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Sample records for lamotrigine extends lifespan

  1. Mitochondrial metabolites extend lifespan.

    PubMed

    Mishur, Robert J; Khan, Maruf; Munkácsy, Erin; Sharma, Lokendra; Bokov, Alex; Beam, Haley; Radetskaya, Oxana; Borror, Megan; Lane, Rebecca; Bai, Yidong; Rea, Shane L

    2016-04-01

    Disruption of mitochondrial respiration in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can extend lifespan. We previously showed that long-lived respiratory mutants generate elevated amounts of α-ketoacids. These compounds are structurally related to α-ketoglutarate, suggesting they may be biologically relevant. Here, we show that provision of several such metabolites to wild-type worms is sufficient to extend their life. At least one mode of action is through stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). We also find that an α-ketoglutarate mimetic, 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,4-PDA), is alone sufficient to increase the lifespan of wild-type worms and this effect is blocked by removal of HIF-1. HIF-1 is constitutively active in isp-1(qm150) Mit mutants, and accordingly, 2,4-PDA does not further increase their lifespan. Incubation of mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts with life-prolonging α-ketoacids also results in HIF-1α stabilization. We propose that metabolites that build up following mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction form a novel mode of cell signaling that acts to regulate lifespan. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Lamotrigine

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain types of seizures in patients who have epilepsy. All types of lamotrigine tablets (tablets, orally disintegrating ... medications to treat seizures in people who have epilepsy or Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (a disorder that causes ...

  3. Nicotinamide extends replicative lifespan of human cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Lee, Hyung Il; Hwang, Eun Seong

    2006-10-01

    We found that an ongoing application of nicotinamide to normal human fibroblasts not only attenuated expression of the aging phenotype but also increased their replicative lifespan, causing a greater than 1.6-fold increase in the number of population doublings. Although nicotinamide by itself does not act as an antioxidant, the cells cultured in the presence of nicotinamide exhibited reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage products associated with cellular senescence, and a decelerated telomere shortening rate without a detectable increase in telomerase activity. Furthermore, in the treated cells growing beyond the original Hayflick limit, the levels of p53, p21WAF1, and phospho-Rb proteins were similar to those in actively proliferating cells. The nicotinamide treatment caused a decrease in ATP levels, which was stably maintained until the delayed senescence point. Nicotinamide-treated cells also maintained high mitochondrial membrane potential but a lower respiration rate and superoxide anion level. Taken together, in contrast to its demonstrated pro-aging effect in yeast, nicotinamide extends the lifespan of human fibroblasts, possibly through reduction in mitochondrial activity and ROS production.

  4. An Engineering Approach to Extending Lifespan in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sagi, Dror; Kim, Stuart K.

    2012-01-01

    We have taken an engineering approach to extending the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. Aging stands out as a complex trait, because events that occur in old animals are not under strong natural selection. As a result, lifespan can be lengthened rationally using bioengineering to modulate gene expression or to add exogenous components. Here, we engineered longer lifespan by expressing genes from zebrafish encoding molecular functions not normally present in worms. Additionally, we extended lifespan by increasing the activity of four endogenous worm aging pathways. Next, we used a modular approach to extend lifespan by combining components. Finally, we used cell- and worm-based assays to analyze changes in cell physiology and as a rapid means to evaluate whether multi-component transgenic lines were likely to have extended longevity. Using engineering to add novel functions and to tune endogenous functions provides a new framework for lifespan extension that goes beyond the constraints of the worm genome. PMID:22737090

  5. Lower Doses of Fructose Extend Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jolene; Gao, Chenfei; Wang, Mingming; Tran, Phuongmai; Mai, Nancy; Finley, John W; Heymsfield, Steven B; Greenway, Frank L; Li, Zhaoping; Heber, David; Burton, Jeffrey H; Johnson, William D; Laine, Roger A

    2017-05-04

    Epidemiological studies indicate that the increased consumption of sugars including sucrose and fructose in beverages correlate with the prevalence of obesity, type-2 diabetes, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension in humans. A few reports suggest that fructose extends lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In Anopheles gambiae, fructose, glucose, or glucose plus fructose also extended lifespan. New results presented here suggest that fructose extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) wild type (N2). C. elegans were fed standard laboratory food source (E. coli OP50), maintained in liquid culture. Experimental groups received additional glucose (111 mM), fructose (55 mM, 111 mM, or 555 mM), sucrose (55 mM, 111 mM, or 555 mM), glucose (167 mM) plus fructose (167 mM) (G&F), or high fructose corn syrup (HFCS, 333 mM). In four replicate experiments, fructose dose-dependently increased mean lifespan at 55 mM or 111 m Min N2, but decreased lifespan at 555 mM (P < 0.001). Sucrose did not affect the lifespan. Glucose reduced lifespan (P < 0.001). Equal amount of G&F or HFCS reduced lifespan (P < 0.0001). Intestinal fat deposition (IFD) was increased at a higher dose of fructose (555 mM), glucose (111 mM), and sucrose (55 mM, 111 mM, and 555 mM). Here we report a biphasic effect of fructose increasing lifespan at lower doses and shortening lifespan at higher doses with an inverse effect on IFD. In view of reports that fructose increases lifespan in yeast, mosquitoes and now nematodes, while decreasing fat deposition (in nematodes) at lower concentrations, further research into the relationship of fructose to lifespan and fat accumulation in vertebrates and mammals is indicated.

  6. Calorie restriction extends Saccharomyces cerevisiae lifespan by increasing respiration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Su-Ju; Kaeberlein, Matt; Andalis, Alex A; Sturtz, Lori A; Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Culotta, Valeria C; Fink, Gerald R; Guarente, Leonard

    2002-07-18

    Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan in a wide spectrum of organisms and is the only regimen known to lengthen the lifespan of mammals. We established a model of CR in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this system, lifespan can be extended by limiting glucose or by reducing the activity of the glucose-sensing cyclic-AMP-dependent kinase (PKA). Lifespan extension in a mutant with reduced PKA activity requires Sir2 and NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). In this study we explore how CR activates Sir2 to extend lifespan. Here we show that the shunting of carbon metabolism toward the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle and the concomitant increase in respiration play a central part in this process. We discuss how this metabolic strategy may apply to CR in animals.

  7. Autophagy extends lifespan via vacuolar acidification

    PubMed Central

    Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Netzberger, Christine; Entfellner, Iryna; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Kickenweiz, Thomas; Stekovic, Slaven; Gleixner, Christina; Schmid, Christian; Klug, Lisa; Hajnal, Ivan; Sorgo, Alice G.; Eisenberg, Tobias; Büttner, Sabrina; Marin͂o, Guillermo; Koziel, Rafael; Magnes, Christoph; Sinner, Frank; Pieber, Thomas R.; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Methionine restriction (MetR) is one of the rare regimes that prolongs lifespan across species barriers. Using a yeast model, we recently demonstrated that this lifespan extension is promoted by autophagy, which in turn requires vacuolar acidification. Our study is the first to place autophagy as one of the major players required for MetR-mediated longevity. In addition, our work identifies vacuolar acidification as a key downstream element of autophagy induction under MetR, and possibly after rapamycin treatment. Unlike other amino acids, methionine plays pleiotropic roles in many metabolism-relevant pathways. For instance, methionine (i) is the N-terminal amino acid of every newly translated protein; (ii) acts as the central donor of methyl groups through S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) during methylation reactions of proteins, DNA or RNA; and (iii) provides the sulfhydryl groups for FeS-cluster formation and redox detoxification via transsulfuration to cysteine. Intriguingly, MetR causes lifespan extension, both in yeast and in rodents. We could show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chronological lifespan (CLS) is increased in two specific methionine-auxotrophic strains (namely Δmet2 and Δmet15).

  8. Lutein extends the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zesheng; Han, Shunkai; Wang, Hao; Wang, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    Lutein is one of the major carotenoids in most fruits and vegetables. The effect of lutein on the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated. Results revealed that 0.1mg lutein/ml diet could prolong their mean lifespan from 49.0 to 54.6 days. This was consistent with a significant reduction in malonyldialdehyde (MDA) level and increase in antioxidant enzyme activities of the flies fed with lutein-treated diet compared with those fed with basal diet. Paraquat (PQ) and H2O2 treatment tests demonstrated that lutein could prolong the survival time of the flies. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated the gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD; SOD1 and SOD2), and catalase (CAT) in the lutein-treated group was up-regulated relative to that of the control group. It was concluded that the lifespan-prolonging activity of lutein was partially by up-regulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes.

  9. D-beta-hydroxybutyrate extends lifespan in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Clare; Canfield, John; Copes, Neil; Rehan, Muhammad; Lipps, David; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2014-08-01

    The ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and has been shown to be protective in many disease models, but its effects on aging are not well studied. Therefore we determined the effect of βHB supplementation on the lifespan ofC. elegans nematodes. βHB supplementation extended mean lifespan by approximately 20%. RNAi knockdown of HDACs hda-2 or hda-3 also increased lifespan and further prevented βHB-mediated lifespan extension. βHB-mediated lifespan extension required the DAF-16/FOXO and SKN-1/Nrf longevity pathways, the sirtuin SIR-2.1, and the AMP kinase subunit AAK-2. βHB did not extend lifespan in a genetic model of dietary restriction indicating that βHB is likely functioning through a similar mechanism. βHB addition also upregulated ΒHB dehydrogenase activity and increased oxygen consumption in the worms. RNAi knockdown of F55E10.6, a short chain dehydrogenase and SKN-1 target gene, prevented the increased lifespan and βHB dehydrogenase activity induced by βHB addition, suggesting that F55E10.6 functions as an inducible βHB dehydrogenase. Furthermore, βHB supplementation increased worm thermotolerance and partially prevented glucose toxicity. It also delayed Alzheimer's amyloid-beta toxicity and decreased Parkinson's alpha-synuclein aggregation. The results indicate that D-βHB extends lifespan through inhibiting HDACs and through the activation of conserved stress response pathways.

  10. D-beta-hydroxybutyrate extends lifespan in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Clare; Canfield, John; Copes, Neil; Rehan, Muhammad; Lipps, David; Bradshaw, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    The ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and has been shown to be protective in many disease models, but its effects on aging are not well studied. Therefore we determined the effect of βHB supplementation on the lifespan of C. elegans nematodes. βHB supplementation extended mean lifespan by approximately 20%. RNAi knockdown of HDACs hda-2 or hda-3 also increased lifespan and further prevented βHB-mediated lifespan extension. βHB-mediated lifespan extension required the DAF-16/FOXO and SKN-1/Nrf longevity pathways, the sirtuin SIR-2.1, and the AMP kinase subunit AAK-2. βHB did not extend lifespan in a genetic model of dietary restriction indicating that βHB is likely functioning through a similar mechanism. βHB addition also upregulated βHB dehydrogenase activity and increased oxygen consumption in the worms. RNAi knockdown of F55E10.6, a short chain dehydrogenase and SKN-1 target gene, prevented the increased lifespan and βHB dehydrogenase activity induced by βHB addition, suggesting that F55E10.6 functions as an inducible βHB dehydrogenase. Furthermore, βHB supplementation increased worm thermotolerance and partially prevented glucose toxicity. It also delayed Alzheimer's amyloid-beta toxicity and decreased Parkinson's alpha-synuclein aggregation. The results indicate that D-βHB extends lifespan through inhibiting HDACs and through the activation of conserved stress response pathways. PMID:25127866

  11. Design and synthesis of compounds that extend yeast replicative lifespan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongying; Baur, Joseph A; Chen, Allen; Miller, Christine; Adams, Jeffrey K; Kisielewski, Anne; Howitz, Konrad T; Zipkin, Robert E; Sinclair, David A

    2007-02-01

    This past decade has seen the identification of numerous conserved genes that extend lifespan in diverse species, yet the number of compounds that extend lifespan is relatively small. A class of compounds called STACs, which were identified as activators of Sir2/SIRT1 NAD+-dependent deacetylases, extend the lifespans of multiple species in a Sir2-dependent manner and can delay the onset of age-related diseases such as cancer, diabetes and neurodegeneration in model organisms. Plant-derived STACs such as fisetin and resveratrol have several liabilities, including poor stability and relatively low potency as SIRT1 activators. To develop improved STACs, stilbene derivatives with modifications at the 4' position of the B ring were synthesized using a Horner-Emmons-based synthetic route or by hydrolyzing deoxyrhapontin. Here, we describe synthetic STACs with lower toxicity toward human cells, and higher potency with respect to SIRT1 activation and lifespan extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These studies show that it is possible to improve upon naturally occurring STACs based on a number of criteria including lifespan extension.

  12. DDS, 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone, extends organismic lifespan.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Chun; Park, Moon Cheol; Keam, Bhumsuk; Choi, Jung Min; Cho, Yunje; Hyun, Soonsil; Park, Sang Chul; Lee, Junho

    2010-11-09

    DDS, 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone, is the most common drug prescribed to treat Hansen disease patients. In addition to its antibacterial activity, DDS has been reported to be involved in other cellular processes that occur in eukaryotic cells. Because DDS treatment significantly enhances the antioxidant activity in humans, we examined its effect on lifespan extension. Here we show that DDS extends organismic lifespan using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system. DDS treatment caused a delay in aging and decreased the levels of a mitochondrial complex. The oxygen consumption rate was also significantly lowered. Consistent with these data, paraquat treatment evoked less reactive oxygen species in DDS-treated worms, and these worms were less sensitive to paraquat. Interestingly enough, all of the molecular events caused by DDS treatment were consistently reproduced in mice treated with DDS for 3 mo and in the C2C12 muscle cell line. Structural prediction identified pyruvate kinase (PK) as a protein target of DDS. Indeed, DDS bound and inhibited PK in vitro and inhibited it in vivo, and a PK mutation conferred extended lifespan of C. elegans. Supplement of pyruvate to the media protected C2C12 cells from apoptosis caused by paraquat. Our findings establish the significance of DDS in lowering reactive oxygen species generation and extending the lifespan, which renders the rationale to examining the possible effect of DDS on human lifespan extension.

  13. A Reduction in Age-Enhanced Gluconeogenesis Extends Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Hachinohe, Mayumi; Yamane, Midori; Akazawa, Daiki; Ohsawa, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Mayumi; Terashita, Yuzu; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of energy metabolism, such as calorie restriction (CR), is a major determinant of cellular longevity. Although augmented gluconeogenesis is known to occur in aged yeast cells, the role of enhanced gluconeogenesis in aged cells remains undefined. Here, we show that age-enhanced gluconeogenesis is suppressed by the deletion of the tdh2 gene, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a protein that is involved in both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in yeast cells. The deletion of TDH2 restores the chronological lifespan of cells with deletions of both the HST3 and HST4 genes, which encode yeast sirtuins, and represses the activation of gluconeogenesis. Furthermore, the tdh2 gene deletion can extend the replicative lifespan in a CR pathway-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that the repression of enhanced gluconeogenesis effectively extends the cellular lifespan. PMID:23342062

  14. Malate and Fumarate Extend Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Clare B.; Copes, Neil; Brito, Andres G.; Canfield, John; Bradshaw, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Malate, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolite, increased lifespan and thermotolerance in the nematode C. elegans. Malate can be synthesized from fumarate by the enzyme fumarase and further oxidized to oxaloacetate by malate dehydrogenase with the accompanying reduction of NAD. Addition of fumarate also extended lifespan, but succinate addition did not, although all three intermediates activated nuclear translocation of the cytoprotective DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor and protected from paraquat-induced oxidative stress. The glyoxylate shunt, an anabolic pathway linked to lifespan extension in C. elegans, reversibly converts isocitrate and acetyl-CoA to succinate, malate, and CoA. The increased longevity provided by malate addition did not occur in fumarase (fum-1), glyoxylate shunt (gei-7), succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein (sdha-2), or soluble fumarate reductase F48E8.3 RNAi knockdown worms. Therefore, to increase lifespan, malate must be first converted to fumarate, then fumarate must be reduced to succinate by soluble fumarate reductase and the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex II. Reduction of fumarate to succinate is coupled with the oxidation of FADH2 to FAD. Lifespan extension induced by malate depended upon the longevity regulators DAF-16 and SIR-2.1. Malate supplementation did not extend the lifespan of long-lived eat-2 mutant worms, a model of dietary restriction. Malate and fumarate addition increased oxygen consumption, but decreased ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential suggesting a mild uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Malate also increased NADPH, NAD, and the NAD/NADH ratio. Fumarate reduction, glyoxylate shunt activity, and mild mitochondrial uncoupling likely contribute to the lifespan extension induced by malate and fumarate by increasing the amount of oxidized NAD and FAD cofactors. PMID:23472183

  15. Steady-state pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of immediate-release and extended-release formulations of lamotrigine in elderly epilepsy patients: Use of stable isotope methodology.

    PubMed

    Polepally, Akshanth R; Remmel, Rory P; Brundage, Richard C; Leppik, Ilo E; Rarick, John O; Ramsay, R Eugene; Birnbaum, Angela K

    2015-10-01

    A classic 2-period crossover bioavailability study was conducted to evaluate the relative and absolute bioavailability of immediate-release (IR) and extended-release (XR) lamotrigine formulations under steady-state conditions in elderly patients with epilepsy. On treatment days, each subject's morning dose (IR or XR lamotrigine) was replaced with an intravenous 50-mg dose of stable-labeled lamotrigine. Lamotrigine concentrations were measured at 13 points between 0 and 96 hours. XR and IR lamotrigine formulations were similar with respect to steady-state area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 hours (AUC0-24 h ss), average concentration (Cavg, ss), and trough concentration (Cτ, ss). A 33% lower fluctuation in concentrations with XR was observed relative to IR lamotrigine. The time to peak concentration (Tmax, ss) was delayed for XR lamotrigine (3.0 vs 1.3 hours) with lower peak concentration (15% lower). The absolute bioavailability for IR and XR formulations was 73% and 92%, respectively. The formulations were bioequivalent with respect to AUC0-24 h ss, Cτ, ss, and Cavg, ss indicating that it may be possible to switch directly from IR to XR lamotrigine without changes in the total daily dose. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  16. Tanshinones extend chronological lifespan in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2014-10-01

    Natural products with anti-aging property have drawn great attention recently but examples of such compounds are exceedingly scarce. By applying a high-throughput assay based on yeast chronological lifespan measurement, we screened the anti-aging activity of 144 botanical materials and found that dried roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge have significant anti-aging activity. Tanshinones isolated from the plant including cryptotanshione, tanshinone I, and tanshinone IIa, are the active components. Among them, cryptotanshinone can greatly extend the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chronological lifespan (up to 2.5 times) in a dose- and the-time-of-addition-dependent manner at nanomolar concentrations without disruption of cell growth. We demonstrate that cryptotanshinone prolong chronological lifespan via a nutrient-dependent regime, especially essential amino acid sensing, and three conserved protein kinases Tor1, Sch9, and Gcn2 are required for cryptotanshinone-induced lifespan extension. In addition, cryptotanshinone significantly increases the lifespan of SOD2-deleted mutants. Altogether, those data suggest that cryptotanshinone might be involved in the regulation of, Tor1, Sch9, Gcn2, and Sod2, these highly conserved longevity proteins modulated by nutrients from yeast to humans.

  17. L-Theanine extends lifespan of adult Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zarse, Kim; Jabin, Saskia; Ristow, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Compounds that delay aging in model organisms may be of significant interest to anti-aging medicine, since these substances potentially provide pharmaceutical approaches to promote healthy lifespan in humans. We here aimed to test whether pharmaceutical concentrations of L-theanine, a putative anti-cancer, anti-obesity, blood pressure-lowering, and neuroprotective compound contained in green tea (Camellia sinensis), are capable of extending lifespan in a nematodal model organism for aging processes, the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. Adult C. elegans roundworms were maintained on agar plates, were fed E. coli strain OP50 bacteria, and L-theanine was applied to agar to test (1) whether it may increase survival upon paraquat exposure and (2) whether it may promote longevity by quantifying survival in the presence and absence of the compound. L-Theanine increases survival of C. elegans in the presence of paraquat at a concentration of 1 micromolar. L-theanine extends C. elegans lifespan when applied at concentrations of 100 nM, as well as 1 and 10 micromolar. In the model organism C. elegans, L-theanine is capable of promoting paraquat resistance and longevity suggesting that this compound may as well promote healthy lifespan in mammals and possibly humans.

  18. Genistein from Vigna angularis Extends Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Byeol; Ahn, Dalrae; Kim, Ban Ji; Lee, So Yeon; Seo, Hyun Won; Cha, Youn-Soo; Jeon, Hoon; Eun, Jae Soon; Cha, Dong Seok; Kim, Dae Keun

    2015-01-01

    The seed of Vigna angularis has long been cultivated as a food or a folk medicine in East Asia. Genistein (4′,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone), a dietary phytoestrogen present in this plant, has been known to possess various biological properties. In this study, we investigated the possible lifespan-extending effects of genistein using Caenorhabditis elegans model system. We found that the lifespan of nematode was significantly prolonged in the presence of genistein under normal culture condition. In addition, genistein elevated the survival rate of nematode against stressful environment including heat and oxidative conditions. Further studies demonstrated that genistein-mediated increased stress tolerance of nematode could be attributed to enhanced expressions of stress resistance proteins such as superoxide dismutase (SOD-3) and heat shock protein (HSP-16.2). Moreover, we failed to find genistein-induced significant change in aging-related factors including reproduction, food intake, and growth, indicating genistein exerts longevity activity independent of affecting these factors. Genistein treatment also led to an up-regulation of locomotory ability of aged nematode, suggesting genistein affects healthspan as well as lifespan of nematode. Our results represent that genistein has beneficial effects on the lifespan of C. elegans under both of normal and stress condition via elevating expressions of stress resistance proteins. PMID:25593647

  19. Mitochondrial ROS Produced via Reverse Electron Transport Extend Animal Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel; Gubina, Nina; Lõhmus, Madis; Nelson, Glyn; Logan, Angela; Cooper, Helen M; Navas, Plácido; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Murphy, Michael P; Sanz, Alberto

    2016-04-12

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has long been considered a cause of aging. However, recent studies have implicated ROS as essential secondary messengers. Here we show that the site of ROS production significantly contributes to their apparent dual nature. We report that ROS increase with age as mitochondrial function deteriorates. However, we also demonstrate that increasing ROS production specifically through respiratory complex I reverse electron transport extends Drosophila lifespan. Reverse electron transport rescued pathogenesis induced by severe oxidative stress, highlighting the importance of the site of ROS production in signaling. Furthermore, preventing ubiquinone reduction, through knockdown of PINK1, shortens lifespan and accelerates aging; phenotypes that are rescued by increasing reverse electron transport. These results illustrate that the source of a ROS signal is vital in determining its effects on cellular physiology and establish that manipulation of ubiquinone redox state is a valid strategy to delay aging.

  20. Mitochondrial ROS Produced via Reverse Electron Transport Extend Animal Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel; Gubina, Nina; Lõhmus, Madis; Nelson, Glyn; Logan, Angela; Cooper, Helen M.; Navas, Plácido; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Murphy, Michael P.; Sanz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has long been considered a cause of aging. However, recent studies have implicated ROS as essential secondary messengers. Here we show that the site of ROS production significantly contributes to their apparent dual nature. We report that ROS increase with age as mitochondrial function deteriorates. However, we also demonstrate that increasing ROS production specifically through respiratory complex I reverse electron transport extends Drosophila lifespan. Reverse electron transport rescued pathogenesis induced by severe oxidative stress, highlighting the importance of the site of ROS production in signaling. Furthermore, preventing ubiquinone reduction, through knockdown of PINK1, shortens lifespan and accelerates aging; phenotypes that are rescued by increasing reverse electron transport. These results illustrate that the source of a ROS signal is vital in determining its effects on cellular physiology and establish that manipulation of ubiquinone redox state is a valid strategy to delay aging. PMID:27076081

  1. Arginase-II Deficiency Extends Lifespan in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yuyan; Yepuri, Gautham; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ming, Xiu-Fen; Yang, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial arginase type II (Arg-II) has been shown to interact with ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and mitochondrial p66(Shc) and to promote cell senescence, apoptosis and inflammation under pathological conditions. However, the impact of Arg-II on organismal lifespan is not known. In this study, we demonstrate a significant lifespan extension in mice with Arg-II gene deficiency (Arg-II(-/-)) as compared to wild type (WT) control animals. This effect is more pronounced in the females than in the males. The gender difference is associated with higher Arg-II expression levels in the females than in the males in skin and heart at both young and old age. Ablation of Arg-II gene significantly reduces the aging marker p16(INK4a) levels in these tissues of old female mice, whereas in the male mice this effect of Arg-II deficiency is weaker. In line with this observation, age-associated increases in S6K1 signaling and p66(Shc) levels in heart are significantly attenuated in the female Arg-II(-/-) mice. In the male mice, only p66(Shc) but not S6K1 signaling is reduced. In summary, our study demonstrates that Arg-II may play an important role in the acceleration of aging in mice. Genetic disruption of Arg-II in mouse extends lifespan predominantly in females, which relates to inhibition of S6K1, p66(Shc), and p16(INK4a). Thus, Arg-II may represent a promising target to decelerate aging process and extend lifespan as well as to treat age-related diseases.

  2. Rapamycin extends murine lifespan but has limited effects on aging.

    PubMed

    Neff, Frauke; Flores-Dominguez, Diana; Ryan, Devon P; Horsch, Marion; Schröder, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hans, Wolfgang; Hettich, Moritz M; Holtmeier, Richard; Hölter, Sabine M; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Naton, Beatrix; Ordemann, Rainer; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Ehninger, Gerhard; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Stypmann, Jörg; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Ehninger, Dan

    2013-08-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for a large number of disorders and functional impairments. Therapeutic targeting of the aging process may therefore represent an innovative strategy in the quest for novel and broadly effective treatments against age-related diseases. The recent report of lifespan extension in mice treated with the FDA-approved mTOR inhibitor rapamycin represented the first demonstration of pharmacological extension of maximal lifespan in mammals. Longevity effects of rapamycin may, however, be due to rapamycin's effects on specific life-limiting pathologies, such as cancers, and it remains unclear if this compound actually slows the rate of aging in mammals. Here, we present results from a comprehensive, large-scale assessment of a wide range of structural and functional aging phenotypes, which we performed to determine whether rapamycin slows the rate of aging in male C57BL/6J mice. While rapamycin did extend lifespan, it ameliorated few studied aging phenotypes. A subset of aging traits appeared to be rescued by rapamycin. Rapamycin, however, had similar effects on many of these traits in young animals, indicating that these effects were not due to a modulation of aging, but rather related to aging-independent drug effects. Therefore, our data largely dissociate rapamycin's longevity effects from effects on aging itself.

  3. Rapamycin extends murine lifespan but has limited effects on aging

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Frauke; Flores-Dominguez, Diana; Ryan, Devon P.; Horsch, Marion; Schröder, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hans, Wolfgang; Hettich, Moritz M.; Holtmeier, Richard; Hölter, Sabine M.; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Naton, Beatrix; Ordemann, Rainer; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H.; Ehninger, Gerhard; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Stypmann, Jörg; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Ehninger, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for a large number of disorders and functional impairments. Therapeutic targeting of the aging process may therefore represent an innovative strategy in the quest for novel and broadly effective treatments against age-related diseases. The recent report of lifespan extension in mice treated with the FDA-approved mTOR inhibitor rapamycin represented the first demonstration of pharmacological extension of maximal lifespan in mammals. Longevity effects of rapamycin may, however, be due to rapamycin’s effects on specific life-limiting pathologies, such as cancers, and it remains unclear if this compound actually slows the rate of aging in mammals. Here, we present results from a comprehensive, large-scale assessment of a wide range of structural and functional aging phenotypes, which we performed to determine whether rapamycin slows the rate of aging in male C57BL/6J mice. While rapamycin did extend lifespan, it ameliorated few studied aging phenotypes. A subset of aging traits appeared to be rescued by rapamycin. Rapamycin, however, had similar effects on many of these traits in young animals, indicating that these effects were not due to a modulation of aging, but rather related to aging-independent drug effects. Therefore, our data largely dissociate rapamycin’s longevity effects from effects on aging itself. PMID:23863708

  4. Apple polyphenols extend the mean lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin; Huang, Yu; Yu, Hongjian; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2011-03-09

    Apple polyphenols (AP) are an excellent source of dietary antioxidants. The present study investigated the effect of AP on the lifespan of fruit flies and their interaction with gene expressions of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), methuselah (MTH), Rpn11, and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) subunits III and VIb. Results showed the mean lifespan was significantly extended by 10% in fruit flies fed the AP diet. This was accompanied by up-regulation of genes SOD1, SOD2, and CAT and down-regulation of MTH in the aged fruit flies. Paraquat and H(2)O(2) challenge tests demonstrated that AP prolonged the survival time only for Oregon R wild type flies but not for SOD(n108) or Cat(n1) mutants, in which either SOD or CAT was knocked out. Chronic paraquat exposure could shorten the maximum lifespan from 68 to 31 days and reduce the climbing ability by 60%, whereas AP could partially reverse the paraquat-induced mortality and decline in climbing ability. AP could up-regulate Rpn11 at day 30, whereas it appeared to have no significant effect on gene expression of ubiquitinated protein, CcO subunits III and VIb. These AP-induced changes were unlikely associated with caloric restriction as the gustatory assay found no difference in average body weight and stomach redness index between the control and AP fruit flies. It was therefore concluded that the antiaging activity of AP was, at least in part, mediated by its interaction with genes SOD, CAT, MTH, and Rpn11.

  5. Uncoupling reproduction from metabolism extends chronological lifespan in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Saisubramanian; Kruckeberg, Arthur L.; Schmidt, Karen H.; Kroll, Evgueny; Hamilton, Morgan; McInnerney, Kate; Summers, Ryan; Taylor, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Studies of replicative and chronological lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have advanced understanding of longevity in all eukaryotes. Chronological lifespan in this species is defined as the age-dependent viability of nondividing cells. To date this parameter has only been estimated under calorie restriction, mimicked by starvation. Because postmitotic cells in higher eukaryotes often do not starve, we developed a model yeast system to study cells as they age in the absence of calorie restriction. Yeast cells were encapsulated in a matrix consisting of calcium alginate to form ∼3 mm beads that were packed into bioreactors and fed ad libitum. Under these conditions cells ceased to divide, became heat shock and zymolyase resistant, yet retained high fermentative capacity. Over the course of 17 d, immobilized yeast cells maintained >95% viability, whereas the viability of starving, freely suspended (planktonic) cells decreased to <10%. Immobilized cells exhibited a stable pattern of gene expression that differed markedly from growing or starving planktonic cells, highly expressing genes in glycolysis, cell wall remodeling, and stress resistance, but decreasing transcription of genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and genes that regulate the cell cycle, including master cyclins CDC28 and CLN1. Stress resistance transcription factor MSN4 and its upstream effector RIM15 are conspicuously up-regulated in the immobilized state, and an immobilized rim15 knockout strain fails to exhibit the long-lived, growth-arrested phenotype, suggesting that altered regulation of the Rim15-mediated nutrient-sensing pathway plays an important role in extending yeast chronological lifespan under calorie-unrestricted conditions. PMID:24706810

  6. Sesamin extends the mean lifespan of fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yuanyuan; Peng, Cheng; Liang, Yintong; Ma, Ka Ying; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigated the anti-ageing activity of sesamin and its effect on gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), methuselah (Mth) and Rpn11 in Drosophila melanogaster. Results demonstrated that 0.2 % sesamin in diet prolonged the mean lifespan of OR wild fruit flies by 12 %, accompanied by up-regulation of SOD1, SOD2, CAT and Rpn11. Sesamin at 0.2 % in diet also attenuated paraquat-induced neurodegeneration with up-regulation of SOD1, SOD2 and Rpn11 in OR wild fruit flies. Supplementation of 0.2 % sesamin in diet increased the survival time of OR wild type flies and Alzheimer flies Aβ42 33769 when they were challenged with paraquat. Furthermore, sesamin-induced increase in the activity and expression of antioxidant enzymes also suggests that the longevity promoting activity of sesamin are possibly due to its action as a hormetin by inducing oxidative stress response-mediated hormesis. It was concluded that sesamin extended the mean lifespan and alleviated the neurodegeneration in Drosophila melanogaster at least mediated by its interaction with genes SOD1, SOD2, CAT, and Rpn11, but not with gene Mth.

  7. Basic and clinical pharmacology contribution to extend anthelmintic molecules lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lanusse, Carlos; Lifschitz, Adrian; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-08-15

    The correct use of pharmacology-based information is critical to design successful strategies for the future of parasite control in livestock animals. Integrated pharmaco-parasitological research approaches have greatly contributed to optimize drug activity. In an attempt to manage drug resistance in helminths of ruminants, combinations of two or more anthelmintics are being used or promoted, based on the fact that individual worms may have a lower degree of resistance to a multiple component formulation, when each chemical has a different mode of action compared to that observed when a single compound is used. However, as emphasized in the current review, the occurrence of potential pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic interactions between drug components highlights the need for deeper and integrated research to identify the advantages or disadvantages associated with the use of combined drug preparations. This review article provides integrated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and clinical pharmacology information pertinent to preserve the traditional and modern active ingredients as practical tools for parasite control. Novel pharmacological data on derquantel and monepantel, as representatives of modern anthelmintics for use in livestock, is summarized here. The article also summarizes the pharmaco-parasitological knowledge considered critical to secure and/or extend the lifespan of the recently available novel molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapamycin additively extends lifespan in short- and long-lived lines of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei.

    PubMed

    Lind, Martin I; Chen, Hwei-Yen; Cortazar-Chinarro, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A

    2017-04-01

    Despite tremendous progress in finding genes that, when manipulated, affects lifespan, little is known about the genetics underlying natural variation in lifespan. While segregating genetic variants for lifespan has been notoriously difficult to find in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), a complementary approach is to manipulate key genetic pathways in lines that differ in lifespan. If these candidate pathways are down regulated in long-lived lines, these lines can be predicted to respond less to pharmaceutical down-regulation of these pathways than short-lived lines. Experimental studies have identified the nutrient-sensing pathway TOR as a key regulator of lifespan in model organisms, and this pathway can effectively be down regulated using the drug rapamycin, which extends lifespan in all tested species. We expose short- and long-lived lines of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei to rapamycin, and investigate if long-lived lines, which are hypothesized to already have down-regulated TOR signaling, respond less to rapamycin. We found no interaction between line and rapamycin treatment, since rapamycin extended lifespan independent of the intrinsic lifespan of the lines. This shows that rapamycin is equally effective on long and short-lived lines, and suggests that the evolution of long life may involve more factors that down-regulation of TOR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dairy Propionibacterium extends the mean lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans via activation of the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gayeung; Lee, Jiyun; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Dairy Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a candidate non-lactic acid probiotic. However, little information is available on the effect of P. freudenreichii on lifespan extension in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of P. freudenreichii on lifespan extension and to elucidate the mechanism of P. freudenreichii-dependent lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans. The results showed that P. freudenreichii significantly (p < 0.05) extended the lifespan of C. elegans compared with Escherichia coli OP50, a standard food for the worm. Analysis of age-related biomarkers showed that P. freudenreichii retards ageing. Moreover, P. freudenreichii increased resistance against a human pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, through the activation of skn-1, which is involved in pathogen resistance in C. elegans. Furthermore, P. freudenreichii-fed daf-16, jnk-1, skn-1 or daf-7 loss-of-function mutants showed an extended mean lifespan compared with E. coli OP50-fed worms. However, the increase in lifespan was not observed in pmk-1, sek-1, mek-1, dbl-1, daf-12 or daf-2 mutants, which suggests potential roles for these genes in P. freudenreichii-induced longevity in C. elegans. In conclusion, P. freudenreichii extends the lifespan of C. elegans via the p38 MAPK pathway involved in stress response and the TGF-β pathways associated with anti-inflammation processes in the immune system. PMID:27531646

  10. Dairy Propionibacterium extends the mean lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans via activation of the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gayeung; Lee, Jiyun; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-08-17

    Dairy Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a candidate non-lactic acid probiotic. However, little information is available on the effect of P. freudenreichii on lifespan extension in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of P. freudenreichii on lifespan extension and to elucidate the mechanism of P. freudenreichii-dependent lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans. The results showed that P. freudenreichii significantly (p < 0.05) extended the lifespan of C. elegans compared with Escherichia coli OP50, a standard food for the worm. Analysis of age-related biomarkers showed that P. freudenreichii retards ageing. Moreover, P. freudenreichii increased resistance against a human pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, through the activation of skn-1, which is involved in pathogen resistance in C. elegans. Furthermore, P. freudenreichii-fed daf-16, jnk-1, skn-1 or daf-7 loss-of-function mutants showed an extended mean lifespan compared with E. coli OP50-fed worms. However, the increase in lifespan was not observed in pmk-1, sek-1, mek-1, dbl-1, daf-12 or daf-2 mutants, which suggests potential roles for these genes in P. freudenreichii-induced longevity in C. elegans. In conclusion, P. freudenreichii extends the lifespan of C. elegans via the p38 MAPK pathway involved in stress response and the TGF-β pathways associated with anti-inflammation processes in the immune system.

  11. The lifespan-extending effects of Nymphaea hybrid root extract in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ziheng; Lv, Ting; Li, Min; Zhang, Yusi; Xue, Ting; Yang, Linsong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Weiming

    2014-12-01

    Nymphaea hybrid, a water lily from the Nymphaeaceae family, has been found to exhibit some in vivo beneficial effects. In the present study we investigated the lifespan-extending effects of Nymphaea hybrid root extract in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that Nymphaea hybrid root extract significantly extended the lifespan of C.elegans and improved its locomotion during aging. Moreover, Nymphaea hybrid root extract increased the resistance of C.elegans to both heat stress and oxidative stress. We found that the ability of Nymphaea hybrid root extract to increase lifespan was independent of its antimicrobial effects and was probably associated with its effects on the reproduction of C.elegans. In addition, the lifespan-extending effects of Nymphaea hybrid root extract were found to be dependent on the insulin/IGF signaling pathway. We also found that total flavones of Nymphaea hybrid could increase survival of C.elegans in both normal and adverse conditions, indicating that total flavones comprise the major fractions with lifespan-extending effects. Therefore, Nymphaea hybrid root extract has lifespan-extending effects in C.elegans and could be developed as a functional food.

  12. Synergism between soluble guanylate cyclase signaling and neuropeptides extends lifespan in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Rachel; Livshits, Leonid; Shaked, Maayan; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Gross, Einav

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen (O2 ) homeostasis is important for all aerobic animals. However, the manner by which O2 sensing and homeostasis contribute to lifespan regulation is poorly understood. Here, we use the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to address this question. We demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in the neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1 and a deletion mutation in the atypical soluble guanylate cyclase gcy-35 O2 sensor interact synergistically to extend worm lifespan. The function of npr-1 and gcy-35 in the O2 -sensing neurons AQR, PQR, and URX shortens the lifespan of the worm. By contrast, the activity of the atypical soluble guanylate cyclase O2 sensor gcy-33 in these neurons is crucial for lifespan extension. In addition to AQR, PQR, and URX, we show that the O2 -sensing neuron BAG and the interneuron RIA are also important for the lifespan lengthening. Neuropeptide processing by the proprotein convertase EGL-3 is essential for lifespan extension, suggesting that the synergistic effect of joint loss of function of gcy-35 and npr-1 is mediated through neuropeptide signal transduction. The extended lifespan is regulated by hypoxia and insulin signaling pathways, mediated by the transcription factors HIF-1 and DAF-16. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to play an important function in lifespan lengthening. As HIF-1 and DAF-16 activities are modulated by ROS, we speculate that joint loss of function of gcy-35 and npr-1 extends lifespan through ROS signaling. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Sorbitol treatment extends lifespan and induces the osmotic stress response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chandler-Brown, Devon; Choi, Haeri; Park, Shirley; Ocampo, Billie R; Chen, Shiwen; Le, Anna; Sutphin, George L; Shamieh, Lara S; Smith, Erica D; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The response to osmotic stress is a highly conserved process for adapting to changing environmental conditions. Prior studies have shown that hyperosmolarity by addition of sorbitol to the growth medium is sufficient to increase both chronological and replicative lifespan in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we report a similar phenomenon in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Addition of sorbitol to the nematode growth medium induces an adaptive osmotic response and increases C. elegans lifespan by about 35%. Lifespan extension from 5% sorbitol behaves similarly to dietary restriction in a variety of genetic backgrounds, increasing lifespan additively with mutation of daf-2(e1370) and independently of daf-16(mu86), sir-2.1(ok434), aak-2(ok524), and hif-1(ia04). Dietary restriction by bacterial deprivation or mutation of eat-2(ad1113) fails to further extend lifespan in the presence of 5% sorbitol. Two mutants with constitutive activation of the osmotic response, osm-5(p813) and osm-7(n1515), were found to be long-lived, and lifespan extension from sorbitol required the glycerol biosynthetic enzymes GPDH-1 and GPDH-2. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that exposure to sorbitol at levels sufficient to induce an adaptive osmotic response extends lifespan in worms and define the osmotic stress response pathway as a longevity pathway conserved between yeast and nematodes.

  14. Methionine restriction extends lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster under conditions of low amino acid status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Ma, Siming; Kim, Gwansu; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Yim, Sun Hee; Hu, Zhen; Harshman, Lawrence G.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced methionine (Met) intake can extend lifespan of rodents, but whether this regimen represents a general strategy for regulating aging has been controversial. Here we report that Met restriction extends lifespan in both fruit flies and yeast, and that this effect requires low amino acid status. Met restriction in Drosophila mimicks the effect of dietary restriction and is associated with decreased reproduction. However, under conditions of high amino acid status, Met restriction is ineffective and the trade-off between longevity and reproduction is not observed. Overexpression of InRDN or Tsc2 inhibits lifespan extension by Met restriction, suggesting the role of TOR signaling in the Met control of longevity. Overall, this study defines the specific roles of Met and amino acid imbalance in aging and suggests that Met restiction is a general strategy for lifespan extension. PMID:24710037

  15. Joint inhibition of TOR and JNK pathways interacts to extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera)

    PubMed Central

    Snell, Terry W.; Johnston, Rachel K.; Rabeneck, Brett; Zipperer, Cody; Teat, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The TOR kinase pathway is central in modulating aging in a variety of animal models. The target of rapamycin (TOR) integrates a complex network of signals from growth conditions, nutrient availability, energy status, and physiological stresses and matches an organism’s growth rate to the resource environment. Important problems remaining are to identify the pathways that interact with TOR and characterize them as additive or synergistic. One of the most versatile stress sensors in metazoans is the Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signalling pathway. JNK is an evolutionarily conserved stress-activated protein kinase that is induced by a range of stressors, including UV irradiation, reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, heat, and bacterial antigens. JNK is thought to interact with the TOR pathway, but its effects on TOR are poorly understood. We used the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas as a model animal to probe the regulation of TOR and JNK pathways and explore their interaction. The effect of various chemical inhibitors was examined in life table and stressor challenge experiments. A survey of 12 inhibitors revealed two, rapamycin and JNK inhibitor, that significantly extended lifespan of B. manjavacas. At 1 μM concentration, exposure to rapamycin or JNK inhibitor extended mean rotifer lifespan by 35% and maximum lifespan by 37%. Exposure to both rapamycin and JNK inhibitor simultaneously extended mean rotifer lifespan 65% more than either alone. Exposure to a combination of rapamycin and JNK inhibitors conveyed greater protection to starvation, UV and osmotic stress than either inhibitor alone. RNAi knockdown of TOR and JNK gene expression was investigated for its ability to extend rotifer lifespan. RNAi knockdown of the TOR gene resulted in 29% extension of mean lifespan compared to control and knockdown of the JNK gene resulted in 51% mean lifespan extension. In addition to lifespan, we quantified mitochondria activity using the fluorescent marker Mitotracker and

  16. Joint inhibition of TOR and JNK pathways interacts to extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K; Rabeneck, Brett; Zipperer, Cody; Teat, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The TOR kinase pathway is central in modulating aging in a variety of animal models. The target of rapamycin (TOR) integrates a complex network of signals from growth conditions, nutrient availability, energy status, and physiological stresses and matches an organism's growth rate to the resource environment. Important remaining problems are the identification of the pathways that interact with TOR and their characterization as additive or synergistic. One of the most versatile stress sensors in metazoans is the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway. JNK is an evolutionarily conserved stress-activated protein kinase that is induced by a range of stressors, including UV irradiation, reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, heat, and bacterial antigens. JNK is thought to interact with the TOR pathway, but its effects on TOR are poorly understood. We used the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas as a model animal to probe the regulation of TOR and JNK pathways and explore their interaction. The effect of various chemical inhibitors was examined in life table and stressor challenge experiments. A survey of 12 inhibitors revealed two, rapamycin and JNK inhibitor, that significantly extended lifespan of B. manjavacas. At 1 μM concentration, exposure to rapamycin or JNK inhibitor extended mean rotifer lifespan by 35% and maximum lifespan by 37%. Exposure to both rapamycin and JNK inhibitor simultaneously extended mean rotifer lifespan by 65% more than either alone. Exposure to a combination of rapamycin and JNK inhibitors conveyed greater protection to starvation, UV and osmotic stress than either inhibitor alone. RNAi knockdown of TOR and JNK gene expression was investigated for its ability to extend rotifer lifespan. RNAi knockdown of the TOR gene resulted in 29% extension of the mean lifespan compared to control and knockdown of the JNK gene resulted in 51% mean lifespan extension. In addition to the lifespan, we quantified mitochondria activity using the fluorescent

  17. Impairment of insulin signalling in peripheral tissue fails to extend murine lifespan.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Kuhlow, Doreen; Laube, Beate; Pöhlmann, Doris; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Kahn, C Ronald; Ristow, Michael; Zarse, Kim

    2017-08-01

    Impaired insulin/IGF1 signalling has been shown to extend lifespan in model organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. Here we sought to determine the effect of targeted disruption of the insulin receptor (IR) in non-neuronal tissues of adult mice on the lifespan. We induced hemizygous (PerIRKO(+/-) ) or homozygous (PerIRKO(-/-) ) disruption of the IR in peripheral tissue of 15-weeks-old mice using a tamoxifen-inducible Cre transgenic mouse with only peripheral tissue expression, and subsequently monitored glucose metabolism, insulin signalling and spontaneous death rates over 4 years. Complete peripheral IR disruption resulted in a diabetic phenotype with increased blood glucose and plasma insulin levels in young mice. Although blood glucose levels returned to normal, and fat mass was reduced in aged PerIRKO(-/-) mice, their lifespan was reduced. By contrast, heterozygous disruption had no effect on lifespan. This was despite young male PerIRKO(+/-) mice showing reduced fat mass and mild increase in hepatic insulin sensitivity. In conflict with findings in metazoans like Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, our results suggest that heterozygous impairment of the insulin signalling limited to peripheral tissues of adult mice fails to extend lifespan despite increased systemic insulin sensitivity, while homozygous impairment shortens lifespan. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Green tea polyphenols extend the lifespan of male drosophila melanogaster while impairing reproductive fitness.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Terry; Schriner, Samuel E; Okoro, Michael; Lu, David; Chiang, Beatrice T; Huey, Jocelyn; Jafari, Mahtab

    2014-12-01

    Green tea is a popular beverage believed to have many health benefits, including a reduction in the risks of heart disease and cancer. Rich in polyphenolic compounds known as catechins, green tea and its components have been shown to increase the lifespan of various animal models, including Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we investigated the gender-specific effects of green tea on the lifespan of fruit flies and observed that green tea extended the lifespan of male flies only. This effect was found to be independent of typical aging interventions, such as dietary restriction, modulation of oxidative energy metabolism, and improved tolerance to environmental stresses. The one exception was that green tea did protect male flies against iron toxicity. Since there is an inverse correlation between lifespan and reproduction, the impact of green tea on male reproductive fitness was also investigated. We found that green tea negatively impacted male fertility as shown by a reduced number of offspring produced and increased mating latency. We further identified that the lifespan extension properties of green tea was only observed in the presence of females which alludes to a reproductive (or mating) dependent mechanism. Our findings suggest that green tea extends the lifespan of male flies by inhibiting reproductive potential, possibly by limiting iron uptake. To our knowledge, our study is the first to report the negative impact of green tea on Drosophila male reproduction. Our results also support previous studies that suggest that green tea might have a negative effect on reproductive fitness in humans.

  19. Green Tea Polyphenols Extend the Lifespan of Male Drosophila melanogaster While Impairing Reproductive Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Terry; Schriner, Samuel E.; Okoro, Michael; Lu, David; Chiang, Beatrice T.; Huey, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Green tea is a popular beverage believed to have many health benefits, including a reduction in the risks of heart disease and cancer. Rich in polyphenolic compounds known as catechins, green tea and its components have been shown to increase the lifespan of various animal models, including Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we investigated the gender-specific effects of green tea on the lifespan of fruit flies and observed that green tea extended the lifespan of male flies only. This effect was found to be independent of typical aging interventions, such as dietary restriction, modulation of oxidative energy metabolism, and improved tolerance to environmental stresses. The one exception was that green tea did protect male flies against iron toxicity. Since there is an inverse correlation between lifespan and reproduction, the impact of green tea on male reproductive fitness was also investigated. We found that green tea negatively impacted male fertility as shown by a reduced number of offspring produced and increased mating latency. We further identified that the lifespan extension properties of green tea was only observed in the presence of females which alludes to a reproductive (or mating) dependent mechanism. Our findings suggest that green tea extends the lifespan of male flies by inhibiting reproductive potential, possibly by limiting iron uptake. To our knowledge, our study is the first to report the negative impact of green tea on Drosophila male reproduction. Our results also support previous studies that suggest that green tea might have a negative effect on reproductive fitness in humans. PMID:25058464

  20. Aspirin increases metabolism through germline signalling to extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Bing; Mu, Xiao-Hui; Wan, Qin-Li; He, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Gui-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin is a prototypic cyclooxygenase inhibitor with a variety of beneficial effects on human health. It prevents age-related diseases and delays the aging process. Previous research has shown that aspirin might act through a dietary restriction-like mechanism to extend lifespan. To explore the mechanism of action of aspirin on aging, we determined the whole-genome expression profile of Caenorhabditis elegans treated with aspirin. Transcriptome analysis revealed the RNA levels of genes involved in metabolism were primarily increased. Reproduction has been reported to be associated with metabolism. We found that aspirin did not extend the lifespan or improve the heat stress resistance of germline mutants of glp-1. Furthermore, Oil Red O staining showed that aspirin treatment decreased lipid deposition and increased expression of lipid hydrolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes. The effect of germline ablation on lifespan was mainly mediated by DAF-12 and DAF-16. Next, we performed genetic analysis with a series of worm mutants and found that aspirin did not further extend the lifespans of daf-12 and daf-16 single mutants, glp-1;daf-12 and glp-1;daf-16 double mutants, or glp-1;daf-12;daf-16 triple mutants. The results suggest that aspirin increase metabolism and regulate germline signalling to activate downstream DAF-12 and DAF-16 to extend lifespan. PMID:28910305

  1. Aspirin increases metabolism through germline signalling to extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Bing; Mu, Xiao-Hui; Wan, Qin-Li; He, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Gui-Sheng; Luo, Huai-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin is a prototypic cyclooxygenase inhibitor with a variety of beneficial effects on human health. It prevents age-related diseases and delays the aging process. Previous research has shown that aspirin might act through a dietary restriction-like mechanism to extend lifespan. To explore the mechanism of action of aspirin on aging, we determined the whole-genome expression profile of Caenorhabditis elegans treated with aspirin. Transcriptome analysis revealed the RNA levels of genes involved in metabolism were primarily increased. Reproduction has been reported to be associated with metabolism. We found that aspirin did not extend the lifespan or improve the heat stress resistance of germline mutants of glp-1. Furthermore, Oil Red O staining showed that aspirin treatment decreased lipid deposition and increased expression of lipid hydrolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes. The effect of germline ablation on lifespan was mainly mediated by DAF-12 and DAF-16. Next, we performed genetic analysis with a series of worm mutants and found that aspirin did not further extend the lifespans of daf-12 and daf-16 single mutants, glp-1;daf-12 and glp-1;daf-16 double mutants, or glp-1;daf-12;daf-16 triple mutants. The results suggest that aspirin increase metabolism and regulate germline signalling to activate downstream DAF-12 and DAF-16 to extend lifespan.

  2. Nmdmc overexpression extends Drosophila lifespan and reduces levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Suyeun; Jang, Yeogil; Paik, Donggi; Lee, Eunil; Park, Joong-Jean

    2015-10-02

    NAD-dependent methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (NMDMC) is a bifunctional enzyme involved in folate-dependent metabolism and highly expressed in rapidly proliferating cells. However, Nmdmc physiological roles remain unveiled. We found that ubiquitous Nmdmc overexpression enhanced Drosophila lifespan and stress resistance. Interestingly, Nmdmc overexpression in the fat body was sufficient to increase lifespan and tolerance against oxidative stress. In addition, these conditions coincided with significant decreases in the levels of mitochondrial ROS and Hsp22 as well as with a significant increase in the copy number of mitochondrial DNA. These results suggest that Nmdmc overexpression should be beneficial for mitochondrial homeostasis and increasing lifespan. - Highlights: • Ubiquitous Nmdmc overexpression enhanced lifespan and stress tolerance. • Nmdmc overexpression in the fat body extended longevity. • Fat body-specific Nmdmc overexpression increased oxidative stress resistance. • Nmdmc overexpression decreased Hsp22 transcript levels and ROS. • Nmdmc overexpression increased mitochondrial DNA copy number.

  3. Dietary Restriction Depends on Nutrient Composition to Extend Chronological Lifespan in Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziyun; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2013-01-01

    The traditional view on dietary restriction has been challenged with regard to extending lifespan of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This is because studies have shown that changing the balance of dietary components without reduction of dietary intake can increase lifespan, suggesting that nutrient composition other than dietary restriction play a pivotal role in regulation of longevity. However, this opinion has not been reflected in yeast aging studies. Inspired by this new finding, response surface methodology was applied to evaluate the relationships between nutrients (glucose, amino acids and yeast nitrogen base) and lifespan as well as biomass production in four Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (wild-type BY4742, sch9Δ, tor1Δ, and sir2Δ mutants) using a high throughput screening assay. Our results indicate that lifespan extension by a typical dietary restriction regime was dependent on the nutrients in media and that nutrient composition was a key determinant for yeast longevity. Four different yeast strains were cultured in various media, which showed similar response surface trends in biomass production and viability at day two but greatly different trends in lifespan. The pH of aging media was dependent on glucose concentration and had no apparent correlation with lifespan under conditions where amino acids and YNB were varied widely, and simply buffering the pH of media could extend lifespan significantly. Furthermore, the results showed that strain sch9Δ was more responsive in nutrient-sensing than the other three strains, suggesting that Sch9 (serine-threonine kinase pathway) was a major nutrient-sensing factor that regulates cell growth, cell size, metabolism, stress resistance and longevity. Overall, our findings support the notion that nutrient composition might be a more effective way than simple dietary restriction to optimize lifespan and biomass production from yeast to other organisms. PMID:23691220

  4. Rhodiola rosea extends lifespan and improves stress tolerance in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Song, Jiangbo; Chen, Min; Li, Zhiquan; Tong, Xiaoling; Hu, Hai; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fangyin

    2016-04-01

    The root of Rhodiola rosea is widely used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The extract from R. rosea is reported to extend the lifespan of yeast, nematode, and fruit fly. However, the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we tested whether R. rosea extends the lifespan of the silkworm. An aqueous extract of R. rosea significantly prolonged the lifespan of the silkworm, without affecting its daily food intake, body weight, or fecundity, suggesting that R. rosea did not exhibit obvious side effects. Rhodiola rosea extract also enhanced the stress resistance in the silkworm, against heat stress (37 °C) and starvation. The R. rosea extract increased the activity of the major antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferase and catalase, and altered the content of glutathione and malondialdehyde. Rhodiola rosea increased the expression of BmFoxO, which is a downstream regulator of insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway in the silkworm. Our results showed that R. rosea extends lifespan, in which IIS pathway might be involved, and enhances stress resistance in the silkworm. Thus, the silkworm might be used as a novel animal model for lifespan study and efficacy evaluation of Traditional Chinese Medicines.

  5. Lifespan-extending and stress resistance properties of brazilin from Caesalpinia sappan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Byeol; Xing, Ming Ming; Kim, Dae Keun

    2017-07-01

    This study contributes to the continual discovery of lifespan-extending compounds from plants, using the Caenorhabditis elegans model system. An ethyl acetate soluble fraction of methanol extract from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan showed a significant lifespan-extending activity. Subsequent activity-guided chromatography of the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction led to the isolation of brazilin. Brazilin showed potent 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging and superoxide anion quenching activities and also revealed a lifespan-extending activity in C. elegans under normal culture conditions. Brazilin also exhibited the protective effects against thermal, oxidative and osmotic stress conditions to improve the survival rate of the nematode. Furthermore, brazilin elevated superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in C. elegans. Further studies showed that brazilin-mediated increased stress tolerance of worms could be due to increased expressions of stress resistance proteins such as heat shock protein (HSP-16.2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD-3). Besides, there were no significant, brazilin-induced changes in aging-related factors, including progeny production, food intake, and growth, indicating brazilin influences longevity activity independent of affecting these factors. Brazilin increased the body movement of aged worms, indicating brazilin affects the healthspan and lifespan of nematode. These results suggest that brazilin contributes to the lifespan of C. elegans under both normal and stress conditions by increasing the expressions of stress resistance proteins.

  6. Procyanidins from apples (Malus pumila Mill.) extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Tadahiro; Shimizu, Takahiko; Kanda, Tomomasa; Tagashira, Motoyuki; Sami, Manabu; Shirasawa, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    Apple polyphenols (AP) mainly consist of procyanidins (PC), which are composed of (-)-epicatechins and (+)-catechins. In order to investigate the antiageing effects of PC, we measured the lifespan of CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS worms treated with PC. Treatment with 65 µg/mL PC extended the mean lifespan of wild-type N2 and FEM-1 worms by 12.1 % and 8.4 %, respectively, i.e., to a similar extent as resveratrol. In addition, treatment with 100 µg/mL AP also significantly prolonged the mean lifespan of the same worms by 12.0 % and 5.3 %, respectively, i.e., to a similar extent as PC. In contrast, treatment with (-)-epicatechin did not extend the lifespan of the worms. PC did not modify the growth, food intake, or fecundity of C. elegans. Treatment with PC did not extend the lifespan of MEV-1 worms, which show excessive oxidative stress, indicating that PC had no antioxidant ability in the MEV-1 mutant. Moreover, treatment with PC had no effect on the longevity of SIR-2.1 worms, which lack the activity of SIR-2, a member of the sirtuin family of NAD (+)-dependent protein deacetylases. These results indicated that PC has SIR-2.1-dependent antiageing effects on C. elegans. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The metabolite alpha-ketoglutarate extends lifespan by inhibiting the ATP synthase and TOR

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Randall M.; Fu, Xudong; Pai, Melody Y.; Vergnes, Laurent; Hwang, Heejun; Deng, Gang; Diep, Simon; Lomenick, Brett; Meli, Vijaykumar S.; Monsalve, Gabriela C.; Hu, Eileen; Whelan, Stephen A.; Wang, Jennifer X.; Jung, Gwanghyun; Solis, Gregory M.; Fazlollahi, Farbod; Kaweeteerawat, Chitrada; Quach, Austin; Nili, Mahta; Krall, Abby S.; Godwin, Hilary A.; Chang, Helena R.; Faull, Kym F.; Guo, Feng; Jiang, Meisheng; Trauger, Sunia A.; Saghatelian, Alan; Braas, Daniel; Christofk, Heather R.; Clarke, Catherine F.; Teitell, Michael A.; Petrascheck, Michael; Reue, Karen; Jung, Michael E.; Frand, Alison R.; Huang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism and ageing are intimately linked. Compared to ad libitum feeding, dietary restriction (DR) or calorie restriction (CR) consistently extends lifespan and delays age-related diseases in evolutionarily diverse organisms1,2. Similar conditions of nutrient limitation and genetic or pharmacological perturbations of nutrient or energy metabolism also have longevity benefits3,4. Recently, several metabolites have been identified that modulate ageing5,6 with largely undefined molecular mechanisms. Here we show that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) extends the lifespan of adult C. elegans. ATP synthase subunit beta is identified as a novel binding protein of α-KG using a small-molecule target identification strategy called DARTS (drug affinity responsive target stability)7. The ATP synthase, also known as Complex V of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), is the main cellular energy-generating machinery and is highly conserved throughout evolution8,9. Although complete loss of mitochondrial function is detrimental, partial suppression of the ETC has been shown to extend C. elegans lifespan10–13. We show that α-KG inhibits ATP synthase and, similar to ATP synthase knockdown, inhibition by α-KG leads to reduced ATP content, decreased oxygen consumption, and increased autophagy in both C. elegans and mammalian cells. We provide evidence that the lifespan increase by α-KG requires ATP synthase subunit beta and is dependent on the target of rapamycin (TOR) downstream. Endogenous α-KG levels are increased upon starvation and α-KG does not extend the lifespan of DR animals, indicating that α-KG is a key metabolite that mediates longevity by DR. Our analyses uncover new molecular links between a common metabolite, a universal cellular energy generator, and DR in the regulation of organismal lifespan, thus suggesting new strategies for the prevention and treatment of ageing and age-related diseases. PMID:24828042

  8. The metabolite α-ketoglutarate extends lifespan by inhibiting ATP synthase and TOR.

    PubMed

    Chin, Randall M; Fu, Xudong; Pai, Melody Y; Vergnes, Laurent; Hwang, Heejun; Deng, Gang; Diep, Simon; Lomenick, Brett; Meli, Vijaykumar S; Monsalve, Gabriela C; Hu, Eileen; Whelan, Stephen A; Wang, Jennifer X; Jung, Gwanghyun; Solis, Gregory M; Fazlollahi, Farbod; Kaweeteerawat, Chitrada; Quach, Austin; Nili, Mahta; Krall, Abby S; Godwin, Hilary A; Chang, Helena R; Faull, Kym F; Guo, Feng; Jiang, Meisheng; Trauger, Sunia A; Saghatelian, Alan; Braas, Daniel; Christofk, Heather R; Clarke, Catherine F; Teitell, Michael A; Petrascheck, Michael; Reue, Karen; Jung, Michael E; Frand, Alison R; Huang, Jing

    2014-06-19

    Metabolism and ageing are intimately linked. Compared with ad libitum feeding, dietary restriction consistently extends lifespan and delays age-related diseases in evolutionarily diverse organisms. Similar conditions of nutrient limitation and genetic or pharmacological perturbations of nutrient or energy metabolism also have longevity benefits. Recently, several metabolites have been identified that modulate ageing; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this are largely undefined. Here we show that α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate, extends the lifespan of adult Caenorhabditis elegans. ATP synthase subunit β is identified as a novel binding protein of α-KG using a small-molecule target identification strategy termed drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS). The ATP synthase, also known as complex V of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, is the main cellular energy-generating machinery and is highly conserved throughout evolution. Although complete loss of mitochondrial function is detrimental, partial suppression of the electron transport chain has been shown to extend C. elegans lifespan. We show that α-KG inhibits ATP synthase and, similar to ATP synthase knockdown, inhibition by α-KG leads to reduced ATP content, decreased oxygen consumption, and increased autophagy in both C. elegans and mammalian cells. We provide evidence that the lifespan increase by α-KG requires ATP synthase subunit β and is dependent on target of rapamycin (TOR) downstream. Endogenous α-KG levels are increased on starvation and α-KG does not extend the lifespan of dietary-restricted animals, indicating that α-KG is a key metabolite that mediates longevity by dietary restriction. Our analyses uncover new molecular links between a common metabolite, a universal cellular energy generator and dietary restriction in the regulation of organismal lifespan, thus suggesting new strategies for the prevention and treatment of ageing

  9. The Nestor Effect: Extending Evolutionary Developmental Psychology to a Lifespan Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greve, Werner; Bjorklund, David F.

    2009-01-01

    We extend an evolutionary perspective of development to the lifespan, proposing that human longevity may be related to the experience, knowledge, and wisdom provided by older members of human groups. In addition to the assistance in childcare provided by grandmothers to their daughters, the experience of wise elders could have served to benefit…

  10. The Nestor Effect: Extending Evolutionary Developmental Psychology to a Lifespan Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greve, Werner; Bjorklund, David F.

    2009-01-01

    We extend an evolutionary perspective of development to the lifespan, proposing that human longevity may be related to the experience, knowledge, and wisdom provided by older members of human groups. In addition to the assistance in childcare provided by grandmothers to their daughters, the experience of wise elders could have served to benefit…

  11. Antioxidants can extend lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera), but only in a few combinations

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Allison M.; Johnston, Rachel K.

    2013-01-01

    Animal cells are protected from oxidative damage by an antioxidant network operating as a coordinated system, with strong synergistic interactions. Lifespan studies with whole animals are expensive and laborious, so there has been little investigation of which antioxidant interactions might be useful for life extension. Animals in the phylum Rotifera are particularly promising models for aging studies because they are small (0.1–1 mm), have short, two-week lifespan, display typical patterns of animal aging, and have well characterized, easy to measure phenotypes of aging and senescence. One class of interventions that has consistently produced significant rotifer life extension is antioxidants. Although the mechanism of antioxidant effects on animal aging remains controversial, the ability of some antioxidant supplements to extend rotifer lifespan was unequivocal. We found that exposing rotifers to certain combinations of antioxidant supplements can produce up to about 20% longer lifespan, but that most antioxidants have no effect. We performed life table tests with 20 single antioxidants and none yielded significant rotifer life extension. We tested 60 two-way combinations of selected antioxidants and only seven (12%) produced significant rotifer life extension. None of the 20 three- and four-way antioxidant combinations tested yielded significant rotifer life extension. These observations suggest that dietary exposure of antioxidants can extend rotifer lifespan, but most antioxidants do not. We observed significant rotifer life extension only when antioxidants were paired with trolox, N-acetyl cysteine, l-carnosine, or EUK-8. This illustrates that antioxidant treatments capable of rotifer life extension are patchily distributed in the parameter space, so large regions must be searched to find them. It furthermore underscores the value of the rotifer model to conduct rapid, facile life table experiments with many treatments, which makes such a search feasible

  12. Antioxidants can extend lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera), but only in a few combinations.

    PubMed

    Snell, Terry W; Fields, Allison M; Johnston, Rachel K

    2012-06-01

    Animal cells are protected from oxidative damage by an antioxidant network operating as a coordinated system, with strong synergistic interactions. Lifespan studies with whole animals are expensive and laborious, so there has been little investigation of which antioxidant interactions might be useful for life extension. Animals in the phylum Rotifera are particularly promising models for aging studies because they are small (0.1-1 mm), have short, two-week lifespan, display typical patterns of animal aging, and have well characterized, easy to measure phenotypes of aging and senescence. One class of interventions that has consistently produced significant rotifer life extension is antioxidants. Although the mechanism of antioxidant effects on animal aging remains controversial, the ability of some antioxidant supplements to extend rotifer lifespan was unequivocal. We found that exposing rotifers to certain combinations of antioxidant supplements can produce up to about 20% longer lifespan, but that most antioxidants have no effect. We performed life table tests with 20 single antioxidants and none yielded significant rotifer life extension. We tested 60 two-way combinations of selected antioxidants and only seven (12%) produced significant rotifer life extension. None of the 20 three- and four-way antioxidant combinations tested yielded significant rotifer life extension. These observations suggest that dietary exposure of antioxidants can extend rotifer lifespan, but most antioxidants do not. We observed significant rotifer life extension only when antioxidants were paired with trolox, N-acetyl cysteine, L: -carnosine, or EUK-8. This illustrates that antioxidant treatments capable of rotifer life extension are patchily distributed in the parameter space, so large regions must be searched to find them. It furthermore underscores the value of the rotifer model to conduct rapid, facile life table experiments with many treatments, which makes such a search feasible

  13. Near-infrared light increases ATP, extends lifespan and improves mobility in aged Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rana; Calaza, Karin; Kam, Jaimie Hoh; Salt, Thomas E.; Hogg, Chris; Jeffery, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is an irreversible cellular decline partly driven by failing mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria accumulate DNA mutations and reduce ATP production necessary for cellular metabolism. This is associated with inflammation. Near-infrared exposure increases retinal ATP in old mice via cytochrome c oxidase absorption and reduces inflammation. Here, we expose fruitflies daily to 670 nm radiation, revealing elevated ATP and reduced inflammation with age. Critically, there was a significant increase in average lifespan: 100–175% more flies survived into old age following 670 nm exposure and these had significantly improved mobility. This may be a simple route to extending lifespan and improving function in old age. PMID:25788488

  14. Near-infrared light increases ATP, extends lifespan and improves mobility in aged Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Begum, Rana; Calaza, Karin; Kam, Jaimie Hoh; Salt, Thomas E; Hogg, Chris; Jeffery, Glen

    2015-03-01

    Ageing is an irreversible cellular decline partly driven by failing mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria accumulate DNA mutations and reduce ATP production necessary for cellular metabolism. This is associated with inflammation. Near-infrared exposure increases retinal ATP in old mice via cytochrome c oxidase absorption and reduces inflammation. Here, we expose fruitflies daily to 670 nm radiation, revealing elevated ATP and reduced inflammation with age. Critically, there was a significant increase in average lifespan: 100-175% more flies survived into old age following 670 nm exposure and these had significantly improved mobility. This may be a simple route to extending lifespan and improving function in old age.

  15. Reevaluation of whether a soma–to–germ-line transformation extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Andrew Kekūpa'a; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Strome, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The germ lineage is considered to be immortal. In the quest to extend lifespan, a possible strategy is to drive germ-line traits in somatic cells, to try to confer some of the germ lineage’s immortality on the somatic body. Notably, a study in Caenorhabditis elegans suggested that expression of germ-line genes in the somatic cells of long-lived daf-2 mutants confers some of daf-2’s long lifespan. Specifically, mRNAs encoding components of C. elegans germ granules (P granules) were up-regulated in daf-2 mutant worms, and knockdown of individual P-granule and other germ-line genes in daf-2 young adults modestly reduced their lifespan. We investigated the contribution of a germ-line program to daf-2’s long lifespan and also tested whether other mutants known to express germ-line genes in their somatic cells are long-lived. Our key findings are as follows. (i) We could not detect P-granule proteins in the somatic cells of daf-2 mutants by immunostaining or by expression of a P-granule transgene. (ii) Whole-genome transcript profiling of animals lacking a germ line revealed that germ-line transcripts are not up-regulated in the soma of daf-2 worms compared with the soma of control worms. (iii) Simultaneous removal of multiple P-granule proteins or the entire germ-line program from daf-2 worms did not reduce their lifespan. (iv) Several mutants that robustly express a broad spectrum of germ-line genes in their somatic cells are not long-lived. Together, our findings argue against the hypothesis that acquisition of a germ-cell program in somatic cells increases lifespan and contributes to daf-2’s long lifespan. PMID:26976573

  16. Acidic Food pH Increases Palatability and Consumption and Extends Drosophila Lifespan12

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sonali A; Yamada, Ryuichi; Mak, Christine M; Hunter, Brooke; Obando, Alina Soto; Hoxha, Sany; Ja, William W

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the prevalent use of Drosophila as a model in studies of nutrition, the effects of fundamental food properties, such as pH, on animal health and behavior are not well known. Objectives: We examined the effect of food pH on adult Drosophila lifespan, feeding behavior, and microbiota composition and tested the hypothesis that pH-mediated changes in palatability and total consumption are required for modulating longevity. Methods: We measured the effect of buffered food (pH 5, 7, or 9) on male gustatory responses (proboscis extension), total food intake, and male and female lifespan. The effect of food pH on germfree male lifespan was also assessed. Changes in fly-associated microbial composition as a result of food pH were determined by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Male gustatory responses, total consumption, and male and female longevity were additionally measured in the taste-defective Pox neuro (Poxn) mutant and its transgenic rescue control. Results: An acidic diet increased Drosophila gustatory responses (40–230%) and food intake (5–50%) and extended survival (10–160% longer median lifespan) compared with flies on either neutral or alkaline pH food. Alkaline food pH shifted the composition of fly-associated bacteria and resulted in greater lifespan extension (260% longer median survival) after microbes were eliminated compared with flies on an acidic (50%) or neutral (130%) diet. However, germfree flies lived longer on an acidic diet (5–20% longer median lifespan) compared with those on either neutral or alkaline pH food. Gustatory responses, total consumption, and longevity were unaffected by food pH in Poxn mutant flies. Conclusions: Food pH can directly influence palatability and feeding behavior and affect parameters such as microbial growth to ultimately affect Drosophila lifespan. Fundamental food properties altered by dietary or drug interventions may therefore contribute to changes in animal physiology, metabolism, and

  17. Acidic Food pH Increases Palatability and Consumption and Extends Drosophila Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sonali A; Yamada, Ryuichi; Mak, Christine M; Hunter, Brooke; Soto Obando, Alina; Hoxha, Sany; Ja, William W

    2015-12-01

    Despite the prevalent use of Drosophila as a model in studies of nutrition, the effects of fundamental food properties, such as pH, on animal health and behavior are not well known. We examined the effect of food pH on adult Drosophila lifespan, feeding behavior, and microbiota composition and tested the hypothesis that pH-mediated changes in palatability and total consumption are required for modulating longevity. We measured the effect of buffered food (pH 5, 7, or 9) on male gustatory responses (proboscis extension), total food intake, and male and female lifespan. The effect of food pH on germfree male lifespan was also assessed. Changes in fly-associated microbial composition as a result of food pH were determined by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Male gustatory responses, total consumption, and male and female longevity were additionally measured in the taste-defective Pox neuro (Poxn) mutant and its transgenic rescue control. An acidic diet increased Drosophila gustatory responses (40-230%) and food intake (5-50%) and extended survival (10-160% longer median lifespan) compared with flies on either neutral or alkaline pH food. Alkaline food pH shifted the composition of fly-associated bacteria and resulted in greater lifespan extension (260% longer median survival) after microbes were eliminated compared with flies on an acidic (50%) or neutral (130%) diet. However, germfree flies lived longer on an acidic diet (5-20% longer median lifespan) compared with those on either neutral or alkaline pH food. Gustatory responses, total consumption, and longevity were unaffected by food pH in Poxn mutant flies. Food pH can directly influence palatability and feeding behavior and affect parameters such as microbial growth to ultimately affect Drosophila lifespan. Fundamental food properties altered by dietary or drug interventions may therefore contribute to changes in animal physiology, metabolism, and survival. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Reevaluation of whether a soma-to-germ-line transformation extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Andrew Kekūpa'a; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Strome, Susan

    2016-03-29

    The germ lineage is considered to be immortal. In the quest to extend lifespan, a possible strategy is to drive germ-line traits in somatic cells, to try to confer some of the germ lineage's immortality on the somatic body. Notably, a study in Caenorhabditis elegans suggested that expression of germ-line genes in the somatic cells of long-lived daf-2 mutants confers some of daf-2's long lifespan. Specifically, mRNAs encoding components of C. elegans germ granules (P granules) were up-regulated in daf-2 mutant worms, and knockdown of individual P-granule and other germ-line genes in daf-2 young adults modestly reduced their lifespan. We investigated the contribution of a germ-line program to daf-2's long lifespan and also tested whether other mutants known to express germ-line genes in their somatic cells are long-lived. Our key findings are as follows. (i) We could not detect P-granule proteins in the somatic cells of daf-2 mutants by immunostaining or by expression of a P-granule transgene. (ii) Whole-genome transcript profiling of animals lacking a germ line revealed that germ-line transcripts are not up-regulated in the soma of daf-2 worms compared with the soma of control worms. (iii) Simultaneous removal of multiple P-granule proteins or the entire germ-line program from daf-2 worms did not reduce their lifespan. (iv) Several mutants that robustly express a broad spectrum of germ-line genes in their somatic cells are not long-lived. Together, our findings argue against the hypothesis that acquisition of a germ-cell program in somatic cells increases lifespan and contributes to daf-2's long lifespan.

  19. Extended life-span conferred by cotransporter gene mutations in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Rogina, B; Reenan, R A; Nilsen, S P; Helfand, S L

    2000-12-15

    Aging is genetically determined and environmentally modulated. In a study of longevity in the adult fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, we found that five independent P-element insertional mutations in a single gene resulted in a near doubling of the average adult life-span without a decline in fertility or physical activity. Sequence analysis revealed that the product of this gene, named Indy (for I'm not dead yet), is most closely related to a mammalian sodium dicarboxylate cotransporter-a membrane protein that transports Krebs cycle intermediates. Indy was most abundantly expressed in the fat body, midgut, and oenocytes: the principal sites of intermediary metabolism in the fly. Excision of the P element resulted in a reversion to normal life-span. These mutations may create a metabolic state that mimics caloric restriction, which has been shown to extend life-span.

  20. Sesamin extends lifespan through pathways related to dietary restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yumiko; Yaguchi, Yukie; Komura, Tomomi; Nakadai, Masakazu; Terao, Kenji; Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-26

    Sesamin, a polyphenolic compound found in sesame seeds, has been reported to exert a variety of beneficial health effects. We have previously reported that sesamin increases the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the longevity effect of sesamin in C. elegans. Starting from three days of age, Caenorhabditis elegans animals were fed a standard diet alone or supplemented with sesamin. A C. elegans genome array was used to perform a comprehensive expression analysis. Genes that showed differential expression were validated using real-time PCR. Mutant or RNAi-treated animals were fed sesamin, and the lifespan was determined to identify the genes involved in the longevity effects of sesamin. The microarray analysis revealed that endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response-related genes, which have been reported to show decreased expression under conditions of SIR-2.1/Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) overexpression, were downregulated in animals supplemented with sesamin. Sesamin failed to extend the lifespan of sir-2.1 knockdown animals and of sir-2.1 loss-of-function mutants. Sesamin was also ineffective in bec-1 RNAi-treated animals; bec-1 is a key regulator of autophagy, and is necessary for longevity induced by sir-2.1 overexpression. Furthermore, the heterozygotic mutation of daf-15, which encodes the target of rapamycin (TOR)-binding partner Raptor, abolished lifespan extension by sesamin. Moreover, sesamin did not prolong the lifespan of loss-of-function mutants of aak-2, which encodes the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Sesamin extends the lifespan of C. elegans through several dietary restriction-related signaling pathways, including processes requiring SIRT1, TOR, and AMPK.

  1. Development of bioartificial renal tubule devices with lifespan-extended human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sanechika, Noriyuki; Sawada, Kaichiro; Usui, Yukio; Hanai, Kazuya; Kakuta, Takatoshi; Suzuki, Hajime; Kanai, Genta; Fujimura, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Tun Aung; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Terachi, Toshiro; Saito, Akira

    2011-09-01

    The bioartificial renal tubule device is a cell therapy system for renal failure. The major obstacle in the development of the bioartificial renal tubule device is the obtainment of a large number of viable renal tubule cells to seed on the inner surface of hollow fibers. Although our previous studies had used a transformed cell line, they may be dangerous for clinical uses. Therefore, different approaches to amplify renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC) in culture without oncogenes, vectors and carcinogens have been required. The limitation of the replicative lifespan of human RPTEC, which is ∼12 population doublings (PDs), was extended by invalidating messenger RNA of cell cycle-related genes with antisense oligonucleotide or small interfering RNA (siRNA). Periodic transfection of siRNA to a tumor suppressor p53 or a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4a) extended the lifespan by 33 and 63 PDs, respectively, in 3 months of culture. The siRNA-mediated lifespan extension was controllable because cell division ceased within 2 weeks after the transfection was discontinued. Expressions of γ-glutamyltransferase 1 and glucose transporter 1 were recovered in siRNA-transfected RPTEC cultured on porous membranes. Bioartificial renal tubule devices (0.8 m(2)) constructed with these cells showed reabsorption of water (122.3 ± 4.2 mL/30 min), sodium (18.1 ± 0.7 mEq/30 min) and glucose (121.7 ± 4.4 mg/30 min) after 1 week of circulation. Furthermore, β2-microglobulin and pentosidine were metabolized by RPTEC in mini-devices (65 cm(2)) within 48 h of circulation. These approaches enabled us to yield a high enough number of RPTEC for construction of bioartificial renal tubule devices repeatedly. Lifespan-extended RPTEC could recover their specific characteristics by culturing on porous membranes, and bioartificial renal tubule devices constructed with these cells showed good performances of reabsorption and metabolism. A large number of human renal tubular

  2. Lifespan-Extending Effects of Royal Jelly and Its Related Substances on the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Yoko; Fujita, Yasunori; Maruyama, Hiroe; Araki, Yoko; Ichihara, Kenji; Sato, Akira; Kojima, Toshio; Tanaka, Masashi; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Ito, Masafumi; Honda, Shuji

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the most important challenges in the study of aging is to discover compounds with longevity-promoting activities and to unravel their underlying mechanisms. Royal jelly (RJ) has been reported to possess diverse beneficial properties. Furthermore, protease-treated RJ (pRJ) has additional pharmacological activities. Exactly how RJ and pRJ exert these effects and which of their components are responsible for these effects are largely unknown. The evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that control longevity have been indicated. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether RJ and its related substances exert a lifespan-extending function in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and to gain insights into the active agents in RJ and their mechanism of action. Principal Findings We found that both RJ and pRJ extended the lifespan of C. elegans. The lifespan-extending activity of pRJ was enhanced by Octadecyl-silica column chromatography (pRJ-Fraction 5). pRJ-Fr.5 increased the animals' lifespan in part by acting through the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, the activation of which is known to promote longevity in C. elegans by reducing insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS). pRJ-Fr.5 reduced the expression of ins-9, one of the insulin-like peptide genes. Moreover, pRJ-Fr.5 and reduced IIS shared some common features in terms of their effects on gene expression, such as the up-regulation of dod-3 and the down-regulation of dod-19, dao-4 and fkb-4. 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA), which was present at high concentrations in pRJ-Fr.5, increased lifespan independently of DAF-16 activity. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that RJ and its related substances extend lifespan in C. elegans, suggesting that RJ may contain longevity-promoting factors. Further analysis and characterization of the lifespan-extending agents in RJ and pRJ may broaden our understanding of the gene network involved in longevity regulation in diverse species and may

  3. Glycerol extends lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera) and protects against stressors

    PubMed Central

    Snell, Terry W.; Johnston, Rachel K.

    2014-01-01

    Diet has profound effects on animal longevity and manipulation of nutrient sensing pathways is one of the primary interventions capable of lifespan extension. This often is done through caloric restriction (CR) and a variety of CR mimics have been identified that produce life extending effects without adhering to the rigorous CR dietary regimen. Glycerol is a dietary supplement capable mimicking CR by shifting metabolism away from glycolysis and towards oxidative phosphorylation. Glycerol supplementation has a number of beneficial effects, including lifespan extension, improved stress resistance, and enhanced locomotory and mitochondria activity in older age classes. Using rotifers as a model, we show that supplements of 150–300 mM glycerol produced 40–50% extension of mean lifespan. This effect was produced by raising glycerol concentration only three times higher than its baseline concentration in rotifer tissues. Glycerol supplementation decreased rotifer reliance on glycolysis and reduced the pro-aging effects of glucose. Glycerol also acted as a chemical chaperone, mitigating damage by protein aggregation. Glycerol treatment improved rotifer swimming performance in older age classes and maintained more mitochondrial activity. Glycerol treatment provided increased resistance to starvation, heat, oxidation, and osmotic stress, but not UV stress. When glycerol was co-administered with the hexokinase inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose, the lifespan extending effect of glycerol was enhanced. Co-administration of glycerol with inhibitors like 2- deoxyglucose can lower their efficacious doses, thereby reducing their toxic side effects. PMID:24835191

  4. Lifespan Extending and Stress Resistant Properties of Vitexin from Vigna angularis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Byeol; Kim, Jun Hyeong; Cha, Youn-Soo; Kim, Mina; Song, Seuk Bo; Cha, Dong Seok; Jeon, Hoon; Eun, Jae Soon; Han, Sooncheon; Kim, Dae Keun

    2015-01-01

    Several theories emphasize that aging is closely related to oxidative stress and disease. The formation of excess ROS can lead to DNA damage and the acceleration of aging. Vigna angularis is one of the important medicinal plants in Korea. We isolated vitexin from V. angularis and elucidated the lifespan-extending effect of vitexin using the Caenorhabditis elegans model system. Vitexin showed potent lifespan extensive activity and it elevated the survival rates of nematodes against the stressful environments including heat and oxidative conditions. In addition, our results showed that vitexin was able to elevate antioxidant enzyme activities of worms and reduce intracellular ROS accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. These studies demonstrated that the increased stress tolerance of vitexin-mediated nematode could be attributed to increased expressions of stress resistance proteins such as superoxide dismutase (SOD-3) and heat shock protein (HSP-16.2). In this work, we also studied whether vitexin-mediated longevity activity was associated with aging-related factors such as progeny, food intake, growth and movement. The data revealed that these factors were not affected by vitexin treatment except movement. Vitexin treatment improved the body movement of aged nematode, suggesting vitexin affects healthspan as well as lifespan of nematode. These results suggest that vitexin might be a probable candidate which could extend the human lifespan. PMID:26535084

  5. Glycerol extends lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera) and protects against stressors.

    PubMed

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K

    2014-09-01

    Diet has profound effects on animal longevity and manipulation of nutrient sensing pathways is one of the primary interventions capable of lifespan extension. This often is done through caloric restriction (CR) and a variety of CR mimics have been identified that produce life extending effects without adhering to the rigorous CR dietary regimen. Glycerol is a dietary supplement capable mimicking CR by shifting metabolism away from glycolysis and towards oxidative phosphorylation. Glycerol supplementation has a number of beneficial effects, including lifespan extension, improved stress resistance, and enhanced locomotory and mitochondria activity in older age classes. Using rotifers as a model, we show that supplements of 150-300mM glycerol produced 40-50% extension of mean lifespan. This effect was produced by raising glycerol concentration only three times higher than its baseline concentration in rotifer tissues. Glycerol supplementation decreased rotifer reliance on glycolysis and reduced the pro-aging effects of glucose. Glycerol also acted as a chemical chaperone, mitigating damage by protein aggregation. Glycerol treatment improved rotifer swimming performance in older age classes and maintained more mitochondrial activity. Glycerol treatment provided increased resistance to starvation, heat, oxidation, and osmotic stress, but not UV stress. When glycerol was co-administered with the hexokinase inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose, the lifespan extending effect of glycerol was enhanced. Co-administration of glycerol with inhibitors like 2-deoxyglucose can lower their efficacious doses, thereby reducing their toxic side effects.

  6. GDF11 administration does not extend lifespan in a mouse model of premature aging

    PubMed Central

    Freitas-Rodríguez, Sandra; Rodríguez, Francisco; Folgueras, Alicia R.

    2016-01-01

    GDF11 has recently emerged as a powerful anti-aging candidate, found in young blood, capable of rejuvenating a number of aged tissues, such as heart, skeletal muscle and brain. However, recent reports have shown contradictory data questioning its capacity to reverse age-related tissue dysfunction. The availability of a mouse model of accelerated aging, which shares most of the features occurring in physiological aging, gives us an excellent opportunity to test in vivo therapies aimed at extending lifespan both in pathological and normal aging. On this basis, we wondered whether the proposed anti-aging functions of GDF11 would have an overall effect on longevity. We first confirmed the existence of a reduction in GDF11/8 levels in our mouse model of accelerated aging compared with wild-type littermates. However, we show herein that GDF11 daily administration does not extend lifespan of premature-aged mice. PMID:27507054

  7. Chlorogenic Acid Extends the Lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans via Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shan-Qing; Huang, Xiao-Bing; Xing, Ti-Kun; Ding, Ai-Jun; Wu, Gui-Sheng; Luo, Huai-Rong

    2017-04-01

    Coffee and tea, two of the most popular drinks around the world, share many in common from chemical components to beneficial effects on human health. One of their shared components, the polyphenols, most notably chlorogenic acid (CGA), was supposed to account for many of the beneficial effects on ameliorating diseases occurred accompanying people aging, such as the antioxidant effect and against diabetes and cardiovascular disease. CGA is also present in many traditional Chinese medicines. However, the mechanism of these effects was vague. The aging signaling pathways were conservative from yeast and worms to mammals. So, we tested if CGA had an effect on aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that CGA could extend the lifespan of C. elegans by up to 20.1%, delay the age-related decline of body movement, and improve stress resistance. We conducted genetic analysis with a series of worm mutants and found that CGA could extend the lifespan of the mutants of eat-2, glp-1, and isp-1, but not of daf-2, pdk-1, akt-1, akt-2, sgk-1, and clk-1. CGA could activate the FOXO transcription factors DAF-16, HSF-1, SKN-1, and HIF-1, but not SIR-2.1. Taken together, CGA might extend the lifespan of C. elegans mainly via DAF-16 in insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Tenebrio molitor Extracts Modulate the Response to Environmental Stressors and Extend Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Won, Seong-Min; Cha, Hye-Uk; Yi, Sun Shin; Kim, Sung-Jo; Park, Sang-Kyu

    2016-09-08

    Tenebrio molitor are large insects and their larvae are consumed as food in many countries. The nutritional composition of T. molitor has been studied and contains high amounts of proteins, unsaturated fatty acids, and valuable minerals. However, the bioactivity of T. molitor has not been fully understood. We examined the effects of T. molitor extracts on resistance to oxidative stress and organism's lifespan using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system. The response to heat shock and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was monitored in vivo. The extracts from T. molitor showed significant effects on resistance to oxidative stress and UV irradiation and extend both mean and maximum lifespan of C. elegans. The number of progeny produced significantly increased in animals supplemented with T. molitor extracts. In addition, the expression of hsp-16.2 and sod-3 was markedly upregulated by supplementation with T. molitor extracts. These findings suggest that T. molitor extracts can increase response to stressors and extend lifespan by the induction of longevity assurance genes in C. elegans.

  9. The normative dimensions of extending the human lifespan by age-related biomedical innovations.

    PubMed

    Ehni, Hans-Joerg; Marckmann, Georg

    2008-10-01

    The current normative debate on age-related biomedical innovations and the extension of the human lifespan has important shortcomings. Mainly, the complexity of the different normative dimensions relevant for ethical and/or juridicial norms is not fully developed and the normative quality of teleological and deontological arguments is not properly distinguished. This article addresses some of these shortcomings and develops the outline of a more comprehensive normative framework covering all relevant dimensions. Such a frame necessarily has to include conceptions of a good life on the individual and societal levels. Furthermore, as a third dimension, a model for the access to and the just distribution of age-related biomedical innovations and technologies extending the human lifespan will be developed. It is argued that such a model has to include the different levels of the general philosophical theories of distributive justice, including social rights and theories of just health care. Furthermore, it has to show how these theories can be applied to the problem area of aging and extending the human lifespan.

  10. Preventing age-related decline of gut compartmentalization limits microbiota dysbiosis and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Summary Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan. PMID:26867182

  11. Suppression of transcriptional drift extends C. elegans lifespan by postponing the onset of mortality.

    PubMed

    Rangaraju, Sunitha; Solis, Gregory M; Thompson, Ryan C; Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L; Kurian, Leo; Encalada, Sandra E; Niculescu, Alexander B; Salomon, Daniel R; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Longevity mechanisms increase lifespan by counteracting the effects of aging. However, whether longevity mechanisms counteract the effects of aging continually throughout life, or whether they act during specific periods of life, preventing changes that precede mortality is unclear. Here, we uncover transcriptional drift, a phenomenon that describes how aging causes genes within functional groups to change expression in opposing directions. These changes cause a transcriptome-wide loss in mRNA stoichiometry and loss of co-expression patterns in aging animals, as compared to young adults. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, we show that extending lifespan by inhibiting serotonergic signals by the antidepressant mianserin attenuates transcriptional drift, allowing the preservation of a younger transcriptome into an older age. Our data are consistent with a model in which inhibition of serotonergic signals slows age-dependent physiological decline and the associated rise in mortality levels exclusively in young adults, thereby postponing the onset of major mortality.

  12. Preventing Age-Related Decline of Gut Compartmentalization Limits Microbiota Dysbiosis and Extends Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan.

  13. Establishment of a protocol to extend the lifespan of human hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma cells.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Aurora; Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Nanni, Simona; Sesta, Antonella; Ferraú, Francesco; Grassi, Claudio; Losa, Marco; Trimarchi, Francesco; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Cannavò, Salvatore; Pecori Giraldi, Francesca; Farsetti, Antonella

    2017-04-26

    The aim of this study was to generate immortalized human anterior pituitary adenoma cells. Reliable cell models for the study of human pituitary adenomas are as yet lacking and studies performed so far used repeated passaging of freshly excised adenomas, with the attendant limitations due to limited survival in culture, early senescence, and poor reproducibility. We devised a technique based upon repeated co-transfections of two retroviral vectors, one carrying the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT, the other SV40 large T antigen. This approach extended the lifespan of cells derived from a human growth hormone-secreting adenoma up to 18 months while retaining morphology of primary cells, growth hormone synthesis and growth hormone secretion. Our attempt represents the first demonstration of successful lifespan extension of human growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma cells via co-transfection of hTERT and SV40T and paves the way to future attempts to obtain stable cell lines.

  14. Genetic perturbation of key central metabolic genes extends lifespan in Drosophila and affects response to dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Talbert, Matthew E.; Barnett, Brittany; Hoff, Robert; Amella, Maria; Kuczynski, Kate; Lavington, Erik; Koury, Spencer; Brud, Evgeny; Eanes, Walter F.

    2015-01-01

    There is a connection between nutrient inputs, energy-sensing pathways, lifespan variation and aging. Despite the role of metabolic enzymes in energy homeostasis and their metabolites as nutrient signals, little is known about how their gene expression impacts lifespan. In this report, we use P-element mutagenesis in Drosophila to study the effect on lifespan of reductions in expression of seven central metabolic enzymes, and contrast the effects on normal diet and dietary restriction. The major observation is that for five of seven genes, the reduction of gene expression extends lifespan on one or both diets. Two genes are involved in redox balance, and we observe that lower activity genotypes significantly extend lifespan. The hexokinases also show extension of lifespan with reduced gene activity. Since both affect the ATP/ADP ratio, this connects with the role of AMP-activated protein kinase as an energy sensor in regulating lifespan and mediating caloric restriction. These genes possess significant expression variation in natural populations, and our experimental genotypes span this level of natural activity variation. Our studies link the readout of energy state with the perturbation of the genes of central metabolism and demonstrate their effect on lifespan. PMID:26378219

  15. Genetic perturbation of key central metabolic genes extends lifespan in Drosophila and affects response to dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Matthew E; Barnett, Brittany; Hoff, Robert; Amella, Maria; Kuczynski, Kate; Lavington, Erik; Koury, Spencer; Brud, Evgeny; Eanes, Walter F

    2015-09-22

    There is a connection between nutrient inputs, energy-sensing pathways, lifespan variation and aging. Despite the role of metabolic enzymes in energy homeostasis and their metabolites as nutrient signals, little is known about how their gene expression impacts lifespan. In this report, we use P-element mutagenesis in Drosophila to study the effect on lifespan of reductions in expression of seven central metabolic enzymes, and contrast the effects on normal diet and dietary restriction. The major observation is that for five of seven genes, the reduction of gene expression extends lifespan on one or both diets. Two genes are involved in redox balance, and we observe that lower activity genotypes significantly extend lifespan. The hexokinases also show extension of lifespan with reduced gene activity. Since both affect the ATP/ADP ratio, this connects with the role of AMP-activated protein kinase as an energy sensor in regulating lifespan and mediating caloric restriction. These genes possess significant expression variation in natural populations, and our experimental genotypes span this level of natural activity variation. Our studies link the readout of energy state with the perturbation of the genes of central metabolism and demonstrate their effect on lifespan. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. A persistent level of Cisd2 extends healthy lifespan and delays aging in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Yu; Chen, Yi-Fan; Wang, Chih-Hao; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Zhuang, Hui-Wen; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Liang-Kung; Kirby, Ralph; Wei, Yau-Huei; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Tsai, Ting-Fen

    2012-09-15

    The CISD2 gene, which is an evolutionarily conserved novel gene, encodes a transmembrane protein primarily associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane. Significantly, the CISD2 gene is located within the candidate region on chromosome 4q where a genetic component for human longevity has been mapped. Previously, we have shown that Cisd2 deficiency shortens lifespan resulting in premature aging in mice. Additionally, an age-dependent decrease in Cisd2 expression has been detected during normal aging. In this study, we demonstrate that a persistent level of Cisd2 achieved by transgenic expression in mice extends their median and maximum lifespan without any apparent deleterious side effects. Cisd2 also ameliorates age-associated degeneration of the skin, skeletal muscles and neurons. Moreover, Cisd2 protects mitochondria from age-associated damage and functional decline as well as attenuating the age-associated reduction in whole-body energy metabolism. These results suggest that Cisd2 is a fundamentally important regulator of lifespan and provide an experimental basis for exploring the candidacy of CISD2 in human longevity.

  17. Low-dose rapamycin extends lifespan in a mouse model of mtDNA depletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Stephanie; Yang, Hua; Sharma, Rohit; Javors, Martin; Skinner, Owen; Mootha, Vamsi; Hirano, Michio; Schon, Eric A

    2017-09-01

    Mitochondrial disorders affecting oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) are caused by mutations in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. One promising candidate for treatment is the drug rapamycin, which has been shown to extend lifespan in multiple animal models, and which was previously shown to ameliorate mitochondrial disease in a knock-out mouse model lacking a nuclear-encoded gene specifying an OxPhos structural subunit (Ndufs4). In that model, relatively high-dose intraperitoneal rapamycin extended lifespan and improved markers of neurological disease, via an unknown mechanism. Here, we administered low-dose oral rapamycin to a knock-in (KI) mouse model of authentic mtDNA disease, specifically, progressive mtDNA depletion syndrome, resulting from a mutation in the mitochondrial nucleotide salvage enzyme thymidine kinase 2 (TK2). Importantly, low-dose oral rapamycin was sufficient to extend Tk2KI/KI mouse lifespan significantly, and did so in the absence of detectable improvements in mitochondrial dysfunction. We found no evidence that rapamycin increased survival by acting through canonical pathways, including mitochondrial autophagy. However, transcriptomics and metabolomics analyses uncovered systemic metabolic changes pointing to a potential "rapamycin metabolic signature." These changes also implied that rapamycin may have enabled the Tk2KI/KI mice to utilize alternative energy reserves, and possibly triggered indirect signaling events that modified mortality through developmental reprogramming. From a therapeutic standpoint, our results support the possibility that low-dose rapamycin, while not targeting the underlying mtDNA defect, could represent a crucial therapy for the treatment of mtDNA-driven, and some nuclear DNA-driven, mitochondrial diseases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Target of rapamycin signalling mediates the lifespan-extending effects of dietary restriction by essential amino acid alteration.

    PubMed

    Emran, Sahar; Yang, Mingyao; He, Xiaoli; Zandveld, Jelle; Piper, Matthew D W

    2014-05-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), defined as a moderate reduction in food intake short of malnutrition, has been shown to extend healthy lifespan in a diverse range of organisms, from yeast to primates. Reduced signalling through the insulin/IGF-like (IIS) and Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signalling pathways also extend lifespan. InDrosophila melanogaster the lifespan benefits of DR can be reproduced by modulating only the essential amino acids in yeast based food. Here, we show that pharmacological downregulation of TOR signalling, but not reduced IIS, modulates the lifespan response to DR by amino acid alteration. Of the physiological responses flies exhibit upon DR, only increased body fat and decreased heat stress resistance phenotypes correlated with longevity via reduced TOR signalling. These data indicate that lowered dietary amino acids promote longevity via TOR, not by enhanced resistance to molecular damage, but through modified physiological conditions that favour fat accumulation.

  19. Target of rapamycin signalling mediates the lifespan-extending effects of dietary restriction by essential amino acid alteration

    PubMed Central

    Emran, Sahar; Yang, Mingyao; He, Xiaoli; Zandveld, Jelle; Piper, Matthew D. W.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), defined as a moderate reduction in food intake short of malnutrition, has been shown to extend healthy lifespan in a diverse range of organisms, from yeast to primates. Reduced signalling through the insulin/IGF-like (IIS) and Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signalling pathways also extend lifespan. In Drosophila melanogaster the lifespan benefits of DR can be reproduced by modulating only the essential amino acids in yeast based food. Here, we show that pharmacological downregulation of TOR signalling, but not reduced IIS, modulates the lifespan response to DR by amino acid alteration. Of the physiological responses flies exhibit upon DR, only increased body fat and decreased heat stress resistance phenotypes correlated with longevity via reduced TOR signalling. These data indicate that lowered dietary amino acids promote longevity via TOR, not by enhanced resistance to molecular damage, but through modified physiological conditions that favour fat accumulation. PMID:24861087

  20. Korean mistletoe (Viscum album coloratum) extract extends the lifespan of nematodes and fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin-Hae; An, Hyo-Sun; Jung, Yong Woo; Lee, Eun-Ji; Lee, Hye-Yeon; Choi, Eun-Seok; An, Seon Woo; Son, Heehwa; Lee, Seung-Jae; Kim, Jong-Bae; Min, Kyung-Jin

    2014-04-01

    Viscum album coloratum (Korean mistletoe) is a semi-parasitic plant that grows on various trees and has a variety of biological functions such as immunomodulation, apoptosis, and anti-tumor activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of Korean mistletoe extract (KME) on lifespan in experimental models using Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Supplementation of KME at 50 μg/ml extended the mean survival time by 9.61 and 19.86 % in worms and flies, respectively. The longevity benefit of KME was not due to reduced feeding, reproduction, and/or locomotion in flies and worms. The supplementation of KME also did not increase resistance to various stresses including heat shock, oxidative, or starvation stresses. Furthermore, KME did not further extend the lifespan of flies fed a dietary restricted diet but did increase the expression of Sir2, one of the target genes of dietary restriction, suggesting that KME may function as a putative dietary restriction mimetic. These results also suggest that the longevity promoting effects of KME may be an example of mild stress-induced hormesis.

  1. Crocus sativus L. protects against SDS‑induced intestinal damage and extends lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zonglin; Chen, Yuchen; Zhang, Hong; Jin, Li Hua

    2016-12-01

    Medicinal plants are important sources of potentially therapeutic biochemical drugs. Crocus sativus L. has been used to treat various diseases in China, the Republic of Korea and Japan. The present study investigated the protective effect of C. sativus L. extract in Drosophila melanogaster intestinal immunity. Wild‑type flies were fed standard cornmeal‑yeast medium and used as controls, and flies supplemented with 1% C. sativus L. aqueous extract in standard medium were used as the experimental group. Following the ingestion of the various toxic compounds, the survival rate of the flies was determined. Cell viability and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using 7‑amino‑actinomycin D and dihydroethidium staining, respectively. The present study demonstrated that aqueous extracts of C. sativus L. may significantly increase the lifespan and survival rate of adult flies. Additionally, C. sativus L. may decrease epithelial cell death and ROS levels, resulting in improved intestinal morphology. These findings indicated that C. sativus L. had a protective effect against intestinal injury and may extend the lifespan of Drosophila. Therefore, the findings of the present study may improve the understanding of clinical researchers on the complex effects of C. sativus L. in intestinal disorders.

  2. Suppression of transcriptional drift extends C. elegans lifespan by postponing the onset of mortality

    PubMed Central

    Rangaraju, Sunitha; Solis, Gregory M; Thompson, Ryan C; Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L; Kurian, Leo; Encalada, Sandra E; Niculescu, Alexander B; Salomon, Daniel R; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Longevity mechanisms increase lifespan by counteracting the effects of aging. However, whether longevity mechanisms counteract the effects of aging continually throughout life, or whether they act during specific periods of life, preventing changes that precede mortality is unclear. Here, we uncover transcriptional drift, a phenomenon that describes how aging causes genes within functional groups to change expression in opposing directions. These changes cause a transcriptome-wide loss in mRNA stoichiometry and loss of co-expression patterns in aging animals, as compared to young adults. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, we show that extending lifespan by inhibiting serotonergic signals by the antidepressant mianserin attenuates transcriptional drift, allowing the preservation of a younger transcriptome into an older age. Our data are consistent with a model in which inhibition of serotonergic signals slows age-dependent physiological decline and the associated rise in mortality levels exclusively in young adults, thereby postponing the onset of major mortality. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08833.001 PMID:26623667

  3. PGRP-SC2 promotes gut immune homeostasis to limit commensal dysbiosis and extend lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Linlin; Karpac, Jason; Tran, Susan L.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Summary Interactions between commensals and the host impact the metabolic and immune status of metazoans. Their deregulation is associated with age-related pathologies like chronic inflammation and cancer, especially in barrier epithelia. Maintaining a healthy commensal population by preserving innate immune homeostasis in such epithelia thus promises to promote health and longevity. Here we show that in the aging intestine of Drosophila, chronic activation of the transcription factor Foxo reduces expression of Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein SC2 (PGRP-SC2), a negative regulator of IMD/Relish innate immune signaling, and homologue of the anti-inflammatory molecules PGLYRP1-4. This repression causes deregulation of Rel/NFkB activity, resulting in commensal dysbiosis, stem cell hyperproliferation, and epithelial dysplasia. Restoring PGRP-SC2 expression in enterocytes of the intestinal epithelium, in turn, prevents dysbiosis, promotes tissue homeostasis and extends lifespan. Our results highlight the importance of commensal control for lifespan of metazoans, and identify SC-class PGRPs as longevity-promoting factors. PMID:24439372

  4. PGRP-SC2 promotes gut immune homeostasis to limit commensal dysbiosis and extend lifespan.

    PubMed

    Guo, Linlin; Karpac, Jason; Tran, Susan L; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-01-16

    Interactions between commensals and the host impact the metabolic and immune status of metazoans. Their deregulation is associated with age-related pathologies like chronic inflammation and cancer, especially in barrier epithelia. Maintaining a healthy commensal population by preserving innate immune homeostasis in such epithelia thus promises to promote health and longevity. Here, we show that, in the aging intestine of Drosophila, chronic activation of the transcription factor Foxo reduces expression of peptidoglycan recognition protein SC2 (PGRP-SC2), a negative regulator of IMD/Relish innate immune signaling, and homolog of the anti-inflammatory molecules PGLYRP1-4. This repression causes deregulation of Rel/NFkB activity, resulting in commensal dysbiosis, stem cell hyperproliferation, and epithelial dysplasia. Restoring PGRP-SC2 expression in enterocytes of the intestinal epithelium, in turn, prevents dysbiosis, promotes tissue homeostasis, and extends lifespan. Our results highlight the importance of commensal control for lifespan of metazoans and identify SC-class PGRPs as longevity-promoting factors.

  5. Debris-covered glaciers extend the lifespan of water supplies in the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardeux, Pierre; Glasser, Neil; Holt, Tom; Hubbard, Bryn

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers have a slower melting rate than clean-ice glaciers due to the insulating effect of their debris layer. In the European Alps, debris-covered glaciers have received little attention due to their small contribution to sea-level rise. However, glaciers provide water supplies for the five main watersheds draining the European Alps (Danube, Rhine, Rhone, Po and Adige, in order of size), an area inhabited by more than 145 million people (20% of Europe's population). It is unclear what volume of ice (and so quantity of potential meltwater) is affected by a debris layer, and what the effect of this layer is for water resources in the Alps. Combining the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI) and online imagery services, we calculated that more than 40% of ice volume in the Alps is influenced by debris cover. In this presentation, we will show the different elements leading to this number, including our evaluation of the RGI, the volume calculation method and what percentage of ice is actually covered (0.6 to 99% of glacier surface area). Our analysis has allowed a comprehensive understanding of the debris-covered glaciers in each watershed by revealing their distribution (i.e. where they will extend water supply lifespan), and hypsometry and equilibrium line altitude (how sensitive they are to climate change). The prolonged lifespan of water supply is visible at the scale of an individual debris-covered glacier: comparing the evolution of Glacier Noir and Glacier Blanc (France) over the last 150 years indicates that Glacier Noir (debris covered) has retained 2.5 times more ice than Glacier Blanc (clean-ice) under the same climatic conditions. The number of debris-covered glaciers will increase as the >1°C rise in temperature in the European Alps since the start of the 20th Century increases the instability of rock faces and scree slopes. The evolution of these glaciers is therefore likely to have a major impact on human populations. This work shows that

  6. Identification of the isomer of methionine sulfoximine that extends the lifespan of the SOD1 G93A mouse.

    PubMed

    Brusilow, William S A

    2017-04-24

    In previous studies methionine sulfoximine (MSO) significantly extended the lifespan of the SOD1 G93A mouse model for ALS. Those studies used commercially available MSO, which is a racemic mixture of the LS and LR diastereomers, leaving unanswered the question of which isomer was responsible for the therapeutic effects. In this study we tested both purified isomers and showed that the LS isomer, a well-characterized inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, extends the lifespan of these mice, but the LR isomer, which has no known activity, does not.

  7. Extending the lifespan and efficacies of immune cells used in adoptive transfer for cancer immunotherapies-A review.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Prokar; Galustian, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Cells used in adoptive cell-transfer immunotherapies against cancer include dendritic cells (DCs), natural-killer cells, and CD8(+) T-cells. These cells may have limited efficacy due to their lifespan, activity, and immunosuppressive effects of tumor cells. Therefore, increasing longevity and activity of these cells may boost their efficacy. Four cytokines that can extend immune effector-cell longevity are IL-2, IL-7, IL-21, and IL-15. This review will discuss current knowledge on effector-cell lifespans and the mechanisms by which IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 can extend effector-cell longevity. We will also discuss how lifespan and efficacy of these cells can be regulated to allow optimal clinical benefits.

  8. Acarbose, 17-α-estradiol, and nordihydroguaiaretic acid extend mouse lifespan preferentially in males.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David E; Strong, Randy; Allison, David B; Ames, Bruce N; Astle, Clinton M; Atamna, Hani; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Flurkey, Kevin; Javors, Martin A; Nadon, Nancy L; Nelson, James F; Pletcher, Scott; Simpkins, James W; Smith, Daniel; Wilkinson, J Erby; Miller, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    Four agents--acarbose (ACA), 17-α-estradiol (EST), nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), and methylene blue (MB)--were evaluated for lifespan effects in genetically heterogeneous mice tested at three sites. Acarbose increased male median lifespan by 22% (P < 0.0001), but increased female median lifespan by only 5% (P = 0.01). This sexual dimorphism in ACA lifespan effect could not be explained by differences in effects on weight. Maximum lifespan (90th percentile) increased 11% (P < 0.001) in males and 9% (P = 0.001) in females. EST increased male median lifespan by 12% (P = 0.002), but did not lead to a significant effect on maximum lifespan. The benefits of EST were much stronger at one test site than at the other two and were not explained by effects on body weight. EST did not alter female lifespan. NDGA increased male median lifespan by 8-10% at three different doses, with P-values ranging from 0.04 to 0.005. Females did not show a lifespan benefit from NDGA, even at a dose that produced blood levels similar to those in males, which did show a strong lifespan benefit. MB did not alter median lifespan of males or females, but did produce a small, statistically significant (6%, P = 0.004) increase in female maximum lifespan. These results provide new pharmacological models for exploring processes that regulate the timing of aging and late-life diseases, and in particular for testing hypotheses about sexual dimorphism in aging and health. © 2013 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Methyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate extends the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans, partly via W06A7.4 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Cai, Liang; Geng, Hai-Ju; Su, Chao-Fen; Yan, Li; Wang, Jia-Hui; Gao, Qin; Luo, Huan-Min

    2014-12-01

    To identify and analyze the compounds that delay aging and extend the lifespan is an important aspect of the gerontology research. A number of compounds, including the ones with the antioxidant properties, have been shown to extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we report that methyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (MDHB), a small antioxidant molecule, prolongs the C. elegans' lifespan under normal as well as stress conditions, delays the age-associated decline in the pharyngeal pumping rate, and obviously enhances the abilities of scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). To further investigate the mechanism underlying the anti-aging action of MDHB, microarray analyses were performed, which demonstrated that 13 genes were differentially expressed in worms treated with MDHB for 48 and 144 h in common. RNA interference of W06A7.4 (NM_001269697.1), the most significantly up-regulated gene, shortened the lifespan of worms by 14%, compared with the L4440 control. Our findings demonstrate that W06A7.4 is a potentially positive determinant of the MDHB induced C. elegans' lifespan extension effect.

  10. PGAM5 promotes lasting FoxO activation after developmental mitochondrial stress and extends lifespan in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Borch Jensen, Martin; Qi, Yanyan; Riley, Rebeccah; Rabkina, Liya; Jasper, Heinrich

    2017-09-11

    The mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) has been associated with long lifespan across metazoans. In Caenorhabditis elegans, mild developmental mitochondrial stress activates UPR(mt) reporters and extends lifespan. We show that similar developmental stress is necessary and sufficient to extend Drosophila lifespan, and identify Phosphoglycerate Mutase 5 (PGAM5) as a mediator of this response. Developmental mitochondrial stress leads to activation of FoxO, via Apoptosis Signal-regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) and Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK). This activation persists into adulthood and induces a select set of chaperones, many of which have been implicated in lifespan extension in flies. Persistent FoxO activation can be reversed by a high-protein diet in adulthood, through mTORC1 and GCN-2 activity. Accordingly, the observed lifespan extension is prevented on a high-protein diet and in FoxO-null flies. The diet-sensitivity of this pathway has important implications for interventions that seek to engage the UPR(mt) to improve metabolic health and longevity.

  11. PGAM5 promotes lasting FoxO activation after developmental mitochondrial stress and extends lifespan in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Borch Jensen, Martin; Qi, Yanyan; Riley, Rebeccah; Rabkina, Liya

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) has been associated with long lifespan across metazoans. In Caenorhabditis elegans, mild developmental mitochondrial stress activates UPRmt reporters and extends lifespan. We show that similar developmental stress is necessary and sufficient to extend Drosophila lifespan, and identify Phosphoglycerate Mutase 5 (PGAM5) as a mediator of this response. Developmental mitochondrial stress leads to activation of FoxO, via Apoptosis Signal-regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) and Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK). This activation persists into adulthood and induces a select set of chaperones, many of which have been implicated in lifespan extension in flies. Persistent FoxO activation can be reversed by a high-protein diet in adulthood, through mTORC1 and GCN-2 activity. Accordingly, the observed lifespan extension is prevented on a high-protein diet and in FoxO-null flies. The diet-sensitivity of this pathway has important implications for interventions that seek to engage the UPRmt to improve metabolic health and longevity. PMID:28891792

  12. FUdR extends the lifespan of the short-lived AP endonuclease mutant in Caenorhabditis elegans in a fertility-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuichi; Miyaji, Masahiro; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2017-03-17

    The anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and its metabolite 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUdR) inhibit thymidylate synthase and induce uracil bases in DNA. FUdR is commonly used for inhibiting fertility when measuring the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. However, it is not known whether DNA damage induced by FUdR affects lifespan. EXO-3 is an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease in C. elegans, and we reported previously that deletion of the exo-3 gene causes reproductive abnormalities and decreased lifespan. In this study, we found that FUdR extended the lifespan of exo-3 mutants. We measured the lifespan of multiple germline mutants to examine whether this lifespan extension effect was dependent on fertility. In the presence of a fem-1 mutation, which causes a deficiency in sperm production, FUdR did not extend the lifespan of the exo-3 mutant. In glp-1 mutants, which do not develop gonads, the exo-3 mutant was not short-lived, and FUdR did not extend its lifespan. These results suggest that the lifespan extension effect of FUdR depends on fertility and the presence of gonads. fem-3 mutants, which do not produce oocytes, had increased lifespan in the presence of FUdR, independent of the exo-3 mutation. It is possible that the fem-3 mutant was susceptible to the lifespan extension effect of FUdR. From these results, we suggest that FUdR affects the lifespan of C. elegans in two ways: by interfering with fertility, which extends lifespan, and by inducing DNA base damage, which reduces lifespan.

  13. Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): thermodynamics or gene regulation?

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Rachel K.; Snell, Terry W.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental temperature greatly affects lifespan in a wide variety of animals, but the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are still largely unknown. A moderate temperature decrease from 22°C to 16°C extends the lifespan of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas by up to 163%. Thermodynamic effects on metabolism contribute to this increase in longevity, but are not the only cause. When rotifers are exposed to 16°C for four days and then transfered to 22°C, they survive until day 13 at nearly identical rates as rotifers maintained at 16°C continuously. This persistence of the higher survival for nine days after transfer to 22°C suggests that low temperature exposure alters the expression of genes that affect the rate of aging. The relative persistence of the gene regulation effect suggests that it may play an even larger role in slowing aging than the thermodynamic effects. The life extending effects of these short-term low temperature treatments are largest when the exposure happens early in the life cycle, demonstrating the importance of early development. There is no advantage to lowering the temperature below 16°C to 11° or 5°C. Rotifers exposed to 16°C also displayed increased resistance to heat, starvation, oxidative and osmotic stress. Reproductive rates at 16°C were lower than those at 22°C, but because they reproduce longer, there is no significant change in the lifetime fecundity of females. To investigate which genes contribute to these effects, the expression of specific temperature sensing genes was knocked down using RNAi. Of 12 genes tested, RNAi knockdown of four eliminated the survival enhancing effects of the four-day cold treatment: TRP7, forkhead box C, Y-box factor, and ribosomal protein S6. This demonstrates that active gene regulation is an important factor in temperature mediated life extension, and that these particular genes play an integral role in these pathways. As a thermoresponsive sensor, TRP7 may be

  14. Moderately lower temperatures greatly extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera): Thermodynamics or gene regulation?

    PubMed

    Johnston, Rachel K; Snell, Terry W

    2016-06-01

    Environmental temperature greatly affects lifespan in a wide variety of animals, but the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are still largely unknown. A moderate temperature decrease from 22°C to 16°C extends the lifespan of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas by up to 163%. Thermodynamic effects on metabolism contribute to this increase in longevity, but are not the only cause. When rotifers are exposed to 16°C for four days and then transfered to 22°C, they survive until day 13 at nearly identical rates as rotifers maintained at 16°C continuously. This persistence of the higher survival for nine days after transfer to 22°C suggests that low temperature exposure alters the expression of genes that affect the rate of aging. The relative persistence of the gene regulation effect suggests that it may play an even larger role in slowing aging than the thermodynamic effects. The life extending effects of these short-term low temperature treatments are largest when the exposure happens early in the life cycle, demonstrating the importance of early development. There is no advantage to lowering the temperature below 16°C to 11° or 5°C. Rotifers exposed to 16°C also displayed increased resistance to heat, starvation, oxidative and osmotic stress. Reproductive rates at 16°C were lower than those at 22°C, but because they reproduce longer, there is no significant change in the lifetime fecundity of females. To investigate which genes contribute to these effects, the expression of specific temperature sensing genes was knocked down using RNAi. Of 12 genes tested, RNAi knockdown of four eliminated the survival enhancing effects of the four-day cold treatment: TRP7, forkhead box C, Y-box factor, and ribosomal protein S6. This demonstrates that active gene regulation is an important factor in temperature mediated life extension, and that these particular genes play an integral role in these pathways. As a thermoresponsive sensor, TRP7 may be

  15. A Steroidal Saponin from Ophiopogon japonicus Extends the Lifespan of Yeast via the Pathway Involved in SOD and UTH1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kaiyue; Cao, Shining; Pei, Liang; Matsuura, Akira; Xiang, Lan; Qi, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Nolinospiroside F is a steroidal saponin isolated from Ophiopogon japonicus (O. japonicus). In this study, we found that nolinospiroside F significantly extends the replicative lifespan of K6001 yeast at doses of 1, 3 and 10 μM, indicating that it has an anti-aging effect. This may be attributed to its anti-oxidative effect, as nolinospiroside F could increase yeast survival under oxidative stress conditions and decrease the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), an oxidative stress biomarker. It could also increase anti-oxidative stress genes, SOD1 and SOD2, expression, and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD). It increase the activity of SIRT1, an upstream inducer of SOD2 expression. In sod1 and sod2 mutant yeast strains, nolinospiroside F failed to extend their replicative lifespan. These results indicate that SOD participates in the anti-aging effect of nolinospiroside F. Furthermore, nolinospiroside F inhibited the expression of UTH1, a yeast-aging gene that is involved in the oxidative stress of yeast, and failed to extend the replicative lifespan of uth1 or skn7 mutant yeast cells. SKN7 is the transcriptional activator of UTH1. We also demonstrate that SOD and UTH1 regulate each other’s expression. Together, these results suggest that SOD and UTH1 genes are required for and play interactive roles in nolinospiroside F-mediated yeast lifespan extension. PMID:23439553

  16. 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic Acid, the Major Lipid Component of Royal Jelly, Extends the Lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans through Dietary Restriction and Target of Rapamycin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yoko; Araki, Yoko; Hata, Taketoshi; Ichihara, Kenji; Ito, Masafumi; Tanaka, Masashi; Honda, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) produced by honeybees has been reported to possess diverse health-beneficial properties and has been implicated to have a function in longevity across diverse species as well as honeybees. 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA), the major lipid component of RJ produced by honeybees, was previously shown to increase the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. The objective of this study is to elucidate signaling pathways that are involved in the lifespan extension by 10-HDA. 10-HDA further extended the lifespan of the daf-2 mutants, which exhibit long lifespan through reducing insulin-like signaling (ILS), indicating that 10-HDA extended lifespan independently of ILS. On the other hand, 10-HDA did not extend the lifespan of the eat-2 mutants, which show long lifespan through dietary restriction caused by a food-intake defect. This finding indicates that 10-HDA extends lifespan through dietary restriction signaling. We further found that 10-HDA did not extend the lifespan of the long-lived mutants in daf-15, which encodes Raptor, a target of rapamycin (TOR) components, indicating that 10-HDA shared some longevity control mechanisms with TOR signaling. Additionally, 10-HDA was found to confer tolerance against thermal and oxidative stress. 10-HDA increases longevity not through ILS but through dietary restriction and TOR signaling in C. elegans.

  17. Growth hormone-releasing hormone disruption extends lifespan and regulates response to caloric restriction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liou Y; Spong, Adam; Swindell, William R; Fang, Yimin; Hill, Cristal; Huber, Joshua A; Boehm, Jacob D; Westbrook, Reyhan; Salvatori, Roberto; Bartke, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We examine the impact of targeted disruption of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in mice on longevity and the putative mechanisms of delayed aging. GHRH knockout mice are remarkably long-lived, exhibiting major shifts in the expression of genes related to xenobiotic detoxification, stress resistance, and insulin signaling. These mutant mice also have increased adiponectin levels and alterations in glucose homeostasis consistent with the removal of the counter-insulin effects of growth hormone. While these effects overlap with those of caloric restriction, we show that the effects of caloric restriction (CR) and the GHRH mutation are additive, with lifespan of GHRH-KO mutants further increased by CR. We conclude that GHRH-KO mice feature perturbations in a network of signaling pathways related to stress resistance, metabolic control and inflammation, and therefore provide a new model that can be used to explore links between GHRH repression, downregulation of the somatotropic axis, and extended longevity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01098.001 PMID:24175087

  18. Beneficial effects of Glycyrrhizae radix extract in preventing oxidative damage and extending the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Qinli; Qiao, Yan; Zhao, Yunli; Xu, Yun; Wang, Meng; Duan, Jinao; Wang, Dayong

    2016-01-11

    Glycyrrhizae radix (GR) is a medicinal herb extensively used in traditional Chinese medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the pharmacological effect of GR and the possible mechanisms of GR, to provide a pharmacological basis in traditional medicine. In the present study, C. elegans (L1-larvae to young adults) was exposed to 0.12-0.24 g/mL of GR in 12-well sterile tissue culture plates at 20°C in the presence of food. Lethality, growth, lifespan, reproduction, locomotion, metabolism, intestinal autofluorescence, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production assays were performed to investigate the possible safety profile and beneficial effects of GR in these nematodes. We found that the lifespan of nematodes exposed to 0.18-0.24 g/mL of GR was extended. We then determined the mechanism of the longevity effect of GR using quantitative reverse transcription PCR and oxidative stress resistance assays induced by heat and paraquat. Prolonged exposure to 0.12-0.24 g/mL of GR did not induce lethality, alter body length, morphology or metabolism, affect brood size, locomotion, the development of D-type GABAergic motor neurons, or induce significant induction of intestinal autofluorescence and intestinal ROS production. In C. elegans, pretreatment with GR suppressed the damage due to heat-stress or oxidative stress induced by paraquat, a ROS generator, on lifespan, and inhibited the induction of intestinal ROS production induced by paraquat. Moreover, prolonged exposure to GR extended lifespan, increased locomotion and decreased intestinal ROS production in adult day-12 nematodes. Furthermore, prolonged exposure to GR significantly altered the expression patterns of genes encoding the insulin-like signaling pathway which had a key role in longevity control. Mutation of daf-16 gene encoding the FOXO transcription factor significantly decreased lifespan, suppressed locomotion, and increased intestinal ROS production in GR exposed adult nematodes. GR is relatively safe and has

  19. Lamotrigine and aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Simms, Kelley M; Kortepeter, Cindy; Avigan, Mark

    2012-03-20

    The purpose of this case series is to characterize a recently identified association of the antiepileptic drug (AED) lamotrigine with aseptic meningitis based on cases reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) database. We performed a data mining analysis of 9 AEDs from the FDA's AERS database. We applied the multi-item gamma Poisson shrinker (MGPS) algorithm to the entire AERS database through November 2, 2009, to generate empirical Bayes geometric mean (EBGM) values with corresponding confidence intervals for 9 AEDs and the adverse event code "meningitis aseptic." The AERS database was also searched for postmarketing reports of aseptic meningitis associated with lamotrigine and a detailed review of each case was performed. Forty AERS cases were identified in this review. Findings from the AERS reports revealed CSF profiles with features of both bacterial as well as viral meningitis. Fifteen cases documented a positive rechallenge; the median time to onset of symptoms upon rechallenge was only 60 minutes. Data mining analysis of several anticonvulsants resulted in disproportionate reporting solely for lamotrigine. There appears to be an association between lamotrigine use and aseptic meningitis. It is notable that nearly 40% of cases in this case series reported a positive rechallenge. Lamotrigine-associated aseptic meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of culture-negative meningitis. This case series highlights the need for continued pharmacovigilance and the importance of systematic monitoring of patients treated with antiepileptic medications.

  20. Lamotrigine in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jennifer G; Gitlin, Michael J; Altshuler, Lori L

    2013-07-01

    Owing to the prevalence of medication side effects and treatment resistance, prescribers often consider off-label uses of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved agents for the treatment of persistent symptoms. The authors review the available literature on the FDA-approved and non-FDA-approved uses of lamotrigine in adults with psychiatric disorders. We used PubMed, MEDLINE, and a hand search of relevant literature to find studies published between 1990 and 2012 and available in English language. The following keywords were searched: lamotrigine, psychiatric, mood disorders, depression, personality disorders, anxiety, schizophrenia, side effects, and rash. Data were selected from 29 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). When RCTs were not available, open-label trials (6), retrospective case reviews (10), and case series (4) were summarized. We extracted results of monotherapy and augmentation trials of lamotrigine on primary and secondary outcome measures. Lamotrigine is generally well tolerated, with the best evidence for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder, particularly in prevention of depressive episodes. In acute bipolar depression, meta-analyses suggested a modest benefit, especially for more severely depressed subjects, with switch rates similar to placebo. In unipolar depression, double-blind RCTs noted benefit on subsets of symptoms and improved response in more severely depressed subjects. Data are limited but promising in borderline personality disorder. Use of lamotrigine in schizophrenia and anxiety disorders has little supportive evidence. Lamotrigine is recommended in bipolar maintenance when depression is prominent. It also has a role in treating acute bipolar depression and unipolar depression, though the latter warrants more research. Data are too limited in other psychiatric disorders to recommend its use at this time. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. Mechanosensory Neuron Aging: Differential Trajectories with Lifespan-Extending Alaskan Berry and Fungal Treatments in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Scerbak, Courtney; Vayndorf, Elena M.; Hernandez, Alicia; McGill, Colin; Taylor, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    Many nutritional interventions that increase lifespan are also proposed to postpone age-related declines in motor and cognitive function. Potential sources of anti-aging compounds are the plants and fungi that have adapted to extreme environments. We studied the effects of four commonly consumed and culturally relevant Interior Alaska berry and fungus species (bog blueberry, lowbush cranberry, crowberry, and chaga) on the decline in overall health and neuron function and changes in touch receptor neuron morphology associated with aging. We observed increased wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and improved markers of healthspan upon treatment with Alaskan blueberry, lowbush cranberry, and chaga extracts. Interestingly, although all three treatments increased lifespan, they differentially affected the development of aberrant morphologies in touch receptor neurons. Blueberry treatments decreased anterior mechanosensory neuron (ALM) aberrations (i.e., extended outgrowths and abnormal cell bodies) while lowbush cranberry treatment increased posterior mechanosensory neuron (PLM) aberrations, namely process branching. Chaga treatment both decreased ALM aberrations (i.e., extended outgrowths) and increased PLM aberrations (i.e., process branching and loops). These results support the large body of knowledge positing that there are multiple cellular strategies and mechanisms for promoting health with age. Importantly, these results also demonstrate that although an accumulation of abnormal neuron morphologies is associated with aging and decreased health, not all of these morphologies are detrimental to neuronal and organismal health. PMID:27486399

  2. Benzimidazole derivative M084 extends the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans in a DAF-16/FOXO-dependent way.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ai-Jun; Wu, Gui-Sheng; Tang, Bin; Hong, Xuechuan; Zhu, Michael X; Luo, Huai-Rong

    2017-02-01

    With the growth of aging population, there is increasing demand to develop strategy to improve the aging process and aging-related diseases. Benzimidazole and its derivatives are crucial heterocyclic backbone of many drugs and compounds with diverse therapeutic applications, including alleviation of aging-related diseases. Here, we investigate if the benzimidazole derivative n-butyl-[1H]-benzimidazol-2-amine (M084), a novel inhibitor of TRPC4 and TRPC5 channels and antidepressant, could affect the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Our results showed that M084 could extend the lifespan of C. elegans, delay age-related decline of phenotypes, and improve stress resistance. M084 could not extend the lifespan of the loss-of-function mutants of daf-16, daf-2, pdk-1, aak-2, clk-1, isp-1, sir-2.1, and skn-1. M084 could decrease the ATP level and increase the gene expression of mitochondrial unfolded protein response factors. Thus, M084 might inhibit the mitochondrial respiration, activate mitochondrial unfolded protein response and AMPK, recruite SIR-2.1 and SKN-1, and finally through the transcription factor DAF-16, delay the aging process of C. elegans. Our findings reveal the new pharmaceutical potential of benzimidazole derivatives and provide clue for developing novel anti-aging agents.

  3. Lithocholic acid extends longevity of chronologically aging yeast only if added at certain critical periods of their lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Michelle T.; Kyryakov, Pavlo; Beach, Adam; Richard, Vincent R.; Koupaki, Olivia; Gomez-Perez, Alejandra; Leonov, Anna; Levy, Sean; Noohi, Forough; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2012-01-01

    Our studies revealed that LCA (lithocholic bile acid) extends yeast chronological lifespan if added to growth medium at the time of cell inoculation. We also demonstrated that longevity in chronologically aging yeast is programmed by the level of metabolic capacity and organelle organization that they developed before entering a quiescent state and, thus, that chronological aging in yeast is likely to be the final step of a developmental program progressing through at least one checkpoint prior to entry into quiescence. Here, we investigate how LCA influences longevity and several longevity-defining cellular processes in chronologically aging yeast if added to growth medium at different periods of the lifespan. We found that LCA can extend longevity of yeast under CR (caloric restriction) conditions only if added at either of two lifespan periods. One of them includes logarithmic and diauxic growth phases, whereas the other period exists in early stationary phase. Our findings suggest a mechanism linking the ability of LCA to increase the lifespan of CR yeast only if added at either of the two periods to its differential effects on various longevity-defining processes. In this mechanism, LCA controls these processes at three checkpoints that exist in logarithmic/diauxic, post-diauxic and early stationary phases. We therefore hypothesize that a biomolecular longevity network progresses through a series of checkpoints, at each of which (1) genetic, dietary and pharmacological anti-aging interventions modulate a distinct set of longevity-defining processes comprising the network; and (2) checkpoint-specific master regulators monitor and govern the functional states of these processes. PMID:22894934

  4. Liver specific expression of Cu/ZnSOD extends the lifespan of Sod1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Liu, Yuhong; Walsh, Michael; Bokov, Alex; Ikeno, Yuji; Jang, Young C; Perez, Viviana I; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan

    2016-03-01

    Genetic ablation of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) in mice (Sod1(-/-) mice) leads to shortened lifespan with a dramatic increase in hepatocellular carcinoma and accelerated aging phenotypes, including early onset sarcopenia. To study the tissue specific effects of oxidative stress in the Sod1(-/-) mice, we generated mice that only express the human SOD1 gene specifically in the liver of Sod1(-/-) mice (Sod1(-/-)/hSOD1(alb) mice). Expression of hSOD1 in the liver of Sod1(-/-) mice improved liver function, reduced oxidative damage in liver, and partially restored the expression of several genes involved in tumorigenesis, which are abnormally expressed in the livers of the Sod1(-/-) mice. However, liver specific expression of hSOD1 did not prevent the loss of body weight and muscle mass and alterations in the structure of neuromuscular junctions. The expression of hSOD1 in the liver of Sod1(-/-) mice significantly improved the lifespan of Sod1(-/-) mice; however, the lifespan of the Sod1(-/-)/hSOD1(alb) mice was still significantly shorter than wild type mice.

  5. A deuterohemin peptide extends lifespan and increases stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shuwen; Li, Pengfei; Luo, Jing; Li, Yuanyuan; Huang, Lei; Wang, Guan; Zhu, Limin; Fan, Hongkuan; Li, Wei; Wang, Liping

    2010-07-01

    This group has invented a novel deuterohemin containing peptide deuterohemin-AlaHisThrValGluLys (DhHP-6), which has various biological activities including protection of murine ischemia reperfusion injury, improving cell survival and preventing apoptosis. It was hypothesized that DhHP-6 is beneficial on the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and increases their resistance to heat and oxidative stress. C. elegans were treated with different concentrations of DhHP-6. Survival time and sensitivity to heat and paraquat were investigated. The data demonstrated that the mean survival time of C. elegans was significantly increased (p < 0.05) in the DhHP-6 treated group compared with the control group. The maximum lifespan was not affected by DhHP-6 treatment. DhHP-6 improved the survival rate of C. elegans in the acute heat stress (35 degrees C) and rescued the C. elegans' sensitivity to paraquat in acute oxidative stress. Superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD-3) protein was up-regulated by DhHP-6 treatment. It was further demonstrated that stress resistance genes such as hsp-16.1, hsp-16.49 and sir-2.1 were regulated by DhHP-6. DAF-16 and SIR-2.1 genes are essential for the beneficial effect of DhHP-6. Therefore, the investigation into the beneficial effect of DhHP-6 on C. elegans' lifespan has the potential to develop novel drugs to prevent ageing.

  6. Extending standard testing period in honeybees to predict lifespan impacts of pesticides and heavy metals using dynamic energy budget modelling

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, H.; Lahive, E.; Horton, A. A.; Robinson, A. G.; Svendsen, C.; Rortais, A.; Dorne, J.- L.; Baas, J.; Spurgeon, D. J.; Heard, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Concern over reported honeybee (Apis mellifera spp.) losses has highlighted chemical exposure as a risk. Current laboratory oral toxicity tests in A. mellifera spp. use short-term, maximum 96 hour, exposures which may not necessarily account for chronic and cumulative toxicity. Here, we use extended 240 hour (10 day) exposures to examine seven agrochemicals and trace environmental pollutant toxicities for adult honeybees. Data were used to parameterise a dynamic energy budget model (DEBtox) to further examine potential survival effects up to 30 day and 90 day summer and winter worker lifespans. Honeybees were most sensitive to insecticides (clothianidin > dimethoate ≫ tau-fluvalinate), then trace metals/metalloids (cadmium, arsenic), followed by the fungicide propiconazole and herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). LC50s calculated from DEBtox parameters indicated a 27 fold change comparing exposure from 48 to 720 hours (summer worker lifespan) for cadmium, as the most time-dependent chemical as driven by slow toxicokinetics. Clothianidin and dimethoate exhibited more rapid toxicokinetics with 48 to 720 hour LC50s changes of <4 fold. As effects from long-term exposure may exceed those measured in short-term tests, future regulatory tests should extend to 96 hours as standard, with extension to 240 hour exposures further improving realism. PMID:27995934

  7. Lifespan-extending caloric restriction or mTOR inhibition impair adaptive immunity of old mice by distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Emily L; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J; Renkema, Kristin R; Ventevogel, Melissa S; Chew, Wade M; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L; Smithey, Megan J; Limesand, Kirsten H; Sempowski, Gregory D; Brooks, Heddwen L; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko

    2015-01-01

    Aging of the world population and a concomitant increase in age-related diseases and disabilities mandates the search for strategies to increase healthspan, the length of time an individual lives healthy and productively. Due to the age-related decline of the immune system, infectious diseases remain among the top 5–10 causes of mortality and morbidity in the elderly, and improving immune function during aging remains an important aspect of healthspan extension. Calorie restriction (CR) and more recently rapamycin (rapa) feeding have both been used to extend lifespan in mice. Preciously few studies have actually investigated the impact of each of these interventions upon in vivo immune defense against relevant microbial challenge in old organisms. We tested how rapa and CR each impacted the immune system in adult and old mice. We report that each intervention differentially altered T-cell development in the thymus, peripheral T-cell maintenance, T-cell function and host survival after West Nile virus infection, inducing distinct but deleterious consequences to the aging immune system. We conclude that neither rapa feeding nor CR, in the current form/administration regimen, may be optimal strategies for extending healthy immune function and, with it, lifespan. PMID:25424641

  8. Extending standard testing period in honeybees to predict lifespan impacts of pesticides and heavy metals using dynamic energy budget modelling.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, H; Lahive, E; Horton, A A; Robinson, A G; Svendsen, C; Rortais, A; Dorne, J-L; Baas, J; Spurgeon, D J; Heard, M S

    2016-12-20

    Concern over reported honeybee (Apis mellifera spp.) losses has highlighted chemical exposure as a risk. Current laboratory oral toxicity tests in A. mellifera spp. use short-term, maximum 96 hour, exposures which may not necessarily account for chronic and cumulative toxicity. Here, we use extended 240 hour (10 day) exposures to examine seven agrochemicals and trace environmental pollutant toxicities for adult honeybees. Data were used to parameterise a dynamic energy budget model (DEBtox) to further examine potential survival effects up to 30 day and 90 day summer and winter worker lifespans. Honeybees were most sensitive to insecticides (clothianidin > dimethoate ≫ tau-fluvalinate), then trace metals/metalloids (cadmium, arsenic), followed by the fungicide propiconazole and herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). LC50s calculated from DEBtox parameters indicated a 27 fold change comparing exposure from 48 to 720 hours (summer worker lifespan) for cadmium, as the most time-dependent chemical as driven by slow toxicokinetics. Clothianidin and dimethoate exhibited more rapid toxicokinetics with 48 to 720 hour LC50s changes of <4 fold. As effects from long-term exposure may exceed those measured in short-term tests, future regulatory tests should extend to 96 hours as standard, with extension to 240 hour exposures further improving realism.

  9. Every-other-day feeding extends lifespan but fails to delay many symptoms of aging in mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kan; Neff, Frauke; Markert, Astrid; Rozman, Jan; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Amarie, Oana Veronica; Becker, Lore; Brommage, Robert; Garrett, Lillian; Henzel, Kristin S; Hölter, Sabine M; Janik, Dirk; Lehmann, Isabelle; Moreth, Kristin; Pearson, Brandon L; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Ryan, Devon P; Schröder, Susanne; Treise, Irina; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Graw, Jochen; Ehninger, Gerhard; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Sandholzer, Michael; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten; Weiergräber, Marco; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Ehninger, Dan

    2017-07-24

    Dietary restriction regimes extend lifespan in various animal models. Here we show that longevity in male C57BL/6J mice subjected to every-other-day feeding is associated with a delayed onset of neoplastic disease that naturally limits lifespan in these animals. We compare more than 200 phenotypes in over 20 tissues in aged animals fed with a lifelong every-other-day feeding or ad libitum access to food diet to determine whether molecular, cellular, physiological and histopathological aging features develop more slowly in every-other-day feeding mice than in controls. We also analyze the effects of every-other-day feeding on young mice on shorter-term every-other-day feeding or ad libitum to account for possible aging-independent restriction effects. Our large-scale analysis reveals overall only limited evidence for a retardation of the aging rate in every-other-day feeding mice. The data indicate that every-other-day feeding-induced longevity is sufficiently explained by delays in life-limiting neoplastic disorders and is not associated with a more general slowing of the aging process in mice.Dietary restriction can extend the life of various model organisms. Here, Xie et al. show that intermittent periods of fasting achieved through every-other-day feeding protect mice against neoplastic disease but do not broadly delay organismal aging in animals.

  10. Conditional abrogation of Atm in osteoclasts extends osteoclast lifespan and results in reduced bone mass.

    PubMed

    Hirozane, Toru; Tohmonda, Takahide; Yoda, Masaki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Kanai, Yae; Matsumoto, Morio; Morioka, Hideo; Nakamura, Masaya; Horiuchi, Keisuke

    2016-09-28

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase is a central component involved in the signal transduction of the DNA damage response (DDR) and thus plays a critical role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Although the primary functions of ATM are associated with the DDR, emerging data suggest that ATM has many additional roles that are not directly related to the DDR, including the regulation of oxidative stress signaling, insulin sensitivity, mitochondrial homeostasis, and lymphocyte development. Patients and mice lacking ATM exhibit growth retardation and lower bone mass; however, the mechanisms underlying the skeletal defects are not fully understood. In the present study, we generated mutant mice in which ATM is specifically inactivated in osteoclasts. The mutant mice did not exhibit apparent developmental defects but showed reduced bone mass due to increased osteoclastic bone resorption. Osteoclasts lacking ATM were more resistant to apoptosis and showed a prolonged lifespan compared to the controls. Notably, the inactivation of ATM in osteoclasts resulted in enhanced NF-κB signaling and an increase in the expression of NF-κB-targeted genes. The present study reveals a novel function for ATM in regulating bone metabolism by suppressing the lifespan of osteoclasts and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption.

  11. Conditional abrogation of Atm in osteoclasts extends osteoclast lifespan and results in reduced bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Hirozane, Toru; Tohmonda, Takahide; Yoda, Masaki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Kanai, Yae; Matsumoto, Morio; Morioka, Hideo; Nakamura, Masaya; Horiuchi, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase is a central component involved in the signal transduction of the DNA damage response (DDR) and thus plays a critical role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Although the primary functions of ATM are associated with the DDR, emerging data suggest that ATM has many additional roles that are not directly related to the DDR, including the regulation of oxidative stress signaling, insulin sensitivity, mitochondrial homeostasis, and lymphocyte development. Patients and mice lacking ATM exhibit growth retardation and lower bone mass; however, the mechanisms underlying the skeletal defects are not fully understood. In the present study, we generated mutant mice in which ATM is specifically inactivated in osteoclasts. The mutant mice did not exhibit apparent developmental defects but showed reduced bone mass due to increased osteoclastic bone resorption. Osteoclasts lacking ATM were more resistant to apoptosis and showed a prolonged lifespan compared to the controls. Notably, the inactivation of ATM in osteoclasts resulted in enhanced NF-κB signaling and an increase in the expression of NF-κB-targeted genes. The present study reveals a novel function for ATM in regulating bone metabolism by suppressing the lifespan of osteoclasts and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. PMID:27677594

  12. Chlorophyll enhances oxidative stress tolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans and extends its lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Erjia

    2016-01-01

    Green vegetables are thought to be responsible for several beneficial properties such as antioxidant, anti-mutagenic, and detoxification activities. It is not known whether these effects are due to chlorophyll which exists in large amounts in many foods or result from other secondary metabolites. In this study, we used the model system Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the anti-oxidative and anti-aging effects of chlorophyll in vivo. We found that chlorophyll significantly improves resistance to oxidative stress. It also enhances the lifespan of C. elegans by up to 25% via activation of the DAF-16/FOXO-dependent pathway. The results indicate that chlorophyll is absorbed by the worms and is thus bioavailable, constituting an important prerequisite for antioxidant and longevity-promoting activities inside the body. Our study thereby supports the view that green vegetables may also be beneficial for humans. PMID:27077003

  13. Parishin from Gastrodia elata Extends the Lifespan of Yeast via Regulation of Sir2/Uth1/TOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanfei; Sun, Yujuan; Weng, Yufang; Xiang, Lan; Qi, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Parishin is a phenolic glucoside isolated from Gastrodia elata, which is an important traditional Chinese medicine; this glucoside significantly extended the replicative lifespan of K6001 yeast at 3, 10, and 30 μM. To clarify its mechanism of action, assessment of oxidative stress resistance, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, replicative lifespans of sod1, sod2, uth1, and skn7 yeast mutants, and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) analysis were conducted. The significant increase of cell survival rate in oxidative stress condition was observed in parishin-treated groups. Silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) gene expression and SOD activity were significantly increased after treating parishin in normal condition. Meanwhile, the levels of ROS and MDA in yeast were significantly decreased. The replicative lifespans of sod1, sod2, uth1, and skn7 mutants of K6001 yeast were not affected by parishin. We also found that parishin could decrease the gene expression of TORC1, ribosomal protein S26A (RPS26A), and ribosomal protein L9A (RPL9A) in the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway. Gene expression levels of RPS26A and RPL9A in uth1, as well as in uth1, sir2 double mutants, were significantly lower than those of the control group. Besides, TORC1 gene expression in uth1 mutant of K6001 yeast was inhibited significantly. These results suggested that parishin exhibited antiaging effects via regulation of Sir2/Uth1/TOR signaling pathway. PMID:27429709

  14. Silymarin extends lifespan and reduces proteotoxicity in C. elegans Alzheimer's model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; Park, Kyung-Chae; Awasthi, Anjali; Prasad, Birendra

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a process of progressive decline in physiological functions resulting in increased vulnerability to diseases and death. Aging results in increased rates of age related disorders like neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, arthritis etc. Modulation of insulin signaling, protein aggregation, stress, free radical damage and inflammation are the major causes for deleterious changes resulting in aging. Many studies are being undertaken to find novel compounds which can improve a typical human life span and aid in healthy aging. We investigated the potential of one such compound silymarin for its anti-aging effect. Silymarin is a flavanone derivative extracted from the seeds of the milk thistle Silybum marianum. It is widely used for the treatment of liver diseases in clinical practice. We tested the anti-aging efficacy of silymarin using the Caenorhabditis elegans model system. Our results demonstrate that C. elegans treated with 25μM and 50μM silymarin concentration resulted in an increase in mean lifespan by 10.1% and 24.8% respectively compared to untreated control. Besides increased lifespan, silymarin treated aged animals showed better locomotion rate, higher response to stimuli and improved tolerance to stress compared to untreated control. We also checked the potential of silymarin to slow the progression of neurodegenerative disorder like Alzheimer's disease (AD) by using CL4176 C. elegans model for AD. C. elegans CL4176 transgenic animal induces expression of amyloid beta-protein (Aβ1-42) in muscle tissues when subjected to temperature of 23°C and above resulting in worm paralysis. CL4176 animals treated with silymarin showed delayed paralysis via enhancing resistance to oxidative stress. These results suggested that silymarin is a potential hormetin for preventing aging and age-related diseases.

  15. Ferulsinaic acid attenuation of advanced glycation end products extends the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Ahmed A R

    2011-03-01

    Ferulsinaic acid is the first member of a new rearranged class of sesquiterpene coumarins of the genus Ferula. The genus Ferula can be used for the treatment of skin infections, hysteria and for stomach disorders, such as a febrifuge and a carminative agent. The effect of ferulsinaic acid on the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been examined. Novel data explaining the effect of ferulsinaic acid on the lifespan of C. elegans and its antioxidant power were obtained. C. elegans was cultivated under standard laboratory conditions in absence and presence of different ferulsinaic acid. Also, animals were cultivated under heat and chemical stress conditions in absence and presence of ferulsinaic acid. Life span assay, determination of protein concentration, assay of malondialdehyde and ELISA for determination of AGEs were performed. Under standard laboratory conditions and in presence of ferulsinaic acid (500 nm, 10 µm and 100 µm), mean life span of wild type animals was significantly lengthened in a dose-dependent manner from 18.64 ± 0.19 days (control) to 19 ± 0.19 (P = 0.695), 20.76 ± 0.25 (P = 0.043) and 22.3 ± 0.29 (P = 0.0291), respectively. Interestingly, in C. elegans resistance for heat stress at 35°C and oxidative stress induced by paraquat were significantly improved with ferulsinaic acid. Ferulsinaic acid was found to significantly attenuate both lipid peroxidation and the formation of advanced glycation end products in the wild-type animals under standard laboratory conditions. Ferulsinaic acid had therapeutic efficacy as an antioxidant with the possibility of its use as an antioxidant drug. © 2011 The Author. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Glucose restriction induces transient G2 cell cycle arrest extending cellular chronological lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Fumie; Ishii, Mahiro; Mori, Ayaka; Uehara, Lisa; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Kojiro; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2016-01-01

    While glucose is the fundamental source of energy in most eukaryotes, it is not always abundantly available in natural environments, including within the human body. Eukaryotic cells are therefore thought to possess adaptive mechanisms to survive glucose-limited conditions, which remain unclear. Here, we report a novel mechanism regulating cell cycle progression in response to abrupt changes in extracellular glucose concentration. Upon reduction of glucose in the medium, wild-type fission yeast cells undergo transient arrest specifically at G2 phase. This cell cycle arrest is dependent on the Wee1 tyrosine kinase inhibiting the key cell cycle regulator, CDK1/Cdc2. Mutant cells lacking Wee1 are not arrested at G2 upon glucose limitation and lose viability faster than the wild-type cells under glucose-depleted quiescent conditions, suggesting that this cell cycle arrest is required for extension of chronological lifespan. Our findings indicate the presence of a novel cell cycle checkpoint monitoring glucose availability, which may be a good molecular target for cancer therapy. PMID:26804466

  17. Nicotinamide riboside promotes Sir2 silencing and extends lifespan via Nrk and Urh1/Pnp1/Meu1 pathways to NAD+.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Racette, Frances G; Bogan, Katrina L; McClure, Julie M; Smith, Jeffrey S; Brenner, Charles

    2007-05-04

    Although NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for Sir2 functions and replicative lifespan in yeast, alterations in NAD(+) precursors have been reported to accelerate aging but not to extend lifespan. In eukaryotes, nicotinamide riboside is a newly discovered NAD(+) precursor that is converted to nicotinamide mononucleotide by specific nicotinamide riboside kinases, Nrk1 and Nrk2. In this study, we discovered that exogenous nicotinamide riboside promotes Sir2-dependent repression of recombination, improves gene silencing, and extends lifespan without calorie restriction. The mechanism of action of nicotinamide riboside is totally dependent on increased net NAD(+) synthesis through two pathways, the Nrk1 pathway and the Urh1/Pnp1/Meu1 pathway, which is Nrk1 independent. Additionally, the two nicotinamide riboside salvage pathways contribute to NAD(+) metabolism in the absence of nicotinamide-riboside supplementation. Thus, like calorie restriction in the mouse, nicotinamide riboside elevates NAD(+) and increases Sir2 function.

  18. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase imparts human endothelial cells with extended replicative lifespan and enhanced angiogenic capacity in a high glucose environment.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2009-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a characteristic of aging-related vascular disease and is worsened during diabetes. High glucose can impair endothelial cell (EC) function through cellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species, an insult that can also limit replicative lifespan. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), also known as PBEF and visfatin, is rate-limiting for NAD+ salvage from nicotinamide and confers resistance to oxidative stress via SIRT1. We therefore sought to determine if Nampt expression could resist the detrimental effects of high glucose and confer a survival advantage to human vascular EC in this pathologic environment. Human aortic EC were infected with retrovirus encoding eGFP or eGFP-Nampt, and FACS-selected to yield populations with similar, modest transgene expression. Using a chronic glucose exposure model we tracked EC populations to senescence, assessed cellular metabolism, and determined in vitro angiogenic function. Overexpression of Nampt increased proliferation and extended replicative lifespan, and did so preferentially during glucose overload. Nampt expression delayed markers of senescence and limited reactive oxygen species accumulation in high glucose through a modest increase in aerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, tube networks formed by Nampt-overexpressing EC were more extensive and glucose-resistant, in accordance with SIRT1-mediated repression of the anti-angiogenic transcription factor, FoxO1. We conclude that Nampt enables proliferating human EC to resist the oxidative stress of aging and of high glucose, and to productively use excess glucose to support replicative longevity and angiogenic activity. Enhancing endothelial Nampt activity may thus be beneficial in scenarios requiring EC-based vascular repair and regeneration during aging and hyperglycemia, such as atherosclerosis and diabetes-related vascular disease.

  19. d-Allulose, a stereoisomer of d-fructose, extends Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan through a dietary restriction mechanism: A new candidate dietary restriction mimetic.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Tomoya; Sakoguchi, Hirofumi; Yoshihara, Akihide; Izumori, Ken; Sato, Masashi

    2017-09-28

    Dietary restriction (DR) is an effective intervention known to increase lifespan in a wide variety of organisms. DR also delays the onset of aging-associated diseases. DR mimetics, compounds that can mimic the effects of DR, have been intensively explored. d-Allulose (d-Alu), the C3-epimer of d-fructose, is a rare sugar that has various health benefits, including anti-hyperglycemia and anti-obesity effects. Here, we report that d-Alu increased the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans both under monoxenic and axenic culture conditions. d-Alu did not further extend the lifespan of the long-lived DR model eat-2 mutant, strongly indicating that the effect is related to DR. However, d-Alu did not reduce the food intake of wild-type C. elegans. To explore the mechanisms of the d-Alu longevity effect, we examined the lifespan of d-Alu-treated mutants deficient for nutrient sensing pathway-related genes daf-16, sir-2.1, aak-2, and skn-1. As a result, d-Alu increased the lifespan of the daf-16, sir-2.1, and skn-1 mutants, but not the aak-2 mutant, indicating that the lifespan extension was dependent on the energy sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). d-Alu also enhanced the mRNA expression and enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. From these findings, we conclude that d-Alu extends lifespan by increasing oxidative stress resistance through a DR mechanism, making it a candidate DR mimetic. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Calorie restriction and late-onset calorie restriction extend lifespan but do not alter protein storage in female grasshoppers

    PubMed Central

    Hatle*, John D.; Wells, Sean M.; Fuller, L. Erin; Allen, I. Cynthia; Gordy, Liza J.; Melnyk, Stephen; Quattrochi, John

    2007-01-01

    Summary Calorie restriction (CR) and late-onset CR enhance longevity in many organisms. Resource allocation theory suggests that longevity is enhanced by increasing somatic storage, at the expense of current reproduction. Phytophagous insects accumulate amino acids as hemolymph storage proteins for major developmental events. We hypothesized that protein storage is involved in life extension from CR. In a longitudinal experiment, we tested whether CR altered protein storage in female grasshoppers. Individuals on CR (60% or 70%) or late-onset CR had at least 60% greater longevity than ad libitum individuals. Age at first oviposition, dry mass of the first clutch, or lifetime fecundity were not affected by CR, but CR did increase the number of clutches produced. Most important, females on life-extending CR and late-onset CR did not differ in the concentration of hemolymph storage of proteins in comparison to ad libitum females. Protein storage changed with time in all groups, demonstrating sufficient sensitivity in our methods. Previous experiments have shown that severe CR (~30% of ad libitum) can reduce hemolymph storage. Therefore, the reduction in intake needed to extend lifespan is not sufficient to reduce protein storage in the hemolymph. These results do not support the hypothesis that protein storage is involved in life extension from CR. PMID:17049582

  1. Management of bipolar depression with lamotrigine: an antiepileptic mood stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Prabhavalkar, Kedar S; Poovanpallil, Nimmy B; Bhatt, Lokesh K

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of lamotrigine in the treatment of focal epilepsies have already been reported in several case reports and open studies, which is thought to act by inhibiting glutamate release through voltage-sensitive sodium channels blockade and neuronal membrane stabilization. However, recent findings have also illustrated the importance of lamotrigine in alleviating the depressive symptoms of bipolar disorder, without causing mood destabilization or precipitating mania. Currently, no mood stabilizers are available having equal efficacy in the treatment of both mania and depression, two of which forms the extreme sides of the bipolar disorder. Lamotrigine, a well established anticonvulsant has received regulatory approval for the treatment and prevention of bipolar depression in more than 30 countries worldwide. Lamotrigine, acts through several molecular targets and overcomes the major limitation of other conventional antidepressants by stabilizing mood from "below baseline" thereby preventing switches to mania or episode acceleration, thus being effective for bipolar I disorder. Recent studies have also suggested that these observations could also be extended to patients with bipolar II disorder. Thus, lamotrigine may supposedly fulfill the unmet requirement for an effective depression mood stabilizer.

  2. Management of bipolar depression with lamotrigine: an antiepileptic mood stabilizer

    PubMed Central

    Prabhavalkar, Kedar S.; Poovanpallil, Nimmy B.; Bhatt, Lokesh K.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of lamotrigine in the treatment of focal epilepsies have already been reported in several case reports and open studies, which is thought to act by inhibiting glutamate release through voltage-sensitive sodium channels blockade and neuronal membrane stabilization. However, recent findings have also illustrated the importance of lamotrigine in alleviating the depressive symptoms of bipolar disorder, without causing mood destabilization or precipitating mania. Currently, no mood stabilizers are available having equal efficacy in the treatment of both mania and depression, two of which forms the extreme sides of the bipolar disorder. Lamotrigine, a well established anticonvulsant has received regulatory approval for the treatment and prevention of bipolar depression in more than 30 countries worldwide. Lamotrigine, acts through several molecular targets and overcomes the major limitation of other conventional antidepressants by stabilizing mood from “below baseline” thereby preventing switches to mania or episode acceleration, thus being effective for bipolar I disorder. Recent studies have also suggested that these observations could also be extended to patients with bipolar II disorder. Thus, lamotrigine may supposedly fulfill the unmet requirement for an effective depression mood stabilizer. PMID:26557090

  3. Ethical, social, and personal implications of extended human lifespan identified by members of the public.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Brad; Lucke, Jayne; Bartlett, Helen; Hall, Wayne

    2009-10-01

    There are a number of ethical, social, and personal implications generated by the potential development and use of technologies that may extend human longevity by intervening in aging. Despite speculations about likely public attitudes toward life extension, to date there have been few attempts to empirically examine the public's perspective of these issues. Using open-ended survey questions via telephone interviews, this study explored the attitudes of 605 members of the Australian public toward the implications of life extension. Participants were asked to briefly describe in their own words what they believed would be the beneficial, as well as negative, implications arising from life extension (if there were any), both for themselves personally and for society as a whole. Participants were also asked to describe any ethical concerns they had about life extension, if they had any at all. All open-ended responses were collated and then underwent a thematic analysis to uncover commonly cited issues regarding personal benefits/negatives, societal benefits/negatives, and ethical concerns. A considerable number of participants envisioned at least some beneficial as well as negative implications for themselves and for society, and many claimed to have at least some ethical concerns. Some novel issues were raised as well as a number of those discussed within the bioethical literature. The results should encourage researchers, bioethicists, and policy makers to engage with members of the public about the goals of research surrounding life extension, the expected outcomes of such research, and the likely implications for individuals and society.

  4. Therapeutic reduction of ataxin-2 extends lifespan and reduces pathology in TDP-43 mice.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lindsay A; Huang, Brenda; Bieri, Gregor; Ma, Rosanna; Knowles, David A; Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan; Messing, James; Kim, Hong Joo; Soriano, Armand; Auburger, Georg; Pulst, Stefan M; Taylor, J Paul; Rigo, Frank; Gitler, Aaron D

    2017-04-20

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by motor neuron loss and that leads to paralysis and death 2-5 years after disease onset. Nearly all patients with ALS have aggregates of the RNA-binding protein TDP-43 in their brains and spinal cords, and rare mutations in the gene encoding TDP-43 can cause ALS. There are no effective TDP-43-directed therapies for ALS or related TDP-43 proteinopathies, such as frontotemporal dementia. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and RNA-interference approaches are emerging as attractive therapeutic strategies in neurological diseases. Indeed, treatment of a rat model of inherited ALS (caused by a mutation in Sod1) with ASOs against Sod1 has been shown to substantially slow disease progression. However, as SOD1 mutations account for only around 2-5% of ALS cases, additional therapeutic strategies are needed. Silencing TDP-43 itself is probably not appropriate, given its critical cellular functions. Here we present a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for ALS that involves targeting ataxin-2. A decrease in ataxin-2 suppresses TDP-43 toxicity in yeast and flies, and intermediate-length polyglutamine expansions in the ataxin-2 gene increase risk of ALS. We used two independent approaches to test whether decreasing ataxin-2 levels could mitigate disease in a mouse model of TDP-43 proteinopathy. First, we crossed ataxin-2 knockout mice with TDP-43 (also known as TARDBP) transgenic mice. The decrease in ataxin-2 reduced aggregation of TDP-43, markedly increased survival and improved motor function. Second, in a more therapeutically applicable approach, we administered ASOs targeting ataxin-2 to the central nervous system of TDP-43 transgenic mice. This single treatment markedly extended survival. Because TDP-43 aggregation is a component of nearly all cases of ALS, targeting ataxin-2 could represent a broadly effective therapeutic strategy.

  5. A nutritional supplement containing lactoferrin stimulates the immune system, extends lifespan, and reduces amyloid β peptide toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Patricia; Llopis, Silvia; Gonzalez, Nuria; Ramón, Daniel; Serrano, Gabriel; Torrens, Ana; Serrano, Juan M; Navarro, Maria; Genovés, Salvador

    2017-03-01

    Lactoferrin is a highly multifunctional glycoprotein involved in many physiological functions, including regulation of iron absorption and immune responses. Moreover, there is increasing evidence for neuroprotective effects of lactoferrin. We used Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to test the protective effects, both on phenotype and transcriptome, of a nutraceutical product based on lactoferrin liposomes. In a dose-dependent manner, the lactoferrin-based product protected against acute oxidative stress and extended lifespan of C. elegans N2. Furthermore, Paralysis of the transgenic C. elegans strain CL4176, caused by Aβ1-42 aggregates, was clearly ameliorated by treatment. Transcriptome analysis in treated nematodes indicated immune system stimulation, together with enhancement of processes involved in the oxidative stress response. The lactoferrin-based product also improved the protein homeostasis processes, cellular adhesion processes, and neurogenesis in the nematode. In summary, the tested product exerts protection against aging and neurodegeneration, modulating processes involved in oxidative stress response, protein homeostasis, synaptic function, and xenobiotic metabolism. This lactoferrin-based product is also able to stimulate the immune system, as well as improving reproductive status and energy metabolism. These findings suggest that oral supplementation with this lactoferrin-based product could improve the immune system and antioxidant capacity. Further studies to understand the molecular mechanisms related with neuronal function would be of interest.

  6. Depleting the methyltransferase Suv39h1 improves DNA repair and extends lifespan in a progeria mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohua; Wang, Zimei; Zhang, Le; Ghosh, Shrestha; Zheng, Huiling; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2013-01-01

    A de novo G608G mutation in LMNA gene leads to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Mice lacking the prelamin A-processing metalloprotease, Zmpste24, recapitulate many of the progeroid features of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Here we show that A-type lamins interact with SUV39H1, and prelamin A/progerin exhibits enhanced binding capacity to SUV39H1, protecting it from proteasomal degradation and, consequently, increasing H3K9me3 levels. Depletion of Suv39h1 reduces H3K9me3 levels, restores DNA repair capacity and delays senescence in progeroid cells. Remarkably, loss of Suv39h1 in Zmpste24(-/-) mice delays body weight loss, increases bone mineral density and extends lifespan by ∼60%. Thus, increased H3K9me3 levels, possibly mediated by enhanced Suv39h1 stability in the presence of prelamin A/progerin, compromise genome maintenance, which in turn contributes to accelerated senescence in laminopathy-based premature aging. Our study provides an explanation for epigenetic alterations in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and a potential strategy for intervention by targeting SUV39H1-mediated heterochromatin remodelling.

  7. Somatic increase of CCT8 mimics proteostasis of human pluripotent stem cells and extends C. elegans lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Noormohammadi, Alireza; Khodakarami, Amirabbas; Gutierrez-Garcia, Ricardo; Lee, Hyun Ju; Koyuncu, Seda; König, Tim; Schindler, Christina; Saez, Isabel; Fatima, Azra; Dieterich, Christoph; Vilchez, David

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells can replicate indefinitely while maintaining their undifferentiated state and, therefore, are immortal in culture. This capacity may demand avoidance of any imbalance in protein homeostasis (proteostasis) that would otherwise compromise stem cell identity. Here we show that human pluripotent stem cells exhibit enhanced assembly of the TRiC/CCT complex, a chaperonin that facilitates the folding of 10% of the proteome. We find that ectopic expression of a single subunit (CCT8) is sufficient to increase TRiC/CCT assembly. Moreover, increased TRiC/CCT complex is required to avoid aggregation of mutant Huntingtin protein. We further show that increased expression of CCT8 in somatic tissues extends Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan in a TRiC/CCT-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of CCT8 also ameliorates the age-associated demise of proteostasis and corrects proteostatic deficiencies in worm models of Huntington's disease. Our results suggest proteostasis is a common principle that links organismal longevity with hESC immortality. PMID:27892468

  8. Mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase 2 is elevated in long-lived primate as well as rodent species and extends fly mean lifespan.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Andrew M; Lehr, Marcus; Gendron, Christi M; Pletcher, Scott D; Miller, Richard A

    2017-08-01

    In a survey of enzymes related to protein oxidation and cellular redox state, we found activity of the redox enzyme thioredoxin reductase (TXNRD) to be elevated in cells from long-lived species of rodents, primates, and birds. Elevated TXNRD activity in long-lived species reflected increases in the mitochondrial form, TXNRD2, rather than the cytosolic forms TXNRD1 and TXNRD3. Analysis of published RNA-Seq data showed elevated TXNRD2 mRNA in multiple organs of longer-lived primates, suggesting that the phenomenon is not limited to skin-derived fibroblasts. Elevation of TXNRD2 activity and protein levels was also noted in liver of three different long-lived mutant mice, and in normal male mice treated with a drug that extends lifespan in males. Overexpression of mitochondrial TXNRD2 in Drosophila melanogaster extended median (but not maximum) lifespan in female flies with a small lifespan extension in males; in contrast, overexpression of the cytosolic form, TXNRD1, did not produce a lifespan extension. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Lamotrigine augmentation in unipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Fabio Lopes; Hara, Claudia

    2003-03-01

    A significant number of patients with unipolar depression fail to achieve remission after one or a series of antidepressants. We present the results of a retrospective chart review of the efficacy and tolerability of lamotrigine as an augmentation drug in treatment-resistant unipolar depression. A previous absence of a response was defined as the clinically significant presence of depressive symptomatology after 6 weeks of treatment with an antidepressant, with at least 3 weeks at the maximum dose tolerated by the patient. The patients were rated retrospectively using the Clinical Global Impression rating scale. Seventy-six percent of the patients improved. Gender, age, basal severity of the episode and degree of previous non response were not statistically significantly associated with response to lamotrigine augmentation. Comorbidity showed a tendency to be negatively related with response to lamotrigine. Three patients abandoned the treatment with lamotrigine due to side-effects. Complaints were excessive somnolence, headache, dizziness, nausea and malaise. Data suggest that lamotrigine is a promising drug for treatment-refractory unipolar depression. Double-blind studies are necessary to confirm its use as an augmentation agent.

  10. The phytochemical, EGCG, extends lifespan by reducing liver and kidney function damage and improving age-associated inflammation and oxidative stress in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yucun; Na, Lixin; Feng, Rennan; Gong, Liya; Zhao, Yue; Li, Qiang; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2013-12-01

    It is known that phytochemicals have many potential health benefits in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term consumption of the phytochemical, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), on body growth, disease protection, and lifespan in healthy rats. 68 male weaning Wistar rats were randomly divided into the control and EGCG groups. Variables influencing lifespan such as blood pressure, serum glucose and lipids, inflammation, and oxidative stress were dynamically determined from weaning to death. The median lifespan of controls was 92.5 weeks. EGCG increased median lifespan to 105.0 weeks and delayed death by approximately 8-12 weeks. Blood pressure and serum glucose and lipids significantly increased with age in both groups compared with the levels at 0 week. However, there were no differences in these variables between the two groups during the whole lifespan. Inflammation and oxidative stress significantly increased with age in both groups compared with 0 week and were significantly lower in serum and liver and kidney tissues in the EGCG group. Damage to liver and kidney function was significantly alleviated in the EGCG group. In addition, EGCG decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of transcription factor NF-κB and increased the upstream protein expressions of silent mating type information regulation two homolog one (SIRT1) and forkhead box class O 3a (FOXO3a). In conclusion, EGCG extends lifespan in healthy rats by reducing liver and kidney damage and improving age-associated inflammation and oxidative stress through the inhibition of NF-κB signaling by activating the longevity factors FoxO3a and SIRT1. © 2013 the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Both overlapping and independent mechanisms determine how diet and insulin-ligand knockouts extend lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zandveld, Jelle; van den Heuvel, Joost; Zwaan, Bastiaan J; Piper, Matthew D W

    2017-01-01

    Lifespan in many organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster, can be increased by reduced insulin-IGF-like signaling (IIS) or by changes in diet. Most studies testing whether IIS is involved in diet-mediated lifespan extension employ only a few diets, but recent data shows that a broad range of nutritional environments is required. Here, we present lifespan data of long-lived Drosophila, lacking three of the eight insulin-like peptides [Drosophila insulin-like peptides 2,3,5 (dilp2-3,5)] on nine different diets that surround the optimum for lifespan. Their nutritional content was varied by manipulating sugar and yeast concentrations independently, and thus incorporated changes in both diet restriction and nutrient balance. The mutants were substantially longer-lived than controls on every diet, but the effects on the lifespan response to sugar and yeast differed. Our data illustrates how a greater coverage of diet balance (DB) and restriction can unify differing interpretations of how IIS might be involved in the response of lifespan to diet.

  12. Emodin extends lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans through insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway depending on DAF-16 and SIR-2.1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuan; Lu, Lulu; Qi, Yonghao; Li, Miao; Zhou, Lijun

    2017-10-01

    The naturally occurring anthraquinone emodin has been serving primarily as an anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory agent. However, little is known about its potential on anti-aging. This investigation examined the effect of emodin on lifespan and focused on its physiological molecular mechanisms in vivo. Using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as an animal model, we found emodin could extend lifespan of worms and improve their antioxidant capacity. Our mechanistic studies revealed that emodin might function via insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway involving, specifically the core transcription factor DAF-16. Quantitative RT-PCR results illustrated that emodin up-regulated transcription of DAF-16 target genes which express antioxidants to promote antioxidant capacity and lifespan of worms. In addition, attenuated effect in sir-2.1 mutants suggests that emodin likely functioned in a SIR-2.1-dependent manner. Our study uncovers a novel role of emodin in prolonging lifespan and supports the understanding of emodin being a beneficial dietary supplement.

  13. Drosophila insulin-like peptide-6 (dilp6) expression from fat body extends lifespan and represses secretion of Drosophila insulin-like peptide-2 from the brain

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hua; Kang, Ping; Tatar, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Reduced insulin/IGF signaling extends lifespan in diverse species, including Drosophila melanogaster where the genome encodes seven insulin-like peptides (dilp1-7). Of these, reduced dilp2 expressed in the brain has been associated with longevity assurance when over-expression of dfoxo in fat bodies extends lifespan. Here, we show that the insulin-regulated transcription factor dFOXO positively modulates dilp6 mRNA in adult fat body. Over-expression of dilp6 in adult fat body extends lifespan and increases longevity-associated metabolic phenotypes. Adult fat body dilp6 expression represses dilp2 and dilp5 mRNA in the brain, and the secretion of DILP2 into the hemolymph. The longevity benefit of expressing dfoxo in fat body, and the nonautonomous effect of fat body dfoxo upon brain dilp expression, is blocked by simultaneously repressing dilp6 by RNAi in fat body. dilp6 thus appears to bridge dFOXO, adipose tissue and brain endocrine function to regulate Drosophila longevity. PMID:22935001

  14. Reserpine modulates neurotransmitter release to extend lifespan and alleviate age-dependent Aβ proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Saharia, Kopal; Arya, Upasna; Kumar, Ranjeet; Sahu, Rashmi; Das, Chinmaya Kumar; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dwivedi, Hemalata; Subramaniam, Jamuna R

    2012-02-01

    Aging is a debilitating process often associated with chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD occurs at a very high incidence posing a huge burden to the society. Model organisms such as C. elegans become essential to understand aging or lifespan extension - the etiology, molecular mechanism and identification of new drugs against age associated diseases. The AD model, manifesting Aβ proteotoxicity, in C. elegans is well established and has provided valuable insights. Earlier, we have reported that Reserpine, an FDA-approved antihypertensive drug, increases C. elegans lifespan with a high quality of life and ameliorates Aβ toxicity in C. elegans. But reserpine does not seem to act through the known lifespan extension pathways or inhibition of its known target, vesicular monoamine transporter, VMAT. Reserpine's mode of action and the pathways it activates are not known. Here, we have evaluated the presynaptic neurotransmitter(s) release pathway and identified acetylcholine (ACh) as the crucial player for reserpine's action. The corroborating evidences are: i) lack of lifespan extension in the ACh loss of function (hypomorphic) - synthesis (cha-1) and transport (unc-17) mutants; ii) mitigation of chronic aldicarb effect; iii) lifespan extension in dopamine (cat-2) and dopamine and serotonin (bas-1) biosynthetic mutants; iv) no rescue from exogenous serotonin induced paralysis in the AD model worms; upon reserpine treatment. Thus, modulation of acetylcholine is essential for reserpine's action. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum from calorie-restricted animals delays senescence and extends the lifespan of normal human fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Cabo, Rafael; Liu, Lijuan; Ali, Ahmed; Price, Nathan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Mingyi; Lakatta, Edward; Irusta, Pablo M

    2015-03-01

    The cumulative effects of cellular senescence and cell loss over time in various tissues and organs are considered major contributing factors to the ageing process. In various organisms, caloric restriction (CR) slows ageing and increases lifespan, at least in part, by activating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent protein deacetylases of the sirtuin family. Here, we use an in vitro model of CR to study the effects of this dietary regime on replicative senescence, cellular lifespan and modulation of the SIRT1 signaling pathway in normal human diploid fibroblasts. We found that serum from calorie-restricted animals was able to delay senescence and significantly increase replicative lifespan in these cells, when compared to serum from ad libitum fed animals. These effects correlated with CR-mediated increases in SIRT1 and decreases in p53 expression levels. In addition, we show that manipulation of SIRT1 levels by either over-expression or siRNA-mediated knockdown resulted in delayed and accelerated cellular senescence, respectively. Our results demonstrate that CR can delay senescence and increase replicative lifespan of normal human diploid fibroblasts in vitro and suggest that SIRT1 plays an important role in these processes.

  16. Serum from calorie-restricted animals delays senescence and extends the lifespan of normal human fibroblasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ahmed; Price, Nathan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Mingyi; Lakatta, Edward; Irusta, Pablo M.

    2015-01-01

    The cumulative effects of cellular senescence and cell loss over time in various tissues and organs are considered major contributing factors to the ageing process. In various organisms, caloric restriction (CR) slows ageing and increases lifespan, at least in part, by activating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent protein deacetylases of the sirtuin family. Here, we use an in vitro model of CR to study the effects of this dietary regime on replicative senescence, cellular lifespan and modulation of the SIRT1 signaling pathway in normal human diploid fibroblasts. We found that serum from calorie-restricted animals was able to delay senescence and significantly increase replicative lifespan in these cells, when compared to serum from ad libitum fed animals. These effects correlated with CR-mediated increases in SIRT1 and decreases in p53 expression levels. In addition, we show that manipulation of SIRT1 levels by either over-expression or siRNA-mediated knockdown resulted in delayed and accelerated cellular senescence, respectively. Our results demonstrate that CR can delay senescence and increase replicative lifespan of normal human diploid fibroblasts in vitro and suggest that SIRT1 plays an important role in these processes. (185 words). PMID:25855056

  17. Chicoric acid is an antioxidant molecule that stimulates AMP kinase pathway in L6 myotubes and extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Schlernitzauer, Audrey; Oiry, Catherine; Hamad, Raphael; Galas, Simon; Cortade, Fabienne; Chabi, Béatrice; Casas, François; Pessemesse, Laurence; Fouret, Gilles; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Cros, Gérard; Cabello, Gérard; Magous, Richard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a caffeoyl derivative previously described as having potential anti-diabetic properties. As similarities in cellular mechanism similarities between diabetes and aging have been shown, we explored on L6 myotubes the effect of CA on the modulation of intracellular pathways involved in diabetes and aging. We also determined its influence on lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans worm (C. elegans). In L6 myotubes, CA was a potent reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, reducing ROS accumulation under basal as well as oxidative stress conditions. CA also stimulated the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) pathway and displayed various features associated with AMPK activation: CA (a) enhanced oxidative enzymatic defences through increase in glutathion peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, (b) favoured mitochondria protection against oxidative damage through up-regulation of MnSOD protein expression, (c) increased mitochondrial biogenesis as suggested by increases in complex II and citrate synthase activities, along with up-regulation of PGC-1α mRNA expression and (d) inhibited the insulin/Akt/mTOR pathway. As AMPK stimulators (e.g. the anti-diabetic agent meformin or polyphenols such as epigallocatechingallate or quercetin) were shown to extend lifespan in C. elegans, we also determined the effect of CA on the same model. A concentration-dependant lifespan extension was observed with CA (5-100 μM). These data indicate that CA is a potent antioxidant compound activating the AMPK pathway in L6 myotubes. Similarly to other AMPK stimulators, CA is able to extend C. elegans lifespan, an effect measurable even at the micromolar range. Future studies will explore CA molecular targets and give new insights about its possible effects on metabolic and aging-related diseases.

  18. Chicoric Acid Is an Antioxidant Molecule That Stimulates AMP Kinase Pathway in L6 Myotubes and Extends Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Schlernitzauer, Audrey; Oiry, Catherine; Hamad, Raphael; Galas, Simon; Cortade, Fabienne; Chabi, Béatrice; Casas, François; Pessemesse, Laurence; Fouret, Gilles; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Cros, Gérard; Cabello, Gérard; Magous, Richard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a caffeoyl derivative previously described as having potential anti-diabetic properties. As similarities in cellular mechanism similarities between diabetes and aging have been shown, we explored on L6 myotubes the effect of CA on the modulation of intracellular pathways involved in diabetes and aging. We also determined its influence on lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans worm (C. elegans). In L6 myotubes, CA was a potent reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, reducing ROS accumulation under basal as well as oxidative stress conditions. CA also stimulated the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) pathway and displayed various features associated with AMPK activation: CA (a) enhanced oxidative enzymatic defences through increase in glutathion peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, (b) favoured mitochondria protection against oxidative damage through up-regulation of MnSOD protein expression, (c) increased mitochondrial biogenesis as suggested by increases in complex II and citrate synthase activities, along with up-regulation of PGC-1α mRNA expression and (d) inhibited the insulin/Akt/mTOR pathway. As AMPK stimulators (e.g. the anti-diabetic agent meformin or polyphenols such as epigallocatechingallate or quercetin) were shown to extend lifespan in C. elegans, we also determined the effect of CA on the same model. A concentration-dependant lifespan extension was observed with CA (5–100 μM). These data indicate that CA is a potent antioxidant compound activating the AMPK pathway in L6 myotubes. Similarly to other AMPK stimulators, CA is able to extend C. elegans lifespan, an effect measurable even at the micromolar range. Future studies will explore CA molecular targets and give new insights about its possible effects on metabolic and aging-related diseases. PMID:24244361

  19. The SIRT1 activator SRT1720 extends lifespan and improves health of mice fed a standard diet

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sarah J.; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Mercken, Evi M.; Palacios, Hector H.; Ward, Theresa M.; Abulwerdi, Gelareh; Minor, Robin K.; Vlasuk, George P.; Ellis, James L.; Sinclair, David A.; Dawson, John; Allison, David B.; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Bernier, Michel; de Cabo, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The prevention or delay of the onset of age-related diseases prolongs survival and improves quality of life while reducing the burden on the health care system. Activation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD+ deacetylase, improves metabolism and confers protection against physiological and cognitive disturbances in old age. SRT1720 is a specific SIRT1 activator that has health and lifespan benefits in adult mice fed a high-fat diet. We found extension in lifespan, delayed onset of age-related metabolic diseases, and improved general health in mice fed a standard diet after SRT1720 supplementation. Inhibition of pro-inflammatory gene expression both in the liver and muscle of SRT1720-treated animals was noted. SRT1720 lowered phosphorylation of NF-κB pathway regulators in vitro only when SIRT1 was functionally present. Combined with our previous work, the current study further supports the beneficial effects of SRT1720 on health across the lifespan in mice. PMID:24582957

  20. Systemic delivery of rAAV6-microdystrophin preserves muscle function and extends lifespan in a murine model of severe muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Allen, James M.; Minami, Elina; Blankinship, Michael J.; Haraguchi, Miki; Meuse, Leonard; Finn, Eric; Adams, Marvin E.; Froehner, Stanley C.; Murry, Charles E.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Mice carrying mutations in both the dystrophin and utrophin genes die prematurely as a consequence of severe muscular dystrophy. Here, we demonstrate that intravascular administration of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors carrying a microdystrophin gene restores dystrophin expression in the striated musculature of these animals, considerably reducing skeletal muscle pathology and extending lifespan. These findings suggest rAAV vector-mediated systemic gene transfer may be useful for treatment of serious neuromuscular disorders such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). PMID:16819550

  1. [Therapeutic drug monitoring of lamotrigine].

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Tribut, Olivier; Verdier, Marie-Clémence

    2010-01-01

    Lamotrigine is a second generation anticonvulsant drug available in France since 1996. As other anticonvulsant drugs, lamotrigine is also used in type I bipolar disorders and except legal notices, in the treatment of neuropathic pains. It is mainly metabolized by the UDP-glucuronyltransferase in inactive metabolites. Its average half-life of elimination is of the order of 22 h, but it is reduced approximately at 14 h if it is associated with enzymatic inductors and increased at 70 h if lamotrigine is administered with sodium valproate. The pharmacokinetic parameters are modified at the young child's, but not in the old population. During the pregnancy, the plasmatic concentrations are lowered and re-increase strongly after the delivery, if dosages were adapted. The renal insufficiency does not require adaptation of dosage, on the other hand in case of severe hepatic insufficiency a decrease of the dose is to be considered. The correlation concentration-efficiency does not seem demonstrated, but there are not enough published studies and they included few patients. Furthermore, they were led with a methodology more pragmatic than rigorous. The correlation concentration-toxicity is better argued. The recommended therapeutic range is from 2.5 to 15 mg/L. For this molecule, the level of proof of the interest of the TDM was estimated in: possibly useful.

  2. Polyphenol-Rich Diets Exacerbate AMPK-Mediated Autophagy, Decreasing Proliferation of Mosquito Midgut Microbiota, and Extending Vector Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Rodrigo Dutra; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Moretti, Débora Monteiro; Medeiros-Castro, Priscilla; Rocha-Santos, Carlucio; Daumas-Filho, Carlos Renato de Oliveira; Bittencourt-Cunha, Paula Rego Barros; Martins-Cardoso, Karina; Cudischevitch, Cecília Oliveira; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo Sadok; Oliveira, José Henrique Maia; Gusmão, Desiely Silva; Alves Lemos, Francisco José; Alviano, Daniela Sales; Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad; Lowenberger, Carl; Majerowicz, David; Oliveira, Ricardo Melo; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Atella, Georgia Correa

    2016-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes feed on plant-derived fluids such as nectar and sap and are exposed to bioactive molecules found in this dietary source. However, the role of such molecules on mosquito vectorial capacity is unknown. Weather has been recognized as a major determinant of the spread of dengue, and plants under abiotic stress increase their production of polyphenols. Results Here, we show that including polyphenols in mosquito meals promoted the activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK positively regulated midgut autophagy leading to a decrease in bacterial proliferation and an increase in vector lifespan. Suppression of AMPK activity resulted in a 6-fold increase in midgut microbiota. Similarly, inhibition of polyphenol-induced autophagy induced an 8-fold increase in bacterial proliferation. Mosquitoes maintained on the polyphenol diet were readily infected by dengue virus. Conclusion The present findings uncover a new direct route by which exacerbation of autophagy through activation of the AMPK pathway leads to a more efficient control of mosquito midgut microbiota and increases the average mosquito lifespan. Our results suggest for the first time that the polyphenol content and availability of the surrounding vegetation may increase the population of mosquitoes prone to infection with arboviruses. PMID:27732590

  3. Polyphenol-Rich Diets Exacerbate AMPK-Mediated Autophagy, Decreasing Proliferation of Mosquito Midgut Microbiota, and Extending Vector Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Rodrigo Dutra; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Moretti, Débora Monteiro; Medeiros-Castro, Priscilla; Rocha-Santos, Carlucio; Daumas-Filho, Carlos Renato de Oliveira; Bittencourt-Cunha, Paula Rego Barros; Martins-Cardoso, Karina; Cudischevitch, Cecília Oliveira; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo Sadok; Oliveira, José Henrique Maia; Gusmão, Desiely Silva; Alves Lemos, Francisco José; Alviano, Daniela Sales; Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad; Lowenberger, Carl; Majerowicz, David; Oliveira, Ricardo Melo; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Atella, Georgia Correa; Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2016-10-01

    Mosquitoes feed on plant-derived fluids such as nectar and sap and are exposed to bioactive molecules found in this dietary source. However, the role of such molecules on mosquito vectorial capacity is unknown. Weather has been recognized as a major determinant of the spread of dengue, and plants under abiotic stress increase their production of polyphenols. Here, we show that including polyphenols in mosquito meals promoted the activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK positively regulated midgut autophagy leading to a decrease in bacterial proliferation and an increase in vector lifespan. Suppression of AMPK activity resulted in a 6-fold increase in midgut microbiota. Similarly, inhibition of polyphenol-induced autophagy induced an 8-fold increase in bacterial proliferation. Mosquitoes maintained on the polyphenol diet were readily infected by dengue virus. The present findings uncover a new direct route by which exacerbation of autophagy through activation of the AMPK pathway leads to a more efficient control of mosquito midgut microbiota and increases the average mosquito lifespan. Our results suggest for the first time that the polyphenol content and availability of the surrounding vegetation may increase the population of mosquitoes prone to infection with arboviruses.

  4. Capillarity Composited Recycled Paper/Graphene Scaffold for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with Enhanced Capacity and Extended Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunya; Gao, Zan; Li, Xiaodong

    2017-09-20

    An effective strategy to tackle the twin crises of global deforestation and fossil fuel depletion is to recycle biomass materials for energy storage devices. This study reports a unique and innovative solution to capitalize on a currently overlooked resource to produce high-performance lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries from recycled paper. The recycled paper fibers are creatively composited with graphene oxide sheets via a capillary adsorption method. The recycled paper/graphene oxide hybrid is then converted to activated paper carbon/reduced graphene oxide (APC/graphene) scaffold for sulfur infiltration. The assembled Li-APC/graphene/S battery exhibits a superior lifespan of 620 cycles with an excellent capacity retention rate of 60.5%. An APC interlayer is sandwiched between the Li anode and the separator to suppress the degradation of Li anode by preventing the nonhomogeneous growth of mossy Li whiskers, stretching the battery lifespan up to 1000 cycles with a capacitance retention rate of 52.3%. The capillary adsorption method coupled with the porous carbonaceous anode interlayer configuration creates a new opportunity for the development of batteries derived from porous biomass materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Artemisinin mimics calorie restriction to extend yeast lifespan via a dual-phase mode: a conclusion drawn from global transcriptome profiling.

    PubMed

    Wang, DaTing; Wu, Ming; Li, SiMing; Gao, Qian; Zeng, QingPing

    2015-05-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) promotes longevity among distinct organisms from yeast to mammals. Although CR-prolonged lifespan is believed to associate with enhanced respiratory activity, it is apparently controversial for accelerated energy consumption regardless of insufficient nutrient intake. In reconciling the contradiction of less food supply versus much metabolite dispense, we revealed a CR-based mode of dual-phase responses that encompass a phase of mitochondrial enhancement (ME) and a phase of post-mitochondrial enhancement (PME), which can be distinguished by the expression patterns and activity dynamics of mitochondrial signatures. ME is characterized by global antioxidative activation, and PME is denoted by systemic metabolic modulation. CR-mediated aging-delaying effects are replicated by artesunate, a semi-synthetic derivative of the antimalarial artemisinin that can alkylate heme-containing proteins, suggesting artesunate-heme conjugation functionally resembles nitric oxide-heme interaction. A correlation of artesunate-heme conjugation with cytochrome c oxidase activation has been established from adduct formation and activity alteration. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide also mimics CR to trigger antioxidant responses, affect signaling cascades, and alter respiratory rhythms, implying hydrogen peroxide is engaged in lifespan extension. Conclusively, artesunate mimics CR-triggered nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide to induce antioxidative networks for scavenging reactive oxygen species and mitigating oxidative stress, thereby directing metabolic conversion from anabolism to catabolism, maintaining essential metabolic functionality, and extending life expectancy in yeast.

  6. Scavengers of reactive γ-ketoaldehydes extend Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and healthspan through protein-level interactions with SIR-2.1 and ETS-7

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy T.; Caito, Samuel W.; Zackert, William E.; West, James D.; Zhu, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Isoketals (IsoKs) are highly reactive γ-ketoaldehyde products of lipid peroxidation that covalently adduct lysine side chains in proteins, impairing their function. Using C. elegans as a model organism, we sought to test the hypothesis that IsoKs contribute to molecular aging through adduction and inactivation of specific protein targets, and that this process can be abrogated using salicylamine (SA), a selective IsoK scavenger. Treatment with SA extends adult nematode longevity by nearly 56% and prevents multiple deleterious age-related biochemical and functional changes. Testing of a variety of molecular targets for SA's action revealed the sirtuin SIR-2.1 as the leading candidate. When SA was administered to a SIR-2.1 knockout strain, the effects on lifespan and healthspan extension were abolished. The SIR-2.1-dependent effects of SA were not mediated by large changes in gene expression programs or by significant changes in mitochondrial function. However, expression array analysis did show SA-dependent regulation of the transcription factor ets-7 and associated genes. In ets-7 knockout worms, SA's longevity effects were abolished, similar to sir-2.1 knockouts. However, SA dose-dependently increases ets-7 mRNA levels in non-functional SIR-2.1 mutant, suggesting that both are necessary for SA's complete lifespan and healthspan extension. PMID:27514077

  7. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ extends lifespan and improves healthspan of a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Li Fang; Gruber, Jan; Cheah, Irwin K; Goo, Chong Kit; Cheong, Wei Fun; Shui, Guanghou; Sit, Kim Ping; Wenk, Markus R; Halliwell, Barry

    2014-06-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ)-induced toxicity and oxidative stress have been postulated to play critical roles in the pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated the in vivo ability of a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, MitoQ, to protect against Aβ-induced toxicity and oxidative stress in a Caenorhabditis elegans model overexpressing human Aβ. Impairment of electron transport chain (ETC) enzymatic activity and mitochondrial dysfunction are early features of AD. We show that MitoQ extends lifespan, delays Aβ-induced paralysis, ameliorates depletion of the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and protects complexes IV and I of the ETC. Despite its protective effects on lifespan, healthspan, and ETC function, we find that MitoQ does not reduce DCFDA fluorescence, protein carbonyl levels or modulate steadystate ATP levels or oxygen consumption rate. Moreover, MitoQ does not attenuate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) oxidative damage. In agreement with its design, the protective effects of MitoQ appear to be targeted specifically to the mitochondrial membrane and our findings suggest that MitoQ may have therapeutic potential for Aβ- and oxidative stress-associated neurodegenerative disorders, particularly AD. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HMGB1 facilitates repair of mitochondrial DNA damage and extends the lifespan of mutant ataxin-1 knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hikaru; Fujita, Kyota; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Homma, Hidenori; Sasabe, Toshikazu; Shimizu, Jun; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Tamura, Takuya; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mutant ataxin-1 (Atxn1), which causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), binds to and impairs the function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a crucial nuclear protein that regulates DNA architectural changes essential for DNA damage repair and transcription. In this study, we established that transgenic or virus vector-mediated complementation with HMGB1 ameliorates motor dysfunction and prolongs lifespan in mutant Atxn1 knock-in (Atxn1-KI) mice. We identified mitochondrial DNA damage repair by HMGB1 as a novel molecular basis for this effect, in addition to the mechanisms already associated with HMGB1 function, such as nuclear DNA damage repair and nuclear transcription. The dysfunction and the improvement of mitochondrial DNA damage repair functions are tightly associated with the exacerbation and rescue, respectively, of symptoms, supporting the involvement of mitochondrial DNA quality control by HMGB1 in SCA1 pathology. Moreover, we show that the rescue of Purkinje cell dendrites and dendritic spines by HMGB1 could be downstream effects. Although extracellular HMGB1 triggers inflammation mediated by Toll-like receptor and receptor for advanced glycation end products, upregulation of intracellular HMGB1 does not induce such side effects. Thus, viral delivery of HMGB1 is a candidate approach by which to modify the disease progression of SCA1 even after the onset. PMID:25510912

  9. Genome-wide screen identifies Escherichia coli TCA cycle-related mutants with extended chronological lifespan dependent on acetate metabolism and the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA

    PubMed Central

    Gonidakis, Stavros; Finkel, Steven E.; Longo, Valter D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Single-gene mutants with extended lifespan have been described in several model organisms. We performed a genome-wide screen for long-lived mutants in Escherichia coli which revealed strains lacking TCA cycle-related genes that exhibit longer stationary phase survival and increased resistance to heat stress compared to wild-type. Extended lifespan in the sdhA mutant, lacking subunit A of succinate dehydrogenase, is associated with reduced production of superoxide and increased stress resistance. On the other hand, the longer lifespan of the lipoic acid synthase mutant (lipA) is associated with reduced oxygen consumption and requires the acetate-producing enzyme pyruvate oxidase, as well as acetyl-CoA synthetase, the enzyme that converts extracellular acetate to acetyl-CoA. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA, acting independently of acetate metabolism, is also required for maximum lifespan extension in the lipA and lpdA mutants, indicating that these mutations promote entry into a mode normally associated with a low-oxygen environment. Since analogous changes from respiration to fermentation have been observed in long-lived Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans strains, such metabolic alterations may represent an evolutionarily conserved strategy to extend lifespan. PMID:20707865

  10. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Weismann, Cara M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M.; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A.; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal−/−) at 1 × 1011 or 3 × 1011 vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36–76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75–86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 1011 vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 1011 vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316–576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250–264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  11. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Cara M; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal(-/-)) at 1 × 10(11) or 3 × 10(11) vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36-76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75-86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 10(11) vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 10(11) vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316-576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250-264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan.

  12. Glycation inhibitors extend yeast chronological lifespan by reducing advanced glycation end products and by back regulation of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Rubina S; Banarjee, Reema M; Deshmukh, Arati B; Patil, Gouri V; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2017-03-06

    Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) are implicated in aging process. Thus, reducing AGEs by using glycation inhibitors may help in attenuating the aging process. In this study using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast system, we show that Aminoguanidine (AMG), a well-known glycation inhibitor, decreases the AGE modification of proteins in non-calorie restriction (NR) (2% glucose) and extends chronological lifespan (CLS) similar to that of calorie restriction (CR) condition (0.5% glucose). Proteomic analysis revealed that AMG back regulates the expression of differentially expressed proteins especially those involved in mitochondrial respiration in NR condition, suggesting that it switches metabolism from fermentation to respiration, mimicking CR. AMG induced back regulation of differentially expressed proteins could be possibly due to its chemical effect or indirectly by glycation inhibition. To delineate this, Metformin (MET), a structural analog of AMG and a mild glycation inhibitor and Hydralazine (HYD), another potent glycation inhibitor but not structural analog of AMG were used. HYD was more effective than MET in mimicking AMG suggesting that glycation inhibition was responsible for restoration of differentially expressed proteins. Thus glycation inhibitors particularly AMG, HYD and MET extend yeast CLS by reducing AGEs, modulating the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and possibly by scavenging glucose.

  13. Running on empty: does mitochondrial DNA mutation limit replicative lifespan in yeast?: Mutations that increase the division rate of cells lacking mitochondrial DNA also extend replicative lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Cory D

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations escalate with increasing age in higher organisms. However, it has so far been difficult to experimentally determine whether mtDNA mutation merely correlates with age or directly limits lifespan. A recent study shows that budding yeast can also lose functional mtDNA late in life. Interestingly, independent studies of replicative lifespan (RLS) and of mtDNA-deficient cells show that the same mutations can increase both RLS and the division rate of yeast lacking the mitochondrial genome. These exciting, parallel findings imply a potential causal relationship between mtDNA mutation and replicative senescence. Furthermore, these results suggest more efficient methods for discovering genes that determine lifespan.

  14. Evolution of lifespan.

    PubMed

    Neill, David

    2014-10-07

    Present-day evolutionary theory, modern synthesis and evo-devo, appear to explain evolution. There remain however several points of contention. These include: biological time, direction, macroevolution verses microevolution, ageing and the extent of internal as opposed to external mediation. A new theoretical model for the control of biological time in vertebrates/bilaterians is introduced. Rather than biological time being controlled solely by a molecular cascade domino effect, it is suggested there is also an intracellular oscillatory clock. This clock (life's timekeeper) is synchronised across all cells in an organism and runs at a constant frequency throughout life. Slower frequencies extend lifespan, increase body/brain size and advance behaviour. They also create a time void which could aid additional evolutionary change. Faster frequencies shorten lifespan, reduce body/brain size and diminish behaviour. They are therefore less likely to mediate evolution in vertebrates/mammals. It is concluded that in vertebrates, especially mammals, there is a direction in evolution towards longer lifespan/advanced behaviour. Lifespan extension could equate with macroevolution and subsequent modifications with microevolution. As life's timekeeper controls the rate of ageing it constitutes a new genetic theory of ageing. Finally, as lifespan extension is internally mediated, this suggests a major role for internal mediation in evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The potential role of lamotrigine in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Large, Charles H; Webster, Elizabeth L; Goff, Donald C

    2005-09-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs are the drugs of choice for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, despite advances, no treatments have been established for patients who fail to improve with the most effective of these, clozapine. The inhibition of dopamine transmission through blockade of dopamine D2 receptors is considered to be essential for antipsychotic efficacy, but it is postulated that modulation of glutamate transmission may be equally important. In support of this, symptoms similar to schizophrenia can be induced in healthy volunteers using N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist drugs that are also known to enhance glutamate transmission. Furthermore, lamotrigine, which can modulate glutamate release, may add to or synergise with atypical antipsychotic drugs, some of which may themselves modulate glutamate transmission. We examine the evidence for the efficacy of lamotrigine. We consider how this fits with a glutamate neuron dysregulation hypothesis of the disorder. We discuss mechanisms by which lamotrigine might influence neuronal activity and glutamate transmission, and possible ways in which the drug might interact with antipsychotic medications. Data from four clinical studies support the efficacy of adjunctive lamotrigine in the treatment of schizophrenia. In addition, and consistent with a glutamate neuron dysregulation hypothesis of schizophrenia, lamotrigine can prevent the psychotic symptoms or behavioural disruption induced by NMDA receptor antagonists in healthy volunteers or rodents. The efficacy of lamotrigine is most likely explained within the framework of a glutamate neuron dysregulation hypothesis, and may arise primarily through the drugs ability to influence glutamate transmission and neural activity in the cortex. The drug is likely to act through inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels, though other molecular interactions cannot be ruled out. Lamotrigine may add to or synergise with some atypical antipsychotic drugs acting on

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays an increased growth rate and an extended replicative lifespan when grown under respiratory conditions in the presence of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kirchman, Paul A; Van Zee, Nicholas

    2017-09-01

    Individual cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have a limited replicative potential, referred to as the replicative lifespan. We have found that both the growth rate and average replicative lifespan of S. cerevisiae cells are greatly increased in the presence of a variety of bacteria. The growth and lifespan effects are not observable when yeast are allowed to ferment glucose but are only notable on solid media when yeast are forced to respire due to the lack of a fermentable carbon source. Growth near strains of Escherichia coli containing deletions of genes needed for the production of compounds used for quorum sensing or for the production of the siderophore enterobactin also still induced the lifespan extension in yeast. Furthermore, the bacterially induced increases in growth rate and lifespan occur even across gaps in the growth medium, indicating that the bacteria are influencing the yeast through the action of a volatile compound.

  17. Bmi-1 extends the lifespan of normal human oral keratinocytes by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Reuben H.; Lieberman, Mark B.; Lee, Rachel; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Mehrazarin, Shebli; Oh, Ju-Eun; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K.

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Bmi-1 extended the in vitro life span of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). We now report that the prolonged life span of NHOK by Bmi-1 is, in part, due to inhibition of the TGF-β signaling pathway. Serial subculture of NHOK resulted in replicative senescence and terminal differentiation, and activation of TGF-β signaling pathway. This was accompanied with enhanced intracellular and secreted TGF-β1 levels, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and increased expression of p15INK4B and p57KIP2. An ectopic expression of Bmi-1 in NHOK (HOK/Bmi-1) decreased intracellular and secreted TGF-β1 level, induced dephosphorylation of Smad2/3, and diminished the level of p15INK4B and p57KIP2. Moreover, Bmi-1 expression led to inhibition of TGF-β-responsive promoter activity in dose-specific manner. Knockdown of Bmi-1 in rapidly proliferating HOK/Bmi-1 and cancer cells increased the level of phosphorylated Smad2/3, p15INK4B and p57KIP2. In addition, an exposure of senescent NHOK to TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor or anti-TGF-β antibody resulted in enhanced replicative potential of cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Bmi-1 suppresses senescence of cells by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway in NHOK. PMID:20630502

  18. Restoring the youth of aged red blood cells and extending their lifespan in circulation by remodelling membrane sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Xiong; Tuo, Wei-Wei; Wang, Di; Kang, Li-Li; Chen, Xing-Yao; Luo, Man

    2016-02-01

    Membrane sialic acid (SA) plays an important role in the survival of red blood cells (RBCs), the age-related reduction in SA content negatively impacts both the structure and function of these cells. We have therefore suggested that remodelling the SA in the membrane of aged cells would help recover cellular functions characteristic of young RBCs. We developed an effective method for the re-sialylation of aged RBCs by which the cells were incubated with SA in the presence of cytidine triphosphate (CTP) and α-2,3-sialytransferase. We found that RBCs could be re-sialylated if they had available SA-binding groups and after the re-sialylation, aged RBCs could restore their membrane SA to the level in young RBCs. Once the membrane SA was restored, the aged RBCs showed recovery of their biophysical and biochemical properties to similar levels as in young RBCs. Their life span in circulation was also extended to twofold. Our findings indicate that remodelling membrane SA not only helps restore the youth of aged RBCs, but also helps recover injured RBCs.

  19. Why genes extending lifespan in model organisms have not been consistently associated with human longevity and what it means to translation research.

    PubMed

    de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2014-01-01

    A recent paper by Deelen et al. (2014) in Human Molecular Genetics reports the largest genome-wide association study of human longevity to date. While impressive, there is a remarkable lack of association of genes known to considerably extend lifespan in rodents with human longevity, both in this latest study and in genetic association studies in general. Here, I discuss several possible explanations, such as intrinsic limitations in longevity association studies and the complex genetic architecture of longevity. Yet one hypothesis is that the lack of correlation between longevity-associated genes in model organisms and genes associated with human longevity is, at least partly, due to intrinsic limitations and biases in animal studies. In particular, most studies in model organisms are conducted in strains of limited genetic diversity which are then not applicable to human populations. This has important implications and, together with other recent results demonstrating strain-specific longevity effects in rodents due to caloric restriction, it questions our capacity to translate the exciting findings from the genetics of aging to human therapies.

  20. Safety profile of lamotrigine in overdose

    PubMed Central

    Alabi, Akintunde; Todd, Adam; Husband, Andrew; Reilly, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant as well as a mood stabilizer. Apart from its established use in the treatment of epilepsy, there has been an expansion of its use in the treatment of mental disorders. Patients with epilepsy as well as those with mental disorders are at increased risk of deliberate drug overdoses. An evidence base for the safety profile of lamotrigine in overdose is an essential tool for prescribers. The objective of this study was to carry out a narrative synthesis of the existing evidence for the safety profile of lamotrigine in overdose. Methods: A systematic search was conducted of EMBASE (1974 to December 2015), MEDLINE (1946 to December 2015), PsycINFO (1806 to December 2015) and CINAHL (1981 to December 2015) databases. Studies were included in which there was a deliberate or accidental single drug overdose of lamotrigine, with its toxic effects described. Studies that did not involve an overdose were excluded. A narrative synthesis of the described toxic effects was carried out. Results: Out of 562 articles identified, 26 studies were included, mainly in the form of case reports and series. The most commonly described toxic effects of lamotrigine were on the central nervous system, specifically seizures, movement disorders and reduced consciousness. Other toxic effects included QTc interval and QRS complex prolongations, hypersensitivity reactions, serotonin syndrome as well as rhabdomyolysis possibly due to seizures and/or agitation. Deaths were recorded in two studies, with cardiovascular and neurological toxic effects described. Conclusions: Even though lamotrigine has been reported to be well tolerated, there is a risk of toxic effects which can be life threatening in overdose. This needs to be borne in mind when prescribing to patients at an increased risk of deliberate drug overdose. PMID:28008350

  1. Newer anticonvulsants: lamotrigine, topiramate and gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Lewis B; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia

    2012-08-01

    BACKGROUND The second generation antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), which include lamotrigine, topiramate, and gabapentin, have been introduced during the past 20 years. Because the newer AEDs differ in their pharmacokinetics from the first generation AEDs, it is hoped that the second generation AEDs will be less teratogenic. METHODS The findings in pregnancy cohorts and case-control studies concerning lamotrigine, topiramate and gabapentin-exposed pregnancies have been analyzed. RESULTS The rate of all malformations in lamotrigine monotherapy-exposed pregnancies has been between 2.0 and 5.6%, in comparison to baseline rates of 1.1 to 3.6% in two unexposed comparison groups. Compared to reference populations, a higher risk (0.4%) of isolated oral clefts has been observed in one cohort of 1562 lamotrigine-exposed pregnancies, but the risk was lower (0.1%) in other studies. In topiramate-exposed pregnancies, the rate of all malformations has been 4.2 to 4.9%, with an increase in oral clefts with and without other anomalies. The limited information available now for gabapentin has shown no evidence of teratogenicity. Concerning other developmental effects of these drugs, young children exposed to lamotrigine in utero have shown no deficits in cognitive function. Prenatal exposure to topiramate has been associated with an elevated frequency of small size for gestational age newborns. CONCLUSIONS The information available suggests an increased risk of oral clefts in infants exposed to topiramate, and perhaps lamotrigine, early in pregnancy, and of growth retardation for topiramate-exposed infants. Larger sample sizes are needed to clarify the questions that have been raised.

  2. Lamotrigine for acute and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an update of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. Some antiepileptic medicines have a place in the treatment of neuropathic pain (pain due to nerve damage). This updated review adds five new additional studies looking at evidence for Lamotrigine as an effective treatment for acute and chronic pain. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of the antiepileptic drug lamotrigine in acute and chronic pain. Search methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of lamotrigine in acute, and chronic pain (including cancer pain) were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL up to January 2011. Additional studies were sought from the reference list of the retrieved papers. Selection criteria RCTs investigating the use of lamotrigine (any dose, by any route, and for any study duration) for the treatment of acute or chronic pain. Assessment of pain intensity or pain relief, or both, using validated scales. Participants were adults aged 18 and over. Only full journal publication articles were included. Data collection and analysis Dichotomous data (ideally for the outcome of at least 50% pain relief) were used to calculate relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. Meta-analysis was undertaken using a fixed-effect model. Numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNTs) were calculated as the reciprocal of the absolute risk reduction. For unwanted effects, the NNT becomes the number needed to harm (NNH) and was calculated. Main results Twelve included studies in 11 publications (1511 participants), all with chronic neuropathic pain: central post stroke pain (1), chemotherapy induced neuropathic pain (1), diabetic neuropathy (4), HIV related neuropathy (2), mixed neuropathic pain (2), spinal cord injury related pain (1), and trigeminal neuralgia (1); none investigated lamotrigine in acute pain. The update had five additional studies (1111 additional participants). Participants were aged between 26 and 77 years. Study duration

  3. Behavioral Senescence and Aging-Related Changes in Motor Neurons and Brain Neuromodulator Levels Are Ameliorated by Lifespan-Extending Reproductive Dormancy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Sifang; Broughton, Susan; Nässel, Dick R.

    2017-01-01

    The lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster can be extended substantially by inducing reproductive dormancy (also known as diapause) by lowered temperature and short days. This increase of longevity is accompanied by lowered metabolism and increased stress tolerance. We ask here whether behavioral senescence is ameliorated during adult dormancy. To study this we kept flies for seven or more weeks in normal rearing conditions or in diapause conditions and compared to 1-week-old flies in different behavioral assays of sleep, negative geotaxis and exploratory walking. We found that the senescence of geotaxis and locomotor behavior seen under normal rearing conditions was negligible in flies kept in dormancy. The normal senescence of rhythmic activity and sleep patterns during the daytime was also reduced by adult dormancy. Investigating the morphology of specific neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we found that changes normally seen with aging do not take place in dormant flies. To monitor age-associated changes in neuronal circuits regulating activity rhythms, sleep and walking behavior we applied antisera to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), serotonin and several neuropeptides to examine changes in expression levels and neuron morphology. In most neuron types the levels of stored neuromodulators decreased during normal aging, but not in diapause treated flies. No signs of neurodegeneration were seen in either condition. Our data suggest that age-related changes in motor neurons could be the cause of part of the behavioral senescence and that this is ameliorated by reproductive diapause. Earlier studies established a link between age-associated decreases in neuromodulator levels and behavioral decline that could be rescued by overexpression of neuromodulator. Thus, it is likely that the retained levels of neuromodulators in dormant flies alleviate behavioral senescence. PMID:28503133

  4. Behavioral Senescence and Aging-Related Changes in Motor Neurons and Brain Neuromodulator Levels Are Ameliorated by Lifespan-Extending Reproductive Dormancy in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sifang; Broughton, Susan; Nässel, Dick R

    2017-01-01

    The lifespan of Drosophilamelanogaster can be extended substantially by inducing reproductive dormancy (also known as diapause) by lowered temperature and short days. This increase of longevity is accompanied by lowered metabolism and increased stress tolerance. We ask here whether behavioral senescence is ameliorated during adult dormancy. To study this we kept flies for seven or more weeks in normal rearing conditions or in diapause conditions and compared to 1-week-old flies in different behavioral assays of sleep, negative geotaxis and exploratory walking. We found that the senescence of geotaxis and locomotor behavior seen under normal rearing conditions was negligible in flies kept in dormancy. The normal senescence of rhythmic activity and sleep patterns during the daytime was also reduced by adult dormancy. Investigating the morphology of specific neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we found that changes normally seen with aging do not take place in dormant flies. To monitor age-associated changes in neuronal circuits regulating activity rhythms, sleep and walking behavior we applied antisera to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), serotonin and several neuropeptides to examine changes in expression levels and neuron morphology. In most neuron types the levels of stored neuromodulators decreased during normal aging, but not in diapause treated flies. No signs of neurodegeneration were seen in either condition. Our data suggest that age-related changes in motor neurons could be the cause of part of the behavioral senescence and that this is ameliorated by reproductive diapause. Earlier studies established a link between age-associated decreases in neuromodulator levels and behavioral decline that could be rescued by overexpression of neuromodulator. Thus, it is likely that the retained levels of neuromodulators in dormant flies alleviate behavioral senescence.

  5. Influence of cirrhosis on lamotrigine pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Marcellin, P; de Bony, F; Garret, C; Altman, C; Boige, V; Castelnau, C; Laurent-Puig, P; Trinchet, J C; Rolan, P; Chen, C; Mamet, J P; Bidault, R

    2001-01-01

    Aims Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, is cleared from the systemic circulation mainly by glucuronidation. The possibility of changes in the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine in plasma owing to hepatic dysfunction has been evaluated. Methods Thirty-six subjects, including 24 patients with various degrees of liver cirrhosis and 12 healthy volunteers received a single 100 mg dose of lamotrgine. Blood samples were taken for 7 days in all subjects, except nine with severe cirrhosis, who had a 29 day blood sampling period. Results The pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine were comparable between the patients with moderate cirrhosis (corresponding to Child-Pugh grade A) and the healthy subjects. Plasma oral clearance mean ratios (90% confidence interval) in patients with severe cirrhosis without or with ascites (corresponding, respectively, to Child-Pugh grade B and C) to healthy subjects were, respectively, 60% (44%, 83%) and 36% (25%, 52%). Plasma half-life mean ratios (90% confidence interval) in these two patient groups to healthy subjects were, respectively, 204% (149%, 278%) and 287% (202%, 408%). Conclusions Lamotrigine administered as a single oral dose of 100 mg was well tolerated in all groups. Initial, escalation and maintenance doses should generally be reduced by approximately 50 or 75% in patients with Child-Pugh Grade B or C cirrhosis. Escalation and maintenance doses should be adjusted according to clinical response. PMID:11421997

  6. Animal lifespan and human influence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.; Yang, S.

    2002-01-01

    Lifespan differs radically among organisms ever lived on earth, even among those roughly similar in size, shape, form, and physiology; Yet, in general, there exists a strong positive relationship between lifespan and body size. Although lifespans of humans and human-related (domestic) animals are becoming increasingly longer than that of other animals of similar sizes, the slope of the regression (lifespan-body size) line and the intercepts have been surprisingly stable over the course of the dramatic human population growth, indicating substantial depression in lifespans of many other animals probably due to shrunk and fragmented natural habitats. This article addresses two questions related to the lifespan-size relationship: (1) what caused the exceptions (e.g., a few remote human-related animals are also located above the regression line with great residuals) and why (e.g., could brain size or intelligence be a covariate in addition to body size in predicting lifespan?), and (2) whether continued human activities can eventually alter the ' natural' regression line in the future, and if so, how much. We also suggest similar research efforts to be extended to the plant world as well.

  7. β-Guanidinopropionic acid extends the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster via an AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent increase in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si; Long, Li-Hong; Li, Di; Zhang, Jian-Kang; Jin, Shan; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls autophagy through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and Unc-51 like kinase 1 (ULK1/Atg1) signaling, which augments the quality of cellular housekeeping, and that β-guanidinopropionic acid (β-GPA), a creatine analog, leads to a chronic activation of AMPK. However, the relationship between β-GPA and aging remains elusive. In this study, we hypothesized that feeding β-GPA to adult Drosophila produces the lifespan extension via activation of AMPK-dependent autophagy. It was found that dietary administration of β-GPA at a concentration higher than 900 mm induced a significant extension of the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster in repeated experiments. Furthermore, we found that Atg8 protein, the homolog of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) and a biomarker of autophagy in Drosophila, was significantly upregulated by β-GPA treatment, indicating that autophagic activity plays a role in the effect of β-GPA. On the other hand, when the expression of Atg5 protein, an essential protein for autophagy, was reduced by RNA interference (RNAi), the effect of β-GPA on lifespan extension was abolished. Moreover, we found that AMPK was also involved in this process. β-GPA treatment significantly elevated the expression of phospho-T172-AMPK levels, while inhibition of AMPK by either AMPK-RNAi or compound C significantly attenuated the expression of autophagy-related proteins and lifespan extension in Drosophila. Taken together, our results suggest that β-GPA can induce an extension of the lifespan of Drosophila via AMPK-Atg1-autophagy signaling pathway. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Long-term tolerability and efficacy of lamotrigine in pediatric patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Duchowny, Michael; Gilman, Jamie; Messenheimer, John; Womble, Gilda; Risner, Marcus

    2002-04-01

    Accumulating data suggest that the antiepilepsy drug lamotrigine, which has been available for adult use for more than a decade, also confers broad-spectrum, well-tolerated control of epilepsy in children. The current study--the open-label continuation phase of several short-term clinical trials--was conducted to assess the long-term tolerability and efficacy of lamotrigine as open-label adjunctive therapy or monotherapy in pediatric patients for a variety of seizure types and syndromes including partial seizures, absence seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Clinic visits occurred every 24 weeks throughout the treatment period. A total of 252 patients under 16 years of age were enrolled in the study. The numbers of patients exposed to at least 48 weeks, 96 weeks, and 144 weeks of treatment with lamotrigine were 185 (73.4%), 119 (47.2%), and 60 (23.8%), respectively, for an average duration of exposure of 96.7 weeks. The most common adverse events considered by the investigator to be drug related were dizziness (9.1%), somnolence (7.9%), nausea (6.3%), vomiting (5.2%), and headache (5.2%). The most common serious adverse events (regardless of suspected cause) included pneumonia (3.0%) and infection (1.9%). Investigators judged that the overall clinical status of three-fourths of the patients had improved at treatment weeks 48 and 96 relative to prelamotrigine clinical status. Lamotrigine administered as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy for an average of 2 years (96.7 weeks) was well tolerated and effective in pediatric patients with partial or generalized epilepsy. These results complement and extend the large body of data demonstrating the tolerability and efficacy of lamotrigine with short- and long-term use in adults.

  9. Lamotrigine administration in panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Papadimitriou, George N; Oulis, Panagiotis

    2010-05-01

    Several anticonvulsants, although as yet not lamotrigine (LTG), have been found useful in the treatment of panic disorder with (PDA) or without agoraphobia. We administered LTG (200 mg/d) to 4 outpatients with PDA, as an augmentation therapy (3 patients with chronic and severe agoraphobia) or monotherapy (1 drug-naive patient with first-onset PDA) in a 14-week trial. The patient under LTG monotherapy improved significantly, whereas PDA symptoms in 2 of the other patients improved to some extent.

  10. Fragile lifespan expansion by dietary mitohormesis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Tauffenberger, Arnaud; Vaccaro, Alexandra; Parker, J Alex

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is central to longevity and an imbalance in mitonuclear protein homeostasis activates a protective response called the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). Toxic compounds damaging mitochondria trigger the UPRmt, but at sublethal doses these insults extend lifespan in simple animals like C. elegans. Mitochondria are the main energy suppliers in eukaryotes, but it is not known if diet influences the UPRmt. High dietary glucose reduces lifespan in worms, and we show that high dietary glucose activates the UPRmt to protect against lifespan reduction. While lifelong exposure to glucose reduces lifespan, glucose exposure restricted to developing animals extends lifespan and requires the UPRmt. However, this lifespan extension is abolished by further mitochondrial stress in adult animals. We demonstrate that dietary conditions regulate mitochondrial homeostasis, where induction of the UPRmt during development extends lifespan, but prolonged activation into adulthood reduces lifespan.

  11. The long-term effects of a life-prolonging heat treatment on the Drosophila melanogaster transcriptome suggest that heat shock proteins extend lifespan.

    PubMed

    Sarup, P; Sørensen, P; Loeschcke, V

    2014-02-01

    Heat-induced hormesis, i.e. the beneficial effect of mild heat-induced stress, increases the average lifespan of many organisms. This effect, which depends on the heat shock factor, decreases the log mortality rate weeks after the stress has ceased. To identify candidate genes that mediate this lifespan-prolonging effect late in life, we treated flies with mild heat stress (34 °C for 2 h) 3 times early in life and compared the transcriptomic response in these flies versus non-heat-treated controls 10-51 days after the last heat treatment. We found significant transcriptomic changes in the heat-treated flies. Several hsp70 probe sets were up-regulated 1.7-2-fold in the mildly stressed flies weeks after the last heat treatment (P<0.01). This result was unexpected as the major Drosophila heat shock protein, Hsp70, is reported to return to normal levels of expression shortly after heat stress. We conclude that the heat shock response, and Hsp70 in particular, may be central to the heat-induced increase in the average lifespan in flies that are exposed to mild heat stress early in life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The tolerability of lamotrigine in elderly patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, L; Gomez, G; O'Neill, F; Hammer, A E; Risner, M

    2001-01-01

    To determine the tolerability of lamotrigine in elderly patients with epilepsy. Pooled data from 13 lamotrigine clinical trials. Multicentre clinical trials conducted in primary care and neurology practices. 208 elderly patients (aged > or = 65 years) were identified: 146 lamotrigine-treated patients, 53 carbamazepine-treated patients and 9 phenytoin-treated patients. Extent of exposure, incidence of drug-related adverse events, serious adverse events and study withdrawals were examined. The median duration of exposure for lamotrigine monotherapy and add-on therapy was 24.1 and 47.4 weeks, respectively. The median daily dosage of lamotrigine was 100 mg for monotherapy (range 75 to 500 mg) and 300 mg for add-on therapy (range 25 to 700 mg). Overall, the incidence of drug-related adverse events was lower for lamotrigine than comparator drugs: 49% (72/146) for lamotrigine compared with 72% (38/53) for carbamazepine (p = 0.006), and 89% (8/9) for phenytoin (p = 0.035) although patient numbers in each treatment group were not comparable. Patients receiving lamotrigine reported incidences of somnolence (p = 0.012), rash (p = 0.034), and headache (nonsignificant) that were one-half the incidence reported with carbamazepine monotherapy. Rash was the most common reason for study withdrawal: 4% (6/146) lamotrigine, 17% (9/53) carbamazepine and 0% phenytoin. Seven (5%, 7/146) lamotrigine-treated patients, 4 (8%, 4/53) carbamazepine-treated patients and 1 (11%, 1/9) phenytoin-treated patient experienced drug-related serious adverse events. Lamotrigine, used in the currently prescribed adult dosage regimen, was well tolerated in elderly patients with epilepsy.

  13. Lamotrigine Dosing for Pregnant Patients With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Crystal T.; Klein, Autumn M.; Perel, James M.; Helsel, Joseph; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little information is available on the need for dosage changes for lamotrigine in pregnant women with bipolar disorder. The authors present new data on serial serum levels of lamotrigine in pregnant patients on lamotrigine monotherapy. They also review the epilepsy literature on use of lamotrigine during pregnancy. Method Lamotrigine serum samples were obtained from eight mother-infant pairs at different time points during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Results All of the women were taking lamotrigine throughout pregnancy. Serum-level-to-dose ratios were lower during pregnancy than the postpartum period. Lamotrigine was taken once daily in doses ranging from 100 mg to 300 mg. Three patients had an increase of 50 mg to their daily dose across pregnancy. The change in serum lamotrigine levels in the postpartum period ranged from a 30% decrease to a 640% increase compared with the first level obtained during pregnancy. Level-to-dose ratios obtained within 4 weeks after delivery reflected a mean level 402% greater than the baseline level during gestation. Compared with the third trimester, lamotrigine serum concentration increased an average of 154% within 5 weeks after delivery. The most dramatic increase in lamotrigine serum level early after delivery occurred at 1.5 weeks. The mean infant cord level was 66% of the maternal serum level at delivery. The mean breast-fed infant serum level was 32.5% of the maternal serum levels. Conclusions The pattern of lamotrigine changes during pregnancy in these women with bipolar disorder was consistent with that described in the epilepsy literature. PMID:24185239

  14. Bimodal Gastroretentive Drug Delivery Systems of Lamotrigine: Formulation and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Poonuru, R. R.; Gonugunta, C. S. R

    2014-01-01

    Gastroretentive bimodal drug delivery systems of lamotrigine were developed using immediate release and extended release segments incorporated in a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose capsule and in vitro and in vivo evaluations were conducted. In vivo radiographic studies were carried out for the optimized formulation in healthy human volunteers with replacement of drug polymer complex by barium sulphate and the floating time was noted. Here the immediate release segment worked as loading dose and extended release segment as maintenance dose. The results of release studies of formulations with hydrophillic matrix to formulations with dual matrix hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate shown that as the percentage of polymer increased, the release decreased. Selected formulation F2 having F-Melt has successfully released the drug within one hour and hydrophillic matrix composing polyethylene oxide with 5% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate showed a lag time of one hour and then extended its release up to 12th hour with 99.59% drug release following zero order kinetics with R2 value of 0.989. The Korsmeyer-Peppas equation showed the R2 value to be 0.941 and n value was 1.606 following non-Fickian diffusion pattern with supercase II relaxation mechanism. Here from extended release tablet the drug released slowly from the matrix while floating. PMID:25593380

  15. Generic Substitution of Lamotrigine Among Medicaid Patients with Diverse Indications

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Daniel M.; Middleton, Luke; Svoboda, Leanne; McGregor, Jessina C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Controversy exists about the safety of substituting generic anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Lamotrigine, the prototypical newer AED, is often used for psychiatric and neurological conditions other than epilepsy. The safety of generic substitution of lamotrigine in diverse populations of AED users is unclear. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate potential associations between generic substitution of lamotrigine and adverse consequences in a population of diverse users of this drug. Study Design This study was a retrospective cohort-crossover design using state Medicaid claims data from July 2006 through June 2009. Methods Subjects were included in the cohort if they converted from brand to generic lamotrigine and had 2 years of lamotrigine use prior to conversion. The frequency of emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and condition-specific ED visits or hospitalizations were recorded in the 60 days immediately following the conversion to generic lamotrigine, then compared with the incidence of the same events during a randomly selected time period indexed to one of the patient’s past refills of branded lamotrigine. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to quantify the association between generic conversion and health services utilization while controlling for changes in lamotrigine dose and concurrent drug use. Results Of the 616 unique subjects included in this analysis, epilepsy was the most common diagnosis (41%), followed by bipolar disorder (32%), pain (30%) and migraine (18%). Conversion to generic lamotrigine was not associated with a statistically significant increase in the odds of an ED visit (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.92, 1.97), hospitalization (AOR = 1.21; 95% CI 0.60, 2.50) or condition-specific encounter (AOR 1.75; 95 CI 0.87, 3.51). Conclusions A statistically significant increase in ED visits, hospitalizations or condition-specific encounters was not

  16. Biopharmaceutic Risk Assessment of Brand and Generic Lamotrigine Tablets.

    PubMed

    Vaithianathan, Soundarya; Raman, Siddarth; Jiang, Wenlei; Ting, Tricia Y; Kane, Maureen A; Polli, James E

    2015-07-06

    The therapeutic equivalence of generic and brand name antiepileptic drugs has been questioned by neurologists and the epilepsy community. A potential contributor to such concerns is pharmaceutical quality. The objective was to assess the biopharmaceutic risk of brand name Lamictal 100 mg tablets and generic lamotrigine 100 mg tablets from several manufacturers. Lamotrigine was characterized in terms of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), including aqueous solubility and Caco-2 permeability. A panel of pharmaceutical quality tests was also performed on three batches of Lamictal, three batches of Teva generic, and one batch of each of four other generics: appearance, identity, assay, impurity, uniformity of dosage units, disintegration, dissolution, friability, and loss on drying. These market surveillance results indicate that all brand name and generic lamotrigine 100 mg tablets passed all tests and showed acceptable pharmaceutical quality and low biopharmaceutic risk. Lamotrigine was classified as a BCS class IIb drug, exhibiting pH-dependent aqueous solubility and dissolution. At pH 1.2 and 4.5, lamotrigine exhibited high solubility, whereas lamotrigine exhibited low solubility at pH 6.8, including non-sink dissolution. Lamotrigine showed high Caco-2 permeability. The apparent permeability (Papp) of lamotrigine was (73.7 ± 8.7) × 10(-6) cm/s in the apical-to-basolateral (AP-BL) direction and (41.4 ± 1.6) × 10(-6) cm/s in the BL-AP direction, which were higher than metoprolol's AP-BL Papp of (21.2 ± 0.9) × 10(-6) cm/s and BL-AP Papp of (34.6 ± 4.6) × 10(-6) cm/s. Overall, lamotrigine's favorable biopharmaceutics from a drug substance perspective and favorable quality characteristics from a tablet formulation perspective suggest that multisource lamotrigine tablets exhibit a low biopharmaceutic risk.

  17. Concerns regarding lamotrigine and breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Liporace, Joyce; Kao, Amy; D'Abreu, Anelyssa

    2004-02-01

    Many women with epilepsy who are planning a pregnancy are treated with lamotrigine (LTG), resulting in greater fetal exposure to the drug. Current care guidelines suggest that mothers with epilepsy breast-feed their children. These recommendations are made without regard to how nursing newborns metabolize medication. Lamotrigine is extensively metabolized by glucuronidation, which is immature in neonates and may lead to accumulation of medication. This article reports LTG levels in full-term nursing newborns born to mothers with epilepsy on lamotrigine monotherapy. Serum LTG levels were obtained in nursing mothers and their neonates on Day 10 of life. Maternal LTG clearance during pregnancy and postpartum was determined and correlated with levels. Four mothers with partial epilepsy on LTG monotherapy were evaluated. Serum LTG levels in nursing newborns ranged from <1.0 to 2.0 microg/mL on Day 10 of life. Three babies had LTG levels >1.0 microg/mL. After excluding one child with an undetectable level, the LTG levels in newborns were on average 30% (range 20-43%) of the maternal drug level. No decline was noted in two children with repeat levels at 2 months. Serum concentrations of LTG in breast-fed children were higher than expected, in some cases reaching "therapeutic" ranges. These high levels may be explained by poor neonatal drug elimination due to inefficient glucuronidation. Our observation that not all newborns had a high LTG level suggests considerable genetic variability in metabolism. Our limited data suggest monitoring blood levels in nursing children and the need for individual counseling for women with epilepsy regarding breast-feeding.

  18. [Lyell syndrome and Stevens-Johnson syndrome caused by lamotrigine].

    PubMed

    Bocquet, H; Farmer, M; Bressieux, J M; Barzegar, C; Jullien, M; Soto, B; Roujeau, J C; Revuz, J

    1999-01-01

    Lamotrigine is a new anticonvulsant belonging to the triazine family. Several cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) have been described in patients taking this drug. We report 2 cases in children attending the same hospital. Two children, aged 9 and 13 years, developed SJS and TEN respectively, 3 and 28 days after lamotrigine was added to their usual anticonvulsant regimen. In both cases, outcome was favorable despite major decline in psychomotor capacity in one. In the first case, chronological attributability was plausible for lamotrigine and doubtful for sodium valproate, clonazepam and hydrocortisone. In the second case, chronological attributability was probable for amoxicillin, plausible for lamotrigine and doubtful for sodium valproate, but the numerous previous absorptions of amoxicillin made lamotrigine more suspect. The risk of Steven-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis is high with lamotrigine with an estimated frequency of 1/1000. This risk is probably higher than with other anticonvulsants. Associating lamotrigine with sodium valproate increases the frequency of adverse skin reactions.

  19. Hyponatraemia associated with lamotrigine in cranial diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Mewasingh, L; Aylett, S; Kirkham, F; Stanhope, R

    2000-08-19

    We report the cases of two children with cranial diabetes insipidus who were treated with lamotrigine for seizures and who had accompanying changes in desmopressin requirements. Lamotrigine is a new anticonvulsant chemically unrelated to other existing antiepileptic drugs. Studies suggest it acts at voltage-sensitive sodium channels and also decreases calcium conductance. Both of these mechanisms of action are shared by carbamazepine, which can cause hyponatraemia secondary to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. It is possible that the effect of lamotrigine on fluid balance in the cases described is also centrally mediated.

  20. Life-threatening overdose with lamotrigine, citalopram, and chlorpheniramine.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, N; O'Neil, D; Hall, A P

    2008-01-01

    Lamotrigine is a commonly used agent for seizure control in epilepsy. There are limited data on the adverse effects of lamotrigine in overdose. We report a number of serious side-effects associated with a large overdose of lamotrigine. A 23-year-old female presented to the emergency department after taking an intentional overdose of 9.2 g of lamotrigine, 56 mg of chlorpheniramine, and 220 mg of citalopram. On admission, she had a reduced level of consciousness and electrocardiographic abnormalities; a widened QRS and a prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval. Prompt treatment with early intubation, along with the use of magnesium for cardioprotection and administration of sodium bicarbonate may have aided in a quick recovery with a short intensive care stay and good outcome.

  1. Lamotrigine monotherapy for control of neuralgia after nerve section.

    PubMed

    Sandner-Kiesling, A; Rumpold Seitlinger, G; Dorn, C; Koch, H; Schwarz, G

    2002-11-01

    We present six patients treated only with the new-generation anticonvulsant lamotrigine to define its sole effect on neuralgia after nerve section. Previous surgical or pharmacological attempts failed to relieve this neuropathic pain in our patients. Before initiation of lamotrigine therapy, patients reported spontaneous and touch-evoked shooting pain followed by periods of burning pain. No breakthrough medication was needed during the maintenance phase of 1-23 months. Data were acquired by a pain diary on a weekly basis. With 75-300 mg of lamotrigine per day, the burning and shooting pain intensity was relieved by 33-100%. Most obviously, the attack frequency of the shooting pain was reduced by 80-100%. No adverse effects were observed. We conclude that lamotrigine may be beneficial in the treatment of neuralgia after nerve section following the failure of previous pharmacological or surgical attempts.

  2. Methionine restriction and lifespan control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending lifespan. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with/without adequate nutrition (e.g. particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend lifespan in various model organisms. We discuss beneficial effects of methionine-restricted (MR) diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions. PMID:26663138

  3. A high-fat jelly diet restores bioenergetic balance and extends lifespan in the presence of motor dysfunction and lumbar spinal cord motor neuron loss in TDP-43A315T mutant C57BL6/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Karen S.; Halang, Luise; Woods, Ina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transgenic transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) mice expressing the A315T mutation under control of the murine prion promoter progressively develop motor function deficits and are considered a new model for the study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, premature sudden death resulting from intestinal obstruction halts disease phenotype progression in 100% of C57BL6/J congenic TDP-43A315T mice. Similar to our recent results in SOD1G93A mice, TDP-43A315T mice fed a standard pellet diet showed increased 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation at postnatal day (P)80, indicating elevated energetic stress during disease progression. We therefore investigated the effects of a high-fat jelly diet on bioenergetic status and lifespan in TDP-43A315T mice. In contrast to standard pellet-fed mice, mice fed high-fat jelly showed no difference in AMPK activation up to P120 and decreased phosphorylation of acetly-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at early-stage time points. Exposure to a high-fat jelly diet prevented sudden death and extended survival, allowing development of a motor neuron disease phenotype with significantly decreased body weight from P80 onward that was characterised by deficits in Rotarod abilities and stride length measurements. Development of this phenotype was associated with a significant motor neuron loss as assessed by Nissl staining in the lumbar spinal cord. Our work suggests that a high-fat jelly diet improves the pre-clinical utility of the TDP-43A315T model by extending lifespan and allowing the motor neuron disease phenotype to progress, and indicates the potential benefit of this diet in TDP-43-associated ALS. PMID:27491077

  4. A high-fat jelly diet restores bioenergetic balance and extends lifespan in the presence of motor dysfunction and lumbar spinal cord motor neuron loss in TDP-43A315T mutant C57BL6/J mice.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Karen S; Halang, Luise; Woods, Ina; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2016-09-01

    Transgenic transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) mice expressing the A315T mutation under control of the murine prion promoter progressively develop motor function deficits and are considered a new model for the study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, premature sudden death resulting from intestinal obstruction halts disease phenotype progression in 100% of C57BL6/J congenic TDP-43(A315T) mice. Similar to our recent results in SOD1(G93A) mice, TDP-43(A315T) mice fed a standard pellet diet showed increased 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation at postnatal day (P)80, indicating elevated energetic stress during disease progression. We therefore investigated the effects of a high-fat jelly diet on bioenergetic status and lifespan in TDP-43(A315T) mice. In contrast to standard pellet-fed mice, mice fed high-fat jelly showed no difference in AMPK activation up to P120 and decreased phosphorylation of acetly-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at early-stage time points. Exposure to a high-fat jelly diet prevented sudden death and extended survival, allowing development of a motor neuron disease phenotype with significantly decreased body weight from P80 onward that was characterised by deficits in Rotarod abilities and stride length measurements. Development of this phenotype was associated with a significant motor neuron loss as assessed by Nissl staining in the lumbar spinal cord. Our work suggests that a high-fat jelly diet improves the pre-clinical utility of the TDP-43(A315T) model by extending lifespan and allowing the motor neuron disease phenotype to progress, and indicates the potential benefit of this diet in TDP-43-associated ALS.

  5. Pharmacological Lifespan Extension of Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lucanic, Mark; Lithgow, Gordon J.; Alavez, Silvestre

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying small, drug-like compounds that slow aging in multiple species, particularly in mammals. Such compounds may prove to be useful in treating and retarding age-related disease in humans. Just as invertebrate models have been essential in helping us understand the genetic pathways that control aging, these model organisms are also proving valuable in discovering chemical compounds that influence longevity. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has numerous advantages for such studies including its short lifespan and has been exploited by a number of investigators to find compounds that impact aging. Here, we summarize the progress being made in identifying compounds that extend the lifespan of invertebrates, and introduce the challenges we face in translating this research into human therapies. PMID:22771382

  6. Brugada pattern in a patient medicated with lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rita; Amador, Pedro; Rassi, Leandro; Seixo, Filipe; Parreira, Leonor; Fonseca, Nuno; Soares, Luís

    2013-10-01

    The authors report the case of a 52-year-old woman with depressive syndrome, treated with lamotrigine for about five months, who went to the emergency department for atypical precordial pain. The electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed a 2-mm downsloping ST-segment elevation and negative T waves in V1 and V2. Due to suspicion of ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome, cardiac catheterization was performed, which revealed normal coronary arteries. The initial ECG was suggestive of type 1 Brugada pattern, but subsequent serial ECGs were less typical. A flecainide test showed the same pattern. After discontinuation of lamotrigine reversal of the typical Brugada ECG pattern was observed. Although not currently contraindicated in Brugada syndrome, the antidepressant lamotrigine blocks sodium channels, which are usually inactivated in heart cell membranes in Brugada syndrome, and may be responsible for the expression of type 1 Brugada pattern. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. A rare case of lamotrigine-induced acute interstitial nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Atul; Assalie, Nour Abou; Gupta, Rajib K.; del Pilar Morales, Maria; Conti, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Medications, especially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antimicrobials, have been most commonly associated with acute interstitial nephritis (AIN); antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are rarely known to cause AIN. This is a case of a 27-year-old male who was recently started on treatment with lamotrigine for bipolar disorder and was found to have rapidly progressive renal failure. Renal biopsy features were suggestive of AIN. Lamotrigine-induced AIN was suspected to be the most likely cause. Discontinuation of the drug and treatment with steroids resulted in complete renal recovery. Lamotrigine use has been recently gaining popularity, not only as an AED but also as a mood stabilizer. With the use of this drug becoming more popular, it is important to emphasize that – although rare – AIN is one of its potential complications. PMID:27987281

  8. Liver dysfunction induced by systemic hypersensitivity reaction to lamotrigine: case report.

    PubMed

    Im, Sung Gyu; Yoo, Sun Hong; Park, Young Min; Lee, Sang Jin; Jang, Sun Kyung; Jeon, Dong Ok; Cho, Hyo Jin; Oh, Mi Jung

    2015-06-01

    Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant drug used to treat partial and generalized seizure disorders. Hypersensitivity to lamotrigine usually causes mild symptoms such as fever, rash, and slight invasion of internal organs. However, a 33-year-old male patient who was admitted with Stevens-Johnson syndrome after taking lamotrigine for 15 days experienced hepatic failure and died 5 days after admission. This case demonstrates the importance of realizing that lamotrigine can lead to fatal hepatic failure, and that tests for the normal liver function should be performed when administering lamotrigine.

  9. Resveratrol and Lifespan in Model Organisms.

    PubMed

    Pallauf, Kathrin; Rimbach, Gerald; Rupp, Petra Maria; Chin, Dawn; Wolf, Insa M A

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol may possess life-prolonging and health-benefitting properties, some of which may resemble the effect of caloric restriction (CR). CR appears to prolong the lifespan of model organisms in some studies and may benefit human health. However, for humans, restricting food intake for an extended period of time seems impracticable and substances imitating the beneficial effects of CR without having to reduce food intake could improve health in an aging and overweight population. We have reviewed the literature studying the influence of resveratrol on the lifespan of model organisms including yeast, flies, worms, and rodents. We summarize the in vivo findings, describe modulations of molecular targets and gene expression observed in vivo and in vitro, and discuss how these changes may contribute to lifespan extension. Data from clinical studies are summarized to provide an insight about the potential of resveratrol supplementation in humans. Resveratrol supplementation has been shown to prolong lifespan in approximately 60% of the studies conducted in model organisms. However, current literature is contradictory, indicating that the lifespan effects of resveratrol vary strongly depending on the model organism. While worms and killifish seemed very responsive to resveratrol, resveratrol failed to affect lifespan in the majority of the studies conducted in flies and mice. Furthermore, factors such as dose, gender, genetic background and diet composition may contribute to the high variance in the observed effects. It remains inconclusive whether resveratrol is indeed a CR mimetic and possesses life-prolonging properties. The limited bioavailability of resveratrol may further impede its potential effects.

  10. Effects of pregnancy and contraception on lamotrigine disposition: new insights through analysis of lamotrigine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ohman, Inger; Luef, Gerhard; Tomson, Torbjörn

    2008-03-01

    To investigate possible underlying mechanisms for alterations in lamotrigine (LTG) kinetics by gestation and use of contraceptives. Plasma concentrations of LTG and its main metabolite lamotrigine-2-N-glucuronide (2-N-GLUC) were measured in 31 women on LTG taking combined oral contraceptives (COC), in 12 with contraceptive intrauterine devices containing levonorgestrel (CIUD), and in 20 on LTG without hormonal contraception (controls). We also measured the levels of LTG and 2-N-GLUC in plasma and urine in eight women during pregnancy, and up to three months postpartum. LTG levels in plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography method (HPLC) and N-2-GLUC in urine and plasma and LTG in urine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). There were no significant differences in LTG dose/concentration (D/C), or N-2-GLUC/LTG ratios between women with CIUD and controls. In contrast, compared to controls, the LTG D/C ratio was 56% higher in women taking COC (mean+/-SD, 83+/-47 versus 53.0+/-24.2; p<0.01) and N-2-GLUC/LTG ratio 82% higher in women taking COC (mean 0.477+/-0.212 SD versus 0.262+/-0.127; p<0.0003. The 2-GLUC/LTG ratios were 154% higher in plasma and 122% higher in urine in late pregnancy compared with baseline 3months postpartum. Our data indicate that the alterations in LTG kinetics in pregnancy as well as those induced by COC are mainly explained by enzymatic induction of the N-2-glucuronide pathway. In addition we found no evidence for an interaction between LTG and CIUD.

  11. Ethosuximide, Valproic Acid, and Lamotrigine in Childhood Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Tracy A.; Cnaan, Avital; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hirtz, Deborah G.; Dlugos, Dennis; Masur, David; Clark, Peggy O.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Adamson, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Childhood absence epilepsy, the most common pediatric epilepsy syndrome, is usually treated with ethosuximide, valproic acid, or lamotrigine. The most efficacious and tolerable initial empirical treatment has not been defined. METHODS In a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial, we compared the efficacy, tolerability, and neuropsychological effects of ethosuximide, valproic acid, and lamotrigine in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy. Drug doses were incrementally increased until the child was free of seizures, the maximal allowable or highest tolerable dose was reached, or a criterion indicating treatment failure was met. The primary outcome was freedom from treatment failure after 16 weeks of therapy; the secondary outcome was attentional dysfunction. Differential drug effects were determined by means of pairwise comparisons. RESULTS The 453 children who were randomly assigned to treatment with ethosuximide (156), lamotrigine (149), or valproic acid (148) were similar with respect to their demographic characteristics. After 16 weeks of therapy, the freedom-from-failure rates for ethosuximide and valproic acid were similar (53% and 58%, respectively; odds ratio with valproic acid vs. ethosuximide, 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 1.98; P = 0.35) and were higher than the rate for lamotrigine (29%; odds ratio with ethosuximide vs. lamotrigine, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.65 to 4.28; odds ratio with valproic acid vs. lamotrigine, 3.34; 95% CI, 2.06 to 5.42; P<0.001 for both comparisons). There were no significant differences among the three drugs with regard to discontinuation because of adverse events. Attentional dysfunction was more common with valproic acid than with ethosuximide (in 49% of the children vs. 33%; odds ratio, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.12 to 3.41; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Ethosuximide and valproic acid are more effective than lamotrigine in the treatment of childhood absence epilepsy. Ethosuximide is associated with

  12. Overexpression of metallothionein-I, a copper-regulating protein, attenuates intracellular copper dyshomeostasis and extends lifespan in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis caused by mutant superoxide dismutase-1.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Eiichi; Okawa, Eriko; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Ono, Shin-Ichi

    2014-03-01

    Over 170 mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a lethal motor neuron disease. Although the molecular properties of SOD1 mutants differ considerably, we have recently shown that intracellular copper dyshomeostasis is a common pathogenic feature of different SOD1 mutants. Thus, the potentiation of endogenous copper regulation could be a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we investigated the effects of the overexpression of metallothionein-I (MT-I), a major copper-regulating protein, on the disease course of a mouse model of ALS (SOD1(G93A)). Using double transgenic techniques, we found that the overexpression of MT-I in SOD1(G93A) mice significantly extended the lifespan and slowed disease progression, but the effects on disease onset were modest. Genetically induced MT-I normalized copper dyshomeostasis in the spinal cord without influencing SOD1 enzymatic activity. The overexpression of MT-I in SOD1(G93A) mice markedly attenuated the pathological features of the mice, including the death of motor neurons, the degeneration of ventral root axons, the atrophy of skeletal muscles, and the activation of glial cells. Double transgenic mice also showed a decreased level of SOD1 aggregates within the glial cells of the spinal cord. Furthermore, the overexpression of MT-I in SOD1(G93A) mice reduced the number of spheroid-shaped astrocytes cleaved by active caspase-3. We concluded that therapeutic strategies aimed at the potentiation of copper regulation by MT-I could be of benefit in cases of ALS caused by SOD1 mutations.

  13. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization. PMID:28280410

  14. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun; Sung, Ki-Wug

    2017-03-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization.

  15. Relationship between plasma concentrations of lamotrigine and its early therapeutic effect of lamotrigine augmentation therapy in treatment-resistant depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Shoko; Mihara, Kazuo; Nakamura, Akifumi; Nemoto, Kenji; Suzuki, Takeshi; Nagai, Goyo; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between plasma concentrations of lamotrigine and its therapeutic effects was prospectively studied on 34 (9 men and 25 women) inpatients with treatment-resistant depressive disorder during an 8-week treatment of lamotrigine augmentation using an open-study design. The subjects were depressed patients who had already shown insufficient response to at least 3 psychotropics, including antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and atypical antipsychotics. The diagnoses were major depressive disorder (n = 12), bipolar I disorder (n = 7), and bipolar II disorder (n = 15). The final doses of lamotrigine were 100 mg/d for 18 subjects who were not taking valproate and 75 mg/d for 16 subjects taking valproate. Depressive symptoms were evaluated by the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) before and after the 8-week treatment. Blood sampling was performed at week 8. Plasma concentrations of lamotrigine were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. There was a significant linear relationship between the plasma concentrations of lamotrigine and percentage improvements at week 8 (r = 0.418, P < 0.05). A stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that plasma lamotrigine concentrations alone had a significant effect on the percentage improvements at week 8 (standardized partial correlation coefficients = 0.454, P < 0.001). The receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that a plasma lamotrigine concentration of 12.7 μmol/L or greater was significantly (P < 0.001) predictive of response (50% or more reduction in the MADRS score). The proportion of the responders was significantly higher in the groups with a lamotrigine concentration >12.7 μmol/L (11/15 versus 4/19, P < 0.01). The present study suggests that an early therapeutic response to lamotrigine is dependent on its plasma concentration and that a plasma lamotrigine concentration of 12.7 μmol/L may be a threshold for a good therapeutic response in treatment

  16. Lifespan Attitudes toward Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Gail; Maiden, Robert

    To more fully understand how attitudes toward death and dying develop and change across the lifespan, 90 male and female subjects between the ages of 2 and 18 years and 90 male and female subjects between the ages of 18 and 97 were administered questionnaires and interviews about dying. The results revealed that children's attitudes were…

  17. Assessment of Seizure Severity with Adjunctive Lamotrigine Therapy: Results from a U.S. Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Comstock, Lynda; Scott-Lennox, Jane; Lennox, Richard

    2001-04-01

    THE ADJUNCTIVE LAMICTAL (LAMOTRIGINE) IN EPILEPSY: Response to Treatment (ALERT) study was an observational study designed to assess the safety of lamotrigine in patients with refractory partial seizures when used in a general practice setting. We measured the impact of adjunctive lamotrigine therapy for 16 weeks on the severity of seizures using the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS). This questionnaire was scored using a revised scoring procedure that assesses the impact of treatment on the patients "most severe seizure." Data from the LSSS were also compared with physician-rated changes of seizure severity. Patients who completed 16 weeks of lamotrigine treatment showed a significant reduction in LSSS scores when compared with patients who discontinued lamotrigine (change scores: patient's taking lamotrigine at Week 16, 9.2 +/- 23.4; patients who discontinued lamotrigine by Week 16, 0.8 +/- 23.4, P < 0.05). These findings were supported by significant reductions in physician ratings of seizure severity in patients who completed 16 weeks of lamotrigine therapy. Seizure severity is an important outcome in the study of antiepileptic medication. Data from this observational study suggest that lamotrigine is effective in reducing seizure severity when used as an adjunctive therapy in patients with refractory partial seizures.

  18. Lamotrigine monotherapy for newly diagnosed typical absence seizures in children☆

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Gregory L.; Frank, L. Matthew; Sheth, Raj D.; Philbrook, Bryan; Wooten, John D.; Vuong, Alain; Kerls, Susan; Hammer, Anne E.; Messenheimer, John

    2008-01-01

    Summary Purpose To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, and effects on behavior and psychosocial functioning of lamotrigine monotherapy in children with newly diagnosed typical absence seizures. Patients and methods Children meeting enrollment criteria (n = 54) received a confirmatory 24-h ambulatory electroencephalogram (EEG) and then entered a Escalation Phase of up to 20-weeks during which lamotrigine was titrated until seizures were controlled or maximum dose (10.2 mg/kg) was reached. Seizure freedom was assessed by diary review and clinic hyperventilation (clinic HV) and then confirmed by EEG with hyperventilation (HV/EEG). Patients who maintained seizure freedom for two consecutive weekly visits were entered into the Maintenance Phase (n = 30). Diary, clinic HV, and HV/EEG data were supplemented with 24-h ambulatory EEG at baseline and the ends of the Escalation and Maintenance Phases. Health outcome assessments were completed at screening and at the end of the Maintenance Phase. Results By the end of the Escalation Phase, seizure-free rates (responders) were 59% by seizure diary (n = 51), 56% by HV/EEG (n = 54) (primary endpoint), and 49% by 24-h ambulatory EEG (n = 49). During the Maintenance Phase, 89% (week 24) and 86% (week 32) remained seizure free by diary (n = 28), 78% by clinic HV (n = 27), and 81% by 24-h ambulatory EEG (n = 26). Seizure freedom was first observed beginning at the fifth week of the Escalation Phase. The most frequent adverse events were headache and cough. Health outcome scores were either improved or unchanged at the end of the Maintenance Phase. Conclusions Lamotrigine monotherapy results in complete seizure freedom in a substantial number of children with typical absence seizures. Lamotrigine was well tolerated in this study. PMID:18778916

  19. Blueberry extract prolongs lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Zuo, Yuanyuan; Kwan, Kin Ming; Liang, Yintong; Ma, Ka Ying; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin; Huang, Yu; Yu, Hongjian; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2012-02-01

    Blueberry possesses greater antioxidant capacity than most other fruits and vegetables. The present study investigated the lifespan-prolonging activity of blueberry extracts in fruit flies and explored its underlying mechanism. Results revealed that blueberry extracts at 5mg/ml in diet could significantly extend the mean lifespan of fruit flies by 10%, accompanied by up-regulating gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and Rpn11 and down-regulating Methuselah (MTH) gene. Intensive H(2)O(2) and Paraquat challenge tests showed that lifespan was only extended in Oregon-R wild type flies but not in SOD(n108) or Cat(n1) mutant strains. Chronic Paraquat exposure shortened the maximum survival time from 73 to 35days and decreased the climbing ability by 60% while blueberry extracts at 5mg/ml in diet could significantly increase the survival rate and partially restore the climbing ability with up-regulating SOD, CAT, and Rpn11. Furthermore, gustatory assay demonstrated that those changes were not due to the variation of food intake between the control and the experimental diet containing 5mg/ml blueberry extracts. It was therefore concluded that the lifespan-prolonging activity of blueberry extracts was at least partially associated with its interactions with MTH, Rpn11, and endogenous antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT.

  20. Hypersexuality in two patients with epilepsy treated with lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Grabowska-Grzyb, Ałbena; Nagańska, Ewa; Wolańczyk, Tomasz

    2006-05-01

    Lamotrigine (LTG) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that exerts an antiepileptic effect by decreasing glutamate release through inhibition of voltage-sensitive sodium channels. LTG has no effect on serum levels of most female reproductive hormones, but its effect on male reproductive hormones still remains unclear. Improvement in sexual function after LTG treatment has been reported, and could have been caused by reduction of seizures, inhibition of focal discharges, or an unknown effect of LTG on reproductive hormones and protein levels. Two male patients exhibited acute hypersexuality while taking lamotrigine as add-on therapy: one patient on carbamazepine and one on oxcarbazepine. Neither prior history of psychiatric illness nor brain damage predisposed them to such a response to treatment, and in both patients, the hypersexuality was not a part of hypomania or a more diffuse psychiatric disturbance. In the first case, sexual hyperactivity resolved after discontinuation of LTG therapy without any concomitant treatment. In the second case, a reduction in the dose of LTG decreased the intensity of the hypersexuality and contributed to the patient's increased satisfaction with his sex life. Lamotrigine may cause drug-related hypersexuality by an unclear underlying mechanism.

  1. Suivi thérapeutique pharmacologique de la lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Tribut, Olivier; Verdier, Marie-Clémence

    2010-01-01

    Lamotrigine is a second generation anticonvulsant drug available in France since 1996. As other anticonvulsant drugs, lamotrigine is also used in type I bipolar disorders and except legal notices, in the treatment of neuropathic pains. It is mainly metabolized by the UDP-glucuronyltransferase in inactive metabolites. Its average half-life of elimination is of the order of 22 h, but it is reduced approximately at 14h if it is associated with enzymatic inductors and increased at 70h if lamotrigine is administered with sodium valproate. The pharmacokinetic parameters are modified at the young child's, but not in the old population. During the pregnancy, the plasmatic concentrations are lowered and re-increase strongly after the delivery, if dosages were adapted. The renal insufficiency does not require adaptation of dosage, on the other hand in case of severe hepatic insufficiency a decrease of the dose is to be considered. The correlation concentration-efficiency does not seem demonstrated, but there are not enough published studies and they included few patients. Furthermore, they were led with a methodology more pragmatic than rigorous. The correlation concentration-toxicity is better argued. The recommended therapeutic range is from 2.5 to 15 mg/L. For this molecule, the level of proof of the interest of the TDM was estimated in: possibly useful.

  2. Lamotrigine Reduces Inflammatory Response and Ameliorates Executive Function Deterioration in an Alzheimer's-Like Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kexin; Fernandez-Escobar, Alejandro; Han, Shuhong; Zhu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been described in the literature, to be associated with impairment of executive function which develops early in the course of disease, and an effective treatment for this clinical feature remains elusive. Preclinical studies have implied that lamotrigine, an antiepileptic agent, could be a potential treatment for executive dysfunction in AD patients. Although there have been promising results in previous studies with lamotrigine, executive function has never been measured using animal models. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of lamotrigine on executive function and determine whether lamotrigine can attenuate inflammatory response in an AD mouse model. Nontransgenic and transgenic mice were treated with lamotrigine (0 or 30 mg/kg/day) in a standard laboratory chow diet starting at 3 months of age. After 6 months of continuous lamotrigine administration, there was a marked improvement in executive function and a significant attenuation in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that lamotrigine could ameliorate executive dysfunction and brain inflammatory response in the mouse model of AD and early lamotrigine intervention may be a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:28042572

  3. Chronic lamotrigine treatment increases rat hippocampal GABA shunt activity and elevates cerebral taurine levels.

    PubMed

    Hassel, B; Taubøll, E; Gjerstad, L

    2001-02-01

    The mechanism of action of the antiepileptic drug lamotrigine has previously been investigated only in acute experiments and is thought to involve inhibition of voltage-dependent sodium channels. However, lamotrigine is effective against more forms of epilepsies than other antiepileptic drugs that also inhibit sodium channels. We investigated whether chronic lamotrigine treatment may affect cerebral amino acid levels. Rats received lamotrigine, 10 mg/kg/day, for 90 days. The hippocampal level of GABA increased 25%, and the activities of glutamate decarboxylase and succinic semialdehyde/GABA transaminase increased 12 and 21% (p< 0.05), respectively, indicating increased GABA turnover. The uptake of GABA and glutamate into proteoliposomes remained unaltered. The level of taurine increased 27% in the hippocampus and 16% in the frontal and parietal cortices. The activities of hexokinase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, remained at control values. Serum lamotrigine was 41.7+/-1.5 microM (mean+/-S.E.M.), which is within the range seen in epileptic patients. Acute experiments with 5, 20 or 100 mg lamotrigine/kg, caused no changes in brain amino acid levels. The results suggest that chronic lamotrigine treatment increases GABAergic activity in the hippocampus. The cerebral increase in taurine, which has neuromodulatory properties, may contribute to the antiepileptic effect of lamotrigine.

  4. Determination of lamotrigine and its metabolites in human plasma by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beck, Olof; Ohman, Inger; Nordgren, Helena K

    2006-10-01

    A method based on electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the quantitative determination of lamotrigine and three of its reported metabolites, lamotrigine-2-N-glucuronide, lamotrigine-2-N-methyl, and lamotrigine-2-N-oxide in human blood plasma. The method utilized sample preparation by precipitation of proteins with acetonitrile, chromatographic separation on a reversed-phase system by gradient elution, and monitoring of the protonated molecular ions. Two internal standards, 3,5-diamino-6-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazine and morphine-3-glucuronide-D3, were utilized to achieve precise quantification. The method validation comprised a demonstration of an agreement in the quantification of lamotrigine with that of a routine HPLC-UV method. The limits of detection were between 0.05 and 0.16 micromol/L. The method was employed for the measurement of clinical samples collected from 55 patients in steady-state prior to the dose intake (trough level). Lamotrigine and the 2-N-glucuronide were typically detected, while the N-methyl and N-oxide metabolites were detected only rarely. The median lamotrigine plasma level was 24.0 micromol/L (range, 4.3 to 64 micromol/L), the median 2-N-glucuronide level was 2.4 micromol/L (range, <0.05 to 24 micromol/L), and the median lamotrigine 2-N-glucuronide/lamotrigine ratio was 0.11 (range, <0.01 to 0.64). In conclusion, this liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method is suitable for simultaneous determination of lamotrigine and its metabolites in human plasma.

  5. Generic substitution of lamotrigine among medicaid patients with diverse indications: a cohort-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Daniel M; Middleton, Luke; Svoboda, Leanne; McGregor, Jessina C

    2012-08-01

    Controversy exists about the safety of substituting generic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Lamotrigine, the prototypical newer AED, is often used for psychiatric and neurological conditions other than epilepsy. The safety of generic substitution of lamotrigine in diverse populations of AED users is unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate potential associations between generic substitution of lamotrigine and adverse consequences in a population of diverse users of this drug. This study was a retrospective cohort-crossover design using state Medicaid claims data from July 2006 through June 2009. Subjects were included in the cohort if they converted from brand to generic lamotrigine and had 2 years of lamotrigine use prior to conversion. The frequency of emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and condition-specific ED visits or hospitalizations were recorded in the 60 days immediately following the conversion to generic lamotrigine, then compared with the incidence of the same events during a randomly selected time period indexed to one of the patient's past refills of branded lamotrigine. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to quantify the association between generic conversion and health services utilization while controlling for changes in lamotrigine dose and concurrent drug use. Of the 616 unique subjects included in this analysis, epilepsy was the most common diagnosis (41%), followed by bipolar disorder (32%), pain (30%) and migraine (18%). Conversion to generic lamotrigine was not associated with a statistically significant increase in the odds of an ED visit (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.92, 1.97), hospitalization (AOR = 1.21; 95% CI 0.60, 2.50) or condition-specific encounter (AOR 1.75; 95 CI 0.87, 3.51). A statistically significant increase in ED visits, hospitalizations or condition-specific encounters was not observed following the switch from brand to generic lamotrigine

  6. Lamotrigine add-on for drug-resistant partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ramaratnam, Sridharan; Panebianco, Mariangela; Marson, Anthony G

    2016-06-22

    This is an updated version of the Cochrane review published in The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 1.Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder, affecting almost 0.5% to 1% of the population. For nearly 30% of these people, their epilepsy is refractory to currently available drugs. Pharmacological treatment remains the first choice to control epilepsy. Lamotrigine is one of the newer antiepileptic drugs and is the topic of this review. Lamotrigine in combination with other antiepileptic drugs (add-on) can reduce seizures, but with some adverse effects. The aim of this systematic review was to overview the current evidence for the efficacy and tolerability of lamotrigine when used as an adjunctive treatment for people with refractory partial epilepsy. To determine the effects of lamotrigine on (1) seizures, (2) adverse effect profile, and (3) cognition and quality of life, compared to placebo controls, when used as an add-on treatment for people with refractory partial epilepsy. For the previous version of the review, the authors searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (January 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1950 to January 2010), and reference lists of articles.For this update, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (28 May 2015), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 4), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to May 2015), and reference lists of articles. We also contacted the manufacturers of lamotrigine (GlaxoSmithKline). No language restrictions were imposed. Randomised placebo-controlled trials of people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy of any age, in which an adequate method of concealment of randomisation was used. The studies were double-, single- or unblinded. For cross-over studies, the first treatment period was treated as a parallel trial. Eligible participants were adults or children with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. For this update, two

  7. The African turquoise killifish genome provides insights into evolution and genetic architecture of lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Valenzano, Dario Riccardo; Benayoun, Bérénice A.; Singh, Param Priya; Zhang, Elisa; Etter, Paul D.; Hu, Chi-Kuo; Clément-Ziza, Mathieu; Willemsen, David; Cui, Rongfeng; Harel, Itamar; Machado, Ben E.; Yee, Muh-Ching; Sharp, Sabrina C.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Beyer, Andreas; Johnson, Eric A.; Brunet, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lifespan is a remarkably diverse trait ranging from a few days to several hundred years in nature, but the mechanisms underlying the evolution of lifespan differences remain elusive. Here we de novo assemble a reference genome for the naturally short-lived African turquoise killifish, providing a unique resource for comparative and experimental genomics. The identification of genes under positive selection in this fish reveals potential candidates to explain its compressed lifespan. Several aging genes are under positive selection in this short-lived fish and long-lived species, raising the intriguing possibility that the same gene could underlie evolution of both compressed and extended lifespans. Comparative genomics and linkage analysis identify candidate genes associated with lifespan differences between various turquoise killifish strains. Remarkably, these genes are clustered on the sex chromosome, suggesting that short lifespan might have co-evolved with sex determination. Our study provides insights into the evolutionary forces that shape lifespan in nature. PMID:26638078

  8. The African Turquoise Killifish Genome Provides Insights into Evolution and Genetic Architecture of Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Valenzano, Dario Riccardo; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Singh, Param Priya; Zhang, Elisa; Etter, Paul D; Hu, Chi-Kuo; Clément-Ziza, Mathieu; Willemsen, David; Cui, Rongfeng; Harel, Itamar; Machado, Ben E; Yee, Muh-Ching; Sharp, Sabrina C; Bustamante, Carlos D; Beyer, Andreas; Johnson, Eric A; Brunet, Anne

    2015-12-03

    Lifespan is a remarkably diverse trait ranging from a few days to several hundred years in nature, but the mechanisms underlying the evolution of lifespan differences remain elusive. Here we de novo assemble a reference genome for the naturally short-lived African turquoise killifish, providing a unique resource for comparative and experimental genomics. The identification of genes under positive selection in this fish reveals potential candidates to explain its compressed lifespan. Several aging genes are under positive selection in this short-lived fish and long-lived species, raising the intriguing possibility that the same gene could underlie evolution of both compressed and extended lifespans. Comparative genomics and linkage analysis identify candidate genes associated with lifespan differences between various turquoise killifish strains. Remarkably, these genes are clustered on the sex chromosome, suggesting that short lifespan might have co-evolved with sex determination. Our study provides insights into the evolutionary forces that shape lifespan in nature.

  9. Changes in Regenerative Capacity through Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Maximina H.

    2015-01-01

    Most organisms experience changes in regenerative abilities through their lifespan. During aging, numerous tissues exhibit a progressive decline in homeostasis and regeneration that results in tissue degeneration, malfunction and pathology. The mechanisms responsible for this decay are both cell intrinsic, such as cellular senescence, as well as cell-extrinsic, such as changes in the regenerative environment. Understanding how these mechanisms impact on regenerative processes is essential to devise therapeutic approaches to improve tissue regeneration and extend healthspan. This review offers an overview of how regenerative abilities change through lifespan in various organisms, the factors that underlie such changes and the avenues for therapeutic intervention. It focuses on established models of mammalian regeneration as well as on models in which regenerative abilities do not decline with age, as these can deliver valuable insights for our understanding of the interplay between regeneration and aging. PMID:26512653

  10. Metformin improves healthspan and lifespan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Mercken, Evi M.; Mitchell, Sarah J.; Palacios, Hector H.; Mote, Patricia L.; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Gomes, Ana P.; Ward, Theresa M.; Minor, Robin K.; Blouin, Marie-José; Schwab, Matthias; Pollak, Michael; Zhang, Yongqing; Yu, Yinbing; Becker, Kevin G.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Ingram, Donald K.; Sinclair, David A.; Wolf, Norman S.; Spindler, Stephen R.; Bernier, Michel; de Cabo, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is a drug commonly prescribed to treat patients with type 2 diabetes. Here we show that long-term treatment with metformin (0.1% w/w in diet) starting at middle age extends healthspan and lifespan in male mice, while a higher dose (1% w/w) was toxic. Treatment with metformin mimics some of the benefits of calorie restriction, such as improved physical performance, increased insulin sensitivity, and reduced LDL and cholesterol levels without a decrease in caloric intake. At a molecular level, metformin increases AMP-activated protein kinase activity and increases antioxidant protection, resulting in reductions in both oxidative damage accumulation and chronic inflammation. Our results indicate that these actions may contribute to the beneficial effects of metformin on healthspan and lifespan. These findings are in agreement with current epidemiological data and raise the possibility of metformin-based interventions to promote healthy aging. PMID:23900241

  11. Changes in Regenerative Capacity through Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Yun, Maximina H

    2015-10-23

    Most organisms experience changes in regenerative abilities through their lifespan. During aging, numerous tissues exhibit a progressive decline in homeostasis and regeneration that results in tissue degeneration, malfunction and pathology. The mechanisms responsible for this decay are both cell intrinsic, such as cellular senescence, as well as cell-extrinsic, such as changes in the regenerative environment. Understanding how these mechanisms impact on regenerative processes is essential to devise therapeutic approaches to improve tissue regeneration and extend healthspan. This review offers an overview of how regenerative abilities change through lifespan in various organisms, the factors that underlie such changes and the avenues for therapeutic intervention. It focuses on established models of mammalian regeneration as well as on models in which regenerative abilities do not decline with age, as these can deliver valuable insights for our understanding of the interplay between regeneration and aging.

  12. Collaboration in pharmacovigilance: lamotrigine and fatal severe cutaneous adverse reactions - a review of spontaneous reports.

    PubMed

    Brickel, Neil; Shaikh, Haris; Kirkham, Andrew; Davies, Greg; Chalker, Michelle; Yoshida, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance presents many challenges, particularly when managing unpredictable, rare conditions, eg, severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Such rare events are often only detected from spontaneous reports, which present their own limitations, particularly during a prolonged global launch schedule. GlaxoSmithKline's routine pharmacovigilance includes regular reviews of global adverse event (AE) reports and aggregate data from a central safety database. Lamotrigine is one of the several antiepileptic drugs associated with SCARs. After identification of increased rates of fatal SCAR cases with lamotrigine in Japan between September and December 2014, this analysis investigated the global incidence of fatal SCARs with lamotrigine and explored whether known risk factors may have contributed to these cases. Global fatal SCAR cases reported with lamotrigine administration from launch until January 2015 were reviewed for evidence of temporal association with dosing and the presence of risk factors, including comorbidities, concomitant medications, and noncompliance with the prescribing information (PI). Worldwide, the estimated cumulative exposure to lamotrigine was >8.4 million patient-years. Globally, there were 54,513 AE reports for lamotrigine, of which 3,454 (6.3%) concerned SCARs. Of these, 122 (3.5%) had a fatal outcome (attributable and nonattributable to lamotrigine), equating to 0.01 fatal SCARs per 1,000 patient-years. In Japan (estimated cumulative exposure 141,000 patient-years), 17 fatal SCARs were reported (attributable and nonattributable), equating to 0.12 per 1,000 patient-years. Seventy-one percent of fatal SCAR cases in Japan showed evidence of noncompliance with the recommended dosing regimen; in 65% of the cases, a delay in discontinuation of lamotrigine after early signs of hypersensitivity was reported. Despite a number of limitations inherent in comparing spontaneous report data, this analysis highlights the need for adherence to the

  13. A Drosophila ABC Transporter Regulates Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Lu-Bo, Ying; Haddad, Gabriel G.

    2014-01-01

    MRP4 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 4) is a member of the MRP/ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that are essential for many cellular processes requiring the transport of substrates across cell membranes. Although MRP4 has been implicated as a detoxification protein by transport of structurally diverse endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including antivirus and anticancer drugs, that usually induce oxidative stress in cells, its in vivo biological function remains unknown. In this study, we investigate the biological functions of a Drosophila homolog of human MRP4, dMRP4. We show that dMRP4 expression is elevated in response to oxidative stress (paraquat, hydrogen peroxide and hyperoxia) in Drosophila. Flies lacking dMRP4 have a shortened lifespan under both oxidative and normal conditions. Overexpression of dMRP4, on the other hand, is sufficient to increase oxidative stress resistance and extend lifespan. By genetic manipulations, we demonstrate that dMRP4 is required for JNK (c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase) activation during paraquat challenge and for basal transcription of some JNK target genes under normal condition. We show that impaired JNK signaling is an important cause for major defects associated with dMRP4 mutations, suggesting that dMRP4 regulates lifespan by modulating the expression of a set of genes related to both oxidative resistance and aging, at least in part, through JNK signaling. PMID:25474322

  14. Lamotrigine in Rett syndrome: treatment experience from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stenbom, Y; Tonnby, B; Hagberg, B

    1998-03-01

    This open pilot study was performed to evaluate the effect of Lamotrigine (LTG) in girls with Rett syndrome (RS) regarding seizure frequency, effect on gross motor dyspraxia and safety. Twelve girls with either the classical form of RS or the milder form fruste variants were included. The effect on epilepsy was evaluated as seizure frequency, motor performance (video comparison) and safety at clinical check up. The dosage of LTG was individualized and related to concomitant anti-epileptic drugs. Two of three girls with epilepsy responded relatively well to treatment, and for one of them even bad tantrums disappeared. LTG was useful in another four girls who became happier, more alert, more able to concentrate, and improved in contacting. Only mild adverse reactions as rash and tremor were seen. It is concluded that LTG could be worth trying as an adjunct in girls with RS, being aware of possible adverse reactions and no effect at all.

  15. Effect of lamotrigine, levetiracetam & topiramate on neurobehavioural parameters & oxidative stress in comparison with valproate in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Sudhir Chandra; Kakkar, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Ritesh; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Though newer antiepileptic drugs are considered safer than conventional antiepileptics, the effects of lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate on neurobehavioural functions are yet to be established. This study evaluated neurobehavioural parameters and oxidative stress markers in brain tissue of rats treated with lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate compared to sodium valproate. Methods: Five groups of male Wistar rats were treated respectively with normal saline (control), sodium valproate (370 mg/kg), lamotrigine (50 mg/kg), levetiracetam (310 mg/kg) and topiramate (100 mg/kg) for 45 days. Neurobehavioural parameters were assessed using elevated plus maze (EPM), actophotometer, rotarod, passive avoidance and Morris water maze (MWM) at baseline and at the end of treatment. Oxidative stress parameters [malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)] were estimated in rat brain at the end of treatment. Results: Valproate and lamotrigine showed no significant effect on learning and memory in passive avoidance and MWM tests. However, levetiracetam and topiramate reduced retention memory significantly as compared to control (P<0.01) and lamotrigine (P<0.05) groups. Performances on EPM, rotarod and actophotometer were not significantly different between the groups. In comparison to control group, MDA was higher in the levetiracetam and topiramate (360.9 and 345.9 nmol/g of homogenized brain tissue, respectively) groups. GSH and SOD activity were significantly reduced by valproate and levetiracetam treatment. Lamotrigine did not induce significant oxidative stress. Interpretation & conclusions: Long-term and therapeutic dose treatment with levetiracetam and topiramate significantly impaired learning and memory, which was not seen with valproate and lamotrigine in rats. Levetiracetam, topiramate and valproate augmented oxidative stress, whereas lamotrigine has little effect on it. These antiepileptic drugs

  16. Brief Communication: SIR-2.1-dependent lifespan extension of Caenorhabditis elegans by oxyresveratrol and resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyun; Kwon, Gayeung; Park, Jieun; Kim, Jeong-Keun; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-10-01

    Resveratrol (RES) has been studied for its effects on the lifespan extension of Caenorhabditis elegans, but controversy still remains on its mechanism related with SIR-2. In this study, longevity assay was performed to confirm SIR-2-dependent lifespan extension of C. elgeans with RES and oxyresveratrol (OXY), an isomer of hydroxylated RES using loss-of-function mutants of C. elegans including sir-2.1 mutant. The results showed that OXY and RES significantly (P < 0.05) extended the lifespan of C. elegans compared with the control. OXY and RES also significantly (P < 0.05) increased the mRNA expression levels of sir-2.1 and aak-2 in a dose-dependent manner and increased the protein expression levels of SIR-2.1. OXY and RES treatment extended the lifespan in daf-16 loss-of-function mutants, which suggested that lifespan extension was not occurring via the activation of DAF-16. However, OXY and RES failed to extend the lifespan in loss-of-function mutants of sir-2.1 and aak-2 Therefore, OXY and RES extend the lifespan of C. elegans by overexpression of SIR-2.1, which is related to lifespan extension through calorie restriction and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway, although this process is independent of the FOXO/DAF-16 pathway. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  17. Lifespan based indirect response models

    PubMed Central

    Ruixo, Juan Jose Perez

    2012-01-01

    In the field of hematology, several mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models have been developed to understand the dynamics of several blood cell populations under different clinical conditions while accounting for the essential underlying principles of pharmacology, physiology and pathology. In general, a population of blood cells is basically controlled by two processes: the cell production and cell loss. The assumption that each cell exits the population when its lifespan expires implies that the cell loss rate is equal to the cell production rate delayed by the lifespan and justifies the use of delayed differential equations for compartmental modeling. This review is focused on lifespan models based on delayed differential equations and presents the structure and properties of the basic lifespan indirect response (LIDR) models for drugs affecting cell production or cell lifespan distribution. The LIDR models for drugs affecting the precursor cell production or decreasing the precursor cell population are also presented and their properties are discussed. The interpretation of transit compartment models as LIDR models is reviewed as the basis for introducing a new LIDR for drugs affecting the cell lifespan distribution. Finally, the applications and limitations of the LIDR models are discussed. PMID:22212685

  18. Investigation of formulation variables affecting the properties of lamotrigine nanosuspension using fractional factorial design

    PubMed Central

    B., Mishra; N., Arya; S., Tiwari

    2010-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Lamotrigine (LMG) undergoes extensive hepatic metabolism upon oral administration and its absorption is affected in the presence of food. This study was aimed to develop nanosuspension of LMG and investigate its formulation characteristics using L9 orthogonal array. Methods Nanosuspension was prepared using emulsification-solvent diffusion method. All the formulations were subjected to in-vitro evaluation and the statistically optimized one was used for stability, scanning electron microscopic and differential scanning calorimetric studies. Results Nanoparticles were spherical with little surface adsorbed drug. Formulation characteristics in terms of size, zeta potential, polydispersity index (PDI), entrapment efficiency (EE), drug content and in vitro drug release were consistent and within their acceptable range. All the batches provided a burst release profile during first 1 hr, followed by a controlled release extending up to 24 hrs. The values of n in Peppas model ranged between 0.2-0.4 for all the formulations indicative of Fickian release mechanism. The formulation remained reasonably stable up to 3 months. No interaction was observed among the drug and polymers. Major conclusion Results of in vitro drug release studies suggested that nanosuspension might be used as a sustained delivery vehicle for LMG. Statistical analysis revealed that size of the nanoparticles was most strongly affected by stabilizer type while EE was influenced by the drug-to-polymer ratio. PMID:22615586

  19. Uncoupling lifespan and healthspan in Caenorhabditis elegans longevity mutants

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ankita; Zhu, Lihua J.; Yen, Kelvin; Tissenbaum, Heidi A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging research has been very successful at identifying signaling pathways and evolutionarily conserved genes that extend lifespan with the assumption that an increase in lifespan will also increase healthspan. However, it is largely unknown whether we are extending the healthy time of life or simply prolonging a period of frailty with increased incidence of age-associated diseases. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans, one of the premiere systems for lifespan studies, to determine whether lifespan and healthspan are intrinsically correlated. We conducted multiple cellular and organismal assays on wild type as well as four long-lived mutants (insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1, dietary restriction, protein translation, mitochondrial signaling) in a longitudinal manner to determine the health of the animals as they age. We find that some long-lived mutants performed better than wild type when measured chronologically (number of days). However, all long-lived mutants increased the proportion of time spent in a frail state. Together, these data suggest that lifespan can no longer be the sole parameter of interest and reveal the importance of evaluating multiple healthspan parameters for future studies on antiaging interventions. PMID:25561524

  20. Variation in dose and plasma level of lamotrigine in patients discharged from a mental health trust

    PubMed Central

    Douglas-Hall, Petrina; Dzahini, Olubanke; Gaughran, Fiona; Bile, Ahmed; Taylor, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objectives of this study were to investigate the dose of lamotrigine when prescribed with an enzyme inhibitor or enzyme inducer in patients discharged from a mental health trust and to determine the corresponding lamotrigine plasma concentrations and the factors that may affect these. Methods: All patients discharged on lamotrigine between October 2007 and September 2012 were identified using the pharmacy dispensing database. We recorded demographic details, lamotrigine dose and plasma levels and coprescribed medication. Results: During the designated period, 187 patients were discharged on lamotrigine of whom 117 had their plasma levels recorded. The mean lamotrigine daily dose was 226.1 mg (range 12.5–800 mg) and the mean plasma level 5.9 mg/l (range 0.8–18.1 mg/l). Gender, ethnicity, diagnosis and smoking status had no significant effect on dose or plasma levels. Patients taking an enzyme-inducing drug (n = 6) had significantly lower plasma levels [mean (SD) 3.40 (1.54) mg/l] than those not taking enzyme inducers [n = 111; 6.03 (3.13) mg/l; p = 0.043]. Patients taking an enzyme-inhibiting drug (n = 23) had significantly higher levels [7.47 (3.99) mg/l] than those not taking an inhibitor [n = 94; 5.52 (2.75) mg/l; p = 0.035]. No significant difference was found between the doses of lamotrigine in patients taking an enzyme inhibitor and those not taking one (p = 0.376). No significant difference was found between the doses of lamotrigine in patients taking an enzyme-inducing drug and those not taking any (p = 0.574). Conclusions: Current dosing recommendations indicate that lamotrigine doses should be halved in individuals taking enzyme inhibitors and doubled in those on enzyme inducers. In our survey these recommendations were rarely followed with the consequence that patients received too high or too low a dose of lamotrigine, respectively. PMID:28101320

  1. The C. elegans Lifespan Machine

    PubMed Central

    Stroustrup, Nicholas; Ulmschneider, Bryne E.; Nash, Zachary M.; López Moyado, Isaac F.; Apfeld, Javier; Fontana, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of lifespan pervades aging research. Because lifespan results from complex interactions between genetic, environmental and stochastic factors, it varies widely even among isogenic individuals. The action of molecular mechanisms on lifespan is therefore visible only through their statistical effects on populations. Survival assays in C. elegans provided critical insights into evolutionarily conserved determinants of aging. To enable the rapid acquisition of survival curves at arbitrary statistical resolution, we developed a scalable imaging and analysis platform to observe nematodes over multiple weeks across square meters of agar surface at 8 μm resolution. The method generates a permanent visual record of individual deaths from which survival curves are constructed and validated, producing data consistent with the manual method for several mutants in both standard and stressful environments. Our approach allows rapid, detailed reverse-genetic and chemical screens for effects on survival and enables quantitative investigations into the statistical structure of aging. PMID:23666410

  2. Analysis of lamotrigine and its metabolites in human plasma and urine by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Vincenzo; Bugamelli, Francesca; Baccini, Cesare; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2005-02-01

    A reliable micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of lamotrigine and its metabolites in human plasma and urine. The variation of different parameters, such as pH of the background electrolyte (BGE) and Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration, were evaluated in order to find optimal conditions. Best separation of the analytes was achieved using a BGE composed of 10 mM borate and 50 mM SDS, pH 9.5; melatonin was selected as the internal standard. Isolation of lamotrigine and its metabolites from plasma and urine was accomplished with an original solid-phase extraction procedure using hydrophilic-lypophilic balance cartridges. Good absolute recovery data and satisfactory precision values were obtained. The calibration plots for lamotrigine and its metabolites were linear over the 1-20 microg/mL concentration range. Sensitivity was satisfactory; the limits of detection and quantitation of lamotrigine were 500 ng/mL and 1 microg/mL, respectively. The application of the method to real plasma samples from epileptic patients under therapy with lamotrigine gave good results in terms of accuracy and selectivity, and in agreement with those obtained with an high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method.

  3. High-performance thin-layer chromatographic determination of lamotrigine in serum.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kuldeep M; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2005-09-05

    A simple and rapid high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) determination of lamotrigine (LTG) in serum is reported. The method involves extraction of the drug by ethyl acetate followed by separation on TLC silica plates using a mixture of toluene-acetone-ammonia (7:3:0.5), as eluting solvent. Densitometric analysis was carried out at 312 nm with lamotrigine being detected at Rf of 0.54. The analytical method has excellent linearity (r=0.998) in the range of 20-300 ng/spot. This assay range is adequate for analyzing human serum, as it corresponds to lamotrigine concentrations measured in human serum from epileptic patients. The method was validated for sensitivity, selectivity, extraction efficiency, accuracy and intra and inter-day reproducibility. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were found to be 6.4 and 10.2 ng, respectively. Good accuracy is reported in the range of 92.06-97.12% and high precision with %CV in range of 0.53-2.59. The method was applied for determination of serum lamotrigine levels in epileptic patients and in pharmacokinetic study of lamotrigine administered orally to rabbits.

  4. Vitamin D enhances antiepileptic and cognitive effects of lamotrigine in pentylenetetrazole-kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Ali F; Afify, Mohamed A; Mahfouz, Amal M; Shahzad, Naiyer; Bamagous, Ghazi A; Al Ghamdi, Saeed S

    2017-10-15

    Despite long use of antiepileptic drugs, it remains a challenge to achieve seizure control while reducing adverse effects and preventing cognitive impairment. Several lines of evidence suggest a role of vitamin D in epilepsy. So this study aimed to investigate the effect of vitamin D on epileptogenesis, cognitive dysfunction and antiepileptic activity of lamotrigine, in a rat model of chemical kindling. Rats were kindled by pentylenetetrazole injections every other day over four weeks, together with daily oral treatment by either vehicle, vitamin D, lamotrigine or combination of vitamin D and lamotrigine. The non-treated kindled rats developed generalized seizures and had poor cognitive performance in water maze, associated with prooxidative status; elevated malondialdehyde and nitric oxide with lowered glutathione levels; in brain tissues. Treatment with either vitamin D, lamotrigine or both leads to significant reduction of seizure activity score, improvement of cognitive performance, and amelioration of the disturbed oxidative stress biomarkers. These findings indicate that, vitamin D has anti-epileptic, cognitive improving and antioxidant effects, on its own and enhance the effects of lamotrigine, in a chronic model of epileptic seizures. Thus, vitamin D supplementation may be a useful addition to antiepileptic drugs improving seizure control and cognitive function in patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of MAP4K3 in lifespan regulation of Caenorhabditiselegans

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Maruf H.; Hart, Matthew J.; Rea, Shane L.

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of MAP4K3 by RNAi leads to increased mean lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutation in the citron homology domain of MAP4K3 leads to increased mean lifespan. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutation in the kinase domain of MAP4K3 has no significant effect on mean lifespan. -- Abstract: The TOR pathway is a kinase signaling pathway that regulates cellular growth and proliferation in response to nutrients and growth factors. TOR signaling is also important in lifespan regulation - when this pathway is inhibited, either naturally, by genetic mutation, or by pharmacological means, lifespan is extended. MAP4K3 is a Ser/Thr kinase that has recently been found to be involved in TOR activation. Unexpectedly, the effect of this protein is not mediated via Rheb, the more widely known TOR activation pathway. Given the role of TOR in growth and lifespan control, we looked at how inhibiting MAP4K3 in Caenorhabditiselegans affects lifespan. We used both feeding RNAi and genetic mutants to look at the effect of MAP4K3 deficiency. Our results show a small but significant increase in mean lifespan in MAP4K3 deficient worms. MAP4K3 thus represents a new target in the TOR pathway that can be targeted for pharmacological intervention to control lifespan.

  6. High carbohydrate-low protein consumption maximizes Drosophila lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Kimberley D.; Hoxha, Sany; Carvalho, Gil B.; Yamada, Ryuichi; Wang, Horng-Dar; Karayan, Paul; He, Shan; Brummel, Ted; Kapahi, Pankaj; Ja, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary restriction extends lifespan in a variety of organisms, but the key nutritional components driving this process and how they interact remain uncertain. In Drosophila, while a substantial body of research suggests that protein is the major dietary component affecting longevity, recent studies claim that carbohydrates also play a central role. To clarify how nutritional factors influence longevity, nutrient consumption and lifespan were measured on a series of diets with varying yeast and sugar content. We show that optimal lifespan requires both high carbohydrate and low protein consumption, but neither nutrient by itself entirely predicts lifespan. Increased dietary carbohydrate or protein concentration does not always result in reduced feeding—the regulation of food consumption is best described by a constant daily caloric intake target. Moreover, due to differences in food intake, increased concentration of a nutrient within the diet does not necessarily result in increased consumption of that particular nutrient. Our results shed light on the issue of dietary effects on lifespan and highlight the need for accurate measures of nutrient intake in dietary manipulation studies. PMID:23403040

  7. Effects of fluctuating temperature and food availability on reproduction and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Pearson, Phillip; Dawson, John; Allison, David B; Gohlke, Julia M

    2016-12-15

    Experimental studies on energetics and aging often remove two major factors that in part regulate the energy budget in a normal healthy individual: reproduction and fluctuating environmental conditions that challenge homeostasis. Here we use the cyclical parthenogenetic Daphnia pulex to evaluate the role of a fluctuating thermal environment on both reproduction and lifespan across six food concentrations. We test the hypotheses that (1) caloric restriction extends lifespan; (2) maximal reproduction will come with a cost of shortened lifespan; and (3) at a given food concentration, relative to a metabolically equivalent constant temperature environment a diel fluctuating thermal environment will alter the allocation of energy to reproduction and lifespan to maintain homeostasis. We did not identify a level of food concentration that extended lifespan in response to caloric restriction, and we found no cost of reproduction in terms of lifespan. Rather, the individuals at the highest food levels generally had the highest reproductive output and the longest lifespans, the individuals at the intermediate food level decreased reproduction and maintained lifespan, and the individuals at the three lower food concentrations had a decrease in reproduction and lifespan as would be predicted with increasing levels of starvation. Fluctuating temperature had no effect on lifespan at any food concentration, but delayed time to reproductive maturity and decreased early reproductive output at all food concentrations. This suggests that a fluctuating temperature regimen activates molecular pathways that alter energy allocation. The costs of fluctuating temperature on reproduction were not consistent across the lifespan. Statistical interactions for age of peak reproduction and lifetime fecundity suggest that senescence of the reproductive system may vary between temperature regimens at the different food concentrations.

  8. Variation of lifespan in multiple strains, and effects of dietary restriction and BmFoxO on lifespan in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiangbo; Tang, Dongmei; Li, Zhiquan; Tong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jianfei; Han, Minjin; Hu, Hai; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fangyin

    2017-01-31

    Established animal models have accelerated our understanding of the mechanisms involved in lifespan determination. However, more experimental animals are required to clarify the complex mechanisms behind the phenomena of aging and lifespan. In this study, we reported the variation of lifespan in nine distinct silkworm strains. Lifespan correlated significantly with BmFoxO gene expression in the representative silkworm strains tested (Xiafang, Dazao-N, and N4). In general, the female silkworm was longer lived than the male of the same strain. Dietary restriction extended the silkworm lifespan compared with that of silkworms fed ad libitum. The expression of BmFoxO was significantly elevated in the dietary restriction group on day 3 of the 4th instar and day 3 of the 5th instar, suggesting that BmFoxO contributes to dietary restriction-mediated lifespan extension. The RNA interference and overexpression of the BmFoxO gene significantly shortened and extended the silkworm adulthood, respectively. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the silkworm might serve as a promising experimental animal to explore the complex biological mechanisms of lifespan determination.

  9. An Open-Label Study of Lamotrigine Adjunct or Monotherapy for the Treatment of Adolescents with Bipolar Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Kiki; Saxena, Kirti; Howe, Meghan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of pediatric bipolar depression has not been well studied. The authors wished to prospectively study the efficacy of lamotrigine as adjunctive or monotherapy in adolescents with bipolar disorder who were experiencing a depressive episode. Method: This was an 8-week open-label trial of lamotrigine with 20 adolescents ages…

  10. Lamotrigine rechallenge after a skin rash. A combined study of open cases and a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Serrani Azcurra, Daniel J L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the safety of lamotrigine rechallenge after a first episode of skin rash in bipolar patients. An open cases prospective study was conducted with patients who, developed a skin rash when first treated with lamotrigine, were refractory to other treatments, and were offered lamotrigine rechallenge using a different dose titration. Additionally a review was performed on previous skin rash management strategies and lamotrigine rechallenge reports. Every 3 out of 10 lamotrigine rechallenge patients required drug interruption due to persistent rash. One of them was potentially serious and resolved by stopping the lamotrigine. The review of available literature identified several lamotrigine rechallenge studies with rates of positive results varying between 70% and 87% depending on the study. No patient developed Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis after rechallenge. The rate of rash was higher when rechallenge began between 4 weeks from initial rash (19% vs. 7%, P=.001) and decreased when first rash showed no potentially serious signs (0% vs.19%, P=.01). Rechallenge is a viable option after a benign lamotrigine-induced rash, and can even be rechallenged after rash with greater precautions when there exists one or two potentially serious signs. In cases of more serious rash there are no reliable data available on rechallenge safety and it may pose a significant risk. In those cases rechallenge should better be avoided between 4 weeks from first rash. Copyright © 2011 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. An Open-Label Study of Lamotrigine Adjunct or Monotherapy for the Treatment of Adolescents with Bipolar Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Kiki; Saxena, Kirti; Howe, Meghan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of pediatric bipolar depression has not been well studied. The authors wished to prospectively study the efficacy of lamotrigine as adjunctive or monotherapy in adolescents with bipolar disorder who were experiencing a depressive episode. Method: This was an 8-week open-label trial of lamotrigine with 20 adolescents ages…

  12. Delayed Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Secondary to the Use of Lamotrigine in Bipolar Mood Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jha, Kunal Kishor; Chaudhary, Durgesh Prasad; Rijal, Tshristi; Dahal, Semanta

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine is a mood-stabilizing drug used in maintenance treatment of bipolar I disease. There are adverse effects with lamotrigine such as a headache, blurred vision, diplopia, somnolence, ataxia, dizziness, rash, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis. SJS is a life-threatening, blistering mucocutaneous disease. SJS is characterized by the presence of flat, diffuse erythematous maculopapular rashes with the involvement of <10% of the body surface area. Standard trigger is drugs including anticonvulsants, antibiotics, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. We report a case where a patient developed SJS secondary to delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction after 6 months of the use of lamotrigine, while his initial response during the first 6 months did not show any sign of SJS.

  13. Lamotrigine Induced Whole Body Tics: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Centorino, Michael B; Catalano, Glenn; Catalano, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant medication that also has utility in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been associated with many side effects, including rashes that can progress to Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. It has also been associated with the development of motor tics, most commonly in the head, neck, and shoulders. We will now present the case of a 45-year-old woman who developed tics that involved the entire left side of her body after her dose of lamotrigine was increased from 200 mg daily (2.0 mg/kg/day) to 225 mg daily (2.3 mg/kg/day). We will review the prior cases of lamotrigine induced tics, and compare them to the circumstances surrounding our patient. We will also discuss the neurobiology of tics and make suggestions to improve the tics, based on the reported cases.

  14. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia associated with anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome induced by lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Ghandourah, Hasan; Bhandal, Samarjeet; Brundler, Marie-Anne; Noseworthy, Mary

    2016-01-29

    A 14-year-old girl who was known to have a seizure disorder and on lamotrigine treatment was admitted to the hospital, with a history of rash, fever and cough. Her condition deteriorated with clinical features suggestive of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (ACHS) complicated with bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia (BOOP). Her chest CT showed multifocal parenchymal opacities and lung biopsy was typical for BOOP. Initially, the lamotrigine was discontinued since the onset of the rash, then she was treated for pneumonia with antibiotics, which may have delayed the diagnosis. Eventually, BOOP was considered and she was treated with a high dose of corticosteroid. She improved clinically and her repeated chest CT showed a marked resolution of the lesions. This case illustrates the possible occurrence of BOOP as a complication of ACHS secondary to lamotrigine treatment. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Lamotrigine use in pregnancy and risk of orofacial cleft and other congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Dolk, Helen; Wang, Hao; Loane, Maria; Morris, Joan; Garne, Ester; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Bakker, Marian; Barisic, Ingeborg; Doray, Berenice; Gatt, Miriam; Kallen, Karin; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Lahesmaa-Korpinen, Anna-Maria; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Mejnartowicz, Jan P; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda; O'Mahony, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Rißmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Wellesley, Diana; Wiesel, Awi; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W

    2016-05-03

    To test previous signals of a risk of orofacial cleft (OC) and clubfoot with exposure to the antiepileptic lamotrigine, and to investigate risk of other congenital anomalies (CA). This was a population-based case-malformed control study based on 21 EUROCAT CA registries covering 10.1 million births (1995-2011), including births to 2005 in which the clubfoot signal was generated and a subsequent independent study population of 6.3 million births. A total of 226,806 babies with CA included livebirths, stillbirths, and terminations of pregnancy following prenatal diagnosis. First-trimester lamotrigine monotherapy exposure in OC cases and clubfoot cases was compared to other nonchromosomal CA (controls). Odds ratios (OR) were adjusted for registry. An exploratory analysis compared the proportion of each standard EUROCAT CA subgroup among all babies with nonchromosomal CA exposed to lamotrigine monotherapy with non-AED exposed pregnancies. There were 147 lamotrigine monotherapy-exposed babies with nonchromosomal CA. For all OC, ORadj was 1.31 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73-2.33), isolated OC 1.45 (95% CI 0.80-2.63), isolated cleft palate 1.69 (95% CI 0.69-4.15). Overall ORadj for clubfoot was 1.83 (95% CI 1.01-3.31) and 1.43 (95% CI 0.66-3.08) in the independent study population. No other specific CA were significantly associated with lamotrigine monotherapy. The risk of OC was not significantly raised and we estimate the excess risk of OC to be less than 1 in every 550 exposed babies. We have not found strong independent evidence of a risk of clubfoot subsequent to our original signal. Our study cannot assess the general malformation risk among lamotrigine-exposed pregnancies. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Lifespan Extension by Preserving Proliferative Homeostasis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Supoyo, Stephen; DeGennaro, Matthew; Lehmann, Ruth; Jasper, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    Regenerative processes are critical to maintain tissue homeostasis in high-turnover tissues. At the same time, proliferation of stem and progenitor cells has to be carefully controlled to prevent hyper-proliferative diseases. Mechanisms that ensure this balance, thus promoting proliferative homeostasis, are expected to be critical for longevity in metazoans. The intestinal epithelium of Drosophila provides an accessible model in which to test this prediction. In aging flies, the intestinal epithelium degenerates due to over-proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and mis-differentiation of ISC daughter cells, resulting in intestinal dysplasia. Here we show that conditions that impair tissue renewal lead to lifespan shortening, whereas genetic manipulations that improve proliferative homeostasis extend lifespan. These include reduced Insulin/IGF or Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling activities, as well as over-expression of stress-protective genes in somatic stem cell lineages. Interestingly, proliferative activity in aging intestinal epithelia correlates with longevity over a range of genotypes, with maximal lifespan when intestinal proliferation is reduced but not completely inhibited. Our results highlight the importance of the balance between regenerative processes and strategies to prevent hyperproliferative disorders and demonstrate that promoting proliferative homeostasis in aging metazoans is a viable strategy to extend lifespan. PMID:20976250

  17. Increased Anxiety, Akathisia, and Suicidal Thoughts in Patients with Mood Disorder on Aripiprazole and Lamotrigine

    PubMed Central

    Pondé, Milena Pereira; Freire, Antonio Carlos Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Akathisia affects around 18% of patients with bipolar disorder treated with aripiprazole and may worsen when aripiprazole is combined with lamotrigine and antidepressants. Case. This paper reports on two clinical cases involving patients with a diagnosis of mood disorder who developed severe akathisia, anxiety, and suicidal ideation while using a combination of aripiprazole, antidepressants, and lamotrigine. Discussion. We recommend that patients with a mood disorder taking multiple drugs should begin aripiprazole therapy with low doses and be monitored for the development of akathisia, increased anxiety, or suicidal thoughts. The appearance of these limiting side effects requires discontinuation of the drug. PMID:26509095

  18. The efficacy of lamotrigine in a resistant case of depersonalization disorder.

    PubMed

    Rosagro-Escámez, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Noelia; Gómez-Merino, Patricia; de la Vega, Irene; Carrasco, José L

    2011-01-01

    The individuals with depersonalizattion disorder suffer from a painful feeling that their body and mental experiences or the experiences of the environment seem become unreal, distant or mechanical. This phenomenon is often associated with other mental disorders, as in the case presented. Among the many psychoactive drugs studied, none of them has been shown to be the treatment of choice. Among those with which the best results are obtained are opioid receptor antagonists, the combination of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with lamotrigine and clorimipramine. We are presenting a resistant case that responded to lamotrigine.

  19. Revisiting the Lamotrigine-Mediated Effect on Hippocampal GABAergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Yin; Liu, Yu-Chao; Lee, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Yen-Chu; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yang, Yi-Ping; Chang, Kaung-Yi; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Lamotrigine (LTG) is generally considered as a voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel blocker. However, recent studies suggest that LTG can also serve as a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel enhancer and can increase the excitability of GABAergic interneurons (INs). Perisomatic inhibitory INs, predominantly fast-spiking basket cells (BCs), powerfully inhibit granule cells (GCs) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Notably, BCs express abundant Nav channels and HCN channels, both of which are able to support sustained action potential generation. Using whole-cell recording in rat hippocampal slices, we investigated the net LTG effect on BC output. We showed that bath application of LTG significantly decreased the amplitude of evoked compound inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in GCs. In contrast, simultaneous paired recordings from BCs to GCs showed that LTG had no effect on both the amplitude and the paired-pulse ratio of the unitary IPSCs, suggesting that LTG did not affect GABA release, though it suppressed cell excitability. In line with this, LTG decreased spontaneous IPSC (sIPSC) frequency, but not miniature IPSC frequency. When re-examining the LTG effect on GABAergic transmission in the cornus ammonis region 1 (CA1) area, we found that LTG markedly inhibits both the excitability of dendrite-targeting INs in the stratum oriens and the concurrent sIPSCs recorded on their targeting pyramidal cells (PCs) without significant hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) enhancement. In summary, LTG has no effect on augmenting Ih in GABAergic INs and does not promote GABAergic inhibitory output. The antiepileptic effect of LTG is likely through Nav channel inhibition and the suppression of global neuronal network activity. PMID:27455251

  20. Comparative evaluation of single and bilayered lamotrigine floating tablets.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Pk; Sridhar, M; Shruthi, B

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare lamotrigine (LM) bilayered and single layered floating tablets and to compare their release profiles. LM floating tablets were prepared by direct compression method. Drug, hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K4M, lactose monohydrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 constitute controlled release layer components and floating layer components includes polymers and sodium bicarbonate. The prepared tablets were evaluated for physicochemical parameters such as hardness, friability, weight variation, thickness, floating lag time (FLT), floating time, in vitro buoyancy study, in vitro release studies. The drug-polymer interaction was studied by fourier transform infrared and differential scanning calorimetry. The FLT of all the formulations were within the prescribed limits (<3 min). When ethyl cellulose was used as floating layer component, tablets showed good buoyancy effect but eroded within 6-8 h. Hence it was replaced with hydroxypropyl cellulose -M hydrophilic polymer, which showed good FLT and floating duration for 16 h. Formulation LFC4 was found to be optimized with dissolution profile of zero order kinetics showing fickian diffusion. A comparative study of bilayered and single layered tablets of LM showed a highest similarity factor of 83.03, difference factor of 2.74 and t-test (P < 0.05) indicates that there is no significant difference between them. Though bilayered tablet possess many advantages, single layered tablet would be economical, cost-effective and reproducible for large scale production in the industry. However, the results of present study demonstrated that the in vitro development of bilayered gastro retentive floating tablets with controlled drug release profile for LM is feasible.

  1. Comparative evaluation of single and bilayered lamotrigine floating tablets

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, PK; Sridhar, M; Shruthi, B

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to prepare lamotrigine (LM) bilayered and single layered floating tablets and to compare their release profiles. Materials and Methods: LM floating tablets were prepared by direct compression method. Drug, hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K4M, lactose monohydrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 constitute controlled release layer components and floating layer components includes polymers and sodium bicarbonate. The prepared tablets were evaluated for physicochemical parameters such as hardness, friability, weight variation, thickness, floating lag time (FLT), floating time, in vitro buoyancy study, in vitro release studies. The drug-polymer interaction was studied by fourier transform infrared and differential scanning calorimetry. Results and Discussion: The FLT of all the formulations were within the prescribed limits (<3 min). When ethyl cellulose was used as floating layer component, tablets showed good buoyancy effect but eroded within 6-8 h. Hence it was replaced with hydroxypropyl cellulose -M hydrophilic polymer, which showed good FLT and floating duration for 16 h. Formulation LFC4 was found to be optimized with dissolution profile of zero order kinetics showing fickian diffusion. A comparative study of bilayered and single layered tablets of LM showed a highest similarity factor of 83.03, difference factor of 2.74 and t-test (P < 0.05) indicates that there is no significant difference between them. Conclusion: Though bilayered tablet possess many advantages, single layered tablet would be economical, cost-effective and reproducible for large scale production in the industry. However, the results of present study demonstrated that the in vitro development of bilayered gastro retentive floating tablets with controlled drug release profile for LM is feasible. PMID:24167788

  2. Life-Span Learning: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The article discusses learning as embedded processes of development and aging, and as social activity over the life course. The concept of life-span learning is proposed and outlined to discuss these processes as aspects of and propositions in life-span development and aging theory. Life-span learning processes arise and continuously develop in a…

  3. Lamotrigine XR conversion to monotherapy: first study using a historical control group.

    PubMed

    French, Jacqueline A; Temkin, Nancy R; Shneker, Bassel F; Hammer, Anne E; Caldwell, Paul T; Messenheimer, John A

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of lamotrigine extended-release tablets (LTG XR) as monotherapy for partial seizures were evaluated using the conversion-to-monotherapy design, and historical data as the control. This methodology was recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, and this study is the first historical control design in epilepsy to complete enrollment. Patients ≥13 years old with uncontrolled partial epilepsy receiving monotherapy with valproate or a noninducing antiepileptic drug were converted to once-daily LTG XR (250 mg or 300 mg) as monotherapy and were followed up for 12 additional weeks. Efficacy was measured by the proportion of patients meeting predefined escape criteria for seizure worsening compared with aggregated pseudoplacebo control data from 8 previously conducted conversion-to-monotherapy trials. Nonoverlap of the 95% confidence limit for LTG XR and the 95% prediction interval of the historical control denotes efficacy. Of 226 randomized patients, 174 (93 in 300 mg/day group and 81 in 250 mg/day group) started withdrawal of the background AED and were evaluated for escape. In the historical control analysis population, the lower 95% prediction interval of the historical control (65.3%) was not overlapped by the upper 95% confidence limit of either LTG XR (300 mg/day; 37.2%) or LTG XR (250 mg/day; 43.4%). Adverse events were reported in 53% and 61% of patients receiving LTG XR (300 mg/day and 250 mg/day, respectively). LTG XR (250 mg or 300 mg once daily) is effective for conversion-to-monotherapy treatment of partial seizures in patients ≥13 years old.

  4. Peripheral Circadian Clocks Mediate Dietary Restriction-Dependent Changes in Lifespan and Fat Metabolism in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Katewa, Subhash D; Akagi, Kazutaka; Bose, Neelanjan; Rakshit, Kuntol; Camarella, Timothy; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Hall, David; Davis, Sonnet; Nelson, Christopher S; Brem, Rachel B; Ramanathan, Arvind; Sehgal, Amita; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2016-01-12

    Endogenous circadian clocks orchestrate several metabolic and signaling pathways that are known to modulate lifespan, suggesting clocks as potential targets for manipulation of metabolism and lifespan. We report here that the core circadian clock genes, timeless (tim) and period (per), are required for the metabolic and lifespan responses to DR in Drosophila. Consistent with the involvement of a circadian mechanism, DR enhances the amplitude of cycling of most circadian clock genes, including tim, in peripheral tissues. Mass-spectrometry-based lipidomic analysis suggests a role of tim in cycling of specific medium chain triglycerides under DR. Furthermore, overexpression of tim in peripheral tissues improves its oscillatory amplitude and extends lifespan under ad libitum conditions. Importantly, effects of tim on lifespan appear to be mediated through enhanced fat turnover. These findings identify a critical role for specific clock genes in modulating the effects of nutrient manipulation on fat metabolism and aging.

  5. Pheromone sensing regulates Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and stress resistance via the deacetylase SIR-2.1

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Andreas H.; Izrayelit, Yevgeniy; Park, Donha; Malik, Rabia U.; Zimmermann, Anna; Mahanti, Parag; Fox, Bennett W.; Bethke, Axel; Doering, Frank; Riddle, Donald L.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2013-01-01

    Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mice is regulated by conserved signaling networks, including the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling cascade and pathways depending on sirtuins, a family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases. Small molecules such as resveratrol are of great interest because they increase lifespan in many species in a sirtuin-dependent manner. However, no endogenous small molecules that regulate lifespan via sirtuins have been identified, and the mechanisms underlying sirtuin-dependent longevity are not well understood. Here, we show that in C. elegans, two endogenously produced small molecules, the dauer-inducing ascarosides ascr#2 and ascr#3, regulate lifespan and stress resistance through chemosensory pathways and the sirtuin SIR-2.1. Ascarosides extend adult lifespan and stress resistance without reducing fecundity or feeding rate, and these effects are reduced or abolished when nutrients are restricted. We found that ascaroside-mediated longevity is fully abolished by loss of SIR-2.1 and that the effect of ascr#2 requires expression of the G protein-coupled receptor DAF-37 in specific chemosensory neurons. In contrast to many other lifespan-modulating factors, ascaroside-mediated lifespan increases do not require insulin signaling via the FOXO homolog DAF-16 or the insulin/IGF-1-receptor homolog DAF-2. Our study demonstrates that C. elegans produces specific small molecules to control adult lifespan in a sirtuin-dependent manner, supporting the hypothesis that endogenous regulation of metazoan lifespan functions, in part, via sirtuins. These findings strengthen the link between chemosensory inputs and conserved mechanisms of lifespan regulation in metazoans and suggest a model for communal lifespan regulation in C. elegans. PMID:23509272

  6. Pheromone sensing regulates Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and stress resistance via the deacetylase SIR-2.1.

    PubMed

    Ludewig, Andreas H; Izrayelit, Yevgeniy; Park, Donha; Malik, Rabia U; Zimmermann, Anna; Mahanti, Parag; Fox, Bennett W; Bethke, Axel; Doering, Frank; Riddle, Donald L; Schroeder, Frank C

    2013-04-02

    Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mice is regulated by conserved signaling networks, including the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling cascade and pathways depending on sirtuins, a family of NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases. Small molecules such as resveratrol are of great interest because they increase lifespan in many species in a sirtuin-dependent manner. However, no endogenous small molecules that regulate lifespan via sirtuins have been identified, and the mechanisms underlying sirtuin-dependent longevity are not well understood. Here, we show that in C. elegans, two endogenously produced small molecules, the dauer-inducing ascarosides ascr#2 and ascr#3, regulate lifespan and stress resistance through chemosensory pathways and the sirtuin SIR-2.1. Ascarosides extend adult lifespan and stress resistance without reducing fecundity or feeding rate, and these effects are reduced or abolished when nutrients are restricted. We found that ascaroside-mediated longevity is fully abolished by loss of SIR-2.1 and that the effect of ascr#2 requires expression of the G protein-coupled receptor DAF-37 in specific chemosensory neurons. In contrast to many other lifespan-modulating factors, ascaroside-mediated lifespan increases do not require insulin signaling via the FOXO homolog DAF-16 or the insulin/IGF-1-receptor homolog DAF-2. Our study demonstrates that C. elegans produces specific small molecules to control adult lifespan in a sirtuin-dependent manner, supporting the hypothesis that endogenous regulation of metazoan lifespan functions, in part, via sirtuins. These findings strengthen the link between chemosensory inputs and conserved mechanisms of lifespan regulation in metazoans and suggest a model for communal lifespan regulation in C. elegans.

  7. Lifespan extension by cranberry supplementation partially requires SOD2 and is life stage independent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaning; Yolitz, Jason; Alberico, Thomas; Sun, Xiaoping; Zou, Sige

    2014-02-01

    Many nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals have been shown to promote healthspan and lifespan. However, the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of prolongevity interventions and the time points at which interventions should be implemented to achieve beneficial effects are not well characterized. We have previously shown that a cranberry-containing nutraceutical can promote lifespan in worms and flies and delay age-related functional decline of pancreatic cells in rats. Here we investigated the mechanism underlying lifespan extension induced by cranberry and the effects of short-term or life stage-specific interventions with cranberry on lifespan in Drosophila. We found that lifespan extension induced by cranberry was associated with reduced phosphorylation of ERK, a component of oxidative stress response MAPK signaling, and slightly increased phosphorylation of AKT, a component of insulin-like signaling. Lifespan extension was also associated with a reduced level of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, a biomarker of lipid oxidation. Moreover, lifespan extension induced by cranberry was partially suppressed by knockdown of SOD2, a major mitochondrial superoxide scavenger. Furthermore, cranberry supplementation was administered in three life stages of adult flies, health span (3-30 days), transition span (31-60 days) and senescence span (61 days to the end when all flies died). Cranberry supplementation during any of these life stages extended the remaining lifespan relative to the non-supplemented and life stage-matched controls. These findings suggest that cranberry supplementation is sufficient to promote longevity when implemented during any life stage, likely through reducing oxidative damage.

  8. Effects of lamotrigine on PCP-evoked elevations in monoamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Quarta, Davide; Large, Charles H

    2011-12-01

    Lamotrigine is suggested to have potential as an add-on treatment for patients with schizophrenia. Supporting evidence comes from the efficacy of the drug in models of psychotic-like behaviour induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, such as phencyclidine (PCP). These drugs enhance levels of the monoamines in the cortex, which may contribute to their psychotomimetic effects. The ability of lamotrigine to prevent these neurochemical changes has not been examined. We studied PCP-evoked overflow of noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin in the medial prefrontal cortex of awake rats using microdialysis. Rats were administered lamotrigine or vehicle, followed by PCP. Locomotor activity was also recorded before and after drug treatment. Lamotrigine did not have an influence on basal levels of the monoamines, but significantly reduced PCP-evoked overflow of dopamine and serotonin; PCP-evoked overflow of noradrenaline was also reduced by lamotrigine, but not to a significant degree. In contrast, PCP-induced hyperactivity was unaffected by lamotrigine. It is concluded that lamotrigine can modify PCP-evoked monoamine overflow in the cortex, consistent with an ability to prevent the psychotomimetic effects of NMDA receptor antagonists in rodents and humans. The dissociation between monoamine overflow and locomotor activity suggests the involvement of different brain circuits; relevance to the treatment of schizophrenia is also discussed.

  9. Interaction of an antiepileptic drug, lamotrigine with human serum albumin (HSA): Application of spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Poureshghi, Fatemeh; Ghandforoushan, Parisa; Safarnejad, Azam; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine (an epileptic drug) interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis, FTIR, CD spectroscopic techniques, and molecular modeling methods. Binding constant (Kb) of 5.74×10(3) and number of binding site of 0.97 showed that there is a slight interaction between lamotrigine and HSA. Thermodynamic studies was constructed using the flourimetric titrations in three different temperatures and the resulted data used to calculate the parameters using Vant Hoff equation. Decreased Stern Volmer quenching constant by enhanced temperature revealed the static quenching mechanism. Negative standard enthalpy (ΔH) and standard entropy (ΔS) changes indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were dominant forces which facilitate the binding of Lamotrigine to HSA, the results were confirmed by molecular docking studies which showed no hydrogen binding. The FRET studies showed that there is a possibility of energy transfer between Trp214 and lamotrigine. Also the binding of lamotrigine to HSA in the studied concentrations was not as much as many other drugs, but the secondary structure of the HSA was significantly changed following the interaction in a way that α-helix percentage was reduced from 67% to 57% after the addition of lamotrigine in the molar ratio of 4:1 to HSA. According to the docking studies, lamotrigine binds to IB site preferably.

  10. Metformin promotes lifespan through mitohormesis via the peroxiredoxin PRDX-2

    PubMed Central

    De Haes, Wouter; Frooninckx, Lotte; Van Assche, Roel; Smolders, Arne; Depuydt, Geert; Billen, Johan; Braeckman, Bart P.; Schoofs, Liliane; Temmerman, Liesbet

    2014-01-01

    The antiglycemic drug metformin, widely prescribed as first-line treatment of type II diabetes mellitus, has lifespan-extending properties. Precisely how this is achieved remains unclear. Via a quantitative proteomics approach using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, we gained molecular understanding of the physiological changes elicited by metformin exposure, including changes in branched-chain amino acid catabolism and cuticle maintenance. We show that metformin extends lifespan through the process of mitohormesis and propose a signaling cascade in which metformin-induced production of reactive oxygen species increases overall life expectancy. We further address an important issue in aging research, wherein so far, the key molecular link that translates the reactive oxygen species signal into a prolongevity cue remained elusive. We show that this beneficial signal of the mitohormetic pathway is propagated by the peroxiredoxin PRDX-2. Because of its evolutionary conservation, peroxiredoxin signaling might underlie a general principle of prolongevity signaling. PMID:24889636

  11. Rapid HPLC analysis of the antiepileptic lamotrigine and its metabolites in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Saracino, Maria Addolorata; Bugamelli, Francesca; Conti, Matteo; Amore, Mario; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2007-09-01

    A liquid chromatographic method with diode array detection (DAD) has been developed for the analysis of the antiepileptic agent lamotrigine (LTG) and its metabolites, lamotrigine 2-N-glucuronide and 2-N-methylated in plasma samples. The analytes were separated on a C8 RP column, using a mobile phase composed of methanol and a 0.45 mM, pH 3.5 phosphate buffer containing 0.17% triethylamine (24:76 v/v). Melatonin was used as the internal standard (IS). The DAD detector was set at 220 nm for the detection of all the analytes. A simple protein precipitation with methanol guaranteed high extraction yield values (>90%) and good purification from matrix interference. Good linearity was obtained in the 0.1-15.0 microg/mL range for LTG and lamotrigine 2-N-glucuronide and in the 0.1-2.0 microg/mL range for lamotrigine 2-N-methylated. The analytical method was validated in terms of precision, extraction yield, and accuracy. These assays gave RSD% values for precision always lower than 4.3% and mean accuracy higher than 80%. The method seems to be suitable for the analysis of plasma samples from patients treated with Lamictal.

  12. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Role of Lamotrigine Augmentation to Anti-Depressant Medication in Winter Depression.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Arshad; Shah, Majid Shafi; Roub, Fazl E; Dar, Mansoor Ahmad; Wani, Zaid Ahmad; Jan, Mohd Muzzaffar; Wani, Rayees Ahmad; Bhat, Tariq Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic options have been evaluated and tried for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) including bright light therapy (BLT), anti-depressants, beta-blockers and psychotherapy, but the data supporting use of mood-stabilizing agents is just handful in spite of this condition being understood most frequently to be associated with bipolar affective disorder II (BPAD II). So we planned to study role of Lamotrigine (Mood stabilizing agent) in SAD. 30 patients of SAD who were prescribed lamotrigine in addition to antidepressant medications for a minimum of 8 weeks and were assessed for severity using HAM-D were selected retrospectively from the hospital records for this study. HAM-D scores at 2, 4 and 8 weeks were compared to baseline scores. Single tailed t-test was used to study the difference of means to assess the therapeutic response and pre/post analysis of change. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Though no significant difference was seen in HAM-D Scores at 2 weeks of treatment compared to baseline, but results were statistically significant at 4 and 8 weeks of treatment with lamotrigine augmentation of antidepressant medications. We conclude that lamotrigine augmentation was found to be effective treatment strategy for managing winter depression phase of Seasonal Affective Disorder.

  13. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Role of Lamotrigine Augmentation to Anti-Depressant Medication in Winter Depression

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Arshad; Shah, Majid Shafi; Roub, Fazl E; Dar, Mansoor Ahmad; Wani, Zaid Ahmad; Jan, Mohd Muzzaffar; Wani, Rayees Ahmad; Bhat, Tariq Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many therapeutic options have been evaluated and tried for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) including bright light therapy (BLT), anti-depressants, beta-blockers and psychotherapy, but the data supporting use of mood-stabilizing agents is just handful in spite of this condition being understood most frequently to be associated with bipolar affective disorder II (BPAD II). So we planned to study role of Lamotrigine (Mood stabilizing agent) in SAD. Materials and Methods: 30 patients of SAD who were prescribed lamotrigine in addition to antidepressant medications for a minimum of 8 weeks and were assessed for severity using HAM-D were selected retrospectively from the hospital records for this study. HAM-D scores at 2, 4 and 8 weeks were compared to baseline scores. Statistics Analysis: Single tailed t-test was used to study the difference of means to assess the therapeutic response and pre/post analysis of change. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Though no significant difference was seen in HAM-D Scores at 2 weeks of treatment compared to baseline, but results were statistically significant at 4 and 8 weeks of treatment with lamotrigine augmentation of antidepressant medications. Conclusion: We conclude that lamotrigine augmentation was found to be effective treatment strategy for managing winter depression phase of Seasonal Affective Disorder. PMID:26664074

  14. Direct nose-to-brain delivery of lamotrigine following intranasal administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Serralheiro, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2015-07-25

    Pharmacoresistance is considered one of the major causes underlying the failure of the anticonvulsant therapy, demanding the development of alternative and more effective therapeutic approaches. Due to the particular anatomical features of the nasal cavity, intranasal administration has been explored as a means of preferential drug delivery to the brain. The purpose of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine administered by the intranasal route to mice, and to investigate whether a direct transport of the drug from nose to brain could be involved. The high bioavailability achieved for intranasally administered lamotrigine (116.5%) underscored the fact that a substantial fraction of the drug has been absorbed to the systemic circulation. Nonetheless, the heterogeneous biodistribution of lamotrigine in different brain regions, with higher concentration levels attained in the olfactory bulb comparatively to the frontal cortex and the remaining portion of the brain, strongly suggest that lamotrigine was directly transferred to the brain via the olfactory neuronal pathway, circumventing the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, it seems that intranasal route can be assumed as a suitable and valuable drug delivery strategy for the chronic treatment of epilepsy, also providing a promising alternative approach for a prospective management of pharmacoresistance.

  15. The use of lamotrigine and other antiepileptic drugs in paediatric patients at a Malaysian hospital.

    PubMed

    Ab Rahman, Ab Fatah; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Ismail, Hussain Imam Mohamed; Seng, Tan Boon

    2005-10-01

    (1) To determine the effect of lamotrigine add-on therapy on the seizure frequency and cost in paediatric patients. (2) To determine the prescribing pattern of other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). A retrospective study of medical records was carried out from October 2000 to June 2001 at the paediatric clinic, Hospital Pulau Pinang. Seizure frequency, cost of drug and types of AED prescribed. A total of 209 medical records were retrieved during the study period. Lamotrigine (LTG) was prescribed in 29 patients as add-on therapy. In 18 patients, there was a significant reduction in seizure frequency after the addition of LTG. Approximately 70% experienced a reduction in seizure frequency of more than 50%. Side effects of LTG were considered mild and manageable. However, drug cost after the addition of LTG increased by 103%. In the remaining 180 patients, the most common AED prescribed was sodium valproate (VPA). Only 15% of the patients received combination therapy. Mean monthly cost of monotherapy was found to be RM 24.4 while monthly cost of combination therapy was RM 45.4 (1 Euro-RM 5.00). The majority of paediatric patients in the study are on AED monotherapy and only a small percentage was prescribed lamotrigine. The use of lamotrigine is associated with better seizure control but with an increase in drug cost.

  16. Behavioral outcomes in children exposed prenatally to lamotrigine, valproate, or carbamazepine

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Uma; Adams, Jane; Macklin, Eric A.; Dhillon, Ruby; McCarthy, Katherine D.; Dworetzky, Barbara; Klein, Autumn; Holmes, Lewis B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate adaptive behavior outcomes of children prenatally exposed to lamotrigine, valproate, or carbamazepine, and to determine if these outcomes were dose-dependent. Methods Data were collected from women enrolled in the North American Anti-epileptic Drug (AED) Pregnancy Registry who had taken lamotrigine, valproate, or carbamazepine monotherapies throughout pregnancy to suppress seizures. The adaptive behavior of 252 exposed children (including 104 lamotrigine-exposed, 97 carbamazepine-exposed, and 51 valproate-exposed), ages 3- to 6-years-old, was measured using the Vineland-II Adaptive Behavior Scales, administered to each mother by telephone. Mean Adaptive Behavior Composite (ABC), domain standard scores for communication, daily living, socialization and motor skills, and adaptive levels were analyzed and correlated with first trimester drug dose. Results After adjusting for maternal age, education, folate use, cigarette and alcohol exposure, gestational age, and birth weight by propensity score analysis, the mean ABC score for valproate-exposed children was 95.6 (95% CI [91, 101]), versus 100.8 (95% CI [98, 103]) and 103.5 (95% CI [101, 106]) for carbamazepine- and lamotrigine-exposed children, respectively (ANOVA; p=0.017). Significant differences were observed among the three drug groups in the ABC (p=0.017), socialization (p=0.026), and motor (p=0.018) domains, with a trend toward significance in the communication domain (p=0.053). Valproate-exposed children scored lowest and lamotrigine-exposed children scored highest in every category. Valproate-exposed children were most likely to perform at a low or moderately low adaptive level in each category. Higher valproate dose was associated with significantly lower ABC (p=0.020), socialization (p=0.009), and motor (p=0.041) scores before adjusting for confounders. After adjusting for the above variables, increasing VPA dose was associated with decreasing Vineland scores in all domains, but the

  17. Sphingolipid metabolism regulates development and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Roy G.; Thompson, Kenneth W.; Camandola, Simonetta; Mack, Kendra T.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a highly conserved lipid component of cell membranes involved in the formation of lipid raft domains that house many of the receptors and cell-to-cell signaling factors involved in regulating cell division, maturation, and terminal differentiation. By measuring and manipulating sphingolipid metabolism using pharmacological and genetic tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, we provide evidence that the synthesis and remodeling of specific ceramides (e.g., dC18:1–C24:1), gangliosides (e.g., GM1–C24:1), and sphingomyelins (e.g., dC18:1–C18:1) influence development rate and lifespan. We found that the levels of fatty acid chain desaturation and elongation in many sphingolipid species increased during development and aging, with no such changes in developmentally-arrested dauer larvae or normal adults after food withdrawal (an anti-aging intervention). Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs directed against serine palmitoyl transferase and glucosylceramide synthase acted to slow development rate, extend the reproductive period, and increase lifespan. In contrast, worms fed an egg yolk diet rich in sphingolipids exhibited accelerated development and reduced lifespan. Our findings demonstrate that sphingolipid accumulation and remodeling are critical events that determine development rate and lifespan in the nematode model, with both development rate and aging being accelerated by the synthesis of sphingomyelin, and its metabolism to ceramides and gangliosides. PMID:25437839

  18. Rapid quantification of lamotrigine in human plasma by two LC systems connected with tandem MS.

    PubMed

    Shah, Hiten J; Subbaiah, Gunta; Patel, Dasharath M; Suhagia, Bhanubhai N; Patel, Chhagan N

    2010-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method has been developed and validated for the determination of lamotrigine in human plasma using multiplexing technique (two HPLC units connected to one MS-MS). Lamotrigine was extracted from human plasma by solid-phase extraction technique using Oasis Hydrophilic Lipophilic Balance (HLB) or N-vinylpyrrolidone and divinylbenzene cartridge. A structural analog, 3,5-diamino-6-phenyl-1,2,4-triazine, was used as an internal standard (IS). A BetaBasic C(8) column was used for the chromatographic separation of analytes. The mass transition [M+H](+) ions used for detection were m/z 256.0 --> 211.0 for lamotrigine and m/z 188.0 --> 143.0 for IS. The method involved a simple multiplexing, rapid solid-phase extraction without evaporation and reconstitution. The proposed method has been validated for a linear range of 0.025 to 10.000 microg/mL with a correlation coefficient > or = 0.9991. The limit of quantification for lamotrigine was 0.025 microg/mL, and limit of detection was 50.000 pg/mL. The intra-run and inter-run precision and accuracy were within 10.0% for intra-HPLC runs and inter-HPLC runs. The overall recoveries for lamotrigine and IS were 97.9% and 92.5%, respectively. Total MS run time was 1.4 min per sample. The validated method has been successfully used to analyze human plasma samples for applications in pharmacokinetic, bioavailability, bioequivalence, or in vitro in vivo correlation studies.

  19. Lamotrigine augmentation in patients with schizophrenia who show partial response to clozapine treatment.

    PubMed

    Vayısoğlu, Sefa; Anıl Yağcıoğlu, A Elif; Yağcıoğlu, Süha; Karahan, Sevilay; Karcı, Oğuzhan; Gürel, S Can; Yazıcı, M Kâzım

    2013-01-01

    Several placebo controlled studies investigating lamotrigine augmentation of clozapine in schizophrenia patients with partial response have shown varying results. The aim of this study was to further investigate the efficacy and safety of this augmentation strategy, and its effect on the glutamatergic system through utilizing mismatch negativity (MMN) component of auditory event related potentials. The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of lamotrigine augmentation of clozapine in a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective, randomized design. Thirty-four patients diagnosed according to DSM-IV schizophrenia criteria and with partial response to clozapine were included. Patients were randomized to 25mg/day of lamotrigine or placebo, gradually increasing up to 200mg/day on the 6th week. The change in psychopathology was assessed with Positive and Negative Syndrome (PANSS), Calgary Depression (CDS) and Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) scales. A neuropsychological test battery was administered and MMN measurements were also obtained at baseline and endpoint. Safety evaluation included physical examination, UKU Side Effect Rating Scale (UKU) assessment and serum drug level measurements. No significant differences were found between the two treatment groups in PANSS Positive and General Psychopathology, CDS, neurocognitive test and UKU scores, as well as MMN measurements. PANSS Total, Negative and CGI-S scores showed significant improvement compared to lamotrigine in the placebo group. This study did not show any benefit of augmentation of clozapine with lamotrigine in schizophrenia patients with partial response. The need for further investigation of other augmentation strategies of clozapine in partially responsive schizophrenia patients is evident. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Tissue-specific transcription of the neuronal gene Lim3 affects Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Rybina, Olga Y; Sarantseva, Svetlana V; Veselkina, Ekaterina R; Bolschakova, Olga I; Symonenko, Alexander V; Krementsova, Anna V; Ryabova, Elena V; Roshina, Natalia V; Pasyukova, Elena G

    2017-05-02

    The identity of neuronal cell types is established and maintained by the expression of neuronal genes coding for ion channels, neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides, among others. Some of these genes have been shown to affect lifespan; however, their role in lifespan control remains largely unclear. The Drosophila melanogaster gene Lim3 encodes a transcription factor involved in complicated motor neuron specification networks. We previously identified Lim3 as a candidate gene affecting lifespan. To obtain direct evidence of the involvement of Lim3 in lifespan control, Lim3 overexpression and RNAi knockdown were induced in the nervous system and muscles of Drosophila using the GAL4-UAS binary system. We demonstrated that Lim3 knockdown in the nervous system increased survival at an early age and that Lim3 knockdown in muscles both increased survival at an early age and extended median lifespan, directly establishing the involvement of Lim3 in lifespan control. Lim3 overexpression in nerves and muscles was deleterious and led to lethality and decreased lifespan, respectively. Lim3 misexpression in both nerves and muscles increased locomotion regardless of changes in lifespan, which indicated that the effects of Lim3 on lifespan and locomotion can be uncoupled. Decreased synaptic activity was observed in the neuromuscular junctions of individuals with Lim3 overexpression in muscles, in association with decreased lifespan. However, no changes in NMJ activity were associated with the positive shift in locomotion observed in all misexpression genotypes. Our data suggested that modifications in the microtubule network may be induced by Lim3 misexpression in muscles and cause an increase in locomotion.

  1. Supplementation with Triptolide Increases Resistance to Environmental Stressors and Lifespan in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Beak, Sun-Mi; Park, Sang-Kyu

    2017-06-01

    Triptolide is a major active compound found in Tripterygium wilfordii., also known as Thunder God Vine. Triptolide has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. In this study, we examined the effect of dietary supplementation with triptolide on response to environmental stressors and lifespan in vivo using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system. Treatment with 50 mg/L of triptolide in the growth media increased resistance to oxidative stress and reduced the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. We also observed a lifespan-extending activity for triptolide. Both mean and maximum lifespans were significantly increased by supplementation with triptolide. Response to other environmental stressors was modulated by triptolide. The survival after heat shock or UV irradiation was markedly increased in worms treated with triptolide. Unlike many lifespan-extending genetic or nutritional interventions, the longevity phenotype conferred by triptolide did not have the trade-off of a reduction in fertility or a delay in the gravid period. The expressions of hsp-16.2 and sod-3, known to positively correlate with a long lifespan, were significantly upregulated by supplementation with triptolide. These findings suggest that triptolide can exhibit antistress and lifespan-extending effects in vivo, possibly through its antioxidant activity and support the free radical theory of aging, which emphasizes the causative role of oxidative stress in aging. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Mechanisms of amino acid-mediated lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Clare; Canfield, John; Copes, Neil; Brito, Andres; Rehan, Muhammad; Lipps, David; Brunquell, Jessica; Westerheide, Sandy D; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2015-02-03

    Little is known about the role of amino acids in cellular signaling pathways, especially as it pertains to pathways that regulate the rate of aging. However, it has been shown that methionine or tryptophan restriction extends lifespan in higher eukaryotes and increased proline or tryptophan levels increase longevity in C. elegans. In addition, leucine strongly activates the TOR signaling pathway, which when inhibited increases lifespan. Therefore each of the 20 proteogenic amino acids was individually supplemented to C. elegans and the effects on lifespan were determined. All amino acids except phenylalanine and aspartate extended lifespan at least to a small extent at one or more of the 3 concentrations tested with serine and proline showing the largest effects. 11 of the amino acids were less potent at higher doses, while 5 even decreased lifespan. Serine, proline, or histidine-mediated lifespan extension was greatly inhibited in eat-2 worms, a model of dietary restriction, in daf-16/FOXO, sir-2.1, rsks-1 (ribosomal S6 kinase), gcn-2, and aak-2 (AMPK) longevity pathway mutants, and in bec-1 autophagy-defective knockdown worms. 8 of 10 longevity-promoting amino acids tested activated a SKN-1/Nrf2 reporter strain, while serine and histidine were the only amino acids from those to activate a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) reporter strain. Thermotolerance was increased by proline or tryptophan supplementation, while tryptophan-mediated lifespan extension was independent of DAF-16/FOXO and SKN-1/Nrf2 signaling, but tryptophan and several related pyridine-containing compounds induced the mitochondrial unfolded protein response and an ER stress response. High glucose levels or mutations affecting electron transport chain (ETC) function inhibited amino acid-mediated lifespan extension suggesting that metabolism plays an important role. Providing many other cellular metabolites to C. elegans also increased longevity suggesting that anaplerosis of tricarboxylic acid (TCA

  3. Pilot investigation of the changes in cortical activation during facial affect recognition with lamotrigine monotherapy in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Jogia, Jigar; Haldane, Morgan; Cobb, Annabel; Kumari, Veena; Frangou, Sophia

    2008-03-01

    Bipolar disorder is associated with dysfunction in prefrontal and limbic areas implicated in emotional processing. To explore whether lamotrigine monotherapy may exert its action by improving the function of the neural network involved in emotional processing. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine changes in brain activation during a sad facial affect recognition task in 12 stable patients with bipolar disorder when medication-free compared with healthy controls and after 12 weeks of lamotrigine monotherapy. At baseline, compared with controls, patients with bipolar disorder showed overactivity in temporal regions and underactivity in the dorsal medial and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and the dorsal cingulate gyrus. Following lamotrigine monotherapy, patients demonstrated reduced temporal and increased prefrontal activation. This preliminary evidence suggests that lamotrigine may enhance the function of the neural circuitry involved in affect recognition.

  4. A rapid and simple assay for lamotrigine in serum/plasma by HPLC, and comparison with an immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Phillip E; Fisher, Danielle S; Evers, Richard; Flanagan, Robert J

    2011-07-01

    Monitoring serum/plasma concentrations of lamotrigine may be useful under certain circumstances. An HPLC column packed with strong cation-exchange (SCX)-modified microparticulate silica together with a 100% methanol eluent containing an ionic modifier permits direct injection of sample extracts. An HPLC-UV method developed using this principle for the measurement of serum/plasma lamotrigine is simple, sensitive and selective. The analysis time is less than 5 min. Intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy meet acceptance criteria, and sample stability, and potential interferences from other compounds have been evaluated. There was good agreement with consensus mean results from external quality assessment samples (n = 32). Analysis of patient samples (n = 115) using the HPLC method and the Seradyn QMS® Lamotrigine immunoassay showed that the immunoassay over-estimated lamotrigine by 21% on average.

  5. Ethosuximide, sodium valproate or lamotrigine for absence seizures in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C

    2017-02-14

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review originally published in 2003, Issue 3, and updated in 2005, Issue 4.Absence seizures are brief epileptic seizures which present in childhood and adolescence. Depending on clinical features and electroencephalogram (EEG) findings they are divided into typical, atypical absences, and absences with special features. Typical absences are characterised by sudden loss of awareness and an EEG typically shows generalised spike wave discharges at three cycles per second. Ethosuximide, valproate and lamotrigine are currently used to treat absence seizures. This review aims to determine the best choice of antiepileptic drug for children and adolescents with typical absence seizures. To review the evidence for the effects of ethosuximide, valproate and lamotrigine as treatments for children and adolescents with absence seizures, when compared with placebo or each other. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (1 September 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO, 1 September 2016), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 1 September 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov (1 September 2016) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (1 September 2016). Previously we searched Embase (1988 to March 2005) and SCOPUS (1823 to 31 March 2014). No language restrictions were imposed. In addition, we contacted Sanofi Winthrop, Glaxo Wellcome (now GlaxoSmithKline) and Parke Davis (now Pfizer), manufacturers of sodium valproate, lamotrigine and ethosuximide respectively. Randomised parallel group monotherapy or add-on trials which include a comparison of any of the following in children or adolescents with absence seizures: ethosuximide; sodium valproate; lamotrigine; or placebo. Outcome measures were: (1) proportion of individuals seizure free at one, three, six, 12 and 18 months post randomisation; (2) people with a 50% or greater

  6. The Evolution of Senescence and Post-Reproductive Lifespan in Guppies (Poecilia reticulata)

    PubMed Central

    Reznick, David; Bryant, Michael; Holmes, Donna

    2006-01-01

    The study of post-reproductive lifespan has been of interest primarily with regard to the extended post-menopausal lifespan seen in humans. This unusual feature of human demography has been hypothesized to have evolved because of the “grandmother” effect, or the contributions that post-reproductive females make to the fitness of their children and grandchildren. While some correlative analyses of human populations support this hypothesis, few formal, experimental studies have addressed the evolution of post-reproductive lifespan. As part of an ongoing study of life history evolution in guppies, we compared lifespans of individual guppies derived from populations that differ in their extrinsic mortality rates. Some of these populations co-occur with predators that increase mortality rate, whereas other nearby populations above barrier waterfalls are relatively free from predation. Theory predicts that such differences in extrinsic mortality will select for differences in the age at maturity, allocation of resources to reproduction, and patterns of senescence, including reproductive declines. As part of our evaluation of these predictions, we quantified differences among populations in post-reproductive lifespan. We present here the first formal, comparative study of the evolution of post-reproductive lifespan as a component of the evolution of the entire life history. Guppies that evolved with predators and that experienced high extrinsic mortality mature at an earlier age but also have longer lifespans. We divided the lifespan into three non-overlapping components: birth to age at first reproduction, age at first reproduction to age at last reproduction (reproductive lifespan), and age at last reproduction to age at death (post-reproductive lifespan). Guppies from high-predation environments live longer because they have a longer reproductive lifespan, which is the component of the life history that can make a direct contribution to individual fitness. We found

  7. The evolution of senescence and post-reproductive lifespan in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Reznick, David; Bryant, Michael; Holmes, Donna

    2006-01-01

    The study of post-reproductive lifespan has been of interest primarily with regard to the extended post-menopausal lifespan seen in humans. This unusual feature of human demography has been hypothesized to have evolved because of the "grandmother" effect, or the contributions that post-reproductive females make to the fitness of their children and grandchildren. While some correlative analyses of human populations support this hypothesis, few formal, experimental studies have addressed the evolution of post-reproductive lifespan. As part of an ongoing study of life history evolution in guppies, we compared lifespans of individual guppies derived from populations that differ in their extrinsic mortality rates. Some of these populations co-occur with predators that increase mortality rate, whereas other nearby populations above barrier waterfalls are relatively free from predation. Theory predicts that such differences in extrinsic mortality will select for differences in the age at maturity, allocation of resources to reproduction, and patterns of senescence, including reproductive declines. As part of our evaluation of these predictions, we quantified differences among populations in post-reproductive lifespan. We present here the first formal, comparative study of the evolution of post-reproductive lifespan as a component of the evolution of the entire life history. Guppies that evolved with predators and that experienced high extrinsic mortality mature at an earlier age but also have longer lifespans. We divided the lifespan into three non-overlapping components: birth to age at first reproduction, age at first reproduction to age at last reproduction (reproductive lifespan), and age at last reproduction to age at death (post-reproductive lifespan). Guppies from high-predation environments live longer because they have a longer reproductive lifespan, which is the component of the life history that can make a direct contribution to individual fitness. We found no

  8. Caenorhabditis elegans Battling Starvation Stress: Low Levels of Ethanol Prolong Lifespan in L1 Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Paola V.; Khare, Shilpi; Young, Brian D.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans arrests development at the first larval stage if food is not present upon hatching. Larvae in this stage provide an excellent model for studying stress responses during development. We found that supplementing starved larvae with ethanol markedly extends their lifespan within this L1 diapause. The effects of ethanol-induced lifespan extension can be observed when the ethanol is added to the medium at any time between 0 and 10 days after hatching. The lowest ethanol concentration that extended lifespan was 1 mM (0.005%); higher concentrations to 68 mM (0.4%) did not result in increased survival. In spite of their extended survival, larvae did not progress to the L2 stage. Supplementing starved cultures with n-propanol and n-butanol also extended lifespan, but methanol and isopropanol had no measurable effect. Mass spectrometry analysis of nematode fatty acids and amino acids revealed that L1 larvae can incorporate atoms from ethanol into both types of molecules. Based on these data, we suggest that ethanol supplementation may extend the lifespan of L1 larvae by either serving as a carbon and energy source and/or by inducing a stress response. PMID:22279556

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans battling starvation stress: low levels of ethanol prolong lifespan in L1 larvae.

    PubMed

    Castro, Paola V; Khare, Shilpi; Young, Brian D; Clarke, Steven G

    2012-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans arrests development at the first larval stage if food is not present upon hatching. Larvae in this stage provide an excellent model for studying stress responses during development. We found that supplementing starved larvae with ethanol markedly extends their lifespan within this L1 diapause. The effects of ethanol-induced lifespan extension can be observed when the ethanol is added to the medium at any time between 0 and 10 days after hatching. The lowest ethanol concentration that extended lifespan was 1 mM (0.005%); higher concentrations to 68 mM (0.4%) did not result in increased survival. In spite of their extended survival, larvae did not progress to the L2 stage. Supplementing starved cultures with n-propanol and n-butanol also extended lifespan, but methanol and isopropanol had no measurable effect. Mass spectrometry analysis of nematode fatty acids and amino acids revealed that L1 larvae can incorporate atoms from ethanol into both types of molecules. Based on these data, we suggest that ethanol supplementation may extend the lifespan of L1 larvae by either serving as a carbon and energy source and/or by inducing a stress response.

  10. Bmk-1 regulates lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans by activating hsp-16.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Xu, Xiangru; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-08-07

    The genetics of aging is typically concerned with lifespan determination that is associated with alterations in expression levels or mutations of particular genes. Previous reports in C. elegans have shown that the bmk-1 gene has important functions in chromosome segregation, and this has been confirmed with its mammalian homolog, KIF11. However, this gene has never been implicated in aging or lifespan regulation. Here we show that the bmk-1 gene is an important lifespan regulator in worms. We show that reducing bmk-1 expression using RNAi shortens worm lifespan by 32%, while over-expression of bmk-1 extends worm lifespan by 25%, and enhances heat-shock stress resistance. Moreover, bmk-1 over-expression increases the level of hsp-16 and decreases ced-3 in C. elegans. Genetic epistasis analysis reveals that hsp-16 is essential for the lifespan extension by bmk-1. These findings suggest that bmk-1 may act through enhanced hsp-16 function to protect cells from stress and inhibit the apoptosis pathway, thereby conferring worm longevity. Though it remains unclear whether this is a distinct function from chromosomal segregation, bmk-1 is a potential new target for extension of lifespan and enhancement of healthspan.

  11. Lamotrigine Augmentation of Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Severe and Long-Term Treatment-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Arrojo-Romero, Manuel; Tajes Alonso, María; de Leon, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The treatment recommendations in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) after lack of response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) include augmentation with other drugs, particularly clomipramine, a more potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI), or antipsychotics. We present two cases of response to lamotrigine augmentation in treatment-refractory OCD; each received multiple SRI trials over a >10-year period. The first patient had eleven years of treatment with multiple combinations including clomipramine and SSRIs. She had a >50% decrease of Y-BOCS (from 29 to 14) by augmenting paroxetine (60 mg/day) with lamotrigine (100 mg/day). The second patient had 22 years of treatment with multiple combinations, including combinations of SSRIs with clomipramine and risperidone. She had an almost 50% decrease of Y-BOCS (from 30 to 16) and disappearance of tics by augmenting clomipramine (225 mg/d) with lamotrigine (200 mg/day). These two patients were characterized by lack of response to multiple treatments, making a placebo response to lamotrigine augmentation unlikely. Prospective randomized trials in treatment-resistant OCD patients who do not respond to combinations of SSRIs with clomipramine and/or antipsychotics are needed, including augmentation with lamotrigine. Until these trials are available, our cases suggest that clinicians may consider lamotrigine augmentation in such treatment-resistant OCD patients. PMID:23936714

  12. Effects of acute and chronic treatment elicited by lamotrigine on behavior, energy metabolism, neurotrophins and signaling cascades in rats.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ribeiro, Karine F; Zappellini, Giovanni; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Gomes, Lara M; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Luciano, Thais F; Marques, Scherolin O; Streck, Emilio L; Souza, Cláudio T; Quevedo, João

    2011-12-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the behavioral and molecular effects of lamotrigine. To this aim, Wistar rats were treated with lamotrigine (10 and 20 mg/kg) or imipramine (30 mg/kg) acutely and chronically. The behavior was assessed using forced swimming test. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), Proteina Kinase B (PKB, AKT), glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) levels, citrate synthase, creatine kinase and mitochondrial chain (I, II, II-III and IV) activities were assessed in the brain. The results showed that both treatments reduced the immobility time. The BDNF were increased in the prefrontal after acute treatment with lamotrigine (20 mg/kg), and the BDNF and NGF were increased in the prefrontal after chronic treatment with lamotrigine in all doses. The AKT increased and Bcl-2 and GSK-3 decreased after both treatments in all brain areas. The citrate synthase and creatine kinase increased in the amygdala after acute treatment with imipramine. Chronic treatment with imipramine and lamotrigine (10 mg/kg) increased the creatine kinase in the hippocampus. The complex I was reduced and the complex II, II-III and IV were increased, but related with treatment and brain area. In conclusion, lamotrigine exerted antidepressant-like, which can be attributed to its effects on pathways related to depression, such as neurotrophins, metabolism energy and signaling cascade. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Extending the lifespan of nuclear power plant structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1995-04-01

    By the end of this decade, 63 of the 111 commercial nuclear power plants in the United States will be more than 20 years old, with some nearing the end of their 40-year operating license term. Faced with the prospect of having to replace lost generating capacity from other sources and substantial shutdown and decommissioning costs, many utilities are expected to apply to continue the service of their plants past the initial licensing period. In support of such applications, evidence should be provided that the capacity of the safety-related systems and structures to mitigate potential extreme events has not deteriorated unacceptably due to either aging or environmental stressor effects during the previous service history.

  14. Myc-dependent genome instability and lifespan in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Greer, Christina; Lee, Moonsook; Westerhof, Maaike; Milholland, Brandon; Spokony, Rebecca; Vijg, Jan; Secombe, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The Myc family of transcription factors are key regulators of cell growth and proliferation that are dysregulated in a large number of human cancers. When overexpressed, Myc family proteins also cause genomic instability, a hallmark of both transformed and aging cells. Using an in vivo lacZ mutation reporter, we show that overexpression of Myc in Drosophila increases the frequency of large genome rearrangements associated with erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In addition, we find that overexpression of Myc shortens adult lifespan and, conversely, that Myc haploinsufficiency reduces mutation load and extends lifespan. Our data provide the first evidence that Myc may act as a pro-aging factor, possibly through its ability to greatly increase genome instability.

  15. Role of Sirtuins in Lifespan Regulation is Linked to Methylation of Nicotinamide

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Kathrin; Mansfeld, Johannes; Kuhlow, Doreen; Weimer, Sandra; Priebe, Steffen; Heiland, Ines; Birringer, Marc; Groth, Marco; Segref, Alexandra; Kanfi, Yariv; Price, Nathan L.; Schmeisser, Sebastian; Schuster, Stefan; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Guthke, Reinhard; Platzer, Matthias; Hoppe, Thorsten; Cohen, Haim Y.; Zarse, Kim; Sinclair, David A.; Ristow, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuins, a family of histone deacetylases, have a fiercely debated role in regulating lifespan. Contrasting recent observations, we here find that overexpression of sir-2.1, the orthologue of mammalian SirT1, does extend C. elegans lifespan. Sirtuins mandatorily convert NAD+ into nicotinamide (NAM). We here find that NAM and its metabolite, 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA), extend C. elegans lifespan, even in the absence of sir-2.1. We identify anmt-1 to encode a C. elegans orthologue of nicotinamide-N-methyltransferase (NNMT), the enzyme that methylates NAM to generate MNA. Disruption and overexpression of anmt-1 have opposing effects on lifespan independent of sirtuins, with loss of anmt-1 fully inhibiting sir-2.1-mediated lifespan extension. MNA serves as a substrate for a newly identified aldehyde oxidase, GAD-3, to generate hydrogen peroxide acting as a mitohormetic ROS signal to promote C. elegans longevity. Taken together, sirtuin-mediated lifespan extension depends on methylation of NAM, providing an unexpected mechanistic role for sirtuins beyond histone deacetylation. PMID:24077178

  16. Role of sirtuins in lifespan regulation is linked to methylation of nicotinamide.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, Kathrin; Mansfeld, Johannes; Kuhlow, Doreen; Weimer, Sandra; Priebe, Steffen; Heiland, Ines; Birringer, Marc; Groth, Marco; Segref, Alexandra; Kanfi, Yariv; Price, Nathan L; Schmeisser, Sebastian; Schuster, Stefan; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Guthke, Reinhard; Platzer, Matthias; Hoppe, Thorsten; Cohen, Haim Y; Zarse, Kim; Sinclair, David A; Ristow, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Sirtuins, a family of histone deacetylases, have a fiercely debated role in regulating lifespan. In contrast with recent observations, here we find that overexpression of sir-2.1, the ortholog of mammalian SirT1, does extend Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan. Sirtuins mandatorily convert NAD(+) into nicotinamide (NAM). We here find that NAM and its metabolite, 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA), extend C. elegans lifespan, even in the absence of sir-2.1. We identify a previously unknown C. elegans nicotinamide-N-methyltransferase, encoded by a gene now named anmt-1, to generate MNA from NAM. Disruption and overexpression of anmt-1 have opposing effects on lifespan independent of sirtuins, with loss of anmt-1 fully inhibiting sir-2.1-mediated lifespan extension. MNA serves as a substrate for a newly identified aldehyde oxidase, GAD-3, to generate hydrogen peroxide, which acts as a mitohormetic reactive oxygen species signal to promote C. elegans longevity. Taken together, sirtuin-mediated lifespan extension depends on methylation of NAM, providing an unexpected mechanistic role for sirtuins beyond histone deacetylation.

  17. The fine line between lifespan extension and shortening in response to caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Szafranski, Kirk; Mekhail, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is generally linked to lifespan extension in various organisms and may limit age-associated diseases. Processes through which caloric restriction promotes lifespan include obesity-countering weight loss, increased DNA repair, control of ribosomal and telomeric DNA repeats, mitochondrial regulation, activation of antioxidants, and protective autophagy. Several of these protective cellular processes are linked to the suppression of TOR (target of rapamycin) or the activation of sirtuins. In stark contrast, CR fails to extend or even shortens lifespan in certain settings. CR-dependent lifespan shortening is linked to weight loss in the non-obese, mitochondrial hyperactivity, genomic inflexibility, and several other processes. Deciphering the balance between positive and negative effects of CR is critical to understanding its ultimate impact on aging. This knowledge is especially needed in order to fulfil the promise of using CR or its mimetic drugs to counteract age-associated diseases and unhealthy aging. PMID:24637399

  18. An audit of lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate usage for epilepsy in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Brian; Crawford, Pamela

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this audit was to ascertain outcomes for people who had taken or who were still taking three "new generation" broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), namely lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate. Thirteen percent of people became seizure free and approximately, one-third had a reduction of greater than 50% in their seizures. Two-thirds of people were still taking their audit AED. In addition, approximately one-third of people with a learning disability derived substantial benefit, although the rate of seizure freedom was lower. All three AEDs were most successful at treating primary generalised epilepsy and least successful with symptomatic generalised epilepsy. With some reservations the data suggests that levetiracetam and topiramate are the most efficacious AEDs, but topiramate is the least well tolerated. These results mean consideration of a "general prescribing policy" is important when using and choosing these AEDs. We conclude that lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate are useful additions to the armamentarium of AEDs.

  19. Determination of Lamotrigine in Pharmaceutical Preparations by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry Using Screen Printed Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Calvo, M. Encarnación Burgoa; Arcos-Martínez, M. Julia

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure that has been optimized for the determination of lamotrigine by Differential Pulse Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry (DPAdSV) using carbon screen-printed electrodes (CSPE) and mercury coated carbon screen-printed electrodes. Selection of the experimental parameters was made using experimental design methodology. The detection limit found was 5.0 × 10-6 M and 2.0 × 10-6 M for the non modified and Hg modified CSPE, respectively. In terms of reproducibility, the precision of the above mentioned methods was calculated in %RSD values at 9.83% for CSPE and 2.73% for Hg-CSPE. The Hg-coated CSPEs developed in this work were successfully applied in the determination of lamotrigine in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:27879931

  20. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptom Syndrome Induced by Lamotrigine

    PubMed Central

    Han, Song Hee; Hur, Min Seok; Youn, Hae Jeong; Roh, Nam Kyung; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom

    2017-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) syndrome is a type of severe adverse drug-induced reaction. Dermatologists should make a quick diagnosis and provide appropriate treatment for DRESS syndrome to reduce mortality rates, which can be as high as 10%. We present the case of a 47-year-old man with schizoaffective disorder treated with lamotrigine who developed DRESS syndrome to emphasize the importance of close observation of patients with drug eruption. He was consulted for erythematous maculopapular rashes on the trunk that developed 3 weeks after starting lamotrigine. A few days later, he developed generalized influenza-like symptoms. The skin rashes spread over his entire body, and the sense of itching was rapidly aggravated within a few days. Increased liver enzyme levels and significant eosinophilia were found on laboratory test results. His condition was diagnosed as DRESS syndrome, and he was treated with systemic and topical corticosteroids for 2 weeks. PMID:28392649

  1. Serotonin Syndrome in the Setting of Lamotrigine, Aripiprazole, and Cocaine Use

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Anupam; Cutrona, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition associated with increased serotonergic activity in the central nervous system. It is classically associated with the simultaneous administration of two serotonergic agents, but it can occur after initiation of a single serotonergic drug or increasing the dose of a serotonergic drug in individuals who are particularly sensitive to serotonin. We describe a case of serotonin syndrome that occurred after ingestion of higher than prescribed doses of lamotrigine and aripiprazole, in addition to cocaine abuse. The diagnosis was established based on Hunter toxicity criteria and severity was classified as mild. The features of this syndrome resolved shortly after discontinuation of the offending agents. Serotonin syndrome is characterized by mental status changes, autonomic hyperactivity, and neuromuscular abnormalities along a spectrum ranging from mild to severe. Serotonin syndrome in our patient was most likely caused by the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between lamotrigine, aripiprazole, and cocaine leading to increased CNS serotonergic activity. PMID:26339247

  2. Ethosuximide, Valproic Acid and Lamotrigine in Childhood Absence Epilepsy: Initial Monotherapy Outcomes at 12 months

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Tracy A.; Cnaan, Avital; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hirtz, Deborah G.; Dlugos, Dennis; Masur, David; Clark, Peggy O.; Adamson, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Determine the optimal initial monotherapy for children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy based on 12 months of double blind therapy. Methods A double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial compared the efficacy, tolerability and neuropsychological effects of ethosuximide, valproic acid and lamotrigine in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy. Study medications were titrated to clinical response and subjects remained in the trial unless they reached a treatment failure criterion. Maximal target doses were ethosuximide 60 mg/kg/day or 2000 mg/day, valproic acid 60 mg/kg/day or 3000 mg/day and lamotrigine 12 mg/kg/day or 600 mg/day. Original primary outcome was at 16–20 weeks and included a video EEG assessment. For this report, the main effectiveness outcome was the freedom from failure rate 12 months after randomization and included a video EEG assessment; differential drug effects were determined by pairwise comparisons. The main cognitive outcome was the percentage of subjects experiencing attentional dysfunction at the Month 12 visit. Key Findings A total of 453 children were enrolled and randomized; seven were deemed ineligible and 446 subjects comprised the overall efficacy cohort. There were no demographic differences between the three cohorts. By 12 months after starting therapy, only 37% of all enrolled subjects were free from treatment failure on their first medication. At the Month 12 visit, the freedom-from-failure rates for ethosuximide and valproic acid were similar (45% and 44%, respectively; odds ratio with valproic acid vs. ethosuximide, 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 1.48; P = 0.82) and were higher than the rate for lamotrigine (21%; odds ratio with ethosuximide vs. lamotrigine, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.86 to 5.13; odds ratio with valproic acid vs. lamotrigine, 2.90; 95% CI, 1.74 to 4.83; P<0.001 for both comparisons). The frequency of treatment failures due to lack of seizure control (p < 0

  3. Degradation pathways of lamotrigine under advanced treatment by direct UV photolysis, hydroxyl radicals, and ozone.

    PubMed

    Keen, Olya S; Ferrer, Imma; Michael Thurman, E; Linden, Karl G

    2014-12-01

    Lamotrigine is recently recognized as a persistent pharmaceutical in the water environment and wastewater effluents. Its degradation was studied under UV and ozone advanced oxidation treatments with reaction kinetics of lamotrigine with ozone (≈4 M(-1)s(-1)), hydroxyl radical [(2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(9)M(-1)s(-1)] and by UV photolysis with low and medium pressure mercury vapor lamps [quantum yields ≈0 and (2.7 ± 0.4)× 10(-4) respectively] determined. All constants were measured at pH 6 and at temperature ≈20°C. The results indicate that lamotrigine is slow to respond to direct photolysis or oxidation by ozone and no attenuation of the contaminant is expected in UV or ozone disinfection applications. The compound reacts rapidly with hydroxyl radicals indicating that advanced oxidation processes would be effective for its treatment. Degradation products were identified under each treatment process using accurate mass time-of-flight spectrometry and pathways of decay were proposed. The main transformation pathways in each process were: dechlorination of the benzene ring during direct photolysis; hydroxyl group addition to the benzene ring during the reaction with hydroxyl radicals; and triazine ring opening after reaction with ozone. Different products that form in each process may be to a varying degree less environmentally stable than the parent lamotrigine. In addition, a novel method of ozone quenching without addition of salts is presented. The new quenching method would allow subsequent mass spectrometry analysis without a solid phase extraction clean-up step. The method involves raising the pH of the sample to approximately 10 for a few seconds and lowering it back and is therefore limited to applications for which temporary pH change is not expected to affect the outcome of the analysis.

  4. The establish of the HPLC method to examine the plasma concentration of lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Ping; Zhao, Yao-Dong; Cheng, Zhi; Zhao, Ning Min; Li, Hao

    2015-05-01

    To establish the HPLC method to examine plasma concentration of lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine. This study set chlorzoxazone as the internal standard, chromatographic column was Column C18 (200×4.6mm, 5um) of DIKMA company, the mobile phase was methanol, water and trifluoroacetic acid, with rate of 40: 60: 0.0005, at a flow rate of 1 mllmin(-1), the detected wavelength was 240 nm. The plasma concentrations of lamotrigine was 0.5-50ug•mL(-1), the standard curve was excellent for Y=0.5511C-0.5669, r=0.9940, average recovery was 91.40%; The plasma concentrations of oxcarbazepine was 0.5-50ugmL-1, the standard curve was good for Y=0.4026C-0.5895, r=0.9925, and the average recovery was 89.59%; The three plasma concentrations of lamotrigine were respectively 25μg•mL(-1), 10 μg•mL(-1) and 2μg•mL(-1) and its five parallel sample for injection RSD were respectively 4.01%, 6.15% and 4.64%; The three plasma concentration of oxcarbazepine were 25μg•mL(-1)-1(-1), 10μg•mL(-1)-1(-1) and 2μg•mL(-1)-1(-1), and its five parallel sample for injection RSD were respectively 3.05%, 4.27% and 9.01%. This method was easy to operate, high recovery and high precision, and was applicable to the clinical detection for plasma concentration of lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine.

  5. Lamotrigine in the treatment of nocturnal myoclonus syndrome (NMS): two case reports.

    PubMed

    Staedt, J; Stoppe, G; Riemann, H; Hajak, G; Rüther, E; Riederer, P

    1996-01-01

    In previous investigations we found an increase of D2 dopamine receptors in the striatum of patients with nocturnal myoclonus syndrome (NMS) after treatment with dopamimetics. Under the hypothesis, that, according to animal experiments, the glutamatergic system could be involved in this atypical dopaminergic up-regulation in NMS. The glutamate release inhibitor lamotrigine was tested in up to now two NMS patients. The results and the success of this approach and its implications are discussed.

  6. Lamotrigine and levetiracetam exert a similar modulation of TMS-evoked EEG potentials.

    PubMed

    Premoli, Isabella; Biondi, Andrea; Carlesso, Sara; Rivolta, Davide; Richardson, Mark P

    2017-01-01

    Antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment failures may occur because there is insufficient drug in the brain or because of a lack of relevant therapeutic response. Until now it has not been possible to measure these factors. It has been recently shown that the combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) can measure the effects of drugs in healthy volunteers. TMS-evoked EEG potentials (TEPs) comprise a series of positive and negative deflections that can be specifically modulated by drugs with a well-known mode of action targeting inhibitory neurotransmission. Therefore, we hypothesized that TMS-EEG can detect effects of two widely used AEDs, lamotrigine and levetiracetam, in healthy volunteers. Fifteen healthy subjects participated in a pseudo-randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover design, using a single oral dose of lamotrigine (300 mg) and levetiracetam (3,000 mg). TEPs were recorded before and 120 min after drug intake, and the effects of drugs on the amplitudes of TEP components were statistically evaluated. A nonparametric cluster-based permutation analysis of TEP amplitudes showed that AEDs both increased the amplitude of the negative potential at 45 msec after stimulation (N45) and suppressed the positive peak at 180 msec (P180). This is the first demonstration of AED-induced modulation of TMS-EEG measures. Despite the different mechanism of action that lamotrigine and levetiracetam exert at the molecular level, both AEDs impact the TMS-EEG response in a similar way. These TMS-EEG fingerprints observed in healthy subjects are candidate predictive markers of treatment response in patients on monotherapy with lamotrigine and levetiracetam. © 2016 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Treatment of seizures in subcortical laminar heterotopia with corpus callosotomy and lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Vossler, D G; Lee, J K; Ko, T S

    1999-05-01

    Focal and generalized cortical dysgeneses are sometimes seen on the magnetic resonance images (MRI) of patients with epilepsy. Subcortical laminar heterotopia are bilateral collections of gray matter in the centrum semiovale that resemble a band or "double cortex" on MRI. We studied one male and two female patients with subcortical laminar heterotopia who had moderate to severe developmental delay, early-onset epilepsy, and medically refractory seizures. Atonic, atypical absence, tonic, myoclonic, complex partial, and generalized tonic-clonic seizures were recorded. Interictal and ictal electroencephalographic patterns were generalized and, less commonly, multifocal. Two years after corpus callosotomy, one patient was free of generalized tonic-clonic and atonic seizures, but the other patient who had undergone callosotomy had no significant reduction in seizure frequency. With lamotrigine treatment, the patient who had not had surgery had complete cessation of monthly episodes of status epilepticus and a dramatic reduction of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and the other patient who received lamotrigine had a 50% reduction of her atonic seizures. In patients with subcortical laminar heterotopia, atonic and generalized tonic-clonic seizures can be substantially reduced or eliminated by corpus callosotomy or treatment with lamotrigine.

  8. [Optimisation of a high-efficiency liquid chromatography technique for measuring lamotrigine in human plasma].

    PubMed

    Rivas, N; Zarzuelo, A; López, F G

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimise the HPLC-UV bio-analytical method currently used by the Salamanca University Clinical Hospital for determining lamotrigine plasma levels. The developed HPLC-UV analytic technique currently in use was shown to be linear, exact and precise, and suitable for use in routine monitoring of lamotrigine levels. The drawback of this method has always been the time required for analysing samples, so our aim was to improve on that elapsed time. That improvement involved using a different chromatographic column from the one used up until now. We replaced the column that was normally used (Kromasil-100C18-5 microm-15*0.4 cm with a LiChroCART-RP18e-3 microm-5.5*0.4 cm); in both cases, a liquid-liquid extraction was performed and the same sample extraction protocol was followed. Both validation methods showed that the two column types are valid for routine lamotrigine monitoring. The decrease in retention time, in addition to a lower quantification limit and better precision and accuracy parameters obtained with the LiChorCART column, suggest that this unit is ideal for use in clinical practice because it enables a large number of determinations to be performed in less time and the greater precision of LTG measurements. Copyright © 2009 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. New high-performance liquid chromatographic method for plasma/serum analysis of lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Croci, D; Salmaggi, A; de Grazia, U; Bernardi, G

    2001-12-01

    Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant drug recently approved in Italy for clinical use. Therapeutic monitoring of lamotrigine is relevant for patient management and avoidance of toxicity. The authors describe a simple, sensitive, and highly selective high-performance liquid chromatography method that does not involved extraction for analysis of serum lamotrigine. Serum (20 microL) with internal standard (BW 725 C) was injected directly into a column (25 cm x 4.6 mm) with an internal surface reversed phase (ISRP). The mobile phase consisted of 0.01 mol/L potassium phosphate bibasic (pH 6.0) and acetonitrile (82:18), the flow rate was 1.0 mL/min, and UV detection was optimized at 330 nm. The overall between-run coefficient of variance ranged from 1.89% to 3.25% and the lowest limit of detection was 0.05 mg/L. High linearity (r = 0.9996) in a wide range of concentrations (0.1-20.0 mg/L) and no interference with other antiepileptic drugs, benzodiazepines, and tricyclic antidepressants were the other characteristics of the method. The innovation of this method is the use of ISRP column and the choice of detection wavelength, which allow a shorter analysis time (5-6 minutes). The possibility of direct injection of plasma samples into the column permits a reduction in reagent consumption and in analytic steps, and hence in analytic error.

  10. Feasibility of a slower lamotrigine titration schedule for bipolar depression: a naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Joe, Soo Hyun; Chang, Jae Seung; Won, Seunghee; Rim, Hyo-Deog; Ha, Tae Hyon; Ha, Kyooseob

    2009-03-01

    The development of a skin rash is often associated with a rapid escalation of lamotrigine dose. We used lamotrigine to treat 259 patients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, bipolar depression using either the standard titration schedule (n=132) or a slower titration schedule (n=127) and compared the clinical efficacy and safety of both groups. Clinical efficacy of lamotrigine treatment was assessed using changes in the Clinical Global Impression Scale for Bipolar Disorder-Modified scores during the course of the 12-week treatment. A significant reduction of the Clinical Global Impression Scale for Bipolar Disorder-Modified score was observed in both groups and the effect size was large for both groups (standard, 0.75; slower, 0.71). A mixed-effect model of repeated measurement revealed an increased rate of improvement in the standard titration group that was significant during the first 5 weeks (P<0.001) but became nonsignificant by the final 7 weeks of treatment. The statistically significant reduction in the development of rashes (P=0.005) was a major advantage for patients in the slower titration group. Although the standard titration schedule generally led to faster recovery from depressive symptoms, the slower titration schedule may be an option for patients with a high risk of rash development.

  11. Genotype effect on lifespan following vitellogenin knockdown.

    PubMed

    Ihle, Kate E; Fondrk, M Kim; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V

    2015-01-01

    Honey bee workers display remarkable flexibility in the aging process. This plasticity is closely tied to behavioral maturation. Workers who initiate foraging behavior at earlier ages have shorter lifespans, and much of the variation in total lifespan can be explained by differences in pre-foraging lifespan. Vitellogenin (Vg), a yolk precursor protein, influences worker lifespan both as a regulator of behavioral maturation and through anti-oxidant and immune functions. Experimental reduction of Vg mRNA, and thus Vg protein levels, in wild-type bees results in precocious foraging behavior, decreased lifespan, and increased susceptibility to oxidative damage. We sought to separate the effects of Vg on lifespan due to behavioral maturation from those due to immune and antioxidant function using two selected strains of honey bees that differ in their phenotypic responsiveness to Vg gene knockdown. Surprisingly, we found that lifespans lengthen in the strain described as behaviorally and hormonally insensitive to Vg reduction. We then performed targeted gene expression analyses on genes hypothesized to mediate aging and lifespan: the insulin-like peptides (Ilp1 and 2) and manganese superoxide dismutase (mnSOD). The two honey bee Ilps are the most upstream components in the insulin-signaling pathway, which influences lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster and other organisms, while manganese superoxide dismutase encodes an enzyme with antioxidant functions in animals. We found expression differences in the llps in fat body related to behavior (llp1 and 2) and genetic background (Ilp2), but did not find strain by treatment effects. Expression of mnSOD was also affected by behavior and genetic background. Additionally, we observed a differential response to Vg knockdown in fat body expression of mnSOD, suggesting that antioxidant pathways may partially explain the strain-specific lifespan responses to Vg knockdown. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mono-unsaturated fatty acids link H3K4me3 modifiers to C. elegans lifespan.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuo; Schroeder, Elizabeth A; Silva-García, Carlos G; Hebestreit, Katja; Mair, William B; Brunet, Anne

    2017-04-13

    Chromatin and metabolic states both influence lifespan, but how they interact in lifespan regulation is largely unknown. The COMPASS chromatin complex, which trimethylates lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me3), regulates lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the mechanism by which H3K4me3 modifiers affect longevity, and whether this mechanism involves metabolic changes, remain unclear. Here we show that a deficiency in H3K4me3 methyltransferase, which extends lifespan, promotes fat accumulation in worms with a specific enrichment of mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). This fat metabolism switch in H3K4me3 methyltransferase-deficient worms is mediated at least in part by the downregulation of germline targets, including S6 kinase, and by the activation of an intestinal transcriptional network that upregulates delta-9 fatty acid desaturases. Notably, the accumulation of MUFAs is necessary for the lifespan extension of H3K4me3 methyltransferase-deficient worms, and dietary MUFAs are sufficient to extend lifespan. Given the conservation of lipid metabolism, dietary or endogenous MUFAs could extend lifespan and healthspan in other species, including mammals.

  13. Biomarker Report from the Phase II Lamotrigine Trial in Secondary Progressive MS – Neurofilament as a Surrogate of Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Grant, Donna; Morant, Steve; Furby, Julian; Hayton, Tom; Teunissen, Charlotte E.; Leoni, Valerio; Marta, Monica; Brenner, Robert; Palace, Jacqueline; Miller, David H.; Kapoor, Raj; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lamotrigine trial in SPMS was a randomised control trial to assess whether partial blockade of sodium channels has a neuroprotective effect. The current study was an additional study to investigate the value of neurofilament (NfH) and other biomarkers in predicting prognosis and/or response to treatment. Methods SPMS patients who attended the NHNN or the Royal Free Hospital, UK, eligible for inclusion were invited to participate in the biomarker study. Primary outcome was whether lamotrigine would significantly reduce detectable serum NfH at 0-12, 12–24 and 0–24 months compared to placebo. Other serum/plasma and CSF biomarkers were also explored. Results Treatment effect by comparing absolute changes in NfH between the lamotrigine and placebo group showed no difference, however based on serum lamotrigine adherence there was significant decline in NfH (NfH 12–24 months p = 0.043, Nfh 0–24 months p = 0.023). Serum NfH correlated with disability: walking times, 9-HPT (non-dominant hand), PASAT, z-score, MSIS-29 (psychological) and EDSS and MRI cerebral atrophy and MTR. Other biomarkers explored in this study were not found to be significantly associated, aside from that of plasma osteopontin. Conclusions The relations between NfH and clinical scores of disability and MRI measures of atrophy and disease burden support NfH being a potential surrogate endpoint complementing MRI in neuroprotective trials and sample sizes for such trials are presented here. We did not observe a reduction in NfH levels between the Lamotrigine and placebo arms, however, the reduction in serum NfH levels based on lamotrigine adherence points to a possible neuroprotective effect of lamotrigine on axonal degeneration. PMID:23936370

  14. Oleanolic acid activates daf-16 to increase lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiaolong; Lu, Lulu; Zhou, Lijun

    2015-12-25

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is an active ingredient in natural plants. It has been reported to possess a variety of pharmacological activities, but very little is known about its effects of anti-aging. We investigate here whether OA has an impact on longevity in vivo, and more specifically, we have examined effects of OA on the lifespan and stress tolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Our results showed that OA could extend the lifespan, increase its stress resistance and reduce the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in wild-type worms. Moreover, we have found that OA-induced longevity may not be associated with the calorie restriction (CR) mechanism. Our mechanistic studies using daf-16 loss-of-function mutant strains (GR1307) indicated that the extension of lifespan by OA requires daf-16. In addition, OA treatment could also modulate the nuclear localization, and the quantitative real-time PCR results revealed that up-regulation of daf-16 target genes such as sod-3, hsp-16.2 and ctl-1 could prolong lifespan and increase stress response in C. elegans. This study overall uncovers the longevity effect of OA and its underpinning mechanisms. - Graphical abstract: Oleanolic acid modulates the activity of DAF-16 to promote longevity and increase stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans. - Highlights: • OA extends the lifespan of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans. • OA improves the stress resistance and reduces the intracellular ROS level in C. elegans. • OA induces lifespan extension may not proceed through the CR mechanism. • OA extends the lifespan in C. elegans is modulated by daf-16.

  15. Computational Analysis of Lifespan Experiment Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Petrascheck, Michael; Miller, Dana L.

    2017-01-01

    Independent reproducibility is essential to the generation of scientific knowledge. Optimizing experimental protocols to ensure reproducibility is an important aspect of scientific work. Genetic or pharmacological lifespan extensions are generally small compared to the inherent variability in mean lifespan even in isogenic populations housed under identical conditions. This variability makes reproducible detection of small but real effects experimentally challenging. In this study, we aimed to determine the reproducibility of C. elegans lifespan measurements under ideal conditions, in the absence of methodological errors or environmental or genetic background influences. To accomplish this, we generated a parametric model of C. elegans lifespan based on data collected from 5,026 wild-type N2 animals. We use this model to predict how different experimental practices, effect sizes, number of animals, and how different “shapes” of survival curves affect the ability to reproduce real longevity effects. We find that the chances of reproducing real but small effects are exceedingly low and would require substantially more animals than are commonly used. Our results indicate that many lifespan studies are underpowered to detect reported changes and that, as a consequence, stochastic variation alone can account for many failures to reproduce longevity results. As a remedy, we provide power of detection tables that can be used as guidelines to plan experiments with statistical power to reliably detect real changes in lifespan and limit spurious false positive results. These considerations will improve best-practices in designing lifespan experiment to increase reproducibility. PMID:28713422

  16. Computational Analysis of Lifespan Experiment Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Petrascheck, Michael; Miller, Dana L

    2017-01-01

    Independent reproducibility is essential to the generation of scientific knowledge. Optimizing experimental protocols to ensure reproducibility is an important aspect of scientific work. Genetic or pharmacological lifespan extensions are generally small compared to the inherent variability in mean lifespan even in isogenic populations housed under identical conditions. This variability makes reproducible detection of small but real effects experimentally challenging. In this study, we aimed to determine the reproducibility of C. elegans lifespan measurements under ideal conditions, in the absence of methodological errors or environmental or genetic background influences. To accomplish this, we generated a parametric model of C. elegans lifespan based on data collected from 5,026 wild-type N2 animals. We use this model to predict how different experimental practices, effect sizes, number of animals, and how different "shapes" of survival curves affect the ability to reproduce real longevity effects. We find that the chances of reproducing real but small effects are exceedingly low and would require substantially more animals than are commonly used. Our results indicate that many lifespan studies are underpowered to detect reported changes and that, as a consequence, stochastic variation alone can account for many failures to reproduce longevity results. As a remedy, we provide power of detection tables that can be used as guidelines to plan experiments with statistical power to reliably detect real changes in lifespan and limit spurious false positive results. These considerations will improve best-practices in designing lifespan experiment to increase reproducibility.

  17. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki; Yoshida, Ryo; Ohta, Shinji; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Mukai, Yukio

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan

  18. Carbon Dioxide Sensing Modulates Lifespan and Physiology in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Peter C.; Kuo, Tsung-Han; Linford, Nancy J.; Roman, Gregg; Pletcher, Scott D.

    2010-01-01

    For nearly all life forms, perceptual systems provide access to a host of environmental cues, including the availability of food and mates as well as the presence of disease and predators. Presumably, individuals use this information to assess the current and future states of the environment and to enact appropriate developmental, behavioral, and regulatory decisions. Recent work using the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans, and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has established that aging is subject to modulation through neurosensory systems and that this regulation is evolutionarily conserved. To date, sensory manipulations shown to impact Drosophila aging have involved general loss of function or manipulation of complex stimuli. We therefore know little about the specific inputs, sensors, or associated neural circuits that affect these life and death decisions. We find that a specialized population of olfactory neurons that express receptor Gr63a (a component of the olfactory receptor for gaseous phase CO2) affects fly lifespan and physiology. Gr63a loss of function leads to extended lifespan, increased fat deposition, and enhanced resistance to some (but not all) environmental stresses. Furthermore, we find that the reduced lifespan that accompanies exposure to odors from live yeast is dependent on Gr63a. Together these data implicate a specific sensory cue (CO2) and its associated receptor as having the ability to modulate fly lifespan and alter organism stress response and physiology. Because Gr63a is expressed in a well-defined population of neurons, future work may now be directed at dissecting more complex neurosensory and neuroendocrine circuits that modulate aging in Drosophila. PMID:20422037

  19. Uncoupling protein-2 regulates lifespan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Zane B.; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term effects of uncoupled mitochondrial respiration by uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) in mammalian physiology remain controversial. Here we show that increased mitochondrial uncoupling activity of different tissues predicts longer lifespan of rats compared with mice. UCP2 reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress throughout the aging process in different tissues in mice. The absence of UCP2 shortens lifespan in wild-type mice, and the level of UCP2 positively correlates with the postnatal survival of superoxide dismutase-2 mutant animals. Thus UCP2 has a beneficial influence on cell and tissue function leading to increased lifespan. PMID:19141680

  20. The AMP-activated protein kinase AAK-2 links energy levels and insulin-like signals to lifespan in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Apfeld, Javier; O'Connor, Greg; McDonagh, Tom; DiStefano, Peter S.; Curtis, Rory

    2004-01-01

    Although limiting energy availability extends lifespan in many organisms, it is not understood how lifespan is coupled to energy levels. We find that the AMP:ATP ratio, a measure of energy levels, increases with age in Caenorhabditis elegans and can be used to predict life expectancy. The C. elegans AMP-activated protein kinase α subunit AAK-2 is activated by AMP and functions to extend lifespan. In addition, either an environmental stressor that increases the AMP:ATP ratio or mutations that lower insulin-like signaling extend lifespan in an aak-2-dependent manner. Thus, AAK-2 is a sensor that couples lifespan to information about energy levels and insulin-like signals. PMID:15574588

  1. Anxiolytic effects of lamotrigine and JZP-4 in the elevated plus maze and in the four plate conflict test.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Mark M; Hanania, Taleen; Eller, Mark

    2009-01-14

    JZP-4 is a novel with anticonvulsant, antidepressant and antimania effects in preclinical models. It has some structural similarity to the sodium channel blocker, lamotrigine, but it has both potent sodium and calcium channel blocking activity. In the current studies, JZP-4 was tested in comparison to lamotrigine in the four plate and elevated plus maze tests for anxiolytic activity. In the four plate test, treatment with JZP-4 (30 mg/kg i.p.) produced significant increases in the number of punished crossings. In contrast, lamotrigine produced an inverted U shaped response with a significant increase in punished crossings at 10 mg/kg i.p. but not at 3 or 30 mg/kg i.p. The increased number of punished crossings induced by JZP-4 was similar to that produced by alprazolam (0.3 mg/kg i.p.). In the elevated plus maze test, treatment with either JZP-4 or lamotrigine at 10 mg/kg i.p. produced significant increases in the distance traveled in the open arms. However, only JZP-4 (10 mg/kg i.p.) produced significant increase in the percent of time spend in the open arms. JZP-4, lamotrigine and diazepam did not produce significant changes in the total distance traveled. Indicating that at the doses tested these compounds did not have a sedative effect. These studies have provided preliminary evidence that JZP-4 could have anxiolytic effects in addition to the anticonvulsant, antidepressant and antimania effects reported earlier.

  2. Glucose Shortens the Lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans by Down-Regulating Aquaporin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Murphy, Coleen T.; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Many studies have addressed the effect of dietary glycemic index on obesity and diabetes, but little is known about its effect on lifespan itself. We found that adding a small amount of glucose to the medium (0.1-2%) shortened the lifespan of C. elegans. Glucose shortened lifespan by inhibiting the activities of lifespan-extending transcription factors that are also inhibited by insulin signaling: the FOXO family member DAF-16 and the heat shock factor HSF-1. This effect involved the down-regulation of an aquaporin glycerol channel, aqp-1. We show that changes in glycerol metabolism are likely to underlie the lifespan-shortening effect of glucose, and that aqp-1 may act cell non-autonomously as a feedback regulator in the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. Insulin down-regulates similar glycerol channels in mammals, suggesting that this glucose-responsive pathway might be conserved evolutionarily. Together these findings raise the possibility that a low-sugar diet might have beneficial effects on lifespan in higher organisms. PMID:19883616

  3. Sexes suffer from suboptimal lifespan because of genetic conflict in a seed beetle.

    PubMed

    Berg, Elena C; Maklakov, Alexei A

    2012-10-22

    Males and females have different routes to successful reproduction, resulting in sex differences in lifespan and age-specific allocation of reproductive effort. The trade-off between current and future reproduction is often resolved differently by males and females, and both sexes can be constrained in their ability to reach their sex-specific optima owing to intralocus sexual conflict. Such genetic antagonism may have profound implications for evolution, but its role in ageing and lifespan remains unresolved. We provide direct experimental evidence that males live longer and females live shorter than necessary to maximize their relative fitness in Callosobruchus maculatus seed beetles. Using artificial selection in a genetically heterogeneous population, we created replicate long-life lines where males lived on average 27 per cent longer than in short-life lines. As predicted by theory, subsequent assays revealed that upward selection on male lifespan decreased relative male fitness but increased relative female fitness compared with downward selection. Thus, we demonstrate that lifespan-extending genes can help one sex while harming the other. Our results show that sexual antagonism constrains adaptive life-history evolution, support a novel way of maintaining genetic variation for lifespan and argue for better integration of sex effects into applied research programmes aimed at lifespan extension.

  4. Sexes suffer from suboptimal lifespan because of genetic conflict in a seed beetle

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Elena C.; Maklakov, Alexei A.

    2012-01-01

    Males and females have different routes to successful reproduction, resulting in sex differences in lifespan and age-specific allocation of reproductive effort. The trade-off between current and future reproduction is often resolved differently by males and females, and both sexes can be constrained in their ability to reach their sex-specific optima owing to intralocus sexual conflict. Such genetic antagonism may have profound implications for evolution, but its role in ageing and lifespan remains unresolved. We provide direct experimental evidence that males live longer and females live shorter than necessary to maximize their relative fitness in Callosobruchus maculatus seed beetles. Using artificial selection in a genetically heterogeneous population, we created replicate long-life lines where males lived on average 27 per cent longer than in short-life lines. As predicted by theory, subsequent assays revealed that upward selection on male lifespan decreased relative male fitness but increased relative female fitness compared with downward selection. Thus, we demonstrate that lifespan-extending genes can help one sex while harming the other. Our results show that sexual antagonism constrains adaptive life-history evolution, support a novel way of maintaining genetic variation for lifespan and argue for better integration of sex effects into applied research programmes aimed at lifespan extension. PMID:22915670

  5. Lifespan regulation under axenic dietary restriction: a close look at the usual suspects.

    PubMed

    Castelein, N; Cai, H; Rasulova, M; Braeckman, B P

    2014-10-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, there are several ways to impose dietary restriction (DR) all of which extend lifespan to a different degree. Until recently, the molecular mechanisms underlying the DR-mediated lifespan extension were completely unknown but extensive efforts led to the identification of several key players in this process. Culture in sterile axenic medium is a method of DR (ADR), leading to an impressive doubling of lifespan. Earlier, we established that ADR-mediated longevity is independent of Ins/IGF signaling and eat-2. The only gene reported to be indispensable for the ADR lifespan effect is cbp-1 (Zhang et al., 2009) which was confirmed in this study. In an attempt to identify more genes involved in ADR-mediated longevity, we tested several candidate genes known to regulate lifespan extension in other DR regimens. We found that cup-4 is equally important as cbp-1 in ADR-mediated longevity and we identified some genes that may contribute to ADR-induced longevity, but are not required for the full lifespan effect. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan by a proteasomal E3 ligase complex

    PubMed Central

    Ghazi, Arjumand; Henis-Korenblit, Sivan; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    The proteasome maintains cellular homeostasis by degrading oxidized and damaged proteins, a function known to be impaired during aging. The proteasome also acts in a regulatory capacity through E3 ligases to mediate the spatially and temporally controlled breakdown of specific proteins that impact biological processes. We have identified components of a Skp1-Cul1-F-Box E3 ligase complex that are required for the extended lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1-signaling (IIS) mutants. The CUL-1 complex functions in postmitotic, adult somatic tissues of IIS mutants to enhance longevity. Reducing IIS function leads to the nuclear accumulation of the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor, which extends lifespan by regulating downstream longevity genes. These CUL-1 complex genes act, at least in part, by promoting the transcriptional activity of DAF-16/FOXO. Together, our findings describe a role for an important cellular pathway, the proteasomal pathway, in the genetic determination of lifespan. PMID:17392428

  7. Calendar life-span versus fission life-span of Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Smith-Sonneborn, J; Reed, J C

    1976-01-01

    The hypothesis that paramecia use fissions, not days, to measure length of cell life-span was investigated. Parallel cell lines were grown at 27 C and at 24 C. The daily fission rate of the cells at 24 C was lower than at 27 C. If the cells count fissions, not days, the life-span in fissions should remain unchanged, whereas the cell life-span in days should increase in the lines with reduced daily fission rate. The results showed a significant increase in cell life-span in days when the cells were cultivated for 70-100% of their life cycle at 24 C. The life-span as measured by fissions, however, remained unchanged regardless of the time of the life cycle when cells were shifted to 24 C. The data indicate that, as a model system for cellular aging, paramecia are comparable to cells which use cell doublings to measure life-span.

  8. Hormonal Programming Across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Tobet, Stuart A; Lara, Hernan E; Lucion, Aldo B; Wilson, Melinda E; Recabarren, Sergio E; Paredes, Alfonso H

    2013-01-01

    Hormones influence countless biological processes across the lifespan, and during developmental sensitive periods hormones have the potential to cause permanent tissue-specific alterations in anatomy and physiology. There are numerous critical periods in development wherein different targets are affected. This review outlines the proceedings of the Hormonal Programming in Development session at the US-South American Workshop in Neuroendocrinology in August 2011. Here we discuss how gonadal hormones impact various biological processes within the brain and gonads during early development and describe the changes that take place in the aging female ovary. At the cellular level, hormonal targets in the brain include neurons, glia, or vasculature. On a genomic/epigenomic level, transcription factor signaling and epigenetic changes alter the expression of hormone receptor genes across development and following ischemic brain insult. In addition, organizational hormone exposure alters epigenetic processes in specific brain nuclei and may be a mediator of sexual differentiation of the neonatal brain. During development of the ovary, exposure to excess gonadal hormones leads to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Exposure to excess androgens during fetal development also has a profound effect on the development of the male reproductive system. In addition, increased sympathetic nerve activity and stress during early life have been linked to PCOS symptomology in adulthood. Finally, we describe how age-related decreases in fertility are linked to high levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), which enhances sympathetic nerve activity and alters ovarian function. PMID:22700441

  9. Cocoa (Theobroma cacao) Polyphenol-rich Extract Increases the Chronological Lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Baiges, I; Arola, L

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model organism with conserved aging pathways. Yeast chronological lifespan experiments mimic the processes involved in human non-dividing tissues, such as the nervous system or skeletal muscle, and can speed up the search for biomolecules with potential anti-aging effects before proceeding to animal studies. To test the effectiveness of a cocoa polyphenol-rich extract (CPE) in expanding the S. cerevisiae chronological lifespan in two conditions: in the stationary phase reached after glucose depletion and under severe caloric restriction. Using a high-throughput method, wild-type S. cerevisiae and its mitochondrial manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase null mutant (sod2Δ) were cultured in synthetic complete dextrose medium. After 2 days, 0, 5 and 20 mg/ml of CPE were added, and viability was measured throughout the stationary phase. The effects of the major components of CPE were also evaluated. To determine yeast lifespan under severe caloric restriction conditions, cultures were washed with water 24 h after the addition of 0 and 20 mg/ml of CPE, and viability was followed over time. CPE increased the chronological lifespan of S. cerevisiae during the stationary phase in a dose-dependent manner. A similar increase was also observed in (sod2Δ). None of the major CPE components (theobromine, caffeine, maltodextrin, (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin and procyanidin B2) was able to increase the yeast lifespan. CPE further increased the yeast lifespan under severe caloric restriction. CPE increases the chronological lifespan of S. cerevisiae through a SOD2-independent mechanism. The extract also extends yeast lifespan under severe caloric restriction conditions. The high-throughput assay used makes it possible to simply and rapidly test the efficacy of a large number of compounds on yeast aging, requiring only small amounts, and is thus a convenient screening assay to accelerate the search for biomolecules with potential anti-aging effects.

  10. Add-on Lamotrigine Treatment for Subsyndromal Depression after Manic or Mixed States in Bipolar Disorder Improved the Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Kon, Katsushi; Kawabe, Masaharu; Ui, Rui; Miura, Taichi; Iimura, Touta; Kimura, Shou

    2012-01-01

    Two cases of patients experienced subsyndromal depression after manic or mixed hypomanic and depressive episodes due to bipolar I (case 1) and II (case 2) disorders prior to the use of lamotrigine. Case 1 showed episodes of mood switching induced by antidepressants and seasonal mood instability. Case 2 showed hippocampal atrophy and a persistent dull headache that preceded the use of lamotrigine. Both were successfully treated with add-on lamotrigine therapy, and the dull headache was effectively treated with olanzapine. Both patients improved in social activity and work performance after these add-on treatments. Thus, add-on treatment with lamotrigine alone or in combination with olanzapine was an effective strategy to improve the quality of life in bipolar depression. Subsyndromal depression that present after the disappearance of the manic or mixed state was suggested to be practical indication for the use of lamotrigine. PMID:23049569

  11. [Changes in prescription patterns to patients with bipolar syndromes. Increased use of lamotrigine and decreased use of lithium].

    PubMed

    Karanti, Alina; Kardell, Mathias; Lundberg, Ulrika; Landén, Mikael

    2014-12-16

    Lithium is a first line option in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder, but several alternative treatment regimens have been introduced in recent years, among them treatment with antiepileptic compounds and atypical antipsychotic drugs. Little is known about if and how this has changed the prescription patterns of mood stabilizers. We analysed trends in prescription of mood stabilisers in Sweden using the national quality register for bipolar disorder (BipoläR), the Prescribed Drug Register, and the Patient Register during the years 2007-2011. We found that lithium use decreased while lamotrigine use increased in bipolar patients. These changes could not be ex-plained by differences in bipolar subtypes; lithium use decreased in both bipolar type I and type II, and the use of lamotrigine increased in bipolar type II. Lithium use was more common in men, whereas lamotrigine use was more common in women. The prescription of other mood stabilisers did not change during these years. 

  12. Density functional theory, restricted Hartree - Fock simulations and FTIR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopic studies on lamotrigine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, T.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and FT Raman spectra of lamotrigine have been recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1, respectively. The title compound is used as Antiepileptic drug. The optimized geometry, frequency, and intensities of the vibrational bands of the lamotrigine were obtained by Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP/631G** basis set and ab initio method at the restricted Hartree Fock/6-31** level. The harmonic vibrational frequencies, Natural population analysis, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, infra red intensities and Raman scattering activities, force constant were calculated by DFT and RHF methods. The quality of lamotrigine under different storage containers were analyzed using UV-Vis spectral technique.

  13. Human Metabolite Lamotrigine-N(2)-glucuronide Is the Principal Source of Lamotrigine-Derived Compounds in Wastewater Treatment Plants and Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Zonja, Bozo; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià

    2016-01-05

    Wastewater and surface water samples, extracted with four solid-phase extraction cartridges of different chemistries, were suspect-screened for the anticonvulsant lamotrigine (LMG), its metabolites, and related compounds. LMG, three human metabolites, and a LMG synthetic impurity (OXO-LMG) were detected. Preliminary results showed significantly higher concentrations of OXO-LMG in wastewater effluent, suggesting its formation in the wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, biodegradation experiments with activated sludge demonstrated that LMG is resistant to degradation and that its human metabolite lamotrigine-N(2)-glucuronide (LMG-N2-G) is the actual source of OXO-LMG in WWTPs. In batch reactors, LMG-N2-G was transformed, following pseudo-first-order kinetics to OXO-LMG and LMG, but kinetic experiments suggested an incomplete mass balance. A fragment ion search applied to batch-reactor and environmental samples revealed another transformation product (TP), formed by LMG-N2-G oxidation, which was identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Accounting for all TPs detected, a total mass balance at two concentration levels in batch reactors was closed at 86% and 102%, respectively. In three WWTPs, the total mass balance of LMG-N2-G ranged from 71 to 102%. Finally, LMG-N2-G and its TPs were detected in surface water samples with median concentration ranges of 23-139 ng L(-1). The results of this study suggest that glucuronides of pharmaceuticals might also be sources of yet undiscovered, but environmentally relevant, transformation products.

  14. Generic-to-generic lamotrigine switches in people with epilepsy: the randomised controlled EQUIGEN trial.

    PubMed

    Privitera, Michael D; Welty, Timothy E; Gidal, Barry E; Diaz, Francisco J; Krebill, Ron; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Dworetzky, Barbara A; Pollard, John R; Elder, Edmund J; Jiang, Wenlei; Jiang, Xiaohui; Berg, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Patients and clinicians share concerns that generic drug substitution might lead to loss of efficacy or emergence of adverse events. In this trial, we assessed US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) bioequivalence standards by studying the effects of switching between two disparate generic immediate-release lamotrigine products in patients with epilepsy. The Equivalence among Generic Antiepileptic Drugs (EQUIGEN) chronic-dose study was a randomised, double-blind, crossover study that enrolled adults (aged ≥18 years) with epilepsy from six epilepsy centres at academic institutions across the USA who were receiving immediate-release lamotrigine dosed at 100 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg, or 400 mg twice daily. Eligible patients were randomly allocated (1:1) to one of two treatment sequences (sequence 1 or sequence 2), comprising four study periods of 14 days each. During each 14-day treatment period, patients received balanced doses of an oral generic lamotrigine product every 12 h (200-800 mg total, identical to lamotrigine dose prior to study enrolment); after each 14-day period, patients were crossed over to receive the other generic product. Computer-based randomisation was done using random permuted blocks of size two or four for each site to prevent sequence predictability. Both patients and study personnel were masked to the generic products selected, their predicted exposure (ie, "high" vs "low"), and their group allocation. The primary outcome of this trial was bioequivalence between the generic products, which was assessed at the end of the study through a comparison of maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) for each product in the analysis population (all patients who completed all four treatment periods). Bioequivalence was established if the 90% CIs of the ratios of these two parameters for the two products were within equivalence limits (80-125%) in the analysis population. This study is registered with Clinical

  15. Bioequivalence Between Generic and Branded Lamotrigine in People With Epilepsy: The EQUIGEN Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Berg, Michel; Welty, Timothy E; Gidal, Barry E; Diaz, Francisco J; Krebill, Ron; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Dworetzky, Barbara A; Pollard, John R; Elder, Edmund J; Jiang, Wenlei; Jiang, Xiaohui; Switzer, Regina D; Privitera, Michael D

    2017-08-01

    Switching between generic antiepileptic drugs is a highly debated issue that affects both clinical care and overall health care costs. To evaluate the single-dose pharmacokinetic bioequivalence of 3 (1 branded and 2 generic drugs) on-market, immediate-release lamotrigine drug products. The Equivalence Among Antiepileptic Drug Generic and Brand Products in People With Epilepsy (EQUIGEN) single-dose study is a crossover, prospective, sequence-randomized, replicate pharmacokinetic study conducted at 5 US academic epilepsy centers. Fifty adults (≥18 years) with epilepsy who were taking concomitant antiepileptic drugs and not currently receiving lamotrigine were enrolled between July 18, 2013, and January 19, 2015. Every participant was randomly assigned to 1 of 3 equivalent sequences, each comprising 6 study periods, during which they had blood draws before and after medication administration. Forty-nine participants were included in intention-to-treat analyses. Participants received a single 25-mg dose of immediate-release lamotrigine at the start of each period, with the branded and the 2 most disparate generic products each studied twice. Lamotrigine was selected as the antiepileptic drug of interest because of its wide use, publications indicating problems with generic switches, and complaints to the US Food and Drug Administration regarding generic products. Both participants and study personnel were blinded to the specific generic products selected. The primary outcome was bioequivalence between products. Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) were compared, and average bioequivalence (ABE) was established if the 90% CIs of the ratios of the 2 products were within equivalence limits (80%-125%). Of the 50 randomized participants, 49 (98%) received all 3 lamotrigine products and completed at least 3 pharmacokinetic assessments and 46 (92%) completed all 6 pharmacokinetic assessments. Among the 49 participants, 28 (57

  16. Treatment Effects of Onion (Allium cepa) and Ginger (Zingiber officinale) on Sexual Behavior of Rat after Inducing an Antiepileptic Drug (lamotrigine)

    PubMed Central

    Khaki, Arash; Farnam, Alireza; Badie, Arash Davatgar; Nikniaz, Hussein

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the beneficial degree of sexual behavior in male rats after inducement of onion and ginger in lamotrigine receiving groups. Material and Methods: Wistar rats (n=70) (male=35, female=35) were allocated so that males were divided into seven groups: control (n=5) and test groups (n=35). Control group used normal Saline (3 cc for each rat). Lamotrigine group were given Lamotrigine (10 mg/kg). Onion group used onion fresh juice (3 cc for each rat/daily). Ginger group was fed on ginger powder (100 mg/kg/daily). Onion & Lamotrigine group used both onion juice (3 cc fresh onion juice for each rat/day) and Lamotrigine (10 mg/kg). Ginger & Lamotrigine group used both ginger powder (100 mg/kg/day) and Lamotrigine (10 mg/kg/day). Onion, ginger & Lamortigine group jointly used ginger powder (100 mg/kg/day) and onion juice (3 cc juice for each rat) and Lamotrigine (10 mg/kg/day). All groups were given treatments orally. For sexual behaviors, Estradiolbenzoate (50 microgram) and 6 hours before test (500 microgram) progesterone was injected to the female rats subcutaneously. Then rats were viewed for erection, ejaculation and cup. Results: There was maximum Serum total testosterone level in the onion group, there was maximum malondialdehyde (MDA) in the Lamotrigine group and there was maximum total antioxidant capacity in both the onion group and ginger group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Results revealed that administration of (100 mg/kg/day) of ginger powder, and freshly prepared onion juice (3 cc for each rat), significantly lowered the adverse effects of lamotrigine, and can have beneficial effects on sexual behavior in male rat. PMID:25207007

  17. Lamotrigine Augmentation Versus Placebo in Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Khalkhali, Mohammadrasoul; Aram, Setareh; Zarrabi, Homa; Kafie, Moosa; Heidarzadeh, Abtin

    2016-04-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used in first-line treatments for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Nevertheless, many of these patients do not respond well to initial therapy. The hypothesis of glutamatergic dysfunction in specific brain regions has been proposed in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder. This study was designed to evaluate the possible efficacy of lamotrigine, a glutamatergic agent in Serotonin reuptake inhibitors-resistant patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. This study was a 12-week, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of adjunctive fixed-doses of lamotrigine (100 mg) to Serotonin reuptake inhibitors therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Eligible subjects who had a total Y-BOCS of 21 or above were randomly assigned to receive adjunctive treatment with either lamotrigine (n = 26), or placebo (n = 27). Response to lamotrigine was defined as clinical improvement (>25% decrease in the total Y-BOCS score), which was administered at weeks 0, 8 and 12. At the endpoint (week 12), significant differences were observed in obsession, compulsion, and total Y-BOCS scores comparing lamotrigine to placebo (P = 0.01, 0.005 and 0.007 respectively). The mean reduction in obsession, compulsion and total scores in lamotrigine group was about 4.15, 4.50 and 8.73, respectively. Similarly, the mean reductions in the placebo group were 2.52, 2.56 and 5.07. Effect sizes for efficacy measureswerecalculatedbyCohen'sd, and it was calculated as 0.54 for the total YBOCS. Our findings provide evidence that this augmentation is well tolerated and may be an effective strategy for patients with refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  18. Effects of monitoring strategies on seizures in pregnant women on lamotrigine: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pirie, Dulcie A J; Al Wattar, Bassel H; Pirie, Alexander M; Houston, Victoria; Siddiqua, Ayesha; Doug, Manjo; Bagary, Manny; Greenhill, Lyn; Khan, Khalid S; McCorry, Dougall; Thangaratinam, Shakila

    2014-01-01

    Pregnant women with epilepsy have a significantly increased risk of mortality and morbidity compared to non-pregnant women. At least one in 250 pregnancies is exposed to anti-epileptic drugs (AED). Seizure deterioration occurs in up to a third of pregnant women. AED levels fall in most pregnant women, although it is uncertain that this is responsible for seizure deterioration rather than a hormonal effect. Current practice of AED monitoring is either therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) or clinical features monitoring (CFM) to adjust the AED dose. We have systematically reviewed the effectiveness of the two monitoring regimens for AEDs, especially lamotrigine, the most commonly used AED in pregnancy on maternal and fetal outcomes. We searched MEDLINE (1966-2012), EMBASE (1980-2012) and Cochrane, for relevant citations on the effectiveness of different monitoring strategies on seizure deterioration in pregnant women with epilepsy on lamotrigine. Study selection, quality assessment and data extraction were carried out by two independent reviewers. We calculated the rates of deterioration in seizures with the two strategies and pooled the estimates with random effects meta-analysis. Six observational studies (n=132) evaluated the effectiveness of the two monitoring strategies on pregnant women with epilepsy on lamotrigine. There were no randomised controlled trials. The rate of seizure deterioration was 0.30 (95% CI 0.21-0.41) in women monitored by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) compared to 0.73 (95% CI 0.56-0.86) in those receiving clinical feature monitoring (CFM) alone. Evidence based on observational data suggests that monitoring of AED levels in pregnancy reduces seizure deterioration, although the included studies have numerous sources of bias. There is paucity of evidence to make firm recommendations on optimal monitoring of AED drugs in pregnancy. Further research is needed to advise on the best clinical practice in managing AED in pregnancy. Copyright © 2013

  19. Dance Talent Development across the Lifespan: A Review of Current Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chua, Joey

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compile and synthesize empirically based articles published between 2000 and 2012 about the critical issues of developing dance talents across the lifespan of children, adolescents and adults. The present article updates and extends a review article related to the identification and development in dance written by…

  20. Dance Talent Development across the Lifespan: A Review of Current Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chua, Joey

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compile and synthesize empirically based articles published between 2000 and 2012 about the critical issues of developing dance talents across the lifespan of children, adolescents and adults. The present article updates and extends a review article related to the identification and development in dance written by…

  1. Clinical Usefulness of Aripiprazole and Lamotrigine in Schizoaffective Presentation of Tuberous Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, In Goo; Kim, Jung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is not as rare as once thought and has high psychiatric comorbidities. However, bipolar or psychotic features associated with tuberous sclerosis have been rarely reported. This report first presents a tuberous sclerosis patient, resembling a schizoaffective disorder of bipolar type. A patient with known tuberous sclerosis displayed mood fluctuation and psychotic features. Her symptoms did not remit along with several psychiatric medications. After hospitalization, the patient responded well with lamotrigine and aripiprazole without exacerbation. As demonstrated in this case, tuberous sclerosis may also encompass bipolar affective or psychotic features. We would like to point out the necessity to consider bipolarity in evaluating and treating tuberous sclerosis. PMID:27489387

  2. Clinical Usefulness of Aripiprazole and Lamotrigine in Schizoaffective Presentation of Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, In Goo; Kim, Jung Jin

    2016-08-31

    Tuberous sclerosis is not as rare as once thought and has high psychiatric comorbidities. However, bipolar or psychotic features associated with tuberous sclerosis have been rarely reported. This report first presents a tuberous sclerosis patient, resembling a schizoaffective disorder of bipolar type. A patient with known tuberous sclerosis displayed mood fluctuation and psychotic features. Her symptoms did not remit along with several psychiatric medications. After hospitalization, the patient responded well with lamotrigine and aripiprazole without exacerbation. As demonstrated in this case, tuberous sclerosis may also encompass bipolar affective or psychotic features. We would like to point out the necessity to consider bipolarity in evaluating and treating tuberous sclerosis.

  3. Observation of neutral, ionic and intermediate states in lamotrigine-acid complexes- inference from crystallographic bond geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Ravikumar, Krishnan

    2014-09-01

    The anticonvulsant and antiepileptic drug lamotrigine was crystallized with three aromatic acids viz., 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (I), para-toluenesulfonic acid (II) and 4-bromobenzoic acid (III), with the objective of understanding the formation of a salt or co-crystal in the solid state. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and FT-infrared spectroscopic measurements were carried out for all of them. The asymmetric units of I and II contain two lamotriginium cations and two anions (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate in I and para-toluenesulfonate in II), respectively, and additionally II contains one water molecule. The asymmetric unit of III comprises one lamotriginium cation, one 4-bromobenzoate anion and one dimethylformamide (DMF) solvate. In all three complexes the protonation occurs at the N2 atom of the triazine ring. In I and II, the complete proton transfer is observed. However in III, only partial proton transfer is inferred from O to N because of the acidic H atom disorder. The protonation of lamotrigine is also confirmed by the unambiguous location of H atom from the difference Fourier map and as well as from the geometrical bond analysis. Further, various lamotrigine-acid complexes from the CSD were analyzed to establish a correlation between different ionization states (neutral, intermediate and ionic) and changes in the geometrical parameters. The bond angles of triazine ring in lamotrigine and bond distances of carboxylic acid are found to be the best descriptors for distinguishing all three ionization states, whereas, the bond angles of carboxylic acid have to failed to distinguish intermediate state from ionic. From hydrogen bonding point of view, only the lamotrigine-acid heterosynthon is observed in I and II, whereas in III, both lamotrigine-lamotrigine homosynthon and lamotrigine-acid heterosynthon are observed. In I, the cation-anion and anion-anion interactions form a supramolecular two-dimension hydrogen-bonded square grid network, while the water molecule

  4. Longer lifespan in male mice treated with a weakly estrogenic agonist, an antioxidant, an α-glucosidase inhibitor or a Nrf2-inducer.

    PubMed

    Strong, Randy; Miller, Richard A; Antebi, Adam; Astle, Clinton M; Bogue, Molly; Denzel, Martin S; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Flurkey, Kevin; Hamilton, Karyn L; Lamming, Dudley W; Javors, Martin A; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Martinez, Paul Anthony; McCord, Joe M; Miller, Benjamin F; Müller, Michael; Nelson, James F; Ndukum, Juliet; Rainger, G Ed; Richardson, Arlan; Sabatini, David M; Salmon, Adam B; Simpkins, James W; Steegenga, Wilma T; Nadon, Nancy L; Harrison, David E

    2016-10-01

    The National Institute on Aging Interventions Testing Program (ITP) evaluates agents hypothesized to increase healthy lifespan in genetically heterogeneous mice. Each compound is tested in parallel at three sites, and all results are published. We report the effects of lifelong treatment of mice with four agents not previously tested: Protandim, fish oil, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and metformin - the latter with and without rapamycin, and two drugs previously examined: 17-α-estradiol and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), at doses greater and less than used previously. 17-α-estradiol at a threefold higher dose robustly extended both median and maximal lifespan, but still only in males. The male-specific extension of median lifespan by NDGA was replicated at the original dose, and using doses threefold lower and higher. The effects of NDGA were dose dependent and male specific but without an effect on maximal lifespan. Protandim, a mixture of botanical extracts that activate Nrf2, extended median lifespan in males only. Metformin alone, at a dose of 0.1% in the diet, did not significantly extend lifespan. Metformin (0.1%) combined with rapamycin (14 ppm) robustly extended lifespan, suggestive of an added benefit, based on historical comparison with earlier studies of rapamycin given alone. The α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose, at a concentration previously tested (1000 ppm), significantly increased median longevity in males and 90th percentile lifespan in both sexes, even when treatment was started at 16 months. Neither fish oil nor UDCA extended lifespan. These results underscore the reproducibility of ITP longevity studies and illustrate the importance of identifying optimal doses in lifespan studies. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Lifespan extension of rotifers by treatment with red algal extracts

    PubMed Central

    Snare, David J.; Fields, Allison M.; Snell, Terry W.; Kubanek, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Aging results from an accumulation of damage to macromolecules inhibiting cellular replication, repair, and other necessary functions. Damage may be due to environmental stressors such as metal toxicity, oxidative stress caused by imperfections in electron transfer reactions, or other metabolic processes. In an effort to discover medical treatments that counteract this damage, we initiated a search for small molecule drugs from natural sources using life table experiments which, through their unbiased approach, present the opportunity to discover first-in-class molecules. We have identified marine red algae as a source of natural products that slow aging of the invertebrate rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Rotifers are a promising model organism for life extension studies as they maintain a short, measurable lifespan while also having an extensive literature related to aging. Rotifer lifespan was increased 9–14% by exposure to three of a total of 200 screened red algal extracts. Bioassay guided fractionation led to semi-purified extracts composed primarily of lipids responsible for rotifer life extension. The life extending mixture from the red alga Acanthophora spicifera contained eicosanoic, octadecanoic, and hexadecanoic acids as well as several unidentified unsaturated fatty acids. The life extending effects of these small molecule mixtures are not a result of their direct antioxidant capacity; other unknown mechanisms of action are likely involved. An understanding of how these natural products interact with their molecular targets could lead to selective and effective treatments for slowing aging and reducing age related diseases. PMID:24120568

  6. Lifespan extension of rotifers by treatment with red algal extracts.

    PubMed

    Snare, David J; Fields, Allison M; Snell, Terry W; Kubanek, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Aging results from an accumulation of damage to macromolecules inhibiting cellular replication, repair, and other necessary functions. Damage may be due to environmental stressors such as metal toxicity, oxidative stress caused by imperfections in electron transfer reactions, or other metabolic processes. In an effort to discover medical treatments that counteract this damage, we initiated a search for small molecule drugs from natural sources using life table experiments which, through their unbiased approach, present the opportunity to discover first-in-class molecules. We have identified marine red algae as a source of natural products that slow aging of the invertebrate rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Rotifers are a promising model organism for life extension studies as they maintain a short, measurable lifespan while also having an extensive literature related to aging. Rotifer lifespan was increased 9-14% by exposure to three of a total of 200 screened red algal extracts. Bioassay guided fractionation led to semi-purified extracts composed primarily of lipids responsible for rotifer life extension. The life extending mixture from the red alga Acanthophora spicifera contained eicosanoic, octadecanoic, and hexadecanoic acids as well as several unidentified unsaturated fatty acids. The life extending effects of these small molecule mixtures are not a result of their direct antioxidant capacity; other unknown mechanisms of action are likely involved. An understanding of how these natural products interact with their molecular targets could lead to selective and effective treatments for slowing aging and reducing age related diseases.

  7. Metabolome analysis of effect of aspirin on Drosophila lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    Song, Chaochun; Zhu, Chenxing; Wu, Qi; Qi, Jiancheng; Gao, Yue; Zhang, Zhichao; Gaur, Uma; Yang, Deying; Fan, Xiaolan; Yang, Mingyao

    2017-09-01

    Effective approaches for drug development involve the repurposing of existing drugs which are already approved by the FDA. Aspirin has been shown to have many health benefits since its discovery as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) to treat pain and inflammation. Recent experiments demonstrated the longevity effects of aspirin in Drosophila, but its mechanism remains to be explored. In order to elucidate the effects of drug on metabolism, we carried out the metabolic analysis of aspirin-treated flies. The results identified 404 active metabolites in addition to the extended lifespan and improved healthspan in fly. There were 28 metabolites having significant changes between aspirin-treated group and the control group, out of which 22 compounds were found to have detailed information. These compounds are reported to have important functions in energy metabolism, amino sugar metabolism, and urea metabolism, indicating that aspirin might be playing positive roles in the fly's lifespan and healthspan improvement. Because of the conservation of major longevity pathways and mechanisms in different species, the health benefits of aspirin administration could be extended to other animals and humans as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome probably induced by a lamotrigine-ginseng drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Myers, Amy P; Watson, Troy A; Strock, Steven B

    2015-03-01

    The likelihood of a drug reaction with lamotrigine is increased by dose escalation that is too rapid or drug interactions that increase the concentration of lamotrigine. There is a well-documented interaction between valproic acid and lamotrigine in which lamotrigine levels are increased, subsequently increasing the risk of a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, diffuse maculopapular rash, multivisceral involvement, eosinophilia, and atypical lymphocytes and has a mortality rate of 10-40%. We describe the first case, to our knowledge, of DRESS syndrome that was probably induced by a drug interaction between lamotrigine and ginseng. A 44-year-old white man presented to the emergency department after experiencing a possible seizure. His medical history included two other lifetime events concerning for seizures at ages 14 and 29 years old. After referral to the neurology clinic, he was diagnosed with generalized tonic-clonic seizure disorder, and lamotrigine was started with up-titration according to the drug's package insert to a goal dosage of 150 mg twice/day. The patient had also been taking deer antler velvet and ginseng that he continued during his lamotrigine therapy. On day 43 of therapy, the patient presented to the emergency department with a pruritic rash that had started on his extremities and spread to his torso. He was thought to have experienced a drug reaction to lamotrigine, and the drug was discontinued. Thirteen days later, the patient was admitted from the acute care clinic for inpatient observation due to laboratory abnormalities in the setting of continued rash, headache, and myalgias. His admission laboratory results on that day were remarkable for leukocytosis, with a white blood cell count up to 17.6 × 10(3) /mm(3) , with a prominent eosinophilia of 3.04 × 10(3) /mm(3) ; his liver enzyme levels were also elevated, with an aspartate

  9. The thioredoxin TRX-1 regulates adult lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Fierro-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Barrios, Maria; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} First in vivo data for thioredoxin in dietary-restriction-(DR)-induced longevity. {yields} Thioredoxin (trx-1) loss suppresses longevity of eat-2 mutant, a genetic DR model. {yields} trx-1 overexpression extends wild-type longevity, but not that of eat-2 mutant. {yields} Longevity by dietary deprivation (DD), a non-genetic DR model, requires trx-1. {yields} trx-1 expression in ASJ neurons of aging adults is increased in response to DD. -- Abstract: Dietary restriction (DR) is the only environmental intervention known to extend adult lifespan in a wide variety of animal models. However, the genetic and cellular events that mediate the anti-aging programs induced by DR remain elusive. Here, we used the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to provide the first in vivo evidence that a thioredoxin (TRX-1) regulates adult lifespan extension induced by DR. We found that deletion of the gene trx-1 completely suppressed the lifespan extension caused by mutation of eat-2, a genetic surrogate of DR in the worm. However, trx-1 deletion only partially suppressed the long lifespan caused by mutation of the insulin-like receptor gene daf-2 or by mutation of the sensory cilia gene osm-5. A trx-1::GFP translational fusion expressed from its own promoter in ASJ neurons (Ptrx-1::trx-1::GFP) rescued the trx-1 deletion-mediated suppression of the lifespan extension caused by mutation of eat-2. This rescue was not observed when trx-1::GFP was expressed from the ges-1 promoter in the intestine. In addition, overexpression of Ptrx-1::trx-1::GFP extended lifespan in wild type, but not in eat-2 mutants. trx-1 deletion almost completely suppressed the lifespan extension induced by dietary deprivation (DD), a non-genetic, nutrient-based model of DR in the worm. Moreover, DD upregulated the expression of a trx-1 promoter-driven GFP reporter gene (Ptrx-1::GFP) in ASJ neurons of aging adults, but not that of control Pgpa-9::GFP (which is also expressed in ASJ neurons). We propose

  10. Extension of Drosophila Lifespan by Rhodiola rosea Depends on Dietary Carbohydrate and Caloric Content in a Simplified Diet.

    PubMed

    Schriner, Samuel E; Coskun, Volkan; Hogan, Sean P; Nguyen, Cindy T; Lopez, Terry E; Jafari, Mahtab

    2016-03-01

    The root and rhizome extract of Rhodiola rosea has been extensively used in traditional medicine to improve physical and mental performance and to protect against stress. We, and others, have reported that R. rosea can extend lifespan in flies, worms, and yeast. We also previously found that the extract can act independently of dietary restriction (DR), a treatment that can extend lifespan in a range of model organisms. In flies, DR is implemented through a reduction in dietary yeast content. Here, we report that the ability of R. rosea extract to extend lifespan in flies is dependent on the carbohydrate and caloric content when supplemented with a simplified diet composed of yeast and sucrose. R. rosea extract elevated the sugar content in flies and down-regulated hexokinase expression, suggesting that it perturbs carbohydrate metabolism in flies. In our previous studies, bananas, barley malt, and corn syrup provided dietary carbohydrates, and R. rosea extract could extend lifespan with a range of caloric levels. We conclude that the lifespan-extending effect of R. rosea extract in flies is dependent on dietary carbohydrate and caloric contents coupled with an interaction with complex dietary components present in bananas, barley, or corn.

  11. Models for the Red Blood Cell Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rajiv P.; Horowitz, Joseph; Hollot, Christopher V.; Germain, Michael J.; Widness, John A.; Mock, Donald M.; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chait, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in the study and interpretation of various clinical conditions. Yet, confusion about the meanings of fundamental terms related to cell survival and their quantification still exists in the literature. To address these issues, we started from a compartmental model of RBC populations based on an arbitrary full lifespan distribution, carefully defined the residual lifespan, current age, and excess lifespan of the RBC population, and then derived the distributions of these parameters. For a set of residual survival data from biotin-labeled RBCs, we fit models based on Weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions, using nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) modeling and parametric bootstrapping. From the estimated Weibull, gamma, and lognormal parameters we computed the respective population mean full lifespans (95% confidence interval): 115.60 (109.17–121.66), 116.71 (110.81–122.51), and 116.79 (111.23–122.75) days together with the standard deviations of the full lifespans: 24.77 (20.82–28.81), 24.30 (20.53–28.33), and 24.19 (20.43–27.73). We then estimated the 95th percentiles of the lifespan distributions (a surrogate for the maximum lifespan): 153.95 (150.02–158.36), 159.51 (155.09–164.00), and 160.40 (156.00–165.58) days, the mean current ages (or the mean residual lifespans): 60.45 (58.18–62.85), 60.82 (58.77–63.33), and 57.26 (54.33–60.61) days, and the residual half-lives: 57.97 (54.96–60.90), 58.36 (55.45–61.26), and 58.40 (55.62–61.37) days, for the Weibull, gamma, and lognormal models respectively. Corresponding estimates were obtained for the individual subjects. The three models provide equally excellent goodness-of-fit, reliable estimation, and physiologically plausible values of the directly interpretable RBC survival parameters. PMID:27039311

  12. Models for the red blood cell lifespan.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rajiv P; Horowitz, Joseph; Hollot, Christopher V; Germain, Michael J; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chait, Yossi

    2016-06-01

    The lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in the study and interpretation of various clinical conditions. Yet, confusion about the meanings of fundamental terms related to cell survival and their quantification still exists in the literature. To address these issues, we started from a compartmental model of RBC populations based on an arbitrary full lifespan distribution, carefully defined the residual lifespan, current age, and excess lifespan of the RBC population, and then derived the distributions of these parameters. For a set of residual survival data from biotin-labeled RBCs, we fit models based on Weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions, using nonlinear mixed effects modeling and parametric bootstrapping. From the estimated Weibull, gamma, and lognormal parameters we computed the respective population mean full lifespans (95 % confidence interval): 115.60 (109.17-121.66), 116.71 (110.81-122.51), and 116.79 (111.23-122.75) days together with the standard deviations of the full lifespans: 24.77 (20.82-28.81), 24.30 (20.53-28.33), and 24.19 (20.43-27.73). We then estimated the 95th percentiles of the lifespan distributions (a surrogate for the maximum lifespan): 153.95 (150.02-158.36), 159.51 (155.09-164.00), and 160.40 (156.00-165.58) days, the mean current ages (or the mean residual lifespans): 60.45 (58.18-62.85), 60.82 (58.77-63.33), and 57.26 (54.33-60.61) days, and the residual half-lives: 57.97 (54.96-60.90), 58.36 (55.45-61.26), and 58.40 (55.62-61.37) days, for the Weibull, gamma, and lognormal models respectively. Corresponding estimates were obtained for the individual subjects. The three models provide equally excellent goodness-of-fit, reliable estimation, and physiologically plausible values of the directly interpretable RBC survival parameters.

  13. Lifespan-regulating genes in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Masaharu; Nishida, Eisuke

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the aging process have garnered much attention in recent decades because aging is the most significant risk factor for many chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cancer. Until recently, the aging process was not considered to be an actively regulated process; therefore, discovering that the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway is a lifespan-regulating genetic pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans was a major breakthrough that changed our understanding of the aging process. Currently, it is thought that animal lifespans are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The genes involved in lifespan regulation are often associated with major signaling pathways that link the rate of aging to environmental factors. Although many of the major mechanisms governing the aging process have been identified from studies in short-lived model organisms such as yeasts, worms and flies, the same mechanisms are frequently observed in mammals, indicating that the genes and signaling pathways that regulate lifespan are highly conserved among different species. This review summarizes the lifespan-regulating genes, with a specific focus on studies in C. elegans. PMID:28721266

  14. C. elegans lifespan extension by osmotic stress requires FUdR, base excision repair, FOXO, and sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Edward N; Corkins, Mark E; Li, Jia-Cheng; Singh, Komudi; Parsons, Sadé; Tucey, Tim M; Sorkaç, Altar; Huang, Huiyan; Dimitriadi, Maria; Sinclair, David A

    2016-01-01

    Moderate stress can increase lifespan by hormesis, a beneficial low-level induction of stress response pathways. 5’-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR) is commonly used to sterilize Caenorhabditis elegans in aging experiments. However, FUdR alters lifespan in some genotypes and induces resistance to thermal and proteotoxic stress. We report that hypertonic stress in combination with FUdR treatment or inhibition of the FUdR target thymidylate synthase, TYMS-1, extends C. elegans lifespan by up to 30%. By contrast, in the absence of FUdR, hypertonic stress decreases lifespan. Adaptation to hypertonic stress requires diminished Notch signaling and loss of Notch co-ligands leads to lifespan extension only in combination with FUdR. Either FUdR treatment or TYMS-1 loss induced resistance to acute hypertonic stress, anoxia, and thermal stress. FUdR treatment increased expression of DAF-16 FOXO and the osmolyte biosynthesis enzyme GPDH-1. FUdR-induced hypertonic stress resistance was partially dependent on sirtuins and base excision repair (BER) pathways, while FUdR-induced lifespan extension under hypertonic stress conditions requires DAF-16, BER, and sirtuin function. Combined, these results demonstrate that FUdR, through inhibition of TYMS-1, activates stress response pathways in somatic tissues to confer hormetic resistance to acute and chronic stress. C. elegans lifespan studies using FUdR may need re-interpretation in light of this work. PMID:26854551

  15. C. elegans lifespan extension by osmotic stress requires FUdR, base excision repair, FOXO, and sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Edward N; Corkins, Mark E; Li, Jia-Cheng; Singh, Komudi; Parsons, Sadé; Tucey, Tim M; Sorkaç, Altar; Huang, Huiyan; Dimitriadi, Maria; Sinclair, David A; Hart, Anne C

    2016-03-01

    Moderate stress can increase lifespan by hormesis, a beneficial low-level induction of stress response pathways. 5'-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR) is commonly used to sterilize Caenorhabditis elegans in aging experiments. However, FUdR alters lifespan in some genotypes and induces resistance to thermal and proteotoxic stress. We report that hypertonic stress in combination with FUdR treatment or inhibition of the FUdR target thymidylate synthase, TYMS-1, extends C. elegans lifespan by up to 30%. By contrast, in the absence of FUdR, hypertonic stress decreases lifespan. Adaptation to hypertonic stress requires diminished Notch signaling and loss of Notch co-ligands leads to lifespan extension only in combination with FUdR. Either FUdR treatment or TYMS-1 loss induced resistance to acute hypertonic stress, anoxia, and thermal stress. FUdR treatment increased expression of DAF-16 FOXO and the osmolyte biosynthesis enzyme GPDH-1. FUdR-induced hypertonic stress resistance was partially dependent on sirtuins and base excision repair (BER) pathways, while FUdR-induced lifespan extension under hypertonic stress conditions requires DAF-16, BER, and sirtuin function. Combined, these results demonstrate that FUdR, through inhibition of TYMS-1, activates stress response pathways in somatic tissues to confer hormetic resistance to acute and chronic stress. C. elegans lifespan studies using FUdR may need re-interpretation in light of this work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The impact on health outcomes and healthcare utilisation of switching to generic medicines consequent to reference pricing: the case of lamotrigine in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Charon; Ashton, Toni; Davis, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Many countries have implemented generic reference pricing and substitution as methods of containing pharmaceutical expenditure. However, resistance to switching between medicines is apparent, especially in the case of anti-epileptic medicines. This study sought to exploit a nation-wide policy intervention on generic reference pricing in New Zealand to evaluate the health outcomes of patients switching from originator to generic lamotrigine, an anti-epileptic medicine. A retrospective study using the national health collections and prescription records was conducted comparing patients who switched from originator brand to generic lamotrigine with patients who remained on the originator brand. Primary outcome measures included switch behaviour, changes in utilisation of healthcare services at emergency departments, hospitalisations and use of specialist services, and mortality. Approximately one-quarter of all patients using the originator brand of lamotrigine switched to generic lamotrigine, half of whom made the switch within 60 days of the policy implementation. Multiple switches (three or more) between generic and brand products were evident for around 10% of switchers. Switch-back rates of 3% were apparent within 30 days post-switch. No difference in heath outcome measures was associated with switching from originator lamotrigine to a generic equivalent and hence no increased costs could be found for switchers. Switching from brand to generic lamotrigine is largely devoid of adverse health outcomes; however, creating an incentive to ensure a greater proportion of patients switch to generic lamotrigine is required to achieve maximal financial savings from a policy of generic reference pricing.

  17. Epigenetic mechanisms underlying lifespan and age-related effects of dietary restriction and the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Cesar L; Mobbs, Charles V

    2016-11-22

    Aging constitutes the central risk factor for major diseases including many forms of cancer, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular diseases. The aging process is characterized by both global and tissue-specific changes in gene expression across taxonomically diverse species. While aging has historically been thought to entail cell-autonomous, even stochastic changes, recent evidence suggests that modulation of this process can be hierarchal, wherein manipulations of nutrient-sensing neurons (e.g., in the hypothalamus) produce peripheral effects that may modulate the aging process itself. The most robust intervention extending lifespan, plausibly impinging on the aging process, involves different modalities of dietary restriction (DR). Lifespan extension by DR is associated with broad protection against diseases (natural and engineered). Here we review potential epigenetic processes that may link lifespan to age-related diseases, particularly in the context of DR and (other) ketogenic diets, focusing on brain and hypothalamic mechanisms.

  18. The role of the ribosome in the regulation of longevity and lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    MacInnes, Alyson W

    2016-01-01

    The most energy-consuming process that a cell must undertake to stay viable is the continuous biogenesis of ribosomes for the translation of RNA into protein. Given the inextricable links between energy consumption and cellular lifespan, it is not surprising that mutations and environmental cues that reduce ribosome biogenesis result in an extension of eukaryotic lifespan. This review goes into detail describing recent discoveries of different and often unexpected elements that play a role in the regulation of longevity by virtue of their ribosome biogenesis functions. These roles include controlling the transcription and processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), the translation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, and the number of ribosomes overall. Together these findings suggest that a fundamental mechanism across eukaryotic species for extending lifespan is to slow down or halt the expenditure of cellular energy that is normally absorbed by the manufacturing and assembly of new ribosomes.

  19. Lipidome determinants of maximal lifespan in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Reznick, Jane; Omerbašić, Damir; Bennett, Nigel C; Lewin, Gary R; Azpurua, Jorge; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Regnard, Pierrick; Wanert, Fanelie; Marchal, Julia; Pifferi, Fabien; Aujard, Fabienne; Liu, Zhen; Shi, Peng; Pääbo, Svante; Schroeder, Florian; Willmitzer, Lothar; Giavalisco, Patrick; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2017-12-01

    Maximal lifespan of mammalian species, even if closely related, may differ more than 10-fold, however the nature of the mechanisms that determine this variability is unresolved. Here, we assess the relationship between maximal lifespan duration and concentrations of more than 20,000 lipid compounds, measured in 669 tissue samples from 6 tissues of 35 species representing three mammalian clades: primates, rodents and bats. We identify lipids associated with species' longevity across the three clades, uncoupled from other parameters, such as basal metabolic rate, body size, or body temperature. These lipids clustered in specific lipid classes and pathways, and enzymes linked to them display signatures of greater stabilizing selection in long-living species, and cluster in functional groups related to signaling and protein-modification processes. These findings point towards the existence of defined molecular mechanisms underlying variation in maximal lifespan among mammals.

  20. Rifampicin reduces advanced glycation end products and activates DAF-16 to increase lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Golegaonkar, Sandeep; Tabrez, Syed S; Pandit, Awadhesh; Sethurathinam, Shalini; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Bansode, Sneha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan; Kulkarni, Mahesh J; Mukhopadhyay, Arnab

    2015-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed when glucose reacts nonenzymatically with proteins; these modifications are implicated in aging and pathogenesis of many age-related diseases including type II diabetes, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, pharmaceutical interventions that can reduce AGEs may delay age-onset diseases and extend lifespan. Using LC-MS(E), we show that rifampicin (RIF) reduces glycation of important cellular proteins in vivo and consequently increases lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans by up to 60%. RIF analog rifamycin SV (RSV) possesses similar properties, while rifaximin (RMN) lacks antiglycation activity and therefore fails to affect lifespan positively. The efficacy of RIF and RSV as potent antiglycating agents may be attributed to the presence of a p-dihydroxyl moiety that can potentially undergo spontaneous oxidation to yield highly reactive p-quinone structures, a feature absent in RMN. We also show that supplementing rifampicin late in adulthood is sufficient to increase lifespan. For its effect on longevity, rifampicin requires DAF-18 (nematode PTEN) as well as JNK-1 and activates DAF-16, the FOXO homolog. Interestingly, the drug treatment modulates transcription of a different subset of DAF-16 target genes, those not controlled by the conserved Insulin-IGF-1-like signaling pathway. RIF failed to increase the lifespan of daf-16 null mutant despite reducing glycation, showing thereby that DAF-16 may not directly affect AGE formation. Together, our data suggest that the dual ability to reduce glycation in vivo and activate prolongevity processes through DAF-16 makes RIF and RSV effective lifespan-extending interventions. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A lifespan view of anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lenze, Eric J.; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2011-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental changes over the lifespan, from childhood through adulthood into old age, have important implications for the onset, presentation, course, and treatment of anxiety disorders. This article presents data on anxiety disorders as they appear in older adults, as compared with earlier in life. In this article, we focus on aging-related changes in the epidemiology, presentation, and treatment of anxiety disorders. Also, this article describes some of the gaps and limitations in our understanding and suggests research directions that may elucidate the mechanisms of anxiety disorder development later in life. Finally we describe optimal management of anxiety disorders across the lifespan, in “eight simple steps” for practitioners. PMID:22275845

  2. FET proteins regulate lifespan and neuronal integrity

    PubMed Central

    Therrien, Martine; Rouleau, Guy A.; Dion, Patrick A.; Parker, J. Alex

    2016-01-01

    The FET protein family includes FUS, EWS and TAF15 proteins, all of which have been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons. Here, we show that a reduction of FET proteins in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans causes synaptic dysfunction accompanied by impaired motor phenotypes. FET proteins are also involved in the regulation of lifespan and stress resistance, acting partially through the insulin/IGF-signalling pathway. We propose that FET proteins are involved in the maintenance of lifespan, cellular stress resistance and neuronal integrity. PMID:27117089

  3. Regulation of Drosophila lifespan by JNK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Biteau, Benoit; Karpac, Jason; Hwangbo, DaeSung; Jasper, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    Cellular responses to extrinsic and intrinsic insults have to be carefully regulated to properly coordinate cytoprotection, repair processes, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Stress signaling pathways, most prominently the Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway, are critical regulators of such cellular responses and have accordingly been implicated in the regulation of lifespan in various organisms. JNK signaling promotes cytoprotective gene expression, but also interacts with the Insulin signaling pathway to influence growth, metabolism, stress tolerance and regeneration. Here, we review recent studies in Drosophila that elucidate the tissue-specific and systemic consequences of JNK activation that ultimately impact lifespan of the organism. PMID:21111799

  4. [Characteristics of hypersensitivity syndrome to lamotrigine: review of one case reported in the Regional Center of Pharmacovigilance of Nantes].

    PubMed

    Veyrac, G; Marcade, G; Chiffoleau, A; Bourin, M; Jolliet, P

    2002-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening idiosyncratic drug reaction. In the literature, about five cases have been reported concerning hypersensitivity syndrome with lamotrigine. Most cases concern aromatic anticonvulsants but we report a case induced by lamotrigine which is a non aromatic anticonvulsant. A 73-year-old man was treated with lamotrigine for epilepsy due to a cerebrovascular stroke for 5 weeks. After 2 weeks with a single oral dose of 50 mg lamotrigine, the patient received 100 mg. Quickly thereafter fever, erythema and edema involving the periorbital area appeared. He was then admitted to hospital and lamotrigine was immediately discontinued. He developed acute hepatic and renal failure. During his hospital stay, he was treated with systemic and topical corticosteroids. After slow improvement, he was discharged 4 weeks later. Concerning this typical case, we review the characteristics of hypersensitivity syndrome and the different etiopathogenesis. The hypersensitivity syndrome typically develops two to six weeks after a drug is first administered, later than most other serious skin reactions. This syndrome manifests as rash, fever, tender lymphadenopathy, hepatitis and eosinophilia. The mechanism of hypersensitivity syndrome is unknown. Several theories have been proposed. The reaction is secondary to circulating antibodies or concerns toxic metabolities. On the other hand, association of human herpes virus 6 infection may play a role in the development of hypersensitivity syndrome. Hypersensitivity reactions to the aromatic antiepileptic drugs appear to have an immune etiology much like lamotrigine: bioactivation, detoxification, covalent adduct formation, processing and presentation of antigen to the immune system, and consequent formation of antibody and T-cell immune effectors. Another theory involves toxic metabolites; the aromatic antiepileptic agents are metabolised by cytochrome P-450 to an

  5. [Open study evaluating lamotrigine efficacy and safety in add-on treatment and consecutive monotherapy in adult patients with epilepsy resistant carbamazepine and valproate].

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak, S; Niedzielska, K; Mańko, E; Terczyński, A

    2000-01-01

    Lamotrigine is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug which is thought to act in part via a use-dependent blockade of voltage-sensitive sodium channels to stabilise the neuronal membrane. This results in the inhibition of the excessive release of excitatory amino acids, such as glutamate, during epileptic activity. An open, multicentre, prospective trial of lamotrigine was carried out in adult patients with drug-resistant epilepsy on monotherapy with carbamazepine or valproate. The primary aim of the study was to assess add-on lamotrigine withdrawing to monotherapy. 28-week clinical trial was divided into 4 phases: (1) Dose escalation period (4 weeks), (2) Add-on period (8 weeks), (3) Standard AED withdrawal period (8 weeks), (4) Lamotrigine monotherapy (8 weeks). Thirty-three patients were previously treated with valproate, 44 with carbamazepine. Of 77 patients recruited into the study, 64 patients (83%) completed add-on therapy, 49 patients (64%) completed lamotrigine monotherapy. 44% of all patients during the add-on phase and 48% during lamotrigine monotherapy had a reduction in seizure frequency of at least 50% compared with pre-study period. 13% of all patients achieved seizure freedom during add-on therapy and 18% during monotherapy. Improvement of Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores was observed in 65% and 57% patients respectively. A significant proportion of patients could be successfully converted to lamotrigine monotherapy. Lamotrigine was also generally well tolerated. 23 patients (30%) had at least one adverse event (AE), but only 1/4 of all AEs might be reasonably regarded as an effect of the medication. 7 patients (9%) discontinued prematurely from the study due to adverse event. More AEs were observed in add-on therapy than in lamotrigine monotherapy. The safety profile was consistent with that seen during other clinical trials with lamotrigine. 1. Lamotrigine is effective AED in add-on and monotherapy (responders rate--44% and 48% respectively). 2. In

  6. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences of the co-administration of lamotrigine and a combined oral contraceptive in healthy female subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Jagdev; Job, Sarah; Singh, Sunita; Philipson, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Aims To assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of co-administration of a combined oral contraceptive (ethinyloestradiol plus levonorgestrel) and lamotrigine. Methods Over a period of 130 days, healthy female subjects took lamotrigine (titrated up to 300 mg day−1) and the combined oral contraceptive, either individually or as co-therapy. Plasma ethinyloestradiol and levonorgestrel concentrations were measured in the presence and absence of lamotrigine, and serum lamotrigine concentrations were measured in the presence and absence of the combined oral contraceptive. Serum concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), progesterone, oestradiol and sex hormone binding globulin were also determined. Results Of the 22 enrolled subjects, 16 had evaluable pharmacokinetic data. The mean (90% CI) ratios of lamotrigine area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0,24 h)) and maximum observed concentration (Cmax) of lamotrigine when it was given with the combined oral contraceptive and during monotherapy were 0.48 (0.44, 0.53) and 0.61 (0.57, 0.66), respectively. Ethinyloestradiol pharmacokinetics were unchanged by lamotrigine, the mean combined oral contraceptive + lamotrigine : combined oral contraceptive alone ratios (90% CI) of the AUC(0,24 h) and Cmax of levonorgestrel were 0.81 (0.76, 0.86) and 0.88 (0.82, 0.93), respectively. FSH and LH concentrations were increased (by 4.7-fold and 3.4-fold, respectively) in the presence of lamotrigine, but the low serum progesterone concentrations suggested that suppression of ovulation was maintained. Intermenstrual bleeding was reported by 7/22 (32%) of subjects during co-administration of lamotrigine and combined oral contraceptive. Conclusions A clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interaction was observed during co-administration of a combined oral contraceptive and lamotrigine. A dosage adjustment for lamotrigine may need to be considered when these agents are co

  7. A transcription elongation factor that links signals from the reproductive system to lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Arjumand; Henis-Korenblit, Sivan; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2009-09-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, the aging of the soma is influenced by the germline. When germline-stem cells are removed, aging slows and lifespan is increased. The mechanism by which somatic tissues respond to loss of the germline is not well-understood. Surprisingly, we have found that a predicted transcription elongation factor, TCER-1, plays a key role in this process. TCER-1 is required for loss of the germ cells to increase C. elegans' lifespan, and it acts as a regulatory switch in the pathway. When the germ cells are removed, the levels of TCER-1 rise in somatic tissues. This increase is sufficient to trigger key downstream events, as overexpression of tcer-1 extends the lifespan of normal animals that have an intact reproductive system. Our findings suggest that TCER-1 extends lifespan by promoting the expression of a set of genes regulated by the conserved, life-extending transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO. Interestingly, TCER-1 is not required for DAF-16/FOXO to extend lifespan in animals with reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Thus, TCER-1 specifically links the activity of a broadly deployed transcription factor, DAF-16/FOXO, to longevity signals from reproductive tissues.

  8. Identification of adverse reactions that can occur on substitution of generic for branded lamotrigine in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Makus, Ken G; McCormick, John

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize outcomes in patients with epilepsy who experienced adverse reactions on switching from branded to generic lamotrigine and who were subsequently switched back to the branded formulation. This case-series analysis used data from patients identified through a survey of Ontario pharmacists, where Health Canada adverse-reaction forms submitted to pharmacists by physicians were retrieved, and from a physician chart audit and survey. Data from male and female patients with epilepsy who experienced an adverse reaction on switching from branded to generic lamotrigine and thus were switched back to the branded formulation were included. The pharmacists' survey indicated that 11 of 14 retrieved adverse-reaction forms described patients with epilepsy who experienced loss of seizure control when generic lamotrigine was substituted for branded drug. Seizure control was regained in 8/10 (80%) patients with reported outcomes when they were switched back to the branded drug. Based on data from the physician survey response rate, 130/544 [24%1], 5/95 (5%) reported filing a Health Canada adverse-reaction form requesting that a patient be dispensed branded lamotrigine rather than the generic formulation. Six physicians provided data on 9 patients who experienced adverse reactions on a brand-to-generic switch, 8 of which were due to loss of seizure control. Seizure control was regained in all but 1 case on a switch back to the branded drug. The results of this small case-series investigation suggest that some patients may experience loss of seizure control when generic lamotrigine is substituted for the branded formulation. The degree of risk was not assessable based on available data, which are merely suggestive because of the observational nature of the study.

  9. Autophagy mediates pharmacological lifespan extension by spermidine and resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Eugenia; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-12-23

    Although autophagy has widely been conceived as a self-destructive mechanism that causes cell death, accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy usually mediates cytoprotection, thereby avoiding the apoptotic or necrotic demise of stressed cells. Recent evidence produced by our groups demonstrates that autophagy is also involved in pharmacological manipulations that increase longevity. Exogenous supply of the polyamine spermidine can prolong the lifespan of (while inducing autophagy in) yeast, nematodes and flies. Similarly, resveratrol can trigger autophagy in cells from different organisms, extend lifespan in nematodes, and ameliorate the fitness of human cells undergoing metabolic stress. These beneficial effects are lost when essential autophagy modulators are genetically or pharmacologically inactivated, indicating that autophagy is required for the cytoprotective and/or anti-aging effects of spermidine and resveratrol. Genetic and functional studies indicate that spermidine inhibits histone acetylases, while resveratrol activates the histone deacetylase Sirtuin 1 to confer cytoprotection/longevity. Although it remains elusive whether the same histones (or perhaps other nuclear or cytoplasmic proteins) act as the downstream targets of spermidine and resveratrol, these results point to an essential role of protein hypoacetylation in autophagy control and in the regulation of longevity.

  10. Autophagy mediates pharmacological lifespan extension by spermidine and resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Eugenia; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Although autophagy has widely been conceived as a self-destructive mechanism that causes cell death, accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy usually mediates cytoprotection, thereby avoiding the apoptotic or necrotic demise of stressed cells. Recent evidence produced by our groups demonstrates that autophagy is also involved in pharmacological manipulations that increase longevity. Exogenous supply of the polyamine spermidine can prolong the lifespan of (while inducing autophagy in) yeast, nematodes and flies. Similarly, resveratrol can trigger autophagy in cells from different organisms, extend lifespan in nematodes, and ameliorate the fitness of human cells undergoing metabolic stress. These beneficial effects are lost when essential autophagy modulators are genetically or pharmacologically inactivated, indicating that autophagy is required for the cytoprotective and/or anti-aging effects of spermidine and resveratrol. Genetic and functional studies indicate that spermidine inhibits histone acetylases, while resveratrol activates the histone deacetylase Sirtuin 1 to confer cytoprotection/longevity. Although it remains elusive whether the same histones (or perhaps other nuclear or cytoplasmic proteins) act as the downstream targets of spermidine and resveratrol, these results point to an essential role of protein hypoacetylation in autophagy control and in the regulation of longevity. PMID:20157579

  11. Glycogen controls Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and resistance to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gusarov, Ivan; Pani, Bibhusita; Gautier, Laurent; Smolentseva, Olga; Eremina, Svetlana; Shamovsky, Ilya; Katkova-Zhukotskaya, Olga; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    A high-sugar diet has been associated with reduced lifespan in organisms ranging from worms to mammals. However, the mechanisms underlying the harmful effects of glucose are poorly understood. Here we establish a causative relationship between endogenous glucose storage in the form of glycogen, resistance to oxidative stress and organismal aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that glycogen accumulated on high dietary glucose limits C. elegans longevity. Glucose released from glycogen and used for NADPH/glutathione reduction renders nematodes and human hepatocytes more resistant against oxidative stress. Exposure to low levels of oxidants or genetic inhibition of glycogen synthase depletes glycogen stores and extends the lifespan of animals fed a high glucose diet in an AMPK-dependent manner. Moreover, glycogen interferes with low insulin signalling and accelerates aging of long-lived daf-2 worms fed a high glucose diet. Considering its extensive evolutionary conservation, our results suggest that glycogen metabolism might also have a role in mammalian aging. PMID:28627510

  12. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase 3 Regulates Metabolism and Lifespan in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moritoh, Yusuke; Oka, Masahiro; Yasuhara, Yoshitaka; Hozumi, Hiroyuki; Iwachidow, Kimihiko; Fuse, Hiromitsu; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 3 (IP6K3) generates inositol pyrophosphates, which regulate diverse cellular functions. However, little is known about its own physiological role. Here, we show the roles of IP6K3 in metabolic regulation. We detected high levels of both mouse and human IP6K3 mRNA in myotubes and muscle tissues. In human myotubes, IP6K3 was upregulated by dexamethasone treatment, which is known to inhibit glucose metabolism. Furthermore, Ip6k3 expression was elevated under diabetic, fasting, and disuse conditions in mouse skeletal muscles. Ip6k3−/− mice demonstrated lower blood glucose, reduced circulating insulin, deceased fat mass, lower body weight, increased plasma lactate, enhanced glucose tolerance, lower glucose during an insulin tolerance test, and reduced muscle Pdk4 expression under normal diet conditions. Notably, Ip6k3 deletion extended animal lifespan with concomitant reduced phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein in the heart. In contrast, Ip6k3−/− mice showed unchanged skeletal muscle mass and no resistance to the effects of high fat diet. The current observations suggest novel roles of IP6K3 in cellular regulation, which impact metabolic control and lifespan. PMID:27577108

  13. Siglec receptors impact mammalian lifespan by modulating oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Flavio; Pearce, Oliver MT; Wang, Xiaoxia; Samraj, Annie N; Läubli, Heinz; Garcia, Javier O; Lin, Hongqiao; Fu, Xiaoming; Garcia-Bingman, Andrea; Secrest, Patrick; Romanoski, Casey E; Heyser, Charles; Glass, Christopher K; Hazen, Stanley L; Varki, Nissi; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process that includes the lifelong accumulation of molecular damage, leading to age-related frailty, disability and disease, and eventually death. In this study, we report evidence of a significant correlation between the number of genes encoding the immunomodulatory CD33-related sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like receptors (CD33rSiglecs) and maximum lifespan in mammals. In keeping with this, we show that mice lacking Siglec-E, the main member of the CD33rSiglec family, exhibit reduced survival. Removal of Siglec-E causes the development of exaggerated signs of aging at the molecular, structural, and cognitive level. We found that accelerated aging was related both to an unbalanced ROS metabolism, and to a secondary impairment in detoxification of reactive molecules, ultimately leading to increased damage to cellular DNA, proteins, and lipids. Taken together, our data suggest that CD33rSiglecs co-evolved in mammals to achieve a better management of oxidative stress during inflammation, which in turn reduces molecular damage and extends lifespan. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06184.001 PMID:25846707

  14. Mechanisms of increased lifespan in hypoxia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic variation accounts for a relatively small amount of the variation in lifespan (generally 15-30%), while environmental stressors are very strong predictors (Finch and Kirkwood 2000). Hypoxia is an environmental stress that increases longevity in some contexts, but the mechanisms remain poorly...

  15. A Lifespan Perspective on Embodied Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Loeffler, Jonna; Raab, Markus; Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen

    2016-01-01

    Since its infancy embodied cognition research has fundamentally changed our understanding of how action, perception, and cognition relate to and interact with each other. Ideas from different schools of thought have led to controversial theories and a unifying framework is still being debated. In this perspective paper, we argue that in order to improve our understanding of embodied cognition and to take significant steps toward a comprehensive framework, a lifespan approach is mandatory. Given that most established theories have been developed and tested in the adult population, which is characterized by relatively robust and stable sensorimotor and cognitive abilities, we deem it questionable whether embodied cognition effects found in this population are representative for different life stages such as childhood or the elderly. In contrast to adulthood, childhood is accompanied by a rapid increase of sensorimotor and cognitive skills, and the old age by a decline of such capacities. Hence, sensorimotor and cognitive capacities, as well as their interactions, are more fragile at both extremes of the lifespan, thereby offering a unique window into the emergence of embodied cognition effects and age-related differences therein. A lifespan approach promises to make a major contribution toward a unifying and comprehensive theory of embodied cognition that is valid across the lifespan and ‘gets better with age.’ PMID:27313562

  16. Interdisciplinary Handbook of Adult Lifespan Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, Jan D., Ed.

    This book is divided into three parts: theories and models, learning in specific life contexts, and the influence of aging on learning. Chapters include: "Chaos Theory as a Framework for Understanding Adult Lifespan Learning" (John C. Cavanaugh, Lisa C. McGuire); "The Future Impact of the Communication Revolution" (Lynn Johnson); "The Educated…

  17. Food insecurity and health across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Sun; Gundersen, Craig; Cook, John; Laraia, Barbara; Johnson, Mary Ann

    2012-09-01

    Our symposium entitled, "Food Insecurity and Health across the Lifespan" explored the latest research from the economic, medical, pediatric, geriatric, and nutrition literature concerning the measurement, prevalence, predictors, and consequences of food insecurity across the lifespan, with a focus on chronic disease, chronic disease management, and healthcare costs. Consideration of the health impacts of food insecurity is a new and timely area of research, with a considerable potential for translation of the findings into public policy surrounding alleviation of food insecurity. Although it is widely acknowledged that food insecurity and hunger are morally unacceptable, strategies to develop national policies to alleviate hunger must also approach this problem by considering the economic impact of food insecurity on health and well-being. The goals of this symposium were to: 1) learn about the prevalence and severity of food insecurity in the US across the lifespan and how this is increasing with the continued economic downturn; 2) understand the growing body of research that documents the impact of varying degrees of food insecurity on physical and mental health across the lifespan; 3) examine how food insecurity is related to chronic disease; and 4) explore research methodology to determine the impact of food insecurity on healthcare costs and utilization. Our symposium provided new and novel understandings and research initiatives directed toward alleviating food insecurity in America.

  18. Interdisciplinary Handbook of Adult Lifespan Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, Jan D., Ed.

    This book is divided into three parts: theories and models, learning in specific life contexts, and the influence of aging on learning. Chapters include: "Chaos Theory as a Framework for Understanding Adult Lifespan Learning" (John C. Cavanaugh, Lisa C. McGuire); "The Future Impact of the Communication Revolution" (Lynn Johnson); "The Educated…

  19. Resveratrol and food effects on lifespan and reproduction in the model crustacean Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunsuk; Ansell, Christine M; Dudycha, Jeffry L

    2014-01-01

    Longevity is a highly variable life history trait and its variation is attributable to both genetic and environmental factors. Exploring well-known environmental factors in a new model system is a useful approach to explore taxonomic variation in plasticity of longevity. We examined responsiveness of the Daphnia pulex clone TCO to potentially related interventions that have been reported to extend lifespan: resveratrol and dietary restriction. First, we examined effects of resveratrol on lifespan and fecundity in TCO which were grown at moderate (12K cells Ankistrodesmus falcatus mL⁻¹) and high (20K cells A. falcatus mL⁻¹) food levels. We found no evidence for lifespan extension by resveratrol, but found a reduction of lifetime fecundity. The effect of resveratrol on fecundity was more pronounced early in life. We then conducted an additional life table to test the effect of dietary restriction on TCO. Surprisingly, reduced food level did not extend the lifespan of TCO, which contrasts with previous studies in D. pulex. Our results suggest that variation in the response to dietary restriction might be more common than previously thought. If resveratrol activates genes involved in the response to dietary restriction, genetic polymorphisms in dietary restriction will influence responses to resveratrol. Thus, this experiment suggests that careful re-examination of resveratrol effects using diverse genotypes is required. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Resveratrol and Food Effects on Lifespan and Reproduction in the Model Crustacean Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    KIM, EUNSUK; ANSELL, CHRISTINE M.; DUDYCHA, JEFFRY L.

    2014-01-01

    Longevity is a highly variable life history trait and its variation is attributable to both genetic and environmental factors. Exploring well-known environmental factors in a new model system is a useful approach to explore taxonomic variation in plasticity of longevity. We examined responsiveness of the Daphnia pulex clone TCO to potentially related interventions that have been reported to extend lifespan: resveratrol and dietary restriction. First, we examined effects of resveratrol on lifespan and fecundity in TCO which were grown at moderate (12K cells Ankistrodesmus falcatus mL−1) and high (20K cells A. falcatus mL−1) food levels. We found no evidence for lifespan extension by resveratrol, but found a reduction of lifetime fecundity. The effect of resveratrol on fecundity was more pronounced early in life. We then conducted an additional life table to test the effect of dietary restriction on TCO. Surprisingly, reduced food level did not extend the lifespan of TCO, which contrasts with previous studies in D. pulex. Our results suggest that variation in the response to dietary restriction might be more common than previously thought. If resveratrol activates genes involved in the response to dietary restriction, genetic polymorphisms in dietary restriction will influence responses to resveratrol. Thus, this experiment suggests that careful re-examination of resveratrol effects using diverse genotypes is required. PMID:24133070

  1. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by cinnamon through a sex-specific dependence on the insulin receptor substrate chico

    PubMed Central

    Schriner, Samuel E.; Kuramada, Steven; Lopez, Terry E.; Truong, Stephanie; Pham, Andrew; Jafari, Mahtab

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamon is a spice commonly used worldwide to flavor desserts, fruits, cereals, breads, and meats. Numerous health benefits have been attributed to its consumption, including the recent suggestion that it may decrease blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Insulin signaling is an integral pathway regulating the lifespan of laboratory organisms, such as worms, flies, and mice. We posited that if cinnamon truly improved the clinical signs of diabetes in people that it would also act on insulin signaling in laboratory organisms and increase lifespan. We found that cinnamon did extend lifespan in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. However, it had no effect on the expression levels of the 3 aging-related Drosophila insulin-like peptides nor did it alter sugar, fat, or soluble protein levels, as would be predicted. In addition, cinnamon exhibited no protective effects in males against oxidative challenges. However, in females it did confer a protective effect against paraquat, but sensitized them to iron. Cinnamon provided no protective effect against desiccation and starvation in females, but sensitized males to both. Interestingly, cinnamon protected both sexes against cold, sensitized both to heat, and elevated HSP70 expression levels. We also found that cinnamon required the insulin receptor substrate to extend lifespan in males, but not females. We conclude that cinnamon does not extend lifespan by improving stress tolerance in general, though it does act, at least in part, through insulin signaling. PMID:25456850

  2. Neuronal ROS signaling rather than AMPK/sirtuin-mediated energy sensing links dietary restriction to lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, Sebastian; Priebe, Steffen; Groth, Marco; Monajembashi, Shamci; Hemmerich, Peter; Guthke, Reinhard; Platzer, Matthias; Ristow, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) extends lifespan and promotes metabolic health in evolutionary distinct species. DR is widely believed to promote longevity by causing an energy deficit leading to increased mitochondrial respiration. We here show that inhibitors of mitochondrial complex I promote physical activity, stress resistance as well as lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans despite normal food uptake, i.e. in the absence of DR. However, complex I inhibition does not further extend lifespan in dietarily restricted nematodes, indicating that impaired complex I activity mimics DR. Promotion of longevity due to complex I inhibition occurs independently of known energy sensors, including DAF-16/FoxO, as well as AAK-2/AMPK and SIR-2.1/sirtuins, or both. Consistent with the concept of mitohormesis, complex I inhibition transiently increases mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that activate PMK-1/p38 MAP kinase and SKN-1/NRF-2. Interference with this retrograde redox signal as well as ablation of two redox-sensitive neurons in the head of the worm similarly prevents extension of lifespan. These findings unexpectedly indicate that DR extends organismal lifespan through transient neuronal ROS signaling rather than sensing of energy depletion, providing unexpected pharmacological options to promote exercise capacity and healthspan despite unaltered eating habits.

  3. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by cinnamon through a sex-specific dependence on the insulin receptor substrate chico.

    PubMed

    Schriner, Samuel E; Kuramada, Steven; Lopez, Terry E; Truong, Stephanie; Pham, Andrew; Jafari, Mahtab

    2014-12-01

    Cinnamon is a spice commonly used worldwide to flavor desserts, fruits, cereals, breads, and meats. Numerous health benefits have been attributed to its consumption, including the recent suggestion that it may decrease blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Insulin signaling is an integral pathway regulating the lifespan of laboratory organisms, such as worms, flies, and mice. We posited that if cinnamon truly improved the clinical signs of diabetes in people that it would also act on insulin signaling in laboratory organisms and increase lifespan. We found that cinnamon did extend lifespan in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. However, it had no effect on the expression levels of the 3 aging-related Drosophila insulin-like peptides nor did it alter sugar, fat, or soluble protein levels, as would be predicted. In addition, cinnamon exhibited no protective effects in males against oxidative challenges. However, in females it did confer a protective effect against paraquat, but sensitized them to iron. Cinnamon provided no protective effect against desiccation and starvation in females, but sensitized males to both. Interestingly, cinnamon protected both sexes against cold, sensitized both to heat, and elevated HSP70 expression levels. We also found that cinnamon required the insulin receptor substrate to extend lifespan in males, but not females. We conclude that cinnamon does not extend lifespan by improving stress tolerance in general, though it does act, at least in part, through insulin signaling. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. [The assessment of lamotrigine effectiveness in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Małowidzka-Serwińska, M

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of lamotrigine (LTG, Lamictal) in patients with long-lasting epilepsy. The group of 11 patients, 4F, 7M aged 16-45 years, mean 31.3 years was included in the study. Complex partial seizures and complex partial with sec. generalization ones occurred in 5 patients, only simple and complex partial seizures in 4 and in 2 cases we observed primary generalized nonconvulsive seizures. The mean seizure frequency was 20/month before LTG treatment. The mean duration of epilepsy was 20 years. Monotherapy with carbamazepine was used in 2 patients, 9 took 2 antiepileptic drugs. The time of investigation and treatment was 4 months with 3 control visits. During LTG treatment the number of conventional antiepileptic drugs was reduced in 7 patients. The dose of the basic antiepileptic drug was not changed. We evaluated how LTG had influenced the frequency, severity and duration of seizures, patients' mental state and adverse events appearance. Good result of treatment--seizure frequency reduction at least 50%--was observed in 5 patients (45.5%), moderate--seizure frequency reduction below 50%--in 1 patient (9%), bad result--no change in seizure frequency or its increase--in 5 cases (45.5%). In 5 patients the drug influenced positively seizure severity and duration. Beneficial psychotropic effect of the drug was found in 2 patients with mental disturbances. Adverse effects occurred in 3 patients. They were vertigo and ataxia in 1 patient, drowsiness in 1 case and dyspeptic symptoms in 1 patient. Adverse events were mild and transient in 2 patients. In 1 patient with vertigo and ataxia they resulted in the drug being discontinued after 3 month treatment. On the whole lamotrigine shows a positive influence on the frequency, severity and duration of seizures in some patients with therapy resistant epilepsy. The drug is well tolerated and seems to have positive psychotropic effects.

  5. Formulation Development and evaluation of fast disintegrating tablets of Lamotrigine using liqui-solid technique

    PubMed Central

    Koteswari, Poluri; Sunium, Suvarnala; Srinivasababu, Puttugunta; Babu, Govada Kishore; Nithya, Pinnamraju Durga

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder. Lamotrigine is an alternative to lithium for the treatment of epilepsy, and its oral bioavailability is 98%; however, its poor aqueous solubility hinders its oral absorption. Among the techniques available to enhance the solubility, dissolution rate and bio availability of poorly soluble drugs, liqui-solid technique is a novel and promising approach. The objectives of the investigation are to formulate, optimize lamotrigine liqui-solid compacts using 23 factorial experiments, validate experimental designs statistically and to compare with the marketed tablets using similarity and difference factors. Materials and Methods: Based on solubility studies tween 20 as nonvolatile liquid, avicel pH 101 as a carrier and aerosil 200 as a coating material were used. Liquid load factor other flow and compression characteristics were determined for different ratios of carrier and coat materials. Suitable quantities of carrier and coat materials were taken, according to the experimental designs other excipients were added, liqui-solid tablets were prepared by direct compression and evaluated. Drug excipient compatibility was determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The hardness, disintegration time and T75% were considered for validation of experimental designs. Results: The physicochemical properties of tablets such as hardness (1.5 ± 0.8–4.95 ± 0.96 kg), in vitro disintegration time (40 ± 20–320 ± 25 s) and Friability (0.39 ± 0.5–1.45 ± 0.2% also <1%) possess all the Indian pharmacopoeal requirements. The T75% was calculated and found to be 6.62–22.8 min. The rate of drug release followed first order kinetics. f1 and f2 values indicated the similarity in dissolution profiles between marketed and the optimized formulation and 63.64% similar with that of the marketed fast disintegrating tablets. FTIR studies revealed the absence of drug excipient incompatibility. PMID

  6. Risk of postpartum episodes in women with bipolar disorder after lamotrigine or lithium use during pregnancy: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wesseloo, Richard; Liu, Xiaoqin; Clark, Crystal T; Kushner, Steven A; Munk-Olsen, Trine; Bergink, Veerle

    2017-08-15

    Women with bipolar disorder are at high risk for relapse/recurrence postpartum. Among all mood stabilizers, lithium has the largest evidence base for efficacy in the peripartum period, but lamotrigine is increasingly prescribed for bipolar spectrum disorders during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether lamotrigine use during pregnancy is as effective as lithium in the prevention of severe episodes postpartum. Danish national registries were used to identify pregnancies of women with a diagnosis of bipolar spectrum disorders at the time of conception who used lamotrigine or lithium during pregnancy. We compared the risk of inpatient psychiatric admission within three months postpartum between women who used lamotrigine (N=55) versus lithium (N=59) during pregnancy. A logistic regression model was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios. We did not find a significant difference in the risk of postpartum psychiatric admission between women who used lamotrigine versus lithium during pregnancy (7.3% versus 15.3% respectively, adjusted OR 0.83; 95% CI 0.22-3.14). We adjusted for year of delivery, parity, previous admissions and antidepressant/benzodiazepine use during pregnancy. Other variables did not differ substantially between groups. We used an observational design and therefore patients were not randomized to lamotrigine or lithium. The study has a small sample size. Lamotrigine was not inferior to lithium in the prevention of severe postpartum episodes. Our findings suggest lamotrigine could be a reasonable alternative treatment option for bipolar disorder during pregnancy in patients with vulnerability for depression and may prevent severe episodes postpartum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ontogenetic patterns in the dreams of women across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Dale, Allyson; Lortie-Lussier, Monique; De Koninck, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    The present study supports and extends previous research on the developmental differences in women's dreams across the lifespan. The participants included 75 Canadian women in each of 5 age groups from adolescence to old age including 12-17, 18-24, 25-39, 40-64, and 65-85, totaling 375 women. One dream per participant was scored by two independent judges using the method of content analysis. Trend analysis was used to determine the ontogenetic pattern of the dream content categories. Results demonstrated significant ontogenetic decreases (linear trends) for female and familiar characters, activities, aggression, and friendliness. These patterns of dream imagery reflect the waking developmental patterns as proposed by social theories and recognized features of aging as postulated by the continuity hypothesis. Limitations and suggestions for future research including the examining of developmental patterns in the dreams of males are discussed.

  8. Vitellogenin family gene expression does not increase Drosophila lifespan or fecundity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yingxue; Hughes, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most striking patterns in comparative biology is the negative correlation between lifespan and fecundity observed in comparisons among species. This pattern is consistent with the idea that organisms need to allocate a fixed energy budget among competing demands of growth, development, reproduction and somatic maintenance. However, exceptions to this pattern have been observed in many social insects, including ants, bees, and termites.  In honey bees ( Apis mellifera), Vitellogenin ( Vg), a yolk protein precursor, has been implicated in mediating the long lifespan and high fecundity of queen bees. To determine if Vg-like proteins can regulate lifespan in insects generally, we examined the effects of expression of Apis Vg and Drosophila CG31150 (a Vg-like gene recently identified as cv-d) on Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and fecundity using the RU486-inducible GeneSwitch system. For all genotypes tested, overexpression of Vg and CG31150 decreased Drosophila lifespan and did not affect total or age-specific fecundity. We also detected an apparent effect of the GeneSwitch system itself, wherein RU486 exposure (or the GAL4 expression it induces) led to a significant increase in longevity and decrease in fecundity in our fly strains. This result is consistent with the pattern reported in a recent meta-analysis of Drosophila aging studies, where transgenic constructs of the UAS/GAL4 expression system that should have no effect (e.g. an uninduced GeneSwitch) significantly extended lifespan in some genetic backgrounds. Our results suggest that Vg-family genes are not major regulators of Drosophila life history traits, and highlight the importance of using appropriate controls in aging studies. PMID:25110583

  9. Growth conditions that increase or decrease lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae lead to corresponding decreases or increases in rates of interstitial deletions and non-reciprocal translocations.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Patrick H

    2016-10-21

    Accumulation of DNA damage, mutations, and chromosomal abnormalities is associated with aging in many organisms. How directly various forms of genomic instability contribute to lifespan in different aging contexts is still under active investigation. Testing whether treatments that alter lifespan change mutation rates early during lifespan could provide support for genomic instability being at least partly responsible for changes in the rates of aging. Rates of mutations, direct repeat recombination, or retrotransposition were measured in young cell populations from two strain backgrounds of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to several growth conditions that shortened or extended yeast chronological lifespan. In most cases, rates of genomic instability did not consistently increase in young cells exposed to lifespan-shortening conditions or decrease in young cells exposed to lifespan-extending conditions. The mutation rate for a copy of the CAN1 gene integrated onto the right arm of chromosome VIII did show expected increases or decreases in young cells in the lifespan-altering growth conditions. These mutations were determined to frequently result from non-allelic recombination events, including non-reciprocal translocations, and were more strongly stimulated by using hydroxyurea to induce DNA replication stress than by the general DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate. The results are not consistent with changes in mutation rates in general mediating the influence of alternative growth conditions on yeast lifespan. The strong correlation between non-allelic recombination events and the effects of the alternative growth conditions on lifespan indicates that genomic instability due to changes in recombination rates may directly contribute to the rate of aging or that lifespan-altering treatments may consistently increase or decrease DNA replication stress. These results further support the connection between DNA replication stress and aging observed in multiple

  10. Sex differences and stress across the lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Tracy L; Epperson, C Neill

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in stress responses can be found at all stages of life and are related to both the organizational and activational effects of gonadal hormones and to genes on the sex chromosomes. As stress dysregulation is the most common feature across neuropsychiatric diseases, sex differences in how these pathways develop and mature may predict sex-specific periods of vulnerability to disruption and increased disease risk or resilience across the lifespan. The aging brain is also at risk to the effects of stress, where the rapid decline of gonadal hormones in women combined with cellular aging processes promote sex biases in stress dysregulation. In this Review, we discuss potential underlying mechanisms driving sex differences in stress responses and their relevance to disease. Although stress is involved in a much broader range of diseases than neuropsychiatric ones, we highlight here this area and its examples across the lifespan. PMID:26404716

  11. Coevolution of intelligence, behavioral repertoire, and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Ghirlanda, Stefano; Enquist, Magnus; Lind, Johan

    2014-02-01

    Across many taxa, intriguing positive correlations exist between intelligence (measured by proxy as encephalization), behavioral repertoire size, and lifespan. Here we argue, through a simple theoretical model, that such correlations arise from selection pressures for efficient learning of behavior sequences. We define intelligence operationally as the ability to disregard unrewarding behavior sequences, without trying them out, in the search for rewarding sequences. We show that increasing a species' behavioral repertoire increases the number of rewarding behavior sequences that can be performed, but also the time required to learn such sequences. This trade-off results in an optimal repertoire size that decreases rapidly with increasing sequence length. Behavioral repertoire size can be increased by increasing intelligence or lengthening the lifespan, giving rise to the observed correlations between these traits.

  12. At neutral pH the chronological lifespan of Hansenula polymorpha increases upon enhancing the carbon source concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Kawałek, Adam; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction is generally assumed to increase the lifespan in most eukaryotes, including the simple model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, recent data questioned whether this phenomenon is indeed true for yeast. We studied the effect of reduction of the carbon source concentration on the chronological lifespan of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha using four different carbon sources. Our data indicate that reduction of the carbon source concentration has a negative (glucose, ethanol, methanol) or positive (glycerol) effect on the chronological lifespan. We show that the actual effect of carbon source concentrations largely depends on extracellular factor(s). We provide evidence that H. polymorpha acidifies the medium and that a low pH of the medium alone is sufficient to significantly decrease the chronological lifespan. However, glucose-grown cells are less sensitive to low pH compared to glycerol-grown cells, explaining why only the reduction of the glycerol-concentration (which leads to less medium acidification) has a positive effect on the chronological lifespan. Instead, the positive effect of enhancing the glucose concentrations is much larger than the negative effect of the medium acidification at these conditions, explaining the increased lifespan with increasing glucose concentrations. Importantly, at neutral pH, the chronological lifespan also decreases with a reduction in glycerol concentrations. We show that for glycerol cultures this effect is related to acidification independent changes in the composition of the spent medium. Altogether, our data indicate that in H. polymorpha at neutral pH the chronological lifespan invariably extends upon increasing the carbon source concentration. PMID:28357243

  13. At neutral pH the chronological lifespan of Hansenula polymorpha increases upon enhancing the carbon source concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kawałek, Adam; van der Klei, Ida J

    2014-05-20

    Dietary restriction is generally assumed to increase the lifespan in most eukaryotes, including the simple model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, recent data questioned whether this phenomenon is indeed true for yeast. We studied the effect of reduction of the carbon source concentration on the chronological lifespan of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha using four different carbon sources. Our data indicate that reduction of the carbon source concentration has a negative (glucose, ethanol, methanol) or positive (glycerol) effect on the chronological lifespan. We show that the actual effect of carbon source concentrations largely depends on extracellular factor(s). We provide evidence that H. polymorpha acidifies the medium and that a low pH of the medium alone is sufficient to significantly decrease the chronological lifespan. However, glucose-grown cells are less sensitive to low pH compared to glycerol-grown cells, explaining why only the reduction of the glycerol-concentration (which leads to less medium acidification) has a positive effect on the chronological lifespan. Instead, the positive effect of enhancing the glucose concentrations is much larger than the negative effect of the medium acidification at these conditions, explaining the increased lifespan with increasing glucose concentrations. Importantly, at neutral pH, the chronological lifespan also decreases with a reduction in glycerol concentrations. We show that for glycerol cultures this effect is related to acidification independent changes in the composition of the spent medium. Altogether, our data indicate that in H. polymorpha at neutral pH the chronological lifespan invariably extends upon increasing the carbon source concentration.

  14. Characterization of global gene expression during assurance of lifespan extension by caloric restriction in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Mi; Kwon, Young-Yon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2013-12-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is the best-studied intervention known to delay aging and extend lifespan in evolutionarily distant organisms ranging from yeast to mammals in the laboratory. Although the effect of CR on lifespan extension has been investigated for nearly 80years, the molecular mechanisms of CR are still elusive. Consequently, it is important to understand the fundamental mechanisms of when and how lifespan is affected by CR. In this study, we first identified the time-windows during which CR assured cellular longevity by switching cells from culture media containing 2% or 0.5% glucose to water, which allows us to observe CR and non-calorically-restricted cells under the same conditions. We also constructed time-dependent gene expression profiles and selected 646 genes that showed significant changes and correlations with the lifespan-extending effect of CR. The positively correlated genes participated in transcriptional regulation, ribosomal RNA processing and nuclear genome stability, while the negatively correlated genes were involved in the regulation of several metabolic pathways, endoplasmic reticulum function, stress response and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, we discovered major upstream regulators of those significantly changed genes, including AZF1 (YOR113W), HSF1 (YGL073W) and XBP1 (YIL101C). Deletions of two genes, AZF1 and XBP1 (HSF1 is essential and was thus not tested), were confirmed to lessen the lifespan extension mediated by CR. The absence of these genes in the tor1Δ and ras2Δ backgrounds did show non-overlapping effects with regard to CLS, suggesting differences between the CR mechanism for Tor and Ras signaling. © 2013.

  15. Chemometric evaluation of the column classification system during the pharmaceutical analysis of lamotrigine and its related substances.

    PubMed

    Szulfer, Jarosław; Plenis, Alina; Bączek, Tomasz

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the performance of a column classification system developed at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven applied to pharmaceutical chromatographic analyses. The liquid chromatography assay of lamotrigine and related compounds was carried out according to the method prescribed in the European Pharmacopoeia monograph, using 28 brands of stationary phases. A ranking was built based on the F KUL value calculated against the selected reference column, then compared with the column test performance established for the stationary phases studied. Therefore, the system suitability test prescribed by the European Pharmacopoeia in order to distinguish between suitable or unsuitable columns for this analysis was evaluated. Moreover, it was examined whether the classes of the stationary phases, determined using test parameter results, contain either suitable or unsuitable supports for the lamotrigine separation. This assay was performed using chemometric a technique, namely factor analysis.

  16. miR-124/ATF-6, a novel lifespan extension pathway of Astragalus polysaccharide in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Jing; Xie, Fang; Gao, Xu; Ye, Jian-Han; Sun, Lu-Yao; Wei, Ran; Ai, Jing

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), especially evolutionarily conserved miRNAs play critical roles in regulating various biological process. However, the functions of conserved miRNAs in longevity are still largely unknown. Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) was recently shown to extend lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans, but its molecular mechanisms have not been fully understood. In the present study, we characterize that microRNA mediated a novel longevity pathway of APS in C. elegans. We found that APS markedly extended the lifespan of C. elegans at the second and the fourth stages. A highly conserved miRNA miR-124 was significantly upregulated in APS-treated C. elegans. Overexpression miR-124 caused the lifespan extension of C. elegans and vice versa, indicating miR-124 regulates the longevity of C. elegans. Using luciferase assay, atf-6 was established as a target gene of miR-124 which acting on three binding sites at atf-6 3'UTR. Consistently, agomir-cel-miR-124 was also shown to inhibit ATF-6 expression in C. elegans. APS-treated C. elegans showed the down-regulation of atf-6 at protein level. Furthermore, the knockdown of atf-6 by RNAi extended the lifespan of C. elegans, indicating atf-6 regulated by miR-124 contributes to lifespan extension. Taken together, miR-124 regulating ATF-6 is a new potential longevity signal pathway, which underlies the lifespan-extending effects of APS in C. elegans. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of the anticonvulsant lacosamide compared to valproate and lamotrigine on cocaine-enhanced reward in rats.

    PubMed

    Béguin, Cécile; Potter, David N; Carlezon, William A; Stöhr, Thomas; Cohen, Bruce M

    2012-10-15

    Some drugs developed as anticonvulsants (notably, valproate and lamotrigine) have therapeutic effects in bipolar and related disorders. Lacosamide, a recently approved anticonvulsant, has unique effects on sodium channels that may play a role in producing the mood-stabilizing effects of anticonvulsant drugs. We tested whether lacosamide would have effects similar to or different from valproate and lamotrigine in a model of reward and elevated mood. The intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) test is sensitive to the function of brain reward systems. Changes in ICSS may model aspects of disorders characterized by abnormalities of reward and motivation. Cocaine elevates mood, and reduction of cocaine-induced facilitation of ICSS has been used to predict antimanic-like or mood stabilizing effects of drugs. We tested lacosamide, lamotrigine, and valproate in the rat ICSS test alone or in the presence of cocaine. A high dose of lacosamide (30 mg/kg) significantly elevated ICSS thresholds, indicating that it reduced the rewarding impact of medial forebrain bundle stimulation. Lower doses (3-10 mg/kg) did not alter ICSS, but blocked the cocaine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds. The highest doses of valproate (300 mg/kg) and lamotrigine (30 mg/kg) also elevated ICSS thresholds, and only these high doses significantly lowered cocaine-induced effects. Of the drugs tested, only lacosamide significantly attenuated the reward-facilitating effects of cocaine at doses that had no effects on ICSS response in the absence of cocaine. Abnormalities of mood and reward are common in psychiatric disorders, and these results suggest that lacosamide deserves further study in models of these disorders.

  18. The antiepileptic drug lamotrigine is a substrate of mouse and human breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Römermann, Kerstin; Helmer, Renate; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the major problem in the treatment of epilepsy. One hypothesis to explain AED resistance suggests that seizure-induced overexpression of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts AEDs to reach their brain targets. Various studies examined whether AEDs are substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp; MDR1; ABCB1), whereas information about the potential role of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) is scanty. We used a highly sensitive in vitro assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) with MDCKII cells transduced with murine Bcrp1 or human BCRP to evaluate whether AEDs are substrates of this major efflux transporter. Six of 7 AEDs examined, namely phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, levetiracetam, topiramate, and valproate, were not transported by Bcrp at therapeutic concentrations, whereas lamotrigine exhibited a marked asymmetric, Bcrp-mediated transport in the CETA, which could be almost completely inhibited with the Bcrp inhibitor Ko143. Significant but less marked transport of lamotrigine was determined in MDCK cells transfected with human BCRP. Lamotrigine is also a substrate of human Pgp, so that this drug is the first AED that has been identified as a dual substrate of the two major human efflux transporters at the BBB. Previous in vivo studies have demonstrated a synergistic or cooperative role of Pgp and Bcrp in the efflux of dual substrates at the BBB, so that transport of lamotrigine by Pgp and BCRP may be an important mechanism of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy patients in whom both transporters are overexpressed.

  19. A Mitochondrial ATP synthase Subunit Interacts with TOR Signaling to Modulate Protein Homeostasis and Lifespan in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoping; Wheeler, Charles T.; Yolitz, Jason; Laslo, Mara; Alberico, Thomas; Sun, Yaning; Song, Qisheng; Zou, Sige

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Diet composition is a critical determinant of lifespan and nutrient imbalance is detrimental health. However, how nutrients interact with genetic factors to modulate lifespan remains elusive. We investigated how diet composition influences mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit d (ATPsyn-d) in modulating lifespan in Drosophila. ATPsyn-d knockdown extended lifespan in females fed low carbohydrate-to-protein (C:P) diets, but not the high C:P ratio diet. This extension was associated with increased resistance to oxidative stress, transcriptional changes in metabolism, proteostasis and immune genes, reduced protein damage and aggregation, and reduced phosphorylation of S6K and ERK in TOR and MAPK signaling, respectively. ATPsyn-d knockdown did not extend lifespan in females with reduced TOR signaling induced genetically by Tsc2 overexpression or pharmacologically by rapamycin. Our data reveal a link among diet, mitochondria, MAPK and TOR signaling in aging and stresses the importance of considering genetic background and diet composition in implementing interventions for promoting healthy aging. PMID:25220459

  20. Chemical genetic screen in fission yeast reveals roles for vacuolar acidification, mitochondrial fission, and cellular GMP levels in lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Jessica; Franke, Jacqueline; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E

    2013-08-01

    The discovery that genetic mutations in several cellular pathways can increase lifespan has lent support to the notion that pharmacological inhibition of aging pathways can be used to extend lifespan and to slow the onset of age-related diseases. However, so far, only few compounds with such activities have been described. Here, we have conducted a chemical genetic screen for compounds that cause the extension of chronological lifespan of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We have characterized eight natural products with such activities, which has allowed us to uncover so far unknown anti-aging pathways in S. pombe. The ionophores monensin and nigericin extended lifespan by affecting vacuolar acidification, and this effect depended on the presence of the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) subunits Vma1 and Vma3. Furthermore, prostaglandin J₂ displayed anti-aging properties due to the inhibition of mitochondrial fission, and its effect on longevity required the mitochondrial fission protein Dnm1 as well as the G-protein-coupled glucose receptor Git3. Also, two compounds that inhibit guanosine monophosphate (GMP) synthesis, mycophenolic acid (MPA) and acivicin, caused lifespan extension, indicating that an imbalance in guanine nucleotide levels impinges upon longevity. We furthermore have identified diindolylmethane (DIM), tschimganine, and the compound mixture mangosteen as inhibiting aging. Taken together, these results reveal unanticipated anti-aging activities for several phytochemicals and open up opportunities for the development of novel anti-aging therapies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and the Anatomical Society.

  1. Stress resistance and lifespan are increased in C. elegans but decreased in S. cerevisiae by mafr-1/maf1 deletion

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ying; Wei, Yue-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Maf1 is a conserved effector of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), an aging promoting kinase. However, whether Maf1 is required for lifespan extension caused by mTOR inhibition, such as dietary restriction (DR) or calorie restriction (CR) remains elusive. Here we show that deletion of maf1 in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae but not mafr-1 in C. elegans prevents DR or CR to extend lifespan. Interestingly, mafr-1 deletion increases stress tolerance and extends lifespan. MAFR-1 is phosphorylated in a mTOR-dependent manner and mafr-1 deletion alleviates the inhibition of tRNA synthesis caused by reduced mTOR activity. We find that the opposite effect of mafr-1 deletion on lifespan is due to an enhancement of stress response, including oxidative stress response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and autophagy. mafr-1 deletion also attenuates the paralysis of a C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease. Our study reveals distinct mechanisms of lifespan regulation by Maf1 and MAFR-1. PMID:26934328

  2. Stress resistance and lifespan are increased in C. elegans but decreased in S. cerevisiae by mafr-1/maf1 deletion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ying; Wei, Yue-Hua

    2016-03-08

    Maf1 is a conserved effector of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), an aging promoting kinase. However, whether Maf1 is required for lifespan extension caused by mTOR inhibition, such as dietary restriction (DR) or calorie restriction (CR) remains elusive. Here we show that deletion of maf1 in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae but not mafr-1 in C. elegans prevents DR or CR to extend lifespan. Interestingly, mafr-1 deletion increases stress tolerance and extends lifespan. MAFR-1 is phosphorylated in a mTOR-dependent manner and mafr-1 deletion alleviates the inhibition of tRNA synthesis caused by reduced mTOR activity. We find that the opposite effect of mafr-1 deletion on lifespan is due to an enhancement of stress response, including oxidative stress response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and autophagy. mafr-1 deletion also attenuates the paralysis of a C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease. Our study reveals distinct mechanisms of lifespan regulation by Maf1 and MAFR-1.

  3. Fate of carbamazepine, its metabolites, and lamotrigine in soils irrigated with reclaimed wastewater: Sorption, leaching and plant uptake.

    PubMed

    Paz, Anat; Tadmor, Galit; Malchi, Tomer; Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas; Polubesova, Tamara; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-10-01

    Irrigation with reclaimed wastewater may result in the ubiquitous presence of pharmaceutical compounds (PCs) and their metabolites in the agroecosystem. In this study, we focused on two highly persistent anticonvulsant drugs, lamotrigine and carbamazepine and two of its metabolites (EP-CBZ and DiOH-CBZ), aiming to elucidate their behavior in agricultural ecosystem using batch and lysimeter experiments. Sorption of the studied compounds by soils was found to be governed mainly by the soil organic matter level. Sorption affinity of compounds to soils followed the order lamotrigine > carbamazepine > EP-CBZ > DiOH-CBZ. Sorption was reversible, and no competition between sorbates in bi-solute systems was observed. The results of the lysimeter studies were in accordance with batch experiment findings, demonstrating accumulation of lamotrigine and carbamazepine in top soil layers enriched with organic matter. Detection of carbamazepine and one of its metabolites in rain-fed wheat previously irrigated with reclaimed wastewater, indicates reversibility of their sorption, resulting in their potential leaching and their availability for plant uptake. This study demonstrates the long-term implication of introduction of PCs to the agroecosystem.

  4. The anti-convulsants lacosamide, lamotrigine, and rufinamide reduce myotonia in isolated human and rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Skov, Martin; de Paoli, Frank V; Nielsen, Ole B; Pedersen, Thomas H

    2017-07-01

    In myotonia congenita, loss of ClC-1 Cl(-) channel function results in skeletal muscle hyperexcitability and myotonia. Anti-myotonic treatment has typically targeted the voltage-gated sodium channel in skeletal muscle (Nav1.4). In this study we explored whether 3 sodium channel-modulating anti-epileptics can reduce myotonia in isolated rat and human muscle. Dissected muscles were rendered myotonic by ClC-1 channel inhibition. The ability of the drugs to suppress myotonia was then assessed from subclinical to maximal clinical concentrations. Drug synergy was determined using isobole plots. All drugs were capable of abolishing myotonia in both rat and human muscles. Lamotrigine and rufinamide completely suppressed myotonia at submaximal clinical concentrations, whereas lacosamide had to be raised above the maximal clinical concentration to suppress myotonia completely. A synergistic effect of lamotrigine and rufinamide was observed. These findings suggest that lamotrigine and rufinamide could be considered for anti-myotonic treatment in myotonia congenita. Muscle Nerve 56: 136-142, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Development and validation of a GC/MS method for the simultaneous determination of levetiracetam and lamotrigine in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Panagiota; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Dona, Artemisia; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Athanaselis, Sotiris

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and accurate gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of levetiracetam and lamotrigine in whole blood. A solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure using HF Bond Elut C18 columns followed by derivatization using N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) with 1% tert-butyldimethylsilyl chloride (TBDMSCl) was used. In this assay, levetiracetam-d6 was used as internal standard. Limits of detection and quantification were 0.15 and 0.50 μg/mL, respectively, for both analytes. The method was proved to be linear within the concentration range of 0.50-50.0 μg/mL (R(2) ≥ 0.992) for both analytes. Absolute recovery was found to be at least 90.0 and 97.2% for levetiracetam and lamotrigine, respectively. Intra-day and inter-day accuracy values for both analytes were ranged from -6.5 to 4.2 and -6.6 to 3.0%, respectively, whereas their respective precision values were less than 11.4 and 8.3%. The developed method was successfully used in our laboratory for quantification of levetiracetam and lamotrigine blood concentrations during the investigation of forensic cases where these antiepileptic drugs were involved. This method could also be used for therapeutic drug monitoring purposes.

  6. A randomized study of the effect of oral lamotrigine and hydromorphone on pain and hyperalgesia following heat/capsaicin sensitization.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin L; Maloney, Alan; Hoke, Frank; Dahl, Jørgen B; Rowbotham, Michael C

    2003-09-01

    In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study, the analgesic effect of oral lamotrigine (400 mg) on cutaneous sensitization induced with the heat/capsaicin sensitization model was compared with the effect of oral hydromorphone (8 mg) in healthy volunteers. In a separate session, intravenous remifentanil (0.10 microg.kg(-1).min(-1)) and placebo were administered. This session was used as an additional reference comparator. Outcome measures were the areas of secondary hyperalgesia to brush and von Frey hair stimulation and the painfulness of noxious thermal stimulation in nonsensitized skin. Compared with placebo, both intravenous remifentanil and oral hydromorphone significantly suppressed secondary hyperalgesia and acute thermal nociception. Oral lamotrigine did not reduce secondary hyperalgesia or acute thermal nociception but produced side effects of severity comparable with that of oral hydromorphone. Although lamotrigine is efficacious in the management of some types of chronic neuropathic pain, the lack of effect of this agent on human experimental pain suggests that its analgesic effects depend on nerve injury-associated abnormalities, which cannot be simulated in healthy human volunteers.

  7. Epigallocatechin gallate affects glucose metabolism and increases fitness and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Anika E.; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Rabe, Doerte; Baenas, Nieves; Schloesser, Anke; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Stocker, Achim; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we tested whether a standardized epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) rich green tea extract (comprising > 90% EGCG) affects fitness and lifespan as well as parameters of glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Following the application of the green tea extract a significant increase in the mean lifespan (+ 3.3 days) and the 50% survival (+ 4.3 days) as well as improved fitness was detected. These effects went along an increased expression of Spargel, the homolog of mammalian PGC1α, which has been reported to affect lifespan in flies. Intriguingly, in flies, treatment with the green tea extract decreased glucose concentrations, which were accompanied by an inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity. Computational docking analysis proved the potential of EGCG to dock into the substrate binding pocket of α-amylase and to a greater extent into α-glucosidase. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EGCG downregulates insulin-like peptide 5 and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, major regulators of glucose metabolism, as well as the Drosophila homolog of leptin, unpaired 2. We propose that a decrease in glucose metabolism in connection with an upregulated expression of Spargel contribute to the better fitness and the extended lifespan in EGCG-treated flies. PMID:26375250

  8. Epigallocatechin gallate affects glucose metabolism and increases fitness and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anika E; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Rabe, Doerte; Baenas, Nieves; Schloesser, Anke; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Stocker, Achim; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-10-13

    In this study, we tested whether a standardized epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) rich green tea extract (comprising > 90% EGCG) affects fitness and lifespan as well as parameters of glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Following the application of the green tea extract a significant increase in the mean lifespan (+ 3.3 days) and the 50% survival (+ 4.3 days) as well as improved fitness was detected. These effects went along an increased expression of Spargel, the homolog of mammalian PGC1α, which has been reported to affect lifespan in flies. Intriguingly, in flies, treatment with the green tea extract decreased glucose concentrations, which were accompanied by an inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity. Computational docking analysis proved the potential of EGCG to dock into the substrate binding pocket of α-amylase and to a greater extent into α-glucosidase. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EGCG downregulates insulin-like peptide 5 and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, major regulators of glucose metabolism, as well as the Drosophila homolog of leptin, unpaired 2. We propose that a decrease in glucose metabolism in connection with an upregulated expression of Spargel contribute to the better fitness and the extended lifespan in EGCG-treated flies.

  9. Lifespan Extension Conferred by Endoplasmic Reticulum Secretory Pathway Deficiency Requires Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Delaney, Joe R.; Kaya, Alaattin; Kennedy, Brian K.; Kaeberlein, Matt; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway. The UPR restores ER homeostasis by degrading misfolded proteins, inhibiting translation, and increasing expression of chaperones that enhance ER protein folding capacity. Although ER stress and protein aggregation have been implicated in aging, the role of UPR signaling in regulating lifespan remains unknown. Here we show that deletion of several UPR target genes significantly increases replicative lifespan in yeast. This extended lifespan depends on a functional ER stress sensor protein, Ire1p, and is associated with constitutive activation of upstream UPR signaling. We applied ribosome profiling coupled with next generation sequencing to quantitatively examine translational changes associated with increased UPR activity and identified a set of stress response factors up-regulated in the long-lived mutants. Besides known UPR targets, we uncovered up-regulation of components of the cell wall and genes involved in cell wall biogenesis that confer resistance to multiple stresses. These findings demonstrate that the UPR is an important determinant of lifespan that governs ER stress and identify a signaling network that couples stress resistance to longevity. PMID:24391512

  10. The neuroprotective and lifespan-extension activities of Damnacanthus officinarum extracts in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiliang; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Jizhou; Xiong, Siqin; Jin, Nanxiang; Huang, Zebo

    2012-05-07

    This study was aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective and anti-aging activity of extracts in Caenorhabditis elegans from the roots and leaves of Damnacanthus officinarum Huang to provide the pharmacological basis in traditional medicine. Investigations on the neuroprotective and lifespan activity were carried out, which were observed by utilizing the following models: observing the worms' chemosensory behavior test based on the aversion index in the assay plate, neuroprotective activity of nematode by evaluating the ASH neuron survival and lifespan test in C. elegans. It has been shown that the ethanol, n-butanol and aqueous extracts in the roots possessed significantly neuroprotective effect both in chemosensory behavior test and ASH neuron survival model. The same extracts in the leaves showed similar activities in two models, but have less potency revealing by the data. Four candidate extracts, possessing excellent neuroprotective activity, extend lifespan in C. elegans. The n-butanol extracts in the root part showed best efficacy among them. The results show the n-butanol and aqueous extracts are the major pharmacological plant extracts. Moreover, the neuroprotective and lifespan-extension activity effects of root extracts are superior to leave extracts, supporting the traditional application of above-ground parts of DOH in treating various diseases associated with brain disorders and anti-aging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Growth hormone signaling is necessary for lifespan extension by dietary methionine.

    PubMed

    Brown-Borg, Holly M; Rakoczy, Sharlene G; Wonderlich, Joseph A; Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Kopchick, John J; Armstrong, Vanessa; Raasakka, Debbie

    2014-12-01

    Growth hormone significantly impacts lifespan in mammals. Mouse longevity is extended when growth hormone (GH) signaling is interrupted but markedly shortened with high-plasma hormone levels. Methionine metabolism is enhanced in growth hormone deficiency, for example, in the Ames dwarf, but suppressed in GH transgenic mice. Methionine intake affects also lifespan, and thus, GH mutant mice and respective wild-type littermates were fed 0.16%, 0.43%, or 1.3% methionine to evaluate the interaction between hormone status and methionine. All wild-type and GH transgenic mice lived longer when fed 0.16% methionine but not when fed higher levels. In contrast, animals without growth hormone signaling due to hormone deficiency or resistance did not respond to altered levels of methionine in terms of lifespan, body weight, or food consumption. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of growth hormone is necessary to sense dietary methionine changes, thus strongly linking growth and lifespan to amino acid availability.

  12. A Life-Span, Relational, Public Health Model of Self-Regulation: Impact on Individual and Community Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maniar, Swapnil; Zaff, Jonathan F.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors extend the ideas around the development of self-regulation and its impact on development by proposing a life-span, relational, public health model. They propose that the role of self-regulation should be understood across transitions from childhood to adulthood and through an individual and community perspective,…

  13. Development and validation of a rapid column-switching high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of Lamotrigine in human serum.

    PubMed

    Brunetto, María del Rosario; Contreras, Yaritza; Delgado, Yelitza; Gallignani, Máximo; Estela, José Manuel; Martin, Víctor Cerdà

    2009-07-01

    This study describes a simple and sensitive column-switching high-performance liquid chromatographic method with UV detection for the determination of Lamotrigine in 50 microL of serum. After solid-phase extraction of Lamotrigine on an Oasis HLB extraction precolumn (20 x 3.9 mm; dp: 25 microm), chromatographic separation was achieved at 30 degrees C on a Chromolith RP-18e column (50 mm x 4.6 mm i.d.) using a solution of 20% acetonitrile in 15 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) as the mobile phase, at a flow-rate of 2.0 mL/min. The eluant was detected at 215 nm. The retention time for Lamotrigine was 1.28 min. The total analysis time was ca. 5 min. However, the overlap of sample preparation, analysis, and reconditioning of the precolumn increased the overall sample throughput to one injection every 3 min. The method was validated for system suitability, linearity, precision, accuracy, robustness, and limit of quantitation. The linearity of the calibration lines, expressed by the linear correlation coefficient, was better than 0.9996. Recovery studies achieved from Lamotrigine spiked plasma samples showed values greater than 93%, demonstrating the excellent extraction efficiency of the precolumn. Intra- and inter-day precision were generally acceptable; the coefficient of variation was < 2.3% in all cases. The detection limits for Lamotrigine at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was 0.002 microg/mL when a sample volume of 50 microL was injected. However, it was possible to enhance the sensitivity further by injecting larger volumes, up to 200 microL. The method was shown to be robust and the results were within the acceptable range. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Lamotrigine in human serum samples of patients submitted to Lamotrigine therapy.

  14. Neurodevelopmental origins of lifespan changes in brain and cognition.

    PubMed

    Walhovd, Kristine B; Krogsrud, Stine K; Amlien, Inge K; Bartsch, Hauke; Bjørnerud, Atle; Due-Tønnessen, Paulina; Grydeland, Håkon; Hagler, Donald J; Håberg, Asta K; Kremen, William S; Ferschmann, Lia; Nyberg, Lars; Panizzon, Matthew S; Rohani, Darius A; Skranes, Jon; Storsve, Andreas B; Sølsnes, Anne Elisabeth; Tamnes, Christian K; Thompson, Wesley K; Reuter, Chase; Dale, Anders M; Fjell, Anders M

    2016-08-16

    Neurodevelopmental origins of functional variation in older age are increasingly being acknowledged, but identification of how early factors impact human brain and cognition throughout life has remained challenging. Much focus has been on age-specific mechanisms affecting neural foundations of cognition and their change. In contrast to this approach, we tested whether cerebral correlates of general cognitive ability (GCA) in development could be extended to the rest of the lifespan, and whether early factors traceable to prenatal stages, such as birth weight and parental education, may exert continuous influences. We measured the area of the cerebral cortex in a longitudinal sample of 974 individuals aged 4-88 y (1,633 observations). An extensive cortical region was identified wherein area related positively to GCA in development. By tracking area of the cortical region identified in the child sample throughout the lifespan, we showed that the cortical change trajectories of higher and lower GCA groups were parallel through life, suggesting continued influences of early life factors. Birth weight and parental education obtained from the Norwegian Mother-Child Cohort study were identified as such early factors of possible life-long influence. Support for a genetic component was obtained in a separate twin sample (Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging), but birth weight in the child sample had an effect on cortical area also when controlling for possible genetic differences in terms of parental height. Our results provide novel evidence for stability in brain-cognition relationships throughout life, and indicate that early life factors impact brain and cognition for the entire life course.

  15. Neurodevelopmental origins of lifespan changes in brain and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Walhovd, Kristine B.; Krogsrud, Stine K.; Bartsch, Hauke; Bjørnerud, Atle; Due-Tønnessen, Paulina; Grydeland, Håkon; Hagler, Donald J.; Håberg, Asta K.; Kremen, William S.; Ferschmann, Lia; Nyberg, Lars; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Rohani, Darius A.; Skranes, Jon; Storsve, Andreas B.; Sølsnes, Anne Elisabeth; Tamnes, Christian K.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Reuter, Chase; Dale, Anders M.; Fjell, Anders M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental origins of functional variation in older age are increasingly being acknowledged, but identification of how early factors impact human brain and cognition throughout life has remained challenging. Much focus has been on age-specific mechanisms affecting neural foundations of cognition and their change. In contrast to this approach, we tested whether cerebral correlates of general cognitive ability (GCA) in development could be extended to the rest of the lifespan, and whether early factors traceable to prenatal stages, such as birth weight and parental education, may exert continuous influences. We measured the area of the cerebral cortex in a longitudinal sample of 974 individuals aged 4–88 y (1,633 observations). An extensive cortical region was identified wherein area related positively to GCA in development. By tracking area of the cortical region identified in the child sample throughout the lifespan, we showed that the cortical change trajectories of higher and lower GCA groups were parallel through life, suggesting continued influences of early life factors. Birth weight and parental education obtained from the Norwegian Mother–Child Cohort study were identified as such early factors of possible life-long influence. Support for a genetic component was obtained in a separate twin sample (Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging), but birth weight in the child sample had an effect on cortical area also when controlling for possible genetic differences in terms of parental height. Our results provide novel evidence for stability in brain–cognition relationships throughout life, and indicate that early life factors impact brain and cognition for the entire life course. PMID:27432992

  16. Variable Pathogenicity Determines Individual Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Blanco, Adolfo; Kim, Stuart K.

    2011-01-01

    A common property of aging in all animals is that chronologically and genetically identical individuals age at different rates. To unveil mechanisms that influence aging variability, we identified markers of remaining lifespan for Caenorhabditis elegans. In transgenic lines, we expressed fluorescent reporter constructs from promoters of C. elegans genes whose expression change with age. The expression levels of aging markers in individual worms from a young synchronous population correlated with their remaining lifespan. We identified eight aging markers, with the superoxide dismutase gene sod-3 expression being the best single predictor of remaining lifespan. Correlation with remaining lifespan became stronger if expression from two aging markers was monitored simultaneously, accounting for up to 49% of the variation in individual lifespan. Visualizing the physiological age of chronologically-identical individuals allowed us to show that a major source of lifespan variability is different pathogenicity from individual to individual and that the mechanism involves variable activation of the insulin-signaling pathway. PMID:21533182

  17. Sleep, aging, and lifespan in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Daniel; Hughes, Kimberly A; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2010-04-29

    Epidemiological studies in humans suggest that a decrease in daily sleep duration is associated with reduced lifespan, but this issue remains controversial. Other studies in humans also show that both sleep quantity and sleep quality decrease with age. Drosophila melanogaster is a useful model to study aging and sleep, and inheriting mutations affecting the potassium current Shaker results in flies that sleep less and have a shorter lifespan. However, whether the link between short sleep and reduced longevity exists also in wild-type flies is unknown. Similarly, it is unknown whether such a link depends on sleep amount per se, rather than on other factors such as waking activity. Also, sleep quality has been shown to decrease in old flies, but it remains unclear whether aging-related sleep fragmentation is a generalized phenomenon. We compared 3 short sleeping mutant lines (Hk1, HkY and Hk2) carrying a mutation in Hyperkinetic, which codes for the beta subunit of the Shaker channel, to wild-type siblings throughout their entire lifespan (all flies kept at 20 degrees C). Hk1 and HkY mutants were short sleeping relative to wild-type controls from day 3 after eclosure, and Hk2 flies became short sleepers about two weeks later. All 3 Hk mutant lines had reduced lifespan relative to wild-type flies. Total sleep time showed a trend to increase in all lines with age, but the effect was most pronounced in Hk1 and HkY flies. In both mutant and wild-type lines sleep quality did not decay with age, but the strong preference for sleep at night declined starting in "middle age". Using Cox regression analysis we found that in Hk1 and HkY mutants and their control lines there was a negative relationship between total sleep amount during the first 2 and 4 weeks of age and hazard (individual risk of death), while no association was found in Hk2 flies and their wild-type controls. Hk1 and HkY mutants and their control lines also showed an association between total daily wake

  18. Sleep, aging, and lifespan in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies in humans suggest that a decrease in daily sleep duration is associated with reduced lifespan, but this issue remains controversial. Other studies in humans also show that both sleep quantity and sleep quality decrease with age. Drosophila melanogaster is a useful model to study aging and sleep, and inheriting mutations affecting the potassium current Shaker results in flies that sleep less and have a shorter lifespan. However, whether the link between short sleep and reduced longevity exists also in wild-type flies is unknown. Similarly, it is unknown whether such a link depends on sleep amount per se, rather than on other factors such as waking activity. Also, sleep quality has been shown to decrease in old flies, but it remains unclear whether aging-related sleep fragmentation is a generalized phenomenon. Results We compared 3 short sleeping mutant lines (Hk1, HkY and Hk2) carrying a mutation in Hyperkinetic, which codes for the beta subunit of the Shaker channel, to wild-type siblings throughout their entire lifespan (all flies kept at 20°C). Hk1 and HkY mutants were short sleeping relative to wild-type controls from day 3 after eclosure, and Hk2 flies became short sleepers about two weeks later. All 3 Hk mutant lines had reduced lifespan relative to wild-type flies. Total sleep time showed a trend to increase in all lines with age, but the effect was most pronounced in Hk1 and HkY flies. In both mutant and wild-type lines sleep quality did not decay with age, but the strong preference for sleep at night declined starting in "middle age". Using Cox regression analysis we found that in Hk1 and HkY mutants and their control lines there was a negative relationship between total sleep amount during the first 2 and 4 weeks of age and hazard (individual risk of death), while no association was found in Hk2 flies and their wild-type controls. Hk1 and HkY mutants and their control lines also showed an association between total daily

  19. Sir2 blocks extreme life-span extension.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Paola; Gattazzo, Cristina; Battistella, Luisa; Wei, Min; Cheng, Chao; McGrew, Kristen; Longo, Valter D

    2005-11-18

    Sir2 is a conserved deacetylase that modulates life span in yeast, worms, and flies and stress response in mammals. In yeast, Sir2 is required for maintaining replicative life span, and increasing Sir2 dosage can delay replicative aging. We address the role of Sir2 in regulating chronological life span in yeast. Lack of Sir2 along with calorie restriction and/or mutations in the yeast AKT homolog, Sch9, or Ras pathways causes a dramatic chronological life-span extension. Inactivation of Sir2 causes uptake and catabolism of ethanol and upregulation of many stress-resistance and sporulation genes. These changes while sufficient to extend chronological life span in wild-type yeast require severe calorie restriction or additional mutations to extend life span of sir2Delta mutants. Our results demonstrate that effects of SIR2 on chronological life span are opposite to replicatve life span and suggest that the relevant activities of Sir2-like deacetylases may also be complex in higher eukaryotes.

  20. Absence of effects of Sir2 over-expression on lifespan in C. elegans and Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Camilla; Valentini, Sara; Cabreiro, Filipe; Goss, Martin; Somogyvári, Milán; Piper, Matthew D.; Hoddinott, Matthew; Sutphin, George L.; Leko, Vid; McElwee, Joshua J.; Vazquez, Rafael; Orfila, Anne-Marie; Ackerman, Daniel; Au, Catherine; Vinti, Giovanna; Riesen, Michèle; Howard, Ken; Neri, Christian; Bedalov, Antonio; Kaeberlein, Matt; Söti, Csaba; Partridge, Linda; Gems, David

    2011-01-01

    Over-expression of sirtuins (NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases) has been reported to increase lifespan in budding yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster1-3. Studies of gene effects on ageing are vulnerable to confounding effects of genetic background4. We re-examined the reported effects of sirtuin over-expression on ageing and found that standardisation of genetic background and use of appropriate controls abolished the apparent effects in both C. elegans and Drosophila. In C. elegans, outcrossing of a line with high level sir-2.1 over-expression1 abrogated the longevity increase, but not sir-2.1 over-expression. Instead, longevity co-segregated with a second-site mutation affecting sensory neurons. Outcrossing of a line with low copy number sir-2.1 over-expression2 also abrogated longevity. A Drosophila strain with ubiquitous over-expression of dSir2 using the UAS-GAL4 system was long-lived relative to wild-type controls, as previously reported3, but not relative to the appropriate transgenic controls, and nor was a new line with stronger over-expression of dSir2. These findings underscore the importance of controlling for genetic background and the mutagenic effects of transgene insertions in studies of genetic effects on lifespan. The life extending effect of dietary restriction (DR) on ageing in Drosophila has also been reported to be dSir2 dependent3. We found that DR increased fly lifespan independently of dSir2. Our findings do not rule out a role for sirtuins in determination of metazoan lifespan, but they do cast doubt on the robustness of the previously reported effects on lifespan in C. elegans and Drosophila. PMID:21938067

  1. Adult diet affects lifespan and reproduction of the fruit-feeding butterfly Charaxes fulvescens.

    PubMed

    Molleman, Freerk; Ding, Jimin; Wang, Jane-Ling; Zwaan, Bas J; Carey, James R; Brakefield, Paul M

    2008-10-01

    Fruit-feeding butterflies are among the longest lived Lepidoptera. While the use of pollen-derived amino acids by Heliconius butterflies has been interpreted as important for the evolution of extended lifespans, very little is known about the life-history consequences of frugivory. This issue is addressed by investigating effects of four adult diets (sugar, sugar with amino acids, banana, and moistened banana) on lifespan and reproduction in the fruit-feeding butterfly Charaxes fulvescens Aurivillius (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Female butterflies were collected from Kibale National Park, Uganda, and kept individually in cages near their natural habitat and data were collected on lifespan, oviposition, and hatching of eggs. Lifespan in captivity was longer for the sugar and the amino acid cohort, than for the banana cohorts. The longitudinal pattern of oviposition was erratic, with many days without oviposition and few periods with high numbers of eggs laid. Butterflies typically did not lay eggs during their 1st week in captivity and the length of the period between capture and first reproduction was significantly shorter for butterflies fed moistened banana. The length of the reproduction period (first reproduction-last reproduction in captivity) and the reproduction rate (total number of eggs/length of the reproduction period) did not differ significantly between the diet treatments. Those fed with amino acid and moistened banana had significantly higher egg hatchability than those fed with sugar and banana. We found no evidence for a lifespan cost of reproduction. Our results show that (1) female C. fulvescens can use amino acids in their diet for laying fertile eggs, (2) more wing-wear does correlate with lower survival in captivity (indicating aging in the wild), but not with intensity of reproduction (providing no evidence for reproductive aging), and (3) fruit-feeding butterflies may be dietary restricted in the field.

  2. Adult diet affects lifespan and reproduction of the fruit-feeding butterfly Charaxes fulvescens

    PubMed Central

    Molleman, Freerk; Ding, Jimin; Wang, Jane-Ling; Zwaan, Bas J.; Carey, James R.; Brakefield, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Fruit-feeding butterflies are among the longest lived Lepidoptera. While the use of pollen-derived amino acids by Heliconius butterflies has been interpreted as important for the evolution of extended lifespans, very little is known about the life-history consequences of frugivory. This issue is addressed by investigating effects of four adult diets (sugar, sugar with amino acids, banana, and moistened banana) on lifespan and reproduction in the fruit-feeding butterfly Charaxes fulvescens Aurivillius (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Female butterflies were collected from Kibale National Park, Uganda, and kept individually in cages near their natural habitat and data were collected on lifespan, oviposition, and hatching of eggs. Lifespan in captivity was longer for the sugar and the amino acid cohort, than for the banana cohorts. The longitudinal pattern of oviposition was erratic, with many days without oviposition and few periods with high numbers of eggs laid. Butterflies typically did not lay eggs during their 1st week in captivity and the length of the period between capture and first reproduction was significantly shorter for butterflies fed moistened banana. The length of the reproduction period (first reproduction–last reproduction in captivity) and the reproduction rate (total number of eggs/length of the reproduction period) did not differ significantly between the diet treatments. Those fed with amino acid and moistened banana had significantly higher egg hatchability than those fed with sugar and banana. We found no evidence for a lifespan cost of reproduction. Our results show that (1) female C. fulvescens can use amino acids in their diet for laying fertile eggs, (2) more wing-wear does correlate with lower survival in captivity (indicating aging in the wild), but not with intensity of reproduction (providing no evidence for reproductive aging), and (3) fruit-feeding butterflies may be dietary restricted in the field. PMID:19774093

  3. Spectrophotometric determination of lamotrigine in pharmaceutical preparations and urine by charge-transfer complexation.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, N; Khakinahad, R; Jabbari, A

    2008-11-01

    Rapid and sensitive spectrophotometric methods are developed for the determination of lamotrigine (LTG) in pharmaceutical dosage forms and urine samples, based on the formation of the charge-transfer (CT) complexes between LTG as an n-donor and the acceptors: bromocresol green (BCG), bromocresol purple (BCP), and chlorophenol red (CPR). These complexes are studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform solution in order to obtain some information about their stoichiometry and stability of complexation. The analytical parameters and their effects on the extraction of drug from urine samples are investigated. The reactions were extremely rapid at room temperature, and the absorbance values remained unchanged after 24 h for all reactions. Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration ranges 0.15-19.8, 0.15-19.8 and 0.05-34.1 microg x ml(-1) for CPR, BCP and BCG, respectively. The proposed methods were applied successfully for the determination of LTG in pharmaceutical formulations, and human urine samples in the presence of other antiepileptic drugs such as carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine and phenobarbital, with good accuracy and precision.

  4. Seradyn quantitative microsphere system lamotrigine immunoassay on a Hitachi 911 analyzer compared with HPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Westley, Ian S; Morris, Raymond G

    2008-10-01

    Lamotrigine (LTG) is used currently as monotherapy or, more frequently, as add-on therapy with other antiepileptic drugs. It demonstrates efficacy against partial seizures, primary and secondary tonic clonic seizures, absence seizures, and drop attacks. LTG pharmacokinetics is complicated by coadministration with other antiepileptic drugs such as valproic acid, phenytoin, or carbamazepine. The wide interpatient variability in LTG dosage required to attain therapeutic plasma LTG concentrations for seizure control suggests that LTG is a good candidate for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). In this study, we compared the quantitative microsphere system (QMS) LTG immunoassay with the LTG high-performance liquid chromatography-ultra violet (HPLC-UV) assay routinely employed for TDM in our laboratory. Samples tested by these methods were patient samples presented for TDM and from a quality assurance program. Quality control material demonstrated within- and between-run (n = 6) coefficient of variation and biases of less than 10%. Patient samples demonstrated a Deming regression of QMS = 1.09 HPLC-UV - 0.17 and quality assurance program samples had a Deming regression of QMS = 1.03 HPLC-UV - 0.11. Patient samples demonstrated a mean bias of 6.1% and quality assurance program samples had a mean bias of 0.2%. The QMS LTG assay had a clinically small but significant overestimation of plasma LTG concentrations. It may be useful as a convenient alternative method that would provide TDM guidance if a chromatographic assay was not available.

  5. Guidelines for treating epilepsy in the age of felbamate, vigabatrin, lamotrigine, and gabapentin.

    PubMed Central

    Laxer, K D

    1994-01-01

    For the first time in 15 years, new antiepileptic medications are available for the treatment of patients with seizure disorders. These drugs have demonstrated efficacy in animal models of epilepsy and in controlled clinical trials. Felbamate was licensed in 1993 for use as adjunctive therapy or monotherapy in adults with partial or tonic-clonic seizures and as adjunctive therapy for children with the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Gabapentin was approved January 1994 as adjunctive therapy in patients 12 years or older with partial seizures, with or without secondary generalization. Lamotrigine is expected to be approved this year for the treatment of partial and tonic-clonic seizures in adults. Last, a new drug application has been filed for vigabatrin this year, with possible licensing next year. These four anticonvulsants present new options in the treatment of patients with refractory epilepsy and are not merely congeners of previously available treatments. They have unique clinical spectrums and are reported to be safer and better tolerated than conventional therapy. Trials to compare their use with that of conventional therapy have not been done, and their use in the initial treatment of patients with epilepsy is not completely clear. Images PMID:7975572

  6. [Case of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome due to lamotrigine: demonstration of sequential reactivation of herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuharu; Kuniba, Hideo; Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Matsuzaka, Tetsuo; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a rare but severe multiorgan disorder. The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and other human herpesviruses has been reported to be associated with its pathogenesis. We herein report a case of 14-year-old female who developed DIHS during the treatment with lamotrigine, a novel antiepileptic drug. She initially presented with fever, skin rash, cervical lymphadenopathy, leukocytosis with eosinophilia and atypical lymphocytosis, liver dysfunction and hypogammaglobulinemia. Discontinuation of the drug and administration of prednisolone led to improvement;however, tapering of prednisolone and administration of midazolam and ketamine thereafter triggered clinical deterioration. She subsequently developed hyperthyroidism followed by hypothyroidism. Herpesviral loads were determined in her peripheral blood by real-time PCR during the course of the treatment, and sequential reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), HHV-6 and cytomegalovirus was demonstrated. EBV viremia was detected throughout the course, except for a short period when HHV-6 viremia was at the peak. HHV-6 viremia developed after the secondary deterioration. Cytomegalovirus viremia appeared transiently before the hyperthyroidic state reversed and became hypothyroidic. Although this syndrome should be regarded as a systemic reaction induced by a complex interplay among herpesviruses and the immune responses against viral infections and drugs, it remains unknown how such a sequential reactivation is related to the pathogenesis of the condition.

  7. GWAS identifies two susceptibility loci for lamotrigine-induced skin rash in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hui Won; Kim, So Won; Cho, Yang-Je; Heo, Kyoung; Lee, Byung In; Lee, Sang Kun; Jang, In-Jin; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Won-Joo; Lee, Ji Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Lamotrigine (LTG)-induced maculopapular eruption (MPE) often causes treatment discontinuation and rising burdens on current healthcare systems. We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify novel susceptibility loci associated with LTG-induced MPE in patients with epilepsy. We enrolled patients with LTG-induced MPE (n=34) and utilized the Korea Association Resource project cohort as a control group (n=1214). We explored associations between LTG-induced MPE and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) through imputation and replicated these associations in samples from 59 LTG-induced MPE cases and 98 LTG tolerant-controls. We found two novel SNPs associated with LTG-induced MPE: rs12668095 near CRAMP1L/TMEM204/IFT140/HN1L (P=4.89×10(-7)) and rs79007183 near TNS3 (P=3.15×10(-10)), both of which were replicated in an independent cohort. These two validated SNPs may be good candidate markers for predicting LTG-induced MPE in epilepsy patients, although further experimental validation is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictive markers for carbamazepine and lamotrigine-induced maculopapular exanthema in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Juan; Hu, Fa-Yun; Wu, Xin-Tong; An, Dong-Mei; Yan, Bo; Zhou, Dong

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify the possible associations of carbamazepine (CBZ)- and lamotrigine (LTG)-induced maculopapular exanthema (MPE) with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles in Chinese patients. A total of 249 subjects, including 40 patients with CBZ-induced MPE (CBZ-MPE), 43 patients with LTG-induced MPE (LTG-MPE), 52 CBZ-tolerant controls, 42 LTG-tolerant controls and 72 healthy controls, were included in this study. High-resolution HLA genotyping was performed by a specific kit. Differences in the allele frequencies among the groups were assessed. The allele frequencies of HLA-A*0201 and HLA-DRB1*1405 were significantly higher (P=0.033 and P=0.003, respectively), but those of HLA-B*5801 and HLA-DRB1*0301 (P=0.037 and P=0.024, respectively) were lower in the CBZ-MPE patients when compared with the CBZ-tolerant group. We also observed two significantly increased alleles of HLA-A*3001 and HLA-B*1302 (P=0.013 and P=0.013, respectively) and a decreased allele of HLA-A*3303 (P=0.048) in the LTG-MPE patients when compared with those in the LTG-tolerant group. Our results support the hypothesis that these HLA alleles contribute to the genetic susceptibility to CBZ/LTG-MPE and may be valuable as potential biomarkers for CBZ/LTG-MPE in Han Chinese.

  9. Genotype-dependent lifespan effects in peptone deprived Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Stastna, Jana J; Snoek, L Basten; Kammenga, Jan E; Harvey, Simon C

    2015-11-05

    Dietary restriction appears to act as a general non-genetic mechanism that can robustly prolong lifespan. There have however been reports in many systems of cases where restricted food intake either shortens, or does not affect, lifespan. Here we analyze lifespan and the effect of food restriction via deprived peptone levels on lifespan in wild isolates and introgression lines (ILs) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These analyses identify genetic variation in lifespan, in the effect of this variation in diet on lifespan and also in the likelihood of maternal, matricidal, hatching. Importantly, in the wild isolates and the ILs, we identify genotypes in which peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction reduces lifespan. We also identify, in recombinant inbred lines, a locus that affects maternal hatching, a phenotype closely linked to dietary restriction in C. elegans. These results indicate that peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction affects lifespan in C. elegans in a genotype-dependent manner, reducing lifespan in some genotypes. This may operate by a mechanism similar to dietary restriction.

  10. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  11. Valproic Acid versus Lamotrigine as First-line Monotherapy in Newly Diagnosed Idiopathic Generalized Tonic –Clonic Seizures in Adults – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Om Prakash; Khan, Farhan Ahmad; Kumar, Narendra; Kumar, Ajay; Haque, Ataul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures (GTCS) are frequently encountered in adults. Their successful control is necessary to improve the quality of life of these patients. Valproic acid is a simple branched-chain carboxylic acid and lamotrigine is a phenyltriazine derivative. Opinions differ in regards to their effectiveness in idiopathic GTCS. Aim To compare the effectiveness of valproic acid and lamotrigine in newly diagnosed adults with idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Materials and Methods The present prospective randomized study was conducted on 60 patients suffering from idiopathic GTCS. Thirty patients received valproic acid and rest 30 patients received lamotrigine. All patients were followed regularly monthly for one year for treatment response and adverse effects. Results After 12 months follow-up, 76.67% patients taking valproic acid and 56.67% patients taking lamotrigine were seizure-free. Common adverse effects recorded were nausea, dyspepsia, headache and skin rash. Conclusion Valproic acid is more effective than lamotrigine as first-line drug in the treatment of adults with newly diagnosed idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizures. PMID:27630862

  12. Simultaneous extraction and quantification of lamotrigine, phenobarbital, and phenytoin in human plasma and urine samples using solidified floating organic drop microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Abbasi, Bijan

    2015-07-01

    A novel and simple method based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection has been developed for simultaneous preconcentration and determination of phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin in human plasma and urine samples. Factors affecting microextraction efficiency such as the type and volume of the extraction solvent, sample pH, extraction time, stirring rate, extraction temperature, ionic strength, and sample volume were optimized. Under the optimum conditions (i.e. extraction solvent, 1-undecanol (40 μL); sample pH, 8.0; temperature, 25°C; stirring rate, 500 rpm; sample volume, 7 mL; potassium chloride concentration, 5% and extraction time, 50 min), the limits of detection for phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin were 1.0, 0.1, and 0.3 μg/L, respectively. Also, the calibration curves for phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin were linear in the concentration range of 2.0-300.0, 0.3-200.0, and 1.0-200.0 μg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations for six replicate extractions and determinations of phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin at 50 μg/L level were less than 4.6%. The method was successfully applied to determine phenobarbital, lamotrigine, and phenytoin in plasma and urine samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Calories or protein? The effect of dietary restriction on lifespan in rodents is explained by calories alone.

    PubMed

    Speakman, J R; Mitchell, S E; Mazidi, M

    2016-12-15

    Almost exactly 100years ago Osborne and colleagues demonstrated that restricting the food intake of a small number of female rats extended their lifespan. In the 1930s experiments on the impact of diet on lifespan were extended by Slonaker, and subsequently McCay. Slonaker concluded that there was a strong impact of protein intake on lifespan, while McCay concluded that calories are the main factor causing differences in lifespan when animals are restricted (Calorie restriction or CR). Hence from the very beginning the question of whether food restriction acts on lifespan via reduced calorie intake or reduced protein intake was disputed. Subsequent work supported the idea that calories were the dominant factor. More recently, however, this role has again been questioned, particularly in studies of insects. Here we review the data regarding previous studies of protein and calorie restriction in rodents. We show that increasing CR (with simultaneous protein restriction: PR) increases lifespan, and that CR with no PR generates an identical effect. None of the residual variation in the impact of CR (with PR) on lifespan could be traced to variation in macronutrient content of the diet. Other studies show that low protein content in the diet does increase median lifespan, but the effect is smaller than the CR effect. We conclude that CR is a valid phenomenon in rodents that cannot be explained by changes in protein intake, but that there is a separate phenomenon linking protein intake to lifespan, which acts over a different range of protein intakes than is typical in CR studies. This suggests there may be a fundamental difference in the responses of insects and rodents to CR. This may be traced to differences in the physiology of these groups, or reflect a major methodological difference between 'restriction' studies performed on rodents and insects. We suggest that studies where the diet is supplied ad libitum, but diluted with inert components, should perhaps be

  14. Extension of Saccharomyces paradoxus Chronological Lifespan by Retrotransposons in Certain Media Conditions Is Associated with Changes in Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    VanHoute, David; Maxwell, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Retrotransposons are mobile DNA elements present throughout eukaryotic genomes that can cause mutations and genome rearrangements when they replicate through reverse transcription. Increased expression and/or mobility of retrotransposons has been correlated with aging in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and mammals. The many copies of retrotransposons in humans and various model organisms complicate further pursuit of this relationship. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ty1 retrotransposon was introduced into a strain of S. paradoxus that completely lacks retrotransposons to compare chronological lifespans (CLSs) of yeast strains with zero, low, or high Ty1 copy number. Yeast chronological lifespan reflects the progressive loss of cell viability in a nondividing state. Chronological lifespans for the strains were not different in rich medium, but were extended in high Ty1 copy-number strains in synthetic medium and in rich medium containing a low dose of hydroxyurea (HU), an agent that depletes deoxynucleoside triphosphates. Lifespan extension was not strongly correlated with Ty1 mobility or mutation rates for a representative gene. Buffering deoxynucleoside triphosphate levels with threonine supplementation did not substantially affect this lifespan extension, and no substantial differences in cell cycle arrest in the nondividing cells were observed. Lifespan extension was correlated with reduced reactive oxygen species during early stationary phase in high Ty1 copy strains, and antioxidant treatment allowed the zero Ty1 copy strain to live as long as high Ty1 copy-number strains in rich medium with hydroxyurea. This exceptional yeast system has identified an unexpected longevity-promoting role for retrotransposons that may yield novel insights into mechanisms regulating lifespan. PMID:25106655

  15. A Novel Physiology-Based Mathematical Model to Estimate Red Blood Cell Lifespan in Different Human Age Groups.

    PubMed

    An, Guohua; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Direct measurement of red blood cell (RBC) survival in humans has improved from the original accurate but limited differential agglutination technique to the current reliable, safe, and accurate biotin method. Despite this, all of these methods are time consuming and require blood sampling over several months to determine the RBC lifespan. For situations in which RBC survival information must be obtained quickly, these methods are not suitable. With the exception of adults and infants, RBC survival has not been extensively investigated in other age groups. To address this need, we developed a novel, physiology-based mathematical model that quickly estimates RBC lifespan in healthy individuals at any age. The model is based on the assumption that the total number of RBC recirculations during the lifespan of each RBC (denoted by N max) is relatively constant for all age groups. The model was initially validated using the data from our prior infant and adult biotin-labeled red blood cell studies and then extended to the other age groups. The model generated the following estimated RBC lifespans in 2-year-old, 5-year-old, 8-year-old, and 10-year-old children: 62, 74, 82, and 86 days, respectively. We speculate that this model has useful clinical applications. For example, HbA1c testing is not reliable in identifying children with diabetes because HbA1c is directly affected by RBC lifespan. Because our model can estimate RBC lifespan in children at any age, corrections to HbA1c values based on the model-generated RBC lifespan could improve diabetes diagnosis as well as therapy in children.

  16. Lifespan extension by peroxidase and dual oxidase-mediated ROS signaling through pyrroloquinoline quinone in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Sasakura, Hiroyuki; Moribe, Hiroki; Nakano, Masahiko; Ikemoto, Kazuto; Takeuchi, Kosei; Mori, Ikue

    2017-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), originally characterized based on their harmful effects on cells or organisms, are now recognized as important signal molecules regulating various biological processes. In particular, low levels of ROS released from mitochondria extend lifespan. Here, we identified a novel mechanism of generating appropriate levels of ROS at the plasma membrane through a peroxidase and dual oxidase (DUOX) system, which could extend lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans A redox co-factor, pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), activates the C. elegans DUOX protein BLI-3 to produce the ROS H2O2 at the plasma membrane, which is subsequently degraded by peroxidase (MLT-7), eventually ensuring adequate levels of ROS. These ROS signals are transduced mainly by the oxidative stress transcriptional factors SKN-1 (Nrf2 or NFE2L2 in mammals) and JUN-1, and partially by DAF-16 (a FOXO protein homolog). Cell biology experiments demonstrated a similarity between the mechanisms of PQQ-induced activation of human DUOX1 and DUOX2 and that of C. elegans BLI-3, suggesting that DUOXs are potential targets of intervention for lifespan extension. We propose that low levels of ROS, fine-tuned by the peroxidase and dual oxidase system at the plasma membrane, act as second messengers to extend lifespan by the effect of hormesis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Life-Span Differences in the Uses and Gratifications of Tablets: Implications for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Dowd, John; Abuljadail, Mohammad; Alsulaiman, Saud; Shareefi, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    This study extends Uses and Gratifications theory by examining the uses and gratifications of a new technological device, the tablet computer, and investigating the differential uses and gratifications of tablet computers across the life-span. First, we utilized a six-week tablet training intervention to adapt and extend existing measures to the tablet as a technological device. Next, we used paper-based and online surveys (N=847), we confirmed four main uses of tablets: 1) Information Seeking, 2) Relationship Maintenance, 3) Style, 4) Amusement and Killing time, and added one additional use category 5) Organization. We discovered differences among the five main uses of tablets across the life-span, with older adults using tablets the least overall. Builders, Boomers, GenX and GenY all reported the highest means for information seeking. Finally, we used a structural equation model to examine how uses and gratifications predicts hours of tablet use. The study provides limitations and suggestions for future research and marketers. In particular, this study offers insight to the relevancy of theory as it applies to particular information and communication technologies and consideration of how different periods in the life-span affect tablet motivations. PMID:26113769

  18. Life-Span Differences in the Uses and Gratifications of Tablets: Implications for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Dowd, John; Abuljadail, Mohammad; Alsulaiman, Saud; Shareefi, Adnan

    2015-11-01

    This study extends Uses and Gratifications theory by examining the uses and gratifications of a new technological device, the tablet computer, and investigating the differential uses and gratifications of tablet computers across the life-span. First, we utilized a six-week tablet training intervention to adapt and extend existing measures to the tablet as a technological device. Next, we used paper-based and online surveys (N=847), we confirmed four main uses of tablets: 1) Information Seeking, 2) Relationship Maintenance, 3) Style, 4) Amusement and Killing time, and added one additional use category 5) Organization. We discovered differences among the five main uses of tablets across the life-span, with older adults using tablets the least overall. Builders, Boomers, GenX and GenY all reported the highest means for information seeking. Finally, we used a structural equation model to examine how uses and gratifications predicts hours of tablet use. The study provides limitations and suggestions for future research and marketers. In particular, this study offers insight to the relevancy of theory as it applies to particular information and communication technologies and consideration of how different periods in the life-span affect tablet motivations.

  19. Naturally occurring p16Ink4a-positive cells shorten healthy lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Darren J.; Childs, Bennett G.; Durik, Matej; Wijers, Melinde E.; Sieben, Cynthia J.; Zhong, Jian; Saltness, Rachel; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Versoza, Grace C.; Pezeshki, Abdul-Mohammad; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Miller, Jordan D.; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stress-induced irreversible growth arrest often characterized by p16Ink4a expression and a distinctive secretory phenotype, prevents the proliferation of preneoplastic cells and has beneficial roles in tissue remodelling during embryogenesis and wound healing. Senescent cells accumulate in various tissues and organs over time and have been speculated to play a role in aging. To explore the physiological relevance and consequences of naturally occurring senescent cells, we used a previously established transgene, INK-ATTAC, to induce apoptosis in p16Ink4a-expressing cells of wild-type mice by injection of AP20187 twice a week starting at one year of age. Here we show that compared to vehicle alone, AP20187 treatment extended median lifespan in both male and female mice of two distinct genetic backgrounds. Clearance of p16Ink4a-positive cells delayed tumorigenesis and attenuated age-related deterioration of several organs without apparent side effects, including kidney, heart and fat, where clearance preserved the functionality of glomeruli, cardio-protective KATP channels, and adipocytes, respectively. Thus, p16Ink4a-positive cells that accumulate during adulthood negatively influence lifespan and promote age-dependent changes in multiple organs, and their therapeutic removal may be an attractive approach to extend healthy lifespan. PMID:26840489

  20. Perturbation analysis of indices of lifespan variability.

    PubMed

    van Raalte, Alyson A; Caswell, Hal

    2013-10-01

    A number of indices exist to calculate lifespan variation, each with different underlying properties. Here, we present new formulae for the response of seven of these indices to changes in the underlying mortality schedule (life disparity, Gini coefficient, standard deviation, variance, Theil's index, mean logarithmic deviation, and interquartile range). We derive each of these indices from an absorbing Markov chain formulation of the life table, and use matrix calculus to obtain the sensitivity and the elasticity (i.e., the proportional sensitivity) to changes in age-specific mortality. Using empirical French and Russian male data, we compare the underlying sensitivities to mortality change under different mortality regimes to determine the conditions under which the indices might differ in their conclusions about the magnitude of lifespan variation. Finally, we demonstrate how the sensitivities can be used to decompose temporal changes in the indices into contributions of age-specific mortality changes. The result is an easily computable method for calculating the properties of this important class of longevity indices.

  1. Turner Syndrome: Four Challenges Across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Erica J; McInerney-Leo, Aideen; Bondy, Carolyn A; Gollust, Sarah E; King, Donnice; Biesecker, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a sex chromosome condition that occurs in approximately 1/2500 live female births. Despite the prevalence of this chromosomal condition, the challenges these women face throughout their lives are not fully understood. This qualitative research study aimed to characterize the subjective experiences of individuals with Turner syndrome throughout their lifespan, to investigate their concerns and obstacles, and to offer insight into the strengths and weaknesses of health care delivery, as they perceived them. Ninety-seven girls and women with TS and 21 parents consented to participate in this interview study. Interviews were semi-structured and open-ended in design. Questions sought to elicit responses relating to existing concerns associated with their condition and positive and negative health care experiences. Participants were divided into four age categories (childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and mature adulthood) to facilitate a comparative analysis across the age spectrum. Regardless of age, infertility was the most frequently cited concern followed closely by short stature. Sexual development and function and general health were also viewed as challenges by a number of participants in each age group. Although the relative weight of these four concerns tended to shift based upon the individual’s age and life experiences, all four issues remained significant throughout the lifespan. Enhanced awareness of the evolving physical and psychological challenges faced by girls and women with TS may help health care providers improve the quality of life for these individuals. PMID:16252273

  2. Linguistic Agency and Life-Span Longevity.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael D; Bair, Jessica L; Persich, Michelle R; Moen, Nicholas R

    2016-09-01

    Agency has been conceptualized as a drive toward mastery, control, and effective self-management. Such an agentic approach to life and its challenges may be life-prolonging, a hypothesis not previously investigated. In four studies, individual differences in agency were assessed in terms of the frequency with which agency-related words (e.g., "achieve," "fix," and "control") were mentioned in archived interviews or speeches (N = 210). Higher levels of linguistic agency predicted longer life-spans among prominent physicists (study 1: n = 60, β = .30, t = 2.30, p = .025), historians (study 2: n = 69, β = .29, t = 2.47, p = .016), psychologists (study 3: n = 45, β = .32, t = 2.35, p = .024), and American presidents (study 4: n = 36, β = .75, t = 2.74, p = .010) when adjusting for birth year. Considered from another angle, life-span longevity averaged 8 years longer at a high (+1 standard deviation) relative to low (-1 standard deviation) level of the linguistic agency continuum, a marked difference. Follow-up analyses indicated that these results could not be attributed to covarying levels of positive emotion, negative emotion, or social connection, as quantified in terms of other linguistic categories. The investigation provides unique support for agentic perspectives on health, and several potential mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Rapamycin-mediated lifespan increase in mice is dose and sex dependent and metabolically distinct from dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Richard A; Harrison, David E; Astle, Clinton M; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Flurkey, Kevin; Han, Melissa; Javors, Martin A; Li, Xinna; Nadon, Nancy L; Nelson, James F; Pletcher, Scott; Salmon, Adam B; Sharp, Zelton Dave; Van Roekel, Sabrina; Winkleman, Lynn; Strong, Randy

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR kinase, increased median lifespan of genetically heterogeneous mice by 23% (males) to 26% (females) when tested at a dose threefold higher than that used in our previous studies; maximal longevity was also increased in both sexes. Rapamycin increased lifespan more in females than in males at each dose evaluated, perhaps reflecting sexual dimorphism in blood levels of this drug. Some of the endocrine and metabolic changes seen in diet-restricted mice are not seen in mice exposed to rapamycin, and the pattern of expression of hepatic genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism is also quite distinct in rapamycin-treated and diet-restricted mice, suggesting that these two interventions for extending mouse lifespan differ in many respects. PMID:24341993

  4. Life-span extension by a metacaspase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sandra Malmgren; Hao, Xinxin; Liu, Beidong; Nyström, Thomas

    2014-06-20

    Single-cell species harbor ancestral structural homologs of caspase proteases, although the evolutionary benefit of such apoptosis-related proteins in unicellular organisms is unclear. Here, we found that the yeast metacaspase Mca1 is recruited to the insoluble protein deposit (IPOD) and juxtanuclear quality-control compartment (JUNQ) during aging and proteostatic stress. Elevating MCA1 expression counteracted accumulation of unfolded proteins and aggregates and extended life span in a heat shock protein Hsp104 disaggregase- and proteasome-dependent manner. Consistent with a role in protein quality control, genetic interaction analysis revealed that MCA1 buffers against deficiencies in the Hsp40 chaperone YDJ1 in a caspase cysteine-dependent manner. Life-span extension and aggregate management by Mca1 was only partly dependent on its conserved catalytic cysteine, which suggests that Mca1 harbors both caspase-dependent and independent functions related to life-span control.

  5. Pomegranate Juice Enhances Healthy Lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramani, Subramani Paranthaman; Mohan, Jayaram; Chatterjee, Arunita; Patnaik, Esha; Kukkupuni, Subrahmanya Kumar; Nongthomba, Upendra; Venkatasubramanian, Padmavathy

    2014-01-01

    Exploring innovative ways to ensure healthy aging of populations is a pre-requisite to contain rising healthcare costs. Scientific research into the principles and practices of traditional medicines can provide new insights and simple solutions to lead a healthy life. Rasayana is a dedicated branch of Ayurveda (an Indian medicine) that deals with methods to increase vitality and delay aging through the use of diet, herbal supplements, and other lifestyle practices. The life-span and health-span enhancing actions of the fruits of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.), a well-known Rasayana, were tested on Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) model. Supplementation of standard corn meal with 10% (v/v) pomegranate juice (PJ) extended the life-span of male and female flies by 18 and 8%, respectively. When male and female flies were mixed and reared together, there was 19% increase in the longevity of PJ fed flies, as assessed by MSD, the median survival day (24.8). MSD for control and resveratrol (RV) groups was at 20.8 and 23.1 days, respectively. A two-fold enhancement in fecundity, improved resistance to oxidative stress (H2O2 and paraquat induced) and to Candida albicans infection were observed in PJ fed flies. Further, the flies in the PJ fed group were physically active over an extended period of time, as assessed by the climbing assay. PJ thus outperformed both control and RV groups in the life-span and health-span parameters tested. This study provides the scope to explore the potential of PJ as a nutraceutical to improve health span and lifespan in human beings. PMID:25566518

  6. The transcriptional repressor Sum1p counteracts Sir2p in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, mitochondrial quality control and replicative lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Vevea, Jason D.; Charalel, Joseph K.; Sapar, Maria L.; Pon, Liza A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the stability or dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton can extend lifespan in C. elegans and S. cerevisiae. Actin cables of budding yeast, bundles of actin filaments that mediate cargo transport, affect lifespan control through effects on mitochondrial quality control. Sir2p, the founding member of the Sirtuin family of lifespan regulators, also affects actin cable dynamics, assembly, and function in mitochondrial quality control. Here, we obtained evidence for novel interactions between Sir2p and Sum1p, a transcriptional repressor that was originally identified through mutations that genetically suppress sir2∆ phenotypes unrelated to lifespan. We find that deletion of SUM1 in wild-type cells results in increased mitochondrial function and actin cable abundance. Furthermore, deletion of SUM1 suppresses defects in actin cables and mitochondria of sir2∆ yeast, and extends the replicative lifespan and cellular health span of sir2∆ cells. Thus, Sum1p suppresses Sir2p function in control of specific aging determinants and lifespan in budding yeast. PMID:28357337

  7. Identifying the incidence of rash, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in patients taking lamotrigine: a systematic review of 122 randomized controlled trials*

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Romi; Amber, Kyle T.

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug used for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar disorder and numerous off-label uses. The development of rash significantly affects its use. The most concerning of these adverse reactions is Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials using lamotrigine as a monotherapy to quantify the incidence of cutaneous reactions, particularly Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. Of a total of 4,364 papers regarding lamotrigine, 122 studies met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. In total, 18,698 patients were included with 1,570 (8.3%) of patients experiencing an adverse dermatologic reaction. The incidence of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis was 0.04%. PMID:28225977

  8. Density functional theory, restricted Hartree-Fock simulations and FTIR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopic studies on lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Ramya, T; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2013-10-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and FT Raman spectra of lamotrigine have been recorded in the region 4000-450 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1), respectively. The title compound is used as Antiepileptic drug. The optimized geometry, frequency, and intensities of the vibrational bands of the lamotrigine were obtained by Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP/631G** basis set and ab initio method at the restricted Hartree Fock/6-31** level. The harmonic vibrational frequencies, Natural population analysis, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, infra red intensities and Raman scattering activities, force constant were calculated by DFT and RHF methods. The quality of lamotrigine under different storage containers were analyzed using UV-Vis spectral technique. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A cross-sectional study of male and female C57BL/6Nia mice suggests lifespan and healthspan are not necessarily correlated

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kathleen E.; Hoffman, Jessica M.; Sloane, Lauren B.; Gelfond, Jonathan A.L.; Soto, Vanessa Y.; Richardson, Arlan G.; Austad, Steven N.

    2016-01-01

    Lifespan provides a discrete metric that is intuitively appealing and the assumption has been that healthspan is extended concomitant with lifespan. Medicine has been more successful at extending life than preserving health during aging. Interventions that extend lifespan in model organisms do not always result in a corresponding increase in healthspan, suggesting that lifespan and healthspan may be uncoupled. To understand how interventions that extend life affect healthspan, we need measures that distinguish between young and old animals. Here we measured age-related changes in healthspan in male and female C57BL/6JNia mice assessed at 4 distinct ages (4 months, 20 months, 28 months and 32 months). Correlations between health parameters and age varied. Some parameters show consistent patterns with age across studies and in both sexes, others changed in one sex only and others showed no significant differences in mice of different ages. Few correlations existed among health assays, suggesting that physiological function in domains we assessed change independently in aging mice. With one exception, health parameters were not significantly associated with an increased probability of premature death. Our results show the need for more robust measures of murine health and suggest a potential disconnect between health and lifespan in mice. PMID:27705904

  10. A cross-sectional study of male and female C57BL/6Nia mice suggests lifespan and healthspan are not necessarily correlated.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kathleen E; Hoffman, Jessica M; Sloane, Lauren B; Gelfond, Jonathan A L; Soto, Vanessa Y; Richardson, Arlan G; Austad, Steven N

    2016-10-02

    Lifespan provides a discrete metric that is intuitively appealing and the assumption has been that healthspan is extended concomitant with lifespan. Medicine has been more successful at extending life than preserving health during aging. Interventions that extend lifespan in model organisms do not always result in a corresponding increase in healthspan, suggesting that lifespan and healthspan may be uncoupled. To understand how interventions that extend life affect healthspan, we need measures that distinguish between young and old animals. Here we measured age-related changes in healthspan in male and female C57BL/6JNia mice assessed at 4 distinct ages (4 months, 20 months, 28 months and 32 months). Correlations between health parameters and age varied. Some parameters show consistent patterns with age across studies and in both sexes, others changed in one sex only and others showed no significant differences in mice of different ages. Few correlations existed among health assays, suggesting that physiological function in domains we assessed change independently in aging mice. With one exception, health parameters were not significantly associated with an increased probability of premature death. Our results show the need for more robust measures of murine health and suggest a potential disconnect between health and lifespan in mice.

  11. Minority Stress across the Career-Lifespan Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispenza, Franco; Brown, Colton; Chastain, Taylor E.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual minority persons (e.g., lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer) are likely to encounter "minority stress", such as discrimination, concealment, expectation of rejection, and internalized heterosexism. Minority stress occurs alongside one's lifespan and has considerable implications in the context of the career lifespan trajectory.…

  12. The Path to Competence: A Lifespan Developmental Perspective on Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a developmental model of reading that encompasses changes across the lifespan. The need for such a lifespan orientation toward reading within our educational institutions is great. Until we adopt this lifelong perspective, we continue to run the risk of turning out undeveloped, unmotivated, and uncritical…

  13. Minority Stress across the Career-Lifespan Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispenza, Franco; Brown, Colton; Chastain, Taylor E.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual minority persons (e.g., lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer) are likely to encounter "minority stress", such as discrimination, concealment, expectation of rejection, and internalized heterosexism. Minority stress occurs alongside one's lifespan and has considerable implications in the context of the career lifespan trajectory.…

  14. A Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article had four goals. First, the authors identified a set of general challenges and questions that a life-span theory of development should address. Second, they presented a comprehensive account of their Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. They integrated the model of optimization in primary and secondary control and the…

  15. Lamotrigine and GABAA receptor modulators interact with menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptives to regulate mood in women with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Robakis, Thalia K; Holtzman, Jessie; Stemmle, Pascale G; Reynolds-May, Margaret F; Kenna, Heather A; Rasgon, Natalie L

    2015-04-01

    To examine the occurrence of menstrually-entrained mood cycling in women with treated bipolar disorder as compared to healthy controls, and to explore whether there is a specific effect of lamotrigine in dampening menstrually-entrained cyclicity of mood. Observational comparison study of daily self-ratings of mood, sleep, and insomnia obtained over a mean of four menstrual cycles in 42 women with bipolar disorder taking lamotrigine as part of their treatment, 30 women with bipolar disorder receiving mood stabilizing regimens without lamotrigine, and 13 healthy controls, all with physiological menstrual cycles. Additional exploratory analysis of interactions between psychopharmacological regimen and hormonal contraceptive use in the group of women with bipolar disorder, with the addition of 19 women with bipolar disorder who were using hormonal contraceptives. Women treated for bipolar disorder manifested lower average mood, longer average nightly sleep duration, and greater fluctuations in mood and sleep across menstrual cycle phases than healthy controls. Women with bipolar disorder who were taking lamotrigine had less fluctuation in mood both within and across menstrual cycle phases, and were more similar to the control group than to women with bipolar disorder who were not taking lamotrigine in this respect. In addition, medications with GABA-A receptor modulating effects were found to result in improved mood ratings when combined with hormonal contraceptives. Menstrually-entrained mood fluctuation is present in women treated for bipolar disorder to a greater degree than in healthy controls. Lamotrigine may be of use in mitigating this fluctuation. GABA-A receptor modulators in general may act synergistically with hormonal contraceptives to enhance mood in women with bipolar disorder; this hypothesis merits further study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synergistic effect of docosahexaenoic acid on anticonvulsant activity of valproic acid and lamotrigine in animal seizure models.

    PubMed

    Gavzan, Hakimeh; Sayyah, Mohammad; Sardari, Soroush; Babapour, Vahab

    2015-10-01

    Add-on therapy is a common strategy to improve efficacy and tolerability of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Anticonvulsant potential and appropriate safety of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) makes it a promising candidate for combination therapy. We evaluated influence of DHA on anticonvulsant activity of AEDs phenytoin, valproate, and lamotrigine in maximal electroshock (MES), pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), and kindling models of epilepsy. The dose-response to DHA was obtained 15 min after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection in PTZ model of clonic seizures in mice, MES model of tonic seizures in mice, and kindling model of complex partial seizures in rats. The dose-response curve of valproate (30 min after i.p. injection to mice) in PTZ, phenytoin (60 min after i.p. injection to mice) in MES, and lamotrigine (60 min after i.p. injection to rats) in kindling models were obtained. Dose-response curves of the AEDs were then achieved in the presence of ED25 of DHA. DHA had no anticonvulsant effect in the MES model. However, it showed a dose-dependent protective effect against PTZ (ED50 = 0.13 μM) and kindled seizures (ED50 = 1.08 mM). DHA at ED25 caused a 3.6-fold increase in potency of valproate as its ED50 value from 117.5 (98.3-135.3) decreased to 32.5 (21.6-44.1) mg/kg. Moreover, a 4.9-fold increase in potency of lamotrigine occurred, as its ED50 value from 13.10 (11.50-14.9) decreased to 2.65 (0.8-5.6) mg/kg. CompuSyn analysis indicated synergistic anticonvulsant interaction between DHA and both valproate and lamotrigine. Co-administration strategy of the safe and inexpensive anticonvulsant compound DHA with AEDs should be favorably regarded in clinical studies of epilepsy treatment.

  17. Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis and Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion Associated with Lamotrigine-induced Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozisik, Lale; Tanriover, Mine Durusu; Saka, Esen

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a severe drug hypersensitivity reaction characterized by rash, fever and multi-organ failure. Limbic encephalitis (LE) is a rare disorder characterized by cognitive dysfunction with memory disturbance, seizures and psychiatric symptoms. We herein present an unusual case of DRESS syndrome due to lamotrigine with reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus, which developed autoimmune LE and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Discontinuation of lamotrigine, administration of methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin led to improvement. The LE in this case might have been caused by an autoimmune inflammatory mechanism associated with DRESS syndrome.

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of fast-dissolving tablets containing solid dispersion of lamotrigine

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Arti; Gundamaraju, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Investigation of in vitro/in vivo behavior of fast-dissolving tablets containing solid dispersions (SDs) of lamotrigine (LM) was the aim and focus of the present research work. Material and Methods: The effect of various hydrophilic polymers on the aqueous solubility of LM was studied. Polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) was selected as the vehicle and SDs were prepared by melting and solvent evaporation method (SEM). Evaluation of SD for dissolution indicated SVM was more appropriate as seen from an enhancement in drug dissolution. Infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicated a lack of physicochemical interaction between the drug and the carrier. A total of nine formulations were compressed into fast-dissolving tablets using Avicel pH 102 as a directly compressible filler and ac-di-sol, sodium starch glycolate and crospovidone as super disintegrates and evaluated for pre- and post-compression parameters and in vitro drug release. Results: Mathematical analysis of in vitro data suggested that first order was most suitable mathematical model for describing the optimized formulation. Stability studies indicated that the effect of storage was insignificant at 5% level of confidence. In vivo studies of pure drug, selected formulation and marketed product were carried out in male Wistar rats and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were calculated using PK function for Microsoft Excel. The best formulation has shown Tmax of 0.5 h which was highly significant (P < 0.05) when compared with pure drug and marketed formulation. The statistical significance was assessed by one way analysis of variance. Conclusion: Therefore, the SDs prepared by SEM using PEG 6000 as hydrophilic carrier can be successfully used for improvement of dissolution of LM and resulted in faster onset of action as indicated by in vivo studies. PMID:25599034

  19. Long-term monotherapy with lamotrigine in newly diagnosed epilepsy in adults.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, B; Kamiński, M L; Kawka, Z

    2001-01-01

    Lamotrigine (LTG) as both effective against a wide range of seizure types and epileptic syndromes and well tolerated drug is being used in mono--as well as in polytherapy of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety and neuropsychological functioning after LTG (mean daily dose: 316 mg) as long-term monotherapy (12 mo) in 24 young adult out-patients (22.5 ys) with newly recognised and not-previously treated epilepsy in an open, non-comparative trial. 67% of patients were responders (above 50% reduction in seizure frequency) and 42% reported seizures remission. The best were results in patients with generalised convulsive fits (87% with remission). Adverse events in the early phase of medication in 21% of patients typically concerned CNS and gastrointestinal system (headache, asthenia, insomnia, nausea, gastric aches) and resolved spontaneously without treatment discontinuation. Biochemical examinations were normal and transient leucopenia and diminishion of MCV were clinically not significant. Neurodynamic abilities, neuropsychological examination results, memory verbal and visual tests and organic evaluation in organic triada tests did not show deterioration after LTG treatment. Slight difficulties in abstractive and operative thinking and some focal symptoms of fronto-temporal origin should be considered a result of drug but also the epilepsy per se. No significant differences in latencies and amplitudes of evoked potentials (VEP, BAEP, SEP and especially ERP-300) were measured after LTG. Preliminary results obtained in this study supported good efficacy and tolerability and especially lack of unfavourable influence of LTG on neuropsychological functioning in young previously untreated patients with epilepsy.

  20. Studies on induction of lamotrigine metabolism in transgenic UGT1 mice.

    PubMed

    Argikar, U A; Senekeo-Effenberger, K; Larson, E E; Tukey, R H; Remmel, R P

    2009-11-01

    A transgenic 'knock-in' mouse model expressing a human UGT1 locus (Tg-UGT1) was recently developed and validated. Although these animals express mouse UGT1A proteins, UGT1A4 is a pseudo-gene in mice. Therefore, Tg-UGT1 mice serve as a 'humanized' UGT1A4 animal model. Lamotrigine (LTG) is primarily metabolized to its N-glucuronide (LTGG) by hUGT1A4. This investigation aimed at examining the impact of pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators on LTG glucuronidation in vivo and in vitro. Tg-UGT1 mice were administered the inducers phenobarbital (CAR), pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PXR), WY-14643 (PPAR-alpha), ciglitazone (PPAR-gamma), or L-165041 (PPAR-beta), once daily for 3 or 4 days. Thereafter, LTG was administered orally and blood samples were collected over 24 h. LTG was measured in blood and formation of LTGG was measured in pooled microsomes made from the livers of treated animals. A three-fold increase in in vivo LTG clearance was seen after phenobarbital administration. In microsomes prepared from phenobarbital-treated Tg-UGT1 animals, 13-fold higher CL(int) (Vmax/K(m)) value was observed as compared with the untreated transgenic mice. A trend toward induction of catalytic activity in vitro and in vivo was also observed following pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile and WY-14643 treatment. This study demonstrates the successful application of Tg-UGT1 mice as a novel tool to study the impact of induction and regulation on metabolism of UGT1A4 substrates.

  1. Captopril potentiates the anticonvulsant activity of carbamazepine and lamotrigine in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    PubMed

    Lukawski, Krzysztof; Jakubus, Tomasz; Raszewski, Grzegorz; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2010-10-01

    Some studies suggest a higher risk of hypertension in people with epilepsy. Captopril, a potent and selective angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, is a well known antihypertensive drug. Besides the peripheral renin-angiotensin system (RAS), ACE inhibitors are also suggested to affect the brain RAS which might participate in the regulation of seizure susceptibility. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of captopril on the protective action of numerous antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine [CBZ], phenytoin [PHT], valproate [VPA], phenobarbital [PB], oxcarbazepine [OXC], lamotrigine [LTG] and topiramate [TPM]) against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice. This study was accompanied by an evaluation of adverse effects of combined treatment with captopril and antiepileptic drugs in the passive avoidance task and chimney test. Captopril (25 and 50 mg/kg i.p.) did not influence the threshold for electroconvulsions. Among the tested antiepileptics, captopril (25 and 50 mg/kg i.p.) potentiated the antiseizure action of CBZ, decreasing its ED(50) value from 12.1 to 8.9 and 8.7 mg/kg, respectively. Moreover, captopril (50 mg/kg i.p.) enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of LTG. ED(50) value for LTG was lowered from 5.1 to 3.5 mg/kg. The observed interactions between captopril and CBZ or LTG were pharmacodynamic in nature as captopril did not alter plasma and total brain concentrations of these antiepileptics. The combinations of captopril with antiepileptic drugs did not lead to retention deficits in the passive avoidance task or motor impairment in the chimney test. Based on the current preclinical data, it is suggested that captopril may positively interact with CBZ and LTG in epileptic patients. The combinations of captopril with the remaining antiepileptics (PHT, VPA, PB, OXC and TPM) seem neutral.

  2. Lamotrigine, carbamazepine and phenytoin differentially alter extracellular levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shagufta; Fowler, Leslie J; Whitton, Peter S

    2005-02-01

    We have studied the effects of treatment with the anticonvulsants lamotrigine (LTG), phenytoin (PHN) and carbamazepine (CBZ) on basal and stimulated extracellular aspartate (ASP), glutamate (GLU), taurine (TAU), GABA, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) in the hippocampus of freely moving rats using microdialysis. All of the drugs investigated have had inhibition of Na(+) channel activity implicated as their principal mechanism of action. Neither LTG (10-20 mg/kg), PHN (20-40 mg/kg) or CBZ (10-20 mg/kg) had an effect on the basal extracellular concentrations of any of the amino acids studied with the exception of glutamate, which was decreased at the highest LTG dose. However, when amino acid transmitter levels were increased with 50 microM veratridine, LTG was found to cause a dose-dependent decrease in dialysate levels of all four amino acids, with the effect being most pronounced for glutamate. In contrast, PHN decreased extracellular aspartate levels but had no effect on evoked-extracellular GLU, TAU or GABA. Somewhat unexpectedly, CBZ did not alter the stimulated increase in the excitatory amino acids, GLU and ASP, but, rather surprisingly for an antiepileptic drug, markedly decreased that of the inhibitory substances TAU and GABA. The three drugs had differing effects on basal extracellular 5-HT and DA. LTG caused a dose-dependent decrease in both, while CBZ and PHN both increased extracellular 5-HT and DA. When extracellular 5-HT and DA was evoked by veratridine LTG had no significant effect on this, while PHN but not CBZ increased stimulated extracellular 5-HT and both PHN and CBZ augmented DA. Thus, the effects of the three drugs studied seemed to depend on whether extracellular transmitter levels are evoked or basal and the particular transmitter in question. This suggests that there are marked differences in the neurochemical mechanisms of antiepileptic drug action of the three compounds studied.

  3. Long-term efficacy and safety of lamotrigine for all types of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yoshinori; Hongo, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Background We investigated whether the long-term efficacy and safety of lamotrigine (LTG) for bipolar disorder (BP) differs between disease types (BP-I, BP-II, or BP not otherwise specified [BP-NOS]), and the efficacy of the concomitant use of antidepressants (ADs). Methods For >1 year, we observed 445 outpatients with BP (diagnosed by DSM-IV criteria) who initiated LTG treatment between July 1 and October 31, 2011, using the Himorogi Self-rating Depression (HSDS) and Anxiety Scales and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale and also recorded adverse events. Results Treatment efficacy was observed at week 4, with the improved HSDS scores sustained until week 52 for all types of BP; 50% of the patients with any type of BP could be treated with LTG for 1 year, whereas ~40% could be treated for >1.5 years. However, 25% of the patients were withdrawn within the first 4 weeks. The overall incidence of adverse events was 22.9% (104/455): 34.1% (14/41) for BP-I, 22.7% (15/66) for BP-II, and 22.2% (75/338) for BP-NOS. The most common adverse event was skin rash: 22.0% for BP-I, 16.7% for BP-II, and 12.1% for BP-NOS. Limitations There was no control group. Data were collected retrospectively. Conclusion With careful and adequate titration, long-term treatment with LTG is possible for any type of BP, with BP-NOS patients, the largest population in clinical practice, responding particularly well. Symptoms can improve with or without ADs. Large-scale prospective studies of the efficacy of ADs in bipolar treatment are warranted. PMID:28360522

  4. Enhanced brain delivery of lamotrigine with Pluronic® P123-based nanocarrier

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Hong; Zhou, Jie; Tang, Xing-Hua; Xu, Lan; Shen, Teng; Wu, Xun-Yi; Hong, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Background P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated drug efflux across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an important mechanism underlying poor brain penetration of certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Nanomaterials, as drug carriers, can overcome P-gp activity and improve the targeted delivery of AEDs. However, their applications in the delivery of AEDs have not been adequately investigated. The objective of this study was to develop a nano-scale delivery system to improve the solubility and brain penetration of the antiepileptic drug lamotrigine (LTG). Methods LTG-loaded Pluronic® P123 (P123) polymeric micelles (P123/LTG) were prepared by thin-film hydration, and brain penetration capability of the nanocarrier was evaluated. Results The mean encapsulating efficiency for the optimized formulation was 98.07%; drug-loading was 5.63%, and particle size was 18.73 nm. The solubility of LTG in P123/LTG can increase to 2.17 mg/mL, making it available as a solution. The in vitro release of LTG from P123LTG presented a sustained-release property. Compared with free LTG, the LTG-incorporated micelles accumulated more in the brain at 0.5, 1, and 4 hours after intravenous administration in rats. Pretreatment with systemic verapamil increased the rapid brain penetration of free LTG but not P123/LTG. Incorporating another P-gp substrate (Rhodamine 123) into P123 micelles also showed higher efficiency in penetrating the BBB in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion These results indicated that P123 micelles have the potential to overcome the activity of P-gp expressed on the BBB and therefore show potential for the targeted delivery of AEDs. Future studies are necessary to further evaluate the appropriateness of the nanocarrier to enhance the efficacy of AEDs. PMID:25152622

  5. Nonparametric inference on quantile lost lifespan.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Lauren; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon

    2017-03-01

    In this article, the existing concept of reversed percentile residual life, or percentile inactivity time, is recast to show that it can be used for routine analysis of time-to-event data under right censoring to summarize "life lost," which poses several advantages over the existing methods for survival analysis. An estimating equation approach is adopted to avoid estimation of the probability density function of the underlying time-to-event distribution to estimate the variance of the quantile estimator. Additionally a K-sample test statistic is proposed to test the ratio of the quantile lost lifespans. Simulation studies are performed to assess finite properties of the proposed K-sample statistic in terms of coverage probability and power. The proposed method is illustrated with a real data example from a breast cancer study.

  6. Mitochondrial and Cytoplasmic ROS Have Opposing Effects on Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Schaar, Claire E.; Dues, Dylan J.; Spielbauer, Katie K.; Machiela, Emily; Cooper, Jason F.; Senchuk, Megan; Hekimi, Siegfried; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are highly reactive, oxygen-containing molecules that can cause molecular damage within the cell. While the accumulation of ROS-mediated damage is widely believed to be one of the main causes of aging, ROS also act in signaling pathways. Recent work has demonstrated that increasing levels of superoxide, one form of ROS, through treatment with paraquat, results in increased lifespan. Interestingly, treatment with paraquat robustly increases the already long lifespan of the clk-1 mitochondrial mutant, but not other long-lived mitochondrial mutants such as isp-1 or nuo-6. To genetically dissect the subcellular compartment in which elevated ROS act to increase lifespan, we deleted individual superoxide dismutase (sod) genes in clk-1 mutants, which are sensitized to ROS. We find that only deletion of the primary mitochondrial sod gene, sod-2 results in increased lifespan in clk-1 worms. In contrast, deletion of either of the two cytoplasmic sod genes, sod-1 or sod-5, significantly decreases the lifespan of clk-1 worms. Further, we show that increasing mitochondrial superoxide levels through deletion of sod-2 or treatment with paraquat can still increase lifespan in clk-1;sod-1 double mutants, which live shorter than clk-1 worms. The fact that mitochondrial superoxide can increase lifespan in worms with a detrimental level of cytoplasmic superoxide demonstrates that ROS have a compartment specific effect on lifespan – elevated ROS in the mitochondria acts to increase lifespan, while elevated ROS in the cytoplasm decreases lifespan. This work also suggests that both ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms contribute to the longevity of clk-1 worms. PMID:25671321

  7. Mitochondrial and cytoplasmic ROS have opposing effects on lifespan.