (located at 0.18 AU from the star) that is separated from the optically thick outer disk (radii {approx}> 46 AU), providing unambiguous evidence for the existence of a gap in this pre-transitional disk. Surprisingly, we find that the gap region is filled with significant amounts of optically thin material with a carbon-dominated dust mineralogy. The presence of this optically thin gap material cannot be deduced solely from the spectral energy distribution, yet it is the dominant contributor at mid-infrared wavelengths. Furthermore, using Keck/NIRC2 aperture masking observations in the H, K', and L' bands, we detect asymmetries in the brightness distribution on scales of {approx}15-40 AU, i.e., within the gap region. The detected asymmetries are highly significant, yet their amplitude and direction changes with wavelength, which is not consistent with a companion interpretation but indicates an inhomogeneous distribution of the gap material. We interpret this as strong evidence for the presence of complex density structures, possibly reflecting the dynamical interaction of the disk material with sub-stellar mass bodies that are responsible for the gap clearing.

  18. A high statistics measurement of the Lambda(+)(c) lifetime.

    PubMed

    Link, J M; Reyes, M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Magnin, J; Massafferi, A; de Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vazquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Ramirez, J E; Segoni, I; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F L; Zallo, A; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Boschini, M; D'Angelo, P; DiCorato, M; Dini, P; Giammarchi, M; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Hernandez, H; Lopez, A M; Luiggi, E; Mendez, H; Mendez, L; Mirles, A; Montiel, E; Olaya, D; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Rivera, C; Xiong, W; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Cho, K; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2002-04-22

    A high statistics measurement of the Lambda(+)(c) lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. We describe the analysis technique with particular attention to the determination of the systematic uncertainty. The measured value of 204.6 +/- 3.4 (stat) +/- 2.5 (syst) fs from 8034 +/- 122 Lambda(+)(c)-->pK(-)pi(+) decays represents a significant improvement over the present world average. PMID:11955226

  19. The chemical composition of three Lambda Bootis stars

    SciTech Connect

    Venn, K.A.; Lambert, D.L. )

    1990-11-01

    Abundance analyses are reported for three certain members (Lambda Boo, 29 Cyg, Pi1 Ori) of the class of rapidly rotating, metal-poor A-type stars known as Lambda Bootis stars. Model atmosphere analysis of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra shows that the metal deficiencies are more severe than previously reported: Fe/H = -2.0, -1.8, -1.3 for Lambda Boo, 29 Cyg, and Pi1 Ori, respectively. Other metals (Mg, Ca, Ti, and Sr) are similarly underabundant, with Na often having a smaller underabundance. C, N, O, and S have near-solar abundances. Vega is shown to be a mild Lambda Boo star. The abundance anomalies of the Lambda Boo stars resemble those found for the interstellar gas in which the metals are depleted through formation of interstellar grains. It is suggested that the Lambda Boo stars are created when circumstellar (or interstellar) gas is separated from the grains and accreted by the star. The bulk of the interstellar grains comprises a circumstellar cloud or disk that is detectable by its infrared radiation. 67 refs.

  20. {lambda}-Polarization Measurement in {pi}-p{yields}K0{lambda} in the Framework of 'EPECUR' Experiment Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Kats, M. M.; Koroleva, L. I.; Kulikov, V. V.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sakharov, V. A.; Sulimov, A. D.; Svirida, D. N.; Filimonov, E. A.; Golubev, V. V.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kozlov, V. S.; Krivshich, A. G.; Novinsky, D. V.; Sumachev, V. V.

    2007-06-13

    The idea of 'EPECUR' was inspired by the recent splash of the activity around the pentaquark matters. The goal of the experiment is the search for narrow resonant states in the reactions {pi}-p {yields} {pi}-p and {pi}-p {yields} K0{lambda} based on the very precise cross section measurements in fine energy steps of 0.5 MeV in terms of the invariant mass. As a valuable byproduct of the second stage of the experiment, {lambda}-polarization in {pi}-p {yields} K0{lambda} can be measured, based on the well-known weak {lambda}-decay asymmetry. The expected statistical significance of the measurement overrides the best existing data from 'NIMROD' detector by an order of magnitude. The experimental setup is under construction at the ITEP proton synchrotron in collaboration with PNPI and ACU.

  1. DYNAMICS OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Spurzem, R.; Giersz, M.; Heggie, D. C.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2009-05-20

    At least 10%-15% of nearby Sunlike stars have known Jupiter-mass planets. In contrast, very few planets are found in mature open and globular clusters such as the Hyades and 47 Tuc. We explore here the possibility that this dichotomy is due to the postformation disruption of planetary systems associated with the stellar encounters in long-lived clusters. One supporting piece of evidence for this scenario is the discovery of freely floating low-mass objects in star forming regions. We use two independent numerical approaches, a hybrid Monte Carlo and a direct N-body method, to simulate the impact of the encounters. We show that the results of numerical simulations are in reasonable agreement with analytical determinations in the adiabatic and impulsive limits. They indicate that distant stellar encounters generally do not significantly modify the compact and nearly circular orbits. However, moderately close stellar encounters, which are likely to occur in dense clusters, can excite planets' orbital eccentricity and induce dynamical instability in systems that are closely packed with multiple planets. The disruption of planetary systems occurs primarily through occasional nearly parabolic, nonadiabatic encounters, though eccentricity of the planets evolves through repeated hyperbolic adiabatic encounters that accumulate small-amplitude changes. The detached planets are generally retained by the potential of their host clusters as free floaters in young stellar clusters such as {sigma} Orionis. We compute effective cross sections for the dissolution of planetary systems and show that, for all initial eccentricities, dissolution occurs on timescales that are longer than the dispersion of small stellar associations, but shorter than the age of typical open and globular clusters. Although it is much more difficult to disrupt short-period planets, close encounters can excite modest eccentricity among them, such that subsequent tidal dissipation leads to orbital decay

  2. Expression of immunoglobulin kappa and lambda chains in mink.

    PubMed

    Bovkun, L A; Peremislov, V V; Nayakshin, A M; Belousov, E S; Mechetina, L V; Aasted, B; Taranin, A V

    1993-08-01

    The ratio of kappa and lambda chains of immunoglobulins varies significantly from one species to another. It has previously been thought that lambda was only type expressed in mink. We tested mink immunoglobulin light chains using two monoclonal antibodies G80 and G88. It has been shown that G80 and G88 specifically recognize two antigenically different subpopulations of the light chains. Immunochemical analysis of these subpopulations separated by affinity chromatography suggested that they represent lambda and kappa types of light chains, respectively. Screening of a mink cDNA library with monoclonal antibody G88 resulted in the isolation of clone pIGK-1 containing kappa chain-encoding sequence. The cDNA insert of pIGK-1 included most of the V segment, as well as the J, C and 3' untranslated sequences. Mink V kappa sequence shown the highest homology with the human V kappa II subgroup genes (76-79%). Mink C kappa sequence was 53-63% homologous to C kappa of other species. The striking feature of mink C kappa chain is the presence of glutamine in the C-terminal position. Southern blot analysis suggested that mink haploid genome has one C kappa gene and multiple V kappa genes. The kappa:lambda chain ratio in the 12 minks studied was, on the average, 46:54. The same ratio was observed for the kappa- and lambda-producing cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. The five previously identified mink light chain allotypes were assigned to the lambda chains, thereby confirming that lambda chains in this species are additionally subdivided into several subtypes.

  3. Ultraviolet Synthetic Spectra for Three Lambda Bootis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Neff, James E.; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Johnson, Dustin; Tarbell, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show mild to extreme deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. We show that the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra (1280-3200 A) of Lambda Bootis, 29 Cygni (a "confirmed" Lambda Boo star), and Vega (a "mild" Lambda Boo star) can be fit remarkably well by single-temperature synthetic spectra. We computed the full resolution synthetic ultraviolet (UV) spectrum covering the IUE wavelength range using Gray's Stellar Spectral Synthesis Program SPECTRUM. To improve the synthetic spectra, we generated a grid of LTE atmosphere models with the appropriate stellar parameters using ATLAS9 and the existing Castelli and Kurucz 2004 models. One of the improvements of their opacity distribution functions (ODFs) is the addition to the line blanketing near 1400 A and 1600 A by the quasi-molecular absorptions of atomic hydrogen undergoing collisions with protons and other neutral hydrogen atoms. New-ODF fluxes reproduce the ultraviolet observations of Lambda Boo stars in a more realistic way than previous computations. We also constructed our own UV line list for the relevant set of absorption features. Modeling the UV line spectra of Lambda Boo stars allows us to confirm their published surface abundances, including CNO and the iron group elements. It also provides further insight into their photospheric conditions (e.g., Teff, log g, [M/H], micro turbulent velocity, etc.). About 40 percent of the published Lambda Boo candidates have existing IUE spectra. We plan to follow this pilot study and perform UV spectral synthesis for all of them.

  4. Longitudinal Spin Transfer in Inclusive {lambda} and {lambda}-bar Production in Polarized Proton-proton Collisions at {radical}(s) =200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Qinghua

    2007-06-13

    This contribution reports on a proof-of-principle measurement of the longitudinal spin transfer DLL in inclusive {lambda} and {lambda}-bar production in polarized proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}(s) = 200 GeV. The data sample consists of about 3 x 106 minimum bias events collected in the year 2005 by the STAR experiment at RHIC with proton beam polarizations of up to 50%. The {lambda}({lambda}-bar) candidates are reconstructed at mid-rapidity (|{eta}| < 1) using the STAR Time Projection Chamber via the dominant decay channel {lambda} {yields} p{pi}- ({lambda}-bar {yields} p-bar{pi}+). Their mean transverse momentum pT is about 1.3 GeV/c and longitudinal momentum fraction xF = 7.5 x 10-3. The longitudinal {lambda}({lambda}-bar) polarization is determined using a method in which the detector acceptance mostly cancels.

  5. Measurement of the branching fraction ${\\mathcal{B}}(\\Lambda^0_b\\rightarrow \\Lambda^+_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01

    We report an analysis of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay in a data sample collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron corresponding to 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. We reconstruct the currently largest samples of the decay modes {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} (with {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455)0{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Sigma}{sub c}(2455)0 {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) and measure the branching fractions relative to the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching fraction. We measure the ratio {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/ {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=3.04 {+-} 0.33(stat){sub -0.55}{sup +0.70}(syst) which is used to derive {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(26.8{sub -11.2}{sup +11.9}) x 10{sup -3}.

  6. Tracing the young massive high-eccentricity binary system θ^1Orionis C through periastron passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, S.; Weigelt, G.; Balega, Y. Y.; Docobo, J. A.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Preibisch, T.; Schertl, D.; Tamazian, V. S.; Driebe, T.; Ohnaka, K.; Petrov, R.; Schöller, M.; Smith, M.

    2009-04-01

    Context: The nearby high-mass star binary system θ^1Ori C is the brightest and most massive of the Trapezium OB stars at the core of the Orion Nebula Cluster, and it represents a perfect laboratory to determine the fundamental parameters of young hot stars and to constrain the distance of the Orion Trapezium Cluster. Aims: By tracing the orbital motion of the θ^1Ori C components, we aim to refine the dynamical orbit of this important binary system. Methods: Between January 2007 and March 2008, we observed θ^1Ori C with VLTI/AMBER near-infrared (H- and K-band) long-baseline interferometry, as well as with bispectrum speckle interferometry with the ESO 3.6 m and the BTA 6 m telescopes (B'- and V'-band). Combining AMBER data taken with three different 3-telescope array configurations, we reconstructed the first VLTI/AMBER closure-phase aperture synthesis image, showing the θ^1Ori C system with a resolution of ˜ 2 mas. To extract the astrometric data from our spectrally dispersed AMBER data, we employed a new algorithm, which fits the wavelength-differential visibility and closure phase modulations along the H- and K-band and is insensitive to calibration errors induced, for instance, by changing atmospheric conditions. Results: Our new astrometric measurements show that the companion has nearly completed one orbital revolution since its discovery in 1997. The derived orbital elements imply a short-period (P ≈ 11.3 yr) and high-eccentricity orbit (e ≈ 0.6) with periastron passage around 2002.6. The new orbit is consistent with recently published radial velocity measurements, from which we can also derive the first direct constraints on the mass ratio of the binary components. We employ various methods to derive the system mass (M_system = 44 ± 7 M⊙) and the dynamical distance (d = 410 ± 20 pc), which is in remarkably good agreement with recently published trigonometric parallax measurements obtained with radio interferometry. Based on observations made

  7. First observation and measurement of the resonant structure of the lambda_b->lambda_c pi-pi+pi- decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Azzurri, P.; Barria, P.; Ciocci, M.A.; Donati, S.; Vataga, E.

    2009-12-01

    The authors present the first observation of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay using data from an integrated luminosity of approximately 2.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They also present the first observation of the resonant decays {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup 0} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and measure their relative branching ratios.

  8. A Measurement of the Recoil Polarization of Electroproduced {Lambda}(1116)

    SciTech Connect

    Simeon McAleer

    2002-01-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory was used to study the reaction e + p {yields} e{prime} + K{sup +} + {Lambda}(1116) for events where {Lambda}(1116) subsequently decayed via the channel {Lambda}(1116) {yields} p + {pi}{sup -}. Data were taken at incident electron beam energies of 2.5, 4.0, and 4.2 GeV during the 1999 E1C run period. They hyperon production spectra span the Q{sup 2} range from 0.5 to 2.8 GeV{sup 2} and nearly the entire range in the center of mass angles. The proton angular distribution in the {Lambda}(1116) rest frame is used to deduce the recoil polarization of the hyperon, and the W and cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} dependence of the recoil polarization will be presented. The data show sizeable negative polarizations for the {Lambda}(1116) as a function of both cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} and W.

  9. The Assembly of Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Berrier, Joel C.; Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Purcell, Chris W.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-05-16

    We study the formation of fifty-three galaxy cluster-size dark matter halos (M = 10{sup 14.0-14.76} M{sub {circle_dot}}) formed within a pair of cosmological {Lambda}CDM N-body simulations, and track the accretion histories of cluster subhalos with masses large enough to host {approx} 0.1L{sub *} galaxies. By associating subhalos with cluster galaxies, we find the majority of galaxies in clusters experience no 'pre-processing' in the group environment prior to their accretion into the cluster. On average, {approx} 70% of cluster galaxies fall into the cluster potential directly from the field, with no luminous companions in their host halos at the time of accretion; and less than {approx} 12% are accreted as members of groups with five or more galaxies. Moreover, we find that cluster galaxies are significantly less likely to have experienced a merger in the recent past ({approx}< 6 Gyr) than a field halo of the same mass. These results suggest that local, cluster processes like ram-pressure stripping, galaxy harassment, or strangulation play the dominant role in explaining the difference between cluster and field populations at a fixed stellar mass; and that pre-evolution or past merging in the group environment is of secondary importance for setting cluster galaxy properties for most clusters. The accretion times for z = 0 cluster members are quite extended, with {approx} 20% incorporated into the cluster halo more than 7 Gyr ago and {approx} 20% within the last 2 Gyr. By comparing the observed morphological fractions in cluster and field populations, we estimate an approximate time-scale for late-type to early-type transformation within the cluster environment to be {approx} 6 Gyr.

  10. Posttranscriptional control of bacteriophage lambda gene expression from a site distal to the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Guarneros, G; Montañez, C; Hernandez, T; Court, D

    1982-01-01

    The bacteriophage lambda int gene product, integrase, recombines the phage DNA with the host DNA at specific sites on each to accomplish lysogeny. The int gene is transcribed from two promoters, PL and PI, each regulated positively by lambda proteins. The expression of integrase is also controlled from a site, sib, in the b region of the phage genome. This is a unique regulatory site because it is located distal to the structural gene in relation to the promoters. The expression of int from the PL promoter is inhibited when sib is present. This effect appears to be specific for PL because sib does not cause inhibition of PI-dependent int synthesis. lambda mutants that contain alterations in the site have been isolated. Sequence analyses of the mutations reveal single base changes, spanning 37 base pairs (bp) in the b region, some 240 bp beyond the int gene. Another mutant, hef13, which has a phenotype similar to that of sib, introduces a nucleotide change within the same 37-bp region. The sib and hef mutations cluster within a region of dyad symmetry. Regulation of int synthesis by sib occurs after transcription of the int gene. There is no difference in the rate of PL-promoted int mRNA synthesis in either sib+ or sib- phage infections, yet int mRNA is less stable in the sib+ infection. Because RNase III host mutants are defective in sib regulation, processing of the PL mRNA at sib by this endoribonuclease may cause int mRNA decay and decrease int synthesis. PMID:6281759

  11. INTEGRATED POLARIZATION OF SOURCES AT {lambda} {approx} 1 m AND NEW ROTATION MEASURE AMBIGUITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, Damon; Rudnick, Lawrence; Brown, Shea

    2011-06-15

    We present an analysis of the polarization of compact radio sources from six pointings of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope at 350 MHz with 35% coverage in {lambda}{sup 2}. After correcting for the off-axis instrumental polarization with a simple analytical model, only a small number of 585 strong sources have significant polarizations at these wavelengths. The median depolarization ratio from 1.4 GHz for the strongest sources is <0.2, reinforcing the likelihood that radio galaxies are found in magnetized environments, even outside of rich clusters. Seven sources with significant 350 MHz polarization were selected for a more in-depth Faraday structure analysis. We fit the observed values Q/I and U/I as a function of {lambda}{sup 2} using both a depolarizing screen and two-component models. We also performed rotation measure (RM) Synthesis/Clean and standard fitting of polarization angle versus {lambda}{sup 2}. We find that a single RM, as found using polarization angle fitting or simple screen models, commonly provides a poor fit when the solutions are translated back into Q, U space. Thus, although a single 'characteristic' RM may be found using these techniques, the Faraday structure of the source may not be adequately represented. We also demonstrate that RM Synthesis may yield an erroneous Faraday structure in the presence of multiple, interfering RM components, even when cleaning of the Faraday spectrum is performed. We briefly explore the conditions under which RMs and Faraday structure results can be reliable. Many measurements in the literature do not meet these criteria; we discuss how these influence the resulting scientific conclusions and offer a prescription for obtaining reliable RMs.

  12. Spectroscopic Research of Lambda Hypdernuclei at JLab Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Gogami, Toshiyuki; et. al.,

    2014-03-01

    A Lambda hyperon which has a strangeness can be bound in deep inside of a nucleus since a Λ does not suffer from the Pauli exclusion principle from nucleons. Thus, a Λ could be a useful tool to investigate inside of a nucleus. Since 2000, Lambda hypernuclear spectroscopic experiments by the (e,e'k) reaction have been performed at the experimental hall C in Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab Hall C). An experiment, JLab E05-115 was carried out to investigate Lambda hypernuclei with a wide mass range (the mass number, A = 7, 9, 10, 12, 52). The latest analysis status of JLab E05-115 experiment is discussed in the present article.

  13. Prediction of narrow N* and {Lambda}* with hidden charm

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-10-24

    The interaction between various charmed mesons and charmed baryons, such as D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. Six narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are dynamically generated with mass above 4 GeV and width smaller than 100 MeV. These predicted new resonances definitely cannot be accommodated by quark models with three constituent quarks. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for PANDA at the forthcoming FAIR facility.

  14. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Observation of B{sup +}{yields}p{lambda}{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-J.; Wang, M.-Z.; Chang, M.-C.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K.-F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Lin, S.-W.; Schuemann, J.; Ueno, K.; Wang, C.C.; Abe, K.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.

    2005-08-05

    We report the first observation of the radiative hyperonic B decay B{sup +}{yields}p{lambda}{gamma}, using a 140 fb{sup -1} data sample recorded on the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The measured branching fraction is B(B{sup +}{yields}p{lambda}{gamma})=(2.16{sub -0.53}{sup +0.58}{+-}0.20)x10{sup -6}. We examine its M{sub p{lambda}} distribution and observe a peak near threshold. This feature is expected by the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} transition. A search for B{sup +}{yields}p{sigma}{sup 0}{gamma} yields no significant signal, and we set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on the branching fraction of B(B{sup +}{yields}p{sigma}{sup 0}{gamma})<4.6x10{sup -6}.

  16. What can we learn about baryon-baryon interaction from hypernuclei {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H?

    SciTech Connect

    Majling, L. Gmuca, S.

    2007-09-15

    At the LHE JINR, an original approach to hypernuclear experiments was elaborated to produce relativistic hypernuclei. The production cross sections and lifetimes, {tau}, of {sub {lambda}}{sup 3}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H were measured successfully. The results of recent experiments on {sup 5}H and {sup 7}H nuclei suggest that the hypernucleus {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H might be stable and that this may be the case even for {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H. The unique quality of the spectrometer SPHERE may be used to identify unambiguously the isotopes of hyperhydrogen-through their pionic decay {sub {lambda}}{sup A}H {sup {yields}} {pi}{sup -} + {sup A}He-including the new hypernuclei {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H with extreme values of N/Z of 4 and 6, respectively. The confirmation of the very existence of these neutron-rich hypernuclei would be a strong motivation to search for their spectra in strangeness and double-charge-exchange reactions (K{sub stop}{sup -}, {pi}{sup +}) at FINUDA or ({pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}) at J-PARC. It is very probable that, similarly as in {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H, there is a low-lying state 1{sup +} also in {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H. If their electromagnetic width (M1) is small enough, we could see two different values of {tau} for {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H and/or {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H. We investigate the spacings of the 1{sup +} and 0{sup +} states of {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H, and {sub {lambda}}{sup 8}H. The understanding of the structure of isospin asymmetric systems plays a key role in the description of systems as diverse as neutron-rich nuclei and neutron matter.

  17. Spin-orbit splitting of {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be excited states studied with the SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.; Suzuki, Y.

    2004-10-01

    The previous Faddeev calculation of the two-alpha plus {lambda} system for {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be is extended to incorporate the spin-orbit components of the SU{sub 6} quark-model (QM) baryon-baryon interactions. We employ the Born kernel of the QM {lambda}N LS interaction and generate the spin-orbit component of the {lambda}{alpha} potential by {alpha}-cluster folding. The Faddeev calculation in the jj-coupling scheme implies that the direct use of the QM Born kernel for the {lambda}N LS component is not good enough to reproduce the small experimental value {delta}E{sub ls}{sup expt}=43{+-}5 keV for the 5/2{sup +}-3/2{sup +} splitting. This procedure predicts 3-5 times larger values in the models FSS and fss2. The spin-orbit contribution from the effective meson-exchange potentials in fss2 is argued to be unfavorable to the small ls splitting, through the analysis of the Scheerbaum factors for the single-particle spin-orbit potentials calculated in the G-matrix formalism.

  18. Measurement of Lambda and Lambda(macro) particles in Au+Au collisions at the square root of S(NN) = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; el-Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; Van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S; Zhou, S

    2002-08-26

    We present results on the measurement of Lambda and Lambda(macro) production in Au+Au collisions at square root of (S (NN) = 130 GeV with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The transverse momentum spectra were measured for minimum bias and for the 5% most central events. The Lambda;/Lambda ratios are constant as a function of p(T) and the number of participants. The measured net Lambda density is significantly larger than predicted by models based on hadronic strings (e.g., HIJING) but in approximate agreement with models which include the gluon-junction mechanism.

  19. Midrapidity Lambda and Lambda(macro) production in Au+Au collisions at the square root of [s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-08-26

    We report the first measurement of strange (Lambda) and antistrange (Lambda macro) baryon production from square root of [s(NN)]=130 GeV Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Rapidity density and transverse mass distributions at midrapidity are presented as a function of centrality. The yield of Lambda and Lambda; hyperons is found to be approximately proportional to the number of negative hadrons. The production of Lambda; hyperons relative to negative hadrons increases very rapidly with transverse momentum. The magnitude of the increase cannot be described by existing hadronic string fragmentation models alone. PMID:12190390

  20. Properties of the Lambda(1405) Measured at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kei Moriya, Reinhard Schumacher

    2010-08-01

    The nature of the Lambda(1405) with its peculiar mass distribution is not well understood, and studies have shown that it may posess strong dynamical components. Using the CLAS detector system in Hall B at Jefferson Lab, we have performed a high statistics measurement of the photoproduction of K+Lambda(1405) using a proton target. The reconstructed invariant mass distribution seen in the various [summation]pi decay modes has been measured, as well as the differential cross section ((d sigma)/(dt)). Various aspects of our analysis are discussed, as well as future prospects to further enhance the precision of the results

  1. Observation of parity violation in the Omega- ---> Lambda K- decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L.C.; Burnstein, R.A.; Chakravorty, A.; Chen, Y.C.; Choong, W.-S.; Clark, K.; Dukes, E.C.; Durandet, C.; Felix, J.; Fu, Y.; Gidal, G.; Gustafson, H.R.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; James, C.; Jenkins, C.M.; Jones, T.D.; Kaplan, D.M.; Longo, M.J.; Luebke, W.; Luk, K.-B.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /UC, Berkeley /Fermilab /Guanajuato U. /IIT, Chicago /Lausanne U. /LBL, Berkeley /Michigan U. /South Alabama U. /Virginia U.

    2005-05-01

    The {alpha} decay parameter in the process {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -} has been measured from a sample of 4.50 million unpolarized {Omega}{sup -} decays recorded by the HyperCP (E871) experiment at Fermilab and found to be [1.78 {+-} 0.19(stat) {+-} 0.16(syst)] x 10{sup -2}. This is the first unambiguous evidence for a nonzero {alpha} decay parameter, and hence parity violation, in the {Omega}{sup -} {Lambda}K{sup -} decay.

  2. LAMBDA Polarization with a Transversely Polarized Proton Target at the COMPASS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Negrini, Teresa

    2009-08-04

    The transverse polarization of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar hyperons is investigated at the COMPASS experiment at CERN. In 2007 a 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and a transversely polarized NH{sub 3} target were employed to study events in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. Preliminary results for the LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar polarizations extracted from this new data set are presented as a function of x{sub Bj} and z. The polarizations of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar are compatible with zero within their error bars and no dependence on x{sub Bj} or z is observed.

  3. X-Ray Flare Characteristics in lambda Eridani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.

    1997-01-01

    This proposal was for a joint X-ray/ultraviolet/ground-based study of the abnormal Be star lambda Eri, which has previously shown evidence of X-ray flaring from ROSAT observations in 1991. The X-ray component consisted of observations from both the ASCA and ROSAT satellites.

  4. X-Ray Flare Characteristics in Lambda Eridani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.

    1997-01-01

    This proposal was for a joint X-ray/ultraviolet/ground-based study of the abnormal Be star lambda Eri, which has previously shown evidence of X-ray flaring from ROSAT observations in 1991. The X-ray component consisted of observations from both the ASCA and ROSAT satellites.

  5. First Observation of the {Lambda}(1405) Line Shape in Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Haiyun; Schumacher, Reinhard A.

    2013-10-01

    We report the first observation of the line shape of the {Lambda}(1405) from electroproduction, and show that it is not a simple Breit-Wigner resonance. Electroproduction of K{sup +}{Lambda}(1405) off the proton was studied by using data from CLAS at Jefferson Lab in the range 1.0Lambda}(1405) and p{pi}{sup 0} of the {Sigma}{sup +}. Neither the standard Particle Data Group resonance parameters, nor free parameters fitting to a single Breit-Wigner resonance represent the line shape. In our fits, the line shape corresponds approximately to predictions of a two-pole meson-baryon picture of the {Lambda}(1405), with a lower mass pole near 1368 MeV/c{sup 2} and a higher mass pole near 1423 MeV/c{sup 2}. Furthermore, with increasing photon virtuality the mass distribution shifts toward the higher mass pole.

  6. Extracting Low-Lying Lambda Resonances Using Correlation Matrix Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Menadue, Benjamin J.; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.; Mahbub, M. S.

    2011-05-24

    The lowest-lying negative-parity state of the Lambda is investigated in (2+1)-flavour full-QCD on the PACS-CS configurations made available through the ILDG. We show that a variational analysis using multiple source and sink smearings can extract a state lying lower than that obtained by using a standard fixed smeared source and sink operator alone.

  7. Healing length near the lambda point in liquid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, M.J.; Spencer, D.S.; Fozooni, P.

    1989-04-01

    Viscous shear waves have been used to probe the spatial variation and healing of the viscosity and superfluid density near a solid wall in bulk He I, bulk He II, and in saturated superfluid films with thicknesses from 14 to 24 nm. The shear waves were generated at 20 and 34 MHz with an AT-cut quartz crystal resonator, and the transverse-acoustic impedance of the helium was measured at temperatures T close to the lambda point at T/sub lambda/. In bulk He II the results confirm a previous measurement of the healing length a(T) = (0.094 +- 0.002)epsilon/sup -2/3/ nm, where epsilon = chemically bond1-T/T/sub lambda/chemically bond. In bulk He I the measurements suggest that the viscosity exhibits healing above T/sub lambda/ near a solid wall with a similar healing length as in He II. Healing effects were observed below the superfluid transition temperature in the films and are also described by the same healing length as in the bulk liquid.

  8. Approaches for the direct estimation of lambda, and demographic contributions to lambda, using capture-recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    We first consider the estimation of the finite rate of population increase or population growth rate, lambda sub i, using capture-recapture data from open populations. We review estimation and modelling of lambda sub i under three main approaches to modelling open-population data: the classic approach of Jolly (1965) and Seber (1965), the superpopulation approach of Crosbie & Manly (1985) and Schwarz & Arnason (1996), and the temporal symmetry approach of Pradel (1996). Next, we consider the contributions of different demographic components to lambda sub i using a probabilistic approach based on the composition of the population at time i + 1 (Nichols et al., 2000b). The parameters of interest are identical to the seniority parameters, gamma sub i, of Pradel (1996). We review estimation of gamma sub i under the classic, superpopulation, and temporal symmetry approaches. We then compare these direct estimation approaches for lambda sub i and gamma sub i with analogues computed using projection matrix asymptotics. We also discuss various extensions of the estimation approaches to multistate applications and to joint likelihoods involving multiple data types.

  9. Symbolic clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Reinke, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Clustering is the problem of finding a good organization for data. Because there are many kinds of clustering problems, and because there are many possible clusterings for any data set, clustering programs use knowledge and assumptions about individual problems to make clustering tractable. Cluster-analysis techniques allow knowledge to be expressed in the choice of a pairwise distance measure and in the choice of clustering algorithm. Conceptual clustering adds knowledge and preferences about cluster descriptions. In this study the author describes symbolic clustering, which adds representation choice to the set of ways a data analyst can use problem-specific knowledge. He develops an informal model for symbolic clustering, and uses it to suggest where and how knowledge can be expressed in clustering. A language for creating symbolic clusters, based on the model, was developed and tested on three real clustering problems. The study concludes with a discussion of the implications of the model and the results for clustering in general.

  10. Methods for identification of recombinants of phage lambda.

    PubMed

    Sanzey, B; Mercereau, O; Ternynck, T; Kourilsky, P

    1976-10-01

    Two methods are described which allow the screening of a large number of phage plaques for a specific DNA sequence carried by the phage or a specific antigen produced within the phage plaque. These methods were set up with lambda and lambdalac phages. Phage plaques were transferred onto nitrocellulose filters by desiccation in 0.1 M NaOH, and the lac sequence was detected by hybridization to radioactive lac mRNA. Beta-Galactosidase was detected by reaction with anti-beta-galactosidase immune serum included in the soft agar of the titration plates; the precipitate thus formed was revealed by means of enzyme-coupled antibodies and in situ coloration. These methods are potentially useful for the identification of lambda transducers, including those which are generated by in vitro recombination with eukaryotic DNA.

  11. A microscopic theory of the lambda transition, II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Tadashi

    1983-08-01

    The previously proposed finite temperature field theory of the lambda transition based on the Schwinger functional method is investigated further. A systematic method for calculating the higher-order loop terms is presented by introducing the one-loop Green's functions, which are found to be a natural finite temperature extension of the Beliaev-Hugenholtz-Pines-Gavoret-Nozières zero-temperature Green's functions. The application of the finite temperature loop expansion to the dynamical properties is presented by calculating the retarded density correlation functions at the one-loop level. The result gives a microscopic basis for the form of the dynamical structure factor recently proposed by Woods and Svensson. From a general point of view, without using any approximations or model interactions, Goldstone's theorem for the lambda transition at finite temperature is presented.

  12. Fourth generation effect on {Lambda}{sub b} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanta, R.; Giri, A. K.

    2010-11-01

    The rare decays of the {Lambda}{sub b} baryon governed by the quark level transitions b{yields}s are investigated in the fourth quark generation model popularly known as SM4. Recently it has been shown that SM4, which is a very simple extension of the standard model, can successfully explain several anomalies observed in the CP violation parameters of B and B{sub s} mesons. We find that in this model due to the additional contributions coming from the heavy t{sup '} quark in the loop, the branching ratios and other observables in rare {Lambda}{sub b} decays deviate significantly from their standard model values. Some of these modes are within the reach of the LHCb experiment and search for such channels is strongly argued.

  13. Lambda modes of the neutron diffusion equation in hexagonal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barrachina, T.; Ginestar, D.; Verdu, G.

    2006-07-01

    A nodal collocation method is proposed to compute the dominant Lambda modes of nuclear reactor core with a hexagonal geometry. This method is based on a triangular mesh and assumes that the neutronic flux can be approximated as a finite expansion in terms of Dubiner's polynomials. The method transforms the initial differential eigenvalue problem into a generalized algebraic one, from which the dominant modes of the reactor can be computed. The performance of the method is tested with two benchmark problems. (authors)

  14. Lambda-carrageenan: a novel chiral selector for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Beck, G M; Neau, S H

    1996-01-01

    Lambda-carrageenan, a linear high molecular weight sulfated polysaccharide, has been employed as a chiral selector in capillary electrophoresis for the separation of enantiomers of weakly basic pharmaceutical compounds. The racemic compounds that were enantioresolved included propranolol, pindolol, tryptophanol, laudanosine and laudanosoline. In addition, the diastereomeric pair of cinchonine and cinchonidine were also resolved. Method conditions such as buffer pH, electrolyte concentration, column temperature, and chiral selector concentration were found to be important for improvement of enantioselectivity.

  15. Rubberlike Dynamics in Sulphur above the {lambda}-Transition Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, G.; Crapanzano, L.; Crichton, W.; Mezouar, M.; Verbeni, R.; Bellissent, R.

    2005-12-16

    The high-frequency acoustic dynamics of sulfur across the liquid-liquid, {lambda} transition has been studied using inelastic x-ray scattering. The combination of these high-frequency data with lower frequency, literature data indicates that liquid sulfur develops, in the high-temperature, polymeric solution phase, some characteristic features of a rubber. In particular, entanglement coupling among polymeric chains plays a relevant role in the dynamics of this liquid phase.

  16. Isolation and characterization of lambda specialized transducing bacteriophages carrying Klebsiella pneumoniae nif genes.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, D; Howe, M M; Brill, W J

    1980-01-01

    Seve lambda dnif specialized transducing bacteriophages were isolated from Escherichia coli strains containing plasmids carrying the his-nif region of Klebsiella pneumoniae. These phages collectively carry deoxyribonucleic acid for all of the genes in the nif regulon and adjacent deoxyribonucleic acid of K. pneumoniae. The phages were isolated by using Mu insertions in the nif region to direct the integration of lambda pMu phages in nif via formation of lambda pMu-Mu dilysogens which, upon induction, yielded lambda dnif phages. This procedure should be generally applicable for isolating lambda specialized transducing phages carrying genes from E. coli or other bacteria. PMID:6245064

  17. ({lambda}, p) Spectrum Analysis in p+A Interactions at 10 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, P. Zh.; Emelyanenko, V. N.

    2007-06-13

    Experimental data from the 2m propane bubble chamber have been analyzed for exotic baryon states search. A number of peculiarities were found in the effective mass spectra of: {lambda}{pi}+({sigma}*+(1382),PDG), {lambda}p and {lambda}pp subsystems. A few events detected on the photographs of the propane bubble chamber exposed to a 10 GeV/c proton beam, were interpreted as S=-2 H0 light(lambda}{lambda})) and heavy H0,+. New event, detected on the photographs of the propane bubble chamber was interpreted as heavy H+(2488) dibaryon by two weak decay channels of K-pp or {sigma}+p{pi}-.

  18. Lambda-Nucleon Potential Calculated from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nemura, Hidekatsu

    2011-10-21

    We present our studies of Lambda-Nucleon ({Lambda}N) interaction by using lattice QCD. The equal-time Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) amplitude of the lowest energy scattering state of a proton-{Lambda} system is calculated from lattice QCD. In this report, two different types of gauge configurations are employed: (i) Quenched QCD configurations at {beta} = 5.7 (a = 0.1416(9) fm) on a 32{sup 3}x48 lattice, whose spatial volume is (4.5 fm){sup 3}.(ii)2+1 flavor full QCD configurations generated by the PACS-CS collaboration at {beta} = 1.9 (a = 0.0907(13) fm) on a 32{sup 3}x64 lattice, whose spatial volume is (2.90 fm){sup 3}. The spin-singlet central potential is calculated from the NBS wave function for the spin J = 0 state, whereas the spin-triplet central potential as well as the tensor potential are deduced simultaneously from the NBS wave function for the spin J = 1 state by dividing it into the S-wave and the D-wave components.

  19. Measurement of the Lambda0(b) Lifetime in Lambda0(b) ---> J/psi Lambda0 in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-09-01

    The authors report a measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime in the exclusive decay {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}{sup 0} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using fully reconstructed decays, they measure {tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 1.593{sub -0.078}{sup +0.083}(stat.) {+-} 0.033(syst.) ps. This is the single most precise measurement of {tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) and is 3.2 {sigma} higher than the current world average.

  20. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoli; Xu, Zemin; Zhang, Xichang; Yang, Fangxing

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil was investigated using compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The results revealed that lambda-cyhalothrin was biodegraded in soil under laboratory conditions. The half-lives of lambda-cyhalothrin were determined to be 49 and 161 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 2mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin and 84 and 154 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 10mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, respectively. The biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin resulted in carbon isotope fractionation, which shifted from -29.0‰ to -26.5‰ in soil spiked with 2mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, and to -27.5‰ with 10mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin. A relationship was established between the stable carbon isotope fraction and the residual concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin by the Rayleigh equation in which the carbon isotope enrichment factor ε of the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in the soil was calculated as -2.53‰. This study provides an approach to quantitatively evaluate the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil in field studies.

  1. Search for CP violation in charged-Xi and Lambda hyperon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Holmstrom, T.; Leros, N.; Burnstein, R.A.; Chakravorty, A.; Chan, A.; Chen, Y.C.; Choong, W.S.; Clark, K.; Dukes, E.C.; Durandet, C.; Felix, J.; Fu, Y.; Gidal, G.; Gu, P.; Gustafson, H.R.; Ho, C.; Huang, M.; James, C.; Jenkins, C.M.; Jones, T.; Kaplan, D.M.; /Virginia U. /Lausanne U. /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /UC, Berkeley /Fermilab /Guanajuato U. /IIT, Chicago /Lausanne U. /LBL, Berkeley /Michigan U. /South Alabama U. /Virginia U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors have compared the p and {bar p} angular distributions in 117 million {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup -} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} and 41 million {Xi}{sup +} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}{pi}{sup +} {yields} {bar p}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} decays using a subset of the data from the HyperCP experiment (ES71) at Fermilab. They find no evidence of CP violation, with the direct-CP-violating parameter A{sub {Xi}{Lambda}} {triple_bond} (a{sub {Xi}}a{sub {Lambda}} - {bar a}{sub {Xi}}{bar a}{sub {Lambda}})/(a{sub {Xi}}a{sub {Lambda}} + {bar a}{sub {Xi}}{bar a}{sub {Lambda}}) = [0.0 {+-} 5.1(stat) {+-} 4.4(syst)] x 10{sup -4}.

  2. [Bacteriophage lambda:lux: design and expression of bioluminescence in E. coli cells].

    PubMed

    Duzhiĭ, D E; Zavil'gel'skiĭ, G B

    1994-01-01

    The bacteriophages lambda:lux and lambda:luxAB have been constructed by ligation of phage arms generated by BamHI or SalGI restriction endonucleases digestion of EMBL4 to BamHI digested plasmid pF1 lux+ or to SalGI digested plasmid pF2 lambda:luxA+B+. Cells of Escherichia coli prototrophic strain Cs were infected with lambda:lux or lambda:luxAB and intensity of bioluminiscence of the samples registered at different time intervals determined. The signal of bioluminiscence was first detected 15 min after infection and its level increased exponentially thereafter demonstrating replication of the lambda:lux bacteriophages. We have used the recombinant lambda:luxAB bacteriophage to detect the enteric indicator bacteria without enrichment in 15 min, provided that they are present at levels higher than 10(4).

  3. A study of K{sub s} {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} production in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, K.G.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-08-01

    We present a preliminary measurement of the inclusive production rates of K{sub s}, A and X hadrons produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation at the Z{sup 0} pole. The analysis is based upon approximately 50K Z{sup 0} decays collected in the SLD experiment at SLAC in 1993. The observed rates of (K{sub s}) = 1.02 {plus_minus} 0.02 {plus_minus} 0.09 and ({Lambda}) + ({bar {Lambda}}) = 0.38 {plus_minus} 0.01 {plus_minus} 0.04 are consistent with previous measurements. Our differential cross section peak-position results are shown to be consistent with QCD predictions based on the modified leading logarithm approximation and local parton-hadron duality.

  4. Interaction of the intrinsically unstructured phage lambda N Protein with Escherichia coli NusA.

    PubMed

    Prasch, Stefan; Schwarz, Sabine; Eisenmann, Anke; Wöhrl, Birgitta M; Schweimer, Kristian; Rösch, Paul

    2006-04-11

    N protein of the Escherichia coli phage lambda (lambdaN) is involved in antitermination, a transcription regulatory process that is essential for the expression of delayed early genes during phage lytic development. lambdaN is an intrinsically unstructured protein that possesses three distinct binding sites interacting with the carboxy terminus of the E. coli host factor protein NusA, the viral nutBoxB-RNA, and RNA polymerase, respectively. Heteronuclear NMR experiments with lambdaN(1-53) in complex with NusA(339-495) revealed that upon complex formation the lambdaN-binding interface, lambdaN(34-47), adopts a rigid structure. NMR data also indicate the induction of a weak helical structure in the nutboxB RNA-binding region lambdaN(1-22) upon binding to NusA(339-495) even in the absence of RNA. Titration experiments of the lambdaN(1-53)-nutBoxB RNA complex with NusA(339-495) revealed that the ternary complex can be described in terms of two structurally independent binary interactions. Furthermore, chemical-shift perturbation experiments with different NusA constructs and different lambdaN peptides showed that only NusA(353-416) is involved in lambdaN binding. We found that only one molecule of NusA(339-426) binds to one molecule of lambdaN(1-53). We also clarified the role of the lambdaN-binding region and could show that N41-R47 also binds to NusA(339-495). Furthermore, we observe that lambdaN(1-22) adopts a helical fold upon binding to NusA(339-495), in agreement with one of the theoretical models of lambdaN action.

  5. Roles for lambda Orf and Escherichia coli RecO, RecR and RecF in lambda recombination.

    PubMed

    Sawitzke, J A; Stahl, F W

    1997-10-01

    Bacteriophage lambda lacking its Red recombination functions requires either its own gene product, Orf, or the product of Escherichia coli's recO, recR and recF genes (RecORF) for efficient recombination in recBC sbcB sbcC mutant cells (the RecF pathway). Phage crosses under conditions of a partial block to DNA replication have revealed the following: (1) In the presence of Orf, RecF pathway recombination is similar to lambda Red recombination; (2) Orf is necessary for focusing recombination toward the right end of the chromosome as lambda is conventionally drawn; (3) RecORF-mediated RecF pathway recombination is not focused toward the right end of the chromosome, which may indicate that RecORF travels along the DNA; (4) both Orf- and RecORF-mediated RecF pathway recombination are stimulated by DNA replication; and (5) low level recombination in the simultaneous absence of Orf and RecORF may occur by a break-copy mechanism that is not initiated by a double strand break. Models for the roles of Orf and RecO, RecR and RecF in recombination are presented. PMID:9335578

  6. Utilizing Synthetic Spectra to Refine Lambda Boo Stars' UV Classification Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Neff, James E.; Johnson, Dustin; Tarbell, Erik; Romo, Christopher; Steele, Patricia; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. This stellar class has recently regained the spotlight because of the directly-imaged planets around a confirmed Lambda Boo star, HR 8799, and a suggested Lambda Boo star Beta Pictoris. The discovery of a giant asteroid belt around Vega, another possible Lambda Boo star, also suggests hidden planets. This possible link between Lambda Boo stars and planet-bearing stars motivates us to study Lambda Boo stars systematically. Since the peculiar nature of the prototype Lambda Bootis was first noticed in 1943, Lambda Boo candidates published in the literature have been selected using widely different criteria. The Lambda Boo label has been applied to almost any peculiar A-type stars that do not fit elsewhere. In order to determine the origin of Lambda Boo stars' unique abundance pattern and to better discriminate between theories explaining the Lambda Boo phenomenon, a consistent working definition of Lambda Boo stars is needed. We have re-evaluated all published Lambda Boo candidates and their available ultraviolet and visible spectra. Using observed and synthetic spectra, we explored the classification of Lambda Boo stars and developed quantitative criteria that discriminate metal-poor stars from bona fide Lambda Boo stars. With model spectra, we demonstrated that the (C I 1657 Angstrom)/ (Al II 1671 Angstrom) line ratio is the best single criterion to distinguish between Lambda Boo stars and metal weak stars, and that one cannot use a single C I/Al II cut-off value as a Lambda Boo classification criterion. The C I/Al II cut-off value is a function of a star's effective temperature and metallicity. Using these stricter Lambda Boo classification criteria, we concluded that neither Beta Pictoris nor Vega should be classified as Lambda Boo stars.

  7. Confronting dark energy models using galaxy cluster number counts

    SciTech Connect

    Basilakos, S.; Plionis, M.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2010-10-15

    The mass function of cluster-size halos and their redshift distribution are computed for 12 distinct accelerating cosmological scenarios and confronted to the predictions of the conventional flat {Lambda}CDM model. The comparison with {Lambda}CDM is performed by a two-step process. First, we determine the free parameters of all models through a joint analysis involving the latest cosmological data, using supernovae type Ia, the cosmic microwave background shift parameter, and baryon acoustic oscillations. Apart from a braneworld inspired cosmology, it is found that the derived Hubble relation of the remaining models reproduces the {Lambda}CDM results approximately with the same degree of statistical confidence. Second, in order to attempt to distinguish the different dark energy models from the expectations of {Lambda}CDM, we analyze the predicted cluster-size halo redshift distribution on the basis of two future cluster surveys: (i) an X-ray survey based on the eROSITA satellite, and (ii) a Sunayev-Zeldovich survey based on the South Pole Telescope. As a result, we find that the predictions of 8 out of 12 dark energy models can be clearly distinguished from the {Lambda}CDM cosmology, while the predictions of 4 models are statistically equivalent to those of the {Lambda}CDM model, as far as the expected cluster mass function and redshift distribution are concerned. The present analysis suggests that such a technique appears to be very competitive to independent tests probing the late time evolution of the Universe and the associated dark energy effects.

  8. Longitudinal spin transfer in inclusive Lambda and Lambda barproduct ion in polarized proton-proton collisions at sqrt s = 200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qinghua; STAR Collaboration

    2006-10-01

    This contribution reports on a proof-of-principle measurement of the longitudinal spin transfer D{sub LL} in inclusive {Lambda} and {Lambda} production in polarized proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV. The data sample consists of about 3 x 10{sup 6} minimum bias events collected in the year 2005 by the STAR experiment at RHIC with proton beam polarizations of up to 50%. The {Lambda}({bar {Lambda}}) candidates are reconstructed at mid-rapidity (|{eta}| < 1) using the STAR Time Projection Chamber via the dominant decay channel {Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup -} ({Lambda} {yields} {bar p}{pi}{sup +}). Their mean transverse momentum p{sub T} is about 1.3 GeV/c and longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} = 7.5 x 10{sup -3}. The longitudinal {Lambda}({bar {Lambda}}) polarization is determined using a method in which the detector acceptance mostly cancels.

  9. Utilizing Synthetic UV Spectra to Explore the Physical Basis for the Classification of Lambda Boötis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Neff, James E.; Johnson, Dustin M.; Tarbell, Erik S.; Romo, Christopher A.; Prabhaker, Arvind; Steele, Patricia A.; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show mild to extreme deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. This intriguing stellar class has recently regained the spotlight because of the directly imaged planets around a confirmed Lambda Boo star, HR 8799, and a suggested Lambda Boo star, Beta Pictoris. The discovery of a giant asteroid belt around Vega, another possible Lambda Boo star, also suggests hidden planets. The possible link between Lambda Boo stars and planet-bearing stars motivates us to study Lambda Boo stars systematically. Since the peculiar nature of the prototype Lambda Boötis was first noticed in 1943, Lambda Boo candidates published in the literature have been selected using widely different criteria. In order to determine the origin of Lambda Boo stars’ unique abundance pattern and to better discriminate between theories explaining the Lambda Boo phenomenon, a consistent working definition of Lambda Boo stars is needed. We have re-evaluated all published Lambda Boo candidates and their available ultraviolet and visible spectra. In this paper, using observed and synthetic spectra, we explore the physical basis for the classification of Lambda Boo stars, and develop quantitative criteria that discriminate metal-poor stars from bona fide Lambda Boo stars. Based on these stricter Lambda Boo classification criteria, we conclude that neither Beta Pictoris nor Vega should be classified as Lambda Boo stars.

  10. Inhibitory effect of tocotrienol on eukaryotic DNA polymerase {lambda} and angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki . E-mail: mizushin@nutr.kobegakuin.ac.jp; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Shibata, Akira; Awata, Yasutoshi; Kuriyama, Isoko; Shimazaki, Noriko; Koiwai, Osamu; Uchiyama, Yukinobu; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Miyazawa, Teruo; Yoshida, Hiromi

    2006-01-20

    Tocotrienols, vitamin E compounds that have an unsaturated side chain with three double bonds, selectively inhibited the activity of mammalian DNA polymerase {lambda} (pol {lambda}) in vitro. These compounds did not influence the activities of replicative pols such as {alpha}, {delta}, and {epsilon}, or even the activity of pol {beta} which is thought to have a very similar three-dimensional structure to the pol {beta}-like region of pol {lambda}. Since {delta}-tocotrienol had the strongest inhibitory effect among the four ({alpha}- to {delta}-) tocotrienols, the isomer's structure might be an important factor in the inhibition of pol {lambda}. The inhibitory effect of {delta}-tocotrienol on both intact pol {lambda} (residues 1-575) and a truncated pol {lambda} lacking the N-terminal BRCA1 C-terminus (BRCT) domain (residues 133-575, del-1 pol {lambda}) was dose-dependent, with 50% inhibition observed at a concentration of 18.4 and 90.1 {mu}M, respectively. However, del-2 pol {lambda} (residues 245-575) containing the C-terminal pol {beta}-like region was unaffected. Tocotrienols also inhibited the proliferation of and formation of tubes by bovine aortic endothelial cells, with {delta}-tocotrienol having the greatest effect. These results indicated that tocotrienols targeted both pol {lambda} and angiogenesis as anti-cancer agents. The relationship between the inhibition of pol {lambda} and anti-angiogenesis by {delta}-tocotrienol was discussed.

  11. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  12. [lambda][phi][sup 4] q-renormalization program

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Romo, S. )

    1994-03-01

    A regularization scheme for quantum field theories given in q-mutator algebra for the internal momentum space in a loop integration is constructed. The author shows Feynman integrals that are finite for q [ne] 1 but diverse as q [yields] 1. Using this regularization scheme, the author proposes a renormalization program in q-mutator space (q-renormalization program) for the [lambda][phi][sup 4] theory as an example, up to some one-loop diagrams. This work paves the way to obtaining physically measureable quantities from quantum field theories over spaces that neither commute nor anticommute.

  13. {Lambda}CDM universe in f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Elizalde, Emilio; Saez-Gomez, Diego; Goswami, Rituparno; Odintsov, Sergei

    2010-07-15

    Several different explicit reconstructions of f(R) gravity are obtained from the background Friedmann-Laimatre-Robertson-Walker expansion history. It is shown that the only theory whose Lagrangian is a simple function of the Ricci scalar R, that admits an exact {Lambda}CDM expansion history, is standard general relativity with a positive cosmological constant and the only way to obtain this behavior of the scale factor for more general functions of R is to add additional degrees of freedom to the matter sector.

  14. Origin of the {lambda} Transition in Liquid Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Scopigno, T.; Yannopoulos, S. N.; Andrikopoulos, K. S.; Fioretto, D.; Ruocco, G.

    2007-07-13

    Developing a novel experimental technique, we applied photon correlation spectroscopy using infrared radiation in liquid sulfur around T{sub {lambda}}, i.e., in the temperature range where an abrupt increase in viscosity by 4 orders of magnitude is observed upon heating within few degrees. This allowed us--overcoming photoinduced and absorption effects at visible wavelengths--to reveal a chain relaxation process with characteristic time in the millisecond range. These results do rehabilitate the validity of the Maxwell relation in sulfur from an apparent failure, allowing rationalizing of the mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of this system within a viscoelastic scenario.

  15. Radiative decays of the Sigma0(1385) and Lambda(1520) hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Taylor; Gordon Mutchler; CLAS Collaboration

    2005-03-01

    The electromagnetic decays of the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and {Lambda}(1520) hyperons were studied in photon-induced reactions {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} in the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. We report the first observation of the radiative decay of the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and a measurement of the {Lambda}(1520) radiative decay width. For the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) {yields} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} transition, we measured a partial width of 479 {+-} 120(stat){sub -100}{sup +81}(sys) keV, larger than all of the existing model predictions. For the {Lambda}(1520) {yields} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} transition, we obtained a partial width of 167 {+-} 43(stat){sub -12}{sup +26}(sys) keV.

  16. ASTEROSEISMOLOGICAL MODELING OF THE MULTIPERIODIC {lambda} BOOTIS STAR 29 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Casas, R.; Moya, A.; Martin-Ruiz, S.; Amado, P. J.; Garrido, R.; Suarez, J. C.; Rodriguez-Lopez, C

    2009-05-20

    The present work focuses on the discussion of the {lambda} Bootis nature of the multiperiodic {delta} Scuti star HD 192640 (29 Cyg), through a comprehensive asteroseismic modeling. Some of the most recent asteroseismic tools are used to check whether the observed low metallicity is internal, i.e., intrinsic, present throughout the star, or due to superficial processes as accretion, diffusive settling, radiative levitation, mass loss, etc. The modeling method uses some of the most recent tools, including: (1) effects of rotation on equilibrium models, on the adiabatic oscillation spectrum, and its influence in multicolor observables, (2) nonadiabatic stability of radial and nonradial modes, (3) inclusion of the atmosphere-pulsation interaction for a more accurate multicolor mode identification, and (4) ratio between radial modes n = 4 and n = 5 in the framework of Petersen diagrams. The analysis performed reveals that the models fulfilling all the constraints are those in the middle of the main sequence (MS), with subsolar metallicity, except some other unlikely possibilities. Therefore, this study does not support the idea of the {lambda} Bootis stars being zero-age MS or pre-MS stars interacting with their primordial cloud of gas and dust, but suggest the explanation of their nature as submetallic MS objects. Nevertheless, more accurate multicolor photometric observations are required for a more conclusive study using the procedure presented here, since the observational errors are too large for a definitive rejection of any of the possible explanations.

  17. Detection of single lambda DNA fragments by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.; Goodwin, P.M.; Ambrose, W.P.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Keller, R.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated flow cytometric detection and sizing of single pieces of fluorescently stained lambda DNA (48.5 kb) and individual Kpn I restriction fragments of lambda DNA at 17.05 kb and 29.95 kb. DNA fragments were stained stoichiometrically with an intercalating dye such that the fluorescence from each fragment was directly proportional to fragment length. Laser powers range from 10 to 100 mW and transit times through the focused laser beam were several milliseconds. Measurements were made using time-resolved single photon counting of the detected fluorescence emission from individual stained DNA fragments. Samples were analyzed at rates of about 50 fragments per second. The measured fluorescence intensities are linearly correlated with DNA fragment length over the range measured. Detection sensitivity and resolution needed for analysis of small pieces of DNA are discussed and a comparison of single photon counting measurements of DNA fragments to measurements using more conventional flow cytometers is made. Applications of this methodology to DNA sizing and DNA fingerprinting are discussed.

  18. Spectroscopic study of the Lambda hypernuclei by the (e,e'K+) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Toshinobu Miyoshi

    2003-03-31

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy study via the (e,e'K+) reaction has been carried out for the first time, establishing a new technique to study Lambda hypernuclei. The high quality electron beam at Jefferson Lab made it possible to measure Lambda hypernuclear spectra with an energy resolution better than 1 MeV (FWHM). The present experiment was designed to make full use of the virtual photon flux, which peaks at very forward angles, by detecting scattered electrons at 0 degrees. Scattered positive kaons were also detected near 0 degrees, where the cross section of the kaon photo-production is maximized. This unique kinematical configuration was realized with the HyperNuclear Spectrometer System (HNSS), which consisted of the Short-Orbit Spectrometer, the Enge Split-Pole Spectrometer, and the splitter magnet. The Lambda12B mass spectrum was measured in the 12C(e,e'K+)Lambda12B reaction with 0.9 MeV (FWHM) energy resolution. The averaged binding energy of the Lambda12B ground state doublet was obtained to be 11.7 ± 0.1 (statistical) ± 0.3 (systematic) MeV, which is consistent with emulsion data. The general spectral structure of the 12C(e,e'K+) Lambda12B reaction was found to be similar to that of the 12C(Lambda+,K+)Lambda12C reaction, showing characteristic peaks corresponding to sLambda and pLambda orbits, as well as a few core-excited states. The cross section of the Lambda12B ground state doublet was derived to be 117 ± 13 (statistical) ± 14 (systematic) nb/sr. The theoretical prediction of the cross section was consistent with the present result, validating DWIA calculation for hypernuclear yields. The present study proved the effectiveness of the (e,e'K+) reaction for future Lambda hypernuclear spectroscopy studies.

  19. Deterministic photon-photon {radical}(SWAP)gate using a {Lambda} system

    SciTech Connect

    Koshino, Kazuki; Ishizaka, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2010-07-15

    We theoretically present a method to realize a deterministic photon-photon {radical}(SWAP) gate using a three-level {Lambda} system interacting with single photons in reflection geometry. The {Lambda} system is used completely passively as a temporary memory for a photonic qubit; the initial state of the {Lambda} system may be arbitrary, and active control by auxiliary fields is unnecessary throughout the gate operations. These distinct merits make this entangling gate suitable for deterministic and scalable quantum computation.

  20. ON THE COMPLETENESS AND QUASIPOWER BASIS PROPERTY OF SYSTEMS \\{z^nf(\\lambda_nz)\\}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskolkov, V. A.

    1990-02-01

    This paper discusses questions of completeness and the quasipower property in spaces A_R of systems of functions \\{z^nf(\\lambda_nz)\\} under some natural conditions on the Taylor coefficients of the function f(z), assumed regular in a disk \\vert z\\vert. The complex numbers \\lambda_n ( n=0,1,\\dots) are subject to the condition \\vert\\lambda_n\\vert\\leqslant1. Bibliography: 8 titles.

  1. Experimental Constraints on the Spin and Parity of the {lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuk, R.; Balagura, V.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Liventsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uglov, T.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.

    2007-06-29

    We report the results of several studies of the {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}X final state in continuum e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected by the Belle detector. An analysis of angular distributions in {lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +}{yields}{sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup 0,++}{pi}{sup +,-} decays strongly favors a {lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +} spin assignment of (5/2) over (3/2) or (1/2). We find evidence for {lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +}{yields}{sigma}{sub c}(2520){sup 0,++}{pi}{sup +,-} decay and measure the ratio of {lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +} partial widths {gamma}({sigma}{sub c}(2520){pi})/{gamma}({sigma}{sub c}(2455){pi})=0.225{+-}0.062{+-}0.= 025. This value favors the {lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +} spin-parity assignment of (5/2){sup +} over (5/2){sup -}. We also report the first observation of {lambda}{sub c}(2940){sup +}{yields}{sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup 0,++}{pi}{sup +,-} decay and measure {lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +} and {lambda}{sub c}(2940){sup +} mass and width parameters. These studies are based on a 553 fb{sup -1} data sample collected at or near the {upsilon}(4S) resonance at the KEKB collider.

  2. Beta-sitosterol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside: a eukaryotic DNA polymerase lambda inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Nakanishi, Rumi; Kuriyama, Isoko; Kamiya, Kohei; Satake, Toshiko; Shimazaki, Noriko; Koiwai, Osamu; Uchiyama, Yukinobu; Yonezawa, Yuko; Takemura, Masaharu; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Yoshida, Hiromi

    2006-05-01

    Beta-sitosterol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (compound 1), a steroidal glycoside isolated from onion (Allium cepa L.) selectively inhibited the activity of mammalian DNA polymerase lambda (pol lambda) in vitro. The compound did not influence the activities of replicative DNA polymerases such as alpha, delta and epsilon, but also showed no effect even on the activity of pol beta which is thought to have a very similar three-dimensional structure to the pol beta-like region of pol lambda. Since parts of compound 1 such as beta-sitosterol (compound 2) and D-glucose (compound 3) did not influence the activities of any enzymes tested, the converted structure of compounds 2 and 3 might be important for pol lambda inhibition. The inhibitory effect of compound 1 on both intact pol lambda (i.e. residues 1-575) and a truncated pol lambda lacking the N-terminal BRCA1 C-terminus (BRCT) domain (133-575, del-1 pol lambda) was dose-dependent, and 50% inhibition was observed at a concentration of 9.1 and 5.4 microM, respectively. The compound 1-induced inhibition of del-1 pol lambda activity was non-competitive with respect to both the DNA template-primer and the dNTP substrate. On the basis of these results, the pol lambda inhibitory mechanism of compound 1 is discussed. PMID:16621516

  3. Measurement of the Lambda_b Lifetime in Lambda_b -> Lambda_c+ pi- Decays in p-pbar Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    We report a measurement of the lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon in decays to the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} final state in a sample corresponding to 1.1 fb{sup -1} collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. Using a sample of about 3000 fully reconstructed {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} events we measure {tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 1.401 {+-} 0.046 (stat) {+-} 0.035 (syst) ps (corresponding to c{tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 420.1 {+-} 13.7 (stat) {+-} 10.6 (syst) {micro}m, where c is the speed of light). The ratio of this result and the world average B{sup 0} lifetime yields {tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})/{tau}(B{sup 0}) = 0.918 {+-} 0.038 (stat and syst), in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  4. Observation of new states decaying into Lambda(c)(+)Kappa(-)pi(+) and Lambda(c)(+)Kappa(0)/(s)pi(-).

    PubMed

    Chistov, R; Abe, K; Abe, K; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Anipko, D; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M-C; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K-F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Chuvikov, A; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Gershon, T; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Golob, B; Gorisek, A; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, S; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Iijima, T; Imoto, A; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kang, J H; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Khan, H R; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lesiak, T; Lin, S-W; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumoto, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Nagamine, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Onuki, Y; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, H; Park, K S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sakai, Y; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Shwartz, B; Sidorov, V; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Soni, N; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stoeck, H; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Takasaki, F; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Tikhomirov, I; Tsuboyama, T; Tsukamoto, T; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Ueno, K; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Varner, G; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Wu, C-H; Xie, Q L; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P

    2006-10-20

    We report the first observation of two charmed strange baryons that decay into Lambda(c)(+)Kappa(-)pi(+). The broader of the two states is measured to have a mass of 2978.5+/-2.1+/-2.0 MeV/c2 and a width of 43.5+/-7.5+/-7.0 MeV/c2. The mass and width of the narrow state are measured to be 3076.7+/-0.9+/-0.5 MeV/c;{2} and 6.2+/-1.2+/-0.8 MeV/c2, respectively. We also perform a search for the isospin partner states that decay into Lambda(c)(+)Kappa(0)/(s)pi(-) and observe a significant signal at the mass of 3082.8+/-1.8+/-1.5 MeV/c2. The data used for this analysis were accumulated at or near the Upsilon(4S) resonance, using the Belle detector at the e+ e- asymmetric-energy collider KEKB. The integrated luminosity of the data sample used is 461.5 fb(-1). PMID:17155385

  5. The REFLEX II Galaxy Cluster sample: mock catalogues and clustering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolinez, Andres; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Bohringer, Hans

    2012-09-01

    We present results of the analysis of abundance and clustering from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX) II galaxy cluster catalogue. To model the covariance matrix of the different statistics, we have created a set of 100 mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite large volume LambdaCDM N-Body simulations (L-BASICC and calibrated with the X-ray luminosity function. We discuss the calibration scheme and some implications regarding the cluster scaling relations, particularly, the link between mass and luminosity. Similarly we show the behavior of the clustering signal as a function of the X-ray luminosity and some cosmological implications.

  6. lambda altSF: a phage variant that acquired the ability to substitute specific sets of genes at high frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, D; Tomich, P; Parsons, C; Olson, E; Deans, R; Flamm, E

    1981-01-01

    We report the isolation of lambda altSF, a variant of Escherichia coli phage lambda that substitutes sets of genes at high frequency. Two forms of the variant phage have been studied: lambda altSF lambda, which exhibits the immunity (repressor recognition) of phage lambda, and lambda altSF22, which exhibits the immunity of Salmonella phage P22. Lysates made from single plaques of lambda altSF lambda contain 10-30% phage of the P22 form. Similarly, lysates from single plaques of lambda altSF22 contain as much as 1% phage of the lambda form. Heteroduplex analyses reveal the following features of the lambda altSF chromosomes: (i) each form has the immunity genes appropriate to its immune phenotype, (ii) the substituted segments include genes involved in regulation and replication, and (iii) the alt phages have unusual additions and substitutions of DNA not normally found associated with either immunity region. In the case of lambda altSF lambda, there is a small insertion in the region of the cI gene. Because revertants that lose this inserted DNA concomitantly lose the ability to substitute, we conclude that the insertion plays a role in the substitution process. In the case of change from lambda altSF lambda to lambda altSF22, the substituting P22 genes are derived from the E. coli host. We have identified a set of Salmonella phage P22 genes in a standard nonlysogenic strain of E. coli K-12 that is apparently carried in a silent form. The reason for this lack of expression is not obvious, because this P22 material includes structural genes and associated promoters and is potentially active. When this set of genes substitutes for the analogous set of genetic material on the genome of lambda altSF lambda, the P22 genes are expressed in a normal manner. Images PMID:6454136

  7. A new paradigm for the X-ray emission of O stars from XMM-Newton observations of the O9.7 supergiant ζ Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, A. M. T.

    2007-03-01

    XMM-Newton observations of the O supergiant ζ Orionis (O9.7 Ib) extend knowledge of its high-resolution spectrum beyond the C VI line at 33.7 Å and suggest a new framework for the interpretation of the X-ray spectra of single hot stars. All the lines are broad and asymmetric with similar velocity profiles. X-rays probably originate in the wind's terminal velocity regime in collisionless shocks controlled by magnetic fields rather than in cooling shocks in the acceleration zone. During post-shock relaxation, exchange of energy between ions and electrons is so slow that electron heating does not take place before hot gas is quenched by the majority cool gas. The observed plasma is not in equilibrium and the electron bremsstrahlung continuum is weak. Charge exchange, ionization and excitation are likely to be produced by protons. Fully thermalized post-shock velocities ensure high cross-sections and account for the observed line widths, with some allowance probably necessary for non-thermal particle acceleration. In general, the form of X-ray spectra in both single and binary stars is likely to be determined principally by the amount of post-shock electron heating: magnetically confined X-ray plasma in binary systems can evolve further towards the higher electron temperatures of equilibrium while in single stars this does not take place. The long mean-free path for Coulomb energy exchange between fast-moving ions may also inhibit the development of line-driven instabilities. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  8. High resolution spectroscopic study of Be10Lambda;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogami, T.; Chen, C.; Kawama, D.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; Baturin, P.; Badui, R.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Brash, E.; Carter, P.; Chiba, A.; Christy, E.; Danagoulian, S.; de Leo, R.; Doi, D.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fujii, Y.; Fujita, M.; Furic, M.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Han, Y.; Hashimoto, O.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hungerford, Ed. V.; Jones, M.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, S.; Kawai, M.; Khanal, H.; Kohl, M.; Liyanage, A.; Luo, W.; Maeda, K.; Margaryan, A.; Markowitz, P.; Maruta, T.; Matsumura, A.; Maxwell, V.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Narayan, A.; Neville, C.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M. I.; Nunez, A.; Nuruzzaman, Okayasu, Y.; Petkovic, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Qiu, X.; Reinhold, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Samanta, C.; Sawatzky, B.; Seva, T.; Shichijo, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tang, L.; Taniya, N.; Tsukada, K.; Veilleux, M.; Vulcan, W.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S. A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ya, L.; Ye, Z.; Yokota, K.; Yuan, L.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zhu, L.; Hksjlab E05-115 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopy of a Be10Lambda; hypernucleus was carried out at JLab Hall C using the (e ,e'K+) reaction. A new magnetic spectrometer system (SPL+HES+HKS), specifically designed for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy, was used to obtain an energy spectrum with a resolution of ˜0.78 MeV (FWHM). The well-calibrated spectrometer system of the present experiment using p (e ,e'K+)Λ ,Σ0 reactions allowed us to determine the energy levels; and the binding energy of the ground-state peak (mixture of 1- and 2- states) was found to be BΛ=8.55 ±0.07 (stat . ) ±0.11 (sys . ) MeV. The result indicates that the ground-state energy is shallower than that of an emulsion study by about 0.5 MeV which provides valuable experimental information on the charge symmetry breaking effect in the Λ N interaction.

  9. Spectral diagnostics of high energy emission in lambda Eri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron

    1995-01-01

    Multi-line observations of the optical spectrum of lambda Eri demonstrates that rapidly varying, low-velocity emissions occur in several He I lines even when H alpha shows no emission. A peculiar aspect of the He I emissions is that the ratio 5876/6678 is = 1. A theory of helium line formation generally admits two common emission mechanisms. The first is recombination/cascades, which is well known to give a ratio of greater than or equal to 3. The second is a non-LTE effect that occurs in hot (O-type) photospheres when resonance He I 584 radiation becomes transparent and drives single lines along into the emission. To accommodate a ratio of 5876/6678 = 1 may require that both processes sometimes operate at the same time, presumably in separate localities near the surface of this star.

  10. A General Formula for Fan-Beam Lambda Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Lambda tomography (LT) is to reconstruct a gradient-like image of an object only from local projection data. It is potentially an important technology for medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) at a reduced radiation dose. In this paper, we prove the first general formula for exact and efficient fan-beam LT from data collected along any smooth curve based on even and odd data extensions. As a result, an LT image can be reconstructed without involving any data extension. This implies that structures outside a scanning trajectory do not affect the exact reconstruction of points inside the trajectory even if the data may be measured through the outside features. The algorithm is simulated in a collinear coordinate system. The results support our theoretical analysis. PMID:23165013

  11. Polarization of Lambda0 and anti-Lambda0 inclusively produced by 610-GeV/c Sigma- and 525-GeV/c proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Lopez, J.L.; Nelson, K.D.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, A.S.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-06-01

    We have measured the polarization of {Lambda}{sup 0} and {bar {Lambda}{sup 0}} inclusively produced by 610 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} and 525 GeV/c proton beams in the experiment SELEX during the 1996/7 fixed target run at Fermilab. The polarization was measured as a function of the {Lambda} longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} and transverse momentum p{sub t}. For the {Lambda}{sup 0} produced by {Sigma}{sup -} the polarization is increasing with x{sub F} , from slightly negative at x{sub F} {approx} 0 to about 15% at large x{sub F} ; it shows a non-monotonic behavior as a function of p{sub t}. For the proton beam, the {Lambda}{sup 0} polarization is negative and decreasing as a function of x{sub F} and p{sub t}. The {bar {Lambda}{sup 0}} polarization is compatible with 0 for both beam particles over the full kinematic range. The target dependence was examined but no statistically significant difference was found.

  12. LambdaStation: Exploiting Advance Networks In Data Intensive High Energy Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey B. Newman

    2009-09-11

    Lambda Station software implements selective, dynamic, secure path control between local storage & analysis facilities, and high bandwidth, wide-area networks (WANs). It is intended to facilitate use of desirable, alternate wide area network paths which may only be intermittently available, or subject to policies that restrict usage to specified traffic. Lambda Station clients gain awareness of potential alternate network paths via Clarens-based web services, including path characteristics such as bandwidth and availability. If alternate path setup is requested and granted, Lambda Station will configure the local network infrastructure to properly forward designated data flows via the alternate path. A fully functional implementation of Lambda Station, capable of dynamic alternate WAN path setup and teardown, has been successfully developed. A limited Lambda Station-awareness capability within the Storage Resource Manager (SRM) product has been developed. Lambda Station has been successfully tested in a number of venues, including Super Computing 2008. LambdaStation software, developed by the Fermilab team, enables dynamic allocation of alternate network paths for high impact traffic and to forward designated flows across LAN. It negotiates with reservation and provisioning systems of WAN control planes, be it based on SONET channels, demand tunnels, or dynamic circuit networks. It creates End-To-End circuit between single hosts, computer farms or networks with predictable performance characteristics, preserving QoS if supported in LAN and WAN and tied security policy allowing only specific traffic to be forwarded or received through created path. Lambda Station project also explores Network Awareness capabilities.

  13. Coincidence Exclusive Measurement of the Nonmesonic Weak Decay of {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M. J.; Ajimura, S.; Aoki, K.; Banu, A.; Bhang, H.; Fukuda, T.; Hashimoto, O.; Hwang, J. I.; Kameoka, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kim, E. H.; Kim, J. H.; Maruta, T.; Miura, Y.; Miyake, Y.; Nagae, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakamura, S. N.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.

    2006-07-11

    We have measured the angular correlation of the pair nucleons np and nn emitted from the nonmesonic weak decay (NMWD) of {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}C produced via the ({pi}+,K+) reaction in coincidence measurement. The {lambda}p {yields} np and {lambda}n {yields} nn modes were clearly identified by measuring the back-to-back correlation of the emitted nucleon pairs which is the characteristic of two-body kinematics. From the measured nucleon pair numbers Nnn and Nnp, the ratio {gamma}n/{gamma}p of the partial decay widths {gamma}n({lambda}n {yields} nn) and {gamma}p({lambda}p {yields} np) of {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}C was extracted to be 0.51 {+-} 0.13(stat){+-}0.04(syst); this result is almost free from the ambiguity due to the nuclear final state interaction and 3-body decay process, which were inherent in the previous results. The obtained {gamma}n/{gamma}p ratio of {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}C (p-shell) is close to that of {sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He (s-shell). The results are consistent with those of recent theoretical calculations.

  14. Plasmid-Controlled Variation in the Content of Methylated Bases in Bacteriophage Lambda Deoxyribonucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Hattman, Stanley

    1972-01-01

    The N6-methyladenine (MeAde) and 5-methylcytosine (MeC) contents in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of bacteriophage lambda has been analyzed as a function of host specificity. The following facts have emerged: (i) lambda grown on strains harboring the P1 prophage contain ca. 70 more MeAde residues/DNA molecule than lambda grown either in the P1-sensitive parent, or in a P1 immune-defective lysogen which does not confer P1 modification; (ii) lambda grown on strains harboring the N-3 drug-resistance factor contain ca. 60 more MeC residues/DNA molecule than lambda grown on the parental strain lacking the factor; (iii) lambda grown in Escherichia coli B strains is devoid of MeC, whereas lambda grown in a B (N-3) host contains a high level of MeC; (iv) the MeAde content in lambda DNA is not affected by the N-3 factor. These results suggest that P1 controls an adenine-specific DNA methylase, and that the N-3 plasmid controls a cytosine-specific DNA methylase. The N-3 factor has been observed previously to direct cytosine-specific methylation of phage P22 DNA and E. coli B DNA in vivo; in vitro studies presented here demonstrate this activity. PMID:4561202

  15. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  16. Measurement of the Branching Ratio Lambda_c+ -> p pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Hinojosa, Guillermo; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-03-01

    The confirmation of the Cabibbo-suppressed charm baryon decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is reported. All data analyzed are from SELEX, a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that took data during 1996 and 1997, mainly with a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratio of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to the Cabibbo-favored mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured to be: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.103 {+-} 0.022.

  17. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  18. Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katgert, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Abell clusters are the most conspicuous groupings of galaxies identified by George Abell on the plates of the first photographic survey made with the SCHMIDT TELESCOPE at Mount Palomar in the 1950s. Sometimes, the term Abell clusters is used as a synonym of nearby, optically selected galaxy clusters....

  19. Cosmology with EMSS Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Megan; Voit, G. Mark

    1999-01-01

    We use ASCA observations of the Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey sample of clusters of galaxies to construct the first z = 0.5 - 0.8 cluster temperature function. This distant cluster temperature function, when compared to local z approximately 0 and to a similar moderate redshift (z = 0.3 - 0.4) temperature function strongly constrains the matter density of the universe. Best fits to the distributions of temperatures and redshifts of these cluster samples results in Omega(sub M) = 0.45 +/- 0.1 if Lambda = 0 and Omega = 0.27 +/- 0.1 if Lambda + Omega(sub M) = 1. The uncertainties are 1sigma statistical. We examine the systematics of our approach and find that systematics, stemming mainly from model assumptions and not measurement errors, are about the same size as the statistical uncertainty +/- 0.1. In this poster proceedings, we clarify the issue of a8 as reported in our paper Donahue & Voit (1999), since this was a matter of discussion at the meeting.

  20. Search for R-parity violating supersymmetry via the LL anti-E couplings lambda(121), lambda(122) or lambda(133) in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-05-01

    A search for gaugino pair production with a trilepton signature in the framework of R-parity violating supersymmetry via the couplings {lambda}{sub 121}, {lambda}{sub 122}, or {lambda}{sub 133} is presented. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L {approx} 360 pb{sup -1}, were collected from April 2002 to August 2004 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This analysis considers final states with three charged leptons with the flavor combinations ee{ell}, {mu}{mu}{ell}, and ee{tau} ({ell} = e or {mu}). No evidence for supersymmetry is found and limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the gaugino pair production cross section and lower bounds on the masses of the lightest neutralino and chargino are derived in two supersymmetric models.

  1. Searches for the baryon- and lepton-number violating decays $B^0\\rightarrow\\Lambda_c^ \\ell^-$, $B^-\\rightarrow\\Lambda\\ell^-$, and $B^-\\rightarrow\\bar{\\Lambda}\\ell^-$

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /Milan U. /Milan U. /Milan U. /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-06-22

    Searches for B mesons decaying to final states containing a baryon and a lepton are performed, where the baryon is either {Lambda}{sub c} or {Lambda} and the lepton is a muon or an electron. These decays violate both baryon and lepton number and would be a signature of physics beyond the standard model. No significant signal is observed in any of the decay modes, and upper limits in the range (3.2 - 520) x 10{sup -8} are set on the branching fractions at the 90% confidence level.

  2. Recombination between bacteriophage lambda and plasmid pBR322 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Pogue-Geile, K L; Dassarma, S; King, S R; Jaskunas, S R

    1980-01-01

    Recombinant lambda phages were isolated that resulted from recombination between the lambda genome and plasmid pBR322 in Escherichia coli, even though these deoxyribonucleic acids (DNAs) did not share extensive regions of homology. The characterization of these recombinant DNAs by heteroduplex analysis and restriction endonucleases is described. All but one of the recombinants appeared to have resulted from reciprocal recombination between a site on lambda DNA and a site on the plasmid. In general, there were two classes of recombinants. One class appeared to have resulted from recombination at the phage attachment site that probably resulted from lambda integration into secondary attachment sites on the plasmid. Seven different secondary attachment sites on pBR322 were found. The other class resulted from plasmid integration at other sites that were widely scattered on the lambda genome. For this second class of recombinants, more than one site on the plasmid could recombine with lambda DNA. Thus, the recombination did not appear to be site specific with respect to lambda or the plasmid. Possible mechanisms for generating these recombinants are discussed. Images PMID:6247334

  3. Search for B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -} decay at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Y.; Iwabuchi, M.; Kim, Y. J.; Ozaki, H.; Kichimi, H.; Adachi, I.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Sakai, Y.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Takasaki, F.; Tanaka, M.; Uno, S.

    2008-03-01

    We search for the doubly charmed baryonic decay B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}, in a data sample of 520x10{sup 6} BB events accumulated at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We find no significant signal and set an upper limit of B(B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -})<6.2x10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level. The result is significantly below a naive extrapolation from B(B{sup -}{yields}{xi}{sub c}{sup 0}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}) assuming a simple Cabibbo-suppression factor of |V{sub cd}/V{sub cs}|{sup 2}. The small branching fraction may be attributed to a suppression due to the large momentum of the baryonic decay products, which has been observed in other charmed baryonic two-body B decays.

  4. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  5. Recombinant lambda-phage nanobioparticles for tumor therapy in mice models.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, Amir; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Gill, Pooria; Hassan, Zuhair; Jahromi, Soodeh Razeghi M; Roohvand, Farzin

    2010-01-01

    Lambda phages have considerable potential as gene delivery vehicles due to their genetic tractability, low cost, safety and physical characteristics in comparison to other nanocarriers and gene porters. Little is known concerning lambda phage-mediated gene transfer and expression in mammalian hosts. We therefore performed experiments to evaluate lambda-ZAP bacteriophage-mediated gene transfer and expression in vitro. For this purpose, we constructed recombinant lambda-phage nanobioparticles containing a mammalian expression cassette encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and E7 gene of human papillomavirus type 16 (lambda-HPV-16 E7) using Lambda ZAP- CMV XR vector. Four cell lines (COS-7, CHO, TC-1 and HEK-239) were transduced with the nanobioparticles. We also characterized the therapeutic anti-tumor effects of the recombinant lambda-HPV-16 E7 phage in C57BL/6 tumor mice model as a cancer vaccine. Obtained results showed that delivery and expression of these genes in fibroblastic cells (COS-7 and CHO) are more efficient than epithelial cells (TC-1 and HEK-239) using these nanobioparticles. Despite the same phage M.O.I entry, the internalizing titers of COS-7 and CHO cells were more than TC-1 and HEK-293 cells, respectively. Mice vaccinated with lambda-HPV-16 E7 are able to generate potent therapeutic antitumor effects against challenge with E7- expressing tumor cell line, TC-1 compared to group treated with the wild phage. The results demonstrated that the recombinant lambda-phages, due to their capabilities in transducing mammalian cells, can also be considered in design and construction of novel and safe phage-based nanomedicines. PMID:20459865

  6. Antiviral Effect of Interferon Lambda Against Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Lukacikova, Lubomira; Oveckova, Ingrid; Betakova, Tatiana; Laposova, Katarina; Polcicova, Katarina; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pastorek, Jaromir; Tomaskova, Jana

    2015-07-01

    Lambda interferons inhibit replication of many viruses, but their role in the inhibition of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection remains unclear. In this study, we examined the antiviral effects of interferon (IFN)-λ2 and IFN-λ3 against LCMV in A549 cells. We found that IFN-λ2 is a more potent inhibitor of LCMV strain MX compared with IFN-λ3, whereas both cytokines have similar antiviral effects against an immunosuppressive variant of LCMV, clone-13. We also demonstrated that the antiviral activity of IFN-λ2 is more effective if it is delivered early rather than after establishment of a long-term infection, suggesting that virus replication is only partially responsive to the cytokine. In agreement with this observation, we showed that LCMV infection significantly reduces IFNLR1 mRNA expression in infected cells. In addition, LCMV infection, to some extent, compromises the signal transduction pathway of IFN-λ2. This implies that IFN receptors as well as their downstream signaling components could be selectively targeted either directly by LCMV proteins or indirectly by cellular factor(s) that are induced or activated by LCMV infection.

  7. Scaling and resonances in elementary K{sup +{Lambda}} photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R. A.; Sargsian, M. M.

    2011-02-15

    Recent cross-section data for the reaction {gamma}+p{yields}K{sup +}+{Lambda} are examined for evidence of scaling in both the low-t Regge domain and in the high-{radical}(s) and -t domain where constituent counting may apply. It is shown that the reaction does scale in both regimes. At large center-of-mass angles, s{sup -7} scaling appears to hold at essentially all -t but with angle-dependent oscillations. The scaled data show particularly strong evidence for s-channel resonances for -t below 2 GeV{sup 2} and for W below about 2.3 GeV. The dominant contributions are consistent with an N{sup *}S{sub 11} resonance at 1690 MeV, a P{sub 13} resonance at 1920 MeV, and a D{sub 13} resonance at 2100 MeV, which interfere to give the observed strong angular dependence.

  8. Lambda and the edge of chaos in recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Seifter, Jared; Reggia, James A

    2015-01-01

    The idea that there is an edge of chaos, a region in the space of dynamical systems having special meaning for complex living entities, has a long history in artificial life. The significance of this region was first emphasized in cellular automata models when a single simple measure, λCA, identified it as a transitional region between order and chaos. Here we introduce a parameter λNN that is inspired by λCA but is defined for recurrent neural networks. We show through a series of systematic computational experiments that λNN generally orders the dynamical behaviors of randomly connected/weighted recurrent neural networks in the same way that λCA does for cellular automata. By extending this ordering to larger values of λNN than has typically been done with λCA and cellular automata, we find that a second edge-of-chaos region exists on the opposite side of the chaotic region. These basic results are found to hold under different assumptions about network connectivity, but vary substantially in their details. The results show that the basic concept underlying the lambda parameter can usefully be extended to other types of complex dynamical systems than just cellular automata.

  9. Clusters of galaxies: a cosmological probe.

    PubMed

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2002-09-15

    The constraints on cosmological parameters presently obtained and those that can be obtained from X-ray cluster surveys are presented. Extremely strong bounds on the values of Omega, Lambda, sigma(8) and the power spectrum of fluctuations, as well as constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, can be determined. Recent Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics and XMM results on the chemical composition of clusters show that the Fe abundance is not universal, but is correlated with cluster mass and central gas density. The Si, S and Fe abundances do not resemble those seen in Milky Way Halo stars or those in the Lyman-limit galaxies. The XMM RGS abundances for gas in elliptical galaxies are subsolar and the abundance pattern is not alpha-element rich, in contradiction with all models of elliptical-galaxy gas abundances. PMID:12804244

  10. Clusters of galaxies: a cosmological probe.

    PubMed

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2002-09-15

    The constraints on cosmological parameters presently obtained and those that can be obtained from X-ray cluster surveys are presented. Extremely strong bounds on the values of Omega, Lambda, sigma(8) and the power spectrum of fluctuations, as well as constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, can be determined. Recent Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics and XMM results on the chemical composition of clusters show that the Fe abundance is not universal, but is correlated with cluster mass and central gas density. The Si, S and Fe abundances do not resemble those seen in Milky Way Halo stars or those in the Lyman-limit galaxies. The XMM RGS abundances for gas in elliptical galaxies are subsolar and the abundance pattern is not alpha-element rich, in contradiction with all models of elliptical-galaxy gas abundances.

  11. High accuracy heat capacity measurements through the lambda transition of helium with very high temperature resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, W. M.; Lipa, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement of the heat capacity singularity of helium at the lambda transition was performed with the aim of improving tests of the Renormalization Group (RG) predictions for the static thermodynamic behavior near the singularity. The goal was to approach as closely as possible to the lambda-point while making heat capacity measurements of high accuracy. To do this, a new temperature sensor capable of unprecedented resolution near the lambda-point, and two thermal control systems were used. A short description of the theoretical background and motivation is given. The initial apparatus and results are also described.

  12. Cloning and sequencing of human lambda immunoglobulin genes by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Songsivilai, S; Bye, J M; Marks, J D; Hughes-Jones, N C

    1990-12-01

    Universal oligonucleotide primers, designed for amplifying and sequencing genes encoding the rearranged human lambda immunoglobulin variable region, were validated by amplification of the lambda light chain genes from four human heterohybridoma cell lines and in the generation of a cDNA library of human V lambda sequences from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human peripheral blood lymphocytes. This technique allows rapid cloning and sequencing of human immunoglobulin genes, and has potential applications in the rescue of unstable human antibody-producing cell lines and in the production of human monoclonal antibodies.

  13. High Resolution Spectroscopy of {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}B by Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Iodice, M.; Cusanno, F.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Acha, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Coman, L.; Markowitz, P.; Moteabbed, M.; Raue, B.; Reinhold, J.; Aniol, K. A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Baturin, P.; Jiang, X.; McCormick, K.; Bertin, P. Y.; Camsonne, A.; Ferdi, C.; Blomqvist, K. I.

    2007-08-03

    An experiment measuring electroproduction of hypernuclei has been performed in hall A at Jefferson Lab on a {sup 12}C target. In order to increase counting rates and provide unambiguous kaon identification two superconducting septum magnets and a ring imaging Cherenkov detector were added to the hall A standard equipment. An unprecedented energy resolution of less than 700 keV FWHM has been achieved. Thus, the observed {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}B spectrum shows for the first time identifiable strength in the core-excited region between the ground-state s-wave {lambda} peak and the 11 MeV p-wave {lambda} peak.

  14. A Photometric Catalog of Herbig AE/BE Stars and Discussion of the Nature and Cause of the Variations of UX Orionis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, W.; Shevchenko, V. S.

    1999-08-01

    UBVR photometric monitoring of Herbig Ae/Be stars and some related objects has been carried out at Maidanak Observatory in Uzbekistan since 1983. More than 71,000 observations of about 230 stars have been obtained and are made available for anonymous ftp. Virtually all Herbig Ae/Be stars observed are irregular variables (called ``UXors'' after UX Ori), but there is a wide range of amplitudes from barely detectable to more than 4 mag in V. Our data confirm the results of previous studies, which indicate that large-amplitude variability is confined to stars with spectral types later than B8. The distribution of variability ranges is quite similar to what is seen in classical T Tauri stars. A careful search has failed to reveal any evidence for periodic variations up to 30 days, which can be interpreted as rotation periods. This is a clear distinction between the light variations of low-mass and high-mass pre-main-sequence stars. The Herbig Ae/Be stars evidently do not possess either the large, stable cool spots or persistent hot spots associated with strong surface magnetic fields and magnetically funneled accretion in classical T Tauri stars. A wide variety of shapes, timescales, and amplitudes exists, but the most common behavior is well illustrated by the light curve of LkHα 234. There are two principal components: (1) irregular variations on timescales of days around a mean brightness level that changes on a much longer timescale (typically years), sometimes in a quasi-cyclic fashion, and (2) occasional episodes of deep minima, occurring at irregular intervals but more frequently near the low points of the brightness cycles. Our data suggest that many T Tauri stars of K0 and earlier spectral type share the same variability characteristics as Herbig Ae/Be stars and should be regarded as UXors. Two FU Orionis stars (``FUors''), FU Ori and V1515 Cyg, also have recent light curves that are similar, in some respects, to UXors. The most developed model to account for

  15. Determination of the {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} handedness using nonleptonic {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, B.; Koerner, J.G.; Kraemer, M.

    1994-03-01

    We consider possibilities to determine the handedness of {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} current transitions using semileptonic baryonic {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sub {ital c}} transitions. We propose to analyze the longitudinal polarization of the daughter baryon {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} by using momentum-spin correlation measurements in the form of forward-backward (FB) asymmetry measures involving its nonleptonic decay products. We use an explicit form factor model to determine the longitudinal polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} in the semileptonic decay {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sub {ital c}}+{ital l}{sup {minus}}+{bar {nu}}{sub {ital l}}. The mean longitudinal polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} is negative (positive) for left-chiral (right-chiral) {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} current transitions. The frame-dependent longitudinal polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} is large ({congruent}80%) in the {Lambda}{sub {ital b}} rest frame and somewhat smaller (30%--40%) in the lab frame when the {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}`s are produced on the {ital Z}{sup 0} peak. We suggest to use nonleptonic decay modes of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} to analyze its polarization and thereby to determine the chirality of the {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} transition. Since {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}`s produced on the {ital Z}{sup 0} are expected to be polarized we discuss issues of the polarization transfer in {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sub {ital c}} transitions. We also investigate the {ital p}{sub {perpendicular}}- and {ital p}-cut sensitivity of our predictions for the polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}}.

  16. Aberrant immunity behaviour of hybrid lambda imm21 phages containing the DNA of ColE1-type plasmids.

    PubMed

    Windass, J D; Brammar, W J

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid lambda and lambda imm21 bacteriophages carrying various ColE1-type plasmids have been constructed in vitro. The lambda imm21/plasmid recombinants display aberrant immunity behaviour, giving clear plaques under conditions where the parental phages give turbid ones and being able to grow on homoimmune lysogens. lambda imm lambda/plasmid recombinants show no such unusual behaviour. Studies with hybrids of a lambda imm21 cITS phage carrying pMB9 DNA showed the operation of the plasmid's replication system to be the basic cause of the aberrant immunity behaviour. The plasmid replication system could act as a complete alternative to the phage system during vegetative phage growth. The probable reason that lambda imm21 phages show such altered phenotypes when carrying a functional plasmid replication origin, whereas lambda imm lambda and lambda imm434 (Mukai et al., 1978) phages do not, is the relative ease of titration of the phage 21 repressor to allow transcription from pR21. Various uses are considered for the altered phenotypic behaviour of lambda imm21/ColE1-type plasmid hybrids.

  17. Continuous resonant four-wave mixing in double- Lambda level configurations of Na2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, S.; Hinze, U.; Tiemann, E.; Wellegehausen, B.

    1996-08-01

    Efficient continuous resonant frequency mixing omega 4= omega 1- omega 2 + omega 3 in Na2 has been realized. A bichromatic field ( lambda 1 =488 nm, lambda 2=525 nm), generated by an Ar+ -laser-pumped Na 2 Raman laser, and radiation at lambda 3=655 nm from a dye laser interact resonantly with corresponding transitions X1 Sigma +g(v=3,J= 43) \\rightarrow B 1 Pi u(6,43) \\rightarrow X 1 Sigma +g(13, 43) \\rightarrow A 1 Sigma +g(24, 44) in a test Na2 heat pipe. For input powers of 200, 25, and 400 mW an output beam of as much as 0.2 mW at lambda 4=599 nm has been observed. Measured parameter dependences indicate an influence of interference effects. This is directly related to the discussion of lasing without inversion.

  18. Evidence for B Semileptonic Decays into the Lambda_c Charm Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-11-05

    We present the first evidence for B semileptonic decays into the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} based on 420 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. Events are tagged by fully reconstructing one of the B mesons in a hadronic decay mode. We measure the relative branching fraction {Beta}({bar B} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}/{bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -}X) = (3.2 {+-} 0.9{sub stat.} {+-} 0.9{sub syst.})%. The significance of the signal including the systematic uncertainty is 4.9 standard deviations.

  19. lambda. production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Baringer, P.; Beltrami, I.; Bylsma, B.G.; DeBonte, R.; Koltick, D.; Loeffler, F.J.; Low, E.H.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.

    1986-05-01

    This paper presents measurements of the inclusive production cross sections of ..lambda.. baryons in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 256 pb/sup -1/ collected with the High Resolution Spectrometer at PEP. Comparisons are made to the predictions of the Lund model. The data are well described using a strange diquark suppression parameter, (us/ud)/(s/d), of 0.89 +- 0.10/sub -0.16//sup +0.56/, and the measured ..lambda../sub c/ ..-->.. ..lambda.. + X branching ratio of 23 +- 10%. No polarization is observed in the ..lambda.. decays. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Electromagnetic Decay of the $\\Sigma^{0}(1385)$ to $\\Lambda\\gamma$

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Dustin; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moscov; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, J P; Ball, Jacques; Battaglieri, Marco; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bennett, Robert; Biselli, Angela; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, Wilbert; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Daniel, AJI; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Dey, Biplap; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; Egiyan, Hovanes; El Alaoui, Ahmed; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Fegan, Stuart; Forest, Tony; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Gohn, Wesley; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Guidal, Michel; Guegan, Baptiste; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Isupov, Evgeny; Jawalkar, Sucheta; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Khetarpal, Puneet; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Konczykowski, Piotr; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; McAndrew, Josephine; KcKinnon, Bryan; Meyer, Curtis; Micherdzinska, Anna; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrison, Brian; Moutarde, Herve; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Ni, Andrey; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, Kijun; Park, Sungkyun; Pasyuk, Eugene; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Pereira, Sergio; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Raue, Brian; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Seraydaryan, Heghine; Sharabian, Youri; Smith, Elton; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Taylor, Charles; Vernarsky, Brian; Vineyard, Michael; Voutier, Eric; Weinstein, Lawrence; Watts, Daniel; Wood, Michael; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2011-04-01

    The electromagnetic decay $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda \\gamma$ was studied using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a proton target, producing an exclusive final state of $K^+\\Sigma^{*0}$. We report the decay widths ratio $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda\\gamma$/ $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda\\pi^0$ = $1.42 \\pm 0.12(\\text{stat})_{-0.07}^{+0.11}(\\text{sys})$%. This ratio is larger than most theoretical predictions by factors ranging from 1.5-3, but is consistent with the only other experimental measurement. From the reported ratio we calculate the partial width and electromagnetic transition magnetic moment for $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda\\gamma$.

  1. Observation of B{sup -}{yields}p{Lambda}D{sup 0} at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Wang, M.-Z.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Liu, Y.; Shiu, J.-G.; Adachi, I.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Sakai, Y.; Uehara, S.; Uno, S.

    2011-10-01

    We study B{sup -} meson decays to p{Lambda}D{sup (*)0} final states using a sample of 657x10{sup 6}BB events collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The observed branching fraction for B{sup -}{yields}p{Lambda}D{sup 0} is (1.43{sub -0.25}{sup +0.28}{+-}0.18)x10{sup -5} with a significance of 8.1 standard deviations, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. Most of the signal events have the p{Lambda} mass peaking near threshold. No significant signal is observed for B{sup -}{yields}p{Lambda}D{sup *0} and the corresponding upper limit on the branching fraction is 4.8x10{sup -5} at the 90% confidence level.

  2. Constraints on the Energy Content of the Universe from a Combination of Galaxy Cluster Observables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; Haiman, Zoltan; Birkinshaw, Mark; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that constraints on cosmological parameters from the distribution of clusters as a function of redshift (dN/dz) are complementary to accurate angular diameter distance (D(sub A)) measurements to clusters, and their combination significantly tightens constraints on the energy density content of the Universe. The number counts can be obtained from X-ray and/or SZ (Sunyaev-Ze'dovich effect) surveys, and the angular diameter distances can be determined from deep observations of the intra-cluster gas using their thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission and the SZ effect. We combine constraints from simulated cluster number counts expected from a 12 deg(sup 2) SZ cluster survey and constraints from simulated angular diameter distance measurements based on the X-ray/SZ method assuming a statistical accuracy of 10% in the angular diameter distance determination of 100 clusters with redshifts less than 1.5. We find that Omega(sub m), can be determined within about 25%, Omega(sub lambda) within 20% and w within 16%. We show that combined dN/dz+(sub lambda) constraints can be used to constrain the different energy densities in the Universe even in the presence of a few percent redshift dependent systematic error in D(sub lambda). We also address the question of how best to select clusters of galaxies for accurate diameter distance determinations. We show that the joint dN/dz+ D(lambda) constraints on cosmological parameters for a fixed target accuracy in the energy density parameters are optimized by selecting clusters with redshift upper cut-offs in the range 0.55 approx. less than 1. Subject headings: cosmological parameters - cosmology: theory - galaxies:clusters: general

  3. The First Generation of Stars in Lambda-CDM Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Liang; Abel, T.; Frenk, C.S.; Jenkins, A.; Springel, V.; Yoshida, N.; /Nagoya U.

    2006-10-10

    We have performed a large set of high-resolution cosmological simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to study the formation of the first luminous objects in the {Lambda}CDM cosmology. We follow the collapse of primordial gas clouds in eight early structures and document the scatter in the properties of the first star-forming clouds. Our first objects span formation redshifts from z {approx} 10 to z {approx} 50 and cover an order of magnitude in halo mass. We find that the physical properties of the central star-forming clouds are very similar in all of the simulated objects despite significant differences in formation redshift and environment. This suggests that the formation path of the first stars is largely independent of the collapse redshift; the physical properties of the clouds have little correlation with spin, mass, or assembly history of the host halo. The collapse of proto-stellar objects at higher redshifts progresses much more rapidly due to the higher densities, which accelerates the formation of molecular hydrogen, enhances initial cooling and shortens the dynamical timescales. The mass of the star-forming clouds cover a broad range, from a few hundred to a few thousand solar masses, and exhibit various morphologies: some have disk-like structures which are nearly rotational supported; others form flattened spheroids; still others form bars. All of them develop a single protostellar ''seed'' which does not fragment into multiple objects up to the moment that the central gas becomes optically thick to H{sub 2} cooling lines. At this time, the instantaneous mass accretion rate onto the centre varies significantly from object to object, with disk-like structures having the smallest mass accretion rates. The formation epoch and properties of the star-forming clouds are sensitive to the values of cosmological parameters.

  4. Spectroscopic studies on lambda cro protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, C; Kidokoro, S; Takimoto, M; Kyogoku, Y; Wada, A

    1991-06-20

    Spectroscopic (circular dichroism and fluorescence) and thermodynamic studies were conducted on lambda Cro-DNA interactions. Some base substitutions were introduced to the operator and the effects on the conformation of the complex and thermodynamic parameters for dissociation of the complex were examined. It was found that, (1) in the specific binding of Cro with DNA which has a (pseudo) consensus sequence, DNA is overwound, while in non-specific binding it is unchanged, or rather unwound; (2) substitution of central base-pairs or the introduction of a mismatched base-pair at the center of the operator reduces the extent of DNA conformational change on Cro binding and lessens the stability of the Cro-DNA complex, even though there is apparently no direct interaction between Cro and DNA at these positions; (3) stability of the complex increases with the degree of DNA conformational change of the same type during binding; (4) in some cases of specific binding, there are three states in the dissociation of the complex as observed by salt titration: two conformational states for the complex depending on salt concentration and, in non-specific binding, dissociation is a two-state transition; (5) the number of ions involved in interactions between Cro and 17 base-pair DNA is about 7.7 for NaCl titrations; (6) dissociation free energy prediction of the Cro-DNA complex by simple addition of the dissociation free energy change of a single base-pair substitution agrees with our experimental results when DNA overwinding occurs during binding, i.e. in specific binding.

  5. Structure and diversity of Mexican axolotl lambda light chains.

    PubMed

    André, S; Guillet, F; Charlemagne, J; Fellah, J S

    2000-11-01

    We report here the structure of cDNA clones encoding axolotl light chains of the lambda type. A single IGLC gene and eight different potential IGLV genes belonging to four different families were detected. The axolotl Cgamma domain has several residues or stretches of residues that are typically conserved in mammalian, avian, and Xenopus Cgamma, but the KATLVCL stretch, which is well conserved in the Cgamma and T-cell receptor Cbeta domains of many vertebrate species, is not well conserved. All axolotl Vgamma sequences closely match several human and Xenopus Vgamma-like sequences and, although the axolotl Cgamma and Vgamma sequences are very like their tetrapod homologues, they are not closely related to nontetrapod L chains. Southern blot experiments suggested the presence of a single IGLC gene and of a limited number of IGLV genes, and analysis of IGLV-J junctions clearly indicated that at least three of the IGLJ segments can associate with IGLV1, IGLV2, or IGLV3 subgroup genes. The overall diversity of the axolotl Vgamma CDR3 junctions seems to be of the same order as that of mammalian Vgamma chains. However, a single IGLV4 segment was found among the 45 cDNAs analyzed. This suggests that the axolotl IGL locus may have a canonical tandem structure, like the mammalian IGK or IGH loci. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting, and microsequencing experiments strongly suggested that most, if not all L chains are of the gamma type. This may explain in part the poor humoral response of the axolotl. PMID:11132150

  6. Lambda and Antilambda Polarization in Proton-Proton Interactions from Sqrt. S = 31 TO 62 GEV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Peter

    This thesis presents measurements of Lambda^0, |Lambda ^0, and Sigma^0 production made using experiment R608 at the CERN ISR. The Lambda^0 cross sections have been measured in the range 0.20 < x _{rm F}< 0.96 and for p _{rm t} up to 2.2 GeV/c. The invariant cross section, E*d^3sigma /dp^3, is presented in x _{rm F} bins, plotted against p_{rm t}^2 . The function Aexp(-(bp _{rm t}^2 + cp _{rm t}^4)) was found to be a good fit to the data. The cross section was integrated with respect to p_{rm t} ^2 to obtain the x_{ rm F} dependence. The Lambda ^0 shows a rapid fall-off with x _{rm F} up to x_ {rm F}~ 0.4, and thereafter exhibits a small decline to zero at x_{ rm F}~ 1, as is typical for baryons produced in proton fragmentation processes. The |Lambda^0 cross section was measured in the region 0.2 < x_{rm F}< 0.5. The invariant cross section was found to be well described by the function Aexp(-bp _{rm t}^2). Unlike the Lambda^0, the |Lambda^0 cross section falls rapidly with x_{rm F}. The Sigma^0 cross section was measured in the region 0.5 < p_{rm t}< 1.2 GeV/c and 0.3 < x_{rm F}< 0.7. In this region, the Lambda ^0/Sigma^0 ratio is 0.376 +/- 0.044. The Sigma^0 is thus the dominant contributor to non-direct Lambda^0 production. The Lambda^0 polarization was measured as function of surds for 31 Lambda ^0 polarization was measured, and was found to be 3.8 +/- 1.5%.

  7. FY04 IRAD-funded GSFC Lambda Network (L-Net) Web Pages and Related Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, J. Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This presentation discusses the advances in Networking Technology combining the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) cooperation with the National Lambda Rail (NLR) implementation. It also focuses on New NASA science needing Gigbit per second networks (Gbps) with coordinated Earth Observing Program, hurricane predictions, global aerosols, remote viewing and manipulation of large Earth Science Data Sets, integration of laser and radar topographic data with land cover data.

  8. Properties of the bound {Lambda}({Sigma}){ital NN} system and hyperon-nucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, K.; Kamada, H.; Gloeckle, W.; Stoks, V.

    1995-06-01

    The Faddeev equations for the hypertriton are solved precisely using the Nijmegen hyperon-nucleon and realistic {ital NN} interactions. The hypertriton turns out to be bound at the experimental value. Thereby the {Lambda}-{Sigma} conversion is crucial. States of the {Lambda}({Sigma}){ital NN} system with quantum numbers ({ital T},{ital J}) different from (0,1/2) are not bound. We visualized properties of the hypertriton wave function in various ways.

  9. A cII-dependent promoter is located within the Q gene of bacteriophage lambda.

    PubMed

    Hoopes, B C; McClure, W R

    1985-05-01

    We have found a cII-dependent promoter, PaQ, within the Q gene of bacteriophage lambda. Transcription experiments and abortive initiation assays performed in vitro showed that the promoter strength and the cII affinity of PaQ were comparable to the other cII-dependent lambda promoters, PE and PI. The location and leftward direction of PaQ suggests a possible role in the delay of lambda late-gene expression by cII protein, a phenomenon that has been called cII-dependent inhibition. We have constructed a promoter down mutation, paq-1, by changing a single base pair in the putative cII binding site of the promoter by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis. The paq-1 mutant promoter required about 4-fold higher cII concentrations for maximal activation compared to the wild-type PaQ. We tested the hypothesis that PaQ is responsible in part for the delay of lambda late-gene expression by recombining the paq-1 mutation into a phage showing severe cII-dependent inhibition. We found that the paq-1 mutation relieved the cII-dependent growth defect of this phage. The paq-1 mutation (in combination with lambda cI857) resulted in a clear-plaque phenotype at the permissive temperature of 32 degrees C. The role of the PaQ-initiated antisense transcript in the control of lambda development is discussed.

  10. A SURVEY FOR PLANETARY NEBULAE IN M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jacoby, George H.; De Marco, Orsola; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Davies, James E.; Kaplan, Evan E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.edu E-mail: mglee@astrog.snu.ac.kr E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: evanskaplan@gmail.com

    2013-05-20

    We report the results of an [O III] {lambda}5007 spectroscopic survey for planetary nebulae (PNe) located within the star clusters of M31. By examining R {approx} 5000 spectra taken with the WIYN+Hydra spectrograph, we identify 3 PN candidates in a sample of 274 likely globular clusters, 2 candidates in objects which may be globular clusters, and 5 candidates in a set of 85 younger systems. The possible PNe are all faint, between {approx}2.5 and {approx}6.8 mag down the PN luminosity function, and, partly as a consequence of our selection criteria, have high excitation, with [O III] {lambda}5007 to H{beta} ratios ranging from 2 to {approx}> 12. We discuss the individual candidates, their likelihood of cluster membership, and the possibility that they were formed via binary interactions within the clusters. Our data are consistent with the suggestion that PN formation within globular clusters correlates with binary encounter frequency, though, due to the small numbers and large uncertainties in the candidate list, this study does not provide sufficient evidence to confirm the hypothesis.

  11. EVIDENCE FOR RAPID REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF STRONG CLUSTER COOLING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Samuele, R.; McNamara, B. R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Mullis, C. R.

    2011-04-10

    We present equivalent widths of the [O II]{lambda}3727 and H{alpha} nebular emission lines for 77 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) selected from the 160 Square Degree ROSAT X-ray survey. We find no [O II]{lambda}3727 or H{alpha} emission stronger than -15 A or -5 A, respectively, in any BCG. The corresponding emission-line luminosities lie below L {approx} 6 x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, which is a factor of 30 below that of NGC 1275 in the Perseus Cluster. A comparison to the detection frequency of nebular emission in BCGs at z {approx}< 0.35 drawn from the Brightest Cluster Survey indicates that we should have detected roughly one dozen emission-line galaxies, assuming that the two surveys are selecting similar clusters in the X-ray luminosity range 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} to 5 x 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. The absence of luminous nebular emission (i.e., Perseus-like systems) in our sample is consistent with an increase in the number density of strong cooling flow (cooling core) clusters between z = 0.5 and today. The decline in their numbers at higher redshift could be due to cluster mergers and heating by active galactic nuclei.

  12. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  13. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  14. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  15. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  16. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Catherine L.; Laffy, Julie M. J.; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O’Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response. PMID:27729912

  17. RAMAN SCATTERED He II {lambda}4332 IN THE SYMBIOTIC STAR V1016 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee-Won

    2012-05-10

    Raman scattering of He II line photons with atomic hydrogen is important in studying the mass loss processes in many symbiotic stars and a number of young planetary nebulae. We calculate the scattering cross sections and branching ratios associated with the Raman scattered He II {lambda}4332 feature formed through inelastic scattering of He II {lambda}949 with a hydrogen atom. At the line center of He II {lambda}949, the total scattering cross section is computed to be {sigma}{sub tot} = 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -22} cm{sup 2}, and the branching ratio into the level 2s is 0.12. We also present a high-resolution spectrum of the symbiotic star V1016 Cygni obtained with the 1.8 m telescope at Mt. Bohyun to investigate the Raman scattering origin of the broad feature blueward of He II {lambda}4338. Based on the atomic calculation, we perform Monte Carlo calculations for the line formation. The scattering region is assumed to be a part of a uniform spherical shell that subtends a solid angle {Delta}{Omega} = {pi} steradian with a neutral column density N{sub HI} = 1.0 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. By adding a far-UV continuum around He II {lambda}949 normalized by the equivalent width of He II {lambda}949 to be 2.3 Angstrom-Sign , we obtain a good fit for both the Raman scattered He II {lambda}4332 and the broad wings around H{gamma}. Our analysis of the Raman feature blueward of H{gamma} in V1016 Cyg is consistent with the previous study of the Raman features blueward of H{alpha} and H{beta} by Jung and Lee.

  18. Measure of clustering in continuum percolation: Computer-simulation of the two-point cluster function

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. B.; Torquato, S.

    1989-07-15

    The two-point cluster function /ital C//sub 2/(/bold r//sub 1/,/bold r//sub 2/) is determined for a /ital D/-dimensional interpenetrable-sphere continuum model from Monte Carlo simulations. /ital C//sub 2/(/bold r//sub 1/,/bold r//sub 2/) gives the probability of finding two points, at positions /bold r//sub 1/ and /bold r//sub 2/, in the same cluster of particles, and thus provides a measure of clustering in continuum-percolation systems. A pair of particles are said to be ''connected'' when they overlap. Results are reported for /ital D/=1,2, and 3 at selected values of the sphere number density /rho/ and of the impenetrability index lambda, 0less than or equal tolambdaless than or equal to1. The extreme limits lambda=0 and 1 correspond, respectively, to the cases of fully penetrable spheres (''Swiss-cheese'' model) and totally impenetrable spheres.

  19. The C4 clustering algorithm: Clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert; Reichart, Dan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Annis, James; McKay, Timothy; Bahcall, Neta; Bernardi, Mariangela; Boehringer, Hans; Connolly, Andrew; Goto, Tomo; Kniazev, Alexie; Lamb, Donald; Postman, Marc; Schneider, Donald; Sheth, Ravi; Voges, Wolfgang; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Portsmouth U., ICG /North Carolina U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI /Michigan U. /Fermilab /Princeton U. Observ. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Pittsburgh U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Penn State U. /Chicago U. /Stavropol, Astrophys. Observ. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron. /INI, SAO

    2005-03-01

    We present the ''C4 Cluster Catalog'', a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster-finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects that have plagued previous optical cluster selection. The present C4 catalog covers {approx}2600 square degrees of sky and ranges in redshift from z = 0.02 to z = 0.17. The mean cluster membership is 36 galaxies (with redshifts) brighter than r = 17.7, but the catalog includes a range of systems, from groups containing 10 members to massive clusters with over 200 cluster members with redshifts. The catalog provides a large number of measured cluster properties including sky location, mean redshift, galaxy membership, summed r-band optical luminosity (L{sub r}), velocity dispersion, as well as quantitative measures of substructure and the surrounding large-scale environment. We use new, multi-color mock SDSS galaxy catalogs, empirically constructed from the {Lambda}CDM Hubble Volume (HV) Sky Survey output, to investigate the sensitivity of the C4 catalog to the various algorithm parameters (detection threshold, choice of passbands and search aperture), as well as to quantify the purity and completeness of the C4 cluster catalog. These mock catalogs indicate that the C4 catalog is {approx_equal}90% complete and 95% pure above M{sub 200} = 1 x 10{sup 14} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} and within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the SDSS DR2 data, we show that the C4 algorithm finds 98% of X-ray identified clusters and 90% of Abell clusters within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the mock galaxy catalogs and the full HV dark matter simulations, we show that the L{sub r} of a cluster is a more robust estimator of the halo mass (M{sub 200}) than the galaxy line-of-sight velocity dispersion or the richness of the cluster. However, if we

  20. FUSE Observations of Warm Gas in the Cooling Flow Clusters A1795 and A2597

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, W. R.; Cowie, L.; Davidsen, A.; Hu, E.; Hutchings, J.; Murphy, E.; Sembach, K.; Woodgate, B.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present far-ultraviolet spectroscopy of the cores of the massive cooling flow clusters Abell 1795 and 2597 obtained with FUSE. As the intracluster gas cools through 3 x 10(exp 5)K, it should emit strongly in the O VI lambda(lambda)1032,1038 resonance lines. We report the detection of O VI (lambda)1032 emission in A2597, with a line flux of 1.35 +/- 0.35 x 10(exp -15) erg/sq cm s, as well as detection of emission from C III (lambda)977. A marginal detection of C III (lambda)977 emission is also reported for A1795. These observations provide evidence for a direct link between the hot (10(exp 7) K) cooling flow gas and the cool (10(exp 4) K) gas in the optical emission line filaments. Assuming simple cooling flow models, the O VI line flux in A2597 corresponds to a mass deposition rate of approx. 40 solar mass /yr within the central 36 kpc. Emission from O VI (lambda)1032 was not detected in A1795, with an upper limit of 1.5 x 10(exp -15) erg/sq cm s, corresponding to a limit on the mass cooling flow rate of M(28 kpc) less than 28M solar mass/ yr. We have considered several explanations for the lack of detection of O VI emission in A1795 and the weaker than expected flux in A2597, including extinction by dust in the outer cluster, and quenching of thermal conduction by magnetic fields. We conclude that a turbulent mixing model, with some dust extinction, could explain our O VI results while also accounting for the puzzling lack of emission by Fe(sub XVII) in cluster cooling flows.

  1. Partial FI gene-independence of lambda-21 hybrid phages specifying chimeric terminases.

    PubMed

    Feiss, M; Frackman, S; Momany, T

    1988-11-01

    The role of the FI gene in the life cycles of a series of lambda-21 hybrid phages that produce chimeric lambda-21 terminases has been examined. An isogenic series of FI+ and FI- derivatives of the hybrids was constructed, and the growth properties of the phages were examined. It was found that three of the four hybrids (hybrids 51, 67, and 33) are able to form plaques and produce a small burst in the absence of the FI gene product (gpFI), but each of the three phages is much healthier in the presence of gpFI. It is concluded that each of the three chimeric terminases is dependent on gpFI. The ability of the FI- hybrids to grow better than lambda FI- is postulated to be due to a minor qualitative or quantitative difference between the chimeric terminases and lambda terminase. The fourth hybrid (54), known from earlier work to produce an infirm terminase, is more dependent on gpFI than the other hybrids and lambda itself. PMID:2973176

  2. Dual resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin and dicrotophos in Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Paulo R R; Michaud, J P; Rodrigues, Agna R S; Torres, Jorge B

    2016-09-01

    Insecticide resistance is usually associated with pests, but may also evolve in natural enemies. In this study, adult beetles of three distinct North American populations of Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, and the progeny of reciprocal crosses between the resistant and most susceptible population, were treated topically with varying concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin and dicrotophos. In addition, the LD50s of both insecticides were applied in combination to resistant individuals. The developmental and reproductive performance of each population was assessed in the absence of insecticide exposure to compare baseline fitness. California and Kansas populations were susceptible to both materials, whereas Georgia (GA) beetles exhibited a resistance ratio (RR50) of 158 to lambda-cyhalothrin and 530 to dicrotophos. Inheritance of lambda-cyhalothrin resistance was X-linked, whereas inheritance of dicrotophos resistance was autosomal. Mortality of resistant beetles treated with a mixture of LD50s of both materials was twice that of those treated with lambda-cyhalothrin alone, but not significantly different from those receiving dicrotophos alone. Life history parameters were largely similar among populations, except that Georgia beetles had higher egg fertility relative to susceptible populations. We conclude that the high levels of resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin and dicrotophos in Georgia beetles reflect heavy loads of these insecticides in local environments, most likely the large acreage under intensive cotton cultivation. PMID:27266835

  3. Lambda Station: Alternate network path forwarding for production SciDAC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; DeMar, Phil; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Moibenko, Alexander; Petravick, Don; Newman, Harvey; Steenberg, Conrad; Thomas, Michael; /Caltech

    2007-09-01

    The LHC era will start very soon, creating immense data volumes capable of demanding allocation of an entire network circuit for task-driven applications. Circuit-based alternate network paths are one solution to meeting the LHC high bandwidth network requirements. The Lambda Station project is aimed at addressing growing requirements for dynamic allocation of alternate network paths. Lambda Station facilitates the rerouting of designated traffic through site LAN infrastructure onto so-called 'high-impact' wide-area networks. The prototype Lambda Station developed with Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach in mind will be presented. Lambda Station has been successfully integrated into the production version of the Storage Resource Manager (SRM), and deployed at US CMS Tier1 center at Fermilab, as well as at US-CMS Tier-2 site at Caltech. This paper will discuss experiences using the prototype system with production SciDAC applications for data movement between Fermilab and Caltech. The architecture and design principles of the production version Lambda Station software, currently being implemented as Java based web services, will also be presented in this paper.

  4. Control of bacteriophage lambda CII activity by bacteriophage and host functions.

    PubMed Central

    Rattray, A; Altuvia, S; Mahajna, G; Oppenheim, A B; Gottesman, M

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the regulation of the lambda cII gene in vivo using cloned lambda fragments. Lambda N protein stimulated cII expression. Surprisingly, although very high cII protein levels were detected by gel electrophoresis, little cII protein activity, measured as stimulation of the lambda pI and pE promoters, was observed. The half-life of cII protein depended critically on its initial level. At low concentrations its half-life was as short as 1.5 min, whereas at high cII protein levels, it could be as long as 22 min. The Escherichia coli mutant ER437 directs lambda towards lysogeny; cII protein was more stable in this strain than in the wild type. On the other hand, although cyclic AMP is required for efficient lysogeny, it did not appear to influence the synthesis, stability, or activity of cII protein. Images PMID:6330032

  5. Proposal and demonstration of lambda-based internet exchange (IX) point using GMPLS protocols and photonic cross-connect (PXC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuritani, Takehiro; Okamoto, Shuichi; Ogino, Nagao; Otani, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2004-10-01

    This paper proposes an architecture of a next-generation Internet eXchange (IX) based on the Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) technologies and the photonic cross-connect (PXC), hereafter referred to a Lambda-IX. At first, we investigate a basic Lambda-IX model where the PXC provides a GMPLS-controlled lambda label-switched path (LSP) to interconnect different ISPs' border routers. We verify that the proposed Lambda-IX model can achieve the lambda-based and resilient interconnection for the ISPs, thanks to the PXC's bit-rate insensitive operation as well as fast restoration operation. In addition, once GMPLS functionalities are introduced on the border routers as well as the PXC, very flexible interconnection can be achieved such as demand-based creation and deletion of lambda LSPs. Next, we initiatively demonstrate an experimental Lambda-IX using a PXC and IP/MPLS routers. A Lambda-LSP with OC-192 bandwidth can be successfully created by using the GMPLS RSVP-TE signaling protocol via a control plane, and an EGP session of Border Gateway Protocol 4 (BGP-4) can be established over the Lambda-LSP created between the GMPLS-enabled border routers via a data plane. We also evaluate the fault recovery operation in the case where such Lambda-IXs are consisted of several PXCs and demonstrate that the Lambda-LSP as well as the corresponding BGP session can be restored with a fast recovery time of less than 1s. Through these investigation and demonstration, it is revealed that the Lambda-IX can be put to practical use aiming at inter-exchanging a large traffic in a near future, while enriching the functions of IX.

  6. Evolution of star clusters in a cosmological tidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Steven; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Langelaan, Paul; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to couple N-body star cluster simulations to a cosmological tidal field, using AMUSE (Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment). We apply this method to star clusters embedded in the CosmoGrid dark matter only Lambda cold dark matter simulation. Our star clusters are born at z = 10 (corresponding to an age of the universe of about 500 Myr) by selecting a dark matter particle and initializing a star cluster with 32 000 stars on its location. We then follow the dynamical evolution of the star cluster within the cosmological environment. We compare the evolution of star clusters in two Milky Way size haloes with a different accretion history. The mass-loss of the star clusters is continuous irrespective of the tidal history of the host halo, but major merger events tend to increase the rate of mass-loss. From the selected two dark matter haloes, the halo that experienced the larger number of mergers tends to drive a smaller mass-loss rate from the embedded star clusters, even though the final masses of both haloes are similar. We identify two families of star clusters: native clusters, which become part of the main halo before its final major merger event, and the immigrant clusters, which are accreted upon or after this event; native clusters tend to evaporate more quickly than immigrant clusters. Accounting for the evolution of the dark matter halo causes immigrant star clusters to retain more mass than when the z = 0 tidal field is taken as a static potential. The reason for this is the weaker tidal field experienced by immigrant star clusters before merging with the larger dark matter halo.

  7. Experiments with the High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer at Jlab Hall C and the New Spectroscopy of ^12_Lambda B Hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Liguang; Chen, Chunhua; Gogami, Toshiyuki; Kawama, Daisuke; Han, Yuncheng; Yuan, Lulin; Matsumura, Akihiko; Okayasu, Yuichi; Seva, Tomislav; Rodriguez, Victor; Baturin, Pavlo; Acha Quimper, Armando; Achenbach, Carsten; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Ates, Ozgur; Badui, Rafael; Baker, Oliver; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Boeglin, Werner; Bono, Jason; Bosted, Peter; Brash, Edward; Carter, Philip; Carlini, Roger; Chiba, Atsushi; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Dalton, Mark; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, Aji; De Leo, Raffaele; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Doi, Daisuke; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Gueye, Paul; Hashimoto, Osamu; Honda, D; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hungerford, Ed; Jayalath, Chandana; Jones, Mark; Johnston, Kathleen; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M; Kato, F; Kato, Seigo; Kawai, Masaharu; Keppel, Cynthia; Khanal, Hari; Kohl, M; Kramer, Laird; Lan, Kejian; Li, Ya; Habarakada Liyanage, Anusha; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Maeda, Kazushige; Malace, Simona; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Markowitz, Pete; Maruta, Tomofumi; Maruyama, Nayuta; Maxwell, Victor; Millener, David; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Motoba, Toshio; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi; Narayan, Amrendra; Neville, Casey; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Nunez, Angel; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Nomura, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Pochodzalla, J; Qiu, Xiyu; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera, R; Roche, Julie; Samanta, Chhanda; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segbefia, Edwin; Schott, Diane; Shichijo, Ayako; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Song, Yushou; Sumihama, Mizuki; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Taniya, Naotaka; Tsukada, Kyo; Tvaskis, Vladas; Veilleux, Micah; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wesselmann, Frank; Wood, Stephen; Yamamoto, Taku; Yan, Chen; Ye, Z; Yokota, Kosuke; Zhamkochyan, Simon; Zhu, Lingyan

    2014-09-01

    Since the pioneering experiment, E89-009 studying hypernuclear spectroscopy using the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction was completed, two additional experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, were performed at Jefferson Lab. These later experiments used a modified experimental design, the "Tilt Method", to dramatically suppress the large electromagnetic background, and allowed for a substantial increase in luminosity. Additionally, a new kaon spectrometer, HKS (E01-011), a new electron spectrometer, HES, and a new splitting magnet were added to produce precision, high-resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy. These two experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, resulted in two new data sets, producing sub-MeV energy resolution in the spectra of ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{28}_{\\Lambda} \\text{Al}$ and ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{10}_{\\Lambda}\\text{Be}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{52}_{\\Lambda}\\text{V}$. All three experiments obtained a ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$, spectrum, which is the most characteristic $p$-shell hypernucleus and is commonly used for calibration. Independent analyses of these different experiments demonstrate excellent consistency and provide the clearest level structure to date of this hypernucleus as produced by the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction. This paper presents details of these experiments, and the extraction and analysis of the observed ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ spectrum.

  8. Quartz Microbalance Study of 400-angstrom Thick Films near the lambda Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Moses H. W.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent measurement we observed the thinning of an adsorbed helium film induced by the confinement of critical fluctuations a few millikelvin below the lambda point. A capacitor set-up was used to measure this Casimir effect. In this poster we will present our measurement of an adsorbed helium film of 400 angstroms near the lambda point with a quartz microbalance. For films this thick, we must take into account the non-linear dynamics of the shear waves in the fluid. In spite of the added complications, we were able to confirm the thinning of the film due to the Casimir effect and the onset of the superfluid transition. In addition, we observe a sharp anomaly at the bulk lambda point, most likely related to critical dissipation of the first sound. This work is carried out in collaboration with Rafael Garcia, Stephen Jordon and John Lazzaretti. This work is funded by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research under grant.

  9. B^0_s and lambda^0_b lifetimes and branching ratios at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Behari, S.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2006-12-01

    The authors review B{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime and branching ratio measurements from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron Run II. Using up to 1 fb{sup -1} data samples per experiment, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime in J/{Psi}{Lambda}{sup 0} decays, B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime difference in K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} decays and B{sub s}{sup 0} branching ratio in D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +} {nu}X decays are reported.

  10. {lambda}{sub c} Enhancement from Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Su Houng; Ohnishi, Kazuaki; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yoo, In-Kwon; Ko, Che Ming

    2008-06-06

    We propose the enhancement of {lambda}{sub c} as a novel quark-gluon plasma signal in heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Assuming a stable bound diquark state in the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma near the critical temperature, we argue that the direct two-body collision between a c quark and a [ud] diquark would lead to an enhanced {lambda}{sub c} production in comparison with the normal three-body collision among independent c, u, and d quarks. In the coalescence model, we find that the {lambda}{sub c}/D yield ratio is enhanced substantially due to the diquark correlation.

  11. Asymmetric lambda/4-shifted InGaAsP/InP DFB lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Usami, M.; Akiba, S.; Utaka, K.

    1987-06-01

    1.5 ..mu..m asymmetric lambda/4-shifted InGaAsP/InP DFB lasers, in which the lambda/4-shift position was moved from the center of the DFB region toward the front side, were made in order to obtain higher output power with high single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) yield. Statistical measurements revealed that it was effective for the increase of the differential quantum efficiency from the front facet without a remarkable decrease of the SLM yield to move the lambda/4-shift position to the front facet by 10-15 percent of the total DFB length. The output efficiencies of the diodes with AR coatings on the window structure were almost coincident to those expected from theoretical calculations.

  12. Observation of the Helium 7 {Lambda} hypernucleus by the (e,e'K+) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Seva, Tomislav; Rodriguez, Victor; Baturin, Pavlo; Yuan, Lulin; Acha Quimper, Armando; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, Oliver; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Boeglin, Wener; Bosted, Peter; Carlini, Roger; Chen, Chunhua; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, Aji; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gan, Liping; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Toshiyuki, Gogami; Gueye, Paul; Han, Yuncheng; Hashimoto, Osamu; Hiyama, E; Honda, D; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hungerford, Ed; Jayalath, Chandana; Jones, Mark; Johnston, Kathleen; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M; Kato, Seigo; Kato, Shigeki; Kawama, Daisuke; Keppel, Cynthia; Kramer, Laird; Lan, Kejian; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Maeda, Kazushige; Malace, Simona; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Markowitz, Pete; Maruta, Tomofumi; Maruyama, Nayuta; Miyoshi, Toshinuobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Nagao, Sho; Navasardyan, Tigran; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera Castillo, Roberto; Roche, Julie; Sato, Yoshinori; Segbefia, Edwin; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Song, Yushou; Sumihama, Mizuki; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tang, Liguang; Tsukada, Kyo; Tvaskis, Vladas; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wood, Stephen; Yan, Chen; Zhamkochyan, Simon

    2013-01-01

    An experiment with a newly developed high-resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) and a scattered electron spectrometer with a novel configuration was performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab). The ground state of a neutron-rich hypernucleus, He 7 {Lambda}, was observed for the first time with the (e,e'K+) reaction with an energy resolution of ~0.6 MeV. This resolution is the best reported to date for hypernuclear reaction spectroscopy. The He 7 {Lambda} binding energy supplies the last missing information of the A=7, T=1 hypernuclear iso-triplet, providing a new input for the charge symmetry breaking (CSB) effect of {Lambda} N potential.

  13. Correlated Leading Baryon-antibaryon Production in e+e- to ccbar to Lambda_c+ antiLambda_c- X

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-22

    We present a study of 649 {+-} 35 e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events produced at {radical}s {approx} 10.6 GeV containing both a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon and a {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} antibaryon. The number observed is roughly four times that expected if the leading charmed hadron types are uncorrelated, confirming an observation by the CLEO Collaboration. We find a 2-jet topology in these events but very few additional baryons, demonstrating that the primary c and {bar c} are predominantly contained in a correlated baryon-antibaryon system. In addition to the charmed baryons we observe on average 2.6 {+-} 0.2 charged intermediate mesons, predominantly pions, carrying 65% of the remaining energy.

  14. Azimuthal anisotropy of K(0)(S) and Lambda+Lambda production at midrapidity from Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-09-23

    We report STAR results on the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v(2) for strange particles K(0)(S), Lambda, and Lambda at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The value of v(2) as a function of transverse momentum, p(t), of the produced particle and collision centrality is presented for both particles up to p(t) approximately 3.0 GeV/c. A strong p(t) dependence in v(2) is observed up to 2.0 GeV/c. The v(2) measurement is compared with hydrodynamic model calculations. The physics implications of the p(t) integrated v(2) magnitude as a function of particle mass are also discussed. PMID:12225018

  15. Rocket spectroscopy of zeta Orionis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis of a spectrum of zeta Ori extending from 922 to 1453 A with approximately 0.8 A resolution recorded at rocket altitudes. All lines used in existing models of stellar atmospheres appear in the recorded spectrum with the exception of those masked by telluric N2 or strong P Cygni-type profiles and by an O V line at 1371.29 A. Fifteen multiplets of subordinate lines have been reliably identified, indicating an approximate range of excitation from 0 to 50 eV. Transitions in C III (1176 A), N III (991 A), N V (1239, 1243 A), O VI (1032, 1038 A), Si IV (1394, 1403 A), S IV (1063, 1074 A), and S VI (933, 944 A) have been observed as P Cygni-type profiles presumably arising in a circumstellar envelope. The degree of ionization, transitions present, and mean radial velocities are all consistent with viewing the envelope as a hot (about 100,000 K), rarefied plasma in which collisional ionization is important. Interstellar lines in C I (1277, 1280 A), C II (1036, 1334 A), N I (1134-1135 A), N I (1200-1201 A), N II (1084-1086 A), O I (1302, 1305 A), Si II (1190, 1193 A), Si II (1260 A), and Si II (1304 A) have been definitely identified. Other transitions in Ar II, S I, C I, and Fe II are tentatively identified. The equivalent width of the L alpha line is found to be 10.4 plus or minus 1.6 A, corresponding to a columnar density of 2.0 plus or minus 0.7 x 10 to the 20th per cu cm.

  16. Dissipation kinetics and assessment of processing factor for chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin in cardamom.

    PubMed

    George, Thomas; Beevi, S Naseema; Xavier, George; Kumar, N Pratheesh; George, Jayesh

    2013-06-01

    The dissipation kinetics and method for estimation of residues of chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin in cardamom were studied and developed. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation arrived for the compounds were 0.01 and 0.025 μg g(-1), respectively. Gas chromatographic response of chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin residues was linear in the range of 0.01-0.50 μg g(-1) and the mean recovery obtained was 97.3 % for chlorpyrifos and 98.9 % for lambda-cyhalothrin with satisfactory relative standard deviation values. The mean initial residues of chlorpyrifos applied at a concentration of 0.05 % in cardamom was 2.5 μg g(-1) and the residue was 8.1 μg g(-1) after processing, with a processing factor of 3.24, while lambda-cyhalothrin when applied at 0.0025 % resulted in initial residues of 1.63 μg g(-1) that magnified to 4.86 μg g(-1) on curing, with a processing factor of 2.98. The half-life of chlorpyrifos was in the range of 5.1-5.24 days while that of lambda-cyhalothrin was in the range of 4.40-4.55 days. The processing factor arrived at in the above experiment lead to the conclusion that the residues of chlorpyrifos got magnified to 3.24-3.68 times and that of lambda-cyhalothrin got magnified to 2.98-3.46 times of initial residues, consequent to loss of weight due to dehydration during curing. PMID:23079795

  17. Dissipation kinetics and assessment of processing factor for chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin in cardamom.

    PubMed

    George, Thomas; Beevi, S Naseema; Xavier, George; Kumar, N Pratheesh; George, Jayesh

    2013-06-01

    The dissipation kinetics and method for estimation of residues of chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin in cardamom were studied and developed. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation arrived for the compounds were 0.01 and 0.025 μg g(-1), respectively. Gas chromatographic response of chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin residues was linear in the range of 0.01-0.50 μg g(-1) and the mean recovery obtained was 97.3 % for chlorpyrifos and 98.9 % for lambda-cyhalothrin with satisfactory relative standard deviation values. The mean initial residues of chlorpyrifos applied at a concentration of 0.05 % in cardamom was 2.5 μg g(-1) and the residue was 8.1 μg g(-1) after processing, with a processing factor of 3.24, while lambda-cyhalothrin when applied at 0.0025 % resulted in initial residues of 1.63 μg g(-1) that magnified to 4.86 μg g(-1) on curing, with a processing factor of 2.98. The half-life of chlorpyrifos was in the range of 5.1-5.24 days while that of lambda-cyhalothrin was in the range of 4.40-4.55 days. The processing factor arrived at in the above experiment lead to the conclusion that the residues of chlorpyrifos got magnified to 3.24-3.68 times and that of lambda-cyhalothrin got magnified to 2.98-3.46 times of initial residues, consequent to loss of weight due to dehydration during curing.

  18. The lambda point experiment in microgravity. [He heat capacity close to phase transition point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Chui, T. C. P.; Marek, D.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment for performing high-resolution measurements of the heat capacity singularity at the lambda point of helium in microgravity conditions is described. By obtaining such measurements in space, it is expected that the intrinsic distortion of the transition would be reduced by at least two orders of magnitude, allowing the theory of cooperative phase transitions to be more effectively tested. Technology developments for the lambda point experiment include a new high-resolution thermometer, an advanced thermal control system, and a reusable flight-qualified superfluid helium dewar.

  19. Near threshold {Lambda} and {Sigma}{sup 0} production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparian, A.; Haidenbauer, J.; Hanhart, C.; Kondratyuk, L.; Speth, J.

    2000-12-31

    The reactions pp {yields} p{Lambda}K{sup +} and pp {yields} p{Sigma}{sup 0}K{sup +} are studied near their thresholds. The strangeness production process is described by the {pi}- and K exchange mechanisms. Effects from the final-state interaction in the hyperon-nucleon system are taken into account rigorously. It is shown that the experimentally observed strong suppression of {Sigma}{sup 0} production compared to {Lambda} production can be explained by a destructive interference between {pi} and K exchange in the reaction pp {yields} p{Sigma}{sup 0}K{sup +}.

  20. Branching ratios from B{sub s} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew S. Martin

    2004-05-28

    CDF Run II relative branching ratio measurements for 65 pb{sup -1} of data in the channels B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {-+}}, {Lambda} {sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} are presented. Further, an observation of B{sub s} {yields} K{sup {+-}} K{sup {-+}} and a measurement of A{sub CP} are presented.

  1. Structure of Lambda(1405) and threshold behavior of pi Sigma scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yoichi Ikeda, Tesuo Hyodo, Daisuke Jido, Hiroyuki Kamano, Toru Sato, Koichi Yazaki

    2011-01-01

    The scattering length and effective range of the pi-Sigma channel are studied in order to characterize the strangeness S = -1 meson-baryon scattering and the Lambda (1405) resonance. We examine various off-shell dependence of the amplitude in dynamical chiral models to evaluate the threshold quantities with the constraint at the KN threshold. We find that the pi-Sigma threshold parameters are important to the structure of the Lambda (1405) resonance and provide further constraints on the subthreshold extrapolation of the KN interaction.

  2. Integration of bacteriophage. lambda. into the cryptic lambdoid prophages of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Lichens-Park, A. ); Smith, C.L. ); Syvanen, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Bacteriophage lambda missing its chromosomal attachment site will integrate into recA{sup +} Escherichia coli K-12 and C at the site of cryptic prophages. The specific regions in which these recombination events occur were identified in both lambda and the bacterial chromosomes. A NotI restriction site on the prophage allowed its physical mapping. This allowed them to identify the locations of Rac, Qin, and Qsr{prime} cryptic prophages on the NotI map of E. coli K-12 and, by analogy, to identify the cryptic prophage in E. coli C as Qin. No new cryptic prophages were detected in E. coli K-12.

  3. Solution of the symmetric eigenproblem AX=lambda BX by delayed division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, G. A.; Bains, N. J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Delayed division is an iterative method for solving the linear eigenvalue problem AX = lambda BX for a limited number of small eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenvectors. The distinctive feature of the method is the reduction of the problem to an approximate triangular form by systematically dropping quadratic terms in the eigenvalue lambda. The report describes the pivoting strategy in the reduction and the method for preserving symmetry in submatrices at each reduction step. Along with the approximate triangular reduction, the report extends some techniques used in the method of inverse subspace iteration. Examples are included for problems of varying complexity.

  4. Formation of Primordial Stars in a Lambda-CDM Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Naoki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Hernquist, Lars; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-06-09

    Primordial stars are formed from a chemically pristine gas consisting of hydrogen and helium. They are believed to have been born at some early epoch in the history of the Universe and to have enriched the interstellar medium with synthesized heavy elements before the emergence of ordinary stellar populations. We study the formation of the first generation of stars in the standard cold dark matter model. We follow the gravitational collapse and thermal evolution of primordial gas clouds within early cosmic structures using very high-resolution, cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. Our simulation achieves a dynamic range of {approx} 10{sup 10} in length scale. With accurate treatment of atomic and molecular physics, it allows us to study the chemo-thermal evolution of primordial gas clouds to densities up to {rho} {approx} 2 x 10{sup -8}g cm{sup -3} (n{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 16}cm{sup -3}) without assuming any a priori equation of state; a six orders of magnitudes improvement over previous three-dimensional calculations. We implement an extensive chemistry network for hydrogen, helium and deuterium. All the relevant atomic and molecular cooling and heating processes, including cooling by collision-induced continuum emission, are implemented. For calculating optically thick H{sub 2} cooling at high densities, we use the Sobolev method (Sobolev 1960) and evaluate the molecular line opacities for a few hundred lines. We validate the accuracy of the method by performing a spherical collapse test and comparing the results with those of accurate one-dimensional calculations that treat the line radiative transfer problem in a fully self-consistent manner. We then perform a cosmological simulation adopting the standard {Lambda}CDM model. Dense gas clumps are formed at the centers of low mass ({approx} 10{sup 5-6}M{sub {circle_dot}}) dark matter halos at redshifts z {approx} 20, and they collapse gravitationally when the cloud mass exceeds a few hundred solar masses. To

  5. Subaru Weak Lensing Measurements of Four Strong Lensing Clusters: Are Lensing Clusters Over-Concentrated?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Gladders, Michael D.; Dahle, Haakon; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Dalal, Neal; Koester, Benjamin P.; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew

    2009-01-29

    We derive radial mass profiles of four strong lensing selected clusters which show prominent giant arcs (Abell 1703, SDSS J1446+3032, SDSS J1531+3414, and SDSS J2111-0115), by combining detailed strong lens modeling with weak lensing shear measured from deep Subaru Suprime-cam images. Weak lensing signals are detected at high significance for all four clusters, whose redshifts range from z = 0.28 to 0.64. We demonstrate that adding strong lensing information with known arc redshifts significantly improves constraints on the mass density profile, compared to those obtained from weak lensing alone. While the mass profiles are well fitted by the universal form predicted in N-body simulations of the {Lambda}-dominated cold dark matter model, all four clusters appear to be slightly more centrally concentrated (the concentration parameters c{sub vir} {approx} 8) than theoretical predictions, even after accounting for the bias toward higher concentrations inherent in lensing selected samples. Our results are consistent with previous studies which similarly detected a concentration excess, and increases the total number of clusters studied with the combined strong and weak lensing technique to ten. Combining our sample with previous work, we find that clusters with larger Einstein radii are more anomalously concentrated. We also present a detailed model of the lensing cluster Abell 1703 with constraints from multiple image families, and find the dark matter inner density profile to be cuspy with the slope consistent with -1, in agreement with expectations.

  6. Hematogones With Lambda Light Chain Restriction in a 4-Year-Old Boy With Burkitt Lymphoma: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Guillory, Tesha; Li, Shiyong; Bergsagel, Daniel J.; Weinzierl, Elizabeth; Bunting, Silvia T.

    2016-01-01

    Hematogones are immature normal B cell precursors with a characteristic immunophenotype profile on flow cytometry that typically do not express surface immunoglobulin light chains. In this report, we describe a case in which the hematogones exhibit light chain restriction. Our patient was a 4-year-old boy with a complicated medical history involving treatment for a presumed bilateral Wilms tumor of the kidney that on later resection was diagnosed as Burkitt lymphoma. Flow cytometry analysis of his bone marrow revealed a small distinct population of cells expressing dim cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, CD22, CD38, dim CD58, human leukocyte antigen–D related (HLA-DR), and dim CD45, which are characteristic of hematogones. These cells, however, demonstrated dim surface immunoglobulin lambda light-chain restriction. Molecular study results for immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light-chain gene rearrangements were negative. We present this case to raise awareness of the potential pitfalls of working up bone marrow for involvement by B cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:27069035

  7. Study of two-dimensional Debye clusters using Brownian motion

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T.E.; Theisen, W.L.

    2006-06-15

    A two-dimensional Debye cluster is a system of n identical particles confined in a parabolic well and interacting through a screened Coulomb (i.e., a Debye-Hueckel or Yukawa) potential with a Debye length {lambda}. Experiments were performed for 27 clusters with n=3-63 particles (9 {mu}m diam) in a capacitively coupled 9 W rf discharge at a neutral argon pressure of 13.6 mTorr. In the strong-coupling regime each particle exhibits small amplitude Brownian motion about its equilibrium position. These motions were projected onto the center-of-mass and breathing modes and Fourier analyzed to give resonance curves from which the mode frequencies, amplitudes, and damping rates were determined. The ratio of the breathing frequency to the center-of-mass frequency was compared with theory to self-consistently determine the Debye shielding parameter {kappa}, Debye length {lambda}, particle charge q, and mode temperatures. It is found that 1 < or approx. {kappa} < or approx. 2, and {kappa} decreases weakly with n. The particle charge averaged over all measurements is -14 200{+-}200 e, and q decreases slightly with n. The two center-of-mass modes and the breathing mode are found to have the same temperature, indicating that the clusters are in thermal equilibrium with the neutral gas. The average cluster temperature is 399{+-}5 K.

  8. 40 CFR 180.438 - Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.438 Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for... established for the combined residues of the pyrethroid [gamma-cyhalothrin (the isolated active isomer...

  9. 40 CFR 180.438 - Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.438 Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for... established for the combined residues of the pyrethroid [gamma-cyhalothrin (the isolated active isomer...

  10. 40 CFR 180.438 - Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.438 Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for... established for the combined residues of the pyrethroid [gamma-cyhalothrin (the isolated active isomer...

  11. 40 CFR 180.438 - Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.438 Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for... established for the combined residues of the pyrethroid [gamma-cyhalothrin (the isolated active isomer...

  12. 40 CFR 180.438 - Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.438 Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for... established for the combined residues of the pyrethroid [gamma-cyhalothrin (the isolated active isomer...

  13. Further observations of the lambda 10830 He line in stars and their significance as a measure of stellar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of the lambda 1030 He line in 198 stars are given along with data on other features in that spectral range. Nearly 80% of all G and K stars show some lambda 10830; of these, half are variable and 1/4 show emission. It was confirmed that lambda 10830 is not found in M stars, is weak in F stars, and is particularly strong in close binaries. The line is found in emission in extremely late M and S stars, along with P gamma, but P gamma is not in emission in G and K stars with lambda 10830 emissions. Variable He emission and Ti I emission are found in the RV Tauri variables R Scuti and U Mon. In R Aqr the Fe XIII coronal line lambda 10747 and a line at lambda 11012 which may be singlet He or La II are found, as well as lambda 10830 and P gamma. The nature of coronas or hot chromospheres in the various stars is discussed. It was concluded that the lambda 10830 intensity must be more or less proportional to the energy deposited in the chromosphere corona by non-thermal processes.

  14. Low-lying {Lambda} baryons with spin 1/2 in two-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Toru T.; Oka, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Low-lying {Lambda} baryons with spin 1/2 are analyzed in full (unquenched) lattice QCD. We construct 2x2 cross correlators from flavor SU(3) octet and singlet baryon operators, and diagonalize them so as to extract information of two low-lying states for each parity. The two-flavor CP-PACS gauge configurations are used, which are generated in the renormalization-group improved gauge action and the O(a)-improved quark action. Three different {beta}'s, {beta}=1.80, 1.95, and 2.10, are employed, whose corresponding lattice spacings are a=0.2150, 0.1555, and 0.1076 fm. For each cutoff, we use four hopping parameters, ({kappa}{sub val},{kappa}{sub sea}), which correspond to the pion masses ranging about from 500 MeV to 1.1 GeV. Results indicate that there are two negative-parity {Lambda} states nearly degenerate at around 1.6 GeV, while no state as low as {Lambda}(1405) is observed. By decomposing the flavor components of each state, we find that the lowest (1st-excited) negative-parity state is dominated by flavor-singlet (flavor-octet) component. We also discuss meson-baryon components of each state, which has drawn considerable attention in the context of multiquark pictures of {Lambda}(1405).

  15. Hydroponic Uptake of Atrazine and Lambda-cyhalothrin in Aquatic Macrophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouldin, J. L.; Farris, J. L.; Moore, M. T.; Smith, S.; Cooper, C. M.

    2005-05-01

    Phytoremediation encompasses an array of plant-associated processes known to mitigate contaminants from soil, sediment, and water. Modification of pesticides associated with agricultural runoff includes processes directly associated with aquatic macrophytes in addition to soil geochemical modifications and associated rhizospheric degradation. Remediation attributes of two vegetative species common to agricultural drainages in the Mississippi Delta, USA, were assessed using atrazine and lambda-cyhalothrin. Concentrations used in 8-d hydroponic exposures were calculated using recommended field applications and a 5% runoff model from a 0.65-cm rainfall event on a 2.02-ha field. While greater atrazine uptake was measured in Juncus effusus, greater lambda-cyhalothrin uptake occurred in Ludwigia peploides. Maximum pesticide uptake was reached within 48 h for each exposure and subsequent translocation of pesticides to upper plant biomass occurred in macrophytes exposed to atrazine. Sequestration of 98.2% of lambda-cyhalothrin in roots of L. peploides was measured after 8 d. Translocation of lambda-cyhalothrin in J. effusus resulted in 25.4% of pesticide uptake partitioned to upper plant biomass. These individual macrophyte remediation studies measured species- and pesticide-specific uptake rates, indicating that the seasonality of pesticide applications and macrophyte emergence might interact strongly to enhance mitigation capabilities in edge-of-field conveyance structures.

  16. Structural and dynamical aspects of avoided-crossing resonances in a three-level {Lambda} system

    SciTech Connect

    Lizuain, I.; Echanobe, J.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Muga, J. G.; Steck, D. A.

    2010-12-15

    In a recent publication [Phys. Rev. A 79, 065602 (2009)], it was shown that an avoided-crossing resonance can be defined according to level-structural or dynamical criteria. We propose an experiment to observe the difference between the two definitions in a three-level {Lambda} system using microwave fields coupling hyperfine magnetic sublevels in alkali-metal atoms.

  17. An addition at the C-terminus of water-buffalo immunoglobin lambda chains.

    PubMed

    Svasti, J

    1977-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the C-terminal tryptic peptide of pooled water-buffalo immunoglobulin lambda chains was determined as Thr-Val-Lys-Pro-Ser-Glu-Cys-Pro-Ser. This sequence is closely homologous to equivalent sequences from other species, but shows an additional amino acid on the C-terminal side of the interchain half-cystine residue.

  18. DNA sequence dependent and independent conformational changes in multipartite operator recognition by lambda-repressor.

    PubMed

    Deb, S; Bandyopadhyay, S; Roy, S

    2000-03-28

    Binding of regulatory proteins to multipartite DNA binding sites often occurs with protein-protein interaction, resulting in cooperative binding. The operators of bacteriophage lambda have several pairs of repressor binding sites (O(R)1-O(R)2, O(R)2-O(R)3, O(L)1-O(L)2, and O(L)2-O(L)3) separated by a variable number of base pairs, and thus, bacteriophage lambda is a model system for studying multipartite operator recognition by DNA-binding proteins. Near-UV circular dichroism spectra show that the DNA is distorted in O(R)1-O(R)2 and O(L)2-O(L)3 but much less so in O(R)2-O(R)3. Upon titration of lambda-repressor with single-operator sites O(R)1, O(R)2, and O(R)3, it was observed that the tryptophan fluorescence quenches to different degrees, suggesting different conformations of the protein in the three DNA-protein complexes. Acrylamide quenching of tryptophan fluorescence of lambda-repressor bound to these single operators also shows different Stern-Volmer constants, supporting the above conclusions. Titration of lambda-repressor with oligonucleotides containing pairs of operator sites also causes different degrees of fluorescence quenching. In particular, fluorescence quenching induced by O(R)1-O(R)2 binding is less than the quenching induced by either of the single operators alone, suggesting additional conformational changes upon establishment of protein-protein contact. Stern-Volmer constants obtained from acrylamide quenching of tryptophan fluorescence of lambda-repressor bound cooperatively to pairs of operator sites are different from those of the single-operator-site-bound repressors. For example, O(R)2-O(R)3-bound repressor has significantly higher acrylamide quenchable components than either of the O(R)2- or O(R)3-bound proteins, again suggesting additional conformational changes upon establishment of protein-protein contact. We conclude that the strategy of recognition of multipartite operator by lambda-repressor is complex and varied, involving

  19. Distance duality relation from x-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations of clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Aghanim, Nabila; Mellier, Yannick

    2004-10-15

    X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich data of clusters of galaxies enable to construct a test of the distance duality relation between the angular and luminosity distances. We argue that such a test on large cluster samples maybe of importance, as a consistency check, while trying to distinguish between various models accounting for the acceleration of the universe. The analysis of a data set of 18 clusters shows no significant violation of this relation for a {lambda}-Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model. The origin and amplitude of systematic effects and the possibility to increase the precision of this method are discussed.

  20. Measurement of sigma(Lambda(b)0) / sigma(anti-B 0) x B(Lambda0(b) ---> Lambda+(c) pi-) / B(anti-B0 ---> D+ pi-) in p anti-p collisions at S**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The authors present the first observation of the baryon decay {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} followed by {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +} in 106 pb{sup -1} p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the CDF experiment. IN order to reduce systematic error, the measured rate for {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay is normalized to the kinematically similar meson decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -} followed by D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. They report the ratio of production cross sections ({sigma}) times the ratio of branching fractions ({Beta}) for the momentum region integrated above p{sub T} > 6 GeV/c and pseudorapidity range |{eta}| < 1.3: {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}X)/{sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} {bar B}{sup 0} X) x {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 0.82 {+-} 0.08(stat) {+-} 0.11(syst) {+-} 0.22 ({Beta}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +})).

  1. UBVR{sub c} I{sub c} ANALYSIS OF THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED TOTALLY ECLIPSING EXTREME MASS RATIO BINARY V1853 ORIONIS, AND A STATISTICAL LOOK AT 25 OTHER EXTREME MASS RATIO SOLAR-TYPE CONTACT BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Samec, R. G.; Labadorf, C. M.; Hawkins, N. C.; Faulkner, D. R.; Van Hamme, W.

    2011-10-15

    We present precision CCD light curves, a period study, photometrically derived standard magnitudes, and a five-color simultaneous Wilson code solution of the totally eclipsing, yet shallow amplitude (A{sub v} {approx} 0.4 mag) eclipsing, binary V1853 Orionis. It is determined to be an extreme mass ratio, q = 0.20, W-type W UMa overcontact binary. From our standard star observations, we find that the variable is a late-type F spectral-type dwarf, with a secondary component of about 0.24 solar masses (stellar type M5V). Its long eclipse duration (41 minutes) as compared to its period, 0.383 days, attests to the small relative size of the secondary. Furthermore, it has reached a Roche lobe fill-out of {approx}50% of its outer critical lobe as it approaches its final stages of binary star evolution, that of a fast spinning single star. Finally, a summary of about 25 extreme mass ratio solar-type binaries is given.

  2. Functional humanization of an anti-CD16 Fab fragment: obstacles of switching from murine {lambda} to human {lambda} or {kappa} light chains.

    PubMed

    Schlapschy, Martin; Fogarasi, Marton; Gruber, Helga; Gresch, Oliver; Schäfer, Claudia; Aguib, Yasmine; Skerra, Arne

    2009-03-01

    An alphaCD30xalphaCD16 bispecific monoclonal antibody (MAb) was previously shown to induce remission of Hodgkin's disease refractory to chemo- and radiotherapy through specific activation of natural killer (NK) cells, but the appearance of a human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) response prevented its use for prolonged therapy. Here, we describe an effort to humanize the Fab arm directed against FcgammaRIII (CD16), which-in context with the previously humanized CD30 Fab fragment-provides the necessary component for the design of a clinically useful bispecific antibody. Thus, the CDRs of the anti-CD16 mouse IgG1/lambda MAb A9 were grafted onto human Ig sequences. In a first attempt, the murine V(lambda) domain was converted to a humanized lambda chain, which led, however, to complete loss of antigen-binding activity and extremely poor folding efficiency upon periplasmic expression in Escherichia coli. Hence, its CDRs were transplanted onto a human kappa light chain in a second attempt, which resulted in a functional recombinant Fab fragment, yet with 100-fold decreased antigen affinity. In the next step, an in vitro affinity maturation was performed, wherein random mutations were introduced into the humanized V(H) and V(kappa) domains through error-prone PCR, followed by a filter sandwich colony screening assay for increased binding activity towards the bacterially produced extracellular CD16 fragment. Finally, an optimized Fab fragment was obtained, which carries nine additional amino acid exchanges and exhibits an affinity that is within a factor of 2 identical to that of the original murine A9 Fab fragment. The resulting humanized Fab fragment was fully functional with respect to binding of the recombinant CD16 antigen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and in cytofluorimetry with CD16-positive granulocytes, thus providing a promising starting point for the preparation of a fully human bispecific antibody that permits the therapeutic recruitment of NK cells.

  3. Cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The revised International Headache Society (IHS) criteria for cluster headache are: attacks of severe or very severe, strictly unilateral pain, which is orbital, supraorbital, or temporal pain, lasting 15 to 180 minutes and occurring from once every other day to eight times daily. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to abort cluster headache? What are the effects of interventions to prevent cluster headache? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 23 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: baclofen (oral); botulinum toxin (intramuscular); capsaicin (intranasal); chlorpromazine; civamide (intranasal); clonidine (transdermal); corticosteroids; ergotamine and dihydroergotamine (oral or intranasal); gabapentin (oral); greater occipital nerve injections (betamethasone plus xylocaine); high-dose and high-flow-rate oxygen; hyperbaric oxygen; leuprolide; lidocaine (intranasal); lithium (oral); melatonin; methysergide (oral); octreotide (subcutaneous); pizotifen (oral); sodium valproate (oral); sumatriptan (oral, subcutaneous, and intranasal); topiramate (oral); tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs); verapamil; and zolmitriptan (oral and intranasal). PMID:21718584

  4. Dynamic processes in Be star atmospheres. 2: He I 2P-nD line formation in lambda Eridani (outburst)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry; Meylan, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    The He I lambda 6678 line of early Be stars generally shows violet (V) and red (R) emission whenever hydrogen alpha emission is present, but its use as a diagnostic has been handicapped by a poor understanding of the processes that drive it into emission. In an attempt to address this problem we obtained three series of eschelle spectra of the first two members of the singlet and triplet 2P-nD series of lambda Eri (B2e) during 1992 November 3-5 at Kitt Peak. During these observations lambda 6678 showed substantial emission variability in both the wings and central profile, providing an opportunity to compare its behavior with that of the lambda 4922, lambda 5876, and lambda 4471 lines. We found that the responses of the lines were different in several respects. Whereas the emissions in the V wings of all four lines scaled together, the R wing of the lambda 4922 line invariably responded with increased absorption whenever the R wing of lambda 6678 line showed increased emission. These same trends occurred within the central photospheric profiles. The R-wing behavior shows that much, but not all of the emission in lambda 6678 is caused by matter projected against the stellar disk. The excitation temperatures of the neighboring 2(sup 1) P transitions, lambda 6678 and lambda 4922 must be greater than and less than the photospheric continuum temperature, respectively. We have investigated departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for the He I spectrum in a variety of ad hoc, perturbed model atmospheres. We have found only one way to cause the source function of lambda 6678 to increase so strongly, namely, by increasing the atmospheric temperature in the line formation region to 30,000 - 40,000 K. This effect was discovered by Auer and Mihalas for O3-O4 atmospheric models, but it has not been applied to active B stars. Our models suggest that lambda 6678 emission in Be stars can be used as a sensitive monitor of localized hot spots on these stars' surfaces

  5. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER RZ 2109 AND THE NATURE OF ITS BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Kundu, Arunav; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Waters, Christopher Z.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Stern, Daniel

    2012-11-10

    We present optical Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) spectroscopy of RZ 2109, a globular cluster (GC) in the elliptical galaxy NGC 4472. This GC is notable for hosting an ultraluminous X-ray source as well as associated strong and broad [O III] {lambda}{lambda}4959, 5007 emission. We show that the HST/STIS spectroscopy spatially resolves the [O III] emission in RZ 2109. While we are unable to make a precise determination of the morphology of the emission-line nebula, the best-fitting models all require that the [O III] {lambda}5007 emission has a half-light radius in the range 3-7 pc. The extended nature of the [O III] {lambda}5007 emission is inconsistent with published models that invoke an intermediate-mass black hole origin. It is also inconsistent with the ionization of ejecta from a nova in the cluster. The spatial scale of the nebula could be produced via the photoionization of a strong wind driven from a stellar mass black hole accreting at roughly its Eddington rate.

  6. Mean field phase diagram of an SU(2){sub {ital L}}{times}SU(2){sub {ital R}} lattice Higgs-Yukawa model at finite {lambda}

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, C.

    1996-02-01

    The phase diagram of an SU(2){sub {ital L}}{times}SU(2){sub {ital R}} lattice Higgs-Yukawa model with finite {lambda} is constructed using mean field theory. The phase diagram bears a superficial resemblance to that for {lambda}={infinity}; however, as {lambda} is decreased the paramagnetic region shrinks in size. For small {lambda} the phase transitions remain second order, and no new first order transitions are seen. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. X-Ray Flare Characteristics in the B2e Star Lambda Eridani (ROSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.

    1997-01-01

    We document the results of a simultaneous wavelength monitoring on the B2e star (lambda) Eri. This campaign was carried out from ground stations and with the ROSAT, ASCA, IUE, and Voyager 2 space platforms during a week in February-March 1995; a smaller follow-up was conducted in September 1995. During the first of these intervals (lambda) Eri exhibited extraordinary wind and disk-ejection activity. The ROSAT/HRI X-ray light curves showed no large flares such as the one the ROSAT/PSCA observed in 1991. However, possible low level fluctuations in the February-March ROSAT data occurred at the same time as unusual activity in H(alpha) He I (lambda)6678, He II (lambda)1640, and the C IV doublet. For example, the hydrogen and helium lines exhibited an emission in the blue half of their profiles, probably lasting several hours. The C IV lines showed a strong high-velocity Discrete Absorption Component (DAC) accompanied by unusually strong absorption at lower velocities. The helium line activity suggests that a mass ejection occurred at the base of the wind while the strong C III (Voyager) and C IV (IUE) lines implies that shock interactions occurred in the wind flow. It is not clear that the X-ray elevations are directly related to the strong C IV absorptions because the former changed on a much more rapid timescale than absorptions in the C IV lines. Within hours of the mild X-ray flux variations found by ROSAT on February 28, the Voyager UVS observed a "ringing" that decayed over three 3-hr. cycles. The amplitude of these fluctuations was strong (50%) at (lambda)(lambda)950-1100, decreased rapidly with wavelength, and faded to nondetection longward of (lambda)1300. Various considerations indicate that these continuum variations were not due to an instrumental pathology in the UVS. Rather, they appear to be due to a time-dependent flux deficit in the (lambda)(lambda)950-1250 region. We outline a scenario in which a dense plasma structure over the star's surface is

  8. Study of nanoscale photopolymerized fullerene clusters in solution droplets using an ultrasonic nebulizer unit.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Seung Jun; Cha, Jeong Ok; Cho, Dae Hee; Pode, Ramchandra; Ahn, Jeung Sun

    2011-07-01

    In a designed and developed ultrasonic nebulizer system for obtaining macroscopic-quantity photopolymerized fullerene (C60) clusters, a C60 solution was vaporized to several micro-sized droplets in vacuum, resulting in the formation of C60 aggregates by evaporating the solvent (toluene). The system was invented to produce nanoscale photopolymerized carbon clusters through the irradiation of ultraviolet (UV) light on the C60 aggregates in vacuum. The products, photopolymerized C60 clusters obtained from the system using UV-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and high-performance (or high-pressure) liquid chromatography (HPLC) spectra, were characterized. Compared with the non-irradiating C60 solution, the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the irradiated C60 solution was drastically decreased, especially at lambda = 335 nm and in the visible region from lambda = 450-650 nm. As such, the UV-Vis absorption spectra provide information about the polymerization of C60 molecules. These photopolymerized C60 clusters can be detected as having a heavy molecular mass order through the HPLC system, and the C60 and photopolymerized C60 cluster can be extracted from the trapped solution on the molecular mass. Although there is a possibility that the products include various forms of C60 clusters, the results suggest that the products obtained from the system using a vaporizer establish a new method of obtaining macroscopic-quantity C60 clusters. PMID:22121736

  9. Single-trial lambda wave identification using a fuzzy inference system and predictive statistical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatchi, R.

    2004-03-01

    The aim of the study was to automate the identification of a saccade-related visual evoked potential (EP) called the lambda wave. The lambda waves were extracted from single trials of electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms using independent component analysis (ICA). A trial was a set of EEG waveforms recorded from 64 scalp electrode locations while a saccade was performed. Forty saccade-related EEG trials (recorded from four normal subjects) were used in the study. The number of waveforms per trial was reduced from 64 to 22 by pre-processing. The application of ICA to the resulting waveforms produced 880 components (i.e. 4 subjects × 10 trials per subject × 22 components per trial). The components were divided into 373 lambda and 507 nonlambda waves by visual inspection and then they were represented by one spatial and two temporal features. The classification performance of a Bayesian approach called predictive statistical diagnosis (PSD) was compared with that of a fuzzy logic approach called a fuzzy inference system (FIS). The outputs from the two classification approaches were then combined and the resulting discrimination accuracy was evaluated. For each approach, half the data from the lambda and nonlambda wave categories were used to determine the operating parameters of the classification schemes while the rest (i.e. the validation set) were used to evaluate their classification accuracies. The sensitivity and specificity values when the classification approaches were applied to the lambda wave validation data set were as follows: for the PSD 92.51% and 91.73% respectively, for the FIS 95.72% and 89.76% respectively, and for the combined FIS and PSD approach 97.33% and 97.24% respectively (classification threshold was 0.5). The devised signal processing techniques together with the classification approaches provided for an effective extraction and classification of the single-trial lambda waves. However, as only four subjects were included, it will be

  10. {Lambda}-p femtoscopy in collisions of Ar+KCl at 1.76A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Agakishiev, G.; Destefanis, M.; Gilardi, C.; Kirschner, D.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Metag, V.; Mishra, D.; Pechenova, O.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Balanda, A.; Dybczak, A.; Michalska, B.; Otwinowski, J.; Przygoda, W.; Salabura, P.; Trebacz, R.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.

    2010-08-15

    Results on {Lambda}p femtoscopy are reported at the lowest energy so far. At a beam energy of 1.76A GeV, the reaction Ar+KCl was studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at SIS18/GSI. A high-statistics and high-purity {Lambda} sample was collected, allowing for the investigation of {Lambda}p correlations at low relative momenta. The experimental correlation function is compared to corresponding model calculations allowing the determination of the space-time extent of the {Lambda}p emission source. The {Lambda}p source radius is found to be slightly smaller than the pp correlation radius for a similar collision system. The present {Lambda}p radius is significantly smaller than that found for Au+Au/Pb+Pb collisions in the AGS, SPS, and RHIC energy domains but larger than that observed for electroproduction from He. Taking into account all available data, we find the {Lambda}p source radius to increase almost linearly with the number of participants to the power of one-third.

  11. FORMING REALISTIC LATE-TYPE SPIRALS IN A {Lambda}CDM UNIVERSE: THE ERIS SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, Javiera; Madau, Piero; Callegari, Simone; Mayer, Lucio

    2011-12-01

    Simulations of the formation of late-type spiral galaxies in a cold dark matter ({Lambda}CDM) universe have traditionally failed to yield realistic candidates. Here we report a new cosmological N-body/smooth particle hydrodynamic simulation of extreme dynamic range in which a close analog of a Milky Way disk galaxy arises naturally. Named 'Eris', the simulation follows the assembly of a galaxy halo of mass M{sub vir} = 7.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} with a total of N = 18.6 million particles (gas + dark matter + stars) within the final virial radius, and a force resolution of 120 pc. It includes radiative cooling, heating from a cosmic UV field and supernova explosions (blastwave feedback), a star formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold (n{sub SF} = 5 atoms cm{sup -3} rather than the canonical n{sub SF} = 0.1 atoms cm{sup -3}), and neglects any feedback from an active galactic nucleus. Artificial images are generated to correctly compare simulations with observations. At the present epoch, the simulated galaxy has an extended rotationally supported disk with a radial scale length R{sub d} = 2.5 kpc, a gently falling rotation curve with circular velocity at 2.2 disk scale lengths of V{sub 2.2} = 214 km s{sup -1}, an i-band bulge-to-disk ratio B/D = 0.35, and a baryonic mass fraction within the virial radius that is 30% below the cosmic value. The disk is thin, has a typical H I-to-stellar mass ratio, is forming stars in the region of the {Sigma}{sub SFR}-{Sigma}{sub HI} plane occupied by spiral galaxies, and falls on the photometric Tully-Fisher and the stellar-mass-halo-virial-mass relations. Hot (T > 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K) X-ray luminous halo gas makes up only 26% of the universal baryon fraction and follows a 'flattened' density profile {proportional_to}r{sup -1.13} out to r = 100 kpc. Eris appears then to be the first cosmological hydrodynamic simulation in which the galaxy structural properties, the mass budget in the

  12. Structure of the lambda tof repressor protein in solution. Heat stability and its relation to binding ability to DNA.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, H; Akutsu, H; Kobayashi, Y; Kyogoku, Y; Ono, T; Koga, H; Horiuchi, T

    1982-04-01

    The lambda tof repressor protein was purified from E. coli cells retaining lambda dv plasmids by applying DNA-cellulose chromatography. 3H-labeled lambda dv and lambda imm21dv DNA, carrying and lacking lambda operators, respectively, were prepared and the binding activity of the lambda tof protein to the DNA was examined. Non-specific binding to lambda imm21dv DNA is completely lost at 30 degrees C, whereas specific binding to the DNA carrying the operators is retained even above 40 degrees C. The conformation of the lambda tof protein was analysed by means of circular dichroism and 1H-NMR spectra. The change in the molar ellipticity at 222 nm vs. temperature in CD spectra indicated a transition between two states with Tm at 42 degrees C. The 360 MHz 1H-NMR spectra revealed the presence at 20 degrees C of another change in local conformation of interaction which was not detected by the CD spectra. 1H-NMR also indicated the coexistence of thermal transitions with exchange rates faster and slower than the NMR time scale at about 50 degrees C, which is explained by the presence of domain structures. The NMR titration curve of the His residue gave a normal pK value showing its location on the surface of the protein. These conformational behaviors are well correlated to the specific and non-specific DNA binding activity of the lambda tof protein. The assignments of 1H resonance signals to some specific residues, including His 35 and Tyr 26, were established. It will be useful to determine the tof-DNA interaction.

  13. Measurements of C_x and C_z for K^+Lambda and K^+Sigma^o Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bradford; Reinhard Schumacher

    2005-10-10

    The CLAS collaboration has recently completed first measurements of the double polarization observables C{sub x} and C{sub z} for the reactions K{sup +} Lambda and K{sup +} Sigma{sup o} photoproduction. C{sub x} and C{sub z} are the beam-recoil polarization asymmetries measuring the polarization transfer from incoming circularly polarized photons to the outgoing hyperons along two directions in the reaction's production plane. The Lambda is found to be nearly maximally polarized along the direction of the incident photon's polarization for forward-going kaons. Polarization transfer to the Sigma{sup o} is different from the Lambda case.

  14. Cosmological constraints from Chandra observations of galaxy clusters.

    PubMed

    Allen, Steven W

    2002-09-15

    Chandra observations of rich, relaxed galaxy clusters allow the properties of the X-ray gas and the total gravitating mass to be determined precisely. Here, we present results for a sample of the most X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed clusters known. We show that the Chandra data and independent gravitational lensing studies provide consistent answers on the mass distributions in the clusters. The mass profiles exhibit a form in good agreement with the predictions from numerical simulations. Combining Chandra results on the X-ray gas mass fractions in the clusters with independent measurements of the Hubble constant and the mean baryonic matter density in the Universe, we obtain a tight constraint on the mean total matter density of the Universe, Omega(m), and an interesting constraint on the cosmological constant, Omega(Lambda). We also describe the 'virial relations' linking the masses, X-ray temperatures and luminosities of galaxy clusters. These relations provide a key step in linking the observed number density and spatial distribution of clusters to the predictions from cosmological models. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a systematic offset of ca. 40% between the normalization of the observed mass-temperature relation and the predictions from standard simulations. This finding leads to a significant revision of the best-fit value of sigma(8) inferred from the observed temperature and luminosity functions of clusters.

  15. Probing the dark energy with quasar clustering.

    PubMed

    Calvão, M O; de Mello Neto, J R T; Waga, I

    2002-03-01

    We show through Monte Carlo simulations that the Alcock-Paczyński test, as applied to quasar clustering, is a powerful tool to probe the cosmological density and equation of state parameters Omega(m0), Omega(x0), and w. By taking into account the effect of peculiar velocities upon the correlation function we obtain for the Two-Degree Field QSO Redshift Survey the predicted confidence contours for the cosmological constant (w = -1) and spatially flat (Omega(m0)+Omega(x0) = 1) cases. For w = -1, the test is especially sensitive to the difference Omega(m0)-Omega(Lambda0), thus being ideal to combine with cosmic microwave background results. For the flat case, it is competitive with future supernova and galaxy number count tests, besides being complementary to them.

  16. Higher-Order Calculations of Light Deflection and the Contribution of the Cosmological Constant to Einstein Radii around Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossett, Jason; Ishak, M.; Rindler, W.; Moldenhauer, J.; Allison, C.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, Rindler and Ishak (2007) made a breakthrough in the field of gravitational lensing showing that a cosmological constant, Λ, will indeed contribute to the bending angle of light by a concentric mass, in fact, by decreasing it. Then Ishak et al. (2007) showed that the effect can be applied to observations of Einstein radii around clusters of galaxies. We present here various higher-order calculations and results for the bending angle and the Lambda contribution. Surprisingly, we find that the Lambda term is the next largest term after the Einstein first-order term for many cluster lens systems. For those lens systems, the Lambda contribution is larger than the second-order term and may be the next targeted term by future high precision experiments.

  17. Circulating monoclonal IgM lambda cryoglobulin with collagen type I affinity in vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Clemmensen, I; Jensen, B A; Hølund, B; Kappelgaard, E; Neilsen, H

    1986-01-01

    A previously fit 66-years-old male primarily presented symptoms compatible with Henock-Schönlein's purpura, from which he seemingly recovered. Shortly hereafter he relapsed with an IgM lambda essential monoclonal cryoglobulinemia type I, presenting a systemic, necrotizing vasculitis, with low titer of circulating immune complexes and complement consumption. Glucocorticoid treatment and plasmapheresis did not prevent an ultimately lethal course. An indirect immunoperoxidase technique showed that the cryo-IgM bound to the interstitial connective tissue corresponding to the localization of collagen type I. In addition it bound to affinity purified human procollagen type I. These results indicate, that the IgM lambda of the proband was an autoantibody with collagen type I specificity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3098468

  18. Second order gravitational effects on CMB temperature anisotropy in {lambda} dominated flat universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Kenji; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-05-15

    We study second order gravitational effects of local inhomogeneities on the cosmic microwave background radiation in flat universes with matter and a cosmological constant {lambda}. We find that the general relativistic correction to the Newtonian approximation is negligible at second order provided that the size of the inhomogeneous region is sufficiently smaller than the horizon scale. For a spherically symmetric top-hat type quasilinear perturbation, the first order temperature fluctuation corresponding to the linear integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect is enhanced (suppressed) by the second order one for a compensated void (lump). As a function of redshift of the local inhomogeneity, the second order temperature fluctuations due to evolution of the gravitational potential have a peak before the matter-{lambda} equality epoch for a fixed comoving size and a density contrast. The second order gravitational effects from local quasilinear inhomogeneities at a redshift z{approx}1 may significantly affect the cosmic microwave background.

  19. Electromagnetically induced transparency in an inhomogeneously broadened {Lambda} transition with multiple excited levels

    SciTech Connect

    Mishina, O. S.; Scherman, M.; Lombardi, P.; Ortalo, J.; Bramati, A.; Laurat, J.; Giacobino, E.; Felinto, D.; Sheremet, A. S.; Kupriyanov, D. V.

    2011-05-15

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) has mainly been modeled for three-level systems. In particular, considerable interest has been dedicated to the {Lambda} configuration, with two ground states and one excited state. However, in the alkali-metal atoms, which are commonly used, the hyperfine interaction in the excited state introduces several levels which simultaneously participate in the scattering process. When the Doppler broadening is comparable with the hyperfine splitting in the upper state, the three-level {Lambda} model does not reproduce the experimental results. Here we theoretically investigate the EIT in a hot vapor of alkali-metal atoms and demonstrate that it can be strongly reduced by the presence of multiple excited levels. Given this model, we also show that well-designed optical pumping enables us to significantly recover the transparency.

  20. Search for the Theta+ pentaquark in the gamma d -> Lambda n K+ reaction measured with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia Niccolai; Marco Mirazita; Patrizia Rossi; Nathan Baltzell; Daniel Carman; Kenneth Hicks; Bryan McKinnon; Tsutomu Mibe; Stepan Stepanyan; David Tedeschi; Gary Adams; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Sergio Pereira; Marco Anghinolfi; Gegham Asryan; Harutyun AVAKIAN; H. Bagdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Angela Biselli; Sergey Boyarinov; Sylvain Bouchigny; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; S.L. Careccia; Bryan Carnahan; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Donald Crabb; Hall Crannell; V. Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Pavel Degtiarenko; Rita De Masi; Airton Deppman; Enzo De Sanctis; Alexandre Deur; Raffaella De Vita; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; L. El Fassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Paul Eugenio; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Herbert Funsten; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Christopher Gordon; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; F. Hersman; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Tsung-shung Lee; Kenneth Livingston; H. Lu; Marion MacCormick; Nikolai Markov; Bernhard Mecking; Jonathan Mellor; Joseph Melone; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Ludyvine Morand; Steven Morrow; Maryam Moteabbed; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Jorge De Olivei Echeimberg; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; K. Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Sergey Pozdnyakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Franck Sabatie; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Youri Sharabian; Nikolay Shvedunov; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Igor Strakovski; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Ulrike Thoma; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2006-04-26

    For the first time, the reaction gamma d -> Lambda n K+ has been analyzed in order to search for the exotic pentaquark baryon Theta+(1540). The data were taken at Jefferson Lab, using the Hall-B tagged-photon beam of energy between 0.8 and 3.6 GeV and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). No statistically significant structures were observed in the nK+ invariant mass distribution. The upper limit on the gamma d -> Lambda Theta+ integrated cross section has been calculated and found to be between 5 and 25 nb, depending on the production model assumed. The upper limit on the differential cross section is also reported.

  1. HE I lambda4922 in B stars: Comparison of theory and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Heasley, J.N.; Wolfe, S.C.

    1981-05-01

    Profiles of the He I lambda4922 line have been observed in 15 B-type stars with an unintensified Reticon detector on the coude spectrograph of the University of Hawaii's 2.2 m telescope on Mauna Kea. The observations are compared with the theoretical line profiles computed by Mihalas, Barnard, Cooper, and Smith, who used an improved line broadening theory. The results show that the computed profiles reproduce the core and red wing of the stellar profiles, but the forbidden component in the blue wing of the line is deeper and broader than the theoretical predictions. Photographic H..cap alpha.. line profiles have been obtained for three of our program stars, and for this sample we find that the Balmer line, He I lambda4922, and Stroemgren photometric colors yield a consistent set of atmospheric parameters.

  2. Residual effectiveness of lambda-cyhalothrin harbourage sprays against foliage-resting mosquitoes in north Queensland.

    PubMed

    Muzari, Odwell M; Adamczyk, Rebecca; Davis, Joseph; Ritchie, Scott; Devine, Gregor

    2014-03-01

    The residual efficacy of lambda-cyhalothrin sprayed on foliage was evaluated against various mosquito species in sections of forest in Cairns, Queensland, Australia Weekly sweep-net collections in treated and untreated areas before and after spraying showed 87-100% reductions in mosquito numbers for the first 9 wk postspray. After that period, reductions fluctuated but remained >71% up to 14 wk posttreatment. Mosquito mortality ranged from 96 to 100% in contact bioassays of treated leaves during the 14 wk study. Our results demonstrate that spraying harborage vegetation with lambda-cyhalothrin is an extremely effective strategy for the control of sylvan and peridomestic mosquito species in tropical north Queensland. PMID:24724295

  3. Disappearance of Roton Propagation in Superfluid {sup 4}He at T{sub {lambda}}

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, E.C.; Montfrooij, W.; de Schepper, I.M.

    1996-11-01

    Using neutron scattering, we determine the dynamic structure factor {ital S}({ital q},{nu}) of liquid {sup 4}He for the roton wave number {ital q}=2.0{sup {minus}1} as a function of frequency {nu} at constant density 0.1715 gcm{sup {minus}3} and for ten temperatures in the range 1.08{le}{ital T}{le}2.00 K, primarily near the superfluid transition temperature {ital T}{sub {lambda}}=1.9202 K. The {lambda} transition is marked by a complete softening of the roton mode and a rapid decrease in lifetime. This change is continuous with temperature, and we find no evidence for a new mode appearing as one enters the superfluid phase, as has been proposed on the basis of theoretical considerations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Development of a novel affinity chromatography resin for platform purification of lambda fabs.

    PubMed

    Eifler, Nora; Medaglia, Giovanni; Anderka, Oliver; Laurin, Linus; Hermans, Pim

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) are novel formats in the growing pipeline of biotherapeutics. Sharing similar features to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with regard to expression, Fabs are considered as unchallenging for upstream development. Yet for downstream processing, the mature mAb downstream purification platform is not directly applicable. New approaches need to be found to achieve a lean purification process that maintains quality, productivity, and timelines while being generically applicable independent of the expression system. In a successful collaboration, BAC BV, GE Healthcare, and Novartis Pharma AG have developed a new affinity chromatography medium (resin) suitable to support cGMP manufacturing of lambda Fabs. We show that using this novel chromatography medium for the capture step, a purification platform for lambda Fabs can be established. PMID:25082738

  5. Involvement of the htpR gene product of Escherichia coli in phage lambda development.

    PubMed

    Waghorne, C; Fuerst, C R

    1985-02-01

    Growth of phage lambda at high temperature requires a functional htpR host gene. The stages of the phage growth cycle shown to be dependent on htpR gene function include prophage excision and particle morphogenesis. Two types of morphogenetic abnormalities have been detected. One is a defect in phage tail assembly that results from a deficiency in tail fibers even though gpJ is produced. The severity of this defect is phage-strain specific. The second morphogenetic defect is less clearly defined, but results in formation of aberrant phage head structures. These abnormalities in lambda reproduction are presumed to be caused by the absence in htpR mutant host cells at high temperature of one or more of the heat-shock proteins of Escherichia coli whose synthesis is known to be regulated by the htpR gene.

  6. K{sup 0} and {lambda} production in Ni+Ni collisions near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Merschmeyer, M.; Herrmann, N.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Cordier, E.; Mangiarotti, A.; Pelte, D.; Xiao, Z. G.; Lopez, X.; Andronic, A.; Hartmann, O. N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Koczon, P.; Leifels, Y.; Reisdorf, W.; Schuettauf, A.; Bastid, N.; Crochet, P.; Barret, V.; Dupieux, P.

    2007-08-15

    New results concerning the production of neutral strange particles, K{sup 0} and {lambda} in Ni+Ni collisions at 1.93A GeV, measured with the FOPI detector at GSI Darmstadt, are presented. Rapidity density distributions and Boltzmann slope parameter distributions are measured in nearly the full phase space of the reaction. The observables are compared to existing K{sup +} and proton data. While the K{sup 0} data agree with previously reported K{sup +} measurements, the {lambda} distributions show a different behavior relative to that of protons. The strangeness balance and the production yield per participating nucleon as a function of the centrality of the reaction are discussed, for the first time at GSI Schwerionen Synchrotron (SIS) energies.

  7. Studies of a human lambda-chain epitope related to a complementarity-determining region.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H S; Deutsch, H F

    1988-01-01

    A tryptic non-adecapeptide representing the 24-42 sequence of the MCG lambda-type Bence-Jones protein, and which contains its entire complementarity-determining region-1, was isolated. The peptide was utilized in preparing an affinity column that was used to isolate an antibody having the reactivity of a previously employed idiotypic antibody to MCG. This antibody preparation, as well as 13 monoclonal mouse antibodies to human lambda-chains, was employed in an enzyme-linked immunoassay to detect other Bence-Jones proteins with this serologic specificity. The results obtained with two of the monoclonal antibodies suggest that the epitope in question is a noncontiguous one. PMID:2452787

  8. Translesion synthesis is the main component of SOS repair in bacteriophage lambda DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Defais, M; Lesca, C; Monsarrat, B; Hanawalt, P

    1989-01-01

    Agents that interfere with DNA replication in Escherichia coli induce physiological adaptations that increase the probability of survival after DNA damage and the frequency of mutants among the survivors (the SOS response). Such agents also increase the survival rate and mutation frequency of irradiated bacteriophage after infection of treated bacteria, a phenomenon known as Weigle reactivation. In UV-irradiated single-stranded DNA phage, Weigle reactivation is thought to occur via induced, error-prone replication through template lesions (translesion synthesis [P. Caillet-Fauquet, M: Defais, and M. Radman, J. Mol. Biol. 117:95-112, 1977]). Weigle reactivation occurs with higher efficiency in double-stranded DNA phages such as lambda, and we therefore asked if another process, recombination between partially replicated daughter molecules, plays a major role in this case. To distinguish between translesion synthesis and recombinational repair, we studied the early replication of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda in SOS-induced and uninduced bacteria. To avoid complications arising from excision of UV lesions, we used bacterial uvrA mutants, in which such excision does not occur. Our evidence suggests that translesion synthesis is the primary component of Weigle reactivation of lambda phage in the absence of excision repair. The greater efficiency in Weigle reactivation of double-stranded DNA phage could thus be attributed to some inducible excision repair unable to occur on single-stranded DNA. In addition, after irradiation, lambda phage replication seems to switch prematurely from the theta mode to the rolling circle mode. Images PMID:2527845

  9. Electroproduction of strangeness on (Lambda)H-3,4 bound states on helium

    SciTech Connect

    F. Dohrmann; D. Abbott; A. Ahmidouch; P. Ambrozewicz; C. S. Armstrong; J. Arrington; R. Asaturyan; K. Assamagan; S. Avery; K. Bailey; S. Beedoe; H. Bitao; H. Breuer; D. S. Brown; R. Carlini; J. Cha; N. Chant; E. Christy; A. Cochran; L. Cole; G. Collins; C. Cothran; J. Crowder; W. J. Cummings; S. Danagoulian; F. Duncan; J. Dunne; D. Dutta; T. Eden; M. Elaasar; R. Ent; L. Ewell; H. Fenker; H. T. Fortune; Y. Fujii; L. Gan; H. Gao; K. Garrow; D. F. Geesaman; P. Gueye; K. Gustafsson; K. Hafidi; J. O. Hansen; W. Hinton; H. E. Jackson; H. Juengst; C. Keppel; A. Klein; D. Koltenuk; Y. Liang; J. H. Liu; A. Lung; D. Mack; R. Madey; P. Markowitz; C. J. Martoff; D. Meekins; J. Mitchell; T. Miyoshi; H. Mkrtchyan; R. Mohring; S. K. Mtingwa; B. Mueller; T. G. O'Neill; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; D. Potterveld; J. W. Price; B. A. Raue; P. E. Reimer; J. Reinhold; J. Roche; P. Roos; M. Sarsour; Y. Sato; G. Savage; R. Sawafta; R. E. Segel; A. Yu. Semenov; S. Stepanyan; V. Tadevosian; S. Tajima; L. Tang; B. Terburg; A. Uzzle; S. Wood; H. Yamaguchi; C. Yan; C. Yan; L. Yuan; M. Zeier; B. Zeidman; B. Zihlmann

    2005-05-01

    The A(e,eK+)X reaction has been investigated at Jefferson Laboratory. Data were taken for Q{sup 2} approx. 0.35 GeV{sup 2} at a beam energy of 3.245 GeV for 1H,3He and 4He targets. Evidence for Lambda-hypernuclear bound states is seen for 3,4He targets. This is the first time that the electroproduction of these hypernuclei has been observed.

  10. Electroproduction of strangeness on {sub {lambda}}{sup 3,4}H bound states on Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, F.; Abbott, D.; Carlini, R.; Dunne, J.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Garrow, K.; Lung, A.; Mack, D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J.; Wood, S.; Yan, C.; Ahmidouch, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Martoff, C.J.; Armstrong, C.S.; Arrington, J.; Bailey, K.; Cummings, W.J.

    2005-05-06

    The A(e,e'K+)X reaction has been investigated at Jefferson Laboratory. Data were taken for Q2 {approx_equal} 0.35 GeV2 at a beam energy of 3.245 GeV for 1H,3He and 4He targets. Evidence for {lambda}-hypernuclear bound states is seen for 3,4He targets. This is the first time that the electroproduction of these hypernuclei has been observed.

  11. An analysis of the openehr archetype semantics based on a typed lambda theory.

    PubMed

    Tatsukawa, Akimichi; Shinohara, Emiko Y; Kawazoe, Yoshimasa; Imai, Takeshi; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The openEHR has adopted the dual model architecture consisting of Reference Model and Archetype. The specification, however, lacks formal definitions of archetype semantics, so that its behaviors have remained ambiguous. The objective of this poster is to analyze semantics of the openEHR archetypes: its variance and mutability. We use a typed lambda calculus as an analyzing tool. As a result, we have reached the conclusion that archetypes should be 1) covariant and 2) immutable schema.

  12. Electromagnetically induced transparency in an open {Lambda}-type molecular lithium system

    SciTech Connect

    Lazoudis, A.; Kirova, T.; Ahmed, E. H.; Lyyra, A. M.; Li, L.; Qi, J.

    2010-08-15

    We present an experimental study of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a {Lambda}-type molecular lithium system. Copropagating beam geometry is utilized in order to minimize the residual Doppler width. A coupling laser power dependent study of the EIT feature is carried out. Our findings have been complemented by theoretical studies of open systems that trace the presence of EIT starting from the density-matrix equations. Numerical simulations have been performed and are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Photospheric Activity in Selected Be STARS: lambda Eri and gamma Cas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations of rapid variations in optical He I lines, X-rays, and FUV wavelengths in the prototypical classical Be stars lambda Eri and star gamma Cas hint that the violent processes occur on the surfaces of these stars almost all the time. We suggest that of these phenomena show greater similarities with magnetic flaring than any other process through to occur on stars.

  14. An analysis of the openehr archetype semantics based on a typed lambda theory.

    PubMed

    Tatsukawa, Akimichi; Shinohara, Emiko Y; Kawazoe, Yoshimasa; Imai, Takeshi; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The openEHR has adopted the dual model architecture consisting of Reference Model and Archetype. The specification, however, lacks formal definitions of archetype semantics, so that its behaviors have remained ambiguous. The objective of this poster is to analyze semantics of the openEHR archetypes: its variance and mutability. We use a typed lambda calculus as an analyzing tool. As a result, we have reached the conclusion that archetypes should be 1) covariant and 2) immutable schema. PMID:23920764

  15. Genomic clone for sandbar shark lambda light chain: generation of diversity in the absence of gene rearrangement.

    PubMed Central

    Hohman, V S; Schuchman, D B; Schluter, S F; Marchalonis, J J

    1993-01-01

    While the general structure of immunoglobulin chains has remained relatively unchanged throughout evolution, the organization of the genes encoding these molecules differs substantially. To understand how the rearranging immunoglobulin system arose, it is necessary to examine living representatives of the most early vertebrate phyla. Elasmo-branches, which include the sharks, skates, and rays, are the most primitive phylogenetic class of vertebrates from which immunoglobulin DNA sequences have been obtained. In the sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus), the genes are arranged in individual clusters in which a single variable (V), joining (J), and constant (C) region gene, along with upstream regulatory elements, span a distance of approximately 4.4 kb or approximately 5.8 kb. We report the complete sequence of a genomic clone encoding sandbar shark lambda light chain. A unique finding of our study is that the V and J genes are fused in the germ line. Three additional clones have been shown by DNA sequencing to also have fused V and J genes. The four clones have complementarity-determining regions 3 of various lengths and amino acid sequence variability similar to the products of rearranged genes. Furthermore, analysis by polymerase chain reaction technology revealed an additional 26 genomic clones demonstrating fusion of the V and J segments. Therefore, VJ fusion is the prominent organizational feature of sandbar shark immunoglobulin light chain genes. This finding raises questions concerning the necessity of recombination to produce an antibody repertoire capable of reacting against a diverse array of antigens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8234330

  16. The motion of a single molecule, the lambda-receptor, in the bacterial outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Oddershede, Lene; Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye; Grego, Sonia; Brown, Stanley; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2002-01-01

    Using optical tweezers and single particle tracking, we have revealed the motion of a single protein, the lambda-receptor, in the outer membrane of living Escherichia coli bacteria. We genetically modified the lambda-receptor placing a biotin on an extracellular site of the receptor in vivo. The efficiency of this in vivo biotinylation is very low, thus enabling the attachment of a streptavidin-coated bead binding specifically to a single biotinylated lambda-receptor. The bead was used as a handle for the optical tweezers and as a marker for the single particle tracking routine. We propose a model that allows extraction of the motion of the protein from measurements of the mobility of the bead-molecule complex; these results are equally applicable to analyze bead-protein complexes in other membrane systems. Within a domain of radius approximately 25 nm, the receptor diffuses with a diffusion constant of (1.5 +/- 1.0) x 10(-9) cm(2)/s and sits in a harmonic potential as if it were tethered by an elastic spring of spring constant of ~1.0 x 10(-2) pN/nm to the bacterial membrane. The purpose of the protein motion might be to facilitate transport of maltodextrins through the outer bacterial membrane. PMID:12496085

  17. Observation of the decay B0bar -> LambdaC antiproton pi0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-26

    In a sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider at SLAC we have observed the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar p}{pi}{sup 0} and measured the branching fraction to be (1.94 {+-} 0.17 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.50) x 10{sup -4}, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and the uncertainty on the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} branching fraction, respectively. We determine an upper limit of 1.5 x 10{sup -6} at 90% C.L. for the product branching fraction {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}{sup +}(2455){bar p}) x {Beta}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}). Furthermore, we observe an enhancement at the threshold of the invariant mass of the baryon-antibaryon pair.

  18. Probability landscape of heritable and robust epigenetic state of lysogeny in phage lambda.

    PubMed

    Cao, Youfang; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Liang, Jie

    2010-10-26

    Computational studies of biological networks can help to identify components and wirings responsible for observed phenotypes. However, studying stochastic networks controlling many biological processes is challenging. Similar to Schrödinger's equation in quantum mechanics, the chemical master equation (CME) provides a basic framework for understanding stochastic networks. However, except for simple problems, the CME cannot be solved analytically. Here we use a method called discrete chemical master equation (dCME) to compute directly the full steady-state probability landscape of the lysogeny maintenance network in phage lambda from its CME. Results show that wild-type phage lambda can maintain a constant level of repressor over a wide range of repressor degradation rate and is stable against UV irradiation, ensuring heritability of the lysogenic state. Furthermore, it can switch efficiently to the lytic state once repressor degradation increases past a high threshold by a small amount. We find that beyond bistability and nonlinear dimerization, cooperativity between repressors bound to O(R)1 and O(R)2 is required for stable and heritable epigenetic state of lysogeny that can switch efficiently. Mutants of phage lambda lack stability and do not possess a high threshold. Instead, they are leaky and respond to gradual changes in degradation rate. Our computation faithfully reproduces the hair triggers for UV-induced lysis observed in mutants and the limitation in robustness against mutations. The landscape approach computed from dCME is general and can be applied to study broad issues in systems biology. PMID:20937911

  19. Direct positive selection for improved nitroreductase variants using SOS triggering of bacteriophage lambda lytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Guise, C P; Grove, J I; Hyde, E I; Searle, P F

    2007-04-01

    Expression of prodrug-activating enzymes that convert non-toxic substrates to cytotoxic derivatives is a promising strategy for cancer gene therapy. However, their catalytic activity with unnatural, prodrug substrates is often suboptimal. Efforts to improve these enzymes have been limited by the inability to select directly for increased prodrug activation. We have focussed on developing variants of Escherichia coli (E. coli) nitroreductase (NTR) with improved ability to activate the prodrug 5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide (CB1954), and describe here a novel, direct, positive selection for improved enzymes that exploits the alternative life cycles of bacteriophage lambda. In lambda lysogens of E. coli, the activation of the prodrug CB1954 by NTR triggers the SOS response to DNA damage, switching integrated lambda prophages into lytic cycle. This provides a direct, positive selection for phages encoding improved NTR variants, as, upon limiting exposure of lysogenized E. coli to CB1954, only those encoding the most active enzyme variants are triggered into lytic cycle, allowing their selective recovery. We exemplify the selection by isolating highly improved 'turbo-NTR' variants from a library of 6.8 x 10(5) clones, conferring up to 50-fold greater sensitivity to CB1954 than the wild type. Carcinoma cells infected with adenovirus expressing T41Q/N71S/F124T-NTR were sensitized to CB1954 concentrations 40- to 80-fold lower than required with WT-NTR. PMID:17301844

  20. Pertinence of kappa and lambda recombinant antibodies directed against thyroid peroxidase in thyroid autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Bresson, D; Chardès, T; Chapal, N; Bès, C; Cerutti, M; Devauchelle, G; Bouanani, M; Mani, J C; Péraldi-Roux, S

    2001-01-01

    Forty-one single-chain variable region fragments (scFvs) directed against thyroid peroxidase (TPO) were obtained by phage display libraries constructed from thyroid-infiltrating B cells of Graves' disease patients. Among these scFvs, 24.4% used a Vkappa light chain whereas 75.6% shows a light chain of Vlamda origin. Study of light chain gene usage in the TPO antibody repertoire demonstrated a dominance of the Vkappa 1-39 and Vlambda 1-51 genes. Thyroid peroxidase probing of overlapping peptides covering the amino acid sequences of anti-TPO T2/kappa and T13/lambda variable regions demonstrated a more restricted antigen recognition on T13/lambda than on T2/kappa. These two recombinant antibodies, expressed as whole IgG1 in the baculovirus/insect cell system, inhibited the binding to TPO of serum TPO autoantibodies whatever the light chain. Our study indicates that lambda as well as kappa light chain usage are found in the TPO antibody repertoire of thyroid-infiltrating B cells and are pertinent in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease.

  1. The A dependence of K{sup 0} and {lambda} Neutrino production on nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Agababyan, N. M.; Ammosov, V. V.; Atayan, M.; Grigoryan, N.; Gulkanyan, H.; Ivanilov, A. A. Karamyan, Zh.; Korotkov, V. A.

    2007-10-15

    The A dependence of the production of K{sup 0} and {lambda} is investigated for the first time in neutrino-nuclear reactions using the data obtained with the SKAT bubble chamber. An exponential parametrization ({approx}A{sup {beta}}) of the particle yields results in {sigma}({beta}{sub V}{sup 0}) {sigma} = 0.20 {+-} 0.05 for V{sup 0} particles (K{sup 0} and {lambda}), while for {pi}{sup -} mesons the A dependence is much weaker ({sigma}({beta}{sub {pi}}{sup -}) {sigma} = 0.068 {+-} 0.007). A nuclear enhancement of the ratio K{sup 0}/{pi}{sup -} is found; this ratio increases from 0.055 {+-} 0.013 for vN interactions up to 0.070 {+-} 0.011 at A {approx} 21 and 0.099 {+-} 0.011 at A {approx} 45. It is observed that the multiplicity rise of V{sup 0} occurs predominantly in the backward hemisphere of the hadronic system. It is shown that the A dependence of the {lambda}{sup 0} and {pi}{sup -} yields can be reproduced in the framework of a model incorporating the secondary intranuclear interactions of pions originating from the primary vN interactions.

  2. Efficacy of alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin applications to prevent Aedes breeding in tires.

    PubMed

    Pettit, William J; Whelan, Peter I; McDonnell, Joseph; Jacups, Susan P

    2010-12-01

    The efficacy of alpha-cypermethrin (Cyperthor) and lambda-cyhalothrin (Demand) to prevent mosquito larval colonization of water-containing receptacles was investigated using 2 differing applications in disused car tires in Darwin, Australia. Insecticide treatments were applied uniformly to the inside surfaces of 2 categories of tires: 1) dry tires that were partially filled with water 24 h after spraying and 2) wet tires partially filled with water prior to spraying. All mosquito larvae, pupae, and dead adults were collected from the treatment and control tires weekly over the 24-wk study period and were later identified to species in the laboratory. Control tires were colonized by Aedes notoscriptus in wk 2 and by Culex quinquefasciatus in wk 4. Aedes notoscriptus failed to colonize any alpha-cypermethrin-treated tires until wk 22 and did not colonize any lambda-cyhalothrin-treated tires during the 24-wk trial. Culex quinquefasciatus colonized alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin-treated tires from wk 11 and wk 15, respectively. These results indicate both insecticides using either application method can prevent colonization of Ae. notoscriptus for at least 20 wk and demonstrate great potential for the prevention of breeding in receptacles for other receptacle-breeding Aedes species, such as the dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus.

  3. Theory of sub-Doppler cooling of three-level {Lambda} atoms in standing light waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kosachev, D.V.; Rozhdestvenskii, Yu.V.

    1994-12-01

    A general theory of cooling of three-level {Lambda} atoms in two standing light waves between which there is a relative spatial phase shift is presented for arbitrary ratios of the intensity and detuning. It is shown that in the case of equal detuning of the light waves, deep (sub-Doppler) cooling of three-level atoms occurs for any values of the spatial phase shift. For zero spatial phase shift, the atoms are strongly cooled due to coherent population trapping in the given atom-field interaction scheme. On the other hand, for the case of different frequency detunings, sub-Doppler cooling of {Lambda} atoms is possible only with a nonzero relative phase shift; it is shown that this is associated with the so-called {open_quotes}Sisyphus{close_quotes} cooling mechanism. The authors underscore that in their scheme neither a polarization gradient of the exciting waves nor a magnetic field is required to achieve this type of cooling pattern; two standing waves acting on different transitions of a {Lambda} atom are sufficient. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Differential cross sections for gamma + p --> K^+ + Y for Lambda and Sigma^0 hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    R. Bradford; R.A. Schumacher; J.W.C. McNabb; L. Todor; et. Al.

    2005-09-29

    High-statistics cross sections for the reactions {gamma} + p {yields} K{sup +} + {Lambda} and {gamma} + p {yields} K{sup +} + {Sigma}{sup 0} have been measured using CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies W between 1.6 and 2.53 GeV, and for -0.85 < cos {theta}{sub K{sup +}}{sup c.m.} < +0.95. In the K{sup +}{Lambda} channel we confirm a resonance-like structure near W=1.9 GeV at backward kaon angles. The position and width of this structure change with angle, indicating that more than one resonance is likely playing a role. The K{sup +} {Lambda} channel at forward angles and all energies is well described by a t-channel scaling characteristic of Regge exchange, while the same scaling applied to the K{sup +} {Sigma}{sup 0} channel is less successful. Several existing theoretical models are compared to the data, but none provide a good representation of the results.

  5. Hierarchy of N-point functions in the {Lambda}CDM and ReBEL cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Weygaert, Rien van de

    2010-11-15

    In this work we investigate higher-order statistics for the {Lambda}CDM and ReBEL scalar-interacting dark matter models by analyzing 180h{sup -1} Mpc dark matter N-body simulation ensembles. The N-point correlation functions and the related hierarchical amplitudes, such as skewness and kurtosis, are computed using the counts-in-cells method. Our studies demonstrate that the hierarchical amplitudes S{sub n} of the scalar-interacting dark matter model significantly deviate from the values in the {Lambda}CDM cosmology on scales comparable and smaller than the screening length r{sub s} of a given scalar-interacting model. The corresponding additional forces that enhance the total attractive force exerted on dark matter particles at galaxy scales lower the values of the hierarchical amplitudes S{sub n}. We conclude that hypothetical additional exotic interactions in the dark matter sector should leave detectable markers in the higher-order correlation statistics of the density field. We focused in detail on the redshift evolution of the dark matter field's skewness and kurtosis. From this investigation we find that the deviations from the canonical {Lambda}CDM model introduced by the presence of the 'fifth' force attain a maximum value at redshifts 0.5

  6. Evaluation of the lambda model for human postural control during ankle strategy.

    PubMed

    Micheau, Philippe; Kron, Aymeric; Bourassa, Paul

    2003-09-01

    An accurate modeling of human stance might be helpful in assessing postural deficit. The objective of this article is to validate a mathematical postural control model for quiet standing posture. The postural dynamics is modeled in the sagittal plane as an inverted pendulum with torque applied at the ankle joint. The torque control system is represented by the physiological lambda model. Two neurophysiological command variables of the central nervous system, designated lambda and micro, establish the dynamic threshold muscle at which motoneuron recruitment begins. Kinematic data and electromyographic signals were collected on four young males in order to measure small voluntary sway and quiet standing posture. Validation of the mathematical model was achieved through comparison of the experimental and simulated results. The mathematical model allows computation of the unmeasurable neurophysiological commands lambda and micro that control the equilibrium position and stability. Furthermore, with the model it is possible to conclude that low-amplitude body sway during quiet stance is commanded by the central nervous system.

  7. Observation of a Near-Threshold Enhancement in the e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -} Cross Section Using Initial-State Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhlova, G.; Balagura, V.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Liventsev, D.; Mizuk, R.; Pakhlov, P.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uglov, T.; Adachi, I.; Brodzicka, J.; Dalseno, J.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.

    2008-10-24

    We report a measurement of the exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -} cross section as a function of center-of-mass energy near the {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -} threshold. A clear peak with a significance of 8.2{sigma} is observed in the {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -} invariant mass distribution just above threshold. With an assumption of a resonance origin for the observed peak, a mass and width of M=[4634{sub -7}{sup +8}(stat){sub -8}{sup +5}(syst)] MeV/c{sup 2} and {gamma}{sub tot}=[92{sub -24}{sup +40}(stat){sub -21}{sup +10}(syst)] MeV are determined. The analysis is based on a study of events with initial-state-radiation photons in a data sample collected with the Belle detector at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance and nearby continuum with an integrated luminosity of 695 fb{sup -1} at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  8. Absence of {lambda} immunoglobulin sequences on the supernumerary chromosome of the {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A.; White, B.N.; Holden, J.J.A.

    1995-09-11

    The supernumerary bisatellited chromosome causing the {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome (CES) is of chromosome 22 origin and consists of an inverted duplication of the 22pter{r_arrow}22q11.2 region. To determine the extent of involvement of band q11.2 on the bisatellited chromosome, copy number assessment of sequences homologous to cloned {lambda} immunoglobulin ({lambda} Ig) gene region probes was carried out on DNA from individuals with CES using densitometric analysis of Southern blots. None of the 10 {lambda} Ig sequences studied was found in increased copy number in DNA from any of the 10 CES individuals tested, indicating that these sequences are not present on the supernumerary chromosome. The breakpoints involved in the generation of the bisatellited supernumerary chromosome associated with CES are therefore proximal to the {lambda} Ig gene region. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Bright high z SnIa: A challenge for {lambda}CDM

    SciTech Connect

    Perivolaropoulos, L.; Shafieloo, A.

    2009-06-15

    It has recently been pointed out by Kowalski et. al.[Astrophys. J. 686, 749 (2008).] that there is 'an unexpected brightness of the SnIa data at z>1'. We quantify this statement by constructing a new statistic which is applicable directly on the type Ia supernova (SnIa) distance moduli. This statistic is designed to pick up systematic brightness trends of SnIa data points with respect to a best fit cosmological model at high redshifts. It is based on binning the normalized differences between the SnIa distance moduli and the corresponding best fit values in the context of a specific cosmological model (e.g. {lambda}CDM). These differences are normalized by the standard errors of the observed distance moduli. We then focus on the highest redshift bin and extend its size toward lower redshifts until the binned normalized difference (BND) changes sign (crosses 0) at a redshift z{sub c} (bin size N{sub c}). The bin size N{sub c} of this crossing (the statistical variable) is then compared with the corresponding crossing bin size N{sub mc} for Monte Carlo data realizations based on the best fit model. We find that the crossing bin size N{sub c} obtained from the Union08 and Gold06 data with respect to the best fit {lambda}CDM model is anomalously large compared to N{sub mc} of the corresponding Monte Carlo data sets obtained from the best fit {lambda}CDM in each case. In particular, only 2.2% of the Monte Carlo {lambda}CDM data sets are consistent with the Gold06 value of N{sub c} while the corresponding probability for the Union08 value of N{sub c} is 5.3%. Thus, according to this statistic, the probability that the high redshift brightness bias of the Union08 and Gold06 data sets is realized in the context of a (w{sub 0},w{sub 1})=(-1,0) model ({lambda}CDM cosmology) is less than 6%. The corresponding realization probability in the context of a (w{sub 0},w{sub 1})=(-1.4,2) model is more than 30% for both the Union08 and the Gold06 data sets indicating a much better

  10. On the theoretical link between LLL-reduction and Lambda-decorrelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannes, A.

    2013-04-01

    The LLL algorithm, introduced by Lenstra et al. (Math Ann 261:515-534, 1982), plays a key role in many fields of applied mathematics. In particular, it is used as an effective numerical tool for preconditioning the integer least-squares problems arising in high-precision geodetic positioning and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). In 1992, Teunissen developed a method for solving these nearest-lattice point (NLP) problems. This method is referred to as Lambda (for Least-squares AMBiguity Decorrelation Adjustment). The preconditioning stage of Lambda corresponds to its decorrelation algorithm. From an epistemological point of view, the latter was devised through an innovative statistical approach completely independent of the LLL algorithm. Recent papers pointed out some similarities between the LLL algorithm and the Lambda-decorrelation algorithm. We try to clarify this point in the paper. We first introduce a parameter measuring the orthogonality defect of the integer basis in which the NLP problem is solved, the LLL-reduced basis of the LLL algorithm, or the Λ -basis of the Lambda method. With regard to this problem, the potential qualities of these bases can then be compared. The Λ -basis is built by working at the level of the variance-covariance matrix of the float solution, while the LLL-reduced basis is built by working at the level of its inverse. As a general rule, the orthogonality defect of the Λ -basis is greater than that of the corresponding LLL-reduced basis; these bases are however very close to one another. To specify this tight relationship, we present a method that provides the dual LLL-reduced basis of a given Λ -basis. As a consequence of this basic link, all the recent developments made on the LLL algorithm can be applied to the Lambda-decorrelation algorithm. This point is illustrated in a concrete manner: we present a parallel Λ -type decorrelation algorithm derived from the parallel LLL algorithm of Luo and Qiao (Proceedings of

  11. Quantitative Analysis of the Stability of Lysogenic State in Phage lambda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Ping

    2004-03-01

    Based on the recently developed dynamical structure theory for complex networks and the seminal work of Shea and Ackers in the 1980's, we formulate a transparent and concise mathematical framework for the gene regulatory network controlling phage lambda life cycles, which naturally includes the stochastic effect. The dynamical structure theory states that the dynamics of a complex network is determined by its four elementary components: The dissipation (analogous to degradation) and stochastic force, the driving force determined by a potential and the transverse force. The potential may be interpreted as a landscape for the phage development in terms of attractive basins, saddle points, peaks and valleys. The dissipation gives rise to the adaptivity of the phage in the landscape defined by the potential: The phage always has the tendency to approach the bottom of the nearby attractive basin. The stochastic fluctuation gives the phage the ability to search around the potential landscape by passing through saddle points. With molecular parameters in our model fixed primarily by the experimental data on wild type phage and supplemented by data on one mutant, our calculated results on mutants agree quantitatively with the available experimental observations on other mutants for protein number, lysogenization frequency, lysis frequency in lysogen culture. The calculation reproduces the observed robustness of the phage lambda genetic switch. This is the first mathematical description which successfully represents such a wide variety of major experimental phenomena. Specifically we find: 1) The explanation for both the stability and the efficiency of phage lambda switch is the exponential dependence of saddle point crossing rate on potential barrier height, a result of the stochastic motion in a landscape; 2) The positive feedback of CI transcription, enhanced by the CI dimer cooperative binding, is the key to the robustness of the phage lambda genetic switch against

  12. NE VIII lambda 774 and time variable associated absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamann, Fred; Barlow, Thomas A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa; Lyons, R.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss measurements of Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption and the time variability of other lines in the z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption system of the z(sub e) = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (0150-203). The C IV lambda 1549 and N V 1240 doublets at z(sub a) = 2.1340 (shifted approximately 1500 km/s from z(sub e) strengthened by a factor of approximately 3 between observations by Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1981 November) and our earliest measurements (1990 November and December). We have no information on changes in other z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption lines. Continued monitoring since 1990 November shows no clear changes in any of the absorptions between approximately 1100 and 1640 A rest. The short timescale of the variability (less than or approximately equal to 2.9 yr rest) strongly suggests that the clouds are dense, compact, close to the QSO, and photoionized by the QSO continuum. If the line variability is caused by changes in the ionization, the timescale requires densities greater than approximately 4000/cu cm. Photoionization calculations place the absorbing clouds within approximately 200 pc of the continuum source. The full range of line ionizations (from Ne VIII lambda 774 to C III lambda 977) in optically thin gas (no Lyman limit) implies that the absorbing regions span a factor of more than approximately 10 in distance or approximately 100 in density. Across these regions, the total hydrogen (H I + H II) column ranges from a few times 10(exp 18)/sq cm in the low-ionization gas to approximately 10(exp 20)/sq cm where the Ne VIII doublet forms. The metallicity is roughly solar or higher, with nitrogen possibly more enhanced by factors of a few. The clouds might contribute significant line emission if they nearly envelop the QSO. The presence of highly ionized Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption near the QSO supports recent studies that link z(sub a) approximately equal to z(sub e) systems with X-ray 'wamr absorbers. We show that the

  13. Presence of crystalline inclusions in the peripheral nerve of a patient with IgA lambda monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Nedelec-Ciceri, Claudine; Vital, Claude

    2008-10-01

    Association of a peripheral neuropathy with an IgA monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is not commonly observed and is sometimes considered as coincidental. We present a case in which the nerve biopsy revealed the presence of crystalline inclusions in the endoneurium, a very unusual finding. A 75-year-old man complained of paresthesiae in both feet and unsteady gait for 6 months. He had no weakness, but deep tendon reflexes were absent and vibratory sensation distally diminished in both legs. An IgA lambda MGUS was evidenced in his serum at 10.2 g/L with 7% plasma cells in his bone marrow and no lytic lesion at skeletal examination. A superficial peroneal nerve biopsy was performed and showed numerous crystalline inclusions in the endoneurium. These were located in the cytoplasm of macrophagic histiocytes or free in the vicinity of nerve fibers. There was also a marked loss of myelinated nerve fibers and several "onion bulb" formations surrounding either isolated remyelinating fibers or small clusters of remyelinating fibers. Such crystalline inclusions have mainly been observed in the cytoplasm of plasma cells in cases of multiple myeloma, and correspond to non-secreted IgA or IgG immunoglobulins with a kappa or rarely lambda light chain. Such inclusions have also been reported in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells from corneal fragments, in patients with multiple myeloma or IgG MGUS, and in the tubular cells from the kidney of patients with multiple myeloma and a nephrotic syndrome. In the literature, there is only one very briefly mentioned case of neuropathy associated with a myeloma and with crystalline inclusions present in the epineurium. Thus, in dysglobulinemic neuropathy, nerve fibers can be damaged by three kinds of interstitial deposits, easily identified by immunohistochemistry and at ultrastructural examination: the well known amyloid fibrils, granulo-fibrillar deposits and also crystalline inclusions. PMID:18410274

  14. Science Archives in the 21st Century: A NASA LAMBDA Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterworth, P.; Greason, M.

    2007-01-01

    Lambda is a thematic data center that focuses on serving the cosmic microwave background (CMB) research community. LAMBDA is an active archive for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission data sets. In addition, LAMBDA provides analysis software, on-line tools, relevant ancillary data and important web links. LAMBDA also tries to preserve the most important ground-based and suborbital CMB data sets. CMB data is unlike other astrophysical data, consisting of intrinsically diffuse surface brightness photometry with a signal contrast of the order 1 part in 100,000 relative to the uniform background. Because of the extremely faint signal levels, the signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low and detailed instrument-specific knowledge of the data is essential. While the number of data sets being produced is not especially large, those data sets are becoming large and complex. That tendency will increase when the many polarization experiments currently being deployed begin producing data. The LAMBDA experience supports many aspects of the NASA data archive model developed informally over the last ten years-that small focused data centers are often more effective than larger more ambitious collections, for example; that data centers are usually best run by active scientists; that it can be particularly advantageous if those scientists are leaders in the use of the archived data sets; etc. LAMBDA has done some things so well that they might provide lessons for other archives. A lot of effort has been devoted to developing a simple and consistent interface to data sets, for example; and serving all the documentation required via simple 'more' pages and longer explanatory supplements. Many of the problems faced by LAMBDA will also not surprise anyone trying to manage other space science data. These range from persuading mission scientists to provide their data as quickly as possible, to dealing with a high volume of

  15. Planck Cold Clumps in the λ Orionis Complex. I. Discovery of an Extremely Young Class 0 Protostellar Object and a Proto-brown Dwarf Candidate in the Bright-rimmed Clump PGCC G192.32-11.88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie; Zhang, Qizhou; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wu, Yuefang; Lee, Chang Won; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Choi, Minho; Juvela, Mika; Thompson, Mark; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Liu, Sheng-yuan; Naomi, Hirano; Koch, Patrick; Henkel, Christian; Sanhueza, Patricio; He, JinHua; Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Wang, Ke; Cunningham, Maria R.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Lai, Shih-Ping; Yuan, Jinghua; Li, Di; Fuller, Gary; Kang, Miju; Nguyen Luong, Quang; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Yang, Ji; Xu, Ye; Hirota, Tomoya; Mardones, Diego; Qin, Sheng-Li; Chen, Huei-Ru; Kwon, Woojin; Meng, FanYi; Zhang, Huawei; Kim, Mi-Ryang; Yi, Hee-Weon

    2016-01-01

    We are performing a series of observations with ground-based telescopes toward Planck Galactic cold clumps (PGCCs) in the λ Orionis complex in order to systematically investigate the effects of stellar feedback. In the particular case of PGCC G192.32-11.88, we discovered an extremely young Class 0 protostellar object (G192N) and a proto-brown dwarf candidate (G192S). G192N and G192S are located in a gravitationally bound bright-rimmed clump. The velocity and temperature gradients seen in line emission of CO isotopologues indicate that PGCC G192.32-11.88 is externally heated and compressed. G192N probably has the lowest bolometric luminosity (˜0.8 {L}⊙ ) and accretion rate (6.3 × 10-7 {M}⊙ yr-1) when compared with other young Class 0 sources (e.g., PACS Bright Red Sources) in the Orion complex. It has slightly larger internal luminosity (0.21 ± 0.01 {L}⊙ ) and outflow velocity (˜14 km s-1) than the predictions of first hydrostatic cores (FHSCs). G192N might be among the youngest Class 0 sources, which are slightly more evolved than an FHSC. Considering its low internal luminosity (0.08 ± 0.01 {L}⊙ ) and accretion rate (2.8 × 10-8 {M}⊙ yr-1), G192S is an ideal proto-brown dwarf candidate. The star formation efficiency (˜0.3%-0.4%) and core formation efficiency (˜1%) in PGCC G192.32-11.88 are significantly smaller than in other giant molecular clouds or filaments, indicating that the star formation therein is greatly suppressed owing to stellar feedback.

  16. SEARCHING FOR COOLING SIGNATURES IN STRONG LENSING GALAXY CLUSTERS: EVIDENCE AGAINST BARYONS SHAPING THE MATTER DISTRIBUTION IN CLUSTER CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Peter K.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; McDonald, Michael; Dahle, Hakon; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren; Mushotzky, Richard

    2013-07-20

    The process by which the mass density profile of certain galaxy clusters becomes centrally concentrated enough to produce high strong lensing (SL) cross-sections is not well understood. It has been suggested that the baryonic condensation of the intracluster medium (ICM) due to cooling may drag dark matter to the cores and thus steepen the profile. In this work, we search for evidence of ongoing ICM cooling in the first large, well-defined sample of SL selected galaxy clusters in the range 0.1 < z < 0.6. Based on known correlations between the ICM cooling rate and both optical emission line luminosity and star formation, we measure, for a sample of 89 SL clusters, the fraction of clusters that have [O II]{lambda}{lambda}3727 emission in their brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). We find that the fraction of line-emitting BCGs is constant as a function of redshift for z > 0.2 and shows no statistically significant deviation from the total cluster population. Specific star formation rates, as traced by the strength of the 4000 A break, D{sub 4000}, are also consistent with the general cluster population. Finally, we use optical imaging of the SL clusters to measure the angular separation, R{sub arc}, between the arc and the center of mass of each lensing cluster in our sample and test for evidence of changing [O II] emission and D{sub 4000} as a function of R{sub arc}, a proxy observable for SL cross-sections. D{sub 4000} is constant with all values of R{sub arc}, and the [O II] emission fractions show no dependence on R{sub arc} for R{sub arc} > 10'' and only very marginal evidence of increased weak [O II] emission for systems with R{sub arc} < 10''. These results argue against the ability of baryonic cooling associated with cool core activity in the cores of galaxy clusters to strongly modify the underlying dark matter potential, leading to an increase in SL cross-sections.

  17. Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Annis, James T.; Becker, Matthew R.; Evrard, August E.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Hansen, Sarah M.; Hao, Jia; Johnston, David E.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Weinberg, David H.; /CCAPP /Ohio State U.

    2009-08-03

    We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness-mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we find {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega}{sub m}/0.25){sup 0.41} = 0.832 {+-} 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness-mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.020 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.

  18. NMR determination of lysine pKa values in the Pol lambda lyase domain: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guanghua; DeRose, Eugene F; Kirby, Thomas W; London, Robert E

    2006-02-14

    The base excision repair (BER) process requires removal of an abasic deoxyribose-5-phosphate group, a catalytic activity that has been demonstrated for the N-terminal 8 kDa domain of DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta), and for the homologous domain of DNA polymerase lambda (Pol lambda). Previous studies have demonstrated that this activity results from formation of a Schiff base adduct of the abasic deoxyribose C-1' with a lysine residue (K312 in the case of Pol lambda), followed by a beta-elimination reaction. To better understand the underlying chemistry, we have determined pKa values for the lysine residues in the Pol lambda lyase domain labeled with [epsilon-13C]lysine. At neutral pH, the H(epsilon) protons on 3 of the 10 lysine residues in this domain, K287, K291, and K312, exhibit chemical shift inequivalence that results from immobilization of the lysyl side chains. For K287 and K291, this results from the K287-E261 and K291-E298 salt bridge interactions, while for K312, immobilization apparently results from steric and hydrogen-bonding interactions that constrain the position of the lysine side chain. The pKa value of K312 is depressed to 9.58, a value indicating that at physiological pH K312 will exist predominantly in the protonated form. Titration of the domain with hairpin DNA containing a 5'-tetrahydrofuran terminus to model the abasic site produced shifts of the labeled lysine resonances that were in fast exchange but appeared to be complete at a stoichiometry of approximately 1:1.3, consistent with a dissociation constant of approximately 1 microM. The epsilon-proton shifts of K273 were the most sensitive to the addition of the DNA, apparently due to changes in the relative orientation between K273 and W274 in the DNA complex. The average pKa values increased by 0.55, consistent with the formation of some DNA-lysine salt bridges and with the general pH increase expected to result from a reduction in the net positive charge of the complex. A general

  19. The effect of confinement on liquid helium near the lambda line

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, M.E.

    1993-12-31

    This thesis is the compilation of several projects relevant to the behavior of confined liquid helium near the {lambda}-line. The first project described is the development of two new high resolution thermometers optimized for specific heat studies of helium confined in pores. One of the thermometers is a superconductive transition thermometer (STT). The STT has a temperature resolution of about 5nK. The other high resolution thermometer described is a magnetic susceptibility thermometer. This thermometer measures the magnetization of copper ammonium bromide (CAB) using a SQUID magnetometer. The CAB thermometer has an observed sensitivity of about 20nK. Suggestions for improvements in both thermometers are made. Simulation work on the temperature profile of a thermal conductivity cell near T{lambda} is described. The simulations are compared with the experimental results, and a careful study of the stability of the numerics is described. The study of helium confined into pores and films is described next. Both previous theoretical and experimental work on finite size effects in liquid helium are described. The geometry provided by glass capillary arrays is analyzed to determine what would be observed when the specific heat of helium confined to the arrays is measured. Finally, I describe my measurements of the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient {beta}{sub P} of 4He confined in an aerogel for several isobars along the {lambda}-line. {beta}{sub P} is an asymptotically linear function of C{sub P} near the superfluid transition temperature {Tc}. Therefore, fits to power laws in t {triple_bond} T/{Tc} - 1 give the specific heat exponents {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} and amplitude ratio A{prime}/A. Such fits gave different exponents {alpha} {approx} -0.6 and {alpha}{prime} {approx} -1.0 above and below {Tc}.

  20. Is it possible to observationally distinguish adiabatic quartessence from {lambda}CDM?

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, L.; Reis, R. R. R.; Waga, I.

    2006-09-15

    The equation of state (EOS) in quartessence models interpolates between two stages: p{approx_equal}0 at high energy densities and p{approx_equal}-{rho} at small ones. In the quartessence models analyzed up to now, the EOS is convex, implying increasing adiabatic sound speed (c{sub s}{sup 2}) as the energy density decreases in an expanding universe. A nonnegligible c{sub s}{sup 2} at recent times is the source of the matter power spectrum problem that plagued all convex (nonsilent) quartessence models. Viability for these cosmologies is only possible in the limit of almost perfect mimicry to {lambda}CDM. In this work we investigate if similarity to {lambda}CDM is also required in the class of quartessence models whose EOS changes concavity as the Universe evolves. We focus our analysis in the simple case in which the EOS has a steplike shape, such that at very early times p{approx_equal}0, and at late times p{approx_equal}const<0. For this class of models a nonnegligible c{sub s}{sup 2} is a transient phenomenon and could be relevant only at a more early epoch. We show that agreement with a large set of cosmological data requires that the transition between these two asymptotic states would have occurred at high redshift (z{sub t} > or approx. 38). This leads us to conjecture that the cosmic expansion history of any successful nonsilent quartessence is (practically) identical to the {lambda}CDM one.

  1. Prophage repression as a model for the study of gene regulation. I. Titration of the lambda repressor.

    PubMed

    Wiesmeyer, H

    1966-01-01

    Wiesmeyer, Herbert (Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.). Prophage repression as a model for the study of gene regulation. I. Titration of the lambda repressor. J. Bacteriol. 91:89-94. 1966.-The concentration of lambda repressor molecules within a lambda lysogenic cell was estimated from the multiplicity of superinfecting homologous phage necessary to permit replication and release of plaque-forming units. A multiplicity of 20 superinfecting phage was found sufficient to permit replication to occur in the normal lambda lysogen. The phage released after lysis of the superinfected lysogen was composed of both prophage and superinfecting phage types. Superinfection of the lysogen at lower multiplicities resulted in the lysis of only a small percentage of infected cells and is thought to represent a possible heterogeneity of repressor concentration in the lysogenic population. Viability of the superinfecting particle was found to be unnecessary for titration of the repressor. The repressor concentration in three lysogens of the nonultraviolet-inducible mutant of lambda, lambda(ind-), was found to be greater than 20 regardless of the host bacterium. However, the number of cells yielding phage after superinfection was found to vary with the particular host. The specificity of the lambda repressor was shown to be limited to homologous phage, as determined following heterologous superinfection experiments with phages T6r, 82c, 434c, 434hy, and 424. In all instances except that of superinfection with phage 434hy, only heterologous phage replication occurred. Superinfection by phage 434hy resulted in the release of both prophage and superinfecting phage types. The latter type represented approximately 80% of the total phage released.

  2. Neutral kaon and lambda production in electron-positron annihilation at 29 GeV and the Z boson resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Fordham, C.S.

    1990-10-01

    The production of K{sup 0} and {Lambda} in the hadronization of q{bar q} events from e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at 29 GeV and the Z{sup 0} resonance is studied using the Mark II detector as upgraded for running at the Stanford Linear Collider. Hadronization processes cannot presently be calculated with Quantum Chromodynamics; instead, hadronization models must be used in comparisons with data. In these models, hadronization occurs at local energy scales of a few GeV, a level at which small differences in quark and diquark mass significantly affect the production of particles such as K{sup 0} and {Lambda}, the lightest neutral meson and baryon containing strange quarks. Their production and behavior in hadronic events is a test for the accuracy of our understanding of hadronization. Two-charged- particle decays of the K{sup 0} and {Lambda} are isolated within the hadronic event sample. The resulting distribution of K{sup 0} and {Lambda} are corrected for inefficiencies and generalized to include all K{sup 0} and {Lambda}. Various kinematic distributions of the strange particles are examined. These distributions include the momentum and scaled momentum of the particles. The kinematics of the particles with respect to the original quark direction are examined through the distributions of rapidity and momentum transverse to the thrust both in and out of the event plane. The dependence of K{sup 0} and {Lambda} production on the sphericity of the hadronic events is also examined. All these distributions show that the behavior of K{sup 0} and {Lambda} in hadronic events is consistent with the hadronization models.

  3. Fiber-coupled dual-mode waveguide interferometer with lambda/130 fringe spacing.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Richard M; Blockley, Andrew F; Banerji, J; Davies, Alan R

    2008-04-25

    Predictions and measurements of a multimode waveguide interferometer operating in a fiber-coupled, "dual-mode" regime are reported. With a 1.32 microm source, a complete switching cycle of the output beam is produced by a 10.0 nm incremental change in the 8.0 microm width of the hollow planar mirror waveguide. This equates to a fringe spacing of approximately lambda/130. This is an order of magnitude smaller than previously reported results for this form of interferometer. PMID:18518197

  4. Very high-resolution heat-capacity measurements near the lambda point of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1983-01-01

    New measurements of the heat capacity of a sample of helium 3-mm high are reported, which extend to within 5 x 10 to the -8th deg of the lambda transition at the vapor pressure. From an analysis of the results allowing for the effect of gravity, the values -0.0127 + or - 0.0026 (2 sigma) for the exponent alpha (= alpha-prime) and 1,058 + or - 0.004 for the leading singularity ratio A/A-prime are obtained. These values are in closer agreement with the theoretical predictions than those reported previously.

  5. The global lambda visualization facility: An international ultra-high-definition wide-area visualization collaboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leigh, J.; Renambot, L.; Johnson, Aaron H.; Jeong, B.; Jagodic, R.; Schwarz, N.; Svistula, D.; Singh, R.; Aguilera, J.; Wang, X.; Vishwanath, V.; Lopez, B.; Sandin, D.; Peterka, T.; Girado, J.; Kooima, R.; Ge, J.; Long, L.; Verlo, A.; DeFanti, T.A.; Brown, M.; Cox, D.; Patterson, R.; Dorn, P.; Wefel, P.; Levy, S.; Talandis, J.; Reitzer, J.; Prudhomme, T.; Coffin, T.; Davis, B.; Wielinga, P.; Stolk, B.; Bum, Koo G.; Kim, J.; Han, S.; Corrie, B.; Zimmerman, T.; Boulanger, P.; Garcia, M.

    2006-01-01

    The research outlined in this paper marks an initial global cooperative effort between visualization and collaboration researchers to build a persistent virtual visualization facility linked by ultra-high-speed optical networks. The goal is to enable the comprehensive and synergistic research and development of the necessary hardware, software and interaction techniques to realize the next generation of end-user tools for scientists to collaborate on the global Lambda Grid. This paper outlines some of the visualization research projects that were demonstrated at the iGrid 2005 workshop in San Diego, California. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Refractive index measured by laser beam displacement at {lambda}=1064 nm for solvents and deuterated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, David P.

    2011-07-20

    The refractive index of a liquid is determined with 0.0003 accuracy from measurements of laser beam displacement by a liquid-filled standard 10 mm spectrophotometer cell. The apparatus and methods are described and the results of measurements at {lambda}=1064 nm and T=25.0 deg. C for 30 solvents and deuterated solvents are presented. Several sources of potential systematic errors as large as 0.003 are identified, the most important being the curvature of the liquid cell windows. The measurements are analyzed accounting for the significant imperfections of the apparatus.

  7. Wolfgang Priester: from the big bounce to the Lambda-dominated universe.

    PubMed

    Overduin, James; Blome, Hans-Joachim; Hoell, Josef

    2007-06-01

    Wolfgang Priester (1924-2005) was one of Germany's most versatile and quixotic astrophysicists, reinventing himself successively as a radio astronomer, space physicist and cosmologist, and making a lasting impact on each field. We focus in this personal account on his contributions to cosmology, where he will be most remembered for his association with quasars, his promotion of the idea of a nonsingular "big bounce" at the beginning of the current expansionary phase, and his recognition of the importance of dark energy (Einstein's cosmological constant Lambda) well before this became the standard paradigm in cosmology. PMID:17146687

  8. Robustness, stability and efficiency of phage lambda genetic switch: dynamical structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X-M; Yin, L; Hood, L; Ao, P

    2004-12-01

    Based on the dynamical structure theory for complex networks recently developed by one of us and on the physical-chemical models for gene regulation, developed by Shea and Ackers in the 1980's, we formulate a direct and concise mathematical framework for the genetic switch controlling phage lambda life cycles, which naturally includes the stochastic effect. The dynamical structure theory states that the dynamics of a complex network is determined by its four elementary components: The dissipation (analogous to degradation), the stochastic force, the driving force determined by a potential, and the transverse force. The potential may be interpreted as a landscape for the phage development in terms of attractive basins, saddle points, peaks and valleys. The dissipation gives rise to the adaptivity of the phage in the landscape defined by the potential: The phage always has the tendency to approach the bottom of the nearby attractive basin. The transverse force tends to keep the network on the equal-potential contour of the landscape. The stochastic fluctuation gives the phage the ability to search around the potential landscape by passing through saddle points. With molecular parameters in our model fixed primarily by the experimental data on wild-type phage and supplemented by data on one mutant, our calculated results on mutants agree quantitatively with the available experimental observations on other mutants for protein number, lysogenization frequency, and a lysis frequency in lysogen culture. The calculation reproduces the observed robustness of the phage lambda genetic switch. This is the first mathematical description that successfully represents such a wide variety of major experimental phenomena. Specifically, we find: (1) The explanation for both the stability and the efficiency of phage lambda genetic switch is the exponential dependence of saddle point crossing rate on potential barrier height, a result of the stochastic motion in a landscape; and (2

  9. Prediction of Narrow N* and {Lambda}* Resonances with Hidden Charm above 4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2010-12-03

    The interaction between various charmed mesons and charmed baryons is studied within the framework of the coupled-channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. Several meson-baryon dynamically generated narrow N{sup *} and {Lambda}{sup *} resonances with hidden charm are predicted with mass above 4 GeV and width smaller than 100 MeV. The predicted new resonances definitely cannot be accommodated by quark models with three constituent quarks and can be looked for in the forthcoming PANDA/FAIR experiments.

  10. Theory of helium under heat flow near the lambda point. II. Dynamics of phase change

    SciTech Connect

    Onuki, A.

    1984-05-01

    The HeI-He II interface is a crucial aspect in the transformation processes between the superfluid and normal fluid phases. Its motion is investigated when temperatures and heat flows at boundaries deviate from those of a stationary coexistence state. As a unique feature, the heat flow to the interface from the He I side can be mostly transmitted to the He II side by thermal counterflow, and the latent heat generation (or absorption) at the interface becomes negligibly small. In any case the interfacial motion is so slow that the temperature on the He II side T/sub infinity/ is still given by the stationary relation T/sub lambda/-T/sub infinity/proportionalQ/sup 3/4/, where T/sub lambda/ is the critical temperatue and Q is the heat flow. The temperature profile and the interfacial position are calculated in some nonstationary cases. To this end a simple approximation scheme is developed. First, the interface can propagate with a constant velocity and the superfluid region can expand as a shock wave. Second, if the heat flow at the warmer boundary Q/sub w/ and that in the He II region Q/sub -/ are fixed at different values, the length of the He I region y/sub i/ changes in time as (d/dt)y/sup 1+p//sub i/ = constproportional Q/sub w/-Q/sub -/, where p = 1/(1-x/sub lambda/), and x/sub lambda/ is the critical exponent of the thermal conductivity. In particular, if y/sub i/ = 0 at t = 0 and Q/sub w/>Q/sub -/, the normal fluid region emerges as y/sub i/proportionalt/sup() 1/1+P/ at the warmer boundary. Third, if Q/sub -/ and the temperature at the warmer boundary are fixed, the interfacial position approaches an equilibrium position exponentially in time. The uniqueness of the problem arises from the superfluidity on the He II side and the strong critical singularity of the thermal conductivity on the He I side.

  11. Additional atmospheric opacity measurements at lambda = 1.1 mm from Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, A.; De Zafra, R. L.; Barrett, J. W.; Solomon, P.; Connor, B.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric opacity values in the zenith direction are given for a wavelength of 1.1 mm (278 GHz) at the summit of Mauna Kea in the Hawaiian Islands. A total of 75 days is covered during the period 1983-1986. Observations were made on a quasi-continuous basis, with opacity measured every 20 minutes around the clock for significant periods of time. A conversion from opacity at lambda = 1.1 mm to the equivalent precipitable water vapor column is given from the measurements of Zammit and Ade (1981), from which opacities at other wavelengths may be derived.

  12. Stochastic contribution to the growth factor in the {lambda}CDM model

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Andrade, A. P. A.; Letelier, P. S.

    2009-01-15

    We study the effect of noise on the evolution of the growth factor of density perturbations in the context of the {lambda}CDM model. Stochasticity is introduced as a Wiener process amplified by an intensity parameter {alpha}. By comparing the evolution of deterministic and stochastic cases for different values of {alpha} we estimate the intensity level necessary to make noise relevant for cosmological tests based on large-scale structure data. Our results indicate that the presence of random forces underlying the fluid description can lead to significant deviations from the nonstochastic solution at late times for {alpha}{>=}10{sup -3}.

  13. Electromagnetic Productions of K{lambda} and K{sigma} on the Nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Mart, T.

    2008-10-13

    We review the progress and problems in the electromagnetic production of K{lambda} on the nucleon. The problem of the data discrepancy in this channel as well as the corresponding physics consequence are highlighted. We also discuss the effect of the new beam-recoil polarization data C{sub x} and C{sub z} on our analysis. For this purpose we use the isobar model Kaon-Maid and a recent multipoles model that can describe recent experimental data. We also present a new multipoles model for the K{sigma} channels to complete our analysis.

  14. Interstellar detection of the intersystem line Si II lambda 2335 toward zeta Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelli, Jason A.; Sofia, Ulysses J.; Savage, Blair D.; Keenan, Francis P.; Dufton, Philip L.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the detection of the weak intersystem transistion of Si II lambda 2335 A in the sight line toward zeta Oph using the Ech-B mode (3.5 km/s resolution) of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph. The high-quality spectrum is characterized by an empirically measured signal-to-noise of 450, in excellent agreement with that expected from photon-statistics. The measured equivalent width of the Si II line is W(sub lambda) = 0.48 +/- 0.12 mA. Using the new experimental f-value of Calamai, Smith, and Bergeson, we find a Si II column density of 2.34 (+/- 0.58) x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm and (Si/H)(sub zeta Oph) = 1.78 (+/- 0.44) x 10(exp -6) for the principal absorbing component(s) at v(sub sun) approx. = -15 km/s. Analysis of the Si II lambda 1808 absorption over the same velocity range using the new experimental f-value of Bergeson & Lawler yields a column density (corrected for saturation) that is consistent within the weak line errors and confirms the relative accuracies of these new f-values. Furthermore, these results indicate that accurate abundances can now be derived for Si II, particularly from the weak Si II lambda 2335 A since it is free of saturation effects. For the zeta Oph v(sub sun) approx. = -15 km/s component(s), we find that greater than 95% of the available cosmic abundance (i.e. the 1989 meteoritic abundances of Anders & Grevesse) of Mg, Fe, and Si is 'missing' from the gas phase and is presumably locked up in the dust. These elements are present in the dust grains in ratios of Fe/Si approximately equals 0.9 and Mg/Si approximately equals 1.1, consistent with the ratio of their cosmic abundances. These ratios are in sharp contrast to more diffuse clouds like those seen toward the high-latitude halo star HD 93521 where in the dust Fe/Si approximately equals 1.8 and Mg/Si approximately equals 2.1.

  15. Constraints on effective field theory parameters for the {Lambda}N{yields}NN transition

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Obiol, Axel; Parreno, Assumpta; Julia-Diaz, Bruno

    2011-08-15

    The relation between the low-energy constants appearing in the effective field theory description of the {Lambda}N{yields}NN transition potential and the parameters of the one-meson-exchange model previously developed is obtained. We extract the relative importance of the different exchange mechanisms included in the meson picture by means of a comparison to the corresponding operational structures appearing in the effective approach. The ability of this procedure to obtain the weak baryon-baryon-meson couplings for a possible scalar exchange is also discussed.

  16. Extended Thermodynamic Integration: Efficient Prediction of Lambda Derivatives at Nonsimulated Points.

    PubMed

    Ruiter, Anita de; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-09-13

    Thermodynamic integration (TI) is one of the most commonly used free-energy calculation methods. The derivative of the Hamiltonian with respect to lambda, ⟨∂H/∂λ⟩, is determined at multiple λ-points. Because a numerical integration step is necessary, high curvature regions require simulations at densely spaced λ-points. Here, the principle of extended TI is introduced, where ⟨∂H/∂λ⟩ values are predicted at nonsimulated λ-points. On the basis of three model systems, it is shown that extended TI requires significantly fewer λ-points than regular TI to obtain similar accuracy. PMID:27494138

  17. Subdivision and direction recognition of lambda/16 of orthogonal fringes for nanometric measurement.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haijiang; Qiu, Xiaoqian; Wang, Jing; Ju, Aisong; Zhang, Yunbo

    2009-11-20

    Subdivision is one of the essential methods to improve the measurement resolution of optical instruments. A new method is proposed to solve lambda/16 bidirectional subdivision and direction recognition for orthogonal interference signals by constructing two sets of reference signals and using zero-cross detection. The experimental results prove that the method is efficient for orthogonal signals and has good real-time performance by field-programmable gate array realization. This method is easy to realize by use of electronic design automation tools and can be widely used in the signal processing system of optical measurement instruments such as a moiré fringe measurement system and laser interferometer. PMID:19935969

  18. B, Lambda{sub b} and charm results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    F. Azfar

    2003-09-18

    Recent results on B{sub d}, B{sub u}{sup {+-}}, B{sub s}, {Lambda}{sub b} and Charm hadrons are reported from {approx} 75 pb{sup -1} and {approx} 40 pb{sup -1} of data accumulated at the upgraded CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}-p collider, during Run-II. These include lifetime and mass measurements of B and Charm hadrons, searches for rare decays in charm and B hadrons and CP-violation in Charm decays. Results relevant to CP-violation in B-decays are also reported.

  19. Rapid construction of capsid-modified adenoviral vectors through bacteriophage lambda Red recombination.

    PubMed

    Campos, Samuel K; Barry, Michael A

    2004-11-01

    There are extensive efforts to develop cell-targeting adenoviral vectors for gene therapy wherein endogenous cell-binding ligands are ablated and exogenous ligands are introduced by genetic means. Although current approaches can genetically manipulate the capsid genes of adenoviral vectors, these approaches can be time-consuming and require multiple steps to produce a modified viral genome. We present here the use of the bacteriophage lambda Red recombination system as a valuable tool for the easy and rapid construction of capsid-modified adenoviral genomes.

  20. Isolated elliptical galaxies, their globular cluster systems, and LCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Richard; Salinas, Ricardo; Richtler, Tom

    2015-08-01

    The globular cluster (GC) systems of isolated elliptical galaxies (IEs) have only recently begun to be studied in detail, and may exhibit morphological connections to the evolutionary histories of their hosts. In fact evidence is mounting that the GC systems of massive galaxies in clusters are largely assembled by infall/accretion processes. IEs are their counterparts in low density environments and a comparison of their GC systems should directly highlight environmental effects. Are GCs the answer to unlocking the evolution of isolated galaxies? In addition, the GC systems of reasonably nearby galaxies are detectable out to large radii, making them useful tracers for producing dynamical models of their hosts. How much dark matter is contained within IEs? Very little it seems, at least in some cases. GCs are, therefore, also one of the most important tools we have for testing Lambda CDM models observationally.

  1. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  2. Investigations of potential bias in the estimation of lambda using Pradel's (1996) model for capture-recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Pradel's (1996) temporal symmetry model permitting direct estimation and modelling of population growth rate, lambda sub i provides a potentially useful tool for the study of population dynamics using marked animals. Because of its recent publication date, the approach has not seen much use, and there have been virtually no investigations directed at robustness of the resulting estimators. Here we consider several potential sources of bias, all motivated by specific uses of this estimation approach. We consider sampling situations in which the study area expands with time and present an analytic expression for the bias in lambda hat sub i. We next consider trap response in capture probabilities and heterogeneous capture probabilities and compute large-sample and simulation-based approximations of resulting bias in lambda hat sub i. These approximations indicate that trap response is an especially important assumption violation that can produce substantial bias. Finally, we consider losses on capture and emphasize the importance of selecting the estimator for lambda sub i that is appropriate to the question being addressed. For studies based on only sighting and resighting data, Pradel's (1996) lambda hat prime sub i is the appropriate estimator.

  3. Characterization of a lambda-cyhalothrin metabolizing glutathione S-transferase CpGSTd1 from Cydia pomonella (L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiyuan; Yang, Xueqing; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-11-01

    In insects, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are enzymes involved in detoxification of insecticides. However, few data are available for the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.). In this study, we cloned a delta class GST gene CpGSTd1 from C. pomonella. Real-time quantitative PCR shows that CpGSTd1 was up-regulated with aging, and the mRNA level of CpGSTd1 was higher in the fat body and silk glands than in other tissues. The expression level of CpGSTd1 exposure to insecticide suggests that CpGSTd1 is up-regulated after chlorpyrifos-methyl and lambda-cyhalothrin treatments. Both lambda-cyhalothrin and chlorpyrifos-methyl altered GST activity in vivo. The purified CpGSTd1 protein exhibits a high catalytic efficiency with CDNB and was inhibited by lambda-cyhalothrin and chlorpyrifos-methyl in vitro. Metabolism assays indicate that lambda-cyhalothrin was significantly metabolized while chlorpyrifos-methyl was not metabolized by CpGSTd1. Binding free energy analysis suggests that CpGSTd1 binding is tighter with lambda-cyhalothrin than with chlorpyrifos-methyl. Our study suggests that CpGSTd1 plays a key role in the metabolism of insecticides in C. pomonella. PMID:24827500

  4. Spherically symmetric solutions, Newton's Law, and the infrared limit {lambda}{yields}1 in covariant Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandre, Jean; Pasipoularides, Pavlos

    2011-10-15

    In this note we examine whether spherically symmetric solutions in covariant Horava-Lifshitz gravity can reproduce Newton's Law in the IR limit {lambda}{yields}1. We adopt the position that the auxiliary field A is independent of the space-time metric [J. Alexandre and P. Pasipoularides, Phys. Rev. D 83, 084030 (2011).][J. Greenwald, V. H. Satheeshkumar, and A. Wang, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 12 (2010) 007.], and we assume, as in [A. M. da Silva, Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 055011 (2011).], that {lambda} is a running coupling constant. We show that under these assumptions, spherically symmetric solutions fail to restore the standard Newtonian physics in the IR limit {lambda}{yields}1, unless {lambda} does not run, and has the fixed value {lambda}=1. Finally, we comment on the Horava and Melby-Thompson approach [P. Horava and C. M. Melby-Thompson, Phys. Rev. D 82, 064027 (2010).] in which A is assumed as a part of the space-time metric in the IR.

  5. Comparative efficacy of oil solution and wettable powder of lambda-cyhalothrin to naturally occurring Ornithonyssus sylviarum infestation of chickens.

    PubMed

    Pan, Baoliang; Liang, Daming; Zhang, Yafeng; Wang, Hailiang; Wang, Ming

    2009-10-14

    The Northern Fowl Mite (NFM), Ornithonyssus sylviarum, is one of the most important and common pests of poultry. Most of available pesticides applied in the NFM control are formulated as wettable powder or emulsifiable concentrate and require to be diluted with water before use. As water has very low affinity to bird feathers, a part of the diluted pesticide will fall on the ground, on the cages, on feed bins or drift in the air upon application, which becomes a source of a potential harm to administrative workers and birds. In contrast to water, an oil solution of pesticide has a higher affinity for feathers and can stay on the feather for a longer time, and maybe provide a high efficacy and be effective for a longer, persistent period against the NFM. In the present study, the efficacy of oil solution and wettable powder of lambda-cyhalothrin to NFM in breeders was compared; the results showed that while spraying lambda-cyhalothrin wettable powder on birds could effectively control NFM, painting lambda-cyhalothrin oil solution on birds gave complete control of NFM for at least 6 weeks. In the application of lambda-cyhalothrin oil solution, no containment of pesticide to cages, feed bin and no pesticide drifting in the air was observed. These results indicated that lambda-cyhalothrin oil solution has a potential to become an effective and safe formulation to control NFM in breeders. PMID:19577369

  6. The LAMBDA photon-counting pixel detector and high-Z sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Struth, B.; Hirsemann, H.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Tolbanov, O.; Zarubin, A.; Tyazhev, A.; Shelkov, G.; Graafsma, H.

    2014-12-01

    Many X-ray experiments at third-generation synchrotrons benefit from using single-photon-counting detectors, due to their high signal-to-noise ratio and potential for high-speed measurements. LAMBDA (Large Area Medipix3-Based Detector Array) is a pixel detector system based on the Medipix3 readout chip. It combines the features of Medipix3, such as a small pixel size of 55 μm and flexible functionality, with a large tileable module design consisting of 12 chips (1536 × 512 pixels) and a high-speed readout system capable of running at 2000 frames per second. To enable high-speed experiments with hard X-rays, the LAMBDA system has been combined with different high-Z sensor materials. Room-temperature systems using GaAs and CdTe systems have been produced and tested with X-ray tubes and at synchrotron beamlines. Both detector materials show nonuniformities in their raw image response, but the pixel yield is high and the uniformity can be improved by flat-field correction, particularly in the case of GaAs. High-frame-rate experiments show that useful information can be gained on millisecond timescales in synchrotron experiments with these sensors.

  7. Heat capacity and thermal relaxation of bulk helium very near the lambda point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, John A.; Swanson, D. R.; Nissen, J. A.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1994-01-01

    In October 1992 a low temperature experiment was flown on the Space Shuttle in low Earth orbit. The objective of the mission was to measure the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of helium very close to the lambda point with the smearing effect of gravity removed. We report preliminary results from the experiment, and compare them with related measurements performed on the ground. The sample was s sphere of helium 3.5 cm in diameter contained within a copper calorimeter of vey high thermal conductivity. The calorimeter was attached to a pair of high resolution paramagnetic salt thermometers with noise levels in the 10(exp -10) K range and suspended from a high stability thermal isolation system. During the mission we found that the resolution of the thermometers was degraded somewhat due to the impact of charged particles. This effect limited the useful resolution of the measurements to about two nanokelvins from the lambda point. The results reported here are limited to about ten nanokelvins from the transition.

  8. The 24 GHz measurements of 2.2 lambda conical horn antennas illuminating a conducting sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, A. E.; Marshall, R. E.; Hearn, C. P.; Neece, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    Monostatic reflection-coefficient magnitude, absolute value of Gamma, measurements occurring between a radiating horn and a metal reflecting plate are presented for a family of three 2.2 lambda diameter conical horn antennas. The three horns have different aperture phase deviations: 6 deg, 22.5 deg, and 125 deg. Measurements of the magnitude of absolute value of Gamma as a function of horn-plate separation (d) extend from an effective antenna aperture short (d = O) to beyond the far-field boundary (d = 2D(sup 2)/lambda, where D is the antenna diameter). Measurement data are presented with various physical environments for each of the horns. Measured scalar data are compared with theoretical data from two models, a numerical model for a circular waveguide aperture in a ground plane and a scalar diffraction theory model. This work was conducted in support of the development effort for a spaceborne multifrequency microwave reflectometer designed to accurately determine the distance from a space vehicle's surface to a reflecting plasma boundary. The metal reflecting plate was used to simulate the RF reflectivity of a critically dense plasma. The resulting configuration, a ground plane mounted aperture facing a reflecting plane in close proximity, produces a strong interaction between the ground plane and the reflecting plate, especially at integral half-wavelength separations. The transition coefficient is characterized by large amplitude variations.

  9. A giant X-ray flare on Lambda Eridani (B2e)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.; Grady, Carol A.; Peters, Geraldine J.; Feigelson, Eric D.

    1993-01-01

    A 30 ks observation with the ROSAT PSPC distributed over 39 hr shows that the putatively single, mild B2e star Lambda Eri emits at most times a soft X-ray flux at a rate and temperature consistent with other B stars. However, during the middle of our observations, this star's X-ray flux increased by a factor of 6 before returning to the basal level. This brightening, due entirely to photon energies of 0.7 keV or greater, can be fitted well to a Raymond-Smith temperature parameter of 14 MK and luminosity 4 x 10 exp 31 ergs/s; these are characteristics of giant stellar flares. With an estimated duration of about 50,000 s, this event is arguably the strongest X-ray flare yet observed. We consider several possible scenarios for the site of the flare, including several with an active cool secondary or degenerate companion. We find that IUE and optical spectra do not support a binary picture and that it is most probable that the flare site is on or related to Lambda Eri itself. This supports other evidence for violent magnetic activity on some B-type stars.

  10. Three-dimensional theory of quantum memories based on {Lambda}-type atomic ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Zeuthen, Emil; Grodecka-Grad, Anna; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2011-10-15

    We develop a three-dimensional theory for quantum memories based on light storage in ensembles of {Lambda}-type atoms, where two long-lived atomic ground states are employed. We consider light storage in an ensemble of finite spatial extent and we show that within the paraxial approximation the Fresnel number of the atomic ensemble and the optical depth are the only important physical parameters determining the quality of the quantum memory. We analyze the influence of these parameters on the storage of light followed by either forward or backward read-out from the quantum memory. We show that for small Fresnel numbers the forward memory provides higher efficiencies, whereas for large Fresnel numbers the backward memory is advantageous. The optimal light modes to store in the memory are presented together with the corresponding spin waves and outcoming light modes. We show that for high optical depths such {Lambda}-type atomic ensembles allow for highly efficient backward and forward memories even for small Fresnel numbers F(greater-or-similar sign)0.1.

  11. Characterization of the organic superconductor, {lambda}-(BETS){sub 2}GaCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Burgin, T.P.; Huffman, J.C.; Montgomery, L.K.

    1995-12-01

    {lambda}-(BETS){sub 2}GaCl{sub 4} (BETS denotes bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene) is an ambient pressure superconductor with a resistive onset (T{sub c}) of 7.5 K. This system is of interest for several reasons. Its T{sub c} is 5.5{degrees} higher than any previously known organic superconductor containing selenium. Tight-binding band calculations suggest that {lambda}-(BETS){sub 2}GaCl{sub 4} has both 1-D and 2-D Fermi surfaces, the most prominent feature being a closed hole pocket centered at X accounting for {approximately}33% of the first Brillouin zone. A number of samples possess broad transitions with onsets as high as 10K. The elevated T{sub c}`s appear to be associated with gold paste that is utilized in the resistance measurements. Various mechanisms (pressure, stress, phase transition) for the effect have been examined. The isotropic pressure derivative, dT{sub c}/dT, has been measured in this connection (-0.3{degrees}K/kbar). Nine different crystal morphologies have been isolated and characterized in the quest for BETS/GaC1{sub 4} salts with T{sub c}`s in the 10K range; none have T{sub c}`s greater than 7.5 K.

  12. Solar cycle dependence of the sun's radius at lambda = 525.0 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, Roger K.; Bertello, L.

    1995-01-01

    The Mount Wilson (California) synoptic program of solar magnetic observations scans the solar disk between 1 and 20 times per day. As part of this program, the radius is determined as an average distance between the image center and the point where the intensity in the FeI line at lambda = 525.0 nm drops to 25 percent of its value at the disk's center. The data base of information was analyzed and corrected for effects such as scattered light and atmospheric reflection. The solar variability and the measurement techniques are described. The observation data sets, the corrections made to the data, and the observed variations, are discussed. It is stated that similar spectral lines at lambda = 525.0 nm, which are common in the solar spectrum, probably exhibit similar radius changes. All portions of the sun are weighted equally so that it is concluded that, within spectral lines, the radiating area of the sun is increased at the solar maximum.

  13. Improving Lambda Red Genome Engineering in Escherichia coli via Rational Removal of Endogenous Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Harris H.; Church, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Lambda Red recombineering is a powerful technique for making targeted genetic changes in bacteria. However, many applications are limited by the frequency of recombination. Previous studies have suggested that endogenous nucleases may hinder recombination by degrading the exogenous DNA used for recombineering. In this work, we identify ExoVII as a nuclease which degrades the ends of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) cassettes. Removing this nuclease improves both recombination frequency and the inheritance of mutations at the 3′ ends of ssDNA and dsDNA. Extending this approach, we show that removing a set of five exonucleases (RecJ, ExoI, ExoVII, ExoX, and Lambda Exo) substantially improves the performance of co-selection multiplex automatable genome engineering (CoS-MAGE). In a given round of CoS-MAGE with ten ssDNA oligonucleotides, the five nuclease knockout strain has on average 46% more alleles converted per clone, 200% more clones with five or more allele conversions, and 35% fewer clones without any allele conversions. Finally, we use these nuclease knockout strains to investigate and clarify the effects of oligonucleotide phosphorothioation on recombination frequency. The results described in this work provide further mechanistic insight into recombineering, and substantially improve recombineering performance. PMID:22957093

  14. NO Detection by Pulsed Polarization of Lambda Probes–Influence of the Reference Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sabine; Schönauer-Kamin, Daniela; Pohle, Roland; Fleischer, Maximilian; Moos, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The pulsed polarization measurement technique using conventional thimble type lambda probes is suitable for low ppm NOx detection in exhaust gas applications. To evaluate the underlying sensor mechanism, the unknown influence of the reference atmosphere on the NO sensing behavior is investigated in this study. Besides answering questions with respect to the underlying principle, this investigation can resolve the main question of whether a simplified sensor element without reference may be also suitable for NO sensing using the pulsed polarization measurement technique. With an adequate sensor setup, the reference atmosphere of the thimble type lambda probe is changed completely after a certain diffusion time. Thus, the sensor response regarding NO is compared with and without different gas atmospheres on both electrodes. It is shown that there is still a very good NO sensitivity even without reference air, although the NO response is reduced due to non-existing overlying mixed potential type voltage, which is otherwise caused by different atmospheres on both electrodes. Considering these results, we see an opportunity to simplify the standard NOx sensor design by omitting the reference electrode.

  15. Genetic requirements of phage lambda red-mediated gene replacement in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Poteete, A R; Fenton, A C

    2000-04-01

    Recombination between short linear double-stranded DNA molecules and Escherichia coli chromosomes bearing the red genes of bacteriophage lambda in place of recBCD was tested in strains bearing mutations in genes known to affect recombination in other cellular pathways. The linear DNA was a 4-kb fragment containing the cat gene, with flanking lac sequences, released from an infecting phage chromosome by restriction enzyme cleavage in the cell; formation of Lac(-) chloramphenicol-resistant bacterial progeny was measured. Recombinant formation was found to be reduced in ruvAB and recQ strains. In this genetic background, mutations in recF, recO, and recR had large effects on both cell viability and on recombination. In these cases, deletion of the sulA gene improved viability and strain stability, without improving recombination ability. Expression of a gene(s) from the nin region of phage lambda partially complemented both the viability and recombination defects of the recF, recO, and recR mutants and the recombination defect of ruvC but not of ruvAB or recQ mutants. PMID:10735883

  16. Role for 10Sa RNA in the growth of lambda-P22 hybrid phage.

    PubMed Central

    Retallack, D M; Johnson, L L; Friedman, D I

    1994-01-01

    Certain lambda-P22 hybrids, providing that they express the P22 C1 protein, fail to grow in Escherichia coli with the sipB391 mutation. We show that sipB391, previously located to the 57-min region of the E. coli chromosome, is a large deletion that extends into the 3' end of ssrA, a gene encoding the small stable 10Sa RNA. This deletion, apparently created by the excision of a cryptic prophage, CP4-57 (identified by Kirby et al. [J. E. Kirby, J. E. Trempy, and S. Gottesman, J. Bacteriol. 176:2068-2081]), leaves most of ssrA intact but removes the sequence encoding the 3' end of the precursor form of 10Sa RNA. The lack of functional 10Sa RNA, resulting from either the excision of CP4-57 or insertional inactivation of ssrA, appears to be responsible for the inhibition of lambda-P22 growth in E. coli with the sipB391 mutation. We propose that 10Sa RNA acts either directly or indirectly to facilitate removal of C1 protein from its DNA target site. Images PMID:8144474

  17. HEATING OF THE MAGNETIC CHROMOSPHERE: OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS FROM Ca II {lambda}8542 SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz Rodriguez, J.; De Pontieu, B.; Carlsson, M.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. H. M.

    2013-02-10

    The heating of the Sun's chromosphere remains poorly understood. While progress has been made on understanding what drives the quiet-Sun internetwork chromosphere, chromospheric heating in strong magnetic field regions continues to present a difficult challenge, mostly because of a lack of observational constraints. We use high-resolution spectropolarimetric data from the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope to identify the location and spatio-temporal properties of heating in the magnetic chromosphere. In particular, we report the existence of raised-core spectral line profiles in the Ca II {lambda}8542 line. These profiles are characterized by the absence of an absorption line core, showing a quasi-flat profile between {lambda} Almost-Equal-To {+-}0.5 A, and are abundant close to magnetic bright points and plage. Comparison with three-dimensional MHD simulations indicates that such profiles occur when the line of sight goes through an ''elevated temperature canopy'' associated with the expansion with height of the magnetic field of flux concentrations. This temperature canopy in the simulations is caused by ohmic dissipation where there are strong magnetic field gradients. The raised-core profiles are thus indicators of locations of increased chromospheric heating. We characterize the location and temporal and spatial properties of such profiles in our observations, thus providing much stricter constraints on theoretical models of chromospheric heating mechanisms than before.

  18. Lambda: A Mathematica package for operator product expansions in vertex algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekstrand, Joel

    2011-02-01

    We give an introduction to the Mathematica package Lambda, designed for calculating λ-brackets in both vertex algebras, and in SUSY vertex algebras. This is equivalent to calculating operator product expansions in two-dimensional conformal field theory. The syntax of λ-brackets is reviewed, and some simple examples are shown, both in component notation, and in N=1 superfield notation. Program summaryProgram title: Lambda Catalogue identifier: AEHF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 087 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 131 812 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: See specifications for running Mathematica V7 or above. Operating system: See specifications for running Mathematica V7 or above. RAM: Varies greatly depending on calculation to be performed. Classification: 4.2, 5, 11.1. Nature of problem: Calculate operator product expansions (OPEs) of composite fields in 2d conformal field theory. Solution method: Implementation of the algebraic formulation of OPEs given by vertex algebras, and especially by λ-brackets. Running time: Varies greatly depending on calculation requested. The example notebook provided takes about 3 s to run.

  19. Tuning the phase sensitivity of a double-lambda system with a static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiwei; Shen, Shuo; Xiao, Yanhong

    2013-05-20

    We study the effect of a DC magnetic field on the phase sensitivity of a double-lambda system coupled by two laser fields, a probe and a pump. It is demonstrated that the gain and the refractive index of the probe can be controlled by either the magnetic field or the relative phase between the two laser fields. More interestingly, when the system reduces to a single-lambda system, turning on the magnetic field transforms the system from a phase-insensitive process to a phase-sensitive one. In the pulsed-probe regime, we observed switching between slow and fast light when the magnetic field or the relative phase was adjusted. Experiments using a coated 87Rb vapor cell produced results in good agreement with our numerical simulation. This work provides a novel and simple means to manipulate phase sensitive electromagnetically-induced-transparency or four-wave mixing, and could be useful for applications in quantum optics, nonlinear optics and magnetometery based on such systems.

  20. High-resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) for medium-heavy Mass Lambda-hypernuclear structure studies at the Jlab (E01-011 Collaboration)

    SciTech Connect

    T. Petkovic; Y. Fujii; O. Hashimoto; H. Kanda; K. Maeda; S. N. Nakamura; Y. Okayasu; T. Takahashi; H. Tamura; K. Tsukada; H. Yamaguchi; S. Kato; H. Noumi; Y. Sato; T. Motoba; O. K. Baker; M. Christy; L. Cole; P. Gueye; C. Keppel; L. Tang; A. Uzzle; L. Yuan; P. Baturin; P. Markowitz; J. Reinhold; A. Daniel; E. Hungerford; K. Lan; T. Miyoshi; V. M. Rodriguez; G. H. Xu; R. Carlini; R. Ent; H. Fenker; D. Mack; G. Smith; W. Vulcan; S. Wood; C. Yan; A. Ahmidouch; S. Danagoulian; L. Gan; A. Gasparian; D. Dehnhard; H. Juengst; N. Simicevic; S. Wells; R. Asaturyan; A. Margaryan; H. Mkrtchyan; S. Stepanyan; V. Tadevosyan; D. Androic; I. Bertovic; M. Furic; M. Planinic; T. Seva; T. Angelescu; V. P. Likhachev

    2005-05-01

    An experimental technique for single-Lambda spectroscopy of the light and medium-heavy mass Lambda-hypernuclei developed at the Jlab by the E01-011 Collaboration has been described. The technique is based on the electroproduction of Lambda-hypernuclei by the (e,eK+) reaction and newly constructed 2nd generation high resolution large solid angle kaon spectrometer (HKS).

  1. Measurements of the branching fractions for B{sub (s)}{yields}D{sub (s)}{pi}{pi}{pi} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{pi}{pi}

    SciTech Connect

    Aaij, R.; Bauer, Th.; Beuzekom, M. van; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Coco, V.; van Eijk, D.; Farinelli, C.; Heijne, V.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; van Leerdam, J.; Merk, M.; Mous, I.; Oggero, S.; Pellegrino, A.; du Pree, T.; Storaci, B.

    2011-11-01

    Branching fractions of the decays H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -} are presented, where H{sub b} (H{sub c}) represents B{sup 0} (D{sup +}), B{sup -} (D{sup 0}), B{sub s}{sup 0} (D{sub s}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} ({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35 pb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be [B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.38{+-}0.11{+-}0.21, [B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -})]= 1.27{+-}0.06{+-}0.11, [B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.01{+-}0.37{+-}0.20, [B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=1.43{+-}0.16{+-}0.13 We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

  2. Survey on granularity clustering.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shifei; Du, Mingjing; Zhu, Hong

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid development of uncertain artificial intelligent and the arrival of big data era, conventional clustering analysis and granular computing fail to satisfy the requirements of intelligent information processing in this new case. There is the essential relationship between granular computing and clustering analysis, so some researchers try to combine granular computing with clustering analysis. In the idea of granularity, the researchers expand the researches in clustering analysis and look for the best clustering results with the help of the basic theories and methods of granular computing. Granularity clustering method which is proposed and studied has attracted more and more attention. This paper firstly summarizes the background of granularity clustering and the intrinsic connection between granular computing and clustering analysis, and then mainly reviews the research status and various methods of granularity clustering. Finally, we analyze existing problem and propose further research.

  3. SUBSTELLAR OBJECTS IN NEARBY YOUNG CLUSTERS (SONYC): THE BOTTOM OF THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION IN NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, Alexander; Geers, Vincent; Jayawardhana, Ray; Fissel, Laura; Lee, Eve; Lafreniere, David; Tamura, Motohide

    2009-09-01

    SONYC-Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters-is a survey program to investigate the frequency and properties of substellar objects with masses down to a few times that of Jupiter in nearby star-forming regions. Here, we present the first results from SONYC observations of NGC 1333, a {approx}1 Myr old cluster in the Perseus star-forming complex. We have carried out extremely deep optical and near-infrared imaging in four bands (i', z', J, K) using Subaru Prime Focus Camera and Multi-Object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) instruments at the Subaru telescope. The survey covers 0.25 deg{sup 2} and reaches completeness limits of 24.7 mag in the i' band and 20.8 mag in the J band. We select 196 candidates with colors as expected for young, very low mass objects. Follow-up multi-object spectroscopy with MOIRCS is presented for 53 objects. We confirm 19 objects as likely brown dwarfs (BDs) in NGC 1333, seven of them previously known. Nine additional objects are classified as possible stellar cluster members, likely with early to mid M spectral types. The confirmed objects are strongly clustered around the peak in the gas distribution and the core of the cluster of known stellar members. For 11 of them, we confirm the presence of disks based on Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera photometry. The effective temperatures for the BD sample range from 2500 K to 3000 K, which translates to masses of {approx}0.015-0.1 M{sub sun}, based on model evolutionary tracks. For comparison, the completeness limit of our survey translates to mass limits of 0.004 M{sub sun} for A{sub V} {approx}< 5 mag or 0.008 M{sub sun} for A{sub V} {approx}< 10 mag. Compared with other star-forming regions, NGC 1333 shows an overabundance of BDs relative to low-mass stars, by a factor of 2-5. On the other hand, NGC 1333 has a deficit of planetary-mass objects: based on the surveys in {sigma} Orionis, the Orion Nebula Cluster and Chamaeleon I, the expected number of planetary-mass objects in NGC

  4. Cluster automorphism groups of cluster algebras with coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wen; Zhu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    We study the cluster automorphism group of a skew-symmetric cluster algebra with geometric coefficients. For this, we introduce the notion of gluing free cluster algebra, and show that under a weak condition the cluster automorphism group of a gluing free cluster algebra is a subgroup of the cluster automorphism group of its principal part cluster algebra (i.e. the corresponding cluster algebra without coefficients). We show that several classes of cluster algebras with coefficients are gluing free, for example, cluster algebras with principal coefficients, cluster algebras with universal geometric coefficients, and cluster algebras from surfaces (except a 4-gon) with coefficients from boundaries. Moreover, except four kinds of surfaces, the cluster automorphism group of a cluster algebra from a surface with coefficients from boundaries is isomorphic to the cluster automorphism group of its principal part cluster algebra; for a cluster algebra with principal coefficients, its cluster automorphism group is isomorphic to the automorphism group of its initial quiver.

  5. Search for Bbar to Lambda_c+ X l- nu Decays in Events with a Fully Reconstructed B Meson

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Tanabe, T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-04-19

    We present a search for semileptonic B decays to the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} based on 420 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. By fully reconstructing the recoiling B in a hadronic decay mode, we reduce non-B backgrounds and determine the flavor of the signal B. We statistically correct the flavor for the effect of the B{sup 0} mixing. We obtain a 90% confidence level upper limit of {Beta}({bar B} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} X{ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} X) < 3.5%.

  6. Dynamically generated N* and {Lambda}* resonances in the hidden charm sector around 4.3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-07-15

    The interactions of D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled-channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. A series of meson-baryon dynamically generated relatively narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are predicted around 4.3 GeV in the hidden charm sector. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for the experiment of antiproton annihilation at Darmstadt (PANDA) at the forthcoming GSI Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) facility.

  7. Dissipation kinetics of alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin residues in aboveground part of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.).

    PubMed

    Słowik-Borowiec, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Dissipation of simultaneously applied insecticides alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin was studied in a minor crop, aboveground part of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.). A validated gas chromatographic method (GC-ECD/NPD) was used to determine insecticide residues. Analytical performances were very satisfactory, with expanded uncertainties not higher than 14% (coverage factor k = 2, confidence level 95%). Dissipation of alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin in white mustard followed first-order kinetics (R(2) between 0.953 and 0.995), with half-lives of 3.1-4.6 and 2.9-3.7 days respectively. Based on the results of this two-year study and the relevant residue regulation, alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin treatments can be considered safe for crop protection, feeding animals and the environment.

  8. Determination of genes, restriction sites, and DNA sequences surrounding the 6S RNA template of bacteriophage lambda.

    PubMed Central

    Sklar, J; Yot, P; Weissman, S M

    1975-01-01

    A major product of the transcription of bacteriophage lambda DNA in vitro is the 6S RNA. This article presents a detailed mapping of restriction endonuclease cleavage sites about the region of the 6S RNA template within the lambda genome. Restriction fragments defined by these sites have been used to localize the 6S RNA template within the physical and genetic maps of the lambda genome. Nucleotide sequence analysis of one of these fragments has largely confimed the nucleotide sequence of the 6S RNA reported previously and has indicated the sequence of DNA that immediately follows the 6S RNA template. This article reports the nucleotide sequence following a known site of transcription termination by RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli. Images PMID:1098044

  9. THERE ARE NO STARLESS MASSIVE PROTO-CLUSTERS IN THE FIRST QUADRANT OF THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C.; Bressert, E.

    2012-10-20

    We search the {lambda} = 1.1 mm Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey for clumps containing sufficient mass to form {approx}10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} star clusters. Eighteen candidate massive proto-clusters are identified in the first Galactic quadrant outside of the central kiloparsec. This sample is complete to clumps with mass M{sub clump} > 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} and radius r {approx}< 2.5 pc. The overall Galactic massive cluster formation rate is CFR(M{sub cluster} > 10{sup 4}) {approx}<5 Myr{sup -1}, which is in agreement with the rates inferred from Galactic open clusters and M31 massive clusters. We find that all massive proto-clusters in the first quadrant are actively forming massive stars and place an upper limit of {tau}{sub starless} < 0.5 Myr on the lifetime of the starless phase of massive cluster formation. If massive clusters go through a starless phase with all of their mass in a single clump, the lifetime of this phase is very short.

  10. Dynamic Processes in Be Star Atmospheres.. 6; Simultaneous X-Ray, Ultraviolet, and Optical Variations in lambda Eridani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.; Murakami, T.; Ezuka, H.; Anandarao, B. G.; Chakraborty, A.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hirata, R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a joint X ray/ultraviolet/ground based study of the abnormal Be star lambda Eri which has previously shown evidence of X ray flaring from Rosat observations in 1991. The 1991 flare event caught the astronomical hot star community by surprise because x ray flares have not been observed from other single B-type stars, before or since. Both optical (H-alpha) and UV/Voyager observations provide evidence for transient heating events near the surface of lambda Eri.

  11. Toxico-pathological effects in rats induced by lambda-cyhalothrin.

    PubMed

    Dahamna, S; Harzallah, D; Guemache, A; Sekfali, N

    2009-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used chemicals making human exposure to pesticides a realistic possibility. Biomonitoring is a common and useful tool for assessing human exposure to pesticides. Pyrethroids are effective insecticides that are often used in household sprays, aerosol bombs, insect repellents, pet shampoos, and lice treatments. Using products containing these compounds will expose people to these chemicals. Since these compounds frequently are used on crOPs, they are often detected in fruits and vegetables. Biomonitoring of exposure is a useful tool for assessing exposure to pesticides. Biomonitoring involves the measurement of the parent pesticide, its metabolite or reaction product in biological media, typically blood or urine, to determine if an exposure has occurred and the extent of that exposure. Although not without its limitations, biomonitoring has great utility in integrating all routes of exposure allowing for one exposure measurement. Pesticides have much shorter environmental half-lives and tend not to bioaccumulate. In fact, from humans within 24 hr as the parent pesticide, a mercapturic acid detoxification product, oxidative or dealkylation metabolites, and/or glucuronide or sulphate-bound metabolites. However, because of the heavy agricultural and residential use of these chemicals, humans are continually exposed to many of these chemicals. The objective of the present study was to explore modification in toxico-pathological responses of rats treated with lambda-cyhalothrin (commercially called karate). Rats (250 g weight), were gavaged by 1/100 LD50 for 4 weeks (one dose every week). Blood was collected before dosing and after 48 hours from the treatment. Enzyme activities were assayed in the plasma samples obtained. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), Glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), Alkaline phosphatase (ALPH) and Glucose. The results showed a decrease in RBC; WBC and Hb. This probably explained by the effect of lambda cyhalothrin

  12. Spectroscopic studies and structure of 3-methoxy-2 -[(2,4,4,6,6-pentachloro-1,3,5,2{lambda}{sup 5},4{lambda}{sup 5},6{lambda}{sup 5}-triazatriphosphin-2-yl)oxy] benzaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Oezay, H.; Yildiz, M.; Uenver, H.; Durlu, T. N.

    2013-01-15

    The compound called 3-methoxy-2- [(2,4,4,6,6-pentachloro-1,3,5,2{lambda}{sup 5},4{lambda}{sup 5},6{lambda}{sup 5}-triazatriphosphin-2-yl)oxy] benzaldehyde has been synthesized from the reaction of 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde with hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene. It has been characterized by elemental analysis, MS, IR, {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, {sup 31}P NMR and UV-visible spectroscopic techniques. The structure of the title compound has been determind by X-ray analysis. Crystals are orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, Z = 4, a = 7.705(1), b = 12.624(1), c = 17.825(2) A, R{sub 1} = 0.0390 and wR{sub 2} = 0.1074 [I > 2{sigma}(I)], respectively.

  13. Matlab Cluster Ensemble Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Sapio, Vincent De; Kegelmeyer, Philip

    2009-04-27

    This is a Matlab toolbox for investigating the application of cluster ensembles to data classification, with the objective of improving the accuracy and/or speed of clustering. The toolbox divides the cluster ensemble problem into four areas, providing functionality for each. These include, (1) synthetic data generation, (2) clustering to generate individual data partitions and similarity matrices, (3) consensus function generation and final clustering to generate ensemble data partitioning, and (4) implementation of accuracy metrics. With regard to data generation, Gaussian data of arbitrary dimension can be generated. The kcenters algorithm can then be used to generate individual data partitions by either, (a) subsampling the data and clustering each subsample, or by (b) randomly initializing the algorithm and generating a clustering for each initialization. In either case an overall similarity matrix can be computed using a consensus function operating on the individual similarity matrices. A final clustering can be performed and performance metrics are provided for evaluation purposes.

  14. A Randomized Study of Peginterferon Lambda-1a Compared to Peginterferon Alfa-2a in Combination with Ribavirin and Telaprevir in Patients with Genotype-1 Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Flisiak, Robert; Shiffman, Mitchell; Arenas, Juan; Cheinquer, Hugo; Nikitin, Igor; Dong, Yuping; Rana, Khurram; Srinivasan, Subasree

    2016-01-01

    Background A randomized, double-blind, multinational, phase 3 study was conducted comparing the efficacy and safety of peginterferon lambda-1a (Lambda)/ribavirin (RBV)/telaprevir (TVR) vs. peginterferon alfa-2a (Alfa)/RBV/TVR in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype-1 (GT-1) infection. Methods Patients (treatment-naïve or relapsers on prior Alfa/RBV treatment) were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive Lambda/RBV/TVR or Alfa/RBV/TVR. Total duration of treatment was either 24 or 48 weeks (response-guided treatment), with TVR administered for the first 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved a sustained virologic response at post treatment week 12 (SVR12), which was tested for noninferiority of Lambda/RBV/TVR. Results A total of 838 patients were enrolled, and 617 were treated; 411 and 206 patients received Lambda/RBV/TVR and Alfa/RBV/TVR, respectively. The majority of patients were treatment-naïve, with HCV GT-1b and a high baseline viral load (≥800,000 IU/mL). Less than 10% of patients had cirrhosis (Lambda, 7.5%; Alfa, 6.8%). Lambda/RBV/TVR did not meet the criterion for noninferiority (lower bound of the treatment difference interval was -12.3%); the SVR12 in all patients (modified intent-to-treat) was 76.2% in the Lambda arm and 82.0% in the Alfa arm. Overall, the frequency of adverse events in each arm was comparable (Lambda, 91.7%; Alfa, 97.1%). As expected based on the safety profile of the 2 interferons, there were more hepatobiliary events observed in the Lambda arm and more hematologic events in the Alfa arm. Conclusions In this comparison of Lambda/RBV/TVR and Alfa/RBV/TVR in patients who were treatment-naïve or had relapsed on prior Alfa/RBV treatment, Lambda failed to demonstrate noninferiority based on SVR12 results. Treatment with Lambda/RBV/TVR was associated with a higher incidence of relapse. More patients discontinued Lambda/RBV/TVR treatment during the first 4 weeks of study treatment

  15. Resistance of the house fly Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) to lambda-cyhalothrin: mode of inheritance, realized heritability, and cross-resistance to other insecticides.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Naeem; Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Shad, Sarfraz Ali

    2014-07-01

    Lambda-cyhalothrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, has been used frequently for the control of house flies, Musca domestica L., worldwide including Pakistan. To assess the resistance risk and design a resistance management strategy, a house fly population was exposed to lambda-cyhalothrin in the laboratory to assess inheritance and heritability, and cross-resistance to other insecticides, including different chemical classes. After 11 generations of selection, the population developed 113.57-fold resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin compared to the susceptible population. There was no cross-resistance to bifenthrin and methomyl, but very low cross-resistance to abamectin and indoxacarb in the lambda-cyhalothrin selected population compared to the field population. Synergism bioassay with piperonyl butoxide and S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate indicated that lambda-cyhalothrin resistance was associated with microsomal oxidases and esterases. The LC50 values of F1 (Lambda-SEL ♀ × Susceptible ♂) and F'1 (Lambda-SEL ♂ × Susceptible ♀) populations were not significantly different and dominance (DLC) values were 0.68 and 0.62. The resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin was completely recessive (DML = 0.00) at highest dose and completely dominant at lowest dose (DML = 0.95). The monogenic model of inheritance showed that lambda-cyhalothrin resistance was controlled by multiple factors. The heritability values were 0.20, 0.04, 0.003, 0.07 and 0.08 for lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, methomyl, indoxacarb and abamectin resistance, respectively. It was concluded that lambda-cyhalothrin resistance in house flies was autosomally inherited, incompletely dominant and controlled by multiple factors. These findings would be helpful to improve the management of house flies.

  16. Analysis of the velocity law in the wind of the Be star Lambda Pavonis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Haiqi; Ringuelet, Adela; Sahade, Jorge; Kondo, Yoji

    1989-01-01

    This paper reanalyzes the IUE spectra of Lambda Pavonis secured in 1982 (Sahade et al.). It is found that the profiles of the broad UV lines are either rotationally broadened or nonrotationally broadened and that the rotationally broadened profiles can be sorted out in two groups characterized by rotational velocity values of 170 km/s and of 210 km/s, respectively. From the analysis of the rotational and of the radial velocities it is possible to distinguish two regions in the extended atmosphere of the star, namely, a region which is rotating and a region which is expanding. In the rotating region, the radial velocities are about zero, and the rotational velocity increases from 170 km/s to 250 km/s. In the expanding region, the rotational energy dissipates, the wind is accelerated to a maximum of -155 km/s, and farther out it decelerates.

  17. Electroluminescence yield for {lambda} > 165 nm in neon-xenon mixtures: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, F.I.G.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Conde, C.A.N.; Kubota, S.

    1996-12-31

    The electroluminescence yield for {lambda} > 165 am in different neon-xenon mixtures is studied as a function of the reduced electric field. These studies were performed using a uniform-field gas proportional scintillation counter. The experimental values obtained for the scintillation and ionization thresholds decrease from approximately 1 and 6 Vcm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} for 100% xenon, to about 0.5 and 3.8 Vcm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} for 20% xenon, to 0.4 and 2.8 Vcm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} for 10% xenon and to 0.3 and 2.2 Vcm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} for 5% xenon. Detector energy resolutions for the Al K line (1.5 keV) are 15% for 20% xenon, 19% for 10% xenon and 22% for 5% xenon.

  18. New results for the lifetimes of the D(, F(, and. lambda. /sub c//sup +/ particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ushida, N.; Kondo, T.; Fujioka, G.; Fukushima, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Tatsumi, S.; Yokoyama, C.; Homma, Y.; Tsuzuki, Y.; Bahk, S.Y.

    1983-12-26

    In an experiment measuring charmed-particle lifetimes with use of a hybrid-emulsion spectrometer in the wide-band neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, 1248 neutrino and antineutrino interactions have been located. Twenty-three charged charm decay candidates have been reconstructed, from which we determine the lifetime of the D/sup + -/ to be 11.5/sub -3.5//sup +7.5/ x 10/sup -13/ s, that of the F/sup + -/ to be 1.9/sub -0.7//sup +1.3/ x 10/sup -13/ s, and that of the ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ to be 2.3/sub -0.6//sup +1.0/ x 10/sup -13/ s.

  19. Isospin Decomposition of the Photoproduced Sigma pi System Near the Lambda(1405)

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Reinhard A.; Moriya, Kei

    2013-09-01

    Recent experimental results for the reaction \\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\Sigma + \\pi\\ from CLAS at Jefferson Lab are discussed. It was found that the mass distributions or "line shapes" of the three charge combinations \\Sigma^+ \\pi^-, \\Sigma^0 \\pi^0 and \\Sigma^- \\pi^+ differ significantly. Our results show that the \\Lambda(1405), as the I=0 constituent of the reaction, must be accompanied by an I > 0 component. We discuss phenomenological fits to the data to test the possible forms and magnitudes of these amplitudes. A two-amplitude I=0 fit of Breit-Wigner form to the \\Sigma^0\\pi^0 channel alone works quite well. The addition of a single I=1 amplitude works fairly well to model all the line shapes simultaneously.

  20. IUE observations of cool stars - Alpha Aurigae, HR1099, Lambda Andromedae, and Epsilon Eridani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Ayres, T. R.; Basri, G. S.; Morrison, N. D.; Boggess, A.; Schiffer, F. H., III; Holm, A.; Cassatella, A.; Heck, A.; Macchetto, F.

    1978-01-01

    Initial IUE observations of four cool stars are reported. Observed fluxes and surface fluxes are given for several UV emission lines in the spectral range 1175-2000 A, obtained at low and high dispersion with the short-wavelength spectrograph and camera. These lines are formed in the outer atmospheres of these stars, in regions presumably analogous to the solar chromosphere and transition region. The surface fluxes in the lines increase along the sequence: quiet sun, Epsilon Eri, Lambda And, Alpha Aur, and HR1099. The 2.8-d RS CVn-type binary HR1099, observed on 1 March 1978 near the end of a major flaring episode, has line surface fluxes roughly 100 times that of the quiet sun, similar to those seen in solar flares. Line profiles and flux ratios in multiplets for Capella are presented, and comments given on the opacity of the lines and on a tendency of line width to increase with temperature of formation.

  1. Line shape of a transition between two levels in a three-level {Lambda} configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hyok Sang; Jeong, Ji Eun; Cho, D.

    2011-09-15

    We report on our study of the line shape of a transition between two levels in a three-level {Lambda} configuration. By using Poisson statistics under the assumption that the atom stays in a two-level steady state before it is optically pumped to the reservoir state, we arrive at a simple analytic expression for the line shape of a three-level atom. This expression reveals a new type of saturation in the time domain, which is conceptually different from that of power-broadening in a two-level atom. It can also be used as a basis for more complicated situations of Doppler-broadened gaseous samples or pump-and-probe spectroscopy. We tested the theory experimentally in an ideal situation of slow pulsed {sup 85}Rb atoms and found excellent agreement. Application to measurements of a branching ratio or a Franck-Condon factor of a diatomic molecule is discussed.

  2. Air nonlinear dynamics initiated by ultra-intense lambda-cubic terahertz pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, Mostafa E-mail: christoph.hauri@psi.ch; Hauri, Christoph P. E-mail: christoph.hauri@psi.ch

    2015-05-04

    We report on the measurement of the instantaneous Kerr nonlinearity and the retarded alignment of air molecules CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} triggered by an intense, lambda-cubic terahertz pulse, a diffraction- and transform-limited single-cycle pulse. The strong-field, impulsive low-frequency excitation (3.9 THz) leads to field-free alignment dynamics of these molecules thanks to the terahertz-induced transient dipole moments in the otherwise non-polar molecules. The strong coupling to the terahertz electric transient results in the excitation of coherent large amplitude long-living rotational states at room temperature and ambient pressure. Beyond fundamental investigations of nonlinear properties in gases, our results suggest a route towards field-free molecular alignment at laser intensity well below the ionization threshold.

  3. Coherent manipulation of noise-protected superconducting artificial atoms in the Lambda scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, P. G.; Paladino, E.; Pope, T. J.; Falci, G.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a protocol for the manipulation of a three-level artificial atom in Lambda (Λ ) configuration. It allows faithful, selective and robust population transfer analogous to stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (Λ -STIRAP), in last-generation superconducting artificial atoms, where protection from noise implies the absence of a direct pump coupling. It combines the use of a two-photon pump pulse with suitable advanced control, operated by a slow modulation of the phase of the external fields, leveraging on the stability of semiclassical microwave drives. This protocol is a building block for manipulation of microwave photons in complex quantum architectures. Its demonstration would be a benchmark for the implementation of a class of multilevel advanced control procedures for quantum computation and microwave quantum photonics in systems based on artificial atoms.

  4. Computation of eigenpairs of Ax = lambda Bx for vibrations of spinning deformable bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, S.; Clemente, J. L. M.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that, when linear theory is used, the general eigenvalue problem related with the free vibrations of spinning deformable bodies is of the type AX = lambda Bx, where A is Hermitian, and B is real positive definite. Since the order n of the matrices may be large, and A and B are banded or block banded, due to the economics of the numerical solution, one is interested in obtaining only those eigenvalues which fall within the frequency band of interest of the problem. The paper extends the well known method of bisections and iteration of R to the n power to n dimensional complex spaces, i.e., to C to the n power, so that it can be applied to the present problem.

  5. Evaluation of Stability and Biological Activity of Solid Nanodispersion of Lambda-Cyhalothrin

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Bo; Feng, Lei; Pan, Zhenzhong; Yu, Manli; Zeng, Zhanghua; Sun, Changjiao; Zhao, Xiang; Wang, Yan; Cui, Haixin

    2015-01-01

    Pesticides are essential agrochemicals used to protect plants from diseases, pests and weeds. However, the formulation defects of conventional pesticides cause food toxicity and ecological environmental problems. In this study, a novel, efficient and environmentally friendly formulation of lambda-cyhalothrin, a solid nanodispersion, was successfully developed based on melt-emulsification and high-speed shearing methods. The solid nanodispersion presented excellent advantages over conventional pesticide formulations in such formulation functions as dispersibility, stability and bioavailability. The formulation is free of organic solvents, and the use of surfactant is reduced. Therefore, the application of the solid nanodispersion in crop production will improve efficacy and reduce the occurrence of both pesticide residues in food and environmental pollution from pesticides. PMID:26281043

  6. K{sub S} Lambda Photoproduction On The Neutron Within The Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Charles E.; Cole, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    We report some preliminary differential cross section results for the gammad --> K{sub S} Lambda(p) reaction using a circularly-polarized photon beam and an unpolarized LD{sub 2} target. The data was collected at the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. For this study the photon energy ranged from 1.3 to 2.53 GeV, which covers from the reaction threshold through the nucleon resonance regimes. The acceptance- and flux-corrected yields show peaks at the center-of mass energies W = 1.7 and W = 1.9 GeV. These first-time results will aid in unraveling the spectrum of non-strange excited baryons.

  7. Interferon Lambda Alleles Predict Innate Antiviral Immune Responses and Hepatitis C Virus Permissiveness

    PubMed Central

    Sheahan, Timothy; Imanaka, Naoko; Marukian, Svetlana; Dorner, Marcus; Liu, Peng; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can result in viral chronicity or clearance. Although host genetics and particularly genetic variation in the interferon lambda (IFNL) locus are associated with spontaneous HCV clearance and treatment success, the mechanisms guiding these clinical outcomes remain unknown. Using a laser capture microdissection-driven unbiased systems virology approach, we isolated and transcriptionally profiled HCV-infected and adjacent primary human hepatocytes (PHH) approaching single cell resolution. An innate antiviral immune signature dominated the transcriptional response, but differed in magnitude and diversity between HCV-infected and adjacent cells. Molecular signatures associated with more effective antiviral control were determined by comparing donors with high and low infection frequencies. Cells from donors with clinically unfavorable IFNL genotypes were infected at a greater frequency and exhibited dampened antiviral and cell death responses. These data suggest that early virus-host interactions, particularly host genetics and induction of innate immunity, critically determine the outcome of HCV infection. PMID:24528865

  8. Interferon lambda genotype and low serum LDL cholesterol levels in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Josephine H.; Lao, Xiang Qian; Tillmann, Hans L.; Rowell, Jennifer; Patel, Keyur; Thompson, Alexander; Suchindran, Sunil; Muir, Andrew J.; Guyton, John R.; Gardner, Stephen D.; McHutchison, John G.; McCarthy, Jeanette J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, genetic polymorphisms occurring in the interferon lambda gene region were associated with response to interferon-based treatment of hepatitis C infection. Both infection with the hepatitis C virus and interferon therapy are associated with decreased serum cholesterol and high cholesterol has been associated with increased likelihood to respond to interferon. We sought to determine if the interferon lambda gene variant was also associated with serum lipid levels in chronic hepatitis C patients. We compared genotypes of the rs12979860 polymorphism, located proximal to the IL28 gene, with serum lipid and apolipoprotein levels in 746 subjects with chronic HCV infection, not currently undergoing treatment, using multivariable analysis of variance. Results Levels of total cholesterol (p=6.0×10-4), apolipoprotein B (p=1.3×10-6) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (p=8.9×10-10) were significantly higher in subjects carrying the rs12979860 CC ‘responder’ genotype compared to those with the CT or TT genotype. Levels of triglycerides (p=0.03), apolipoprotein A-I (p=0.06) and apolipoprotein E (p=0.01) were slightly lower in the rs12979860 CC genotype group, while levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.78) and apolipoprotein C-III (p=0.74) did not vary by rs12979860 genotype. Conclusions Our results suggest that low levels of LDL cholesterol in chronic hepatitis C patients may be a marker of host endogenous interferon response to hepatitis C and that subjects with the rs12979860 CC ‘responder’ genotype may have a lower endogenous interferon response to the virus. PMID:20235331

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis in Aphis glycines Mutsumura under lambda-cyhalothrin insecticide stress.

    PubMed

    Bi, Rui; Pan, Yiou; Shang, Qingli; Peng, Tianfei; Yang, Shuang; Wang, Shang; Xin, Xuecheng; Liu, Yan; Xi, Jinghui

    2016-09-01

    Lambda-cyhalothrin is now widely used in China to control the soybean aphid Aphis glycines. To dissect the resistance mechanism, a laboratory-selected resistant soybean aphid strain (CRR) was established with a 43.42-fold resistance ratio to λ-cyhalothrin than the susceptible strain (CSS) in adult aphids. In this study, a comparative proteomic analysis between the CRR and CSS strains revealed important differences between the susceptible and resistant strains of soybean aphids for λ-cyhalothrin. Approximately 493 protein spots were detected in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Thirty-six protein spots displayed differential expression of >2-fold in the CRR strain compared to the CSS strain. Out of these 36 protein spots, 21 had elevated and 15 had decreased expression. Twenty-four differentially expressed proteins were identified by MALDI TOF MS/MS and categorized into the functional groups cytoskeleton-related protein, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein folding, antioxidant system, and nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Function analysis showed that cytoskeleton-related proteins and energy metabolism proteins have been associated with the λ-cyhalothrin resistance of A. glycines. The differential expression of λ-cyhalothrin responsive proteins reflected the overall change in cellular structure and metabolism after insecticide treatment in aphids. In summary, our studies improve understanding of the molecular mechanism resistance of soybean aphid to lambda-cyhalothrin, which will facilitate the development of rational approaches to improve the management of this pest and to improve the yield of soybean. PMID:27395796

  10. Light element non-LTE abundances of lambda Bootis stars. II. Nitrogen and sulphur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, I.; Iliev, I. Kh.; Paunzen, E.; Pintado, O. I.; Solano, E.; Barzova, I. S.

    2001-09-01

    One of the main characteristics proclaimed for the group of the lambda Bootis stars is the apparent solar abundance of the light elements C, N, O and S. The typical abundance pattern is completed by the strong underabundances of the Fe-peak elements. In the first paper of this series, we have shown that carbon is less abundant than oxygen but both elements are still significantly more abundant than Fe-peak elements. The mean abundances, based on a detailed non-LTE investigation, were found -0.37 dex and -0.07 dex, respectively. As a further step, we now present non-LTE abundances of nitrogen and sulphur for thirteen members of the lambda Bootis group based on several spectral lines between 8590 Å, and 8750 Å. Furthermore, LTE abundances for calcium in the same spectral range were derived and compared with values from the literature. Similar to the mean abundances of carbon and oxygen, nearly solar values were found (-0.30 dex for nitrogen and -0.11 dex for sulphur) for our sample of program stars. Among our sample, one previously undetected binary system (HD 64491) was identified. From a statistical point of view, the abundances of the light elements range from slightly overabundant to moderately underabundant compared to the Sun. However, the individual objects always exhibit a similiar pattern, with the Fe-peak elements being significantly more underabundant than the light elements. No correlation of the derived abundances with astrophysical parameters such as the effective temperature, surface gravity or projected rotational velocity was found. Furthermore, the abundances of the light elements do not allow us to discriminate between any proposed theory. Based on observations obtained at BNAO Rozhen and Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under the agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba y San Juan.

  11. Human placenta: relative content of antibodies of different classes and subclasses (IgG1-IgG4) containing lambda- and kappa-light chains and chimeric lambda-kappa-immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Lekchnov, Evgenii A; Sedykh, Sergey E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-06-01

    The specific organ placenta is much more than a filter: it is an organ that protects, feeds and regulates the growth of the embryo. Affinity chromatography, ELISA, SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry were used. Using 10 intact human placentas deprived of blood, a quantitative analysis of average relative content [% of total immunoglobulins (Igs)] was carried out for the first time: (92.7), IgA (2.4), IgM (2.5), kappa-antibodies (51.4), lambda-antibodies (48.6), IgG1 (47.0), IgG2 (39.5), IgG3 (8.8) and IgG4 (4.3). It was shown for the first time that placenta contains sIgA (2.5%). In the classic paradigm, Igs represent products of clonal B-cell populations, each producing antibodies recognizing a single antigen. There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monovalent molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. However, similarly to human milk Igs, placenta antibodies undergo extensive half-molecule exchange and the IgG pool consists of 43.5 ± 15.0% kappa-kappa-IgGs and 41.6 ± 17.0% lambda-lambda-IgGs, while 15.0 ± 4.0% of the IgGs contained both kappa- and lambda-light chains. Kappa-kappa-IgGs and lambda-lambda-IgGs contained, respectively (%): IgG1 (47.7 and 34.4), IgG2 (36.3 and 44.5), IgG3 (7.4 and 11.8) and IgG4 (7.5 and 9.1), while chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of (%): 43.5 IgG1, 41.0 IgG2, 5.6 IgG3 and 7.9 IgG4. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between placenta IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens, which explains a very well-known polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of different human IgGs.

  12. Regional Listening Forums: An Examination of the Methodologies Used by the Child Welfare League of America and Lambda Legal to Highlight the Experiences of LGBTQ Youth in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woronoff, Rob; Estrada, Rudy

    2006-01-01

    In 2002, the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) and the Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund began Fostering Transitions: CWLA/Lambda Joint Initiative to Support LGBTQ Youth and Adults Involved with the Child Welfare System. To document the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth, as well as identify…

  13. An algorithmic approach using kappa/lambda ratios to improve the diagnostic accuracy of urine protein electrophoresis and to reduce the volume required for immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Levinson, S S

    1997-06-27

    The most sensitive routine method for identifying urinary monoclonal immunoglobulin kappa and lambda light chains, called Bence Jones proteins (BJPs), in clinical laboratories is immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE), but this procedure is time-consuming and expensive. As a result, many laboratories screen for paraproteins with urine protein electrophoresis (UPE), which is insensitive when low concentrations of BJP are present and is difficult to interpret with severe proteinuria. The purpose of this study was to determine whether kappa/lambda ratios can be used in conjunction with UPE to improve diagnostic reliability in identifying paraproteins, and decrease the need for IFE on all samples. Urine specimens from 243 patients were examined by UPE and kappa/lambda ratios, and compared with IFE. Due to poor analytical sensitivity, the urinary kappa or lambda concentrations could not be determined in many cases. As a result, many specimens showed kappa/lambda ratios that were indeterminate. Nevertheless, when both urinary kappa and lambda concentrations were undetectable, a BJP could be ruled out. A urinary kappa/lambda ratio between 0.75-3 also ruled out a BJP. The use of kappa/lambda ratios, in conjunction with UPE, resulted in a 52% decrease in the volume of IFE during the course of this study, with 100% sensitivity for detecting BJP.

  14. The isolation of a human Ig V lambda gene from a recombinant library of chromosome 22 and estimation of its copy number.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, M L; Szajnert, M F; Kaplan, J C; McColl, L; Young, B D

    1984-01-01

    We report the first isolation and characterisation of a human Ig V lambda gene. The gene was isolated from a recombinant phage library of human chromosome 22 using a mouse Ig lambda cDNA as probe. DNA sequence analysis predicts a short leader peptide interrupted by an intron of 88 nucleotides, and a mature polypeptide of 96-97 amino acids which shares 61% homology with mouse V lambda I chains. Comparison with the amino acid sequence of known human lambda chains of all six subgroups shows agreement at 22/25 low variance positions. However the maximum homology with human chains is 49%, so we conclude that this sequence represents a new IgV lambda subgroup. The coding region is followed by the conserved heptamer, CACAGTG, and nonamer, ACATAAACC, sequences which have been implicated in V-J segment recombination. This gene has the hallmarks of an active V lambda gene including recently identified transcriptional controlling sequences. Probing genomic DNA with the subcloned V lambda gene detects a family of about 10 cross hybridizing members at low stringency and 2 at high stringency. There is limited polymorphism of the V lambda locus. Images PMID:6091030

  15. Immunoglobulin G kappa [IgG kappa] and IgG lambda paraproteinemia in a child with AIDS and response to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Seeborg, Filiz Odabasi; Gay, Hannah; Schmiege, Lorenz M; Bernard, David; Shearer, William T

    2005-11-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy with AIDS, extremely elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration and IgG kappa [IgG(kappa)] and IgG lambda [IgG(lambda)] paraproteinemia. This paraproteinemia partially responded to highly active antiretroviral therapy. This case emphasizes the importance of controlling B-cell activation. PMID:16275950

  16. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  17. A new clustering strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-xin; Tang, Jia-fu; Wang, Guang-xing

    2007-04-01

    On the basis of the analysis of clustering algorithm that had been proposed for MANET, a novel clustering strategy was proposed in this paper. With the trust defined by statistical hypothesis in probability theory and the cluster head selected by node trust and node mobility, this strategy can realize the function of the malicious nodes detection which was neglected by other clustering algorithms and overcome the deficiency of being incapable of implementing the relative mobility metric of corresponding nodes in the MOBIC algorithm caused by the fact that the receiving power of two consecutive HELLO packet cannot be measured. It's an effective solution to cluster MANET securely.

  18. Absolute dimensions of solar-type eclipsing binaries. III. EW Orionis: stellar evolutionary models tested by a G0 V system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, J. V.; Bruntt, H.; Olsen, E. H.; Helt, B. E.; Claret, A.

    2010-02-01

    detected. The apsidal motion period is U = 16 300 ± 3900 yr, and the inferred mean central density concentration coefficient, log(k2) = -1.66 ± 0.30, agrees marginally with model predictions. The measured rotational velocities, 9.0 ± 0.7 (primary) and 8.8 ± 0.6 (secondary) km s-1, are in agreement with both the synchronous velocities and the theoretically predicted pseudo-synchronous velocities. Finally, the distance (175 ± 7 pc), age, and center-of mass velocity (6 km s-1) exclude suggested membership of the open cluster Collinder 70. Conclusions: EW Ori now belongs to the small group of solar-type eclipsing binaries with well-established astrophysical properties. Based on observations carried out at the Strömgren Automatic Telescope (SAT) and the 1.5 m telescope (62.L-0284) at ESO, La Silla.Table 11 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/511/A22

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of Lambda hypernuclei in the wide mass region using the (e, e-prime K+) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi N. Nakamura

    2011-09-01

    The third generation spectroscopic study of {Lambda} hypernuclei using (e,e'K{sup +}) reaction (JLab E05-115) was performed at JLab Hall-C in 2009. The experiment introduced the newly developed high-resolution electron spectrometer (HES) with the existing high-resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS). Experimental configuration, conditions, spectrometer designs and current status of analysis are presented.

  20. Lambda transducing bacteriophage carrying deletions of the argCBH-rpoBC region of the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Linn, T; Goman, M; Scaife, J

    1979-01-01

    Deletions in the rpoBC region have been transferred to phage lambda and characterized in detail by genetic, structural, and functional tests. We thus extend and confirm knowledge of the organization of this part of the chromosome. The new phages are useful tools for studying the genes for the bacterial transcription and translation machinery. Images PMID:159290

  1. Unconventional methods for clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Cluster analysis or clustering is a task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a cluster) are more similar (in some sense or another) to each other than to those in other groups (clusters). It is the main task of exploratory data mining and a common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine learning, pattern recognition, image analysis, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. The topic of this paper is one of the modern methods of clustering namely SOM (Self Organising Map). The paper describes the theory needed to understand the principle of clustering and descriptions of algorithm used with clustering in our experiments.

  2. Galaxy clusters and cold dark matter - A low-density unbiased universe?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Cen, Renyue

    1992-01-01

    Large-scale simulations of a universe dominated by cold dark matter (CDM) are tested against two fundamental properties of clusters of galaxies: the cluster mass function and the cluster correlation function. We find that standard biased CDM models are inconsistent with these observations for any bias parameter b. A low-density, low-bias CDM-type model, with or without a cosmological constant, appears to be consistent with both the cluster mass function and the cluster correlations. The low-density model agrees well with the observed correlation function of the Abell, Automatic Plate Measuring Facility (APM), and Edinburgh-Durham cluster catalogs. The model is in excellent agreement with the observed dependence of the correlation strength on cluster mean separation, reproducing the measured universal dimensionless cluster correlation. The low-density model is also consistent with other large-scale structure observations, including the APM angular galaxy-correlations, and for lambda = 1-Omega with the COBE results of the microwave background radiation fluctuations.

  3. Comparison between the lambda response of eye-fixation-related potentials and the P100 component of pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Kazai, Koji; Yagi, Akihiro

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the lambda response of eye-fixation-related potentials (EFRPs) with the P100 component of pattern-reversal visual-evoked potentials. EFRPs were obtained by averaging EEGs time-locked to the offset of the saccade. The dipole of the lambda response and that of the P100 component were estimated by the dipole-tracing method (Musha & Homma, 1990). The locations of their dipoles at the occipital sites were very close to each other when the difference waveform, which was calculated by subtracting the EFRP to the patternless stimulus from the EFRP to the patterned stimulus, was used for the lambda response. This finding implies that the lambda response and P100 have a common neural generator in the visual cortex. However, the peak latency of the lambda response was shorter than that of P100. The saccades in the EFRP trial were considered to be the cause of the difference.

  4. Electrochemical studies of the mono-Fe, Fe-Zn, and Fe-Fe metalloisoforms of bacteriophage lambda protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Tiffany A; Rusnak, Frank

    2004-01-27

    Bacteriophage lambda protein phosphatase (lambdaPP) is a member of a large superfamily of metallophosphoesterases, including serine/threonine protein phosphatases, purple acid phosphatases, 5'-nucleotidase, and DNA repair enzymes such as Mre11. Members of this family share several common characteristics, including a common phosphoesterase motif, secondary structural fold (betaalphabetaalphabeta), and metal ligand environment, and often accommodate a dinuclear metal center. The identity of the active site metals often differs between family members. Despite the extensive spectroscopic studies of several family members, only the standard redox potential of porcine purple acid phosphate (PAP) has been measured. In this report, we investigate the redox properties of another member of this protein family. The standard redox potentials of the mono-Fe, Fe-Zn, and Fe-Fe metalloisoforms of lambdaPP were determined from anaerobic redox titration experiments. Two different S = 5/2, mono-Fe3+ lambdaPP species were identified: the first with an E/D approximately 0.17, g = 8.9 and 4.8, and an Eo' approximately +130 mV; the second with E/D approximately 0.05, g = 6.7, 5.9, and 4.4, and an Eo' approximately +120 mV. The first and second mono-Fe3+ species are thought to represent Fe present in the M2 and M1 sites, respectively. The addition of Zn2+ to mono-Fe3+ lambdaPP results in a decrease in both mono-Fe3+ species and the appearance of a new S = 5/2, Fe(3+)-Zn2+ species (E/D approximately 0.02, g = 5.9, and an Eo' > +175 mV). The Fe-Fe lambdaPP titration revealed an S = 1/2, Fe(3+)-Fe2+ (g < 2) species with an Eo' > +128 mV. These results suggest that the active site of lambdaPP supports a high oxidation potential for both metal sites and may indicate an equally oxidizing active site for other member metallophosphoesterases.

  5. Stability, ghost, and strong coupling in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity with {lambda}{ne}1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yongqing; Wang Anzhong

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, we investigate three important issues: stability, ghost, and strong coupling, in the Horava-Melby-Thompson setup of the Horava-Lifshitz theory with {lambda}{ne}1, generalized recently by da Silva. We first develop the general linear scalar perturbations of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe with arbitrary spatial curvature and find that an immediate by-product of the setup is that, in all the inflationary models described by a scalar field, the FRW universe is necessarily flat. Applying them to the case of the Minkowski background, we find that it is stable, and, similar to the case {lambda}=1, the spin-0 graviton is eliminated. The vector perturbations vanish identically in the Minkowski background. Thus, similar to general relativity, a free gravitational field in this setup is completely described by a spin-2 massless graviton, even with {lambda}{ne}1. We also study the ghost problem in the FRW background and find explicitly the ghost-free conditions. To study the strong coupling problem, we consider two different kinds of spacetimes, all with the presence of matter: one is cosmological, and the other is static. We find that the coupling becomes strong for a process with energy higher than M{sub pl}|c{sub {psi}|}{sup 5/2} in the flat FRW background and M{sub pl}|c{sub {psi}|}{sup 3} in a static weak gravitational field, where |c{sub {psi}|{identical_to}}|(1-{lambda})/(3{lambda}-1)|{sup 1/2}.

  6. Multistep Ionization of Argon Clusters in Intense Femtosecond Extreme Ultraviolet Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bostedt, C.; Thomas, H.; Hoener, M.; Eremina, E.; Fennel, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Wabnitz, H.; Kuhlmann, M.; Ploenjes, E.; Tiedtke, K.; Treusch, R.; Feldhaus, J.; Castro, A. R. B. de; Moeller, T.

    2008-04-04

    The interaction of intense extreme ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulses ({lambda}=32.8 nm) from the FLASH free electron laser (FEL) with clusters has been investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy and modeled by Monte Carlo simulations. For laser intensities up to 5x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, we find that the cluster ionization process is a sequence of direct electron emission events in a developing Coulomb field. A nanoplasma is formed only at the highest investigated power densities where ionization is frustrated due to the deep cluster potential. In contrast with earlier studies in the IR and vacuum ultraviolet spectral regime, we find no evidence for electron emission from plasma heating processes.

  7. Generation of strongly coupled Xe cluster nanoplasmas by low intensive soft x-ray laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2012-07-11

    A seeding gas jet including Xe clusters was irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft x-ray laser pulse ({lambda}=13.9 nm, {approx}7 ps, {<=}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}), where the laser photon energy is high enough to ionize 4d core electrons. In order to clarify how the innershell ionization followed by the Auger electron emission is affected under the intense laser irradiation, the electron energy distribution was measured. Photoelectron spectra showed that the peak position attributed to 4d hole shifted to lower energy and the spectral width was broadened with increasing cluster size. Moreover, the energy distribution exhibited that a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma with several eV was generated.

  8. Information-based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Slonim, Noam; Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2005-01-01

    In an age of increasingly large data sets, investigators in many different disciplines have turned to clustering as a tool for data analysis and exploration. Existing clustering methods, however, typically depend on several nontrivial assumptions about the structure of data. Here, we reformulate the clustering problem from an information theoretic perspective that avoids many of these assumptions. In particular, our formulation obviates the need for defining a cluster “prototype,” does not require an a priori similarity metric, is invariant to changes in the representation of the data, and naturally captures nonlinear relations. We apply this approach to different domains and find that it consistently produces clusters that are more coherent than those extracted by existing algorithms. Finally, our approach provides a way of clustering based on collective notions of similarity rather than the traditional pairwise measures. PMID:16352721

  9. Convex Discriminative Multitask Clustering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Multitask clustering tries to improve the clustering performance of multiple tasks simultaneously by taking their relationship into account. Most existing multitask clustering algorithms fall into the type of generative clustering, and none are formulated as convex optimization problems. In this paper, we propose two convex Discriminative Multitask Clustering (DMTC) objectives to address the problems. The first one aims to learn a shared feature representation, which can be seen as a technical combination of the convex multitask feature learning and the convex Multiclass Maximum Margin Clustering (M3C). The second one aims to learn the task relationship, which can be seen as a combination of the convex multitask relationship learning and M3C. The objectives of the two algorithms are solved in a uniform procedure by the efficient cutting-plane algorithm and further unified in the Bayesian framework. Experimental results on a toy problem and two benchmark data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms. PMID:26353206

  10. Clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhlinin, A. A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Markevich, M. L.; Sunyaev, R. A.; Churazov, E. M.

    2014-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are formed via nonlinear growth of primordial density fluctuations and are the most massive gravitationally bound objects in the present Universe. Their number density at different epochs and their properties depend strongly on the properties of dark matter and dark energy, making clusters a powerful tool for observational cosmology. Observations of the hot gas filling the gravitational potential well of a cluster allows studying gasdynamic and plasma effects and the effect of supermassive black holes on the heating and cooling of gas on cluster scales. The work of Yakov Borisovich Zeldovich has had a profound impact on virtually all cosmological and astrophysical studies of galaxy clusters, introducing concepts such as the Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum, the Zeldovich approximation, baryon acoustic peaks, and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Here, we review the most basic properties of clusters and their role in modern astrophysics and cosmology.

  11. S gene expression and the timing of lysis by bacteriophage lambda.

    PubMed

    Chang, C Y; Nam, K; Young, R

    1995-06-01

    The S gene of bacteriophage lambda encodes the holin required for release of the R endolysin at the onset of phage-induced host lysis. S is the promoter-proximal gene on the single lambda late transcript and spans 107 codons. S has a novel translational initiation region with dual start codons, resulting in the production of two protein products, S105 and S107. Although differing only by the Met-1-Lys-2... N-terminal extension present on S107, the two proteins are thought to have opposing functions, with the shorter polypeptide acting as the lysis effector and the longer one acting as an inhibitor. The expression of wild-type and mutant alleles of the holin gene has been assessed quantitatively with respect to the scheduling of lysis. S mRNA accumulates during the late gene expression period to a final level of about 170 molecules per cell and is maintained at that level for at least the last 15 min before lysis. Total S protein synthesis, partitioned at about 2:1 in favor of the S105 protein compared with the other product, S107, accumulates to a final level of approximately 4,600 molecules per cell. The kinetics of accumulation of S is consistent with a constant translational rate of less than one S protein per mRNA per minute. Mutant alleles with alterations in the translational initiation region were studied to determine how the translational initiation region of S achieves the proper partition of initiation events at the two S start codons and how the synthesis of S105 and S107 relates to lysis timing. The results are discussed in terms of a model for the pathway by which the 30S ribosome-fMet-tRNA complex binds to the translational initiation region of S. In addition, analysis of the relationship between lysis timing and the levels of the two S gene products suggests that S107 inhibits S105, the lethal lysis effector, by a stoichiometric titration.

  12. Calorimetric analysis of lambda cI repressor binding to DNA operator sites.

    PubMed

    Merabet, E; Ackers, G K

    1995-07-11

    Enthalpies and heat capacities were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry for bacteriophage lambda cI repressor binding to DNA containing various combinations of the three operator sites OR1, OR2, and OR3 (each comprising a consensus half-site and a specific nonconsensus half-site). Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to evaluate the effects of specific DNA binding on thermal melting of the N-terminal and C-terminal repressor domains. Principal findings of this study are as follows: (1) Binding of repressor to each of the DNA operators is dominated by a large negative enthalpy, in agreement with earlier van't Hoff analyses of quantitative footprint titration data [Koblan & Ackers (1992) Biochemistry 31, 57-65]. The calorimetric data also revealed negative heat capacities for cI binding that are of comparable magnitude with many other systems [Spolar & Record (1994) Science 263, 777-784]. However, this feature in combination with the large negative values of binding enthalpies leads to an enthalpic dominance throughout the physiological temperature range. The resulting thermodynamic profile is opposite to the entropically dominated binding observed for many systems, including lambda cro repressor which binds to the same sites as cI and also employs a helix-turn-helix binding domain [Takeda et al. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 89, 8180-8184]. It is suggested that these thermodynamic differences may arise from interactions of the cI repressor's N-terminal "arm" with the DNA. (2) Repressor monomers do not bind significantly to DNA containing either a consensus half-site or a nonconsensus half-site. Binding affinity to the double-consensus operator is much weaker than to any of the natural full-site operators. The same was found with other combinations of half-sites. A mutant repressor (PT158) which is severely defective in dimerization [Burz et al. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 8399-8405] was also found to bind only full-site operators and showed

  13. The spatial clustering of radio sources in NVSS and FIRST; implications for galaxy clustering evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overzier, R. A.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rengelink, R. B.; Wilman, R. J.

    2003-07-01

    We have measured the angular correlation function, w(theta ), of radio sources in the 1.4 GHz NVSS and FIRST radio surveys. Below ~ 6arcmin the signal is dominated by the size distribution of classical double radio galaxies, an effect underestimated in some previous studies. We model the physical size distribution of FRII radio galaxies to account for this excess signal in w(theta ). The amplitude of the true cosmological clustering of radio sources is roughly constant at A =~ 1*E-3 for flux limits of 3-40 mJy, but has increased to A =~ 7*E-3 at 200 mJy. This can be explained if powerful (FRII) radio galaxies probe significantly more massive structures compared to radio galaxies of average power at z ~ 1. This is consistent with powerful high-redshift radio galaxies generally having massive (forming) elliptical hosts in rich (proto-)cluster environments. For FRIIs we derive a spatial (comoving) correlation length of r0=14+/-3 h-1 Mpc. This is remarkably close to that measured for extremely red objects (EROs) associated with a population of old elliptical galaxies at z ~ 1 by \\citet{daddi01}. Based on their similar clustering properties, we propose that EROs and powerful radio galaxies may be the same systems seen at different evolutionary stages. Their r0 is ~ 2x higher than that of QSOs at a similar redshift, and comparable to that of bright ellipticals locally. This suggests that r0 (comoving) of these galaxies has changed little from z ~ 1 to z=0, in agreement with current Lambda CDM hierarchical merging models for the clustering evolution of massive early-type galaxies. Alternatively, the clustering of radio galaxies can be explained by the galaxy conservation model. This then implies that radio galaxies of average power are the progenitors of the local field population of early-types, while the most powerful radio galaxies will evolve into a present-day population with r0 comparable to that of local rich clusters.

  14. Mini-clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinellato, J. A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Bellandifilho, J.; Lattes, C. M. G.; Menon, M. J.; Navia, C. E.; Pamilaju, A.; Sawayanagi, K.; Shibuya, E. H.; Turtelli, A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of mini-clusters observed in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber no.19 are summarized. The study was made on 54 single core shower upper and 91 shower clusters of E(gamma) 10 TeV from 30 families which are visible energy greater than 80 TeV and penetrate through both upper and lower detectors of the two-story chamber. The association of hadrons in mini-cluster is made clear from their penetrative nature and microscopic observation of shower continuation in lower chamber. Small P sub t (gamma) of hadrons in mini-clusters remained in puzzle.

  15. Reactions of intermetallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, R. W.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1990-02-01

    Reaction of bismuth-alkali clusters with closed-shell HX acids provides insight into the structures, formation, and stabilities of these intermetallic species. HC1 and HI are observed to quantitatively strip BixNay and BixKy, respectively, of their alkali component, leaving bare bismuth clusters as the only bismuth-containing species detected. Product bismuth clusters exhibit the same distribution observed when pure bismuth is evaporated in the source. Though evaporated simultaneously from the same crucible, this suggests alkali atoms condense onto existing bismuth clusters and have negligible effect on their formation and consequent distribution. The indistinguishibility of reacted and pure bismuth cluster distributions further argues against the simple replacement of alkali atoms with hydrogen in these reactions. This is considered further evidence that the alkali atoms are external to the stable bismuth Zintl anionic structures. Reactivities of BixNay clusters with HC1 are estimated to lie between 3×10-13 for Bi4Na, to greater than 4×10-11 for clusters possessing large numbers of alkali atoms. Bare bismuth clusters are observed in separate experiments to react significantly more slowly with rates of 1-9×10-14 and exhibit little variation of reactivity with size. The bismuth clusters may thus be considered a relatively inert substrate upon which the alkali overlayer reacts.

  16. Management of cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of cluster headache is 0.1% and cluster headache is often not diagnosed or misdiagnosed as migraine or sinusitis. In cluster headache there is often a considerable diagnostic delay - an average of 7 years in a population-based survey. Cluster headache is characterized by very severe or severe orbital or periorbital pain with a duration of 15-180 minutes. The cluster headache attacks are accompanied by characteristic associated unilateral symptoms such as tearing, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea, eyelid oedema, miosis and/or ptosis. In addition, there is a sense of restlessness and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment and prophylactic treatment. In ECH and CCH the attacks can be treated with oxygen (12 L/min) or subcutaneous sumatriptan 6 mg. For both oxygen and sumatriptan there are two randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrating efficacy. In both ECH and CCH, verapamil is the prophylactic drug of choice. Verapamil 360 mg/day was found to be superior to placebo in one clinical trial. In clinical practice, daily doses of 480-720 mg are mostly used. Thus, the dose of verapamil used in cluster headache treatment may be double the dose used in cardiology, and with the higher doses the PR interval should be checked with an ECG. At the start of a cluster, transitional preventive treatment such as corticosteroids or greater occipital nerve blockade can be given. In CCH and in long-standing clusters of ECH, lithium, methysergide, topiramate, valproic acid and ergotamine tartrate can be used as add-on prophylactic treatment. In drug-resistant CCH, neuromodulation with either occipital nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation of the hypothalamus is an alternative treatment strategy

  17. The youngest globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Sara

    2015-11-01

    It is likely that all stars are born in clusters, but most clusters are not bound and disperse. None of the many protoclusters in our Galaxy are likely to develop into long-lived bound clusters. The super star clusters (SSCs) seen in starburst galaxies are more massive and compact and have better chances of survival. The birth and early development of SSCs takes place deep in molecular clouds, and during this crucial stage the embedded clusters are invisible to optical or UV observations but are studied via the radio-infrared supernebulae (RISN) they excite. We review observations of embedded clusters and identify RISN within 10 Mpc whose exciting clusters have ≈ 106 M⊙ or more in volumes of a few pc3 and which are likely to not only survive as bound clusters, but to evolve into objects as massive and compact as Galactic globulars. These clusters are distinguished by very high star formation efficiency η, at least a factor of 10 higher than the few percent seen in the Galaxy, probably due to the violent disturbances their host galaxies have undergone. We review recent observations of the kinematics of the ionized gas in RISN showing outflows through low-density channels in the ambient molecular cloud; this may protect the cloud from feedback by the embedded H II region.

  18. Clustering versus non-clustering phase synchronizations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2014-03-15

    Clustering phase synchronization (CPS) is a common scenario to the global phase synchronization of coupled dynamical systems. In this work, a novel scenario, the non-clustering phase synchronization (NPS), is reported. It is found that coupled systems do not transit to the global synchronization until a certain sufficiently large coupling is attained, and there is no clustering prior to the global synchronization. To reveal the relationship between CPS and NPS, we further analyze the noise effect on coupled phase oscillators and find that the coupled oscillator system can change from CPS to NPS with the increase of noise intensity or system disorder. These findings are expected to shed light on the mechanism of various intriguing self-organized behaviors in coupled systems.

  19. Galaxy Cluster Gas Mass Fractions From Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Measurements: Constraints on Omega(M)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Holzapfel, William L.; Joy, Marshall K.; Mohr, Joseph J.; Patel, Sandeep

    2001-01-01

    Using sensitive centimeter-wave receivers mounted on the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association millimeter arrays, we have obtained interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich(SZ) effect toward massive galaxy clusters. We use the SZ data to determine the pressure distribution of the cluster gas and, in combination with published X-ray temperatures, to infer the gas mass and total gravitational mass of 18 clusters. The gas mass fraction, f(g), is calculated for each cluster and is extrapolated to the fiducial radius r(500) using the results of numerical simulations. The mean f(g) within r(500) is 0.081(+ 0.009 / - 0.011) per h(100) (statistical uncertainty at 68% confidence level, assuming Omega(M) = 0.3, Omega(Lambda) = 0.7). We discuss possible sources of systematic errors in the mean f(sub g) measurement. We derive an upper limit for Omega(M) from this sample under the assumption that the mass composition of clusters within r(500) reflects the universal mass composition: Omega(M)h is less than or equal to Omega(B)/f(g). The gas mass fractions depend on cosmology through the angular diameter distance and the r(500) correction factors. For a flat universe (Omega(Lambda) is identical with 1 - Omega(M)) and h = 0.7, we find the measured gas mass fractions are consistent with Omega(M) is less than 0.40, at 68% confidence. Including estimates of the baryons contained in galaxies and the baryons which failed to become bound during the cluster formation process, we find Omega(M) is approximately equal to 0.25.

  20. Interferon lambda 1 expression in cervical cells differs between low-risk and high-risk human papillomavirus-positive women.

    PubMed

    Cannella, Fabiana; Scagnolari, Carolina; Selvaggi, Carla; Stentella, Patrizia; Recine, Nadia; Antonelli, Guido; Pierangeli, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    Persistent infection by high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) types is a prerequisite for progression to cancer. HR-HPVs may lead to a deregulation of innate immunity by interfering with the epithelial type I interferon (IFN) response, whereas very little is known about type III IFNs, a key component of the mucosal antiviral response. This study reports a first attempt to evaluate the activation of type III IFN genes (IFN lambda 1-3), IFN lambda receptor genes (IFN-lambdaR1 and IL10R2), and IFN-induced genes (MxA, ISG15, ISG56) in HPV-positive and HPV-negative cervical cells from 154 women attending the gynecological unit of a university hospital in Rome. Despite an increased individual variability, a coordinated expression of several IFN lambda-related genes was observed. Furthermore, IFN lambda 1 and IFN-lambdaR1 genes were expressed at higher levels in cervical cells positive to low-risk (LR) HPV compared to HR-HPV and HPV-negative cells. Consistently, ISG15 expression was significantly higher in LR-HPV-infected women than in the other groups. Moreover, IFN lambda 1 expression decreased significantly with abnormal cytological results. This study is the first to show the activation of a type III IFN response in LR-HPV-positive cervical cells and suggests that the lack of this response in HR-HPV infection may be related to lesion progression. PMID:24510368