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Sample records for laminar starting plumes

  1. Starting laminar plumes: Comparison of laboratory and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatteville, Judith; van Keken, Peter E.; Limare, Angela; Davaille, Anne

    2009-12-01

    A detailed comparison of starting laminar plumes in viscous fluids is provided using the complementary approaches of laboratory modeling and numerical simulation. In the laboratory experiments the plumes are started in a nearly isoviscous silicone oil with heat supplied through a fixed circular source. The temperature field is measured by differential interferometry and thermochromic liquid crystals. The velocity field is determined by particle image velocimetry. Numerical simulations of the laboratory experiments are performed using a finite element method that employs the measured properties of the physical oil and the heating history. No further adjustments are made to match the laboratory results. For fluids at two different viscosities and for variable power supplied to the plume there is excellent agreement in the temporal evolution and fine spatial detail of the plume. Minor differences remain, particulary in the transient stage of the plume in the low-viscosity fluid, but the differences are within the experimental uncertainties. In contrast, the assumption of constant viscosity in the numerical models leads to differences that are larger than the experimental uncertainties, demonstrating that these near-isoviscous fluids should not be considered to have constant viscosity.

  2. Velocity field measurements of a laminar starting plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanny, J.; Shlien, D. J.

    1985-04-01

    The region of buoyant fluid resulting from the initiation of heating of an infinite fluid is called the starting plume. Here, velocity field measurements of this flow pattern are presented for the first time. The measurements were carried out by processing digitized tracer particle path photographs. Similarity of the velocity field of the starting plume as it rises was found to exist in the limited range of heat injection rates investigated. The vorticity computed from the velocity field was diffuse, there being no evidence of a distinctive core. Additional flow visualization experiments show the spiral structure in the starting plume cap.

  3. Scalar field measurements of a laminar starting plume cap using digital processing of interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chay, Avraham; Shlien, D. J.

    1986-08-01

    The scalar field (heat or species concentration) of a small-source laminar starting plume was measured at a single dimensionless buoyancy injection rate for two values of the ratio of momentum diffusivity to scalar diffusivity, Pr=7 and 300. Digital image processing was used to extract concentration contours from the interferograms, which considerably reduced the data reduction time and permitted an improved resolution. The effect of Pr was clearly visible in the scalar contours, especially in terms of the entrained fluid that is found to be undiluted far inside the cap of the higher Pr. The scalar contours were not self-similar when a single length scale was used, but the data collapsed well using a two-length scale normalization. The convective velocity of the cap was also measured for the two cases, suggesting a possible logarithmic effect of Pr. An analysis confirms the speculation. It was also found that about 37% of the total injection rate into the starting plume is convected into the cap. This work is the first experimental investigation demonstrating the effect of change in Pr on the motion of small buoyancy-source laminar gravitational convection phenomena.

  4. Anatomy of a laminar starting thermal plume at high Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaille, Anne; Limare, Angela; Touitou, Floriane; Kumagai, Ichiro; Vatteville, Judith

    2011-02-01

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of a plume generated from a small heat source in a high Prandtl number fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The velocity field was determined with particle image velocimetry, while the temperature field was measured using differential interferometry and thermochromic liquid crystals. The combination of these different techniques run simultaneously allows us to identify the different stages of plume development, and to compare the positions of key-features of the velocity field (centers of rotation, maximum vorticity locations, stagnation points) respective to the plume thermal anomaly, for Prandtl numbers greater than 103. We further show that the thermal structure of the plume stem is well predicted by the constant viscosity model of Batchelor (Q J R Met Soc 80: 339-358, 1954) for viscosity ratios up to 50.

  5. Near Field of Starting Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.; Gharib, M.; Dabiri, D.

    1997-11-01

    Although steady jets and plumes have been studied extensively in the past, there is relatively little known about the initial stages of starting buoyant jets. The present investigation examined buoyancy-driven flows resulting from cylindrical containers w ith length to diameter ratios (L/D) between 2 and 13. Density ratios up to ten percent were utilized. A technique was developed to release the column of buoyant fluid with minimal disturbance during the discharge. Our observations indicate that the majori ty of the released fluid gets entrained into the starting vortex ring for L/D < 4. Longer columns result in a jet trailing behind the starting vortex. In all cases, the starting vortex ring becomes unstable as a result of the baroclinic torque generation around its perimeter, and disintegrates into a turbulent mass within the first 5 diameters. This fluid mass then gets reorganized into a larger, more diffuse thermal. The thermal formation occurs closer to the source as the length to diameter ratio of th e buoyant column gets smaller. The temporal evolution of the circulation associated with the buoyant fluid, which was derived from the digital particle image velocimetry technique, will be presented.

  6. Laminar and turbulent surgical plume characteristics generated from curved- and straight-blade laparoscopic ultrasonic dissectors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Fernando J; Sehrt, David; Pompeo, Alexandre; Molina, Wilson R

    2014-05-01

    To characterize laparoscopic ultrasonic dissector surgical plume emission (laminar or turbulent) and investigate plume settlement time between curved and straight blades. A straight and a curved blade laparoscopic ultrasonic dissector were activated on tissue and in a liquid environment to evaluate plume emission. Plume emission was characterized as either laminar or turbulent and the plume settlement times were compared. Devices were then placed in liquid to observed consistency in the fluid disruption. Two types of plume emission were identified generating different directions of plume: laminar flow causes minimal visual obstruction by directing the aerosol downwards, while turbulent flow directs plume erratically across the cavity. Laminar plume dissipates immediately while turbulent plume reaches a second maximum obstruction approximately 0.3 s after activation and clears after 2 s. Turbulent plume was observed with the straight blade in 10 % of activations, and from the curved blade in 47 % of activations. The straight blade emitted less obstructive plume. Turbulent flow is disruptive to laparoscopic visibility with greater field obstruction and requires longer settling than laminar plume. Ultrasonic dissectors with straight blades have more consistent oscillations and generate more laminar flow compared with curved blades. Surgeons may avoid laparoscope smearing from maximum plume generation depending on blade geometry.

  7. A uniform laminar air plasma plume with large volume excited by an alternating current voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Chu, Jingdi; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying

    2015-12-01

    Using a plasma jet composed of two needle electrodes, a laminar plasma plume with large volume is generated in air through an alternating current voltage excitation. Based on high-speed photography, a train of filaments is observed to propagate periodically away from their birth place along the gas flow. The laminar plume is in fact a temporal superposition of the arched filament train. The filament consists of a negative glow near the real time cathode, a positive column near the real time anode, and a Faraday dark space between them. It has been found that the propagation velocity of the filament increases with increasing the gas flow rate. Furthermore, the filament lifetime tends to follow a normal distribution (Gaussian distribution). The most probable lifetime decreases with increasing the gas flow rate or decreasing the averaged peak voltage. Results also indicate that the real time peak current decreases and the real time peak voltage increases with the propagation of the filament along the gas flow. The voltage-current curve indicates that, in every discharge cycle, the filament evolves from a Townsend discharge to a glow one and then the discharge quenches. Characteristic regions including a negative glow, a Faraday dark space, and a positive column can be discerned from the discharge filament. Furthermore, the plasma parameters such as the electron density, the vibrational temperature and the gas temperature are investigated based on the optical spectrum emitted from the laminar plume.

  8. Evidence for Little Shallow Entrainment in Starting Mantle Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, F. C.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Hort, M.

    2005-12-01

    Basalts from intraplate or hotspot ocean islands show distinct geochemical signatures. Their diversity in composition is generally believed to result from the upwelling plume entraining shallow mantle material during ascent, while potentially also entraining other deep regions of the mantle. Here we present results from analogue laboratory experiments and numerical modelling that there is evidence for little shallow entrainment into ascending mantle plumes, i.e. most of the plume signature is inherited from the source. We conducted laboratory experiments using glucose syrup contaminated with glass beads to visualize fluid flow and origin. The plume is initiated by heating from below or by injecting hot, uncontaminated syrup. Particle movement is captured by a CCD camera. In our numerical experiments we solve the Stokes equations for a viscous fluid at infinite Prandtl number with passive tracer particles being used to track fluid flow and entrainment rates, simulating laboratory as well as mantle conditions. In both analogue experiments and numerical models we observe the classical plume structure being embedded in a `sheath' of material from the plume source region that retains little of the original temperature anomaly of the plume source. Yet, this sheath ascends in the `slipstream' of the plume at speeds close to the ascent speed of the plume head, and effectively prevents the entrainment of surrounding material into the plume head or plume tail. We find that the source region is most effectively sampled by an ascending plume and that compositional variations in the source region are preserved during plume ascent. The plume center and plume sheath combined are composed of up to 85% source material. However, there is also evidence of significant entrainment of up to 30% of surrounding material into the outer layers of the plume sheath. Entrainment rates are found to be influenced by mantle composition and structure, with the radial viscosity profile of the

  9. Propagation of vortex rings and starting plumes in high and low g. [during crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, J.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation of vortex rings and starting plumes during crystal growth in supercooled solutions was investigated in variable gravity environment created by acceleration-deceleration routine of a NASA's KC-135 flight. A specially designed crystal growth cell was used to study convection around crystals growing in supersaturated solutions of Na2SO4 and NaCl aboard the NASA KC-135. The results of vertical velocity measurements have shown that a continuously fed plume attains a higher velocity than the individual vortex ring. The results also indicated that the vortex ring decelerates as it propagates, and slows down much more rapidly than the starting plume, indicating a less efficient transport. It is suggested that inertial effects and buoyancy effects on vortex and plume propagation can be separated in the controlled environment of a Space Station borne centrifuge.

  10. Interaction between a laminar starting immersed micro-jet and a parallel wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaleiro, Juan Martin; Laborde, Cecilia; Artana, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we study the starting transient of an immersed micro-jet in close vicinity to a solid wall parallel to its axis. The experiments concern laminar jets (Re < 200) issuing from a 100 μm internal tip diameter glass micro-pipette. The effect of the confinement was studied placing the micro-pipette at different distances from the wall. The characterization of the jet was carried out by visualizations on which the morphology of the vortex head and trajectories was analyzed. Numerical simulations were used as a complementary tool for the analysis. The jet remains stable for very long distances away from the tip allowing for a similarity analysis. The self-similar behavior of the starting jet has been studied in terms of the frontline position with time. A symmetric and a wall dominated regime could be identified. The starting jet in the wall type regime, and in the symmetric regime as well, develops a self-similar behavior that has a relative rapid loss of memory of the preceding condition of the flow. Scaling for both regimes are those that correspond to viscous dominated flows.

  11. Simultaneous 2-D Measurements of Transient Velocity and Temperature Fields in a Thermal Starting Plume: Laboratory Models of Entrainment and Structure of Mantle Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, I.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kurita, K.

    2002-12-01

    Both numerical and experimental models of thermal plumes suggest that mantle plumes entrain surrounding mantle and their morphology (temperature and compositional fields in the plume head) evolves as they rise. Recent geochemical and isotopic studies of mantle plume products have revealed mixing of the ambient mantle with the primitive plume source. In order to make a quantitative comparison of the geophysical modeling with geological evidences, it is desired to show a precise image of spatial and temporal evolution of temperature and compositional fields in the plumes. Here, we present preliminary results of our laboratory experiments on thermal starting plumes using a quantitative technique of digital image processing. By coupling Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) we can measure simultaneous 2-dimensional transient velocity and temperature fields in a thermal plume. Our experiments were conducted in a transparent rectangular tank containing a viscous fluid. Buoyancy in the form of heat was injected into the fluid by operating a heater at the base of the tank. The flow was marked with tracer particles for velocity and with the fluorescence dye, Rhodamine B, for temperature measurements. The particles and the fluorescence dye were illuminated and exited by a thin vertical sheet of laser light that was oriented to contain the axis of symmetry. We succeeded in simultaneous measurements of ascent velocity of the plume head, precise velocity field within the plume head, and evolution of the temperature field. This makes clear their relation and is useful for considering the entrainment process of plumes. Our aim of this study is to clarify the physics of entrainment and mixing phenomena of starting plumes, and to make quantitative geophysical models of mantle plumes connecting with geological and seismic evidences. In this presentation, we will show that this quantitative technique is a powerful tool for approaching these issues.

  12. Vortex ring formation in starting forced plumes with negative and positive buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, L.; Yu, S. C. M.

    2016-11-01

    The limiting process of vortex ring formation in starting forced plumes, with Richardson number in the range of -0.06 ≤ Ri ≤ 0.06, was studied numerically under the Boussinesq approximation. The examination of the dynamics of the starting flow evolution reveals that the plume-ambient density difference affects the vortex ring pinch-off mainly through three mechanisms, i.e., the baroclinic production of vorticity, the buoyancy acceleration (or deceleration) on the vortical structures, and its effect on the trailing shear layer instability. As Ri increases from negative to positive values, three regimes can be identified in terms of the vortex interaction patterns during the pinch-off process, i.e., the weak-interaction regime (-0.06 < Ri < - 0.02), the transition regime (-0.02 ≤ Ri < 0), and the strong-interaction regime (0 ≤ Ri < 0.06). By eliminating the influence of the baroclinic vorticity production, the circulation method proposed for the starting jets is revised to determine the buoyant formation number F in the starting forced plumes. Besides the formation number F, another dimensionless time scale (dubbed as the separation number S), which corresponds to the end of the pinch-off process, is identified by the time of vanishment of the vorticity flux feeding the leading vortex ring. The numerical results show that the variation trends of formation number and separation number against Ri change near the critical value of Ric ≈ - 0.02. In the weak-interaction regime, both formation number and separation number increase rapidly against Ri. While in the transition and strong-interaction regimes alike, the formation number increases at a much slower rate than in the weak-interaction regime, and the separation number declines dramatically as Ri increases. Finally, a qualitative explanation on the variation patterns of formation number and separation number is proposed based on the buoyancy effects on the dynamic properties of the leading vortex ring and

  13. A linear-field plasma jet for generating a brush-shaped laminar plume at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuechen; Jia, Pengying; Li, Jiyuan; Chu, Jingdi; Zhang, Panpan

    2016-06-15

    A linear-field plasma jet composed of line-to-plate electrodes is used to generate a large-scale brush-shaped plasma plume with flowing argon used as working gas. Through electrical measurement and fast photography, it is found that the plasma plume bridges the two electrodes for the discharge in the positive voltage half-cycle, which behaves like fast moving plasma bullets directed from the anode to the cathode. Compared with the positive discharge, the negative discharge only develops inside the nozzle and propagates much slower. Results also indicate that the gas temperature of the plume is close to room temperature, which is promising for biomedical application.

  14. Vortex ring formation in starting forced plumes with negative and positive buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Yu, Simon Ching-Man

    2016-11-01

    The limiting process of vortex formation in starting forced plumes, with Richardson number in the range of -0.06 <= Ri <= 0.06, was studied numerically. As Ri increases, three regimes can be identified in terms of the vortex interaction patterns, i.e., the weak-interaction regime (-0.06

  15. Rocket engine plume diagnostics using video digitization and image processing - Analysis of start-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, P. J.; Shoe, B.; Dhawan, A. P.

    1991-01-01

    Video digitization techniques have been developed to analyze the exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Temporal averaging and a frame-by-frame analysis provide data used to evaluate the capabilities of image processing techniques for use as measurement tools. Capabilities include the determination of the necessary time requirement for the Mach disk to obtain a fully-developed state. Other results show the Mach disk tracks the nozzle for short time intervals, and that dominate frequencies exist for the nozzle and Mach disk movement.

  16. Rocket engine plume diagnostics using video digitization and image processing - Analysis of start-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, P. J.; Shoe, B.; Dhawan, A. P.

    1991-01-01

    Video digitization techniques have been developed to analyze the exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Temporal averaging and a frame-by-frame analysis provide data used to evaluate the capabilities of image processing techniques for use as measurement tools. Capabilities include the determination of the necessary time requirement for the Mach disk to obtain a fully-developed state. Other results show the Mach disk tracks the nozzle for short time intervals, and that dominate frequencies exist for the nozzle and Mach disk movement.

  17. Laminar Soot Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Image of soot (smoke) plume made for the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment during the Microgravity Sciences Lab-1 mission in 1997. LSP-2 will fly in the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. The principal investigator is Dr. Gerard Faeth of the University of Michigan. LSP uses a small jet burner, similar to a classroom butane lighter, that produces flames up to 60 mm (2.3 in) long. Measurements include color TV cameras and a temperature sensor, and laser images whose darkness indicates the quantity of soot produced in the flame. Glenn Research in Cleveland, OH, manages the project.

  18. Sampling by mantle plumes : the legacy of the plume source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandeis, G.; Touitou, F.; Davaille, A.

    2013-12-01

    Plumes in the Earth's mantle are considered to be at the origin of intraplate volcanism (or hotspots). They continue to fascinate the scientific community by the heterogeneity of the material they sample on the surface of our planet. To characterize what part of the mantle is sampled by plumes, we have developed a laboratory model for laminar thermal plumes at high Prandtl number, in a fluid whose viscosity depends strongly on the temperature. This study describes the precise phenomenology of the plume and proposes scaling laws for the speed and temperature of the conduit of the plume. We show a strong dependence of these features of the plume with the Rayleigh number and viscosity ratio. Our visualization technique allows for the simultaneous non-intrusive measurements of the temperature, deformation and velocity fields. By calculating numerically the advection of passive markers through the experimental velocity field, we found that (1) the hot center of the plume conduit only consists of fluid which has passed through the thermal boundary layer ("TBL") at the bottom of the tank from which the plume was issued. Moreover, as material is stretched by velocity gradients, it is also in the thermal boundary layer that most of the material stretching occurs (2). The fluid is then transported in the conduit without lateral mixing, and further stretched vertically by the lateral velocity gradients. Since it is only the hot upwelling plume center which melts and therefore is sampled by volcanic activity, (1) implies that the plume geochemical signature is representative of the material located in the deep TBL of the mantle from which the plume is issued. On the other hand, (2) implies that filaments, pancakes, and concentric or bimodal zonation of the plume at the surface all result from different distributions of the heterogeneities in the plume source, filaments being the most generic case. Finally, we apply the scaling laws to the case of Hawaii.

  19. Laminar Flow Aircraft Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Various topics telative to laminar flow aircraft certification are discussed. Boundary layer stability, flaps for laminar flow airfoils, computational wing design studies, manufacturing requirements, windtunnel tests, and flow visualization are among the topics covered.

  20. Laminar-Separation Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, G. S.; Carraway, D. L.; Lee, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Reduction of viscous drag on airplanes explores limits of practical applications of natural laminar flow. Wind-tunnel and flight tests conducted to explore abilities of hot-film sensors to identify separation of laminar flow as principal mode of amplification of instability leading to transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Two different laminar-separation-sensor configurations developed and used to detect boundary-layer transitions. Results show hot-film laminar-separation-sensor technique viable means for detecting existence of transition as well as for indicating reversed flow in laminar-separation bubble. Refinement of sensor configurations provides tools necessary to explore, in all speed regimes, practical limits of laminar-flow applications and viscous-drag-reduction technology.

  1. Mantle plumes and continental tectonics.

    PubMed

    Hill, R I; Campbell, I H; Davies, G F; Griffiths, R W

    1992-04-10

    Mantle plumes and plate tectonics, the result of two distinct modes of convection within the Earth, operate largely independently. Although plumes are secondary in terms of heat transport, they have probably played an important role in continental geology. A new plume starts with a large spherical head that can cause uplift and flood basalt volcanism, and may be responsible for regional-scale metamorphism or crustal melting and varying amounts of crustal extension. Plume heads are followed by narrow tails that give rise to the familiar hot-spot tracks. The cumulative effect of processes associated with tail volcanism may also significantly affect continental crust.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Mass Transport, Dynamics, and Stirring in Isolated Thermal Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, William H.

    2011-12-01

    Significant differences exist between isotopic signatures of typical mid-ocean ridge basalts and those associated with many ocean islands, with ocean island basalts (OIB) generally exhibiting more variability in trace element concentrations and a bias towards enrichment in more primitive isotopes in sonic cases. Such observations coupled with other geophysical evidence have been used to suggest that. OIB's are surface manifestations of upwellings originating in the deep interior near the core-mantle boundary that interact with distinct geochemical reservoirs as material is transported from the Earth's interior to the surface. Although many have studied the chemistry and dynamics of these mantle plumes, fundamental questions remain. Lagrangian coherent structures and elements of dynamical systems theory are used to extract key material lines and surfaces in isolated laminar plumes. These structures are shown to provide a taxonomic picture of plumes operating in different regimes, to govern how the plume interacts with the ambient during its ascent, and to have a pronounced effect on the origin of mass transported by the plume. A metric is developed to provide a means of predicting the morphology of mass transported by a general flow, and the rise velocity of the starting plume is used to investigate time scales for liftoff. All investigations are conducted using a series of experiments and numerical models where laminar, thermal plumes are generated in a high Prandtl number fluid having strongly temperature dependent viscosity. Experimental data are acquired using a custom-built stereoscopic particle image velocimetry with thermochromic liquid crystals to measure the 3D flow and temperature fields within the tank. A hybrid particle image particle tracking velocimetry scheme is presented which provides improved robustness to particle pattern deformation when using PIV techniques. In agreement with others, we find starting plumes rise with an essentially constant

  3. Plume-induced subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, T.; Stern, R. J.; Baes, M.; Sobolev, S. V.; Whattam, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Dominant present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and/or pre-existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are themselves consequences of plate tectonics. In contrast, recently discovered plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without pre-existing plate tectonics. Here, we investigate this new mechanism with high-resolution 3D numerical thermomechanical modeling experiments. We show that typical plume-induced subduction dynamics is subdivided into five different stages: (1) oceanic plateau formation by arrival of a mantle plume head; (2) formation of an incipient trench and a descending nearly-circular slab at the plateau margins; (3) tearing of the circular slab; (4) formation of several self-sustained retreating subduction zones and (5) cooling and spreading of the new lithosphere formed between the retreating subduction zones. At the final stage of plume-induced subduction initiation, a mosaic of independently moving, growing and cooling small oceanic plates heading toward individual retreating subduction zones forms. The plates are separated by spreading centers, triple junctions and transform faults and thus the newly formed multi-slab subduction system operates as an embryonic plate tectonic cell. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained plume-induced subduction: (1) old negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) intense weakening of the lithosphere by plume-derived magmas; and (3) lubrication of the forming subduction interface by hydrated oceanic crust. We furthermore discuss that plume-induced subduction, which is rare at present day conditions, may have been common in the Precambrian time and likely started global plate tectonics on Earth.

  4. Splash Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    I have discovered a new class of thermal upwellings in mantle convection simulations which are not rooted in a thermal boundary layer (ref 1). Since they look a bit like water droplet splashes, I have abbreviated these `plumes not rooted in thermal boundary layers' as `splash plumes'. These mantle convection simulations are high resolution ( ~ 22km spacing) 3D spherical simulations at Earth-like vigour. They have a chondritic rate of internal heating and bottom heating that straddles expected Earth values. There is a realistic depth variation in viscosity, with a lithosphere and lower mantle more viscous than upper mantle. The mantle is compressible with the coefficient of thermal expansion decreasing with depth. Some models have phase transitions. The surface of the models is driven by 119Myr of recent plate motion history. At the end of most simulations (present day) we discover many examples of hot mid-mantle thermal anomalies in the shape of bowls which have hot cylindrical plumes rising from the rim. They originate at a range of depths and are not rooted in thermal boundary layers. These splash plumes are formed from hot mantle collecting beneath the surface, and then a cold instability from the surface descending onto the sheet of hot underlying material pushing it down into the mantle and forming a bowl. The plumes are formed by instabilities coming from the bowl rim edge. In fact the downwellings can push the sheets all the way to the core mantle boundary in certain cases where it is then difficult to tell splash plumes apart from `traditional plumes'. Splash plumes might provide explanations for weak, short-lived plumes that do not seem to have deep roots (e.g. Eifel). If the surface boundary condition is made free-slip (ref 2), rather than be driven by recent plate motion history, we do not discover splash plumes but rather large steady strong thermal boundary layer plumes. Therefore while the discovery of splash plumes is interesting, potentially a more

  5. Aircraft Laminar Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft laminar flow control (LFC) from the 1930's through the 1990's is reviewed and the current status of the technology is assessed. Examples are provided to demonstrate the benefits of LFC for subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Early studies related to the laminar boundary-layer flow physics, manufacturing tolerances for laminar flow, and insect-contamination avoidance are discussed. LFC concept studies in wind-tunnel and flight experiments are the major focus of the paper. LFC design tools are briefly outlined for completeness.

  6. Laminar-flow airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An airfoil having a fore airfoil element, an aft airfoil element, and a slot region in between them. These elements induce laminar flow over substantially all of the fore airfoil element and also provide for laminar flow in at least a portion of the slot region. The method of the invention is one for inducing natural laminar flow over an airfoil. In the method, a fore airfoil element, having a leading and trailing edge, and an aft airfoil element define a slot region. Natural laminar flow is induced over substantially all of the fore airfoil element, by inducing the pressures on both surfaces of the fore airfoil element to decrease to a location proximate the trailing edge of the fore airfoil element using pressures created by the aft airfoil element.

  7. Laminar Soot Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K. -C.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science for several reasons: soot emissions are responsible for more deaths than any other combustion pollutant, thermal loads due to continuum radiation from soot limit the durability of combustors, thermal radiation from soot is mainly responsible for the growth and spread of unwanted fires, carbon monoxide associated with soot emissions is responsible for most fire deaths, and limited understanding of soot processes is a major impediment to the development of computational combustion. Thus, soot processes within laminar nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are being studied, emphasizing space-based experiments at microgravity. The study is limited to laminar flames due to their experimental and computational tractability, noting the relevance of these results to practical flames through laminar flamelet concepts. The microgravity environment is emphasized because buoyancy affects soot processes in laminar diffusion flames whereas effects of buoyancy are small for most practical flames. Results discussed here were obtained from experiments carried out on two flights of the Space Shuttle Columbia. After a brief discussion of experimental methods, results found thus far are described, including soot concentration measurements, laminar flame shapes, laminar smoke points and flame structure. The present discussion is brief.

  8. Tvashtar's Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This dramatic image of Io was taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons at 11:04 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, just about 5 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The distance to Io was 2.5 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) and the image is centered at 85 degrees west longitude. At this distance, one LORRI pixel subtends 12 kilometers (7.4 miles) on Io.

    This processed image provides the best view yet of the enormous 290-kilometer (180-mile) high plume from the volcano Tvashtar, in the 11 o'clock direction near Io's north pole. The plume was first seen by the Hubble Space Telescope two weeks ago and then by New Horizons on February 26; this image is clearer than the February 26 image because Io was closer to the spacecraft, the plume was more backlit by the Sun, and a longer exposure time (75 milliseconds versus 20 milliseconds) was used. Io's dayside was deliberately overexposed in this picture to image the faint plumes, and the long exposure also provided an excellent view of Io's night side, illuminated by Jupiter. The remarkable filamentary structure in the Tvashtar plume is similar to details glimpsed faintly in 1979 Voyager images of a similar plume produced by Io's volcano Pele. However, no previous image by any spacecraft has shown these mysterious structures so clearly.

    The image also shows the much smaller symmetrical fountain of the plume, about 60 kilometers (or 40 miles) high, from the Prometheus volcano in the 9 o'clock direction. The top of a third volcanic plume, from the volcano Masubi, erupts high enough to catch the setting Sun on the night side near the bottom of the image, appearing as an irregular bright patch against Io's Jupiter-lit surface. Several Everest-sized mountains are highlighted by the setting Sun along the terminator, the line between day and night.

    This is the last of a handful of LORRI images that New Horizons is sending 'home' during its busy close

  9. Tvashtar's Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This dramatic image of Io was taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons at 11:04 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, just about 5 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The distance to Io was 2.5 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) and the image is centered at 85 degrees west longitude. At this distance, one LORRI pixel subtends 12 kilometers (7.4 miles) on Io.

    This processed image provides the best view yet of the enormous 290-kilometer (180-mile) high plume from the volcano Tvashtar, in the 11 o'clock direction near Io's north pole. The plume was first seen by the Hubble Space Telescope two weeks ago and then by New Horizons on February 26; this image is clearer than the February 26 image because Io was closer to the spacecraft, the plume was more backlit by the Sun, and a longer exposure time (75 milliseconds versus 20 milliseconds) was used. Io's dayside was deliberately overexposed in this picture to image the faint plumes, and the long exposure also provided an excellent view of Io's night side, illuminated by Jupiter. The remarkable filamentary structure in the Tvashtar plume is similar to details glimpsed faintly in 1979 Voyager images of a similar plume produced by Io's volcano Pele. However, no previous image by any spacecraft has shown these mysterious structures so clearly.

    The image also shows the much smaller symmetrical fountain of the plume, about 60 kilometers (or 40 miles) high, from the Prometheus volcano in the 9 o'clock direction. The top of a third volcanic plume, from the volcano Masubi, erupts high enough to catch the setting Sun on the night side near the bottom of the image, appearing as an irregular bright patch against Io's Jupiter-lit surface. Several Everest-sized mountains are highlighted by the setting Sun along the terminator, the line between day and night.

    This is the last of a handful of LORRI images that New Horizons is sending 'home' during its busy close

  10. Supersonic laminar flow control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar stability. The effects of supersonic laminar flow with distributed heating and cooling on active control will be studied. The primary tasks of the research applying to the NASA/Ames POC and LFSWT's nozzle design with laminar flow control are as follows: (1) supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition prediction; (2) effects of heating and cooling for supersonic laminar flow control; and (3) POC and LFSWT nozzle design with heating and cooling effects combining wall contour and length changes.

  11. Plume Mechanics and Aerosol Growth Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO NO ACCESSION NO %. Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5423 II 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Plume Mechanics and...formulation and a finite element sc hem e ......... ..................... 192 c. Diffusion of aerosols in laminar flow in a cylindrical tube...The principal elements are the liquid oil and carrier gas metering systems, the oil vaporizer, coaxial jet system, and the sampling and aerosol

  12. Supersonic laminar flow control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition, and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of supersonic laminar flow with distributed heating and cooling on active control will be studied. The primary tasks of the research applying to the NASA/Ames Proof of Concept (POC) Supersonic Wind Tunnel and Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT) nozzle design with laminar flow control are as follows: (1) predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition, (2) effects of wall heating and cooling for supersonic laminar flow control, and (3) performance evaluation of POC and LFSWT nozzles design with wall heating and cooling effects applying at different locations and various length.

  13. Laminar Soot Processes (LSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Krishnan, S. S.; Lin, K.-C.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program considering the structure and the soot surface reaction properties of laminar nonpremixed (diffusion) flames. The study was limited to ground-based measurements of buoyant laminar jet diffusion flames at pressures of 0.1-1.0 atm. The motivation for the research is that soot formation in flames is a major unresolved problem of combustion science that influences the pollutant emissions, durability and performance of power and propulsion systems, as well as the potential for developing computational combustion. The investigation was divided into two phases considering the structure of laminar soot-containing diffusion flames and the soot surface reaction properties (soot surface growth and oxidation) of these flames, in turn. The first phase of the research addressed flame and soot structure properties of buoyant laminar jet diffusion flames at various pressures. The measurements showed that H, OH and O radical concentrations were generally in superequilibrium concentrations at atmospheric pressure but tended toward subequilibrium concentrations as pressures decreased. The measurements indicated that the original fuel decomposed into more robust compounds at elevated temperatures, such as acetylene (unless the original fuel was acetylene) and H, which are the major reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. The second phase of the research addressed soot surface reaction properties, e.g., soot surface growth and surface oxidation. It was found that soot surface growth rates in both laminar premixed and diffusion flames were in good agreement, that these rates were relatively independent of fuel type, and that these rates could be correlated by the Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) mechanisms of Colket and Hall (1994), Frenklach et al. (1990,1994), and Kazakov et al. (1995). It was also

  14. Supersonic laminar flow control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Wiberg, Clark G.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition, and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of distributed heating and cooling as an active boundary layer control technique will be studied. The primary tasks of the research apply to the NASA/Ames Proof of Concept (PoC) and Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel's (LFSWT's) nozzle design with laminar flow control and are listed as follows: (1) predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition, (2) effects of wall heating and cooling on supersonic laminar flow control, (3) performance evaluation of the PoC and LFSWT nozzle designs with wall heating and cooling applied at different locations and various lengths, and (4) effects of a conducted versus pulse wall temperature distribution for the LFSWT.

  15. Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Wiberg, Clark G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of distributed heating and cooling as an active boundary layer control technique will be studied. The primary tasks of the research apply to the NASA/Ames PoC and LFSWT's nozzle design with laminar flow control and are listed as follows: Predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition; Effects of wall heating and cooling on supersonic laminar flow control on a flat plate; Performance evaluation of the PoC and LFSWT nozzle designs with wall heating and cooling applied at different locations and various lengths; Effects of a conducted-vs-pulse wall temperature distribution for the LFSWT; and Application of wall heating and/or cooling to laminar boundary layer and flow separation control of airfoils and investigation of related active control techniques.

  16. Hybrid Laminar Fin Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    the driving unit being an ejector . Reynolds numbers at cruise conditions a ½2 scale model has been chosen to be tested in the ONERA SI MA wind The...enabled laminar flow to be ONERA and based on advanced CFD -tools [3] the final fully demonstrated up to a Mach number of 0.6. For shape which is...for different Mach numbers. As A critical issue for the second item and therefore a part of a detailed analysis of these experimental results

  17. Laminar Soot Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Interior of the Equipment Module for the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP-2) experiment that fly in the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 (LSP-1 flew on Microgravity Sciences Lab-1 mission in 1997). The principal investigator is Dr. Gerard Faeth of the University of Michigan. LSP uses a small jet burner (yellow ellipse), similar to a classroom butane lighter, that produces flames up to 60 mm (2.3 in) long. Measurements include color TV cameras and a radiometer or heat sensor (blue circle), and laser images whose darkness indicates the quantity of soot produced in the flame. Glenn Research in Cleveland, OH, manages the project.

  18. Laminar Soot Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment under way during the Microgravity Sciences Lab-1 mission in 1997. LSP-2 will fly in the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001. The principal investigator is Dr. Gerard Faeth of the University of Michigan. LSP uses a small jet burner, similar to a classroom butane lighter, that produces flames up to 60 mm (2.3 in) long. Measurements include color TV cameras and a temperature sensor, and laser images whose darkness indicates the quantity of soot produced in the flame. Glenn Research in Cleveland, OH, manages the project.

  19. Flight experiences with laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.

    1986-01-01

    A review of natural laminar flow (NLF) flight experiences over the period from the 1930's to the present has been given to provide information on the achievability and maintainability of NLF in typical airplane operating environments. Significant effects of loss of laminar flow on airplane performance have been observed for several airplanes, indicating the importance of providing information on these changes to laminar flow airplane operators. Significant changes in airplane stability and control and maximum lift were observed in flight experiments with the loss of laminar flow. However, these effects can be avoided by proper selection of airfoils. Conservative laminar flow airfoil designs should be employed which do not experience significant loss of lift (caused by flow separation) upon the loss of laminar flow. Mechanisms have been observed for the effects of insect accumulation, flight through clouds and precipitation, and propeller slipstreams on laminar flow behavior. Fixed transition testing, in addition to free transition testing, is recommended as a new standard procedure for airplanes with surfaces designed to support laminar flow.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF PLUME DIVING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents an assessment of plume diving. Observations included: vertical plume delineation at East Patchogue, NY showed BTEX and MTBE plumes sinking on either side of a gravel pit; Lake Druid TCE plume sank beneath unlined drainage ditch; and aquifer recharge/dis...

  1. Supersonic laminar flow control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Wiberg, Clark G.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of distributed heating and cooling as an active boundary layer control technique will be studied. The primary tasks of the research apply to the NASA/Ames PoC and LFSWT's nozzle design with laminar flow control and are listed as follows: (1) predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition; (2) effects of wall heating and cooling on supersonic laminar flow control; (3) performance evaluation of the PoC and LFSWT nozzle designs with wall heating and cooling applied at different locations and various lengths; and (4) effects of a conducted -vs- pulse wall temperature distribution for the LFSWT.

  2. Mantle plumes in the vicinity of subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mériaux, C. A.; Mériaux, A.-S.; Schellart, W. P.; Duarte, J. C.; Duarte, S. S.; Chen, Z.

    2016-11-01

    We present three-dimensional deep-mantle laboratory models of a compositional plume within the vicinity of a buoyancy-driven subducting plate with a fixed trailing edge. We modelled front plumes (in the mantle wedge), rear plumes (beneath the subducting plate) and side plumes with slab/plume systems of buoyancy flux ratio spanning a range from 2 to 100 that overlaps the ratios in nature of 0.2-100. This study shows that 1) rising side and front plumes can be dragged over thousands of kilometres into the mantle wedge, 2) flattening of rear plumes in the trench-normal direction can be initiated 700 km away from the trench, and a plume material layer of lesser density and viscosity can ultimately almost entirely underlay a retreating slab after slab/plume impact, 3) while side and rear plumes are not tilted until they reach ∼600 km depth, front plumes can be tilted at increasing depths as their plume buoyancy is lessened, and rise at a slower rate when subjected to a slab-induced downwelling, 4) rear plumes whose buoyancy flux is close to that of a slab, can retard subduction until the slab is 600 km long, and 5) slab-plume interaction can lead to a diversity of spatial plume material distributions into the mantle wedge. We discuss natural slab/plume systems of the Cascadia/Bowie-Cobb, and Nazca/San Felix-Juan Fernandez systems on the basis of our experiments and each geodynamic context and assess the influence of slab downwelling at depths for the starting plumes of Java, Coral Sea and East Solomon. Overall, this study shows how slab/plume interactions can result in a variety of geological, geophysical and geochemical signatures.

  3. Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. F.; Wiberg, Clark G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition and active control. Some prediction techniques are developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of distributed heating and cooling as an active boundary layer control technique are studied. The primary tasks of the research apply to the NASA/Ames Proof-of-Concept (PoC) and the Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel's (LFSWT's) nozzle design with laminar flow control and are listed as follows: (1) Predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition; (2) Effects of wall heating and cooling on supersonic laminar flow control on a flat plate; (3) Performance evaluation of the PoC and LFSWT nozzle designs with wall heating and cooling applied at different locations and various lengths; (4) Effects of a conducted -vs- pulse wall temperature distribution for the LFSWT; and (5) Application of wall heating and/or cooling to laminar boundary layer and flow separation control of airfoils and investigation of related active control techniques.

  4. Ash Plume from Shiveluch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    When NASA’s Terra satellite passed over Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula at noon local time (00:00 Universal Time) on October 6, 2012, Shilveluch Volcano was quiet. By the time NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over the area two hours later (bottom image), the volcano had erupted and sent a plume of ash over the Kamchatskiy Zaliv. The plume traveled about 90 kilometers (55 miles) toward the south-southeast, where a change in wind direction began pushing the plume toward the east. On October 6, 2012, the Kamchatka Volcanic Emergency Response Team (KVERT) reported that the ash plume from Shiveluch reached an altitude of 3 kilometers (9,800 feet) above sea level, and had traveled some 220 kilometers (140 miles) from the volcano summit. Shiveluch (also spelled Sheveluch) ranks among the biggest and most active volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula. Rising to 3,283 meters (10,771 feet) above sea level, Shiveluch is a stratovolcano composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, compacted ash, and rocks ejected by previous eruptions. The beige-colored expanse of rock on the volcano’s southern slopes (visible in both images) is due to an explosive eruption that occurred in 1964. Part of Shiveluch’s southern flank collapsed, and the light-colored rock is avalanche debris left by that event. High-resolution imagery of Shiveluch shows very little vegetation within that avalanche zone. On October 6, 2012, KVERT cited observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on Terra and Aqua in detecting the Shiveluch eruption. This was not the first time that MODIS observed a Shiveluch eruption shortly after it started. In 2007, MODIS captured an image within minutes of the eruption’s start, before winds could blow the ash away from the summit. When NASA’s Terra satellite passed over Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula at noon local time (00:00 Universal Time) on October 6, 2012, Shilveluch Volcano was quiet (top image). By the time NASA

  5. Overview of Laminar Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    The history of Laminar Flow Control (LFC) from the 1930s through the 1990s is reviewed and the current status of the technology is assessed. Early studies related to the natural laminar boundary-layer flow physics, manufacturing tolerances for laminar flow, and insect-contamination avoidance are discussed. Although most of this publication is about slot-, porous-, and perforated-suction LFC concept studies in wind tunnel and flight experiments, some mention is made of thermal LFC. Theoretical and computational tools to describe the LFC aerodynamics are included for completeness.

  6. Radiation Chemistry of Potential Europa Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent detection of atomic hydrogen and atomic oxygen and their correlation to potential water plumes on Europa [Roth, Saur et al. 2014] invoked significant interest in further understanding of these potential/putative plumes on Europa. Unlike on Enceladus, Europa receives significant amount of electron and particle radiation. If the plumes come from trailing hemisphere and in the high radiation flux regions, then it is expected that the plume molecules be subjected to radiation processing. Our interest is to understand to what extent such radiation alterations occur and how they can be correlated to the plume original composition, whether organic or inorganic in nature. We will present laboratory studies [Henderson and Gudipati 2014] involving pulsed infrared laser ablation of ice that generates plumes similar to those observed on Enceladus [Hansen, Esposito et al. 2006; Hansen, Shemansky et al. 2011] and expected to be similar on Europa as a starting point; demonstrating the applicability of laser ablation to simulate plumes of Europa and Enceladus. We will present results from electron irradiation of these plumes to determine how organic and inorganic composition is altered due to radiation. Acknowledgments:This research was enabled through partial funding from NASA funding through Planetary Atmospheres, and the Europa Clipper Pre-Project. B.L.H. acknowledges funding from the NASA Postdoctoral Program for an NPP fellowship. Hansen, C. J., L. Esposito, et al. (2006). "Enceladus' water vapor plume." Science 311(5766): 1422-1425. Hansen, C. J., D. E. Shemansky, et al. (2011). "The composition and structure of the Enceladus plume." Geophysical Research Letters 38. Henderson, B. L. and M. S. Gudipati (2014). "Plume Composition and Evolution in Multicomponent Ices Using Resonant Two-Step Laser Ablation and Ionization Mass Spectrometry." The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 118(29): 5454-5463. Roth, L., J. Saur, et al. (2014). "Transient Water Vapor at Europa's South

  7. Plume Detection and Plume Top Height Estimation using SLSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Timo H.; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sogacheva, Larisa; Rodriguez, Edith; Saponaro, Giulia; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2017-04-01

    We present preliminary results on ash and desert dust plume detection and plume top height estimates based on satellite data from the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) aboard Sentinel-3, launched in 2016. The methods are based on the previously developed AATSR Correlation Method (ACM) height estimation algorithm, which utilized the data of the preceding similar instrument, Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). The height estimate is based on the stereo-viewing capability of SLSTR, which allows to determine the parallax between the satellite's 55° backward and nadir views, and thus the corresponding height. The ash plume detection is based on the brightness temperature difference between between thermal infrared (TIR) channels centered at 11 and 12 μm, which show characteristic signals for both desert dust and ash plumes. The SLSTR instrument provides a unique combination of dual-view capability and a wavelength range from visible to thermal infrared, rendering it an ideal instrument for this work. Accurate information on the volcanic ash position is important for air traffic safety. The ACM algorithm can provide valuable data of both horizontal and vertical ash dispersion. These data may be useful for comparisons with other volcanic ash and desert dust retrieval methods and dispersion models. The current work is being carried out as part of the H2020 project EUNADICS-AV ("European Natural Disaster Coordination and Information System for Aviation"), which started in October 2016.

  8. Laminar Flow Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, David F.

    1992-10-01

    The major thrust of this book is to present a technique of analysis that aids the formulation, understanding, and solution of problems of viscous flow. The intent is to avoid providing a "canned" program to solve a problem, offering instead a way to recognize the underlying physical, mathematical, and modeling concepts inherent in the solutions. The reader must first choose a mathematical model and derive governing equations based on realistic assumptions, or become aware of the limitations and assumptions associated with existing models. An appropriate solution technique is then selected. The solution technique may be either analytical or numerical. Computer-aided analysis algorithms supplement the classical analyses. The book begins by deriving the Navier-Stokes equation for a viscous compressible variable property fluid. The second chapter considers exact solutions of the incompressible hydrodynamic boundary layer equations solved with and without mass transfer at the wall. Forced convection, free convection, and the compressible laminar boundary layer are discussed in the remaining chapters. The text unifies the various topics by tracing a logical progression from simple to complex governing differential equations and boundary conditions. Numerical, parametric, and directed analysis problems are included at the end of each chapter.

  9. Plume effects on the flow around a blunted cone at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atcliffe, P.; Kumar, D.; Stollery, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Tests at M = 8.2 show that a simulated rocket plume at the base of a blunted cone can cause large areas of separated flow, with dramatic effects on the heat transfer rate distribution. The plume was simulated by solid discs of varying sizes or by an annular jet of gas. Flow over the cone without a plume is fully laminar and attached. Using a large disc, the boundary layer is laminar at separation at the test Reynolds number. Transition occurs along the separated shear layer and the boundary layer quickly becomes turbulent. The reduction in heat transfer associated with a laminar separated region is followed by rising values as transition occurs and the heat transfer rates towards the rear of the cone substantially exceed the values obtained without a plume. With the annular jet or a small disc, separation occurs much further aft, so that heat transfer rates at the front of the cone are comparable with those found without a plume. Downstream of separation the shear layer now remains laminar and the heat transfer rates to the surface are significantly lower than the attached flow values.

  10. Dust Plume off Mauritania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A thick plume of dust blew off the coast of Mauritania in western Africa on October 2, 2007. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite observed the dust plume as it headed toward the southwest over the Atlantic Ocean. In this image, the dust varies in color from nearly white to medium tan. The dust plume is easier to see over the dark background of the ocean, but the plume stretches across the land surface to the east, as well. The dust plume's structure is clearest along the coastline, where relatively clear air pockets separate distinct puffs of dust. West of that, individual pillows of dust push together to form a more homogeneous plume. Near its southwest tip, the plume takes on yet another shape, with stripes of pale dust fanning out toward the northwest. Occasional tiny white clouds dot the sky overhead, but skies are otherwise clear.

  11. Modeling Europa's dust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B. S.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Jupiter's moon Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we simulate possible Europa plume configurations, analyze particle number density and surface deposition results, and estimate the expected flux of ice grains on a spacecraft. Due to Europa's high escape speed, observing an active plume will require low-altitude flybys, preferably at altitudes of 5-100 km. At higher altitudes a plume may escape detection. Our simulations provide an extensive library documenting the possible structure of Europa dust plumes, which can be quickly refined as more data on Europa dust plumes are collected.

  12. Suction laminarization of highly swept supersonic laminar flow control wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, W.; Vemuru, C. S.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of a suction-based method for the laminarization of highly-swept supersonic wings at cruise Mach numbers in the 2.0-2.5 range, in the interest of the reduction of wave drag due to lift. The laminar boundary layer development, as well as Tollmien-Schlichting and crossflow instabilities, have been analyzed for the case of an X66 supercritical airfoil at 60 and 72 deg sweep, for Mach numbers of 1.56 and 2.52, respectively. Strong suction is found to be needed at the front part of the upper surface and both the upper and lower rear pressure-rise areas.

  13. Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-02-01

    The "plasma bullet" behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

  14. Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-02-15

    The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

  15. Hybrid laminar flow control study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) in which leading edge suction is used in conjunction with wing pressure distribution tailoring to postpone boundary layer transition and reduce friction drag was examined. Airfoil design characteristics required for laminar flow control (LFC) were determined. The aerodynamic design of the HLFC wing for a 178 passenger commercial turbofan transport was developed, and a drag was estimated. Systems changes required to install HLFC were defined, and weights and fuel economy were estimated. The potential for 9% fuel reduction for a 3926-km (2120-nmi) mission is identified.

  16. Supersonic laminar-flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed, up to date systems studies of the application of laminar flow control (LFC) to various supersonic missions and/or vehicles, both civilian and military, are not yet available. However, various first order looks at the benefits are summarized. The bottom line is that laminar flow control may allow development of a viable second generation SST. This follows from a combination of reduced fuel, structure, and insulation weight permitting operation at higher altitudes, thereby lowering sonic boom along with improving performance. The long stage lengths associated with the emerging economic importance of the Pacific Basin are creating a serious and renewed requirement for such a vehicle. Supersonic LFC techniques are discussed.

  17. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  18. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  19. Laminar flow: Challenge and potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, Mark E.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial air transportation has experienced revolutionary technology advances since WWII. These technology advances have resulted in an explosive growth in passenger traffic. Today, however, many technologies have matured, and maintaining a similar growth rate will be a challenge. A brief history of laminar flow technology and its application to subsonic and supersonic air transportation is presented.

  20. Laminar-flow flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Richard D.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Bartlett, D. W.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Braslow, A. L.

    1989-01-01

    The flight testing conducted over the past 10 years in the NASA laminar-flow control (LFC) will be reviewed. The LFC program was directed towards the most challenging technology application, the high supersonic speed transport. To place these recent experiences in perspective, earlier important flight tests will first be reviewed to recall the lessons learned at that time.

  1. The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) Experiment Mounting Structure (EMS) was used to conduct the LSP experiment on Combustion Module-1. The EMS was inserted into the nozzle on the EMS and ignited by a hot wire igniter. The flame and its soot emitting properties were studied.

  2. Modeling Europa's Dust Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring the properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we adjust the ejection model by Schmidt et al. [2008] to the conditions at Europa. In this way, we estimate properties of a possible, yet unobserved dust component of the Europa plume. For a size-dependent speed distribution of emerging ice particles we use the model from Kempf et al. [2010] for grain dynamics, modified to run simulations of plumes on Europa. Specifically, we model emission from the two plume locations determined from observations by Roth et al. [2014] and also from other locations chosen at the closest approach of low-altitude flybys investigated in the Europa Clipper study. This allows us to estimate expected fluxes of ice grains on the spacecraft. We then explore the parameter space of Europa dust plumes with regard to particle speed distribution parameters, plume location, and spacecraft flyby elevation. Each parameter set results in a 3-dimensional particle density structure through which we simulate flybys, and a map of particle fallback ('snowfall') on the surface of Europa. Due to the moon's high escape speed, a Europa plume will eject few to no particles that can escape its gravity, which has several further consequences: (i) For given ejection velocity a Europa plume will have a smaller scale height, with a higher particle number densities than the plume on Enceladus, (ii) plume particles will not feed the diffuse Galilean dust ring, (iii) the snowfall pattern on the surface will be more localized about the plume location, and will not induce a global m = 2 pattern as seen on Enceladus, and (iv) safely observing an active plume will require low altitude flybys, preferably at 50

  3. Local stability of axisymmetric plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R. v. K., Chakravarthy; Lesshafft, Lutz; Huerre, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    A linear stability analysis of a forced plume with non-zero momentum at the inlet is performed for Pr = 1 , Re = 100 and Ri near 1. The steady base flow is obtained as a laminar solution of the steady Navier Stokes equations. The base flow asymptotes to a self-similar solution as it evolves downstream. In the non-self-similar regime close to the inlet, both axisymmetric mode (m = 0) and the helical mode (m = 1) are convectively unstable at sufficiently low Richardson number. In the self-similar regime, only the helical mode is absolutely unstable and the axisymmetric mode is stable. Higher helical modes (m >= 2) are seen to be convectively unstable very close to the inlet and become stable as the flow evolves downstream. The transition from convective to absolute instability makes the flow a good candidate for observing steep nonlinear global modes associated with buoyancy. This work is supported by a PhD scholarship from Ecole polytechnique.

  4. Operational considerations for laminar flow aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.; Wagner, Richard D.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the development of laminar flow technology for commercial transports during the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) laminar flow program. Practical, operational laminar flow control (LFC) systems have been designed, fabricated, and are undergoing flight testing. New materials, fabrication methods, analysis techniques, and design concepts were developed and show much promise. The laminar flow control systems now being flight tested on the NASA Jetstar aircraft are complemented by natural laminar flow flight tests to be accomplished with the F-14 variable-sweep transition flight experiment. An overview of some operational aspects of this exciting program is given.

  5. Solar Jetlets and Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, Craig; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.; Kumar, Pankaj; Raouafi, Nour-Eddine; Roberts, Merrill; Uritsky, Vadim; Wyper, Peter

    2017-08-01

    We present results of a careful deep-field (low-noise) analysis of evolution and structure of solar plumes using multiple wavelength channels from SDO/AIA. Using new noise-reduction techniques on SDO/AIA images, we reveal myriad small, heating events that appear to be the primary basis of plume formation and sustenance. These events ("jetlets") comprise a dynamic tapestry that forms the more distributed plume itself. We identify the "jetlets" with ejecta that have been previously observed spectroscopically, and distinguish them from the quasi-periodic slow mode waves that are seen as large collective motions. We speculate that the jetlets themselves, which are consistent with multiple interchange reconnection events near the base of the plume, are the primary energy driver heating plasma in the plume envelope.Solar polar (and low-latitude) plumes have been analyzed by many authors over many years. Plumes are bright, persistent vertical structures embedded in coronal holes over quasi-unipolar magnetic flux concentrations. They are EUV-bright in the ~1MK lines, slightly cooler (by ionization fraction) than the surrounding coronal hole, persistent on short timescales of a few hours, and recurrent on timescales of a few days. Their onset has been associated with large X-ray jets, although not all plumes are formed that way. Plumes appear to comprise myriad small "threads" or "strands", and may (or may not) contribute significantly to the solar wind, though they have been associated with myriad small, frequent eruptive ejection events.Our results are new and interesting because they are the lowest-noise, time-resolved observations of polar plumes to date; and they reveal the deep association between small-scale magnetic activity and the formation of the plumes themselves.

  6. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  7. Natural Laminar Flow Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steers, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    A supercritical airfoil section was designed with favorable pressure gradients on both the upper and lower surfaces. Wind tunnel tests were conducted in the Langley 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. The outer wing panels of the F-111 TACT airplane were modified to incorporate partial span test gloves having the natural laminar, flow profile. Instrumentation was installed to provide surface pressure data as well as to determine transition location and boundary layer characteristics. The flight experiment encompassed 19 flights conducted with and without transition fixed at several locations for wing leading edge sweep angles which varied from 10 to 26 at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 0.85 and altitudes of 7620 meters and 9144 meters. Preliminary results indicate that a large portion of the test chord experienced laminar flow.

  8. Downstream Development of a Laminar Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Naoki; Matsumoto, Akira

    It was well-known that a disturbance, introduced artificially into a supercritical laminar boundary layer along a flat plate, is still laminar in the initial stage of its downstream development. Thus, we named it a "laminar spot" because it resembles a turbulent spot though its velocity perturbation remains laminar. From velocity measurements using a rake-type 16-channel hot-wire probe, we found that in the first stage of the downstream development of a laminar spot, its maximum width was at 0.2δ (what is called the critical layer) and one-half of its lateral growth angle was about 5°, which is almost one-half that of a turbulent spot. We call this region a "laminar spot region". In the present study, we measured in detail the velocity field of a laminar spot using a new hot-wire probe in the laminar spot region. The results showed that a laminar spot consists of some hairpin vortices and some induced U-shaped vortices under the hairpin vortices. Because of the interaction of the velocities induced by the respective vortex legs, the legs of the U-shaped vortices were located at the outermost part of the spot. Moreover, the new vortex legs extended spanwise at about 4° as the spot traveled downstream. Consequently, we concluded that the laminar spot grew spanwise in accordance with the span of these vortex legs.

  9. Vortex structure and breakup mechanism of gaseous jet in supersonic crossflow with laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Liang, Jianhan; Zhao, Yuxin

    2016-11-01

    Employing nano-particle planar laser scattering and particle image velocimetry technology, underexpanded jet in supersonic crossflow with laminar boundary layer is experimental investigated in a low noise wind tunnel. Instantaneous flow structures and average velocity distribution of jet plume are captured in experimental images. Horseshoe vortex system is dominated by oscillating and coalescing regime, contributing to vortex generation of jet shear layer. The "tilting-stretching-tearing" mechanism dominating in near field raises average fractal dimension. But vortex structures generated on the windward side of jet plume scatter in jet plume and dissipate gradually, which makes the vortexes break up from outside in near field and break down into small turbulence completely in far field.

  10. Entrainment by Lazy Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Nigel; Hunt, Gary

    2004-11-01

    We consider plumes with source conditions that have a net momentum flux deficit compared to a pure plume - so called lazy plumes. We examine both the case of constant buoyancy flux and buoyancy flux linearly increasing with height. By re-casting the plume conservation equations (Morton, Taylor & Turner 1956) for a constant entrainment coefficient ((α)) in terms of the plume radius (β) and the dimensionless parameter (Γ=frac5Q^2 B4α M^5/2) we show that the far-field flow in a plume with a linear internal buoyancy flux gain is a constant velocity lazy plume with reduced entrainment and radial growth rate. For highly lazy source conditions we derive first-order approximate solutions which indicate a region of zero entrainment near the source. These phenomena have previously been observed, however, it has often been assumed that reduced entrainment implies a reduced (α). We demonstrate that a constant (α) formulation is able to capture the behaviour of these reduced entrainment flows. Morton, B. R., Taylor, G. I. & Turner, J. S. (1956), Turbulent gravitational convection from maintained and instantaneous sources.', Proc. Roy. Soc. 234, 1-23.

  11. An Approach to the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.

    1997-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integral turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the laminar flow toward the desired amount. An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  12. LAMINAR TRANSITIONAL AND TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS FOR COMPRESSIBLE AXISYMMETRIC FLOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    This is a finite-difference program for calculating the viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. The flow may be initially laminar and progress through a transitional zone to a fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on the imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of the momentum and energy equations. The flow may also be forced into a turbulent flow at a chosen spot by the data input. The input may contain factors of arbitrary Reynolds number, free-stream Mach number, free stream turbulence, wall heating or cooling, longitudinal wall curvature, wall suction or blowing, and wall roughness. The solution may start from an initial Falkner-Skan similarity profile, an approximate equilibrium turbulent profile, or an initial arbitrary input profile. This program has been implemented on the IBM 7094/7044 Direct Couple System. This program is written in FORTRAN IV and was developed in 1974.

  13. LAMINAR TRANSITIONAL AND TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS FOR COMPRESSIBLE AXISYMMETRIC FLOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    This is a finite-difference program for calculating the viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. The flow may be initially laminar and progress through a transitional zone to a fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on the imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of the momentum and energy equations. The flow may also be forced into a turbulent flow at a chosen spot by the data input. The input may contain factors of arbitrary Reynolds number, free-stream Mach number, free stream turbulence, wall heating or cooling, longitudinal wall curvature, wall suction or blowing, and wall roughness. The solution may start from an initial Falkner-Skan similarity profile, an approximate equilibrium turbulent profile, or an initial arbitrary input profile. This program has been implemented on the IBM 7094/7044 Direct Couple System. This program is written in FORTRAN IV and was developed in 1974.

  14. Analysis of the laminar flamelet concept for nonpremixed laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Claramunt, K.; Consul, R.; Carbonell, D.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.

    2006-06-15

    The goal of this paper is to investigate the application of the laminar flamelet concept to the multidimensional numerical simulation of nonpremixed laminar flames. The performance of steady and unsteady flamelets is analyzed. The deduction of the mathematical formulation of flamelet modeling is exposed and some commonly used simplifications are examined. Different models for the scalar dissipation rate dependence on the mixture fraction variable are analyzed. Moreover, different criteria to evaluate the Lagrangian-type flamelet lifetime for unsteady flamelets are investigated. Inclusion of phenomena such as differential diffusion with constant Lewis number for each species and radiation heat transfer are also studied. A confined co-flow axisymmetric nonpremixed methane/air laminar flame experimentally investigated by McEnally and Pfefferle (Combust. Sci. Technol. 116-117 (1996) 183-209) and numerically investigated by Bennett, McEnally, Pfefferle, and Smooke (Combust. Flame 123 (2000) 522-546), Consul, Perez-Segarra, Claramunt, Cadafalch, and Oliva (Combust. Theory Modelling 7 (3) (2003) 525-544), and Claramunt, Consul, Perez-Segarra, and Oliva (Combust. Flame 137 (2004) 444-457) has been used as a test case. Results obtained using the flamelet concept have been compared to data obtained from the full resolution of the complete transport equations using primitive variables. Finite-volume techniques over staggered grids are used to discretize the governing equations. A parallel multiblock algorithm based on domain decomposition techniques running with loosely coupled computers has been used. To assess the quality of the numerical solutions presented in this paper, a verification process based on the generalized Richardson extrapolation technique and on the grid convergence index (GCI) has been applied. (author)

  15. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  16. Methane Plumes on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Spectrometer instruments attached to several telescopes detect plumes of methane emitted from Mars during its summer and spring seasons. High levels of methane are indicated by warmer colors. The m...

  17. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  18. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  19. Enceladus' water vapor plume.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Candice J; Esposito, L; Stewart, A I F; Colwell, J; Hendrix, A; Pryor, W; Shemansky, D; West, R

    2006-03-10

    The Cassini spacecraft flew close to Saturn's small moon Enceladus three times in 2005. Cassini's UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph observed stellar occultations on two flybys and confirmed the existence, composition, and regionally confined nature of a water vapor plume in the south polar region of Enceladus. This plume provides an adequate amount of water to resupply losses from Saturn's E ring and to be the dominant source of the neutral OH and atomic oxygen that fill the Saturnian system.

  20. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  1. Laminar cortical necrosis in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-10-01

    Laminar cortical necrosis, defined as focal or diffuse necrosis of one or more cortical lamina, represents an increasingly recognized neuropathological endpoint of vascular, endocrine, immunologic, metabolic, or toxic conditions, of which mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are the third most frequent after cerebral ischemia and hypoxia. To investigate the prevalence of laminar cortical necrosis in MIDs, types of MIDs associated with laminar cortical necrosis, and the morphological characteristics on imaging and autopsy. Medline literature review for the terms "laminar cortical necrosis", "cortical signal change", "mitochondrial" and all acronyms of syndromatic MIDs. Among 139 hits for "laminar cortical necrosis", 10 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria (7%). Among the ten hits five were case series and the other five single case reports. The syndromic MID most frequently associated with laminar cortical necrosis is the MELAS syndrome, but was also described in a single patient each with Leigh syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndrome, and mitochondrial spinocerebellar ataxia. The morphological and pathohistological features of laminar cortical necrosis in MIDs were not at variance from those in non-mitochondrial disorders. In MIDs laminar cortical necrosis represents the histopathological and imaging endpoint of a stroke-like lesion. Though laminar cortical necrosis may have a wide pathophysiological background the histological and imaging characteristics do not vary between the different underlying conditions.

  2. Plume Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    Atle Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, California 92126 and Craig Huhta JIMAR University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822...Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment by Age Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, CA 92126 Craig Huhta JIMAR...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) &. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION SonTek, Inc., 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105, San Diego, CA 92126 REPORT NUMBER

  3. The Start of Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The creation of the Head Start program occurred at break-neck speed with many dramatic turns and many colorful players. No one tells the story better than Edward Zigler in "Head Start: The Inside Story of America's Most Successful Educational Experiment"--a detailed and personal, behind the scenes look at the program's inception. From this…

  4. The Start of Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The creation of the Head Start program occurred at break-neck speed with many dramatic turns and many colorful players. No one tells the story better than Edward Zigler in "Head Start: The Inside Story of America's Most Successful Educational Experiment"--a detailed and personal, behind the scenes look at the program's inception. From this…

  5. Plume tectonics and cratons formation in the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, T.; Stern, R. J.; Baes, M.; Fischer, R.; Sizova, E.; Sobolev, S. V.; Whattam, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Modern geodynamics and continental growth are critically driven by subduction and plate tectonics, however how this tectonic regime started and what geodynamic regime was before remains controversial. Most present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and/or pre-existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are themselves the consequence of plate tectonics. Here, we focus on plume-lithosphere interactions and spontaneous plume-induced subduction initiation, which does not require pre-existing lithospheric fabric and is viable for both stagnant lid and mobile/deformable lid conditions. We present results of 2D and 3D numerical modeling of plume-induced deformation and associated crustal growth resulting from tectono-magmatic interaction of ascending mantle plumes with oceanic-type lithosphere. We demonstrate that weakening of the lithosphere by plume-induced magmatism is the key factor allowing for its internal deformation and differentiation resulting in continental crust growth. We also show that plume-lithosphere interaction can enable subduction and rudimentary plate tectonics initiation at the margins of a crustal plateau growing above the plume head. We argue that frequent plume-arc interactions recorded in Archean crust could reflect either short-term plume-induced subduction or plume-induced episodic lithospheric drips. We furthermore suggest a distinct plume-tectonics regime operated on Earth before plate tectonics, which was associated with widespread tectono-magmatic heat and mass exchange between the crust and the mantle. This regime was characterized by weak deformable plates with low topography, massive juvenile crust production from mantle derived melts, mantle-flows-driven crustal deformation, magma-assisted crustal convection and widespread development of lithospheric delamination and crustal drips. Plume tectonics also resulted in growth of hot depleted chemically buoyant subcrustal proto-cratonic mantle layer. Later

  6. On laminar and turbulent friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH

    1946-01-01

    Report deals, first with the theory of the laminar friction flow, where the basic concepts of Prandtl's boundary layer theory are represented from mathematical and physical points of view, and a method is indicated by means of which even more complicated cases can be treated with simple mathematical means, at least approximately. An attempt is also made to secure a basis for the computation of the turbulent friction by means of formulas through which the empirical laws of the turbulent pipe resistance can be applied to other problems on friction drag. (author)

  7. Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence, using propane fuel, was taken STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:2/05:30 (approximate). LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel-like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (983KB, 9-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300184.html.

  8. Burning Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence was taken July 15, 1997, MET:14/10:34 (approximate) and shows the ignition and extinction of this flame. LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel -- like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (518KB, 20-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300182.html.

  9. Chevrons formation in laminar erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devauchelle, Olivier; Josserand, Christophe; Lagree, Pierre-Yves; Zaleski, Stephane; Nguyen, Khanh-Dang; Malverti, Luce; Lajeunesse, Eric

    2007-11-01

    When eroded by laminar free-surface flows, granular substrates may generate a rich variety of natural patterns. Among them are dunes, similar to the ones observed by Charru and Hinch in a Couette cell (Charru F, Hinch EJ ; Ripple formation on a particle bed sheared by a viscous liquid. Part 1. Steady flow ; JOURNAL OF FLUID MECHANICS 550: 111-121 MAR 10 2006). Chevron-shaped instabilities as those found on the sea-shore, can also be observed, sometimes in competition against dunes formation. These were first pointed out by Daerr et al. when pulling a plate covered with granular material out of a bath of water (Daerr A, Lee P, Lanuza J, et al. ; Erosion patterns in a sediment layer ; PHYSICAL REVIEW E 67 (6): Art. No. 065201 Part 2 JUN 2003). Both instabilities can grow in laminar open-channel flows, an experimental set-up which is more easily controlled. The mechanisms leading to the formation of these patterns are investigated and compared. Whereas dunes formation requires vertical inertia effects, we show that chevrons may result from the non-linear evolution of bars instability, which may grow even in purely viscous flows.

  10. Laminar-flow wind tunnel experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.; Harris, Charles D.; Sewall, William G.; Stack, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Although most of the laminar flow airfoils recently developed at the NASA Langley Research Center were intended for general aviation applications, low-drag airfoils were designed for transonic speeds and wind tunnel performance tested. The objective was to extend the technology of laminar flow to higher Mach and Reynolds numbers and to swept leading edge wings representative of transport aircraft to achieve lower drag and significantly improved operation costs. This research involves stabilizing the laminar boundary layer through geometric shaping (Natural Laminar Flow, NLF) and active control involving the removal of a portion of the laminar boundary layer (Laminar-Flow Control, LFC), either through discrete slots or perforated surface. Results show that extensive regions of laminar flow with large reductions in skin friction drag can be maintained through the application of passive NLF boundary-layer control technologies to unswept transonic wings. At even greater extent of laminar flow and reduction in the total drag level can be obtained on a swept supercritical airfoil with active boundary layer-control.

  11. Laminar and Turbulent Flow in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, H. G.; Riveros-Rosas, D.

    2010-01-01

    There are many ways to visualize flow, either for laminar or turbulent flows. A very convincing way to show laminar and turbulent flows is by the perturbations on the surface of a beam of water coming out of a cylindrical tube. Photographs, taken with a flash, show the nature of the flow of water in pipes. They clearly show the difference between…

  12. Laminar and Turbulent Flow in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, H. G.; Riveros-Rosas, D.

    2010-01-01

    There are many ways to visualize flow, either for laminar or turbulent flows. A very convincing way to show laminar and turbulent flows is by the perturbations on the surface of a beam of water coming out of a cylindrical tube. Photographs, taken with a flash, show the nature of the flow of water in pipes. They clearly show the difference between…

  13. An analytic model of axisymmetric mantle plume due to thermal and chemical diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Mian; Chase, Clement G.

    1990-01-01

    An analytic model of axisymmetric mantle plumes driven by either thermal diffusion or combined diffusion of both heat and chemical species from a point source is presented. The governing equations are solved numerically in cylindrical coordinates for a Newtonian fluid with constant viscosity. Instead of starting from an assumed plume source, constraints on the source parameters, such as the depth of the source regions and the total heat input from the plume sources, are deduced using the geophysical characteristics of mantle plumes inferred from modelling of hotspot swells. The Hawaiian hotspot and the Bermuda hotspot are used as examples. Narrow mantle plumes are expected for likely mantle viscosities. The temperature anomaly and the size of thermal plumes underneath the lithosphere can be sensitive indicators of plume depth. The Hawaiian plume is likely to originate at a much greater depth than the Bermuda plume. One suggestive result puts the Hawaiian plume source at a depth near the core-mantle boundary and the source of the Bermuda plume in the upper mantle, close to the 700 km discontinuity. The total thermal energy input by the source region to the Hawaiian plume is about 5 x 10(10) watts. The corresponding diameter of the source region is about 100 to 150 km. Chemical diffusion from the same source does not affect the thermal structure of the plume.

  14. A Brilliant Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons captured another dramatic picture of Jupiter's moon Io and its volcanic plumes, 19 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter on Feb. 28, 2007. LORRI took this 75 millisecond exposure at 0035 Universal Time on March 1, 2007, when Io was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the spacecraft.

    Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

    The shadow of Io, cast by the Sun, slices across the plume. The plume is quite asymmetrical and has a complicated wispy texture, for reasons that are still mysterious. At the heart of the eruption incandescent lava, seen here as a brilliant point of light, is reminding scientists of the fire fountains spotted by the Galileo Jupiter orbiter at Tvashtar in 1999.

    The sunlit plume faintly illuminates the surface underneath. 'New Horizons and Io continue to astonish us with these unprecedented views of the solar system's most geologically active body' says John Spencer, deputy leader of the New Horizons Jupiter Encounter Science Team and an Io expert from Southwest Research Institute.

    Because this image shows the side of Io that faces away from Jupiter, the large planet does not illuminate the moon's night side except for an extremely thin crescent outlining the edge of the disk at lower right. Another plume, likely from the volcano Masubi, is illuminated by Jupiter just above this lower right edge. A third and much fainter plume, barely visible at the 2 o'clock position, could be the first plume seen from the volcano Zal Patera.

    As in other New Horizons images of Io, mountains catch the setting Sun just beyond the terminator (the line dividing day and night

  15. A Brilliant Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons captured another dramatic picture of Jupiter's moon Io and its volcanic plumes, 19 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter on Feb. 28, 2007. LORRI took this 75 millisecond exposure at 0035 Universal Time on March 1, 2007, when Io was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the spacecraft.

    Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

    The shadow of Io, cast by the Sun, slices across the plume. The plume is quite asymmetrical and has a complicated wispy texture, for reasons that are still mysterious. At the heart of the eruption incandescent lava, seen here as a brilliant point of light, is reminding scientists of the fire fountains spotted by the Galileo Jupiter orbiter at Tvashtar in 1999.

    The sunlit plume faintly illuminates the surface underneath. 'New Horizons and Io continue to astonish us with these unprecedented views of the solar system's most geologically active body' says John Spencer, deputy leader of the New Horizons Jupiter Encounter Science Team and an Io expert from Southwest Research Institute.

    Because this image shows the side of Io that faces away from Jupiter, the large planet does not illuminate the moon's night side except for an extremely thin crescent outlining the edge of the disk at lower right. Another plume, likely from the volcano Masubi, is illuminated by Jupiter just above this lower right edge. A third and much fainter plume, barely visible at the 2 o'clock position, could be the first plume seen from the volcano Zal Patera.

    As in other New Horizons images of Io, mountains catch the setting Sun just beyond the terminator (the line dividing day and night

  16. Martian Atmospheric Plumes: Behavior, Detectability and Plume Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, Don; Mischna, M.; Sykes, R.; Dissly, R.

    2013-10-01

    We will present our recent work simulating neutrally buoyant plumes in the martian atmosphere. This work is primarily directed at understanding the behavior of discrete plumes of biogenic tracer gases, and thus increasing our understanding of their detectability (both from orbit and from in situ measurements), and finally how to use the plumes to identify their precise source locations. We have modeled the detailed behavior of martian atmospheric plumes using MarsWRF for the atmospheric dynamics and SCIPUFF (a terrestrial state of the art plume modeling code that we have modified to represent martian conditions) for the plume dynamics. This combination of tools allows us to accurately simulate plumes not only from a regional scale from which an orbital observing platform would witness the plume, but also from an in situ perspective, with the instantaneous concentration variations that a turbulent flow would present to a point sampler in situ instrument. Our initial work has focused on the detectability of discrete plumes from an orbital perspective and we will present those results for a variety of notional orbital trace gas detection instruments. We have also begun simulating the behavior of the plumes from the perspective of a sampler on a rover within the martian atmospheric boundary layer. The detectability of plumes within the boundary layer has a very strong dependence on the atmospheric stability, with plume concentrations increasing by a factor of 10-1000 during nighttime when compared to daytime. In the equatorial regions of the planet where we have simulated plumes, the diurnal tidal “clocking” of the winds is strongly evident in the plume trail, which similarly “clocks” around its source. This behavior, combined with the strong diurnal concentration variations suggests that a rover hunting a plume source would be well suited to approach it from a particular azimuth (downwind at night) to maximize detectability of the plume and the ability to

  17. Double flood basalts and plume head separation at the 660-kilometer discontinuity.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, D; Mahoney, J

    1994-11-25

    Several of the world's flood basalt provinces display two distinct times of major eruptions separated by between 20 million and 90 million years. These double flood basalts may occur because a starting mantle plume head can separate from its trailing conduit upon passing the interface between the upper mantle and the lower mantle. This detached plume head eventually triggers the first flood basalt event. The remaining conduit forms a new plume head, which causes the second eruptive event. The second plume head is predicted to arrive at the lithosphere at least 10 million years after the first plume head, in general agreement with observations regarding double flood basalts.

  18. Birth, life, and death of a solar coronal plume

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco; Poletto, Giannina; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2014-10-01

    We analyze a solar polar-coronal-hole (CH) plume over its entire ≈40 hr lifetime, using high-resolution Solar Dynamic Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data. We examine (1) the plume's relationship to a bright point (BP) that persists at its base, (2) plume outflows and their possible contribution to the solar wind mass supply, and (3) the physical properties of the plume. We find that the plume started ≈2 hr after the BP first appeared and became undetectable ≈1 hr after the BP disappeared. We detected radially moving radiance variations from both the plume and from interplume regions, corresponding to apparent outflow speeds ranging over ≈(30-300) km s{sup –1} with outflow velocities being higher in the 'cooler' AIA 171 Å channel than in the 'hotter' 193 Å and 211 Å channels, which is inconsistent with wave motions; therefore, we conclude that the observed radiance variations represent material outflows. If they persist into the heliosphere and plumes cover ≈10% of a typical CH area, these flows could account for ≈50% of the solar wind mass. From a differential emission measure analysis of the AIA images, we find that the average electron temperature of the plume remained approximately constant over its lifetime, at T {sub e} ≈ 8.5 × 10{sup 5} K. Its density, however, decreased with the age of the plume, being about a factor of three lower when the plume faded compared to when it was born. We conclude that the plume died due to a density reduction rather than to a temperature decrease.

  19. Start Young!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Penni

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of early interest in science and how effective it is on career choice in adult stages of life. Recommends starting mathematics and science activities in preschool and kindergarten. Describes how to create a career-oriented learning center in the classroom with examples of kitchen chemistry, nutrition/botany, zoology,…

  20. Start Young!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Penni

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of early interest in science and how effective it is on career choice in adult stages of life. Recommends starting mathematics and science activities in preschool and kindergarten. Describes how to create a career-oriented learning center in the classroom with examples of kitchen chemistry, nutrition/botany, zoology,…

  1. Analysis of volcanic plume detection on Mount Etna through GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranzulla, Massimo; Cannavò, Flavio; Scollo, Simona; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Immé, Giuseppina

    2013-04-01

    A permanent and continuous GPS network developed by Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo (Italy) was used to study its capability in detecting volcanic plumes produced during Etna explosive eruptions. Indeed, the electron plasma and neutral atmosphere, water vapor, hydrometeors and particulates induce propagation path delays in the GPS signal. The existing GPS network consists of 35 permanent stations located on the volcano flanks and is currently used to detect ground displacements of the volcano. We processed the GPS data coming from the Etna network using the GAMIT package developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology. We used the undifferenced post-fit phase residuals as input in testing for the presence of a volcanic plume. Four robust cross-statistics were applied to assert the plume detection by GPS signals with 99% of confidence. The GPS network was able to detect the volcanic plume occurred on 4 September 2007. Here, we extend the proposed method to the lava fountains of Etna recorded in 2012. During this period Mount Etna produced more than twenty lava fountain episodes, forming volcanic plumes from few to tens kilometers of altitude. Starting from the previous experiences in which we considered a simplified paraboloid model to represent the geometry of the volcanic plume in atmosphere to evaluate the GPS satellite-station paths that crossed the plume, here we improve the method taking into account the results of simulations of volcanic ash dispersal in order to have a more realistic volcanic plume representation.

  2. Plume primary smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastenet, J. C.

    1993-06-01

    The exhaust from a solid propellant rocket motor usually contains condensed species. These particles, also called 'Primary Smoke', are often prejudicial to missile detectability and to the guidance system. To avoid operational problems it is necessary to know and quantify the effects of particles on all aspects of missile deployment. A brief description of the origin of the primary smoke is given. It continues with details of the interaction between particles and light as function of both particles and light properties (nature, size, wavelength, etc). The effects of particles on plume visibility, attenuation of an optical beam propagated through the plume and the contribution of particles on optical signatures of the plume are also described. Finally, various methods used in NATO countries to quantify the primary smoke effects are discussed.

  3. Rocket plume burn hazard.

    PubMed

    Stoll, A M; Piergallini, J R; Chianta, M A

    1980-05-01

    By use of miniature rocket engines, the burn hazard posed by exposure to ejection seat rocket plume flames was determined in the anaesthetized rat. A reference chart is provided for predicting equivalent effects in human skin based on extrapolation of earlier direct measurements of heat input for rat and human burns. The chart is intended to be used in conjunction with thermocouple temperature measurements of the plume environment for design and modification of escape seat system to avoid thermal injury on ejection from multiplace aircraft.

  4. Eiffel Tower Plume

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-19

    This still image from an animation from NASA GSFC Solar Dynamics Observatory shows a single plume of plasma, many times taller than the diameter of Earth, spewing streams of particles for over two days Aug. 17-19, 2015 before breaking apart. At times, its shape resembled the Eiffel Tower. Other lesser plumes and streams of particles can be seen dancing above the solar surface as well. The action was observed in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19875

  5. Where Plumes Live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. D.

    2004-12-01

    From the perspective of fluid dynamics, `Plumes or not?' might be the wrong question. Let me begin by defining a few terms. Plume with a `P' is the well-known thermal structure with thin (order 100 km) tail and large, bulbous head that originates at the core-mantle boundary. The thin tail/large, bulbous-head morphology has been generated in a number of laboratory and numerical experiments. It can be seen, for example, on the cover of the famous fluid dynamics text by Batchelor. There is a clearly-defined range of parameters for which this structure is the preferred solution for instabilities arising from a bottom boundary layer in a convecting fluid. For example, a strong temperature-dependent rheology is needed. By contrast, plume with a `p' is any cylindrical or quasi-cylindrical instability originating from a thermal (or thermo-chemical) boundary layer. In fluid dynamics plume is sometimes used interchangeable with jet. Unless there is a very small temperature drop across the core-mantle boundary or a rather remarkable balance between temperature and composition at the base of the mantle, there are almost certainly plumes. (Note the little p.) Are these plumes the thermal structures with thin (order 100 km) tails and large bulbous heads or could they be broad, hot regions such as the degree 2 pattern seen in global seismic tomography images of the lower mantle, or the disconnected droplets seen in chaotic convection? To study this question, I will present a sequence of numerical `experiments' that illustrate the morphology of instabilities from a basal thermal boundary layer, i.e., plumes. Some of the aspects I will present include: spherical geometry, temperature-and pressure-dependence of rheology, internal heating, pressure-dependent coefficient of thermal expansion, variable coefficient of thermal diffusivity, phase transformations, and compositional layering at the base of the mantle. The goal is to map out the parameters and conditions where Plumes live

  6. Press Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    This level sets the stage for the design philosophy called “Triadic Game Design” (TGD). This design philosophy can be summarized with the following sentence: it takes two to tango, but it takes three to design a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Before the philosophy is further explained, this level will first delve into what is meant by a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Many terms and definitions have seen the light and in this book I will specifically orient at digital games that aim to have an effect beyond the context of the game itself. Subsequently, a historical overview is given of the usage of games with a serious purpose which starts from the moment we human beings started to walk on our feet till our contemporary society. It turns out that we have been using games for all kinds of non-entertainment purposes for already quite a long time. With this introductory material in the back of our minds, I will explain the concept of TGD by means of a puzzle. After that, the protagonist of this book, the game Levee Patroller, is introduced. Based on the development of this game, the idea of TGD, which stresses to balance three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play, came into being. Interested? Then I suggest to quickly “press start!”

  7. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-03-26

    This color image, acquired during NASA Galileo ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon, erupting over a caldera volcanic depression named Pillan Patera.

  8. Hydrostatic Modeling of Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.; Deremble, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has led to increased interest in understanding point source convection dynamics. Most of the existing oil plume models use a Lagrangian based approach, which computes integral measures such as plume centerline trajectory and plume radius. However, this approach doesn't account for feedbacks of the buoyant plume on the ambient environment. Instead, we employ an Eulerian based approach to acquire a better understanding of the dynamics of buoyant plumes. We have performed a series of hydrostatic modeling simulations using the MITgcm. Our results show that there is a dynamical response caused by the presence of the buoyant plume, in that there is a modification of the background flow. We find that the buoyant plume becomes baroclinically unstable and sheds eddies at the neutral buoyancy layer. We also explore different scenarios to determine the effect of the buoyancy source and the temperature stratification on the evolution of buoyant plumes.

  9. LAMP Observes the LCROSS Plume

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video shows LAMP’s view of the LCROSS plume. The first half of the animation shows the LAMP viewport scanning across the horizon, passing through the plume, and moving on. The second half of...

  10. EUV analysis of polar plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, I. A.; Withbroe, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Three polar plumes were studied using Skylab Mg X and O VI data. The plumes lie within the boundaries of a polar coronal hole. We find that the mean temperature of the plumes is about 1.1 million K and that they have a small vertical temperature gradient. Densities are determined and found consistent with white light analyses. The variation of density with height in the plumes is compared with that expected for hydrostatic equilibrium. As is the case for other coronal features, polar plumes will be a source of solar wind if the magnetic field lines are open. On the basis of the derived plume model and estimates of the numbers of plumes in polar coronal holes, it appears that polar plumes contain about 15% of the mass in a typical polar hole and occupy about 10% of the volume.

  11. Natural laminar flow application to transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratzer, Louis B.

    1990-01-01

    A major goal of NASA during the last 15 years has been the development of laminar flow technology for aircraft drag reduction. Of equal importance is achieving a state of readiness that will allow the successful application of this technology by industry to large, long-range aircraft. Recent progress in achieving extensive laminar flow with limited suction on the Boeing 757 has raised the prospects from practical application of the hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) concept to subsonic aircraft. Also, better understanding of phenomena affecting laminar flow stability and response to disturbances has encouraged consideration of natural laminar flow (NLF), obtained without suction or active mechanical means, for application to transport aircraft larger than previously thought feasible. These ideas have inspired the current NASA/ASEE project with goals as follows: explore the feasibility of extensive NLF for aircraft at high Reynolds number under realistic flight conditions; determine the potential applications of NLF technology and the conditions under which they may be achieved; and identify existing aircraft that could be adapted to carry out flight experiments to validate NLF technology application. To achieve these objectives, understanding of the physical limits to natural laminar flow and possible ways to extend these limits was sought. The primary factors involved are unit Reynolds number, Mach number, wing sweep, thickness, and lift coefficients as well as surface pressure gradients and curvature. Based on previous and ongoing studies using laminar boundary layer stability theory, the interplay of the above factors and the corresponding transition limits were postulated.

  12. Halogen Chemistry in Volcanic Plumes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Tjarda

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes release vast amounts of gases and particles in the atmosphere. Volcanic halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, HI) are co-emitted alongside SO2, and observations show rapid formation of BrO and OClO in the plume as it disperses into the troposphere. The development of 1D and Box models (e.g. PlumeChem) that simulate volcanic plume halogen chemistry aims to characterise how volcanic reactive halogens form and quantify their atmospheric impacts. Following recent advances, these models can broadly reproduce the observed downwind BrO/SO2 ratios using "bromine-explosion" chemistry schemes, provided they use a "high-temperature initialisation" to inject radicals (OH, Cl, Br and possibly NOx) which "kick-start" the low-temperature chemistry cycles that convert HBr into reactive bromine (initially as Br2). The modelled rise in BrO/SO2 and subsequent plateau/decline as the plume disperses downwind reflects cycling between reactive bromine, particularly Br-BrO, and BrO-HOBr-BrONO2. BrCl is produced when aerosol becomes HBr-depleted. Recent model simulations suggest this mechanism for reactive chlorine formation can broadly account for OClO/SO2 reported at Mt Etna. Predicted impacts of volcanic reactive halogen chemistry include the formation of HNO3 from NOx and depletion of ozone. This concurs with HNO3 widely reported in volcanic plumes (although the source of NOx remains under question), as well as observations of ozone depletion reported in plumes from several volcanoes (Mt Redoubt, Mt Etna, Eyjafjallajokull). The plume chemistry can transform mercury into more easily deposited and potentially toxic forms, for which observations are limited. Recent incorporation of volcanic halogen chemistry in a 3D regional model of degassing from Ambrym (Vanuatu) also predicts how halogen chemistry causes depletion of OH to lengthen the SO2 lifetime, and highlights the potential for halogen transport from the troposphere to the stratosphere. However, the model parameter-space is vast and

  13. PLUME and research sotware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Veronique; Gomez-Diaz, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    The PLUME open platform (https://www.projet-plume.org) has as first goal to share competences and to value the knowledge of software experts within the French higher education and research communities. The project proposes in its platform the access to more than 380 index cards describing useful and economic software for this community, with open access to everybody. The second goal of PLUME focuses on to improve the visibility of software produced by research laboratories within the higher education and research communities. The "development-ESR" index cards briefly describe the main features of the software, including references to research publications associated to it. The platform counts more than 300 cards describing research software, where 89 cards have an English version. In this talk we describe the theme classification and the taxonomy of the index cards and the evolution with new themes added to the project. We will also focus on the organisation of PLUME as an open project and its interests in the promotion of free/open source software from and for research, contributing to the creation of a community of shared knowledge.

  14. Buoyant plume calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C.; Edwards, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Smoke from raging fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in surface temperatures. However, the extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change, depend on how the smoke is distributed with altitude. We present a model capable of evaluating the initial distribution of lofted smoke above a massive fire. Calculations are shown for a two-dimensional slab version of the model and a full three-dimensional version. The model has been evaluated by simulating smoke heights for the Hamburg firestorm of 1943 and a smaller scale oil fire which occurred in Long Beach in 1958. Our plume heights for these fires are compared to those predicted by the classical Morton-Taylor-Turner theory for weakly buoyant plumes. We consider the effect of the added buoyancy caused by condensation of water-laden ground level air being carried to high altitude with the convection column as well as the effects of background wind on the calculated smoke plume heights for several fire intensities. We find that the rise height of the plume depends on the assumed background atmospheric conditions as well as the fire intensity. Little smoke is injected into the stratosphere unless the fire is unusually intense, or atmospheric conditions are more unstable than we have assumed. For intense fires significant amounts of water vapor are condensed raising the possibility of early scavenging of smoke particles by precipitation. 26 references, 11 figures.

  15. Evaluation of Visible Plumes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Thomas

    Developed for presentation at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971, this outline discusses plumes with contaminants that are visible to the naked eye. Information covers: (1) history of air pollution control regulations, (2) need for methods of evaluating…

  16. Evaluation of Visible Plumes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Thomas

    Developed for presentation at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971, this outline discusses plumes with contaminants that are visible to the naked eye. Information covers: (1) history of air pollution control regulations, (2) need for methods of evaluating…

  17. Enceladus' Water Vapour Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Esposito, L.; Colwell, J.; Hendrix, A.; Matson, Dennis; Parkinson, C.; Pryor, W.; Shemansky, D.; Stewart, I.; Tew, J.; Yung, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the discovery of Enceladus water vapor plumes is shown. Conservative modeling of this water vapor is also presented and also shows that Enceladus is the source of most of the water required to supply the neutrals in Saturn's system and resupply the E-ring against losses.

  18. Enceladus' Water Vapour Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Esposito, L.; Colwell, J.; Hendrix, A.; Matson, Dennis; Parkinson, C.; Pryor, W.; Shemansky, D.; Stewart, I.; Tew, J.; hide

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the discovery of Enceladus water vapor plumes is shown. Conservative modeling of this water vapor is also presented and also shows that Enceladus is the source of most of the water required to supply the neutrals in Saturn's system and resupply the E-ring against losses.

  19. Double Diffusive Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Lee, Brace

    2008-11-01

    Sour gas flares attempt to dispose of deadly H2S gas through combustion. What does not burn rises as a buoyant plume. But the gas is heavier than air at room temperature, so as the rising gas cools eventually it becomes negatively buoyant and descends back to the ground. Ultimately, our intent is to predict the concentrations of the gas at ground level in realistic atmospheric conditions. As a first step towards this goal we have performed laboratory experiments examining the structure of a steady state plume of hot and salty water that rises buoyantly near the source and descends as a fountain after it has cooled sufficiently. We call this a double-diffusive plume because its evolution is dictated by the different (turbulent) diffusivities of heat and salt. A temperature and conductivity probe measures both the salinity and temperature along the centreline of the plume. The supposed axisymmetric structure of the salinity concentration as it changes with height is determined by light-attenuation methods. To help interpret the results, a theory has been successfully adapted from the work of Bloomfield and Kerr (2000), who developed coupled equations describing the structure of fountains. Introducing a new empirical parameter for the relative rates of turbulent heat and salt diffusion, the predictions are found to agree favourably with experimental results.

  20. Enceladus Plume Movie

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-12-06

    Jets of icy particles burst from Saturn’s moon Enceladus in this brief movie sequence of four images taken on Nov. 27, 2005. The sensational discovery of active eruptions on a third outer solar system body (Io and Triton are the others) is surely one of the great highlights of the Cassini mission. Imaging scientists, as reported in the journal Science on March 10, 2006, believe that the jets are geysers erupting from pressurized subsurface reservoirs of liquid water above 273 degrees Kelvin (0 degrees Celsius). Images taken in January 2005 appeared to show the plume emanating from the fractured south polar region of Enceladus, but the visible plume was only slightly brighter than the background noise in the image, because the lighting geometry was not suitable to reveal the true details of the feature. This potential sighting, in addition to the detection of the icy particles in the plume by other Cassini instruments, prompted imaging scientists to target Enceladus again with exposures designed to confirm the validity of the earlier plume sighting. The new views show individual jets, or plume sources, that contribute to the plume with much greater visibility than the earlier images. The full plume towers over the 505-kilometer-wide (314-mile) moon and is at least as tall as the moon's diameter. The four 10-second exposures were taken over the course of about 36 minutes at approximately 12 minute intervals. Enceladus rotates about 7.5 degrees in longitude over the course of the frames, and most of the observed changes in the appearances of the jets is likely attributable to changes in the viewing geometry. However, some of the changes may be due to actual variation in the flow from the jets on a time scale of tens of minutes. Additionally, the shift of the sources seen here should provide information about their location in front of and behind the visible limb (edge) of Enceladus. These images were obtained using the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera at

  1. Research in Natural Laminar Flow and Laminar-Flow Control, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, Jerry N. (Compiler); Sabo, Frances E. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Part 3 of the Symposium proceedings contains papers addressing advanced airfoil development, flight research experiments, and supersonic transition/laminar flow control research. Specific topics include the design and testing of natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils, NLF wing gloves, and NLF nacelles; laminar boundary-layer stability over fuselage forebodies; the design of low noise supersonic/hypersonic wind tunnels; and boundary layer instability mechanisms on swept leading edges at supersonic speeds.

  2. Radiation build-up in laminar and turbulent regimes in quasi-CW Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Sergey V; Tarasov, Nikita; Churkin, Dmitry V

    2015-10-19

    We study the radiation build-up in laminar and turbulent generation regimes in quasi-CW Raman fiber laser. We found the resulted spectral shape and generation type is defined by the total spectral broadening/narrowing balance over laser cavity round-trip, which is substantially different in different regimes starting from first round-trips of the radiation build-up. In turbulent regime, the steady-state is reached only after a few round-trips, while in the laminar regime the laser approaches the equilibrium spectrum shape asymptotically.

  3. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Krishnan, S. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon-fueled flames affect emissions of pollutant soot, thermal loads on combustors, hazards of unwanted fires and capabilities for computational combustion. In view of these observations, the present study is considering processes of soot formation in both burner-stabilized and freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. These flames are being studied in order to simplify the interpretation of measurements and to enhance computational tractability compared to the diffusion flame environments of greatest interest for soot processes. In addition, earlier studies of soot formation in laminar premixed flames used approximations of soot optical and structure properties that have not been effective during recent evaluations, as well as questionable estimates of flow residence times). The objective of present work was to exploit methods of avoiding these difficulties developed for laminar diffusion flames to study soot growth in laminar premixed flames. The following description of these studies is brief.

  4. Gasdynamic approach to small plumes computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkin, L.; Baer, M.; Falcovitz, J.

    1993-07-01

    The semi-inverse marching characteristics scheme SIMA was extended to treat rotational flows; it is applied to computation of free plumes, starting out from non-uniform nozzle exit flow that reflects substantial viscous effects. For lack of measurements of exit flow in small nozzles, the exit plane flow is approximated by introducing a Power Law Interpolation (PLI) between the exit plane center and lip values. Exit plane flow variables thus approximated, are Mach number, pressure, flow angle and stagnation temperature. This choice is guided by gasdynamic considerations of exhaust flow from small nozzles into vacuum. The PLI is adjusted so as to obtain a match between computations and measurements at intermediate range from the nozzle. Computed plumes were found to be in good agreement with five different sets of small plume experiments. Comparative computations were performed using two alternate methods: the Boynton-Simons point-source approximation, and SIMA computation that started out from a uniform exit flow. It is demonstrated that for small nozzles having an exit flow dominated by viscous effects, the combined SIMA/PLI computational method is reasonably accurate and is dearly superior to either of the two alternate methods.

  5. Starting motor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Hamano, I

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a starting motor having a housing, planetary reduction gears including an internal gear in the housing. The improvement consists of an elastic member having a first annular portion mounted in engagement with a fixed annular member of the housing and a plurality of protruding axially extending elastic portions providing a corrugated surface pressed into engagement with an end portion of the internal gear, the elastic member being sandwiched between the internal gear and the housing member, the protruding axially extending elastic portions providing resilient means which flex and incline circumferentially under turning force from the internal gear and exert reactive thrust on the internal gear elastically so that the frictional force at the abutting surfaces of the protruding portions holds the internal gear in resilient engagement with the elastic member and the resilient means acts as a buffer to absorb rotary impact force developing in the planetary reduction gears.

  6. Laminar Flow Breakdown due to Particle Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    effect on the boundary layer when encountering cirrus cloud , is incomplete. The observed performance degradations [5, 9] have been attributed to the...crystals as occurring in cirrus cloud would have a detrimental effect on the performance of Laminar Flow Control (LFC) systems. During flight tests of...full chord suction type LFC systems aboard two X-21 aircraft, laminar flow was entirely lost when entering thick cirrus cloud and degraded even in

  7. Dynamics of thermochemical plumes: 2. Complexity of plume structures and its implications for mapping mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shu-Chuan; van Keken, Peter E.

    2006-03-01

    The mantle plume hypothesis provides explanations for several major observations of surface volcanism. The dynamics of plumes with purely thermal origin has been well established, but our understanding of the role of compositional variations in the Earth's mantle on plume formation is still incomplete. In this study we explore the structures of plumes originating from a thermochemical boundary layer at the base of the mantle in an attempt to complement fluid dynamical studies of purely thermal plumes. Our numerical experiments reveal diverse characteristics of thermochemical plumes that frequently deviate from the classic features of plumes. In addition, owing to the interplay between the thermal and compositional buoyancy forces, the morphology, temperature, and flow fields in both the plume head and plume conduit are strongly time-dependent. The entrainment of the dense layer and secondary instabilities developed in the boundary layer contribute to lateral heterogeneities and enhance stirring processes in the plume head. Our models show that substantial topography of the compositional layer can develop simultaneously with the plumes. In addition, plumes may be present in the lower mantle for more than 70 million years. These features may contribute to the large low seismic velocity provinces beneath the south central Pacific, the southern Atlantic Ocean, and Africa. Our model results support the idea that the dynamics of mantle plumes is much more complicated than conventional thinking based on studies of purely thermal plumes. The widely used criteria for mapping mantle plumes, such as a vertically continuous low seismic velocity signature and strong surface topography swell, may not be universally applicable. We propose that the intrinsic density contrast of the distinct composition may reduce the associated topography of some large igneous provinces such as Ontong Java.

  8. On plane submerged laminar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    We address the laminar flow generated when a developed stream of liquid of kinematic viscosity ν flowing along channel of width 2 h discharges into an open space bounded by two symmetric plane walls departing from the channel rim with an angle α 1 . Attention is focused on values of the jet volume flux 2 Q such that the associated Reynolds number Re = Qh / ν is of order unity. The formulation requires specification of the boundary conditions far from the channel exit. If the flow is driven by the volume flux, then the far-field solution corresponds to Jeffery-Hamel self-similar flow. However, as noted by Fraenkel (1962), such solutions exist only for α <129o in a limited range of Reynolds numbers 0 <=Re <=Rec (α) (e.g. Rec = 1 . 43 for α = π / 2). It is reasoned that an alternative solution, driven by a fraction of the momentum flux of the feed stream, may also exist for all values of Re and α, including a near-centerline Bickley jet, a surrounding Taylor potential flow driven by the jet entrainment, and a Falkner-Skan near-wall boundary layer. Numerical integrations of the Navier-Stokes equations are used to ascertain the existence of these different solutions.

  9. An approach to the constrained design of natural laminar flow airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford Earl

    1995-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integml turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the larninar flow toward the desired amounl An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  10. Boundary layer stability analysis of a natural laminar flow glove on the F-111 TACT airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. J.; Steers, L. L.

    1980-01-01

    A natural laminar flow airfoil has been developed as a part of the aircraft energy efficiency program. A NASA flight program incorporating this airfoil into partial wing gloves on the F-111 TACT airplane was scheduled to start in May, 1980. In support of this research effort, an extensive boundary layer stability analysis of the partial glove has been conducted. The results of that analysis show the expected effects of wing leading-edge sweep angle, Reynolds number, and compressibility on boundary layer stability and transition. These results indicate that it should be possible to attain on the order of 60% laminar flow on the upper surface and 50% laminar flow on the lower surface for sweep angles of at least 20 deg, chord Reynolds numbers of 25 x 10 to the 6th and Mach numbers from 0.81 to 0.85.

  11. Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

    2006-02-14

    This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides.

  12. Chemical plume source localization.

    PubMed

    Pang, Shuo; Farrell, Jay A

    2006-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the dispersion of the chemical is dominated by turbulence, resulting in an intermittent chemical signal. The vehicle is capable of detecting above-threshold chemical concentration and sensing the fluid flow velocity at the vehicle location. This paper reviews instances of biological plume tracing and reviews previous strategies for a vehicle-based plume tracing. The main contribution is a new source-likelihood mapping approach based on Bayesian inference methods. Using this Bayesian methodology, the source-likelihood map is propagated through time and updated in response to both detection and nondetection events. Examples are included that use data from in-water testing to compare the mapping approach derived herein with the map derived using a previously existing technique.

  13. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-02-01

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression

  14. 3-D numerical modeling of plume-induced subduction initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Marzieh; Gerya, taras; Sobolev, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of mechanisms involved in formation of a new subduction zone can help us to better understand plate tectonics. Despite numerous previous studies, it is still unclear how and where an old oceanic plate starts to subduct beneath the other plate. One of the proposed scenarios for nucleation of subduction is plume-induced subduction initiation, which was investigated in detail, using 2-D models, by Ueda et al. (2008). Recently. Gerya et al. (2015), using 3D numerical models, proposed that plume-lithosphere interaction in the Archean led to the subduction initiation and onset of plate tectonic. In this study, we aim to pursue work of Ueda et al. (2008) by incorporation of 3-D thermo-mechanical models to investigate conditions leading to oceanic subduction initiation as a result of thermal-chemical mantle plume-lithosphere interaction in the modern earth. Results of our experiments show four different deformation regimes in response to plume-lithosphere interaction, that are a) self-sustaining subduction initiation where subduction becomes self-sustained, b) freezing subduction initiation where subduction stops at shallow depths, c) slab break-off where subducting circular slab breaks off soon after formation and d) plume underplating where plume does not pass through the lithosphere but spreads beneath it (failed subduction initiation). These different regimes depend on several parameters such as plume's size, composition and temperature, lithospheric brittle/plastic strength, age of the oceanic lithosphere and presence/absence of lithospheric heterogeneities. Results show that subduction initiates and becomes self-sustained when lithosphere is older than 10 Myr and non-dimensional ratio of the plume buoyancy force and lithospheric strength above the plume is higher than 2.

  15. Evolution: Why all plumes and jets evolve to round cross sections

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, A.; Ziaei, S.; Lorente, S.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent curtains of smoke rise initially as flat plumes and, above a certain height, they become round plumes. The same evolution of cross-sectional shape is exhibited by jets issuing from flat nozzles. Here we predict based on principle that all such flows should evolve their cross-sectional shapes from flat to round (and not the other way) at a critical distance downstream, which is predictable. The principle is that the prevailing flow architecture provides greater access to the flow of momentum from the moving core (plume, jet) to the still surroundings. For turbulent plumes and jets, the transition distance scales with the long dimensions (L) of the two-dimensional (flat) heat sources and nozzles that drive them. For laminar jets, the transition distance scales with L Re, where Re is the Reynolds number based on nozzle velocity and the smaller dimension of the nozzle cross section. These predictions are confirmed by full numerical experiments of the three-dimensional flow fields of turbulent and laminar jets covering the Re range 10–104. PMID:24756029

  16. Seismic Imaging of Mantle Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, Henri-Claude

    The mantle plume hypothesis was proposed thirty years ago by Jason Morgan to explain hotspot volcanoes such as Hawaii. A thermal diapir (or plume) rises from the thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle and produces a chain of volcanoes as a plate moves on top of it. The idea is very attractive, but direct evidence for actual plumes is weak, and many questions remain unanswered. With the great improvement of seismic imagery in the past ten years, new prospects have arisen. Mantle plumes are expected to be rather narrow, and their detection by seismic techniques requires specific developments as well as dedicated field experiments. Regional travel-time tomography has provided good evidence for plumes in the upper mantle beneath a few hotspots (Yellowstone, Massif Central, Iceland). Beneath Hawaii and Iceland, the plume can be detected in the transition zone because it deflects the seismic discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depths. In the lower mantle, plumes are very difficult to detect, so specific methods have been worked out for this purpose. There are hints of a plume beneath the weak Bowie hotspot, as well as intriguing observations for Hawaii. Beneath Iceland, high-resolution tomography has just revealed a wide and meandering plume-like structure extending from the core-mantle boundary up to the surface. Among the many phenomena that seem to take place in the lowermost mantle (or D''), there are also signs there of the presence of plumes. In this article I review the main results obtained so far from these studies and discuss their implications for plume dynamics. Seismic imaging of mantle plumes is still in its infancy but should soon become a turbulent teenager.

  17. Low altitude plume impingement handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    Plume Impingement modeling is required whenever an object immersed in a rocket exhaust plume must survive or remain undamaged within specified limits, due to thermal and pressure environments induced by the plume. At high altitudes inviscid plume models, Monte Carlo techniques along with the Plume Impingement Program can be used to predict reasonably accurate environments since there are usually no strong flowfield/body interactions or atmospheric effects. However, at low altitudes there is plume-atmospheric mixing and potential large flowfield perturbations due to plume-structure interaction. If the impinged surface is large relative to the flowfield and the flowfield is supersonic, the shock near the surface can stand off the surface several exit radii. This results in an effective total pressure that is higher than that which exists in the free plume at the surface. Additionally, in two phase plumes, there can be strong particle-gas interaction in the flowfield immediately ahead of the surface. To date there have been three levels of sophistication that have been used for low altitude plume induced environment predictions. Level 1 calculations rely on empirical characterizations of the flowfield and relatively simple impingement modeling. An example of this technique is described by Piesik. A Level 2 approach consists of characterizing the viscous plume using the SPF/2 code or RAMP2/LAMP and using the Plume Impingement Program to predict the environments. A Level 3 analysis would consist of using a Navier-Stokes code such as the FDNS code to model the flowfield and structure during a single calculation. To date, Level 1 and Level 2 type analyses have been primarily used to perform environment calculations. The recent advances in CFD modeling and computer resources allow Level 2 type analysis to be used for final design studies. Following some background on low altitude impingement, Level 1, 2, and 3 type analysis will be described.

  18. Structure of axisymmetric mantle plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Peter; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The structure of axisymmetric subsolidus thermal plumes in the earth's lower mantle is inferred from calculations of axisymmetric thermal plumes in an infinite Prandtl number fluid with thermally activated viscosity. The velocity and temperature distribution is determined for axisymmetric convection above a heated disk in an incompressible fluid cylinder 2,400 km in height and 1,200 km in diameter. Several calculations of plumes with heat transport in the range 100-400 GW, similar to the advective heat transport at the Hawaiian hotspot, are presented. Hotspot formation by plumes originating at the base of the mantle requires both large viscosity variations and a minimum heat transport.

  19. Laminar Heating Validation of the OVERFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillard, Randolph P.; Dries, Kevin M.

    2005-01-01

    OVERFLOW, a structured finite difference code, was applied to the solution of hypersonic laminar flow over several configurations assuming perfect gas chemistry. By testing OVERFLOW's capabilities over several configurations encompassing a variety of flow physics a validated laminar heating was produced. Configurations tested were a flat plate at 0 degrees incidence, a sphere, a compression ramp, and the X-38 re-entry vehicle. This variety of test cases shows the ability of the code to predict boundary layer flow, stagnation heating, laminar separation with re-attachment heating, and complex flow over a three-dimensional body. In addition, grid resolutions studies were done to give recommendations for the correct number of off-body points to be applied to generic problems and for wall-spacing values to capture heat transfer and skin friction. Numerical results show good comparison to the test data for all the configurations.

  20. Wing Leading Edge Joint Laminar Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    An F-104G aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has been equipped with a specially designed and instrumented test fixture to simulate surface imperfections of the type likely to be present near the leading edge on the wings of some laminar flow aircraft. The simulated imperfections consisted of five combinations of spanwise steps and gaps of various sizes. The unswept fixture yielded a pressure distribution similar to that of some laminar flow airfoils. The experiment was conducted at cruise conditions typical for business-jets and light transports: Mach numbers were in the range 0.5-0.8, and unit Reynolds numbers were 1.5-2.5 million per foot. Skin friction measurements indicated that laminar flow was often maintained for some distance downstream of the surface imperfections. Further work is needed to more precisely define transition location and to extend the experiments to swept-wing conditions and a broader range of imperfection geometries.

  1. Single SCA-plume dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J.-I.; Baizig, Hichem

    2012-11-01

    A fully prognostic prototype of bulk mass-flux convection parameterization is presented. The bulk mass-flux parameterization is formulated by assuming a subgrid-scale system consisting only of a convective plume and environment. Both subcomponents (segments) are assumed to be homogeneous horizontally. This assumption is called the segmentally constant approximation (SCA). The present study introduces this purely geometrical constraint (SCA) into the full nonhydrostatic anelastic system. A continuous-space description of the full system is, thus, replaced by a discretization consisting only of two segments (plume and environment) in the horizontal direction. The resulting discretized system is mathematically equivalent to a 0th order finite volume formulation with the only two finite volumes. The model is presented under a two-dimensional configuration. Interfaces between the plume and the environment segments may either be fixed in time or Lagrangianly advected as two limiting cases. Under this framework, the single-plume dynamics is systematically investigated in a wide phase space of Richardson number, the aspect ratio, and a displacement rate of the plume interfaces relative to the Lagrangian displacement. Advantage of the present model is in evaluating the lateral mixing processes of the plume without invoking an entrainment-detrainment hypothesis. The fractional entrainment-detrainment rate diagnosed from the present model simulations highly varies both over space and time, suggesting a limitation of applying an entrainment-detrainment hypothesis to unsteady plumes, as in the present case, in which circulations of the plume scale dominates over the turbulent mixing process. Furthermore, when the entrainment-plume hypothesis of Morton et al. is adopted for defining the plume-interface displacement rate, the plume continuously expands with time without reaching equilibrium.

  2. Endothelin mediated contraction of equine laminar veins.

    PubMed

    Keen, J A; Hillier, C; McGorum, B C; Nally, J E

    2008-07-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) may be a key mediator in the pathogenesis of laminitis, but endothelin-mediated responses in the venous microcirculation of the equine foot have yet to be fully characterised. To characterise the response of equine laminar veins to ET-1 and evaluate the ET-1 receptor subtypes that mediate this response. Small veins (150-500 microns) draining the equine digital laminae from healthy horses and ponies subjected to euthanasia at an abattoir were investigated using wire myography. Concentration response curves were constructed for ET-1 in the presence of ETA (BQ123) and ETB (BQ788) receptor antagonists, and L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase blocker. The selective ETB receptor agonist BQ3020 was investigated alone and following incubation with L-NAME, with or without BQ788. Endothelin-1 contraction of laminar veins was significantly inhibited by BQ123 but not by BQ788. In the presence of L-NAME, sensitivity of laminar veins to ET-1 was enhanced 4-fold, and further addition of BQ788 did not alter this increased sensitivity. BQ3020 induced no venoconstriction; however, in the presence of L-NAME, it caused contraction of veins with approximately 30% of the efficacy of ET-1. The action of BQ3020 in the presence of L-NAME was abolished by BQ788. Both ETA and ETB receptors are involved in the net tonic response to ET-1 in normal laminar veins. A population of ETB receptors may be present on the vascular endothelium and on smooth muscle of laminar veins, and the action of ET-1 at these 2 sites is likely to be approximately equal and opposite. Our results clarify the function of the ET-1 receptor subtypes in laminar veins from healthy horses. Further study of ET-1 receptors in laminitic horses is therefore warranted.

  3. Mapping the Hawaiian plume conduit with converted seismic waves

    PubMed

    Li; Kind; Priestley; Sobolev; Tilmann; Yuan; Weber

    2000-06-22

    The volcanic edifice of the Hawaiian islands and seamounts, as well as the surrounding area of shallow sea floor known as the Hawaiian swell, are believed to result from the passage of the oceanic lithosphere over a mantle hotspot. Although geochemical and gravity observations indicate the existence of a mantle thermal plume beneath Hawaii, no direct seismic evidence for such a plume in the upper mantle has yet been found. Here we present an analysis of compressional-to-shear (P-to-S) converted seismic phases, recorded on seismograph stations on the Hawaiian islands, that indicate a zone of very low shear-wave velocity (< 4 km s(-1)) starting at 130-140 km depth beneath the central part of the island of Hawaii and extending deeper into the upper mantle. We also find that the upper-mantle transition zone (410-660 km depth) appears to be thinned by up to 40-50 km to the south-southwest of the island of Hawaii. We interpret these observations as localized effects of the Hawaiian plume conduit in the asthenosphere and mantle transition zone with excess temperature of approximately 300 degrees C. Large variations in the transition-zone thickness suggest a lower-mantle origin of the Hawaiian plume similar to the Iceland plume, but our results indicate a 100 degrees C higher temperature for the Hawaiian plume.

  4. Hybrid plume plasma rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A technique for producing thrust by generating a hybrid plume plasma exhaust is disclosed. A plasma flow is generated and introduced into a nozzle which features one or more inlets positioned to direct a flow of neutral gas about the interior of the nozzle. When such a neutral gas flow is combined with the plasma flow within the nozzle, a hybrid plume is constructed including a flow of hot plasma along the center of the nozzle surrounded by a generally annular flow of neutral gas, with an annular transition region between the pure plasma and the neutral gas. The temperature of the outer gas layer is below that of the pure plasma and generally separates the pure plasma from the interior surfaces of the nozzle. The neutral gas flow both insulates the nozzle wall from the high temperatures of the plasma flow and adds to the mass flow rate of the hybrid exhaust. The rate of flow of neutral gas into the interior of the nozzle may be selectively adjusted to control the thrust and specific impulse of the device.

  5. Neuroimaging characteristics of pseudosubcortical laminar heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Maria Augusta; Li, Li Min; Guerreiro, Marilisa M; Cendes, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    Subcortical laminar heterotopia (SLH) is a subtype of malformation of cortical development characterized by laminar gray matter between the cortex and ventricles, which can vary in thickness and may be continuous or discontinuous. The objective of this study is to describe a normal finding of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging that may simulate an SLH. SLH is isointense to cortex on both T1- and T2-weighted/FLAIR images, usually both anteriorly and posteriorly in location. Conversely, pseudo-SLH is a normal variant present only at the posterior aspect of the brain, and with dark signal on both T1- and T2-weighted/FLAIR images.

  6. Flow/Soot-Formation Interactions in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program considering interactions between flow and soot properties within laminar diffusion flames. Laminar diffusion flames were considered because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for theoretical and experimental studies than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. In particular, understanding the transport and chemical reaction processes of laminar flames is a necessary precursor to understanding these processes in practical turbulent flames and many aspects of laminar diffusion flames have direct relevance to turbulent diffusion flames through application of the widely recognized laminar flamelet concept of turbulent diffusion flames. The investigation was divided into three phases, considering the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in still air, the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in coflowing air, and the hydrodynamic suppression of soot formation in laminar diffusion flames.

  7. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes

    PubMed Central

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis. PMID:20368458

  8. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    PubMed

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  9. The role of heat source for spatio-temporal variations of mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, I.; Yamagishi, Y.; Davaille, A.

    2014-12-01

    Hot mantle plumes ascending from the core-mantle boundary experience a filtering effect by the endothermic phase change at the 660-km discontinuity. Fluid dynamics predicts that some hot mantle plumes stagnate at the phase boundary and locally heat the bottom of the upper mantle. This generates the secondary plumes in the upper mantle originating hotspots volcanic activities on the Earth's surface. Recently, seismic tomographic images around the upper-lower mantle boundary showed that the horizontal scale of the low velocity regions, which corresponds to that of the thermally buoyant heat sources, is the order of 100-1000 km. Although most of the fluid dynamic theories on the thermal plumes have been developed using an assumption that the heat source effect is negligible, the behaviors of the starting plumes in the upper mantle should depend on the size of heat source, which is generated by the hotter plume from the CMB. In order to understand the effects of heater size on the starting plume generation, we have experimentally investigated the behaviors of thermally buoyant plumes using a localized heat source (circular plate heater). The combination of quantitative visualization techniques of temperature (Thermochromic Liquid Crystals) and velocity (Particle Image Velocimetry) fields reveals the transient nature of the plume evolution: a variety of the spatio-tempotal distribution of plumes. Simple scaling laws for their ascent velocity and spacing of the plumes are experimentally determined. We also estimate the onset time of the secondary plumes in the upper mantle which depends on the local characteristics of the thermal boundary layer developing at the upper-lower mantle boundary.

  10. Research in Natural Laminar Flow and Laminar-Flow Control, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, Jerry N. (Compiler); Sabo, Frances E. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Since the mid 1970's, NASA, industry, and universities have worked together to conduct important research focused at developing laminar flow technology that could reduce fuel consumption for general aviation, commuter, and transport aircraft by as much as 40 to 50 percent. The symposium was planned in view of the recent accomplishments within the areas of laminar flow control and natural laminar flow, and the potential benefits of laminar flow technology to the civil and military aircraft communities in the United States. Included were technical sessions on advanced theory and design tool development; wind tunnel and flight research; transition measurement and detection techniques; low and high Reynolds number research; and subsonic and supersonic research.

  11. Scanning thermal plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Madding, R. P.; Green, T., III

    1975-01-01

    Over a three-year period 800 thermal line scans of power plant plumes were made by an airborne scanner, with ground truth measured concurrently at the plants. Computations using centered finite differences in the thermal scanning imagery show a lower bound in the horizontal temperature gradient in excess of 1.6 C/m. Gradients persist to 3 m below the surface. Vector plots of the velocity of thermal fronts are constructed by tracing the front motion in successive thermal images. A procedure is outlined for the two-point ground calibration of a thermal scanner from an equation describing the scanner signal and the voltage for two known temperatures. The modulation transfer function is then calculated by input of a thermal step function and application of digital time analysis techniques using Fast Fourier Transforms to the voltage output. Field calibration tests are discussed. Data accuracy is limited by the level of ground truth effort chosen.

  12. Scanning thermal plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Madding, R. P.; Green, T., III

    1975-01-01

    Over a three-year period 800 thermal line scans of power plant plumes were made by an airborne scanner, with ground truth measured concurrently at the plants. Computations using centered finite differences in the thermal scanning imagery show a lower bound in the horizontal temperature gradient in excess of 1.6 C/m. Gradients persist to 3 m below the surface. Vector plots of the velocity of thermal fronts are constructed by tracing the front motion in successive thermal images. A procedure is outlined for the two-point ground calibration of a thermal scanner from an equation describing the scanner signal and the voltage for two known temperatures. The modulation transfer function is then calculated by input of a thermal step function and application of digital time analysis techniques using Fast Fourier Transforms to the voltage output. Field calibration tests are discussed. Data accuracy is limited by the level of ground truth effort chosen.

  13. Laminar flamelet modeling of turbulent diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, W. E.; Kosaly, G.; Planche, O.; Poinsot, T.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    In modeling turbulent combustion, decoupling the chemistry from the turbulence is of great practical significance. In cases in which the equilibrium chemistry model breaks down, laminar flamelet modeling (LFM) is a promising approach to decoupling. Here, the validity of this approach is investigated using direct numerical simulation of a simple chemical reaction in two-dimensional turbulence.

  14. Laminar flamelet modeling of turbulent diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mell, W. E.; Kosaly, G.; Planche, O.; Poinsot, T.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1990-12-01

    In modeling turbulent combustion, decoupling the chemistry from the turbulence is of great practical significance. In cases in which the equilibrium chemistry model breaks down, laminar flamelet modeling (LFM) is a promising approach to decoupling. Here, the validity of this approach is investigated using direct numerical simulation of a simple chemical reaction in two-dimensional turbulence.

  15. Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    The Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor (LEFR) is a modular, lab scale, single-user reactor for the study of catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP). This system can be employed to study a variety of reactor conditions for both in situ and ex situ CFP.

  16. Direct numerical simulations of a rapidly expanding thermal plume: structure and entrainment interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plourde, Fr?D.?Ric; Pham, Minh Vuong; Kim, Son Doan; Balachandar, S.

    We examine the development of a thermal plume originating from a localized heat source using direct numerical simulation. The Reynolds number of the plume, based on source diameter and the characteristic buoyancy velocity, is chosen to be 7700, which is sufficiently large so that the flow turns to a fully turbulent state. A highly resolved grid of 622 million points is used to capture the entire range of turbulent scales in the plume. Here at the source, only heat has been added with no mass or momentum addition and accordingly the vertical evolution of the mass, momentum and buoyancy fluxes computed from the simulation have been verified to follow those of a pure thermal plume. The computed vertical evolution of the time-averaged centreline velocity and temperature are in good agreement with available experimental measurements. Investigation of the time evolution of the plume shows periodic formation of vortex ring structure surrounding the main ascending column of hot fluid. The vortex ring forms very close to the heat source and even at formation it is three-dimensional. The vortex ring ascends with the plume and at an elevation of about two diameters it strongly interacts with and destabilizes the central column and subsequently a complex turbulent flow arises. Thus, relatively laminar, transitional and fully turbulent regimes of the plume evolution can be identified. In the fully turbulent regime, complex three-dimensional hairpin-like vortex structures are observed; but vestiges of the coherent vortex rolls that form close to the source can be observed in the turbulent statistics. It is shown that local entrainment consists of contraction and expulsion phases. Such instantaneous mechanisms drive the entrainment process, and the instantaneous entrainment coefficient shows large variation in both time and space with local values up to three times higher than the average entrainment level. Such findings support the view that entrainment mechanisms in plumes

  17. Plumes of neuronal activity propagate in three dimensions through the nuclear avian brain.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Gabriël J L; van der Meij, Jacqueline; Lesku, John A; Rattenborg, Niels C

    2014-02-28

    In mammals, the slow-oscillations of neuronal membrane potentials (reflected in the electroencephalogram as high-amplitude, slow-waves), which occur during non-rapid eye movement sleep and anesthesia, propagate across the neocortex largely as two-dimensional traveling waves. However, it remains unknown if the traveling nature of slow-waves is unique to the laminar cytoarchitecture and associated computational properties of the neocortex. We demonstrate that local field potential slow-waves and correlated multiunit activity propagate as complex three-dimensional plumes of neuronal activity through the avian brain, owing to its non-laminar, nuclear neuronal cytoarchitecture. The traveling nature of slow-waves is not dependent upon the laminar organization of the neocortex, and is unlikely to subserve functions unique to this pattern of neuronal organization. Finally, the three-dimensional geometry of propagating plumes may reflect computational properties not found in mammals that contributed to the evolution of nuclear neuronal organization and complex cognition in birds.

  18. Buckling of Chemical Wave Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Michael C.; Morris, Stephen W.

    2004-03-01

    Chemical wave fronts are found in many autocatalytic chemical reactions, such as the iodate oxidation of arsenous acid. In vertical capillary tubes, ascending chemical wave fronts show convective behavior when a dimensionless driving parameter S exceeds a critical value Sc ˜ 100. S ∝ a^3, where a is the radius of the tube. In the iodate arsenous-acid reaction, the density jump that drives convection is created by both the partial molal density decrease of the product solution and by thermal expansion due to the slight exothermicity of the reaction. We observed strongly supercritical ascending chemical wave plumes in vertical tubes with S 10^7. We report on the motion of these plumes in experiments where both the viscosity and the temperature of the reactant fluid are control parameters. We find experimentally that the background temperature of the reactant fluid has a significant influence on the behavior of the plumes. Above a critical temperature, plumes rise straight up the tube, whereas below this temperature, plumes go through an initial stage of buckling before they surrender to straight rising motion. The flow induced by the chemical plumes can be visualized using tracer particles. The buckling behavior of the plumes may arise from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, as in the case of a fluid jet descending through stratified surroundings [Pesci et al., Phys. Rev. E, 68, 056305 (2003)].

  19. Three-dimensional Spherical Simulations of Solar Convection. I. Differential Rotation and Pattern Evolution Achieved with Laminar and Turbulent States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Elliott, Julian R.; Toomre, Juri; Clune, Tom L.; Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Gilman, Peter A.

    2000-03-01

    Rotationally constrained convection possesses velocity correlations that transport momentum and drive mean flows such as differential rotation. The nature of this transport can be very complex in turbulent flow regimes, where large-scale, coherent vorticity structures and mean flows can be established by smaller scale turbulence through inverse cascades. The dynamics of the highly turbulent solar convection zone therefore may be quite different than in early global-scale numerical models, which were limited by computational resources to nearly laminar flows. Recent progress in high-performance computing technology and ongoing helioseismic investigations of the dynamics of the solar interior have motivated us to develop more sophisticated numerical models of global-scale solar convection. Here we report three-dimensional simulations of compressible, penetrative convection in rotating spherical shells in both laminar and turbulent parameter regimes. The convective structure in the laminar case is dominated by ``banana cells,'' but the turbulent case is much more complex, with an intricate, rapidly evolving downflow network in the upper convection zone and an intermittent, plume-dominated structure in the lower convection zone and overshoot region. Convective patterns generally propagate prograde at low latitudes and retrograde at high latitudes relative to the local rotation. The differential rotation profiles show some similarity with helioseismic determinations of the solar rotation but still exhibit significantly more cylindrical alignment. Strong, intermittent, vortical downflow lanes and plumes play an important dynamical role in turbulent flow regimes and are responsible for significant differences relative to laminar flows with regard to momentum and energy transport and to the structure of the overshoot region at the base of the convection zone.

  20. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) plume and plume effects study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to characterize the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) propulsion and attitude control system engine exhaust plumes and predict the resultant plume impingement pressure, heat loads, forces, and moments. Detailed description is provided of the OMV gaseous nitrogen (GN2) thruster exhaust plume flow field characteristics calculated with the RAMP2 snd SFPGEN computer codes. Brief descriptions are included of the two models, GN2 thruster characteristics and RAMP2 input data files. The RAMP2 flow field could be recalculated by other organizations using the information presented. The GN2 flow field can be readily used by other organizations who are interested in GN2 plume induced environments which require local flow field properties which can be supplied using the SFPGEN GN2 model.

  1. Investigation of a Laminar Flow Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny

    1994-01-01

    The recent resurgence of interest in utilizing laminar flow on aircraft surfaces for reduction in skin friction drag has generated a considerable amount of research in natural laminar flow (NLF) and hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) on transonic aircraft wings. This research has focused primarily on airfoil design and understanding transition behavior with little concern for the surface imperfections and manufacturing variations inherent to most production aircraft. In order for laminar flow to find wide-spread use on production aircraft, techniques for constructing the wings must be found such that the large surface imperfections present in the leading edge region of current aircraft do not occur. Toward this end, a modification to existing leading edge construction techniques was devised such that the resulting surface did not contain large gaps and steps as are common on current production aircraft of this class. A lowspeed experiment was first conducted on a simulation of the surface that would result from this construction technique. Preston tube measurements of the boundary layer downstream of the simulated joint and flow visualization using sublimation chemicals validated the literature on the effects of steps on a laminar boundary layer. These results also indicated that the construction technique was indeed compatible with laminar flow. In order to fully validate the compatibility of this construction technique with laminar flow, thus proving that it is possible to build wings that are smooth enough to be used on business jets and light transports in a manner compatible with laminar flow, a flight experiment is being conducted. In this experiment Mach number and Reynolds number will be matched in a real flight environment. The experiment is being conducted using the NASA Dryden F-104 Flight Test Fixture (FTF). The FTF is a low aspect ratio ventral fin mounted beneath an F-104G research aircraft. A new nose shape was designed and constructed for this

  2. The Saturn hydrogen plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemansky, D. E.; Liu, X.; Melin, H.

    2009-12-01

    Images of the Saturn atmosphere and magnetosphere in H Lyα emission during the Cassini spacecraft pre and post Saturn orbit insertion (SOI) event obtained using the UVIS experiment FUV spectrograph have revealed definitive evidence for the escape of H I atoms from the top of the thermosphere. An image at 0.1×0.1 Saturn equatorial radii ( RS) pixel resolution with an edge-on-view of the rings shows a distinctive structure (plume) with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.56RS at the exobase sub-solar limb at ˜-13.5∘ latitude as part of the distributed outflow of H I from the sunlit hemisphere, with a counterpart on the antisolar side peaking near the equator above the exobase limb. The structure of the image indicates that part of the outflowing population is sub-orbital and re-enters the thermosphere in an approximate 5 h time scale. An evident larger more broadly distributed component fills the magnetosphere to beyond 45RS in the orbital plane in an asymmetric distribution in local time, similar to an image obtained at Voyager 1 post encounter in a different observational geometry. It has been found that H2 singlet ungerade Rydberg EUV/FUV emission spectra collected with the H Lyα into the image mosaic show a distinctive resonance property correlated with the H Lyα plume. The inferred approximate globally averaged energy deposition at the top of the thermosphere from the production of the hot atomic hydrogen accounts for the measured atmospheric temperature. The only known process capable of producing the atoms at the required few eV/atom kinetic energy appears to be the direct electron excitation of non-LTE H2XΣg+1( v:J) into the repulsive H2bΣu+3, although details of the processes need to be examined under the constraints imposed by the observations to determine compatibility with the current knowledge of hydrogen rate processes.

  3. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  4. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  5. The thermal and mechanical structure of a two-dimensional plume in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yinting, Li; Meissner, R. O.; En, Xue

    1983-10-01

    On the condition that the distribution of velocity and temperature at the mid-plane of a mantle plume has been obtained (pages 213-218, this issue), the problem of determining the lateral structure of the plume at a given depth is reduced to solving an eigenvalue problem of a set of ordinary differential equations with five unknown functions, with an eigenvalue being related to the thermal thickness of the plume at this depth. The lateral profiles of upward velocity, temperature and viscosity in the plume and the thickness of the plume at various depths are calculated for two sets of Newtonian rheological parameters. The calculations show that the precondition for the existence of the plume, δT/ L ≪ 1 ( L = the height of the plume, δT = lateral distance from the mid-plane), can be satisfied, except for the starting region of the plume or near the base of the lithosphere. At the lateral distance, δT, the upward velocity decreases to 0.1 - 50% of its maximum value at different depths. It is believed that this model may provide an approach for a quantitative description of the detailed structure of a mantle plume.

  6. Plume and plate controlled hotspot trails in the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John; Jokat, Wilfried; le Roex, Anton; Class, Cornelia; Wijbrans, Jan; Keßling, Stefanie; Kuiper, Klaudia; Nebel, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    Discovering if hotspots observed on the Earth's surface are explained by underlying plumes rising from the deep mantle or by shallow plate-driven processes continues to be an essential goal in Earth Science. Key evidence underpinning the mantle plume concept is the existence of age-progressive volcanic trails recording past plate motion relative to surface hotspots and their causal plumes. Using the icebreaker RV Polarstern, we sampled scattered hotspot trails on the 2,000 km-wide southeast Atlantic hotspot swell, which projects down to one of the Earth's two largest and deepest regions of slower-than-average seismic wave speed - the Africa Low Shear Wave Velocity Province - caused by a massive thermo-chemical 'pile' on the core-mantle boundary. We showed recently using Ar/Ar isotopic ages - and crustal structure and seafloor ages - that these hotspot trails are age progressive and formed synchronously across the swell, consistent with African plate motion over plumes rising from the stable edge of a Low Shear Wave Velocity Province (LLSVP) (O'Connor et al., 2012). We showed furthermore that hotspot trails formed initially only at spreading boundaries at the outer edges of the swell until roughly 44 million years ago, when they started forming across the swell, far from spreading boundaries in lithosphere that was sufficiently weak (young) for plume melts to reach the surface. We concluded that if plume melts formed synchronous age progressive hotspot trails whenever they could penetrate the lithosphere, then hotspot trails in the South Atlantic are controlled by the interplay between deep plumes and the shallow motion and structure of the African plate. If the distribution of hotspot trails reflects where plume melts could or could not penetrate the continental or oceanic lithosphere then plumes could have been active for significantly longer than indicated by their volcanic chains. This provides a mechanism for extended late stage interplay between deep mantle

  7. Electrical Charging of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Wilson, L.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.; Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Martin, R. S.

    2008-06-01

    Many explosive terrestrial volcanic eruptions are accompanied by lightning and other atmospheric electrical phenomena. The plumes produced generate large perturbations in the surface atmospheric electric potential gradient and high charge densities have been measured on falling volcanic ash particles. The complex nature of volcanic plumes (which contain gases, solid particles, and liquid drops) provides several possible charging mechanisms. For plumes rich in solid silicate particles, fractoemission (the ejection of ions and atomic particles during fracture events) is probably the dominant source of charge generation. In other plumes, such as those created when lava enters the sea, different mechanisms, such as boiling, may be important. Further charging mechanisms may also subsequently operate, downwind of the vent. Other solar system bodies also show evidence for volcanism, with activity ongoing on Io. Consequently, volcanic electrification under different planetary scenarios (on Venus, Mars, Io, Moon, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Triton) is also discussed.

  8. Electrical Charging of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Wilson, L.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.; Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Martin, R. S.

    Many explosive terrestrial volcanic eruptions are accompanied by lightning and other atmospheric electrical phenomena. The plumes produced generate large perturbations in the surface atmospheric electric potential gradient and high charge densities have been measured on falling volcanic ash particles. The complex nature of volcanic plumes (which contain gases, solid particles, and liquid drops) provides several possible charging mechanisms. For plumes rich in solid silicate particles, fractoemission (the ejection of ions and atomic particles during fracture events) is probably the dominant source of charge generation. In other plumes, such as those created when lava enters the sea, different mechanisms, such as boiling, may be important. Further charging mechanisms may also subsequently operate, downwind of the vent. Other solar system bodies also show evidence for volcanism, with activity ongoing on Io. Consequently, volcanic electrification under different planetary scenarios (on Venus, Mars, Io, Moon, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Triton) is also discussed.

  9. Collapsing plumes and resurrecting fountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton; Hunt, Gary

    2012-11-01

    We explore the range of behaviour predicted for steady plumes and fountains that undergo an increase or decrease in buoyancy which arise due to phase changes or chemical reactions. We model these changes in the simplest possible way by assuming a quadratic relationship between the density and the temperature of the fluid. We thereby extend the model of Caulfield & Woods (`95) to include the most recent developments in the literature on steady releases of buoyancy emitted vertically from horizontal area sources in unconfined quiescent environments of uniform density based on the plume model of Morton, Taylor & Turner (`56). We provide closed-form solutions and identify four classes of solution: collapsing plumes, resurrecting fountains, plumes with enhanced buoyancy and fountains with enhanced negative buoyancy. We provide criteria for each category of behaviour in terms of the source-value of two non-dimensional quantities: the Richardson number and a temperature parameter.

  10. Instabilities of plumes driven by localized heating in a stably stratified ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Francisco; Lopez, Juan

    2014-11-01

    Plumes due to localized buoyancy sources are of wide interest due to their prevalence in many geophysical situations. This study investigates the transition from laminar to turbulent dynamics. Several experiments have reported that this transition is sensitive to external perturbations. As such, a well-controlled set-up has been chosen for our numerical study, consisting of a localized heat source at the bottom of an enclosed cylinder whose sidewall is maintained at a fixed temperature which varies linearly up the wall, and there is a localized heat source on the bottom. Restrincting the dynamics to the axisymmetric subspace, the first instability is to a puffing state. However, for smaller Grashof numbers, the plume becomes unstable to 3D perturbations and a swirling plume spontaneously appear. Further bifurcations observed in the rotating frame where the plume is stationary also exibits puffing, suggesting a connection between the unstable axisymmetric solution and the swirling plume. Further bifurcations result in quasiperiodic states with a very low frequency modulation, that eventually become turbulent. Spanish Ministry of Education and Science Grant (with FEDER funds) FIS2013-40880 and U.S. National Science Foundation Grant CBET-1336410

  11. Smoke plumes: Emissions and effects

    Treesearch

    Susan O' Neill; Shawn Urbanski; Scott Goodrick; Sim Larkin

    2017-01-01

    Smoke can manifest itself as a towering plume rising against the clear blue sky-or as a vast swath of thick haze, with fingers that settle into valleys overnight. It comes in many forms and colors, from fluffy and white to thick and black. Smoke plumes can rise high into the atmosphere and travel great distances across oceans and continents. Or smoke can remain close...

  12. CFD analysis of laminar oscillating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Booten, C. W. Charles W.); Konecni, S.; Smith, B. L.; Martin, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical simulations of oscillating flow in a constricted duct and compares the results with experimental and theoretical data. The numerical simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX4.2. The numerical model simulates an experimental oscillating flow facility that was designed to test the properties and characteristics of oscillating flow in tapered ducts, also known as jet pumps. Jet pumps are useful devices in thermoacoustic machinery because they produce a secondary pressure that can counteract an unwanted effect called streaming, and significantly enhance engine efficiency. The simulations revealed that CFX could accurately model velocity, shear stress and pressure variations in laminar oscillating flow. The numerical results were compared to experimental data and theoretical predictions with varying success. The least accurate numerical results were obtained when laminar flow approached transition to turbulent flow.

  13. Insect contamination protection for laminar flow surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croom, Cynthia C.; Holmes, Bruce J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of modern aircraft surfaces to achieve laminar flow was well-accepted in recent years. Obtaining the maximum benefit of laminar flow for aircraft drag reduction requires maintaining minimum leading-edge contamination. Previously proposed insect contamination prevention methods have proved impractical due to cost, weight, or inconvenience. Past work has shown that insects will not adhere to water-wetted surfaces, but the large volumes of water required for protection rendered such a system impractical. The results of a flight experiment conducted by NASA to evaluate the performance of a porous leading-edge fluid discharge ice protection system operated as an insect contamination protections system are presented. In addition, these flights explored the environmental and atmospheric conditions most suitable for insect accumulation.

  14. Coupling of wrinkled laminar flames with gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedat, Benoit; Kostiuk, Larry W.; Cheng, Robert K.

    1995-01-01

    The overall objective of our research is to understand flame-gravity coupling processes in laminar and low turbulent Reynolds number, Re(sub l), premixed flames (i.e. wrinkled- laminar flames). The approach we have developed is to compare the flowfields and mean flame properties under different gravitational orientations. Key to our study is the investigation of microgravity (mu g) flames. These mu g experiments provide vital information to reconcile the differences between flames in normal gravity (+g, flame pointing upward) and reverse gravity (-g, flame pointing downwards). Traditionally, gravity effects are assumed to be insignificant or circumvented in the laboratory, therefore, not much is available in the literature on the behavior of -g flames.

  15. Evaluation of laminar flow microbiological safety cabinets.

    PubMed

    Staat, R H; Beakley, J W

    1968-10-01

    The microbiological control efficiency of two class 100 laminar down-flow hoods was determined by using aerosols of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores. The first unit challenged utilized a slanted eyelid to partially enclose the front work opening. This hood showed nearly perfect control of ambient organisms in the work area. It also gave a 10(6) or greater drop in the number of organisms passing out of the exhaust system. However, when the interior work area of the hood was challenged, significant numbers of spores penetrated the air barrier and escaped into the ambient air. A redesigned laminar flow hood was built incorporating a vertical eyelid and a reduced opening to the work area. This hood showed the same excellent characteristics for controlling ambient contamination. Exhaust system leakage was also extremely low. Air barrier efficiency for the newer hood was increased with lower amounts of spore penetration into the ambient air.

  16. Laminar Flow in the Ocean Ekman Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J. T. H.

    INTRODUCTION THE EFFECT OF A STABLE DENSITY GRADIENT THE FATAL FLAW FLOW VISUALIZATION THE DISCOVERY OF LAMINAR FLOW FINE STRUCTURE WAVE-INDUCED SHEAR INSTABILITY BILLOW TURBULENCE REVERSE TRANSITION REVISED PARADIGM ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODELLING OF THE UPPER OCEAN DIURNAL VARIATION BUOYANT CONVECTION BILLOW TURBULENCE IN THE DIURNAL THERMOCLINE CONSEQUENCES FOR THE EKMAN CURRENT PROFILE SOLAR RADIATION APPLICATIONS Slippery Seas of Acapulco Pollution Afternoon Effect in Sonar Patchiness Fisheries Climate DISCUSSION CONCLUSION REFERENCES

  17. Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinders, Mark; Dickinson, Larry

    1997-01-01

    A Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) composite is defined as composite laminate with up to five percent volume of fibrous reinforcement oriented in a 'trans-laminar' fashion in the through-thickness direction. The TLR can be continuous threads as in 'stitched laminates', or it can be discontinuous rods or pins as in 'Z-Fiber(TM) materials. It has been repeatedly documented in the literature that adding TLR to an otherwise two dimensional laminate results in the following advantages: substantially improved compression-after-impact response; considerably increased fracture toughness in mode 1 (double cantilever beam) and mode 2 (end notch flexure); and severely restricted size and growth of impact damage and edge delamination. TLR has also been used to eliminate catastrophic stiffener disbonding in stiffened structures. TLR directly supports the 'Achilles heel' of laminated composites, that is delamination. As little as one percent volume of TLR significantly alters the mechanical response of laminates. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of TLR on the in-plane and inter-laminar mechanical response of undamaged composite laminates. Detailed finite element models of 'unit cells', or representative volumes, were used to study the effects of adding TLR on the elastic constants; the in-plane strength; and the initiation of delamination. Parameters investigated included TLR material, TLR volume fraction, TLR diameter, TLR through-thickness angle, ply stacking sequence, and the microstructural features of pure resin regions and curved in-plane fibers. The work was limited to the linear response of undamaged material with at least one ply interface. An inter-laminar dominated problem of practical interest, a flanged skin in bending, was also modeled.

  18. Exponential DNA Replication by Laminar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter; Goddard, Noel L.; Libchaber, Albert

    2003-10-01

    It is shown that laminar thermal convection can drive a chain reaction of DNA replication. The convection is triggered by a constant horizontal temperature gradient, moving molecules along stationary paths between hot and cold regions. This implements the temperature cycling for the classical polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplification is shown to be exponential and reaches 100 000-fold gains within 25min. Besides direct applications, the mechanism might have implications for the molecular evolution of life.

  19. Laminar streak enhancement using streamwise grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Carlos; Martín, Juan Ángel

    2011-11-01

    Laminar streak promotion in a flat plate boundary layer results in an increase of the stability of the Tollmien-Schlichting waves with respect to that of the 2D Blasius profile. This stabilization delays the laminar-turbulent transition, increasing the laminar phase of the flow. The stabilization effect is stronger for higher streak amplitudes, and therefore simple ways of generating high amplitude stable streaks are sought to be used as boundary layer flow control methods. In a recent experiment [Tallamelli & Franson,AIAA 2010-4291] high amplitude stable steady streaks have been produced using Miniature Vortex Generators (MGVs), where one array of MGVs is used to excite the streak and a second array is used downstream to enhance their amplitude. In this presentation we numerically explore the possibility of enhancing the streaks using a different passive mechanism: streamwise grooves carved in the plate. We will present some numerical simulations for different values of the spanwise period of the streaks and of the grooves, and we will show the combinations that provide maximum streak amplitude.

  20. The Starting Early Starting Smart Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey Family Programs, Seattle, WA.

    Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) is an early childhood public/private initiative designed to identify new, empirical knowledge about the effectiveness of integrating substance abuse prevention, addictions treatment, and mental health services with primary health care and childcare service settings (e.g., Head Start, day care, preschool) to…

  1. Temperature fluctuation of the Iceland mantle plume through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spice, Holly E.; Fitton, J. Godfrey; Kirstein, Linda A.

    2016-02-01

    The newly developed Al-in-olivine geothermometer was used to find the olivine-Cr-spinel crystallization temperatures of a suite of picrites spanning the spatial and temporal extent of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), which is widely considered to be the result of a deep-seated mantle plume. Our data confirm that start-up plumes are associated with a pulse of anomalously hot mantle over a large spatial area before becoming focused into a narrow upwelling. We find that the thermal anomaly on both sides of the province at Baffin Island/West Greenland and the British Isles at ˜61 Ma across an area ˜2000 km in diameter was uniform, with Al-in-olivine temperatures up to ˜300°C above that of average mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) primitive magma. Furthermore, by combining our results with geochemical data and existing geophysical and bathymetric observations, we present compelling evidence for long-term (>107 year) fluctuations in the temperature of the Iceland mantle plume. We show that the plume temperature fell from its initial high value during the start-up phase to a minimum at about 35 Ma, and that the mantle temperature beneath Iceland is currently increasing.

  2. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).

    The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.

    North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page

  3. Trans-laminar-reinforced (TLR) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Larry Charles

    1997-11-01

    A Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) composite is defined as composite laminate with up to five percent volume of fibrous reinforcement oriented in a "trans-laminar" fashion in the through-thickness direction. The TLR can be continuous threads as in "stitched laminates", or it can be discontinuous rods or pins as in "Z-FiberspTM" materials. Adding TLR to an otherwise two dimensional laminate results in the following advantages: substantially improved compression-after-impact response; considerably increased fracture toughness in mode I (double cantilever beam) and mode II (end notch flexure); and severely restricted size and growth of impact damage and edge delamination. TLR has also been used to eliminate catastrophic stiffener disbonding in stiffened structures. As little as one percent volume of TLR significantly alters the mechanical response of laminates. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of TLR on the in-plane and inter-laminar mechanical response of undamaged composite laminates. Detailed finite element models were made of "unit cells," or representative volumes, and an inter-laminar dominated problem of practical interest. The work was limited to the linear response of undamaged material with at least one ply interface. Adding a few percent TLR had a small negative effect on the in-plane extensional and shear moduli, Esbx, Esby and Gsbxy, but had a large positive effect (up to 60 percent) on the thickness direction extensional modulus, Esbz. The out-of-plane shear moduli, Gsbxz and Gsbyz, were significantly affected only with the use of a TLR with a shear modulus an order of magnitude greater than that of the composite lamina. A simple stiffness averaging method for calculating the elastic constants was found to compare closely with the finite element results, with the greatest difference being found in the inter-laminar shear moduli, Gsbxz and Gsbyz. Delamination initiation was studied with a strength of materials approach in the unit

  4. A plume beneath western Ethiopia!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keranen, K. M.; Hariharan, A.; Alemayehu, S.; Ayele, A.; Bastow, I. D.

    2016-12-01

    Body-wave tomography, receiver functions, and measurements of seismic anisotropy reveal a profound impact of magmatic systems on the crust and upper mantle beneath the Ethiopian highlands. Finite-frequency tomography (using the method of Schmandt et al., 2010) reveals a low-velocity conduit-like structure in the upper mantle beneath the Ethiopian highlands. We interpret the anomaly as a probable plume stem and the likely source of the Ethiopian flood basalts. This "plume" is located 300-km west of the actively-extending Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and 700-km southwest of the suggested Afar plume. Within the lithosphere, the anomaly separates into multiple fingers, rising beneath previously enigmatic regions of off-rift Quaternary faulting and volcanism far west of the MER. One finger underlies the Lake Tana graben, within the highlands 400-km from the rift, and another finger rises beneath a lineament of faulting and volcanism known as the Yerer-Tullu Wellel lineament (YTVL). The YTVL runs along the southern edge of the Ethiopian highlands, between the interpreted plume source and the MER. We suggest that the Quaternary volcanism in the YTVL and the Tana regions is related to melt associated with these lithospheric velocity anomalies. At shallower depths, receiver function estimates indicate a concentrated zone of 40-45 km thick crust near the Lake Tana anomaly, thicker than the 30-35 km thick crust elsewhere beneath the Ethiopian Plateau. This crustal thickening, likely from magmatic underplating, and the recent Quaternary volcanism occur within the projected borders of a northwest-southeast trending Mesozoic Blue Nile rift system, suggesting control on magmatic ascent above the plume by the existing rift structure. The MER itself may have been influenced by both the plume beneath the Ethiopian highlands, and by a similar plume stem beneath Afar.

  5. Plumes, orogenesis, and supercontinental fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalziel, I. W. D.; Lawver, L. A.; Murphy, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    A time-space relationship between large igneous provinces (LIPS), present day hot spots, and the fragmentation of Pangea has been documented over several decades, but the cause of fragmentation has remained elusive. LIPS are regarded either as the result of impingement of a mantle plume on the base of the lithosphere, or as the initial products of adiabatic decompression melting of anomalously hot mantle. Do LIPS therefore constitute evidence of an active role for plumes from the deep mantle in supercontinental fragmentation, or are they merely the first indications of a large-scale but near-surface tectonic process? Two long recognized and enigmatic orogenic events may offer a solution to this geologically important 'chicken or egg' conundrum. The reconstructed early Mesozoic Gondwanide fold belt of South America, southern Africa, and Antarctica, could have resulted from 'plume-modified orogeny', flattening of a downgoing lithospheric slab due to the buoyancy of a plume rising beneath a continental margin subduction zone. If so, the ˜180 Ma Karroo and Ferrar LIPS associated with the opening of the ocean basin between East and West Gondwanaland at ˜165 Ma resulted from impingement of this plume and are unrelated to the thermal insulation of the shallow mantle beneath Gondwanaland. It would then follow that the plume itself played an active, possibly critical, role in the initial breakup of the supercontinent. The Late Paleozoic 'Ancestral Rockies' deformation in the southwestern United States could be yet another example of orogeny driven by a plume that initiated the break-up of Pangea approximately 15 Myr earlier in the Central Atlantic region.

  6. Computer program for calculating laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers for a compressible axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Gregg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A finite-difference program is described for calculating the viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. The flow may be initially laminar and progress through a transitional zone to fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on the imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of the momentum and energy equations. The flow may also be forced into a turbulent flow at a chosen spot by the data input. The input may contain the factors of arbitrary Reynolds number, free-stream Mach number, free-stream turbulence, wall heating or cooling, longitudinal wall curvature, wall suction or blowing, and wall roughness. The solution may start from an initial Falkner-Skan similarity profile, an approximate equilibrium turbulent profile, or an initial arbitrary input profile.

  7. Stationary Plasma Thruster Plume Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Manzella, David H.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary Plasma Thrusters (SPT's) are being investigated for application to a variety of near-term missions. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the thruster plume characteristics which are needed to assess spacecraft integration requirements. Langmuir probes, planar probes, Faraday cups, and a retarding potential analyzer were used to measure plume properties. For the design operating voltage of 300 V the centerline electron density was found to decrease from approximately 1.8 x 10 exp 17 cubic meters at a distance of 0.3 m to 1.8 X 10 exp 14 cubic meters at a distance of 4 m from the thruster. The electron temperature over the same region was between 1.7 and 3.5 eV. Ion current density measurements showed that the plume was sharply peaked, dropping by a factor of 2.6 within 22 degrees of centerline. The ion energy 4 m from the thruster and 15 degrees off-centerline was approximately 270 V. The thruster cathode flow rate and facility pressure were found to strongly affect the plume properties. In addition to the plume measurements, the data from the various probe types were used to assess the impact of probe design criteria

  8. Bromine oxidation in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowski, N.; Vogel, L.; Kern, C.; Giuffrida, G. B.; Delgado-Granados, H.; Platt, U.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes are very strong sources of hydrogen, carbon, sulphur and halogen compounds, as well as of particles. Some gases only behave as passive tracers; others interact and affect the formation, growth or chemical characteristics of aerosol particles in a complex system. Recent measurements of halogen radicals in volcanic plumes showed that volcanic plumes are chemically very active. Kinetic considerations (Oppenheimer et al., 2006) and detailed calculations with an atmospheric chemistry model (Bobrowski et al., 2007) explain the halogen chemistry mainly with photochemical reactions involving both, the gas and particle phase. They reproduce the measured gas-phase concentrations quite well. However, temporal evolution of BrO in the early plume is not well described in the models. The understanding of chemical kinetics of BrO formation is still not complete. Recent measurement results (Vogel et al., 2008) do not fit with initial model calculation. The new data lead to the suggestion that the BrO formation could be much faster during the first few minutes after emission than initially suggested. Old and recent data sets will be confronted, compared and possible causes of their differences discussed. The measurements considered were taken at Mt. Etna (Italy), Villarica (Chile), and Popocatépetl (Mexico) volcanoes. Additionally, at Mt Etna the emission consists of up to four individual plumes from four summit craters. The differences between the individual plumes have been investigated during the last years and will be presented.

  9. Capture of the Canary mantle plume material by the Gibraltar arc mantle wedge during slab rollback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mériaux, C. A.; Duarte, J. C.; Duarte, S. S.; Schellart, W. P.; Chen, Z.; Rosas, F.; Mata, J.; Terrinha, P.

    2015-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a portion of the Canary plume travelled northeastwards below the lithosphere of the Atlas Mountains in North Africa towards the Alboran domain and was captured ˜10 Ma ago by the Gibraltar subduction system in the Western Mediterranean. The capture would have been associated with the mantle return flow induced by the westward-retreating slab that would have dragged and trapped a portion of the plume material in the mantle wedge of the Gibraltar subduction zone. Such material eventually contaminated the subduction related volcanism in the Alboran region. In this work, we use scaled analogue models of slab-plume interaction to investigate the plausibility of the plume capture. An upper-mantle-scaled model combines a narrow (400 km) edge-fixed subduction plate with a laterally offset compositional plume. The subduction dominated by slab rollback and toroidal mantle flow is seen to increasingly impact on the plume dynamics as the area of influence of the toroidal flow cells at the surface is up to 500 × 1350 km2. While the plume head initially spreads axisymmetrically, it starts being distorted parallel to the plate in the direction of the trench as the slab trench approaches the plume edge at a separation distance of about 500 km, before getting dragged towards mantle wedge. When applied to the Canary plume-Gibraltar subduction system, our model supports the observationally based conceptual model that mantle plume material may have been dragged towards the mantle wedge by slab rollback-induced toroidal mantle flow. Using a scaling argument for the spreading of a gravity current within a channel, we also show that more than 1500 km of plume propagation in the sublithospheric Atlas corridor is dynamically plausible.

  10. High-altitude plume computer code development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audeh, B. J.; Murphy, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The flowfield codes that have been developed to predict rocket motor plumes at high altitude were used to predict plume properties for the RCS motor which show reasonable agreement with experimental data. A systematic technique was established for the calculation of high altitude plumes. The communication of data between the computer codes was standardized. It is recommended that these outlined procedures be more completed, documented and updated as the plume methodology is applied to the varied problems of plume flow and plume impingement encountered by space station design and operation.

  11. Flame Structure and Scalar Properties in Microgravity Laminar Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feikema, D. A.; Lim, J.; Sivathanu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Recent results from microgravity combustion experiments conducted in the Zero Gravity Facility (ZGF) 5.18 second drop tower are reported. Emission mid-infrared spectroscopy measurements have been completed to quantitatively determine the flame temperature, water and carbon dioxide vapor concentrations, radiative emissive power, and soot concentrations in a microgravity laminar ethylene/air flame. The ethylene/air laminar flame conditions are similar to previously reported experiments including the Flight Project, Laminar Soot Processes (LSP). Soot concentrations and gas temperatures are in reasonable agreement with similar results available in the literature. However, soot concentrations and flame structure dramatically change in long duration microgravity laminar diffusion flames as demonstrated in this paper.

  12. Plume base flow simulation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B. B.; Wallace, R. O.; Sims, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A combined analytical/empirical approach was studied in an effort to define the plume simulation parameters for base flow. For design purposes, rocket exhaust simulation (i.e., plume simulation) is determined by wind tunnel testing. Cold gas testing was concluded to be a cost and schedule effective data base of substantial scope. The results fell short of the target, although work conducted was conclusive and advanced the state of the art. Comparisons of wind tunnel predictions with Space Transportation System (STS) flight data showed considerable differences. However, a review of the technology program data base has yielded an additional parameter that may correlate flight and cold gas test data. Data from the plume technology program and the NASA test flights are presented to substantiate the proposed simulation parameters.

  13. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology

  14. Simulation of Europa's water plume .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, A.; Cremonese, G.; Schneider, N. M.; Plainaki, C.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Zusi, M.; Palumbo, P.

    Plumes on Europa would be extremely interesting science and mission targets, particularly due to the unique opportunity to obtain direct information on the subsurface composition, thereby addressing Europa's potential habitability. The existence of water plume on the Jupiter's moon Europa has been long speculated until the recent discover. HST imaged surpluses of hydrogen Lyman alpha and oxygen emissions above the southern hemisphere in December 2012 that are consistent with two 200 km high plumes of water vapor (Roth et al. 2013). In previous works ballistic cryovolcanism has been considered and modeled as a possible mechanism for the formation of low-albedo features on Europa's surface (Fagents et al. 2000). Our simulation agrees with the model of Fagents et al. (2000) and consists of icy particles that follow ballistic trajectories. The goal of such an analysis is to define the height, the distribution and the extension of the icy particles falling on the moon's surface as well as the thickness of the deposited layer. We expect to observe high albedo regions in contrast with the background albedo of Europa surface since we consider that material falling after a cryovolcanic plume consists of snow. In order to understand if this phenomenon is detectable we convert the particles deposit in a pixel image of albedo data. We consider also the limb view of the plume because, even if this detection requires optimal viewing geometry, it is easier detectable in principle against sky. Furthermore, we are studying the loss rates due to impact electron dissociation and ionization to understand how these reactions decrease the intensity of the phenomenon. We expect to obtain constraints on imaging requirements necessary to detect potential plumes that could be useful for ESA's JUICE mission, and in particular for the JANUS camera (Palumbo et al. 2014).

  15. Mobile Bay turbidity plume study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozier, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory and field transmissometer studies on the effect of suspended particulate material upon the appearance of water are reported. Quantitative correlations were developed between remotely sensed image density, optical sea truth data, and actual sediment load. Evaluation of satellite image sea truth data for an offshore plume projects contours of transmissivity for two different tidal phases. Data clearly demonstrate the speed of change and movement of the optical plume for water patterns associated with the mouth of Mobile bay in which relatively clear Gulf of Mexico water enters the bay on the eastern side. Data show that wind stress in excess of 15 knots has a marked impact in producing suspended sediment loads.

  16. Research in Natural Laminar Flow and Laminar-Flow Control, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, Jerry N. (Compiler); Sabo, Frances E. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Part 2 of the Symposium proceedings includes papers addressing various topics in basic wind tunnel research/techniques and computational transitional research. Specific topics include: advanced measurement techniques; laminar flow control; Tollmien-Schlichting wave characteristics; boundary layer transition; flow visualization; wind tunnel tests; flight tests; boundary layer equations; swept wings; and skin friction.

  17. Distributed Apertures in Laminar Flow Laser Turrets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    STANDARDS lq63 A LEYE &i 00 NPS 67-81-014 A--q NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 00 oMonterey, California THESIS Distributed Apertures in Laminar Flow Laser...diameter, m DA individual aperture diameter in the array, m F array factor h altitude, km H scale height, km I irradiance on the target, watts m- 2 Io ...and the argument of J, are con. red. This yields Iii at that point; I is stored ,, -:ray. Those grid points within "the Bucket" contriZv,.t io the

  18. Laminar natural convection under nonuniform gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J.; Eichhorn, R.; Dhir, V.

    1972-01-01

    Laminar natural convection is analyzed for cases in which gravity varies with the distance from the leading edge of an isothermal plate. The study includes situations in which gravity varies by virtue of the varying slope of a surface. A general integral solution method which includes certain known integral solutions as special cases is developed to account for arbitrary position-dependence of gravity. A series method of solution is also developed for the full equations. Although it is more cumbersome it provides verification of the integral method.

  19. Design Considerations for Laminar Flow Control Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.; Bennett, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate major design considerations involved in the application of laminar flow control to the wings and empennage of long range subsonic transport aircraft compatible with initial operation in 1985. For commercial transports with a design mission range of 10,186 km (5500 n mil) and a payload of 200 passengers, parametric configuration analyses were conducted to evaluate the effect of aircraft performance, operational, and geometric parameters on fuel efficiency. Study results indicate that major design goals for aircraft optimization include maximization of aspect ratio and wing loading and minimization of wing sweep consistent with wing volume and airport performance requirements.

  20. Large eddy simulations of laminar separation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieux, Francois

    The flow over blades and airfoils at moderate angles of attack and Reynolds numbers ranging from ten thousand to a few hundred thousands undergoes separation due to the adverse pressure gradient generated by surface curvature. In many cases, the separated shear layer then transitions to turbulence and reattaches, closing off a recirculation region -- the laminar separation bubble. To avoid body-fitted mesh generation problems and numerical issues, an equivalent problem for flow over a flat plate is formulated by imposing boundary conditions that lead to a pressure distribution and Reynolds number that are similar to those on airfoils. Spalart & Strelet (2000) tested a number of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models for a laminar separation bubble flow over a flat plate. Although results with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model were encouraging, none of the turbulence models tested reliably recovered time-averaged direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. The purpose of this work is to assess whether large eddy simulation (LES) can more accurately and reliably recover DNS results using drastically reduced resolution -- on the order of 1% of DNS resolution which is commonly achievable for LES of turbulent channel flows. LES of a laminar separation bubble flow over a flat plate are performed using a compressible sixth-order finite-difference code and two incompressible pseudo-spectral Navier-Stokes solvers at resolutions corresponding to approximately 3% and 1% of the chosen DNS benchmark by Spalart & Strelet (2000). The finite-difference solver is found to be dissipative due to the use of a stability-enhancing filter. Its numerical dissipation is quantified and found to be comparable to the average eddy viscosity of the dynamic Smagorinsky model, making it difficult to separate the effects of filtering versus those of explicit subgrid-scale modeling. The negligible numerical dissipation of the pseudo-spectral solvers allows an unambiguous

  1. Velocity profiles in laminar diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Margle, Janice M.

    1986-01-01

    Velocity profiles in vertical laminar diffusion flames were measured by using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Four fuels were used: n-heptane, iso-octane, cyclohexane, and ethyl alcohol. The velocity profiles were similar for all the fuels, although there were some differences in the peak velocities. The data compared favorably with the theoretical velocity predictions. The differences could be attributed to errors in experimental positioning and in the prediction of temperature profiles. Error in the predicted temperature profiles are probably due to the difficulty in predicting the radiative heat losses from the flame.

  2. Geometries for roughness shapes in laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J. (Inventor); Martin, Glenn L. (Inventor); Domack, Christopher S. (Inventor); Obara, Clifford J. (Inventor); Hassan, Ahmed A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A passive interface mechanism between upper and lower skin structures, and a leading edge structure of a laminar flow airfoil is described. The interface mechanism takes many shapes. All are designed to be different than the sharp orthogonal arrangement prevalent in the prior art. The shapes of the interface structures are generally of two types: steps away from the centerline of the airfoil with a sloping surface directed toward the trailing edge and, the other design has a gap before the sloping surface. By properly shaping the step, the critical step height is increased by more than 50% over the orthogonal edged step.

  3. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  4. An evaluation of modeled plume injection height with satellite-derived observed plume height

    Treesearch

    Sean M. Raffuse; Kenneth J. Craig; Narasimhan K. Larkin; Tara T. Strand; Dana Coe Sullivan; Neil J.M. Wheeler; Robert. Solomon

    2012-01-01

    Plume injection height influences plume transport characteristics, such as range and potential for dilution. We evaluated plume injection height from a predictive wildland fire smoke transport model over the contiguous United States (U.S.) from 2006 to 2008 using satellite-derived information, including plume top heights from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (...

  5. Modified Laminar Flow Biological Safety Cabinet

    PubMed Central

    Mcgarrity, Gerard J.; Coriell, Lewis L.

    1974-01-01

    Tests are reported on a modified laminar flow biological safety cabinet in which the return air plenum that conducts air from the work area to the high efficiency particulate air filters is under negative pressure. Freon gas released inside the cabinet could not be detected outside by a freon gas detection method capable of detecting 10-6 cc/s. When T3 bacteriophage was aerosolized 5 cm outside the front opening in 11 tests, no phage could be detected inside the cabinet with the motor-filter unit in operation. An average of 2.8 × 105 plaque-forming units (PFU)/ft3 (ca. 0.028 m3) were detected with the motor-filter unit not in operation, a penetration of 0.0%. Aerosolization 5 cm inside the cabinet yielded an average of 10 PFU/ft3 outside the cabinet with the motor-filter unit in operation and an average of 4.1 × 105 PFU/ft3 with the motor-filter unit not in operation, a penetration of 0.002%. These values are the same order of effectiveness as the positive-pressure laminar flow biological safety cabinets previously tested. The advantages of the negative-pressure return plenum design include: (i) assurance that if cracks or leaks develop in the plenum it will not lead to discharge of contaminated air into the laboratory; and (ii) the price is lower due to reduced manufacturing costs. Images PMID:4420479

  6. A Series of Laminar Jet Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence, using propane fuel, was taken STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:2/05:30 (approximate). LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel-like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (249KB JPEG, 1350 x 1524 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300185.html.

  7. Series of Laminar Soot Processes Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence was taken July 15, 1997, MET:14/10:34 (approximate) and shows the ignition and extinction of this flame. LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel -- like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (189KB JPEG, 1350 x 1517 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300183.html.

  8. A Series of Laminar Jet Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence, using propane fuel, was taken STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:2/05:30 (approximate). LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel-like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (249KB JPEG, 1350 x 1524 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300185.html.

  9. Series of Laminar Soot Processes Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence was taken July 15, 1997, MET:14/10:34 (approximate) and shows the ignition and extinction of this flame. LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel -- like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (189KB JPEG, 1350 x 1517 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300183.html.

  10. Laminar composite structures for high power actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobosyan, M. A.; Martinez, P. M.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Haines, C. S.; Baughman, R. H.; Martirosyan, K. S.

    2017-05-01

    Twisted laminar composite structures for high power and large-stroke actuators based on coiled Multi Wall Carbon Nanotube (MWNT) composite yarns were crafted by integrating high-density Nanoenergetic Gas Generators (NGGs) into carbon nanotube sheets. The linear actuation force, resulting from the pneumatic force caused by expanding gases confined within the pores of laminar structures and twisted carbon nanotube yarns, can be further amplified by increasing NGG loading and yarns twist density, as well as selecting NGG compositions with high energy density and large-volume gas generation. Moreover, the actuation force and power can be tuned by the surrounding environment, such as to increase the actuation by combustion in ambient air. A single 300-μm-diameter integrated MWNT/NGG coiled yarn produced 0.7 MPa stress and a contractile specific work power of up to 4.7 kW/kg, while combustion front propagated along the yarn at a velocity up to 10 m/s. Such powerful yarn actuators can also be operated in a vacuum, enabling their potential use for deploying heavy loads in outer space, such as to unfold solar panels and solar sails.

  11. Anatomy of mantle plumes: hot heads and cold stems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaille, A. B.; Kumagai, I.; Vatteville, J.; Touitou, F.; Brandeis, G.

    2012-12-01

    Recent petrological studies show evidences for secular cooling in mantle plumes: the source temperature of oceanic plateaus could be 100°C hotter than the source temperature of volcanic island chains (Herzberg and Gazel, Nature, 2009). In terms of mantle plumes, it would mean that the temperature of the plume head is hotter than that of the plume stem. This is at odd with a model where a plume head would entrain so much ambient mantle on its journey towards the Earth's surface that it would end up being considerably colder than its narrow stem. So we revisited the problem using laboratory experiments and new visualization techniques to measure in situ simultaneously the temperature, velocity and composition fields. At time t=0, a hot instability is created by heating a patch of a given radius at constant power or constant temperature. The fluids are mixtures of sugar syrups , with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity, and salt. Rayleigh numbers were varied from 104 to 108, viscosity ratios between 1.8 and 4000, and buoyancy ratios between 0 and 2. After a stage where heat transport is by conduction only, the hot fluid gathers in a sphere and begins to rise, followed by a stem anchored on the hot patch. In all cases, temperatures in the head start with higher values than in the subsequent stem. This is also the case for the thermal instabilities rising from a infinite plate heated uniformly. However, the head also cools faster than the stem as they rise, so that they will eventually have the same temperature if the mantle is deep enough. Moreover, all the material sampled by partial melting in the plume head or stem would be coming from the heated area around the deep source, and very little entrainment from the ambient mantle is predicted. The difference in temperature between head and stem strongly depends on the mantle depth, the viscosity ratio and the buoyancy ratio. Our scaling laws predict that Earth's mantle plumes can indeed have hot heads and colder

  12. Large Smoke Plumes, Alberta Canada

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-12-30

    ...     View Larger Image Devastating wildfires in Alberta Province, Canada, near the city of Fort McMurray began on ... a result of intense thermal heating emanating from surface wildfires. The intense heating drives convection within the smoke plume. At the ...

  13. Smoke Plume Over Eastern Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In late May, a massive smoke plume hundreds of kilometers across blew eastward over New Brunswick toward the Atlantic Ocean. On May 26, 2007, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image at 11:40 a.m. local time. By the time MODIS took this picture, the smoke appeared to have completely detached itself from the source, a large fire burning in southwestern Quebec, beyond the western edge of this image. In this image, the smoke appears as a gray-beige opaque mass with fuzzy, translucent edges. The plume is thickest in the southwest and diminishes toward the northeast. Just southwest of the plume is a red outline indicating a hotspot an area where MODIS detected anomalously warm surface temperatures, such as those resulting from fires. This hotspot, however, is not the source for this smoke plume. According to a bulletin from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the southwestern Quebec fire was the source. According to reports from the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre on May 29, that fire was estimated at 63,211 hectares (156,197 acres), and it was classified as 'being held.' At the same time, more than 20 wildfires burned in Quebec, news sources reported, and firefighters from other Canadian provinces and the United States had been brought in to provide reinforcements for the area's firefighters.

  14. Global volcanic emissions: budgets, plume chemistry and impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past few decades our understanding of global volcanic degassing budgets, plume chemistry and the impacts of volcanic emissions on our atmosphere and environment has been revolutionized. Global volcanic emissions budgets are needed if we are to make effective use of regional and global atmospheric models in order to understand the consequences of volcanic degassing on global environmental evolution. Traditionally volcanic SO2 budgets have been the best constrained but recent efforts have seen improvements in the quantification of the budgets of other environmentally important chemical species such as CO2, the halogens (including Br and I) and trace metals (including measurements relevant to trace metal atmospheric lifetimes and bioavailability). Recent measurements of reactive trace gas species in volcanic plumes have offered intriguing hints at the chemistry occurring in the hot environment at volcanic vents and during electrical discharges in ash-rich volcanic plumes. These reactive trace species have important consequences for gas plume chemistry and impacts, for example, in terms of the global fixed nitrogen budget, volcanically induced ozone destruction and particle fluxes to the atmosphere. Volcanically initiated atmospheric chemistry was likely to have been particularly important before biological (and latterly anthropogenic) processes started to dominate many geochemical cycles, with important consequences in terms of the evolution of the nitrogen cycle and the role of particles in modulating the Earth's climate. There are still many challenges and open questions to be addressed in this fascinating area of science.

  15. Types of thermal plumes in coastal waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, T.; Madding, R.; Scarpace, F.

    1977-01-01

    A large number of thermal images of the surface temperatures of the thermal plumes associated with the once-through cooling of electric power plants show that four kinds of plume occur sufficiently often to be classified as distinct plume types. Each type has implications for both numerical models and measurement strategies.

  16. Chesapeake Bay plume dynamics from LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, J. C., Jr.; Fedosh, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    LANDSAT images with enhancement and density slicing show that the Chesapeake Bay plume usually frequents the Virginia coast south of the Bay mouth. Southwestern (compared to northern) winds spread the plume easterly over a large area. Ebb tide images (compared to flood tide images) show a more dispersed plume. Flooding waters produce high turbidity levels over the shallow northern portion of the Bay mouth.

  17. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  18. Heat sources for mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, C.; Rushmer, T.; Turner, S. P.

    2008-06-01

    Melting anomalies in the Earth's upper mantle have often been attributed to the presence of mantle plumes that may originate in the lower mantle, possibly from the core-mantle boundary. Globally, mantle plumes exhibit a large range in buoyancy flux that is proportional to their temperature and volume. Plumes with higher buoyancy fluxes should have higher temperatures and experience higher degrees of partial melting. This excess heat in mantle plumes could reflect either (1) an enrichment of the heat-producing elements (HPE: U, Th, K) in their mantle source leading to an increase of heat production by radioactive decay, (2) material transport from core to mantle (either advective or diffusive), or (3) conductive heat transport across the core-mantle boundary. The advective/diffusive transport of heat may result in a physical contribution of material from the core to the lower mantle. If core material is incorporated into the lower mantle, mantle plumes with a higher buoyancy flux should have higher core tracers, e.g., increased 186Os, 187Os, and Fe concentrations. Geophysical and dynamic modeling indicate that at least Afar, Easter, Hawaii, Louisville, and Samoa may all originate at the core-mantle boundary. These plumes encompass the whole range of known buoyancy fluxes from 0.9 Mg s-1 (Afar) to 8.7 Mg s-1 (Hawaii), providing evidence that the buoyancy flux is largely independent of other geophysical parameters. In an effort to explore whether the heat-producing elements are the cause of excess heat we looked for correlations between fractionation-corrected concentrations of the HPE and buoyancy flux. Our results suggest that there is no correlation between HPE concentrations and buoyancy flux (with and without an additional correction for variable degrees of partial melting). As anticipated, K, Th, and U are positively correlated with each other (e.g., Hawaii, Iceland, and Galapagos have significantly lower concentrations than, e.g., Tristan da Cunha, the Canary

  19. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance.

  20. Gliding Swifts Attain Laminar Flow over Rough Wings

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1–2% of chord length on the upper surface—10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration—similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  1. Lithospheric response to plume- and plate-tectonic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchkov, V.

    2012-04-01

    Plate movements and deformations of lithosphere are driven mostly by a thermochemical convection in asthenosphere. Contrariwise, plume-tectonic processes result from a larger-scale thermochemical convection in the whole mantle, starting at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and depending on core-mantle interactions. The plate-tectonic processes affect lithosphere as a whole, dividing it into moving and deforming plates, while the plume-tectonic ones are manifested locally or regionally as LIPs (Large Igneous Provinces) and hot spots. Meeting in the lithosphere, these processes interact, resulting in a series of tectonic effects that deserve a special consideration. 1. It was noted (e.g. Sengor, 2001; Li et al., 2008) that destruction of supercontinents is accompanied by growth of a superplume (LIP) activity within continental territories. Meanwhile, there are cases when a superplume activity is not connected with continents and conversely, superplumes on continents do not necessarily lead to their splitting. According to V. Trubitsyn (2000), the break-up of a supercontinent is a result of a "blanketing effect" of heat accumulation under it, inducing a restructuring of a convection pattern. I suggested that superplumes simply add the heat to this effect, supplying the process with an additional energy and making the break-up of a supercontinent more easy. 2. One more example of a joint action of plate and plume processes is a formation of continental passive margins, that belong to two types: volcanic and avolcanic (Jeffroy,2005; Melankholina, 2008, 2011). Such characteristics of the volcanic type as a high volcanic activity, underplating, presence of specific seaward-dipping reflectors, are the result of an interference of a passive rifting with active plume processes after the break-up of a supercontinent. 3. Another example of a co-operation of plume- and plate tectonic mechanics is well known: it is a formation of time-progressive volcanic chains (Morgan,1971

  2. Models of the Enceladus Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Porco, C. C.; Helfenstein, P.; West, R. A.; Cassini ISS Team

    2006-09-01

    The gases in the plumes include H2O, CO2, N2, CH4, and possibly other hydrocarbons, according to the INMS team. The solid particles in the plumes are probably water ice, but the identification is less certain than for the gaseous components. The plumes emanate from warm cracks in the surface near the south pole. The gas has a scale height of 80 km, according to the UVIS team, and the particles have a scale height of 30 km, according to the ISS team. By integrating across the plumes in their images, the ISS team was able to infer the upward flux of particles vs. altitude. Close to the surface, the falloff of density with altitude is much steeper than that of an escaping atmosphere in which both the particles and the gas are moving upward with the thermal velocity of the gas. Thus some of the particles are falling back to the surface and some are escaping. The larger scale height of the gas implies that the escaping fraction is greater for the gas. I will present models that attempt to explain these plume data. The density of the gas and the size of the particles determine the degree of dynamical coupling between gas and particles. There are three models - a sublimating gas that picks up particles as it leaves the surface; sublimating gas that forms particles in flight as the pressure decreases; a boiling liquid that freezes by evaporative cooling as the pressure decreases. Each model has its own range of mass flux, density, particle size, and scale height for both gas and liquid. I will discuss the implications of the observations and models regarding the possibility of liquid water near the surface.

  3. CRTs: electrostatic focusing systems for performing Laminar electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgarian, Artoush H.

    2004-09-01

    Current CRT technology suffers from a reduced bright image response, and a reduced image resolution due to the distribution of beam current densities following a Gaussian rather than a uniform distribution. A uniform distribution of beam current necessary achieved by proper manipulation of CRT's electro-static focusing system. Functional connection has been found between three electrodes of CRT's electro-static focusing systems, which provide "Laminar" electron flow in system. This technology provides unique characteristics that is providing uniformly distributed output current density. Theoretical analysis is given for some current Electro-optical systems through the calculation of trajectories of electrons in the system without taking into account the different starting velocities. This analysis proves the importance of producing the Electro-optical systems with uniform distribution of current density. As the result it has been achieved ideal explicitness of the image and picture compression from 1 (transfer 1:1, for night vision devices) to 50 times (transfer 1:0.02, for electron-optics transmission) and more accompanied by uniform distribution of current density. Usage of this technology allows 10 time's reduction of time resolution and 2500 times increasing of light intensity for a compression of 50x. There is no need in corrective electrode in order to achieve high power brightness. With this technology no gain correction is required.

  4. On the theory of laminar boundary layers involving separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH; Millikan, C

    1934-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical discussion of the laminar boundary layer, which was developed with a view of facilitating the investigation of those boundary layers in particular for which the phenomenon of separation occurs. The treatment starts with a slight modification of the form of the boundary layer equation first published by Von Mises. Two approximate solutions of this equation are found, one of which is exact at the outer edge of the boundary layer while the other is exact at the wall. The final solution is obtained by joining these two solutions at the inflection points of the velocity profiles. The final solution is given in terms of a series of universal functions for a fairly broad class of potential velocity distributions outside of the boundary layer. Detailed calculations of the boundary layer characteristics are worked out for the case in which the potential velocity is a linear function of the distance from the upstream stagnation point. Finally, the complete separation point characteristics are determined for the boundary layer associated with a potential velocity distribution made up of two linear functions of the distance from the stagnation point. It appears that extensions of the detailed calculations to more complex potential flows can be fairly easily carried out by using the explicit formulae given in the paper. (author)

  5. Liquid Booster Module (LBM) plume flowfield model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    A complete definition of the LBM plume is important for many Shuttle design criteria. The exhaust plume shape has a significant effect on the vehicle base pressure. The LBM definition is also important to the Shuttle base heating, aerodynamics and the influence of the exhaust plume on the launch stand and environment. For these reasons a knowledge of the LBM plume characteristics is necessary. A definition of the sea level LBM plume as well as at several points along the Shuttle trajectory to LBM, burnout is presented.

  6. Turbulent forces within river plumes affect spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-08-01

    When rivers drain into oceans through narrow mouths, hydraulic forces squeeze the river water into buoyant plumes that are clearly visible in satellite images. Worldwide, river plumes not only disperse freshwater, sediments, and nutrients but also spread pollutants and organisms from estuaries into the open ocean. In the United States, the Columbia River—the largest river by volume draining into the Pacific Ocean from North America—generates a plume at its mouth that transports juvenile salmon and other fish into the ocean. Clearly, the behavior and spread of river plumes, such as the Columbia River plume, affect the nation's fishing industry as well as the global economy.

  7. Laminar flow control flight experiment design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Aaron Alexander

    Demonstration of spanwise-periodic discrete roughness element laminar flow control (DRE LFC) technology at operationally relevant flight regimes requires extremely stable flow conditions in flight. A balance must be struck between the capabilities of the host aircraft and the scientific apparatus. A safe, effective, and efficient flight experiment is described to meet the test objectives, a flight test technique is designed to gather research-quality data, flight characteristics are analyzed for data compatibility, and an experiment is designed for data collection and analysis. The objective is to demonstrate DRE effects in a flight environment relevant to transport-category aircraft: [0.67 -- 0.75] Mach number and [17.0M -- 27.5M] Reynolds number. Within this envelope, flight conditions are determined which meet evaluation criteria for minimum lift coefficient and crossflow transition location. The angle of attack data band is determined, and the natural laminar flow characteristics are evaluated. Finally, DRE LFC technology is demonstrated in the angle of attack data band at the specified flight conditions. Within the angle of attack data band, a test angle of attack must be maintained with a tolerance of +/- 0.1° for 15 seconds. A flight test technique is developed that precisely controls angle of attack. Lateral-directional stability characteristics of the host aircraft are exploited to manipulate the position of flight controls near the wing glove. Directional control inputs are applied in conjunction with lateral control inputs to achieve the desired flow conditions. The data are statistically analyzed in a split-plot factorial that produces a system response model in six variables: angle of attack, Mach number, Reynolds number, DRE height, DRE spacing, and the surface roughness of the leading edge. Predictions on aircraft performance are modeled to enable planning tools for efficient flight research while still producing statistically rigorous flight data

  8. Teaching the Mantle Plumes Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, G. R.

    2010-12-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding whether or not mantle plumes exist. This debate has highlighted a number of issues regarding how Earth science is currently practised, and how this feeds into approaches toward teaching students. The plume model is an hypothesis, not a proven fact. And yet many researchers assume a priori that plumes exist. This assumption feeds into teaching. That the plume model is unproven, and that many practising researchers are skeptical, may be at best only mentioned in passing to students, with most teachers assuming that plumes are proven to exist. There is typically little emphasis, in particular in undergraduate teaching, that the origin of melting anomalies is currently uncertain and that scientists do not know all the answers. Little encouragement is given to students to become involved in the debate and to consider the pros and cons for themselves. Typically teachers take the approach that “an answer” (or even “the answer”) must be taught to students. Such a pedagogic approach misses an excellent opportunity to allow students to participate in an important ongoing debate in Earth sciences. It also misses the opportunity to illustrate to students several critical aspects regarding correct application of the scientific method. The scientific method involves attempting to disprove hypotheses, not to prove them. A priori assumptions should be kept uppermost in mind and reconsidered at all stages. Multiple working hypotheses should be entertained. The predictions of a hypothesis should be tested, and unpredicted observations taken as weakening the original hypothesis. Hypotheses should not be endlessly adapted to fit unexpected observations. The difficulty with pedagogic treatment of the mantle plumes debate highlights a general uncertainty about how to teach issues in Earth science that are not yet resolved with certainty. It also represents a missed opportunity to let students experience how scientific theories evolve, warts

  9. Compositional differentiation of Enceladus' plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, N.; Postberg, F.; Schmidt, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) on board the Cassini spacecraft sampled Enceladus' plume ice particles emanated directly from Enceladus' fractured south polar terrain (SPT), the so-called "Tiger Stripes", during two consecutive flybys (E17 and E18) in 2012. The spacecraft passed through the dense plume with a moderate velocity of ~7.5km/s, horizontally to the SPT with a closest approach (CA) at an altitude of ~75km almost directly over the south pole. In both flybys, spectra were recorded during a time interval of ~ ±3 minutes with respect to the closest approach achieving an average sampling rate of about 0.6 sec-1. We assume that the spacecraft passed through the plume during an interval of about ±60(sec) from the CA. Particles encountered before and after this period are predominately from the E-ring background in which Enceladus is embedded. Most CDA TOF-mass spectra are identified as one of three compositional types: (i) almost pure water (ii) organic rich and (iii) salt rich [2]. A Boxcar Analysis (BCA) is performed from a count database for compositional mapping of the plume along the space-craft trajectory. In BCA, counts of each spectrum type are integrated for a certain interval of time (box size). The integral of counts represents frequencies of compositional types in absolute abundances, which are converted later into proportions. This technique has been proven to be a suitable for inferring the compositional profiles from an earlier flyby (E5) [1]. The inferred compositional profiles show similar trends on E17 and E18. The abundances of different compositional types in the plume clearly differ from the Ering background and imply a compositional differentiation inside the plume. Following up the work of Schmidt et al, 2008 and Postberg et al, 2011 we can link different compositional types to different origins. The E17/E18 results are compared with the E5 flyby in 2008, which yielded the currently best compositional profile [2] but was executed at much

  10. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Hammer, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  11. Aerodynamic interactions with turbulent jet exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The importance of aerodynamic interactions associated with external flow-field effects on turbulent jet exhaust plume structure is discussed. A viscous/inviscid prediction technique is presented which combines the overlaid mixing and inviscid plume components of the JANNAF Standardized Plume Flow-Field (SPF) model with inviscid external flow and boundary-layer analyses for treating nozzle afterbodies at subsonic/transonic speeds. Validation of the technique via comparisons between predictions and experiment for cold-air jet plumes is presented. Predicted spatial temperature distributions for hot, nonafterburning plumes are presented and compared to results obtained from more simplified prediction techniques in order to assess the importance of the aerodynamic interactions associated with external boundary layers and pressure gradients. It is demonstrated that these interactions play a significant role in determining the near-field turbulent mixing and inviscid plume shock structure. The implication of these results to plume radiation predictions is discussed.

  12. The mechanism of plasma plume termination for pulse-excited plasmas in a quartz tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Mingzhe; Xia, Wenjie; Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhijie; Liu, Dingxin; Liang, Zhihu; Zhang, Xiaoning; Kong, Michael G.

    2017-08-01

    Although the formation and propagation of plasma plume for atmospheric pressure plasmas have been intensively studied, how does the plasma plume terminate is still little known. In this letter, helium plasma plumes are generated in a long quartz tube by pulsed voltages and a constant gas flow. The voltages have a variable pulse width (PW) from 0.5 μs to 200 μs. It is found that the plasma plume terminates right after the falling edge of each voltage pulse when PW < 20 μs, whereas it terminates before the falling edge. When PW is larger than 30 μs, the duration of plasma plume starts to decrease, and the termination is found to occur at the current zero moment of the discharge current through the high-voltage electrode, which is much different from that through the ground electrode. This indicates that part of the discharge current is shunted by the plasma plume to its downstream gas region. An equivalent circuit model is developed, from which the surface charge deposited on the quartz tube is found crucial for accelerating the termination of a plasma plume when PW > 30 μs.

  13. Toward a laminar-flow-control transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    Analyses were conducted to define a practical design for an advanced technology laminar flow control (LRC) transport for initial passenger operation in the early 1990's. Mission requirements, appropriate design criteria, and level of technology for the study aircraft were defined. The characteristics of the selected configuration were established, aircraft and LFC subsystems compatible with the mission requirements were defined, and the aircraft was evaluated in terms of fuel efficiency. A wing design integrating the LFC ducting and metering system into advanced composite wing structure was developed, manufacturing procedures for the surface panel design were established, and environmental and structural testing of surface panel components were conducted. Test results revealed a requirement for relatively minor changes in the manufacturing procedures employed, but have shown the general compatibility of both the selected design and the use of composite materials with the requirements of LFC wing surface panels.

  14. On the combustion of a laminar spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Yeshayahou; Bulzan, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    A spray combustor, with flow velocities in the laminar range, exhibits a unique operating mode where large amplitude, self-induced oscillations of the flame shape occur. The phenomenon, not previously encountered, only occurs when fuel is supplied in the form of fine liquid droplets and does not occur when fuel is supplied in gaseous form. Several flow mechanisms are coupled in such a fashion as to trigger and maintain the oscillatory motion of the flame. These mechanisms include heat transfer and evaporation processes, dynamics of two-phase flows, and effects of gravity (buoyancy forces). An interface volume, lying above the fuel nozzle and below the flame was found to be the most susceptible to gravity effects and postulated to be responsible for inducing the oscillatory motion. Heptane fuel was used in the majority of the tests. Tests performed with iso-octane also showed similar results.

  15. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Mena, Baltasar; Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier

    2017-02-01

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived.

  16. Base pressure in laminar supersonic flow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messiter, A. F.; Hough, G. R.; Feo, A.

    1973-01-01

    An asymptotic description is proposed for supersonic laminar flow over a wedge or a backward-facing step, for large Reynolds number and for a base or step height which is small compared with the boundary-layer length. The analysis is carried out for adiabatic wall conditions and a viscosity coefficient proportional to temperature. In a particular limit corresponding to a very thick boundary layer, a similarity law is obtained for the base pressure. For a thinner boundary layer an asymptotic form for the base pressure is obtained which shows the dependence on the parameters explicitly and which permits good agreement with experiment. This latter result is based on an inviscid-flow approximation for the corner expansion and for reattachment with viscous forces important primarily in a thin sublayer about the dividing streamline. A prediction of the pressure distribution at reattachment is given and the result is compared with experimental pressure distributions.

  17. Laminar flow control SPF/08 feasibility demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, R. C.; Williams, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of applying superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) technology to laminar flow control (LFC) system concepts was demonstrated. Procedures were developed to produce smooth, flat titanium panels, using thin -0.016 inch sheets, meeting LFC surface smoothness requirements. Two large panels 28 x 28 inches were fabricated as final demonstration articles. The first was flat on the top and bottom sides demonstrating the capability of the tooling and the forming and diffusion bonding procedures to produce flat, defect free surfaces. The second panel was configurated for LFC porous panel treatment by forming channels with dimpled projections on the top side. The projections were machined away leaving holes extending into the panel. A perforated titanium sheet was adhesively bonded over this surface to complete the LFC demonstration panel. The final surface was considered flat enough to meet LFC requirements for a jet transport aircraft in cruising flight.

  18. Laminar flow control perforated wing panel development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischler, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    Many structural concepts for a wing leading edge laminar flow control hybrid panel were analytically investigated. After many small, medium, and large tests, the selected design was verified. New analytic methods were developed to combine porous titanium sheet bonded to a substructure of fiberglass and carbon/epoxy cloth. At -65 and +160 F test conditions, the critical bond of the porous titanium to the composite failed at lower than anticipated test loads. New cure cycles, design improvements, and test improvements significantly improved the strength and reduced the deflections from thermal and lateral loadings. The wave tolerance limits for turbulence were not exceeded. Consideration of the beam column midbay deflections from the combinations of the axial and lateral loadings and thermal bowing at -65 F, room temperature, and +160 F were included. Many lap shear tests were performed at several cure cycles. Results indicate that sufficient verification was obtained to fabricate a demonstration vehicle.

  19. Evaluation of the Edgegard laminar flow hood.

    PubMed

    Coriell, L L; McGarrity, G J

    1970-09-01

    In a horizontal back-to-front flow high-efficiency particulate air-filtered laminar hood, it is shown that a Blake bottle obstruction to the air flow causes a downstream cone of turbulent air which can draw microbial contamination into the work area of the hood. In controlled experiments, contamination with T3 coliphage was reduced by a series of perforations around the open edge of the hood which eliminates the cone of turbulent air. The average reduction in phage counts was 90.75, 86.79, 91.12, and 98.92%, depending upon the site of nebulization. The phage counts were reduced in 48 of the 51 tests.

  20. Two-dimensional stability of laminar flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukunda, H. S.; Drummond, J. Philip

    1992-01-01

    The stability of laminar flames was studied numerically and the dependence of stability on finite rate chemistry with low activation energy and variable thermodynamic and transport properties was addressed. The calculations show that activation energy and details of chemistry play a minor role in altering the linear neutral stability results from asymptotic analysis. Variable specific heat makes a marginal change to the stability; variable transport properties, on the other hand, tend to substantially enhance the stability from a critical wave number of about 0.50 to 0.20. Also, the effects of variable properties tend to nullify the effects of nonunity Lewis number. When the Lewis number of a single species is different from unity, as is true in a hydrogen-air premixed flame, the stability results remain close to that of unity Lewis number.

  1. Progress in natural laminar flow research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    For decades, since the earliest attempts to obtain natural laminar flow (NLF) on airplanes, three classical objections to its practicality have been held in the aeronautical community. These objectives concerned first, the capability to manufacture practical airframe surfaces smooth enough for NLF; second, the apparent inherent instability and sensitivity of NLF; and third, the accumulation of contamination such as insect debris in flight. This paper explains recent progress in our understanding of the achieveability and maintainability of NLF on modern airframe surfaces. This discussion explains why previous attempts to use NLF failed and what has changed regarding the three classical objections to NLF practicality. Future NASA research plans are described concerning exploring the limits of NLF usefulness, production tolerances, operational considerations, transition behavior and measurement methods, and NLF design applications.

  2. Thermohydrodynamic analysis for laminar lubricating films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, H. G.; Brewe, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    A Galerkin-type analysis to include thermal effects in laminar lubricating films was performed. The lubricant properties were assumed constant except for a temperature-dependent Newtonian viscosity. The cross-film temperature profile is established by collocation at the film boundaries and two interior Lobatto points. The interior temperatures are determined by requiring that the zeroth and first moment of the energy equation be satisfied across the film. The fluidity is forced to conform to a third--degree polynomial appropriate to the Lobatto-point temperatures. Preliminary indications are that the use of just two such sampling points enables satisfactory prediction of bearing performance even in the presence of substantial viscosity variation.

  3. The Laminar Cortex Model: A New Continuum Cortex Model Incorporating Laminar Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiaxin; Vegh, Viktor; Reutens, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) are widely used to study the function of local networks in the brain. They are also closely correlated with the blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal, the predominant contrast mechanism in functional magnetic resonance imaging. We developed a new laminar cortex model (LCM) to simulate the amplitude and frequency of LFPs. Our model combines the laminar architecture of the cerebral cortex and multiple continuum models to simulate the collective activity of cortical neurons. The five cortical layers (layer I, II/III, IV, V, and VI) are simulated as separate continuum models between which there are synaptic connections. The LCM was used to simulate the dynamics of the visual cortex under different conditions of visual stimulation. LFPs are reported for two kinds of visual stimulation: general visual stimulation and intermittent light stimulation. The power spectra of LFPs were calculated and compared with existing empirical data. The LCM was able to produce spontaneous LFPs exhibiting frequency-inverse (1/ƒ) power spectrum behaviour. Laminar profiles of current source density showed similarities to experimental data. General stimulation enhanced the oscillation of LFPs corresponding to gamma frequencies. During simulated intermittent light stimulation, the LCM captured the fundamental as well as high order harmonics as previously reported. The power spectrum expected with a reduction in layer IV neurons, often observed with focal cortical dysplasias associated with epilepsy was also simulated. PMID:23093925

  4. Head Start Automation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Univ., College Park. Univ. Coll.

    The task for the National Data Management Project is to share technological capabilities with the Head Start Community in order to implement improved services for children and families involved in Head Start. Many Head Start programs have incorporated technology into their programs, including word processing, database management systems,…

  5. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  6. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  7. Irritants in cigarette smoke plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, H.E.; Yeager, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    Concentrations of the irritants formaldehyde and acrolein in side stream cigarette smoke plumes are up to three orders of magnitude above occupational limits, readily accounting for eye and nasal irritation. ''Low-tar'' cigarettes appear at least as irritating as other cigarettes. More than half the irritant is associated with the particulate phase of the smoke, permitting deposition throughout the entire respiratory tract and raising the issue of whether formaldehyde in smoke is associated with bronchial cancer.

  8. F-111 TACT natural laminar flow glove flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Steers, L. L.; Trujillo, B.

    1981-01-01

    Improvements in cruise efficiency on the order of 15 to 40% are obtained by increasing the extent of laminar flow over lifting surfaces. Two methods of achieving laminar flow are being considered, natural laminar flow and laminar flow control. Natural laminar flow (NLF) relies primarily on airfoil shape while laminar flow control involves boundary layer suction or blowing with mechanical devices. The extent of natural laminar flow that could be achieved with consistency in a real flight environment at chord Reynolds numbers in the range of 30 x 10(6) power was evaluated. Nineteen flights were conducted on the F-111 TACT airplane having a NLF airfoil glove section. The section consists of a supercritical airfoil providing favorable pressure gradients over extensive portions of the upper and lower surfaces of the wing. Boundary layer measurements were obtained over a range of wing leading edge sweep angles at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 0.85. Data were obtained for natural transition and for a range of forced transition locations over the test airfoil.

  9. NASA F-16XL supersonic laminar flow control program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of the NASA supersonic laminar flow control program are provided. Successful application of laminar flow control to a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) offers significant benefits in reductions of take-off gross weight, mission fuel burn, cruise drag, structural temperatures, engine size, emissions, and sonic boom. The ultimate economic success of the proposed HSCT may depend on the successful adaption of laminar flow control, which offers the single most significant potential improvements in lift drag ratio (L/D) of all the aerodynamic technologies under consideration. The F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Control (SLFC) Experiment was conceived based on the encouraging results of in-house and NASA supported industry studies to determine if laminar flow control is feasible for the HSCT. The primary objective is to achieve extensive laminar flow (50-60 percent chord) on a highly swept supersonic wing. Data obtained from the flight test will be used to validate existing Euler and Navier Stokes aerodynamic codes and transition prediction boundary layer stability codes. These validated codes and developed design methodology will be delivered to industry for their use in designing supersonic laminar flow control wings. Results from this experiment will establish preliminary suction system design criteria enabling industry to better size the suction system and develop improved estimates of system weight, fuel volume loss due to wing ducting, turbocompressor power requirements, etc. so that benefits and penalties can be more accurately assessed.

  10. Microbial populations in contaminant plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, S.K.; Bekins, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient biodegradation of subsurface contaminants requires two elements: (1) microbial populations with the necessary degradative capabilities, and (2) favorable subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions. Practical constraints on experimental design and interpretation in both the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences have resulted in limited knowledge of the interaction between hydrogeological and microbiological features of subsurface environments. These practical constraints include: (1) inconsistencies between the scales of investigation in the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences, and (2) practical limitations on the ability to accurately define microbial populations in environmental samples. However, advances in application of small-scale sampling methods and interdisciplinary approaches to site investigations are beginning to significantly improve understanding of hydrogeological and microbiological interactions. Likewise, culture-based and molecular analyses of microbial populations in subsurface contaminant plumes have revealed significant adaptation of microbial populations to plume environmental conditions. Results of recent studies suggest that variability in subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions significantly influences subsurface microbial-community structure. Combined investigations of site conditions and microbial-community structure provide the knowledge needed to understand interactions between subsurface microbial populations, plume geochemistry, and contaminant biodegradation.

  11. Triton's Geyser-like Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Soderblom, Laurence A.

    In August of 1989, while flying by Neptune's largest satellite Triton, Voyager 2 made another of its stunning discoveries in its epic journey through the outer solar system. First seen by one of us (LAS) and Tammy Becker (also of the USGS), after stereoscopic examination of a group of images taken very near Voyager's closest approach to the satellite, were at least two, geyser-like plumes spewing almost perfectly vertical columns of material 1-km across roughly 8-km high into Triton's atmosphere; there the columns were sheared by stratospheric winds into 100-km-long, dark clouds thought to composed of condensed nitrogen mixed with organic particles. Triton's plumes may be the most unique of all the manifestations of geologic activity on satellites in the outer solar system in that their energy source may be sunlight trapped below Triton's surface in a so-called "solid-state greenhouse". This talk will focus on the physical characteristics of those plumes, and on the various mechanisms proposed to explain their presence and apparent persistence on Triton.

  12. The ice plumes of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    2014-10-01

    It is of extreme interest to NASA and the scientific community that evidence has been found for plumes of water ice venting from the polar regions of Europa (Roth et al 2014) - spectroscopic detection of off-limb line emission from the dissociation products of water. We were awarded Cycle 21 time to seek direct images of the Europa exosphere, including Enceladus-like plumes if present, basing our study on FUV images of Europa as it transits the smooth face of Jupiter. We also obtained a necessary FUV image of Europa out of transit. These observations provide additional evidence for the presence of ice plumes on Europa. Here, we propose to augment our previous imaging work and to seek an initial, efficient characterization of off-limb emission as Europa orbits Jupiter. Such images provide sensitive flux and column density limits, with exceptional spatial resolution. In transit, our strategy can place firm limits on, or measurements of, absorbing columns, their distribution with altitude above the surface of Europa, and constrain their wavelength dependence and hence composition. Out of transit, geometrical and surface brightness considerations can help us distinguish between continuum FUV emission from forward- or back-scattering, from line emission, or, though we might prefer otherwise, from more subtle instrumental artifacts than hitherto understood. If the ice fountains of Europa arise from the deep ocean, we have gained access to probably the most astrobiologically interesting location in the Solar System.

  13. Coastal river plumes: Collisions and coalescence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan; Farnsworth, Katherine L

    2017-01-01

    Plumes of buoyant river water spread in the ocean from river mouths, and these plumes influence water quality, sediment dispersal, primary productivity, and circulation along the world’s coasts. Most investigations of river plumes have focused on large rivers in a coastal region, for which the physical spreading of the plume is assumed to be independent from the influence of other buoyant plumes. Here we provide new understanding of the spreading patterns of multiple plumes interacting along simplified coastal settings by investigating: (i) the relative likelihood of plume-to-plume interactions at different settings using geophysical scaling, (ii) the diversity of plume frontal collision types and the effects of these collisions on spreading patterns of plume waters using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and (iii) the fundamental differences in plume spreading patterns between coasts with single and multiple rivers using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Geophysical scaling suggests that coastal margins with numerous small rivers (watershed areas < 10,000 km2), such as found along most active geologic coastal margins, were much more likely to have river plumes that collide and interact than coastal settings with large rivers (watershed areas > 100,000 km2). When two plume fronts meet, several types of collision attributes were found, including refection, subduction and occlusion. We found that the relative differences in pre-collision plume densities and thicknesses strongly influenced the resulting collision types. The three-dimensional spreading of buoyant plumes was found to be influenced by the presence of additional rivers for all modeled scenarios, including those with and without Coriolis and wind. Combined, these results suggest that plume-to-plume interactions are common phenomena for coastal regions offshore of the world’s smaller rivers and for coastal settings with multiple river mouths in close proximity, and that the spreading and

  14. Coastal river plumes: Collisions and coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Farnsworth, Katherine L.

    2017-02-01

    Plumes of buoyant river water spread in the ocean from river mouths, and these plumes influence water quality, sediment dispersal, primary productivity, and circulation along the world's coasts. Most investigations of river plumes have focused on large rivers in a coastal region, for which the physical spreading of the plume is assumed to be independent from the influence of other buoyant plumes. Here we provide new understanding of the spreading patterns of multiple plumes interacting along simplified coastal settings by investigating: (i) the relative likelihood of plume-to-plume interactions at different settings using geophysical scaling, (ii) the diversity of plume frontal collision types and the effects of these collisions on spreading patterns of plume waters using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and (iii) the fundamental differences in plume spreading patterns between coasts with single and multiple rivers using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Geophysical scaling suggests that coastal margins with numerous small rivers (watershed areas < 10,000 km2), such as found along most active geologic coastal margins, were much more likely to have river plumes that collide and interact than coastal settings with large rivers (watershed areas > 100,000 km2). When two plume fronts meet, several types of collision attributes were found, including refection, subduction and occlusion. We found that the relative differences in pre-collision plume densities and thicknesses strongly influenced the resulting collision types. The three-dimensional spreading of buoyant plumes was found to be influenced by the presence of additional rivers for all modeled scenarios, including those with and without Coriolis and wind. Combined, these results suggest that plume-to-plume interactions are common phenomena for coastal regions offshore of the world's smaller rivers and for coastal settings with multiple river mouths in close proximity, and that the spreading and fate of

  15. Laminar flow studies at Dassault Aviation: Calculations and flight tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, J. C.; Bulgubure, C.; Arnal, D.

    1993-11-01

    The tools used at Dassault Aviation to calculate the limits on laminar layers, transition criteria and analyses on linear stability are presented and analyzed as far as their precision but also as far as their effectiveness when they have to be used to optimize the design of aircrafts' wing systems. These calculations were used in the concept of laminar deviation that was tested in the air on a FALCON 50, and in the concept of a wing with an hybrid laminarity that was tested in the air on a FALCON 50 during a second phase, 1987-1990.

  16. Inductively coupled plasma torch with laminar flow cooling

    DOEpatents

    Rayson, Gary D.; Shen, Yang

    1991-04-30

    An improved inductively coupled gas plasma torch. The torch includes inner and outer quartz sleeves and tubular insert snugly fitted between the sleeves. The insert includes outwardly opening longitudinal channels. Gas flowing through the channels of the insert emerges in a laminar flow along the inside surface of the outer sleeve, in the zone of plasma heating. The laminar flow cools the outer sleeve and enables the torch to operate at lower electrical power and gas consumption levels additionally, the laminar flow reduces noise levels in spectroscopic measurements of the gaseous plasma.

  17. Current Laminar Flow Control Experiments at NASA Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Al

    2010-01-01

    An experiment to demonstrate laminar flow over the swept wing of a subsonic transport is being developed. Discrete Roughness Elements are being used to maintain laminar flow over a substantial portion of a wing glove. This passive laminar flow technology has only come to be recognized as a significant player in airliner drag reduction in the last few years. NASA is implementing this experiment and is planning to demonstrate this technology at full-scale Bight cruise conditions of a small-to-medium airliner.

  18. Laminar Flow Control Leading Edge Systems in Simulated Airline Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fisher, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    Achieving laminar flow on the wings of a commercial transport involves difficult problems associated with the wing leading edge. The NASA Leading Edge Flight Test Program has made major progress toward the solution of these problems. The effectiveness and practicality of candidate laminar flow leading edge systems were proven under representative airline service conditions. This was accomplished in a series of simulated airline service flights by modifying a JetStar aircraft with laminar flow leading edge systems and operating it out of three commercial airports in the United States. The aircraft was operated as an airliner would under actual air traffic conditions, in bad weather, and in insect infested environments.

  19. Winds, waves, and the Fraser river plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, S. E.; Horner-Devine, A.; Thomson, J.

    2016-12-01

    We present observations of winds, waves, and river plume dynamics at the mouth of the Fraser River in the Strait of Georgia during ebb tidal conditions. Measurements were taken using Surface Wave Instrument Floats with Tracking (SWIFT) buoys during a two-week observational field campaign in January 2016 with a variety of forcing conditions. During storm conditions, strong northwesterly winds and waves were incident on a sharp northern plume front generating energetic wave breaking. During the more common southeasterly wind conditions, waves propagated over a thinner, highly sheared plume and did not interact with fronts. We examine the effect of the plume on the waves using a non-dimensional analysis of fetch. During northwesterly wind conditions in the Straight of Georgia, the wind blows over a longer ( 100 km) fetch than during southeasterly wind conditions, creating larger waves. Thomson et al, 2014, found that under similar incident wind and wave conditions, the wind sea peak in the wave energy spectra is blocked by strong horizontal velocity gradients at the river plume front. This blocking effect would result in a lower wave energy level within the plume than predicted by fetch scaling for the northwesterly storm conditions. We assess this simple hypothesis by comparing wave spectra from SWIFTs inside the plume and an Acoustic Waves and Current (AWAC) mooring outside the plume. Furthermore, we use these wave conditions as context for understanding the plume response, in which plume spreading is suppressed by northwesterly storm conditions.

  20. Seismically imaging the Afar plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, J. O.; Kendall, J. M.; Bastow, I. D.; Stuart, G. W.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.; Ogubazghi, G.; Ebinger, C. J.; Belachew, M.

    2011-12-01

    Plume related flood basalt volcanism in Ethiopia has long been cited to have instigated continental breakup in northeast Africa. However, to date seismic images of the mantle beneath the region have not produced conclusive evidence of a plume-like structure. As a result the nature and even existence of a plume in the region and its role in rift initiation and continental rupture are debated. Previous seismic studies using regional deployments of sensors in East-Africa show that low seismic velocities underlie northeast Africa, but their resolution is limited to the top 200-300km of the Earth. Thus, the connection between the low velocities in the uppermost mantle and those imaged in global studies in the lower mantle is unclear. We have combined new data from Afar, Ethiopia with 6 other regional experiments and global network stations across Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti and Yemen, to produce high-resolution models of upper mantle P- and S- wave velocities to the base of the transition zone. Relative travel time tomographic inversions show that the top 100km is dominated by focussed low velocity zones, likely associated with melt in the lithosphere/uppermost asthenosphere. Below these depths a broad SW-NE oriented sheet like upwelling extends down to the top of the transition zone. Within the transition zone two focussed sharp-sided low velocity regions exist: one beneath the Western Ethiopian plateau outside the rift valley, and the other beneath the Afar depression. The nature of the transition zone anomalies suggests that small upwellings may rise from a broader low velocity plume-like feature in the lower mantle. This interpretation is supported by numerical and analogue experiments that suggest the 660km phase change and viscosity jump may impede flow from the lower to upper mantle creating a thermal boundary layer at the base of the transition zone. This allows smaller, secondary upwellings to initiate and rise to the surface. Our images of secondary upwellings

  1. Exploring the thermodynamics of small ash plumes with thermal (FLIR) video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M.

    2005-12-01

    Handheld thermal (FLIR) video cameras offer a unique perspective on explosive volcanism. During June-July, 2004, several hundred emerging strombolian ash plumes were imaged with a FLIR camera operating at 30 Hz on Stromboli volcano, Italy. Of these eruptions, 25-80 were suitable for varying levels of quantitative analyses. This study addresses two factors. First, the evolving morphology, motion and air entrainment rates were tracked and explored using the spatio-temporal component of the data. Plumes were observed to transition among several common forms in the first 30 seconds upon leaving the vent (jets, starting plumes, thermals), which reflected changing spreading rates and air entrainment coefficients. Based upon spreading rates, plume fronts exhibited air entrainment coefficients of approximately 0.10 in gas-thrust phases and approximately 0.20 in buoyant phases, while the steady plume air entrainment coefficients were approximately 0.10 throughout. In the second part of the study, the temperature and heat/mass contents were examined using the thermal information in the FLIR data. An essential prerequisite to measuring accurate plume temperature is plume opacity, which can be characterized by tracking apparent temperature and heat content trends. Bulk temperatures of the plume fronts began between 300 and 700 C at the crater rim, and dropped below 100 C within 130 m height. Whereas total heat content in a plume can be estimated with good precision (within a few percent) from this temperature information, translating heat content to ejecta mass is more troublesome (uncertainties of at least 60 percent). This complication is due to uncertainties in gas mass fraction which are inherent in strombolian scenarios and result from the incidental origin of strombolian particles.

  2. Selected experiments in laminar flow: An annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Since the 1930s, there have been attempts to reduce drag on airplanes by delaying laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition. Experiments conducted during the 1940's, while successful in delaying transition, were discouraging because of the careful surface preparation necessary to meet roughness and waviness requirements. The resulting lull in research lasted nearly 30 years. By the late 1970s, airframe construction techniques had advanced sufficiently that the high surface quality required for natural laminar flow (NLF) and laminar flow control (LFC) appeared possible on production aircraft. As a result, NLF and LFC research became widespread. This report is an overview of that research. The experiments summarized herein were selected for their applicability to small transonic aircraft. Both flight and wind tunnel tests are included. The description of each experiment is followed by corresponding references. Part One summarizes NLF experiments; Part Two deals with LFC and hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) experiments.

  3. Design of fuselage shapes for natural laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, S. S.; Vandam, C. P.; Vijgen, P. M. H. W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent technological advances in airplane construction techniques and materials allow for the production of aerodynamic surfaces without significant waviness and roughness, permitting long runs of natural laminar flow (NLF). The present research effort seeks to refine and validate computational design tools for use in the design of axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric natural-laminar-flow bodies. The principal task of the investigation involves fuselage body shaping using a computational design procedure. Analytical methods were refined and exploratory calculations conducted to predict laminar boundary-layer on selected body shapes. Using a low-order surface-singularity aerodynamic analysis program, pressure distribution, boundary-layer development, transition location and drag coefficient have been obtained for a number of body shapes including a representative business-aircraft fuselage. Extensive runs of laminar flow were predicted in regions of favorable pressure gradient on smooth body surfaces. A computational design procedure was developed to obtain a body shape with minimum drag having large extent of NLF.

  4. Assessment of the National Transonic Facility for Laminar Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Jeffrey D.; Sutanto, Mary I.; Witkowski, David P.; Watkins, A. Neal; Rivers, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    A transonic wing, designed to accentuate key transition physics, is tested at cryogenic conditions at the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley. The collaborative test between Boeing and NASA is aimed at assessing the facility for high-Reynolds number testing of configurations with significant regions of laminar flow. The test shows a unit Reynolds number upper limit of 26 M/ft for achieving natural transition. At higher Reynolds numbers turbulent wedges emanating from the leading edge bypass the natural transition process and destroy the laminar flow. At lower Reynolds numbers, the transition location is well correlated with the Tollmien-Schlichting-wave N-factor. The low-Reynolds number results suggest that the flow quality is acceptable for laminar flow testing if the loss of laminar flow due to bypass transition can be avoided.

  5. F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Test Flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    An F-16XL aircraft was used by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in a NASA-wide program to improve laminar airflow on aircraft flying at sustained supersonic speeds. It was th...

  6. Studies of premixed laminar and turbulent flames at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    A two and one-half year experimental and theoretical research program on the properties of laminar and turbulent premixed gas flames at microgravity was conducted. Progress during this program is identified and avenues for future studies are discussed.

  7. Structure of Soot-Containing Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortazavi, S.; Sunderland, P. B.; Jurng, J.; Koylu, U. O.; Faeth, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of nonbuoyant and weakly-buoyant round jet diffusion flames were studied, considering ethylene, propane and acetylene burning in air at pressures of 0.125-2.0 atm. Measurements of flame structure included radiative heat loss fractions, flame shape and temperature distributions in the fuel-lean (overfire) region. These measurements were used to evaluate flame structure predictions based on the conserved-scalar formalism in conjunction with the laminar flamelet concept, finding good agreement betweem predictions and measurements. Soot property measurements included laminar smoke points, soot volume function distributions using laser extinction, and soot structure using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy. Nonbuoyant flames were found to exhibit laminar smoke points like buoyant flames but their properties are very different; in particular, nonbuoyant flames have laminar smoke point flame lengths and residence times that are shorter and longer, respectively, than buoyant flames.

  8. Space shuttle main engine plume radiation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. E.; Lee, Y. C.

    1978-01-01

    The methods are described which are used in predicting the thermal radiation received by space shuttles, from the plumes of the main engines. Radiation to representative surface locations were predicted using the NASA gaseous plume radiation GASRAD program. The plume model is used with the radiative view factor (RAVFAC) program to predict sea level radiation at specified body points. The GASRAD program is described along with the predictions. The RAVFAC model is also discussed.

  9. Constraining the source of mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagney, N.; Crameri, F.; Newsome, W. H.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Cotel, A.; Hart, S. R.; Whitehead, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    In order to link the geochemical signature of hot spot basalts to Earth's deep interior, it is first necessary to understand how plumes sample different regions of the mantle. Here, we investigate the relative amounts of deep and shallow mantle material that are entrained by an ascending plume and constrain its source region. The plumes are generated in a viscous syrup using an isolated heater for a range of Rayleigh numbers. The velocity fields are measured using stereoscopic Particle-Image Velocimetry, and the concept of the 'vortex ring bubble' is used to provide an objective definition of the plume geometry. Using this plume geometry, the plume composition can be analysed in terms of the proportion of material that has been entrained from different depths. We show that the plume composition can be well described using a simple empirical relationship, which depends only on a single parameter, the sampling coefficient, sc. High-sc plumes are composed of material which originated from very deep in the fluid domain, while low-sc plumes contain material entrained from a range of depths. The analysis is also used to show that the geometry of the plume can be described using a similarity solution, in agreement with previous studies. Finally, numerical simulations are used to vary both the Rayleigh number and viscosity contrast independently. The simulations allow us to predict the value of the sampling coefficient for mantle plumes; we find that as a plume reaches the lithosphere, 90% of its composition has been derived from the lowermost 260-750 km in the mantle, and negligible amounts are derived from the shallow half of the lower mantle. This result implies that isotope geochemistry cannot provide direct information about this unsampled region, and that the various known geochemical reservoirs must lie in the deepest few hundred kilometres of the mantle.

  10. Aggregate particles in the plumes of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Kopparla, Pushkar; Zhang, Xi; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Estimates of the total particulate mass of the plumes of Enceladus are important to constrain theories of particle formation and transport at the surface and interior of the satellite. We revisit the calculations of Ingersoll and Ewald (Ingersoll, A.P., Ewald, S.P. [2011]. Icarus 216(2), 492-506), who estimated the particulate mass of the Enceladus plumes from strongly forward scattered light in Cassini ISS images. We model the plume as a combination of spherical particles and irregular aggregates resulting from the coagulation of spherical monomers, the latter of which allows for plumes of lower particulate mass. Though a continuum of solutions are permitted by the model, the best fits to the ISS data consist either of low mass plumes composed entirely of small aggregates or high mass plumes composed of mostly spheres. The high particulate mass plumes have total particulate masses of (166 ± 42) × 103 kg, consistent with the results of Ingersoll and Ewald (Ingersoll, A.P., Ewald, S.P. [2011]. Icarus 216(2), 492-506). The low particulate mass plumes have masses of (25 ± 4) × 103 kg, leading to a solid to vapor mass ratio of 0.07 ± 0.01 for the plume. If indeed the plumes are made of such aggregates, then a vapor-based origin for the plume particles cannot be ruled out. Finally, we show that the residence time of the monomers inside the plume vents is sufficiently long for Brownian coagulation to form the aggregates before they are ejected to space.

  11. Natural laminar flow airfoil analysis and trade studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of an airfoil for a large commercial transport cruising at Mach 0.8 and the use of advanced computer techniques to perform the analysis are described. Incorporation of the airfoil into a natural laminar flow transport configuration is addressed and a comparison of fuel requirements and operating costs between the natural laminar flow transport and an equivalent turbulent flow transport is addressed.

  12. Natural laminar-turbulent transition delay by dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, Maxim; Kogan, Mikhail; Litvinov, Vladimir; Uspensky, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    The use dielectric barrier discharge for the delay of laminar turbulent transition excited by natural flow disturbances in a quiet wind-tunnel was investigated experimentally. Optimal electrodes location and the operational regime of high-voltage impulse generator provided maximal downstream shift of transition location were found. It was demonstrated that the 10% increase of the laminar part of boundary layer can be obtained using barrier discharge with the cross-flow electrodes. This gives up to 20% friction drag reduction.

  13. 700 South 1600 East PCE Plume

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Web page contains 700 South 1600 East PCE Plume Superfund site information, site description, site risk, cleanup progress, community involvement, site documents, frequent questions, contacts and links.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic waves in coronal polar plumes.

    PubMed

    Nakariakov, Valery M

    2006-02-15

    Polar plumes are cool, dense, linear, magnetically open structures that arise from predominantly unipolar magnetic footpoints in the solar polar coronal holes. As the Alfvén speed is decreased in plumes in comparison with the surrounding medium, these structures are natural waveguides for fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves. The simplicity of the geometry of polar plumes makes them an ideal test ground for the study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave interaction with solar coronal structures. The review covers recent observational findings of compressible and incompressible waves in polar plumes with imaging and spectral instruments, and interpretation of the waves in terms of MHD theory.

  15. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  16. Particle-Image Velocimetry in Microgravity Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Greenberg, P. S.; Urban, D. L.; Wernet, M. P.; Yanis, W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses planned velocity measurements in microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames. These measurements will be conducted using Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV) in the NASA Glenn 2.2-second drop tower. The observations are of fundamental interest and may ultimately lead to improved efficiency and decreased emissions from practical combustors. The velocity measurements will support the evaluation of analytical and numerical combustion models. There is strong motivation for the proposed microgravity flame configuration. Laminar jet flames are fundamental to combustion and their study has contributed to myriad advances in combustion science, including the development of theoretical, computational and diagnostic combustion tools. Nonbuoyant laminar jet flames are pertinent to the turbulent flames of more practical interest via the laminar flamelet concept. The influence of gravity on these flames is deleterious: it complicates theoretical and numerical modeling, introduces hydrodynamic instabilities, decreases length scales and spatial resolution, and limits the variability of residence time. Whereas many normal-gravity laminar jet diffusion flames have been thoroughly examined (including measurements of velocities, temperatures, compositions, sooting behavior and emissive and absorptive properties), measurements in microgravity gas-jet flames have been less complete and, notably, have included only cursory velocity measurements. It is envisioned that our velocity measurements will fill an important gap in the understanding of nonbuoyant laminar jet flames.

  17. Laminar Tendon Composites with Enhanced Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Kyle A.; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Illeperuma, Widusha R.; Suo, Zhigang; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A strong isotropic material that is both biocompatible and biodegradable is desired for many biomedical applications, including rotator cuff repair, tendon and ligament repair, vascular grafting, among others. Recently, we developed a technique, called “bioskiving” to create novel 2D and 3D constructs from decellularized tendon, using a combination of mechanical sectioning, and layered stacking and rolling. The unidirectionally aligned collagen nanofibers (derived from sections of decellularized tendon) offer good mechanical properties to the constructs compared with those fabricated from reconstituted collagen. Methods In this paper, we studied the effect that several variables have on the mechanical properties of structures fabricated from tendon slices, including crosslinking density and the orientation in which the fibers are stacked. Results We observed that following stacking and crosslinking, the strength of the constructs is significantly improved, with crosslinked sections having an ultimate tens ile strength over 20 times greater than non-crosslinked samples, and a modulus nearly 50 times higher. The mechanism of the mechanical failure mode of the tendon constructs with or without crosslinking was also investigated. Conclusions The strength and fiber organization, combined with the ability to introduce transversely isotropic mechanical properties makes the laminar tendon composites a biocompatiable material that may find future use in a number of biomedical and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25691802

  18. Radiative interactions in laminar duct flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, P. A.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented for infrared radiative energy transfer in gases when other modes of energy transfer occur simultaneously. Two types of geometries are considered, a parallel plate duct and a circular duct. Fully developed laminar incompressible flows of absorbing-emitting species in black surfaced ducts are considered under the conditions of uniform wall heat flux. The participating species considered are OH, CO, CO2, and H2O. Nongray as well as gray formulations are developed for both geometries. Appropriate limiting solutions of the governing equations are obtained and conduction-radiation interaction parameters are evaluated. Tien and Lowder's wide band model correlation was used in nongray formulation. Numerical procedures are presented to solve the integro-differential equations for both geometries. The range of physical variables considered are 300 to 2000 K for temperature, 0.1 to 100.0 atm for pressure, and 0.1 to 100 cm spacings between plates/radius of the tube. An extensive parametric study based on nongray formulation is presented. Results obtained for different flow conditions indicate that the radiative interactions can be quite significant in fully developed incompressible flows.

  19. Structure of laminar sooting inverse diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Mikofski, Mark A.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Blevins, Linda G.

    2007-06-15

    The flame structure of laminar inverse diffusion flames (IDFs) was studied to gain insight into soot formation and growth in underventilated combustion. Both ethylene-air and methane-air IDFs were examined, fuel flow rates were kept constant for all flames of each fuel type, and airflow rates were varied to observe the effect on flame structure and soot formation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of hydroxyl radicals (OH PLIF) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH PLIF), planar laser-induced incandescence of soot (soot PLII), and thermocouple-determined gas temperatures were used to draw conclusions about flame structure and soot formation. Flickering, caused by buoyancy-induced vortices, was evident above and outside the flames. The distances between the OH, PAH, and soot zones were similar in IDFs and normal diffusion flames (NDFs), but the locations of those zones were inverted in IDFs relative to NDFs. Peak OH PLIF coincided with peak temperature and marked the flame front. Soot appeared outside the flame front, corresponding to temperatures around the minimum soot formation temperature of 1300 K. PAHs appeared outside the soot layer, with characteristic temperature depending on the wavelength detection band. PAHs and soot began to appear at a constant axial position for each fuel, independent of the rate of air flow. PAH formation either preceded or coincided with soot formation, indicating that PAHs are important components in soot formation. Soot growth continued for some time downstream of the flame, at temperatures below the inception temperature, probably through reaction with PAHs. (author)

  20. Stability of laminar electron layers. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Chernin, D.; Lau, Y.Y.

    1984-06-22

    The stability of a finite thickness, laminar cylindrical shell of electrons rotating azimuthally and enclosed in a coaxial waveguide is considered. The equilibrium rotation of the electrons is supported either by a radial electric field, an axial magnetic field, or a combination of both. The stability problem is formulated exactly as an eigenvalue problem, including all relativistic and electromagnetic effects as well as all effects of self and applied equilibrium fields. An approximate dispersion relation, valid for thin beams, is obtained analytically and the classical results for the longitudinal modes, i.e., the negative mass, cyclotron maser and diocotron instabilities and for the transvers mode are recovered in appropriate limits. The dispersion relation is relatively simple and is valid for arbitrary values of the equilibrium electric and magnetic fields and for arbitrary bean energy. It therefore provides a ready comparison of the small signal properties of such devices as the Astron, gyrotron, orbitron, heliotron and the various cross field devices. It may also be of interest in accelerator and space physics applications. Some heretofore unnoticed effects on beam stability of equilibrium fields are reported; one such effect in particular leads to formulation of a simple, effective method either to maximize or eliminate altogether the longitudinal mode growth. Results from the dispersion relation compare favorably to results obtained from a numerical solution of the eigenvalue problem.

  1. Laminar flow past a rotating circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangmo; Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Sangsan

    1999-11-01

    The present study numerically investigates two-dimensional laminar flow past a circular cylinder rotating with a constant angular velocity, for the purpose of controlling vortex shedding and understanding the underlying flow mechanism. Numerical simulations are performed for flows with Re=60, 100, and 160 in the range of 0⩽α⩽2.5, where α is the circumferential speed at the cylinder surface normalized by the free-stream velocity. Results show that the rotation of a cylinder can suppress vortex shedding effectively. Vortex shedding exists at low rotational speeds and completely disappears at α>αL, where αL is the critical rotational speed which shows a logarithmic dependence on Re. The Strouhal number remains nearly constant regardless of α while vortex shedding exists. With increasing α, the mean lift increases linearly and the mean drag decreases, which differ significantly from those predicted by the potential flow theory. On the other hand, the amplitude of lift fluctuation stays nearly constant with increasing α (<αL), while that of drag fluctuation increases. Further studies from the instantaneous flow fields demonstrate again that the rotation of a cylinder makes a substantial effect on the flow pattern.

  2. Laminar Flow past a Rotating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-11-01

    In this study, laminar flow past a rotating sphere is numerically investigated to understand the effect of the streamwise rotation on the flow characteristics behind a sphere. The present numerical method is based on a newly developed immersed boundary method in a cylindrical coordinate. Numerical simulations are performed at Re =100, 250 and 300 in the range of 0 <= ω^* <= 1.0, where ω^* is the maximum circumferential speed at the sphere surface normalized by the free-stream velocity. At ω^*=0 (without rotation), the flow past a sphere experiences steady axisymmetry, steady plane-symmetry, and unsteady plane-symmetry, respectively, at Re =100, 250 and 300. When the rotational speed increases, the drag increases for all the Reynolds numbers investigated, whereas the lift shows a non-monotonic behavior depending on the Reynolds number. At Re =100, the flow past a sphere shows steady axisymmetry for all the rotational speeds considered and thus the lift is zero. On the other hand, at Re =250 and 300, the flow becomes unsteady with rotation. With increasing rotational speed, the lift first decreases and then increases, showing a local minimum of lift at a specific rotational speed. The three-dimensional vortical structures behind a sphere are significantly modified by the streamwise rotation. For example, the vortical structures at Re =300 are completely changed and phase locked with rotation at ω^*=0.6.

  3. A New Approach to Laminar Flowmeters

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Fernando Lopez; Diaz, Alvaro Deibe; Lema, Marcos Rodriguez; Rodriguez, Santiago Vazquez

    2010-01-01

    After studying the performance and characteristics of actual laminar flowmeters a new disposition for this type of sensors is proposed in such a way that the measurement errors introduced by the intrinsic nature of the device can be minimized. The preliminary study shows that the developing entry region introduces non-linearity effects in all these devices. These effects bring about not only errors, but also a change in the slope of the linear calibration respect of the Poiseuille relation. After a subsequent analysis on how these non-linearity errors can be reduced, a new disposition of this type of flowmeters is introduced. This device makes used of flow elements having pressure taps at three locations along its length and connected to three isolated chambers. In this way, the static pressure can be measured at three locations and contributed to by the pressure taps at the level of each chamber. Thus the linearization error is reduced with an additional advantage of producing a reduced pressure drop. PMID:22163486

  4. Review of hybrid laminar flow control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, K. S. G.; Bertram, O.; Seibel, O.

    2017-08-01

    The aeronautic community always strived for fuel efficient aircraft and presently, the need for ecofriendly aircraft is even more, especially with the tremendous growth of air traffic and growing environmental concerns. Some of the important drivers for such interests include high fuel prices, less emissions requirements, need for more environment friendly aircraft to lessen the global warming effects. Hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) technology is promising and offers possibility to achieve these goals. This technology was researched for decades for its application in transport aircraft, and it has achieved a new level of maturity towards integration and safety and maintenance aspects. This paper aims to give an overview of HLFC systems research and associated flight tests in the past years both in the US and in Europe. The review makes it possible to distinguish between the successful approaches and the less successful or outdated approaches in HLFC research. Furthermore, the technology status shall try to produce first estimations regarding the mass, power consumption and performance of HLFC systems as well as estimations regarding maintenance requirements and possible subsystem definitions.

  5. Longitudinal Laminar Flow Between Cylinders Arranged in Regular Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, E. M.; Loeffler, A. L., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    The increasing complexity of heat transfer and process situations which involve fluid flow has demanded the frequent use of flow passages of unusual geometrical configuration. The present investigation is concerned with one such novel configuration, namely the longitudinal flow between solid cylindrical rods which are arranged in regular array. A schematic diagram of the situation under study. The rods may be located either in triangular or square array. The flow will be taken to be laminar and fully developed. The aim of this analysis is to determine the pressure drop, shear stress, and velocity-distribution characteristics of the system. The starting point of this study is the basic law of momentum conservation. The resulting differential equation has been solved in an approximate, but almost exact, manner by the use of truncated trigonometric series. Results are obtained over a wide range of porosity values for both the triangular and square arrays. Heat transfer has not been considered. The configuration under investigation has potential application in compact heat exchangers for nuclear reactors and other situations. Further the results should also be of interest in the theory of flow through unconsolidated porous beds (ia, 9a). The only related analytical work known to the authors is that of Emersleben (S), who considered only the square array. His rather involved solution, based on complex zeta functions, appears to be valid only at high porosities. Experiments covering a porosity range of 0.093 to 0.984 have been made by Sullivan (4) using parallel-oriented fibers, most of the tests being for fibers in random array. These previous investigations will be compared with the present theory in a later section.

  6. Simulation of plume rise: Study the effect of stably stratified turbulence layer on the rise of a buoyant plume from a continuous source by observing the plume centroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhimireddy, Sudheer Reddy; Bhaganagar, Kiran

    2016-11-01

    Buoyant plumes are common in atmosphere when there exists a difference in temperature or density between the source and its ambience. In a stratified environment, plume rise happens until the buoyancy variation exists between the plume and ambience. In a calm no wind ambience, this plume rise is purely vertical and the entrainment happens because of the relative motion of the plume with ambience and also ambient turbulence. In this study, a plume centroid is defined as the plume mass center and is calculated from the kinematic equation which relates the rate of change of centroids position to the plume rise velocity. Parameters needed to describe the plume are considered as the plume radius, plumes vertical velocity and local buoyancy of the plume. The plume rise velocity is calculated by the mass, momentum and heat conservation equations in their differential form. Our study focuses on the entrainment velocity, as it depicts the extent of plume growth. This entrainment velocity is made up as sum of fractions of plume's relative velocity and ambient turbulence. From the results, we studied the effect of turbulence on the plume growth by observing the variation in the plume radius at different heights and the centroid height reached before loosing its buoyancy.

  7. Start at the End ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsworthy, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Start at the end; that's the way to improve children's plans for investigations. Strange as it may seem, there are times when beginning at the beginning of an investigation is not the best way to start things off. To give children the opportunity to ask questions and plan what to do, sometimes it is best to get them first to consider others' data…

  8. Head Start. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Head Start is a national program that provides comprehensive developmental services for preschool children (ages 3 to 5) from low-income families and social services for their families. Approximately 1,400 community-based nonprofit organizations and school systems develop programs to meet specific needs. Head Start began in 1965 in the Office of…

  9. Science Starts Early.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, J. Christine; Weeks, Valerie; Evans, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the Science Starts Early program, which is designed to expose young, potentially gifted children, particularly girls, to basic scientific principles that will allow them to explore the world around them. A Science Starts Early program curriculum is described and examples are provided of experiments. (Contains references.)…

  10. Starting School in August

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chmelynski, Carol

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the controversial decision of the school board from the Broward County, Florida to start the school year on August 9. School boards across the country that are grappling with the idea of starting school earlier in the year are increasingly running up against strong opposition from parents. In many districts,…

  11. Volcanic Plume Chemistry: Models, Observations and Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Martin, Robert; Oppenheimer, Clive; Griffiths, Paul; Braban, Christine; Cox, Tony; Jones, Rod; Durant, Adam; Kelly, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic plumes are highly chemically reactive; both in the hot, near-vent plume, and also at ambient temperatures in the downwind plume, as the volcanic gases and aerosol disperse into the background atmosphere. In particular, DOAS (Differential Optical Absortpion Spectroscopy) observations have identified BrO (Bromine Monoxide) in several volcanic plumes degassing into the troposphere. These observations are explained by rapid in-plume autocatalytic BrO-chemistry that occurs whilst the plume disperses, enabling oxidants such as ozone from background air to mix with the acid gases and aerosol. Computer modelling tools have recently been developed to interpret the observed BrO and predict that substantial ozone depletion occurs downwind. Alongside these modelling developments, advances in in-situ and remote sensing techniques have also improved our observational understanding of volcanic plumes. We present simulations using the model, PlumeChem, that predict the spatial distribution of gases in volcanic plumes, including formation of reactive halogens BrO, ClO and OClO that are enhanced nearer the plume edges, and depletion of ozone within the plume core. The simulations also show that in-plume chemistry rapidly converts NOx into nitric acid, providing a mechanism to explain observed elevated in-plume HNO3. This highlights the importance of coupled BrO-NOx chemistry, both for BrO-formation and as a production mechanism for HNO3 in BrO-influenced regions of the atmosphere. Studies of coupled halogen-H2S-chemistry are consistent with in-situ Alphasense electrochemical sensor observations of H2S at a range of volcanoes, and only predict H2S-depletion if Cl is additionally elevated. Initial studies regarding the transformations of mercury within volcanic plumes suggest that significant in-plume conversion of Hg0 to Hg2+ can occur in the downwind plume. Such Hg2+ may impact downwind ecology through enhanced Hg-deposition, and causing enhanced biological uptake of

  12. START II and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, J.

    1996-10-01

    The second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START II), signed by President George Bush and Russian President Boris yeltsin in January 1993, was ratified by the US Senate in January 1996 by and overwhelming vote of 87-4. The treaty, which will slash the strategic arsenals of the United States and Russia to 3,000-3,500 warheads each, is now before the two houses of the Russian Parliament (the Duma and the Federation Council) awaiting ratification amidst confusion and criticism. The Yeltsin administration supports START II and spoke in favor of Russian ratification after the Senate acted on the treaty. The Russian foreign minister and the Russian military believed that START II should be ratified as soon as possible. During the recent presidential campaign and his subsequent illness, President Yeltsin has been virtually silent on the subject of START II and nuclear force reductions. Without a push from the Yeltsin administration, the tone among Duma members, has been sharply critical of START II. Voices across the Russian political spectrum have questioned the treaty and linked it to constraints on highly capable theater missile defense (TMD) systems and the continued viability of the ABM Treaty. And urged that START II ratification be held hostage until NATO abandons its plans to expand eastward. Although the START I and START II accords have generated the momentum, opportunity and expectation-both domestic and international-for additional nuclear arms reductions, the current impasse over ratification in the Duma has cast a shadow over the future of START II and raised questions about the chances for any follow-on (START III) agreement.

  13. The MISR Wildfire Smoke Plume Height Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. L.; Garay, M. J.; Diner, D. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Together the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer (MODIS) instruments on the Terra satellite observe several characteristics of wildfire smoke plumes. With support from NASA and the EPA, the MISR team is assembling a database of these observations for North America, Africa, Siberia, Indonesia, etc. that extends back to the beginning of the Terra mission in 2000. The thermal infrared channels on MODIS provide the location of fires and their approximate radiative power. By using an interactive visualization program called the MISR INteractive eXplorer (MINX), users interactively digitize wildfire plumes to retrieve accurate plume heights and wind speeds using a new stereo height retrieval algorithm. This information, along with the locations and directions of individual plumes, their areas and aerosol properties derived from the operational MISR aerosol algorithm, are stored in this publicly accessible database for subsequent analysis (http://www-misr2.jpl.nasa.gov/EPA-Plumes/). The plume database currently contains about 4000 smoke plumes and smoke clouds from North America. An equal number of plumes and clouds for other regions around the world has also been digitized. A few thousand additional plumes are in the process of being incorporated. Smoke plumes in this context are considered to be discrete regions of smoke that can be followed to their fire sources at ground level and have a distinctive shape determined by the direction the smoke is driven downwind. Smoke “clouds” are defined here as regions of dense smoke not clearly associated with specific fire sources, and whose direction of transport is not easily determined. Plume height measurements can be used as a surrogate for injection heights, which are important for modeling smoke transport. Examples of height and wind retrievals for specific plumes will be shown. Those chosen have not only been incorporated in statistical analyses of plume

  14. Laminar round jet diffusion flame buoyant instabilities: Study on the disappearance of varicose structures at ultra-low Froude number

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, Joan

    2010-04-15

    At very low Froude number, buoyancy instabilities of round laminar jet diffusion flames disappear (except for small tip oscillations referred to as flickering) and those flames look stable and smooth. This study examines the contributions of the different phenomena in the flow dynamics that may explain this effect. It is observed that, at ultra-low Froude/Reynolds numbers, the material influenced by buoyancy is the plume of the flame and not the flame itself (reaction zone) that is short. Therefore, the vorticity creation zone does not profit from the reaction neighbourhood promoting a sharp gradient of density. Expansion and stretch are also important as they push vorticity creation terms more inside the flame and closer to the burner rim compared to moderate Froude flames. In these latter, the vorticity is continuously created around the flame reaction zone, along its developed height and closer to the vertical direction (in average). (author)

  15. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  16. New indices for the spatial validation of plume forecasts with observations of smoke plumes from grassfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Joaquín E.; Berri, Guillermo J.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to propose new indices for the spatial validation of hazardous plumes forecast, and apply and test them with data of a case study. One, the Plume-Overlap-Area Hit index, is a modification of a widely used index that considers the overlap area between observed and forecast plumes. The other one, the Plume-Mean-Orientation Hit index, introduces a new concept in plume forecast validation, i.e., the mean direction of plume propagation. These two indices are combined in a new two-dimensional Combined-Direction-Area Hit index. The new indices are applied to the spatial validation of smoke plume forecast for a case study of uncontrolled grassfires that took place during April and May 2008 in the La Plata River region in South America. Operational models at the Argentine National Meteorological Service (SMN) are employed to produce the plume forecast. The HIRHYLTAD dispersion model is used to forecast the smoke plumes, employing the Eta/SMN meteorological forecast model outputs. The forecast plumes are compared to the observed plumes in high-resolution MODIS imagery from AQUA and TERRA satellites, from which a total of 59 smoke plumes are identified. The study concludes that the presented methodology that employs operational meteorological models and simplified dispersion models can be used to produce reasonably accurate forecasts of the areas affected by the smoke plumes that originate in forest and grassland fires, particularly in cases when limited information is available about the fires. Although the present study is specifically applied to smoke plumes, the validation technique with the proposed indices can be of utility to study pollutant plumes of diverse nature.

  17. Possible cause of plumes from Bennett Island, Soviet Far Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.W.; Amand, P.S.; Matson, M.

    1986-05-01

    Since 1974, NOAA satellites have shown more than 150 plumes coming from the vicinity of Bennett Island in the Soviet far Arctic (long 149/sup 0/3'E, lat 76/sup 0/7'N). These plumes, which may be hundreds of kilometers long and as much as 30 km wide at the origin, start and end abruptly. Multiple sources occur. Infrared imagery indicates that the plumes are as cold as -45/sup 0/C. The geologic section on Bennett Island suggests that the region is gas prone. Lower Cretaceous sedimentary and volcanic rocks lie unconformably on Cambrian-Ordovician sedimentary rocks. At the base of the Cretaceous is a 20-m thick section of sandstone, dark shale, and coal beds. Bennett Island is now 500 km from mainland Siberia; however, during most of the last 5 m.y., it was part of the mainland, and the nearest sea was 350 km north. Permafrost would have developed throughout this entire area. Within this permafrost zone, methane derived from the Cretaceous coal beds would have gone into the hydrate form. With the relatively recent melting of the great continental ice sheets and accompanying rise in sea level, the region around Bennett Island has been covered by tens of meters of water. Permafrost and associated hydrates are unstable under such conditions and have begun to break up. The authors propose that methane, released by breakup of the permafrost and accompanying hydrate, escapes periodically into the atmosphere, expands adiabatically, and in the process entrains particles of hydrate, water, and clay. These particles cause condensation of atmospheric moisture, forming the plumes that are observed by the satellites.

  18. Looking for life in the plumes of ocean worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, Jonathan; Srama, Ralf; Waite, J. Hunter; Sherwood, Brent; Cable, Morgan; Postberg, Frank; Kempf, Sascha

    2016-07-01

    Interest in searching for life in the outer solar system has intensified recently with the new start of the Europa Multiple Flyby Mission and the insertion through a NASA community announcement of an Ocean Worlds (Titan and Enceladus) theme in the list of admissible New Frontiers Missions. As part of a Discovery proposal called "Enceladus Life Finder", or ELF, a multidisciplinary team of scientists led by the authors developed a set of measurements for determining the habitability of Enceladus' internal ocean and the presence of biological activity therein, obtained by flying two mass spectrometers through Enceladus' plume - one optimized for gas, the other for grains. The measurements and information derived therefrom cut to the heart of what biological activity does that distinguishes it from abiotic processes. They also tightly constrain the essential parameters of ocean habitability including pH, redox state, available free energy, and temperature of any active hydrothermal systems on the floor of the Enceladus ocean. In addition to Enceladus, such a protocol is applicable to Europa should deep-seated plumes be present there, but the much higher gravity requires that the grain mass spectrometer be flown at a very low altitude. On the Europa flyby mission, this would require a small spacecraft that would detach from the main spacecraft and fly within a few kilometers of the surface. Proposed to NASA as Sylph, this simple plume probe would provide a low-cost way to equip the Europa Multiple Flyby Mission to prepare for potential plumes, and use them to determine the habitability and biopotential of the Europan ocean.

  19. Laminar Diffusion Flame Studies (Ground- and Space-Based Studies)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Laminar diffusion flames are of interest because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for analysis and experiments than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. Certainly, understanding flame processes within laminar diffusion flames must precede understanding these processes in more complex turbulent diffusion flames. In addition, many properties of laminar diffusion flames are directly relevant to turbulent diffusion flames using laminar flamelet concepts. Laminar jet diffusion flame shapes (luminous flame boundaries) have been of particular interest since the classical study of Burke and Schumann because they are a simple nonintrusive measurement that is convenient for evaluating flame structure predictions. Thus, consideration of laminar flame shapes is undertaken in the following, emphasizing conditions where effects of gravity are small, due to the importance of such conditions to practical applications. Another class of interesting properties of laminar diffusion flames are their laminar soot and smoke point properties (i.e., the flame length, fuel flow rate, characteristic residence time, etc., at the onset of soot appearance in the flame (the soot point) and the onset of soot emissions from the flame (the smoke point)). These are useful observable soot properties of nonpremixed flames because they provide a convenient means to rate several aspects of flame sooting properties: the relative propensity of various fuels to produce soot in flames; the relative effects of fuel structure, fuel dilution, flame temperature and ambient pressure on the soot appearance and emission properties of flames; the relative levels of continuum radiation from soot in flames; and effects of the intrusion of gravity (or buoyant motion) on emissions of soot from flames. An important motivation to define conditions for soot emissions is that observations of laminar jet diffusion flames in critical environments, e.g., space shuttle and space station

  20. Models and Observations of Plume-Ridge Interaction in the South Atlantic and their Implications for Crustal Thickness Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmoeller, R.; Dannberg, J.; Steinberger, B. M.; Bredow, E.; Torsvik, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle plumes are thought to originate at thermal or thermo-chemical boundary layers, and since their origin is relatively fixed compared to plate motion they produce hotspot tracks at the position of their impingement. When plumes reach the surface close to mid-ocean ridges, they generate thicker oceanic crust due to their increased temperature and hence higher degree of melting. Observations of these thickness variations allow estimates about the buoyancy flux and excess temperature of the plume. One example is the interaction of the Tristan plume with the South Atlantic Mid-Ocean Ridge, however, conclusions about the plume properties are complicated by the fact that the Tristan plume track has both on- and off-ridge segments. In these cases, where a plume is overridden by a ridge, it is assumed that the plume flux has a lateral component towards the ridge (the plume is "captured" by the ridge). Additionally, sea floor spreading north of the Florianopolis Fracture Zone did not start until 112 Ma -- at least 15 Ma after the plume head arrival -- while the Atlantic had already opened south of it. Therefore, the plume is influenced by the jump in lithosphere thickness across the Florianopolis Fracture zone.We present crustal thickness and plume tracks of a three-dimensional regional convection model of the upper mantle for the Tristan-South Atlantic ridge interaction. The model is created with the convection code ASPECT, which allows for adaptive finite-element meshes to resolve the fine-scale structures within a rising plume head in the presence of large viscosity variations. The boundary conditions of the model are prescribed from a coarser global mantle convection model and the results are compared against recently published models of crustal thickness in the South Atlantic and hotspot tracks in global moving hotspot reference frames. In particular, we investigate the influence of the overriding ridge on the plume head.Thus, our comparison between models of plume

  1. VISUAL PLUMES MIXING ZONE MODELING SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a long history of both supporting plume model development and providing mixing zone modeling software. The Visual Plumes model is the most recent addition to the suite of public-domain models available through the EPA-Athens Center f...

  2. Dynamics of fire plumes in verticle shear

    Treesearch

    Philip Cunningham; Scott L. Goodrick; Hussaini M. Yousuff; Rodman R. Linn; Chunmei Xia

    2003-01-01

    Plumes from wildfires and prescribed fires represent a critical aspect of smoke mangement and aire quality assessment, as as such it is important to understand the structure and dynamics of these plumes, both with respect to a basic understanding of the phenomena and with respect to an assessment of the validity of plumerise parameterizations over a wide variety of...

  3. Io with Loki Plume on Bright Limb

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-03

    NASA's Voyager 1 image of Io showing active plume of Loki on limb. Heart-shaped feature southeast of Loki consists of fallout deposits from active plume Pele. The images that make up this mosaic were taken from an average distance of approximately 490,000 kilometers (340,000 miles). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00010

  4. VISUAL PLUMES MIXING ZONE MODELING SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency has a history of developing plume models and providing technical assistance. The Visual Plumes model (VP) is a recent addition to the public-domain models available on the EPA Center for Exposure Assessment Modeling (CEAM) web page. The Wind...

  5. VISUAL PLUMES MIXING ZONE MODELING SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a long history of both supporting plume model development and providing mixing zone modeling software. The Visual Plumes model is the most recent addition to the suite of public-domain models available through the EPA-Athens Center f...

  6. Io with Loki Plume on Bright Limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Voyager 1 image of Io showing active plume of Loki on limb. Heart-shaped feature southeast of Loki consists of fallout deposits from active plume Pele. The images that make up this mosaic were taken from an average distance of approximately 490,000 kilometers (340,000 miles).

  7. Io with Loki Plume on Bright Limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Voyager 1 image of Io showing active plume of Loki on limb. Heart-shaped feature southeast of Loki consists of fallout deposits from active plume Pele. The images that make up this mosaic were taken from an average distance of approximately 490,000 kilometers (340,000 miles).

  8. VISUAL PLUMES MIXING ZONE MODELING SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency has a history of developing plume models and providing technical assistance. The Visual Plumes model (VP) is a recent addition to the public-domain models available on the EPA Center for Exposure Assessment Modeling (CEAM) web page. The Wind...

  9. Laminar flame propagation in a stratified charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Youngchul

    The propagation of laminar flame from a rich or stoichiometric mixture to a lean mixture in a stratified methane-air charge was investigated experimentally and numerically. Emphasis was on the understanding of the flame behavior in the transition region; in particular, on the mechanism of burning velocity enhancement in this region. In the experimental setup, mixtures of two different equivalence ratios were separated by a soap bubble in a spherical constant volume combustion vessel. The richer mixture inside the bubble was ignited by a focused laser beam. The flame development was observed by Schlieren technique and flame speeds were measured by heat release analysis of the pressure data. An one-dimensional, time- dependant numerical simulation of the flame propagation in a charge with step-stratification was used to interpret the experimental results. Both the experimental and numerical studies showed that the instantaneous flame speed depended on the previous flame history. Thus a `strong' (with mixture equivalence ratio close to stoichiometric) flame can sustain propagation into finite regions of substantially lean equivalence ratio. Both thermal and chemical effects were crucial for explaining the mechanism of the flame speed enhancement in the transition period. Because of the presence of this `back- support' effect, the usual concept of specifying the burning velocity as a function of the end gas state is inadequate for a stratified charge. A simple correlation for instantaneous flame velocity based on the local burned gas temperature is developed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253- 1690.)

  10. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  11. Modeling absolute plate and plume motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodinier, G. P.; Wessel, P.; Conrad, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    Paleomagnetic evidence for plume drift has made modeling of absolute plate motions challenging, especially since direct observations of plume drift are lacking. Predictions of plume drift arising from mantle convection models and broadly satisfying observed paleolatitudes have so far provided the only framework for deriving absolute plate motions over moving hotspots. However, uncertainties in mantle rheology, temperature, and initial conditions make such models nonunique. Using simulated and real data, we will show that age progressions along Pacific hotspot trails provide strong constraints on plume motions for all major trails, and furthermore that it is possible to derive models for relative plume drift from these data alone. Relative plume drift depends on the inter-hotspot distances derived from age progressions but lacks a fixed reference point and orientation. By incorporating paleolatitude histories for the Hawaii and Louisville chains we add further constraints on allowable plume motions, yet one unknown parameter remains: a longitude shift that applies equally to all plumes. To obtain a solution we could restrict either the Hawaii or Louisville plume to have latitudinal motion only, thus satisfying paleolatitude constraints. Yet, restricting one plume to latitudinal motion while all others move freely is not realistic. Consequently, it is only possible to resolve the motion of hotspots relative to an overall and unknown longitudinal shift as a function of time. Our plate motions are therefore dependent on the same shift via an unknown rotation about the north pole. Yet, as plume drifts are consequences of mantle convection, our results place strong constraints on the pattern of convection. Other considerations, such as imposed limits on plate speed, plume speed, proximity to LLSVP edges, model smoothness, or relative plate motions via ridge-spotting may add further constraints that allow a unique model of Pacific absolute plate and plume motions to be

  12. Low-buoyancy thermochemical plumes resolve controversy of classical mantle plume concept

    PubMed Central

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's biggest magmatic events are believed to originate from massive melting when hot mantle plumes rising from the lowermost mantle reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical models predict large plume heads that cause kilometre-scale surface uplift, and narrow (100 km radius) plume tails that remain in the mantle after the plume head spreads below the lithosphere. However, in many cases, such uplifts and narrow plume tails are not observed. Here using numerical models, we show that the issue can be resolved if major mantle plumes contain up to 15–20% of recycled oceanic crust in a form of dense eclogite, which drastically decreases their buoyancy and makes it depth dependent. We demonstrate that, despite their low buoyancy, large enough thermochemical plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Their tails are bulky (>200 km radius) and remain in the upper mantle for 100 millions of years. PMID:25907970

  13. Low-buoyancy thermochemical plumes resolve controversy of classical mantle plume concept.

    PubMed

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan V

    2015-04-24

    The Earth's biggest magmatic events are believed to originate from massive melting when hot mantle plumes rising from the lowermost mantle reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical models predict large plume heads that cause kilometre-scale surface uplift, and narrow (100 km radius) plume tails that remain in the mantle after the plume head spreads below the lithosphere. However, in many cases, such uplifts and narrow plume tails are not observed. Here using numerical models, we show that the issue can be resolved if major mantle plumes contain up to 15-20% of recycled oceanic crust in a form of dense eclogite, which drastically decreases their buoyancy and makes it depth dependent. We demonstrate that, despite their low buoyancy, large enough thermochemical plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Their tails are bulky (>200 km radius) and remain in the upper mantle for 100 millions of years.

  14. Water Vapor Enhancement in Prescribed Fire Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, C. M.; Clements, C. B.; Potter, B. E.; Strenfel, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    In situ radiosonde measurements were obtained during multiple prescribed fires at the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center at Ichauway, Georgia in March and July of 2008. Data were obtained from prescribed fires conducted in longleaf pine ecosystems. After significant smoke generation was observed, radiosondes were launched downwind of the fire front and rose directly into the smoke plumes. Radiosondes were also launched before each burn to obtain ambient background conditions. This provided a unique dataset of smoke plume moisture to determine how moisture enhancement from fire smoke alters the dynamics of the smoke plume. Preliminary analysis of results show moisture enhancement occurred in all smoke plumes with relative humidity values increasing by 10 to 30 percent and water vapor mixing ratios increasing by 1 to 4 g kg-1. Understanding the moisture enhancement in prescribed fire smoke plumes will help determine the convective dynamics that occur in major wildland fires and convection columns.

  15. Follow the plume: the habitability of Enceladus.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher P; Anbar, Ariel D; Porco, Carolyn; Tsou, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The astrobiological exploration of other worlds in our Solar System is moving from initial exploration to more focused astrobiology missions. In this context, we present the case that the plume of Enceladus currently represents the best astrobiology target in the Solar System. Analysis of the plume by the Cassini mission indicates that the steady plume derives from a subsurface liquid water reservoir that contains organic carbon, biologically available nitrogen, redox energy sources, and inorganic salts. Furthermore, samples from the plume jetting out into space are accessible to a low-cost flyby mission. No other world has such well-studied indications of habitable conditions. Thus, the science goals that would motivate an Enceladus mission are more advanced than for any other Solar System body. The goals of such a mission must go beyond further geophysical characterization, extending to the search for biomolecular evidence of life in the organic-rich plume. This will require improved in situ investigations and a sample return.

  16. Modelling oil plumes from subsurface spills.

    PubMed

    Lardner, Robin; Zodiatis, George

    2017-07-11

    An oil plume model to simulate the behavior of oil from spills located at any given depth below the sea surface is presented, following major modifications to a plume model developed earlier by Malačič (2001) and drawing on ideas in a paper by Yapa and Zheng (1997). The paper presents improvements in those models and numerical testing of the various parameters in the plume model. The plume model described in this paper is one of the numerous modules of the well-established MEDSLIK oil spill model. The deep blowout scenario of the MEDEXPOL 2013 oil spill modelling exercise, organized by REMPEC, has been applied using the improved oil plume module of the MEDSLIK model and inter-comparison with results having the oil spill source at the sea surface are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  18. MISR observations of Etna volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scollo, S.; Kahn, R. A.; Nelson, D. L.; Coltelli, M.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Realmuto, V. J.

    2012-03-01

    In the last twelve years, Mt. Etna, located in eastern Sicily, has produced a great number of explosive eruptions. Volcanic plumes have risen to several km above sea level and created problems for aviation and the communities living near the volcano. A reduction of hazards may be accomplished using remote sensing techniques to evaluate important features of volcanic plumes. Since 2000, the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on board NASA's Terra spacecraft has been extensively used to study aerosol dispersal and to extract the three-dimensional structure of plumes coming from anthropogenic or natural sources, including volcanoes. In the present work, MISR data from several explosive events occurring at Etna are analyzed using a program named MINX (MISR INteractive eXplorer). MINX uses stereo matching techniques to evaluate the height of the volcanic aerosol with a precision of a few hundred meters, and extracts aerosol properties from the MISR Standard products. We analyzed twenty volcanic plumes produced during the 2000, 2001, 2002-03, 2006 and 2008 Etna eruptions, finding that volcanic aerosol dispersal and column height obtained by this analysis is in good agreement with ground-based observations. MISR aerosol type retrievals: (1) clearly distinguish volcanic plumes that are sulphate and/or water vapor dominated from ash-dominated ones; (2) detect even low concentrations of volcanic ash in the atmosphere; (3) demonstrate that sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes consist of smaller-sized particles compared to ash plumes. This work highlights the potential of MISR to detect important volcanic plume characteristics that can be used to constrain the eruption source parameters in volcanic ash dispersion models. Further, the possibility of discriminating sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes from ash-dominated ones is important to better understand the atmospheric impact of these plumes.

  19. MISR Observations of Etna Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scollo, S.; Kahn, R. A.; Nelson, D. L.; Coltelli, M.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Realmuto, V. J.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twelve years, Mt. Etna, located in eastern Sicily, has produced a great number of explosive eruptions. Volcanic plumes have risen to several km above sea level and created problems for aviation and the communities living near the volcano. A reduction of hazards may be accomplished using remote sensing techniques to evaluate important features of volcanic plumes. Since 2000, the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on board NASA s Terra spacecraft has been extensively used to study aerosol dispersal and to extract the three-dimensional structure of plumes coming from anthropogenic or natural sources, including volcanoes. In the present work, MISR data from several explosive events occurring at Etna are analyzed using a program named MINX (MISR INteractive eXplorer). MINX uses stereo matching techniques to evaluate the height of the volcanic aerosol with a precision of a few hundred meters, and extracts aerosol properties from the MISR Standard products. We analyzed twenty volcanic plumes produced during the 2000, 2001, 2002-03, 2006 and 2008 Etna eruptions, finding that volcanic aerosol dispersal and column height obtained by this analysis is in good agreement with ground-based observations. MISR aerosol type retrievals: (1) clearly distinguish volcanic plumes that are sulphate and/or water vapor dominated from ash-dominated ones; (2) detect even low concentrations of volcanic ash in the atmosphere; (3) demonstrate that sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes consist of smaller-sized particles compared to ash plumes. This work highlights the potential of MISR to detect important volcanic plume characteristics that can be used to constrain the eruption source parameters in volcanic ash dispersion models. Further, the possibility of discriminating sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes from ash-dominated ones is important to better understand the atmospheric impact of these plumes.

  20. MISR Observations of Etna Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scollo, S.; Kahn, R. A.; Nelson, D. L.; Coltelli, M.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Realmuto, V. J.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twelve years, Mt. Etna, located in eastern Sicily, has produced a great number of explosive eruptions. Volcanic plumes have risen to several km above sea level and created problems for aviation and the communities living near the volcano. A reduction of hazards may be accomplished using remote sensing techniques to evaluate important features of volcanic plumes. Since 2000, the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on board NASA s Terra spacecraft has been extensively used to study aerosol dispersal and to extract the three-dimensional structure of plumes coming from anthropogenic or natural sources, including volcanoes. In the present work, MISR data from several explosive events occurring at Etna are analyzed using a program named MINX (MISR INteractive eXplorer). MINX uses stereo matching techniques to evaluate the height of the volcanic aerosol with a precision of a few hundred meters, and extracts aerosol properties from the MISR Standard products. We analyzed twenty volcanic plumes produced during the 2000, 2001, 2002-03, 2006 and 2008 Etna eruptions, finding that volcanic aerosol dispersal and column height obtained by this analysis is in good agreement with ground-based observations. MISR aerosol type retrievals: (1) clearly distinguish volcanic plumes that are sulphate and/or water vapor dominated from ash-dominated ones; (2) detect even low concentrations of volcanic ash in the atmosphere; (3) demonstrate that sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes consist of smaller-sized particles compared to ash plumes. This work highlights the potential of MISR to detect important volcanic plume characteristics that can be used to constrain the eruption source parameters in volcanic ash dispersion models. Further, the possibility of discriminating sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes from ash-dominated ones is important to better understand the atmospheric impact of these plumes.

  1. High fidelity radiative heat transfer models for high-pressure laminar hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jian; Lei, Shenghui; Dasgupta, Adhiraj; Modest, Michael F.; Haworth, Daniel C.

    2014-11-01

    Radiative heat transfer is studied numerically for high-pressure laminar H2-air jet diffusion flames, with pressure ranging from 1 to 30 bar. Water vapour is assumed to be the only radiatively participating species. Two different radiation models are employed, the first being the full spectrum k-distribution model together with conventional Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solvers. Narrowband k-distributions of water vapour are calculated and databased from the HITEMP 2010 database, which claims to retain accuracy up to 4000 K. The full-spectrum k-distributions are assembled from their narrowband counterparts to yield high accuracy with little additional computational cost. The RTE is solved using various spherical harmonics methods, such as P1, simplified P3 (SP3) and simplified P5 (SP5). The resulting partial differential equations as well as other transport equations in the laminar diffusion flames are discretized with the finite-volume method in OpenFOAM®. The second radiation model is a Photon Monte Carlo (PMC) method coupled with a line-by-line spectral model. The PMC absorption coefficient database is derived from the same spectroscopy database as the k-distribution methods. A time blending scheme is used to reduce PMC calculations at each time step. Differential diffusion effects, which are important in laminar hydrogen flames, are also included in the scalar transport equations. It was found that the optically thin approximation overpredicts radiative heat loss at elevated pressures. Peak flame temperature is less affected by radiation because of faster chemical reactions at high pressures. Significant cooling effects are observed at downstream locations. As pressure increases, the performance of RTE models starts to deviate due to increased optical thickness. SPN models perform only marginally better than P1 because P1 is adequate except at very high pressure.

  2. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... More... Home Getting Started National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives - Getting Started Getting Started Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) are relatively new legal instruments ...

  3. Brief history of laminar flow clean room systems

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, W J

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the development and evolution of laminar flow clean rooms and hoods and describes the underlying principles and rationales associated with development of this type of clean room system and Federal Standard No. 209. By the mid 1970's, over a thousand hospitals in the US had installed laminar flow equipment in operating rooms. During the past several years a great deal of attention has been focused on conserving energy in clean rooms. Some gains in energy conservation have been achieved by improved design, off hours shutdown, and closer evaluation of requirements for clean rooms. By the early 1970's, the laminar flow principle had been carried from the Laboratory and applied to production hardware to create a mature industry producing and marketing a variety of laminar flow equipment in less than 10 years time. This achievement was made possible by literally dozens of persons in industry, government, military, and private individuals who developed hardware, added numerous innovations, and had the foresight to apply the technology to many fields other than industrial clean rooms. Now, with laminar flow devices available, class 100 levels are readily achievable and maintained, and at the same time require fewer operating restrictions than previously possible.

  4. Computational Analysis of the G-III Laminar Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Liao, Wei; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2011-01-01

    Under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project, flight experiments are planned with the primary objective of demonstrating the Discrete Roughness Elements (DRE) technology for passive laminar flow control at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. In this paper, we present a preliminary computational assessment of the Gulfstream-III (G-III) aircraft wing-glove designed to attain natural laminar flow for the leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg. Analysis for a flight Mach number of 0.75 shows that it should be possible to achieve natural laminar flow for twice the transition Reynolds number ever achieved at this sweep angle. However, the wing-glove needs to be redesigned to effectively demonstrate passive laminar flow control using DREs. As a by-product of the computational assessment, effect of surface curvature on stationary crossflow disturbances is found to be strongly stabilizing for the current design, and it is suggested that convex surface curvature could be used as a control parameter for natural laminar flow design, provided transition occurs via stationary crossflow disturbances.

  5. Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) Experiment: Findings From Space Flight Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z. G.; Aalburg, C.; Diez, F. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    2003-01-01

    The present experimental study of soot processes in hydrocarbon-fueled laminar nonbuoyant and nonpremixed (diffusion) flames at microgravity within a spacecraft was motivated by the relevance of soot to the performance of power and propulsion systems, to the hazards of unwanted fires, and to the emission of combustion-generated pollutants. Soot processes in turbulent flames are of greatest practical interest, however, direct study of turbulent flames is not tractable because the unsteadiness and distortion of turbulent flames limit available residence times and spatial resolution within regions where soot processes are important. Thus, laminar diffusion flames are generally used to provide more tractable model flame systems to study processes relevant to turbulent diffusion flames, justified by the known similarities of gas-phase processes in laminar and turbulent diffusion flames, based on the widely-accepted laminar flamelet concept of turbulent flames. Unfortunately, laminar diffusion flames at normal gravity are affected by buoyancy due to their relatively small flow velocities and, as discussed next, they do not have the same utility for simulating the soot processes as they do for simulating the gas phase processes of turbulent flames.

  6. Laminar and turbulent heating predictions for mars entry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Yan, Chao; Zheng, Weilin; Zhong, Kang; Geng, Yunfei

    2016-11-01

    Laminar and turbulent heating rates play an important role in the design of Mars entry vehicles. Two distinct gas models, thermochemical non-equilibrium (real gas) model and perfect gas model with specified effective specific heat ratio, are utilized to investigate the aerothermodynamics of Mars entry vehicle named Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). Menter shear stress transport (SST) turbulent model with compressible correction is implemented to take account of the turbulent effect. The laminar and turbulent heating rates of the two gas models are compared and analyzed in detail. The laminar heating rates predicted by the two gas models are nearly the same at forebody of the vehicle, while the turbulent heating environments predicted by the real gas model are severer than the perfect gas model. The difference of specific heat ratio between the two gas models not only induces the flow structure's discrepancy but also increases the heating rates at afterbody of the vehicle obviously. Simple correlations for turbulent heating augmentation in terms of laminar momentum thickness Reynolds number, which can be employed as engineering level design and analysis tools, are also developed from numerical results. At the time of peak heat flux on the +3σ heat load trajectory, the maximum value of momentum thickness Reynolds number at the MSL's forebody is about 500, and the maximum value of turbulent augmentation factor (turbulent heating rates divided by laminar heating rates) is 5 for perfect gas model and 8 for real gas model.

  7. Spontaneous transfer of droplets across microfluidic laminar interfaces.

    PubMed

    Deng, Nan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2016-11-01

    The precise manipulation of droplets in microfluidics has revolutionized a myriad of drop-based technologies, such as multiple emulsion preparation, drop fusion, drop fission, drop trapping and drop sorting, which offer promising new opportunities in chemical and biological fields. In this paper, we present an interfacial-tension-directed strategy for the migration of droplets across liquid-liquid laminar streams. By carefully controlling the interfacial energies, droplets of phase A are able to pass across the laminar interfaces of two immiscible fluids from phase B to phase C due to a positive spreading coefficient of phase C over phase B. To demonstrate this, we successfully perform the transfer of water droplets across an oil-oil laminar interface and the transfer of oil droplets across an oil-water laminar interface. The whole transfer process is spontaneous and only takes about 50 ms. We find that the fluid dynamics have an impact on the transfer processes. Only if the flowrate ratios are well matched will the droplets pass through the laminar interface successfully. This interfacial-tension-directed transfer of droplets provides a versatile procedure to make new structures and control microreactions as exemplified by the fabrication of giant unilamellar vesicles and cell-laden microgels.

  8. Assessment of LAURA for Laminar Supersonic Shallow Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Pulsonetti, Maria V.; Everhart, Joel L.; Bey, Kim S.

    2004-01-01

    The ability of the Laura flow solver to predict local heating augmentation factors for shallow cavities is assessed. This assessment is part of a larger e ort within the Space Shuttle return-to-flight program to develop technologies to support on-orbit tile repair decisions. The comparison is made against global phosphor thermography images taken in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Laboratory 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The cavities are rectangular in shape, with lengths L/H of 14 20 and depths H/ of 1.1 5.2. The fully laminar results, for Re = 300, show good agreement between the data sets. For Re = 503, the wind tunnel data indicates boundary layer transition with turbulent flow both within and downstream of the cavity. The turbulent flow structures are significantly di erent from the laminar predictions, with order of magnitude increases in the heating augmentations. Because of the di erent flow structures, no simple bump factor can be used to correct the laminar calculations to account for the turbulent heating levels. A fine gradation in wind tunnel cases will be required to clearly delineate the laminar-to-turbulent transition point, and hence the limits of applicability of the laminar numerical approach.

  9. Laminarization of Turbulent Boundary Layer on Flexible and Rigid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the control of turbulent boundary layer flow over flexible and rigid surfaces downstream of a concave-convex geometry has been made. The concave-convex curvature induces centrifugal forces and a pressure gradient on the growth of the turbulent boundary layer. The favorable gradient is not sufficient to overcome the unfavorable; thus, the net effect is a destabilizing, of the flow into Gortler instabilities. This study shows that control of the turbulent boundary layer and structural loading can be successfully achieved by using localized surface heating because the subsequent cooling and geometrical shaping downstream over a favorable pressure gradient is effective in laminarization of the turbulence. Wires embedded in a thermally insulated substrate provide surface heating. The laminarized velocity profile adjusts to a lower Reynolds number, and the structure responds to a lower loading. In the laminarization, the turbulent energy is dissipated by molecular transport by both viscous and conductivity mechanisms. Laminarization reduces spanwise vorticity because of the longitudinal cooling gradient of the sublayer profile. The results demonstrate that the curvature-induced mean pressure gradient enhances the receptivity of the flow to localized surface heating, a potentially viable mechanism to laminarize turbulent boundary layer flow; thus, the flow reduces the response of the flexible structure and the resultant sound radiation.

  10. Sulfur Dioxide Plume During the Continuing Eruption of Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-08-03

    The current eruption of Mt. Etna started on July 17, and has continued to the present. This ASTER image was acquired on Sunday, July 29 and shows the sulfur dioxide plume (in purple) originating form the summit, drifting over the city of Catania, and continuing over the Ionian Sea. ASTER's unique combination of multiple thermal infrared channels and high spatial resolution allows the determination of the thickness and position of the SO2 plume. The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km. The image is centered at 37.7 degrees north latitude, 15 degrees east longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02678

  11. Dynamics and Deposits of Coignimbrite Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engwell, Samantha; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Neri, Augusto

    2014-05-01

    Fine ash in the atmosphere poses a significant hazard, with potentially disastrous consequences for aviation and, on deposition, health and infrastructure. Fine-grained particles form a large proportion of ejecta in Plinian volcanic clouds. However, another common, but poorly studied phenomena exists whereby large amounts of fine ash are injected into the atmosphere. Coignimbrite plumes form as material is elutriated from the top of pyroclastic density currents. The ash in these plumes is considerably finer grained than that in Plinian plumes and can be distributed over thousands of kilometres in the atmosphere. Despite their significance, very little is known regarding coignimbrite plume formation and dispersion, predominantly due to the poor preservation of resultant deposits. As a result, consequences of coignimbrite plume formation are usually overlooked when conducting hazard and risk analysis. In this study, deposit characteristics and numerical models of plumes are combined to investigate the conditions required for coignimbrite plume formation. Coignimbrite deposits from the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption (Magnitude 7.7, 39 ka) are well sorted and very fine, with a mode of between 30 and 50 microns, and a significant component of respirable ash (less than 10 microns). Analogous distributions are found for coignimbrite deposits from Tungurahua 2006 and Volcan de Colima (2004-2006), amongst others, regardless of magnitude, type or chemistry of eruption. These results indicate that elutriation processes are the dominant control on coignimbrite grainsize distribution. To further investigate elutriation and coignimbrite plume dynamics, the numerical plume model of Bursik (2001) is applied. Model sensitivity analysis demonstrates that neutral buoyancy conditions (required for the formation of the plume) are controlled by a balance between temperature and gas mass flux in the upper most parts of the pyroclastic density current. In addition, results emphasize the

  12. Plumes on Enceladus: Lessons for Europa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.

    2014-12-01

    The possible detection of a water vapour plume on Europa [1] suggests resemblances to Enceladus, a cryovolcanically active satellite [2]. How does this activity work, and what lesson does Enceladus have for plumes on Europa? The inferred vapour column densities of the Europa [1] and Enceladus [3] plumes are similar, but the inferred velocity and mass flux of the former are higher. At Enceladus, the inferred plume strength is modulated by its orbital position [4,5], suggesting that tides opening and closing cracks control the eruption behaviour [6,7]. An additional source of stress potentially driving eruptions is the effect of slow freezing of the ice shell above[7,8]. The original detection of the Europa plume was close to apocentre, when polar fractures are expected to be in tension [1]. Follow-up observations at the same orbital phase did not detect a plume [9], although the Galileo E12 magnetometer data may provide evidence for an earlier plume [Khurana, pers. comm.]. One possible explanation for the plume's disappearance is that longer-period tidal effects are playing a role; there are hints of similar secular changes in the Enceladus data [4,5]. Another is that detectability of the Europa plumein the aurora observations also depends on variations in electron density (which affects the UV emission flux) [9]. Or it may simply be that eruptive activity on Europa is highly time-variable, as on Io. At Enceladus, the plume scale height is independent of orbital position and plume brightness [5]. This suggests that the vapour velocity does not depend on crack width, consistent with supersonic flow through a near-surface throat. The large scale height inferred for the Europa plume likewise suggests supersonic behaviour. Continuous fallback of solid plume material at Enceladus affects both the colour [10] and surface texture [2] of near-polar regions. Less frequent plume activity would produce subtler effects; whether the sparse available imagery at Europa [11

  13. Analytical solution of laminar-laminar stratified two-phase flows with curved interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brauner, N.; Rovinsky, J.; Maron, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    The present study represents a complete analytical solution for laminar two-phase flows with curved interfaces. The solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the two-phases in bipolar coordinates provides the `flow monograms` describe the relation between the interface curvature and the insitu flow geometry when given the phases flow rates and viscosity ratios. Energy considerations are employed to construct the `interface monograms`, whereby the characteristic interfacial curvature is determined in terms of the phases insitu holdup, pipe diameter, surface tension, fluids/wall adhesion and gravitation. The two monograms are then combined to construct the system `operational monogram`. The `operational monogram` enables the determination of the interface configuration, the local flow characteristics, such as velocity profiles, wall and interfacial shear stresses distribution as well as the integral characteristics of the two-phase flow: phases insitu holdup and pressure drop.

  14. Persistence of a Groundwater Contaminant Plume after Hydraulic Source Containment at a Chlorinated-Solvent Contaminated Site

    PubMed Central

    Matthieu, D.E.; Brusseau, M.L.; Guo, Z.; Plaschke, M.; Carroll, K.C.; Brinker, F.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the behavior of a groundwater contaminant (trichloroethene) plume after implementation of a source-containment operation at a site in Arizona. The plume resides in a quasi three-layer system comprising a sand/gravel unit bounded on the top and bottom by relatively thick silty clayey layers. The system was monitored for 60 months beginning at start-up in 2007 to measure the change in contaminant concentrations within the plume, the change in plume area, the mass of contaminant removed, and the integrated contaminant mass discharge. Concentrations of trichloroethene in groundwater pumped from the plume extraction wells have declined significantly over the course of operation, as have concentrations for groundwater sampled from 40 monitoring wells located within the plume. The total contaminant mass discharge associated with operation of the plume extraction wells peaked at 0.23 kg/d, decreased significantly within one year, and thereafter began an asymptotic decline to a current value of approximately 0.03 kg/d. Despite an 87% reduction in contaminant mass and a comparable 87% reduction in contaminant mass discharge for the plume, the spatial area encompassed by the plume has decreased by only approximately 50%. This is much less than would be anticipated based on ideal flushing and mass-removal behavior. Simulations produced with a simplified 3-D numerical model matched reasonably well to the measured data. The results of the study suggest that permeability heterogeneity, back diffusion, hydraulic factors associated with the specific well field system, and residual discharge from the source zone are all contributing to the observed persistence of the plume, as well as the asymptotic behavior currently observed for mass removal and for the reduction in contaminant mass discharge. PMID:26069436

  15. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230/s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit In the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experiments] conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous Annie lengths of 49-64 mm. Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging, soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, not structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer. The present flames were larger, and emitted soot men readily, than comparable observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  16. Bioremediation of a Large Chlorinated Solvent Plume, Dover AFB, DE

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Aleisa C

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation of a Large Chlorinated Solvent Plume, Dover AFB, DE Aleisa Bloom, (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA) Robert Lyon (bob.lyon@aecom.com), Laurie Stenberg, and Holly Brown (AECOM, Germantown, Maryland, USA) ABSTRACT: Past disposal practices at Dover Air Force Base (AFB), Delaware, created a large solvent plume called Area 6 (about 1 mile long, 2,000 feet wide, and 345 acres). The main contaminants are PCE, TCE, and their degradation products. The remedy is in-situ accelerated anaerobic bioremediation (AAB). AAB started in 2006 and is focusing on source areas and downgradient plume cores. Direct-push injections occurred in source areas where contamination is typically between 5 and 20 feet below ground surface. Lower concentration dissolved-phased contamination is present downgradient at 35 and 50 feet below ground surface. Here, permanent injection/extraction wells installed in transects perpendicular to the flow of groundwater are used to apply AAB. The AAB substrate is a mix of sodium lactate, emulsified vegetable oil, and nutrients. After eight years, dissolved contaminant mass within the main 80-acre treatment area has been reduced by over 98 percent. This successful application of AAB has stopped the flux of contaminants to the more distal portions of the plume. While more time is needed for effects to be seen in the distal plume, AAB injections will soon cease, and the remedy will transition to natural attenuation. INTRODUCTION Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Science Division (ORNL) and AECOM (formerly URS Corporation) have successfully implemented in situ accelerated anaerobic bioremediation (AAB) to remediate chlorinated solvent contamination in a large, multi-sourced groundwater plume at Dover Air Force Base (AFB). AAB has resulted in significant reductions of dissolved phase chlorinated solvent concentrations. This plume, called Area 6, was originally over 1 mile in length and over 2,000 feet wide (Figure 1

  17. Dynamics of the Chesapeake Bay outflow plume: Realistic plume simulation and its seasonal and interannual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Long; Xia, Meng

    2016-02-01

    The three-dimensional unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) was implemented for Chesapeake Bay and its adjacent coastal ocean to delineate the realistic Chesapeake Bay outflow plume (CBOP) as well as its seasonal and interannual variability. Applying the appropriate horizontal and vertical resolution, the model exhibited relatively high skill in matching the observational water level, temperature, and salinity from 2003 to 2012. The simulated surface plume structure was verified by comparing output to the HF radar current measurements, earlier field observations, and the MODIS and AVHRR satellite imagery. According to the orientation, shape, and size of the CBOP from both model snapshots and satellite images, five types of real-time plume behavior were detected, which implied strong regulation by wind and river discharge. In addition to the episodic plume modulation, horizontal and vertical structure of the CBOP exhibited variations on seasonal and interannual temporal scales. Seasonally, river discharge with a 1 month lag was primarily responsible for the surface plume area variation, while the plume thickness was mainly correlated to wind magnitude. On the interannual scale, river discharge was the predominant source of variability in both surface plume area and depth; however, the southerly winds also influenced the offshore plume depth. In addition, large-scale climate variability, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, could potentially affect the plume signature in the long term by altering wind and upwelling dynamics, underlining the need to understand the impacts of climate change on buoyant plumes, such as the CBOP.

  18. Effects of Prandtl number on the laminar cross flow past a heated cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajith Kumar, S.; Mathur, Manikandan; Sameen, A.; Anil Lal, S.

    2016-11-01

    Flow past a heated cylinder at constant surface temperature is computationally simulated and analyzed in the laminar regime at moderate buoyancy. The parameters governing the flow dynamics are the Reynolds number, Re, the Richardson number, Ri, and the Prandtl number, Pr. We perform our computations in the range 10 ≤ Re ≤ 35, for which the flow past an unheated cylinder results in a steady separation bubble, and vary the other two parameters in the range 0 ≤ Ri ≤ 2, 0.25 ≤ Pr ≤ 100. The heat transfer from the entire cylinder surface, quantified by the average Nusselt number Nuavg, is shown to obey Nuavg = 0.7435Re0.44Pr0.346 in the mixed convection regime we investigate. For a fixed Re and Pr, the flow downstream of the cylinder becomes asymmetric as Ri is increased from zero, followed by a complete disappearance of the vortices in the recirculation bubble beyond a threshold value of Ri. For a fixed Re and Ri, the vortices in the recirculation bubble are again observed to disappear beyond a threshold Pr, but with the reappearance of both the vortices above a larger threshold of Pr. In the limit of large Pr, the time-averaged flow outside the thermal boundary layer but within the near-wake region regains symmetry about the centerline and ultimately converges to a flow field similar to that of Ri = 0; in the far-wake region, however, we observe asymmetric vortex shedding for moderate Pr. The thermal plume structure in the cylinder wake is then discussed, and the plume generation is identified at points on the cylinder where the Nusselt number is a local minimum. The difference between the plume generation and the flow separation locations on the cylinder is shown to converge to zero in the limit of large Pr. We conclude by plotting the lift and drag coefficients as a function of Ri and Pr, observing that CD decreases with Ri for Pr < Prt (and vice versa for Pr > Prt), where Prt ≈ 7.5.

  19. Chasing plumes at the Endeavour Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, J. W.; Jeffries, M. A.; Mihaly, S. F.; Jenkyns, R.; Timmerman, R.

    2016-02-01

    The five major hydrothermal vents of the Endeavour Segment along the Juan de Fuca Ridge are estimated to emit the heat energy of a small nuclear power plant. From high temperature vent structures, this energy, along with mineral-rich vent fluids, is emitted chimney-like into the ocean, subsequently mixing with seawater and rising to neutral buoyancy between 150 and 300m above the seafloor. At this elevation, the hydrothermal vent plume is above the protection of the rift valley and is free to be carried away in the ambient ocean currents. In addition to anomalous chemical properties and particulates, the plume also carries planktonic residents of the deep-sea vent area. These larvae are key to the ongoing success of the existing ecosystems and their transport can facilitate the rapid colonization of newly formed venting sites. During Ocean Network Canada's 2015 maintenance expedition at the Endeavour Segment, we surveyed the vent plume both along and across-axis using optical transmission to locate the plume. Analysis of our observations reveals that the plume is retained over the central axis of the valley, thus exhibiting favorable conditions for the promulgation of vent ecosystems. We compare this analysis with earlier surveys conducted by Ocean Networks Canada as well as historic data collected since 1986 by the Institute of Ocean Sciences to estimate the spatial variability of the plume. Using this we propose a "climatology" of plume spreading over the Endeavour Segment.

  20. On Numerically Reproducing the Enceladus Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Enceladus plume was one of the most exciting discoveries of the NASA Cassini mission. However, a number of fundamental features of the plume have yet to be agreed upon. Schmidt et al. (2008) estimated a mass production rate on the order of 5 kg/s based on data from the Cassini dust detector, while Ingersoll and Ewald (2005) estimated a production rate of 51 kg/s based on plume brightness. Porco et al. (2014) produced a set of jet locations and source strength based on imaging; however, simulations of these sources do not reproduce surface deposition patterns of plume particles across Enceladus. We simulate jet sources across the south polar terrain, particularly along the fractures, accounting for gravitational forces and the Lorentz force, to construct a detailed numerical profile of the Enceladus plume. Recent simulations have led to updated surface deposition maps, which are able to constrain jet source locations and strength, and the recent E21 flyby provides detailed, low-altitude data from the dust detector on spacecraft impact rates. Altogether, dust-detector data, surface heat maps of plume fractures, UV surface deposition maps, and photometry are used in conjunction to better resolve both the mass production rate - and thereby dust-to-gas ratio - and source strength and location for the Enceladus plume.

  1. Io's Active Eruption Plumes: Insights from HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, K. L.; Spencer, J. R.

    2011-10-01

    Taking advantage of the available data, we recently [10] completed a detailed analysis of the spectral signature of Io's Pele-type Tvashtar plume as imaged by the HST Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (HST/WFPC2) via absorption during Jupiter transit and via reflected sunlight in 2007, as well as HST/WFPC2 observations of the 1997 eruption of Io's Prometheus-type Pillan plume (Fig. 1). These observations were obtained in the 0.24-0.42 μm range, where the plumes gas absorption and aerosol scattering properties are most conspicuous. By completing a detailed analysis of these observations, several key aspects of the reflectance and the absorption properties of the two plumes have been revealed. Additionally, by considering the analysis of the HST imaging data in light of previously published spectral analysis of Io's Prometheus and Pele-type plumes several trends in the plume properties have been determined, allowing us to define the relative significance of each plume on the rate of re-surfacing occurring on Io and providing the measurements needed to better assess the role the volcanoes play in the stability of Io's tenuous atmosphere.

  2. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  3. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-12-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  4. Fractal analysis: A new tool in transient volcanic ash plume characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournigand, Pierre-Yves; Peña Fernandez, Juan Jose; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Perugini, Diego; Sesterhenn, Jörn

    2017-04-01

    varying rates. Increasing fractal dimension correspond to an increase in the overall complexity of plume shape and thus to an increase in flow turbulence over time. Accordingly, numerical simulations show that, fractal dimension increases faster with increasing Reynolds number. However, other parameters seem to play a role in volcanic plumes evolution. The features of the eruption source (e.g. vent number, size and shape, ejection duration, number and time interval between the different ejection pulses that characterize unsteady eruptions) seem also to have an effect on this time evolution with for example a single vent source generating a faster increase of the fractal dimension than in the case of a plume fed by several vents over time. This first attempt to use fractal analysis on volcanic plume could be the starting point towards a new kind of tools for volcanic plume characterization potentially giving an access to parameters so far unreachable by only using more traditional techniques. Fractal dimension analysis applied on volcanic plumes could directly link a shape evolution to source conditions and thus help to constrain uncertainties existing on such parameters.

  5. Natural Laminar Flow Design for Wings with Moderate Sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Lynde, Michelle N.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the aerodynamic design of wings with natural laminar flow is under development at the NASA Langley Research Center. The approach involves the addition of new flow constraints to an existing knowledge-based design module for use with advanced flow solvers. The uniqueness of the new approach lies in the tailoring of target pressure distributions to achieve laminar flow on transonic wings with leading-edge sweeps and Reynolds numbers typical of current transports. The method is demonstrated on the Common Research Model configuration at critical N-factor levels representative of both flight and high-Reynolds number wind tunnel turbulence levels. The design results for the flight conditions matched the target extent of laminar flow very well. The design at wind tunnel conditions raised some design issues that prompted further improvements in the method, but overall has given promising results.

  6. IR thermography for dynamic detection of laminar-turbulent transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bernhard; Filius, Adrian; Tropea, Cameron; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the potential of infrared (IR) thermography for the dynamic detection of laminar-turbulent transition. The experiments are conducted on a flat plate at velocities of 8-14 m/s, and the transition of the laminar boundary layer to turbulence is forced by a disturbance source which is turned on and off with frequencies up to 10 Hz. Three different heating techniques are used to apply the required difference between fluid and structure temperature: a heated aluminum structure is used as an internal structure heating technique, a conductive paint acts as a surface bounded heater, while an IR heater serves as an example for an external heating technique. For comparison of all heating techniques, a normalization is introduced and the frequency response of the measured IR camera signal is analyzed. Finally, the different heating techniques are compared and consequences for the design of experiments on laminar-turbulent transition are discussed.

  7. Method and apparatus for detecting laminar flow separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John P. (Inventor); Mangalam, Sivaramakrishnan M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for detecting laminar flow separation and flow reattachment of a fluid stream by simultaneously sensing and comparing a plurality of output signals, each representing the dynamic shear stress at one of an equal number of sensors spaced along a straight line on the surface of an airfoil or the like that extends parallel to the fluid stream. The output signals are concurrently compared to detect the sensors across which a reversal in phase of said output signal occurs, said detected sensors being in the region of laminar separation or reattachment. The novelty in this invention is the discovery and use of the phase reversal phenomena to detect laminar separation and attachment of a fluid stream from any surface such as an airfoil supported therein.

  8. Temperature measurement in laminar free convective flow using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Mosarraf; Shakher, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    A method for measurement of temperature in laminar free convection flow of water is presented using digital holographic interferometry. The method is relatively simple and fast because the method uses lensless Fourier transform digital holography, for which the reconstruction algorithm is simple and fast, and also the method does not require use of any extra experimental efforts as in phase shifting. The quantitative unwrapped phase difference is calculated experimentally from two digital holograms recorded in two different states of water--one in the quiescent state, the other in the laminar free convection. Unknown temperature in laminar free convection is measured quantitatively using a known value of temperature in the quiescent state from the unwrapped phase difference, where the equation by Tilton and Taylor describing the variation of refractive index of water with temperature is used to connect the phase with temperature. Experiments are also performed to visualize the turbulent free convection flow.

  9. Laminar flow control, 1976 - 1982: A selected annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. H.; Maddalon, D. V.

    1982-01-01

    Laminar Flow Control technology development has undergone tremendous progress in recent years as focused research efforts in materials, aerodynamics, systems, and structures have begun to pay off. A virtual explosion in the number of research papers published on this subject has occurred since interest was first stimulated by the 1976 introduction of NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency Laminar Flow Control Program. The purpose of this selected bibliography is to list available, unclassified laminar flow (both controlled and natural) research completed from about 1975 to mid 1982. Some earlier pertinent reports are included but listed separately in the Appendix. Reports listed herein emphasize aerodynamics and systems studies, but some structures work is also summarized. Aerodynamic work is mainly limited to the subsonic and transonic sped regimes. Because wind-tunnel flow qualities, such as free stream disturbance level, play such an important role in boundary-layer transition, much recent research has been done in this area and it is also included.

  10. Method for laminar boundary layer transition visualization in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J. (Inventor); Gall, Peter D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of visualizing laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition, shock location, and laminar separation bubbles around a test surface. A liquid crystal coating is formulated using an unencapsulated liquid crystal operable in a temperature bandwidth compatible with the temperature environment around the test surface. The liquid crystal coating is applied to the test surface, which is preferably pretreated by painting with a flat, black paint to achieve a deep matte coating, after which the surface is subjected to a liquid or gas flow. Color change in the liquid crystal coating is produced in response to differences in relative shear stress within the boundary layer around the test surface. The novelty of this invention resides in the use of liquid crystals which are sensitive to shear stress to show aerodynamic phenomena such as a boundary layer transition, shock location, and laminar separation bubbles around a test surface.

  11. Lockheed laminar-flow control systems development and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Roy H.

    1987-01-01

    Progress is summarized from 1974 to the present in the practical application of laminar-flow control (LFC) to subsonic transport aircraft. Those efforts included preliminary design system studies of commercial and military transports and experimental investigations leading to the development of the leading-edge flight test article installed on the NASA JetStar flight test aircraft. The benefits of LFC on drag, fuel efficiency, lift-to-drag ratio, and operating costs are compared with those for turbulent flow aircraft. The current activities in the NASA Industry Laminar-Flow Enabling Technologies Development contract include summaries of activities in the Task 1 development of a slotted-surface structural concept using advanced aluminum materials and the Task 2 preliminary conceptual design study of global-range military hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) to obtain data at high Reynolds numbers and at Mach numbers representative of long-range subsonic transport aircraft operation.

  12. Numerical verification of the similarity laws for the formation of laminar vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettel, M.; Wetzel, F.; Habisreuther, P.; Bockhorn, H.

    From analytical investigations it is well known that the roll-up of an inviscid plane vortex sheet which separates at the edge of a body is a self-similar process which can be described by scaling laws. Unlike plane vortices, ring vortices have a curved rotational axis. For this special vortex type experimental investigations as well as calculations in the literature suggest that the scaling laws are only partially valid. The main goal of this work is to clarify how far these similarity or scaling laws are also valid for the formation of viscid laminar vortex rings. Therefore, the formation process of laminar vortex rings was investigated numerically using a CFD (computational-fluid-dynamics) code. The calculations refer to an experimental setup for which detailed experimental data are available in the literature. In this setup, laminar ring vortices are generated by ejecting water from a circular tube into a quiescent environment by means of a piston. First, a case based on a constant piston velocity was investigated. Comparing calculated and measured data yields a very good agreement. Further calculations were made when forcing the velocity of the piston by three different time-dependent functions. The results of these calculations show that the formation laws for inviscid plane vortices are also valid for the formation process of viscid ring vortices. This applies to the normalized axial and radial position of the vortex centre as well as the normalized diameter of the vortex spiral. However, the similarity laws are valid only if the process is considered in a special frame of reference which moves in conjunction with the front of the jet and if the starting time of the formation process with respect to the starting time of the ejection is taken into account. Additionally, the formation of a ring vortex, which occurs during the start-up process of a free jet flow, was calculated. The results confirm a dependence for the motion of the jet front, which is known

  13. No Ocean Source for the Enceladus Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Schneider, N. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Kargel, J. S.; Schaller, E. L.; Brown, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    One surprising discovery of the Cassini mission to Saturn has been the presence of geyser-like plumes at the south pole of the icy moon Enceladus ejecting >300; kg/s of water into Saturn's magnetosphere. In situ and remote observations (Waite et al. 2006; Hansen et al. 2006) have shown that the primary plume constituent is H2O, and thermal measurements indicate intense heating in cracks believed to be plume vents on the surface (Spencer et al. 2006). These observations have led to speculation that the plumes are fed from a liquid water reservoir beneath Enceladus' surface. We present results from an extremely sensitive, high-resolution spectroscopic search using the Keck and Anglo-Australian Telescopes which place a stringent upper limit on sodium emission in the Enceladus plumes. Large amounts of sodium would be expected if Enceladus' plume material were derived directly from a subsurface liquid reservoir in contact with rocky material. Chemical models predict that sodium would dissolve into such an ocean at mixing ratios relative to water of 10-4 to 10-1 (Zolotov et al., 2007). Our numerical plume models show that such high sodium concentrations would form a detectable torus encircling Saturn. Our detection upper limits fall orders of magnitude below these models, leading us to conclude that the Enceladus plumes do not originate in an ocean or sea. These observations support the alternative theories that the plumes are generated by shear heating of the icy crust resulting in sublimation or melting, or the decomposition of clathrates. This work has been supported by the NASA Postdoctoral Program and the NSF's Planetary Astronomy Program. References: Hansen et al., Science, 311, 1422, 2006. Spencer et al., Science, 311, 1401, 2006. Waite et al., Science, 311, 1419, 2006. Zolotov et al., Presented to the "Enceladus Focus Group Workshop," Boulder, CO, 2007.

  14. Atmospheric chemistry of an Antarctic volcanic plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Clive; Kyle, Philip; Eisele, Fred; Crawford, Jim; Huey, Greg; Tanner, David; Kim, Saewung; Mauldin, Lee; Blake, Don; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Buhr, Martin; Davis, Doug

    2010-01-01

    We report measurements of the atmospheric plume emitted by Erebus volcano, Antarctica, renowned for its persistent lava lake. The observations were made in December 2005 both at source, with an infrared spectrometer sited on the crater rim, and up to 56 km downwind, using a Twin Otter aircraft; with the two different measurement platforms, plume ages were sampled ranging from <1 min to as long as 9 h. Three species (CO, carbonyl sulfide (OCS), and SO2) were measured from both air and ground. While CO and OCS were conserved in the plume, consistent with their long atmospheric lifetimes, the downwind measurements indicate a SO2/CO ratio about 20% of that observed at the crater rim, suggesting rapid chemical conversion of SO2. The aircraft measurements also identify volcanogenic H2SO4, HNO3 and, recognized for the first time in a volcanic plume, HO2NO2. We did not find NOx in the downwind plume despite previous detection of NO2 above the crater. This suggests that near-source NOx was quickly oxidized to HNO3 and HO2NO2, and probably NO32-(aq), possibly in tandem with the conversion of SO2 to sulfate. These fast processes may have been facilitated by "cloud processing" in the dense plume immediately downwind from the crater. A further striking observation was O3 depletion of up to ˜35% in parts of the downwind plume. This is likely to be due to the presence of reactive halogens (BrO and ClO) formed through heterogeneous processes in the young plume. Our analysis adds to the growing evidence for the tropospheric reactivity of volcanic plumes and shows that Erebus volcano has a significant impact on Antarctic atmospheric chemistry, at least locally in the Southern Ross Sea area.

  15. Dynamics of a single buoyant plume in a FENE-P fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajipeyajula, Bhaskar; Khambampati, Tejsavi; Handler, Robert A.

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics of a single laminar buoyant plume in a FENE-P (finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin) fluid has been investigated by performing a series of direct simulations over a range of Weissenberg numbers. Examination of this flow has given insight into the heat transfer reduction phenomenon observed recently in more complex Rayleigh-Benard turbulence. The simulations, which were performed with a Rayleigh number of 2.53 ×1 06 and a maximal polymeric extension of L = 100, show that the wall heat flux is reduced by about 28% at a Weissenberg number of 20, which is in reasonable agreement with the results obtained in Rayleigh-Benard turbulence. In addition, the global flow kinetic energy was reduced by about one order of magnitude.

  16. RAPID REMOVAL OF A GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT PLUME.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefkoff, L. Jeff; Gorelick, Steven M.; ,

    1985-01-01

    A groundwater management model is used to design an aquifer restoration system that removes a contaminant plume from a hypothetical aquifer in four years. The design model utilizes groundwater flow simulation and mathematical optimization. Optimal pumping and injection strategies achieve rapid restoration for a minimum total pumping cost. Rapid restoration is accomplished by maintaining specified groundwater velocities around the plume perimeter towards a group of pumping wells located near the plume center. The model does not account for hydrodynamic dispersion. Results show that pumping costs are particularly sensitive to injection capacity. An 8 percent decrease in the maximum allowable injection rate may lead to a 29 percent increase in total pumping costs.

  17. Digital filtering of plume emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transformation and digital filtering techniques were used to separate the superpositioned spectral phenomena observed in the exhaust plumes of liquid propellant rocket engines. Space shuttle main engine (SSME) spectral data were used to show that extraction of spectral lines in the spatial frequency domain does not introduce error, and extraction of the background continuum introduces only minimal error. Error introduced during band extraction could not be quantified due to poor spectrometer resolution. Based on the atomic and molecular species found in the SSME plume, it was determined that spectrometer resolution must be 0.03 nm for SSME plume spectral monitoring.

  18. Method and apparatus for detecting laminar flow separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John P. (Inventor); Mangalam, Sivaramakrishnan M. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for simultaneously detecting laminar separation and reattachment of a fluid stream such as an airstream from and to the upper surface of an airfoil by simultaneously sensing and comparing a plurality of output signals. Each signal represents the dynamic shear stress at one of an equal number of sensors spaced along a straight line on the surface of the airfoil that extends parallel to the airstream. The output signals are simultaneously compared to detect the sensors across which a reversal in phase of said output signal occurs, said detected sensors being in the region of laminar separation or reattachment.

  19. Roughness and waviness requirements for laminar flow surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, Clifford J.; Holmes, Bruce J.

    1986-01-01

    Many modern metal and composite airframe manufacturing techniques can provide surface smoothness which is compatible with natural laminar flow (NLF) requirements. An important consideration is manufacturing roughness of the surface in the form of steps and gaps perpendicular to the freestream. The principal challenge to the design and manufacture of laminar flow surfaces today appears to be in the installation of leading-edge panels on wing, nacelle, and empennage surfaces. A similar challenge is in the installation of access panels, doors, windows, fuselage noses, and engine nacelles. Past work on roughness and waviness manufacturing tolerances and comparisons with more recent experiments are reviewed.

  20. An experimental study of the thermal plume developed above a finite cylindrical heat source to validate the point source model

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzinaoui, Abdelhakim; Devienne, Rene; Fontaine, Jean Raymond

    2007-07-15

    An experimental study of the thermal plume developed above a variable cylindrical source of finite dimensions was conducted with the aim of verifying the corresponding point source model. The heat source was a 1 m diameter, 1 m high cylinder featuring five zones (four 0.25 m high cylindrical surfaces and a top disk) of identical surface area. Two different configurations were tested: in the first, only the top surface of the cylinder was heated and, in the second, both the top disk and the related cylindrical zone were heated. Surface temperatures were chosen to maintain the same source convective power for both situations. A battery of nine anemometric probes recorded simultaneously plume velocity and temperature distributions. These measurements allowed the plume thermal and dynamic radii above the source to be deduced. These radii vary linearly with height and they enable the plume virtual origin to be situated. If the virtual origin of each source is taken as a starting point, we observe that, in both test cases, the plumes develop in the same way, effectively validating the point source model. Velocity measurements also allowed the plume flow rate to be evaluated. The values found agree closely with those calculated using the relation that gives plume flow rate as a function of source convective power and height above the virtual origin. (author)

  1. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of Saturn V/S1-C/F1 nozzle and plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.

    1993-01-01

    An axisymmetric single engine Computational Fluid Dynamics calculation of the Saturn V/S 1-C vehicle base region and F1 engine plume is described. There were two objectives of this work, the first was to calculate an axisymmetric approximation of the nozzle, plume and base region flow fields of S1-C/F1, relate/scale this to flight data and apply this scaling factor to a NLS/STME axisymmetric calculations from a parallel effort. The second was to assess the differences in F1 and STME plume shear layer development and concentration of combustible gases. This second piece of information was to be input/supporting data for assumptions made in NLS2 base temperature scaling methodology from which the vehicle base thermal environments were being generated. The F1 calculations started at the main combustion chamber faceplate and incorporated the turbine exhaust dump/nozzle film coolant. The plume and base region calculations were made for ten thousand feet and 57 thousand feet altitude at vehicle flight velocity and in stagnant freestream. FDNS was implemented with a 14 species, 28 reaction finite rate chemistry model plus a soot burning model for the RP-1/LOX chemistry. Nozzle and plume flow fields are shown, the plume shear layer constituents are compared to a STME plume. Conclusions are made about the validity and status of the analysis and NLS2 vehicle base thermal environment definition methodology.

  2. Blogs: Getting Started

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyrud, Marilyn A.; Worley, Rebecca B.; Schultz, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Blogs are communication tools, they serve as vehicles to transmit messages. Before deciding to blog, one needs to devise a strategy on how this medium will fit in with his or her communication needs. This will also help later in deciding which features one will need to include in his or her blog. This article discusses ways on how to start and…

  3. Is Head Start Dying?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Ann; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of problems faced by Head Start and its present status includes a review of its transfer from O.E.O. to H.E.W., its extensions, the Westinghouse Report, and other studies and articles. Decline in public interest and support is noted. (KW)

  4. Starting in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertine, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Through its signature initiative, Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP), the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) is promoting a vision for learning that begins in school: Starting in School . . . Rigorous and rich curriculum focused on the essential learning outcomes; comprehensive, individualized, and…

  5. TARCOG Home Start Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Top of Alabama Regional Council of Governments, Huntsville. Human Resources Program.

    This report describes the Top of Alabama Regional Council of Governments (TARCOG) Home Start Program. Five aspects of the program are presented. (1) The nutrition component is aimed at helping parents make the best use of food resources through good planning, buying, and cooking. (2) The health program involves provision of medical and dental…

  6. Mapping Sure Start Scotland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham-Burley, Sarah; Jamieson, Lynn; Morton, Sarah; Adam, Rachel; McFarlane, Vivienne

    Sure Start Scotland is part of a broader action program for children from birth to age three and their families with the objectives of improving children's social and emotional development, health, and ability to learn, as well as strengthening families and communities. This summary report details a "mapping" project to identify services…

  7. Starting Trees from Cuttings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a procedure for starting tree cuttings from woody plants, explaining "lag time," recommending materials, and giving step-by-step instructions for rooting and planting. Points out species which are likely candidates for cuttings and provides tips for teachers for developing a unit. (JM)

  8. Starting in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertine, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Through its signature initiative, Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP), the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) is promoting a vision for learning that begins in school: Starting in School . . . Rigorous and rich curriculum focused on the essential learning outcomes; comprehensive, individualized, and…

  9. Project Right Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Barbara B.

    The University-Urban Interface Program (UUIP) is a federally-funded project to study an urban university's community relations efforts and innovations, their successes and failures. This is a study of one of the UUIP areas of priority, Project Right Start, a plan for creating a facility for the detection and treatment of psychological problems in…

  10. Smart Start Evaluation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Donna; Burchinal, Margaret; Buysse, Virginia; Kotch, Jonathan; Maxwell, Kelly; Neenan, Peter; Noblit, George; Orthner, Dennis; Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen; Telfair, Joseph

    Smart Start is North Carolina's partnership between state government and local leaders, service providers, and families to better serve children under 6 years of age and their families. This report describes the comprehensive plan to evaluate the state and local goals and objectives of the program, focusing on the components addressing the…

  11. Home Start Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roggman, Lori; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains monthly work plans and weekly activity units for a Home Start Program. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the home, the family unit, and the education and development of young children by their own parents. Yearly goals include concern for the following: physical and dental health, nutrition, mental health and…

  12. Home Start Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High/Scope Educational Research Foundation, Ypsilanti, MI.

    Case studies of eight Home Start programs are given as the third section of an evaluation study. Communities involved are Binghamton, New York; Franklin, North Carolina; Cleveland, Ohio; Harrogate, Tennessee; Houston, Texas; Weslaco, Texas; Millville, Utah; Parkersburg, West Virginia. Although each study varies in format, each describes in detail…

  13. Assessment of analytical techniques for predicting solid propellant exhaust plumes and plume impingement environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of experimental nozzle, exhaust plume, and exhaust plume impingement data is presented. The data were obtained for subscale solid propellant motors with propellant Al loadings of 2, 10 and 15% exhausting to simulated altitudes of 50,000, 100,000 and 112,000 ft. Analytical predictions were made using a fully coupled two-phase method of characteristics numerical solution and a technique for defining thermal and pressure environments experienced by bodies immersed in two-phase exhaust plumes.

  14. Sensitivity of air quality simulation to smoke plume rise

    Treesearch

    Yongqiang Liu; Gary Achtemeier; Scott Goodrick

    2008-01-01

    Plume rise is the height smoke plumes can reach. This information is needed by air quality models such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to simulate physical and chemical processes of point-source fire emissions. This study seeks to understand the importance of plume rise to CMAQ air quality simulation of prescribed burning to plume rise. CMAQ...

  15. Approach to SSME health monitoring. III - Exhaust plume emission spectroscopy: Recent results and detailed analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.; van Dyke, David B.; Bircher, Felix E.

    1993-06-01

    Spectral data for two recent A-1 test firings, 901-717 and 901-718, obtained from an Optical Multichannel Analyzer and an Optical Plume Anomaly Detector, are presented. The spectral data encompasses the database of SSME critical components and materials and the spectral database for the SSME related elements and materials. Relatively strong and continuous emissions from Cr and Fe atomic transitions were observed starting at engine start plus 494 s and persisting until the engine shut off at engine start plus 520 s. These emissions are considered to be emanated from the SSME material AISI 440C, which is traced to high pressure turbopump bearings.

  16. F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    The F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment was part of the NASA High-Speed Research Program. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate extensive laminar flow, to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and design methodology, and to establish laminar flow control design criteria. Topics include the flight test hardware and design, airplane modification, the pressure and suction distributions achieved, the laminar flow achieved, and the data analysis and code correlation.

  17. Ozone depletion in tropospheric volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Alan; McGonigle, Andrew J. S.; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Stith, Jeffrey L.; Turnbull, Kate; von Glasow, Roland

    2010-11-01

    We measured ozone (O3) concentrations in the atmospheric plumes of the volcanoes St. Augustine (1976), Mt. Etna (2004, 2009) and Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and found O3 to be strongly depleted compared to the background at each volcano. At Mt. Etna O3 was depleted within tens of seconds from the crater, the age of the St. Augustine plumes was on the order of hours, whereas the O3 destruction in the plume of Eyjafjallajökull was maintained in 1-9 day old plumes. The most likely cause for this O3 destruction are catalytic bromine reactions as suggested by a model that manages to reproduce the very early destruction of O3 but also shows that O3 destruction is ongoing for several days. Given the observed rapid and sustained destruction of O3, heterogeneous loss of O3 on ash is unlikely to be important.

  18. Isotopic mapping of groundwater perchlorate plumes.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Neil C; Hoaglund, John R; Marroquin, Roy J; Beloso, Abelardo D; Heraty, Linnea J; Bortz, Sarah E; Patterson, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of stable isotope ratios of chlorine and oxygen in perchlorate can, in some cases, be used for mapping and source identification of groundwater perchlorate plumes. This is demonstrated here for large, intersecting perchlorate plumes in groundwater from a region having extensive groundwater perchlorate contamination and a large population dependent on groundwater resources. The region contains both synthetic perchlorate derived from rocket fuel manufacturing and testing activities and agricultural perchlorate derived predominantly from imported Chilean (Atacama) nitrate fertilizer, along with a likely component of indigenous natural background perchlorate from local wet and dry atmospheric deposition. Most samples within each plume reflect either a predominantly synthetic or a predominantly agricultural perchlorate source and there is apparently a minor contribution from the indigenous natural background perchlorate. The existence of isotopically distinct perchlorate plumes in this area is consistent with other lines of evidence, including groundwater levels and flow paths as well as the historical land use and areal distribution of potential perchlorate sources.

  19. High altitude plumes at Mars morning terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Garcia Muñoz, A.; Garcia Melendo, E.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Gomez Forrellad, J. M.; Pellier, C.; Delcroix, M.; Lopez Valverde, M. A.; González Galindo, F.; Jaeschke, W.; Parker, D.; Phillips, J.; Peach, D.

    2015-10-01

    In March and April 2012 two extremely high altitude plumes were observed at the Martian terminator reaching 200 -250 km or more above the surface[1]. They were located at about 195o West longitude and 45o South latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and extended ˜500 -1,000 km in both North-South and East- West, and lasted for about 10 days. Both plumes exhibited day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb. Another large plume was captured on Hubble Space Telescope images in May 1997 at 99º West longitude and 3º South latitude, but its altitude cannot be pr ecisely determined.Broad-band photometry was performed of both events in the spectral range 255 nm -1052 nm. Based on the observed properties, we discuss different possible scenarios for the mechanism responsible for the formation of these plumes.

  20. The Plasmaspheric Plume and Magnetopause Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Phan, T. D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Souza, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present near-simultaneous measurements from two THEMIS spacecraft at the dayside magnetopause with a 1.5 h separation in local time. One spacecraft observes a high-density plasmaspheric plume while the other does not. Both spacecraft observe signatures of magnetic reconnection, providing a test for the changes to reconnection in local time along the magnetopause as well as the impact of high densities on the reconnection process. When the plume is present and the magnetospheric density exceeds that in the magnetosheath, the reconnection jet velocity decreases, the density within the jet increases, and the location of the faster jet is primarily on field lines with magnetosheath orientation. Slower jet velocities indicate that reconnection is occurring less efficiently. In the localized region where the plume contacts the magnetopause, the high-density plume may impede the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling by mass loading the reconnection site.

  1. Source Region for Possible Europa Plumes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-26

    This map composed of images NASA Galileo and Voyager missions shows the hemisphere of Europa that might be affected by plume deposits. The view is centered at -65 degrees latitude, 183 degrees longitude.

  2. Earth science: Plate motion and mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R. Dietmar

    2011-07-01

    A model based on geophysical data from the Indian Ocean suggests that a mantle-plume head may once have coupled the motions of the African and Indian tectonic plates, and determined their respective speeds. See Article p.47

  3. Plume Ascent Tracker: Interactive Matlab software for analysis of ascending plumes in image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, S. A.; Harris, A. J. L.; Cerminara, M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents Matlab-based software designed to track and analyze an ascending plume as it rises above its source, in image data. It reads data recorded in various formats (video files, image files, or web-camera image streams), and at various wavelengths (infrared, visible, or ultra-violet). Using a set of filters which can be set interactively, the plume is first isolated from its background. A user-friendly interface then allows tracking of plume ascent and various parameters that characterize plume evolution during emission and ascent. These include records of plume height, velocity, acceleration, shape, volume, ash (fine-particle) loading, spreading rate, entrainment coefficient and inclination angle, as well as axial and radial profiles for radius and temperature (if data are radiometric). Image transformations (dilatation, rotation, resampling) can be performed to create new images with a vent-centered metric coordinate system. Applications may interest both plume observers (monitoring agencies) and modelers. For the first group, the software is capable of providing quantitative assessments of plume characteristics from image data, for post-event analysis or in near real-time analysis. For the second group, extracted data can serve as benchmarks for plume ascent models, and as inputs for cloud dispersal models. We here describe the software's tracking methodology and main graphical interfaces, using thermal infrared image data of an ascending volcanic ash plume at Santiaguito volcano.

  4. Near-glacier surveying of a subglacial discharge plume: Implications for plume parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. H.; Shroyer, E. L.; Nash, J. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Carroll, D.; Fried, M. J.; Catania, G. A.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Stearns, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    At tidewater glaciers, plume dynamics affect submarine melting, fjord circulation, and the mixing of meltwater. Models often rely on buoyant plume theory to parameterize plumes and submarine melting; however, these parameterizations are largely untested due to a dearth of near-glacier measurements. Here we present a high-resolution ocean survey by ship and remotely operated boat near the terminus of Kangerlussuup Sermia in west Greenland. These novel observations reveal the 3-D structure and transport of a near-surface plume, originating at a large undercut conduit in the glacier terminus, that is inconsistent with axisymmetric plume theory, the most common representation of plumes in ocean-glacier models. Instead, the observations suggest a wider upwelling plume—a "truncated" line plume of ˜200 m width—with higher entrainment and plume-driven melt compared to the typical axisymmetric representation. Our results highlight the importance of a subglacial outlet's geometry in controlling plume dynamics, with implications for parameterizing the exchange flow and submarine melt in glacial fjord models.

  5. NRL Satellite Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, J.; Kuciauskas, A. P.; Richardson, K.; Solbrig, J.; Miller, S. D.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Bankert, R.; Lee, T.; Kent, J.; Tsui, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory’s (NRL) Marine Meteorology Division (NRL-MRY) is assembling a unique suite of near real-time digital satellite products geared towards monitoring volcanic ash plumes which can create hazardous aviation conditions. Ash plume detection, areal extent, plume top height and mass loading will be extracted via automated algorithms from a combination of geostationary (GEO) and low earth orbiting (LEO) data sets that take advantage of their complimentary strengths since no one sensor has the required spectral, spatial and temporal attributes needed. This product suite would then be available to the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) and other interested users via web distribution. Initially, GOES-West and the Japanese MTSAT data will be incorporated to view volcanic plumes within the north Pacific region. Although GEO sensor spectral channels are not optimized for ash detection, temporal changes over limited timeframes can assist in plume extraction, but not for those at the highest latitudes. Examples with multi-channel techniques will be highlighted via animations. LEO sensors provide a suite of spectral channels unmatched on GEO platforms and permit enhanced ash plume monitoring. NRL has exploited the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and SeaWiFS via a “dust enhancement technique” that has demonstrated positive plume monitoring results. Multi-channel methods using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) will be highlighted to take advantage of the numerous NOAA LEO satellites carrying this wide swath sensor with frequent volcano overpasses at the higher latitudes. The DMSP Operational Linescan System (OLS) provides daytime visible/infrared, as well as night time visible data which has shown value in spotting ash plumes when sufficient lunar illumination is present. The following suite of products is potentially available for over twenty (20) volcano sites world-wide via our NexSat web site: http

  6. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher

  7. Numerical Methods for Explosion Plume Predictions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-12

    AD-A262 343 6 NAVSWC TR 91-718 A -22~4..v~w•T ,,-., I II It ill/111111 ti(. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR EXPLOSION PLUME PREDICTIONS BY W.G. SZYMCZAK AND A...METHODS FOR EXPLOSION PLUME PREDICTIONS BY W. G. SZYMCZAK AND A. B. WARDLAW RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 12 MARCH 1993 Approved for public release...2 TABLES Table Page 3-1 SHALLOW DEPTH EXPLOSION BUBBLE INITIAL DATA

  8. Geological factors affecting CO2 plume distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Leetaru, H.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the lateral extent of a CO2 plume has important implications with regards to buying/leasing pore volume rights, defining the area of review for an injection permit, determining the extent of an MMV plan, and managing basin-scale sequestration from multiple injection sites. The vertical and lateral distribution of CO2 has implications with regards to estimating CO2 storage volume at a specific site and the pore pressure below the caprock. Geologic and flow characteristics such as effective permeability and porosity, capillary pressure, lateral and vertical permeability anisotropy, geologic structure, and thickness all influence and affect the plume distribution to varying degrees. Depending on the variations in these parameters one may dominate the shape and size of the plume. Additionally, these parameters do not necessarily act independently. A comparison of viscous and gravity forces will determine the degree of vertical and lateral flow. However, this is dependent on formation thickness. For example in a thick zone with injection near the base, the CO2 moves radially from the well but will slow at greater radii and vertical movement will dominate. Generally the CO2 plume will not appreciably move laterally until the caprock or a relatively low permeability interval is contacted by the CO2. Conversely, in a relatively thin zone with the injection interval over nearly the entire zone, near the wellbore the CO2 will be distributed over the entire vertical component and will move laterally much further with minimal vertical movement. Assuming no geologic structure, injecting into a thin zone or into a thick zone immediately under a caprock will result in a larger plume size. With a geologic structure such as an anticline, CO2 plume size may be restricted and injection immediately below the caprock may have less lateral plume growth because the structure will induce downward vertical movement of the CO2 until the outer edge of the plume reaches a spill

  9. Puff/Plume for Windows 95-NT

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Gary

    1998-05-20

    PFPL-NT is a GUI event-driven scientific application integrating 14 background processes to access the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous materials from production facilities and transportation vehicles. A simple straight-line Gaussian assumption has been employed with observations from meteorological towers to calculate and visually display plume directions, plume width, and dose/concentration estimates in the immediate vicinity of a radiological or chemical release.

  10. Sampling Particles In Hot Gas Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, James F.; Sambamurthi, Jay

    1994-01-01

    Sampling darts and launching apparatus built to collect particles in vertical plume of hot gas. In original application, hot gas plume is rocket-engine exhaust during test firing. Dart passes made at various heights, depending on launch angle and launch-gas pressure. Adaptable to variety of terrestrial uses like research on particulate emissions of volcanoes or determining origin of building fire while still burning.

  11. Remote Diagnostic Measurements of Hall Thruster Plumes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-14

    distribution Angle Relative to Thruster Centerline (degrees) Summary and Conclusions 1. Plasma diagnostics designed, developed, and fabricated 2. Calibrated... Thruster Plumes 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Casey C. Farnell ( Plasma Controls); Daniel L. Brown (AFRL/RZSS); Garret...measurements of Hall thruster plumes that characterize ion energy distributions and charge state fractions using remotely located plasma diagnostics

  12. OPAD data analysis. [Optical Plumes Anomaly Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray L.; Kraft, Richard; Whitaker, Kevin; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.; Wallace, Tim L.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained in the framework of an Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program intended to create a rocket engine health monitor based on spectrometric detections of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the exhaust plume are analyzed. The major results include techniques for handling data noise, methods for registration of spectra to wavelength, and a simple automatic process for estimating the metallic component of a spectrum.

  13. Black Saturday bushfire smoke plumes as seen from SCIAMACHY measurements in limb geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörner, Steffen; Pukite, Janis; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Fromm, Mike; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The so called Black Saturday bushfires started on the 7th of February 2009 in southeastern Victoria, Australia. Resulting smoke plumes contaminated the lower stratosphere in the following weeks as measured by a variety satellite instruments. Particle extinction profiles retrieved from SCIAMACHY measurements in limb geometry provide a complementary view on the development of the smoke plume, especially on the first days of the event when measurements of other instruments were sparse. Earlier studies showed that commonly used 1D retrieval algorithms for limb observations of particle extinction potentially underestimate optical thickness and altitude of such injections into the stratosphere. In this study, a 2D particle extinction retrieval algorithm for SCIAMACHY limb measurements is used to track optical thickness and plume altitude of the Black Saturday bushfires over the month of February. The required information about the horizontal distribution of the plume is determined by the absorbing aerosol index (AAI) derived from SCIAMACHY measurements in nadir geometry. First results indicate enhanced particle scattering above 18 km on the 9th of February while the smoke plume is drifting to the north east above the Pacific ocean.

  14. The Relative Motion of Pacific Mantle Plumes: Implications for the Viscosity Structure of the Earth's Mantle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, K.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Steinberger, B. M.; Konter, J. G.; Finlayson, V.; Jackson, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The origin of linear, age-progressive hotspot chains have been long attributed to thermal anomalies in the lower mantle. More recently, it has been shown that individual mantle plumes show variable and independent motion. In an effort to assess the relative vectors and magnitudes of plume motion recorded on the Pacific plate we compare the long-lived Hawaii, Louisville and Rurutu hotspot tracks. All three plumes show motion in the modeled age range (0 - 80 Ma) with variable magnitudes related to the proximity of the hotspot from zones of major mantle upwelling as defined primarily by the location of spreading ridges. We compare the observed inter-hotspot distance between tracks through time to the hotspot distances derived through large scale mantle flow and related plume motion modeling. Over 80,000 different hotspot motion model runs with varied viscosity structures, mantle tomography models, and plume starting ages, buoyancies, and depths are compared using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to find a mantle structure which best fits the observed inter-hotspot distance data. Preliminary results in particular are most sensitive to the assumed viscosity structure of the Earth's mantle and thus finding realistic viscosity structures will provide critical and much needed boundary conditions for Earth-like geodynamic modeling.

  15. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  16. Laminar flow between a stationary and a rotating disk with radial throughflow

    SciTech Connect

    Nesreddine, H.; Nguyen, C.T.; Vo-Ngoc, D.

    1995-05-01

    The problem of axisymmetric laminar flow of a viscous incompressible fluid that occurs between a stationary and a rotating disk subjected to a uniform radial throughflow has been numerically investigated for a large range of flow parameters. Results show that the basic flow structure is rather complex and depends strongly on both the rotational and the flow structure is rather complex and depends strongly on both the rotational and the throughflow Reynolds numbers. In general, the basic unicellular structure has been observed. With the increase of the throughflow Reynolds number, a multicellular flow structure may be found. The phenomenon of multiple solutions has been clearly observed for cases with sufficiently high rational Re and/or high throughflow Re. Among these solutions, stable as well as unstable solutions have been determined by applying Rayleigh`s stability criterion. The influence of the starting conditions on the stability of the flow has also been investigated for various ranges of flow parameters.

  17. Further experiments on the stability of laminar and turbulent hydrogen-air flames at reduced pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fine, Burton

    1957-01-01

    Stability limits for laminar and turbulent hydrogen-air burner flames were measured as a function of pressure, burner diameter, and composition. On the basis of a simple flame model, turbulent flashback involved a smaller effective penetration distance than laminar flashback. No current theoretical treatment predicts the observed pressure and diameter dependence of laminar and turbulent blowoff.

  18. Magnetospheric Convection near a Drainage Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chin S.; Yeh, Huey-Ching; Sandel, Bill R.; Goldstein, J.; Rich, Frederick J.; Burke, William J.; Foster, J. C.

    2007-05-01

    We report on equatorial convection associated with a plasmaspheric drainage plume using simultaneous observations from five satellites. During the early recovery phase of the July 2000 Bastille Day magnetic storm, the Extreme Ultraviolet sensor on the Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration satellite detected the plume near 16:00-17:00 magnetic local time extending outward to L ≈ 2.8. The plasmaspheric boundary was near L = 2 at other local times. We mapped simultaneously measured ionospheric plasma drifts from ROCSAT-1 and three Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft along magnetic field lines to infer equatorial convection velocities in the inner magnetosphere. The zonal component of convection derived from ROCSAT-1 ion-drift measurements had a sharp, positive azimuthal gradient near the plume's boundaries, reversing direction from westward to eastward. The meridional profile of horizontal velocities deduced from DMSP measurements shows a large, westward-flowing subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) located outside the plasmapause. The peak velocity of the SAPS centered at a radial distance of L ≈ 2.8 with a full width of ˜1 RE. In the inertial frame of reference, equatorial plasmas flowed toward the plume from both its day and evening sides, suggesting a negative gradient in the equatorial azimuthal velocity that was largest near the plume's outermost boundary. These observations provide new evidence about diversion of SAPS plasma flows and distinctive azimuthal velocity patterns in the vicinity of plasmaspheric plumes.

  19. Hubble Sees Recurring Plume Erupting From Europa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-13

    These composite images show a suspected plume of material erupting two years apart from the same location on Jupiter's icy moon Europa. The images bolster evidence that the plumes are a real phenomenon, flaring up intermittently in the same region on the satellite. Both plumes, photographed in ultraviolet light by NASA's Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, were seen in silhouette as the moon passed in front of Jupiter. The newly imaged plume, shown at right, rises about 62 miles (100 kilometers) above Europa's frozen surface. The image was taken Feb. 22, 2016. The plume in the image at left, observed by Hubble on March 17, 2014, originates from the same location. It is estimated to be about 30 miles (50 kilometers) high. The snapshot of Europa, superimposed on the Hubble image, was assembled from data from NASA's Galileo mission to Jupiter. The plumes correspond to the location of an unusually warm spot on the moon's icy crust, seen in the late 1990s by the Galileo spacecraft (see PIA21444). Researchers speculate that this might be circumstantial evidence for water venting from the moon's subsurface. The material could be associated with the global ocean that is believed to be present beneath the frozen crust. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21443

  20. Confirmation of Europa's water vapor plume activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Lorenz

    2013-10-01

    STIS spectral UV images of Jupiter's satellite Europa obtained during HST Cycle 20 revealed atomic H and O auroral emissions in intensity ratios which uniquely identify the source as electron impact excitation of water molecules above Europa's south pole and hypothesized to be associated with water vapor plumes as reported in Roth et al., Science, 2014. The plumes were detected when Europa was at apocenter on December 30/31, 2012. Two other sets of STIS observations when Europa was near pericenter did not show plume emission within the sensitivity of STIS. The plume variability is predicted to be correlated with Europa's distance from Jupiter in the observed way. However, the one plume detection at apocenter and the two non-detections near pericenter require confirmation. Therefore we request two visits of 5 orbits each to observe Europa at orbital positions of the predicted maximum plume activity {similar to the December 2012 STIS Europa visit} to provide confirmation of the initial STIS discovery and to consolidate the predicted geophysical variability pattern.

  1. RELATIVE ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN PLUMES AND INTERPLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-07-10

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ≈24 hr period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes.

  2. Chemical Plume Detection with an Iterative Background Estimation Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-17

    SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS Plume contamination of the background parameter estimates remains a difficult problem to address for plume detection systems ...schemes because of contamination of background statistics by the plume. To mitigate the effects of plume contamination , a first pass of the detector...can be used to create a background mask. However, large diffuse plumes are typically not removed by a single pass. Instead, contamination can be

  3. Application of laminar flow control to supersonic transport configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Nagel, A. L.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility and impact of implementing a laminar flow control system on a supersonic transport configuration were investigated. A hybrid laminar flow control scheme consisting of suction controlled and natural laminar flow was developed for a double-delta type wing planform. The required suction flow rates were determined from boundary layer stability analyses using representative wing pressure distributions. A preliminary design of structural modifications needed to accommodate suction through a perforated titanium skin was carried out together with the ducting and systems needed to collect, compress and discharge the suction air. The benefits of reduced aerodynamic drag were weighed against the weight, volume and power requirement penalties of suction system installation in a mission performance and sizing program to assess the net benefits. The study showed a feasibility of achieving significant laminarization of the wing surface by use of a hybrid scheme, leading to an 8.2 percent reduction in the cruise drag. This resulted in an 8.5 percent reduction in the maximum takeoff weight and a 12 percent reduction in the fuel burn after the inclusion of the LFC system installation penalties. Several research needs were identified for a resolution of aerodynamics, structural and systems issues before these potential benefits could be realized in a practical system.

  4. Flame Radiation, Structure, and Scalar Properties in Microgravity Laminar Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feikema, Douglas; Lim, Jongmook; Sivathanu, Yudaya

    2007-01-01

    Results from microgravity combustion experiments conducted in the Zero Gravity Research Facility (ZGF) 5.18 second drop facility are reported. The results quantify flame radiation, structure, and scalar properties during the early phase of a microgravity fire. Emission mid-infrared spectroscopy measurements have been completed to quantitatively determine the flame temperature, water and carbon dioxide vapor concentrations, radiative emissive power, and soot concentrations in microgravity laminar methane/air, ethylene/nitrogen/air and ethylene/air jet flames. The measured peak mole fractions for water vapor and carbon dioxide are found to be in agreement with state relationship predictions for hydrocarbon/air combustion. The ethylene/air laminar flame conditions are similar to previously reported results including those from the flight project, Laminar Soot Processes (LSP). Soot concentrations and gas temperatures are in reasonable agreement with similar results available in the literature. However, soot concentrations and flame structure dramatically change in long-duration microgravity laminar diffusion flames as demonstrated in this report.

  5. Laminar-turbulent transition delay on a swept wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodulin, V. I.; Ivanov, A. V.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Hanifi, A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper describes the results of experiments on robustness of laminar-turbulent transition control on a swept-wing using distributed micro-sized roughness (DMSR) elements. These elements introduce controlled stationary vortices which are able to significantly modify the base flow and its stability characteristics. We have performed parametric study first varying height and period of the DMSR elements in order to find the most stabilizing effect on boundary later flow in compare to uncontrolled reference case without DMSR. Significant downstream shift of laminar-turbulent transition position due to application of DMSR is found and well documented with help of thermography. The robustness of this flow control method was studied by variation of the wind-tunnel flow quality introducing significant sound background or introducing enhanced turbulence level (applying turbulizing grids). The wind-tunnel tests performed with turbulence-generating grids (at enhanced turbulence levels) have shown that laminar-turbulent transition moves upstream in this case, while DMSR-elements loose their effectiveness for transition control (no matter in quiet sound conditions or at elevated sound background). The experiments on acoustic influence have shown that without DMSR acoustic does not effect transition location. However, in case then laminar-turbulent transition is delayed by presence of DMSR, an additional transition delay was observed when harmonic acoustic waves of certain frequency were excited.

  6. Application of porous materials for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Fairly smooth porous materials were elected for study Doweave; Fibermetal; Dynapore; and perforated titanium sheet. Factors examined include: surface smoothness; suction characteristics; porosity; surface impact resistance; and strain compatibility. A laminar flow control suction glove arrangement was identified with material combinations compatible with thermal expansion and structural strain.

  7. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The wing was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  8. Soot Formation in Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames are important because they affect the durability and performance of propulsion systems, the hazards of unwanted fires, the pollutant and particulate emissions from combustion processes, and the potential for developing computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, this investigation involved an experimental study of the structure and soot properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames, seeking an improved understanding of soot formation (growth and nucleation) within diffusion flames. The present study extends earlier work in this laboratory concerning laminar smoke points (l) and soot formation in acetylene/air laminar jet diffusion flames (2), emphasizing soot formation in hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames for fuels other than acetylene. In the flame system, acetylene is the dominant gas species in the soot formation region and both nucleation and growth were successfully attributed to first-order reactions of acetylene, with nucleation exhibiting an activation energy of 32 kcal/gmol while growth involved negligible activation energy and a collision efficiency of O.53%. In addition, soot growth in the acetylene diffusion flames was comparable to new soot in premixed flame (which also has been attributed to first-order acetylene reactions). In view of this status, a major issue is the nature of soot formation processes in diffusion flame involving hydrocarbon fuels other than acetylene. In particular, information is needed about th dominant gas species in the soot formation region and the impact of gas species other than acetylene on soot nucleation and growth.

  9. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    A flight-test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane (McDonnell Douglas Corporation, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  10. Numerical assessment of accurate measurements of laminar flame speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulier, Joules; Bizon, Katarzyna; Chaumeix, Nabiha; Meynet, Nicolas; Continillo, Gaetano

    2016-12-01

    In combustion, the laminar flame speed constitutes an important parameter that reflects the chemistry of oxidation for a given fuel, along with its transport and thermal properties. Laminar flame speeds are used (i) in turbulent models used in CFD codes, and (ii) to validate detailed or reduced mechanisms, often derived from studies using ideal reactors and in diluted conditions as in jet stirred reactors and in shock tubes. End-users of such mechanisms need to have an assessment of their capability to predict the correct heat released by combustion in realistic conditions. In this view, the laminar flame speed constitutes a very convenient parameter, and it is then very important to have a good knowledge of the experimental errors involved with its determination. Stationary configurations (Bunsen burners, counter-flow flames, heat flux burners) or moving flames (tubes, spherical vessel, soap bubble) can be used. The spherical expanding flame configuration has recently become popular, since it can be used at high pressures and temperatures. With this method, the flame speed is not measured directly, but derived through the recording of the flame radius. The method used to process the radius history will have an impact on the estimated flame speed. Aim of this work is to propose a way to derive the laminar flame speed from experimental recording of expanding flames, and to assess the error magnitude.

  11. Estimation of Laminar Burning Velocities by Direct Digital Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uske, J.; Barat, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Bunsen burner flame, which is the most common flame in the laboratory, can be easily studied for its dynamics because of modern, economical digital technology available to student laboratories. Direct digital photography of Bunsen flames is used to obtain laminar burning velocities of selected gaseous hydrocarbon/air flames.

  12. Combustion Module-1 with Laminar Soot Process (LSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Technicians install the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment into the combustion chamber of Combustion Module-1. CM-1 was one of the most complex and technologically sophisticated pieces of hardware ever to be included as a part of a Spacelab mission.

  13. Laminar Soot Processes Experiment Shedding Light on Flame Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment investigated soot processes in nonturbulent, round gas jet diffusion flames in still air. The soot processes within these flames are relevant to practical combustion in aircraft propulsion systems, diesel engines, and furnaces. However, for the LSP experiment, the flames were slowed and spread out to allow measurements that are not tractable for practical, Earth-bound flames.

  14. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  15. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1984-04-16

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow through the assembly.

  16. Estimation of Laminar Burning Velocities by Direct Digital Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uske, J.; Barat, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Bunsen burner flame, which is the most common flame in the laboratory, can be easily studied for its dynamics because of modern, economical digital technology available to student laboratories. Direct digital photography of Bunsen flames is used to obtain laminar burning velocities of selected gaseous hydrocarbon/air flames.

  17. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1985-01-01

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow throughout the assembly.

  18. Numerical studies of laminar and turbulent drag reduction, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Orszag, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The flow over wave shaped surfaces is studied using a Navier Stokes solver. Detailed comparisons with theoretical results are presented, including the stability of a laminar flow over wavy surfaces. Drag characteristics of nonplanar surfaces are predicted using the Navier-Stokes solver. The secondary instabilities of wall bounded and free shear flows are also discussed.

  19. Retrieving eruptive vent conditions from dynamical properties of unsteady volcanic plume using high-speed imagery and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournigand, Pierre-Yves; Taddeucci, Jacopo; José Peña Fernandez, Juan; Gaudin, Damien; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Del Bello, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    Vent conditions are key parameters controlling volcanic plume dynamics and the ensuing different hazards, such as human health issues, infrastructure damages, and air traffic disruption. Indeed, for a given magma and vent geometry, plume development and stability over time mainly depend on the mass eruption rate, function of the velocity and density of the eruptive mixture at the vent, where direct measurements are impossible. High-speed imaging of eruptive plumes and numerical jet simulations were here non-dimensionally coupled to retrieve eruptive vent conditions starting from measurable plume parameters. High-speed videos of unsteady, momentum-driven volcanic plumes (jets) from Strombolian to Vulcanian activity from three different volcanoes (Sakurajima, Japan, Stromboli, Italy, and Fuego, Guatemala) were recorded in the visible and the thermal spectral ranges by using an Optronis CR600x2 (1280x1024 pixels definition, 500 Hz frame rate) and a FLIR SC655 (640x480 pixels definition, 50 Hz frame rate) cameras. Atmospheric effects correction and pre-processing of the thermal videos were performed to increase measurement accuracy. Pre-processing consists of the extraction of the plume temperature gradient over time, combined with a temperature threshold in order to remove the image background. The velocity and the apparent surface temperature fields of the plumes, and their changes over timescales of tenths of seconds, were then measured by particle image velocimetry and thermal image analysis, respectively, of the pre-processed videos. The parameters thus obtained are representative of the outer plume surface, corresponding to its boundary shear layer at the interface with the atmosphere, and may significantly differ from conditions in the plume interior. To retrieve information on the interior of the plume, and possibly extrapolate it even at the eruptive vent level, video-derived plume parameters were non-dimensionally compared to the results of numerical

  20. Engine Cold Start

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    have a high surface to volume ratio for the combustion chamber , and high gas velocities during compression that results in high heat transfer rates...into the pre- chambers during the injection event to augment ignition. Except for a thermostatically controlled cold start advance, the mechanical fuel...Kistler Cylinder Pressure Transducer, 6052B (Main- Chamber ) • Kistler 5018 Charge Amplifiers • Kistler Fuel Line Pressure Transducer, 4065A1000 with

  1. A global sensitivity analysis of the PlumeRise model of volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Mark J.; Hogg, Andrew J.; Phillips, Jeremy C.

    2016-10-01

    Integral models of volcanic plumes allow predictions of plume dynamics to be made and the rapid estimation of volcanic source conditions from observations of the plume height by model inversion. Here we introduce PlumeRise, an integral model of volcanic plumes that incorporates a description of the state of the atmosphere, includes the effects of wind and the phase change of water, and has been developed as a freely available web-based tool. The model can be used to estimate the height of a volcanic plume when the source conditions are specified, or to infer the strength of the source from an observed plume height through a model inversion. The predictions of the volcanic plume dynamics produced by the model are analysed in four case studies in which the atmospheric conditions and the strength of the source are varied. A global sensitivity analysis of the model to a selection of model inputs is performed and the results are analysed using parallel coordinate plots for visualisation and variance-based sensitivity indices to quantify the sensitivity of model outputs. We find that if the atmospheric conditions do not vary widely then there is a small set of model inputs that strongly influence the model predictions. When estimating the height of the plume, the source mass flux has a controlling influence on the model prediction, while variations in the plume height strongly effect the inferred value of the source mass flux when performing inversion studies. The values taken for the entrainment coefficients have a particularly important effect on the quantitative predictions. The dependencies of the model outputs to variations in the inputs are discussed and compared to simple algebraic expressions that relate source conditions to the height of the plume.

  2. Interactions of the Greater Ontong Java mantle plume component with the Osbourn Trough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Liang; Li, Chao

    2016-11-21

    The Ontong Java-Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau (OJMHP) is considered to have originated from a starting mantle plume, and have been rifted apart by two spreading ridges. However, the ages of these spreading ridges and their possible interactions with the presumed mantle plume are unclear. The Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau has been rifted apart by the Osbourn Trough which formed the southwestern Pacific crust to the east of the Tonga-Kermadec trench. Here we report Pb-Hf-Os isotopes of the basaltic crust (Site U1365 of IODP Expedition 329) formed by the Osbourn Trough. Linear regression of Re-Os isotopes results in an age of 103.7 ± 2.3 Ma for Site U1365 basalts, indicating that the Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau was rifted apart by the Osbourn Trough with a spreading rate of ~190 mm/yr. The superfast spreading rate supports the Osbourn as an abandoned segment of the early Pacific spreading ridge, which initially overlapped with the giant starting plume. Moreover, the Pb-Hf isotopes of some of Site U1365 basalts show distinct differences from those of the Pacific mid-ocean ridge basalts, while they are similar to the basalts of the Ontong Java and Manihiki plateaus. We suggest that the OJMHP mantle plume components has been involved by the Osbourn spreading center.

  3. Interactions of the Greater Ontong Java mantle plume component with the Osbourn Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Liang; Li, Chao

    2016-11-01

    The Ontong Java-Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau (OJMHP) is considered to have originated from a starting mantle plume, and have been rifted apart by two spreading ridges. However, the ages of these spreading ridges and their possible interactions with the presumed mantle plume are unclear. The Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau has been rifted apart by the Osbourn Trough which formed the southwestern Pacific crust to the east of the Tonga-Kermadec trench. Here we report Pb-Hf-Os isotopes of the basaltic crust (Site U1365 of IODP Expedition 329) formed by the Osbourn Trough. Linear regression of Re-Os isotopes results in an age of 103.7 ± 2.3 Ma for Site U1365 basalts, indicating that the Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau was rifted apart by the Osbourn Trough with a spreading rate of ~190 mm/yr. The superfast spreading rate supports the Osbourn as an abandoned segment of the early Pacific spreading ridge, which initially overlapped with the giant starting plume. Moreover, the Pb-Hf isotopes of some of Site U1365 basalts show distinct differences from those of the Pacific mid-ocean ridge basalts, while they are similar to the basalts of the Ontong Java and Manihiki plateaus. We suggest that the OJMHP mantle plume components has been involved by the Osbourn spreading center.

  4. Interactions of the Greater Ontong Java mantle plume component with the Osbourn Trough

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Liang; Li, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The Ontong Java-Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau (OJMHP) is considered to have originated from a starting mantle plume, and have been rifted apart by two spreading ridges. However, the ages of these spreading ridges and their possible interactions with the presumed mantle plume are unclear. The Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau has been rifted apart by the Osbourn Trough which formed the southwestern Pacific crust to the east of the Tonga-Kermadec trench. Here we report Pb-Hf-Os isotopes of the basaltic crust (Site U1365 of IODP Expedition 329) formed by the Osbourn Trough. Linear regression of Re-Os isotopes results in an age of 103.7 ± 2.3 Ma for Site U1365 basalts, indicating that the Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau was rifted apart by the Osbourn Trough with a spreading rate of ~190 mm/yr. The superfast spreading rate supports the Osbourn as an abandoned segment of the early Pacific spreading ridge, which initially overlapped with the giant starting plume. Moreover, the Pb-Hf isotopes of some of Site U1365 basalts show distinct differences from those of the Pacific mid-ocean ridge basalts, while they are similar to the basalts of the Ontong Java and Manihiki plateaus. We suggest that the OJMHP mantle plume components has been involved by the Osbourn spreading center. PMID:27869235

  5. Impulsively started, steady and pulsated annular inflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Raouf, Emad; Sharif, Muhammad A. R.; Baker, John

    2017-04-01

    A computational investigation was carried out on low Reynolds number laminar inflow starting annular jets using multiple blocking ratios and atmospheric ambient conditions. The jet exit velocity conditions are imposed as steady, unit pulsed, and sinusoidal pulsed while the jet surroundings and the far-field jet inlet upstream conditions are left atmospheric. The reason is to examine the flow behavior in and around the jet inlet under these conditions. The pulsation mode behavior is analyzed based on the resultant of the momentum and pressure forces at the entry of the annulus, the circulation and vortex formation, and the propulsion efficiency of the inflow jets. The results show that under certain conditions, the net force of inflow jets (sinusoidal pulsed jets in particular) could point opposite to the flow direction due to the adverse pressure drops in the flow. The propulsion efficiency is also found to increase with pulsation frequency and the sinusoidal pulsed inflow jets are more efficient than the unit pulsed inflow jets. In addition, steady inflow jets did not trigger the formation of vortices, while unit and sinusoidal pulsed inflow jets triggered the formation of vortices under a certain range of frequencies.

  6. Sulfur chemistry in a copper smelter plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, D. J.; Christensen, J. J.; Eatough, N. I.; Hill, M. W.; Major, T. D.; Mangelson, N. F.; Post, M. E.; Ryder, J. F.; Hansen, L. D.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Fischer, J. W.

    Sulfur transformation chemistry was studied in the plume of the Utah smelter of Kennecott Copper Corporation from April to October 1977. Samples were taken at up to four locations from 4 to 60 km from the stacks. Data collected at each station included: SO 2 concentration, low-volume collected total paniculate matter, high-volume collected size fractionated paniculate matter, wind velocity and direction, temperature, and relative humidity. Paniculate samples were analyzed for S(IV). sulfate, strong acid, anions, cations, and elemental concentrations using calorimetric, ion Chromatographie, FIXE, ESCA, ion microprobe, and SEM-ion microprobe techniques. The concentration of As in the paniculate matter was used as a conservative plume tracer. The ratios Mo/As, Pb/As, and Zn/As were constant in particulate matter collected at all sampling sites for any particle size. Strong mineral acid was neutralized by background metal oxide and/or carbonate particulates within 40km of the smelter. This neutralization process is limited only by the rate of incorporation of basic material into the plume. Two distinct metal-S(IV) species similar to those observed in laboratory aerosol experiments were found in the plume. The formation of paniculate S(IV) species occurs by interaction of SO 2 (g) with both ambient and plume derived aerosol and is equilibrium controlled. The extent of formation of S(IV) complexes in the aerosol is directly proportional to the SO 2(g) and paniculate (Cu + Fe) concentration and inversely proportional to the paniculate acidity. S(IV) species were stable in collected paniculate matter only in the neutralized material, but with proper sampling techniques could be demonstrated to also be present in very acidic particles at high ambient SO 2(g) concentrations. Reduction of arsenate to arsenite by the aerosol S(IV) complexes during plume transport is suggested. The SO 2(g)-sulfate conversion process in the plume is described by a mechanism which is first order

  7. Hubble Captures Volcanic Eruption Plume From Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a picture of a 400-km-high (250-mile-high) plume of gas and dust from a volcanic eruption on Io, Jupiter's large innermost moon.

    Io was passing in front of Jupiter when this image was taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in July 1996. The plume appears as an orange patch just off the edge of Io in the eight o'clock position, against the blue background of Jupiter's clouds. Io's volcanic eruptions blasts material hundreds of kilometers into space in giant plumes of gas and dust. In this image, material must have been blown out of the volcano at more than 2,000 mph to form a plume of this size, which is the largest yet seen on Io.

    Until now, these plumes have only been seen by spacecraft near Jupiter, and their detection from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope opens up new opportunities for long-term studies of these remarkable phenomena.

    The plume seen here is from Pele, one of Io's most powerful volcanos. Pele's eruptions have been seen before. In March 1979, the Voyager 1 spacecraft recorded a 300-km-high eruption cloud from Pele. But the volcano was inactive when the Voyager 2 spacecraft flew by Jupiter in July 1979. This Hubble observation is the first glimpse of a Pele eruption plume since the Voyager expeditions.

    Io's volcanic plumes are much taller than those produced by terrestrial volcanos because of a combination of factors. The moon's thin atmosphere offers no resistance to the expanding volcanic gases; its weak gravity (one-sixth that of Earth) allows material to climb higher before falling; and its biggest volcanos are more powerful than most of Earth's volcanos.

    This image is a contrast-enhanced composite of an ultraviolet image (2600 Angstrom wavelength), shown in blue, and a violet image (4100 Angstrom wavelength), shown in orange. The orange color probably occurs because of the absorption and/or scattering of ultraviolet light in the plume. This light from Jupiter passes through

  8. Microbial populations in contaminant plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    Efficient biodegradation of subsurface contaminants requires two elements: (1) microbial populations with the necessary degradative capabilities, and (2) favorable subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions. Practical constraints on experimental design and interpretation in both the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences have resulted in limited knowledge of the interaction between hydrogeological and microbiological features of subsurface environments. These practical constraints include: (1) inconsistencies between the scales of investigation in the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences, and (2) practical limitations on the ability to accurately define microbial populations in environmental samples. However, advances in application of small-scale sampling methods and interdisciplinary approaches to site investigations are beginning to significantly improve understanding of hydrogeological and microbiological interactions. Likewise, culture-based and molecular analyses of microbial populations in subsurface contaminant plumes have revealed significant adaptation of microbial populations to plume environmental conditions. Results of recent studies suggest that variability in subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions significantly influences subsurface microbial-community structure. Combined investigations of site conditions and microbial-community structure provide the knowledge needed to understand interactions between subsurface microbial populations, plume geochemistry, and contaminant biodegradation. La biodégradation efficace des polluants souterrains requiert deux éléments: des populations microbiennes possédant les aptitudes nécessaires à la dégradation, et des conditions géochimiques et hydrologiques souterraines favorables. Des contraintes pratiques sur la conception et l'interprétation des expériences à la fois en microbiologie et en hydrogéologie ont conduit à une connaissance limitée des interactions entre les

  9. When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... away. What conditions increase the urgency to start ART? The following conditions increase the urgency to start ... risk of HIV transmission. Once a person starts ART, why is medication adherence important? ART is a ...

  10. Ridge suction drives plume-ridge interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Hékinian, R.

    2003-04-01

    Deep-sourced mantle plumes, if existing, are genetically independent of plate tectonics. When the ascending plumes approach lithospheric plates, interactions between the two occur. Such interactions are most prominent near ocean ridges where the lithosphere is thin and the effect of plumes is best revealed. While ocean ridges are mostly passive features in terms of plate tectonics, they play an active role in the context of plume-ridge interactions. This active role is a ridge suction force that drives asthenospheric mantle flow towards ridges because of material needs to form the ocean crust at ridges and lithospheric mantle in the vicinity of ridges. This ridge suction force increases with increasing plate separation rate because of increased material demand per unit time. As the seismic low-velocity zone atop the asthenosphere has the lowest viscosity that increases rapidly with depth, the ridge-ward asthenospheric flow is largely horizontal beneath the lithosphere. Recognizing that plume materials have two components with easily-melted dikes/veins enriched in volatiles and incompatible elements dispersed in the more refractory and depleted peridotitic matrix, geochemistry of some seafloor volcanics well illustrates that plume-ridge interactions are consequences of ridge-suction-driven flow of plume materials, which melt by decompression because of lithospheric thinning towards ridges. There are excellent examples: 1. The decreasing La/Sm and increasing MgO and CaO/Al_2O_3 in Easter Seamount lavas from Salas-y-Gomez Islands to the Easter Microplate East rift zone result from progressive decompression melting of ridge-ward flowing plume materials. 2. The similar geochemical observations in lavas along the Foundation hotline towards the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge result from the same process. 3. The increasing ridge suction force with increasing spreading rate explains why the Iceland plume has asymmetric effects on its neighboring ridges: both topographic and

  11. African Equatorial and Subtropical Ozone Plumes: Recurrences Timescales of the Brown Cloud Trans-African Plumes and Other Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Thompson, Anne M.; Guan, Hong; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-01-01

    We have found repeated illustrations in the maps of Total Tropospheric Ozone (TTO) of apparent transport of ozone from the Indian Ocean to the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. Most interesting are examples that coincide with the INDOEX observations of late northern winter, 1999. Three soundings associated with the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) network help confirm and quantify degree of influence of pollution, lightning, and stratospheric sources, suggesting that perhaps 40% of increased Atlantic ozone could be Asian pollution during periods of maximum identified in the TTO maps. We outline recurrent periods of apparent ozone transport from Indian to Atlantic Ocean regions both during and outside the late-winter period. These are placed in the context of some general observations about factors controlling recurrence timescales for the expression of both equatorial and subtropical plumes. Low-level subtropical plumes are often controlled by frontal systems approaching the Namib coast; these direct mid-level air into either easterly equatorial plumes or westerly mid- troposphere plumes. Equatorial plumes of ozone cross Africa on an easterly path due to the occasional coincidence of two phenomena: (1) lofting of ozone to mid and upper levels, often in the Western Indian Ocean, and (2) the eastward extension of an Equatorial African easterly jet.

  12. African Equatorial and Subtropical Ozone Plumes: Recurrence Timescales of the Brown Cloud Trans-African Plume and Other Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatfield, R. B.; Guan, H.; Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J.

    2004-05-01

    We have found repeated illustrations in the maps of Total Tropospheric Ozone (TTO) of apparent transport of ozone from the Indian Ocean to the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. Most interesting are examples that coincide with the INDOEX observations of late northern winter, 1999. Three soundings associated with the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) network help confirm and quantify degree of influence of pollution, lightning, and stratospheric sources, suggesting that perhaps 40% of increased Atlantic ozone could be Asian pollution during periods of maximum identified in the TTO maps. We outline recurrent periods of apparent ozone transport from Indian to Atlantic Ocean regions both during and outside the late-winter period. These are placed in the context of some general observations about factors controlling recurrence timescales for the expression of both equatorial and subtropical plumes. Low-level subtropical plumes are often controlled by frontal systems approaching the Namib coast; these direct mid-level air into eithier easterly equatorial plumes or westerly mid-troposphere plumes. Equatorial plumes of ozone cross Africa on an easterly path due to the occasional coincidence of two phenomena: (1) lofting of ozone to mid and upper levels, often in the Western Indian Ocean, and (2) the eastward extension of an Equatorial African easterly jet.

  13. African Equatorial and Subtropical Ozone Plumes: Recurrences Timescales of the Brown Cloud Trans-African Plumes and Other Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Thompson, Anne M.; Guan, Hong; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-01-01

    We have found repeated illustrations in the maps of Total Tropospheric Ozone (TTO) of apparent transport of ozone from the Indian Ocean to the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. Most interesting are examples that coincide with the INDOEX observations of late northern winter, 1999. Three soundings associated with the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) network help confirm and quantify degree of influence of pollution, lightning, and stratospheric sources, suggesting that perhaps 40% of increased Atlantic ozone could be Asian pollution during periods of maximum identified in the TTO maps. We outline recurrent periods of apparent ozone transport from Indian to Atlantic Ocean regions both during and outside the late-winter period. These are placed in the context of some general observations about factors controlling recurrence timescales for the expression of both equatorial and subtropical plumes. Low-level subtropical plumes are often controlled by frontal systems approaching the Namib coast; these direct mid-level air into either easterly equatorial plumes or westerly mid- troposphere plumes. Equatorial plumes of ozone cross Africa on an easterly path due to the occasional coincidence of two phenomena: (1) lofting of ozone to mid and upper levels, often in the Western Indian Ocean, and (2) the eastward extension of an Equatorial African easterly jet.

  14. Understanding vapour plume structure in indoor environments for the detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foat, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Dogs remain the most effective method for the detection of explosives in many situations yet the spatially, temporally and chemically varying signature that they sense cannot easily be quantified. Vapour plumes can be highly unsteady and intermittent and the problem is further complicated in indoor spaces where turbulent, transitional and laminar regions may exist and where there may be no dominant flow direction. Intermittent plumes can have peak concentrations that are considerably higher than the time averaged values. As dogs can sample the air at 5 Hz it is possible that these unsteady fluctuations play a key part in their detection process. A low Reynolds number (Re less than 5000 at the inlet) benchmark test case for indoor airflow has been studied using large-eddy simulation computational fluid dynamics. Fixed concentration vapour sources have been included on the floor of the room and the resulting vapour dispersion has been modelled. Sources with different surface areas have been included and their instantaneous and mean concentration profiles compared. The results from this study will provide insight into canine detection of vapour in indoor environments.

  15. PlumeSat: A Micro-Satellite Based Plume Imagery Collection Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.

    2002-06-30

    This paper describes a technical approach to cost-effectively collect plume imagery of boosting targets using a novel micro-satellite based platform operating in low earth orbit (LEO). The plume collection Micro-satellite or PlueSat for short, will be capable of carrying an array of multi-spectral (UV through LWIR) passive and active (Imaging LADAR) sensors and maneuvering with a lateral divert propulsion system to different observation altitudes (100 to 300 km) and different closing geometries to achieve a range of aspect angles (15 to 60 degrees) in order to simulate a variety of boost phase intercept missions. The PlumeSat will be a cost effective platform to collect boost phase plume imagery from within 1 to 10 km ranges, resulting in 0.1 to 1 meter resolution imagery of a variety of potential target missiles with a goal of demonstrating reliable plume-to-hardbody handover algorithms for future boost phase intercept missions. Once deployed on orbit, the PlumeSat would perform a series phenomenology collection experiments until expends its on-board propellants. The baseline PlumeSat concept is sized to provide from 5 to 7 separate fly by data collects of boosting targets. The total number of data collects will depend on the orbital basing altitude and the accuracy in delivering the boosting target vehicle to the nominal PlumeSat fly-by volume.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: INNOVATIVE MEASURES FOR SUBSURFACE CHROMIUM REMEDIATION: SOURCE ZONE, CONCENTRATED PLUME, AND DILUTE PLUME.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This environmental research brief reports on innovative measures for addressing 1) the source zone soils, 2) the concentrated portion of the ground-water plume, and 3) the dilute portion of the ground-water plume. For the source zone, surfactant-enhanced chromium extraction is ev...

  17. Rocket exhaust plume computer program improvement. Volume 1: Summary: Method of characteristics nozzle and plume programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, A. W.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, N. M.

    1972-01-01

    A summary is presented of the various documents that discuss and describe the computer programs and analysis techniques which are available for rocket nozzle and exhaust plume calculations. The basic method of characteristics program is discussed, along with such auxiliary programs as the plume impingement program, the plot program and the thermochemical properties program.

  18. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  19. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  20. Properties of "started" earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeshko, V. A.; Evdokimova, O. V.; Babeshko, O. M.

    2016-04-01

    The properties of earthquakes called "started" in [1] are studied. The problems associated with the method of revealing them, the expected behavior of the event, and the determination of its place, time, and intensity are discussed. Certain characteristic properties of real earthquakes are compared with the modeled ones. It is emphasized that there are no data on earthquakes of a similar type in scientific publications. The method of using high-efficiency calculations is proposed by imbedding the investigations in topological spaces having a wider spectrum of properties than the functional ones.

  1. Unveiling CO2 heterogeneous freezing plumes during champagne cork popping.

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Cordier, Daniel; Honvault, Jacques; Cilindre, Clara

    2017-09-14

    Cork popping from clear transparent bottles of champagne stored at different temperatures (namely, 6, 12, and 20 °C) was filmed through high-speed video imaging in the visible light spectrum. During the cork popping process, a plume mainly composed of gaseous CO2 with traces of water vapour freely expands out of the bottleneck through ambient air. Most interestingly, for the bottles stored at 20 °C, the characteristic grey-white cloud of fog classically observed above the bottlenecks of champagne stored at lower temperatures simply disappeared. It is replaced by a more evanescent plume, surprisingly blue, starting from the bottleneck. We suggest that heterogeneous freezing of CO2 occurs on ice water clusters homogeneously nucleated in the bottlenecks, depending on the saturation ratio experienced by gas-phase CO2 after adiabatic expansion (indeed highly bottle temperature dependent). Moreover, and as observed for the bottles stored at 20 °C, we show that the freezing of only a small portion of all the available CO2 is able to pump the energy released through adiabatic expansion, thus completely inhibiting the condensation of water vapour found in air packages adjacent to the gas volume gushing out of the bottleneck.

  2. Laminar-to-turbulence and relaminarization zones detection by simulation of low Reynolds number turbulent blood flow in large stenosed arteries.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Reza; Ghalichi, Farzan; Hossainpour, Siamak; Ghasemzadeh, Kamran

    2016-08-12

    Laminar, turbulent, transitional, or combine areas of all three types of viscous flow can occur downstream of a stenosis depending upon the Reynolds number and constriction shape parameter. Neither laminar flow solver nor turbulent models for instance the k-ω (k-omega), k-ε (k-epsilon), RANS or LES are opportune for this type of flow. In the present study attention has been focused vigorously on the effect of the constriction in the flow field with a unique way. It means that the laminar solver was employed from entry up to the beginning of the turbulent shear flow. The turbulent model (k-ω SST Transitional Flows) was utilized from starting of turbulence to relaminarization zone while the laminar model was applied again with onset of the relaminarization district. Stenotic flows, with 50 and 75% cross-sectional area, were simulated at Reynolds numbers range from 500 to 2000 employing FLUENT (v6.3.17). The flow was considered to be steady, axisymmetric, and incompressible. Achieving results were reported as axial velocity, disturbance velocity, wall shear stress and the outcomes were compared with previously experimental and CFD computations. The analogy of axial velocity profiles shows that they are in acceptable compliance with the empirical data. As well as disturbance velocity and wall shear stresses anticipated by this new approach, part by part simulation, are reasonably valid with the acceptable experimental studies.

  3. Mantle plume capture, anchoring, and outflow during Galápagos plume-ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Geist, D. J.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    Compositions of basalts erupted between the main zone of Galápagos plume upwelling and adjacent Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) provide important constraints on dynamic processes involved in transfer of deep-mantle-sourced material to mid-ocean ridges. We examine recent basalts from central and northeast Galápagos including some that have less radiogenic Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions than plume-influenced basalts (E-MORB) from the nearby ridge. We show that the location of E-MORB, greatest crustal thickness, and elevated topography on the GSC correlates with a confined zone of low-velocity, high-temperature mantle connecting the plume stem and ridge at depths of ˜100 km. At this site on the ridge, plume-driven upwelling involving deep melting of partially dehydrated, recycled ancient oceanic crust, plus plate-limited shallow melting of anhydrous peridotite, generate E-MORB and larger amounts of melt than elsewhere on the GSC. The first-order control on plume stem to ridge flow is rheological rather than gravitational, and strongly influenced by flow regimes initiated when the plume was on axis (>5 Ma). During subsequent northeast ridge migration material upwelling in the plume stem appears to have remained "anchored" to a contact point on the GSC. This deep, confined NE plume stem-to-ridge flow occurs via a network of melt channels, embedded within the normal spreading and advection of plume material beneath the Nazca plate, and coincides with locations of historic volcanism. Our observations require a more dynamically complex model than proposed by most studies, which rely on radial solid-state outflow of heterogeneous plume material to the ridge.

  4. Wind-Forced Baroclinic Beta-Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmadani, A.; Maximenko, N. A.; Melnichenko, O.; Schneider, N.; Di Lorenzo, E.

    2011-12-01

    A planetary beta-plume is a classical example of oceanic circulation induced by a localized vorticity source or sink that allows an analytical description in simplistic cases. Its barotropic structure is a zonally-elongated, gyre-like cell governed by the Sverdrup circulation on the beta-plane. The dominant zonal currents, found west of the source/sink, are often referred to as zonal jets. This simple picture describes the depth-integrated flow. Previous studies have investigated beta-plumes in a reduced-gravity framework or using other simple models with a small number of vertical layers, thereby lacking representation of the vertical structure. In addition, most previous studies use a purely linear regime without considering the role of eddies. However, these jets are often associated with strong lateral shear that makes them unstable under increased forcing. The circulation in such a nonlinear regime may involve eddy-mean flow interactions, which modify the time-averaged circulation. Here, the baroclinic structures of linear and nonlinear wind-forced beta-plumes are studied using a continuously-stratified, primitive equation, eddy-permitting ocean model (ROMS). The model is configured in an idealized rectangular domain for the subtropical ocean with a flat bottom. The surface wind forcing is a steady anticyclonic Gaussian wind vortex, which provides a localized vorticity source in the center of the domain. The associated wind stress curl and Ekman pumping comprise downwelling in the vortex center surrounded by a ring of weaker upwelling. Under weak forcing, the simulated steady-state circulation corresponds well with a theoretical linear beta-plume. While its depth-integrated transport exhibits a set of zonal jets, consistent with Sverdrup theory, the baroclinic structure of the plume is remarkably complex. Relatively fast westward decay of the surface currents occurs simultaneously with the deepening of the lower boundary of the plume. This deepening suggests

  5. CALIOP-derived Smoke Plume Injection Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, A. J.; Winker, D. M.; Choi, H. D.; Fairlie, T. D.; Westberg, D. J.; Roller, C. M.; Pouliot, G.; Vaughan, M.; Pierce, T. E.; Trepte, C. R.; Rao, V.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning is a dominant natural and anthropogenic disturbance that feeds back to the climate system. Fire regimes, ecosystem fuels, fire severity and intensity vary widely, even within the same system, largely under the control of weather and climate. These strongly influence fire plume injection height and thus the transport of related biomass burning emissions, affecting air quality, human health and the climate system. If our knowledge of plume injection height is incorrect, transport models of those emissions will likewise be incorrect, adversely affecting our ability to analyze and predict climate feedbacks (i.e. black carbon to the Arctic, precipitation, cloud-radiation relationships) and public health (air quality forecast). Historically, plume height was based on the pioneering work of G.A. Briggs [1969; 1971] and verified with limited field campaigns. However, we currently have two satellite instruments, Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard CALIPSO (afternoon overpass) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) onboard TERRA (morning overpass), that can provide the statistics necessary to verify our assumptions and improve fire plume injection height estimates for use in both small- and large-scale models. We have developed a methodology to assess fire plume injection height using the Langley Trajectory Model (LaTM), CALIOP, Hazard Mapping System (HMS) smoke plume, and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) thermal anomaly data that is capable of generating two distinct types of verification data. A single CALIOP smoke-filled aerosol envelop can be traced back to numerous fire events, and using multiple CALIOP transects from numerous days, a daily smoke plume injection height evolution from a single fire can be defined. Additionally, we have linked the smoke plumes to ecosystems and the meteorological variables that define fire weather. In concert, CALIOP and MISR data can produce the statistical knowledge

  6. Compressible plume dynamics in the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossmann, A. B.; Van Keken, P. E.; Ritsema, J. E.; Goes, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Plumes rising from the deep mantle may explain hotspot volcanism, but their occurrence in the lower mantle is not unambiguously confirmed by seismological imaging studies. Additionally, the seismologically observed flat topography of the 670 km discontinuity below hotspots disagrees with the elevation expected due to its negative Clapeyron slope and plume excess temperature. Numerical models that account for realistic rheology, compressibility and consistently implemented phase transitions may help reconciling these observations with the mantle plume hypothesis. Here we present numerical mantle plume models in an axisymmetric spherical shell geometry. The Anelastic Liquid Approximation is applied to the governing equations to account for mantle compressibility, viscous dissipation and work done against gravity. Besides this, a depth- and temperature dependent viscosity and the main phase boundaries at 400 and 670 km depth as well as latent heat effects during the phase transitions are considered. The reference state is based on the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and considers PREM-like density jumps at 400 and 670 km depth and latent heat effects in the temperature profile. We include a dense layer above the core-mantle boundary from which the plume rises. Plume dynamics and morphology is studied for varying Clapeyron slope, especially at the endothermic phase transition, Rayleigh number and different viscosity models. We evaluate the importance of consistently implementing latent heat in the governing equations and reference state. Furthermore we vary excess density and thickness of the dense layer to study the effects on entrainment of the layer and the dynamics in the transition zone. Our models show that the seismologically observed flat topography of the 670 km phase boundary is consistent with a plume origin in the deep mantle and offer an additional explanation independent of previously proposed ones, as we observe a large plume head in the lower mantle

  7. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  8. Nighttime chemistry in the Houston urban plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luria, Menachem; Valente, Ralph J.; Bairai, Solomon; Parkhurst, William J.; Tanner, Roger L.

    A late afternoon polluted air parcel transported from the Houston metropolitan area was monitored by an instrumented aircraft throughout the night of 21-22 July, 2005. Sampling was conducted during three flight segments over several downwind areas that were identified by a controllable meteorological balloon released from the Houston area at sundown. Samples were taken for approximately 2 h over each area. Using carbon monoxide as a tracer of the urban plume, it was revealed that the dilution inside the plume was relatively small. Ozone levels of up to 120 ppb were found in the plume at the furthest downwind distance, some 250 km northwest of Houston, with plume transport in the direction of the Dallas metropolitan area. The data further suggest that the nighttime conversion of NO x to NO z was very rapid, with complete (˜100%) conversion by the end of the night. At two locations the urban plume mixed with fresh emissions from power plants. At these sampling points ˜50% of the NO y had already been converted to NO z, thus indicating very rapid oxidation at night.

  9. Modeling the Enceladus Plume--Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleshman, B. L.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the chemical interaction between Saturn's corotating plasma and Enceladus' volcanic plumes. The evolution of a parcel of ambient plasma passing through a prescribed H2O plume is estimated using a physical chemistry model based on the Io torus chemistry but adapted for water-group reactions. The flow field is assumed to be that of a plasma around an electrically-conducting obstacle centered on Enceladus and aligned with Saturn's magnetic field, consistent with Cassini magnetometer data. Our results suggest that charge exchange dominates the local chemistry and that H3O+ dominates the water-group composition downstream of the Enceladus plumes. We explore the effects on the physical chemistry of (1) a small population of hot electrons and (2) a flow decelerated in response to the pickup of fresh ions near the plumes. Charge exchange dominates the local interaction, leading to an H3O+-dominated local water-group chemistry. Pickup Rate/(kg s-1) Pickup rate from the plasma--plume interaction. We emphasize: (1) The possibility of hot electron beams at Enceladus, given the contraints on charge exchange + impact ionization pickup [0.2--3 kg s-1, Khurana et al. (2007); Saur et al. (2007); Burger et al. (2008)]. (2) Charge exchange dominates the local chemistry.

  10. Particle Characterization in Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, E. Eugene, Jr.; Fisher, J. Scott

    1997-01-01

    A method to characterize particles in rocket exhaust plumes is developed. The particle velocity, size, and material composition are determined from crater characteristics resulting from impacts into aluminum and copper targets passed through the plume. The targets are mounted on a steel arm approximately 21 inches (53 cm) long which is rotated through the plume at sufficient velocity to prevent material failure resulting from thermal effects. A Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with secondary x-ray detectors is used to determine the particle material, and a standard optical measurement microscope is used to determine the crater diameter and depth. The crater diameter and depth are used in turn, as inputs to a ballistics computer code to estimate the velocity and size of the particle. The target has a safe residence time in the plume of approximately 50 ms before reaching an unacceptably high temperature. The = must mach a velocity of 104 ft/s (32 m/s) before entering the plume to produce the design residence time of 20 ms. The arm is actuated by a torsion spring with a 5-inch (13 cm) outer diameter, 0.625-inch (16 mm wire diameter, and 11 coils. A prototype of the entire rocket exhaust particle impact characterization system (PICS) was constructed and statically tested.

  11. Reconnaissance of gas plumes offshore Sado Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, H.; Aoyama, C.; Watanabe, H.; Komatsu, H.; Tajima, H.

    2016-12-01

    In late March 2016, an exploration of gas plume offshore Sado Island was conducted to know about their distribution, especially from shallow sea floor of 150 - 400 m. In the Japan Sea, more than thousand of gas plumes had been found in the recent 3 years. Most of them are supposed to be originated from dissolution of submarine methane hydrate on the sea floor surface and/or shallow subsurface. Comparison of the plumes and flux observed by multi-beam sonar and fish-finder record between 2016 and 2013 shows that both of the distribution and the gas flux, evaluated from intensity in echogram has changed. Sub-bottom scanner imagery suggest that the apparently sub-surface gas-chimney-like structure was observed at as many sites. Unlike large-scale seafloor surface type methane-hydrate site, those subsurface chimney did not reach the seafloor, possibly because the temperature-pressure condition was not satisfied on the surface. Authors have sampled sea water near the vent of those plume gas, depressurized to extract dissolved air bubbles, which was subjected to chemical analysis. Atmospheres around above large-scale plume which looks reaching to the sea surface was collected and analyzed. Results show that the air collected from the seafloor near the vent contains slightly higher concentration of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2).

  12. Space Shuttle Plume Simulation Effect on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Technology for simulating plumes in wind tunnel tests was not adequate to provide the required confidence in test data where plume induced aerodynamic effects might be significant. A broad research program was undertaken to correct the deficiency. Four tasks within the program are reported. Three of these tasks involve conducting experiments, related to three different aspects of the plume simulation problem: (1) base pressures; (2) lateral jet pressures; and (3) plume parameters. The fourth task involves collecting all of the base pressure test data generated during the program. Base pressures were measured on a classic cone ogive cylinder body as affected by the coaxial, high temperature exhaust plumes of a variety of solid propellant rockets. Valid data were obtained at supersonic freestream conditions but not at transonic. Pressure data related to lateral (separation) jets at M infinity = 4.5, for multiple clustered nozzles canted to the freestream and operating at high dynamic pressure ratios. All program goals were met although the model hardware was found to be large relative to the wind tunnel size so that operation was limited for some nozzle configurations.

  13. Confirmation of Water Plumes on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    Evidence was found for plumes of water ice venting from the polar regions of Europa (Roth et al 2014a) - FUV detection of off-limb line emission from the dissociation products of water. We find additional evidence for the presence of ice plumes on Europa from HST transit imaging observations (Sparks et al 2016). The evidence for plumes remains marginal, 4-sigma, and there is considerable debate as to their reality. SOFIA can potentially resolve this issue with an unambiguous direct detection of water vapor using EXES. Detection of the fundamental vibrational mode of water vapor at 6 micron, as opposed to the atomic constituents of water, would prove that the plumes exist and inform us of their physical chemistry through quantitative consideration of the balance between water vapor and its dissociation products, hydrogen and oxygen. We propose to obtain spectra of the leading and trailing hemispheres separately, with trailing as the higher priority. These provide two very different physical environments and plausibly different degrees of activity. If the plumes of Europa arise from the deep ocean, we have gained access to probably the most astrobiologically interesting location in the Solar System, and clarify an issue of major strategic importance in NASAs planning for its multi-billion dollar mission to Europa.

  14. Intermittent heat instabilities in an air plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mouël, Jean-Louis; Kossobokov, Vladimir G.; Perrier, Frederic; Morat, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    We report the results of heating experiments carried out in an abandoned limestone quarry close to Paris, in an isolated room of a volume of about 400 m3. A heat source made of a metallic resistor of power 100 W was installed on the floor of the room, at distance from the walls. High-quality temperature sensors, with a response time of 20 s, were fixed on a 2 m long bar. In a series of 24 h heating experiments the bar had been set up horizontally at different heights or vertically along the axis of the plume to record changes in temperature distribution with a sampling time varying from 20 to 120 s. When taken in averages over 24 h, the temperatures present the classical shape of steady-state plumes, as described by classical models. On the contrary, the temperature time series show a rich dynamic plume flow with intermittent trains of oscillations, spatially coherent, of large amplitude and a period around 400 s, separated by intervals of relative quiescence whose duration can reach several hours. To our knowledge, no specific theory is available to explain this behavior, which appears to be a chaotic interaction between a turbulent plume and a stratified environment. The observed behavior, with first-order factorization of a smooth spatial function with a global temporal intermittent function, could be a universal feature of some turbulent plumes in geophysical environments.

  15. Shapes of Buoyant and Nonbuoyant Methane Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, Peter B.; Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Laminar gas jet diffusion flames represent a fundamental combustion configuration. Their study has contributed to numerous advances in combustion, including the development of analytical and computational combustion tools. Laminar jet flames are pertinent also to turbulent flames by use of the laminar flamelet concept. Investigations into the shapes of noncoflowing microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames have primarily been pursued in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower, by Cochran and coworkers and by Bahadori and coworkers. These studies were generally conducted at atmospheric pressure; they involved soot-containing flames and reported luminosity lengths and widths instead of the flame-sheet dimensions which are of Greater value to theory evaluation and development. The seminal model of laminar diffusion flames is that of Burke and Schumann, who solved the conservation of momentum equation for a jet flame in a coflowing ambient by assuming the velocity of fuel, oxidizer and products to be constant throughout. Roper and coworkers improved upon this model by allowing for axial variations of velocity and found flame shape to be independent of coflow velocity. Roper's suggestion that flame height should be independent of gravity level is not supported by past or present observations. Other models have been presented by Klajn and Oppenheim, Markstein and De Ris, Villermaux and Durox, and Li et al. The common result of all these models (except in the buoyant regime) is that flame height is proportional to fuel mass flowrate, with flame width proving much more difficult to predict. Most existing flame models have been compared with shapes of flames containing soot, which is known to obscure the weak blue emission of flame sheets. The present work involves measurements of laminar gas jet diffusion flame shapes. Flame images have been obtained for buoyant and nonbuoyant methane flames burning in quiescent air at various fuel flow-rates, burner diameters and ambient

  16. Conceptual design for a laminar-flying-wing aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, T. I.

    The laminar-flying-wing aircraft appears to be an attractive long-term prospect for reducing the environmental impact of commercial aviation. In assessing its potential, a relatively straightforward initial step is the conceptual design of a version with restricted sweep angle. Such a design is the topic of this thesis. Subject to constraints, this research aims to; provide insight into the parameters affecting practical laminar-flow-control suction power requirements; identify a viable basic design specification; and, on the basis of this, an assessment of the fuel efficiency through a detailed conceptual design study. It is shown that there is a minimum power requirement independent of the suction system design, associated with the stagnation pressure loss in the boundary layer. This requirement increases with aerofoil section thickness, but depends only weakly on Mach number and (for a thick, lightly-loaded laminar flying wing) lift coefficient. Deviation from the optimal suction distribution, due to a practical chamber-based architecture, is found to have very little effect on the overall suction coefficient. In the spanwise direction, through suitable choice of chamber depth, the pressure drop due to frictional and inertial effects may be rendered negligible. Finally, it is found that the pressure drop from the aerofoil surface to the pump collector ducts determines the power penalty. To identify the viable basic design specification, a high-level exploration of the laminar flying wing design space is performed. The characteristics of the design are assessed as a function of three parameters: thickness-to-chord ratio, wingspan, and unit Reynolds number. A feasible specification, with 20% thickness-to-chord, 80 m span and a unit Reynolds number of 8 x 106 m-1, is identified; it corresponds to a 187 tonne aircraft which cruises at Mach 0.67 and altitude 22,500 ft, with lift coefficient 0.14. On the basis of this specification, a detailed conceptual design is

  17. Heat transfer along the route to chaos of a swaying thermal plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, D.; Corticelli, M. A.; Fichera, A.; Pagano, A.

    2015-11-01

    Detailed analyses have been recently reported on the low order dynamics of a thermal plume arising from a horizontal cylindrical heat source concentric to an air-filled isothermally cooled square enclosure, together with those of the related flow structures, in the limit of the 2D approximation. In particular, within the range of 0 < Ra < 3Racr, with Racr corresponding to the loss of stability of the stationary buoyant plume, the entire evolution from a periodic limit cycle (P1) to the birth of chaos through a period-doubling cascade has been fully explored. With this respect, special attention has been given to the window of quasiperiodic dynamics onto a T2-torus that is observed to separate the monoperiodic dynamics from the biperiodic dynamics onto a P1 and a P2-limit cycle, respectively. The results of these analyses hint at the bimodal nature of the overall dynamics, in general, and of the subharmonic cascade, in particular, which are still under investigation. Although relevant on a dynamical perspective, a with a main reflection on the laminar-turbulent transition, the observed oscillations appear to be characterised by comparable amplitudes and to be determined by similar evolutions of the flow pattern evolutions, so that their role on the overall heat transfer rate is expected to be marginal. Within this frame, the present study aims at reporting the influence played by the observed dynamics of the thermal plume and of the flow structures on the global heat transfer rate. In particular, the aim is the assessment of the correlation between the Rayleigh number and the average Nusselt number on the cylinder surface, as well as the effect on the latter of the observed series of bifurcations.

  18. The 2016 Case for Mantle Plumes and a Plume-Fed Asthenosphere (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason P.

    2016-04-01

    The process of science always returns to weighing evidence and arguments for and against a given hypothesis. As hypotheses can only be falsified, never universally proved, doubt and skepticism remain essential elements of the scientific method. In the past decade, even the hypothesis that mantle plumes exist as upwelling currents in the convecting mantle has been subject to intense scrutiny; from geochemists and geochronologists concerned that idealized plume models could not fit many details of their observations, and from seismologists concerned that mantle plumes can sometimes not be 'seen' in their increasingly high-resolution tomographic images of the mantle. In the place of mantle plumes, various locally specific and largely non-predictive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origins of non-plate boundary volcanism at Hawaii, Samoa, etc. In my opinion, this debate has now passed from what was initially an extremely useful restorative from simply 'believing' in the idealized conventional mantle plume/hotspot scenario to becoming an active impediment to our community's ability to better understand the dynamics of the solid Earth. Having no working hypothesis at all is usually worse for making progress than having an imperfect and incomplete but partially correct one. There continues to be strong arguments and strong emerging evidence for deep mantle plumes. Furthermore, deep thermal plumes should exist in a mantle that is heated at its base, and the existence of Earth's (convective) geodynamo clearly indicates that heat flows from the core to heat the mantle's base. Here I review recent seismic evidence by French, Romanowicz, and coworkers that I feel lends strong new observational support for the existence of deep mantle plumes. I also review recent evidence consistent with the idea that secular core cooling replenishes half the mantle's heat loss through its top surface, e.g. that the present-day mantle is strongly bottom heated. Causes for

  19. Study of vertical plane turbulent jets and plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprian, B. R.; Chandrasekhara, M. S.

    1983-03-01

    Asymptotic, plane, vertical, turbulent plumes and nonbuoyant jets were studied. Simultaneous velocity and temperature were measured using frequency shifted, two component Laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), resistance thermometry and a high speed data acquisition system. Results obtained for two plumes with vastly different initial Richardson numbers indicate that both the plumes exhibit a nearly universal asymptotic behavior. The Richardson number of the asymptotic plume is a universal constant and is about 0.3. The mean velocity and temperature profiles in both jets and plumes are nearly Gaussian. It is found that turbulence levels in plumes are significantly higher than in jets.

  20. Plume size measurements on underexpanded jets in vacuum chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankert, C.; Boettcher, R.-D.; Dettleff, G.; Legge, H.

    1985-06-01

    The subject of investigation is an axisymmetric jet expanding into a low pressure surrounding of a static medium. Such flow conditions are of interest when studying thruster nozzles in ground facilities like vacuum chambers. Especially the maximum plume diameter is important for plume-surface and plume-plume interaction and contamination. Four different nozzles and four test gases are investigated. Most of the plumes are visualized by glow discharge of the flowing molecules in an electric field. The measured data are compared to MOC calculations. Length and diameter of the plumes depend on gas, nozzle divergence angle, exit Mach number, background pressure, and condensation effects.

  1. Evolution of tropical plumes in VAS water vapor imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.; Ulsh, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Synoptic scale tropical plumes are analyzed using satellite data and outgoing longwave radiation data. The evolution of plumes is described and their precursor signals are examined. The horizontal moisture patterns of the plumes are compared with nonplume climatology, and the predictability of plumes based solely on satellite imagery is assessed. The results show that a plume evolves as a stationary, tropical, dry or moist dipole, separated by an exceptionally strong cloud or moisture gradient. Tropical plume evolution is accompanied by a systematic drying of the tropical eastern Pacific atmosphere before development, and moistening and increased cloudiness with development.

  2. Minnesota: Early Head Start Initiatiive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Minnesota provides supplemental state funding to existing federal Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) grantees to increase their capacity to serve additional infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. The initiative was started in 1997 when the state legislature earmarked $1 million of the general state Head Start supplemental funds for children…

  3. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  4. A collisionless plasma thruster plume expansion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Cichocki, Filippo; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    A two-fluid model of the unmagnetized, collisionless far region expansion of the plasma plume for gridded ion thrusters and Hall effect thrusters is presented. The model is integrated into two semi-analytical solutions valid in the hypersonic case. These solutions are discussed and compared against the results from the (exact) method of characteristics; the relative errors in density and velocity increase slowly axially and radially and are of the order of 10-2-10-3 in the cases studied. The plasma density, ion flux and ambipolar electric field are investigated. A sensitivity analysis of the problem parameters and initial conditions is carried out in order to characterize the far plume divergence angle in the range of interest for space electric propulsion. A qualitative discussion of the physics of the secondary plasma plume is also provided.

  5. Simulating Irregular Source Geometries for Ionian Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    McDoniel, W. J.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.; Buchta, D. A.; Freund, J.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2011-05-20

    Volcanic plumes on Io respresent a complex rarefied flow into a near-vacuum in the presence of gravity. A 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to investigate the gas dynamics of such plumes, with a focus on the effects of source geometry on far-field deposition patterns. A rectangular slit and a semicircular half annulus are simulated to illustrate general principles, especially the effects of vent curvature on deposition ring structure. Then two possible models for the giant plume Pele are presented. One is a curved line source corresponding to an IR image of a particularly hot region in the volcano's caldera and the other is a large area source corresponding to the entire caldera. The former is seen to produce the features seen in observations of Pele's ring, but with an error in orientation. The latter corrects the error in orientation, but loses some structure. A hybrid simulation of 3D slit flow is also discussed.

  6. Leachate plumes in ground water from Babylon and Islip landfills, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimmel, Grant E.; Braids, O.C.

    1977-01-01

    Landfills operated by the towns of Babylon and Islip in southwest and central Suffolk County, N.Y., contain urban refuse , incinerated garbage, and scavenger (cesspool) waste; some industrial refuse is deposited at the Babylon site. The Islip landfill was started in 1933, the Babylon landfill in 1947. The landfills are in contact with and discharge leachate into the highly permeable upper glacial aquifer hydraulic conductivity 190 to 500 ft/d. The aquifer is 74 feet thick at the Babylon landfill and 170 feet thick at the Islip landfill. The leachate-enriched water occupies the entire thickness of the aquifer beneath both landfills, but hydrologic boundaries retard downward migration of the plumes to deeper aquifers. The Babylon plume is 1,900 feet wide at the landfill and narrows to about 700 feet near its terminus 10,000 feet from the landfill. The Islip plume is 1,400 feet wide at the landfill and narrows to 500 feet near its terminus 5,000 feet from the landfill. Hydrochemical maps and sections show the distribution of the major chemical constituents of the plumes. The most highly leachate-enriched ground water obtained was from the Babylon site; it contained 860 mg/liter sodium, 110 mg/liter potassium, 565 mg/liter calcium, 100 mg/liter magnesium, 2,700 mg/liter bicarbonate, and 1,300 mg/liter chloride. Simulation of the movement and dispersion of the Babylon plume with a mathematical dispersion model indicated the coefficient of longitudinal dispersion to be about 60 feet squared per day and the ground-water velocity to be 1 ft/d. However, the velocity determined from the hydraulic gradient and public-supply wells in the area was 4 ft/d, which would cause a plume four times as long as that predicted by the model. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Leachate plumes in ground water from Babylon and Islip landfills, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimmel, Grant E.; Braids, O.C.

    1980-01-01

    Landfills operated by the towns of Babylon and Islip in southwest and central Suffolk County, N.Y., contain urban refuse incinerated garbage, and scavenger (cesspool) waste; some industrial refuse is deposited at the Babylon site. The Islip landfill was started in 1933, the Babylon landfill in 1947. The landfills are in contact with and discharge leachate into the highly permeable upper glacial aquifer (hydraulic conductivity 190 and 500 ft/d). The aquifer is 74 feet thick at the Babylon landfill and 170 feet thick at the Islip landfill. The leachate-enriched water occupies the boundaries retard downward migration of the plumes to deeper aquifers. The Babylon plume is 1,900 feet wide at the landfill and narrows to about 700 feet near its terminus 10,000 feet from the landfill. The Islip plume is 5,000 feet from the landfill. Hydrochemical maps and sections show the distribution of the major chemical constituents of the plumes. The most highly leachate-enriched ground water obtained was from the Babylon site; it contained 860 mg/L sodium, 110 mg/L potassium, 565 mg/L calcium, 100 mg/L magnesium, 2,7000 mg/L bicarbonate, and 1,300 mg/L chloride. Simulation of the movement and dispersion of the Babylon plume with a mathematical dispersion model indicated the coefficient of the longitudinal dispersion to be about 60 feet squared per day and the ground-water velocity to be 1 ft/d. However, the velocity determined from the hydraulic gradient and public-supply wells in the area was 4 ft/d, which would cause a plume four times as long as that predicted by the model. (Kosco-USGS)

  8. Sensitivity analysis of the physical dynamics of the Fly River plume in Torres Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanfang; Martins, Flavio; Wolanski, Eric

    2017-07-01

    The intrusion in the Torres Strait of the Fly River plume polluted by mine tailings is an international water issue. To investigate the physical mechanisms involved in the intrusion process, numerical simulations were conducted to assess the relative influence of the bathymetry and the external forcing, namely the tides, the mean sea level slope across the strait, river runoff and wind forcing. The wind data from Horn Island, the only long-term wind station in the Torres Strait, is shown to be unreliable due to orographic effects. Mean sea level data from altimetry compare well with those from tide gauges in these shallow, reef-studded waters. The wind has a dominant effect on the mean sea level at seasonal and inter-annual periods. The resulting mean sea level difference across the strait fluctuated seasonally and strongly influenced the intrusion of the Fly River plume in the Torres Strait. The 3D finite-volume MOHID model reproduced the observation that the river plume starts by being stratified in the Gulf of Papua where it originates, and it mixes vertically when it enters the Torres Strait. The MOHID and the SLIM models were applied with different resolution to the Torres Strait and responded similarly to the external forcings. The predicted and observed Fly River plume intrusion in the eastern Torres Strait agreed well with each other, including the formation of patches due to flow reversals. However, the two models predicted a widely different Fly River plume in its far field in the western Torres Strait, the differences were attributed to the different bathymetry in the Australian and British-US bathymetry data for these poorly charted waters, which demonstrated the importance of the details of the bathymetry in controlling the extent of plume intrusion.

  9. Alignments of volcanic features in the southern hemisphere of Mars produced by migrating mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Mars shows alignments of volcanic landforms in its southern hemisphere, starting from the equatorial regions and converging towards the South Pole, and visible at global scale. These composite alignments of volcanoes, calderas, shields, vents, heads of valley networks and massifs between the equatorial regions and the southern polar region define twelve different lines, fitted by rhumb lines (loxodromes), that I propose to be the traces of mantle plumes. The morphology of the volcanic centres changes along some of the alignments suggesting different processes of magma emplacement and eruptive style. The diameters of the volcanic centres and of the volcanic provinces are largest at Tharsis and Elysium, directly proportional to the number of alignments starting from them. A minor presence of unaligned volcanic features is observed on the northern lowlands and on the highlands outside the 12 major alignments. The heads of channels commonly interpreted as fluvial valleys are aligned with the other volcanic centres; unaltered olivine is present along their bed-floors, raising severe doubts as to their aqueous origin. Several hypotheses have tried to explain the formation of Tharsis with the migration of a single mantle plume under the Martian lithosphere, but the discovery of twelve alignments, six starting from Tharsis, favours the hypothesis of several mantle plumes as predicted by the model of the Southern Polar Giant Impact (SPGI) and provides a new view on the formation of the volcanic provinces of Mars.

  10. Development of laminar flow control wing surface porous structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M.; Pearce, W.; Anderson, C.; Thelander, J.; Boronow, W.; Gallimore, F.; Brown, W.; Matsuo, T.; Christensen, J.; Primavera, G.

    1984-01-01

    It was concluded that the chordwise air collection method, which actually combines chordwise and spanwise air collection, is the best of the designs conceived up to this time for full chord laminar flow control (LFC). Its shallower ducting improved structural efficiency of the main wing box resulting in a reduction in wing weight, and it provided continuous support of the chordwise panel joints, better matching of suction and clearing airflow requirements, and simplified duct to suction source minifolding. Laminar flow control on both the upper and lower surfaces was previously reduced to LFC suction on the upper surface only, back to 85 percent chord. The study concludes that, in addition to reduced wing area and other practical advantages, this system would be lighter because of the increase in effective structural wing thickness.

  11. Effect of heat loss on laminar flamelet species concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccanera, Marco; Lentini, Diego

    2016-10-01

    The effects of heat loss on the structure of laminar flamelets, which are the constitutive elements of turbulent flames under the most common operating conditions, are investigated for typical aeronautical gas-turbine operating conditions at take-off. The magnitude of heat loss is quantified via the "enthalpy defect" measured with respect to an adiabatic flame. A procedure to generate laminar flamelets with an assigned enthalpy defect at the boundaries is devised and applied to nonpremixed propane/air flames, as propane reproduces the essential features of higher hydrocarbon combustion. It is found, contrary to commonly held beliefs, that the enthalpy defect has a significant effect on the concentration not only of minor species, but also of main reaction products. Such effects are found in general to be more pronounced for fuel-rich conditions. An impact is anticipated on the formation rate of nitric oxides. The effects of scalar dissipation rate are also discussed.

  12. Hydrodynamic Fluctuations in Laminar Fluid Flow. II. Fluctuating Squire Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz de Zárate, José M.; Sengers, Jan V.

    2013-02-01

    We use fluctuating hydrodynamics to evaluate the enhancement of thermally excited fluctuations in laminar fluid flow using plane Couette flow as a representative example. In a previous publication (J. Stat. Phys. 144:774, 2011) we derived the energy amplification arising from thermally excited wall-normal fluctuations by solving a fluctuating Orr-Sommerfeld equation. In the present paper we derive the energy amplification arising from wall-normal vorticity fluctuation by solving a fluctuating Squire equation. The thermally excited wall-normal vorticity fluctuations turn out to yield the dominant contribution to the energy amplification. In addition, we show that thermally excited streaks, even in the absence of any externally imposed perturbations, are present in laminar fluid flow.

  13. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu∼Pr^{1/4}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1/2}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≪1 and Nu∼Pr^{0}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≫1. These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 10^{5} to 10^{10} and Pr from 10^{-2} to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10^{-1}.

  14. Natural laminar flow and airplane stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Cornelis P.

    1986-01-01

    Location and mode of transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer flow have a dominant effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil section. The influences of these parameters on the sectional lift and drag characteristics of three airfoils are examined. Both analytical and experimental results demonstrate that when the boundary layer transitions near the leading edge as a result of surface roughness, extensive trailing-edge separation of the turbulent boundary layer may occur. If the airfoil has a relatively sharp leading-edge, leading-edge stall due to laminar separation can occur after the leading-edge suction peak is formed. These two-dimensional results are used to examine the effects of boundary layer transition behavior on airplane longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control.

  15. Preliminary aerodynamic design considerations for advanced laminar flow aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L., Jr.; Yip, Long P.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Modern composite manufacturing methods have provided the opportunity for smooth surfaces that can sustain large regions of natural laminar flow (NLF) boundary layer behavior and have stimulated interest in developing advanced NLF airfoils and improved aircraft designs. Some of the preliminary results obtained in exploratory research investigations on advanced aircraft configurations at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed. Results of the initial studies have shown that the aerodynamic effects of configuration variables such as canard/wing arrangements, airfoils, and pusher-type and tractor-type propeller installations can be particularly significant at high angles of attack. Flow field interactions between aircraft components were shown to produce undesirable aerodynamic effects on a wing behind a heavily loaded canard, and the use of properly designed wing leading-edge modifications, such as a leading-edge droop, offset the undesirable aerodynamic effects by delaying wing stall and providing increased stall/spin resistance with minimum degradation of laminar flow behavior.

  16. Hypersonic laminar/turbulent transition: computations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlik, E.; Kornilov, V.; Ferrier, M.; Fedioun, I.; Davidenko, D.

    2012-01-01

    In order to predict the laminar/turbulent transition on a hypersonic vehicle forebody at Mach numbers 4 and 6, the three-dimensional (3D) modal linear stability analysis is applied, coupled with the eN method. Nevertheless, N factors are unknown for wind tunnel conditions. Experimental investigations have been carried out on a flat plate in the blowdown wind tunnel T-313 of ITAM RAS (Novosibirsk). At M∞ = 2 to 6, the position of laminar/turbulent transition was measured by both Pitot tube and thermocouples. Then, stability analysis allows computing N factors at transition on the flat plate: they are about 3 ˜ 4, typical of conventional wind tunnels. These flat plate correlations can then be used to predict the transition on the forebody in the same wind tunnel. Experiments for the forebody are currently in progress and will allow checking the predicted transition location.

  17. Concentration distribution for pollutant dispersion in a reversal laminar flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Chen, G. Q.

    2017-08-01

    Pollutant transport in reversal laminar flows gains its significance in various coastal regions. Since oscillation in the flow introduces much complexity into the transport process, little progress has been made to illustrate the evolution of concentration distribution. In this work, the first order expansion of the generalized dispersion model, as a simplified applicable method based on the previously proposed Aris-Gill expansion (Wang and Chen, 2016b,c), is applied to analytically study the pollutant dispersion in an open channel reversal laminar flow. This method is conveniently used to accurately predict the two-dimensional concentration evolution characteristic of peak concentration position and duration. The vertical concentration difference is determined to be tremendous and vary periodically, and the peak concentration appears at the freesurface or bottom depending on the reversal amplitude. The approach for vertical concentration to uniformity in the dispersion process lasts longer remarkably in reversal flows than that in steady flows.

  18. Laminar boundary layers with uniform shear cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    Laminar boundary layers with fully developed uniform shear cross flows are considered. The first streamwise laminar flow is a Blasius boundary layer flow, the second is uniform shear flow over a semi-infinite plate, and the third is the flow induced by a power-law stretching surface. In the first two cases, the effect of streamwise plate motion is taken into account by the parameter λ. In each case, the similarity solutions reduce the governing boundary layer equations to a primary ordinary differential equation for the streamwise flow and a secondary linear equation coupled to the primary solution for the cross flow. It is found that an infinity of solutions exist in each problem and the unique solution in each case is found by applying the Glauert criterion. In some instances, a simple exact solution for the cross flow is presented. Results for the wall shear stresses and velocity profiles are given in graphical form.

  19. Laminar/turbulent oscillating flow in circular pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional oscillating flow analysis was conducted simulating the gas flow inside Stirling engine heat exchangers. Both laminar and turbulent oscillating pipe flow were investigated numerically for Re(max) = 1920 (Va = 80), 10,800 (Va = 272), 19,300 (Va = 272), and 60,800 (Va = 126). The results are compared with experimental results of previous investigators. Predictions of the flow regime are also checked by comparing velocity amplitudes and phase difference with those from laminar theory and quasi-steady profile. A high Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was used for turbulent oscillating pipe flow. Finally, the performance of the k-epsilon model was evaluated to explore the applicability of quasi-steady turbulent models to unsteady oscillating flow analysis.

  20. The LCROSS Ejecta Plume Revealed: First Characterization from Earth-based Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C.; Chanover, N.; Hermalyn, B.; Strycker, P. D.; Hamilton, R. T.; Suggs, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    On October 9, 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) struck the floor of Cabeus crater. We observed the LCROSS impact site at 0.5-second intervals throughout the time of impact in the V-band (491 to 591 nm) using the Agile camera on the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory. Our initial analysis of these images showed that the ejecta plume could be no brighter than 9.5 magnitudes/arcsec^2. (Chanover et al. 2011, JGR). We subsequently applied a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique to filter out time-varying seeing distortions and image registration errors from an 8-minute sequence of images centered on the LCROSS impact time and unambiguously detected the evolving plume below the noise threshold. This is the first and only reported image detection of the LCROSS plume from ground-based instruments. Our detection is consistent with an ejecta plume that reaches peak brightness between 12 and 20 seconds after impact and fades to an undetectable level within 90 seconds after impact. This is consistent with in situ observations made by the LCROSS Shepherding Satellite (LCROSS S/SC) and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) that observed the impact from above (Colaprete et al., and Hayne et. al., 2010, Science). To test our detection method, we compared the brightness profiles derived from our impact image sequence to those extracted from a sequence with a simulated ejecta pattern. We performed 3-D ballistic simulations of trial impacts, starting with initial particle ejection angles and velocities derived from laboratory measurements made with the NASA Ames Vertical Gun of impacts of hollow test projectiles (Hermalyn et. al., 2012, Icarus). We extracted images from these simulations at 0.5-second intervals, combined them with a computer generated lunar landscape, and introduced image distortions due to time-varying seeing conditions and instrumental noise sources to produce a synthetic ejecta image sequence. We then re

  1. Effects of meteorological conditions on spore plumes.

    PubMed

    Burch, M; Levetin, E

    2002-08-01

    Fungal spores are an ever-present component of the atmosphere, and have long been known to trigger asthma and hay fever symptoms in sensitive individuals. The atmosphere around Tulsa has been monitored for airborne spores and pollen with Burkard spore traps at several sampling stations. This study involved the examination of the hourly spore concentrations on days that had average daily concentrations near 50,000 spores/m(3) or greater. Hourly concentrations of Cladosporium, Alternaria, Epicoccum, Curvularia, Pithomyces, Drechslera, smut spores, ascospores, basidiospores, other, and total spores were determined on 4 days at three sites and then correlated with hourly meteorological data including temperature, rainfall, wind speed, dew point, air pressure, and wind direction. On each of these days there was a spore plume, a phenomenon in which spore concentrations increased dramatically over a very short period of time. Spore plumes generally occurred near midday, and concentrations were seen to increase from lows around 20,000 total spores/m(3) to highs over 170,000 total spores/m(3) in 2 h. Multiple regression analysis of the data indicated that increases in temperature, dew point, and air pressure correlated with the increase in spore concentrations, but no single weather variable predicted the appearance of a spore plume. The proper combination of changes in these meteorological parameters that result in a spore plume may be due to the changing weather conditions associated with thunderstorms, as on 3 of the 4 days when spore plumes occurred there were thunderstorms later that evening. The occurrence of spore plumes may have clinical significance, because other studies have shown that sensitization to certain spore types can occur during exposure to high spore concentrations.

  2. Effects of meteorological conditions on spore plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, M.; Levetin, E.

    2002-05-01

    Fungal spores are an ever-present component of the atmosphere, and have long been known to trigger asthma and hay fever symptoms in sensitive individuals. The atmosphere around Tulsa has been monitored for airborne spores and pollen with Burkard spore traps at several sampling stations. This study involved the examination of the hourly spore concentrations on days that had average daily concentrations near 50,000 spores/m3 or greater. Hourly concentrations of Cladosporium, Alternaria, Epicoccum, Curvularia, Pithomyces, Drechslera, smut spores, ascospores, basidiospores, other, and total spores were determined on 4 days at three sites and then correlated with hourly meteorological data including temperature, rainfall, wind speed, dew point, air pressure, and wind direction. On each of these days there was a spore plume, a phenomenon in which spore concentrations increased dramatically over a very short period of time. Spore plumes generally occurred near midday, and concentrations were seen to increase from lows around 20,000 total spores/m3 to highs over 170,000 total spores/m3 in 2 h. Multiple regression analysis of the data indicated that increases in temperature, dew point, and air pressure correlated with the increase in spore concentrations, but no single weather variable predicted the appearance of a spore plume. The proper combination of changes in these meteorological parameters that result in a spore plume may be due to the changing weather conditions associated with thunderstorms, as on 3 of the 4 days when spore plumes occurred there were thunderstorms later that evening. The occurrence of spore plumes may have clinical significance, because other studies have shown that sensitization to certain spore types can occur during exposure to high spore concentrations.

  3. Polar Plumes Observed at Extreme Coronal Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, C. E.; Plunkett, S. P.

    1999-09-01

    Polar plumes, unipolar high density structures in the polar coronal holes, are key to our understanding of solar wind acceleration and coronal heating. Because unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the coronal hole account for approximately 50 leaves the coronal hole (DeForest et al., 1996), plumes (which arise from some such concentrations) are tracers of a type of magnetic structure that fills nearly half of the solar system at solar minimum. Plumes have been observed up to altitudes of about 10 solar radii with the LASCO instrument (DeForest et al., 1996), above which they fade into the coronal background. There is some contention (Habbal and Woo, 1997; Paetzold and Bird, 1998) over whether plumes extend into the interplanetary medium or become mixed with the interplume solar wind at altitudes between 10 and 100 solar radii. Several mechanisms, including the Kelvin-Helmholtz two-stream instability and cross-mode resonant wave scattering near the alfvenic point in the wind's acceleration, have been proposed that could break up the structure of the observed plumes. Using the LASCO C-3 instrument aboard SOHO (Brueckner et al, 1995) to accumulate multiple images that we then recombine, we have generated coronal images with effective exposure times in the thousands of seconds and actual durations of less than four hours. These images clearly show polar plumes extending to altitudes of 25 solar radii or more, very close to the outer edge of the C-3 field of view and above the likely alfvenic point of the wind flow.

  4. Cassini Radio Occultation by Enceladus Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, A.; Armstrong, J.; Flasar, F.; French, R.; Marouf, E.; Nagy, A.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.; Asmar, S.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Goltz, G.; Aguilar, R.; Rochblatt, D.

    2006-12-01

    A fortuitous Cassini radio occultation by Enceladus plume occurs on September 15, 2006. The occultation track (the spacecraft trajectory in the plane of the sky as viewed from the Earth) has been designed to pass behind the plume (to pass above the south polar region of Enceladus) in a roughly symmetrical geometry centered on a minimum altitude above the surface of about 20 km. The minimum altitude was selected primarily to ensure probing much of the plume with good confidence given the uncertainty in the spacecraft trajectory. Three nearly-pure sinusoidal signals of 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm-wavelength (Ka-, X-, and S-band, respectively) are simultaneously transmitted from Cassini and are monitored at two 34-m Earth receiving stations of the Deep Space Network (DSN) in Madrid, Spain (DSS-55 and DSS-65). The occultation of the visible plume is extremely fast, lasting less than about two minutes. The actual observation time extends over a much longer time interval, however, to provide a good reference baseline for potential detection of signal perturbations introduced by the tenuous neutral and ionized plume environment. Given the likely very small fraction of optical depth due to neutral particles of sizes larger than about 1 mm, detectable changes in signal intensity is perhaps unlikely. Detection of plume plasma along the radio path as perturbations in the signals frequency/phase is more likely and the magnitude will depend on the electron columnar density probed. The occultation time occurs not far from solar conjunction time (Sun-Earth-probe angle of about 33 degrees), causing phase scintillations due to the solar wind to be the primary limiting noise source. We estimate a delectability limit of about 1 to 3E16 electrons per square meter columnar density assuming about 100 seconds integration time. Potential measurement of the profile of electron columnar density along the occultation track is an exciting prospect at this time.

  5. Enceladus Plumes: A Boiling Liquid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Miki; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2012-10-01

    Following the discovery of H2O vapor and particle plumes from the tiger stripes at the south pole of Enceladus (Porco et al., 2006), observational and theoretical studies have been conducted to understand the plume mechanism (e.g., Schmidt et al., 2008; Kieffer et al., 2009; Ingersoll and Pankine, 2010). Although the “Ice Chamber Model”, which assumes that ice sublimation under the stripes causes the plumes, has successfully explained the plume mass flux (e.g., Nimmo et al., 2007; Ingersoll and Pankine, 2010), it cannot explain the high salinity in the plume (Postberg et al., 2009). Ice particles condensing from a vapor are relatively salt free, but ice particles derived from a salty liquid can have high salinity. Therefore we have investigated the “Boiling Liquid Model”, which assumes that liquid H2O under the stripes causes the plumes. With conservation of mass, momentum and energy, we built a simple atmospheric model that includes controlled boiling and gas-ice wall interaction. We first assumed that the heat radiated to space comes entirely from the heat generated by condensation of the gas onto the ice wall. We varied the width (0.1-1 m) and the height (5-4000 m) of the crack as parameters. We find that the escaping vapor flux can be relatively close to the observed value (250±100 kg/s, Hansen et al., 2006, 2008) but the radiated heat flux is only 1 GW, which is much less than the observed value (15.8 GW, Howett et al., 2011). Other models (Nimmo et al., 2007; Abramov and Spencer, 2009) also have the same difficulty accounting for the observed value. We then investigated the additional heat radiated by the particles after they come out of the crack. We built a simple model to estimate the size distributions of these condensed ice particles and their radiative properties.

  6. Io Plume Monitoring (frames 1-36)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-04

    A sequence of full disk Io images was taken prior to Galileo's second encounter with Ganymede. The purpose of these observations was to view all longitudes of Io and search for active volcanic plumes. The images were taken at intervals of approximately one hour corresponding to Io longitude increments of about ten degrees. Because both the spacecraft and Io were traveling around Jupiter the lighting conditions on Io (e.g. the phase of Io) changed dramatically during the sequence. These images were registered at a common scale and processed to produce a time-lapse "movie" of Io. This movie combines all of the plume monitoring frames obtained by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The most prominent volcanic plume seen in this movie is Prometheus (latitude 1.6 south, longitude 153 west). The plume becomes visible as it moves into daylight, crosses the center of the disk, and is seen in profile against the dark of space at the edge of Io. This plume was first seen by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1979 and is believed to be a geyser-like eruption of sulfur dioxide snow and gas. Although details of the region around Prometheus have changed in the seventeen years since Voyager's visit, the shape and height of the plume have not changed significantly. It is possible that this geyser has been erupting nearly continuously over this time. Galileo's primary 24 month mission includes eleven orbits around Jupiter and will provide observations of Jupiter, its moons and its magnetosphere. North is to the top of all frames. The smallest features which can be discerned range from 13 to 31 kilometers across. The images were obtained between the 2nd and the 6th of September, 1996. The animation can be viewed at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01073

  7. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plume rebound and shockwave dynamics of confined aluminum laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2011-06-15

    Generation and expansion dynamics of aluminum laser plasma plumes generated between parallel plates of varying separation ({Delta}Z = 2.0, 3.2, 4.0, and 5.6 mm), which confined plume expansion normal to the ablation surface, were diagnosed. Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy in the spectral range {lambda} = 355-470 nm and time gated visible imaging were employed to record emission spectra and plume dynamics. Space and time resolved profiles of N{sub e} (the electron density), T{sub e} (the electron temperature), and T{sub ionz} (the ionization temperature) were compared for different positions in the plasma plume. Significant modifications of the profiles of the above parameters were observed for plasma-surface collisions at the inner surface of the front plate, which formed a barrier to the free expansion of the plasma plume generated by the laser light on the surface of the back plate. Shockwave generation at the collision interface resulted in delayed compression of the low-density plasma plume near the inner ablation surface, at late stages in the plasma history. Upon exiting the cavity formed by the two plates, through an aperture in the front plate, the plasma plume underwent a second phase of free expansion.

  8. Laminar shocks in high power laser plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Trines, R.

    2014-02-15

    We propose a theory to describe laminar ion sound structures in a collisionless plasma. Reflection of a small fraction of the upstream ions converts the well known ion acoustic soliton into a structure with a steep potential gradient upstream and with downstream oscillations. The theory provides a simple interpretation of results dating back more than forty years but, more importantly, is shown to provide an explanation for recent observations on laser produced plasmas relevant to inertial fusion and to ion acceleration.

  9. An elementary model for autoignition of laminar jets

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Peter V.; Gotti, Daniel J.; Hegde, Uday G.; Hicks, Michael C.; Kulis, Michael J.; Sivashinsky, Gregory I.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate and analyse an elementary model for autoignition of cylindrical laminar jets of fuel injected into an oxidizing ambient at rest. This study is motivated by renewed interest in analysis of hydrothermal flames for which such configuration is common. As a result of our analysis, we obtain a sharp characterization of the autoignition position in terms of the principal physical and geometrical parameters of the problem. PMID:26345080

  10. Ground vibration test of the laminar flow control JStar airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, M. W.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Ellison, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A ground vibration test was conducted on a Lockheed JetStar airplane that had been modified for the purpose of conducting laminar flow control experiments. The test was performed prior to initial flight flutter tests. Both sine-dwell and single-point-random excitation methods were used. The data presented include frequency response functions and a comparison of mode frequencies and mode shapes from both methods.

  11. Making Large Suction Panels For Laminar-Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.

    1991-01-01

    Perforated titanium panels used to identify and resolve issues related to manufacture. Recently, relatively large suction panels with aerodynamically satisfactory surface perforations and with surface contours and smoothness characteristics necessary for Laminar-Flow Control (LFC) designed, fabricated, and tested. Requirements of production lines for commercial transport airplanes carefully considered in development of panels. Sizes of panels representative of what is used on wing of commercial transport airplane. Tests of perforated panels in transonic wind tunnel demonstrated aerodynamic stability at flight mach numbers.

  12. Design Guide for Laminar Flow Fluidic Amplifiers and Sensors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-27

    input * and output characteristics for the geometry of any amplifier . The only constraint is that the flow out of the supply nozzle remains laminar and...supply pressure in the range of 2 to 20 MPa. Although turbulent flow jet deflection amplifiers have useful characteristics , their low gain and low dynamic...simple proportional fluidic controllers using turbulent flow amplifiers indicated that the characteristics of these devices would restrict the

  13. Development of a laminar boundary layer behind a suction point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuest, Walter

    1952-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of the development of a laminar boundary layer behind a suction slot that is assumed to cut off part of the boundary layer without exerting any sink effect. The development, which is approximate, is based on the heat conduction equation. The heat conduction equation enters the analysis through a linearization of the Prandtl-Mises form of the boundary-layer equation.

  14. Simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianvashrad, N.; Knight, D.

    2017-06-01

    The capability of the Navier-Stokes equations with a perfect gas model for simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions is assessed. The configuration is a hollow cylinder flare. The experimental data were obtained by Calspan-University of Buffalo (CUBRC) for total enthalpies ranging from 5.07 to 21.85 MJ/kg. Comparison of the computed and experimental surface pressure and heat transfer is performed and the computed §ow¦eld structure is analyzed.

  15. Ultrasonically Absorptive Coatings for Hypersonic Laminar Flow Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY ( Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED February 2008 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE...efforl nclude theoretical analysis, direct numerical simulation (DNS), wind-tunnel experiments, as well as fabrication of ceramic materials that...increase of the laminar run. First samples of a ceramic UAC integrated into TPS tile were fabricated using a stampinj echnique. Benchmark (no flow

  16. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z. G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue CO2 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smokepoint conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smokepoint conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  17. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue C02 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smoke-point conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smoke-point conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous-flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  18. Structure and Soot Formation Properties of Laminar Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science for several reasons: soot emissions are responsible for more deaths than any other combustion-generated pollutant, thermal loads due to continuum radiation from soot limit the durability of combustors, thermal radiation from soot is mainly responsible for the growth and spread of unwanted fires, carbon monoxide emissions associated with soot emissions are responsible for most fire deaths, and limited understanding of soot processes in flames is a major impediment to the development of computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, soot processes within laminar premixed and nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are being studied during this investigation. The study is limited to laminar flames due to their experimental and computational tractability, noting the relevance of these results to practical flames through laminar flamelet concepts. Nonbuoyant flames are emphasized because buoyancy affects soot processes in laminar diffusion flames whereas effects of buoyancy are small for most practical flames. This study involves both ground- and space-based experiments, however, the following discussion will be limited to ground-based experiments because no space-based experiments were carried out during the report period. The objective of this work was to complete measurements in both premixed and nonpremixed flames in order to gain a better understanding of the structure of the soot-containing region and processes of soot nucleation and surface growth in these environments, with the latter information to be used to develop reliable ways of predicting soot properties in practical flames. The present discussion is brief, more details about the portions of the investigation considered here can be found in refs. 8-13.

  19. Segmented electrode hall thruster with reduced plume

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2004-08-17

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with segmented electrodes along the channel, which make the acceleration region as localized as possible. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to minimize erosion and arcing. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to produce a substantial reduction in plume divergence. The use of electrodes made of emissive material will reduce the radial potential drop within the channel, further decreasing the plume divergence. Also disclosed is a method of arranging and powering these electrodes so as to provide variable mode operation.

  20. Plume impingement forces on inclined flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, H.

    Plume impingement from spacecraft control thrusters on vehicles in space is simulated in wind tunnel scale experiments. Pressure and shear stress are measured on flat plates inclined to the plume axis between 0 and 90 deg. In addition to a nozzle of a 0.5N thruster, a free jet from a thin plate orifice was used, by which the flow regime from nearly free molecular flow to continuum flow was covered. Simple pressure and shear stress laws are given by which the impingement pressure and shear stress can be estimated for engineering applications.