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Sample records for lamprey lampetra fluviatilis

  1. [Parasite fauna of the European river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis (L.) from Lake Onega].

    PubMed

    Evseeva, N V

    2007-01-01

    Data on the parasite fauna of the adult European river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis (L.) from Lake Onega are reported. Ten parasite species are found, including trematodes Diplostomum petromyzifluviatilis and D. spathaceum (metacercariae), cestode Proteocephalus longicollis, nematodes Cucullanus truttae and Raphidascaris acus, acanthocephalan Echinorhynchus salmonis, ectoparasitic infusoria Chilodonella hexastica, Trichodina tenuidens, and Trichodinella epizootica, and fungus Saprolegnia parasitica. Three species are found to be dominate, namely D. petromyzifluviatilis, Cucullanus truttae, and P. longicollis. Comparative analysis of the parasite faunas of the lampreys from other basins is carried out. Some similarity in the parasite faunas of lampreys and salmonids is discovered.

  2. Characterization of insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin from the river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J M; Bondareva, V; Rusakov, Y; Plisetskaya, E M; Mynarcik, D C; Whittaker, J

    1995-10-01

    Insulin has been isolated from an extract of the pancreas of an Agnathan, the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. The primary structure of the peptide (A-chain: GIVEQ CCHRK CSIYD MENYC N; B-chain: SALTG AGGTH LCGSH LVEAL YVVCG DRGFF YTPSK T) is the same as that of insulin from the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus. In contrast, Lampetra glucagon (HAQGS FTSDY SKYLD SKQAK DFVIW LMNT), isolated from an extract of intestine, is structurally more similar to human glucagon (five amino acid substitutions) than to Petromyzon glucagon (six substitutions). Similarly, the primary structure of somatostatin (AAAAP GAAGG AQLPL GNRER KAGCK NFFWK TFSSC), isolated from Lampetra pancreas, contains eight amino acid substitutions and an additional residue compared with Petromyzon somatostatin. Somatostatin, isolated from Lampetra brain, has an identical structure to mammalian somatostatin-14 (AGCKN FFWKT FTSC), indicative of the same tissue-specific expression of different somatostatin genes that was previously observed in Petromyzon. In contrast to the reduced binding affinity of other fish insulins, lamprey insulin was equipotent with porcine insulin in inhibiting the binding of [3-[125I]iodotyrosine-A14] human insulin to the human insulin receptor.

  3. [Liver monoamine oxidase activity of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. the substrate-inhibitory specificity].

    PubMed

    Iagodina, O V; Basova, I N

    2013-01-01

    Based on data of substrate-inhibitory analysis with use of specific inhibitors--deprenyl, chlorgi-lin--and specific substrates--serotonin, noradrenalin, benzylamine, beta-phenylethylamine, and N-methylhistamine--a suggestion is put forward about the possible existence of one molecular form of monoamine oxidase (MAO) in liver of mature individuals of the European lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. There are determined kinetic parameters of monoamine oxidase deamination of eight substrates, which indicates the large spectrum of substrate specificity of the lamprey liver MAO. The studied enzyme does not deaminate histamine and putrescine and is not sensitive to 10(-2) M semicarbaside. Results of study of the substrate-inhibitor specificity allow us to suggest some resemblance of catalytic properties of the lamprey liver MAO and the mammalian form A MAO. The revealed low activity of the enzyme at deamination of all used substrates seems to be connected with low detoxational functional of the lamprey liver.

  4. A possible homologue of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus of lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis L.).

    PubMed

    Weigle, C; Wicht, H; Korf, H W

    1996-10-18

    This study in lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis L.) is concerned with the phylogenetic age of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus which in mammals receives input from the retinohypothalamic tract and acts as circadian pacemaker. Tracing experiments with the fluorescent dye DiI demonstrated a retinohypothalamic projection in lampreys which terminates in a distinct area of the hypothalamus corresponding to the infrachiasmatic part of the nucleus of the postoptic commissure. Immunocytochemical investigations showed vasotocinergic neurons and a relatively high concentration of neuropeptide Y-, substance P- and serotonin-immunoreactive nerve fibers in this region. These hodological and immunocytochemical data suggest that the infrachiasmatic part of the nucleus of the postoptic commissure of lampreys might be homologous to the suprachiasmatic nucleus of other craniates.

  5. [SENSITIVITY OF LIVER MONOAMINE OXIDASE IN THE LAMPREY LAMPETRA FLUVIATILIS TO SOME TRICYCLIC COMPOUNDS].

    PubMed

    Basova, L N; Basova, N E; Suvorov, A A; Yagodina, O V

    2015-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the effect of the five acridine, three phenothiazine and one xanten (pyronine G) derivatives on the activity of liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) in sexually mature male river lampreys Lampetra fluviatilis has been conducted. Tyramine, dopamine, serotonin, noradrenaline, benzylamine, β-phenylethylamine and N-methylhistamine have been used as substrates for analyzing the monoamine oxidase activity of heterocyclic compounds. The analyzed synthetic hexamerous tricyclic compounds exhibit irreversible inhibition of the enzyme but no specificity depending on the desaminated substrate. The number and identity of heteroatoms in the analyzed heterocyclic compounds have been established to influence their inhibitory efficiency. The data of substrate-inhibitory analysis obtained with the use of the specific substrates provide indirect evidence for the existence of a single MAO form in the lamprey liver.

  6. Immunocytochemical localization of calretinin in the olfactory system of the adult lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Pombal, M A; de Arriba, M C; Sampedro, C; Alvarez, R; Megías, M

    The distribution of calretinin immunoreactive (CR-ir) structures in the adult lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) olfactory system was studied by using immunocytochemical techniques. In the olfactory epithelium, a subpopulation of olfactory receptor cells was CR-ir. In the olfactory bulbs, three different cell populations were observed. Large CR-ir cells (mitral cells) were located medially to the olfactory glomeruli and occasionally between them. In the inner cellular layer, two types of CR-ir perikarya were found: numerous small CR-ir cells (granule cells) and some medium-sized CR-ir cells (putative displaced periglomerular cells). In addition, different intensities of CR-ir fibers were present in particular rootlets of the olfactory nerves, as well as in particular glomeruli. The presence of CR-ir cells and fibers in all layers of the lamprey olfactory bulbs supports the idea that this protein is present in pathways underlying the processing of sensory information throughout evolution.

  7. Evolutionary history of lamprey paired species Lampetra fluviatilis (L.) and Lampetra planeri (Bloch) as inferred from mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Espanhol, Rute; Almeida, Pedro R; Alves, M Judite

    2007-05-01

    A remarkable trend in the evolution of lampreys is the occurrence in most genera of 'paired species', in which the parasitic anadromous lampreys are believed to have given rise to nonparasitic freshwater resident populations. The present work examines the phylogeography of the European paired species Lampetra fluviatilis and Lampetra planeri, in an attempt to elucidate species pair evolutionary history. We studied sequence variation in cytochrome b and ATPase 6, 8 mitochondrial genes in 63 individuals from 21 localities of the paired species throughout their distribution range. Results from the phylogenetic and nested clade analyses were largely consistent, suggesting the existence of three major evolutionary lineages: lineage I and possibly lineage II are widespread throughout Europe, while the most ancestral lineage III is apparently restricted to the Iberian Peninsula. The high genetic diversity observed in the Iberian Peninsula is probably the result of refugial persistence and subsequent accumulation of variation over several ice ages, whereas the low levels of genetic diversity observed in central and northern Europe should reflect a rapid postglacial colonization. Results suggest that L. planeri originated within at least two distinct evolutionary lineages, rejecting the single origin hypothesis. The observed lack of taxa monophyly within lineage I may be the result of ongoing gene flow if the two taxa are alternate life-history forms of a single species. However, structure within lineage I is also consistent with the hypothesis of divergence of taxa after postglacial dispersion (around 2000 generations ago) with incomplete lineage sorting. Further testing of the alternative hypotheses is warranted.

  8. Transport of lithium across the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Gennadii P; Agalakova, Natalia I; Ivanova, Tatiana I

    2008-12-01

    Lithium, capable of replacing Na+ in various membrane transport processes, was used to investigate Na+ transport pathways across the lamprey erythrocytes membrane. The values of Li+ influxes have ranged from 8 to 24 mmol/l cells/h. Intracellular accumulation of Li+ was associated with loss of cellular Na+, the value of which was less than the value of Li+ influx. Both Li+ influx and Na+ efflux were partially inhibited by amiloride. The amiloride-sensitive Li+ influx was considerably stimulated by hyperosmotic cell shrinkage. The treatment of lamprey erythrocytes with blockers of protein phosphatases (fluoride and cantharidin) also resulted in a considerable increase in Li+ accumulation within the cells. No significant difference was observed between the values of Li+ and Na+ (22Na) influxes measured in red cells incubated simultaneously in isotonic LiCl and NaCl media (9.2 +/- 2.1 and 7.8 +/- 1.3 mmol/l cells/h, respectively). In hypo- and hypertonic media, however, the rate of Na+ influx in lamprey erythrocytes was approximately twice higher as compared to the rate of Li+ influx, what was determined by the difference in the amiloride-sensitive components. In acidified lamprey erythrocytes (intracellular pH 6.0) Li+ and Na+ influxes were considerably increased due to activation of amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ (Li+/H+) exchange mechanism, although the activity of Na+/H+ exchange was much greater than that of Li+/H+ exchange. The data obtained confirm the hypothesis on the presence of two amiloride-sensitive systems of Na+ transport in the lamprey red blood cells.

  9. Vitellogenin from female and estradiol-stimulated male river lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis L.).

    PubMed

    Mewes, Karsten Rüdiger; Latz, Martin; Golla, Holger; Fischer, Albrecht

    2002-01-01

    The influence of estradiol-17beta (E(2)) on vitellogenesis is well documented for a number of oviparous craniates. We have examined the role that estradiol-17beta plays in the induction and regulation of vitellogenin synthesis in the maturing European river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis. In both females and males the estradiol-17beta concentrations in the plasma reached comparable maximum values in March, only a few weeks before spawning. Throughout the spawning run, the vitellogenin titer in the blood of females remains rather constant while the ovary volume increases. In contrast, we never found circulating VTG in untreated male lampreys. The synthesis and secretion of the yolk precursor molecule can be induced in males, however, by high doses of estradiol injected into the coelom. Lamprey vitellogenin was isolated from the blood of maturing females as well as from hormone-stimulated males and identified by its immunological and electrophoretic properties. In the blood plasma of both maturing female and estradiol-treated male lampreys it always appears simultaneously in two different molecular forms: a vitellogenin monomer with an apparent molecular weight of 310-330kDa and a dimer. After SDS treatment, vitellogenin is represented as a 212-kDa polypeptide. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. The lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) erythrocyte; morphology, ultrastructure, major plasma membrane proteins and phospholipids, and cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Hägerstrand, H; Danieluk, M; Bobrowska-Hägerstrand, M; Holmström, T; Kralj-Iglic, V; Lindqvist, C; Nikinmaa, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the erythrocyte of the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis), a primitive vertebrate. The lamprey erythrocyte predominantly has a non-axisymmetric stomatocytelike shape. It has a nucleus and a haemoglobin-filled cytosol with a few organelles and vesicular structures. Surprisingly, there is no marginal band of microtubules. Sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Coomassie blue staining of isolated plasma membranes revealed a single band at the level of the human spectrin doublet. Major bands also occurred at approximately 175 kDa and comigrating with human erythrocyte actin (approximately 45 kDa). The presence of spectrin, actin and vimentin was shown by immunoblotting. Band 3 protein, the anion exchanger in higher vertebrates, seemed to be highly deficient or lacking, as was also the case with ankyrin. Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with immunocytochemical methods showed spectrin, actin and vimentin mainly to be localized around the nucleus, from where actin- and vimentin-strands extended out into the cytoplasm. Actin also seemed to be present at the plasma membrane. Phospholipid analyses of plasma membrane preparations showed the presence of the same four major phospholipid groups as in the human erythrocyte, although with higher and lower amounts of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, respectively. The low fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated annexin V binding, as monitored by flow cytometry, indicated that phosphatidylserine is mainly confined to the inner membrane leaflet in the lamprey erythrocyte plasma membrane.

  11. Insulin receptor downregulation in isolated hepatocytes of river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Leibush, B N; Lappova, Y L

    1995-10-01

    Insulin receptor downregulation in the isolated hepatocytes of lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) was studied at the ambient temperature for this species. Preincubation of hepatocytes with 10(-9)-10(-8) M unlabeled insulin decreased insulin binding capacity to 43, 37, and 34% at 4, 15, and 25 degrees, respectively. Preincubation of hepatocytes in the presence of 10(-10) M unlabeled insulin had no effect on the 125I-insulin binding. The maximal decrease in the 125I-insulin binding was reached after 10 min of preincubation and was then maintained at a constant level for 2 hr. Competitive binding assays demonstrated that preincubation with unlabeled insulin resulted in a 45% decline in the number of binding sites. In rat adipocytes and frog hepatocytes used for the comparison, preincubation with insulin caused a 65% decrease in cell-surface receptors, while intracellular (internalized receptors) increased proportionally. In contrast, in the lamprey hepatocytes both cell-surface and intracellular receptors decreased. We conclude that insulin receptors of the lamprey hepatocytes could be down-regulated at the ambient temperature for the species and at the physiological concentrations of insulin (10(-9)-10(-8) M).

  12. Activation of the newly discovered cyclostome renin-angiotensin system in the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Brown, J Anne; Cobb, Christopher S; Frankling, Susan C; Rankin, J Cliff

    2005-01-01

    This study describes the first investigations of the physiological signals involved in activating the newly discovered cyclostome renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and its role in the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. Experimental manipulation showed that volume depletion (removal of 40% blood volume) rapidly activated the RAS of lampreys acclimated to water at 576 mOsm kg(-1) (21 p.p.t.), significantly increasing plasma angiotensin concentrations after 30 min and 60 min. In agreement with these results, a rapid change in environmental salinity (758 mOsm kg(-1) to freshwater (FW) and FW to 605 mOsm kg(-1)), resulted in a rapid decrease and increase in plasma [angiotensin], respectively. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of FW-acclimated river lampreys with 1% body mass by volume of nominally isosmotic saline (120 mmol l(-1) NaCl; 233 mOsm kg(-1)) resulted in a significant decrease in the plasma angiotensin concentration within 15 min. In contrast, i.p. injection of hyperosmotic saline (4 mol l(-1) NaCl) at 1% body mass by volume, which significantly increased plasma osmolality, had no significant effect on plasma [angiotensin], suggesting that volume/pressure receptors and osmoreceptors interact in regulating the lamprey RAS. These results indicate an important role for volume/pressor receptors, as in teleosts, but with an additional osmoreceptor mechanism, such that circulatory [angiotensin] is determined by interaction of volume/pressure and osmoreceptors and their relative sensitivities. The volume/pressure sensitivity is in keeping with the recent evidence of a vasoconstrictor action of homologous lamprey angiotensin and provides evidence that the fundamental role of the RAS in maintaining volume and pressure is an ancient function conserved over 500 million years of vertebrate evolution.

  13. Antidiuretic action of angiotensin II in the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis: evidence for endocrine control of kidney function in cyclostomes.

    PubMed

    Cobb, C S; Brown, J A; Rankin, J C

    2010-10-01

    Intravenous infusion of angiotensin II ([Asn¹ Val⁵]-Ang II) at 10⁻⁹ mol min⁻¹ kg⁻¹ body mass produced a significant antidiuresis in river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis, captured during upstream migration and maintained in fresh water. Although the renin-angiotensin hormonal system (RAS) is now recognized in jawless fishes, until this study, the role of homologous Ang II in L. fluviatilis kidney function had not been examined. This study provides the first evidence for an antidiuretic action of Ang II in cyclostomes and, in evolutionary terms, suggests a renal function for the RAS in early vertebrates.

  14. An anatomical and electrophysiological study of the centrifugal visual system in the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Vesselkin, N P; Reperant, J; Kenigfest, N B; Miceli, D; Ermakova, T V; Rio, J P

    1984-01-30

    The centrifugal visual system of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis was investigated using various neurohistophysical methods: intraocular injections of [3H]adenosine, fluorescent tracer (Evans Blue) and the iontophoretic deposit of HRP on the optic nerve. Retrogradely labeled neurons were identified bilaterally within the nucleus M5 of Schober and contralaterally in the reticular mesencephalic area (RMA). Comparison of the various orthograde and retrograde labeling results indicated that the neurons of M5 and RMA were labeled via retrograde axonal transport of the different tracers in the retinopetal system and not by orthograde transneuronal processes or from extraretinal pathways. Part of the anatomical data regarding RMA as a site of origin of the centrifugal visual system was confirmed using electrophysiological techniques involving evoked potential and unit cell recordings in RMA following electrical stimulation of the optic nerve. The experiments were performed in the curarized animal under conditions of either normal blood circulation, perfusions of adapted physiological saline, or with a solution known to block chemical synaptic transmission. Various electrophysiological criteria, including the results obtained during the conditions of reversible chemical synaptic blockade, indicated that the responses in RMA reflect an antidromic process. The anatomical organization of the centrifugal visual system in the lamprey is compared to that found in different gnathostome vertebrate species. Several hypotheses concerning the marked interspecies differences related either to the number and the topographical location of the centrifugal neurons as well as the evolution of this system are advanced.

  15. Regulation of ion transport across lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) erythrocyte membrane by oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Virkki, L V; Salama, A; Nikinmaa, M

    1998-06-01

    We have measured the effects of oxygen tension on the transport of Na+, K+ and Cl- across the erythrocyte membrane of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. The transport of each ion was affected by the oxygen tension of the medium. Hypoxic conditions (PO2 2 kPa) caused an increase in the acidification-induced influx of Na+ via Na+/H+ exchange. The influx of K+ was only slightly affected by the oxygenation of the medium. In contrast, the basal K+ efflux, measured using the radioactive isotope 43K, was markedly reduced by decreasing the oxygen tension of the medium, whereas the K+ flux in hypotonic medium was not affected. Only minor effects of hypoxic conditions on the influx of Cl- were observed in either isotonic or hypotonic conditions (there was a tendency for the isotonic influx to increase) or on the efflux in isotonic conditions. However, deoxygenation caused a marked reduction in the Cl- efflux in hypotonic conditions. The results show that oxygen tension has a marked effect on the pH and volume regulatory transport pathways of lamprey erythrocytes. For K+ and Cl-, the regulation appears to be asymmetric, i.e. influx and efflux are affected differently.

  16. Identification of an IL-8 homolog in lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis): early evolutionary divergence of chemokines.

    PubMed

    Najakshin, A M; Mechetina, L V; Alabyev, B Y; Taranin, A V

    1999-02-01

    Subtractive hybridization was used to study river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) leukocyte-specific cDNA. A clone representing the most abundant component (12%) of the leukocyte library subtracted with liver cDNA was isolated and characterized. The cDNA encodes a presumably secreted polypeptide of 101 residues. The 3' untranslated region of the cDNA contains motifs characteristic of the transiently expressing genes. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with known protein sequences revealed its homology to the members of the chemokine superfamily. Designated as LFCA-1, the lamprey protein contains four conserved cysteines, of which the first two are separated by a residue, and a number of other CXC family characteristic residues. LFCA-1 has the highest similarity to the chicken EMF-1 (40%) and to the mammalian IL-8 (32-33%). However, it lacks the ELR motif essential for the function of the mammalian IL-8-related chemokines. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the LFCA-1 relationship to the higher vertebrate chemokines, it is concluded that the evolutionary origin of the chemokine superfamily is ancient, and that the divergence of the CXC and CC families most likely occurred at the time or before the first vertebrates emerged.

  17. Regulation of ion transport across lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) erythrocyte membrane by oxygen tension

    PubMed

    Virkki; Salama; Nikinmaa

    1998-05-21

    We have measured the effects of oxygen tension on the transport of Na+, K+ and Cl- across the erythrocyte membrane of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. The transport of each ion was affected by the oxygen tension of the medium. Hypoxic conditions (PO2 2 kPa) caused an increase in the acidification-induced influx of Na+ via Na+/H+ exchange. The influx of K+ was only slightly affected by the oxygenation of the medium. In contrast, the basal K+ efflux, measured using the radioactive isotope 43K, was markedly reduced by decreasing the oxygen tension of the medium, whereas the K+ flux in hypotonic medium was not affected. Only minor effects of hypoxic conditions on the influx of Cl- were observed in either isotonic or hypotonic conditions (there was a tendency for the isotonic influx to increase) or on the efflux in isotonic conditions. However, deoxygenation caused a marked reduction in the Cl- efflux in hypotonic conditions. The results show that oxygen tension has a marked effect on the pH and volume regulatory transport pathways of lamprey erythrocytes. For K+ and Cl-, the regulation appears to be asymmetric, i.e. influx and efflux are affected differently.

  18. Electrical excitation of the heart in a basal vertebrate, the European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Haverinen, Jaakko; Egginton, Stuart; Vornanen, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Hagfishes and lampreys (order Cyclostomata) are living representatives of an ancient group of jawless vertebrates (class Agnatha). Studies on cyclostome hearts may provide insights into the evolution of the vertebrate heart and thereby increase our understanding of cardiac function in higher vertebrates, including mammals. To this end, electrical excitability of the heart in a basal vertebrate, the European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis), was examined. Ion currents of cardiac myocytes, action potentials (APs) of atrial and ventricular muscle, and electrocardiogram (in vivo) were measured using the patch-clamp method, intracellular microelectrodes, and trailing wires, respectively. The characteristic features of fairly high heart rate (28.4 ± 3 beats min(-1)) and short AP duration (550 ± 44 and 122.1 ± 28.5 for ventricle and atrium, respectively) at low ambient temperature (5°C) are shared with cold-active teleost fishes. However, the ion current basis of the ventricular AP differs from that of other fishes. For inward currents, sodium current density (INa) is lower and calcium current density (ICa) higher than in teleost ventricles, while the kinetics of INa is slow and that of ICa is fast in comparison. Among the ventricular repolarizing currents, the delayed rectifier K(+) current is smaller than in myocytes of several teleost species. Unlike mammalian hearts, ATP-sensitive K(+) channels are constitutively open under normoxic conditions, thus contributing to negative resting membrane potential and repolarization of APs. Upstroke velocity of AP (5.4 ± 0.9 and 6.3 ± 0.6 V s(-1) for ventricular and atrial myocytes, respectively) is slower than in teleost hearts. Excitability of the lamprey heart seems to possess both primitive and advanced characteristics. Short APs are appropriate to support brief and vigorous contractions (in common with higher vertebrates), while relatively low AP upstroke velocities enable only relatively slow propagation of

  19. Reversible metabolic depression in hepatocytes of lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) during pre-spawning: regulation by substrate availability.

    PubMed

    Gamper, N L; Savina, M V

    2000-10-01

    The regulation of oxidative metabolism in hepatocytes of lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis) during the freshwater pre-spawning period of their life cycle was studied. The energy metabolism in these cells is characterized by a simplified scheme, where glycolytic ATP production is insignificant and fatty acids are the major respiratory substrates. Seasonal changes in aerobic cell metabolism include a considerable reversible depression of metabolic rate in lamprey hepatocytes during the winter months of the pre-spawning period. The depression is characterized by a more than twofold decrease in hepatocyte endogenous respiration rate, a reduction of oxidative phosphorylation and drop in cellular ATP content. The addition of fatty acids to the hepatocyte incubation medium prevents the decrease in the metabolic rate. In spring, before spawning, a marked activation of energy metabolism in lamprey hepatocytes is found. These observations support the conclusion that the regulation of lamprey hepatocyte energy metabolism is realized through the availability of fatty acids for oxidation.

  20. Oxygen consumption, ventilatory frequency and heart rate of lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis) during their spawning run.

    PubMed

    Claridge, P N; Potter, I C

    1975-08-01

    1. The standard rate of oxygen consumption, ventilatory frequency and heart rate of adult Lampetra fluviatilis were measured during the light phase of the photoperiod and at times corresponding to various stages in the upstream migration. 2. All three parameters increased during the spawning run but only in mature individuals were significant differences found between the sexes. 3. The regression coefficients for the logarithmic relationship between oxygen consumption and body weight of immature animals were 0.912 and 0.925 at 9.5 and 16 degrees C respectively. 4. Both the standard rate of oxygen consumption and the amount of oxygen taken up during activity increased greatly during the hours of darkness. 5. Oxygen consumption, ventilatory frequency and, to a lesser extent, heart rate increased significantly at 9.5 degrees C over the 100-20% range of saturation with air. 6. Below 20% saturation with air, lampreys no longer remained attached by their oral disc for prolonged periods and the ventilatory frequency rose even more rapidly to reach a maximum of 175 beats/min at 12.5%. Exposure to 7.5% resulted in death within 5-8 h.

  1. Development of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive systems in the brain of the larval lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Pierre-Simons, Jacqueline; Repérant, Jacques; Mahouche, Mohamed; Ward, Roger

    2002-05-27

    The development of the catecholaminergic system of the brain of the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) was studied with immunocytochemistry in a series of larvae of different sizes by using two different antibodies directed against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme of catecholamine synthesis. In group 1 larvae (length: 29-54 mm, ages: 8 months to 1.5 years), the only TH-immunoreactive somata observed were located in the caudal wall of the recessus praeopticus (RP) and in the nucleus tuberculi posterioris (NTP). In group 2 larvae (length: 55-80 mm, ages: 1.5-2.5 years), the somata of immunolabeled cells of the NTP give rise to fibers, most of which are ascending and terminate in the corpus striatum. Additional immunoreactive cells are observed in the nucleus praeopticus (NP), which has differentiated, and in the spinal cord. In group 3 larvae (length: 81-110 mm, ages: 2.5-4 years), the spatial distribution of TH-immunoreactive elements (somata, fibers, and terminals) bears many resemblances to that seen in the adult. Immunolabeled cells may be observed in the olfactory bulb, in the nucleus commissurae postopticae (NCP), and in the nucleus dorsalis hypothalami (NDH). Nevertheless, some groups of TH-immunoreactive cells found in the adult are not observed in group 3 larvae; these may appear during the metamorphic phase. By comparative analysis, we show that, in spite of several differences, the spatiotemporal sequence of appearance of TH-immunoreactive cell bodies and fibers in the lamprey presents many similarities to that described in gnathostomes.

  2. [Kinetic properties of sodium transport pathways in the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T I; Sherstobitov, A O; Gusev, G P

    2007-01-01

    To activate Na+/H+ exchange, intracellular pH (pHi) of erythrocytes of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis were changed from 6 to 8 using nigericin. The Na+/H+ exchanger activity was estimated from the values of amiloride-sensitive components of Na+ (22Na) inflow or of H+ outflow from erythrocytes. Kinetic parameters of the carrier functioning were determined by using Hill equation. Dependence of Na+ and H+ transport on pHi value is described by hyperbolic function with the Hill coefficient value (n) close to 1. Maximal rate of ion transport was within the limits of 9-10 mmol/l cells/min, and the H+ concentration producing the exchanger 50% activation amounted to 0.6-1.0 microM. Stimulation of H+ outcome from acidified erythrocytes (pHi 5.9) with increase of H+ concentration in the incubation medium is described by Hill equation with n value of 1.6. Concentration of Na+: for the semimaximal stimulation of H+ outcome amounted to 19 mM. The obtained results indicate the presence in lamprey erythrocytes of only one binding site for H+ from the cytoplasm side and the presence of positive cooperativity in Na+ binding from the extracellular side of the Na+/H+ exchanger. Its efflux from cells in the Na+ -free medium did not change at a 10-fold increase of H+ concentration in the incubation medium. The presented data indicate differences of kinetic properties of the lamprey erythrocyte Na+/H+ exchanger and of this carrier isoforms in mammalian cells. In intact erythrocytes the dependence of the amiloride-sensitive Na+ inflow on its concentration in the medium is described by Hill equation with n 1.5. The Na+ concentration producing the 50% transport activation amounted to 39 mM and was essentially higher as compared with that in acidified erythrocytes. These data confirm the concept of the presence of two amiloride-sensitive pathways of Na+ transport in lamprey erythrocytes.

  3. Evolution of retinoic acid receptors in chordates: insights from three lamprey species, Lampetra fluviatilis, Petromyzon marinus, and Lethenteron japonicum.

    PubMed

    Campo-Paysaa, Florent; Jandzik, David; Takio-Ogawa, Yoko; Cattell, Maria V; Neef, Haley C; Langeland, James A; Kuratani, Shigeru; Medeiros, Daniel M; Mazan, Sylvie; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Laudet, Vincent; Schubert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) signaling controls many developmental processes in chordates, from early axis specification to late organogenesis. The functions of RA are chiefly mediated by a subfamily of nuclear hormone receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. While RARs have been extensively studied in jawed vertebrates (that is, gnathostomes) and invertebrate chordates, very little is known about the repertoire and developmental roles of RARs in cyclostomes, which are extant jawless vertebrates. Here, we present the first extensive study of cyclostome RARs focusing on three different lamprey species: the European freshwater lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis, the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, and the Japanese lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum. We identified four rar paralogs (rar1, rar2, rar3, and rar4) in each of the three lamprey species, and phylogenetic analyses indicate a complex evolutionary history of lamprey rar genes including the origin of rar1 and rar4 by lineage-specific duplication after the lamprey-hagfish split. We further assessed their expression patterns during embryonic development by in situ hybridization. The results show that lamprey rar genes are generally characterized by dynamic and highly specific expression domains in different embryonic tissues. In particular, lamprey rar genes exhibit combinatorial expression domains in the anterior central nervous system (CNS) and the pharyngeal region. Our results indicate that the genome of lampreys encodes at least four rar genes and suggest that the lamprey rar complement arose from vertebrate-specific whole genome duplications followed by a lamprey-specific duplication event. Moreover, we describe a combinatorial code of lamprey rar expression in both anterior CNS and pharynx resulting from dynamic and highly specific expression patterns during embryonic development. This 'RAR code' might function in regionalization and patterning of these two tissues by

  4. Distribution of galanin-like immunoreactive elements in the brain of the adult lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, A J; Mancera, J M; Pombal, M A; Pérez-Fígares, J M; Fernández-Llebrez, P

    1996-04-29

    Galanin is a brain-gut peptide present in the central nervous system of vertebrates and invertebrates. The distribution of galanin-like immunoreactive perikarya and fibers in the brain of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis (Agnatha) has been studied immunocytochemically by using antisera against rat and porcine galanin. Galanin-like immunoreactive perikarya were seen in the telencephalon and mediobasal diencephalon. In the telencephalon, they were present in the nucleus olfactorius anterior, nucleus basalis, and especially, in the nucleus commissurae anterioris. The diencephalon contained most of the immunoreactive neurons. They were located in the nucleus commissurae praeinfundibularis, nucleus ventralis hypothalami, nucleus commissurae postinfundibularis, nucleus ventralis thalami, and nucleus dorsalis thalami pars medius. Most of the galanin-like immunoreactive infundibular neurons showed apical processes contacting the cerebrospinal fluid. Immunoreactive fibers and terminals were widely distributed throughout the neuraxis. In the telencephalon, the richest galaninergic innervation was found in the nucleus olfactorius anterior, lobus subhippocampalis, corpus striatum, and around the nucleus septi and the nucleus praeopticus. In the diencephalon, the highest density of galanin-like immunoreactive fibers was seen in the nucleus commissurae postopticae, nucleus commissurae praeinfundibularis, nucleus ventralis hypothalami, nucleus dorsalis hypothalami, and neurohypophysis. In the mesencephalon and rhombencephalon, the distribution of immunoreactive fibers was heterogeneous, being most pronounced in a region between the nucleus nervi oculomotorii and the nucleus interpeduncularis mesencephali, in the nucleus isthmi, and in the raphe region. A subependymal plexus of immunoreactive fibers was found throughout the ventricular system. The distribution of immunoreactive neurons and fibers was similar to that of teleosts but different to those of other vertebrate

  5. Diencephalic projection to reticulospinal neurons involved in the initiation of locomotion in adult lampreys Lampetra fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    El Manira, A; Pombal, M A; Grillner, S

    1997-12-29

    Morphological and electrophysiological techniques were used to characterize a diencephalic projection from the ventral thalamus to reticulospinal neurons and its role in initiating rhythmic locomotor activity in the spinal cord of adult lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis). Injection of fluorescein-coupled dextran amine (FDA) into the rhombencephalic reticular nuclei labeled neurons in the ventral thalamus region on both the ipsilateral side and the contralateral side. Injection of FDA into the ventral thalamus labeled axonal projections in all reticular nuclei, but no direct projections were found to the spinal cord. Extracellular stimulation of the ventral thalamus elicited monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), polysynaptic EPSPs, and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in reticulospinal neurons in the posterior (prrn) and middle (mrrn) rhombencephalic reticular nuclei. The monosynaptic EPSPs were blocked by the glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid and can be considered glutamatergic. The monosynaptic EPSPs were potentiated (up to 12 minutes) following a brief high-frequency stimulation. Stimulation of the ventral thalamus induced rhythmic firing of reticulospinal neurons and elicited rhythmic burst activity in the spinal ventral roots. The projections from the ventral thalamus to the reticulospinal neurons in the prrn and mrrn thus provide excitatory inputs to the reticulospinal neurons, which, in turn, can activate the spinal circuits underlying locomotion. Also, the input nuclei to the ventral thalamus were labeled following injection of FDA into this nucleus. Labeled cells were found in the olfactory bulb, pallial areas, striatum, preoptic nucleus, hypothalamus, dorsal thalamus, optic tectum, and dorsal isthmic gray. The ventral thalamus, therefore, receives inputs from several different regions in the brain and controls the level of excitability in reticulospinal neurons.

  6. [Transport of monovalent thallium across the membrane of oocyte of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis].

    PubMed

    Sherstobitov, A O; Lapin, A V; Glazunov, V V; Nikiforov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms of transport of monovalent thallium across the membrane of oocyte of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis were studied by using 204Tl. Transport of Tl+ in lamprey oocytes has been shown to be realized by at least two pathways: through Na/K-pump and by the mechanism of Na,K,Cl-cotransport. In the standard Ringer solution (mM): 4 KCl, 140 NaCl, 0.5 CaCl2, 5 glucose, 10 Tris-HCl--in the presence of oubain, the coefficient of the 204Tl stationary distribution (cell/medium) was within the range of 2.3-2.5, while the time necessary to reach its 50 % value amounted to 40-5 min at 20 degrees C. In potassium-free media, transport of 204Tl via Na/K-pump was described by simple kinetis with saturation and was characterized by the value V(max) = 520 pmol/(cell x h) and K(M) = 0.3 mM. In the presence of 4 mM K+ and 0.1 mM/l Tl+, the oubain-sensitive Tl+ flow decreased to 75 pmol/(cell x h). At activation of the mechanism of Na,K,Cl-cotransport by the outer Na+ (in Na-NMDG media of different composition) the total inflow of Tl+ reached 193 +/- 20 pmol/(cell x h), while the butamenide-sensitive component--119 +/- 12 pmol/(cell x h) with K(M) for Na+ about 20 mM. In the incubation media with variable concentration of chloride ions (replacement of Cl- by NO3(-)) the total Tl+ flow reached 220 +/- 21, while via the mechanisms of Na,K,Cl-cotransport--87 +/- 8 pmol/(cell x h). Under our experimental conditions, mechanisms of active transport and Na,K,Cl-cotransport accounted for 94% of the Tl+ inflow. The potassium channels that usually are also permeable to monovalent thallium ions were not revealed.

  7. Organisation of the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) embryonic brain: insights from LIM-homeodomain, Pax and hedgehog genes.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Joana; Mazan, Sylvie; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the embryonic development of the central nervous system of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis, we have isolated and analysed the expression patterns of members of the LIM-homeodomain, Pax, Hedgehog and Nkx2.1 families. Using degenerate RT-PCR, single representatives of Lhx1/Lhx5, Lhx2/Lhx9, Pax3/Pax7 and Hedgehog families could be isolated in L. fluviatilis. Expression analysis revealed that the lamprey forebrain presents a clear neuromeric pattern. We describe the existence of 4 embryonic diencephalic prosomeres whose boundaries can be identified by the combined and relative expressions of LfPax37, LfLhx15 and LfLhx29. This suggests that the embryonic lamprey and gnathostome forebrain are patterned in a highly similar manner. Moreover, analysis of the LfHh gene, which is expressed in the hypothalamus, zona limitans intrathalamica and floor plate, reveals the possible molecular origin of this neuromeric brain pattern. By contrast, LfHh and LfNkx2.1 expressions suggest major differences in patterning mechanisms of the ventral telencephalon when compared to gnathostomes. In summary, our findings highlight a neuromeric organisation of the embryonic agnathan forebrain and point to the possible origin of this organisation, which is thus a truly vertebrate character. They also suggest that Hh/Shh midline signalling might act as a driving force for forebrain evolution.

  8. Evidence of a recent decline in river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis parasitism of a nationally rare whitefish Coregonus lavaretus: is there a diamond in the ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus?

    PubMed

    Hume, J B; Adams, C E; Bean, C W; Maitland, P S

    2013-05-01

    Lamprey-induced scarring of the nationally rare Coregonus lavaretus, a known host of a freshwater-resident population of European river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis, was found to have declined precipitously since the establishment of several non-native fishes in Loch Lomond. Evidence presented in this study points to the possibility that L. fluviatilis in this lake may have altered its trophic ecology in response to the negative impact that non-native species, in particular ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus, have had on their favoured host. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. Distribution of a Y1 receptor mRNA in the brain of two Lamprey species, the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and the river Lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, Juan; Megías, Manuel; Pombal, Manuel A

    2013-02-01

    The neuropeptide Y system consists of several neuropeptides acting through a broad number of receptor subtypes, the NPY family of receptors. NPY receptors are divided into three subfamilies (Y1, Y2, and Y5) that display a complex evolutionary history due to local and large-scale gene duplication events and gene losses. Lampreys emerged from a basal branch of the tree of vertebrates and they are in a key position to shed light on the evolutionary history of the NPY system. One member of the Y1 subfamily has been reported in agnathans, but the phylogenetic tree of the Y1 subfamily is not yet clear. We cloned the sequences of the Y1-subtype receptor of Petromyzon marinus and Lampetra fluviatilis to study the expression pattern of this receptor in lampreys by in situ hybridization and to analyze the phylogeny of the Y1-subfamily receptors in vertebrates. The phylogenetic study showed that the Y1 receptor of lampreys is basal to the Y1/6 branch of the Y1-subfamily receptors. In situ hybridization showed that the Y1 receptor is widely expressed throughout the brain of lampreys, with some regions showing numerous positive neurons, as well as the presence of numerous cerebrospinal fluid-contacting cells in the spinal cord. This broad distribution of the lamprey Y1 receptor is more similar to that found in other vertebrates for the Y1 receptor than that of the other members of the Y1 subfamily: Y4, Y8, and Y6 receptors. Both phylogenetic relationship and expression pattern suggest that this receptor is a Y1 receptor.

  10. Embryonic expression of Tbx1, a DiGeorge syndrome candidate gene, in the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Le Mentec, Chantal; Lepage, Mario; Mazan, Sylvie

    2002-11-01

    We report the embryonic expression in the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis of Tbx1, the main candidate gene involved in DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial syndrome (DGS/VCFS). From the end of neurulation to stage 26, Tbx1 becomes progressively expressed in all developing pharyngeal arches, as they form. Transcripts are mainly restricted to the mesodermal core and to the posterior pharyngeal endoderm, excluding ingressing neural crest cells. They are also present in the otic vesicle, in a ventral and posterior location. From a later stage (stage 27) onwards, additional expression domains in the head mesenchyme, later contributing to labial muscle precursors, and in the cloacal region, become visible. The comparison of these data with those reported in the chick and the mouse indicates a high conservation of Tbx1 expression in the pharyngeal arches among vertebrates.

  11. Effect of peptides of the insulin superfamily on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in skeletal muscles of river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) during prespawning starvation.

    PubMed

    Chistyakova, O V; Kuznetsova, L A

    2009-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in skeletal muscles of the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) decreased during prespawning starvation (September-May). The observed changes were particularly pronounced in January. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, and relaxin produce an in vitro stimulatory effect on the enzyme. Insulin was most potent in this respect. Inactivation of the enzyme was accompanied by a decrease in its sensitivity to the stimulatory effect of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1.

  12. On the mechanism(s) of membrane permeability transition in liver mitochondria of lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis L.: insights from cadmium.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Elena A; Emelyanova, Larisa V; Korotkov, Sergey M; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Savina, Margarita V

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in its low conductance state is the case in hepatocytes of the Baltic lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis L.) during reversible metabolic depression taking place in the period of its prespawning migration when the exogenous feeding is switched off. The depression is observed in the last year of the lamprey life cycle and is conditioned by reversible mitochondrial dysfunction (mitochondrial uncoupling in winter and coupling in spring). To further elucidate the mechanism(s) of induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the lamprey liver, we used Cd(2+) and Ca(2+) plus Pi as the pore inducers. We found that Ca(2+) plus Pi induced the high-amplitude swelling of the isolated "winter" mitochondria both in isotonic sucrose and ammonium nitrate medium while both low and high Cd(2+) did not produce the mitochondrial swelling in these media. Low Cd(2+) enhanced the inhibition of basal respiration rate of the "winter" mitochondria energized by NAD-dependent substrates whereas the same concentrations of the heavy metal evoked its partial stimulation on FAD-dependent substrates. The above changes produced by Cd(2+) or Ca(2+) plus Pi in the "winter" mitochondria were only weakly (if so) sensitive to cyclosporine A (a potent pharmacological desensitizer of the nonselective pore) added alone and they were not sensitive to dithiothreitol (a dithiol reducing agent). Under monitoring of the transmembrane potential of the "spring" lamprey liver mitochondria, we revealed that Cd(2+) produced its decrease on both types of the respiratory substrates used that was strongly hampered by cyclosporine A, and the membrane potential was partially restored by dithiothreitol. The effects of different membrane permeability modulators on the lamprey liver mitochondria function and the seasonal changes in their action are discussed.

  13. On the Mechanism(s) of Membrane Permeability Transition in Liver Mitochondria of Lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis L.: Insights from Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Elena A.; Emelyanova, Larisa V.; Korotkov, Sergey M.; Brailovskaya, Irina V.; Savina, Margarita V.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in its low conductance state is the case in hepatocytes of the Baltic lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis L.) during reversible metabolic depression taking place in the period of its prespawning migration when the exogenous feeding is switched off. The depression is observed in the last year of the lamprey life cycle and is conditioned by reversible mitochondrial dysfunction (mitochondrial uncoupling in winter and coupling in spring). To further elucidate the mechanism(s) of induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the lamprey liver, we used Cd2+ and Ca2+ plus Pi as the pore inducers. We found that Ca2+ plus Pi induced the high-amplitude swelling of the isolated “winter” mitochondria both in isotonic sucrose and ammonium nitrate medium while both low and high Cd2+ did not produce the mitochondrial swelling in these media. Low Cd2+ enhanced the inhibition of basal respiration rate of the “winter” mitochondria energized by NAD-dependent substrates whereas the same concentrations of the heavy metal evoked its partial stimulation on FAD-dependent substrates. The above changes produced by Cd2+ or Ca2+ plus Pi in the “winter” mitochondria were only weakly (if so) sensitive to cyclosporine A (a potent pharmacological desensitizer of the nonselective pore) added alone and they were not sensitive to dithiothreitol (a dithiol reducing agent). Under monitoring of the transmembrane potential of the “spring” lamprey liver mitochondria, we revealed that Cd2+ produced its decrease on both types of the respiratory substrates used that was strongly hampered by cyclosporine A, and the membrane potential was partially restored by dithiothreitol. The effects of different membrane permeability modulators on the lamprey liver mitochondria function and the seasonal changes in their action are discussed. PMID:24995321

  14. Preoptic FMRF-amide-like immunoreactive projections to the retina in the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Médina, Monique; Repérant, Jacques; Ward, Roger; Jay, Bruno; Miceli, Dom; Kenigfest, Natalia

    2009-06-01

    A centrifugal visual system showing FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity has been demonstrated in Lampetra fluviatilis by using immunocytochemical and hodological techniques. From 50 to 60 immunoreactive neurons, labelled after contralateral intraocular injection of rhodamine beta-isothiocyanate, form a small, clearly defined, nucleus in the lateral neural plate of the magnocellular preoptic nucleus. These cells give rise to immunoreactive axons which have been observed at the base of the nucleus, in the optic chiasma and in the optic nerve, to project into the intermediate plexiform layer of the retina, which separates the layer of internal horizontal cells from the layer of external horizontal cells. This FMRF-amide-like immunoreactive centrifugal visual system is compared to that described in Gnathostomes.

  15. Experimental quantification of the swimming performance and behaviour of spawning run river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and European eel Anguilla anguilla.

    PubMed

    Russon, I J; Kemp, P S

    2011-06-01

    Using a large-scale open-channel flume, the swimming ability and behaviour of individual adult European eel Anguilla anguilla and river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis, species that exhibit anguilliform locomotion, were quantified under complex hydraulic conditions created by a 0·2-0·3 m high under- or overshot weir during four discharge regimes. Fishes were allowed to approach the weirs from both up- and downstream. All fishes passed the undershot weir, independent of discharge and direction of movement, and under high flow (mean ±S.E. 194·63 ± 6·48 l s(-1)) moved upstream against velocities that ranged between 1·75 and 2·12 m s(-1), suggesting greater maximum swimming capability than previously reported. In comparison, passage efficiency during upstream movement was lower for the overshot weir for both L. fluviatilis and A. anguilla. Downstream moving A. anguilla took longer to pass the over- than undershot weir. This study describes a methodology to attain realistic measures of swimming ability and behavioural performance required to develop multispecies fish passage criteria. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2011 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  16. Cloning and analysis of an HMG gene from the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis: gene duplication in vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Sharman, A C; Hay-Schmidt, A; Holland, P W

    1997-01-03

    Evolution has shaped the organisation of vertebrate genomes, including the human genome. To shed further light on genome history, we have cloned and analysed an HMG gene from lamprey, representing one of the earliest vertebrate lineages. Genes of the HMG1/2 family encode chromosomal proteins that bind DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner, and have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes dependent on chromatin structure. They are characterised by two copies of a conserved motif, the HMG box, followed by an acidic C-terminal region. We report here the cloning of a cDNA clone from the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis containing a gene with two HMG boxes and an acidic tail; we designate this gene LfHMG1. Molecular phylogenetic analysis shows that LfHMG1 is descended from a gene ancestral to mammalian HMG1 and HMG2. This implies that there was a duplication event in the HMG1/2 gene family, that occurred after the divergence of the jawed and jawless fishes, 450 million years ago. This conclusion supports and refines the hypothesis that there was a period of extensive gene duplication early in vertebrate evolution. We also show that the HMG1/2 family originated before the protostomes and deuterostomes diverged, over 525 million years ago.

  17. Immunocytochemical localization of dopamine and its synthetic enzymes in the central nervous system of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Pierre, J; Mahouche, M; Suderevskaya, E I; Repérant, J; Ward, R

    1997-03-31

    The distribution of dopamine (DA)-containing cell bodies, fibers, and terminals in the brain and spinal cord of Lampetra fluviatilis was investigated by immunohistochemical means. In order to distinguish dopaminergic neurons from those using other catecholamines as the primary neurotransmitter, the distribution of dopamine-immunoreactive structures was compared to that of cell bodies, fibers, and terminals labelled with antibodies directed against the enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), and phenylethanolamine-N-methyl transferase (PNMT). We define dopaminergic neurons as those that are simultaneously DA, TH, and AADC immunoreactive and at the same time DBH and PNMT nonreactive. The overall concentrations of dopamine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline and some of their metabolites were also measured via high-performance liquid chromatography of whole-brain extracts. Our results revealed the presence of 10 populations of dopaminergic neurons in the brain of the lamprey in the olfactory bulb, preoptic area, hypothalamus, rhombencephalon, and spinal cord. In addition, uniquely DA-immunoreactive neurons, in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid, were observed in the hypothalamus and spinal cord. Chromatography indicated that dopamine exists in considerably higher concentrations than noradrenaline in the lamprey brain, whereas adrenaline is absent, the latter finding being supported by our failure to observe any PNMT-immunoreactive cell bodies, fibers, or terminals. The dopaminergic system of the lamprey appears to share many features not only with that of other anamniotes but also with that of amniotes; however, as in teleosts, dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain corresponding to the substantia nigra, the retrorubral area, and the ventral tegmental area of other species do not exist in the lamprey.

  18. A significant role of sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac contraction of a basal vertebrate, the river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Vornanen, M; Haverinen, J

    2013-02-01

    Cardiac contraction and relaxation are mediated by rapidly changing calcium concentration around the myofibrils. In comparison with endotherms, ectothermic hearts are more strongly dependent on extracellular calcium for contraction suggesting this trait might represent the primitive vertebrate mode of cardiac activation. This study tests the hypothesis that intracellular calcium stores play a minor role in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling of a basal vertebrate, the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis). Contribution of sarcoplasmic reticulum to cardiac calcium management was examined by measuring the ryanodine sensitivity of contraction, determining the number of cardiac ryanodine receptors and their calcium sensitivity, assessing the size of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in enzymatically isolated cardiac myocytes and qualitative electron microscopic observations of sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac muscle. An extensive network of nonjunctional sarcoplasmic reticulum around myofibrils and numerous junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum couplings at the periphery of the myocytes was present in atrial and ventricular muscle of the lamprey heart. High numbers of ryanodine receptors were present in atrial (0.16 ± 0.04 nmol mg(-1) prot) and ventricular membranes (0.27 ± 0.03) (P < 0.01), and 10 μm ryanodine inhibited large part of contraction force in atrial (37.8 ± 5.7%) and ventricular (49.2 ± 6.5%) muscle. Sarcoplasmic reticulum is well developed in the lamprey heart and plays a significant role in cardiac calcium management. This suggests that in the common ancestor of vertebrates, cardiac excitation-contraction coupling could have been fairly strongly dependent on sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Functionally, this trait might be associated with high cardiac output and active predatory lifestyle of the lamprey. © 2012 The Authors Acta Physiologica © 2012 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  19. Apoptotic death in erythrocytes of lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis induced by ionomycin and tert-butyl hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Agalakova, Natalia I; Ivanova, Tatiana I; Gusev, Gennadii P; Nazarenkova, Anna V; Sufiyeva, Dina A

    2017-04-01

    The work examined the effects of Ca(2+) overload and oxidative damage on erythrocytes of river lamprey Lampetra fluvialtilis. The cells were incubated for 3h with 0.1-5μM Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin in combination with 2.5mM Ca(2+) and 10-100μM pro-oxidant agent tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP). The sensitivity of lamprey RBCs to studied compounds was evaluated by the kinetics of their death. Both toxicants induced dose- and time dependent phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization (annexin V-FITC labeling) and loss of membrane integrity (propidium iodide uptake). Highest doses of ionomycin (1-2μM) increased the number of PS-exposed erythrocytes to 7-9% within 3h, while 100μM tBHP produced up to 50% of annexin V-FITC-positive cells. Caspase inhibitor Boc-D-FMK (50μM), calpain inhibitor PD150606 (10μM) and broad protease inhibitor leupeptin (200μM) did not prevent ionomycin-induced PS externalization, whereas tBHP-triggered apoptosis was blunted by Boc-D-FMK. tBHP-dependent death of lamprey erythrocytes was accompanied by the decrease in relative cell size, loss of cell viability, activation of caspases 9 and 3/7, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, but all these processes were partially attenuated by Boc-D-FMK. None of examined death-associated events were observed in ionomycin-treated erythrocytes except activation of caspase-9. Incubation with ionomycin did not alter intracellular K(+) and Na(+) content, while exposure to tBHP resulted in 80% loss of K(+) and 2.8-fold accumulation of Na(+). Thus, lamprey erythrocytes appear to be more susceptible to oxidative damage. Ca(2+) overload does not activate the cytosolic death pathways in these cells.

  20. Different stocks of brook lamprey in Spain and their origin from Lampetra fluviatilis at two distinct times and places.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A M; Doadrio, I; Robalo, J I; Almada, V C

    2014-11-01

    Using the mitochondrial non-coding region I, it was shown that the two Spanish Lampetra planeri populations (Cares-Deva and Olabidea-Ugarana) correspond to different genetic units. The Cares-Deva population is probably a recent offshoot of Lampetra fluviatilis, being the Olabidea-Ugarana population less diverse and of older origin. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. [Accumulation of sodium and potassium ions in oocytes of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis during prespawning period].

    PubMed

    Sherstobitov, A O; Lapin, A V; Glazunov, V V; Nikiforov, V A; Nikiforov, A A

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of Na+ and K+ ions in oocytes of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and their transport across the plasma membrane is realized by two main mechanisms--Na,K-pump and Na,K,Cl-cotransport. At the prespawning period from December to May the intracellular Na+ concentration was observed to increase from 10 to 25 mM and the K+ concentration--from 28 to 45 mM. Results obtained on isolated oocytes with aid of 204Tl radioactive label have shown that contributions of the Na,K-pump and Na,K,Cl-cotransport to potassium accumulations were close until March. In spring, the total K+ inflow almost doubled owing to activation of the Na,K-pump, whereas contribution of Na,K,Cl-cotransport did not change. It seems that an increase of the intracellular content of the main inorganic cations in oocytes resulted in parallel activation of the Na,K-pump and probably of Na/H-exchange. The biological significance of activation of these mechanisms of ion transport at the prespawning period might be due to a necessity of accumulation of Na+ and K+ ions in concentrations optimal for subsequent embryonic development.

  2. Chloride transport in red blood cells of lamprey lampetra fluviatilis: evidence for a novel anion-exchange system

    PubMed

    Bogdanova; Sherstobitov; g

    1998-06-01

    The existence of a furosemide-sensitive Cl- transport pathway activated by external Ca2+ and Mg2+ has been demonstrated previously in studies of Cl- influx across the lamprey erythrocyte membrane. The aim of the present study was to characterize further specific Cl- transport pathways, especially those involved in Cl- efflux, in the red blood cell membrane of Lampetra fluviatilis. Cl- efflux was inhibited by 0.05 mmol l-1 dihydroindenyloxyalkanoic acid (DIOA) (81 %), 1 mmol l-1 furosemide (76 %) and 0.1 mmol l-1 niflumic acid (54 %). Bumetanide (100 micromol l-1) and DIDS (100 micromol l-1) had no effect effect on Cl- efflux. Substitution of external Cl- by gluconate, but not by NO3-, led to a gradual decline of Cl- efflux. In addition, the removal of external Ca2+ resulted in a significant reduction in the rate of Cl- efflux. Membrane depolarization caused by increasing external K+ concentration or by inhibiting K+ channels with 1 mmol l-1 Ba2+ did not affect Cl- efflux. The furosemide-sensitive component of Cl- influx was a saturable function of external [Cl-] with an apparent Km of approximately 92 mmol l-1 and Vmax of approximately 17.8 mmol l-1 cells-1 h-1. Furosemide did not affect intracellular Cl- concentration (57.6+/-5. 2 mmol l-1 cell water), measured using an ion-selective Cl- electrode, showing that a furosemide-sensitive pathway is not involved in net Cl- movement. A gradual fall (from 28.1+/-1.4 to 15. 0+/-1.3 mmol l-1 cells-1 h-1) in unidirectional Cl- influx with time was observed within 3 h of cell preincubation in the standard physiological medium. These data provide evidence for the existence for an electroneutral furosemide-sensitive anion-exchange pathway in the lamprey erythrocyte membrane that accepts chloride and nitrate, but not bicarbonate or bromide.

  3. Chloride transport in red blood cells of lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis: evidence for a novel anion-exchange system.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova AYu; Sherstobitov, A O; Gusev, G P

    1998-03-01

    The existence of a furosemide-sensitive Cl- transport pathway activated by external Ca2+ and Mg2+ has been demonstrated previously in studies of Cl- influx across the lamprey erythrocyte membrane. The aim of the present study was to characterize further specific Cl- transport pathways, especially those involved in Cl- efflux, in the red blood cell membrane of Lampetra fluviatilis. Cl- efflux was inhibited by 0.05 mmol l-1 dihydroindenyloxyalkanoic acid (DIOA) (81%), 1 mmol l-1 furosemide (76%) and 0.1 mmol l-1 niflumic acid (54%). Bumetanide (100 mumol l-1) and DIDS (100 mumol l-1) had no effect effect on Cl- efflux. Substitution of external Cl- by gluconate, but not by NO3-, led to a gradual decline of Cl- efflux. In addition, the removal of external Ca2+ resulted in a significant reduction in the rate of Cl- efflux. Membrane depolarization caused by increasing external K+ concentration or by inhibiting K+ channels with 1 mmol l-1 Ba2+ did not affect Cl- efflux. The furosemide-sensitive component of Cl- influx was a saturable function of external [Cl-] with an apparent K(m) of approximately 92 mmol l-1 and Vmax of approximately 17.8 mmol l-1 cells-1 h-1. Furosemide did not affect intracellular Cl- concentration (57.6 +/- 5.2 mmol l-1 cell water), measured using an ion-selective Cl- electrode, showing that a furosemide-sensitive pathway is not involved in net Cl- movement. A gradual fall (from 28.1 +/- 1.4 to 15.0 +/- 1.3 mmol l-1 cells-1 h-1) in unidirectional Cl- influx with time was observed within 3 h of cell preincubation in the standard physiological medium. These data provide evidence for the existence for an electroneutral furosemide-sensitive anion-exchange pathway in the lamprey erythrocyte membrane that accepts chloride and nitrate, but not bicarbonate or bromide.

  4. Molecular evolution of peptide tyrosine--tyrosine: primary structure of PYY from the lampreys Geotria australis and Lampetra fluviatilis, bichir, python and desert tortoise.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Nielsen, P F; Youson, J H; Potter, I C; Lance, V A; Conlon, J M

    1999-02-05

    Peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) has been isolated from the intestines of two species of reptile, the desert tortoise Gopherus agassizii (Testudines) and the Burmese python Python molurus (Squamata), from the primitive Actinopterygian fish, the bichir Polypterus senegalis (Polypteriformes) and from two agnathans, the Southern-hemisphere lamprey Geotria australis (Geotriidae) and the holarctic lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis (Petromyzontidae). The primary structure of bichir PYY is identical to the proposed ancestral sequence of gnathostome PYY (YPPKPENPGE10/DAPPEELAKY20/YSALR HYINL30/ITRQRY). Tortoise and python PYY differ by six and seven residues, respectively, from the ancestral sequence consistent with the traditional view that the Testudines represent an earlier divergence from the primitive reptilian stock than the Squamates. The current views of agnathan phylogeny favor the hypothesis that the Southern-hemisphere lampreys and the holarctic lampreys arose from a common ancestral stock but their divergence is of a relatively ancient (pre-Tertiary) origin. The Geotria PYY-related peptide shows only two amino acid substitutions (Pro10-->Gln and Leu22-->Ser) compared with PYY from the holarctic lamprey Petromyzon marinus. This result was unexpected as Petromyzon PYY differs from Lampetra PYY deduced from the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA (Söderberg et al. J. Neurosci. Res. 1994;37:633-640) by 10 residues. However, a re-examination of an extract of Lampetra intestine revealed the presence of a PYY that differed in primary structure from Petromyzon PYY by only one amino acid residue (Pro10-->Ser). This result suggests that the structure of PYY has been strongly conserved during the evolution of Agnatha and that at least two genes encoding PYY-related peptides are expressed in Lampetra tissues.

  5. Angiotensin converting enzyme-like activity in tissues from the river lamprey or lampern, Lampetra fluviatilis, acclimated to freshwater and seawater.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Christopher S; Frankling, Sue C; Rankin, J Clifford; Brown, J Anne

    2002-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) or kininase II is a dipeptidyl-carboxypeptidase that converts angiotensin I (Ang I) to angiotensin II (Ang II) in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and inactivates bradykinin in the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). Angiotensin converting enzyme-like activity (ACELA) has been demonstrated in a wide range of vertebrates, and only in lampreys is a lack of ACELA still suggested. Though long controversial, a lamprey RAS has recently been identified by isolation and sequencing of lamprey Ang I and the measurement of circulating plasma angiotensins. We therefore re-investigated the presence of ACE in tissues from the river lamprey or lampern, Lampetra fluviatilis, using a highly sensitive fluorimetric assay. Significant detection of ACELA was found in a wide range of lamprey tissues (brain, gill, gonad, gut, heart, liver, skeletal muscle, skin, kidney, and plasma). The mammalian ACE inhibitor captopril at 10(-5)M was an effective, but variable inhibitor of the ACELA found in most lamprey tissues. The brain contained the highest ACELA, while kidney (including urinary duct), skin, gonads, and heart only contained very low ACELA. In most tissues, ACELA was similar in lampreys acclimated to freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW). However, gut ACELA was significantly higher in lampreys acclimated to SW than in FW-acclimated lampreys. Liver, skin, and gonad ACELA was significantly lower in lampreys acclimated to SW than in FW lampreys. Male and female lampreys acclimated to FW showed similar ACELA in all tissues except the kidney (including the urinary duct), where ACELA was significantly higher in male than in female lampreys. These results indicate that ACELA, a component of the RAS and KKS, is present in tissues from one of the earliest evolved groups of vertebrates.

  6. The state of health of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis (L.) from Lake Dabie compared to the pathogens hitherto found in this host.

    PubMed

    Sobecka, Ewa; Moskal, Jerzy; Wiecaszek, Beata

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to check the health status of the anadromic river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis (L.), the most frequently recorded lamprey species in Poland caught in Lake Dabie, connected with the Odra river estuary. The species composition of parasitofauna of the river lamprey from the Polish waters was compared to the pathogens of this host noted so far. The skin and fins, eyes, oral cavity and nasal mucus of 36 lamprey specimens were examined. After decapitation the brains and gills were analysed. A single gonad, liver and the kidney wet microscopic preparations were made and examined. Examination was also made of the contents of the straight alimentary tract, the body cavity and muscles from the dorsal area. The pathogens known of the river lamprey are mostly the parasites of a very low extensity. No monogeneans were found among the parasites recorded. The reasons of such species composition of the parasitic fauna are discussed against the background of the anatomy, physiology and biology of the host. In the alimentary tract of one lamprey single larva of the nematode Anisakis simplex (Rudolphi, 1809) was found, not noted yet in this host in Poland and Europe. The parasite was noted in any of the lamprey species occurring in neither fresh nor saline waters in Europe. Such a low prevalence and intensity of the infection pointed that this nematode as many other species of parasites was swallowed accidentally.

  7. [Transmembranous currents of isolated spinal cord neurons of ammocete--larva of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis].

    PubMed

    Suderevskaia, E I; Tsvetkov, E A; Dudko, N B; Maliel', A I; Veselkin, N P

    2008-01-01

    The work is carried out with aid of the patch-clamp method in the "whole cell" modification. There were studied potential-activated and chemosensitive currents of isolated spinal neurons of the lamprey larva--ammocete. The described properties of the currents indicate their similarities with those in adult lampreys.

  8. [Mitochondrial and lysosomal pathways of death of hepatocytes of lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis L].

    PubMed

    Konovalova, S A; Savina, M V; Nikiforov, A A; Puchkova, L V

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of mitochondrial and lysosomal pathways of natural cell death in lamprey hepatocytes at the spring period of prespawning migration are described. The mitochondrial pathways (release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytosol and activation ofcaspases) operates according to the classical scheme known for apoptosis. The lysosomal cell death pathway connected with activation of cathepsin B has been revealed quite recently in cells in pathologies, in particular at obstruction of gallbladder and bile ducts. The peculiarity of lamprey hepatocytes consists in biliary atresia (the absence both of gallbladder and of bile ducts) in liver of adult animals. Thereby the lamprey hepatocytes represent an excellent object for study of this new pathway of cell death. We have revealed a parallel development of the mitochondrial and lysosomal pathways of cell death of lamprey hepatocytes.

  9. The vertebrate 7S K RNA separates hagfish (Myxine glutinosa) and lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, H C; Koper, D; Benecke, B J

    2000-05-01

    7S RNA sequences from the hagfish (Myxiniformes) and lamprey (Petromyzontiformes) were cloned and analyzed. In both species, 7S L RNA (also designated SRP RNA, since it represents the RNA constituent of the signal recognition particle) was clearly detectable. The sequence similarity between the two species was 86%, compared with about 75% similarity between either of these species and mammals. 7S K RNA was also cloned from the lamprey. The similarity between the 7S K RNA of the lamprey and that of mammals was 68%. Interestingly, several interspersed elements were found with nearly 100% similarity compared with mammals. In contrast to the lamprey, no 7S K RNA-related sequences were detectable among hagfish RNA, neither in northern blots nor with the PCR assay. In view of the significant conservation between the 7S K RNA of lamprey and that of mammals (human), this unexpected result clearly separates lamprey and hagfish. In addition, the lack of detectable 7S K RNA sequences in an outgroup, such as amphioxus, indicates that these results do not reflect an autapomorphy of hagfish. Therefore, our data provide additional support to the notion of a sister group relationship between Petromyzontiformes and gnathostomous vertebrates to the exclusion of Myxiniformes.

  10. [Peculiarities of functioning of liver mitochondria of river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and common frog Rana temporaria at periods of suppression and activation of energy metabolism].

    PubMed

    Emel'ianova, L V; Savina, M V; Beliaeva, E A; Braĭlovskaia, I V

    2007-01-01

    The work dealt with study of mitochondria in reversible metabolic suppression of hepatocytes of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis in the course of prespawning starvation and of liver mitochondria of the common frog Rana temporaria during hibernation and activity. In winter the metabolic depression of lamprey hepatocytes, unlike that of frog hepatocytes, has been found to be due to deactivation of complex I of the electron transport mitochondrial chain, a low rate of NAD-dependent substrate oxidation, a low content of adenine nucleotide content, and a high degree of mitochondrial membrane permeability to H+ and other monovalent ions (KCl-, K+). The mitochondrial membrane permeability decreases in the presence of ethyleneglycoldiamineethyltetraacetic acid (EGTA), cyclosporine A (CsA), adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP), and Mg+. These facts indicate the presence in these mitochondria of the Ca2+ -dependent unspecific pore in the low-conductance state. Histological studies showed the lamprey and the frog to have principal differences in use of energy substrates at the period of metabolic depression. Lampreys utilize predominantly lipids, whereas frogs--glycogen. The clearly pronounces activation of lipid consumption is observed at the spring period before spawning and death of lamprey. Possible causes of metabolic depression are discussed as well as similarity and difference in behavior of mitochondria of cyclostomes and amphibians throughout metabolic depression and activity.

  11. Haemoglobin H+ equilibria in lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) and hagfish (Myxine glutinosa)

    PubMed

    Jensen

    1999-07-01

    Agnathans, comprising lamprey and hagfish species, have been reported to be practically devoid of HCO3-/Cl- exchange across the red blood cell membrane. This suggests that the capacity of their haemoglobin (Hb) to remove H+ is essential for obtaining a high CO2-carrying capacity in the blood. Hydrogen ion titrations were performed on oxygenated and deoxygenated composite Hbs from river lamprey and from Atlantic hagfish at 15 degrees C and an ionic strength of 0.1 (0.1 mol l-1 KCl). Lamprey Hb was characterised by very low buffer values when the degree of oxygenation was constant, whereas the fixed-acid Haldane effect was large (uptake of approximately 0.9 H+ per monomer upon deoxygenation). Hagfish Hb, in contrast, had large buffer values and a moderate fixed-acid Haldane effect. In deoxygenated Hb, the low buffer values in lamprey correlated with the presence of only 1-1.5 titratable 'neutral' groups (normally histidines and &agr; -amino groups) per monomer, whereas there were 4-5 titratable 'neutral' groups per monomer in hagfish. The large differences in Hb/H+ equilibria between the two species reflect the early evolutionary divergence between lampreys and hagfish. With respect to CO2 transport, the special Hb/H+ equilibria and the high red blood cell pH in lamprey ensure a high concentration of free HCO3- inside the red cells in venous blood, which compensates for the absence of a shift of HCO3- to the plasma. The Hb/H+ equilibria in hagfish are less effective in ensuring a high CO2-carrying capacity given the virtual absence of a red blood cell HCO3-/Cl- exchange, and other adaptations may be involved.

  12. [The nephron microanatomy of the kidney in the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis L. before and after metamorphosis].

    PubMed

    Semenov, A V; Fok, E M; Goncharevskaia, O A

    1997-01-01

    Isolated nephrons from premetamorphic lamprey larvae and adult animals were obtained using microdissection and kidney collagenase treatment methods. Significant differences in the architectonics of kidney tubules were found in larvae as compared with adults. The position of larval kidney was cranial while that in adult lampreys was caudal. The absence of nephron loop was noted in larval kidney. Distal and proximal tubules were shifted one from another in mediolateral direction. Distal tubule was significantly larger than proximal one. Mesonephric duct was located laterally near the glomus. Kidney tubules morphogenesis and nephron population number increase was observed at premetamorphic stage of larval kidney development.

  13. The prevalence of Clostridium botulinum in European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) in Finland.

    PubMed

    Merivirta, Lauri O; Lindström, Miia; Björkroth, K Johanna; Korkeala, Hannu J

    2006-06-15

    The prevalence of Clostridium botulinum types A, B, E and F in river lampreys caught in Finnish rivers was determined for the first time using a quantitative PCR-MPN (most probable number) analysis. One of 67 raw whole lampreys (1.5%) was positive for the botulinum neurotoxin type E gene, with the estimated C. botulinum count being 100spores/kg. Two type E strains were isolated from the positive sample and confirmed as different genotypes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Although the current procedure of bringing the charcoal-broiled lampreys to market has been without any further packaging or extended storage, interest towards increasing the shelf life of the product by vacuum-packaging is increasing. Our results demonstrate that C. botulinum type E may constitute a safety hazard in processed lampreys from the Baltic Sea area if packaging and extended shelf lives are to be used. To control the potential risk, a storage temperature of 3 degrees C or below should be recommended for these products.

  14. Developing microbial spoilage population in vacuum-packaged charcoal-broiled European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Merivirta, Lauri O; Koort, Joanna M K; Kivisaari, Meija; Korkeala, Hannu; Björkroth, K Johanna

    2005-05-25

    Microbiological and sensory changes in vacuum-packaged charcoal-broiled river lampreys from three lamprey processing plants were monitored as a function of time at 8 degrees C. The lampreys were examined every 7 days up to 8 weeks for aerobic plate count (APC) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The highest mean APC and LAB were 6.01 log CFU/g and 4.86 log CFU/g, respectively. Only 6 out of 15 lots reached an APC value of 7.0 log CFU/g during storage. The sensory scores remained at the baseline levels after 8 weeks' storage. Twenty-seven isolates were randomly picked from MRS agar and identified to species level using a 16S and 23S rDNA HindIII RFLP (ribotyping) database and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene if no database match was obtained. Twelve of the 27 isolates were identified as Lactobacillus curvatus subsp. curvatus, and two Leuconostoc mesenteroides and one Weissella halotolerans strain were also detected. Twelve isolates were not identified by the LAB database. However, they possessed very high (99.9%) 16S gene sequence similarity with either Staphylococcus warneri or Staphylococcus pasteuri type strains. The LAB detected, with the exception of W. halotolerans, have commonly been associated with spoilage of fishery products, but in these vacuum-packaged lampreys, they were not the dominant organisms within the developing spoilage population.

  15. Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype II isolated from European river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis in Finland during surveillance from 1999 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Gadd, Tuija; Jakava-Viljanen, Miia; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Ariel, Ellen; Koski, Perttu; Sihvonen, Liisa

    2010-02-17

    We examined the occurrence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in the main spawning stocks of wild European river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis in the rivers of Finland from 1999 to 2008. Pooled samples of internal organs (kidney, liver and heart or brain) from 2621 lampreys were examined for the presence of VHSV by standard virological techniques. VHSV was isolated from 5 samples from the rivers Lestijoki and Kalajoki, which flow from Finland into the Bothnian Bay of the Baltic Sea. The presence of VHSV was confirmed by immunofluorescent antibody technique (IFAT), ELISA and RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis based on the full-length VHSV glycoprotein (G) gene sequence revealed that the isolates were most closely related to the VHSV strain isolated in 1996 from herring Clupea harengus and sprat Sprattus sprattus in the Eastern Gotland Basin of the Baltic Sea, and were therefore assigned to VHSV genotype II. The partial G gene sequences obtained (nt 1 to 672-1129) of all 5 lamprey VHSV isolates were identical, and so were the entire G genes (nt 1 to 1524) of 2 isolates sequenced. The virulence of one of the lamprey isolates was evaluated by an experimental infection trial in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fry. No mortality was induced postinfection by waterborne and intraperitoneal challenge, respectively, while 2 genotype Id isolates originating from Finnish rainbow trout caused marked mortality under the same conditions. The infection in the European river lamprey is thought to be independent from the epidemic in farmed rainbow trout in Finnish brackish waters, because the isolates from rainbow trout were of a different genotype. This is the first report of VHSV found in the European river lamprey. The role of wild river lampreys in maintaining the infection in the marine environment remains unclear.

  16. Lack of glomerular intermittency in the river lamprey lampetra fluviatilis acclimated to sea water and following acute transfer to iso-osmotic brackish water

    PubMed

    Brown; Rankin

    1999-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that in the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis, in contrast to teleost fish, all glomeruli are actively filtering. In the present study, we have applied the ferrocyanide technique to obtain more definitive values for the population of filtering nephrons in the lamprey under conditions of high (in fresh water) and low (in sea water) glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and when the branchial osmotic gradient was eliminated by acute transfer of freshwater lampreys to iso-osmotic brackish water. These studies demonstrated that the renal antidiuresis in lampreys acclimated to full-strength sea water does not involve any reduction in the filtering population of glomeruli. Transfer to brackish water significantly reduced GFR and thereby urine flow rate (287+/-23 ml kg-1 24 h-1 in fresh water; 6.9+/-2.5 ml kg-1 24 h-1 in brackish water). In four of the eight fish examined, 100 % of glomeruli remained filtering; in the other four fish, non-filtering glomeruli occurred in patches along the kidney, always associated with an absence of vascular perfusion, which implies possible endocrine/neural control of vascular tone. The numbers of non-filtering glomeruli were always small, and these glomeruli do not appear to make a major contribution to the overall decline in urine output. The results provide firm evidence that although lampreys, like teleosts, show considerable variations in urine output, the renal mechanisms by which lampreys and the teleosts achieve this differ fundamentally, with glomerular intermittency playing little or no part in the lamprey.

  17. [Comparative characteristics of depolarization (potassium) and acetylcholine contracture of Lampetra fluviatilis lamprey phasic muscle].

    PubMed

    Skorobovichuk, N F; Nasledov, G A

    1978-01-01

    Acetylcholine (Ach) contractures of thin bundle from m. longitudinal linguae of the lamprey differs by several parameters from depolarization (potassium) contracture, although Ach similar to K ions totally depolarizes the surface membrane of muscle fibers. Maximum tension of Ach contracture is 30--100% higher than that of K contracture, maximum of both contractures being observed at the same membrane potential level (approximately -10mV). The rate of rise of Ach contracture is 10 times higher, whereas the latent period is 3 times shorter as compared with the same parameters of K contracture. At higher Ach concentrations (10(-5)--10(-4) g/ml) the latent period of contracture is shorter than that of depolarization.

  18. Two distinct K+ channels in lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) erythrocyte membrane characterized by single channel patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Virkki, L V; Nikinmaa, M

    1998-05-01

    Two channels, distinguished by using single-channel patch-clamp, carry out potassium transport across the red cell membrane of lamprey erythrocytes. A small-conductance, inwardly rectifying K(+)-selective channel was observed in both isotonic and hypotonic solutions (osmolarity decreased by 50%). The single-channel conductance was 26 +/- 3 pS in isotonic (132 mM K+) solutions and 24 +/- 2 pS in hypotonic (63 mM K+) solutions. No outward conductance was found for this channel, and the channel activity was completely inhibited by barium. Cell swelling activated another inwardly rectifying K+ channel with a larger inward conductance of 65 pS and outward conductance of 15 pS in the on-cell configuration. In this channel, rectification was due to the block of outward currents by Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions, since when both ions were removed from the cytosolic side in inside-out patches the conductance of the channel was nearly ohmic. In contrast to the small-conductance channel, the swelling-activated channel was observed also in the presence of barium in the pipette. Neither type of channel was dependent on the presence of Ca2+ ions on the cytosolic side for activity.

  19. Regulation of iron metabolism in the sanguivore lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis--molecular cloning of two ferritin subunits and two iron-regulatory proteins (IRP) reveals evolutionary conservation of the iron-regulatory element (IRE)/IRP regulatory system.

    PubMed

    Andersen, O; Pantopoulos, K; Kao, H T; Muckenthaler, M; Youson, J H; Pieribone, V

    1998-06-01

    Two ferritin cDNAs were cloned from the liver and spinal cord of the sanguivore lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis, an extant representative of the ancient agnathan (jawless) stage in vertebrate evolution. The deduced proteins of 20.2 kDa (H-subunit) and 20.1 kDa (M-subunit) display 73% sequence identity, and both contain the ferroxidase center characteristic of animal H-ferritin. A highly conserved iron-responsive element (IRE) was identified in the 5' untranslated region of lamprey H-ferritin. Lamprey ferritin IRE forms a specific complex with crude lamprey and rat liver extracts, and with recombinant human iron-regulatory protein (IRP-1) in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Furthermore, lamprey ferritin IRE competes with labeled human ferritin IRE for binding to IRP in lamprey and mammalian extracts. Two liver cDNA sequences encoding 323 residues and 101 residues of two genetically distinct lamprey IRP were amplified by PCR. Lamprey IRP-1 and IRP-2, which are 72% identical, display about 74% sequence identity to their presumed homologues in mammals. Northern blot analysis shows that two IRP transcripts of 3.6 kb and 5.8 kb are expressed in lamprey liver. Given the ancient lineage of lampreys, the results indicate that the IRE/IRP regulatory system has remained highly conserved during the evolution of vertebrates.

  20. Circulating angiotensins in the river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis, acclimated to freshwater and seawater: possible involvement in the regulation of drinking.

    PubMed

    Rankin, J C; Cobb, C S; Frankling, S C; Brown, J A

    2001-06-01

    Plasma angiotensin levels were measured for the first time in a cyclostome, the river lamprey. With the demonstration that angiotensins are present in the circulation, the possibility of a physiological role in the regulation of drinking was re-examined. Angiotensin II and III concentrations and plasma osmolalities were significantly higher in lampreys acclimated to 28 ppt seawater than in those acclimated to freshwater. No changes were found in angiotensin II and III levels 4 h after transfer from freshwater to 50% seawater, although plasma osmolality had started to rise by this time. There was a suggestion that plasma angiotensin II levels might be related to osmolality in the transfer experiment. Injection of Asp(1)Val(5)- or Asn(1)Val(5)-angiotensin II (40-169 microg/kg body wt.) did not stimulate drinking in freshwater-acclimated lampreys, even when they were still capable of drinking. The angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril and the smooth muscle relaxant papaverine both reduced drinking rate in 50% seawater-acclimated lampreys. The data do not provide direct evidence for the involvement of the renin-angiotensin system in the control of drinking behaviour in the lamprey. Indirect evidence from the captopril effect is suggestive, but could have other explanations.

  1. Microbiology of charcoal-broiled European river lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis) stored at 3 and 22 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Merivirta, Lauri O; Björkroth, K Johanna; Korkeala, Hannu J

    2003-12-01

    The microbiological quality of 30 production lots of charcoal-broiled river lampreys was studied at three lamprey processing plants (plants A, B, and C). Samples were taken directly after charcoal broiling and stored at 22 and 3 degrees C. Lampreys were examined on the day of manufacture, and those kept at 22 degrees C were examined every second day for 6 days. Samples kept at 3 degrees C were examined every fourth day for up to 24 days. On the production day, the mean aerobic plate counts (APCs) for broiled lampreys from plants A, B, and C were 2.29 log CFU/g, 1.88 log CFU/g, and undetectable (1.67 log CFU/g), respectively. At 22 degrees C, the mean APCs for samples from plants A, B, and C increased markedly within 4 days, and after 6 days the counts for samples from these plants were 8.56, 5.04, and 6.23 log CFU/g, respectively. Chilling and storage at 3 degrees C remarkably improved the shelf life of the product. The levels of bacteria in charcoal-broiled river lampreys from plant A were higher than those in lampreys from plants B and C. No significant increases in APCs were observed during storage at 3 degrees C for 24 days; mean APCs did not exceed 2.80 log CFU/g for samples from any plant. Staphylococcus aureus was found in two samples. No lactic acid bacteria, thermotolerant coliforms, enterococci, Clostridium perfringens, or Listeria monocytogenes was detected. Microbiological data from this study will be used for the development of a hazard analysis for the determination of critical control points.

  2. The mitogenomes of the pouched lamprey (Geotria australis) and least brook lamprey (Lampetra aepyptera) with phylogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianfeng; Pu, Jiafei; Buchinger, Tyler; Zhu, Xinyun; Baker, Cindy; Li, Weiming

    2016-09-01

    We report the mitogenomes of the pouched lamprey (Geotria australis) and least brook lamprey (Lampetra aepyptera) in the families Geotriidae and Petromyzontidae, respectively. Both of the mitogenomes contain the 37 typical vertebrate genes. Their gene order and contents are identical to those of previously described lamprey mitogenomes. The mitogenome of G. australis (17 080 bp) is the largest among the 10 reported lamprey mitogenomes, owed to two long noncoding regions. The mitogenome of L. aepyptera is 77 bp longer (16 236 bp) than that of the congeneric European river lamprey L. fluviatilis, a size difference mostly due to different copy numbers of tandem repeats in the noncoding regions. The phylogenetic analysis supports that the pouched lamprey (Geotriidae) diverged earlier from the common ancestor of lampreys than the Petromyzonids, and the placement of the least brook lamprey in the genus Lampetra.

  3. ATP-consuming processes in hepatocytes of river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis on the course of prespawning starvation.

    PubMed

    Agalakova, Natalia I; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Korotkov, Sergei M; Lavrova, Elena A; Nikiforov, Anatolii A

    2016-11-01

    The work was performed to establish which of the major ATP-consuming processes is the most important for surviving of hepatocytes of female lampreys on the course of prespawning starvation. The requirements of protein synthesis and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase for ATP in the cells were monitored by the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in the presence of corresponding inhibitors from the peak of metabolic depression (January-February) to the time of recovery from it (March-April) and spawning (May). Integrity of lamprey liver cells was estimated by catalytic activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in blood plasma. In January-February, the share of ATP necessary for protein synthesis was 20-22%, whereas before spawning it decreased to 8-11%. Functioning of Na(+)-K(+)-pump required 22% of cellular ATP at the peak of metabolic depression, but 38% and 62% of ATP in March-April and May, respectively. Progression of prespawning period was accompanied by 3.75- and 1.6-fold rise of ALT and AST activities in blood plasma, respectively, whereas de Ritis coefficient decreased from 2.51±0.34 to 0.81±0.08, what indicates severe damage of hepatocyte membranes. Thus, the adaptive strategy of lamprey hepatocytes to develop metabolic depression under conditions of energy limitation is the selective production of proteins necessary for spawning, most probably vitellogenins. As spawning approaches, the maintenance of transmembrane ion gradients, membrane potential and cell volume to prevent premature cell death becomes the priority cell function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of angiotensin I in a cyclostome, Lampetra fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Rankin, John Clifford; Watanabe, Takushi X; Nakajima, Kiichiro; Broadhead, Caren; Takei, Yoshio

    2004-02-01

    Angiotensin I (ANG I) was isolated from incubates of plasma and kidney extracts of the river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis, using eel vasopressor activity as an assay during purification. Its sequence was Asn-Arg-Val-Tyr-Val-His-Pro-Phe-Thr-Leu as determined by the sequence analysis and mass spectrometry. The sequence was confirmed by identity of the elution profile with the synthetic peptide in two different reverse-phase columns of high-performance liquid chromatography. Lamprey ANG I produced dorsal-aortic pressor responses in L. fluviatilis but the rise was very small in comparison to that produced by angiotensin II. Angiotensin III produced an even bigger increase. It was not possible to demonstrate a difference in response to Asn(1) (lamprey) ANG I and Asp(1) (human) ANG I. The present study directly demonstrated the presence and biological activity of the renin-angiotensin system in the most primitive extant vertebrates, the cyclostomes. Thus the renin-angiotensin system is a phylogenetically old hormonal system that is present throughout the vertebrates.

  5. Taphonomic controls on the distribution of melanosomes in tissues from river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) and the implications for interpreting the anatomy of Mayomyzon pieckoensis from the Carboniferous, Mazon Creek Lagerstätte.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedza, Christopher; Purnell, Mark; Vinther, Jakob; Gabbott, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    Pigment bearing organelles - melanosomes - are found in a variety of tissues across a broad range of taxa. Melanin, the pigment found within these organelles, has an array of uses, including determining colouration patterns in integument, alongside acting as an antimicrobial agent in vertebrate organs. Famously, work on fossilised melanosomes has enabled palaeontologists to reconstruct the colour patterning of extinct organisms thereby providing ecological insights. Recent studies on the retina of vertebrate fossils have demonstrated the potential for fossil melanosomes to help elucidate phylogenetic relationships. However, little is known about the distribution and morphology of melanosomes throughout a single taxon in different tissues and how their distribution may be affected by decay. Here we present preliminary results into the distribution and morphology of melanosomes within different tissues of the extant river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis, in comparison to the extinct Carboniferous lamprey Mayomyzon pieckoensis. These data indicate that melanosome morphology can vary between different tissues in M. pieckoensis, particularly melanosomes found within the eyes. This has significant implications for interpreting the pigmented anatomy of extinct organisms, and provides evidence that understanding melanosome distribution and morphology could help untangle debates surrounding controversial interpretations of pigmented anatomy.

  6. D-Glucose uptake in fish hepatocytes: mediated by transporter in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), but only by diffusion in prespawning lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) and in RTH-149 cell line.

    PubMed

    Mannerström, Marika; Tähti, Hanna; Tiihonen, Kirsti; Salama, Annika

    2003-11-01

    The transport of D-glucose into rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) hepatocytes, as well as into rainbow trout hepatoblastoma cell line RTH-149 was studied using tracer methods. The half-time for D-glucose equilibration was 15 s for rainbow trout. The half-times for the non-metabolizable D-glucose analog, 3-O-methyl-D-glucose equilibration were 8 s, 37 s and 38 s for rainbow trout, lamprey and RTH-149 cells, respectively. The 3-O-methyl-D-glucose was taken up by rainbow trout hepatocytes by facilitated diffusion in addition to simple diffusion. The uptake showed saturation kinetics with the K(m) of 37 mM and V(max) of 62 mmol kg(-1) cells min(-1). The uptake was sensitive to phloretin and cytochalasin B, but not affected by ouabain. The 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake by lamprey hepatocytes and RTH-149 cells showed no indication of saturation up to 160 mM, and was not affected by phloretin, cytochalasin B or ouabain, which suggests the mode of transport to be by passive diffusion. However, immunocytochemical stainings revealed the existence of mammalian type GLUT1 and GLUT2 transporters in all cells studied. The lack of a functioning carrier-mediated glucose uptake in lamprey hepatocytes might be due to its physiological state (prespawning starvation). The minor 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake into RTH-149 cells compared to freshly isolated rainbow trout hepatocytes might reflect low metabolic activity of the cell lines. Under the conditions applied the RTH-149 cell line is no suitable in vitro model for glucose transport in fish cells.

  7. Phylogeographical analysis reveals multiple conservation units in brook lampreys Lampetra planeri of Portuguese streams.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A M; Robalo, J I; Freyhof, J; Maia, C; Fonseca, J P; Valente, A; Almada, V C

    2010-08-01

    The populations of brook lamprey Lampetra planeri of Portuguese Rivers were analysed phylogeographically using a fragment of 644 bp of the mitochondrial control region of 158 individuals from six populations. Samples representing L. planeri and migratory lampreys Lampetra fluviatilis of rivers draining to the North Sea and the Baltic Sea were also included to assess the relationships of Portuguese samples. The data support a clear differentiation of all the populations studied. Several populations, which are isolated among themselves and also from the migratory lampreys, proved to be entirely composed of private haplotypes, a finding that supports some time of independent evolutionary history for these populations. This, combined with the geographic confinement to small water bodies, justifies the recognition of at least four conservation units in the Portuguese rivers Sado, São Pedro, Nabão and Inha.

  8. Isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci in the brook lamprey Lampetra planeri (Petromyzontiformes) using 454 sequence data.

    PubMed

    Schedina, I M; Pfautsch, S; Hartmann, S; Dolgener, N; Polgar, A; Bianco, P G; Tiedemann, R; Ketmaier, V

    2014-09-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed for the brook lamprey Lampetra planeri through 454 sequencing and their usefulness was tested in 45 individuals of both L. planeri and the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. The number of alleles per loci ranged between two and five; the Italian and Irish populations had a mean expected heterozygosity of 0·388 and 0·424 and a mean observed heterozygosity of 0·418 and 0·411, respectively. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. Anthropogenic Influence on the Dynamics of the River Lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis Landings in the River Daugava Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birzaks, Janis; Abersons, Kaspars

    2011-01-01

    The construction of the Daugava hydro power station (HPS) cascade has significantly transformed Latvia's largest river the Daugava, reducing its importance in the natural reproduction of anadromous fish species. Currently in Latvia, as well as in other Baltic Sea countries, the river lamprey catch is decreasing, whereas the landings in the river Daugava have tended to increase. The dynamics of the river lamprey landings show the possible redistribution of lamprey stocks between the rivers Gauja and the Daugava. Possibly, this is a result of anthropogenic influence and changes in the river lamprey resource management may be necessary in the future.

  10. Glucose and free amino acids in the blood of lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis L.) and frogs (Rana temporaria L.) under prolonged starvation.

    PubMed

    Emelyanova, Larisa V; Koroleva, Elena M; Savina, Margarita V

    2004-08-01

    The content variation dynamics of glucose and free amino acids in blood plasma was followed for lampreys and frogs from autumn till spring, when the exogenous feeding is switched off. In October, the glucose level is rather high (8-10 mM) in blood plasma of both lampreys and frogs. It falls by 50% during winter and falls to a critically low level (1-2 mM) during spring. The lamprey plasma amino acid levels increase by 74% from November to April and thus reach the lower limit known for mammals. The amount of free amino acids in frog plasma decreases by 40% by spring in comparison with the values in autumn. More intensive proteolysis in lamprey tissues compared with that in frog tissues has been confirmed by quantitatively determining leucine, isoleucine, and valine in the blood of these animals. Besides these three amino acids, alanine, glycine, lysine, threonine and, in certain periods, tyrosine have been found to be quantitatively significant in the plasma of both animals.

  11. Biological responses of midge (Chironomus riparius) and lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) larvae in ecotoxicity assessment of PCDD/F-, PCB- and Hg-contaminated river sediments.

    PubMed

    Salmelin, J; Karjalainen, A K; Hämäläinen, H; Leppänen, M T; Kiviranta, H; Kukkonen, J V K; Vuori, K M

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the utility of chironomid and lamprey larval responses in ecotoxicity assessment of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans (PCDD/F)-, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)- and mercury (Hg)-contaminated river sediments. Sediment samples were collected from the River Kymijoki with a known industrial pollution gradient. Sediment for the controls and lamprey larvae were obtained from an uncontaminated river nearby. Contamination levels were verified with sediment and tissue PCDD/F, PCB and Hg analyses. Behaviour of sediment-exposed chironomid and lamprey larvae were measured with Multispecies Freshwater Biomonitor© utilizing quadrupole impedance conversion technique. In addition, mortality, growth and head capsule deformity incidence of chironomids were used as ecotoxicity indicators. WHOPCDD/F+PCB-TEQ in the R. Kymijoki sediments ranged from the highest upstream 22.36 ng g(-1) dw to the lowest 1.50 ng g(-1) near the river mouth. The sum of PCDD/Fs and PCBs correlated strongly with Hg sediment concentrations, which ranged from <0.01 to 1.15 μg g(-1). Lamprey tissue concentrations of PCDD/Fs were two orders and PCBs one order of magnitude higher in the R. Kymijoki compared to the reference. Chironomid growth decreased in contaminated sediments and was negatively related to sediment ∑PCDD/Fs, WHOPCDD/F+PCB-TEQ and Hg. There were no significant differences in larval mortality or chironomid mentum deformity incidence between the sediment exposures. The distinct behavioural patterns of both species indicate overall applicability of behavioural MFB measurements of these species in sediment toxicity bioassays. Chironomids spent less and lampreys more time in locomotion in the most contaminated sediment compared to the reference, albeit statistically significant differences were not detected. Lamprey larvae had also a greater activity range in some of the contaminated sediments than in the reference. High pollutant levels in lamprey indicate risks

  12. [PHOSPHOLIPIDS AND FATTY ACIDS IN ERYTHROCYTES OF THE LAMPREY LAMPETRA FLUVIATILIS DURING AUTUMN PRESPAWNING PERIOD AND THE ABSORPTION SPECTRUM OF THEIR LIPID EXTRACT].

    PubMed

    Zabelinskii, S A; Chebotareva, M A; Shukolyukova, E P; Krivchenko, A I

    2015-01-01

    The content of some classes of phospholipids and their fatty acid composition in erythrocytes of the lamprey Lampetrafluviatilis during the autumn period of its prespawning migration are investigated. It is found that the phospholipid spectrum of erythrocytes of the lamprey, the oldest representative of vertebrates, is similar to that of many mammals. A four-fold prevalence of phosphatidilcholine content over sphingomyelin content as well as prevalence of (ω3-acids over ω6-acids indicates the of lamprey's erythrocyte membranes - an important indicator of deformational ability of lamprey's erythrocytes. Phosphatidilethanol amine and its plasmalogenic form are the most unsaturated phospholipids (their unsaturation indices are 230 and 342, correspondingly). Phosphatidilcholine is the most saturated one (UI is 167). It is found that the basic acid indicators characterizing the fluidity of erythrocyte membranes remain unchanged during the whole period of prespawning migration of lampreys up to spawning. The blood contains several buffer systems, in particular, membrane phospholipids which neutralize acids and alkali incoming into the blood. In the process of organism life a change of pH inside erythrocytes occurs. One can suppose that the base of the system associated with buffer properties of the blood is water dissociation. Inside thin vessels of the circulatory system the hemoglobin attaches and returns molecules of oxygen due to interaction of the buffer systems with water. The property of water to dissociate as well as ion transfer produce in erythrocytes, lying within narrow vessels of the circulatory system, a local pH alteration allowing displacing/attaching the molecule of oxygen from hemoglobin.

  13. The hypothalamo-hypophysial system of the lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis L. III. High-resolution radioautography of monoaminergic structures in neurohemal regions.

    PubMed

    Belenky, M A; Chetverukhin, V K; Polenov, A L

    1979-12-01

    The distribution of monoaminergic structures was studied in the proximal neurosecretory contact region and neurohypophysis of the lamprey by light and electron microscopic radioautography. Only weak radioautographic reactions were found in the proximal neurosecretory contact region 1 h after injection of 3H-dopamine. High-resolution radioautography revealed some labeled neurosecretory terminals mainly in contact with the basement membrane of the connective tissue layer separating the proximal neurosecretory contact region from the hypophysial pars distalis. The number of silver grains as well as the number of neurosecretory terminals marked by the presence of labeled dopamine was much higher in the neurohypophysis of the same species. In the latter, labeled neurosecretory terminals were found in contact with the connective tissue layer containing blood vessels of the general circulation. Some neurosecretory terminals make synaptoid contacts with tanycyte perikarya and their basal processes. According to their ultrastructure and the size of their granules, the labeled neurosecretory terminals are identical with the B type terminals described in both neurohemal regions (transmission electron microscopy). No labeled neurosecretory terminals were observed in the proximal neurosecretory contact region and the neurohypophysis of lampreys treated with the serotonin precursor, 3H-5-hydroxytryptophan.

  14. The complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the agnathan Lampetra fluviatilis: bearings on the phylogeny of cyclostomes.

    PubMed

    Delarbre, C; Escriva, H; Gallut, C; Barriel, V; Kourilsky, P; Janvier, P; Laudet, V; Gachelin, G

    2000-04-01

    There are two competing theories about the interrelationships of craniates: the cyclostome theory assumes that lampreys and hagfishes are a clade, the cyclostomes, whose sister group is the jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes); the vertebrate theory assumes that lampreys and gnathostomes are a clade, the vertebrates, whose sister group is hagfishes. The vertebrate theory is best supported by a number of unique anatomical and physiological characters. Molecular sequence data from 18S and 28S rRNA genes rather support the cyclostome theory, but mtDNA sequence of Myxine glutinosa rather supports the vertebrate theory. Additional molecular data are thus needed to elucidate this three-taxon problem. We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mtDNA of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. The mtDNA of L. fluviatilis possesses the same genomic organization as Petromyzon marinus, which validates this gene order as a synapomorphy of lampreys. The mtDNA sequence of L. fluviatilis was used in combination with relevant mtDNA sequences for an approach to the hagfish/lamprey relationships using the maximum-parsimony, neighbor-joining, and maximum-likelihood methods. Although trees compatible with our present knowledge of the phylogeny of craniates can be reconstructed by using the three methods, the data collected do not support the vertebrate or the cyclostome hypothesis. The present data set does not allow the resolution of this three-taxon problem, and new kinds of data, such as nuclear DNA sequences, need to be collected.

  15. On the origin of the olfactory receptor family: receptor genes of the jawless fish (Lampetra fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Freitag, J; Beck, A; Ludwig, G; von Buchholtz, L; Breer, H

    1999-01-21

    In vertebrates, recognition of odorous compounds is based on a large repertoire of receptor subtypes encoded by a multigene family. Towards an understanding of the phylogenetic origin of the vertebrate olfactory receptor family, attempts have been made to identify related receptor genes in the river lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis), which are descendants of the earliest craniates and living representatives of the most ancient vertebrates. Employing molecular cloning approaches led to the discovery of four genes encoding heptahelical receptors, which share only a rather low overall sequence identity but several of the characteristic structural hallmarks with vertebrate olfactory receptors. Furthermore, in situ hybridization studies demonstrated that the identified genes are expressed in chemosensory cells of the singular lamprey olfactory organ. Molecular phylogenetic analysis confirmed a close relationship of the lamprey receptors to vertebrate olfactory receptors and in addition demonstrated that olfactory genes of the agnathostomes diverged from the gnathostome receptor genes before those split into class I and class II receptors. The data indicate that the lamprey receptors represent the most ancient family of the hitherto identified vertebrate olfactory receptors.

  16. Synaptic circuitry in the retinorecipient layers of the optic tectum of the lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis). A combined hodological, GABA and glutamate immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Repérant, Jacques; Ward, Roger; Médina, Monique; Kenigfest, Natalia B; Rio, Jean-Paul; Miceli, Dom; Jay, Bruno

    2009-09-01

    The ultrastructure of the retinorecipient layers of the lamprey optic tectum was analysed using tract tracing techniques combined with GABA and glutamate immunocytochemistry. Two types of neurons were identified; a population of large GABA-immunonegative cells, and a population of smaller, highly GABA-immunoreactive interneurons, some of whose dendrites contain synaptic vesicles (DCSV). Five types of axon terminals were identified and divided into two major categories. The first of these are GABA-immunonegative, highly glutamate-immunoreactive, contain round synaptic vesicles, make asymmetrical synaptic contacts, and can in turn be divided into AT1 and AT2 terminals. The AT1 terminals are those of the retinotectal projection. The origin of the nonretinal AT2 terminals could not be determined. AT1 and AT2 terminals establish synaptic contacts with DCSV, with dendrites of the retinopetal neurons (DRN), and with conventional dendritic (D) profiles. The terminals of the second category are GABA-immunoreactive and can similarly be divided into AT3 and AT4 terminals. The AT3 terminals contain pleiomorphic synaptic vesicles and make symmetrical synaptic contacts for the most part with glutamate-immunoreactive D profiles. The AT4 terminals contain rounded synaptic vesicles and make asymmetrical synaptic contacts with DRN, with DCSV, and with D profiles. A fifth, rarely observed category of terminals (AT5) contain both clear synaptic vesicles and a large number of dense-core vesicles. Synaptic triads involving AT1, AT2 or AT4 terminals are rare. Our findings are compared to these of previous studies of the fine structure and immunochemical properties of the retinorecipient layers of the optic tectum or superior colliculus of Gnathostomes.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA variation of an isolated population of the Adriatic brook lamprey Lampetra zanandreai (Agnatha: Petromyzontidae): phylogeographic and phylogenetic inferences.

    PubMed

    Caputo, V; Giovannotti, M; Nisi Cerioni, P; Splendiani, A; Marconi, M; Tagliavini, J

    2009-12-01

    Two mitochondrial genes were examined to compare an isolated population of the Adriatic brook lamprey Lampetra zanandreai in central Italy with other populations in the species range (Po plain) and with parasitic and freshwater lampreys. A single haplotype, identical to one in a Venetian sample, was found in 10 individuals from the isolated population. The reduced variability is consistent with a history of dispersal after the Pleistocene expansion of the Po basin. The results support the hypothesis of an origin of L. zanandreai and L. fluviatilis-L. planeri from a common anadromous ancestor.

  18. Pax6 expression patterns in Lampetra fluviatilis and Scyliorhinus canicula embryos suggest highly conserved roles in the early regionalization of the vertebrate brain.

    PubMed

    Derobert, Y; Baratte, B; Lepage, M; Mazan, S

    We report expression patterns of the Pax6 gene in the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula and the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis during neurulation and at the beginning of organogenesis. At the stages studied, both genes display very similar expression domains in the dorsal forebrain, with a sharp posterior boundary at the diencephalon-mesencephalon border, in the hindbrain, excluding the floor plate and the roof plate, and in the spinal cord. The comparison of these expression patterns with those reported in osteichthyans suggests that the roles played by Pax6 in early brain regionalization have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution.

  19. Swimming behaviour of juvenile Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, Dennis D.; Moursund, Russell A.; Bleich, Matthew D.

    2006-02-01

    Actively migrating juvenile Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata Richardson, 1836) were collected from hydroelectric bypass facilities in the Columbia River and transferred to the laboratory to study their diel movement patterns and swimming ability. Volitional movement of lamprey was restricted mainly to night, with 94% of all swimming activity occurring during the 12-hr dark period. Burst speed of juvenile lamprey ranged from 56 to 94 cm/s with a mean of 71 ±5 cm/s or an average speed of 5.2 body lengths (BL)/s. Sustained swim speed for 5-min test intervals ranged from 0 to 46 cm/s with a median of 23 cm/s. Critical swimming speed was 36.0±10.0 cm/s and 2.4±0.6 BL/s. There was no significant relationship between fish length and critical swimming speed. Overall swimming performance of juvenile Pacific lamprey is low compared to that of most anadromous teleosts. Their poor swimming ability provides a challenge during the freshwater migration interval to the Pacific Ocean.

  20. Influence of band 3 protein absence and skeletal structures on amphiphile- and Ca(2+)-induced shape alterations in erythrocytes: a study with lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis), trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) and human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hägerstrand, H; Danieluk, M; Bobrowska-Hägerstrand, M; Iglic, A; Wróbel, A; Isomaa, B; Nikinmaa, M

    2000-06-01

    Amphiphiles which induce either spiculated (echinocytic) or invaginated (stomatocytic) shapes in human erythrocytes, and ionophore A23187 plus Ca(2+), were studied for their capacity to induce shape alterations, vesiculation and hemolysis in the morphologically and structurally different lamprey and trout erythrocytes. Both qualitative and quantitative differences were found. Amphiphiles induced no gross morphological changes in the non-axisymmetric stomatocyte-like lamprey erythrocyte or in the flat ellipsoidal trout erythrocyte, besides a rounding up at higher amphiphile concentrations. No shapes with large broad spicula were seen. Nevertheless, some of the 'echinocytogenic' amphiphiles induced plasma membrane protrusions in lamprey and trout erythrocytes, from where exovesicles were shed. In trout erythrocytes, occurrence of corrugations at the cell rim preceded protrusion formation. Other 'echinocytogenic' amphiphiles induced invaginations in lamprey erythrocytes. The 'stomatocytogenic' amphiphiles induced invaginations in both lamprey and trout erythrocytes. Surprisingly, in trout erythrocytes, some protrusions also occurred. Some of the amphiphiles hemolyzed lamprey, trout and human erythrocytes at a significantly different concentration/membrane area. Ionophore A23187 plus Ca(2+) induced membrane protrusions and sphering in human and trout erythrocytes; however, the lamprey erythrocyte remained unperturbed. The shape alterations in lamprey erythrocytes, we suggest, are characterized by weak membrane skeleton-lipid bilayer interactions, due to band 3 protein and ankyrin deficiency. In trout erythrocyte, the marginal band of microtubules appears to strongly influence cell shape. Furthermore, the presence of intermediate filaments and nuclei, additionally affecting the cell membrane shear elasticity, apparently influences cell shape changes in lamprey and trout erythrocytes. The different types of shape alterations induced by certain amphiphiles in the cell

  1. Giant American brook lampreys, Lampetra lamottei, in the upper Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.; Purvis, Harold A.

    1971-01-01

    Five female American brook lampreys, Lampetra lamottei, collected in lakes Michigan and Huron averaged nearly twice as long and about six times as heavy as American brook lampreys of normal size. Three factors suggested that the giant lampreys may have fed parasitically after metamorphosis: morphological adaptations of the species for parasitic life, their large size, and absence of extremely large ammocetes among a million sampled.

  2. Genetic diversity, endemism and phylogeny of lampreys within the genus Lampetra sensu stricto (Petromyzontiformes: Petromyzontidae) in western North America.

    PubMed

    Boguski, D A; Reid, S B; Goodman, D H; Docker, M F

    2012-11-01

    Phylogenetic structure of four Lampetra species from the Pacific drainage of North America (western brook lamprey Lampetra richardsoni, Pacific brook lamprey Lampetra pacifica, river lamprey Lampetra ayresii and Kern brook lamprey Lampetra hubbsi) and unidentified Lampetra specimens (referred to as Lampetra sp.) from 36 locations was estimated using the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian inferences did not correspond with any taxonomic scheme proposed to date. Rather, although L. richardsoni (from Alaska to California) and L. ayresii (from British Columbia to California) together constituted a well-supported clade distinct from several genetically divergent Lampetra populations in Oregon and California, these two species were not reciprocally monophyletic. The genetically divergent populations included L. pacifica (from the Columbia River basin) and L. hubbsi (from the Kern River basin) and four Lampetra sp. populations in Oregon (Siuslaw River and Fourmile Creek) and California (Kelsey and Mark West Creeks). These four Lampetra sp. populations showed genetic divergence between 2.3 and 5.7% from any known species (and up to 8.0% from each other), and may represent morphologically cryptic and thus previously undescribed species. A fifth population (from Paynes Creek, California) may represent a range extension of L. hubbsi into the Upper Sacramento River. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  3. Identification of Larval Pacific Lampreys (Lampetra Tridentata), River Lampreys (L. Ayresi) and Western Brook Lampreys (L. Richardson) and Thermal Requirements of Early Life History Stages of Lampreys : Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwig, Michael H.

    2003-02-01

    Two fundamental aspects of lamprey biology were examined to provide tools for population assessment and determination of critical habitat needs of Columbia River Basin lampreys (the Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata, and the western brook lamprey, L. richardsoni). In particular: (1) we examined the usefulness of current diagnostic characteristics in identification of larval lampreys, specifically pigmentation patterns, and collected material for development of meristic and morphometric descriptions of early life stages of lampreys, and (2) we examined the effects of temperature on survival and development of early life stages of Columbia River Basin lampreys.

  4. Status Report of the Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra Trzdentata) in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect

    Close, David A.; Parker, Blaine; James, gary

    1995-07-01

    The widespread decline of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Pacific Northwest, especially in the Columbia River system has led to concerns and questions from a number of regional agencies, Native American tribes, and the public. To address these concerns, new research efforts must focus on specific problems associated with this understudied species. The preservation and restoration of this species is critical for a number of reasons, including its importance to the tribes and its importance as an indicator of ecosystem health. Historically lamprey have been labeled a pest species due to the problems associated with the exotic sea lamprey, (Petromyzon marinus), invading the Great Lakes.

  5. The presence of a galanin-like peptide in the gut neuroendocrine system of Lampetra fluviatilis and Acipenser transmontanus: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Bosi, G; Shinn, A P; Giari, L; Arrighi, S; Domeneghini, C

    2004-08-01

    Galanin is a brain-gut neuropeptide present in the central and peripheral nervous systems of vertebrates. In the present survey, the galaninergic and the diffuse endocrine systems of the alimentary canal of the river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis, and the white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus, were studied by immunohistochemistry. The results show the presence of galanin-like immunoreactive endocrine cells in the gut of L. fluviatilis. In addition, a galanin-like immunoreactivity was detected in enteric intramural neurons of both species. It is conceivable that the galaninergic system plays in both species a role in the regulation of the gut muscle contractility and in the modulation of mucosal secretive/absorptive processes. In A. transmontanus, the presence of galanin-like immunoreactive nerve fibres associated with components of the gut associated-lymphoid tissue is possibly correlated with a control of the defensive events at this site. The presence of a galanin-like immunoreactivity in the neuroendocrine system of these two ancient fishes confirms the hypothesis on the early occurrence of this regulative molecule in the gastro-enteric system of vertebrates.

  6. Lampetra soljani, a new brook lamprey from the southern Adriatic Sea basin (Petromyzontiformes: Petromyzontidae).

    PubMed

    Tutman, Pero; Freyhof, Jörg; Dulčić, Jakov; Glamuzina, Branko; Geiger, Matthias

    2017-06-07

    Lampetra soljani, new species, is described from the lower Neretva River in the Adriatic Sea basin. Previously it was identified as L. zanandreai. Based on morphological similarity and mitochondrial genetic data, it is related to L. lanceolata and L. ninae from the Black Sea basin. Lampetra soljani is distinguished from all other species of Lampetra by having a marmorate flank pattern in live, fully grown ammocoetes, and in some adults (vs. plain colour pattern). Lampetra soljani is distinguished from other Lampetra species by having three velar tentacles, 54-57 trunk myomeres between the last branchial opening and the anus, no posterial teeth and a bicuspid middle endolateral tooth. Lampetra soljani is also well distinguished by COI barcode data from its congeners. The new species is widespread in the Neretva River drainage and lampreys from Lake Skadar basin are likely to belong to this species also.

  7. Characterization of Brachyury genes in the dogfish S. canicula and the lamprey L. fluviatilis. Insights into gastrulation in a chondrichthyan.

    PubMed

    Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Baratte, Blandine; Lepage, Mario; Mazan, Sylvie

    2003-11-15

    In order to gain insights into the evolution of gastrulation mechanisms among vertebrates, we have characterized a Brachyury-related gene in a lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis, and in a chondrichthyan, Scyliorhinus canicula. These two genes, respectively termed LfT and ScT, share with their osteichthyan counterparts prominent expression sites in the developing notochord, the tailbud, but also a transient expression in the prechordal plate, which is likely to be ancestral among vertebrates. In addition, the lamprey LfT gene is transcribed in the endoderm of the pharyngeal arches and the epiphysis, two expression sites that have not been reported thus far in gnathostomes, and, as in the chick, in the differentiating nephrotomes. Since Brachyury expression in nascent mesoderm and endoderm is highly conserved among vertebrates as well as cephalochordates, we have used this marker to identify these cell populations during gastrulation in the dogfish. The results suggest that these cells are initially present over the whole margin of the blastoderm and are displaced during gastrulation to its posterior part, which may correspond to the site of mesoderm and endoderm internalization. These data provide the first molecular characterization of gastrulation in a chondrichthyan. They indicate that gastrulation in the dogfish and in some amniotes shares striking similarities despite the phylogenetic distance between these species. This supports the hypothesis that the extensively divergent morphologies of gastrulae among vertebrates largely result from adaptations to the presence of yolk.

  8. Anti-angiogenic activities of CRBGP from buccal glands of lampreys (Lampetra japonica).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi; Liu, Yu; Duan, Dandan; Gou, Meng; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jihong; Li, Qingwei; Xiao, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs), characterized by 16 conserved cysteines, are distributed in a wide range of organisms, such as secernenteas, amphibians, reptiles and mammals. In the previous studies, a novel CRISP family member (cysteine-rich buccal gland protein, CRBGP) was separated from the buccal gland of lampreys (Lampetra japonica, L. japonica). Lamprey CRBGP could not only suppress depolarization-induced contraction of rat tail arterial smooth muscle, but also block voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). In the present study, the anti-angiogenic activities of lamprey CRBGP were investigated using endothelial cells and chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) models. In vitro assays, lamprey CRBGP is able to induce human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) apoptosis by disturbing the calcium homeostasis and mitochondria functions. In addition, lamprey CRBGP could inhibit proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion and tube formation of HUVECs by affecting the organization of F-actin and expression level of matrix metallo-proteinase 2 (MMP-2), matrix metallo-proteinase 9 (MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) which are related to angiogenesis. In vivo assays, lamprey CRBGP could suppress the blood vessel formation in CAM models. Therefore, lamprey CRBGP is an important protein present in the buccal gland of lampreys and might help lampreys suppress the contraction of blood vessels, nociceptive responses and wound healing of host fishes during their feeding time. In addition, lamprey CRBGP might have the potential to act as an effective anti-angiogenic factor for the treatment of abnormal angiogenesis induced diseases.

  9. Identification and characterization of a cathepsin D homologue from lampreys (Lampetra japonica).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rong; Zhang, Zhilin; Wang, Hongyan; Han, Yinglun; Gou, Meng; Li, Bowen; Duan, Dandan; Wang, Jihong; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2015-03-01

    Cathepsin D (EC 3.4.23.5) is a lysosomal aspartic proteinase of the pepsin superfamily which participates in various digestive processes within the cell. In the present study, the full length cDNA of a novel cathepsin D homologue was cloned from the buccal glands of lampreys (Lampetra japonica) for the first time, including a 124-bp 5' terminal untranslated region (5'-UTR), a 1194-bp open reading frame encoding 397 amino acids, and a 472-bp 3'-UTR. Lamprey cathepsin D is composed of a signal peptide (Met 1-Ala 20), a propeptide domain (Leu 21-Ala 48) and a mature domain (Glu 76-Val 397), and has a conserved bilobal structure. Cathepsin D was widely distributed in the buccal glands, immune bodies, hearts, intestines, kidneys, livers, and gills of lampreys. After challenging with Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus, the expression level of lamprey cathepsin D in the buccal gland was 8.5-fold or 6.5-fold higher than that in the PBS group. In addition, lamprey cathepsin D stimulated with Escherichia coli was also up-regulated in the hearts, kidneys, and intestines. As for the Staphylococcus aureus challenged group, the expression level of lamprey cathepsin D was found increased in the intestines. The above results revealed that lamprey cathepsin D may play key roles in immune response to exogenous pathogen and could serve as a potential antibacterial agent in the near future. In addition, lamprey cathepsin D was subcloned into pcDNA 3.1 vector and expressed in the human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The recombinant lamprey cathepsin D could degrade hemoglobin, fibrinogen, and serum albumin which are the major components in the blood, suggested that lamprey cathepsin D may also act as a digestive enzyme during the adaptation to a blood-feeding lifestyle.

  10. Identification of larval Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata), river lampreys (L. ayresi), and western brook lampreys (L. richardsoni) and thermal requirements of early life history stages of lampreys. Annual report 2002-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.; Reiche, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Two fundamental aspects of lamprey biology were examined to provide tools for population assessment and determination of critical habitat needs of Columbia River Basin (CRB) lampreys (the Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata, and the western brook lamprey, L. richardsoni). We evaluated the usefulness of current diagnostic characteristics for identification of larval lampreys (i.e., pigment patterns) and collected material for development of meristic and morphometric descriptions of early life stage CRB lampreys, and we determined the effects of temperature on survival and development of early life stage CRB lampreys. Thirty-one larval lampreys were collected from locations throughout the CRB and transported to the Columbia River Research Laboratory. Lampreys were sampled at six-week intervals at which time they were identified to the species level based on current diagnostic characteristics. Sampling was repeated until lampreys metamorphosed, at which time species identification was validated based on dentition, or until they died, at which time they were preserved for genetic examination. These lampreys were sampled 30 times with two individuals metamorphosing, both of which were consistently identified, and subsequently validated, as Pacific lampreys. Of the remaining lampreys, only one was inconsistently identified (Pacific lamprey in 83% of the sampling events and western brook lamprey in 17% of the sampling events). These data suggest that pigmentation patterns do not change appreciably through time. In 2001 and 2002 we artificially spawned Pacific and western brook lampreys in the laboratory to provide material for meristic and morphometric descriptions. We collected, digitized, preserved, and measured the mean chorion diameter of Pacific and western brook lamprey embryos. Embryos ranged in development from 1 d post fertilization to just prior to hatch, and were incubated at 14 C. Mean chorion diameter was greater and more variable for Pacific lampreys (mean

  11. Identification of Larval Pacific Lampreys (Lampetra tridentata), River Lampreys (L. ayresi), and Western Brook Lampreys (L. richardsoni) and Thermal Requirements of Early Life History Stages of Lampreys, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwig, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Two fundamental aspects of lamprey biology were examined to provide tools for population assessment and determination of critical habitat needs of Columbia River Basin (CRB) lampreys (the Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata, and the western brook lamprey, L. richardsoni). We evaluated the usefulness of current diagnostic characteristics for identification of larval lampreys (i.e., pigment patterns) and collected material for development of meristic and morphometric descriptions of early life stage CRB lampreys, and we determined the effects of temperature on survival and development of early life stage CRB lampreys. Thirty-one larval lampreys were collected from locations throughout the CRB and transported to the Columbia River Research Laboratory. Lampreys were sampled at six-week intervals at which time they were identified to the species level based on current diagnostic characteristics. Sampling was repeated until lampreys metamorphosed, at which time species identification was validated based on dentition, or until they died, at which time they were preserved for genetic examination. These lampreys were sampled 30 times with two individuals metamorphosing, both of which were consistently identified, and subsequently validated, as Pacific lampreys. Of the remaining lampreys, only one was inconsistently identified (Pacific lamprey in 83% of the sampling events and western brook lamprey in 17% of the sampling events). These data suggest that pigmentation patterns do not change appreciably through time. In 2001 and 2002 we artificially spawned Pacific and western brook lampreys in the laboratory to provide material for meristic and morphometric descriptions. We collected, digitized, preserved, and measured the mean chorion diameter of Pacific and western brook lamprey embryos. Embryos ranged in development from 1 d post fertilization to just prior to hatch, and were incubated at 14 C. Mean chorion diameter was greater and more variable for Pacific lampreys (mean

  12. Suppression of neuronal excitability by the secretion of the lamprey (Lampetra japonica) provides a mechanism for its evolutionary stability.

    PubMed

    Chi, Shaopeng; Xiao, Rong; Li, Qingwei; Zhou, Liwei; He, Rongqiao; Qi, Zhi

    2009-07-01

    Lampreys are one of the most primitive vertebrates still living today. They attach themselves to the body surface of the host fish through their sucker-like mouths and suck blood of the host for days. Recent fossil evidence has indicated that morphology of lampreys in the late Devonian period, over 360 million years ago, already possessed the present day major characteristics, suggesting the evolutionary stability of a highly specialized parasitic feeding habit. Obviously, nociceptive responses and hemostasis of the host are two major barriers to long-term feeding of the parasitic lamprey. It has been found, to counteract hemostasis of the host, that paired buccal glands of lampreys secrete antihemostatic compounds to prevent blood of the host from coagulation. However, it is not known how lampreys make the host lose nociceptive responses. Here, we prepared components of the crude extract from the buccal glands of the lampreys (Lampetra japonica). Then, we show that crude extract and one of its purified components reduce the firing frequency of neuronal action potentials probably through inhibiting the voltage-dependent Na(+) channels. As the voltage-gated Na(+) channels are highly conserved throughout evolution, we argue that the secretion of the lampreys could exert the similar effect on the Na(+) channels of their host fish as well. Therefore, together with its antihemostatic effect, the secretion due to its inhibitory effect on neuronal excitability might provide a mechanism for the parasitic lampreys to keep their evolutionary stability.

  13. Brown trout Salmo trutta redd superimposition by spawning Lampetra species in a lowland stream.

    PubMed

    Nika, N; Virbickas, T

    2010-12-01

    Reproductive interaction between sympatric lampreys and salmonids was studied. The superimposition of brown trout Salmo trutta redds by spring-spawning river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and brook lamprey Lampetra planeri was examined in a small lowland stream of western Lithuania. A high superimposition rate of S. trutta redds by both L. fluviatilis (up to 83%) and L. planeri (up to 48%) was found, when the spawning intensity of Lampetra spp. was high. The occurrence of this phenomenon is the result of the overlap in the spawning habitat preferences at the reach-scale and at the microhabitat scale for the three species. One of the main requirements for Lampetra spp. spawning site selection was the negative streambed slope, an essential trait of the pool-riffle transitional zone. The structure of the salmonid redd created a considerable negative microhabitat slope suitable for Lampetra spp. spawning, which put the redds under a higher susceptibility to be superimposed. The timing of Lampetra spp. spawning overlapped closely with the emergence of S. trutta fry, suggesting a probable ecological effect of superimposition on S. trutta in the pre-emergent and emerging stages. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2010 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  14. Catalytic properties of CYP1A isoforms in the liver of an agnathan (Lampetra fluviatilis) and two species of teleost (Pleuronectes flesus, Anguilla anguilla).

    PubMed

    Rotchell, J M; Steventon, G B; Bird, D J

    2000-02-01

    The catalytic activity of CYP1A isoforms and the effect of mammalian CYP1A-specific inhibitors in liver S9 fractions were studied in an agnathan (River lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis, 30-33 cm) and in two species of teleost fish (European flounder, Pleuronectes flesus, 11-18 cm and common eel, Anguilla anguilla, 31-48 cm). Ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD), caffeine N-demethylation/C-oxidation and phenacetin O-deethylation (POD) activity increased 3-4-fold in flounders and 17-46-fold in eels, 5 days after fish were injected (i.p.) with 100 mg kg(-1) benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P). In lampreys, basal EROD activity was very low and no increase in activity was observed following exposure to B[a]P. While the apparent Michaelis constant (K(m)) for each assay showed only small changes after B[a]P injection, maximum reaction velocity (V(max)) values increased by up to 19- and 84-fold for EROD activity, 4- and 35-fold for caffeine-related metabolism and 4- and 19-fold for POD activity in flounders and eels, respectively. The mammalian CYP1A2 inhibitor furafylline (50 microM-1 mM) reduced activity in the EROD, caffeine and POD assays to 65, 21 and 20% of control values in flounders and to 85, 10 and 5% of control values in eels, respectively. By contrast, low concentrations (0.025-0.050 microM) of the mammalian CYP1A1 inhibitor ellipticine completely abolished EROD activity, but had no effect (up to 1 mM) on caffeine metabolism or POD activity in either species. While the inhibitor studies strongly suggest that two separate enzymes are present in flounders and eels, the monophasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics obtained in all the assays imply that only a single CYP1A protein is present that has substrate and inhibitor specificities characteristic of both mammalian CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 isoforms.

  15. A novel protein tyrosine kinase Tec identified in lamprey, Lampetra japonica.

    PubMed

    Li, Ranran; Su, Peng; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Qiong; Zhu, Ting; Pang, Yue; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2015-08-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase Tec, a kind of non-receptor tyrosine kinase, is primarily found to be expressed in T cells, B cells, hematopoietic cells, and liver cells as a cytoplasmic protein. Tec has been proved to be a critical modulator of T cell receptor signaling pathway. In the present study, a homolog of Tec was identified in the lamprey, Lampetra japonica. The full-length Tec cDNA of L. japonica (Lja-Tec) contains a 1923 bp open reading frame that encodes a 641-amino acid protein. The multi-alignment of the deduced amino acid sequence of Lja-Tec with typical vertebrate Tecs showed that it possesses all conserved domains of the Tec family proteins, indicating that an ortholog of Tec exists in the extant jawless vertebrate. In the phylogenetic tree that was reconstructed with 24 homologs of jawless and jawed vertebrates, the Tecs from lampreys and hagfish were clustered as a single clade. The genetic distance between the outgroup and agnathan Tecs' group is closer than that between outgroup and gnathostome Tecs' group, indicating that its origin was far earlier than any of the jawed vertebrates. The mRNA levels of Lja-Tec in lymphocyte-like cells and gills were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results showed that it was significantly upregulated under stimulation with mixed pathogens. This result was further confirmed by western blot analysis. All these results indicated that Lja-Tec plays an important role in immune response. Our data will provide a reference for the further study of lamprey Tec and its immunological function in jawless vertebrates.

  16. Molecular cloning, expression pattern, and molecular evolution of the spleen tyrosine kinase in lamprey, Lampetra japonica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Su, Peng; Li, Ranran; Zhang, Qiong; Zhu, Ting; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2015-04-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a member of Syk family of cytoplasmic non-receptor tyrosine kinases, is a key component of B cell receptor signaling and regulates multiple physiological functions of B lymphocytes in vertebrates. In the current study, a Syk homologue was identified in the lamprey Lampetra japonica (Lj-Syk). The cDNA fragment of Lj-Syk contains a 1953-bp open reading frame which encodes 651 amino acids, a 12-bp fragment of 5'-untranslated region, and a 1029-bp 3'-untranslated region. The same as vertebrate's Syks, Lj-Syk protein also contains a tyrosine kinase catalytic domain which functions as its kinase activity center and two Src homology 2 (SH2) domains which are the targets when Syk is recruited by phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif. It is revealed by multiple sequence alignment that the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain and two SH2 domains are conserved throughout the Syk gene family in vertebrates. The evolutionary dynamics of Syks were analyzed by MEME software using conserved motifs as markers. Among 19 conserved motifs elicited from 22 Syks or Syk-like proteins, 12 motifs that locate at N-terminal, two tandem SH2, Inter SH2, and Tyrkc domains are conserved in Syks from jawless to jawed vertebrates. From the absence and existence of the other seven motifs, it can be concluded that the primary Syk gene evolved to modern functional gene through short insertion and deletion strategy in their gene sequence rather than gene duplication. The expression of lamprey Syk was examined by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot methods in leukocyte cells, gills, supraneural myeloid bodies, kidneys, and hearts of lampreys before and after the animals were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The transcriptional level of lamprey Syk was upregulated in gill, kidney, heart, and leukocyte cells, and the protein expression level is upregulated in leukocyte cells and supraneural myeloid bodies after stimulated with LPS. It

  17. Neuroanatomical evidence for electroreception in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Fritzsch, B; Crapon de Caprona, M D; Wächtler, K; Körtje, K H

    1984-01-01

    The patterns of the anterior lateral-line afferents of Lampetra fluviatilis as revealed by transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase are described. The afferents form two roots in entering the rhombencephalon. Fibers of the dorsalmost root can be traced to a short dorsal fascicle which runs along the dorsal nucleus. The ventral roots form two fascicles adjacent to the nucleus intermedius. Comparison with urodeles indicates that lampreys, like urodeles and other anamniotic vertebrates are electroreceptive.

  18. Characterization, phylogenetic analysis and cDNA cloning of natterin-like gene from the blood of lamprey, Lampetra japonica.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhuang; Liu, Xin; Pang, Yue; Yu, Tao; Xiao, Rong; Jin, Minli; Han, Yinglun; Su, Peng; Wang, Jihong; Lv, Li; Wu, Fenfang; Li, Qingwei

    2012-01-01

    Lamprey as a "living fossil" of immunological origin and "rich treasure" of biological pharmaceutical development has caused attention of scholars. The cDNA library construction and EST sequencing of blood had been done previously in our lab, and bioinformatics analysis provided a gene fragment which is highly homologous with natterin family, named natterin-like. To elucidate the characterization and phylogeny of natterin-like genes in early evolution, we cloned the full-length cDNA of natterin-like gene from the blood of Lampetra japonica. The open reading frame of this sequence contained 942bp and encoded 313 amino acids, including a lectin-like domain and a pore-forming toxin-like domain. Using reverse transcription PCR, natterin-like mRNA was also detected in lamprey blood, kidney, heart, liver, medullary, gonad, but absent in lamprey intestine and gill. Our results suggested that in lampreys and most of other species, there might be only one natterin-like gene, which was fused by certain sequences during evolution and encoded proteins with more functions. It is similar between C terminal of natterin-like protein and Aerolysin in space structure and the lectin-like domain of natterin-like equivalent to glycoprotein binding motif of Aerolysin in function. We also propose that the defense mechanism against specific predators in historical evolution of lamprey. Our findings may provide insights into the function and characterization of natterin-like genes as well as other gene families in vertebrates and provide a foundation for identification and structural, functional, and evolutionary analyses of more natterin-like genes and other gene families.

  19. Selection and preference of benthic habitat by small and large ammocoetes of the least brook lamprey (Lampetra aepyptera)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.M.; Welsh, S.A.; Turk, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory study, we quantified substrate selection by small (<50 mm) and large (100-150 mm) ammocoetes of the least brook lamprey (Lampetra aepyptera). In aquaria, ammocoetes were given a choice to burrow into six equally-available substrate types: small gravel (2.360-4.750 mm), coarse sand (0.500-1.400 mm), fine sand (0.125-0.500 mm), organic substrate (approximately 70% decomposing leaves/stems and organic sediment particles, and 30% silt and fine sand), an even mixture of silt, clay, and fine sand, and silt/clay (<0.063 mm). Fine sand was selected with a significantly higher probability than any other substrate. Fine sand habitat is limited in many streams, in part owing to geology, but also as a result of channelization and excessive silt/clay sedimentation, which is a conservation concern. Our results indicate that ammocoetes of least brook lampreys are habitat specialists that prefer fine sand habitat. Hence, availability of fine sand habitat may limit distributions and population sizes. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  20. Selection and preference of benthic habitat by small and large Ammocoetes of the Least Brook Lamprey (Lampetra aepyptera)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Dustin M.; Welsh, Stuart; Turk, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory study, we quantified substrate selection by small (<50 mm) and large (100–150 mm) ammocoetes of the least brook lamprey (Lampetra aepyptera). In aquaria, ammocoetes were given a choice to burrow into six equally-available substrate types: small gravel (2.360–4.750 mm), coarse sand (0.500–1.400 mm), fine sand (0.125–0.500 mm), organic substrate (approximately 70% decomposing leaves/stems and organic sediment particles, and 30% silt and fine sand), an even mixture of silt, clay, and fine sand, and silt/clay (<0.063 mm). Fine sand was selected with a significantly higher probability than any other substrate. Fine sand habitat is limited in many streams, in part owing to geology, but also as a result of channelization and excessive silt/clay sedimentation, which is a conservation concern. Our results indicate that ammocoetes of least brook lampreys are habitat specialists that prefer fine sand habitat. Hence, availability of fine sand habitat may limit distributions and population sizes.

  1. First evidence of protein G-binding protein in the most primitive vertebrate: serum lectin from lamprey (Lampetra japonica).

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhuang; Pang, Yue; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Zhen; Xiao, Rong; Jin, Minli; Han, Yinglun; Su, Peng; Lv, Li; Wang, Jihong; Li, QingWei

    2013-12-01

    The intelectins, a recently identified subgroup of extracellular animal lectins, are glycan-binding receptors that recognize glycan epitopes on foreign pathogens in host systems. Here, we have described NPGBP (novel protein G-binding protein), a novel serum lectin found in the lamprey, Lampetra japonica. RT-PCR yielded a 1005 bp cDNA sequence from the lamprey liver encoding a 334 amino acid secretory protein with homology to mammalian and aquatic organism intelectins. Gene expression analyses showed that the NPGBP gene was expressed in the blood, intestines, kidney, heart, gill, liver, adipose tissue and gonads. NPGBP was isolated by protein G-conjugated agarose immunoprecipitation, and SDS-PAGE analyses showed that NPGBP migrated as a specific band (∼35 and ∼124 kDa under reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively). These results suggested that NPGBP forms monomers and tetramers. NPGBP gene expression was induced by in vivo bacterial stimulation, and NPGBP showed different agglutination activities against pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. The induction of NPGBP suggested that it plays an important role in defense against microorganisms in the internal circulation system of the lamprey. When incubated with an unrelated antibody, the specific binding between NPGBP and protein G was competitively inhibited, indicating that NPGBP and the Fc region of Ig bind to the same site on protein G. We thus assume that the tertiary structure of NPGBP is similar to that of the Fc region of Ig. Additionally, NPGBP can effectively promote endothelial cell mitosis. These findings suggest that NPGBP plays a role in the immune defense against microorganisms, and this study represents one of the few examples of the characterization and functional analysis of an aquatic organism intelectin.

  2. Preparation, identfication, and activity assay of lamprey (lampetra japonica) natural intelectins.

    PubMed

    Su, Peng; Zheng, Zhen; Pang, Yue; Xue, Zhuang; Gou, Meng; Han, Yinglun; Liu, Ge; Zan, Qi; Li, Qingwei

    2015-01-01

    Intelectins play an important role in innate immune response. In a previous study, lamprey inteletins purified by galactose-Sepharose were inactive and insoluble. Herein, we provided a simple and effective method to purify natural intelectins from the serum of lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum) using proteinG agarose. SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to analyze the purified proteins. The purified proteins were identified to be lamprey serum lectin and intelectinB. The activity analysis results indicated that the proteins had certain extent agglutination activity. The effective method will be useful to study their immune functions and molecular mechanisms.

  3. Molecular cloning, expression pattern, and phylogenetic analysis of a tetraspanin CD82-like molecule in lamprey Lampetra japonica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Song, Xueying; Su, Peng; Gou, Meng; Wang, Hao; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2016-03-01

    CD82, a member of the tetraspanins, is originally identified as an accessory molecule in T cell activation, and it participates in the formation of immune synapse both in T cells and antigen-presenting cells of jawed vertebrates. In the present study, a CD82 homologous complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence is identified in the lamprey Lampetra japonica. The open reading frame of this sequence is 801 bp long and encodes a 266-amino acid protein. The multialignment of this sequence with several typical CD82s and CD37s of jawed vertebrates shows that it also possesses their conserved four transmembrane domains and a six-cysteine motif Cys-Cys-Gly…Cys-Ser-Cys…Cys…Cys, which is a characteristic motif of CD82 and CD37 vertebrate tetraspanin sequences. Since it is close to CD82s in sequence similarity, we name it as Lja-CD82-like. From the distribution profile of the conserved motifs of CD82-like, CD82, and CD37 molecules from molluscas to mammals, it seems that the CD82s and CD37s evolved from a common ancestral gene through a gene duplication event to their modern forms by a short insertion or substitution approaches. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that CD82 and CD37 molecules of jawed vertebrates originated from a common ancestral gene which is close to agnathan CD82-like and evolved into two distinct paralogous groups maybe after the divergence of jawed and jawless vertebrates. An expression vector with trigger factor (TF) was constructed to ensure that Lja-CD82-like express in prokaryotic expression host. The expressions of Lja-CD82-like messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in immune-related tissues of lamprey were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Results showed that the mRNA and the protein levels of Lja-CD82-like were significantly upregulated in lymphocyte-like cells, gills, and supraneural myeloid bodies after stimulation with mixed antigens, respectively. Our data provided a foundation for the further study

  4. [Peculiarities of dopamine receptors on the membrane of spinal cord multipolar neurons of the brook lamprey Lampetra planeri].

    PubMed

    Bukinich, A a; Tsvetkov, E A; Veselkin, N P

    2007-01-01

    On isolated multiporal neurons of spinal cord of amniocoete larva of the brook lamprey Lampetra planeri, by the patch-clamp method in configuration "the whole cell", a modulating effect of dopamine on potential-activated Na+ currents was studied. Application of dopamine (10 microM) was shown to produce a complex action on the sodium current amplitude. In some cases a decrease of the amplitude, on average, by 13.5 +/- 2.2% was found, while in others--an increase, on average, by 8.6 +/- 6.1%. The modulation dopamine effect was not accompanied by any changes either of the threshold of the current appearance or of resistance of neuronal cell membranes. Pharmacological analysis with use of dopamine agonist has shown that the agonist of D1-receptors (-)-SKF-38393 (10 microM) decreases the Na+ current amplitude, whereas the agonist of D2-receptors (-)-quinpirole (10 microM) can produce in different cells both an increase, by 30.7 +/- 17.0 %, and a decrease, by 13.2 +/- 3.1%, of the Na+ current amplitude. The obtained data indicate the existence of D1- and D2-receptors on the membrane of multipolar spinal neurons of the amniocoete larva of the brook lamprey. Study of action of antagonists has shown that the antagonist of D1-receptors (+)-SCH-23390 (10 microM) does not affect action of the agonist of D1-receptors (-)-SKF-38393 (10 microM); the antagonist of D2-receptors (-)-sulpiride (10 microM) blocks completely effects both of the agonist of D1-receptors (-)-SKF-38393 (10 microM) and of the agonist of D2-receptors (-)-quinpirole (10 microM). The antagonist of D1-receptors (+)-SCH-23390 (10 microM) produced no effect on action of the agonist of D1-receptors (-)-SKF-38393 (10 microM). The obtained data indicate peculiarities of dopamine receptors of Cyclostomata as compared with those in mammals.

  5. Lampetra fluviatilis neurotrophin homolog, descendant of a neurotrophin ancestor, discloses the early molecular evolution of neurotrophins in the vertebrate subphylum.

    PubMed

    Hallböök, F; Lundin, L G; Kullander, K

    1998-11-01

    We have isolated a neurotrophin from the lamprey that permitted us to perform a phylogenetic analysis of the neurotrophin gene family that dates back more than 460 million years to the early vertebrate ancestors. The results show that the neurotrophin gene family was originally formed by two subsequent duplications. The duplication that formed nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin-4/5 occurred after the split of lampreys but before the split of cartilaginous fish from the main vertebrate lineage. Compilation of chromosomal gene maps around the neurotrophins shows that they are located in paralogous regions, suggesting that the genes were formed at major duplication events possibly by complete genome doubling. Analysis of two isolated Trk receptor sequences shows similar results as for the lamprey neurotrophin. Multiple neurotrophin and Trk genes, including neurotrophin-6 and -7, have been found in bony fish, and we suggest that the extra genes were formed by an additional duplication in the bony fish lineage. Analysis of lamprey Trk mRNA expression in the adult brain shows that the genes are expressed in all regions analyzed so far. Together, the results suggest that the duplications of ancestral neurotrophin and Trk genes at an early vertebrate stage have permitted evolution to bring about differential neurotrophin and Trk expression, thereby allowing the formation of specific functions in selective neuronal populations.

  6. [Immunoreactivity of the synapses on the primary afferent axons and sensory neurons of the spinal cord Lampetra fluviatilis].

    PubMed

    Adanina, V O; Rio, J P; Adanina, A S; Reperan, J; Veselkin, N P

    2008-01-01

    The existence of GABA-like immunoreactivity in the synapses on the primary afferent axons and GABA- and glutamate immunoreactive synapses on the dorsal cell somatic membrane was shown using double postembedding immunogold cytochemistry. These morphological findings suggest that control of the sensory information in the lamprey spinal cord is realized by means of presynaptic inhibition through the synapses on the primary afferent axons as well as directly through the synapses on the somata of the sensory neurons.

  7. Identification of Larval Pacific Lampreys (Lampetra Tridentata), River Lampreys (L. Ayresi) and Western Brook Lampreys (L. Richardsoni) and Thermal Requirements of Early Life History Stages of Lampreys : Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwig, Michael H.

    2002-01-01

    Lampreys inhabit temperate regions in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Typically, lampreys spawn in fresh water streams where, after hatching, larval lampreys (ammocoetes) burrow into soft substrate and spend an extended larval period filtering particulate matter from the water column. During this larval period, lampreys are characterized by greatly reduced subcutaneous eyes, reduced fins, unidirectional flow of water from the mouth through the gill pores for filter feeding, and the absence of tooth-like keratin plates (the structure most often used to differentiate lamprey species). After approximately three to seven years (Hardisty and Potter 1971a) lampreys go through a metamorphosis marked by drastic physiological and morphological changes. The resulting juvenile lampreys exhibit fully developed eyes, fins, and characteristic dentition patterns.

  8. Identification and characterization of a novel IκB-ε-like gene from lamprey (Lampetra japonica) with a role in immune response.

    PubMed

    Su, Peng; Liu, Xin; Han, Yinglun; Zheng, Zhen; Liu, Ge; Li, Jing; Li, Qingwei

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear factor of kappa B (NF-κB) is a stimuli-activated transcription factor, regulates the expression of a diverse array of genes. Inhibitor of kappa B-epsilon (IκB-ε) is an inhibitor of NF-κB, which retains NF-κB in an inactive state in the cytoplasm. Lampreys (Lampetra japonica) belong to the lowest class of vertebrates with little information about its IκBs. We have identified a cDNA sequence IκB-ε-like in the lamprey and the deduced amino acid sequence of IκB-ε-like. It contains a conserved DSGxxS motif and six consecutive ankyrin repeats, which are necessary for signal-induced degradation of the molecule. Phylogenetic analysis indicated it had high sequence homology with IκB-εs from other vertebrates. FACS analysis showed that IκB-ε-like located in cytoplasm of leukocytes. The degradation of IκB-ε-like could be observed in leukocytes of L. japonica stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. These results indicate that IκB-ε proteins are conserved across vertebrates and the NF-κB-like signaling pathway may exist in the oldest agnatha.

  9. Two lamprey Hedgehog genes share non-coding regulatory sequences and expression patterns with gnathostome Hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Kano, Shungo; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Osório, Joana; Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-10-13

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences.

  10. Two Lamprey Hedgehog Genes Share Non-Coding Regulatory Sequences and Expression Patterns with Gnathostome Hedgehogs

    PubMed Central

    Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences. PMID:20967201

  11. Paradoxical exploitation of protected fishes as bait for anglers: evaluating the Lamprey bait market in Europe and developing sustainable and ethical solutions.

    PubMed

    Foulds, William L; Lucas, Martyn C

    2014-01-01

    A reoccurring conservation problem is the resolution of consumptive use of threatened wildlife and is especially difficult to defend when it occurs for recreational practices. We explored the commercial capture and supply of threatened European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) to anglers, to determine the extent of exploitation and seek opportunities for improved conservation. The trade began in 1995 from England, but by 2012 involved sale of lamprey from England, The Netherlands and Estonia, including from protected populations. Lamprey are sold frozen for the capture of predatory fish, mostly in freshwater. In the year 2011/2012 9 tonnes (>90,000 lampreys) of river lamprey were supplied, almost exclusively to British anglers. Although annual catches in the main English lamprey fishery (River Ouse) have varied widely since 1995, catch per unit effort did not decline between 2000 and 2012. Conservation actions since 2011 have included a cap on fishing licenses, catch quotas and restricted fishing seasons. Now, 86% of lamprey bait is imported to Britain. Most bait sellers interviewed would not stock lamprey if they knew they were from threatened populations; many felt their trade would not be impacted if lamprey were not stocked. This facilitates opportunities to enter into dialogue with anglers over alternative baits to threatened lamprey. The study emphasises the need to inform stakeholders about conservation species subjected to market-driven exploitation.

  12. Paradoxical Exploitation of Protected Fishes As Bait for Anglers: Evaluating the Lamprey Bait Market in Europe and Developing Sustainable and Ethical Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Foulds, William L.; Lucas, Martyn C.

    2014-01-01

    A reoccurring conservation problem is the resolution of consumptive use of threatened wildlife and is especially difficult to defend when it occurs for recreational practices. We explored the commercial capture and supply of threatened European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) to anglers, to determine the extent of exploitation and seek opportunities for improved conservation. The trade began in 1995 from England, but by 2012 involved sale of lamprey from England, The Netherlands and Estonia, including from protected populations. Lamprey are sold frozen for the capture of predatory fish, mostly in freshwater. In the year 2011/2012 9 tonnes (>90,000 lampreys) of river lamprey were supplied, almost exclusively to British anglers. Although annual catches in the main English lamprey fishery (River Ouse) have varied widely since 1995, catch per unit effort did not decline between 2000 and 2012. Conservation actions since 2011 have included a cap on fishing licenses, catch quotas and restricted fishing seasons. Now, 86% of lamprey bait is imported to Britain. Most bait sellers interviewed would not stock lamprey if they knew they were from threatened populations; many felt their trade would not be impacted if lamprey were not stocked. This facilitates opportunities to enter into dialogue with anglers over alternative baits to threatened lamprey. The study emphasises the need to inform stakeholders about conservation species subjected to market-driven exploitation. PMID:24936643

  13. Contrasting population genetic structure among freshwater-resident and anadromous lampreys: the role of demographic history, differential dispersal and anthropogenic barriers to movement.

    PubMed

    Bracken, Fiona S A; Hoelzel, A Rus; Hume, John B; Lucas, Martyn C

    2015-03-01

    The tendency of many species to abandon migration remains a poorly understood aspect of evolutionary biology that may play an important role in promoting species radiation by both allopatric and sympatric mechanisms. Anadromy inherently offers an opportunity for the colonization of freshwater environments, and the shift from an anadromous to a wholly freshwater life history has occurred in many families of fishes. Freshwater-resident forms have arisen repeatedly among lampreys (within the Petromyzontidae and Mordaciidae), and there has been much debate as to whether anadromous lampreys, and their derived freshwater-resident analogues, constitute distinct species or are divergent ecotypes of polymorphic species. Samples of 543 European river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis (mostly from anadromous populations) and freshwater European brook lamprey Lampetra planeri from across 18 sites, primarily in the British Isles, were investigated for 13 polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci, and 108 samples from six of these sites were sequenced for 829 bp of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We found contrasting patterns of population structure for mtDNA and microsatellite DNA markers, such that low diversity and little structure were seen for all populations for mtDNA (consistent with a recent founder expansion event), while fine-scale structuring was evident for nuclear markers. Strong differentiation for microsatellite DNA loci was seen among freshwater-resident L. planeri populations and between L. fluviatilis and L. planeri in most cases, but little structure was evident among anadromous L. fluviatilis populations. We conclude that postglacial colonization founded multiple freshwater-resident populations with strong habitat fidelity and limited dispersal tendencies that became highly differentiated, a pattern that was likely intensified by anthropogenic barriers.

  14. Contrasting population genetic structure among freshwater-resident and anadromous lampreys: the role of demographic history, differential dispersal and anthropogenic barriers to movement

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Fiona S A; Hoelzel, A Rus; Hume, John B; Lucas, Martyn C

    2015-01-01

    The tendency of many species to abandon migration remains a poorly understood aspect of evolutionary biology that may play an important role in promoting species radiation by both allopatric and sympatric mechanisms. Anadromy inherently offers an opportunity for the colonization of freshwater environments, and the shift from an anadromous to a wholly freshwater life history has occurred in many families of fishes. Freshwater-resident forms have arisen repeatedly among lampreys (within the Petromyzontidae and Mordaciidae), and there has been much debate as to whether anadromous lampreys, and their derived freshwater-resident analogues, constitute distinct species or are divergent ecotypes of polymorphic species. Samples of 543 European river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis (mostly from anadromous populations) and freshwater European brook lamprey Lampetra planeri from across 18 sites, primarily in the British Isles, were investigated for 13 polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci, and 108 samples from six of these sites were sequenced for 829 bp of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We found contrasting patterns of population structure for mtDNA and microsatellite DNA markers, such that low diversity and little structure were seen for all populations for mtDNA (consistent with a recent founder expansion event), while fine-scale structuring was evident for nuclear markers. Strong differentiation for microsatellite DNA loci was seen among freshwater-resident L. planeri populations and between L. fluviatilis and L. planeri in most cases, but little structure was evident among anadromous L. fluviatilis populations. We conclude that postglacial colonization founded multiple freshwater-resident populations with strong habitat fidelity and limited dispersal tendencies that became highly differentiated, a pattern that was likely intensified by anthropogenic barriers. PMID:25689694

  15. Olfactory sensitivity of Pacific Lampreys to lamprey bile acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, T. Craig; Sorensen, Peter W.; Bayer, Jennifer M.; Seelye, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata are in decline throughout much of their historical range in the Columbia River basin. In support of restoration efforts, we tested whether larval and adult lamprey bile acids serve as migratory and spawning pheromones in adult Pacific lampreys, as they do in sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus. The olfactory sensitivity of adult Pacific lampreys to lamprey bile acids was measured by electro-olfactogram recording from the time of their capture in the spring until their spawning in June of the following year. As controls, we tested L-arginine and a non-lamprey bile acid, taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLS). Migrating adult Pacific lampreys were highly sensitive to petromyzonol sulfate (a component of the sea lamprey migratory pheromone) and 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (a component of the sea lamprey sex pheromone) when first captured. This sensitivity persisted throughout their long migratory and overwinter holding period before declining to nearly unmeasurable levels by the time of spawning. The absolute magnitudes of adult Pacific lamprey responses to lamprey bile acids were smaller than those of the sea lamprey, and unlike the sea lamprey, the Pacific lamprey did not appear to detect TLS. No sexual dimorphism was noted in olfactory sensitivity. Thus, Pacific lampreys are broadly similar to sea lampreys in showing sensitivity to the major lamprey bile acids but apparently differ in having a longer period of sensitivity to those acids. The potential utility of bile acid-like pheromones in the restoration of Pacific lampreys warrants their further investigation in this species.

  16. The distribution of melanin-concentrating hormone in the lamprey brain.

    PubMed

    Bird, D J; Potter, I C; Sower, S A; Baker, B I

    2001-03-01

    In addition to its novel, colour-regulating hormonal role in teleosts, the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) serves as a neuromodulatory peptide in all vertebrate brains. In gnathostome vertebrates, it is produced in several neuronal cell groups in the hypothalamus. The present work examines the organisation of the MCH system in the brain of lampreys, which separated from gnathostome vertebrates at an early stage in evolution. In all three lamprey genera examined-Petromyzon, Lampetra, and Geotria spp.-MCH perikarya were found in one major anatomical site, the periventricular dorsal hypothalamic nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus. Axons from these cell bodies projected medially into the ventricular cavity, and laterally to the neuropile of the lateral hypothalamus. From here, they extended anteriorly and posteriorly to the fore- and hindbrain. Other fibres extended dorsomedially to the habenular nucleus. In Lampetra, but not in Petromyzon, MCH fibres were seen in the pituitary neurohypophysis, most prominantly above the proximal pars distalis. The hypothalamic region in which the MCH perikarya are found forms part of the paraventricular organ (PVO), which is rich in monoamines and other neuropeptides. The association of MCH neurones with the PVO, which occurs also in many other nonmammalian vertebrates, may reflect the primary location of the MCH system. These MCH neurones were present in ammocoetes, postmetamorphic juveniles, and adults. They were more heavily granulated in adults than in young lampreys but showed no marked change in secretory appearance associated with metamorphosis or experimental osmotic challenge to indicate a role in feeding or osmoregulation. In sexually maturing Lampetra fluviatilis, however, a second group of small MCH neurones became detectable in the telencephalon, suggesting a potential role in reproduction and/or behaviour. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Use of an extensive radio receiver network to document Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) entrance efficiency at fishways in the Lower Columbia River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moser, M.L.; Matter, A.L.; Stuehrenberg, L.C.; Bjornn, T.C.

    2002-01-01

    We used an extensive network of more than 170 radio receiving stations to document fine-scale passage efficiency of adult anadromous Pacific lamprey at Bonneville and The Dalles Dams in the lower Columbia River in the northwestern U.S.A. Each spring from 1997 to 2000, we released 197-299 lamprey with surgically implanted radio transmitters. Unique transmitter codes and the date and time of reception at each antenna site were downloaded electronically, and initial processing was conducted to eliminate false positive signals. The resulting large Oracle database was analyzed using an Arc View-based coding protocol. Underwater antennas positioned outside the fishway entrances detected lamprey approaches, and antennas positioned immediately inside the entrances indicated successful entries. Entrance efficiency (the number of lamprey that successfully entered a fishway divided by the number that approached that fishway) was compared for different types of entrances (main entrances versus orifice entrances) and entrance locations (powerhouse versus spillway). Lamprey used orifice-type entrances less frequently than main entrances, and passage success was generally low (< 50%) at all entrances to fishways at Bonneville Dam (the lowest dam in the system). Lamprey activity at the entrances was highest at night, and entrance success was significantly higher at The Dalles Dam (the next dam upstream from Bonneville Dam) than at Bonneville Dam. In 1999 and 2000, construction modifications were made to Bonneville Dam spillway entrances, and water velocity at these entrances was reduced at night. Modifications to increase lamprey attachment at the entrances improved lamprey entrance efficiency, but entrance efficiency during reduced velocity tests was not significantly higher than during control conditions.

  18. Low reproductive isolation and highly variable levels of gene flow reveal limited progress towards speciation between European river and brook lampreys.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Q; Gaigher, A; Lasne, E; Côte, J; Coke, M; Besnard, A-L; Launey, S; Evanno, G

    2015-12-01

    Ecologically based divergent selection is a factor that could drive reproductive isolation even in the presence of gene flow. Population pairs arrayed along a continuum of divergence provide a good opportunity to address this issue. Here, we used a combination of mating trials, experimental crosses and population genetic analyses to investigate the evolution of reproductive isolation between two closely related species of lampreys with distinct life histories. We used microsatellite markers to genotype over 1000 individuals of the migratory parasitic river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) and freshwater-resident nonparasitic brook lamprey (Lampetra planeri) distributed in 10 sympatric and parapatric population pairs in France. Mating trials, parentage analyses and artificial fertilizations demonstrated a low level of reproductive isolation between species even though size-assortative mating may contribute to isolation. Most parapatric population pairs were strongly differentiated due to the joint effects of geographic distance and barriers to migration. In contrast, we found variable levels of gene flow between sympatric populations ranging from panmixia to moderate differentiation, which indicates a gradient of divergence with some population pairs that may correspond to alternative morphs or ecotypes of a single species and others that remain partially isolated. Ecologically based divergent selection may explain these variable levels of divergence among sympatric population pairs, but incomplete genome swamping following secondary contact could have also played a role. Overall, this study illustrates how highly differentiated phenotypes can be maintained despite high levels of gene flow that limit the progress towards speciation.

  19. Tachykinins with unusual structural features from a urodele, the amphiuma, an elasmobranch, the hammerhead shark, and an agnathan, the river lamprey.

    PubMed

    Waugh, D; Bondareva, V; Rusakov, Y; Bjenning, C; Nielsen, P F; Conlon, J M

    1995-01-01

    Tachykinins were purified from extracts of gastrointestinal tissues of the urodele, Amphiuma tridactylum (three-toed amphiuma), and the elasmobranch Sphyrna lewini (hammerhead shark), and from the brain of the agnathan Lampetra fluviatilis (river lamprey). The amphiuma substance P (SP) (DNPSVGQFYGLM-NH2) contains 12 amino residues compared with 11 for mammalian SP and lacks the Arg/Lys-Pro-Xaa-Pro motif that is characteristic of NK1 receptor-selective agonists. Lampetra SP (RKPHPKEFVGLM-NH2) is identical to SP from the sea lamprey and the shark SP-related peptide (AKFDKFYGLM-NH2) is identical to dogfish scyliorhinin I. Amphiuma neurokinin A (NKA) (HKDAFIGLM-NH2) and lamprey NKA (HFDEFVGLM-NH2) contain 9 amino acid residues compared with 10 for mammalian NKA. The shark NKA-related peptide (ASGPTQAGIV10GRKRQKGEMF20VGLM-NH2) shows limited structural similarity to mammalian neuropeptide gamma and the teleost tachykinin, carassin but contains 24 rather than 21 amino acid residues. The data show that the primary structures of the tachykinins have been very poorly conserved during vertebrate evolution and that pressure has acted only to maintain the functionally important sequence -Phe-Xaa-Gly Leu-Met-NH2 at the COOH-termini of the peptides.

  20. European Lampreys: New Insights on Postglacial Colonization, Gene Flow and Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Mateus, Catarina Sofia; Almeida, Pedro Raposo; Mesquita, Natacha; Quintella, Bernardo Ruivo; Alves, Maria Judite

    2016-01-01

    Ice ages are known to be the most dominant palaeoclimatic feature occurring on Earth, producing severe climatic oscillations and consequently shaping the distribution and the population structure of several species. Lampreys constitute excellent models to study the colonization of freshwater systems, as they commonly appear in pairs of closely related species of anadromous versus freshwater resident adults, thus having the ability to colonize new habitats, through the anadromous species, and establish freshwater resident derivates. We used 10 microsatellite loci to investigate the spatial structure, patterns of gene flow and migration routes of Lampetra populations in Europe. We sampled 11 populations including the migratory L. fluviatilis and four resident species, L. planeri, L. alavariensis, L. auremensis and L. lusitanica, the last three endemic to the Iberian Peninsula. In this southern glacial refugium almost all sampled populations represent a distinct genetic cluster, showing high levels of allopatric differentiation, reflecting long periods of isolation. As result of their more recent common ancestor, populations from northern Europe are less divergent among them, they are represented by fewer genetic clusters, and there is evidence of strong recent gene flow among populations. These previously glaciated areas from northern Europe may have been colonized from lampreys expanding out of the Iberian refugia. The pair L. fluviatilis/L. planeri is apparently at different stages of speciation in different locations, showing evidences of high reproductive isolation in the southern refugium, and low differentiation in the north. PMID:26871930

  1. European Lampreys: New Insights on Postglacial Colonization, Gene Flow and Speciation.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Catarina Sofia; Almeida, Pedro Raposo; Mesquita, Natacha; Quintella, Bernardo Ruivo; Alves, Maria Judite

    2016-01-01

    Ice ages are known to be the most dominant palaeoclimatic feature occurring on Earth, producing severe climatic oscillations and consequently shaping the distribution and the population structure of several species. Lampreys constitute excellent models to study the colonization of freshwater systems, as they commonly appear in pairs of closely related species of anadromous versus freshwater resident adults, thus having the ability to colonize new habitats, through the anadromous species, and establish freshwater resident derivates. We used 10 microsatellite loci to investigate the spatial structure, patterns of gene flow and migration routes of Lampetra populations in Europe. We sampled 11 populations including the migratory L. fluviatilis and four resident species, L. planeri, L. alavariensis, L. auremensis and L. lusitanica, the last three endemic to the Iberian Peninsula. In this southern glacial refugium almost all sampled populations represent a distinct genetic cluster, showing high levels of allopatric differentiation, reflecting long periods of isolation. As result of their more recent common ancestor, populations from northern Europe are less divergent among them, they are represented by fewer genetic clusters, and there is evidence of strong recent gene flow among populations. These previously glaciated areas from northern Europe may have been colonized from lampreys expanding out of the Iberian refugia. The pair L. fluviatilis/L. planeri is apparently at different stages of speciation in different locations, showing evidences of high reproductive isolation in the southern refugium, and low differentiation in the north.

  2. Calcium currents and GABAB receptors in the dorsal sensory cells of the lamprey spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Batueva, I V; Buchanan, J T; Tsvetkov, E A; Sagatelyan, A K; Veselkin, N P

    1999-01-01

    Patch-clamp studies were performed on the isolated dorsal sensory cells of the spinal cords of three species of lamprey, Ichthyomyzon unicuspis, Petromyzon marinus, and Lampetra fluviatilis, to measure changes in the amplitudes of calcium current induced by GABA and its specific antagonists and agonists. The experiments showed that GABA (4 mM) reduced the peak amplitude of the calcium current by 28.5 +/- 4.9%, with subsequent recovery to 96.2 +/- 9.2% of control (n = 45). The GABAB agonist baclofen had similar effects. The GABAA agonists glycine and taurine had no effect on the Ca2+ current. The inhibitory effect of GABA was blocked by 2-hydroxysaclofen (a GABAB antagonist), but persisted in the presence of bicuculline (a GABAA antagonist). These results are evidence that the membranes of dorsal sensory cells contain GABAB receptors, which significantly increases our understanding of the mechanisms of presynaptic inhibition in the spinal cords of the cyclostomata.

  3. Diatoms as food of larval sea lampreys in a small tributary of northern Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The food and food preferences of sea lamprey ammocoetes have not been investigated. The food of the larval American brook lamprey, Lampetra lamottei, in the Great Lakes region consisted mainly of diatoms and desmids according to Creaser and Hann. Schroll discussed the biology of feeding of ammocoetes of Lampetra planeri and Eudontomyzon danfordi in Europe. This report presents data on the availability and use of diatoms by sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus Linnaeus, ammocoetes in a small tributary of northern Lake Michigan.

  4. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project : Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Close, David A.

    2002-11-01

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 1999-2000. The findings in these chapters represent the efforts of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and collaborative efforts among other researchers working on Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) under this project. The findings in these chapters will help management and recovery of Pacific lampreys in the Columbia River Basin.

  5. Reconstructing the demographic history of divergence between European river and brook lampreys using approximate Bayesian computations

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Camille; Neuenschwander, Samuel; Goudet, Jérôme; Launey, Sophie; Evanno, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Inferring the history of isolation and gene flow during species divergence is a central question in evolutionary biology. The European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) and brook lamprey (L. planeri) show a low reproductive isolation but have highly distinct life histories, the former being parasitic-anadromous and the latter non-parasitic and freshwater resident. Here we used microsatellite data from six replicated population pairs to reconstruct their history of divergence using an approximate Bayesian computation framework combined with a random forest model. In most population pairs, scenarios of divergence with recent isolation were outcompeted by scenarios proposing ongoing gene flow, namely the Secondary Contact (SC) and Isolation with Migration (IM) models. The estimation of demographic parameters under the SC model indicated a time of secondary contact close to the time of speciation, explaining why SC and IM models could not be discriminated. In case of an ancient secondary contact, the historical signal of divergence is lost and neutral markers converge to the same equilibrium as under the less parameterized model allowing ongoing gene flow. Our results imply that models of secondary contacts should be systematically compared to models of divergence with gene flow; given the difficulty to discriminate among these models, we suggest that genome-wide data are needed to adequately reconstruct divergence history. PMID:27077007

  6. The Nuclear DNA Content and Genetic Diversity of Lampetra morii

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinyu; Meng, Wenbin; Wu, Fenfang; Xu, Anlong; Chen, Shangwu; Huang, Shengfeng

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear DNA content and genetic diversity of a river lamprey, the Korean lamprey Lampetra morii, which is distributed in the northeast of China. L. morii spends its whole life cycle in fresh water, and its adult size is relatively small (~160 mm long) compared with that of other lampreys. The haploid nuclear DNA content of L. morii is 1.618 pg (approximately 1.582 Gb) in germline cells, and there is ~15% germline DNA loss in somatic cells. These values are significantly smaller than those of Petromyzon marinus, a lamprey with a published draft genome. The chromosomes of L. morii are small and acrocentric, with a diploid modal number of 2n = 132, lower than some other lampreys. Sequence and AFLP analyses suggest that the allelic polymorphism rate (~0.14% based on examined nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences) of L. morii is much lower than that (~2%) of P. marinus. Phylogenetic analysis based on a mitochondrial DNA fragment confirms that L. morii belongs to the genus Lampetra, which, together with the genus Lethenteron, forms a sister group to P. marinus. These genetic background data are valuable for subsequent genetic and genomic research on L. morii. PMID:27388621

  7. The Nuclear DNA Content and Genetic Diversity of Lampetra morii.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinyu; Meng, Wenbin; Wu, Fenfang; Xu, Anlong; Chen, Shangwu; Huang, Shengfeng

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear DNA content and genetic diversity of a river lamprey, the Korean lamprey Lampetra morii, which is distributed in the northeast of China. L. morii spends its whole life cycle in fresh water, and its adult size is relatively small (~160 mm long) compared with that of other lampreys. The haploid nuclear DNA content of L. morii is 1.618 pg (approximately 1.582 Gb) in germline cells, and there is ~15% germline DNA loss in somatic cells. These values are significantly smaller than those of Petromyzon marinus, a lamprey with a published draft genome. The chromosomes of L. morii are small and acrocentric, with a diploid modal number of 2n = 132, lower than some other lampreys. Sequence and AFLP analyses suggest that the allelic polymorphism rate (~0.14% based on examined nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences) of L. morii is much lower than that (~2%) of P. marinus. Phylogenetic analysis based on a mitochondrial DNA fragment confirms that L. morii belongs to the genus Lampetra, which, together with the genus Lethenteron, forms a sister group to P. marinus. These genetic background data are valuable for subsequent genetic and genomic research on L. morii.

  8. Morphological abnormalities in a population of Lampetra planeri, with a short review of petromyzontid teratologies.

    PubMed

    Hume, J B; Bean, C W; Adams, C E

    2014-05-01

    Reported here are several deviations (n = 15; 1·96%) from typical morphology in a large sample (n = 767) of European brook lamprey Lampetra planeri from a single population in the Loch Lomond catchment; this includes one specimen bearing a true anal fin. A brief review of petromyzontid teratology is provided. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. Structural basis of the aberrant receptor binding properties of hagfish and lamprey insulins.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Waseem; Holst, Patricia A; Kiselyov, Vladislav V; Andersen, Asser S; Conlon, J Michael; Kristensen, Claus; Kjeldsen, Thomas; Whittaker, Jonathan; Chan, Shu J; De Meyts, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    The insulin from the Atlantic hagfish (Myxine glutinosa) has been one of the most studied insulins from both a structural and a biological viewpoint; however, some aspects of its biology remain controversial, and there has been no satisfying structural explanation for its low biological potency. We have re-examined the receptor binding kinetics, as well as the metabolic and mitogenic properties, of this phylogenetically ancient insulin, as well as that from another extant representative of the ancient chordates, the river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis). Both insulins share unusual binding kinetics and biological properties with insulin analogues that have single mutations at residues that contribute to the hexamerization surface. We propose and demonstrate by reciprocal amino acid substitutions between hagfish and human insulins that the reduced biological activity of hagfish insulin results from unfavorable substitutions, namely, A10 (Ile to Arg), B4 (Glu to Gly), B13 (Glu to Asn), and B21 (Glu to Val). We likewise suggest that the altered biological activity of lamprey insulin may reflect substitutions at A10 (Ile to Lys), B4 (Glu to Thr), and B17 (Leu to Val). The substitution of Asp at residue B10 in hagfish insulin and of His at residue A8 in both hagfish and lamprey insulins may help compensate for unfavorable changes in other regions of the molecules. The data support the concept that the set of unusual properties of insulins bearing certain mutations in the hexamerization surface may reflect those of the insulins evolutionarily closer to the ancestral insulin gene product.

  10. Structural Basis of the Aberrant Receptor Binding Properties of Hagfish and Lamprey Insulins†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The insulin from the Atlantic hagfish (Myxine glutinosa) has been one of the most studied insulins from both a structural and a biological viewpoint; however, some aspects of its biology remain controversial, and there has been no satisfying structural explanation for its low biological potency. We have re-examined the receptor binding kinetics, as well as the metabolic and mitogenic properties, of this phylogenetically ancient insulin, as well as that from another extant representative of the ancient chordates, the river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis). Both insulins share unusual binding kinetics and biological properties with insulin analogues that have single mutations at residues that contribute to the hexamerization surface. We propose and demonstrate by reciprocal amino acid substitutions between hagfish and human insulins that the reduced biological activity of hagfish insulin results from unfavorable substitutions, namely, A10 (Ile to Arg), B4 (Glu to Gly), B13 (Glu to Asn), and B21 (Glu to Val). We likewise suggest that the altered biological activity of lamprey insulin may reflect substitutions at A10 (Ile to Lys), B4 (Glu to Thr), and B17 (Leu to Val). The substitution of Asp at residue B10 in hagfish insulin and of His at residue A8 in both hagfish and lamprey insulins may help compensate for unfavorable changes in other regions of the molecules. The data support the concept that the set of unusual properties of insulins bearing certain mutations in the hexamerization surface may reflect those of the insulins evolutionarily closer to the ancestral insulin gene product. PMID:19863112

  11. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration : Annual Report 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Aaron D.; Hatch, Douglas R.; Close, David A.

    1998-08-05

    The once abundant stocks of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) above Bonneville Dam are currently depressed (Close et al. 1995). It is likely that many of the same factors that led to the decline of wild stocks of Columbia River Pacific salmon and steelhead have impacted Pacific lamprey populations as well. The Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration, is a cooperative effort between the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, and Oregon State University with the goal to increase Pacific lamprey stocks above Bonneville Dam.

  12. HPLC and ELISA analyses of larval bile acids from Pacific and western brook lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yun, S.-S.; Scott, A.P.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.; Close, D.A.; Li, W.

    2003-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on two native lamprey species, Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) and western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni) from the Pacific coast along with sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from the Great Lakes, to investigate their bile acid production and release. HPLC and ELISA analyses of the gall bladders and liver extract revealed that the major bile acid compound from Pacific and western brook larval lampreys was petromyzonol sulfate (PZS), previously identified as a migratory pheromone in larval sea lamprey. An ELISA for PZS has been developed in a working range of 20pg-10ng per well. The tissue concentrations of PZS in gall bladder were 127.40, 145.86, and 276.96??g/g body mass in sea lamprey, Pacific lamprey, and western brook lamprey, respectively. Releasing rates for PZS in the three species were measured using ELISA to find that western brook and sea lamprey released PZS 20 times higher than Pacific lamprey did. Further studies are required to determine whether PZS is a chemical cue in Pacific and western brook lampreys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of 12 microsatellite loci for the Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus (Petromyzontidae), and cross-amplification in five other lamprey species.

    PubMed

    Spice, E K; Whitesel, T A; McFarlane, C T; Docker, M F

    2011-12-22

    The Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) is an anadromous fish that is of conservation concern in North America and Asia. Data on Pacific lamprey population structure are scarce and conflicting, impeding conservation efforts. We optimized 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the Pacific lamprey. Three to 13 alleles per locus were observed in a sample of 51 fish collected from the West Fork Illinois River, Oregon. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.235 to 0.902 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.214 to 0.750. Cross-species amplification produced 8 to 12 polymorphic loci in four other Entosphenus species and in the western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni). Two loci appear to be diagnostic for distinguishing Entosphenus from Lampetra. These markers will be valuable for evaluating population structure and making conservation decisions for E. tridentatus and other lamprey species.

  14. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project : Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Close, David A.

    2002-11-01

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) has significantly declined along the Oregon coast and in the Columbia River Basin (Downey et al. 1993; Close and Jackson 2001). Declines in adults can be partially attributed to hydroelectric dams, which have impeded passage of adult Pacific lamprey in the Columbia and Snake rivers, thus effecting larval recruitment in the basin. Adult pacific lamprey also declined in numbers in the Umatilla River, a tributary of the Columbia River. In addition to hydro power dams in the Columbia River, habitat alterations and chemical treatments have been involved in the collapse of Pacific lamprey populations in the Umatilla River. To initiate the restoration effort, CTUIR began developing a restoration plan in 1998. The goal of the lamprey research and restoration project is to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable level. This report is summarizing the studies and restoration efforts concluded in 2001.

  15. Distribution of Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus in watersheds of Puget Sound Based on smolt monitoring data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Michael C.; Hays, Richard; Rubin, Stephen P.; Chase, Dorothy M.; Hallock, Molly; Cook-Tabor, Carrie; Luzier, Christina W.; Moser, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Lamprey populations are in decline worldwide and the status of Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) is a topic of current interest. They and other lamprey species cycle nutrients and serve as prey in riverine ecosystems. To determine the current distribution of Pacific lamprey in major watersheds flowing into Puget Sound, Washington, we sampled lamprey captured during salmonid smolt monitoring that occurred from late winter to mid-summer. We found Pacific lamprey in 12 of 18 watersheds and they were most common in southern Puget Sound watersheds and in watersheds draining western Puget Sound (Hood Canal). Two additional species, western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni) and river lamprey (L. ayresii) were more common in eastern Puget Sound watersheds. Few Pacific lamprey macrophthalmia were found, suggesting that the majority of juveniles migrated seaward during other time periods. In addition, “dwarf” adult Pacific lamprey (< 300 mm) were observed in several watersheds and may represent an alternate life history for some Puget Sound populations. Based on genetic data, the use of visual techniques to identify lamprey ammocoetes as Entosphenus or Lampetra was successful for 97% (34 of 35) of the samples we evaluated.

  16. Evaluate Habitat Use and Population Dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Jennifer; Pirtle, Jody; Barndt, Scott A.

    2002-03-31

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River Basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River Basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. This annual report describes the activities and results of the second year of this project. Adult (n = 24), metamorphosed (n = 247), transforming (n = 4), and ammocoete (n = 387) stages from both species were examined in 2001. Lamprey were captured using adult fish ladders, lamprey pots, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers. Twenty-nine spawning ground surveys were conducted. Nine strategic point-specific habitat surveys were performed to assess habitat requirements of juvenile lamprey.

  17. Adult Pacific Lamprey Migration in the Lower Columbia River: 2007 Radiotelemetry and Half-duplex Pit Tag Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    ADULT PACIFIC LAMPREY MIGRATION IN THE LOWER COLUMBIA RIVER: 2007 RADIOTELEMETRY AND HALF-DUPLEX PIT TAG STUDIES A Report for Study Code ADS-P-00-8...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adult Pacific Lamprey Migration in the Lower Columbia River: 2007 Radiotelemetry and Half-duplex Pit Tag Studies 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Monitoring Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) run size and migration behaviors in the Columbia River basin is difficult given their cryptic and photo

  18. Evaluate Habitat Use and Population Dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Jennifer

    2001-03-31

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River Basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River Basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. Adult (n = 40), metamorphosed (n = 116), transforming (n = 10), and ammocoete (n = 870) stages from both species were examined in 2000. Lamprey were captured using adult fish ladders, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers, and spawning ground surveys were conducted. US Forest Service level II and strategic point-specific habitat surveys were conducted to assess habitat requirements of both adult and larval lamprey. Multivariate statistics will be applied to determine relationships between abundance and habitat.

  19. Evaluate Habitat Use and Population Dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Pirtle, Jodi; Stone, Jennifer; Barndt, Scott

    2003-03-01

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) and river lamprey (L. ayresi) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. This annual report describes the activities and results of the third year of this project. Adult (n = 62), metamorphosed (n = 76), transforming (n = 4), and ammocoete (n = 315) stages of Pacific and western brook lamprey were examined in 2002. Lampreys were captured using adult fish ladders, lamprey pots, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers. In addition, fifty-four spawning ground surveys were conducted during which 124 Pacific lamprey and 13 western brook lamprey nests were identified. Stream gradient of spawning grounds were surveyed to better understand spawning habitat requirements.

  20. An electric beam trawl for the capture of larval lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLain, Alberton; Dahl, Frederick H.

    1968-01-01

    The chemicals used to control the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, in the Great Lakes have drastically reduced populations of larval lampreys in tributary streams. These larvicides are too costly and difficult to apply, however, in inland lakes, estuaries, and bays. Populations of sea lampreys in these areas constitute a threat to the refinement of the control. The gear available to locate, ample, and evaluate larval populations in deep water are inefficient. Electric shockers, satisfactory for collecting ammocoetes in streams, are limited to shallow water. The use of mechanical devices such as the Petersen dredge, anchor dredge, and the orange-peel dredge is time consuming, inefficient, and relatively ineffective in providing reliable quantitative evaluation of population size and composition over large areas of bottom. A device was required to sample adequately many areas in a short period of time, regardless of the depth of water. Mobility also was essential to permit operation of the unit in the various Great Lakes and in inland waters. An electrified beam trawl has been developed that most nearly meets these requirements. It has been used successfully to collect larvae of the sea lamprey, American brook lamprey (Lampetra lamottei), northern brook lamprey (Ichthyomyzon fossor), and silver lamprey (I. unicuspis). Effectiveness of the trawl did not appear to differ with species.

  1. Morphology and aging precision of statoliths from larvae of Columbia river basin lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Bayer, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The general morphology and precision associated with age determination of statoliths from larval Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata and western brook lampreys L. richardsoni found within the Columbia River basin were examined. Significant positive correlations were observed between the size of left and right statoliths from individuals. Principal components analysis indicated an allometric relationship between lamprey length and statolith size as well as a potential species grouping based on these measurements. Discriminant analysis was able to correctly classify more than 94% of Pacific lampreys and 92% of western brook lampreys based on lamprey length and statolith size, and Pacific lamprey statoliths tended to be larger than western brook lamprey statoliths for lampreys of a given size. Reader bias in age estimates of statoliths was greater for older lampreys. Multiple independent age readings of both statoliths from individual lampreys indicated that the overall average percent error was 16.7% for Pacific lampreys and 33.0% for western brook lampreys. Within-individual average percent error ranged from 5.1% to 20.1% among species and readers. Within-reader average percent error ranged from 6.4% to 17.8% among species and readers. The average percent error observed in this study was greater than that observed in studies of other species of lampreys; however, statoliths that were ambiguous or difficult to read were not excluded from this study. In general, the modal separation of age-groups observed in length-frequency distributions for lampreys is poor, as seen in this study; therefore, statolith-based ages may verify or provide better estimates of population age structure. These data demonstrate that estimates of precision are necessary before management actions founded on statolith-based age structure determination are implemented. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  2. Bioenergetics models to estimate numbers of larval lampreys consumed by smallmouth bass in Elk Creek, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, Luke; Heck, Michael; Kowalski, Brandon M; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Coates, Kelly C.; Dunham, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Nonnative fishes have been increasingly implicated in the decline of native fishes in the Pacific Northwest. Smallmouth Bass Micropterus dolomieu were introduced into the Umpqua River in southwest Oregon in the early 1960s. The spread of Smallmouth Bass throughout the basin coincided with a decline in counts of upstream-migrating Pacific Lampreys Entosphenus tridentatus. This suggested the potential for ecological interactions between Smallmouth Bass and Pacific Lampreys, as well as freshwater-resident Western Brook Lampreys Lampetra richardsoni. To evaluate the potential effects of Smallmouth Bass on lampreys, we sampled diets of Smallmouth Bass and used bioenergetics models to estimate consumption of larval lampreys in a segment of Elk Creek, a tributary to the lower Umpqua River. We captured 303 unique Smallmouth Bass (mean: 197 mm and 136 g) via angling in July and September. We combined information on Smallmouth Bass diet and energy density with other variables (temperature, body size, growth, prey energy density) in a bioenergetics model to estimate consumption of larval lampreys. Larval lampreys were found in 6.2% of diet samples, and model estimates indicated that the Smallmouth Bass we captured consumed 925 larval lampreys in this 2-month study period. When extrapolated to a population estimate of Smallmouth Bass in this segment, we estimated 1,911 larval lampreys were consumed between July and September. Although the precision of these estimates was low, this magnitude of consumption suggests that Smallmouth Bass may negatively affect larval lamprey populations.

  3. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration : Annual Report 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Aaron D.

    1997-01-01

    The once abundant stocks of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) above Bonneville Dam are currently depressed (Close et al. 1995). It is likely that many of the same factors that led to the decline of wild stocks of Columbia River Pacific salmon and steelhead have impacted Pacific lamprey populations. The Pacific lamprey is an important part of the food web of North Pacific ecosystems, both as predator and prey. Lamprey (a.k.a. eels) are also a valuable food and culture resource for American Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest. Depressed Pacific lamprey runs have impacted treaty secured fishing opportunities by forcing tribal members to gather this traditional food in lower Columbia River locations. The Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration, is a cooperative effort between the Confederated Tribes of The Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission, and Oregon State University with the goal to increase Pacific lamprey stocks above Bonneville Dam. The initial objectives of the project are to determine the past and current abundance of Pacific lamprey stocks in major mid Columbia tributaries and at various hydroelectric facilities, and to determine factors limiting Pacific lamprey abundance and distribution. Ultimately, Pacific lamprey restoration plans will be developed and implemented. Part (A)-CTUIR: (1) determine past and present abundance and distribution in NE Oregon and SE Washington tributaries; and (2) determine limiting habitat factors. Part (B)-CRITFC: (1) adult abundance monitoring at Columbia and Snake River dams; (2) juvenile abundance monitoring at Columbia and Snake River dams; and (3) juvenile passage impediments and needed improvements at Columbia and Snake River dams. Part (C)- OSU: (1) adult passage impediments and needed improvements at Columbia and Snake River dams; and (2) juvenile passage impediments and needed improvements at Columbia and Snake River dams.

  4. [Cloning and expression of VLRB of Lampetra japonica and generation of the corresponding monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Wu, Fen-Fang; Ma, Ning; Chen, Li-Yong; Su, Peng; Li, Qing-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The agnathans (lampreys and hagfishes) are representatives of the jawless vertebrates. The receptor molecules of adaptive immune system in lampreys are different from the antigen receptors in mammal vertebrates. The unique receptor molecules of lampreys are known as variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR). There are three types of VLRs in lampreys, VLRA, VLRB, and VLRC. Multimeric antigen-specific VLRB antibodies are secreted by VLRB+ lymphocytes and constitute the major components of the humoral arm of the lamprey adaptive immune system. Oligomeric VLRB antibodies are composed of four or five disulfide-linked dimeric subunits, which are similar to IgM antibodies in structure and function. In this study, the conservative c-terminal of Lampetra japonica VLRB was cloned and expressed in BL21 E. coli. The recombinant VLRB protein was purified by Ni2+ affinity chromatography column. After Balb/c mice immunity, cell fusion, the positive clones were screened by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Finally, the hybridoma cells that produced specific anti-VLRB monoclonal antibodies were obtained. In order to get a large number of antibodies against VLRB, the hybridoma cells were injected into the abdominal cavity of Balb/c mice and the antibodies were purified by protein G sepharose. The results of ELISA indicated that the valence of anti-VLRB antibodies was 1:40000. Western blotting assay showed that the antibodies were able to detect both recombinant VLRB and secreted VLRB in lamprey sera. Flow cytometry analysis also revealed the existence of VLRB on the surface of lymphocytes. In summary, the anti-VLRB monoclonal antibodies provided a major tool for studying lamprey adaptive immune system.

  5. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Close, David; Aronsuu, Kimmo; Jackson, Aaron

    2003-07-01

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) has significantly declined along the Oregon coast and in the Columbia River Basin (Downey et al. 1993, Close and Jackson 2001). Declines in adults can be partially attributed to hydroelectric dams, which have impeded passage of adult Pacific lamprey in the Columbia and Snake rivers (Moser et al. 2002), thus effecting larval recruitment in the basin (Moser and Close in press). Adult Pacific lamprey also declined in numbers in the Umatilla River, a tributary of the Columbia River (Close and Jackson 2001). In addition to hydro power dams in the Columbia River, habitat alterations and chemical treatments have been involved in the collapse of Pacific lamprey populations in the Umatilla River (Close 1999). To initiate the restoration effort, CTUIR began developing a restoration plan in 1998. The goal of the lamprey research and restoration project is to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable level. This report is summarizing the studies and restoration efforts concluded in 2002.

  6. Comparative embryology of five species of lampreys of the upper Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Allen J.; Howell, John H.; Piavis, George W.

    1968-01-01

    The four species of lampreys native to the upper Great Lakes (American brook lamprey, Lampetra lamotteni; chestnut lamprey, Ichthyomyzon castaneus; northern brook lamprey, I. fossor; and silver lamprey, I. unicuspis) were collected in various stages of their life cycle and maintained in the laboratory until sexually mature. Secondary sex characters of the four native species are compared. Several batches of eggs of each species were reared at 18.4A?C and their development was compared to that of the exotic sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus. The temperature of 18.4A?C was previously determined to be optimum for development of the sea lamprey. The high percentage survival of many batches of eggs of native species to prolarvae indicated that 18.4A?C was near the optimum for them. Survival to the burrowing stage varied considerably among different batches of eggs from the same species; some batches failed to produce prolarvae. The staging characteristics used for the sea lamprey were applicable to the native species, except for the end point of the burrowing stage. Embryos of the native species in each stage of development appeared according to the time sequence established for the sea lamprey.

  7. Ecological and Cultural Importance of a Species at Risk of Extinction, Pacific Lamprey, 1964-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Close, David A.

    2002-07-01

    The cultural and ecological values of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) have not been understood by Euro-Americans and thus their great decline has almost gone unnoticed except by Native Americans, who elevated the issue and initiated research to restore its populations, at least in the Columbia Basin. They regard Pacific lamprey as a highly valued resource and as a result ksuyas (lamprey) has become one of their cultural icons. Ksuyas are harvested to this day as a subsistence food by various tribes along the Pacific coast and are highly regarded for their cultural value. Interestingly, our review suggests that the Pacific lamprey plays an important role in the food web, may have acted as a buffer for salmon from predators, and may have been an important source of marine nutrients to oligotrophic watersheds. This is very different from the Euro-American perception that lampreys are pests. We suggest that cultural biases affected management policies.

  8. A Noninvasive Tool to Assess the Distribution of Pacific Lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) in the Columbia River Basin

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael K.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) is an anadromous fish once abundant throughout coastal basins of western North America that has suffered dramatic declines in the last century due primarily to human activities. Here, we describe the development of an environmental DNA (eDNA) assay to detect Pacific lamprey in the Columbia River basin. The eDNA assay successfully amplified tissue derived DNA of Pacific lamprey collected from 12 locations throughout the Columbia River basin. The assay amplifies DNA from other Entosphenus species found outside of the Columbia River basin, but is species-specific within this basin. As a result, the assay presented here may be useful for detecting Entosphenus spp. in geographic range beyond the Columbia River Basin. The assay did not amplify tissue or synthetically derived DNA of 14 commonly sympatric non-target species, including lampreys of the genus Lampetra, which are morphologically similar to Pacific lamprey in the freshwater larval stage. PMID:28068358

  9. A Noninvasive Tool to Assess the Distribution of Pacific Lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) in the Columbia River Basin.

    PubMed

    Carim, Kellie J; Dysthe, J Caleb; Young, Michael K; McKelvey, Kevin S; Schwartz, Michael K

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) is an anadromous fish once abundant throughout coastal basins of western North America that has suffered dramatic declines in the last century due primarily to human activities. Here, we describe the development of an environmental DNA (eDNA) assay to detect Pacific lamprey in the Columbia River basin. The eDNA assay successfully amplified tissue derived DNA of Pacific lamprey collected from 12 locations throughout the Columbia River basin. The assay amplifies DNA from other Entosphenus species found outside of the Columbia River basin, but is species-specific within this basin. As a result, the assay presented here may be useful for detecting Entosphenus spp. in geographic range beyond the Columbia River Basin. The assay did not amplify tissue or synthetically derived DNA of 14 commonly sympatric non-target species, including lampreys of the genus Lampetra, which are morphologically similar to Pacific lamprey in the freshwater larval stage.

  10. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    Close, David A.

    2001-10-01

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1996 through 1999. The findings in these chapters represent the efforts of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and collaborative efforts among other researchers working on Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) under this project. The findings in these chapters will help management and recovery of Pacific lampreys in the Columbia River Basin. Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) of Pacific lampreys from tribal members within the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation was useful in gaining baseline life history information. Tribal members described harvesting two types of lampreys from spring through fall, the short brown type and the long dark type. Lamprey spawning distribution was from the mouth to the headwaters in the Umatilla River. Larval lampreys were observed in the mud and sand areas of the river. Tribal members observed major declines in lampreys within the Columbia River basin. Larval Pacific lampreys were distributed throughout the John Day River basin. Larval distribution in the other subbasins was patchy and limited to the lower reaches of the streams. Larval densities were highly variable in the Middle Fork John Day and North Fork John Day rivers, as opposed to the Main stem John Day River. Larval lengths varied little in the Middle Fork John Day and North Fork John Day rivers, but were highly variable in the Main stem John Day River. Larval abundance decreased as we moved upstream in the Columbia and Snake rivers. In addition, we found strong evidence for lack of larval recruitment as distance increased from the mouth of the Columbia River. We identified clinical indicators of stress in adult Pacific lampreys. Plasma glucose became elevated soon after acute stress and remained elevated for one week. Plasma lactate also became elevated by 30 minutes; however, it decreased to resting levels by one hour after application of the stressor

  11. Effects of temperature on survival and development of early life stage Pacific and western brook lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the effects of temperature (10, 14, 18, and 22??C) on survival and development of Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata and western brook lampreys L. richardsoni during embryological and early larval stages. The temperature for zero development was estimated for each species, and the response to temperature was measured as the proportion of individuals surviving to hatch, surviving to the larval stage, and exhibiting abnormalities at the larval stage (i.e., malformations of the body). The estimated temperature for zero development was 4.850C for Pacific lampreys and 4.97??C for western brook lampreys. Survival was greatest at 18??C, followed by 14, 10, and 22??C, significant differences being observed between 22??C and the other temperatures. Overall survival was significantly greater for western brook lampreys than for Pacific lampreys; however, the overall difference in proportion of individuals surviving was only 0.02. Overall survival significantly decreased from the time of hatch (proportion surviving = 0.85) to the larval stage (0.82; i.e., during the free-embryo stage). The proportion of individuals exhibiting abnormalities at the larval stage was greatest at 22??C, followed by 18, 10, and 14??C, significant differences being observed between 22??C and the other temperatures. These data provide baseline information on the thermal requirements of early life stage Pacific and western brook lampreys and will aid in assessment and prediction of suitable spawning and rearing habitats for these species.

  12. Variations in the presence of chloride cells in the gills of lampreys (Petromyzontiformes) and their evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Bartels, H; Docker, M F; Krappe, M; White, M M; Wrede, C; Potter, I C

    2015-04-01

    Although confined to fresh water, non-parasitic species of lampreys and the landlocked parasitic sea lamprey, all of which were derived relatively recently from an adromous ancestors, still develop chloride cells, whose function in their ancestors was for osmoregulation in marine waters during the adult parasitic phase. In contrast, such cells are not developed by the non-parasitic least brook lamprey Lampetra aepyptera, which has been separated from its ancestor for >2 million years, nor by the freshwater parasitic species of the genus Ichthyomyzon. The length of time that a non-parasitic species or landlocked parasitic form or species has spent in fresh water is thus considered the overriding factor determining whether chloride cells are developed by those lampreys.

  13. Large wood and in-stream habitat for juvenile coho salmon and larval lampreys in a Pacific Northwest stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonzalez, Rosalinda; Dunham, Jason; Lightcap, Scott W.; McEnroe, Jeffery R.

    2017-01-01

    The influences of large wood on Pacific salmon are well-studied, but studies of nonsalmonid species such as lampreys are uncommon. To address this need, we evaluated the potential effects of large wood on larval lampreys (Pacific Lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus; and potentially Western Brook Lamprey Lampetra richardsoni), as well as juvenile Coho Salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch, in a small coastal Oregon stream. Our objectives were to 1) identify in-stream habitat characteristics associated with the presence of larval lampreys and abundance of juvenile Coho Salmon; and 2) evaluate how these characteristics were associated with in-stream wood. To address habitat use, we quantified presence of larval lampreys in 92 pools and abundance of juvenile Coho Salmon in 44 pools during summer low flows. We focused on a study reach where large wood was introduced into the stream between 2008 and 2009. Results indicated that presence of larval lampreys was significantly associated with availability of fine sediment and deeper substrate. The abundance of juvenile Coho Salmon (fish/pool) was strongly associated with pool surface area and to a weaker extent with the proportion of cobble and boulder substrates in pools. Pools with wood, regardless of whether they were formed by wood, had significantly greater coverage of fine sediment, deeper substrate, and greater pool surface area. Taken together, these results suggest that in-stream wood can provide habitat associated with presence of larval lampreys and greater abundance of juvenile Coho Salmon.

  14. [Genetic basis of immune response of lymphocyte-like cells in the mucosal immune system of Lampetra japonica].

    PubMed

    Xin, Liu; Xueying, Song; Xiaoping, Zhang; Yinglun, Han; Ting, Zhu; Rong, Xiao; Qingwei, Li

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the antigen recognition mechanism based on variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) was found in agnathan lamprey. To illuminate the genetic basis of immune response of lymphocyte-like cells in the mucosal immune system of lamprey and explore the evolutionary relationship of adaptive immune responses between the jawless and jawed vertebrates, we constructed cDNA libraries of lamprey (Lampetra japonica) gills before and after stimulation, and then performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and analysis. Through functional annotation of 88 525 assembled unigenes, 21 704 and 9769 unigenes were annotated in Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, respectively. Among 999 unigenes involved in multiple pathways of immune system, 184 unigenes were highly homologous to 51 TCR (T cell receptor) and BCR (B cell receptor) signalling molecules in higher vertebrates, indicating that molecules involved in adaptive immune signalling pathways in higher vertebrates also exist in lampreys. In addition, identification of five VLRA, seven VLRB and four VLRC molecules suggest that at least three types of lymphocyte subsets are distributed in lamprey gill mucosal immune tissues. The results of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR showed that the expression levels of Lck, Fyn and Zap70 were up-regulated after immune stimulation while those of Syk, Btk and Blnk were not changed significantly, indicating the activation of TCR-like signal transduction pathway after antigen stimulation in lamprey gill tissues. Our studies preliminaryly proved that two parallel adaptive immune systems in jawless and jawed vertebrates have common genetic basis, and also provided valuable clues to the exploration of signalling processes of VLRA⁺, VLRB⁺, and VLRC⁺ lymphocyte-like cells in response to antigens.

  15. Swimming performance and physiological responses to exhaustive exercise in radio-tagged and untagged Pacific lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have declined in the Columbia River basin. One factor that may have contributed to this reduction in population size is an excessive use of energy by adult lampreys as they negotiate fishways at dams during spawning migrations. To gain an understanding of the performance capacity of Pacific lampreys, we estimated the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) and documented physiological responses of radio-tagged and untagged adult lampreys exercised to exhaustion. The mean (??SD) Ucrit of untagged lampreys was 86.2 ?? 7.5 cm/s at 15??C, whereas the Ucrit for radio-tagged lampreys was 81.5 ?? 7.0 cm/s, a speed that was significantly lower than that of untagged fish. The physiological responses of tagged and untagged lampreys subjected to exhaustive exercise included decreases in blood pH of 0.3-0.5 units, a 40% decrease in muscle glycogen levels, a 22% increase in hematocrit for untagged fish only, and a 4- to 5-fold increase in muscle and a 40- to 100-fold increase in plasma lactate concentrations. These physiological changes were significant compared with resting control fish and usually returned to resting levels by 1-4 h after fatigue. Our estimates of Ucrit for Pacific lampreys are the first quantitative measures of their swimming performance and suggest that these fish may have difficulty negotiating fishways at dams on the Columbia River, which can have water velocities approaching 2 m/s. Our physiological results indicate that tagged and untagged Pacific lampreys show similar metabolic dysfunction after exhaustive exercise but recover quickly from a single exposure to such a stressor.

  16. Characterisation of the bacterial community structures in the intestine of Lampetra morii.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingying; Xie, Wenfang; Li, Qingwei

    2016-07-01

    The metagenomic analysis and 16S rDNA sequencing method were used to investigate the bacterial community in the intestines of Lampetra morii. The bacterial community structure in L. morii intestine was relatively simple. Eight different operational taxonomic units were observed. Chitinophagaceae_unclassified (26.5 %) and Aeromonas spp. (69.6 %) were detected as dominant members at the genus level. The non-dominant genera were as follows: Acinetobacter spp. (1.4 %), Candidatus Bacilloplasma (2.5 %), Enterobacteria spp. (1.5 %), Shewanella spp. (0.04 %), Vibrio spp. (0.09 %), and Yersinia spp. (1.8 %). The Shannon-Wiener (H) and Simpson (1-D) indexes were 0.782339 and 0.5546, respectively. The rarefaction curve representing the bacterial community richness and Shannon-Wiener curve representing the bacterial community diversity reached asymptote, which indicated that the sequence depth were sufficient to represent the majority of species richness and bacterial community diversity. The number of Aeromonas in lamprey intestine was two times higher after stimulation by lipopolysaccharide than PBS. This study provides data for understanding the bacterial community harboured in lamprey intestines and exploring potential key intestinal symbiotic bacteria essential for the L. morii immune response.

  17. Identification and characterization of aldehyde dehydrogenase 9 from Lampetra japonica and its protective role against cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunhui; Wang, Dan; Feng, Bin; Gou, Meng; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2015-09-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which oxidize aldehyde to corresponding acids, play a major role in the detoxification of various endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. In this study, we cloned and characterized ALDH9 (designated LjALDH9) from Arctic lamprey Lampetra japonica. The open reading frame of LjALDH9 was 1566 bp, encoding 521 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 55.68 kDa. LjALDH9 protein had a signal peptide and Aldedh domain with the active site Cys315. In addition, LjALDH9 shares high sequence homology with ALDH9 of jawed vertebrates. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that LjALDH9 was highly expressed in the buccal gland. A reactive LjALDH9 protein was obtained by prokaryotic expression, two-step-denaturing and refolding and affinity purification. During enzyme activity analysis of recombinant LjALDH9, we found that the most suitable reaction conditions were pH7.0, 16-23 °C and Mn(2+) as the activator. Our study provides theoretical proof that LjALDH9 plays an important role in the parasitic life phase of lamprey.

  18. Identification and Characterization of the Lamprey High-Mobility Group Box 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yue; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2012-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome structures, transcription, and inflammation. We identified a homolog of HMGB1 in the Japanese lamprey (Lampetra japonica). The Lampetra japonica HMGB1 gene (Lj-HMGB1) has over 70% sequence identity with its homologs in jawed vertebrates. Despite the reasonably high sequence identity with other HMGB1 proteins, Lj-HMGB1 did not group together with these proteins in a phylogenetic analysis. We examined Lj-HMGB1 expression in lymphocyte-like cells, and the kidneys, heart, gills, and intestines of lampreys before and after the animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and concanavalin A (ConA). Lj-HMGB1 was initially expressed at a higher level in the heart, but after treatment with LPS and ConA only the gills demonstrated a significant up-regulation of expression. The recombinant Lj-HMGB1 (rLj-HMGB1) protein bound double-stranded DNA and induced the proliferation of human adenocarcinoma cells to a similar extent as human HMGB1. We further revealed that Lj-HMGB1 was able to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a pro-inflammatory mediator, in activated human acute monocytic leukemia cells. These results suggest that lampreys use HMGB1 to activate their innate immunity for the purpose of pathogen defense. PMID:22563397

  19. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho: Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

    2002-12-01

    Recent decline of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata adult migrants to the Snake River drainage has focused attention on the species. Adult Pacific lamprey counted passing Ice Harbor Dam fishway averaged 18,158 during 1962-69 and 361 during 1993-2000. Human resource manipulations in the Snake River and Clearwater River drainages have altered ecosystem habitat in the last 120 years, likely impacting the productive potential of Pacific lamprey habitat. Timber harvest, stream impoundment, road construction, grazing, mining, and community development have dominated habitat alteration in the Clearwater River system and Snake River corridor. Hydroelectric projects in the Snake River corridor impact juvenile/larval Pacific lamprey outmigrants and returning adults. Juvenile and larval lamprey outmigrants potentially pass through turbines, turbine bypass/collection systems, and over spillway structures at the four lower Snake River hydroelectric dams. Clearwater River drainage hydroelectric facilities have impacted Pacific lamprey populations to an unknown degree. The Pacific Power and Light Dam on the Clearwater River in Lewiston, Idaho, restricted chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha passage in the 1927-1940 period, altering the migration route of outmigrating Pacific lamprey juveniles/larvae and upstream adult migrants (1927-1972). Dworshak Dam, completed in 1972, eliminated Pacific lamprey spawning and rearing in the North Fork Clearwater River drainage. Construction of the Harpster hydroelectric dam on the South Fork of the Clearwater River resulted in obstructed fish passage 1949-1963. Through Bonneville Power Administration support, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage in 2001. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine Pacific lamprey distribution, life history strategies, and habitat requirements in the South Fork

  20. Developmental anatomy of lampreys.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Michael K; Admiraal, Jeroen; Wright, Glenda M

    2010-02-01

    Lampreys are a group of aquatic chordates whose relationships to hagfishes and jawed vertebrates are still debated. Lamprey embryology is of interest to evolutionary biologists because it may shed light on vertebrate origins. For this and other reasons, lamprey embryology has been extensively researched by biologists from a range of disciplines. However, many of the key studies of lamprey comparative embryology are relatively inaccessible to the modern scientist. Therefore, in view of the current resurgence of interest in lamprey evolution and development, we present here a review of lamprey developmental anatomy. We identify several features of early organogenesis, including the origin of the nephric duct, that need to be re-examined with modern techniques. The homologies of several structures are also unclear, including the intriguing subendothelial pads in the heart. We hope that this review will form the basis for future studies into the phylogenetic embryology of this interesting group of animals.

  1. Lamprey variable lymphocyte receptors mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfang; Chen, Liyong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Huaying; Su, Peng; Han, Yinglun; Feng, Bo; Qiao, Xu; Zhao, Jing; Ma, Ning; Liu, Huijie; Zheng, Zhen; Li, Qingwei

    2013-02-01

    An alternative adaptive-immune system is present in the most basal vertebrates--lampreys and hagfish--the only surviving jawless vertebrates. These eel-like fish use leucine-rich repeat-based receptors for Ag recognition instead of the Ig-based receptors used in jawed vertebrates. We report that in Japanese lamprey (Lampetra japonica), variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR)B interacts with C1q and C3 proteins to mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity for bacteria and tumor cells. The immune-based lysis involves deposition of VLRB and C1q-like protein complex on the surface of target cells, activation of C3, and ultimate disruption of cell wall integrity. The demonstration of functional interaction between VLRB and complement components in lamprey provides evidence for the emergence of cooperative innate and adaptive-immune responses at a pivotal point in vertebrate evolution, before or in parallel with the evolution of Ig-based Abs and the classical complement-activation pathway.

  2. Determining Lamprey Species Composition, Larval Distribution and Adult Abundance in the Deschutes River Subbasin, Oregon ; 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Matt; Graham, Jennifer C.

    2009-06-26

    We will report results of an ongoing project in the Deschutes River Subbasin to describe Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) life history. Project objectives were to determine adult lamprey escapement from Sherars Falls located at Rkm 70.4 and determine lamprey focal spawning areas, spawn timing and habitat through radio telemetry. A mark-recapture study and tribal creel was conducted to determine adult escapement. Lamprey were radio tagged and are currently being mobile, aerial and fixed site tracked to describe spawning. Adult lamprey were collected at Sherars Falls using a long-handled dip net from June-September 2007. The fate of lamprey collected at Sherars Falls was determined based on girth measurements. Fish measuring less than 10.5 cm received two markings for the mark-recapture estimation while those measuring 10.5 cm or greater were implanted with radio transmitters. Two-hundred and nine lamprey were marked during first event sampling, 2,501 lamprey inspected for marks and 64 recaptured during second event sampling. We estimate lamprey abundance to be 8,083 (6,352-10,279) with a relative precision of 19.8. Tribal harvest was 2,303 +/- 88. Escapement was estimated at 5,780 adult lamprey. Thirty-six lamprey received radio transmitters. Lamprey were transported upstream 6.3 Rkm for surgery, held to recover from anesthesia and released. Mobile tracking efforts started mid-July 2007 and are on-going. To date 35 of the 36 lamprey have been detected. Upon release, extensive ground-based tracking was conducted until fish became dormant in mid-October. Since, fixed site downloading and tracking have occurred weekly on the mainstem Deschutes River. Majority of lamprey (88%) are holding in the mainstem Deschutes River. Three lamprey moved upstream more than 70 Rkms into westside tributaries from August-December. Three moved approximately 18 Rkms downstream of the release site. Tracking will continue through the spawning season when redd characteristics will be

  3. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho : Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Recent decline of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata adult migrants to the Snake River drainage has focused attention on the species. Adult returns in 1995-1999 were more than ten magnitudes less than returns in the early 1960's. Human activities in the Snake River and Clearwater River drainages have altered ecosystem habitat in the last 100 years and likely the productive potential of Pacific lamprey habitat. Logging, stream impoundment, road construction, grazing, mining, and community development have dominated habitat alteration in the Clearwater River system and Snake River corridor. Hydroelectric projects in the Snake River corridor impact juvenile Pacific lamprey outmigrants and returning adults. Juvenile lamprey outmigrants potentially pass through turbines, turbine bypass and collection systems, and spillway structures at lower Snake River hydroelectric dams. Clearwater River drainage hydroelectric facilities including the Pacific Power and Light Dam on the Clearwater River in Lewiston, Idaho, impacted Pacific lamprey populations, however, the degree of impact is unknown (1920's-early 1970's). Hydroelectric dam construction (Harpster Dam) on the South Fork of the Clearwater River resulted in obstructed salmonid passage in the mid-1900's. Habitat alterations in the Snake River basin and Clearwater River drainage have had numerous negative effects on salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead trout O. mykiss populations (wild fish), but the magnitude of impacts on lamprey productivity and survival is unknown. Thorough understanding of Pacific lamprey habitat use and life history processes is needed to facilitate management and restoration of the species. Through Bonneville Power Administration support, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game began investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage in 2000. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine where Pacific lamprey persist

  4. Determining Adult Pacific Lamprey Abundance and Spawning Habitat in the Lower Deschutes River Sub-Basin, Oregon, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Matt; Graham, Jennifer C.

    2009-04-30

    An adult Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) escapement estimate was generated in the lower Deschutes River during run year 2008. This included a mark-recapture study to determine adult abundance and a tribal subsistence creel. Fish measuring less than 10.5 cm received two marks for the mark-recapture estimate while those measuring greater than 10.5 cm were surgically implanted with radio transmitters to monitor migration upstream of Sherars Falls (rkm 70.4). Radio telemetry was used to determine habitat, focal spawning areas and spawn timing. All fish were collected at the Sherars Falls fish ladder from July-October 2008 using a long handled dip-net. Escapement was generated using a two event mark-recapture experiment. Adult lamprey populations were estimated at 3,471 (95% CI = 2,384-5,041; M = 101; C = 885 R = 25) using Chapman's modification of the Peterson estimate. The relative precision around the estimate was 31.42. Tribal harvest was approximately 806 adult lamprey (95% CI = +/- 74) with a total escapement of 2,669. Fourteen lamprey received radio tags and were released at Lower Blue Hole recreation site (rkm 77.3). Movement was recorded by mobile, fixed site and aerial telemetry methods. Upstream movements of lamprey were documented from July through December 2008 with most lamprey over-wintering in the mainstem Deschutes River.

  5. Morphometric discrimination of early life stage Lampetra tridentata and L richardsoni (Petromyzonidae) from the Columbia river basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Bayer, J.M.; Reiche, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of morphometric and meristic characteristics for taxonomic discrimination of Lampetra tridentata and L. richardsoni (Petromyzonidae) during embryological, prolarval, and early larval stages (i.e., age class 1) were examined. Mean chorion diameter increased with time from fertilization to hatch and was significantly greater for L. tridentata than for L. richardsoni at 1, 8, and 15 days postfertilization. Lampetra tridentata larvae had significantly more trunk myomeres than L. richardsoni; however, trunk myomere numbers were highly variable within species and deviated from previously published data. Multivariate examinations of prolarval and larval L. tridentata (7.2-11.0 mm; standard length) and L. richardsoni (6.6-10.8 mm) were conducted based on standard length and truss element lengths established from eight homologous landmarks. Principal components analysis indicated allometric relationships among the morphometric characteristics examined. Changes in body shape were indicated by groupings of morphometric characteristics associated with body regions (e.g., oral hood, branchial region, trunk region, and tail region). Discriminant function analysis using morphometric characteristics was successful in classifying a large proportion (>94.7%) of the lampreys sampled. 

  6. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  7. Reproductive ecology of lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nicholas S.; Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Lampreys typically spawn in riffle habitats during the spring. Spawning activity and diel (i.e., during daylight and at night) behavioral patterns are initiated when spring water temperatures increase to levels that coincide with optimal embryologic development. Nests are constructed in gravel substrate using the oral disc to move stones and the tail to fan sediment out of the nest. Spawning habitat used by individual species is generally a function of adult size, where small-bodied species construct nests in shallower water with slower flow and smaller gravel than large-bodied species. The mating system of lampreys is primarily polygynandrous (i.e., where multiple males mate with multiple females). Lamprey species with adult total length less than 30 cm generally spawn communally, where a nest may contain 20 or more individuals of both sexes. Lamprey species with adult sizes greater than 35 cm generally spawn in groups of two to four. Operational sex ratios of lampreys are highly variable across species, populations, and time, but are generally male biased. The act of spawning typically starts with the male attaching with his oral disc to the back of the female’s head; the male and female then entwine and simultaneously release gametes. However, alternative mating behaviors (e.g., release of gametes without paired courtship and sneaker males) have been observed. Future research should determine how multiple modalities of communication among lampreys (including mating pheromones) are integrated to inform species recognition and mate choice. Such research could inform both sea lamprey control strategies and provide insight into possible evolution of reproductive isolation mechanisms between paired lamprey species in sympatry.

  8. Embryology of the lamprey and evolution of the vertebrate jaw: insights from molecular and developmental perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Kuratani, S; Nobusada, Y; Horigome, N; Shigetani, Y

    2001-01-01

    Evolution of the vertebrate jaw has been reviewed and discussed based on the developmental pattern of the Japanese marine lamprey, Lampetra japonica. Though it never forms a jointed jaw apparatus, the L. japonica embryo exhibits the typical embryonic structure as well as the conserved regulatory gene expression patterns of vertebrates. The lamprey therefore shares the phylotype of vertebrates, the conserved embryonic pattern that appears at pharyngula stage, rather than representing an intermediate evolutionary state. Both gnathostomes and lampreys exhibit a tripartite configuration of the rostral-most crest-derived ectomesenchyme, each part occupying an anatomically equivalent site. Differentiated oral structure becomes apparent in post-pharyngula development. Due to the solid nasohypophyseal plate, the post-optic ectomesenchyme of the lamprey fails to grow rostromedially to form the medial nasal septum as in gnathostomes, but forms the upper lip instead. The gnathostome jaw may thus have arisen through a process of ontogenetic repatterning, in which a heterotopic shift of mesenchyme-epithelial relationships would have been involved. Further identification of shifts in tissue interaction and expression of regulatory genes are necessary to describe the evolution of the jaw fully from the standpoint of evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:11604127

  9. Expression of foreign genes in lamprey embryos: an approach to study evolutionary changes in gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Rie; Tochinai, Shin; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2003-04-15

    Evolution in development can be viewed as a sequence of changes in gene regulation. To investigate the cross-species compatibility of 5' upstream regulatory regions, we introduced exogenous gene constructs derived from a gnathostome genome into fertilized eggs of the Japanese lamprey, Lampetra japonica, a sister group of the gnathostomes. Eggs were injected with gene constructs in which a sequence encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) had been located downstream of either a virus promoter or 5' regulatory regions of medaka actin genes. Reporter gene expression was recorded for more than a month starting two days after injection. Although the expression patterns were highly mosaic and differed among individuals, GFP was expressed predominantly in the striated muscles of lamprey embryos when driven by the 5' upstream regions of the medaka muscle actin genes. This implies that a pan-vertebrate muscle-specific gene regulatory mechanism may have evolved before the agnathan/gnathostome divergence. This gene-transfer technique potentially facilitates the visualization of cells in various differentiating tissues throughout development. The introduction of developmental genes of the lamprey or other animals into lamprey embryos is another potentially important application, one that could provide us with information on the evolutionary changes in functions of genes or gene cascades.

  10. Lamprey TLRs with properties distinct from those of the variable lymphocyte receptors.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Akihiro; Matsuo, Aya; Sawa, Hirofumi; Tsujita, Tadayuki; Shida, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2007-01-01

    Fish express mammalian-type (M-type) TLRs consisting of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and Toll-IL-1R (TIR) homology domain for immunity, whereas invertebrates in deuterostomes appear to have no orthologs of M-type TLRs. Lampetra japonica (lamprey) belongs to the lowest class of vertebrates with little information about its TLRs. We have identified two cDNA sequences of putative TLRs in the lamprey (laTLRs) that contain LRRs and TIR domains. The two laTLRs were 56% homologous to each other, and their TIRs were similar to those of members of the human TLR2 subfamily, most likely orthologs of fish TLR14. We named them laTLR14a and laTLR14b. We raised a rabbit polyclonal Ab against laTLR14b and identified a 85-kDa protein in a human HEK293 transfectant by immunoblotting using the Ab. FACS, histochemical, and confocal analyses showed that laTLR14b is expressed intracellularly in lamprey gill cells and that the overexpressed protein resides in the endoplasmic reticulum of human and fish (medaka) cell lines. Because natural agonists of TLR14 remained unidentified, we made a chimera construct of extracellular CD4 and the cytoplasmic domain of laTLR14. The chimera molecule of laTLR14b, when expressed in HEK293 cells, elicited activation of NF-kappaB and, consequently, weak activation of the IFN-beta promoter. laTLR14b mRNA was observed in various organs and leukocytes. This lamprey species expressed a variable lymphocyte receptor structurally independent of laTLR14 in leukocytes. Thus, the jawless vertebrate lamprey possesses two LRR-based recognition systems, the variable lymphocyte receptor and TLR, and the M-type TLRs are conserved across humans, fish, and lampreys.

  11. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

    2009-05-07

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  12. Upstream Migration of Pacific Lampreys in the John Day River : Behavior, Timing, and Habitat Use : Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Jennifer M.; Seelye, James G.; Robinson, T. Craig

    2001-04-12

    Historic accounts and recent observations of Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) at mainstem Columbia River dams indicate the number of Pacific lampreys migrating upriver has decreased dramatically over the last 60 years. Consequently, state, federal, and tribal governments have recently expressed concern for this species. Little is known about the biological and ecological characteristics of habitats suitable for upstream migrating Pacific lampreys. If rehabilitation efforts are to be done effectively and efficiently, we must gain knowledge of factors limiting survival and reproduction of Pacific lampreys. From data gathered in the first year of this project, we can for the first time, describe the timing, extent, and patterns of movements for Pacific lampreys. We have tested methods and gained information that will allow us to refine our objectives and approach in future work. Knowledge of behavior, timing, and the resulting quantification of habitat use will provide a means to assess the suitability of overwintering and spawning habitats and allow the establishment of goals for recovery projects. Further research is necessary, including multiple years of data collection, tracking of movement patterns through the spawning season, and more rigorously examining habitat use.

  13. Hierarchical controls on native larval lamprey habitat in the Umpqua basin, southwestern Oregon, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K.; Mangano, J.; Keith, M. K.; O'Connor, J. E.; Dunham, J.; Heck, M.; Wise, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between streamflow and geomorphic processes at multiple spatial scales shape the ranges of habitats, species, and life stages that a river can support. Understanding these processes within a hierarchical context for Pacific Northwest rivers may be helpful for proactive monitoring and restoration of native western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsonii) and Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus). To that end, our study assessed the processes creating thick, fine-grained sediment deposits that lamprey larvae rely on as rearing habitat in the Umpqua River basin, southwestern Oregon. We first developed a spatial framework for characterizing basins based on expected fluxes of suspended and bed-material sediment and transport capacity. We then assessed the reach-scale controls on sediment deposition and erosion. Coupling remotely based watershed analyses and field sampling helped us assess the broad-scale spatial controls on sediment supply imposed by geology, and in turn, local factors that control sediment deposition and create larval lamprey habitat. Collectively, the results of this work aid in understanding the critical physical controls influencing the patterns in local habitat availability for larval lamprey within river networks.

  14. Effectiveness of common fish screen materials to protect lamprey ammocoetes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Brien P.; Mesa, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of irrigation diversions on populations of Pacific lampreyLampetra tridentata in the Columbia River basin is needed for their recovery. We tested the effectiveness of five common fish screen materials for excluding lamprey ammocoetes: interlock (IL), vertical bar (VB), perforated plate (PP), and 12-gauge and 14-gauge wire cloth (WC12) and (WC14). When fish (28–153 mm) were exposed for 60 min to screen panels perpendicular to an approach velocity of 12 cm/s in a recirculating flume, the percentage of ammocoetes entrained (i.e., passed through the screen) was 26% for the IL, 18% for the PP, 33% for the VB, 62% for the WC14, and 65% for the WC12 screens. For all screens, most fish were entrained within the first 15–20 min. Fish length significantly influenced entrainment, with the PP, VB, and IL screens preventing fish greater than 50–65 mm from entrainment and the WC14 and WC12 screens preventing entrainment of fish greater than 90–110 mm. Fish of all sizes repeatedly became impinged (i.e., contacting the screen for more than 1 s) on the screens, with the frequency of impingement events increasing during the first 5 min and becoming relatively stable thereafter. Impingement ranges were highest on the IL screen (36–62%), lowest on the WC14 and WC12 screens (13–31%), and intermediate on the PP and VB screens (23–54%). However, the WC14 and WC12 screens had fewer and larger fish remaining as time elapsed because so many were entrained. For all screen types, injuries were rare and minor, and no fish died after overnight posttest holding. Our results indicate that wire cloth screens should be replaced, where practical, with perforated plate, vertical bar, or interlocking bar screens to reduce lamprey entrainment at water diversions.

  15. Survival and growth of juvenile Pacific lampreys tagged with passive integrated transponders (PIT) in freshwater and seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.; Christiansen, Helena E.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Roon, Sean R.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    Tagging methods are needed for both adult and juvenile life stages of Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata to better understand their biology and factors contributing to their decline. We developed a safe and efficient technique for tagging juvenile Pacific lampreys with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We tested the short-term survival of PIT-tagged juvenile lampreys in freshwater at four temperatures (9, 12, 15, and 18°C) and their long-term growth and survival in seawater. For both experiments there was little to no tag loss, and juvenile lampreys in freshwater showed high survival at all temperatures at 7 d (95–100%) and 14 d (88–100%) posttagging. Prolonged holding (40 d) resulted in significantly lower survival (28–79%) at warmer temperatures (12–18°C). For juvenile lampreys tagged in freshwater and then transitioned to seawater, survival was 97% for tagged fish until day 94, and at the end of 6 months, survival was about 58% for both tagged and control fish. About half of the tagged and control fish that survived in seawater grew, but there was no difference in growth between the two groups. In freshwater, but not in seawater, most fish that died had an aquatic fungal infection. In both experiments, survival increased with increasing fish length at tagging. Our results indicate that tags similar in size to a 9-mm PIT tag are a feasible option for tagging metamorphosed juvenile lampreys migrating downstream and that when fungal infections are mitigated—as in seawater—long-term (at least 6 months) survival of tagged juvenile lampreys is high.

  16. War on lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffett, James W.

    1953-01-01

    Vampire-like sea lampreys look somewhat like short sections of garden hose, swim like eels, and live solely on the blood of fishes. Their voracious appetites have been especially harmful to fish in the Great Lakes, and it is there that methods of underwater electrocution are being applied in their control.

  17. Identification and characterisation of the anti-oxidative stress properties of the lamprey prohibitin 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiesong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Yang; Li, Qingwei

    2015-02-01

    The highly conserved protein prohibitin 2 (PHB2) has been implicated as a cell-surface receptor in the regulation of proliferation, apoptosis, transcription, and mitochondrial protein folding. In the present study, we identified a Lampetra morii homologue of PHB2, Lm-PHB2, showing greater than 61.8% sequence identity with its homologues. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the position of Lm-PHB2 is consistent with lamprey phylogeny. Expression of the Lm-PHB2 protein was nearly equivalent in the heart, liver, kidneys, intestines, and muscles of normal lampreys. However, the Lm-PHB2 protein was down-regulated in the myocardia of lampreys challenged for 5 days with adriamycin (Adr), followed by a significant up-regulation 10 days after treatment. In vitro, recombinant Lm-PHB2 (rLm-PHB2) protein could significantly enhance the H2O2-induced oxidative stress tolerance in Chang liver (CHL) cells. Further mechanism studies indicated that the nucleus-to-mitochondria translocation of Lm-PHB2 was closely involved in the oxidative stress protection. Our results suggests that the strategies to modulate Lm-PHB2 levels may constitute a novel therapeutic approach for myocardial injury and liver inflammatory diseases, conditions in which oxidative stress plays a critical role in tissue injury and inflammation.

  18. Biliary atresia in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Youson, J H

    1993-01-01

    The preceding pages have described an organism that is far removed from mammals on the taxonomic scale of vertebrates but one that has proven to have a unique and most useful system for studies of liver function and, in particular, bile product transport and excretion. It is also an organism in which iron loading can be studied in the liver and other organs and tissues. Many of the events that occur in this animal during its life cycle with regard to bile pigment metabolism as normal programmed phenomena are unparalleled among the vertebrates. In the larval (ammocoete) period of lampreys, there is an intrahepatic gallbladder and a biliary tree that is well equipped for the storage, transport, and elimination of bile products into the intestine for ultimate excretion with the feces. The importance of the patency of these bile ducts to bile excretion is illustrated in one species of lampreys in which the bile ducts of young ammocoetes become infested with larval nematodes to a degree that bile pigment regurgitation into the blood results in a green serum that is identified as biliverdin. Despite having serum levels of biliverdin that would be toxic to humans, these individuals live a complete larval life. The larvae of all lamprey species undergo a phase of metamorphosis in which they transform into adults. During this phase the larval gallbladder, the bile canaliculi of the hepatocytes, and all the intrahepatic bile ducts completely regress in a developmental process called lamprey biliary atresia. The epithelium of the extrahepatic common bile duct transforms and expands into a caudal portion of the endocrine pancreas of the adult. Many of the events of lamprey biliary atresia resemble events occurring during experimental and pathological conditions of mammalian cholestasis, including disruption to the bile-blood barrier (intercellular junctions), accumulation of bile components in the cytoplasmic inclusions, and alteration of the distribution of membrane enzymes

  19. The structure, splicing, synteny and expression of lamprey COE genes and the evolution of the COE gene family in chordates.

    PubMed

    Lara-Ramírez, Ricardo; Poncelet, Guillaume; Patthey, Cédric; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2017-09-05

    COE genes encode transcription factors that have been found in all metazoans examined to date. They possess a distinctive domain structure that includes a DNA-binding domain (DBD), an IPT/TIG domain and a helix-loop-helix (HLH) domain. An intriguing feature of the COE HLH domain is that in jawed vertebrates it is composed of three helices, compared to two in invertebrates. We report the isolation and expression of two COE genes from the brook lamprey Lampetra planeri and compare these to COE genes from the lampreys Lethenteron japonicum and Petromyzon marinus. Molecular phylogenetic analyses do not resolve the relationship of lamprey COE genes to jawed vertebrate paralogues, though synteny mapping shows that they all derive from duplication of a common ancestral genomic region. All lamprey genes encode conserved DBD, IPT/TIG and HLH domains; however, the HLH domain of lamprey COE-A genes encodes only two helices while COE-B encodes three helices. We also identified COE-B splice variants encoding either two or three helices in the HLH domain, along with other COE-A and COE-B splice variants affecting the DBD and C-terminal transactivation regions. In situ hybridisation revealed expression in the lamprey nervous system including the brain, spinal cord and cranial sensory ganglia. We also detected expression of both genes in mesenchyme in the pharyngeal arches and underlying the notochord. This allows us to establish the primitive vertebrate expression pattern for COE genes and compare this to that of invertebrate chordates and other animals to develop a model for COE gene evolution in chordates.

  20. Tagging Juvenile Pacific Lamprey with Passive Integrated Transponders: Methodology, Short-Term Mortality, and Influence on Swimming Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Bleich, Matthew D.

    2006-05-31

    Populations of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River basin have declined drastically over the past 20 years. Possible causes include habitat degradation and instream flow obstacles, such as the mainstem hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River. To determine why lamprey populations have declined a monitoring system to track their movements was needed to determine possible impacts. Juvenile lamprey were implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and their detection rates determined while migrating through fish bypass facilities at McNary in 2001 and 2005 and John Day Dam in 2002. Juvenile Pacific lamprey (115–178 mm) were obtained from the John Day Dam fish collection facility, transported to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and surgically PIT-tagged. Lamprey were allowed to recover for 3 to 4 days following PIT tag implantation and subsequently were released upstream of the PIT tag detectors at both dams. Primary detector efficiency was 98% at McNary Dam and 97% at John Day Dam. Average in-river travel time for fish released at McNary Dam and detected at John Day Dam was 16.1 d in 2001 and 10 d in 2005. Mean detection rates at McNary Dam varied from 74% for gatewell releases to 69% for the collection channel. Follow up tests in 2005 at McNary Dam showed detections rates near 100% from collection channel releases. Detection rates from forebay releases at McNary Dam were lower, ranging from 0% to 38% (mean = 21%). Mean travel times from release point to the primary detectors at McNary Dam were; forebay (492 min), gatewell (323 min), and collection channel (245 min). The detection efficiency at the primary detectors was similar to that of PIT-tagged smolts and travel time within the bypass system showed that lamprey can hold in the bypass system for prolonged periods.

  1. Identification and characterization of the lamprey IRF gene.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yue; Liu, Shuang; Zheng, Zhen; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2015-04-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are named for their ability to bind to and regulate interferon genes when an organism becomes infected with a virus. Numerous studies have revealed the versatile and critical functions of IRFs. In this study, an IRF gene from Lampetra japonica was identified and analyzed using bioinformatic methods. The L. japonica IRF (Lj-IRF) shares high sequence homology with other vertebrate IRFs but low sequence homology with an ascidian IRF-like protein. We also used recombinant Lj-IRF protein (rLj-IRF) to immunize New Zealand rabbits to prepare specific anti-rLj-IRF polyclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and Western blotting assays were performed to detect the valence and specificity of the antibody. FACS analysis revealed that the Lj-IRF protein was expressed in approximately 21.14% of leukocytes and 9.60% of supraneural body cells in L. japonica, with immunofluorescence staining indicating a cytoplasmic location. The immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that IRF is distributed in the epithelial cells of the heart, supraneural body, kidneys and gills but is not detectable in intestinals or oral gland tissues. However, the expression of IRF was upregulated in lamprey intestinal tissues upon stimulation with the rLj-HMGB1 protein. Lj-IRF gene expression levels were higher in the rLj-HMGB1-stimulated group than the control group, and the expression level of Lj-IRF was significantly increased in the intestines as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. These results provide a foundation for studying the origin and evolution of the innate immune system in lampreys.

  2. Survival and tag retention of Pacific lamprey larvae and macrophthalmia marked with coded wire tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Puls, A.L.; Bayer, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the survival, tag retention, and growth of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata larvae and macrophthalmia marked with standard-length decimal coded wire tags and exposed to two levels of handling stress. The survival of marked individuals did not differ from that of unmarked individuals at either life stage for the duration of the experiment (56 d). Tag retention was 100% for all treatment combinations except larvae that were handled frequently (93 ?? 3%). The majority of tag loss occurred within 28 d of marking, and no tag loss was observed between 42 and 56 d after marking. The individuals that lost tags were among the smallest marked, and a logistic regression model indicated a relationship between larva length and the probability of tag retention. Size of larvae (length and mass) and macrophthalmia (mass) decreased over the duration of the experiment; however, changes in size were systematic among treatment combinations, indicating that factors other than tagging or handling affected growth. These data indicate that coded wire tags may be useful for field-based studies of Pacific lamprey larvae and macrophthalmia.

  3. Complete mitochondrial genomes of paired species northern brook lamprey (Ichthyomyzon fossor) and silver lamprey (I. unicuspis).

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianfeng; Buchinger, Tyler; Pu, Jiafei; Jia, Liang; Li, Weiming

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitogenomes of paired species northern brook lamprey (Ichthyomyzon fossor) and silver lamprey (I. unicuspis) is reported. The two mitogenomes show a 13 bp length difference on the tRNA-Gly and two control regions. The gene order and contents are conserved in the two lampreys and identical to the lamprey mitogenomes published. Except for three indel polymorphic sites, there are 27 SNP sites which are all synonymous substitution sites and occurred on 9 protein-coding genes, two rRNAs and one tRNA. The control region1 contains six consecutive 39-nt repetitive strings in both lampreys. A 7-nt repetitive string in the control region2 is repeated 3 and 5 times in northern brook lamprey and silver lamprey, respectively. The observed level of similarity between nucleotide sequences (99.74%) is consistent with the hypothesis that northern brook lamprey and silver lamprey represent two ecotypes of one species.

  4. Tagging Juvenile Pacific Lamprey with Passive Integrated Transponders: Methodology, Short-Term Mortality, and Influence on Swimming Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Bleich, Matthew D.

    2006-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the feasibility (i.e., efficiency and onintrusiveness) of tagging juvenile Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and to determine any associated impacts on survivorship and swimming ability. Juvenile Pacific lampreys were obtained from the John Day Dam fish collection facility and tests were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in 2001 and 2002. A new PIT-tagging procedure was used to inject 12-mm tags 5 mm posterior to the gill openings. ampreys were allowed to recover for 3–4 d following surgery before postmortality and swimming tests were conducted. The PIT tagging procedure during 2001 did not include a suture, and 2.6% of the tags were shed after 40 d. During 2002 a single suture was used to close the opening after inserting a tag, and no tag shedding was observed. Overall short-term mortality rates for lampreys 120–155 mm (total length) held for 40 d at 88C was 2.2% for tagged and 2.7% for untagged fish. Mortality increased significantly when tagged and untagged groups were held in warmer (19–238C) river water: 50% for tagged and 60% for untagged animals. Lengths did not significantly affect survival for either the tagged or untagged group held in warm water. A fungal infection was observed to be the cause of death when water temperature increased. Swimming tests to determine any adverse effects due to tag insertion showed no significant difference (P ¼ 0.12) between tagged and untagged lampreys for mean burst speed; however, maximum burst speeds were significantly lower for the PIT-tagged group.

  5. 76 FR 12129 - Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup AGENCY: Fish and... (Service), announce a ] meeting of the Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup (Workgroup... and implementation of sea lamprey control techniques alternative to lampricide that are...

  6. The hydrodynamics of lamprey locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan C.

    The lamprey, an anguilliform swimmer, propels itself by undulating most of its body. This type of swimming produces flow patterns that are highly three-dimensional in nature and not very well understood. However, substantial previous work has been done to understand two-dimensional unsteady propulsion, the possible wake structures and thrust performance. Limited studies of three-dimensional propulsors with simple geometries have displayed the importance of the third dimension in designing unsteady swimmers. Some of the results of those studies, primarily the ways in which vorticity is organized in the wake region, are seen in lamprey swimming as well. In the current work, the third dimension is not the only important factor, but complex geometry and body undulations also contribute to the hydrodynamics. Through dye flow visualization, particle induced velocimetry and pressure measurements, the hydrodynamics of anguilliform swimming are studied using a custom built robotic lamprey. These studies all indicate that the undulations of the body are not producing thrust. Instead, it is the tail which acts to propel the animal. This conclusion led to further investigation of the tail, specifically the role of varying tail flexibility on hydrodymnamics. It is found that by making the tail more flexible, one decreases the coherence of the vorticity in the lamprey's wake. Additional flexibility also yields less thrust.

  7. Population Genetic Structure of Aedes fluviatilis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Multini, Laura Cristina; Wilke, André Barretto Bruno; Suesdek, Lincoln; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2016-01-01

    Although Aedes fluviatilis is an anthropophilic mosquito found abundantly in urban environments, its biology, epidemiological potential and genetic characteristics are poorly understood. Climate change and urbanization processes that result in environmental modifications benefit certain anthropophilic mosquito species such as Ae. fluviatilis, greatly increasing their abundance in urban areas. To gain a better understanding of whether urbanization processes modulate the genetic structure of this species in the city of São Paulo, we used eight microsatellite loci to genetically characterize Ae. fluviatilis populations collected in nine urban parks in the city of São Paulo. Our results show that there is high gene flow among the populations of this species, heterozygosity deficiency and low genetic structure and that the species may have undergone a recent population expansion. There are two main hypotheses to explain these findings: (i) Ae. fluviatilis populations have undergone a population expansion as a result of urbanization; and (ii) as urbanization of the city of São Paulo occurred recently and was quite intense, the structuring of these populations cannot be observed yet, apart from in the populations of Ibirapuera and Piqueri parks, where the first signs of structuring have appeared. We believe that the expansion found in Ae. fluviatilis populations is probably correlated with the unplanned urbanization of the city of São Paulo, which transformed green areas into urbanized areas, as well as the increasing population density in the city.

  8. Population Genetic Structure of Aedes fluviatilis (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Multini, Laura Cristina; Suesdek, Lincoln; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2016-01-01

    Although Aedes fluviatilis is an anthropophilic mosquito found abundantly in urban environments, its biology, epidemiological potential and genetic characteristics are poorly understood. Climate change and urbanization processes that result in environmental modifications benefit certain anthropophilic mosquito species such as Ae. fluviatilis, greatly increasing their abundance in urban areas. To gain a better understanding of whether urbanization processes modulate the genetic structure of this species in the city of São Paulo, we used eight microsatellite loci to genetically characterize Ae. fluviatilis populations collected in nine urban parks in the city of São Paulo. Our results show that there is high gene flow among the populations of this species, heterozygosity deficiency and low genetic structure and that the species may have undergone a recent population expansion. There are two main hypotheses to explain these findings: (i) Ae. fluviatilis populations have undergone a population expansion as a result of urbanization; and (ii) as urbanization of the city of São Paulo occurred recently and was quite intense, the structuring of these populations cannot be observed yet, apart from in the populations of Ibirapuera and Piqueri parks, where the first signs of structuring have appeared. We believe that the expansion found in Ae. fluviatilis populations is probably correlated with the unplanned urbanization of the city of São Paulo, which transformed green areas into urbanized areas, as well as the increasing population density in the city. PMID:27598889

  9. Growth and annual survival estimates to examine the ecology of larval lamprey and the implications of ageing error in fitting models.

    PubMed

    Schultz, L D; Chasco, B E; Whitlock, S L; Meeuwig, M H; Schreck, C B

    2017-04-01

    This study used existing western brook lamprey Lampetra richardsoni age information to fit three different growth models (i.e. von Bertalanffy, Gompertz and logistic) with and without error in age estimates. Among these growth models, there was greater support for the logistic and Gompertz models than the von Bertalanffy model, regardless of ageing error assumptions. The von Bertalanffy model, however, appeared to fit the data well enough to permit survival estimates; using length-based estimators, annual survival varied between 0·64 (95% credibility interval: 0·44-0·79) and 0·81 (0·79-0·83) depending on ageing and growth process error structure. These estimates are applicable to conservation and management of L. richardsoni and other western lampreys (e.g. Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus) and can potentially be used in the development of life-cycle models for these species. These results also suggest that estimators derived from von Bertalanffy growth models should be interpreted with caution if there is high uncertainty in age estimates. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. Burrowing activities of the larval lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawyer, Philip J.

    1959-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1950 of Applegate's work on the sea lamprey in Michigan (U. S. Fish and Wildl. Serv., Spec. Sci. Rept.; Fish, No. 55) and the subsequent development of means to control lampreys in the Great Lakes, biologists have accumulated much additional information on adult lampreys. Larval lampreys, however, are difficult animals to observe in the field, and many facets of their behavior are still unknown. While working with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, I kept ammocetes in captivity, and was able to observe their burrowing activities.

  11. Warming alters the body shape of European perch Perca fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Rowiński, P K; Mateos-Gonzalez, F; Sandblom, E; Jutfelt, F; Ekström, A; Sundström, L F

    2015-11-01

    The consequences of elevated temperature on body shape were investigated by comparing European perch Perca fluviatilis from the Forsmark area of the Baltic Sea to P. fluviatilis from a nearby Biotest enclosure. The Biotest is a man-made enclosure within the Baltic Sea that has received warm water from a nuclear power plant since 1980, resulting in temperatures that are elevated 5-10 °C relative to the surrounding Baltic Sea. Sampled fish ranged from young-of-the-year to 14 years. Geometric morphometrics and multivariate statistical analysis revealed significant morphological differences between individuals of P. fluviatilis from these two habitats. Most importantly, relative shape changed with size, with small individuals of P. fluviatilis from Biotest being characterized by a deeper body shape and a larger caudal peduncle than the smaller Baltic individuals. In large specimens, smaller differences were found with Biotest individuals being more slender than Baltic individuals. These results show that, in order to have a full understanding of the biological effects of elevated temperatures, studies that cover the entire size range of organisms will be important. Apart from the direct influence of temperature on growth rate and body shape, other ecological factors affected by temperature are discussed as possible contributors to the observed differences between the two populations. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  12. First report on Anopheles fluviatilis U in southeastern Iran.

    PubMed

    Mehravaran, A; Oshaghi, M A; Vatandoost, H; Abai, M R; Ebrahimzadeh, A; Roodi, A Moazeni; Grouhi, A

    2011-02-01

    Anopheles fluviatilis James, one of the malaria vectors in Iran, is a complex of at least three cryptic species provisionally designated as species S, T and U. These species are morphologically indistinguishable at any stage of their life cycle and can be identified only by the examination of species-specific fixed inversions in the polytene chromosomes. Recently, sequence analysis of 28S D3 and second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) regions of ribosomal DNA has revealed 7 haplotypes of S, U, T1, T2, Y, X and V within the complex. Identification of the cryptic species of the complex is of paramount importance in a disease control program due to contrasting differences in their vectorial efficiency, preference for feeding on humans and resting behavior. In this study we analyzed the sequence of 28S D3- and ITS2-rDNA loci to identify the species composition of the An. fluviatilis complex in Jiroft and Chabahar districts, two of the most important endemic malaria foci in southeastern corner of Iran. The ITS2 sequence analysis revealed that all of the An. fluviatilis specimens were identical to the Y/T2 haplotype of An. fluviatilis T, whereas D3 sequence analysis revealed presence of species T in Jiroft and species U in Chabahar district. It is the first report of species U in Iran. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A thymus candidate in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Bajoghli, Baubak; Guo, Peng; Aghaallaei, Narges; Hirano, Masayuki; Strohmeier, Christine; McCurley, Nathanael; Bockman, Dale E; Schorpp, Michael; Cooper, Max D; Boehm, Thomas

    2011-02-03

    Immunologists and evolutionary biologists have been debating the nature of the immune system of jawless vertebrates--lampreys and hagfish--since the nineteenth century. In the past 50 years, these fish were shown to have antibody-like responses and the capacity to reject allografts but were found to lack the immunoglobulin-based adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates. Recent work has shown that lampreys have lymphocytes that instead express somatically diversified antigen receptors that contain leucine-rich-repeats, termed variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs), and that the type of VLR expressed is specific to the lymphocyte lineage: T-like lymphocytes express type A VLR (VLRA) genes, and B-like lymphocytes express VLRB genes. These clonally diverse anticipatory antigen receptors are assembled from incomplete genomic fragments by gene conversion, which is thought to be initiated by either of two genes encoding cytosine deaminase, cytosine deaminase 1 (CDA1) in T-like cells and CDA2 in B-like cells. It is unknown whether jawless fish, like jawed vertebrates, have dedicated primary lymphoid organs, such as the thymus, where the development and selection of lymphocytes takes place. Here we identify discrete thymus-like lympho-epithelial structures, termed thymoids, in the tips of the gill filaments and the neighbouring secondary lamellae (both within the gill basket) of lamprey larvae. Only in the thymoids was expression of the orthologue of the gene encoding forkhead box N1 (FOXN1), a marker of the thymopoietic microenvironment in jawed vertebrates, accompanied by expression of CDA1 and VLRA. This expression pattern was unaffected by immunization of lampreys or by stimulation with a T-cell mitogen. Non-functional VLRA gene assemblies were found frequently in the thymoids but not elsewhere, further implicating the thymoid as the site of development of T-like cells in lampreys. These findings suggest that the similarities underlying the dual nature of the adaptive

  14. Update: brain and pituitary hormones of lampreys.

    PubMed

    Sower, S A; Kawauchi, H

    2001-06-01

    Lampreys and hagfish of the class Agnatha are of particular importance in understanding endocrinological relationships since they represent the oldest lineages of extant vertebrates which evolved over 550 million years ago. This review briefly summarizes the latest findings on the reproductive endocrinology of the sea lampreys. Since the First International Symposium of Fish Endocrinology in 1988, when virtually little was known of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, substantial new biochemical, molecular, physiological and immunological evidence has now clearly shown that lamprey reproduction is controlled by the neuroendocrine axis. In addition, five brain and six pituitary hormones of lampreys have been identified mainly by Sower and Kawauchi and colleagues between 1986 and 2000. We now hypothesize that lamprey reproduction is a highly synchronized process that is initiated or mediated by a coordination of complex integration of environmental cues and hormonal mechanisms which is broadly similar to that exhibited by gnathostome vertebrates.

  15. Development of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larvicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, John H.; Lech, John J.; Allen, John L.

    1980-01-01

    Larvicides are used to control sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes. These larvicides are useful because they are more toxic to sea lamprey than fish species found in the same habitat. The lampricides come from two classes of chemical compounds: (1) halonitrophenols, and (2) halonitrosalicylanilides. Selectivity of the larvicides appears to be based on the differences in the ability of sea lamprey larvae and fishes to detoxify and/or excrete the chemicals. Glucuronide conjugation is an important mechanism for detoxification of these larvicides by fish, and selectivity of larvicides may be due to differences in glucuronyl transferase activity between lamprey and fishes. If more detailed information were available on uptake, metabolism, excretion, and the biochemistry and physiology of lamprey as compared to fishes, it might be possible to design chemicals that would be more selective than those now in use.

  16. Using stable isotopes and C:N ratios to examine the life-history strategies and nutritional sources of larval lampreys.

    PubMed

    Evans, T M; Bauer, J E

    2016-02-01

    Natural abundance stable-isotope analysis (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) and C:N ratios were used to study the ammocoete phase of two common non-parasitic lamprey species (least brook lamprey Lampetra aepyptera and American brook lamprey Lethenteron appendix) in two tributaries of the Ohio River (U.S.A.). The C:N ratios suggest that each species employs different lipid accumulation strategies to support its metamorphosis and recruitment into an adult animal. Ammocoete δ(13)C values generally increased with increasing C:N values. In contrast to δ(13)C, ammocoete δ(15)N values were weakly related to the total length (LT) in L. aepyptera, but positively correlated to both LT and C:N ratios in L. appendix. In L. appendix, C:N also correlated positively with LT, and presumably age. A Bayesian mixing model using δ(13)C and δ(15)N was used to estimate nutritional subsidies of different potential food resources to ammocoetes at each site. The models suggested that although nutritional subsidies to ammocoetes varied as a function of site, ammocoetes were generally reliant on large contributions (42-62% at three sites) from aquatic plants. Contributions from aquatic sediment organic matter were also important at all sites (32-63%) for ammocoetes, with terrestrially derived plant materials contributing smaller amounts (4-33%). These findings provide important insights into the feeding ecology and nutrition of two species of lampreys. They also suggest that similar and other quantitative approaches are required to (1) fully understand how the observed stable-isotopes ratios are established in ammocoetes and (2) better assess ammocoete nutritional subsidies in different natal streams.

  17. Differences in the clotting of lamprey fibrinogen by lamprey and bovine thrombins

    PubMed Central

    Doolittle, R. F.

    1965-01-01

    1. Improved methods for the purification of lamprey thrombin and fibrinogen are presented. 2. Lamprey thrombin releases two fibrinopeptides from lamprey fibrinogen during the transformation into fibrin. Bovine thrombin releases only one of these, a peptide referred to as fibrinopeptide B. The differences in the by-products of fibrin formation are reflected in the different N-terminal amino acid compositions of the two types of fibrin. 3. The fibrinopeptide that is not removed from the lamprey fibrinogen by bovine thrombin can subsequently be released by treatment of that fibrin with lamprey thrombin. 4. Under the conditions used, lamprey thrombin releases both fibrinopeptides at about the same rate. 5. The differences in interaction among these pairs of related proteins are extreme manifestations of the phenomenon loosely referred to as `species specificity'. PMID:14340065

  18. Effects of lamprey gonadotropin-releasing hormone-III on steroidogenesis and spermiation in male sea lampreys.

    PubMed

    Deragon, K L; Sower, S A

    1994-09-01

    The biological activities of lamprey gonadotropin-releasing hormone-III (GnRH-III) were determined in the adult male sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus. One injection of lamprey GnRH-III at 0.1 or 0.2 microgram/g body wt stimulated plasma estradiol and progesterone levels in adult male sea lampreys undergoing final maturation. Four successive injections of lamprey GnRH-III at 0.1 microgram/g of lamprey GnRH-1 at 0.2 microgram/g induced spermiation in 78 or 30% of the lampreys, respectively, compared to 0% in controls by Day 16. In summary, lamprey GnRH-III is biologically active in stimulating the pituitary-gonadal axis in adult male lampreys.

  19. Thrust Production in a Mechanical Swimming Lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan; Smits, Alexander

    2008-11-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey as a means of investigating the surface pressure and wake structure during swimming. A programmable microcomputer actuates 11 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The waveform is based on the motion of the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), as described by Tytell and Lauder (2004) and kinematic studies of living lamprey. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments indicating that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined. The project is supported by NIH CNRS Grant 1R01NS054271.

  20. Thrust production by a mechanical swimming lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, M. C.; Smits, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey to investigate the formation of the wake structure, the shedding vorticity from the body, and the relationship between thrust production and pressure on the surface of the robot. The robot mimics the motion of living lamprey in steady swimming by using a programmable microcomputer to actuate 13 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments. This indicates that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined, showing a clear connection between the location of vortex structures and the fluctuations of the pressure signal.

  1. Lamprey: a model for vertebrate evolutionary research.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Zhu, Si-Wei; Li, Qing-Wei

    2016-09-18

    Lampreys belong to the superclass Cyclostomata and represent the most ancient group of vertebrates. Existing for over 360 million years, they are known as living fossils due to their many evolutionally conserved features. They are not only a keystone species for studying the origin and evolution of vertebrates, but also one of the best models for researching vertebrate embryonic development and organ differentiation. From the perspective of genetic information, the lamprey genome remains primitive compared with that of other higher vertebrates, and possesses abundant functional genes. Through scientific and technological progress, scientists have conducted in-depth studies on the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems of lampreys. Such research has significance for understanding and revealing the origin and evolution of vertebrates, and could contribute to a greater understanding of human diseases and treatments. This review presents the current progress and significance of lamprey research.

  2. Lamprey: a model for vertebrate evolutionary research

    PubMed Central

    XU, Yang; ZHU, Si-Wei; LI, Qing-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Lampreys belong to the superclass Cyclostomata and represent the most ancient group of vertebrates. Existing for over 360 million years, they are known as living fossils due to their many evolutionally conserved features. They are not only a keystone species for studying the origin and evolution of vertebrates, but also one of the best models for researching vertebrate embryonic development and organ differentiation. From the perspective of genetic information, the lamprey genome remains primitive compared with that of other higher vertebrates, and possesses abundant functional genes. Through scientific and technological progress, scientists have conducted in-depth studies on the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems of lampreys. Such research has significance for understanding and revealing the origin and evolution of vertebrates, and could contribute to a greater understanding of human diseases and treatments. This review presents the current progress and significance of lamprey research. PMID:27686784

  3. Sensitivity of lamprey ammocoetes to six chemicals.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Helle B; Caldwell, Richard S; Toll, John; Do, Thai; Saban, Lisa

    2010-11-01

    As part of the ecological risk assessment for Portland Harbor Superfund site, a study was conducted to address the question of whether the use of surrogate species in the risk assessment would be protective of lamprey ammocoetes. The study evaluated the acute toxicity of six chemicals: pentachlorophenol, copper, diazinon, aniline, naphthalene, and lindane; these chemicals represent the toxic modes of action of oxidative phosphorylation uncoupler, gill dysfunction, acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, polar narcosis, narcosis, and central nervous system interference, respectively. Field-collected lamprey ammocoetes were exposed to each of the six chemicals in a definitive 96-h flow-through acute water-only toxicity test. LC(50)s were calculated for pentachlorophenol at 31 μg/l, copper at 46 μg/l, diazinon at 8.9 mg/l, and aniline at 430 mg/l. Species sensitivity distributions based on LC(50)s for aquatic organisms indicated that lamprey ammocoetes were relatively sensitive to pentachlorophenol (15th percentile). The sensitivity of lamprey ammocoetes to copper approximated the average of aquatic species tested (46th percentile). Lamprey ammocoetes were relatively insensitive to diazinon and aniline (72nd and 90th percentile, respectively). The 96-h LC(50) for naphthalene was estimated at 10 mg/l, based on 50% mortality in the highest concentration. Based on a comparison with LC(50)s for four other fish species, ranging from 2.0 to 6.6 mg/l, lamprey ammocoetes were relatively insensitive to naphthalene. A 96-h LC(50) could not be derived for lindane, with 12.5% mortality in the highest test concentration of 2.68 mg/l. LC(50)s for numerous other fish species ranged from 0.001 to 0.24 mg/l, indicating that lamprey ammocoetes were relatively insensitive to lindane. The study concluded that the use of surrogate species in the ecological risk assessment for Portland Harbor would be protective of lamprey ammocoetes.

  4. Pacific lamprey artificial propogation and rearing investigations: Rocky Reach Lamprey Management Plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; ,; ,; ,; ,

    2011-01-01

    The impetus for developing this document is through implementing the Rocky Reach Pacific Lamprey Management Plan (PLMP), a component of the Rocky Reach Comprehensive Settlement Agreement, both of which are discussed more thoroughly in Section 1.2. The ultimate goal of the PLMP is to achieve No Net Impact (NNI) to Pacific lamprey of ongoing operations of the Rocky Reach Hydroelectric Project. Conducting artificial propagation of Pacific lamprey was considered by the state and federal fishery agencies and Tribes that are parties to the Settlement Agreement as a potential Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement measure (PME) for achieving NNI during the term of the current Rocky Reach license. This document is intended to provide guidance as to the feas ibility of culturing Pacific lamprey, the associated facilities necessary for culture practices, and identifying uncertainties for monitoring culture efficacy and rationale for implementing Pacific lamprey artificial propagation

  5. Resistance to 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) in sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholefield, R.J.; Seelye, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) has been used in the United States and Canada for more than 30 years to control populations of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes. There is concern that sea lamprey might become resistant to TFM. Lampricide toxicity tests have been conducted at the Hammond Bay Biological Station, Millersburg, Michigan, since the 1950s and examination of TFM toxicity data for larval lamprey from 1963 to 1987 indicated that sea lamprey have not developed increased resistance to TFM. Maintenance of current control practices are unlikely to cause the development of TFM-resistant sea lamprey strains in the foreseeable future.

  6. Identification of a natriuretic peptide (NP) in cyclostomes (lamprey and hagfish): CNP-4 is the ancestral gene of the NP family.

    PubMed

    Kawakoshi, Akatsuki; Hyodo, Susumu; Nozaki, Masumi; Takei, Yoshio

    2006-08-01

    In bony fishes, natriuretic peptides (NPs) comprise a hormone family that is composed of seven subtypes; ANP, BNP, VNP that have an intramolecular ring and N- and C-terminal extensions, and four CNPs (CNP-1 to -4) that lack the C-terminal extension. To assess the ancestral molecule of the NP family, we determined the NP sequences in several species of two extant cyclosotome groups, lampreys and hagfishes. A cDNA encoding CNP was cloned from the heart and brain of three phylogenetically distant species of lampreys, Geotria australis, Lampetra japonica, and Petromyzon marinus. In the deduced prohormone sequence of each species, two potential processing signals, lysine-lysine (KK) that is commonly present in CNP precursors, and arginine-X-X-arginine (RXXR) for furin-like proprotein convertase (PC) that is typical for CNP-4 were present. The deduced mature peptides that are released at each signal were highly conserved among three species; 100% cleaved at KK and >92% processed at RXXR. In L. japonica, the CNP gene was expressed almost exclusively in the heart and brain. Meanwhile, a cDNA encoding NP with a C-terminal tail sequence was cloned from the heart and brain of three hagfish species in different genera, Myxine glutinosa, Eptatretus cirrhatus, and Paramyxine atami. The precursor sequences including the prosegment had >80% identity among the three hagfish species. A processing signal, RXXR, is also conserved in the prosegment of all hagfish NPs. The molecular phylogenetic analyses inferred that the lamprey CNP and hagfish NP belong to the CNP-4 group, even though the hagfish NP has a C-terminal sequence extended from the intramolecular ring. The presence of a processing signal, RXXR, in the prosegment of cyclostome NPs supports the above classification. Based on the current findings, we suggest that the ancestral gene of the NP family is CNP-4.

  7. Lampreys as Diverse Model Organisms in the Genomics Era

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, David W.; Docker, Margaret F.; Whyard, Steve; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Lampreys, one of the two surviving groups of ancient vertebrates, have become important models for study in diverse fields of biology. Lampreys (of which there are approximately 40 species) are being studied, for example, (a) to control pest sea lamprey in the North American Great Lakes and to restore declining populations of native species elsewhere; (b) in biomedical research, focusing particularly on the regenerative capability of lampreys; and (c) by developmental biologists studying the evolution of key vertebrate characters. Although a lack of genetic resources has hindered research on the mechanisms regulating many aspects of lamprey life history and development, formerly intractable questions are now amenable to investigation following the recent publication of the sea lamprey genome. Here, we provide an overview of the ways in which genomic tools are currently being deployed to tackle diverse research questions and suggest several areas that may benefit from the availability of the sea lamprey genome. PMID:26951616

  8. Assessing Pacific Lamprey Status in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Mary L.; Close, David A.

    2003-06-01

    In the Columbia River drainage, salmonid-based monitoring programs have historically been used to assess status of both adult and juvenile Pacific lamprey. We compared adult lamprey counts at hydropower dams to recent radiotelemetry results and found that the counts underestimated losses between some dams and overestimated passage times through reservoirs. Count data were not correlated with trap captures of adults conducted in the same area and at the same time, likely due to lamprey-specific behaviors that result in inaccurate counts. We recommend maintenance of traditional count protocols, but emphasize the need for continued research to develop an accurate correction factor to apply to these data. Existing salmonid-based sampling for juvenile lamprey is inadequate and we highlight the need for standardized larval lamprey monitoring that provides both abundance and size distributions. Our electrofishing survey for juvenile lamprey indicated that this technique provides critical information on lamprey recruitment and is feasible over large spatial scales.

  9. Lampreys as Diverse Model Organisms in the Genomics Era.

    PubMed

    McCauley, David W; Docker, Margaret F; Whyard, Steve; Li, Weiming

    2015-11-01

    Lampreys, one of the two surviving groups of ancient vertebrates, have become important models for study in diverse fields of biology. Lampreys (of which there are approximately 40 species) are being studied, for example, (a) to control pest sea lamprey in the North American Great Lakes and to restore declining populations of native species elsewhere; (b) in biomedical research, focusing particularly on the regenerative capability of lampreys; and (c) by developmental biologists studying the evolution of key vertebrate characters. Although a lack of genetic resources has hindered research on the mechanisms regulating many aspects of lamprey life history and development, formerly intractable questions are now amenable to investigation following the recent publication of the sea lamprey genome. Here, we provide an overview of the ways in which genomic tools are currently being deployed to tackle diverse research questions and suggest several areas that may benefit from the availability of the sea lamprey genome.

  10. A Study of a Mechanical Swimming Lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan; Hultmark, Marcus; Smits, Alexander

    2007-11-01

    In order to develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a swimming robotic lamprey as a means of investigating the surface pressure, thrust and wake structure. A programmable microcomputer actuates 13 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey's body. This waveform is based on the motion of the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), as described by Tytell and Lauder (2004). Dye flow visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV) are used to study the wake structure generated by the robot and the flowfield along the body. These visualization methods show that two distinct, oppositely signed vortices are shed each half cycle; whereas along the body, no large scale vortical shedding can be observed, suggesting that most of the thrust is produced by the tail. Thrust data based on momentum balances support this suggestion. The project is supported by NIH Grant 1RO1NS054271.

  11. Assessing occupational exposure to sea lamprey pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Diana M; Beaucham, Catherine C; Kurtz, Kristine; Musolin, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sea lampreys are parasitic fish found in lakes of the United States and Canada. Sea lamprey is controlled through manual application of the pesticides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and BayluscideTM into streams and tributaries. 3-Trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol may cause irritation and central nervous system depression and Bayluscide may cause irritation, dermatitis, blisters, cracking, edema, and allergic skin reactions. Objectives: To assess occupational exposures to sea lamprey pesticides. Methods: We developed a wipe method for evaluating surface and skin contamination with these pesticides. This method was field tested at a biological field station and at a pesticide river application. We also evaluated exposures using control banding tools. Results: We verified TFM surface contamination at the biological station. At the river application, we found surfaces and worker’s skin contaminated with pesticides. Conclusion: We recommended minimizing exposures by implementing engineering controls and improved use of personal protective equipment. PMID:25730600

  12. Abnormal tooth development in a sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.; Hanson, Lee H.

    1977-01-01

    Sea lampreys en route to their spawning grounds have been captured at mechanical or electrical structures that have been in operation for 1 to 27 spawning seasons (1949-75) on some 167 tributaries of the upper Great Lakes; more than 750,000 were taken in 1949-70 (Smith 1971). Among these lampreys (all of which were routinely examined at the time of capture) was one female (length, 434 mm; weight, 130 g) with markedly underdeveloped teeth. It was captured in May 1968 at an electrical barrier in the Ocqueoc River, a Michigan tributary of Lake Huron

  13. Decay of vertebrate characters in hagfish and lamprey (Cyclostomata) and the implications for the vertebrate fossil record.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Robert S; Gabbott, Sarah E; Purnell, Mark A

    2011-04-22

    The timing and sequence of events underlying the origin and early evolution of vertebrates remains poorly understood. The palaeontological evidence should shed light on these issues, but difficulties in interpretation of the non-biomineralized fossil record make this problematic. Here we present an experimental analysis of decay of vertebrate characters based on the extant jawless vertebrates (Lampetra and Myxine). This provides a framework for the interpretation of the anatomy of soft-bodied fossil vertebrates and putative cyclostomes, and a context for reading the fossil record of non-biomineralized vertebrate characters. Decay results in transformation and non-random loss of characters. In both lamprey and hagfish, different types of cartilage decay at different rates, resulting in taphonomic bias towards loss of 'soft' cartilages containing vertebrate-specific Col2α1 extracellular matrix proteins; phylogenetically informative soft-tissue characters decay before more plesiomorphic characters. As such, synapomorphic decay bias, previously recognized in early chordates, is more pervasive, and needs to be taken into account when interpreting the anatomy of any non-biomineralized fossil vertebrate, such as Haikouichthys, Mayomyzon and Hardistiella.

  14. Decay of vertebrate characters in hagfish and lamprey (Cyclostomata) and the implications for the vertebrate fossil record

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Robert S.; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Purnell, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The timing and sequence of events underlying the origin and early evolution of vertebrates remains poorly understood. The palaeontological evidence should shed light on these issues, but difficulties in interpretation of the non-biomineralized fossil record make this problematic. Here we present an experimental analysis of decay of vertebrate characters based on the extant jawless vertebrates (Lampetra and Myxine). This provides a framework for the interpretation of the anatomy of soft-bodied fossil vertebrates and putative cyclostomes, and a context for reading the fossil record of non-biomineralized vertebrate characters. Decay results in transformation and non-random loss of characters. In both lamprey and hagfish, different types of cartilage decay at different rates, resulting in taphonomic bias towards loss of ‘soft’ cartilages containing vertebrate-specific Col2α1 extracellular matrix proteins; phylogenetically informative soft-tissue characters decay before more plesiomorphic characters. As such, synapomorphic decay bias, previously recognized in early chordates, is more pervasive, and needs to be taken into account when interpreting the anatomy of any non-biomineralized fossil vertebrate, such as Haikouichthys, Mayomyzon and Hardistiella. PMID:20947532

  15. A study on the blood vascular system of the lamprey gill filament.

    PubMed

    Nakao, T; Uchinomiya, K

    1978-02-01

    The blood vessels in the gill filaments of lamprey, Lampetra japonica, were studied with an electron microscope. Each gill filament is supplied by an afferent filament artery (afa) flanked by a pair of filament veins (fv), along the outer border of the axial plate, and an efferent filament artery (efa) along the inner, free border. Between these arteries are interposed the cavernous body and the blood lacunae. The marginal channel arises from the cavernous body, which leads to the afa, runs along the free border of the secondary lamella collecting oxygenated blood from the lamellar blood lacunae, and finally joins efa. This channel is considered to play an important role in the gill circulation as a bypass between afa and efa. Pillar cells were found only in the blood lacunae of the axial plate and the secondary lamellae. The basal lamina is generally absent on the vascular wall, but only a small amount of dense material could be seen on the basal surface of endothelial cells of afa and fv: this is regarded as an anchoring device between the cell and connective tissue fibrils. Fenestrations are generally absent in the endothelial layer but numerous gaps were seen in the wall of fv. Arterio-venus anastomoses were found between afa or the cavernous body and fv, and between efa or the collecting arteries of the efferent branchial artery and the peribranchial venous sinus. The anastomosing channel consists of the inner endothelial layer and the outer smooth muscle layer, which is thicker in the intermediate portion of the channel. The endothelial cells called "AVA cells" here are characterized by (1) dense cytoplasms, (2) apical microvilli and (3) basal cytoplasmic processes closely associated with smooth muscle cells.

  16. Available benthic habitat type may influence predation risk in larval lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Dustin M.; Welsh, Stuart; Turk, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Population declines of lamprey species have largely been attributed to habitat degradation, yet there still remain many unanswered questions about the relationships between lampreys and their habitats (Torgensen & Close 2004; Smith et al. 2011). One scarcely researched area of lamprey ecology is the effect of predation on lampreys (Cochran 2009). Specifically, the influence of available habitat on predation risk has not been documented for larval lampreys but may be important to the management and conservation of lamprey populations.

  17. Biology of the sea lamprey in its parasitic phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Phillip S.; Lennon, Robert E.

    1956-01-01

    The investigations conducted on sea lampreys in aquariums were concerned with the duration of the parasitic phase of life, feeding, growth, and the interrelations between predator and host fish. Observations on lampreys reared from metamorphosis to maturity were made at the Fish and Wildlife Service Laboratory at Hammond Bay, Michigan. Most of the experimental lampreys were mature and ripe after 14 to 18 months of parasitic life. They exhibited signs of irreversible physical degeneration which precedes death. Three specimens were immature after 14, 18, and 26 months in aquariums, thus indicating that under certain conditions, lampreys may extend their parasitic phase. The feeding activity, growth, and shrinkage in size of aquarium specimens were considered typical of lampreys in the Great Lakes, although the wild lampreys achieve greater average size. Female lampreys made more attacks, fed more, killed more fish, and grew larger than males. They also shrank proportionately more in length and weight as they approached sexual maturity, but their terminal average size was slightly larger than that of males. It is estimated that the average fish-kill by a wild lamprey exceeds, and could be approximately double, the 18.5 pounds of fish killed by a laboratory lamprey. The rate and extent of fish destruction depended on the size, sex, and stage in the parasitic phase of the lampreys, and on the species and size of the fish. There was an increase in the number of fish killed as the lampreys grew, and the fish were killed more quickly. Attacks made by experimental lampreys at any stage of their parasitic phase up to full maturity, and on any part of a prey fish except fins, usually resulted in death to the host. Some fish which survived lamprey attacks succumbed to fungus infections of the wounds. A small number of trout recovered from attacks, and their wounds healed.

  18. Volumetric flow around a swimming lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Andrea M.; Colin, Sean P.; Costello, John H.; Leftwich, Megan C.; Tytell, Eric D.

    2015-11-01

    A primary experimental technique for studying fluid-structure interactions around swimming fish has been planar dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV). Typically, two components of the velocity vector are measured in a plane, in the case of swimming studies, directly behind the animal. While useful, this approach provides little to no insight about fluid structure interactions above and below the fish. For fish with a small height relative to body length, such as the long and approximately cylindrical lamprey, 3D information is essential to characterize how these fish interact with their fluid environment. This study presents 3D flow structures along the body and in the wake of larval lamprey, P etromyzon m arinus , which are 10-15 cm long. Lamprey swim through a 1000 cm3 field of view in a standard 10 gallon tank illuminated by a green laser. Data are collected using the three component velocimeter V3V system by TSI, Inc. and processed using Insight 4G software. This study expands on previous works that show two pairs of vortices each tail beat in the mid-plane of the lamprey wake. NSF DMS 1062052.

  19. Chemosterilization of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Lee H.; Manion, Patrick J.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical, P,P-bis(1-aziridinyl)-N-methylphosphinothioic amide (bisazir), was found in laboratory studies to be an effective sterilant for both sexes of adult sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) when given intraperitoneally at a dosage of 100 mg per kilogram of body weight. A total of 300 normal spawning-run sea lampreys and 300 injected with bisazir were released into the Big Garlic River, Marquette County, Michigan, (a small stream divided into five sections by natural barriers), to determine the effect of bisazir on the nesting and spawning behavior of the adults and on the production of larvae. The lampreys constructed and spawned in 95 nests. Sterile adults showed no abnormal nest building or spawning behavior. Sterile males competed effectively with normal males for females. Egg samples taken from nests indicated that eggs in nests where sterile males spawned with sterile or normal females did not hatch, although some embryonic development occurred. Extensive surveys with electric shockers produced no larvae in stream sections where sterile males spawned, but yielded numerous larvae in sections where normal males spawned with normal females. These findings suggest that the release of sterile males may be an effective tool in an integrated approach to control of sea lampreys in the Great Lakes.

  20. Testing and extension of a sea lamprey feeding model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochran, Philip A.; Swink, William D.; Kinziger, Andrew P.

    1999-01-01

    A previous model of feeding by sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus predicted energy intake and growth by lampreys as a function of lamprey size, host size, and duration of feeding attachments, but it was applicable only to lampreys feeding at 10°C and it was tested against only a single small data set of limited scope. We extended the model to other temperatures and tested it against an extensive data set (more than 700 feeding bouts) accumulated during experiments with captive sea lampreys. Model predictions of instantaneous growth were highly correlated with observed growth, and a partitioning of mean squared error between model predictions and observed results showed that 88.5% of the variance was due to random variation rather than to systematic errors. However, deviations between observed and predicted values varied substantially, especially for short feeding bouts. Predicted and observed growth trajectories of individual lampreys during multiple feeding bouts during the summer tended to correspond closely, but predicted growth was generally much higher than observed growth late in the year. This suggests the possibility that large overwintering lampreys reduce their feeding rates while attached to hosts. Seasonal or size-related shifts in the fate of consumed energy may provide an alternative explanation. The lamprey feeding model offers great flexibility in assessing growth of captive lampreys within various experimental protocols (e.g., different host species or thermal regimes) because it controls for individual differences in feeding history.

  1. Behavioral responses of Pacific lamprey to alarm cues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Laurie L.; Hayes, Michael C.; Jackson, Aaron D.; Burke, Brian J.; Moser, Mary L.; Wagner, R. Steven

    2017-01-01

    Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus), an anadromous ectoparasite, faces several challenges during adult migration to spawning grounds. Developing methods to address these challenges is critical to the success of ongoing conservation efforts. The challenges are diverse, and include anthropogenic alterations to the ecosystem resulting in loss of habitat, impassable barriers such as dams, climate change impacts, and altered predator fields. We conducted a behavioral study to understand how adult migrating Pacific lamprey respond to potential alarm cues: White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), human saliva, decayed Pacific lamprey, and river otter (Lontra canadensis). Research has shown that some species of lamprey can be guided to a location using odors and similar cues may be useful as a management tool for Pacific lamprey. Experiments were conducted over 2 nights and measured the number of entries (count) and duration of time spent (occupancy) by adult lamprey in each arm of a two-choice maze. During the first night, no odor was added to test for selection bias between arms. During the second night odor was added to one arm of the maze. Contrary to expectations, lamprey were significantly attracted to the river otter odor in both count and occupancy. No significant differences were found in the response of lamprey to the other three odors. Results from this study indicate that Pacific lamprey do respond to some odors; however, additional tests are necessary to better identify the types of odors and concentrations that elicit a repeatable response.

  2. Evidence for selective bacterial community structuring in the freshwater sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rodrigo; Keller-Costa, Tina; Gomes, Newton C M; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; van Overbeek, Leo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2013-01-01

    To understand the functioning of sponges, knowledge of the structure of their associated microbial communities is necessary. However, our perception of sponge-associated microbiomes remains mainly restricted to marine ecosystems. Here, we report on the molecular diversity and composition of bacteria in the freshwater sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis inhabiting the artificial lake Vinkeveense Plassen, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints revealed that the apparent diversities within the domain Bacteria and the phylum Actinobacteria were lower in E. fluviatilis than in bulk water. Enrichment of specific PCR-DGGE bands in E. fluviatilis was detected. Furthermore, sponge- and bulk water-derived bacterial clone libraries differed with respect to bacterial community composition at the phylum level. E. fluviatilis-derived sequences were affiliated with six recognized phyla, i.e., Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydiae and Verrucomicrobia, in order of relative abundance; next to the uncultured candidate phylum TM7 and one deeply rooted bacterial lineage of undefined taxonomy (BLUT). Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the dominant bacterial phyla in the freshwater clone library whereas sequences affiliated with Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria and Armatimonadetes were found at lower frequencies. Fine-tuned phylogenetic inference showed no or negligible overlaps between the E. fluviatilis and water-derived phylotypes within bacterial taxa such as Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. We also ascertained the status of two alphaproteobacterial lineages as freshwater sponge-specific phylogenetic clusters, and report on high distinctiveness of other E. fluviatilis specific phylotypes, especially within the Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes and Chlamydia taxa. This study supports the contention that the composition and

  3. An integrative CFD model of lamprey swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; McMillen, Tyler; Fauci, Lisa

    2008-11-01

    Swimming due to sinusoidal body undulations is observed across the full spectrum of swimming organisms, from microscopic flagella to fish. These undulations are achieved due to internal force-generating mechanisms, which, in the case of lamprey are due to a wave of neural activation from head to tail which gives rise to a wave of muscle activation. These active forces are also mediated by passive structural forces. Here we present recent results on a computational model of a swimming lamprey that couples activation of discrete muscle segments, passive elastic forces, and a surrounding viscous, incompressible fluid. The fluid dynamics is modeled by the Navier-Stokes equations at appropriate Reynolds numbers, where the resulting flow field and vortex shedding may be measured.

  4. A Study of a Mechanical Swimming Lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan; Smits, Alexander

    2006-11-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey swimming, the wake structure generated by a swimming mechanical model is investigated using dye flow visualization. The eel is activated by 13 programmable servomotors and a traveling wave is generated along the length of the body. The waveform is based on the motion of an American eel (Anguilla rostrata) of Tytell and Lauder (2004). A laser scanning system is used to visualize the three-dimensional unsteady wake structure.

  5. Identification of three somatostatin genes in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Tostivint, Hervé; Dettaï, Agnès; Quan, Feng B; Ravi, Vydianathan; Tay, Boon-Hui; Rodicio, Maria Celina; Mazan, Sylvie; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Kenigfest, Natalia B

    2016-10-01

    Somatostatins (SSs) are a structurally diverse family of neuropeptides that play important roles in the regulation of growth, development and metabolism in vertebrates. It has been recently proposed that the common ancestor of gnathostomes possessed three SS genes, namely SS1, SS2 and SS5. SS1 and SS2 are still present in most extant gnathostome species investigated so far while SS5 primarily occurs in chondrichthyes, actinopterygians and actinistia but not in tetrapods. Very little is known about the repertoire of SSs in cyclostomes, which are extant jawless vertebrates. In the present study, we report the cloning of the cDNAs encoding three distinct lamprey SS variants that we call SSa, SSb and SSc. SSa and SSb correspond to the two SS variants previously characterized in lamprey, while SSc appears to be a totally novel one. SSa exhibits the same sequence as gnathostome SS1. SSb differs from SSa by only one substitution (Thr(12)→Ser). SSc exhibits a totally unique structure (ANCRMFYWKTMAAC) that shares only 50% identity with SSa and SSb. SSa, SSb and SSc precursors do not exhibit any appreciable sequence similarity outside the C-terminal region containing the SS sequence. Phylogenetic analyses failed to clearly assign orthology relationships between lamprey and gnathostome SS genes. Synteny analysis suggests that the SSc gene arose before the split of the three gnathostome genes SS1, SS2 and SS5. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Anesthetic effect of 4-styrylpyridine on lamprey and fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, John H.; Thomas, Paul M.

    1964-01-01

    The anestheticp roperty of 4-styrylpyridine (4-SP) on fish and lamprey was first noticed during chemical screening search of a selective toxicant for larval lamprey (Applegate, Howell, Hall, and Smith, 1957). To assess the possible value of the compound as an anesthetic, we later conducted the experiments reviewed in this report.

  7. 75 FR 82061 - Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ...-1335-0000-J3] Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...), announce a meeting of the Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup (Workgroup). The... date. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Lake Champlain Basin Program/Vermont Fish and Wildlife...

  8. Lamprey metamorphosis: Thyroid hormone signaling in a basal vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Manzon, Richard G; Manzon, Lori A

    2017-06-16

    As one of the most basal living vertebrates, lampreys represent an excellent model system to study the evolution of thyroid hormone (TH) signaling. The lamprey hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid and reproductive axes overlap functionally. Lampreys have 3 gonadotropin-releasing hormones and a single glycoprotein hormone from the hypothalamus and pituitary, respectively, that regulate both the reproductive and thyroid axes. TH synthesis in larval lampreys takes place in an endostyle that transforms into typical vertebrate thyroid tissue during metamorphosis; both the endostyle and follicular tissue have all the typical TH synthetic components found in other vertebrates. Furthermore, lampreys also have the vertebrate suite of peripheral regulators including TH distributor proteins (THDPs), deiodinases and TH receptors (TRs). Although at the molecular level the components of the lamprey thyroid system are ancestral to other vertebrates, their functions have been largely conserved. TH signaling as it relates to lamprey metamorphosis represents a particularly interesting phenomenon. Unlike other metamorphosing vertebrates, lamprey THs increase throughout the larval period, peak prior to metamorphosis and decline rapidly at the onset of metamorphosis; patterns of deiodinase activity are consistent with these increases and declines. Moreover, goitrogens (which suppress TH levels) initiate precocious metamorphosis, and exogenous TH treatment blocks goitrogen-induced metamorphosis and disrupts natural metamorphosis. Despite this clear physiological difference, TH action via TRs is consistent with higher vertebrates. Based on observations that TRs are upregulated in a tissue-specific fashion during morphogenesis and the finding that lamprey TRs upregulate genes via THs in a fashion similar to higher vertebrates, we propose the following hypothesis for further testing. THs have a dual role in lampreys where high TH levels promote larval feeding and growth and then at the onset of

  9. Patterns of proopiomelanotropin and proopiocortin gene expression and of immunohistochemistry for gonadotropin-releasing hormones (lGnRH-I and III) during the life cycle of a nonparasitic lamprey: relationship to this adult life history type.

    PubMed

    Youson, J H; Heinig, J A; Khanam, S F; Sower, S A; Kawauchi, H; Keeley, F W

    2006-08-01

    There are two adult life history types among lamprey species, nonparasitic and parasitic, with the former commencing the final interval of sexual maturation immediately after metamorphosis. There are no extensive studies that directly compare hormone profiles during the life cycles of nonparasitic and parasitic lamprey species, yet such data may explain differences in development, reproductive maturation, and feeding status. The present study uses immunohistochemistry to show the life cycle profiles for gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH-I and -III) in the brain of the nonparasitic species, the American brook lamprey, Lampetra appendix, for comparison with the extensive, published, immunohistochemical data on these hormones in the parasitic species, the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus. The complete cDNAs for the two lamprey prohormones, proopiocortin (POC), and proopiomelanotropin (POM), were cloned for L. appendix and both nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were compared with those previously published for P. marinus. The POC and POM cDNAs for both species were used in expression studies, with Northern blotting, throughout their life cycles. Although GnRH-I and -III immunohistochemistry revealed a similar distribution of immunoreactive cells and fibers in the two species during the life cycles, a qualitative evaluation of staining intensity in L. appendix, implied early activity in the brains of metamorphosis of this species, particularly in GnRH-I. GnRH-III seems to be important in larval life and early metamorphosis in both species. A novel feature of this immunohistochemical study is the monthly observations of the distribution and relative intensity of the two GnRHs during the critical period of final sexual maturation that lead to spawning and then the spent animal. L. appendix POC and POM nucleotide sequences had 92.9 and 94.6% identity, respectively, with P. marinus POC and POM and there was an earlier increase in their expression during

  10. Identification and characterisation of the immune response properties of Lampetra japonica BLNK

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yinglun; Liu, Xin; Shi, Biyue; Xiao, Rong; Gou, Meng; Wang, Hao; Li, Qingwei

    2016-01-01

    B cell linker protein (BLNK) is a central linker protein involved in B cell signal transduction in jawed vertebrates. In a previous study, we have reported the identification of a BLNK homolog named Lj-BLNK in lampreys. In this study, a 336 bp cDNA fragment encoding the Lj-BLNK Src homology 2 (SH2) domain was cloned into the vector pET-28a(+) and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The recombinant fragment of Lj-BLNK (rLj-BLNK) was purifiedby His-Bind affinity chromatography, and polyclonal antibodies against rLj-BLNK were raised in male New Zealand rabbits. Fluorescenceactivated cell sorting (FACS) analysisrevealed that Lj-BLNK was expressed in approximately 48% of the lymphocyte-like cells of control lampreys, and a significant increase in Lj-BLNK expression was observed in lampreys stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Western blotting analysis showed that variable lymphocyte receptor B (VLRB) and Lj-BLNKwere distributed in the same immune-relevant tissues, and the levels of both were upregulated in supraneural myeloid bodies and lymphocyte-like cells after LPS stimulation. Immunofluorescence demonstrated that Lj-BLNK was localized in VLRB+ lymphocyte-like cells. These results indicate that the Lj-BLNK protein identified in lampreys might play an important role in the VLRB-mediated adaptive immune response. PMID:27126461

  11. Sensitivity of a tucuxi (Sotalia fluviatilis guianensis) to airborne sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebschner, Alexander; Hanke, Wolf; Miersch, Lars; Dehnhardt, Guido; Sauerland, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Auditory systems of cetaceans are considered highly specialized for underwater sound processing, whereas the extent of their hearing capacity in air is still a point of issue. In this study, the sensitivity to airborne sound in a male tucuxi (Sotalia fluviatilis guianensis) was tested by means of a go/no go response paradigm. Auditory thresholds were obtained from 2 to 31.5 kHz. Compared to the hearing thresholds of other dolphins as well as of amphibian mammals, the sensitivity to airborne sound of the test subject is low from 2 to 8 kHz, with the highest threshold at 4 kHz. Thresholds at 16 and 31.5 kHz reveal a sharp increase in hearing sensitivity. Thus, although not obtained in this study, the upper aerial hearing limit is in the ultrasonic range. A comparison of the present data with the underwater audiogram of the same test subject referred to sound intensity indicates that the sensitivity of Sotalia to underwater sound is generally better than to airborne sound. .

  12. Studies on endangered and rare non-commercial fish species recorded in the Pomeranian Bay (southern Baltic Sea) in 2010-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Więcaszek, Beata; Sobecka, Ewa; Keszka, Sławomir; Stepanowska, Katarzyna; Dudko, Stanisław; Biernaczyk, Marcin; Wrzecionkowski, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on endangered and rare non-commercial fish species ( Spinachia spinachia, Nerophis ophidion, Syngnathus typhle, Agonus cataphractus, Pholis gunnellus, Enchelyopus cimbrius, Cyclopterus lumpus) and one lamprey species ( Lampetra fluviatilis), recorded as bycatch during monitoring surveys in 2010-2013 in the Pomeranian Bay. Two species were observed for the first time in the Pomeranian Bay: A. cataphractus and E. cimbrius. Descriptions of parasite fauna are provided for C. lumpus and E. cimbrius, which were infected with four pathogenic species from Neomonada, Digenea, Nematoda, and Acanthocephala. Almost all parasite species were new in the hosts examined.

  13. The changes of proteins and polysaccharides in extracellular polymeric substance for Spirogyra fluviatilis under different salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yichao; Chang, Shuiping

    2017-05-01

    Spirogyra is a genus of widely distributed, large green fresh water algae. This study discovered that changes in salinity can induce Spirogyra fluviatilis to produce amounts of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) when controlling other environmental conditions. If culturing S. fluviatilis with salinity greater than a 3.0‰ medium for 4 hours, the secretion EPS will be changed. And the level of polysaccharides and proteins, the primary components of EPS, is slightly increased in accordance with the increase in the salinity. But the proteins to polysaccharides ratio changes are not significantly

  14. A lamprey from the Devonian period of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gess, Robert W; Coates, Michael I; Rubidge, Bruce S

    2006-10-26

    Lampreys are the most scientifically accessible of the remaining jawless vertebrates, but their evolutionary history is obscure. In contrast to the rich fossil record of armoured jawless fishes, all of which date from the Devonian period and earlier, only two Palaeozoic lampreys have been recorded, both from the Carboniferous period. In addition to these, the recent report of an exquisitely preserved Lower Cretaceous example demonstrates that anatomically modern lampreys were present by the late Mesozoic era. Here we report a marine/estuarine fossil lamprey from the Famennian (Late Devonian) of South Africa, the identity of which is established easily because many of the key specializations of modern forms are already in place. These specializations include the first evidence of a large oral disc, the first direct evidence of circumoral teeth and a well preserved branchial basket. This small agnathan, Priscomyzon riniensis gen. et sp. nov., is not only more conventionally lamprey-like than other Palaeozoic examples, but is also some 35 million years older. This finding is evidence that agnathans close to modern lampreys had evolved before the end of the Devonian period. In this light, lampreys as a whole appear all the more remarkable: ancient specialists that have persisted as such and survived a subsequent 360 million years.

  15. Different forms of locomotion in the spinal lamprey.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N; Zelenin, Pavel V

    2014-06-01

    Forward locomotion has been extensively studied in different vertebrate animals, and the principal role of spinal mechanisms in the generation of this form of locomotion has been demonstrated. Vertebrate animals, however, are capable of other forms of locomotion, such as backward walking and swimming, sideward walking, and crawling. Do the spinal mechanisms play a principal role in the generation of these forms of locomotion? We addressed this question in lampreys, which are capable of five different forms of locomotion - fast forward swimming, slow forward swimming, backward swimming, forward crawling, and backward crawling. To induce locomotion in lampreys spinalised at the second gill level, we used either electrical stimulation of the spinal cord at different rostrocaudal levels, or tactile stimulation of specific cutaneous receptive fields from which a given form of locomotion could be evoked in intact lampreys. We found that any of the five forms of locomotion could be evoked in the spinal lamprey by electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, and some of them by tactile stimulation. These results suggest that spinal mechanisms in the lamprey, in the absence of phasic supraspinal commands, are capable of generating the basic pattern for all five forms of locomotion observed in intact lampreys. In spinal lampreys, the direction of swimming did not depend on the site of spinal cord stimulation, but on the stimulation strength. The direction of crawling strongly depended on the body configuration. The spinal structures presumably activated by spinal cord stimulation and causing different forms of locomotion are discussed.

  16. Chemical cues and pheromones in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Buchinger, Tyler J; Siefkes, Michael J; Zielinski, Barbara S; Brant, Cory O; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Chemical cues and pheromones guide decisions in organisms throughout the animal kingdom. The neurobiology, function, and evolution of olfaction are particularly well described in insects, and resulting concepts have driven novel approaches to pest control. However, aside from several exceptions, the olfactory biology of vertebrates remains poorly understood. One exception is the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), which relies heavily upon olfaction during reproduction. Here, we provide a broad review of the chemical cues and pheromones used by the sea lamprey during reproduction, including overviews of the sea lamprey olfactory system, chemical cues and pheromones, and potential applications to population management. The critical role of olfaction in mediating the sea lamprey life cycle is evident by a well-developed olfactory system. Sea lamprey use chemical cues and pheromones to identify productive spawning habitat, coordinate spawning behaviors, and avoid risk. Manipulation of olfactory biology offers opportunities for management of populations in the Laurentian Great Lakes, where the sea lamprey is a destructive invader. We suggest that the sea lamprey is a broadly useful organism with which to study vertebrate olfaction because of its simple but well-developed olfactory organ, the dominant role of olfaction in guiding behaviors during reproduction, and the direct implications for vertebrate pest management.

  17. 75 FR 54163 - Office of the Secretary: Renewal of the Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION... General Services Administration, has reestablished the charter for the Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control... policy and technical advice on efforts to develop and implement sea lamprey control...

  18. Electroreception in lampreys: evidence that the earliest vertebrates were electroreceptive.

    PubMed

    Bodznick, D; Northcutt, R G

    1981-04-24

    Evoked potential and unit responses from the lamprey brain to weak electric fields demonstrate that lampreys have an electrosensory system as sensitive as those of other electroreceptive fishes. Electrosensory responses were recorded in the dorsal medulla, the midbrain torus semicircularis, and the optic tectum. Similarities in the structure of the anterior lateral line nerves and medullary organization between lampreys and several primitive jawed fishes indicate that the electroreceptive systems are homologous in these taxa. Thus electroreception was probably present in the earliest vertebrates ancestral to both agnathans and gnathostomes.

  19. Toxicity of 33 NCS to freshwater fish and sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marking, Leif L.; King, Everett L.; Walker, Charles R.; Howell, John H.

    1970-01-01

    The chemical 33NCS (3'-chloro-3-nitrosalicylanilide) was evaluated as a fish control agent and as a larvicide for sea lampreys at the Fish Control Laboratories of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and the Hammond Bay Biological Station of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. The chemical is rapidly toxic to many species. Sea lampreys, bowfin, and channel catfish are the most sensitive species. Carp are more sensitive than trouts or sunfishes. Use of 33NCS in selective control of freshwater fishes or sea lampreys requires precise control because its toxicity is strongly influenced by variations in water quality.

  20. Characteristics of GnRH binding in the gonads and effects of lamprey GnRH-I and -III on reproduction in the adult sea lamprey.

    PubMed

    Gazourian, L; Deragon, K L; Chase, C F; Pati, D; Habibi, H R; Sower, S A

    1997-11-01

    In the present study, both lamprey GnRH-I and -III stimulated steroidogenesis and induced ovulation in adult female sea lampreys during their final reproductive stage. One injection of lamprey GnRH-III at 0.1 or 0.2 microg/g lamprey stimulated plasma estradiol levels in lampreys held at each of three water temperatures, 13 degrees , 17 degrees , and 19 degrees , corresponding to increasing stages of maturation. Four successive injections, 3 to 4 days apart, of lamprey GnRH-III at 0.1 or 0.2 microg/g body weight induced ovulation in 100 or 88% of lampreys, respectively, compared to 21% in controls by Day 31. Lamprey GnRH-III also had a direct stimulatory effect on estradiol production in the sea lamprey gonads in vitro. Lamprey GnRH-III at 100 or 1000 ng/ml stimulated estradiol levels in media incubated with either lamprey ovaries or testes. In contrast to a previous finding in which lamprey GnRH-III was more potent than lamprey GnRH-I in inducing spermiation in adult male sea lampreys (Deragon and Sower, 1994), the results from the present study indicate that lamprey GnRH-I and -III are equally potent in inducing ovulation and stimulating steroidogenesis in female sea lampreys. In addition, GnRH binding sites have been demonstrated for the first time in both the testis and the ovary of the adult sea lamprey using an analog of mammalian GnRH ([D-Lys6] mammalian GnRH) as a labeled ligand. Scatchard analysis suggested the presence of a high affinity binding site in both the testis and the ovary. In summary, lamprey GnRH-III is biologically active in stimulating the pituitary-gonadal axis in adult female sea lampreys. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of a GnRH binding site in the gonads of an Agnathan. The evidence for a direct stimulatory effect of lamprey GnRH in the gonads, the presence of GnRH binding site, and the absence of GnRH in the plasma suggest that, like other vertebrates including rat, rabbit, teleost fish, and human, there may be a Gn

  1. The fertilization potential provides a fast block to polyspermy in lamprey eggs.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, W; Baba, Y; Shimozawa, T; Yamamoto, T S

    1994-02-01

    At fertilization, the membrane potential of the egg of the lamprey, Lampetra japonica, shifted rapidly from its resting value of -12 to +36 mV and gradually returned to about the same resting level (fertilization potential). The amplitude of depolarization was influenced by the external Cl- concentration and by an anion channel blocker, DIDS, indicating that the positive shift of membrane potential resulted from Cl- efflux. A similar change in membrane potential (activation potential) was observed when the unfertilized egg was pricked with a fine needle or treated with A23187 to induce parthenogenetic activation. Pricking at the animal pole region (predetermined site for sperm entry) resulted in the occurrence of an immediate activation potential and the initiation of cortical granule exocytosis. A time lag between the pricking and the occurrence of the activation potential was observed when the egg was pricked at a distance from the animal pole. In this instance, the activation potential was produced immediately before the propagating cortical granule exocytosis initiated at the pricked site reached the animal pole region. Sperm-egg fusion was blocked in eggs voltage-clamped at +20 to +40 mV and inseminated, whereas it took place in eggs clamped at -60 to 0 mV. However, most eggs clamped at +20 to +40 mV did activate, indicating that the voltage dependence of egg activation differs from that of sperm-egg fusion. Although eggs voltage-clamped at negative membrane potentials permitted multiple sperm to fuse with the egg plasma membrane, the nucleus of the fused sperm did not necessarily enter the ooplasm. We conclude that: (1) A fast electrical block against polyspermy operates in this species and is effective for about 160 sec of the onset of the positive shift; (2) the opening of Cl- channels is responsible for the potential change; (3) the channels are largely localized in the animal pole region; (4) during voltage clamp at positive potentials, eggs can be

  2. Genome-wide analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family in sea lamprey and Japanese lamprey.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianfeng; Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chu-Yin; Scott, Camille; Brown, Titus; Li, Weiming

    2015-06-06

    Lampreys are extant representatives of the jawless vertebrate lineage that diverged from jawed vertebrates around 500 million years ago. Lamprey genomes contain information crucial for understanding the evolution of gene families in vertebrates. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family is found from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. The recent availability of two lamprey draft genomes from sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus and Japanese lamprey Lethenteron japonicum presents an opportunity to infer early evolutionary events of ABC genes in vertebrates. We conducted a genome-wide survey of the ABC gene family in two lamprey draft genomes. A total of 37 ABC transporters were identified and classified into seven subfamilies; namely seven ABCA genes, 10 ABCB genes, 10 ABCC genes, three ABCD genes, one ABCE gene, three ABCF genes, and three ABCG genes. The ABCA subfamily has expanded from three genes in sea squirts, seven and nine in lampreys and zebrafish, to 13 and 16 in human and mouse. Conversely, the multiple copies of ABCB1-, ABCG1-, and ABCG2-like genes found in sea squirts have contracted in the other species examined. ABCB2 and ABCB3 seem to be new additions in gnathostomes (not in sea squirts or lampreys), which coincides with the emergence of the gnathostome-specific adaptive immune system. All the genes in the ABCD, ABCE and ABCF subfamilies were conserved and had undergone limited duplication and loss events. In the sea lamprey transcriptomes, the ABCE and ABCF gene subfamilies were ubiquitously and highly expressed in all tissues while the members in other gene subfamilies were differentially expressed. Thirteen more lamprey ABC transporter genes were identified in this study compared with a previous study. By concatenating the same gene sequences from the two lampreys, more full length sequences were obtained, which significantly improved both the assignment of gene names and the phylogenetic trees compared with a previous analysis using partial sequences. The ABC

  3. Anatomical and physiological evidence for electroreception in larval lampreys.

    PubMed

    Ronan, M

    1988-05-10

    In larval lampreys, the superficial ophthalmic, buccal, and recurrent rami of the anterior lateral line nerve project to the dorsal nucleus of the ipsilateral medulla; the posterior lateral line nerve projects to the medial nucleus bilaterally. The recurrent ramus is the largest source of afferents to the dorsal nucleus. Extracellular recordings from recurrent afferents in the trunk lateral line nerve indicate larval lampreys are sensitive to weak, low-frequency electric fields. Cathodal (outside negative) fields are excitatory; anodal fields are inhibitory.

  4. Artificial propagation of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lennon, Robert E.

    1955-01-01

    Observations on the gland products, gonads, and general characteristics of sexually mature sea lampreys, Petromyzon marinus (Linnaeus), from Lake Huron, and a need to obtain some information on very young larval lampreys, prompted an experiment on the stripping and hatching of eggs. Seventeen specimens were selected from a group of spawning migrants which had been trapped in the Ocqueoc River, Michigan, during June and held in live-cars in the lake until early August.

  5. Plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of perch Perca fluviatilis in response to different salinities and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Christensen, E A F; Svendsen, M B S; Steffensen, J F

    2017-03-01

    The present study determined the blood plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of the perch Perca fluviatilis at different salinities (0, 10 and 15) and temperatures (5, 10 and 20° C). Blood plasma osmolality increased with salinity at all temperatures. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) increased with salinity at 10 and 20° C. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope was lowest at salinity of 15 at 5° C, yet at 20° C, they were lowest at a salinity of 0. A cost of osmoregulation (SMR at a salinity of 0 and 15 compared with SMR at a salinity of 10) could only be detected at a salinity of 15 at 20° C, where it was 28%. The results show that P. fluviatilis have capacity to osmoregulate in hyper-osmotic environments. This contradicts previous studies and indicates intraspecific variability in osmoregulatory capabilities among P. fluviatilis populations or habitat origins. An apparent cost of osmoregulation (28%) at a salinity of 15 at 20° C indicates that the cost of osmoregulation in P. fluviatilis increases with temperature under hyperosmotic conditions and a power analysis showed that the cost of osmoregulation could be lower than 12·5% under other environmental conditions. The effect of salinity on MMR is possibly due to a reduction in gill permeability, initiated to reduce osmotic stress. An interaction between salinity and temperature on aerobic scope shows that high salinity habitats are energetically beneficial during warm periods (summer), whereas low salinity habitats are energetically beneficial during cold periods (winter). It is suggested, therefore, that the seasonal migrations of P. fluviatilis between brackish and fresh water is to select an environment that is optimal for metabolism and aerobic scope.

  6. Wolbachia and dengue virus infection in the mosquito Aedes fluviatilis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Silva, Jéssica Barreto Lopes; Magalhães Alves, Debora; Bottino-Rojas, Vanessa; Pereira, Thiago Nunes; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Caragata, Eric Pearce; Moreira, Luciano Andrade

    2017-01-01

    Dengue represents a serious threat to human health, with billions of people living at risk of the disease. Wolbachia pipientis is a bacterial endosymbiont common to many insect species. Wolbachia transinfections in mosquito disease vectors have great value for disease control given the bacterium's ability to spread into wild mosquito populations, and to interfere with infections of pathogens, such as dengue virus. Aedes fluviatilis is a mosquito with a widespread distribution in Latin America, but its status as a dengue vector has not been clarified. Ae. fluviatilis is also naturally infected by the wFlu Wolbachia strain, which has been demonstrated to enhance infection with the avian malarial parasite Plasmodium gallinaceum. We performed experimental infections of Ae. fluviatilis with DENV-2 and DENV-3 isolates from Brazil via injection or oral feeding to provide insight into its competence for the virus. We also examined the effect of the native Wolbachia infection on the virus using a mosquito line where the wFlu infection had been cleared by antibiotic treatment. Through RT-qPCR, we observed that Ae. fluviatilis could become infected with both viruses via either method of infection, although at a lower rate than Aedes aegypti, the primary dengue vector. We then detected DENV-2 and DENV-3 in the saliva of injected mosquitoes, and observed that injection of DENV-3-infected saliva produced subsequent infections in naïve Ae. aegypti. However, across our data we observed no difference in prevalence of infection and viral load between Wolbachia-infected and -uninfected mosquitoes, suggesting that there is no effect of wFlu on dengue virus. Our results highlight that Ae. fluviatilis could potentially serve as a dengue vector under the right circumstances, although further testing is required to determine if this occurs in the field.

  7. The Sea Lamprey as an Etiological Model for Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chu-Yin; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive, inflammatory, and fibrosclerosing cholangiopathy in infants that results in obstruction of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts. It is the most common cause for pediatric liver transplantation. In contrast, the sea lamprey undergoes developmental BA with transient cholestasis and fibrosis during metamorphosis, but emerges as a fecund adult with steatohepatitis and fibrosis in the liver. In this paper, we present new histological evidence and compare the sea lamprey to existing animal models to highlight the advantages and possible limitations of using the sea lamprey to study the etiology and compensatory mechanisms of BA and other liver diseases. Understanding the signaling factors and genetic networks underlying lamprey BA can provide insights into BA etiology and possible targets to prevent biliary degeneration and to clear fibrosis. In addition, information from lamprey BA can be used to develop adjunct treatments for patients awaiting or receiving surgical treatments. Furthermore, the cholestatic adult lamprey has unique adaptive mechanisms that can be used to explore potential treatments for cholestasis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). PMID:26101777

  8. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) has a receptor for androstenedione.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Mara B; Scott, Alexander P; Li, Weiming

    2007-10-01

    The use of nuclear steroid receptors as ligand-activated transcription factors is a critical event in vertebrate evolution. It is believed that nuclear steroid receptors arose at or before the vertebrate radiation, except for an androgen receptor (Ar) that evolved only in the gnathostome line. We report an androgen-Ar complex in the male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), an extant jawless vertebrate. The androgen with the highest affinity is not testosterone, but its direct precursor, androstenedione (Ad). To establish that the binding moiety in lamprey testis is a receptor-and not an "androgen-binding protein"-we have shown that it can be extracted from the nucleus as well as the cytosol, that the Ad-receptor complex binds to DNA, and that the receptor is approximately twice the size of an androgen-binding protein extracted from the Atlantic salmon testis. The capacity (and high affinity) of binding of the lamprey Ar is such that much of the Ad present in male lampreys becomes sequestered within the testis (as opposed to circulating in the plasma). Concentrations of Ad (but not of testosterone) in plasma and testis tissue are upregulated by injection of lamprey GnRH. Implantation of male lampreys with exogenous Ad significantly accelerates the development of the testis and growth of at least one secondary male characteristic. It appears that all classes of steroid hormones have contributed to the evolution of the regulatory complexity of steroid receptors found in modern vertebrates.

  9. Vulnerability of larval lamprey to Columbia River hydropower system operations—effects of dewatering on larval lamprey movements and survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Weiland, Lisa K.; Mesa, Matthew G.

    2015-08-27

    Numbers of adult and juvenile Pacific lamprey ( Entosphenus tridentatus ) in the upper Columbia River Basin of the interior Pacific Northwest have decreased from historical levels (Close and others, 2002), raising concerns f rom State and Federal agencies and Tribal entities. In 1994, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated Pacific lamprey as a Category 2 candidate species and in 2003, the species was petitioned for listing under the Endangered Species Act. Listing consideration and potential recovery planning are significantly hindered by a lack of information on the basic biology and ecology of lampreys, including limiting factors. To date (2015), several factors that may limit lamprey production require study, including dam passage issues, contaminants, and effects on habitat.

  10. Lake fisheries need lamprey control and research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffett, James W.

    1953-01-01

    Since 1921, when the first sea lamprey was recorded from Lake Erie, concern about this parasite in the Great Lakes above Niagara Falls, where previously it had never occurred, grew successively. At first, the concern was shared only in scientific circles, but as the parasite continued its persistent and rapid spread throughout the upper Great Lakes this concern was voiced by state conservation departments, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and interested fishermen. Catches of lake trout especially, and other species secondarily, began to fall below anything representing normal fluctuations in abundance. The fishing industry on Lake Huron and Lake Michigan became extremely concerned due to the fact that income was diminishing greatly. Producers on Lake Superior were fearful that the same decline in production would soon characterize their fishery.

  11. Non-undulatory locomotion in the lamprey.

    PubMed

    Archambault, P S; Deliagina, T G; Orlovsky, G N

    2001-07-03

    The lamprey (a lower vertebrate, cyclostome), in addition to ordinary swimming, is also capable of crawling. Here we describe crawling forward in a narrow U-shaped tunnel. A rapid movement along the tunnel was evoked by stimulating the tail. The muscle activity responsible for propulsion was confined to the area around the body bend. Muscles on the inner (concave) side were activated when approaching the turn, and inactivated on the top of the arc. Muscles on the outer (convex) side were co-active with their antagonists, but also active in the area of straightening of the body bend. This pattern of muscle activity propagated along the body. The role of central and reflex mechanisms in the generation of locomotor movements is discussed.

  12. Neural crest contributions to the lamprey head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCauley, David W.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    The neural crest is a vertebrate-specific cell population that contributes to the facial skeleton and other derivatives. We have performed focal DiI injection into the cranial neural tube of the developing lamprey in order to follow the migratory pathways of discrete groups of cells from origin to destination and to compare neural crest migratory pathways in a basal vertebrate to those of gnathostomes. The results show that the general pathways of cranial neural crest migration are conserved throughout the vertebrates, with cells migrating in streams analogous to the mandibular and hyoid streams. Caudal branchial neural crest cells migrate ventrally as a sheet of cells from the hindbrain and super-pharyngeal region of the neural tube and form a cylinder surrounding a core of mesoderm in each pharyngeal arch, similar to that seen in zebrafish and axolotl. In addition to these similarities, we also uncovered important differences. Migration into the presumptive caudal branchial arches of the lamprey involves both rostral and caudal movements of neural crest cells that have not been described in gnathostomes, suggesting that barriers that constrain rostrocaudal movement of cranial neural crest cells may have arisen after the agnathan/gnathostome split. Accordingly, neural crest cells from a single axial level contributed to multiple arches and there was extensive mixing between populations. There was no apparent filling of neural crest derivatives in a ventral-to-dorsal order, as has been observed in higher vertebrates, nor did we find evidence of a neural crest contribution to cranial sensory ganglia. These results suggest that migratory constraints and additional neural crest derivatives arose later in gnathostome evolution.

  13. Neural crest contributions to the lamprey head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCauley, David W.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    The neural crest is a vertebrate-specific cell population that contributes to the facial skeleton and other derivatives. We have performed focal DiI injection into the cranial neural tube of the developing lamprey in order to follow the migratory pathways of discrete groups of cells from origin to destination and to compare neural crest migratory pathways in a basal vertebrate to those of gnathostomes. The results show that the general pathways of cranial neural crest migration are conserved throughout the vertebrates, with cells migrating in streams analogous to the mandibular and hyoid streams. Caudal branchial neural crest cells migrate ventrally as a sheet of cells from the hindbrain and super-pharyngeal region of the neural tube and form a cylinder surrounding a core of mesoderm in each pharyngeal arch, similar to that seen in zebrafish and axolotl. In addition to these similarities, we also uncovered important differences. Migration into the presumptive caudal branchial arches of the lamprey involves both rostral and caudal movements of neural crest cells that have not been described in gnathostomes, suggesting that barriers that constrain rostrocaudal movement of cranial neural crest cells may have arisen after the agnathan/gnathostome split. Accordingly, neural crest cells from a single axial level contributed to multiple arches and there was extensive mixing between populations. There was no apparent filling of neural crest derivatives in a ventral-to-dorsal order, as has been observed in higher vertebrates, nor did we find evidence of a neural crest contribution to cranial sensory ganglia. These results suggest that migratory constraints and additional neural crest derivatives arose later in gnathostome evolution.

  14. Parameterization of European perch Perca fluviatilis length-at-age data using stochastic Gompertz growth models.

    PubMed

    Troynikov, V S; Gorfine, H K; Ložys, L; Pūtys, Z; Jakubavičiūtė, E; Day, R W

    2011-12-01

    Three stochastic versions of the Gompertz growth model were used to parameterize total length (L(T) )-at-age data for perch Perca fluviatilis, an important target species for commercial and recreational fishers and a food species for predatory fishes and aquatic birds. Each model addresses growth heterogeneity by incorporating random parameters from a specific positive distribution: Weibull, gamma or log-normal. The modelling outputs for each version of the model provide L(T) distributions for selected ages and percentiles of L(T) at age for both males and females. The results highlight the importance of using a stochastic approach and the logistic-like growth pattern for analysing growth data for P. fluviatilis in Curonian Lagoon (Lithuania). Outputs from this modelling can be extended to a stochastic analysis of fish cohort dynamics, incorporating all length-based biological relationships, and the selectivity-related interactions between fish cohorts and fishing gear.

  15. MULTIPLE NEUROFILAMENT SUBUNITS ARE PRESENT IN LAMPREY CNS

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Li-Qing; Zhang, Guixin; Pennicooke, Brenton; Laramore, Cindy; Selzer, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, there are three neurofilament (NF) subunits (NF-L, NF-M, and NF-H), but it was thought that only a single NF, NF180, exists in lamprey. However, NF180 lacked the ability to self-assemble, suggesting that like mammalian NFs, lamprey NFs are heteropolymers, and that additional NF subunits may exist. The present study provides evidence for the existence of a lamprey NF-L homolog (L-NFL). Genes encoding two new NF-M isoforms (NF132 and NF95) also have been isolated and characterized. With NF180, this makes three NF-M-like isoforms. In situ hybridization showed that all three newly cloned NFs are expressed in spinal cord neurons and in spinal-projecting neurons of the brainstem. Like NF180, there were no KSP multiphosphorylation repeat motifs in the tail regions of NF132 or NF95. NF95 was highly identical to homologous parts of NF180, sharing 2 common pieces of DNA with it. Northern blots suggested that NF95 may be expressed at very low levels in older larvae. The presence of L-NFL in lamprey CNS may support the hypothesis that as in mammals, NFs in lamprey are obligate heteropolymers, in which NF-L is a required subunit. PMID:21081119

  16. A putative corticosteroid hormone in Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus.

    PubMed

    Rai, Satbir; Szeitz, András; Roberts, Brent W; Christie, Quill; Didier, Wesley; Eom, Junho; Yun, Sang-Seon; Close, David A

    2015-02-01

    Great efforts have been put forth to elucidate the mechanisms of the stress response in vertebrates and demonstrate the conserved response across different vertebrate groups, ranging from similarities in the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to the release and role of corticosteroids. There is however, still very little known about stress physiology in the Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus), descendants of the earliest vertebrate lineage, the agnathans. In this paper we demonstrate that 11-deoxycortisol, a steroid precursor to cortisol in the steroidogenic pathway, may be a functional corticosteroid in Pacific lamprey. We identified the putative hormone in Pacific lamprey plasma by employing an array of methods such as RIA, HPLC and mass spectrometry analysis. We demonstrated that plasma levels of 11-deoxycortisol significantly increased in Pacific lamprey 0.5 and 1 h after stress exposure and that lamprey corticotropin releasing hormone injections increased circulating levels of 11-deoxycortisol, suggesting that the stress response is under the control of the HPA/I axis as it is in higher vertebrates. A comprehensive understanding of vertebrate stress physiology may help shed light on the evolution of the corticosteroid signaling system within the vertebrate lineage.

  17. Dopamine and the Brainstem Locomotor Networks: From Lamprey to Human

    PubMed Central

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Dubuc, Réjean

    2017-01-01

    In vertebrates, dopamine neurons are classically known to modulate locomotion via their ascending projections to the basal ganglia that project to brainstem locomotor networks. An increased dopaminergic tone is associated with increase in locomotor activity. In pathological conditions where dopamine cells are lost, such as in Parkinson's disease, locomotor deficits are traditionally associated with the reduced ascending dopaminergic input to the basal ganglia. However, a descending dopaminergic pathway originating from the substantia nigra pars compacta was recently discovered. It innervates the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) from basal vertebrates to mammals. This pathway was shown to increase locomotor output in lampreys, and could very well play an important role in mammals. Here, we provide a detailed account on the newly found dopaminergic pathway in lamprey, salamander, rat, monkey, and human. In lampreys and salamanders, dopamine release in the MLR is associated with the activation of reticulospinal neurons that carry the locomotor command to the spinal cord. Dopamine release in the MLR potentiates locomotor movements through a D1-receptor mechanism in lampreys. In rats, stimulation of the substantia nigra pars compacta elicited dopamine release in the pedunculopontine nucleus, a known part of the MLR. In a monkey model of Parkinson's disease, a reduced dopaminergic innervation of the brainstem locomotor networks was reported. Dopaminergic fibers are also present in human pedunculopontine nucleus. We discuss the conserved locomotor role of this pathway from lamprey to mammals, and the hypothesis that this pathway could play a role in the locomotor deficits reported in Parkinson's disease. PMID:28603482

  18. DiI cell labeling in lamprey embryos.

    PubMed

    Nikitina, Natalya; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana

    2009-01-01

    Lampreys are one of the most basal animals in which many of the true vertebrate characteristics (e.g., neural crest, placodes, segmented brain, skull, paired sensory organs, pharyngeal skeleton) are present. Studying the molecular and developmental mechanisms responsible for the formation of these structures in lamprey and higher vertebrates can provide insight into how these vertebrate characteristics evolved. The relative ease of obtaining mature adults and embryos makes this animal an ideal model for investigations into early vertebrate evolution. In addition, studies of features that are unique to lampreys can provide insights into mechanisms of parallel evolution. Lamprey embryos are particularly amenable to injection techniques. Like zebrafish and Xenopus embryos, they have double chorions and are resistant to surface-tension-induced rupture when removed from liquid. They can therefore be injected in a dry dish; this eliminates the need to support the embryo while performing injections and makes the procedure very rapid. Also, a single ovulating female can contain up to 100,000 eggs, so the number of injectable embryos per fertilization is not a limiting factor. This protocol describes how to label lamprey embryo cells by microinjecting the fluorescent dye DiI (1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate) to study cell fate during development.

  19. The sea lamprey has a primordial accessory olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Steven; Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Libants, Scot V; Nanlohy, Kaben G; Kiupel, Matti; Brown, C Titus; Li, Weiming

    2013-08-17

    A dual olfactory system, represented by two anatomically distinct but spatially proximate chemosensory epithelia that project to separate areas of the forebrain, is known in several classes of tetrapods. Lungfish are the earliest evolving vertebrates known to have this dual system, comprising a main olfactory and a vomeronasal system (VNO). Lampreys, a group of jawless vertebrates, have a single nasal capsule containing two anatomically distinct epithelia, the main (MOE) and the accessory olfactory epithelia (AOE). We speculated that lamprey AOE projects to specific telencephalic regions as a precursor to the tetrapod vomeronasal system. To test this hypothesis, we characterized the neural circuits and molecular profiles of the accessory olfactory epithelium in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). Neural tract-tracing revealed direct and reciprocal connections with the dorsomedial telencephalic neuropil (DTN) which in turn projects directly to the dorsal pallium and the rostral hypothalamus. High-throughput sequencing demonstrated that the main and the accessory olfactory epithelia have virtually identical profiles of expressed genes. Real time quantitative PCR confirmed expression of representatives of all 3 chemoreceptor gene families identified in the sea lamprey genome. Anatomical and molecular evidence shows that the sea lamprey has a primordial accessory olfactory system that may serve a chemosensory function.

  20. Evidence for lack of homing by sea lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.; Seelye, James G.

    1995-01-01

    Recently metamorphosed sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus were captured in the Devil River, a tributary to Lake Huron, during summer and autumn 1990. They were tagged with a coded wire tag and returned to the river to continue their migration to Lake Huron to begin the parasitic (juvenile) phase of their life. During the spawning run in spring 1992 when the tagged animals were expected to mature and return to spawn, sea lampreys were trapped in nine tributaries to Lake Huron, including the Devil River; 47,946 animals were examined for coded wire tags, and 41 tagged animals were recovered. None of the 45 mature sea lampreys captured in the Devil River in 1992 were tagged, a proportion (0%) significantly lower than the proportion of the recently metamorphosed sea lampreys tagged in 1990. The distribution of tag recoveries among streams lakewide, however, was proportional to catch. Tagged sea lampreys did not appear to home, but instead seemed to select spawning streams through innate attraction to other sensory cues.

  1. The sea lamprey has a primordial accessory olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A dual olfactory system, represented by two anatomically distinct but spatially proximate chemosensory epithelia that project to separate areas of the forebrain, is known in several classes of tetrapods. Lungfish are the earliest evolving vertebrates known to have this dual system, comprising a main olfactory and a vomeronasal system (VNO). Lampreys, a group of jawless vertebrates, have a single nasal capsule containing two anatomically distinct epithelia, the main (MOE) and the accessory olfactory epithelia (AOE). We speculated that lamprey AOE projects to specific telencephalic regions as a precursor to the tetrapod vomeronasal system. Results To test this hypothesis, we characterized the neural circuits and molecular profiles of the accessory olfactory epithelium in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). Neural tract-tracing revealed direct and reciprocal connections with the dorsomedial telencephalic neuropil (DTN) which in turn projects directly to the dorsal pallium and the rostral hypothalamus. High-throughput sequencing demonstrated that the main and the accessory olfactory epithelia have virtually identical profiles of expressed genes. Real time quantitative PCR confirmed expression of representatives of all 3 chemoreceptor gene families identified in the sea lamprey genome. Conclusion Anatomical and molecular evidence shows that the sea lamprey has a primordial accessory olfactory system that may serve a chemosensory function. PMID:23957559

  2. Conservation challenges and research needs for Pacific lamprey in the Columbia River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clemens, Benjamin J.; Beamish, Richard J.; Coates, Kelly C.; Docker, Margaret F.; Dunham, Jason; Gray, Ann E.; Hess, Jon E.; Jolley, Jeffrey C.; Lampman, Ralph T.; McIlraith, Brian J.; Moser, Mary L.; Murauskas, Joshua G.; Noakes, David L. G.; Schaller, Howard A.; Schreck, Carl B.; Starcevich, Steven J.; Streif, Bianca; van de Wetering, Stan J.; Wade, Joy; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Wyss, Lance A.

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific Lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus, an anadromous fish native to the northern Pacific Ocean and bordering freshwater habitats, has recently experienced steep declines in abundance and range contractions along the West Coast of North America. During the early 1990s, Native American tribes recognized the declining numbers of lamprey and championed their importance. In 2012, 26 entities signed a conservation agreement to coordinate and implement restoration and research for Pacific Lamprey. Regional plans have identified numerous threats, monitoring needs, and strategies to conserve and restore Pacific Lamprey during their freshwater life stages. Prime among these are needs to improve lamprey passage, restore freshwater habitats, educate stakeholders, and implement lamprey-specific research and management protocols. Key unknowns include range-wide trends in status, population dynamics, population delineation, limiting factors, and marine influences. We synthesize these key unknowns, with a focus on the freshwater life stages of lamprey in the Columbia River basin.

  3. Evolution and development of immunological structures in the lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Chris T; Saha, Nil Ratan; Zapata, Agustin

    2007-01-01

    Comparative immunology has been revitalized by the integration of genomics approaches, which allow a foothold into addressing problems that previously had been difficult to study. One such problem had been the enigmatic finding of overt immune anatomical structures in the lamprey, yet its apparent lack of bona fide immunoglobulin or T cell receptor molecules. The genomic characterization of a novel extended locus that undergoes rearrangements to generate receptor diversity and the subsequent implementation of this diversity in the immune system of lampreys have generated considerable interest as well as new avenues for investigation. Here, we review the anatomical structures of the lamprey that exhibit lympho-hematopoietic characteristics, with the ultimate goal of reconciling these data with contemporary molecular findings. By integrating these datasets we seek to better understand how an alternative adaptive immune system could have evolved. PMID:17875388

  4. Metamorphosis of the landlocked sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.; Stauffer, Thomas M.

    1970-01-01

    The external metamorphosis of the sea lamprey was divided into four stages, based primarily on the condition of the mouth: mouth reduced, mouth fused, mouth enclosed, and mouth elongated. During metamorphosis, the eye enlarged greatly, the snout and mouth region changed from a fleshy hood enclosing a sieve apparatus to a large sucking disc, the nasopore membrane and the branchial area shrank, the branchiopores changed in shape, the general color changed from dark brown and yellow to an intense blue-black dorsally and white ventrally, and the total length increased. Metamorphosis began in early to mid-July and did not take place after August. The duration of external metamorphosis was about 3 months for lampreys transforming under natural conditions. The mean lengths of metamorphosing lampreys from tributaries of lakes Superior and Michigan were 145 and 136 mm, respectively.

  5. Rearing of sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, embryos in distilled water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piavis, George W.; Howell, John H.

    1969-01-01

    Most embryological studies of lampreys in the Great Lakes have been conducted with filtered water from Lake Huron. Although this water was entirely satisfactory for the earlier work, the present need for knowledge of the effects of various compounds on embryological development requires that the initial medium be sterile. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether sea lamprey embryos could be successfully reared in distilled water. Mature sea lampreys were collected from the Ocqueoc River, Presque Isle County, Michigan, and transferred to the Hammond Bay Biological Station where eggs were stripped and fertilized according to the method of Piavis. After activation was ascertained to be 90-100% complete, the embryos were washed 3-5 timesexperimentals with commercially obtained U.S.P. distilled water and controls with filtered Lake Huron water.

  6. Hsp90 and hepatobiliary transformation during sea lamprey metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chu-Yin; Bussy, Ugo; Li, Ke; Davidson, Peter J; Nanlohy, Kaben G; Brown, C Titus; Whyard, Steven; Li, Weiming

    2015-12-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a human infant disease with inflammatory fibrous obstructions in the bile ducts and is the most common cause for pediatric liver transplantation. In contrast, the sea lamprey undergoes developmental BA with transient cholestasis and fibrosis during metamorphosis, but emerges as a fecund adult. Therefore, sea lamprey liver metamorphosis may serve as an etiological model for human BA and provide pivotal information for hepatobiliary transformation and possible therapeutics. We hypothesized that liver metamorphosis in sea lamprey is due to transcriptional reprogramming that dictates cellular remodeling during metamorphosis. We determined global gene expressions in liver at several metamorphic landmark stages by integrating mRNA-Seq and gene ontology analyses, and validated the results with real-time quantitative PCR, histological and immunohistochemical staining. These analyses revealed that gene expressions of protein folding chaperones, membrane transporters and extracellular matrices were altered and shifted during liver metamorphosis. HSP90, important in protein folding and invertebrate metamorphosis, was identified as a candidate key factor during liver metamorphosis in sea lamprey. Blocking HSP90 with geldanamycin facilitated liver metamorphosis and decreased the gene expressions of the rate limiting enzyme for cholesterol biosynthesis, HMGCoA reductase (hmgcr), and bile acid biosynthesis, cyp7a1. Injection of hsp90 siRNA for 4 days altered gene expressions of met, hmgcr, cyp27a1, and slc10a1. Bile acid concentrations were increased while bile duct and gall bladder degeneration was facilitated and synchronized after hsp90 siRNA injection. HSP90 appears to play crucial roles in hepatobiliary transformation during sea lamprey metamorphosis. Sea lamprey is a useful animal model to study postembryonic development and mechanisms for hsp90-induced hepatobiliary transformation.

  7. Boll weevil eradication: a model for sea lamprey control?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, James W.; Swink, William D.

    2003-01-01

    Invasions of boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) into the United States and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) into the Great Lakes were similar in many ways. Important species (American cotton, Gossypium hirsutum, and lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush) and the industries they supported were negatively affected. Initial control efforts were unsuccessful until pesticides and application technologies were developed. For boll weevils, controls relying on pesticides evolved into an integrated program that included recommended farming practices and poisoned baits. However, the discovery of a boll weevil sex pheromone in 1964 allowed adoption of an ongoing program of eradication. Despite opposition over concept and cost, insecticides, pheromone traps, poisoned baits, and approved farming practices were used to eradicate boll weevils from Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama by 1999. Using the working back approach along the path of the original invasion, eradication was nearly completed by 2002 in Mississippi and eradication programs were underway in Arkansas, Tennessee, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and parts of Texas. Insecticide use for cotton production decreased 50 to 90%, and cotton yields and farm income increased an average of 78 kg/ha and $190 U.S./ha in areas where boll weevils were eradicated. For sea lampreys, integrated management uses lampricides, barriers to migration, trapping, and release of sterilized males. Although sea lamprey eradication is not currently feasible, recent research on larval and sex pheromones might provide the tools to make it possible. A successful eradication program for sea lampreys starting in Lake Superior and expanding to the lower Great Lakes would ultimately provide huge ecological and economic benefits by eliminating lampricide applications, removing barriers that block teleost fishes, and facilitating the recovery of lake trout. Should the opportunity arise, the concept of sea lamprey eradication should

  8. Structure and specificity of lamprey monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Herrin, Brantley R; Alder, Matthew N; Roux, Kenneth H; Sina, Christina; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Boydston, Jeremy A; Turnbough, Charles L; Cooper, Max D

    2008-02-12

    Adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates (lamprey and hagfish) is mediated by lymphocytes that undergo combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments to create a diverse repertoire of variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) genes. Immunization with particulate antigens induces VLR-B-bearing lymphocytes to secrete antigen-specific VLR-B antibodies. Here, we describe the production of recombinant VLR-B antibodies specific for BclA, a major coat protein of Bacillus anthracis spores. The recombinant VLR-B antibodies possess 8-10 uniform subunits that collectively bind antigen with high avidity. Sequence analysis, mutagenesis, and modeling studies show that antigen binding involves residues in the beta-sheets lining the VLR-B concave surface. EM visualization reveals tetrameric and pentameric molecules having a central core and highly flexible pairs of stalk-region "arms" with antigen-binding "hands." Remarkable antigen-binding specificity, avidity, and stability predict that these unusual LRR-based monoclonal antibodies will find many biomedical uses.

  9. Similarities and Differences for Swimming in Larval and Adult Lampreys.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Andrew D; Pale, Timothée; Messina, J Alex; Buso, Scott; Shebib, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The spinal locomotor networks controlling swimming behavior in larval and adult lampreys may have some important differences. As an initial step in comparing the locomotor systems in lampreys, in larval animals the relative timing of locomotor movements and muscle burst activity were determined and compared to those previously published for adults. In addition, the kinematics for free swimming in larval and adult lampreys was compared in detail for the first time. First, for swimming in larval animals, the neuromechanical phase lag between the onsets or terminations of muscle burst activity and maximum concave curvature of the body increased with increasing distance along the body, similar to that previously shown in adults. Second, in larval lampreys, but not adults, absolute swimming speed (U; mm s(-1)) increased with animal length (L). In contrast, normalized swimming speed (U'; body lengths [bl] s(-1)) did not increase with L in larval or adult animals. In both larval and adult lampreys, U' and normalized wave speed (V') increased with increasing tail-beat frequency. Wavelength and mechanical phase lag did not vary significantly with tail-beat frequency but were significantly different in larval and adult animals. Swimming in larval animals was characterized by a smaller U/V ratio, Froude efficiency, and Strouhal number than in adults, suggesting less efficient swimming for larval animals. In addition, during swimming in larval lampreys, normalized lateral head movements were larger and normalized lateral tail movements were smaller than for adults. Finally, larval animals had proportionally smaller lateral surface areas of the caudal body and fin areas than adults. These differences are well suited for larval sea lampreys that spend most of the time buried in mud/sand, in which swimming efficiency is not critical, compared to adults that would experience significant selection pressure to evolve higher-efficiency swimming to catch up to and attach to fish for

  10. Embryonic development of the Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yuji; Fukutomi, Norio; Takeda, Korenori; Iwata, Akihisa

    2003-09-01

    Embryonic development of the Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus, from Japan is described. Egg sizes averaged 1.249 mm (longest axis) and 1.145 mm (shortest axis), the time required for hatching being 11 days at 18 degrees C, shorter than previously reported for a lower water temperature (19 days at 15 degrees C). Early development in E. tridentatus proceeded at a similar rate to that in other lampreys, in spite of different rearing water temperatures for the latter, indicating possible specific differences in basic developmental rates.

  11. Turbine Intake Diversion Screens: Investigating Effects on Pacific Lamprey

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, Russell A.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Langeslay, Mike

    2003-03-01

    Our studies to date show that juvenile lamprey are not likely to be harmed by changes in pressure or shear conditions that occur during turbine passage. They are, however, vulnerable to impingement on 1/8-inch submersible bar screens because of their weak swimming ability and their tendency to use their tail to move about on the structure. Because of their tendency to swim low in the water column, the lamprey have a higher potential for turbine entrainment than do the anadromous salmonids.

  12. Evidence for lamprey GnRH-I and -III-like molecules in the brains of the southern hemisphere lampreys Geotria australis and Mordacia mordax.

    PubMed

    Sower, S A; McGregor, A J; Materne, O L; Chase, C; Potter, I; Joss, J

    2000-11-01

    The present study has characterized gonadotropic releasing hormone (GnRH)-like molecules in the brains of representatives of the two southern hemisphere families of lampreys, Geotriidae and Mordaciidae. Chromatographic and immunocytochemical evidence showed that the brains of Geotria australis and Mordacia mordax contain two forms of GnRH-like molecules. These two forms correspond to lamprey GnRH-I and -III, which were first sequenced from the brain of the anadromous sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus, a representative of the family Petromyzontidae that is found only in the northern hemisphere. In chromatographic studies (HPLC) using lamprey GnRH-I and -III antiserum, two early eluting GnRH forms coeluted with synthetic lamprey GnRH-I and -III standards. Our studies thus indicate that, despite their apparently long period of separation, the three families of extant lampreys have each retained both of the lamprey GnRH (-I and -III forms) molecules. Moreover, immunocytochemical localization of lamprey GnRH indicated that the pattern of its distribution in the adult brain of at least one of these southern hemisphere lampreys (G. australis) is similar to that previously described for P. marinus. Distribution of GnRH in the brain of larval G. australis was not as extensive as that in larval P. marinus, which may account for the later gonadal development in the former species. The fact that lamprey GnRH-I and -III are the dominant GnRH forms in all three families of lampreys implies that these neurohormones have an ancient origin.

  13. Sea lamprey abundance and management in Lake Superior 1957-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinrich, John W.; Mullett, Katherine M.; Hansen, Michael J.; Adams, Jean V.; Klar, Gerald T.; Johnson, David A.; Christie, Gavin C.; Young, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The international sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) control program successfully laid the foundation for rehabilitation of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Superior and was well coordinated among management agencies during 1957–1999. The lampricide TFM was the primary control tool, with recurring treatments in 52 larval-producing streams. Barriers and sterile-male-release, as alternative control technologies, were significant elements of the program. Barriers blocked spawning sea lampreys from substantial areas of habitat for sea lamprey larvae during 1966–1999, and the sterile-male-release technique was used to reduce larval production during 1991–1996. Sea lamprey control resulted in the suppression of sea lamprey populations in Lake Superior, as evidenced by the linear decline in spawner abundance during 1962–1999. However, sea lamprey abundance was not as low as the targets specified in the fish community objectives. Most of the parasitic sea lampreys in Lake Superior probably originated from survivors of lampricide treatments. Self-sustaining populations of lake trout were restored in most of the lake by 1996, although many were killed annually by sea lampreys. Economic injury levels for damage to fish populations by sea lampreys are being developed and will be used to distribute sea lamprey control resources among the Great Lakes.

  14. Characterization of a cellular retinol-binding protein from lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum.

    PubMed

    Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Morii, Mayako; Yoshikawa, Kiwamu; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Miura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Katsuyuki; Yoshino, Hiroaki; Senoo, Haruki

    2012-03-01

    Lampreys are ancestral representatives of vertebrates known as jawless fish. The Japanese lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum, is a parasitic member of the lampreys known to store large amounts of vitamin A within its body. How this storage is achieved, however, is wholly unknown. Within the body, the absorption, transfer and metabolism of vitamin A are regulated by a family of proteins called retinoid-binding proteins. Here we have cloned a cDNA for cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) from the Japanese lamprey, and phylogenetic analysis suggests that lamprey CRBP is an ancestor of both CRBP I and II. The lamprey CRBP protein was expressed in bacteria and purified. Binding of the lamprey CRBP to retinol (Kd of 13.2 nM) was identified by fluorimetric titration. However, results obtained with the protein fluorescence quenching technique indicated that lamprey CRBP does not bind to retinal. Northern blot analysis showed that lamprey CRBP mRNA was ubiquitously expressed, although expression was most abundant in the intestine. Together, these results suggest that lamprey CRBP has an important role in absorbing vitamin A from the blood of host animals.

  15. Neuroendocrine and behavioral responses to weak electric fields in adult sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Bryan, Mara B; Teeter, John; Bedore, Christine N; Li, Weiming

    2008-06-01

    We characterized the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses of adult sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) to weak electric fields. Adult sea lampreys, captured during upstream spawning migration, exhibited limited active behaviors during exposure to weak electric fields and spent the most time attached to the wall of the testing arena near the cathode (-). For adult male sea lampreys, exposure to weak electric fields resulted in increased lamprey (l) GnRH-I mRNA expression but decreased lGnRH-I immunoreactivities in the forebrain, and decreased Jun (a neuronal activation marker) mRNA levels in the brain stem. Similar effects were not observed in the brains of female sea lampreys after weak electric field stimulation. The influence of electroreception on forebrain lGnRH suggests that electroreception may modulate the reproductive systems in adult male sea lampreys. The changes in Jun expression may be associated with swimming inhibition during weak electric field stimulation. The results for adult sea lampreys are the opposite of those obtained using parasitic-stage sea lampreys, which displayed increased activity during and after cathodal stimulation. Our results demonstrate that adult sea lampreys are sensitive to weak electric fields, which may play a role in reproduction. They also suggest that electrical stimuli mediate different behaviors in feeding-stage and spawning-stage sea lampreys.

  16. The interrelationship of estrogen receptor and GnRH in a Basal vertebrate, the sea lamprey.

    PubMed

    Sower, Stacia A; Baron, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a vertebrate innovation and seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans. Lampreys are the earliest evolved vertebrates for which there is a demonstrated neuroendocrine system. Lampreys have three hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs; lGnRH-I, -II, and -III) and two and possibly three pituitary GnRH receptors involved in mediating reproductive processes. Estradiol is considered to be a major reproductive steroid in both male and female lampreys. The purpose of this study was to investigate estrogen receptor (ER) expression in the lamprey brain in adult sea lampreys. Expression of ER mRNA was confirmed in the adult lamprey brain using RT-PCR. Using digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled probes, ER expression was shown to yield moderate, but distinct reaction products in specific neuronal nuclei of the lamprey brain, including the olfactory lobe, hypothalamus, habenular area, and hindbrain. Expression of ER in the hypothalamic area of the brain provides evidence of potential interaction between estradiol and GnRH(s), and is consistent with previous evidence showing estrogen feedback on GnRH in adult lamprey brain. Earlier studies have reported that there is a close distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD; GABA-synthesizing enzyme) and lamprey GnRH in the preoptic region in adult lampreys. The establishment of a direct estradiol-kisspeptin-GABA-GnRH interaction in lamprey has yet to be determined and will require future functional and co-localization studies. The phylogenetic position of lampreys as a basal vertebrate allows lampreys to be a basis for understanding the molecular evolution of the neuroendocrine system that arose in the vertebrates.

  17. The Interrelationship of Estrogen Receptor and GnRH in a Basal Vertebrate, the Sea Lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Sower, Stacia A.; Baron, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a vertebrate innovation and seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans. Lampreys are the earliest evolved vertebrates for which there is a demonstrated neuroendocrine system. Lampreys have three hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs; lGnRH-I, -II, and -III) and two and possibly three pituitary GnRH receptors involved in mediating reproductive processes. Estradiol is considered to be a major reproductive steroid in both male and female lampreys. The purpose of this study was to investigate estrogen receptor (ER) expression in the lamprey brain in adult sea lampreys. Expression of ER mRNA was confirmed in the adult lamprey brain using RT-PCR. Using digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled probes, ER expression was shown to yield moderate, but distinct reaction products in specific neuronal nuclei of the lamprey brain, including the olfactory lobe, hypothalamus, habenular area, and hindbrain. Expression of ER in the hypothalamic area of the brain provides evidence of potential interaction between estradiol and GnRH(s), and is consistent with previous evidence showing estrogen feedback on GnRH in adult lamprey brain. Earlier studies have reported that there is a close distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD; GABA-synthesizing enzyme) and lamprey GnRH in the preoptic region in adult lampreys. The establishment of a direct estradiol–kisspeptin–GABA–GnRH interaction in lamprey has yet to be determined and will require future functional and co-localization studies. The phylogenetic position of lampreys as a basal vertebrate allows lampreys to be a basis for understanding the molecular evolution of the neuroendocrine system that arose in the vertebrates. PMID:22654815

  18. PCNA immunoreactivity revealing normal proliferative activity in the brain of adult Lampetra planeri (Bloch, 1784).

    PubMed

    Margotta, Vito; Caronti, Brunella; Colombari, Paolo Tito; Castiglia, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    It is now well known that the Teleosts among Osteichthyes, Urodele and Anuran Amphibians, Lacertilian Reptiles possess encephalic natural proliferative activities even into adulthood, as demonstrated by a great number of researches performed both under normal and various experimental conditions. Few years ago we have undertaken in adult heterothermic vertebrates a reappraisal on spontaneous cerebral proliferative events involving some organisms (Podarcis sicula, Triturus carnifex, Rana esculenta, Carassius carassius) representative of these vertebrates and belonging to the same or phylogenetically similar species used by previous researchers in studies having the same object. In our investigations, these performances were revealed by a proliferative immunocytochemical marker, the Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA). At this point of our study in the scenario emerging from findings a missing piece is represented by Petromyzontidae. To fill up this gap in the present investigation, using our usual test, we have paid attention to adult specimens of Lampetra planeri. The obtained immunostaining panorama has revealed the presence of a considerable number of spontaneous proliferative activities. These events might differ in quantity, in various encephalic districts. PCNA-labelled cells appeared scattered in the cranial portion of olfactory bulbs, while the PCNA expression has been observed steadily localized with a distinctly continous distribution in cells interposed among the ependymal epithelium which lines the cavities of the proximal portion of the olfactory region and of the cerebral ventricles. DNA synthesis activity has been also found in cells scattered in the telencephalic, diencephalic, mesencephalic and medulla oblongata periventricular grey. This immunoreactivity was not revealable in the cerebellum. Our findings are discussed in the light of bibliographic news.

  19. 11-Deoxycortisol is a corticosteroid hormone in the lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Close, D.A.; Yun, S.-S.; McCormick, S.D.; Wildbill, A.J.; Li, W.

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroid hormones are critical for controlling metabolism, hydromineral balance, and the stress response in vertebrates. Although corticosteroid hormones have been well characterized in most vertebrate groups, the identity of the earliest vertebrate corticosteroid hormone has remained elusive. Here we provide evidence that 11-deoxycortisol is the corticosteroid hormone in the lamprey, a member of the agnathans that evolved more than 500 million years ago. We used RIA, HPLC, and mass spectrometry analysis to determine that 11-deoxycortisol is the active corticosteroid present in lamprey plasma. We also characterized an 11-deoxycortisol receptor extracted from sea lamprey gill cytosol. The receptor was highly specific for 11-deoxycortisol and exhibited corticosteroid binding characteristics, including DNA binding. Furthermore, we observed that 11-deoxycortisol was regulated by the hypothalamus-pituitary axis and responded to acute stress. 11-Deoxycortisol implants reduced sex steroid concentrations and upregulated gill Na+, K+-ATPase, an enzyme critical for ion balance. We show here that 11-deoxycortisol functioned as both a glucocorticoid and a mineralocorticoid in the lamprey. Our findings indicate that a complex and highly specific corticosteroid signaling pathway evolved at least 500 million years ago with the arrival of the earliest vertebrate.

  20. Characterization of lamprey IL-17 family members and their receptors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qifeng; Das, Sabyasachi; Hirano, Masayuki; Holland, Stephen J.; McCurley, Nathanael; Guo, Peng; Rosenberg, Charles S.; Boehm, Thomas; Cooper, Max D.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-17 is an ancient cytokine implicated in a variety of immune defense reactions. We have indentified five members of the sea lamprey IL-17 family (IL-17D.1, IL-17D.2, IL-17E, IL-17B and IL-17C) and six IL-17 receptor genes (IL-17RA.1, IL-17RA.2, IL-17RA.3, IL-17RF, IL-17RE/RC and IL-17RD), determined their relationship with mammalian orthologues, and examined their expression patterns and potential interactions in order to explore their roles in innate and adaptive immunity. The most highly expressed IL-17 family member is IL-17D.1 (mammalian IL-17D like), which was found to be preferentially expressed by epithelial cells of skin, intestine and gills and by the two types of lamprey T-like cells. IL-17D.1 binding to recombinant IL-17RA.1 and to the surface of IL-17RA.1-expressing B-like cells and monocytes of lamprey larvae was demonstrated, and treatment of lamprey blood cells with recombinant IL-17D.1 protein enhanced transcription of genes expressed by the B-like cells. These findings suggest a potential role for IL-17 in coordinating the interactions between T-like cells and other cells of the adaptive and innate immune systems in jawless vertebrates. PMID:26491201

  1. cDNA sequences of two apolipoproteins from lamprey

    SciTech Connect

    Pontes, M.; Xu, X.; Graham, D.; Riley, M.; Doolittle, R.F.

    1987-03-24

    The messages for two small but abundant apolipoproteins found in lamprey blood plasma were cloned with the aid of oligonucleotide probes based on amino-terminal sequences. In both cases, numerous clones were identified in a lamprey liver cDNA library, consistent with the great abundance of these proteins in lamprey blood. One of the cDNAs (LAL1) has a coding region of 105 amino acids that corresponds to a 21-residue signal peptide, a putative 8-residue propeptide, and the 76-residue mature protein found in blood. The other cDNA (LAL2) codes for a total of 191 residues, the first 23 of which constitute a signal peptide. The two proteins, which occur in the high-density lipoprotein fraction of ultracentrifuged plasma, have amino acid compositions similar to those of apolipoproteins found in mammalian blood; computer analysis indicates that the sequences are largely helix-permissive. When the sequences were searched against an amino acid sequence data base, rat apolipoprotein IV was the best matching candidate in both cases. Although a reasonable alignment can be made with that sequence and LAL1, definitive assignment of the two lamprey proteins to typical mammalian classes cannot be made at this point.

  2. 11-Deoxycortisol is a corticosteroid hormone in the lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Close, David A.; Yun, Sang-Seon; McCormick, Stephen D.; Wildbill, Andrew J.; Li, Weiming

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroid hormones are critical for controlling metabolism, hydromineral balance, and the stress response in vertebrates. Although corticosteroid hormones have been well characterized in most vertebrate groups, the identity of the earliest vertebrate corticosteroid hormone has remained elusive. Here we provide evidence that 11-deoxycortisol is the corticosteroid hormone in the lamprey, a member of the agnathans that evolved more than 500 million years ago. We used RIA, HPLC, and mass spectrometry analysis to determine that 11-deoxycortisol is the active corticosteroid present in lamprey plasma. We also characterized an 11-deoxycortisol receptor extracted from sea lamprey gill cytosol. The receptor was highly specific for 11-deoxycortisol and exhibited corticosteroid binding characteristics, including DNA binding. Furthermore, we observed that 11-deoxycortisol was regulated by the hypothalamus–pituitary axis and responded to acute stress. 11-Deoxycortisol implants reduced sex steroid concentrations and up-regulated gill Na+, K+-ATPase, an enzyme critical for ion balance. We show here that 11-deoxycortisol functioned as both a glucocorticoid and a mineralocorticoid in the lamprey. Our findings indicate that a complex and highly specific corticosteroid signaling pathway evolved at least 500 million years ago with the arrival of the earliest vertebrate. PMID:20643930

  3. Response of Juvenile Pacific Lamprey to Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, D.

    2009-09-14

    To help determine the Pacific lamprey’s ability to survive turbine passage, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists conducted laboratory tests designed to simulate a fish’s passage through the turbine environment. Juvenile Pacific lamprey were subjected to two of three aspects of passage: pressure drop and shear stress. The third aspect, blade strike, was not tested.

  4. Mercury accumulation in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from Lake Huron.

    PubMed

    Madenjian, Charles P; Johnson, Nicholas S; Siefkes, Michael J; Dettmers, John M; Blum, Joel D; Johnson, Marcus W

    2014-02-01

    We determined whole-fish total mercury (Hg) concentrations of 40 male and 40 female adult sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) captured in the Cheboygan River, a tributary to Lake Huron, during May 2011. In addition, bioenergetics modeling was used to explore the effects of sex-related differences in activity and resting (standard) metabolic rate (SMR) on mercury accumulation. The grand mean for Hg concentrations was 519 ng/g (standard error of the mean=46 ng/g). On average, males were 16% higher in Hg concentration than females. Bioenergetics modeling results indicated that 14% higher activity and SMR in males would account for this observed sex difference in Hg concentrations. We concluded that the higher Hg concentration in males was most likely due to higher rate of energy expenditure in males, stemming from greater activity and SMR. Our findings have implications for estimating the effects of sea lamprey populations on mercury cycling within ecosystems, as well as for the proposed opening of sea lamprey fisheries. Eventually, our results may prove useful in improving control of sea lamprey, a pest responsible for substantial damage to fisheries in lakes where it is not native.

  5. Mercury accumulation in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Siefkes, Michael J.; Dettmers, John M.; Blum, Joel D.; Johnson, Marcus W.

    2014-01-01

    We determined whole-fish total mercury (Hg) concentrations of 40 male and 40 female adult sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) captured in the Cheboygan River, a tributary to Lake Huron, during May 2011. In addition, bioenergetics modeling was used to explore the effects of sex-related differences in activity and resting (standard) metabolic rate (SMR) on mercury accumulation. The grand mean for Hg concentrations was 519 ng/g (standard error of the mean = 46 ng/g). On average, males were 16% higher in Hg concentration than females. Bioenergetics modeling results indicated that 14% higher activity and SMR in males would account for this observed sex difference in Hg concentrations. We concluded that the higher Hg concentration in males was most likely due to higher rate of energy expenditure in males, stemming from greater activity and SMR. Our findings have implications for estimating the effects of sea lamprey populations on mercury cycling within ecosystems, as well as for the proposed opening of sea lamprey fisheries. Eventually, our results may prove useful in improving control of sea lamprey, a pest responsible for substantial damage to fisheries in lakes where it is not native.

  6. In vitro and in vivo effects of GABA, muscimol, and bicuculline on lamprey GnRH concentration in the brain of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Root, Adam R; Sanford, Jocelyn D; Kavanaugh, Scott I; Sower, Stacia A

    2004-08-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a neurotransmitter with a demonstrated neuroregulatory role in reproduction in most representative species of vertebrate classes via the hypothalamus. The role of GABA on the hypothalamus-pituitary axis in lampreys has not been fully elucidated. Recent immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization studies suggest that there may be a neuroregulatory role of GABA on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) system in lampreys. To assess possible GABA-GnRH interactions, the effects of GABA and its analogs on lamprey GnRH in vitro and in vivo were studied in adult female sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus). In vitro perfusion of GABA and its analogs at increasing concentrations (0.1-100 microM) was performed over a 3-h time course. There was a substantial increase of GnRH-I and GnRH-III following treatment of muscimol at 100 microM. In in vivo studies, GABA or muscimol injected at 200 microg/kg significantly increased lamprey GnRH concentration in the brain 0.5 h after treatment compared to controls in female sea lampreys. No significant change in lamprey GnRH-I or GnRH-III was observed following treatment with bicuculline. These data provide novel physiological data supporting the hypothesis that GABA may influence GnRH in the brain of sea lamprey.

  7. Contamination of metals in tissues of Ctenopharyngodon idella and Perca fluviatilis, from Anzali Wetland, Iran.

    PubMed

    Baramaki Yazdi, Rahimeh; Ebrahimpour, Mohammad; Mansouri, Borhan; Rezaei, Mohammad Reza; Babaei, Hadi

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the levels of metals (Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cr) in muscle, gill, liver, kidney and intestine of two freshwater fish, Ctenopharyngodon idella and Perca fluviatilis, in Anzali Wetland, Iran. The concentrations were different between the fish species as well as among the tissues of fish. Results showed that the metal concentrations in both fish species were in descending order of Zn > Cu > Pb > Cr > Cd. Results also showed that the Cd, Cu, Zn, and Pb concentrations in the muscle of both fish from Anzali Wetland are below levels of concern for human consumption.

  8. Fine-scale pathways used by adult sea lampreys during riverine spawning migrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holbrook, Christopher; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Adams, Noah S.; Hatton, Tyson; McLaughlin, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Better knowledge of upstream migratory patterns of spawning Sea Lampreys Petromyzon marinus, an invasive species in the Great Lakes, is needed to improve trapping for population control and assessment. Although trapping of adult Sea Lampreys provides the basis for estimates of lake-wide abundance that are used to evaluate the Sea Lamprey control program, traps have only been operated at dams due to insufficient knowledge of Sea Lamprey behavior in unobstructed channels. Acoustic telemetry and radiotelemetry were used to obtain movement tracks for 23 Sea Lampreys in 2008 and 18 Sea Lampreys in 2009 at two locations in the Mississagi River, Ontario. Cabled hydrophone arrays provided two-dimensional geographic positions from acoustic transmitters at 3-s intervals; depth-encoded radio tag detections provided depths. Upstream movements occurred at dusk or during the night (2015–0318 hours). Sea Lampreys were closely associated with the river bottom and showed some preference to move near banks in shallow glide habitats, suggesting that bottom-oriented gears could selectively target adult Sea Lampreys in some habitats. However, Sea Lampreys were broadly distributed across the river channel, suggesting that the capture efficiency of nets and traps in open channels would depend heavily on the proportion of the channel width covered. Lack of vertical movements into the water column may have reflected lamprey preference for low water velocities, suggesting that energy conservation was more beneficial for lampreys than was vertical searching in rivers. Improved understanding of Sea Lamprey movement will assist in the development of improved capture strategies for their assessment and control in the Great Lakes.

  9. Environmental factors regulate the effects of roach Rutilus rutilus and pike Esox lucius on perch Perca fluviatilis populations in small boreal forest lakes.

    PubMed

    Olin, M; Vinni, M; Lehtonen, H; Rask, M; Ruuhijärvi, J; Saulamo, K; Ala-Opas, P

    2010-04-01

    In this study of 18 small boreal forest lakes, the effects of abiotic and biotic factors (roach Rutilus rutilus and pike Esox lucius) on various population variables of perch Perca fluviatilis were examined. As a single variable, the gillnet catch per unit effort (CPUE) of R. rutilus was negatively related to the mean mass of small (< 200 mm) and the growth rate of young (1-2 years) P. fluviatilis. The mean mass of large (> or = 200 mm) P. fluviatilis was the highest at intermediate CPUE of R. rutilus. Redundancy analysis including environmental factors and P. fluviatilis population variables suggested that 'predation-productivity-humus' gradient affected P. fluviatilis populations by decreasing the CPUE and mean mass of small individuals but increasing these variables of large individuals. The CPUE of R. rutilus and lake area had a negative effect on small and a positive effect on large P. fluviatilis growth rate. In small boreal forest lakes, P. fluviatilis populations are affected by the partially opposite forces of competition by R. rutilus and predation by E. lucius, and the intensity of these interactions is regulated by several environmental factors.

  10. A synthesized mating pheromone component increases adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) trap capture in management scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nicholas S.; Siefkes, Michael J.; Wagner, C. Michael; Dawson, Heather; Wang, Huiyong; Steeves, Todd; Twohey, Michael; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Application of chemical cues to manipulate adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) behavior is among the options considered for new sea lamprey control techniques in the Laurentian Great Lakes. A male mating pheromone component, 7a,12a,24-trihydroxy-3-one-5a-cholan-24-sulfate (3kPZS), lures ovulated female sea lamprey upstream into baited traps in experimental contexts with no odorant competition. A critical knowledge gap is whether this single pheromone component influences adult sea lamprey behavior in management contexts containing free-ranging sea lampreys. A solution of 3kPZS to reach a final in-stream concentration of 10-12 mol·L-1 was applied to eight Michigan streams at existing sea lamprey traps over 3 years, and catch rates were compared between paired 3kPZS-baited and unbaited traps. 3kPZS-baited traps captured significantly more sexually immature and mature sea lampreys, and overall yearly trapping efficiency within a stream averaged 10% higher during years when 3kPZS was applied. Video analysis of a trap funnel showed that the likelihood of sea lamprey trap entry after trap encounter was higher when the trap was 3kPZS baited. Our approach serves as a model for the development of similar control tools for sea lamprey and other aquatic invaders.

  11. Complete genome sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the river lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yuri L; Yura, Kei; Shindo, Miyuki; Kusakabe, Rie; Hayashi, Keiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Okamura, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Lampreys are eel-like jawless fishes evolutionarily positioned between invertebrates and vertebrates, and have been used as model organisms to explore vertebrate evolution. In this study we determined the complete genome sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the Japanese river lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum, using next-generation sequencers. The sequence was 16,272 bp in length. The gene content and order were identical to those of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, which has been the reference among lamprey species. However, the sequence similarity was less than 90%, suggesting the need for the whole-genome sequencing of L. japonicum.

  12. Comparison of electrofishing techniques to detect larval lampreys in wadeable streams in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunham, Jason B.; Chelgren, Nathan D.; Heck, Michael P.; Clark, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the probability of detecting larval lampreys using different methods of backpack electrofishing in wadeable streams in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Our primary objective was to compare capture of lampreys using electrofishing with standard settings for salmon and trout to settings specifically adapted for capture of lampreys. Field work consisted of removal sampling by means of backpack electrofishing in 19 sites in streams representing a broad range of conditions in the region. Captures of lampreys at these sites were analyzed with a modified removal-sampling model and Bayesian estimation to measure the relative odds of capture using the lamprey-specific settings compared with the standard salmonid settings. We found that the odds of capture were 2.66 (95% credible interval, 0.87–78.18) times greater for the lamprey-specific settings relative to standard salmonid settings. When estimates of capture probability were applied to estimating the probabilities of detection, we found high (>0.80) detectability when the actual number of lampreys in a site was greater than 10 individuals and effort was at least two passes of electrofishing, regardless of the settings used. Further work is needed to evaluate key assumptions in our approach, including the evaluation of individual-specific capture probabilities and population closure. For now our results suggest comparable results are possible for detection of lampreys by using backpack electrofishing with salmonid- or lamprey-specific settings.

  13. Role of physical barriers in the control of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.B.; Youngs, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    Mechanical and electromechanical barriers played a significant role in the initial attempts to control sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations in the upper Great Lakes. More recently electromechanical weirs have been used to assess the relative abundance of spawning-run sea lampreys in Lake Superior. Development of an integrated control approach to sea lamprey control has stimulated an ongoing research program to define structural and/or velocity criteria that can be used to design barrier dams that block spawning runs of sea lamprey

  14. Behavior and potential threats to survival of migrating lamprey ammocoetes and macrophthalmia

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Mary L.; Jackson, Aaron D.; Lucas, Martyn C.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2015-03-01

    Upon metamorphosis, anadromous juvenile lamprey (macrophthalmia) exhibit distinct migration behaviors that take them from larval rearing habitats in streams to the open ocean. While poorly studied, lamprey larvae (ammocoetes) also engage in downstream movement to some degree. Like migrating salmon smolts, lamprey macrophthalmia undergo behavioral changes associated with a highly synchronized metamorphosis. Unlike salmon smolts, the timing of juvenile migration in lamprey is protracted and poorly documented. Lamprey macrophthalmia and ammocoetes are not strong swimmers, attaining maximum individual speeds of less than 1 m s-1, and sustained speeds of less than 0.5 m s-1. They are chiefly nocturnal and distribute throughout the water column, but appear to concentrate near the bottom in the thalweg of deep rivers. At dams and irrigation diversions, macrophthalmia can become impinged on screens or entrained in irrigation canals, suffer increased predation, and experience physical injury that may result in direct or delayed mortality. The very structures designed to protect migrating juvenile salmonids can be harmful to juvenile lamprey. Yet at turbine intakes and spillways, lampreys, which have no swim bladder, can withstand changes in pressure and shear stress large enough to injure or kill most teleosts. Lamprey populations are in decline in many parts of the world, with some species designated as species of concern for conservation that merit legally mandated protections. Hence, provisions for safe passage of juvenile lamprey are being considered at dams and water diversions in North America and Europe.

  15. The Freshwater Sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis Harbours Diverse Pseudomonas Species (Gammaproteobacteria, Pseudomonadales) with Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Keller-Costa, Tina; Jousset, Alexandre; van Overbeek, Leo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Costa, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria are believed to play an important role in the fitness and biochemistry of sponges (Porifera). Pseudomonas species (Gammaproteobacteria, Pseudomonadales) are capable of colonizing a broad range of eukaryotic hosts, but knowledge of their diversity and function in freshwater invertebrates is rudimentary. We assessed the diversity, structure and antimicrobial activities of Pseudomonas spp. in the freshwater sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis. Polymerase Chain Reaction – Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints of the global regulator gene gacA revealed distinct structures between sponge-associated and free-living Pseudomonas communities, unveiling previously unsuspected diversity of these assemblages in freshwater. Community structures varied across E. fluviatilis specimens, yet specific gacA phylotypes could be detected by PCR-DGGE in almost all sponge individuals sampled over two consecutive years. By means of whole-genome fingerprinting, 39 distinct genotypes were found within 90 fluorescent Pseudomonas isolates retrieved from E. fluviatilis. High frequency of in vitro antibacterial (49%), antiprotozoan (35%) and anti-oomycetal (32%) activities was found among these isolates, contrasting less-pronounced basidiomycetal (17%) and ascomycetal (8%) antagonism. Culture extracts of highly predation-resistant isolates rapidly caused complete immobility or lysis of cells of the protozoan Colpoda steinii. Isolates tentatively identified as P. jessenii, P. protegens and P. oryzihabitans showed conspicuous inhibitory traits and correspondence with dominant sponge-associated phylotypes registered by cultivation-independent analysis. Our findings suggest that E. fluviatilis hosts both transient and persistent Pseudomonas symbionts displaying antimicrobial activities of potential ecological and biotechnological value. PMID:24533086

  16. Domestication drive the changes of immune and digestive system of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaowen; Wang, Jun; Qian, Long; Gaughan, Sarah; Xiang, Wei; Ai, Tao; Fan, Zhenming; Wang, Chenghui

    2017-01-01

    Domestication has altered a variety of traits within the Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis), including phenotypic, physiological and behavioral traits of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis). Little is known, however, about the genetic changes between domesticated and wild Eurasian perch. In this study, we assembled a high-quality de novo reference transcriptome and identified differentially expressed genes between wild and domesticated Eurasian perch. A total of 113,709 transcripts were assembled, and 58,380 transcripts were annotated. Transcriptomic comparison revealed 630 differentially expressed genes between domesticated and wild Eurasian perch. Within domesticated Eurasian perch there were 412 genes that were up-regulated including MHCI, MHCII, chia, ighm within immune system development. There were 218 genes including try1, ctrl, ctrb, cela3b, cpa1 and cpb1, which were down-regulated that were associated with digestive processes. Our results indicated domestication drives the changes of immune and digestive system of Eurasian perch. Our study not only provide valuable genetic resources for further studies in Eurasian perch, but also provide novel insights into the genetic basis of physiological changes in Eurasian perch during domestication process. PMID:28257494

  17. Domestication drive the changes of immune and digestive system of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowen; Wang, Jun; Qian, Long; Gaughan, Sarah; Xiang, Wei; Ai, Tao; Fan, Zhenming; Wang, Chenghui

    2017-01-01

    Domestication has altered a variety of traits within the Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis), including phenotypic, physiological and behavioral traits of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis). Little is known, however, about the genetic changes between domesticated and wild Eurasian perch. In this study, we assembled a high-quality de novo reference transcriptome and identified differentially expressed genes between wild and domesticated Eurasian perch. A total of 113,709 transcripts were assembled, and 58,380 transcripts were annotated. Transcriptomic comparison revealed 630 differentially expressed genes between domesticated and wild Eurasian perch. Within domesticated Eurasian perch there were 412 genes that were up-regulated including MHCI, MHCII, chia, ighm within immune system development. There were 218 genes including try1, ctrl, ctrb, cela3b, cpa1 and cpb1, which were down-regulated that were associated with digestive processes. Our results indicated domestication drives the changes of immune and digestive system of Eurasian perch. Our study not only provide valuable genetic resources for further studies in Eurasian perch, but also provide novel insights into the genetic basis of physiological changes in Eurasian perch during domestication process.

  18. Life history of the sea lamprey of Cayugaf Lake, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wigley, Roland L.

    1959-01-01

    A life history study of the sea lamprey, Petromyson marinus Linnaeus, in Cayuga Lake, N.Y., was conducted during 1950, 1951, and 1952. One of the major objectives was to obtain biological data concerning this endemic stock of sea lampreys for comparison with the newly established stocks in the Great Lakes. Sexually mature sea lampreys captured on their spawning migration in Cayuga Inlet were the basis of much of this study. Such items as meristic counts, body proportions, body color, sex ratios, lengths and weights, fecundity, rate of upstream travel, effect of dams in retarding upstream movement, nesting habits, parasites, predators, estimates of abundance, and morphological changes were based on mature upstream migrants. Sea lampreys were procured by weir and trap operations and captured by hand. Tagging and marking' programs each spring made it possible to determine movements and morphological changes of individual lampreys, in addition to estimating the number of upstream migrants. Growth of parasitic-phase sea lampreys was estimated from measurements of specimens captured in Cayuga Inlet and Cayuga Lake proper. The incubation period of lamprey eggs and the habits of ammocoetes and transforming lampreys were ascertained from specimens kept in hatchery troughs and raceways. Length-frequency and weight-frequency distributions, together with the length-weight regression, of ammocoetes from Cayuga Inlet were utilized for estimating the duration of their larval life. Lake trout, Salvelinus n. namayc"Ush (Walbaum), from Cayuga Lake and Seneca Lake were the subject of an inquiry into the effects of sea lamprey attacks. Incidence of sea lamprey attacks on the white sucker, Catosto7llus c. commerson/: (LacepMe), was investigated. Three methods are suggested for reducing the number of sea lampreys in Cayuga Lake.

  19. Flowfield measurements in the wake of a robotic lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Hultmark, Marcus; Leftwich, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Experiments are reported on the hydrodynamics of a swimming robotic lamprey under conditions of steady swimming and where the thrust exceeds the drag. The motion of the robot was based on the swimming of live lampreys, which is described by an equation similar to that developed for the American eel by Tytell and Lauder (J Exp Biol 207:1825–1841, 2004). For steady swimming, the wake structure closely resembles that of the American eel, where two pairs of same sign vortices are shed each tail beat cycle, giving the wake a 2P structure. Force estimates suggest that the major part of the thrust is produced at or close to the end of the tail. PMID:19946623

  20. An inhibitory receptor of VLRB in the agnathan lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fenfang; Chen, Liyong; Ren, Yong; Yang, Xiaojing; Yu, Tongzhou; Feng, Bo; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2016-01-01

    Lamprey, the primitive jawless vertebrate, uses variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) as alternative adaptive immune system instead of immunoglobulin (Ig)-based receptors used in jawed vertebrates. In the present study, we characterized a potential inhibitory receptor of VLRB from leucocytes in lamprey. It is a novel ITIM-containing IgSF protein and was therefore named as NICIP. NICIP has two Ig-like domains in extracellular region, a transmembrane domain and two classical ITIM motifs in cytoplasmic domain. It is mainly expressed on the surface of granulocytes and monocytes and can interact with VLRB. In transiently transfected HEK293T cells, it was confirmed again that it could interact with VLRB and the two phosphorylated ITIM motifs could recruit SHP-1 and SHP-2. These results imply that NICIP may play a role as a potential inhibitory receptor of VLRB and involve in negative regulation of immune response mediated by VLRB. PMID:27762335

  1. Flowfield measurements in the wake of a robotic lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Leftwich, Megan; Smits, Alexander J.

    2007-11-01

    Experiments are reported on the hydrodynamics of a swimming robotic lamprey under conditions of steady swimming and where the thrust exceeds the drag. The motion of the robot was based on the swimming of live lampreys, which is described by an equation similar to that developed for the American eel by Tytell and Lauder (J Exp Biol 207:1825-1841, 2004). For steady swimming, the wake structure closely resembles that of the American eel, where two pairs of same sign vortices are shed each tail beat cycle, giving the wake a 2P structure. Force estimates suggest that the major part of the thrust is produced at or close to the end of the tail.

  2. Flowfield measurements in the wake of a robotic lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Leftwich, Megan; Smits, Alexander J.

    Experiments are reported on the hydrodynamics of a swimming robotic lamprey under conditions of steady swimming and where the thrust exceeds the drag. The motion of the robot was based on the swimming of live lampreys, which is described by an equation similar to that developed for the American eel by Tytell and Lauder (J Exp Biol 207:1825-1841, 2004). For steady swimming, the wake structure closely resembles that of the American eel, where two pairs of same sign vortices are shed each tail beat cycle, giving the wake a 2P structure. Force estimates suggest that the major part of the thrust is produced at or close to the end of the tail.

  3. Expression of Sox family genes in early lamprey development

    PubMed Central

    UY, BENJAMIN R.; SIMOES-COSTA, MARCOS; SAUKA-SPENGLER, TATJANA; BRONNER, MARIANNE E.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Sox (Sry-related high mobility group box) family of transcription factors play a variety of roles during development of both vertebrates and invertebrates. A marked expansion in gene number occurred during emergence of vertebrates, apparently via gene duplication events that are thought to have facilitated new functions. By screening a macroarrayed library as well as the lamprey genome, we have isolated genes of the Sox B, D, E and F subfamilies in the basal jawless vertebrate, lamprey. The expression patterns of all identified Sox genes were examined from gastrulation through early organogenesis (embryonic day 4–14), with particular emphasis on the neural crest, a vertebrate innovation. Coupled with phylogenetic analysis of these Sox genes, the results provide insight into gene duplication and divergence in paralog deployment occurring during early vertebrate evolution. PMID:22811271

  4. A shift in resting habitat and feeding behavior of Anopheles fluviatilis sibling species in the Keonjhar district of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Rath, Animesha; Prusty, Manas R; Das, Mumani; Mahapatra, Namita; Tripathy, Harekrushna; Hazra, Rupenangshu K

    2015-11-01

    Anopheles fluviatilis exists as a complex of sibling species S, T, U and V exhibiting distinct variations. Sibling species S is considered as the main vector and anthropogenic whereas T, U and V are zoophagic non-vectors. This study was performed in a forested village of Keonjhar district, Odisha to identify the status of An. fluviatilis sibling species. Mosquito collections were made from cattle sheds (CS), human dwellings (HD) and mixed dwellings (MD) from June 2012 to May 2013. The proportion of An. fluviatilis collected from different habitats was compared with An. culicifacies. PCR assays were conducted to reveal their sibling species composition, host preference and sporozoite rate. Anopheles fluviatilis was the dominant species followed by An. culicifacies. The relative proportion of collection was high in MD and HD for An. fluviatilis and An. culicifacies respectively. PCR assay confirmed 9.4% S and 75.5% T. Mean collection of sibling species T and S were significantly high in MD and HD. Human blood index (HBI) of 0.88 and 0.61 was confirmed for sibling species S and T respectively with 13% sporozoite rate for S. High density of the sibling T was found in the study site with a shift in resting habitat and blood feeding preference. GenBank submissions: KJ451071.1, KJ451072.1, KJ451073.1, KJ451074.1, KJ451432.1, KJ451433.1, KJ451434.1, KJ451435.1, KJ451428.1, KJ451429.1, KJ451430.1, KJ451431.1. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Thrust Production and Wake Structure of an Actuated Lamprey Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, James; Smits, Alexander

    2004-11-01

    Thrust generation is studied for a flexible lamprey model which is actuated periodically to produce a streamwise traveling wave. Shape memory alloy actuators are used to achieve this deformation. The flow field is investigated using DPIV and flow visualization for a range of Strouhal numbers based on peak-to-peak amplitude of the trailing edge. The vortex kinematics in the spanwise and streamwise planes are examined, and a three-dimensional unsteady vortex model of the wake will be discussed.

  6. THE METAMORPHOSIS OF VISUAL SYSTEMS IN THE SEA LAMPREY

    PubMed Central

    Wald, George

    1957-01-01

    The life cycle of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, includes two metamorphoses. At the end of a period spent as a blind larva, buried in the mud of streams, a first metamorphosis prepares it to migrate downstream to the sea or a lake for its growth phase. Then, following a second metamorphosis, it migrates upstream as a sexually mature adult to spawn and die. The downstream migrants have a visual system based upon rhodopsin and vitamin A1, whereas that of the upstream migrants is based upon porphyropsin and vitamin A2. The livers contain vitamin A1 at all stages. The sea lamprey therefore exhibits a metamorphosis of visual systems, like those observed earlier among amphibia. The presence of porphyropsin in this member of the most primitive living group of vertebrates, as in fishes and amphibia, supports the notion that porphyropsin may have been the primitive vertebrate visual pigment. Its association with fresh water existence throughout this range of organisms also is consistent with the view that the vertebrate stock originated in fresh water. The observation that in the life cycle of the lamprey rhodopsin precedes porphyropsin is not at variance with the idea that porphyropsin is the more primitive pigment, since this change is part of the second metamorphosis, marking the return to the original environment. The observation that in lampreys, fishes, and amphibia, porphyropsin maintains the same general association with fresh water, and rhodopsin with marine and terrestrial habit, suggests that a single genetic mechanism may govern this association throughout this wide span of organisms. PMID:13439167

  7. Mercury concentrations in Pacific lamprey ( Entosphenus tridentatus ) and sediments in the Columbia River basin: Mercury in Columbia River Pacific lamprey

    SciTech Connect

    Linley, Timothy; Krogstad, Eirik; Mueller, Robert; Gill, Gary; Lasorsa, Brenda

    2016-06-21

    We investigated mercury accumulation in Pacific lamprey and sediments in the Columbia River basin. Mercury concentrations in larval lamprey differed significantly among sample locations (P < 0.001) and were correlated with concentrations in sediments (r2 = 0.83), whereas adult concentrations were highly variable (range 0.1–9.5 µg/g) and unrelated to holding time after collection. The results suggest that Pacific lamprey in the Columbia River basin may be exposed to mercury levels that have adverse ecological effects.

  8. Distribution of ferric iron in larval lampreys, Petromyzon marinus L.

    PubMed

    Hall, S J; Youson, J H

    1988-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of ferric iron in larval lampreys (Petromyzon marinus L.) were investigated using light microscopy and the Prussian blue stain. Animals from various watersheds contained different concentrations of iron, although the sites of deposition were the same for all animals. A major portion of iron is within adipose tissue, while the liver, and cartilage contain predominantly low to trace amounts of iron, respectively. Iron is associated with fibrous connective tissue in several places in the body, and this association may have particular significance in the inner ear. Iron is also located in cells of the meninges. The presence of iron in the epithelial cells of the posterior intestine may reflect elimination of the metal through the extrusion of iron-loaded cells into the intestinal lumen. Iron within mucous cells of the epidermis, suggest elimination of iron during mucous secretion. Iron-loaded cells of bipolar shape are also present in the epidermis, but are particularly prominent around the branchiopore. Low concentrations of iron are observed within in melanin-containing macrophages (melano-macrophages) in regions of iron absorption, erythrophagocytosis, and haemopoiesis. High levels of iron in the epithelia and lumina of pronephric tubules are concomitant with degeneration of this organ. These data are evidence of the wide spread distribution of iron in lamprey tissues and additional evidence for the potential value of lampreys for the study of iron metabolism in vertebrates.

  9. Evidence for partial overlap of male olfactory cues in lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Ke; Huertas, Mar; Baker, Cindy F.; Jia, Liang; Hayes, Michael C.; Li, Weiming; Johnson, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on a mosaic of complex information to find and evaluate mates. Pheromones, often comprised of multiple components, are considered to be particularly important for species-recognition in many species. While the evolution of species-specific pheromone blends is well-described in many insects, very few vertebrate pheromones have been studied in a macro-evolutionary context. Here, we report a phylogenetic comparison of multi-component male odours that guide reproduction in lampreys. Chemical profiling of sexually mature males from eleven species of lamprey, representing six of ten genera and two of three families, indicated the chemical profiles of sexually mature male odours are partially shared among species. Behavioural assays conducted with four species sympatric in the Laurentian Great Lakes indicated asymmetric female responses to heterospecific odours, where Petromyzon marinus were attracted to male odour collected from all species tested but other species generally preferred only the odour of conspecifics. Electro-olfactogram recordings from P. marinusindicated that although P. marinus exhibited behavioural responses to odours from males of all species, at least some of the compounds that elicited olfactory responses were different in conspecific male odours compared to heterospecific male odours. We conclude that some of the compounds released by sexually mature males are shared among species and elicit olfactory and behavioural responses in P. marinus, and suggest that our results provide evidence for partial overlap of male olfactory cues among lampreys. Further characterization of the chemical identities of odour components is needed to confirm shared pheromones among species.

  10. Microsatellite loci cross-species transferability in Aedes fluviatilis (Diptera:Culicidae): a cost-effective approach for population genetics studies.

    PubMed

    Multini, Laura Cristina; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo; Wilke, André Barretto Bruno

    2015-12-15

    Aedes fluviatilis is a neotropical mosquito species thought to be a potential vector of Yellow Fever viruses and can be infected with Plasmodium gallinaceum in laboratory. A better understanding of its genetic structure is very important to understand its epidemiologic potential and how it is responding to urbanization. The objective of this study was to survey the transferability of microsatellites loci developed for other Aedes to Ae. fluviatilis. We tested in Ae. fluviatilis 40 pairs of primers known to flank microsatellite regions in Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Aedes caspius, and found eight loci that amplified consistently. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 15, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.09 to 0.85. We found that several microsatellite primers successfully transferred to Ae. fluviatilis. This finding opens avenues for cost-effective optimization of high-resolution population genetic tools.

  11. Olfactory-mediated stream-finding behavior of migratory adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vrieze, L.A.; Bergstedt, R.A.; Sorensen, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Stream-finding behavior of adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), an anadromous fish that relies on pheromones to locate spawning streams, was documented in the vicinity of an important spawning river in the Great Lakes. Untreated and anosmic migrating sea lampreys were implanted with acoustic transmitters and then released outside the Ocqueoc River. Lampreys swam only at night and then actively. When outside of the river plume, lampreys pursued relatively straight bearings parallel to the shoreline while making frequent vertical excursions. In contrast, when within the plume, lampreys made large turns and exhibited a weak bias towards the river mouth, which one-third of them entered. The behavior of anosmic lampreys resembled that of untreated lampreys outside of the plume, except they pursued a more northerly compass bearing. To locate streams, sea lampreys appear to employ a three-phase odor-mediated strategy that involves an initial search along shorelines while casting vertically, followed by river-water-induced turning that brings them close to the river's mouth, which they then enter using rheotaxis. This novel strategy differs from that of salmonids and appears to offer this poor swimmer adaptive flexibility and suggests ways that pheromonal odors might be used to manage this invasive species.

  12. Synthesis of juvenile lamprey migration and passage research and monitoring at Columbia and Snake River Dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Weiland, Lisa K.; Christiansen, Helena E.

    2016-01-01

    We compiled and summarized previous sources of data and research results related to the presence, numbers, and migration timing characteristics of juvenile (eyed macropthalmia) and larval (ammocoetes) Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus, in the Columbia River basin (CRB). Included were data from various screw trap collections, data from historic fyke net studies, catch records of lampreys at JBS facilities, turbine cooling water strainer collections, and information on the occurrence of lampreys in the diets of avian and piscine predators. We identified key data gaps and uncertainties that should be addressed in a juvenile lamprey passage research program. The goal of this work was to summarize information from disparate sources so that managers can use it to prioritize and guide future research and monitoring efforts related to the downstream migration of juvenile Pacific lamprey within the CRB. A common finding in all datasets was the high level of variation observed for CRB lamprey in numbers present, timing and spatial distribution. This will make developing monitoring programs to accurately characterize lamprey migrations and passage more challenging. Primary data gaps centered around our uncertainty on the numbers of juvenile and larval present in the system which affects the ability to assign risk to passage conditions and prioritize management actions. Recommendations include developing standardized monitoring methods, such as at juvenile bypass systems (JBS’s), to better document numbers and timing of lamprey migrations at dams, and use biotelemetry tracking techniques to estimate survival potentials for different migration histories.

  13. Discovery of fossil lamprey larva from the Lower Cretaceous reveals its three-phased life cycle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mee-mann; Wu, Feixiang; Miao, Desui; Zhang, Jiangyong

    2014-10-28

    Lampreys are one of the two surviving jawless vertebrate groups and one of a few vertebrate groups with the best exemplified metamorphosis during their life cycle, which consists of a long-lasting larval stage, a peculiar metamorphosis, and a relatively short adulthood with a markedly different anatomy. Although the fossil records have revealed that many general features of extant lamprey adults were already formed by the Late Devonian (ca. 360 Ma), little is known about the life cycle of the fossil lampreys because of the lack of fossilized lamprey larvae or transformers. Here we report the first to our knowledge discovery of exceptionally preserved premetamorphic and metamorphosing larvae of the fossil lamprey Mesomyzon mengae from the Lower Cretaceous of Inner Mongolia, China. These fossil ammocoetes look surprisingly modern in having an eel-like body with tiny eyes, oral hood and lower lip, anteriorly positioned branchial region, and a continuous dorsal skin fin fold and in sharing a similar feeding habit, as judged from the detritus left in the gut. In contrast, the larger metamorphosing individuals have slightly enlarged eyes relative to large otic capsules, thickened oral hood or pointed snout, and discernable radials but still anteriorly extended branchial area and lack a suctorial oral disk, which characterize the early stages of the metamorphosis of extant lampreys. Our discovery not only documents the larval conditions of fossil lampreys but also indicates the three-phased life cycle in lampreys emerged essentially in their present mode no later than the Early Cretaceous.

  14. Sea lamprey avoid areas scented with conspecific tissue extract in Michigan streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Di Rocco, Richard; Johnson, Nicholas; Brege, Linnea; Imre, I.; Brown, G.E.

    2016-01-01

    Three in-stream experiments were conducted to determine whether sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus L., tissue extract (alarm cue) and 2-phenylethylamine hydrochloride (PEA HCl, a putative predator cue) influenced the distribution of migrating adult sea lamprey. Experiments evaluated sea lamprey movement when an odour was applied to (1) a tributary of a larger stream; and (2) half of a stream channel. Fewer sea lamprey entered the tributary and side of the river scented with sea lamprey tissue extract compared to the control treatment. Sea lamprey did not avoid the tributary and side of the river scented with PEA HCl. A final laboratory experiment found no difference in the avoidance response of sea lamprey to PEA HCl mixed with river water vs PEA HCl mixed with water from Lake Huron. As such, the lack of sea lamprey response to PEA HCl in the stream was unlikely to have been caused by the presence of the river water. Rather, the difference between laboratory and field results may be attributed to the complexity of the physical environment.

  15. A lamprey view on the origins of neuroendocrine regulation of the thyroid axis.

    PubMed

    Sower, Stacia A; Hausken, Krist N

    2017-04-13

    This mini review summarizes the current knowledge of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) endocrine system in lampreys, jawless vertebrates. Lampreys and hagfish are the only two extant members of the class of agnathans, the oldest lineage of vertebrates. The high conservation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in lampreys makes the lamprey model highly appropriate for comparative and evolutionary analyses. However, there are still many unknown questions concerning the hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis in its regulation of thyroid activities in lampreys. As an example, the hypothalamic and pituitary hormone(s) that regulate the HPT axis have not been confirmed and/or characterized. Similar to gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), lampreys produce thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) from thyroid follicles that are suggested to be involved in larval development, metamorphosis, and reproduction. The existing data provide evidence of a primitive, overlapping yet functional HPG and HPT endocrine system in lamprey. We hypothesize that lampreys are in an evolutionary intermediate stage of hypothalamic-pituitary development, leading to the emergence of the highly specialized HPG and HPT endocrine axes in jawed vertebrates. Study of the ancient lineage of jawless vertebrates, the agnathans, is key to understanding the origins of the neuroendocrine system in vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Discovery of fossil lamprey larva from the Lower Cretaceous reveals its three-phased life cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mee-mann; Wu, Feixiang; Miao, Desui; Zhang, Jiangyong

    2014-01-01

    Lampreys are one of the two surviving jawless vertebrate groups and one of a few vertebrate groups with the best exemplified metamorphosis during their life cycle, which consists of a long-lasting larval stage, a peculiar metamorphosis, and a relatively short adulthood with a markedly different anatomy. Although the fossil records have revealed that many general features of extant lamprey adults were already formed by the Late Devonian (ca. 360 Ma), little is known about the life cycle of the fossil lampreys because of the lack of fossilized lamprey larvae or transformers. Here we report the first to our knowledge discovery of exceptionally preserved premetamorphic and metamorphosing larvae of the fossil lamprey Mesomyzon mengae from the Lower Cretaceous of Inner Mongolia, China. These fossil ammocoetes look surprisingly modern in having an eel-like body with tiny eyes, oral hood and lower lip, anteriorly positioned branchial region, and a continuous dorsal skin fin fold and in sharing a similar feeding habit, as judged from the detritus left in the gut. In contrast, the larger metamorphosing individuals have slightly enlarged eyes relative to large otic capsules, thickened oral hood or pointed snout, and discernable radials but still anteriorly extended branchial area and lack a suctorial oral disk, which characterize the early stages of the metamorphosis of extant lampreys. Our discovery not only documents the larval conditions of fossil lampreys but also indicates the three-phased life cycle in lampreys emerged essentially in their present mode no later than the Early Cretaceous. PMID:25313060

  17. PCB concentrations and activity of sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus vary by sex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Binder, Thomas R.; Rediske, Richard R.; O'Keefe, James P.

    2013-01-01

    We determined the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations of 40 male and 40 female adult sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus captured in the Cheboygan River, a tributary to Lake Huron, during May 2011. In addition, we performed a laboratory experiment using passive integrated transponder tags to determine whether male adult sea lampreys were more active than female adult sea lampreys. Sex had a significant effect on PCB concentration, and PCB concentration at a given level of sea lamprey condition was approximately 25 % greater in males than in females. Adjusting for the difference in condition between the sexes, males averaged a 17 % greater PCB concentration compared with females. Results from the laboratory experiment indicated that males were significantly more active than females. The observed sex difference in PCB concentrations was not due to female sea lampreys releasing eggs at spawning because the sea lamprey is semelparous, and we caught the sea lampreys before spawning. Rather, we attributed the sex difference in PCB concentrations to a greater rate of energy expenditure in males compared with females. We proposed that this greater rate of energy expenditure was likely due to greater activity. Our laboratory experiment results supported this hypothesis. A greater resting metabolic rate may also have contributed to a greater rate of energy expenditure. Our findings should eventually be applicable toward improving control of sea lamprey, a pest responsible for considerable damage to fisheries in lakes where it is not native.

  18. Control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in Lake Superior, 1953-70

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bernard R.; Tibbles, J. James; Johnson, B.G.H.

    1974-01-01

    Although sea lamprey control and heavy plantings of hatchery-reared stock had restored lake trout abundance to prelamprey levels in many areas by 1970, the trout had not yet become self-sustaining. Additional effort will be required to further reduce the effects of lamprey predation.

  19. Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) parasite-host interactions in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bence, James R.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Christie, Gavin C.; Cochran, Phillip A.; Ebener, Mark P.; Koonce, Joseph F.; Rutter, Michael A.; Swink, William D.

    2003-01-01

    Prediction of how host mortality responds to efforts to control sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) is central to the integrated management strategy for sea lamprey (IMSL) in the Great Lakes. A parasite-host submodel is used as part of this strategy, and this includes a type-2 multi-species functional response, a developmental response, but no numerical response. General patterns of host species and size selection are consistent with the model assumptions, but some observations appear to diverge. For example, some patterns in sea lamprey marking on hosts suggest increases in selectivity for less preferred hosts and lower host survival when preferred hosts are scarce. Nevertheless, many of the IMSL assumptions may be adequate under conditions targeted by fish community objectives. Of great concern is the possibility that the survival of young parasites (parasitic-phase sea lampreys) varies substantially among lakes or over time. Joint analysis of abundance estimates for parasites being produced in streams and returning spawners could address this. Data on sea lamprey marks is a critical source of information on sea lamprey activity and potential effects. Theory connecting observed marks to sea lamprey feeding activity and host mortality is reviewed. Uncertainties regarding healing and attachment times, the probability of hosts surviving attacks, and problems in consistent classification of marks have led to widely divergent estimates of damages caused by sea lamprey. Laboratory and field studies are recommended to provide a firmer linkage between host blood loss, host mortality, and observed marks on surviving hosts, so as to improve estimates of damage.

  20. Role of Flexibility in Thrust Production of a Mechanical Swimming Lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan; Smits, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey as a means of investigating the wake structure during swimming with an anatomically designed tail of varying degrees of flexibility. A programmable microcomputer actuates 11 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The waveform is based on kinematic studies of living lamprey. The shape of the tail is taken from CT scan data of the silver lamprey, and it is constructed of flexible PVC gel. Plastic inserts allow the the degree of flexibility to be changed. PIV measurements in the wake behind the most flexible tail show a 2P wake structure that quickly looses coherence as it is convected downstream. This is in contrast to the strongly coherent and symmetrical 2P wake seen in previous experiments using a rigid, rectangular tail. The project is supported by NIH CNRS Grant 1R01NS054271.

  1. Research to support sterile-male-release and genetic alteration techniques for sea lamprey control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.; Twohey, Michael B.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated pest management of sea lampreys in the Laurentian Great Lakes has recently been enhanced by addition of a sterile-male-release program, and future developments in genetic approaches may lead to additional methods for reducing sea lamprey reproduction. We review the development, implementation, and evaluation of the sterile-male-release technique (SMRT) as it is being applied against sea lampreys in the Great Lakes, review the current understanding of SMRT efficacy, and identify additional research areas and topics that would increase either the efficacy of the SMRT or expand its geographic potential for application. Key areas for additional research are in the sterilization process, effects of skewed sex ratios on mating behavior, enhancing attractiveness of sterilized males, techniques for genetic alteration of sea lampreys, and sources of animals to enhance or expand the use of sterile lampreys.

  2. Sequencing of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) genome provides insights into vertebrate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jeramiah J; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Holt, Carson; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Jiang, Ning; Campbell, Michael S; Yandell, Mark D; Manousaki, Tereza; Meyer, Axel; Bloom, Ona E; Morgan, Jennifer R; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Sims, Carrie; Garruss, Alexander S; Cook, Malcolm; Krumlauf, Robb; Wiedemann, Leanne M; Sower, Stacia A; Decatur, Wayne A; Hall, Jeffrey A; Amemiya, Chris T; Saha, Nil R; Buckley, Katherine M; Rast, Jonathan P; Das, Sabyasachi; Hirano, Masayuki; McCurley, Nathanael; Guo, Peng; Rohner, Nicolas; Tabin, Clifford J; Piccinelli, Paul; Elgar, Greg; Ruffier, Magali; Aken, Bronwen L; Searle, Stephen MJ; Muffato, Matthieu; Pignatelli, Miguel; Herrero, Javier; Jones, Matthew; Brown, C Titus; Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Nanlohy, Kaben G; Libants, Scot V; Yeh, Chu-Yin; McCauley, David W; Langeland, James A; Pancer, Zeev; Fritzsch, Bernd; de Jong, Pieter J; Zhu, Baoli; Fulton, Lucinda L; Theising, Brenda; Flicek, Paul; Bronner, Marianne E; Warren, Wesley C; Clifton, Sandra W; Wilson, Richard K; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Lampreys are representatives of an ancient vertebrate lineage that diverged from our own ~500 million years ago. By virtue of this deeply shared ancestry, the sea lamprey (P. marinus) genome is uniquely poised to provide insight into the ancestry of vertebrate genomes and the underlying principles of vertebrate biology. Here, we present the first lamprey whole-genome sequence and assembly. We note challenges faced owing to its high content of repetitive elements and GC bases, as well as the absence of broad-scale sequence information from closely related species. Analyses of the assembly indicate that two whole-genome duplications likely occurred before the divergence of ancestral lamprey and gnathostome lineages. Moreover, the results help define key evolutionary events within vertebrate lineages, including the origin of myelin-associated proteins and the development of appendages. The lamprey genome provides an important resource for reconstructing vertebrate origins and the evolutionary events that have shaped the genomes of extant organisms. PMID:23435085

  3. Characterization of the Runx Gene Family in a Jawless Vertebrate, the Japanese Lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum)

    PubMed Central

    Nah, Giselle Sek Suan; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Osato, Motomi; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2014-01-01

    The cyclostomes (jawless vertebrates), comprising lampreys and hagfishes, are the sister group of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and are hence an important group for the study of vertebrate evolution. In mammals, three Runx genes, Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3, encode transcription factors that are essential for cell proliferation and differentiation in major developmental pathways such as haematopoiesis, skeletogenesis and neurogenesis and are frequently associated with diseases. We describe here the characterization of Runx gene family members from a cyclostome, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). The Japanese lamprey contains three Runx genes, RunxA, RunxB, and RunxC. However, phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggest that they are not one-to-one orthologs of gnathostome Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3. The major protein domains and motifs found in gnathostome Runx proteins are highly conserved in the lamprey Runx proteins. Although all gnathostome Runx genes each contain two alternative promoters, P1 (distal) and P2 (proximal), only lamprey RunxB possesses the alternative promoters; lamprey RunxA and RunxC contain only P2 and P1 promoter, respectively. Furthermore, the three lamprey Runx genes give rise to fewer alternative isoforms than the three gnathostome Runx genes. The promoters of the lamprey Runx genes lack the tandem Runx-binding motifs that are highly conserved among the P1 promoters of gnathostome Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3 genes; instead these promoters contain dispersed single Runx-binding motifs. The 3′UTR of lamprey RunxB contains binding sites for miR-27 and miR-130b/301ab, which are conserved in mammalian Runx1 and Runx3, respectively. Overall, the Runx genes in lamprey seem to have experienced a different evolutionary trajectory from that of gnathostome Runx genes which are highly conserved all the way from cartilaginous fishes to mammals. PMID:25405766

  4. Characterization of the Runx gene family in a jawless vertebrate, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum).

    PubMed

    Nah, Giselle Sek Suan; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Osato, Motomi; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2014-01-01

    The cyclostomes (jawless vertebrates), comprising lampreys and hagfishes, are the sister group of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and are hence an important group for the study of vertebrate evolution. In mammals, three Runx genes, Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3, encode transcription factors that are essential for cell proliferation and differentiation in major developmental pathways such as haematopoiesis, skeletogenesis and neurogenesis and are frequently associated with diseases. We describe here the characterization of Runx gene family members from a cyclostome, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). The Japanese lamprey contains three Runx genes, RunxA, RunxB, and RunxC. However, phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggest that they are not one-to-one orthologs of gnathostome Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3. The major protein domains and motifs found in gnathostome Runx proteins are highly conserved in the lamprey Runx proteins. Although all gnathostome Runx genes each contain two alternative promoters, P1 (distal) and P2 (proximal), only lamprey RunxB possesses the alternative promoters; lamprey RunxA and RunxC contain only P2 and P1 promoter, respectively. Furthermore, the three lamprey Runx genes give rise to fewer alternative isoforms than the three gnathostome Runx genes. The promoters of the lamprey Runx genes lack the tandem Runx-binding motifs that are highly conserved among the P1 promoters of gnathostome Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3 genes; instead these promoters contain dispersed single Runx-binding motifs. The 3'UTR of lamprey RunxB contains binding sites for miR-27 and miR-130b/301ab, which are conserved in mammalian Runx1 and Runx3, respectively. Overall, the Runx genes in lamprey seem to have experienced a different evolutionary trajectory from that of gnathostome Runx genes which are highly conserved all the way from cartilaginous fishes to mammals.

  5. Does climate at different scales influence the phenology and phenotype of the River Warbler Locustella fluviatilis?

    PubMed

    Kanuscák, Pavel; Hromada, Martin; Tryjanowski, Piotr; Sparks, Tim

    2004-09-01

    Weather and climatic conditions may impact on the phenology and morphology of birds, and thereby affect their survival rate and population dynamics. We examined the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), precipitation in the Sahel zone, temperatures in the wintering grounds, on the migration route, and in the breeding area in relation to arrival dates and six morphological measures (wing, tarsus, bill, and tail lengths, body mass, body condition) in a Slovak population of the River Warbler Locustella fluviatilis. Arrival dates did not change significantly over the study period, but were significantly positively correlated with NAO, although not with temperatures in wintering areas, migration route or breeding area, nor with Sahel precipitation. Four of the six morphological traits changed during the study period and part of the change in condition index can be attributed to climatic variables. We suggest changes in birds' phenotype vary with food availability, which fluctuate according to climate events.

  6. 3D model of lamprey estrogen receptor with estradiol and 15alpha-hydroxy-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael E; Chang, David J; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie

    2009-06-25

    Lamprey, basal vertebrate, is an important model system for understanding early events in vertebrate evolution. Lamprey contains orthologs of the estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor and corticoid receptor. A perplexing property of lamprey is that 15alpha-hydroxy-steroids are active steroids. For example, 15alpha-hydroxy-estradiol [15alpha-OH-E2] is the estrogen, instead of estradiol [E2]. To investigate how 15alpha-OH-E2 binds lamprey ER, we constructed a 3D model of the lamprey ER with E2 and 15alpha-OH-E2. We used the 3D structure of human ERalpha as a template to construct a 3D model of lamprey ER. E2 and 15alpha-OH-E2 were inserted into the 3D model of lamprey ER and 15alpha-OH-E2 was inserted into human ERalpha. Then the each steroid-protein complex was refined using Discover 3 from Insight II software. To determine if lamprey ER had some regions that were unique among vertebrate ERs, we used the ligand-binding domain of lamprey ER as a query for a BLAST search of GenBank. Our 3D model of lamprey ER with 15alpha-OH-E2 shows that Sdelta on Met-409 can form a hydrogen bond with the 15alpha-hydroxyl on 15alpha-OH-E2. In human ERalpha, the corresponding residue Ile-424 has a van der Waals contact with 15alpha-OH-E2. BLAST analysis of GenBank indicates that among vertebrate ERs, only lamprey ER contains a methionine at this position. Thus, the contact between Sdelta on Met-409 and 15alpha-OH-E2 is unique. Interestingly, BLAST finds that five New World monkeys and a sturgeon contain a valine instead of isoleucine. In addition to shedding light on the structure of the ER in a basal vertebrate, our 3D model of lamprey ER should prove useful in virtual screening of chemical libraries to identify compounds for controlling reproduction in sea lamprey, an environmental pest in Lake Michigan.

  7. 3D Model of Lamprey Estrogen Receptor with Estradiol and 15α-Hydroxy-Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Michael E.; Chang, David J.; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie

    2009-01-01

    Background Lamprey, basal vertebrate, is an important model system for understanding early events in vertebrate evolution. Lamprey contains orthologs of the estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor and corticoid receptor. A perplexing property of lamprey is that 15α-hydroxy-steroids are active steroids. For example, 15α-hydroxy-estradiol [15α-OH-E2] is the estrogen, instead of estradiol [E2]. To investigate how 15α-OH-E2 binds lamprey ER, we constructed a 3D model of the lamprey ER with E2 and 15α-OH-E2. Methodology We used the 3D structure of human ERα as a template to construct a 3D model of lamprey ER. E2 and 15α-OH-E2 were inserted into the 3D model of lamprey ER and 15α-OH-E2 was inserted into human ERα. Then the each steroid-protein complex was refined using Discover 3 from Insight II software. To determine if lamprey ER had some regions that were unique among vertebrate ERs, we used the ligand-binding domain of lamprey ER as a query for a BLAST search of GenBank. Principal Findings Our 3D model of lamprey ER with 15α-OH-E2 shows that Sδ on Met-409 can form a hydrogen bond with the 15α-hydroxyl on 15α-OH-E2. In human ERα, the corresponding residue Ile-424 has a van der Waals contact with 15α-OH-E2. BLAST analysis of GenBank indicates that among vertebrate ERs, only lamprey ER contains a methionine at this position. Thus, the contact between Sδ on Met-409 and 15α-OH-E2 is unique. Interestingly, BLAST finds that five New World monkeys and a sturgeon contain a valine instead of isoleucine. Significance In addition to shedding light on the structure of the ER in a basal vertebrate, our 3D model of lamprey ER should prove useful in virtual screening of chemical libraries to identify compounds for controlling reproduction in sea lamprey, an environmental pest in Lake Michigan. PMID:19557178

  8. Lamprey IGF-Binding Protein-3 Has IGF-Dependent and -Independent Actions

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yingbin; Duan, Cunming

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) are multifunctional proteins that possess IGF-dependent and -independent actions. Recent studies suggest that its IGF-independent action appeared early and that the IGF-binding function may have been acquired later in evolution. The timing of the emergence of IGF-dependent actions is unclear. Here, we identified and characterized an igfbp gene from sea lamprey, an agnathan, which was separated from the jawed vertebrates 450 million years ago. Phylogenetic and structural analyses suggested that the encoded protein belongs to the IGFBP-3 clade in the IGFBP family. Lamprey IGFBP-3 contains an IGF-binding domain (IBD), nuclear localization signal, and transactivation (TA) domain. Biochemical and functional analyses showed that these domains are all functional. Lamprey IGFBP-3 can bind IGFs and modulate IGF signaling when tested in mammalian cells. Lamprey IGFBP-3 also has the capacity to enter the nucleus and has strong TA activity. Forced expression of lamprey IGFBP-3, but not its IBD mutant, in zebrafish embryos decreased body growth and developmental speed. Lamprey IGFBP-3 inhibited BMP2 signaling in cultured cells and in zebrafish embryos, and this action is independent of its IGF-binding function. These results suggest that lamprey IGFBP-3 has both IGF-dependent and -independent actions and provide new insights into the functional evolution of the IGFBP family. PMID:28149290

  9. Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations in Lake Michigan, 1971-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, LaRue

    1980-01-01

    Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) was exterminated in Lake Michigan by the mid-1950s as a result of the combined effects of an intensive fishery and predation by the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The widespread application of lampricide in tributary streams had greatly reduced the abundance of lampreys by the early 1960s, and a program to restore self-sustaining populations of lake trout through stocking of yearlings and fingerlings was initiated in 1965. Although the hatchery-reared fish spawned widely in Lake Michigan each year after 1970, no progeny were observed except in an isolated area in Grand Traverse Bay. During 1971–78, sea lamprey abundance was generally greater in Wisconsin than in other parts of the lake. However, the rate of occurrence of sea lamprey wounds on lake trout dropped dramatically there in 1978 after the Peshtigo River, a tributary to Green Bay, was treated with lampricide. Application of Lake Michigan wounding rates to a regression model relating mortality to lamprey wounding developed from Lake Superior data, yielded lamprey-induced mortality estimates in 1977 of 5% in Michigan plus Indiana (combined) and 31% in Wisconsin; corresponding estimates for 1978 were 5 and 15%.Key words: lake trout, sea lamprey predation, abundance, Lake Michigan

  10. How the bending kinematics of swimming lampreys build negative pressure fields for suction thrust.

    PubMed

    Gemmell, Brad J; Fogerson, Stephanie M; Costello, John H; Morgan, Jennifer R; Dabiri, John O; Colin, Sean P

    2016-12-15

    Swimming animals commonly bend their bodies to generate thrust. For undulating animals such as eels and lampreys, their bodies bend in the form of waves that travel from head to tail. These kinematics accelerate the flow of adjacent fluids, which alters the pressure field in a manner that generates thrust. We used a comparative approach to evaluate the cause-and-effect relationships in this process by quantifying the hydrodynamic effects of body kinematics at the body-fluid interface of the lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, during steady-state swimming. We compared the kinematics and hydrodynamics of healthy control lampreys to lampreys whose spinal cord had been transected mid-body, resulting in passive kinematics along the posterior half of their body. Using high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) and a method for quantifying pressure fields, we detail how the active bending kinematics of the control lampreys were crucial for setting up strong negative pressure fields (relative to ambient fields) that generated high-thrust regions at the bends as they traveled all along the body. The passive kinematics of the transected lamprey were only able to generate significant thrust at the tail, relying on positive pressure fields. These different pressure and thrust scenarios are due to differences in how active versus passive body waves generated and controlled vorticity. This demonstrates why it is more effective for undulating lampreys to pull, rather than push, themselves through the fluid.

  11. Cholangiocyte apoptosis is an early event during induced metamorphosis in the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus L.

    PubMed

    Boomer, Laura A; Bellister, Seth A; Stephenson, Linda L; Hillyard, Stanley D; Khoury, Joseph D; Youson, John H; Gosche, John R

    2010-01-01

    Research in biliary atresia has been hindered by lack of a suitable animal model. Lampreys are primitive vertebrates with distinct larval and adult life cycle stages. During metamorphosis the biliary system of the larval lamprey disappears. Lamprey metamorphosis has been proposed as a model for biliary atresia. We have begun to explore cellular events during lamprey metamorphosis by assessing for cholangiocyte apoptosis. Sea lamprey larvae were housed under controlled environmental conditions. Premetamorphic larvae were induced to undergo metamorphosis by exposure to 0.01% KClO(4). Animals were photographed weekly, and the stage of metamorphosis was assigned based upon external features. Livers were harvested and processed for routine histology and immunohistochemistry. DNA fragmentation was detected using deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays and cholangiocytes were identified with antibodies to cytokeratin-19. Percent TUNEL+ cholangiocytes at different stages of metamorphosis was determined. The percentage of TUNEL+ cholangiocytes was 10% in premetamorphic (stage 0) lamprey (n = 6), 51% at stage 1 (n = 6), 40% at stage 2 (n = 5), 18% at stage 3 (n = 5), and 9% stage 4 (n = 4). Routine hemotoxylin and eosin stained paraffin-embedded tissue sections revealed frequent apoptotic bodies at stages 3 and 4 of metamorphosis without histologic evidence of necrosis. DNA fragmentation is identified at the earliest stages of metamorphosis during induced metamorphosis in lampreys. Additional studies are necessary to validate this potentially valuable animal model. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrical guidance efficiency of downstream-migrating juvenile Sea Lamprey decreases with increasing water velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miehls, Scott M.; Johnson, Nicholas; Haro, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    We tested the efficacy of a vertically oriented field of pulsed direct current (VEPDC) created by an array of vertical electrodes for guiding downstream-moving juvenile Sea Lampreys Petromyzon marinus to a bypass channel in an artificial flume at water velocities of 10–50 cm/s. Sea Lampreys were more likely to be captured in the bypass channel than in other sections of the flume regardless of electric field status (on or off) or water velocity. Additionally, Sea Lampreys were more likely to be captured in the bypass channel when the VEPDC was active; however, an interaction between the effects of VEPDC and water velocity was observed, as the likelihood of capture decreased with increases in water velocity. The distribution of Sea Lampreys shifted from right to left across the width of the flume toward the bypass channel when the VEPDC was active at water velocities less than 25 cm/s. The VEPDC appeared to have no effect on Sea Lamprey distribution in the flume at water velocities greater than 25 cm/s. We also conducted separate tests to determine the threshold at which Sea Lampreys would become paralyzed. Individuals were paralyzed at a mean power density of 37.0 µW/cm3. Future research should investigate the ability of juvenile Sea Lampreys to detect electric fields and their specific behavioral responses to electric field characteristics so as to optimize the use of this technology as a nonphysical guidance tool across variable water velocities.

  13. Evidence for partial overlap of male olfactory cues in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Buchinger, Tyler J; Li, Ke; Huertas, Mar; Baker, Cindy F; Jia, Liang; Hayes, Michael C; Li, Weiming; Johnson, Nicholas S

    2017-02-01

    Animals rely on a mosaic of complex information to find and evaluate mates. Pheromones, often consisting of multiple components, are considered to be particularly important for species-recognition in many species. Although the evolution of species-specific pheromone blends is well described in many insects, very few vertebrate pheromones have been studied in a macro-evolutionary context. Here, we report a phylogenetic comparison of multi-component male odours that guide reproduction in lampreys. Chemical profiling of sexually mature males from eleven species of lamprey, representing six of ten genera and two of three families, indicated that the chemical profiles of sexually mature male odours are partially shared among species. Behavioural assays conducted with four species sympatric in the Laurentian Great Lakes indicated asymmetric female responses to heterospecific odours, where Petromyzon marinus were attracted to male odour collected from all species tested, but other species generally preferred only the odour of conspecifics. Electro-olfactogram recordings from P. marinus indicated that although P. marinus exhibited behavioural responses to odours from males of all species, at least some of the compounds that elicited olfactory responses were different in conspecific male odours compared with heterospecific male odours. We conclude that some of the compounds released by sexually mature males are shared among species and elicit olfactory and behavioural responses in P. marinus, and suggest that our results provide evidence for partial overlap of male olfactory cues among lampreys. Further characterization of the chemical identities of odour components is needed to confirm shared pheromones among species. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Rapid proliferation of an endemic galaxiid following eradication of an alien piscivore (Perca fluviatilis) from a reservoir.

    PubMed

    Beatty, S J; Morgan, D L

    2017-03-01

    Following the complete eradication of the alien piscivorous perch Perca fluviatilis from a potable reservoir, the abundance of the endemic western minnow Galaxias occidentalis, which was previously undetectable prior to the initial eradication event, increased dramatically. The study reveals the potential of reservoirs to act as ecological refuges and has implications for understanding the relative effects of alien fishes v. habitat alteration on native freshwater fishes. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  15. Evolutionary crossroads in developmental biology: cyclostomes (lamprey and hagfish).

    PubMed

    Shimeld, Sebastian M; Donoghue, Phillip C J

    2012-06-01

    Lampreys and hagfish, which together are known as the cyclostomes or 'agnathans', are the only surviving lineages of jawless fish. They diverged early in vertebrate evolution, before the origin of the hinged jaws that are characteristic of gnathostome (jawed) vertebrates and before the evolution of paired appendages. However, they do share numerous characteristics with jawed vertebrates. Studies of cyclostome development can thus help us to understand when, and how, key aspects of the vertebrate body evolved. Here, we summarise the development of cyclostomes, highlighting the key species studied and experimental methods available. We then discuss how studies of cyclostomes have provided important insight into the evolution of fins, jaws, skeleton and neural crest.

  16. Evidence for at least six Hox clusters in the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum).

    PubMed

    Mehta, Tarang K; Ravi, Vydianathan; Yamasaki, Shinichi; Lee, Alison P; Lian, Michelle M; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tohari, Sumanty; Yanai, Seiji; Tay, Alice; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2013-10-01

    Cyclostomes, comprising jawless vertebrates such as lampreys and hagfishes, are the sister group of living jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and hence an important group for understanding the origin and diversity of vertebrates. In vertebrates and other metazoans, Hox genes determine cell fate along the anteroposterior axis of embryos and are implicated in driving morphological diversity. Invertebrates contain a single Hox cluster (either intact or fragmented), whereas elephant shark, coelacanth, and tetrapods contain four Hox clusters owing to two rounds of whole-genome duplication ("1R" and "2R") during early vertebrate evolution. By contrast, most teleost fishes contain up to eight Hox clusters because of an additional "teleost-specific" genome duplication event. By sequencing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones and the whole genome, here we provide evidence for at least six Hox clusters in the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). This suggests that the lamprey lineage has experienced an additional genome duplication after 1R and 2R. The relative age of lamprey and human paralogs supports this hypothesis. Compared with gnathostome Hox clusters, lamprey Hox clusters are unusually large. Several conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) were predicted in the Hox clusters of lamprey, elephant shark, and human. Transgenic zebrafish assay indicated the potential of CNEs to function as enhancers. Interestingly, CNEs in individual lamprey Hox clusters are frequently conserved in multiple Hox clusters in elephant shark and human, implying a many-to-many orthology relationship between lamprey and gnathostome Hox clusters. Such a relationship suggests that the first two rounds of genome duplication may have occurred independently in the lamprey and gnathostome lineages.

  17. Characterization of a native angiotensin from an anciently diverged serine protease inhibitor in lamprey.

    PubMed

    Wong, Marty K S; Takei, Yoshio

    2011-04-01

    Angiotensinogen belongs to family A serine protease inhibitors (SERPIN family) and we have cloned and characterized SERPIN genes in two lamprey species, which possess all the properties of angiotensinogen. The putative angiotensinogens in lampreys can be considered as an evolutionary link between SERPIN and other angiotensinogen according to the phylogenetic analyses. The inferred sea lamprey angiotensinogen gene was expressed abundantly in liver and to a lesser extent in other tissues. The predicted lamprey angiotensin I (Ang I) sequence was unique and different from the teleost-type Ang I identified previously by the incubation of lamprey plasma with its kidney extract. Therefore, we characterized and compared the biochemical and physiological properties of this native lamprey Ang II (LpAng II) (EEDYDERPYMQPF) with teleost-type Ang II (NRVYVHPF). Using a newly developed RIA for LpAng II, plasma levels in Japanese lamprey were measured (157.4 ± 35.2 fmol/ml, n=6), but teleost-type Ang II was undetectable. In conscious cannulated lamprey, LpAng II at 100 pmol/kg elicited a transient vasodepressor effect. At doses higher than 300 pmol/kg, a biphasic cardiovascular response with an initial vasodepressor effect followed by a transient rebound vasopressor effect was observed in a dose-dependent manner. However, teleost-type Ang II was not vasoactive up to 1 nmol/kg. In Japanese eel, LpAng II injection up to 3 nmol/kg did not alter the cardiovascular parameters. Our results suggested that the renin-angiotensin system first appeared in cyclostomes, and LpAng II could be important for the regulation of cardiovascular dynamics in lampreys because of its potent and acute vasoactive effect.

  18. Primary structure and biological activity of a third gonadotropin-releasing hormone from lamprey brain.

    PubMed

    Sower, S A; Chiang, Y C; Lovas, S; Conlon, J M

    1993-03-01

    Previous studies have led to the identification of two molecular forms of GnRH (GnRH-I and II) in the brain of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus. From analysis of these two forms, the primary structure of GnRH-I and the amino acid composition of GnRH-II were determined. We have now isolated a third molecular form of GnRH (GnRH-III) from the brain of this species that is different from GnRH-I and -II. The primary structure of GnRH-III is pGlu-His-Trp-Ser-His-Asp-Trp-Lys- Pro-Gly-NH2. A synthetic decapeptide with this amino acid sequence was chromatographically identical to natural GnRH-III. Intraperitoneal injection of synthetic lamprey GnRH-III (0.1 microgram/g) produced a significant (P < 0.05) elevation of plasma progesterone (31% over basal values) in female lampreys that was comparable to that produced by the same dose of lamprey GnRH-I (36% over basal). The elevation in plasma estradiol produced by lamprey GnRH-III (244% over basal) was significantly (P < 0.05) less than the elevation produced by GnRH-I (322% over basal). We propose based on the biological activity of lamprey GnRH-III in these studies and the occurrence of this peptide during metamorphosis in lampreys, that both lamprey GnRH-I and -III are neurohormones involved in reproduction in lampreys.

  19. Habituation of adult sea lamprey repeatedly exposed to damage-released alarm and predator cues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Imre, Istvan; Di Rocco, Richard T.; Brown, Grant E.; Johnson, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Predation is an unforgiving selective pressure affecting the life history, morphology and behaviour of prey organisms. Selection should favour organisms that have the ability to correctly assess the information content of alarm cues. This study investigated whether adult sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus habituate to conspecific damage-released alarm cues (fresh and decayed sea lamprey extract), a heterospecific damage-released alarm cue (white sucker Catostomus commersoniiextract), predator cues (Northern water snake Nerodia sipedon washing, human saliva and 2-phenylethylamine hydrochloride (PEA HCl)) and a conspecific damage-released alarm cue and predator cue combination (fresh sea lamprey extract and human saliva) after they were pre-exposed 4 times or 8 times, respectively, to a given stimulus the previous night. Consistent with our prediction, adult sea lamprey maintained an avoidance response to conspecific damage-released alarm cues (fresh and decayed sea lamprey extract), a predator cue presented at high relative concentration (PEA HCl) and a conspecific damage-released alarm cue and predator cue combination (fresh sea lamprey extract plus human saliva), irrespective of previous exposure level. As expected, adult sea lamprey habituated to a sympatric heterospecific damage-released alarm cue (white sucker extract) and a predator cue presented at lower relative concentration (human saliva). Adult sea lamprey did not show any avoidance of the Northern water snake washing and the Amazon sailfin catfish extract (heterospecific control). This study suggests that conspecific damage-released alarm cues and PEA HCl present the best options as natural repellents in an integrated management program aimed at controlling the abundance of sea lamprey in the Laurentian Great Lakes.

  20. Evidence for at least six Hox clusters in the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum)

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Tarang K.; Ravi, Vydianathan; Yamasaki, Shinichi; Lee, Alison P.; Lian, Michelle M.; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tohari, Sumanty; Yanai, Seiji; Tay, Alice; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2013-01-01

    Cyclostomes, comprising jawless vertebrates such as lampreys and hagfishes, are the sister group of living jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and hence an important group for understanding the origin and diversity of vertebrates. In vertebrates and other metazoans, Hox genes determine cell fate along the anteroposterior axis of embryos and are implicated in driving morphological diversity. Invertebrates contain a single Hox cluster (either intact or fragmented), whereas elephant shark, coelacanth, and tetrapods contain four Hox clusters owing to two rounds of whole-genome duplication (“1R” and “2R”) during early vertebrate evolution. By contrast, most teleost fishes contain up to eight Hox clusters because of an additional “teleost-specific” genome duplication event. By sequencing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones and the whole genome, here we provide evidence for at least six Hox clusters in the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). This suggests that the lamprey lineage has experienced an additional genome duplication after 1R and 2R. The relative age of lamprey and human paralogs supports this hypothesis. Compared with gnathostome Hox clusters, lamprey Hox clusters are unusually large. Several conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) were predicted in the Hox clusters of lamprey, elephant shark, and human. Transgenic zebrafish assay indicated the potential of CNEs to function as enhancers. Interestingly, CNEs in individual lamprey Hox clusters are frequently conserved in multiple Hox clusters in elephant shark and human, implying a many-to-many orthology relationship between lamprey and gnathostome Hox clusters. Such a relationship suggests that the first two rounds of genome duplication may have occurred independently in the lamprey and gnathostome lineages. PMID:24043829

  1. The Modulation of the Symbiont/Host Interaction between Wolbachia pipientis and Aedes fluviatilis Embryos by Glycogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha Fernandes, Mariana; Martins, Renato; Pessoa Costa, Evenilton; Casagrande Pacidônio, Etiene; Araujo de Abreu, Leonardo; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Moreira, Luciano A.; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Logullo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis, a maternally transmitted bacterium that colonizes arthropods, may affect the general aspects of insect physiology, particularly reproduction. Wolbachia is a natural endosymbiont of Aedes fluviatilis, whose effects in embryogenesis and reproduction have not been addressed so far. In this context, we investigated the correlation between glucose metabolism and morphological alterations during A. fluviatilis embryo development in Wolbachia-positive (W+) and Wolbachia-negative (W−) mosquito strains. While both strains do not display significant morphological and larval hatching differences, larger differences were observed in hexokinase activity and glycogen contents during early and mid-stages of embryogenesis, respectively. To investigate if glycogen would be required for parasite-host interaction, we reduced Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) levels in adult females and their eggs by RNAi. GSK-3 knock-down leads to embryonic lethality, lower levels of glycogen and total protein and Wolbachia reduction. Therefore, our results suggest that the relationship between A. fluviatilis and Wolbachia may be modulated by glycogen metabolism. PMID:24926801

  2. The modulation of the symbiont/host interaction between Wolbachia pipientis and Aedes fluviatilis embryos by glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Fernandes, Mariana; Martins, Renato; Pessoa Costa, Evenilton; Pacidônio, Etiene Casagrande; Araujo de Abreu, Leonardo; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Moreira, Luciano A; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Logullo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis, a maternally transmitted bacterium that colonizes arthropods, may affect the general aspects of insect physiology, particularly reproduction. Wolbachia is a natural endosymbiont of Aedes fluviatilis, whose effects in embryogenesis and reproduction have not been addressed so far. In this context, we investigated the correlation between glucose metabolism and morphological alterations during A. fluviatilis embryo development in Wolbachia-positive (W+) and Wolbachia-negative (W-) mosquito strains. While both strains do not display significant morphological and larval hatching differences, larger differences were observed in hexokinase activity and glycogen contents during early and mid-stages of embryogenesis, respectively. To investigate if glycogen would be required for parasite-host interaction, we reduced Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) levels in adult females and their eggs by RNAi. GSK-3 knock-down leads to embryonic lethality, lower levels of glycogen and total protein and Wolbachia reduction. Therefore, our results suggest that the relationship between A. fluviatilis and Wolbachia may be modulated by glycogen metabolism.

  3. Flowing recirculated-water system for inducing laboratory spawning of sea lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredricks, Kim T.; Seelye, James G.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a water-recirculating system for inducing spawning of sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) held under laboratory conditions. Water temperature in the system was gradually increased to and maintained at 18 +/- 2 degrees C, the optimal temperature for spawning. About 10% freshwater was added daily to prevent buildup of waste products. Sea lampreys were provided substrate (approximately 3-6 cm in diameter) to build nests, and a water velocity of 0.2-0.3 m/s was maintained with an electric trolling motor. Sea lampreys held in this system exhibited characteristic spawning behavior. Prolarvae produced from artificial fertilization of gametes developed according to the standard timeline.

  4. Mercury concentrations in Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) and sediments in the Columbia River basin.

    PubMed

    Linley, Timothy; Krogstad, Eirik; Mueller, Robert; Gill, Gary; Lasorsa, Brenda

    2016-10-01

    The accumulation of mercury was investigated in Pacific lamprey and stream sediments in the Columbia River basin. Mercury concentrations in larval lamprey differed significantly among sample locations (p < 0.001) and were correlated with concentrations in sediments (r(2)  = 0.83). Adult concentrations were highly variable (range, 0.1-9.5 μg/g) and unrelated to holding time after collection. The results suggest that Pacific lamprey in the Columbia River basin may be exposed to mercury levels that have adverse ecological effects. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2571-2576. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Toxicity of 33NCS (3'-chloro-3-nitrosalicylanilide) to freshwater fish and sea lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marking, Leif L.; King, Everett L.; Walker, Charles R.; Howell, John H.

    1970-01-01

    The chemical 33NCS (3'-chloro-3-nitrosalicylanilide) was evaluated as a fish control agent and as a larvicide for sea lampreys at the Fish Control Laboratories of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and the Hammond Bay Biological Station of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. The chemical is rapidly toxic to many species. Sea lampreys, bowfin, and channel catfish are the most sensitive species. Carp are more sensitive than trouts or sunfishes. Use of 33NCS in selective control of freshwater fishes or sea lampreys requires precise control because its toxicity is strongly influenced by variations in water quality.

  6. Treatment of East Bay, Alger County, Michigan, with toxaphene for control of sea lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaylord, William E.; Smith, Bernard R.

    1966-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether toxaphene can be used to eradicate lake-dwelling sea lampreys and to determine its effect on fish populations. In East Bay, a 78-acre lake on the Sucker River, Alger County, Mich., an estimated concentration of 100 parts per billion was maintained for 14 days. The sea lamprey larvae were more resistant to toxaphene than were the fish, but a complete kill was indicated. One year after treatment, sea lampreys were absent from the lake, while the fish population had recovered.

  7. Occurrence of Ergasilus megaceros Wilson, 1916, in the sea lamprey and other fishes from North America.

    PubMed

    Muzzall, Patrick M; Hudson, Patrick L

    2004-02-01

    Ergasilus megaceros (Copepoda: Ergasilidae) was recovered from the nasal fossae (lamellae) of the olfactory sac in 1 (1.8%) of 56 sea lampreys, Petromyzon marinus Linne, 1758, collected in May 2002 from the Cheboygan River, Michigan. Although the sea lamprey is a new host record for E. megaceros, this fish species may not be a preferred host because of its low prevalence. Ergasilus megaceros is the second ergasilid species reported from the sea lamprey in North America. This is the third report of an ergasilid species infecting the nasal fossae of fishes in North America, with E. rhinos being the only other species reported from this site.

  8. Telemetry narrows the search for sea lamprey spawning locations in the St. Clair-Detroit River System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holbrook, Christopher; Jubar, Aaron K.; Barber, Jessica M.; Tallon, Kevin; Hondorp, Darryl W.

    2016-01-01

    Adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) abundance in Lake Erie has remained above targets set by fishery managers since 2005, possibly due to increased recruitment in the St. Clair-Detroit River System (SCDRS). Sea lamprey recruitment in the SCDRS poses an enormous challenge to sea lamprey control and assessment in Lake Erie because the SCDRS contains no dams to facilitate capture and discharge is at least an order of magnitude larger in the SCDRS than most other sea lamprey-producing tributaries in the Great Lakes. As a first step toward understanding population size, spatial distribution, and spawning habitat of adult sea lampreys in the SCDRS, we used acoustic telemetry to determine where sea lampreys ceased migration (due to spawning, death, or both) among major regions of the SCDRS. All tagged sea lampreys released in the lower Detroit River (N = 27) moved upstream through the Detroit River and entered Lake St. Clair. After entering Lake St. Clair, sea lampreys entered the St. Clair River (N = 22), Thames River (N = 1), or were not detected again (N = 4). Many sea lampreys (10 of 27) were last observed moving downstream (“fallback”) but we were unable to determine if those movements occurred before or after spawning, or while sea lampreys were dead or alive. Regardless of whether estimates of locations where sea lampreys ceased migration were based on the most upstream region occupied or final region occupied, most sea lampreys ceased migration in the St. Clair River or Lake St. Clair. Results suggest that spawning and rearing in the St. Clair River could be an important determinant of sea lamprey recruitment in the SCDRS and may direct future assessment and control activities in that system.

  9. A pheromone outweighs temperature in influencing migration of sea lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Brant, Cory O.; Li, Ke; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Organisms continuously acquire and process information from surrounding cues. While some cues complement one another in delivering more reliable information, others may provide conflicting information. How organisms extract and use reliable information from a multitude of cues is largely unknown. We examined movement decisions of sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus L.) exposed to a conspecific and an environmental cue during pre-spawning migration. Specifically, we predicted that the mature male-released sex pheromone 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS) will outweigh the locomotor inhibiting effects of cold stream temperature (less than 15°C). Using large-scale stream bioassays, we found that 3kPZS elicits an increase (more than 40%) in upstream movement of pre-spawning lampreys when the water temperatures were below 15°C. Both warming temperatures and conspecific cues increase upstream movement when the water temperature rose above 15°C. These patterns define an interaction between abiotic and conspecific cues in modulating animal decision-making, providing an example of the hierarchy of contradictory information. PMID:26064660

  10. Identification of human plasma cells with a lamprey monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuiling; Liu, Yanling; Chan, Justin Tze Ho; Tong, Jiefei; Li, Zhihua; Shi, Mengyao; Davani, Dariush; Parsons, Marion; Khan, Srijit; Zhan, Wei; Kyu, Shuya; Grunebaum, Eyal; Campisi, Paolo; Propst, Evan J.; Jaye, David L.; Trudel, Suzanne; Moran, Michael F.; Ostrowski, Mario; Herrin, Brantley R.; Lee, F. Eun-Hyung; Sanz, Ignacio; Cooper, Max D.; Ehrhardt, Götz R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Ab-producing plasma cells (PCs) serve as key participants in countering pathogenic challenges as well as being contributors to autoimmune and malignant disorders. Thus far, only a limited number of PC–specific markers have been identified. The characterization of the unique variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) Abs that are made by evolutionarily distant jawless vertebrates prompted us to investigate whether VLR Abs could detect novel PC antigens that have not been recognized by conventional Abs. Here, we describe a monoclonal lamprey Ab, VLRB MM3, that was raised against primary multiple myeloma cells. VLRB MM3 recognizes a unique epitope of the CD38 ectoenzyme that is present on plasmablasts and PCs from healthy individuals and on most, but not all, multiple myelomas. Binding by the VLRB MM3 Ab coincides with CD38 dimerization and NAD glycohydrolase activity. Our data demonstrate that the lamprey VLRB MM3 Ab is a unique reagent for the identification of plasmablasts and PCs, with potential applications in the diagnosis and therapeutic intervention of PC or autoimmune disorders. PMID:27152361

  11. A thermogenic secondary sexual character in male sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Priess, M. Cody; Yeh, Chu-Yin; Brant, Cory O.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Ke; Nanlohy, Kaben G.; Bryan, Mara B.; Brown, C. Titus; Choi, Jongeun; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Secondary sexual characters in animals are exaggerated ornaments or weapons for intrasexual competition. Unexpectedly, we found that a male secondary sexual character in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus ) is a thermogenic adipose tissue that instantly increases its heat production during sexual encounters. This secondary sexual character, developed in front of the anterior dorsal fin of mature males, is a swollen dorsal ridge known as the ‘rope’ tissue. It contains nerve bundles, multivacuolar adipocytes and interstitial cells packed with small lipid droplets and mitochondria with dense and highly organized cristae. The fatty acid composition of the rope tissue is rich in unsaturated fatty acids. The cytochrome c oxidase activity is high but the ATP concentration is very low in the mitochondria of the rope tissue compared with those of the gill and muscle tissues. The rope tissue temperature immediately rose up to 0.3°C when the male encountered a conspecific. Mature males generated more heat in the rope and muscle tissues when presented with a mature female than when presented with a male (paired t-test, P-3 more heat than the muscle in 10 min. Transcriptome analyses revealed that genes involved in fat cell differentiation are upregulated whereas those involved in oxidative-phosphorylation-coupled ATP synthesis are downregulated in the rope tissue compared with the gill and muscle tissues. Sexually mature male sea lamprey possess the only known thermogenic secondary sexual character that shows differential heat generation toward individual conspecifics.

  12. A pheromone outweighs temperature in influencing migration of sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brant, Cory O.; Li, Ke; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Organisms continuously acquire and process information from surrounding cues. While some cues complement one another in delivering more reliable information, others may provide conflicting information. How organisms extract and use reliable information from a multitude of cues is largely unknown. We examined movement decisions of sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus L.) exposed to a conspecific and an environmental cue during pre-spawning migration. Specifically, we predicted that the mature male-released sex pheromone 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS) will outweigh the locomotor inhibiting effects of cold stream temperature (less than 15°C). Using large-scale stream bioassays, we found that 3kPZS elicits an increase (more than 40%) in upstream movement of pre-spawning lampreys when the water temperatures were below 15°C. Both warming temperatures and conspecific cues increase upstream movement when the water temperature rose above 15°C. These patterns define an interaction between abiotic and conspecific cues in modulating animal decision-making, providing an example of the hierarchy of contradictory information.

  13. Classification of lentic habitat for sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larvae using a remote seabed classification device

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fodale, Michael F.; Bronte, Charles R.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Cuddy, Douglas W.; Adams, Jean V.

    2003-01-01

    Lentic populations of larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) are suspected of being a major source of recruitment to parasitic stocks in some areas of the Great Lakes, and methods are needed to estimate habitat and population sizes. A deepwater electroshocker has been used to quantitatively assess larval sea lamprey populations in deepwater areas, however a method has not been developed to efficiently identify the most promising locations to sample in this environment. A remote seabed classification device (RoxAnn™) was used to identify soft substrates in a lentic area where sea lamprey larvae have been found in Batchawana Bay (Ontario) in eastern Lake Superior, and related those substrate types to larval distribution and occurrence. Presence of larvae was significantly related to substrate type, distance from the stream mouth, and slope of the lake bottom. Remote seabed classification would be a useful tool in the Sea Lamprey Control Program to identify the most promising locations to conduct larval surveys in lentic areas.

  14. Sterilizing effects of cobalt-60 and cesium-137 radiation on male sea lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, L.H.

    1990-01-01

    Male spawning-run sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus were exposed to various doses of cobalt-60 or cesium-137 radiation in an attempt to sterilize them for use in a program for controlling sea lampreys through the release of sterile males. Males captured and irradiated during the early part of the upstream migration were not effectively sterilized at the doses tested. After irradiation, the sea lampreys were more susceptible to fungal infections by Saprolegnia sp., and many died without attempting to spawn. Males captured and irradiated during the middle and late parts of the spawning migration were effectively sterilized at a dose of 2,000 rads. However, some radiation-induced mortality was observed in males captured and irradiated during the middle part of the spawning migration. Radiation is not as effective as the chemosterilant bisazir for sterilizing male sea lampreys.

  15. How-to-Do-It: Maintaining Parasitic Lampreys in Closed Laboratory Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Philip A.

    1989-01-01

    Describes modifications and procedures needed for parasitic lampreys to be kept in a closed system. Presents information dealing with obtaining the organisms, tank modifications, temperature, feeding, disease prevention, and animal welfare. A discussion is included. (RT)

  16. An aquarium experiment on the American eel as a predator on larval lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perlmutter, Alfred

    1951-01-01

    The parasitic sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, has in recent years spread throughout Lakes Huron and Michigan and is now firmly established in these waters (Applegate, 1949, Mich. Cons., 18 (4): 13-15). Coincident with their spread, the abundance of lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, has declined in both lakes (Hile, 1949, Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc., 76 (1946): 121-147) and the lake trout as well as other species of fishes are showing an increase in scarring from lamprey attacks. For Lake Michigan the analysis of fishermen's questionnaires gave an increase in percentage by weight of lamprey-scarred lake trout from 31 percent in 1947 to 41 percent in 1948. The sea lamprey is now spreading through Lake Superior, the last of the Great Lakes containing a large population of lake trout.

  17. How-to-Do-It: Maintaining Parasitic Lampreys in Closed Laboratory Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Philip A.

    1989-01-01

    Describes modifications and procedures needed for parasitic lampreys to be kept in a closed system. Presents information dealing with obtaining the organisms, tank modifications, temperature, feeding, disease prevention, and animal welfare. A discussion is included. (RT)

  18. Development of the viscerocranial skeleton during embryogenesis of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon Marinus.

    PubMed

    Martin, Wendy M; Bumm, Lloyd A; McCauley, David W

    2009-12-01

    Evolution of the skeleton was a key transition in early vertebrates. Lampreys lack a mineralized skeleton but possess cartilaginous neurocranial and viscerocranial elements. In lampreys, the visceral skeleton develops as a fused branchial basket supporting the pharynx. Here, we have adapted Alcian blue staining of lamprey cartilage and show this method results in cartilage fluorescence that we used to describe development of the branchial skeleton in Petromyzon marinus between 17 and 63 days of development. We show that skeletal rods develop from condensations of flattened discoidal chondrocytes and may involve cellular intercalation. Lamprey trabecular, parachordal, and subchordal cartilages consist of aggregations of polygonal chondrocytes positioned on the ventral and lateral surfaces of the notochord. We speculate that morphological differences relate to functional differences in the cartilage. We show that differentiated skeletal rods are derived from neural crest. Finally, we show how branchial muscles intercalate with skeletal rods of the branchial basket. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Factors influencing capture of invasive sea lamprey in traps baited with a synthesized sex pheromone component

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nicholas; Siefkes, Michael J.; Wagner, C. Michael; Bravener, Gale; Steeves, Todd; Twohey, Michael; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, is emerging as a model organism for understanding how pheromones can be used for manipulating vertebrate behavior in an integrated pest management program. In a previous study, a synthetic sex pheromone component 7α,12α, 24-trihydroxy-5α-cholan-3-one 24-sulfate (3kPZS) was applied to sea lamprey traps in eight streams at a final in-stream concentration of 10−12 M. Application of 3kPZS increased sea lamprey catch, but where and when 3kPZS had the greatest impact was not determined. Here, by applying 3kPZS to additional streams, we determined that overall increases in yearly exploitation rate (proportion of sea lampreys that were marked, released, and subsequently recaptured) were highest (20–40 %) in wide streams (~40 m) with low adult sea lamprey abundance (<1000). Wide streams with low adult abundance may be representative of low-attraction systems for adult sea lamprey and, in the absence of other attractants (larval odor, sex pheromone), sea lamprey may have been more responsive to a partial sex pheromone blend emitted from traps. Furthermore, we found that the largest and most consistent responses to 3kPZS were during nights early in the trapping season, when water temperatures were increasing. This may have occurred because, during periods of increasing water temperatures, sea lamprey become more active and males at large may not have begun to release sex pheromone. In general, our results are consistent with those for pheromones of invertebrates, which are most effective when pest density is low and when pheromone competition is low.

  20. Sneak male mating tactics between lampreys (Petromyzontiformes) exhibiting alternative life-history strategies.

    PubMed

    Hume, J B; Adams, C E; Mable, B; Bean, C W

    2013-03-01

    Interspecific sneak male mating tactics between paired lamprey species are described for the first time. Although alternative mating tactics among petromyzontids have been described previously, including intraspecific sneak males, the presence of sneak male tactics between parasitic and non-parasitic forms suggests that high levels of gene flow between putative lamprey species could remain high, despite large body size discrepancies. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Factors Influencing Capture of Invasive Sea Lamprey in Traps Baited With a Synthesized Sex Pheromone Component.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas S; Siefkes, Michael J; Wagner, C Michael; Bravener, Gale; Steeves, Todd; Twohey, Michael; Li, Weiming

    2015-10-01

    The sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, is emerging as a model organism for understanding how pheromones can be used for manipulating vertebrate behavior in an integrated pest management program. In a previous study, a synthetic sex pheromone component 7α,12α, 24-trihydroxy-5α-cholan-3-one 24-sulfate (3kPZS) was applied to sea lamprey traps in eight streams at a final in-stream concentration of 10(-12) M. Application of 3kPZS increased sea lamprey catch, but where and when 3kPZS had the greatest impact was not determined. Here, by applying 3kPZS to additional streams, we determined that overall increases in yearly exploitation rate (proportion of sea lampreys that were marked, released, and subsequently recaptured) were highest (20-40%) in wide streams (~40 m) with low adult sea lamprey abundance (<1000). Wide streams with low adult abundance may be representative of low-attraction systems for adult sea lamprey and, in the absence of other attractants (larval odor, sex pheromone), sea lamprey may have been more responsive to a partial sex pheromone blend emitted from traps. Furthermore, we found that the largest and most consistent responses to 3kPZS were during nights early in the trapping season, when water temperatures were increasing. This may have occurred because, during periods of increasing water temperatures, sea lamprey become more active and males at large may not have begun to release sex pheromone. In general, our results are consistent with those for pheromones of invertebrates, which are most effective when pest density is low and when pheromone competition is low.

  2. Acute toxicity of methyl mercury to the larval lamprey, Petromyzon marinus

    SciTech Connect

    Mallatt, J.; Barron, M.G.; McDonough, C.

    1986-08-01

    Mercury compounds pollute many aquatic habitats and are extremely toxic to aquatic organisms. Acute toxicity of waterborne methyl mercury has been studied in several teleost species. Lampreys are taxonomically distant from teleosts and are used for comparative toxicological purposes. Landlocked sea lampreys, Petromyzon marinus, inhabit the Great Lakes region, and their larvae (ammocoetes) burrow in stream sediments. In this study, the authors present toxicity curves for ammocoetes exposed acutely to methyl mercuric chloride solutions. Susceptibility was related to temperature and animal size.

  3. Upstream migration of Pacific lampreys in the John Day River, Oregon: Behavior, timing, and habitat use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, T. Craig; Bayer, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Adult Pacific lamprey migration and habitat preferences for over-winter holding and spawning, and larval rearing in tributaries to the Columbia River are not well understood. The John Day River is one such tributary where larval and adult stages of this species have been documented, and its free-flowing character provided the opportunity to study migration of Pacific lampreys unimpeded by passage constraints. Forty-two adult Pacific lampreys were captured in the John Day River near its mouth during their upstream migration. Pacific lampreys were surgically implanted with radio transmitters and released onsite, and tracked by fixed-site, aerial, and terrestrial telemetry methods for nearly one year. Adults moved upstream exclusively at night, with a mean rate of 11.1 ?? 6.3 km/day. They halted upstream migration by September, and held a single position for approximately six months in the lateral margins of riffles and glides, using boulders for cover. More than half of Pacific lampreys resumed migration in March before ending movement in early May. Pacific lampreys that resumed migration in spring completed a median of 87% of their upstream migration before over-winter holding. Upon completing migration. Pacific lampreys briefly held position before beginning downstream movement at the end of May. Though not directly observed, halting migration and movement downstream were likely the result of spawning and death. Gains in adult Pacific lamprey passage through the Columbia River hydrosystem and tributaries may be made by improvements that would expedite migration during spring and summer and increase the quantity and variety of cover and refuge opportunities. ?? 2005 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene regulatory networks that control the specification of neural-crest cells in the lamprey.

    PubMed

    Nikitina, Natalya V; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2009-04-01

    The lamprey is the only basal vertebrate in which large-scale gene perturbation analyses are feasible at present. Studies on this unique animal model promise to contribute both to the understanding of the basic neural-crest gene regulatory network architecture, and evolution of the neural crest. In this review, we summarize the currently known regulatory relationships underlying formation of the vertebrate neural crest, and discuss new ways of addressing the many remaining questions using lamprey as an experimental model.

  5. Host selection and lethality of attacks by sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) in laboratory studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swink, William D.

    2003-01-01

    Parasitic-phase sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) are difficult to study in the wild. A series of laboratory studies (1984-1995) of single attacks on lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and burbot (Lota lota) examined host size selection; determined the effects of host size, host species, host strain, and temperature on host mortality; and estimated the weight of hosts killed per lamprey. Rainbow trout were more able and burbot less able to survive attacks than lake trout. Small sea lampreys actively selected the larger of two small hosts; larger sea lampreys attacked larger hosts in proportion to the hosts' body sizes, but actively avoided shorter hosts (a?? 600 mm) when larger were available. Host mortality was significantly less for larger (43-44%) than for smaller hosts (64%). However, the yearly loss of hosts per sea lamprey was less for small hosts (range, 6.8-14.2 kg per sea lamprey) than larger hosts (range, 11.4-19.3 kg per sea lamprey). Attacks at the lower of two temperature ranges (6.1-11.8A?C and 11.1-15.0A?C) did not significantly reduce the percentage of hosts killed (54% vs. 69%, p > 0.21), but longer attachment times at lower temperatures reduced the number of hosts attacked (33 vs. 45), and produced the lowest loss of hosts (6.6 kg per sea lamprey). Low temperature appeared to offset other factors that increase host mortality. Reanalysis of 789 attacks pooled from these studies, using forward stepwise logistic regression, also identified mean daily temperature as the dominant factor affecting host mortality. Observations in Lakes Superior, Huron, and Ontario support most laboratory results.

  6. Use of physiological knowledge to control the invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Laurentian Great Lakes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) control in the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America is an example of using physiological knowledge to successfully control an invasive species and rehabilitate an ecosystem and valuable fishery. The parasitic sea lamprey contributed to the devastating collapse of native fish communities after invading the Great Lakes during the 1800s and early 1900s. Economic tragedy ensued with the loss of the fishery and severe impacts to property values and tourism resulting from sea lamprey-induced ecological changes. To control the sea lamprey and rehabilitate the once vibrant Great Lakes ecosystem and economy, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (Commission) was formed by treaty between Canada and the United States in 1955. The Commission has developed a sea lamprey control programme based on their physiological vulnerabilities, which includes (i) the application of selective pesticides (lampricides), which successfully kill sedentary sea lamprey larvae in their natal streams; (ii) barriers to spawning migrations and associated traps to prevent infestations of upstream habitats and remove adult sea lamprey before they reproduce; and (iii) the release of sterilized males to reduce the reproductive potential of spawning populations in select streams. Since 1958, the application of the sea lamprey control programme has suppressed sea lamprey populations by ~90% from peak abundance. Great Lakes fish populations have rebounded and the economy is now thriving. In hopes of further enhancing the efficacy and selectivity of the sea lamprey control programme, the Commission is exploring the use of (i) sea lamprey chemosensory cues (pheromones and alarm cues) to manipulate behaviours and physiologies, and (ii) genetics to identify and manipulate genes associated with key physiological functions, for control purposes. Overall, the Commission capitalizes on the unique physiology of the sea lamprey and strives to develop a diverse integrated

  7. Comparison of synthesis of 15α-hydroxylated steroids in males of four North American lamprey species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryan, Mara B.; Young, Bradley A.; Close, David A.; Semeyn, Jesse; Robinson, T. Craig; Bayer, Jennifer M.; Li, Weiming

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that 15α-hydroxytestosterone (15α-T) and 15α-hydroxyprogesterone (15α-P) are produced in vitro and in vivo in adult male sea lampreys (Petromyzonmarinus), and that circulatory levels increase in response to injections with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). We examined four species from the Petromyzontidae family including silver lampreys (Ichthyomyzon unicuspis), chestnut lampreys (I. castaneus), American brook lampreys (Lethenteron appendix), and Pacific lampreys (Entosphenus tridentatus) to determine if these unusual steroids were unique to sea lampreys or a common feature in lamprey species. In vitro production was examined through incubations of testis with tritiated precursors, and 15α-T and 15α-P production was confirmed in all species through co-elution with standards on both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin layerchromatography. In vivo production was proven by demonstrating that HPLC-fractionated plasma had peaks of immunoreactive 15α-T and 15α-P that co-eluted with standards through using previously developed radioimmunoassays for 15α-T and 15α-P. The possible functionality of 15α-T and 15α-P was further examined in silver and Pacific lampreys by investigating the effect of injection of either type of lamprey GnRH on plasma concentrations of 15α-T and 15α-P. Injections with exogenous GnRH did not affect circulatory levels of either steroid in silver lampreys, and only GnRH III elicited higher levels of both steroids in Pacific lampreys. The 15α-hydroxylase enzyme(s) for steroids appeared to present in adult males of all species examined, but the question of whether 15α-hydroxylated steroids are functional in these lamprey species, and the significance of the 15-hydroxyl group, requires further research.

  8. Use of physiological knowledge to control the invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Laurentian Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Siefkes, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) control in the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America is an example of using physiological knowledge to successfully control an invasive species and rehabilitate an ecosystem and valuable fishery. The parasitic sea lamprey contributed to the devastating collapse of native fish communities after invading the Great Lakes during the 1800s and early 1900s. Economic tragedy ensued with the loss of the fishery and severe impacts to property values and tourism resulting from sea lamprey-induced ecological changes. To control the sea lamprey and rehabilitate the once vibrant Great Lakes ecosystem and economy, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (Commission) was formed by treaty between Canada and the United States in 1955. The Commission has developed a sea lamprey control programme based on their physiological vulnerabilities, which includes (i) the application of selective pesticides (lampricides), which successfully kill sedentary sea lamprey larvae in their natal streams; (ii) barriers to spawning migrations and associated traps to prevent infestations of upstream habitats and remove adult sea lamprey before they reproduce; and (iii) the release of sterilized males to reduce the reproductive potential of spawning populations in select streams. Since 1958, the application of the sea lamprey control programme has suppressed sea lamprey populations by ~90% from peak abundance. Great Lakes fish populations have rebounded and the economy is now thriving. In hopes of further enhancing the efficacy and selectivity of the sea lamprey control programme, the Commission is exploring the use of (i) sea lamprey chemosensory cues (pheromones and alarm cues) to manipulate behaviours and physiologies, and (ii) genetics to identify and manipulate genes associated with key physiological functions, for control purposes. Overall, the Commission capitalizes on the unique physiology of the sea lamprey and strives to develop a diverse integrated programme to

  9. Recommendations for assessing sea lamprey damages: toward optimizing the control program in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Bence, James R.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Ebener, Mark P.; Lupi, Frank; Rutter, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    The Great Lakes sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) control program currently allocates stream treatments to optimize the number of juvenile sea lampreys killed for a given level of control. Although the economic benefits derived from control appear to outweigh the dollars spent on control efforts, optimizing the number of sea lampreys killed will not necessarily optimize the economic benefits provided by the fish communities. These benefits include both non-consumptive and fishery values. We emphasize that the biological damages caused by each juvenile sea lamprey will vary, as will the economic value associated with each host that is killed. We consider issues related to assessing damages due to sea lampreys, taking into account effects on the fish community and fisheries, so as to improve the sea lamprey control program. We recommend a consolidation of information regarding the valuation of benefits, better understanding of variation in host-parasite interactions among the Great Lakes, and integration of the control program with other fisheries management objectives and activities. Adoption of these recommendations should promote lake trout rehabilitation in the Great Lakes, healthy fish communities and prudent use of limited fishery management resources.

  10. The effect of the lamprey larvicide, 3-trifluormethyl-4-nitrophenol, on selected aquatic invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Allen J.

    1967-01-01

    The chemical compound 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) is used to control the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the upper Great Lakes. It is introduced into streams in which sea lampreys have spawned, to kill the larvae. These 'treatments' are carried out at intervals shorter than the larval phase of the sea lamprey's life cycle (about 4 to 7 years) to prevent movement of the metamorphosed parasitic lampreys into the lakes. Most of the streams which contain sea lamprey larvae also have valuable resident fish or serve as spawning and nursery areas for fish of the Great Lakes. These species must be protected from both the direct toxic effects of the control method and from indirect effects such as destruction of food supplies. Studies have shown that TFM is nontoxic to most species of fish when used at the concentrations that kill larval lampreys. Information on the effect of TFM on aquatic invertebrates is meager. Applegate et al. reported that TFM was not harmful to selected invertebrates which they included in simulated stream tests. They also stated that no harmful effects to invertebrates were observed during actual stream application. The variety of invertebrate species used in simulated stream tests was limited, and close observation of invertebrates under stream conditions is difficult. Therefore, the present laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the toxicity of TFM to representatives of a number of groups of invertebrates.

  11. Classification of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) attack marks on Great Lakes lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Everett Louis

    1980-01-01

    Criteria for the classification of marks inflicted by sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) into nine categories were developed from laboratory studies in an attempt to refine the classification system used in field assessment work. These criteria were based on characteristics of the attachment site that could be identified under field conditions by unaided visual means and by touching the attachment site. Healing of these marks was somewhat variable and was influenced by the size of lamprey, duration of attachment, severity of the wound at lamprey detachment, season and water temperature, and by other less obvious factors. Even under laboratory conditions staging of some wounds was difficult, especially at low water temperatures. If these criteria are to be used effectively and with precision in the field, close examination of individual fish may be required. If the feeding and density of specific year-classes of sea lampreys are to be accurately assessed on an annual basis, close attention to the wound size (as it reflects the size of the lamprey's oral disc) and character of wounds on fish will be required as well as consideration of the season of the year in which they are observed.Key words: sea lamprey, attack marks, lake trout, Great Lakes

  12. Neuronal release and successful astrocyte uptake of aminoacidergic neurotransmitters after spinal cord injury in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Blanca; Valle-Maroto, Silvia María; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to mammals, the spinal cord of lampreys spontaneously recovers from a complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Understanding the differences between lampreys and mammals in their response to SCI could provide valuable information to propose new therapies. Unique properties of the astrocytes of lampreys probably contribute to the success of spinal cord regeneration. The main aim of our study was to investigate, in the sea lamprey, the release of aminoacidergic neurotransmitters and the subsequent astrocyte uptake of these neurotransmitters during the first week following a complete SCI by detecting glutamate, GABA, glycine, Hu and cytokeratin immunoreactivities. This is the first time that aminoacidergic neurotransmitter release from neurons and the subsequent astrocytic response after SCI are analysed by immunocytochemistry in any vertebrate. Spinal injury caused the immediate loss of glutamate, GABA and glycine immunoreactivities in neurons close to the lesion site (except for the cerebrospinal fluid-contacting GABA cells). Only after SCI, astrocytes showed glutamate, GABA and glycine immunoreactivity. Treatment with an inhibitor of glutamate transporters (DL-TBOA) showed that neuronal glutamate was actively transported into astrocytes after SCI. Moreover, after SCI, a massive accumulation of inhibitory neurotransmitters around some reticulospinal axons was observed. Presence of GABA accumulation significantly correlated with a higher survival ability of these neurons. Our data show that, in contrast to mammals, astrocytes of lampreys have a high capacity to actively uptake glutamate after SCI. GABA may play a protective role that could explain the higher regenerative and survival ability of specific descending neurons of lampreys.

  13. Lampreys have a single gene cluster for the fast skeletal myosin heavy chain gene family.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Ono, Yosuke; Hirano, Shigeki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs) and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod), a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs) are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost) contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans). We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5'-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny.

  14. Bioinformatic Characterization of Genes and Proteins Involved in Blood Clotting in Lampreys.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Russell F

    2015-10-01

    Lampreys and hagfish are the earliest diverging of extant vertebrates and are obvious targets for investigating the origins of complex biochemical systems found in mammals. Currently, the simplest approach for such inquiries is to search for the presence of relevant genes in whole genome sequence (WGS) assemblies. Unhappily, in the past a high-quality complete genome sequence has not been available for either lampreys or hagfish, precluding the possibility of proving gene absence. Recently, improved but still incomplete genome assemblies for two species of lamprey have been posted, and, taken together with an extensive collection of short sequences in the NCBI trace archive, they have made it possible to make reliable counts for specific gene families. Particularly, a multi-source tactic has been used to study the lamprey blood clotting system with regard to the presence and absence of genes known to occur in higher vertebrates. As was suggested in earlier studies, lampreys lack genes for coagulation factors VIII and IX, both of which are critical for the "intrinsic" clotting system and responsible for hemophilia in humans. On the other hand, they have three each of genes for factors VII and X, participants in the "extrinsic" clotting system. The strategy of using raw trace sequence "reads" together with partial WGS assemblies for lampreys can be used in studies on the early evolution of other biochemical systems in vertebrates.

  15. THE EVOLUTION OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE. 3. IMMUNOLOGIC RESPONSES IN THE LAMPREY.

    PubMed

    FINSTAD, J; GOOD, R A

    1964-12-01

    1. Studies of the immune response have been carried out in more than 1700 lampreys representing three stages in the life cycle of these animals. 2. Lampreys used in this study were unable to clear certain soluble protein antigens and bacteriophage and were unable to make antibodies to these antigens. Hemocyanin was cleared from the circulation. 3. The immune responses demonstrated in lampreys include the production of specific antibody to killed Brucella cells, the rejection of skin homografts, and the development of a delayed allergic response to old tuberculin. 4. A responsive proliferation of lymphoid cells occurred in the protovertebral arch following antigen-adjuvant stimulation. 5. Electrophoretic and immunoelectrophoretic analysis of lamprey serum revealed gamma globulin. Ultracentrifugal analysis of serum revealed proteins with sedimentation coefficients of 17S, 8S, 7S, and 3S. 6. The antibodies thus far observed in the lamprey are of relatively high molecular weight and destroyed by 2-mercaptoethanol. 7. In the lamprey it would appear that there is reflected the coordinate evolution of a primitive thymus, primitive spleen containing lymphoid foci, a family of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and capacity for gamma globulin synthesis and expression of adaptive immunity.

  16. Investigations of novel unsaturated bile salts of male sea lamprey as potential chemical cues.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas S; Yun, Sang-Seon; Li, Weiming

    2014-10-01

    Sulfated bile salts function as chemical cues that coordinate reproduction in sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus. 7α, 12α, 24-trihydroxy-5α-cholan-3-one 24-sulfate (3kPZS) is the most abundant known bile salt released by sexually mature male sea lampreys and attracts ovulated females. However, previous studies showed that the male-produced pheromone consists of unidentified components in addition to 3kPZS. Here, analysis of water conditioned with mature male sea lampreys indicated the presence of 4 oxidized, unsaturated compounds with molecular weights of 466 Da, 468 Da, and 2 of 470 Da. These compounds were not detectable in water conditioned with immature male sea lampreys. By using mass spectrometry, 4 A-ring unsaturated sulfated bile salts were tentatively identified from male washings as 2 4-ene, a 1-ene, and a 1,4-diene analogs. These were synthesized to determine if they attracted ovulated female sea lampreys to spawning nests in natural streams. One of the novel synthetic bile salts, 3 keto-1-ene PZS, attracted ovulated females to the point of application at a concentration of 10(-12) M. This study reveals the structural diversity of bile salts in sea lamprey, some of which have been demonstrated to be pheromonal cues.

  17. Contribution of manipulable and non-manipulable environmental factors to trapping efficiency of invasive sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Heather A.; Bravener, Gale; Beaulaurier, Joshua; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Twohey, Michael; McLaughlin, Robert L.; Brenden, Travis O.

    2017-01-01

    We identified aspects of the trapping process that afforded opportunities for improving trap efficiency of invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in a Great Lake's tributary. Capturing a sea lamprey requires it to encounter the trap, enter, and be retained until removed. Probabilities of these events depend on the interplay between sea lamprey behavior, environmental conditions, and trap design. We first tested how strongly seasonal patterns in daily trap catches (a measure of trapping success) were related to nightly rates of trap encounter, entry, and retention (outcomes of sea lamprey behavior). We then tested the degree to which variation in rates of trap encounter, entry, and retention were related to environmental features that control agents can manipulate (attractant pheromone addition, discharge) and features agents cannot manipulate (water temperature, season), but could be used as indicators for when to increase trapping effort. Daily trap catch was most strongly associated with rate of encounter. Relative and absolute measures of predictive strength for environmental factors that managers could potentially manipulate were low, suggesting that opportunities to improve trapping success by manipulating factors that affect rates of encounter, entry, and retention are limited. According to results at this trap, more sea lamprey would be captured by increasing trapping effort early in the season when sea lamprey encounter rates with traps are high. The approach used in this study could be applied to trapping of other invasive or valued species.

  18. Lampreys Have a Single Gene Cluster for the Fast Skeletal Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Ono, Yosuke; Hirano, Shigeki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs) and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod), a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs) are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost) contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans). We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5′-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny. PMID:24376886

  19. Assessment of PIT tag retention and post-tagging survival in metamorphosing juvenile Sea Lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simard, Lee G; Sotola, V Alex; Marsden, J Ellen; Miehls, Scott M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags have been used to document and monitor the movement or behavior of numerous species of fishes. Data on short-term and long-term survival and tag retention are needed before initiating studies using PIT tags on a new species or life stage. We evaluated the survival and tag retention of 153 metamorphosing juvenile Sea Lamprey Petromyzon marinus tagged with 12 mm PIT tags on three occasions using a simple surgical procedure. Results: Tag retention was 100% and 98.6% at 24 h and 28-105 d post-tagging. Of the lamprey that retained their tags, 87.3% had incisions sufficiently healed to prevent further loss. Survival was 100% and 92.7% at 24 h and 41-118 d post-tagging with no significant difference in survival between tagged and untagged control lamprey. Of the 11 lamprey that died, four had symptoms that indicated their death was directly related to tagging. Survival was positively correlated with Sea Lamprey length. Conclusions: Given the overall high level of survival and tag retention in this study, future studies can utilize 12 mm PIT tags to monitor metamorphosing juvenile Sea Lamprey movement and migration patterns.

  20. Daytime avoidance of chemosensory alarm cues by adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Di Rocco, Richard; Belanger, Cowan; Imre, István; Brown, Grant; Johnson, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) avoid damage-released and predator chemosensory cues at night, but their response to these cues during the day is unknown. Here, we explored (i) whether sea lamprey avoid these cues during the day and (ii) the effect of water temperature on the avoidance of chemosensory alarm cues in two diurnal laboratory experiments. We hypothesized that daytime activity would be temperature-dependent and that only sea lamprey vulnerable to predation (i.e., not hiding) would behaviourally respond to chemosensory alarm cues. Ten groups of ten sea lamprey were exposed to one of a variety of potential chemosensory cues. The experiments were conducted over a range of temperatures to quantify the effect of temperature on avoidance behaviour. Consistent with our hypothesis, a higher proportion of animals were active during daytime as water temperature increased. Moving sea lamprey showed an avoidance response to 2-phenylethylamine (a compound found in mammalian urine) and human saliva once water temperatures had risen to mean (±SD) = 13.7 (±1.4) °C. Resting and hiding sea lamprey did not show an avoidance response to any of the experimental stimuli.

  1. Investigations of novel unsaturated bile salts of male sea lamprey as potential chemical cues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nicholas S.; Yun, Sang-Seon; Li, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Sulfated bile salts function as chemical cues that coordinate reproduction in sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus. 7α, 12α, 24-trihydroxy-5α-cholan-3-one 24-sulfate (3kPZS) is the most abundant known bile salt released by sexually mature male sea lampreys and attracts ovulated females. However, previous studies showed that the male-produced pheromone consists of unidentified components in addition to 3kPZS. Here, analysis of water conditioned with mature male sea lampreys indicated the presence of 4 oxidized, unsaturated compounds with molecular weights of 466 Da, 468 Da, and 2 of 470 Da. These compounds were not detectable in water conditioned with immature male sea lampreys. By using mass spectrometry, 4 A-ring unsaturated sulfated bile salts were tentatively identified from male washings as 2 4-ene, a 1-ene, and a 1,4-diene analogs. These were synthesized to determine if they attracted ovulated female sea lampreys to spawning nests in natural streams. One of the novel synthetic bile salts, 3 keto-1-ene PZS, attracted ovulated females to the point of application at a concentration of 10-12 M. This study reveals the structural diversity of bile salts in sea lamprey, some of which have been demonstrated to be pheromonal cues.

  2. Use of chemosensory cues as repellents for sea lamprey: Potential directions for population management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Imre, I.; Brown, G.E.; Bergstedt, R.A.; McDonald, R.

    2010-01-01

    Sea lamprey invaded the Great Lakes in the early 20th century and caused an abrupt decline in the population densities of several native fish species. The integrated management of this invasive species is composed of chemical (lampricide) applications, low-head barrier dams, adult trapping and sterile male release. Recently, there has been an increased emphasis on the development of control methods alternative to lampricide applications. We propose as an alternative-control method the use of chemosensory cues as repellents for sea lamprey population management. Based on the available evidence at this time, we suggest that injury-released chemical alarm cues show promise as repellents for sea lamprey and further research should be directed at determining whether sea lamprey show an avoidance response to these types of chemosensory cues. From a management perspective, these chemosensory cues could be used to restrict sea lamprey access to spawning grounds. Repellents could also be used together with attractants like sex pheromones to manipulate sea lamprey behavior, similar to the "push-pull" strategies utilized with insect pests. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Sea lamprey mark type, marking rate, and parasite-host relationships for lake trout and other species in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, Brian F.; Adams, Jean V.; Christie, Gavin; Schaner, Teodore; Bowlby, James; Keir, Michael; Lantry, Jana; Sullivan, Paul; Bishop, Daniel; Treska, Ted; Morrison, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    We examined how attack frequency by sea lampreys on fishes in Lake Ontario varied in response to sea lamprey abundance and preferred host abundance (lake trout > 433 mm). For this analysis we used two gill net assessment surveys, one angler creel survey, three salmonid spawning run datasets, one adult sea lamprey assessment, and a bottom trawl assessment of dead lake trout. The frequency of fresh sea lamprey marks observed on lake trout from assessment surveys was strongly related to the frequency of sea lamprey attacks observed on salmon and trout from the creel survey and spawning migrations. Attack frequencies on all salmonids examined were related to the ratio between the abundances of adult sea lampreys and lake trout. Reanalysis of the susceptibility to sea lamprey attack for lake trout strains stocked into Lake Ontario reaffirmed that Lake Superior strain lake trout were among the most and Seneca Lake strain among the least susceptible and that Lewis Lake strain lake trout were even more susceptible than the Superior strain. Seasonal attack frequencies indicated that as the number of observed sea lamprey attacks decreased during June–September, the ratio of healing to fresh marks also decreased. Simulation of the ratios of healing to fresh marks indicated that increased lethality of attacks by growing sea lampreys contributed to the decline in the ratios and supported laboratory studies about wound healing duration.

  4. New estimates of lethality of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) attacks on lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush): Implications for fisheries management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, C.P.; Chipman, B.D.; Marsden, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) control in North America costs millions of dollars each year, and control measures are guided by assessment of lamprey-induced damage to fisheries. The favored prey of sea lamprey in freshwater ecosystems has been lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). A key parameter in assessing sea lamprey damage, as well as managing lake trout fisheries, is the probability of an adult lake trout surviving a lamprey attack. The conventional value for this parameter has been 0.55, based on laboratory experiments. In contrast, based on catch curve analysis, mark-recapture techniques, and observed wounding rates, we estimated that adult lake trout in Lake Champlain have a 0.74 probability of surviving a lamprey attack. Although sea lamprey growth in Lake Champlain was lower than that observed in Lake Huron, application of an individual-based model to both lakes indicated that the probability of surviving an attack in Lake Champlain was only 1.1 times higher than that in Lake Huron. Thus, we estimated that lake trout survive a lamprey attack in Lake Huron with a probability of 0.66. Therefore, our results suggested that lethality of a sea lamprey attack on lake trout has been overestimated in previous model applications used in fisheries management. ?? 2008 NRC.

  5. Evaluating the growth potential of sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) feeding on siscowet lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, E.K.; Weidel, B.C.; Ahrenstorff, T.D.; Mattes, W.P.; Kitchell, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Differences in the preferred thermal habitat of Lake Superior lake trout morphotypes create alternative growth scenarios for parasitic sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) attached to lake trout hosts. Siscowet lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) inhabit deep, consistently cold water (4–6 °C) and are more abundant than lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) which occupy temperatures between 8 and 12 °C during summer thermal stratification. Using bioenergetics models we contrasted the growth potential of sea lampreys attached to siscowet and lean lake trout to determine how host temperature influences the growth and ultimate size of adult sea lamprey. Sea lampreys simulated under the thermal regime of siscowets are capable of reaching sizes within the range of adult sea lamprey sizes observed in Lake Superior tributaries. High lamprey wounding rates on siscowets suggest siscowets are important lamprey hosts. In addition, siscowets have higher survival rates from lamprey attacks than those observed for lean lake trout which raises the prospect that siscowets serve as a buffer to predation on more commercially desirable hosts such as lean lake trout, and could serve to subsidize lamprey growth.

  6. High efficiency of meiotic gynogenesis in sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinchard, J.; Dabrowski, K.; Garcia-Abiado, M. -A.

    2006-01-01

    Induction of androgenesis and gynogenesis by applying a pressure (PS) or heat shock (HS) to double the haploid chromosomal set results in progenies possessing only chromosomes from a single parent. This has never been accomplished in representatives of Agnatha. The objective of this study was to induce gynogenesis and androgenesis in sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus. For gynogenesis experiments, ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated sperm was used to activate sea lamprey eggs and HS or PS were applied to inhibit the second meiotic division and consequently induce diploidy in the embryos. The UV irradiation of immobilized sperm was performed for 1 min at 1,719 J m-2. HS of 35 ?? 1??C for 2 min and PS of 9,000 psi for 4 min were applied at different times after egg activation (8, 12, 20, and 24 min or 8, 16, and 24 min for HS or PS, respectively). Regardless of the induction time of the HS, survivals at pre-hatching stage were similar. In contrast, PS applied 8 min after activation appears to increase survival rate of pre-hatched embryos in comparison to 16 and 24 min after activation. In control groups, without shock treatment (no diploidization), there were no survivors. All deformed, gynogenetic embryos were confirmed to be haploids and died prior to burying themselves in the sand. We confirmed by flow cytometry that progenies produced using both shock methods surviving to the next stage, burying in the substrate, were diploid gynogenetic. For the androgenesis experiments, UV-irradiated eggs (1,719 J m-2 for 1 min) were fertilized with non-treated sperm and HS was applied to restore diploidy of the eggs. Several attempts have been made to optimize the parameters used. HS of 35 ?? 1??C was applied 110, 140, 170, 200, and 230 min after activation for 2 min. Low yields of androgens were obtained and all animals died within a week after hatching. These techniques will allow to establish meiotic gynogenetic lines of sea lamprey for determining sex differentiation in this species

  7. High efficiency of meiotic gynogenesis in sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus.

    PubMed

    Rinchard, Jacques; Dabrowski, Konrad; Garcia-Abiado, Mary-Ann

    2006-11-15

    Induction of androgenesis and gynogenesis by applying a pressure (PS) or heat shock (HS) to double the haploid chromosomal set results in progenies possessing only chromosomes from a single parent. This has never been accomplished in representatives of Agnatha. The objective of this study was to induce gynogenesis and androgenesis in sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus. For gynogenesis experiments, ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated sperm was used to activate sea lamprey eggs and HS or PS were applied to inhibit the second meiotic division and consequently induce diploidy in the embryos. The UV irradiation of immobilized sperm was performed for 1 min at 1,719 J m(-2). HS of 35+/-1 degrees C for 2 min and PS of 9,000 psi for 4 min were applied at different times after egg activation (8, 12, 20, and 24 min or 8, 16, and 24 min for HS or PS, respectively). Regardless of the induction time of the HS, survivals at pre-hatching stage were similar. In contrast, PS applied 8 min after activation appears to increase survival rate of pre-hatched embryos in comparison to 16 and 24 min after activation. In control groups, without shock treatment (no diploidization), there were no survivors. All deformed, gynogenetic embryos were confirmed to be haploids and died prior to burying themselves in the sand. We confirmed by flow cytometry that progenies produced using both shock methods surviving to the next stage, burying in the substrate, were diploid gynogenetic. For the androgenesis experiments, UV-irradiated eggs (1,719 J m(-2) for 1 min) were fertilized with non-treated sperm and HS was applied to restore diploidy of the eggs. Several attempts have been made to optimize the parameters used. HS of 35+/-1 degrees C was applied 110, 140, 170, 200, and 230 min after activation for 2 min. Low yields of androgens were obtained and all animals died within a week after hatching. These techniques will allow to establish meiotic gynogenetic lines of sea lamprey for determining sex differentiation

  8. Lamprey hemoglobin. Structural basis of the bohr effect.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Maillett, D H; Knapp, J; Olson, J S; Riggs, A F

    2000-05-05

    Lampreys, among the most primitive living vertebrates, have hemoglobins (Hbs) with self-association and ligand-binding properties very different from those that characterize the alpha(2)beta(2) tetrameric Hbs of higher vertebrates. Monomeric, ligated lamprey Hb self-associates to dimers and tetramers upon deoxygenation. Dissociation to monomers upon oxygenation accounts for the cooperative binding of O(2) and its pH dependence. Honzatko and Hendrickson (Honzatko, R. B., and Hendrickson, W. A. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A 83, 8487-8491) proposed that the dimeric interface of the Hb resembles either the alpha(1)beta(2) interface of mammalian Hbs or the contacts in clam Hb where the E and F helices form the interface. Perutz (Perutz, M. F. (1989) Quart. Rev. Biophys. 2, 139- 236) proposed a version of the clam model in which the distal histidine swings out of the heme pocket upon deoxygenation to form a bond with a carboxyl group of a second monomer. The sedimentation behavior and oxygen equilibria of nine mutants of the major Hb component, PMII, from Petromyzon marinus have been measured to test these models. The results strongly support a critical role of the E helix and the AB corner in forming the subunit interface in the dimer and rule out the alpha(1)beta(2) model. The pH dependence of both the sedimentation equilibrium and the oxygen binding of the mutant E75Q indicate that Glu(75) is one of two groups responsible for the Bohr effect. Changing the distal histidine 73 to glutamine almost completely abolishes the self-association of the deoxy-Hb and causes a large increase in O(2) affinity. The recent x-ray crystallographic determination of the structure of deoxy lamprey Hb, reported after the completion of this work (Heaslet, H. A., and Royer, W. E. (1999) Structure 7, 517-526), shows that the dimer interface does involve the E helix and the AB corner, supporting the measurements and interpretations reported here.

  9. Fitness aspects of transgenic Aedes fluviatilis mosquitoes expressing a Plasmodium-blocking molecule.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maíra N; Nogueira, Paula M; Dias, Fernando B S; Valle, Denise; Moreira, Luciano A

    2010-12-01

    Vector-born diseases cause millions of deaths every year globally. Alternatives for the control of diseases such as malaria and dengue fever are urgently needed and the use of transgenic mosquitoes that block parasite/virus is a sound strategy to be used within control programs. However, prior to use transgenic mosquitoes as control tools, it is important to study their fitness since different biological aspects might influence their ability to disseminate and compete with wild populations. We previously reported the construction of four transgenic Aedes fluviatilis mosquito lines expressing a Plasmodium- blocking molecule (mutated bee venom phospholipase A(2)-mPLA(2)). Presently we studied two aspects of their fitness: body size, that has been used as a fitness-related status, and the expression of major enzymes classes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics, including insecticides. Body size analysis (recorded by geometric wing morphometrics) indicated that both male and female mosquitoes were larger than the non-transgenic counterparts, suggesting that this characteristic might have an impact on their overall fitness. By contrast, no significant difference in the activity of enzymes related to metabolic insecticide resistance was detected in transgenic mosquitoes. The implication on fitness advantage of these features, towards the implementation of this strategy, is further discussed.

  10. Whistles of small groups of Sotalia fluviatilis during foraging behavior in southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivari, Daniela; Rosso, Sergio

    2005-10-01

    Whistle emissions were recorded from small groups of marine tucuxi dolphins (Sotalia fluviatilis) in two beaches located in an important biological reserve in the Cananéia estuary (25°03'S, 47°58'W), southeastern Brazil. A total of 17 h of acoustic data was collected when dolphins were engaged in a specific feeding foraging activity. The amount of 3235 whistles was recorded and 40% (n=1294) were analyzed. Seven acoustic whistle parameters were determined: duration (ms), number of inflection points, start and end frequency (kHz), minimum and maximum frequency (kHz), and frequency range (kHz). Whistles with up to four inflection points were found. Whistles with no inflection points and rising frequency corresponded to 85% (n=1104) of all analyzed whistles. Whistle duration varied from 38 to 627 ms (mean=229.6+/-109.9 ms), with the start frequency varying between 1 and 16 kHz (mean=8.16+/-3.0 kHz) and the end frequency between 2 and 18 kHz (mean=14.35+/-3.0 kHz). The importance of this study requires an accurate measurement of the whistles' emissions in an unusual foraging feeding behavior situation on two beaches where several tucuxis, mostly mother-calf pairs, are frequently present. These two beaches are located in a federal and state environment Environmental Protected Area threatened by the progressive increase of tourism.

  11. The caddisfly Ceraclea fulva and the freshwater sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis: a successful relationship.

    PubMed

    Corallini, Carla; Gaino, Elda

    2003-02-01

    The association between the aquatic phases of the caddisfly Ceraclea fulva (Trichoptera, Leptoceridae) and the freshwater sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis (Porifera, Spongillidae) has been investigated by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). Ceraclea fulva habitually feeds on sponges and builds its case by using the siliceous spicules of the sponge, which are arranged side by side, inter-crossed, cemented with silk, and organised in layers. In the newly hatched larva, the case is strengthened exclusively by cemented siliceous spicules, while during growth, the insect adds sponge fragments to it. The fine organisation of the sponge tissues growing on the case proves that the sponge is functional. Inter-spaced, small protrusions, derived from the outermost compact silk layer, form a series of "bridges" enhancing case/sponge adhesion. Tube-case shape varies according to the aquatic developmental phase of the insect: in the mature larva and pupa, this shelter carries larger sponge fragments dorsally. The caddisfly acts as carrier of the sponge, thus facilitating its dispersal and the colonisation of new habitats. This justifies regarding this association as a successful mutualistic relationship, and not as a unilateral parasitic behaviour on the part of the insect. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Water Transparency Drives Intra-Population Divergence in Eurasian Perch (Perca fluviatilis)

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Pia; Hirsch, Philipp E.; Svanbäck, Richard; Eklöv, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Trait combinations that lead to a higher efficiency in resource utilization are important drivers of divergent natural selection and adaptive radiation. However, variation in environmental features might constrain foraging in complex ways and therefore impede the exploitation of critical resources. We tested the effect of water transparency on intra-population divergence in morphology of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) across seven lakes in central Sweden. Morphological divergence between near-shore littoral and open-water pelagic perch substantially increased with increasing water transparency. Reliance on littoral resources increased strongly with increasing water transparency in littoral populations, whereas littoral reliance was not affected by water transparency in pelagic populations. Despite the similar reliance on pelagic resources in pelagic populations along the water transparency gradient, the utilization of particular pelagic prey items differed with variation in water transparency in pelagic populations. Pelagic perch utilized cladocerans in lakes with high water transparency and copepods in lakes with low water transparency. We suggest that under impaired visual conditions low utilization of littoral resources by littoral perch and utilization of evasive copepods by pelagic perch may lead to changes in morphology. Our findings indicate that visual conditions can affect population divergence in predator populations through their effects on resource utilization. PMID:22912895

  13. Responses of Acilius sulcatus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) to chemical cues from perch (Perca fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Åbjörnsson, Kajsa; Wagner, Bálint M A; Axelsson, Anna; Bjerselius, Rickard; Olsén, K Håkan

    1997-07-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that the presence of chemical stimuli from a hungry predator would initiate anti-predator responses, while stimuli from a satiated predator would not. We used chemical stimuli released from starved perch (Perca fluviatilis) and from satiated perch (predator). As prey we used adult Acilius sulcatus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae). The reaction of the beetles to different predator conditions was tested during daytime. We also tested the reaction to starved perch during the night. A. sulcatus activity decreased when it was exposed to stimuli released from starved perch during daytime when visibility was poor, due to the presence of artificial vegetation. There was, however, no reaction to satiated perch under the same experimental conditions. These results indicate that A. sulcatus can discriminate between chemical cues from hungry and satiated fish predators. When visibility was good and the concentration of chemical cues was constant, the beetles did not react to starved perch in the daytime, but their activity decreased at night in response to stimuli released from starved perch. Visual as well as chemical cues seem to be important for detecting a potential predator. When visibility is good, beetles seem to rely on visual stimuli, while in darkness they seem to use chemical stimuli to detect the presence of predators.

  14. Whistles of small groups of Sotalia fluviatilis during foraging behavior in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pivari, Daniela; Rosso, Sergio

    2005-10-01

    Whistle emissions were recorded from small groups of marine tucuxi dolphins (Sotalia fluviatilis) in two beaches located in an important biological reserve in the Cananéia estuary (25 degrees 03'S, 47 degrees 58'W), southeastern Brazil. A total of 17 h of acoustic data was collected when dolphins were engaged in a specific feeding foraging activity. The amount of 3235 whistles was recorded and 40% (n=1294) were analyzed. Seven acoustic whistle parameters were determined: duration (ms), number of inflection points, start and end frequency (kHz), minimum and maximum frequency (kHz), and frequency range (kHz). Whistles with up to four inflection points were found. Whistles with no inflection points and rising frequency corresponded to 85% (n=1104) of all analyzed whistles. Whistle duration varied from 38 to 627 ms (mean=229.6+/-109.9 ms), with the start frequency varying between 1 and 16 kHz (mean=8.16+/-3.0 kHz) and the end frequency between 2 and 18 kHz (mean=14.35+/-3.0 kHz). The importance of this study requires an accurate measurement of the whistles' emissions in an unusual foraging feeding behavior situation on two beaches where several tucuxis, mostly mother-calf pairs, are frequently present. These two beaches are located in a federal and state environment Environmental Protected Area threatened by the progressive increase of tourism.

  15. Water transparency drives intra-population divergence in Eurasian Perch (Perca fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Bartels, Pia; Hirsch, Philipp E; Svanbäck, Richard; Eklöv, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Trait combinations that lead to a higher efficiency in resource utilization are important drivers of divergent natural selection and adaptive radiation. However, variation in environmental features might constrain foraging in complex ways and therefore impede the exploitation of critical resources. We tested the effect of water transparency on intra-population divergence in morphology of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) across seven lakes in central Sweden. Morphological divergence between near-shore littoral and open-water pelagic perch substantially increased with increasing water transparency. Reliance on littoral resources increased strongly with increasing water transparency in littoral populations, whereas littoral reliance was not affected by water transparency in pelagic populations. Despite the similar reliance on pelagic resources in pelagic populations along the water transparency gradient, the utilization of particular pelagic prey items differed with variation in water transparency in pelagic populations. Pelagic perch utilized cladocerans in lakes with high water transparency and copepods in lakes with low water transparency. We suggest that under impaired visual conditions low utilization of littoral resources by littoral perch and utilization of evasive copepods by pelagic perch may lead to changes in morphology. Our findings indicate that visual conditions can affect population divergence in predator populations through their effects on resource utilization.

  16. RNA Interference Technology to Control Pest Sea Lampreys - A Proof-of-Concept

    PubMed Central

    Heath, George; Childs, Darcy; Docker, Margaret F.; McCauley, David W.; Whyard, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The parasitic sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) has caused extensive losses to commercial fish stocks of the upper Great Lakes of North America. Methods of controlling the sea lamprey include trapping, barriers to prevent migration, and use of a chemical lampricide (3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol) to kill the filter-feeding larvae. Concerns about the non-specificity of these methods have prompted continued development of species-specific methods to control lampreys outside their native range. In this study, we considered the utility of RNA interference to develop a sea lamprey-specific lampricide. Injection of six different short interfering, double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs) into lamprey embryos first confirmed that the siRNAs could reduce the targeted transcript levels by more than 50%. Two size classes of lamprey larvae were then fed the siRNAs complexed with liposomes, and three of the siRNAs (targeting elongation factor 1α, calmodulin, and α-actinin) reduced transcript levels 2.5, 3.6, and 5.0–fold, respectively, within the lamprey midsections. This is not only the first demonstration of RNAi in lampreys, but it is also the first example of delivery of siRNAs to a non-mammalian vertebrate through feeding formulations. One of the siRNA treatments also caused increased mortality of the larvae following a single feeding of siRNAs, which suggests that prolonged or multiple feedings of siRNAs could be used to kill filter-feeding larvae within streams, following development of a slow-release formulation. The genes targeted in this study are highly conserved across many species, and only serve as a proof-of-concept demonstration that siRNAs can be used in lampreys. Given that RNA interference is a sequence-specific phenomenon, it should be possible to design siRNAs that selectively target gene sequences that are unique to sea lampreys, and thus develop a technology to control these pests without adversely affecting non-target species. PMID:24505485

  17. RNA interference technology to control pest sea lampreys--a proof-of-concept.

    PubMed

    Heath, George; Childs, Darcy; Docker, Margaret F; McCauley, David W; Whyard, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The parasitic sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) has caused extensive losses to commercial fish stocks of the upper Great Lakes of North America. Methods of controlling the sea lamprey include trapping, barriers to prevent migration, and use of a chemical lampricide (3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol) to kill the filter-feeding larvae. Concerns about the non-specificity of these methods have prompted continued development of species-specific methods to control lampreys outside their native range. In this study, we considered the utility of RNA interference to develop a sea lamprey-specific lampricide. Injection of six different short interfering, double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs) into lamprey embryos first confirmed that the siRNAs could reduce the targeted transcript levels by more than 50%. Two size classes of lamprey larvae were then fed the siRNAs complexed with liposomes, and three of the siRNAs (targeting elongation factor 1α, calmodulin, and α-actinin) reduced transcript levels 2.5, 3.6, and 5.0-fold, respectively, within the lamprey midsections. This is not only the first demonstration of RNAi in lampreys, but it is also the first example of delivery of siRNAs to a non-mammalian vertebrate through feeding formulations. One of the siRNA treatments also caused increased mortality of the larvae following a single feeding of siRNAs, which suggests that prolonged or multiple feedings of siRNAs could be used to kill filter-feeding larvae within streams, following development of a slow-release formulation. The genes targeted in this study are highly conserved across many species, and only serve as a proof-of-concept demonstration that siRNAs can be used in lampreys. Given that RNA interference is a sequence-specific phenomenon, it should be possible to design siRNAs that selectively target gene sequences that are unique to sea lampreys, and thus develop a technology to control these pests without adversely affecting non-target species.

  18. Selection of the lamprey VLRC antigen receptor repertoire.

    PubMed

    Holland, Stephen J; Gao, Mingming; Hirano, Masayuki; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Luo, Ming; Schorpp, Michael; Cooper, Max D; Aravind, L; Mariuzza, Roy A; Boehm, Thomas

    2014-10-14

    The alternative adaptive immune system of jawless vertebrates is based on different isotypes of variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) that are composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and expressed by distinct B- and T-like lymphocyte lineages. VLRB is expressed by B-like cells, whereas VLRA and VLRC are expressed by two T-like lineages that develop in the thymoid, a thymus-like structure in lamprey larvae. In each case, stepwise combinatorial insertions of different types of short donor LRR cassettes into incomplete germ-line genes are required to generate functional VLR gene assemblies. It is unknown, however, whether the diverse repertoires of VLRs that are expressed by peripheral blood lymphocytes are shaped by selection after their assembly. Here, we identify signatures of selection in the peripheral repertoire of VLRC antigen receptors that are clonally expressed by one of the T-like cell types in lampreys. Selection strongly favors VLRC molecules containing four internal variable leucine-rich repeat (LRRV) modules, although VLRC assemblies encoding five internal modules are initially equally frequent. In addition to the length selection, VLRC molecules in VLRC(+) peripheral lymphocytes exhibit a distinct pattern of high entropy sites in the N-terminal LRR1 module, which is inserted next to the germ-line-encoded LRRNT module. This is evident in comparisons to VLRC gene assemblies found in the thymoid and to VLRC gene assemblies found in some VLRA(+) cells. Our findings are the first indication to our knowledge that selection operates on a VLR repertoire and provide a framework to establish the mechanism by which this selection occurs during development of the VLRC(+) lymphocyte lineage.

  19. Neurogenesis In The Lamprey CNS Following Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guixin; Pizarro, Ivonne Vidal; Swain, Gary P.; Kang, Shin H.; Selzer, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    After spinal cord transection, lampreys recover functionally and axons regenerate. It is not known whether this is accompanied by neurogenesis. Previous studies suggested a baseline level of non-neuronal cell proliferation in the spinal cord and rhombencephalon (where most supraspinal projecting neurons are located). To determine whether cell proliferation increases after injury and whether this includes neurogenesis, larval lampreys were spinally transected and injected with BrdU at 0-3 weeks post-transection. Labeled cells were counted in the lesion site, within 0.5 mm rostral and caudal to the lesion, and in the rhombencephalon. One group of animals was processed in the winter, and a second group was processed in the summer. The number of labeled cells was greater in winter than in summer. The lesion site had the most BrdU labeling at all times, correlating with an increase in the number of cells. In the adjacent spinal cord the percentage of BrdU labeling was higher in the ependymal than in non-ependymal regions. This was also true in the rhombencephalon but only in summer. In winter, BrdU labeling was seen primarily in the subventricular and peripheral zones. Some BrdU-labeled cells were also double-labeled by antibodies to glial-specific (anti-keratin) as well as to neuron-specific (anti-Hu) antigens, indicating that both gliogenesis and neurogenesis occurred after spinal cord transection. However, the new neurons were restricted to the ependymal zone, were never labeled by anti-neurofilament antibodies, and never migrated away from the ependyma, even at 5 weeks after BrdU injection. They would appear to be CSF-contacting neurons. PMID:24151158

  20. A thermogenic secondary sexual character in male sea lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Priess, M. Cody; Yeh, Chu-Yin; Brant, Cory O.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Ke; Nanlohy, Kaben G.; Bryan, Mara B.; Brown, C. Titus; Choi, Jongeun; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Secondary sexual characters in animals are exaggerated ornaments or weapons for intrasexual competition. Unexpectedly, we found that a male secondary sexual character in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is a thermogenic adipose tissue that instantly increases its heat production during sexual encounters. This secondary sexual character, developed in front of the anterior dorsal fin of mature males, is a swollen dorsal ridge known as the ‘rope’ tissue. It contains nerve bundles, multivacuolar adipocytes and interstitial cells packed with small lipid droplets and mitochondria with dense and highly organized cristae. The fatty acid composition of the rope tissue is rich in unsaturated fatty acids. The cytochrome c oxidase activity is high but the ATP concentration is very low in the mitochondria of the rope tissue compared with those of the gill and muscle tissues. The rope tissue temperature immediately rose up to 0.3°C when the male encountered a conspecific. Mature males generated more heat in the rope and muscle tissues when presented with a mature female than when presented with a male (paired t-test, P<0.05). On average, the rope generated 0.027±0.013 W cm−3 more heat than the muscle in 10 min. Transcriptome analyses revealed that genes involved in fat cell differentiation are upregulated whereas those involved in oxidative-phosphorylation-coupled ATP synthesis are downregulated in the rope tissue compared with the gill and muscle tissues. Sexually mature male sea lamprey possess the only known thermogenic secondary sexual character that shows differential heat generation toward individual conspecifics. PMID:23804672

  1. Selection of the lamprey VLRC antigen receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Stephen J.; Gao, Mingming; Hirano, Masayuki; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Luo, Ming; Schorpp, Michael; Cooper, Max D.; Aravind, L.; Mariuzza, Roy A.; Boehm, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The alternative adaptive immune system of jawless vertebrates is based on different isotypes of variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) that are composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and expressed by distinct B- and T-like lymphocyte lineages. VLRB is expressed by B-like cells, whereas VLRA and VLRC are expressed by two T-like lineages that develop in the thymoid, a thymus-like structure in lamprey larvae. In each case, stepwise combinatorial insertions of different types of short donor LRR cassettes into incomplete germ-line genes are required to generate functional VLR gene assemblies. It is unknown, however, whether the diverse repertoires of VLRs that are expressed by peripheral blood lymphocytes are shaped by selection after their assembly. Here, we identify signatures of selection in the peripheral repertoire of VLRC antigen receptors that are clonally expressed by one of the T-like cell types in lampreys. Selection strongly favors VLRC molecules containing four internal variable leucine-rich repeat (LRRV) modules, although VLRC assemblies encoding five internal modules are initially equally frequent. In addition to the length selection, VLRC molecules in VLRC+ peripheral lymphocytes exhibit a distinct pattern of high entropy sites in the N-terminal LRR1 module, which is inserted next to the germ-line–encoded LRRNT module. This is evident in comparisons to VLRC gene assemblies found in the thymoid and to VLRC gene assemblies found in some VLRA+ cells. Our findings are the first indication to our knowledge that selection operates on a VLR repertoire and provide a framework to establish the mechanism by which this selection occurs during development of the VLRC+ lymphocyte lineage. PMID:25228760

  2. Gene expression during ovarian differentiation in parasitic and non-parasitic lampreys: implications for fecundity and life history types.

    PubMed

    Spice, Erin K; Whyard, Steven; Docker, Margaret F

    2014-11-01

    Lampreys diverged from the jawed vertebrate lineage approximately 500million years ago. Lampreys undergo sex differentiation much later than most other vertebrates, and ovarian differentiation occurs several years before testicular differentiation. The genetic basis of lamprey sex differentiation is of particular interest both because of the phylogenetic importance of lampreys and because of their unusual pattern of sex differentiation. As well, differences between parasitic and non-parasitic lampreys may first become evident at ovarian differentiation. However, nothing is known about the genetic basis of ovarian differentiation in lampreys. This study examined potential differences in gene expression before, during, and after ovarian differentiation in parasitic chestnut lamprey Ichthyomyzon castaneus and non-parasitic northern brook lamprey Ichthyomyzonfossor. Eight target genes (17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, germ cell-less, estrogen receptor β, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, daz-associated protein 1, cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, Wilms' tumour suppressor protein 1, and dehydrocholesterol reductase 7) were examined. Northern brook lamprey displayed higher expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, whereas chestnut lamprey displayed higher expression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor; these genes may be involved in apoptosis and oocyte growth, respectively. Presumptive male larvae had higher expression of Wilms' tumour suppressor protein 1, which may be involved in the undifferentiated gonad and/or later testicular development. Differentiated females had higher expression of 17β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and daz-associated protein 1, which may be involved in female development. This study is the first to identify genes that may be involved in ovarian differentiation and fecundity in lampreys. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Infection of sea lamprey with an unusual strain of Aeromonas salmonicida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diamanka, Arfang; Loch, Thomas P.; Cipriano, Rocco C.; Winters, Andrew D.; Faisal, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of the Laurentian Great Lakes by the fish-parasitic sea lamprey has led to catastrophic consequences, including the potential introduction of fish pathogens. Aeromonas salmonicida is a bacterial fish pathogen that causes devastating losses worldwide. Currently, there are five accepted subspecies of Aeromonas salmonicida: A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, masoucida, smithia, achromogenes, and pectinolytica. We discuss the discovery of an isolate of A. salmonicida that is pathogenic to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and exhibits unique phenotypic and molecular characteristics. We examined 181 adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from the Humber River (Lake Ontario watershed) and 162 adult sea lamprey from Duffins Creek (Lake Ontario watershed) during the spring seasons of 2005–11. Among those, 4/343 (1.2%) sea lamprey were culture positive for A. salmonicida, whereby biochemical and molecular studies identified three of the isolates as A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida. The remaining isolate (As-SL1) recovered from Humber River sea lamprey was phenotypically more similar to A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida than to the four other A. salmonicida subspecies. However, unlike A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, As-SL1 was sucrose positive, produced an acid-over-acid reaction on triple-sugar iron medium and did not amplify with A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida specific primers. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial stretches of the 16S rRNA and DNA gyrase subunit B genes further confirmed that the As-SL1 isolate was not A. salmonicida subsp. masoucida, smithia, achromogenes, or pectinolytica. Based on our analyses, the As-SL1 isolate is either an unusual strain of A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida or a novel A. salmonicida subspecies. The four A. salmonicida isolates that were recovered from sea lamprey were pathogenic to rainbow trout in experimental challenge studies. Our study also underscores the potential role of sea lamprey in the ecology of

  4. Effect of water temperature on sea lamprey growth and lake trout survival

    SciTech Connect

    Swink, W.D. )

    1993-11-01

    Percent mortality of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush subjected to single sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus attacks did not differ significantly between lower-temperature (mortality = 54%; temperature [le] 10[degrees]C; N = 33) and higher-temperature (mortality = 69%; temperature = 12.8-14.4[degrees]C; N = 45) laboratory studies conducted from 1 June to 28 November 1989. However, sea lampreys fed longer and killed fewer fish in colder water (mean attachment 467.0 h; 18 fish killed) than in warmer water (mean attachment 161.7 h; 31 fish killed), probably because food consumption was lower in colder water. These results indicate that the number of fish killed by sea lampreys could be much greater in warmer water and that temperature must be considered when fish losses from sea lamprey attacks are estimated. Previous studies (Swink and Hanson 1989; Swink 1990) of the effects of single sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus attacks on lake trout Salvelinus namaycush showed significantly less lake trout mortality at temperatures of 10[degrees]C and lower than at higher temperatures. The reduced host mortality, however, could not be attributed solely to lower temperature because warmwater and coldwater attacks occurred during different seasons. In those studies, the author was unable to hold water temperature at 10[degrees]C or less in late summer and early fall, when most fish are killed by sea lampreys in the Great Lakes (Christie and Kolenosky 1980; Bergstedt and Schneider 1988). Modifications to the fish holding facilities at the Hammond Bay Biological Station in 1988 allowed maintenance of a limited amount of water at 10[degrees]C or less throughout the year. Hence, the objective of this study was to compare sea lamprey-induced mortality of lake trout at 10[degrees]C or less with that at 12.8-14.4[degrees]C during the normal feeding season (June through November). 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Theory on the evolutionary history of lamprey metamorphosis: role of reproductive and thyroid axes.

    PubMed

    Youson, J H; Sower, S A

    2001-06-01

    Metamorphosis is a developmental strategy used by only a small number of extant fishes and little is known about its phylogenetic development during the evolution history of this large group of vertebrates. The present report provides a putative evolutionary history of metamorphosis in the lamprey, an extant agnathan with direct descendancy from some of the oldest known vertebrates. The study reviews recent data on the role of the thyroid gland and its hormones in metamorphosis, summarizes some recent views on the evolution of the endostyle/follicular thyroid in lampreys, and provides new data on the content of two gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH-I and -III) in brain during goitrogen-stimulated, precocious metamorphosis. These new data support an earlier viewpoint of a relationship between thyroid and reproductive axes during metamorphosis. It is proposed that the earliest lampreys were paedomorphic larvae and they lived in a marine environment; as such, they resembled in many ways the larvae from which the ancient protochordates, Larvacea, are derived. The iodide-concentrating efficiency of the endostyle was a critical factor in the evolution of metamorphosis and this gland was replaced by a follicular thyroid, for postmetamorphic animals needed to store iodine following their invasion of freshwater. Larval growth and postmetamorphic reproduction in freshwater became fixtures in the lamprey life cycle; a non-parasitic adult life-history type appeared later. The presence among extant lampreys of two different adult life-history types, and examples of the lability of the timing of sexual maturation in some species, imply that there has been a complex interplay between the thyroid and reproductive axes during the evolution of metamorphosis in lampreys. This proposal is consistent with what we know of interplay of these axes in extant adult lampreys and with the long-held viewpoint that thyroid function and sexual maturation are an association with an ancient

  6. Evidence for a receiver bias underlying female preference for a male mating pheromone in sea lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Buchinger, T. J.; Wang, H.; Li, W.; Johnson, N. S.

    2013-01-01

    Receiver bias models suggest that a male sexual signal became exaggerated to match a pre-existing sensory, perceptual or cognitive disposition of the female. Accordingly, these models predict that females of related taxa possessing the ancestral state of signalling evolved preference for the male trait in a non-sexual context. We postulated that female preference for the male-released bile alcohol mating pheromone, 3 keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS), of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) evolved as a result of a receiver bias. In particular, we propose that migratory silver lamprey (Ichthyomyzon unicuspis), a basal member of the Petromyzontidae, evolved a preference for 3kPZS released by stream-resident larvae as a means of identifying productive habitat for offspring. Larval silver lamprey released 3kPZS at rates sufficient to be detected by migratory lampreys. Females responded to 3kPZS by exhibiting upstream movement behaviours relevant in a migratory context, but did not exhibit proximate behaviours important to mate search and spawning. Male silver lamprey did not release 3kPZS at rates sufficient to be detected by females in natural high-volume stream environments. We infer that female silver lamprey cue onto 3kPZS excreted by stream-resident larvae as a mechanism to locate habitat conducive to offspring survival and that males do not signal with 3kPZS. We suggest that this female preference for a male signal in a non-sexual context represents a bias leading to the sexual signalling observed in sea lamprey. PMID:24068361

  7. The Central Nervous System of Jawless Vertebrates: Encephalization in Lampreys and Hagfishes.

    PubMed

    Salas, Carlos A; Yopak, Kara E; Lisney, Thomas J; Potter, Ian C; Collin, Shaun P

    2017-01-01

    Lampreys and hagfishes are the sole surviving representatives of the early agnathan (jawless) stage in vertebrate evolution, which has previously been regarded as the least encephalized group of all vertebrates. Very little is known, however, about the extent of interspecific variation in relative brain size in these fishes, as previous studies have focused on only a few species, even though lampreys exhibit a variety of life history traits. While some species are parasitic as adults, with varying feeding behaviors, others (nonparasitic species) do not feed after completing their macrophagous freshwater larval phase. In addition, some parasitic species remain in freshwater, while others undergo an anadromous migration. On the basis of data for postmetamorphic individuals representing approximately 40% of all lamprey species, with representatives from each of the three families, the aforementioned differences in life history traits are reflected in variations in relative brain size. Across all lampreys, brain mass increases with body mass with a scaling factor or slope (α) of 0.35, which is less than those calculated for different groups of gnathostomatous (jawed) vertebrates (α = 0.43-0.62). When parasitic and nonparasitic species are analyzed separately, with phylogeny taken into account, the scaling factors of both groups (parasitic α = 0.43, nonparasitic α = 0.45) approach those of gnathostomes. The relative brain size in fully grown adults of parasitic species is, however, less than that of the adults of nonparasitic species, paralleling differences between fully grown adults and recently metamorphosed individuals of anadromous species. The average degree of encephalization is found in anadromous parasitic lampreys and might thus represent the ancestral condition for extant lampreys. These results suggest that the degree of encephalization in lampreys varies according to both life history traits and phylogenetic relationships. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Validation and insights of anesthetic action in an early vertebrate network: the isolated lamprey spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Jinks, Steven L; Andrada, Jason

    2011-11-01

    The lamprey spinal cord is a well-characterized vertebrate network that could facilitate our understanding of anesthetic action. We tested several hypotheses concerning the lamprey's clinical application to anesthesia, and the sites/mechanisms of anesthetic action. In isolated lamprey spinal cords, minimum immobilizing concentrations (MICs) were determined for halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, propofol, or the nonimmobilizer F6 (1,2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane), applied during D-glutamate-induced fictive swimming or noxious tail stimulation. Isoflurane and propofol effects on fictive swimming were tested in the presence and absence of strychnine and/or picrotoxin. Volatile anesthetic MICs were clinically comparable. Isoflurane MIC for fictive swimming and noxious stimulus-evoked movement were the same. F6 did not produce immobility, but decreased the amplitude and phase lag of fictive swimming. Isoflurane decreased fictive swimming cycle frequency, amplitude, autocorrelation, rostrocaudal phase lag, and coherence. Strychnine and picrotoxin elicited only disorganized motor activity under isoflurane and caused small increases in MIC. The effects of propofol differed from isoflurane for all locomotor rhythm variables except amplitude. The propofol MIC was much larger in lampreys compared with mammals. However, picrotoxin reversed propofol-induced immobility by reinitiating coordinated locomotor activity and increasing MIC>8-fold. The lamprey spinal cord is a relevant and tractable vertebrate network model for anesthetic action. Isoflurane disrupts interneuronal locomotor networks. γ-Aminobutyric acid A and glycine receptors have marginal roles in isoflurane-induced immobility in lampreys. Propofol's selective γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor-mediated immobilizing mechanism is conserved in lampreys. The differential immobilizing mechanisms of isoflurane versus propofol reflect those in mammals, and further suggest different network modes of immobilizing

  9. Evidence for a receiver bias underlying female preference for a male mating pheromone in sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchinger, Tyler J.; Wang, Huiyong; Li, Weiming; Johnson, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Receiver bias models suggest that a male sexual signal became exaggerated to match a pre-existing sensory, perceptual or cognitive disposition of the female. Accordingly, these models predict that females of related taxa possessing the ancestral state of signalling evolved preference for the male trait in a non-sexual context. We postulated that female preference for the male-released bile alcohol mating pheromone, 3 keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS), of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) evolved as a result of a receiver bias. In particular, we propose that migratory silver lamprey (Ichthyomyzon unicuspis), a basal member of the Petromyzontidae, evolved a preference for 3kPZS released by stream-resident larvae as a means of identifying productive habitat for offspring. Larval silver lamprey released 3kPZS at rates sufficient to be detected by migratory lampreys. Females responded to 3kPZS by exhibiting upstream movement behaviours relevant in a migratory context, but did not exhibit proximate behaviours important to mate search and spawning. Male silver lamprey did not release 3kPZS at rates sufficient to be detected by females in natural high-volume stream environments. We infer that female silver lamprey cue onto 3kPZS excreted by stream-resident larvae as a mechanism to locate habitat conducive to offspring survival and that males do not signal with 3kPZS. We suggest that this female preference for a male signal in a non-sexual context represents a bias leading to the sexual signalling observed in sea lamprey.

  10. Lamprey parasitism of sharks and teleosts: high capacity urea excretion in an extant vertebrate relic.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Michael P; Turnbull, Steven; Bird, Jonathan; Wang, Yuxiang S; Claude, Jaime F; Youson, John H

    2004-08-01

    We observed 10 sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) parasitizing basking sharks (Cetorhinus maximus), the world's second largest fish, in the Bay of Fundy. Due to the high concentrations of urea in the blood and tissues of ureosmotic elasmobranchs, we hypothesized that sea lampreys would have mechanisms to eliminate co-ingested urea while feeding on basking sharks. Post-removal urea excretion rates (J(Urea)) in two lampreys, removed from separate sharks by divers, were initially 450 ( approximately 9000 micromol N kg-1 h-1) and 75 times ( approximately 1500 micromol N kg-1 h-1) greater than basal (non-feeding) rates ( approximately 20 micromol N kg-1 h-1). In contrast, J(Urea) increased by 15-fold after parasitic lampreys were removed from non-ureosmotic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Since activities of the ornithine urea cycle (OUC) enzymes, carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (CPSase III) and ornithine carbamoyl transferase (OCT) were relatively low in liver and below detection in intestine and muscle, it is unlikely that the excreted urea arose from de novo urea synthesis. Measurements of arginase activity suggested that hydrolysis of dietary arginine made a minor contribution to J(Urea.). Post-feeding ammonia excretion rates (J(Amm)) were 15- to 25-fold greater than basal rates in lampreys removed from both basking sharks and rainbow trout, suggesting that parasitic lampreys have a high capacity to deaminate amino acids. We conclude that the sea lamprey's ability to penetrate the dermal denticle armor of sharks, to rapidly excrete large volumes of urea and a high capacity to deaminate amino acids, represent adaptations that have contributed to the evolutionary success of these phylogenetically ancient vertebrates.

  11. Evidence for a receiver bias underlying female preference for a male mating pheromone in sea lamprey.

    PubMed

    Buchinger, T J; Wang, H; Li, W; Johnson, N S

    2013-11-22

    Receiver bias models suggest that a male sexual signal became exaggerated to match a pre-existing sensory, perceptual or cognitive disposition of the female. Accordingly, these models predict that females of related taxa possessing the ancestral state of signalling evolved preference for the male trait in a non-sexual context. We postulated that female preference for the male-released bile alcohol mating pheromone, 3 keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS), of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) evolved as a result of a receiver bias. In particular, we propose that migratory silver lamprey (Ichthyomyzon unicuspis), a basal member of the Petromyzontidae, evolved a preference for 3kPZS released by stream-resident larvae as a means of identifying productive habitat for offspring. Larval silver lamprey released 3kPZS at rates sufficient to be detected by migratory lampreys. Females responded to 3kPZS by exhibiting upstream movement behaviours relevant in a migratory context, but did not exhibit proximate behaviours important to mate search and spawning. Male silver lamprey did not release 3kPZS at rates sufficient to be detected by females in natural high-volume stream environments. We infer that female silver lamprey cue onto 3kPZS excreted by stream-resident larvae as a mechanism to locate habitat conducive to offspring survival and that males do not signal with 3kPZS. We suggest that this female preference for a male signal in a non-sexual context represents a bias leading to the sexual signalling observed in sea lamprey.

  12. Adaptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and neutral genetic variation in two native Baltic Sea fishes (perch Perca fluviatilis and zander Sander lucioperca) with comparisons to an introduced and disease susceptible population in Australia (P. fluviatilis): assessing the risk of disease epidemics.

    PubMed

    Faulks, L K; Östman, Ö

    2016-04-01

    This study assessed the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and neutral genetic variation and structure in two percid species, perch Perca fluviatilis and zander Sander lucioperca, in a unique brackish ecosystem, the Baltic Sea. In addition, to assess the importance of MHC diversity to disease susceptibility in these populations, comparisons were made to an introduced, disease susceptible, P. fluviatilis population in Australia. Eighty-three MHC class II B exon 2 variants were amplified: 71 variants from 92 P. fluviatilis samples, and 12 variants from 82 S. lucioperca samples. Microsatellite and MHC data revealed strong spatial genetic structure in S. lucioperca, but not P. fluviatilis, across the Baltic Sea. Both microsatellite and MHC data showed higher levels of genetic diversity in P. fluviatilis from the Baltic Sea compared to Australia, which may have facilitated the spread of an endemic virus, EHNV in the Australian population. The relatively high levels of genetic variation in the Baltic Sea populations, together with spatial genetic structure, however, suggest that there currently seems to be little risk of disease epidemics in this system. To ensure this remains the case in the face of ongoing environmental changes, fisheries and habitat disturbance, the conservation of local-scale genetic variation is recommended.

  13. A noninvasive tool to assess the distribution of Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) in the Columbia River basin

    Treesearch

    Kellie J. Carim; J. Caleb Dysthe; Michael K. Young; Kevin S. McKelvey; Michael K. Schwartz

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) is an anadromous fish once abundant throughout coastal basins of western North America that has suffered dramatic declines in the last century due primarily to human activities. Here, we describe the development of an environmental DNA (eDNA) assay to detect Pacific lamprey in the Columbia River basin. The eDNA assay...

  14. Basin-scale patterns in the drift of embryonic and larval fishes and lamprey ammocoetes in two coastal rivers

    Treesearch

    Jason L. White; Bret C. Harvey

    2003-01-01

    We studied the distribution and abundance of drifting embryonic and larval fishes and lampreys in the Smith and Van Duzen rivers of northern California, U.S.A. We collected seven fish species in four families and at least one lamprey species in the drift. All taxa drifted almost exclusively at night. Sculpins, Cottus aleuticus and C. asper...

  15. First isolation of a rhabdovirus from perch Perca fluviatilis in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Wahli, Thomas; Bellec, Laure; von Siebenthal, Beat; Cabon, Joëlle; Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike; Morin, Thierry

    2015-10-16

    Perca fluviatilis is a fish species of increasing interest to the Swiss fish farming industry. In recent years, recirculation systems have been specifically set up to increase production. In one of these farms, abnormal spiral swimming associated with elevated mortalities occurred in repeated batches of imported perch shortly after stocking on several occasions. No bacterial or parasitic etiology was detected, but a virus grown in bluegill fry (BF-2) cells was identified as perch rhabdovirus. Subsequent investigations of other samples suggested a viral tropism for the central nervous system (CNS). Phylogenetic analysis of the partial N and entire G gene sequences positioned this isolate in genogroup C of the species Perch rhabdovirus, with high nucleotide and amino acid (aa) sequence identities with the DK5533 strain isolated in Denmark in 1989. Comparative studies using other closely related isolates allowed the distinction of 2 serological patterns among perch rhabdoviruses and the identification of a proline substitution by a serine in position 147 of the glycoprotein potentially involved in antigenic differentiation. Even if perch imported onto the farm tested negative by virus isolation prior to transport, they may have been the origin of this outbreak since CNS tissue was not included in the samples that were analyzed. Another possibility might be a sub-clinical infection with a viral load in resident fish too low to be detected. This study reports the first isolation of a perch rhabdovirus in Switzerland, and emphasizes the necessity of optimizing diagnostic tools that facilitate better control of the risks associated with fish translocation.

  16. Chronic environmental warming alters cardiovascular and haematological stress responses in European perch (Perca fluviatilis).

    PubMed

    Ekström, Andreas; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Fredrik Sundström, L; Adill, Anders; Aho, Teija; Sandblom, Erik

    2016-12-01

    Environmental warming and acute stress increase cardiorespiratory activity in ectothermic animals like fish. While thermal acclimation can buffer the direct thermal effects on basal cardiorespiratory function during chronic warming, little is known about how acclimation affects stress-induced cardiorespiratory responses. We compared cardiovascular and haematological responses to chasing stress in cannulated wild European perch (Perca fluviatilis) from a reference area at natural temperature (16 °C) with perch from the 'Biotest enclosure'; an experimental system chronically warmed (22 °C) by effluents from a nuclear power plant. Routine blood pressure was similar, but Biotest perch had slightly higher resting heart rate (59.9 ± 2.8 vs 51.3 ± 2.9 beats min(-1)), although the Q 10 for heart rate was 1.3, indicating pronounced thermal compensation. Chasing stress caused hypertension and a delayed tachycardia in both groups, but the maximum heart rate increase was 2.5-fold greater in Biotest fish (43.3 ± 4.3 vs 16.9 ± 2.7 beats min(-1)). Moreover, the pulse pressure response after stress was greater in reference fish, possibly due to the less pronounced tachycardia or a greater ventricular pressure generating capacity and thermally mediated differences in aortic compliance. Baseline haematological status was also similar, but after chasing stress, the haematocrit was higher in Biotest fish due to exacerbated red blood cell swelling. This study highlights that while eurythermal fishes can greatly compensate routine cardiorespiratory functions through acclimation processes, stress-induced responses may still differ markedly. This knowledge is essential when utilising cardiorespiratory variables to quantify and compare stress responses across environmental temperatures, and to forecast energetic costs and physiological constraints in ectothermic animals under global warming.

  17. Establishment and interspecific associations in two species of Ichthyocotylurus (Trematoda) parasites in perch (Perca fluviatilis)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Co-infections of multiple parasite species in hosts may lead to interspecific associations and subsequently shape the structure of a parasite community. However, few studies have focused on these associations in highly abundant parasite species or, in particular, investigated how the associations develop with time in hosts exposed to co-infecting parasite species for the first time. We investigated metacercarial establishment and interspecific associations in the trematodes Ichthyocotylurus variegatus and I. pileatus co-infecting three age cohorts of young perch (Perca fluviatilis). Results We found that the timing of transmission of the two Ichthyocotylurus species was very similar, but they showed differences in metacercarial development essentially so that the metacercariae of I. pileatus became encapsulated faster. Correlations between the abundances of the species were significantly positive after the first summer of host life and also within the main site of infection, the swim bladder. High or low abundances of both parasite species were also more frequent in the same host individuals than expected by chance, independently of host age or size. However, the highest abundances of the species were nevertheless observed in different host individuals and this pattern was consistent in all age cohorts. Conclusions The results suggest similar temporal patterns of transmission, non-random establishment, and facilitative rather than competitive associations between the parasite species independently of the age of the infracommunities. However, we suggest that spatial differences in exposure are most likely responsible for the segregation of the parasite species observed in the few most heavily infected hosts. Regardless of the underlying mechanism, the result suggests that between-species associations should be interpreted with caution along with detailed examination of the parasite distribution among host individuals. PMID:21599910

  18. A new clarification method to visualize biliary degeneration during liver metamorphosis in Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Davidson, Peter J; Scott, Anne M; Walaszczyk, Erin J; Brant, Cory O; Buchinger, Tyler; Johnson, Nicholas S; Li, Weiming

    2014-06-06

    Biliary atresia is a rare disease of infancy, with an estimated 1 in 15,000 frequency in the southeast United States, but more common in East Asian countries, with a reported frequency of 1 in 5,000 in Taiwan. Although much is known about the management of biliary atresia, its pathogenesis is still elusive. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) provides a unique opportunity to examine the mechanism and progression of biliary degeneration. Sea lamprey develop through three distinct life stages: larval, parasitic, and adult. During the transition from larvae to parasitic juvenile, sea lamprey undergo metamorphosis with dramatic reorganization and remodeling in external morphology and internal organs. In the liver, the entire biliary system is lost, including the gall bladder and the biliary tree. A newly-developed method called "CLARITY" was modified to clarify the entire liver and the junction with the intestine in metamorphic sea lamprey. The process of biliary degeneration was visualized and discerned during sea lamprey metamorphosis by using laser scanning confocal microscopy. This method provides a powerful tool to study biliary atresia in a unique animal model.

  19. Spawning patterns of Pacific Lamprey in tributaries to the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayfield, M.P.; Schultz, Luke; Wyss, Lance A.; Clemens, B. J.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    Addressing the ongoing decline of Pacific Lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus across its range along the west coast of North America requires an understanding of all life history phases. Currently, spawning surveys (redd counts) are a common tool used to monitor returning adult salmonids, but the methods are in their infancy for Pacific Lamprey. To better understand the spawning phase, our objective was to assess temporal spawning trends, redd abundance, habitat use, and spatial patterns of spawning at multiple spatial scales for Pacific Lamprey in the Willamette River basin, Oregon. Although redd density varied considerably across surveyed reaches, the observed temporal patterns of spawning were related to physical habitat and hydrologic conditions. As has been documented in studies in other basins in the Pacific Northwest, we found that redds were often constructed in pool tailouts dominated by gravel, similar to habitat used by spawning salmonids. Across the entire Willamette Basin, Pacific Lampreys appeared to select reaches with alluvial geology, likely because this is where gravel suitable for spawning accumulated. At the tributary scale, spawning patterns were not as strong, and in reaches with nonalluvial geology redds were more spatially clumped than in reaches with alluvial geology. These results can be used to help identify and conserve Pacific Lamprey spawning habitat across the Pacific Northwest.

  20. Blocking and guiding adult sea lamprey with pulsed direct current from vertical electrodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nicholas S.; Thompson, Henry T.; Holbrook, Christopher M.; Tix, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the invasion front of aquatic nuisance species is of high importance to resource managers. We tested the hypothesis that adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a destructive invasive species in the Laurentian Great Lakes, would exhibit behavioral avoidance to dual-frequency pulsed direct current generated by vertical electrodes and that the electric field would not injure or kill sea lamprey or non-target fish. Laboratory and in-stream experiments demonstrated that the electric field blocked sea lamprey migration and directed sea lamprey into traps. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and white sucker (Catostomus commersoni), species that migrate sympatrically with sea lamprey, avoided the electric field and had minimal injuries when subjected to it. Vertical electrodes are advantageous for fish guidance because (1) the electric field produced varies minimally with depth, (2) the electric field is not grounded, reducing power consumption to where portable and remote deployments powered by solar, wind, hydro, or a small generator are feasible, and (3) vertical electrodes can be quickly deployed without significant stream modification allowing rapid responses to new invasions. Similar dual-frequency pulsed direct current fields produced from vertical electrodes may be advantageous for blocking or trapping other invasive fish or for guiding valued fish around dams.

  1. A reporter assay in lamprey embryos reveals both functional conservation and elaboration of vertebrate enhancers.

    PubMed

    Parker, Hugo J; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Bronner, Marianne; Elgar, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The sea lamprey is an important model organism for investigating the evolutionary origins of vertebrates. As more vertebrate genome sequences are obtained, evolutionary developmental biologists are becoming increasingly able to identify putative gene regulatory elements across the breadth of the vertebrate taxa. The identification of these regions makes it possible to address how changes at the genomic level have led to changes in developmental gene regulatory networks and ultimately to the evolution of morphological diversity. Comparative genomics approaches using sea lamprey have already predicted a number of such regulatory elements in the lamprey genome. Functional characterisation of these sequences and other similar elements requires efficient reporter assays in lamprey. In this report, we describe the development of a transient transgenesis method for lamprey embryos. Focusing on conserved non-coding elements (CNEs), we use this method to investigate their functional conservation across the vertebrate subphylum. We find instances of both functional conservation and lineage-specific functional evolution of CNEs across vertebrates, emphasising the utility of functionally testing homologous CNEs in their host species.

  2. Biallelic editing of a lamprey genome using the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yao; Zhang, Xushuai; Ren, Jianfeng; Dong, Xuehong; Zhu, Zhe; Jia, Liang; Zhang, Qinghua; Li, Weiming

    2016-03-23

    Lampreys are extant representatives of agnathans. Descriptions of lamprey development, physiology and genome have provided critical insights into early evolution of vertebrate traits. However, efficient means for genetic manipulation in agnathan species have not been developed, hindering functional studies of genes in these important Evo-Devo models. Here, we report a CRISPR/Cas system optimized for lamprey genomes and use it to disrupt genomic loci in the Northeast Chinese lamprey (Lethenteron morii) with efficiencies ranging between 84~99%. The frequencies of indels observed in the target loci of golden (gol), kctd10, wee1, soxe2, and wnt7b, estimated from direct sequencing of genomic DNA samples of injected lamprey larvae, were 68/69, 47/56, 38/39, 36/37 and 36/42, respectively. These indels often occurred in both alleles. In the CRISPR/Cas9 treatment for gol or kctd10, 38.6% or 85.3% of the targeted larvae had the respective recessive null-like phenotypes, further confirming the disruption of both loci. The kctd10 gRNA, designed against an essential functional region of Kctd10, resulted in null-like phenotypes and in-frame mutations in alleles. We suggest that the CRISPR/Cas-based approach has the potential for efficient genetic perturbation in organisms less amenable to germ line transmission based approaches.

  3. Lamprey type II collagen and Sox9 reveal an ancient origin of the vertebrate collagenous skeleton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangjun; Miyamoto, Michael M; Cohn, Martin J

    2006-02-28

    Type II collagen is the major cartilage matrix protein in the jawed vertebrate skeleton. Lampreys and hagfishes, by contrast, are thought to have noncollagenous cartilage. This difference in skeletal structure has led to the hypothesis that the vertebrate common ancestor had a noncollagenous skeleton, with type II collagen becoming the predominant cartilage matrix protein after the divergence of jawless fish from the jawed vertebrates approximately 500 million years ago. Here we report that lampreys have two type II collagen (Col2alpha1) genes that are expressed during development of the cartilaginous skeleton. We also demonstrate that the adult lamprey skeleton is rich in Col2alpha1 protein. Furthermore, we have isolated a lamprey orthologue of Sox9, a direct transcriptional regulator of Col2alpha1 in jawed vertebrates, and show that it is coexpressed with both Col2alpha1 genes during skeletal development. These results reveal that the genetic pathway for chondrogenesis in lampreys and gnathostomes is conserved through the activation of cartilage matrix molecules and suggest that a collagenous skeleton evolved surprisingly early in vertebrate evolution.

  4. Mixture of new sulfated steroids functions as a migratory pheromone in the sea lamprey.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Peter W; Fine, Jared M; Dvornikovs, Vadims; Jeffrey, Christopher S; Shao, Feng; Wang, Jizhou; Vrieze, Lance A; Anderson, Kari R; Hoye, Thomas R

    2005-11-01

    The sea lamprey is an ancient, parasitic fish that invaded the Great Lakes a century ago, where it triggered the collapse of many fisheries. Like many fishes, this species relies on chemical cues to mediate key aspects of its life, including migration and reproduction. Here we report the discovery of a multicomponent steroidal pheromone that is released by stream-dwelling larval lamprey and guides adults to spawning streams. We isolated three compounds with pheromonal activity (in submilligram quantities from 8,000 l of larval holding water) and deduced their structures. The most important compound contains an unprecedented 1-(3-aminopropyl)pyrrolidin-2-one subunit and is related to squalamine, an antibiotic produced by sharks. We verified its structure by chemical synthesis; it attracts adult lamprey at very low (subpicomolar) concentrations. The second component is another new sulfated steroid and the third is petromyzonol sulfate, a known lamprey-specific bile acid derivative. This mixture is the first migratory pheromone identified in a vertebrate and is being investigated for use in lamprey control.

  5. Otx expression during lamprey embryogenesis provides insights into the evolution of the vertebrate head and jaw.

    PubMed

    Tomsa, J M; Langeland, J A

    1999-03-01

    Agnathan or jawless vertebrates, such as lampreys, occupy a critical phylogenetic position between the gnathostome or jawed vertebrates and the cephalochordates, represented by amphioxus. In order to gain insight into the evolution of the vertebrate head, we have cloned and characterized a homolog of the head-specific gene Otx from the lamprey Petromyzon marinus. This lamprey Otx gene is a clear phylogenetic outgroup to both the gnathostome Otx1 and Otx2 genes. Like its gnathostome counterparts, lamprey Otx is expressed throughout the presumptive forebrain and midbrain. Together, these results indicate that the divergence of Otx1 and Otx2 took place after the gnathostome/agnathan divergence and does not correlate with the origin of the vertebrate brain. Intriguingly, Otx is also expressed in the cephalic neural crest cells as well as mesenchymal and endodermal components of the first pharyngeal arch in lampreys, providing molecular evidence of homology with the gnathostome mandibular arch and insights into the evolution of the gnathostome jaw. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. Biallelic editing of a lamprey genome using the CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Yao; Zhang, Xushuai; Ren, Jianfeng; Dong, Xuehong; Zhu, Zhe; Jia, Liang; Zhang, Qinghua; Li, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Lampreys are extant representatives of agnathans. Descriptions of lamprey development, physiology and genome have provided critical insights into early evolution of vertebrate traits. However, efficient means for genetic manipulation in agnathan species have not been developed, hindering functional studies of genes in these important Evo-Devo models. Here, we report a CRISPR/Cas system optimized for lamprey genomes and use it to disrupt genomic loci in the Northeast Chinese lamprey (Lethenteron morii) with efficiencies ranging between 84~99%. The frequencies of indels observed in the target loci of golden (gol), kctd10, wee1, soxe2, and wnt7b, estimated from direct sequencing of genomic DNA samples of injected lamprey larvae, were 68/69, 47/56, 38/39, 36/37 and 36/42, respectively. These indels often occurred in both alleles. In the CRISPR/Cas9 treatment for gol or kctd10, 38.6% or 85.3% of the targeted larvae had the respective recessive null-like phenotypes, further confirming the disruption of both loci. The kctd10 gRNA, designed against an essential functional region of Kctd10, resulted in null-like phenotypes and in-frame mutations in alleles. We suggest that the CRISPR/Cas-based approach has the potential for efficient genetic perturbation in organisms less amenable to germ line transmission based approaches. PMID:27005311

  7. Horizontal Transfers of Tc1 Elements between Teleost Fishes and Their Vertebrate Parasites, Lampreys

    PubMed Central

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Qiu, Huan; Meyer, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been recognized to be an important mechanism that shaped the evolution and genomes of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. However, HGT is regarded to be exceedingly rare among eukaryotes. We discovered massive transfers of a DNA transposon, a Tc1 element encoding a transposase, between multiple teleost fishes and lampreys that last shared a common ancestor over 500 Ma. Members of this group of Tc1 elements were found to exhibit a mosaic phylogenetic distribution, yet their sequences were highly similar even between distantly related lineages (95%–99% identity). Our molecular phylogenetic analyses suggested that horizontal transfers of this element happened repeatedly, involving multiple teleost fishes that are phylogenetically only distantly related. Interestingly, almost all the affected teleost lineages are also known to be subject to lamprey parasitism, suggesting that the horizontal transfers between vertebrates might have occurred through parasite–host interaction. The genomes of several northern hemisphere lamprey species, including that of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), were found to contain thousands of copies of the foreign elements. Impact of this event is discussed in relation to other peculiar genomic features of lampreys. PMID:22887124

  8. Lethality of sea lamprey attacks on lake trout in relation to location on the body surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.; Schneider, Clifford P.; O'Gorman, Robert

    2001-01-01

    We compared the locations of healed attack marks of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus on live lake trout Salvelinus namaycush with those of unhealed attack marks on dead lake trout to determine if the lethality of a sea lamprey attack was related to attack location. Lake trout were collected from Lake Ontario, live fish with gill nets in September 1985 and dead fish with trawls in October 1983−1986. Attack location was characterized by the percent distances from snout to tail and from the ventral to the dorsal midline. Kolmogorov−Smirnov two-sample tests did not detect significant differences in the distribution of attack location along either the anteroposterior axis or the dorsoventral axis. When attack locations were grouped into six anatomical regions historically used to record sea lamprey attacks, dead fish did not exhibit a significantly higher proportion of attacks in the more anterior regions. Even if the differences in attack location on live and dead fish were significant, they were too small to imply substantial spatial differences in attack lethality that should be accounted for when modeling the effects of sea lampreys feeding on lake trout. We suggest that the tendency for sea lamprey attacks to occur on the anterior half of the fish is related to the lower amplitude of lateral body movement there during swimming and thus the lower likelihood of being dislodged.

  9. Anesthesia of juvenile Pacific Lampreys with MS-222, BENZOAK, AQUI-S 20E, and Aquacalm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, Helena E.; Gee, Lisa P.; Mesa, Matthew G.

    2013-01-01

    Effective anesthetics are a critical component of safe and humane fish handling procedures. We tested three concentrations each of four anesthetics—Finquel (tricaine methanesulfonate, herein referred to as MS-222), BENZOAK (20% benzocaine), AQUI-S 20E (10% eugenol), and Aquacalm (metomidate hydrochloride)—for efficacy and safety in metamorphosed, outmigrating juvenile Pacific Lampreys Entosphenus tridentatus. The anesthetics MS-222 (100 mg/L) and BENZOAK (60 mg/L) were the most effective for anesthetizing juvenile Pacific Lampreys to a handleable state with minimal irritation to the fish. Fish anesthetized with BENZOAK also had lower rates of fungal infection than those exposed to MS-222, AQUI-S 20E, or no anesthetic. Exposure to AQUI-S 20E irritated juvenile Pacific Lampreys, causing them to leap or climb out of the anesthetic solution, and Aquacalm anesthetized fish to a handleable state too slowly and incompletely for effective use with routine handling procedures. Our results indicate that MS-222 and BENZOAK are effective anesthetics for juvenile Pacific Lampreys, but field studies are needed to determine whether exposure to MS-222 increases risk of fungal infection in juvenile Pacific Lampreys released to the wild.

  10. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

    2003-10-01

    In 2002 Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine Pacific lamprey distribution, life history strategies, and habitat requirements in the South Fork Clearwater River, Lochsa River, Selway River, and Middle Fork Clearwater River subbasins. Five-hundred forty-one ammocoetes were captured electroshocking 70 sites in the South Fork Clearwater River, Lochsa River, Selway River, Middle Fork Clearwater River, Clearwater River, and their tributaries in 2002. Habitat utilization surveys in Red River support previous work indicating Pacific lamprey ammocoete densities are greater in lateral scour pool habitats compared to riffles and rapids. Presence-absence survey findings in 2002 augmented 2000 and 2001 indicating Pacific lamprey macrothalmia and ammocoetes are not numerous or widely distributed. Pacific lamprey distribution was confined to the lower reaches of Red River below rkm 8.0, the South Fork Clearwater River, Lochsa River (Ginger Creek to mouth), Selway River (Race Creek to mouth), Middle Fork Clearwater River, and the Clearwater River (downstream to Potlatch River).

  11. Evidence for early metamorphosis of sea lampreys in the Chippewa River, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morkert, Sidney B.; Swink, William D.; Seelye, James G.

    1998-01-01

    We determined age at metamorphosis to the juvenile or parasitic phase for sea lampreysPetromyzon marinus in a highly productive Great Lakes tributary to determine if the age at metamorphosis was earlier than expected. Ages determined from statoliths, a structure analogous to otoliths in teleost fishes, indicated that many sea lampreys collected from the Chippewa River, Michigan, in September 1995 were undergoing metamorphosis at age 2, at least 1 year earlier than previously observed. In all, 141 newly metamorphosed lampreys were examined, and 81% were estimated to be only 2 years old. The length-frequency distribution of newly metamorphosed sea lampreys in the Chippewa River also indicated the possibility of metamorphsis at age 2, but to a lesser extent than indicated by statolith aging. The Chippewa River is a highly productive stream that might require more frequent treatment than previously suspected. More careful examination of other highly productive streams is needed to determine if, and to what extent, sea lampreys metamorphose at age 2 in the Chippewa River and other Great Lakes tributaries.

  12. A spatial age-structured model for describing sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Jason M.; Wilberg, Michael J.; Adams, Jean V.; Jones, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The control of invasive sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) presents large scale management challenges in the Laurentian Great Lakes. No modeling approach has been developed that describes spatial dynamics of lamprey populations. We developed and validated a spatial and age-structured model and applied it to a sea lamprey population in a large river in the Great Lakes basin. We considered 75 discrete spatial areas, included a stock-recruitment function, spatial recruitment patterns, natural mortality, chemical treatment mortality, and larval metamorphosis. Recruitment was variable, and an upstream shift in recruitment location was observed over time. From 1993–2011 recruitment, larval abundance, and the abundance of metamorphosing individuals decreased by 80, 84, and 86%, respectively. The model successfully identified areas of high larval abundance and showed that areas of low larval density contribute significantly to the population. Estimated treatment mortality was less than expected but had a large population-level impact. The results and general approach of this work have applications for sea lamprey control throughout the Great Lakes and for the restoration and conservation of native lamprey species globally.

  13. Does DNA methylation regulate metamorphosis? The case of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) as an example.

    PubMed

    Covelo-Soto, Lara; Saura, María; Morán, Paloma

    2015-07-01

    Lampreys represent one of the most ancient vertebrate lineages enclosing a special interest for genetic and epigenetic studies. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is an anadromous species that experiences metamorphosis all the way up to the adult stage. Although representing a gradual process, metamorphosis in this species involves dramatic conversions with regard to physiological together with structural body changes preparing individuals for a marine and parasitic life; in consequence, multiple gene expression modifications are expected. The implications of thyroid hormones and HOX gene expression changes have previously been reported in this species and also in other vertebrate species. Nonetheless, information lacks on how these genes are regulated in lampreys. We here report about the existence of methylation pattern differences between the adult and the larvae sea lamprey life cycle stages making use of the Methylation-Sensitive Amplified Polymorphism (MSAP) technique. Differentially methylated fragment sequencing allowed to establish homologous identities with HOX genes involved in morphogenesis, along with genes related to the water balance and to the osmotic homoeostasis, all associated to a marine environment adaptation. These results provide evidences revealing that DNA methylation plays a role in the epigenetic regulation of the P. marinus post-natal development representing a starting point for future studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study which detects DNA methylation changes associated with metamorphosis in lampreys. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diseases and parasites of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, in the Lake Huron basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLain, Alberton L.

    1952-01-01

    Sea lampreys from the Lake Huron basin carried no external parasites and showed a fairly low degree of infection by internal parasites. The material examined represented three life-history stages of the sea lamprey. Recently transformed downstream migrants (215 specimens) harbored only nematodes belonging to the genus Camallanus. The percentage of infection was 2.3. Active feeders from the lake (29 lampreys) revealed the highest degree of parasitism (31.0 percent) with the following parasites present: Echinorhynchus coregoni Linkins; Triaenophorus crassus Forel; and Camallanus sp. Among the 257 sexually mature upstream migrants (14.8 percent infected) Echinorhynchus coregoni and E. leidyi Van Cleave were the most common. Only occasional nematodes and cestodes were found, which fact indicates a failure of the lamprey to carry these parasites to the end of its natural life. Of the parasites observed, only the nematodes gave evidence of serious damage to the host. The study suggests that the role played by parasites in the natural control of the sea lamprey in its new habitat in the upper Great Lakes is of minor importance.

  15. Wake structures behind a swimming robotic lamprey with a passively flexible tail.

    PubMed

    Leftwich, Megan C; Tytell, Eric D; Cohen, Avis H; Smits, Alexander J

    2012-02-01

    A robotic lamprey, based on the silver lamprey, Ichthyomyzon unicuspis, was used to investigate the influence of passive tail flexibility on the wake structure and thrust production during anguilliform swimming. A programmable microcomputer actuated 11 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The waveform was based on kinematic studies of living lamprey, and the shape of the tail was taken from a computer tomography scan of the silver lamprey. The tail was constructed of flexible PVC gel, and nylon inserts were used to change its degree of flexibility. Particle image velocimetry measurements using three different levels of passive flexibility show that the large-scale structure of the wake is dominated by the formation of two pairs of vortices per shedding cycle, as seen in the case of a tail that flexed actively according to a pre-defined kinematic pattern, and did not bend in response to fluid forces. When the tail is passively flexible, however, the large structures are composed of a number of smaller vortices, and the wake loses coherence as the degree of flexibility increases. Momentum balance calculations indicate that, at a given tailbeat frequency, increasing the tail flexibility yields less net force, but changing the cycle frequency to match the resonant frequency of the tail increases the force production.

  16. Wake structures behind a swimming robotic lamprey with a passively flexible tail

    PubMed Central

    Leftwich, Megan C.; Tytell, Eric D.; Cohen, Avis H.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A robotic lamprey, based on the silver lamprey, Ichthyomyzon unicuspis, was used to investigate the influence of passive tail flexibility on the wake structure and thrust production during anguilliform swimming. A programmable microcomputer actuated 11 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The waveform was based on kinematic studies of living lamprey, and the shape of the tail was taken from a computer tomography scan of the silver lamprey. The tail was constructed of flexible PVC gel, and nylon inserts were used to change its degree of flexibility. Particle image velocimetry measurements using three different levels of passive flexibility show that the large-scale structure of the wake is dominated by the formation of two pairs of vortices per shedding cycle, as seen in the case of a tail that flexed actively according to a pre-defined kinematic pattern, and did not bend in response to fluid forces. When the tail is passively flexible, however, the large structures are composed of a number of smaller vortices, and the wake loses coherence as the degree of flexibility increases. Momentum balance calculations indicate that, at a given tailbeat frequency, increasing the tail flexibility yields less net force, but changing the cycle frequency to match the resonant frequency of the tail increases the force production. PMID:22246250

  17. Prosomeric map of the lamprey forebrain based on calretinin immunocytochemistry, Nissl stain, and ancillary markers.

    PubMed

    Pombal, M A; Puelles, L

    1999-11-22

    The structural organization of the lamprey extratelencephalic forebrain is re-examined from the perspective of the prosomeric segmental paradigm. The question asked was whether the prosomeric forebrain model used for gnathostomes is of material advantage for interpreting subdivisions in the lamprey forebrain. To this aim, the main longitudinal and transverse landmarks recognized by the prosomeric model in other vertebrates were identified in Nissl-stained lamprey material. Lines of cytoarchitectural discontinuity and contours of migrated neuronal groups were mapped in a two-dimensional sagittal representation and were also classified according to their radial position. Immunocytochemical mapping of calretinin expression in adjacent sections served to define particular structural units better, in particular, the dorsal thalamus. These data were complemented by numerous other chemoarchitectonic observations obtained with ancillary markers, which identified additional specific formations, subdivisions, or boundaries. Emphasis was placed on studying whether such chemically defined neuronal groups showed boundaries aligned with the postulated inter- or intraprosomeric boundaries. The course of diverse axonal tracts was studied also with regard to their prosomeric topography. This analysis showed that the full prosomeric model applies straightforwardly to the lamprey forebrain. This finding implies that a common segmental and longitudinal organization of the neural tube may be primitive for all vertebrates. Interesting novel aspects appear in the interpretation of the lamprey pretectum, the dorsal and ventral thalami, and the hypothalamus. The topologic continuity of the prosomeric forebrain regions with evaginated or non-evaginated portions of the telencephalon was also examined.

  18. Lamprey type II collagen and Sox9 reveal an ancient origin of the vertebrate collagenous skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, GuangJun; Miyamoto, Michael M.; Cohn, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    Type II collagen is the major cartilage matrix protein in the jawed vertebrate skeleton. Lampreys and hagfishes, by contrast, are thought to have noncollagenous cartilage. This difference in skeletal structure has led to the hypothesis that the vertebrate common ancestor had a noncollagenous skeleton, with type II collagen becoming the predominant cartilage matrix protein after the divergence of jawless fish from the jawed vertebrates ≈500 million years ago. Here we report that lampreys have two type II collagen (Col2α1) genes that are expressed during development of the cartilaginous skeleton. We also demonstrate that the adult lamprey skeleton is rich in Col2α1 protein. Furthermore, we have isolated a lamprey orthologue of Sox9, a direct transcriptional regulator of Col2α1 in jawed vertebrates, and show that it is coexpressed with both Col2α1 genes during skeletal development. These results reveal that the genetic pathway for chondrogenesis in lampreys and gnathostomes is conserved through the activation of cartilage matrix molecules and suggest that a collagenous skeleton evolved surprisingly early in vertebrate evolution. PMID:16492784

  19. Horizontal transfers of Tc1 elements between teleost fishes and their vertebrate parasites, lampreys.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Qiu, Huan; Meyer, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been recognized to be an important mechanism that shaped the evolution and genomes of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. However, HGT is regarded to be exceedingly rare among eukaryotes. We discovered massive transfers of a DNA transposon, a Tc1 element encoding a transposase, between multiple teleost fishes and lampreys that last shared a common ancestor over 500 Ma. Members of this group of Tc1 elements were found to exhibit a mosaic phylogenetic distribution, yet their sequences were highly similar even between distantly related lineages (95%-99% identity). Our molecular phylogenetic analyses suggested that horizontal transfers of this element happened repeatedly, involving multiple teleost fishes that are phylogenetically only distantly related. Interestingly, almost all the affected teleost lineages are also known to be subject to lamprey parasitism, suggesting that the horizontal transfers between vertebrates might have occurred through parasite-host interaction. The genomes of several northern hemisphere lamprey species, including that of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), were found to contain thousands of copies of the foreign elements. Impact of this event is discussed in relation to other peculiar genomic features of lampreys.

  20. A new clarification method to visualize biliary degeneration during liver metamorphosis in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Davidson, Peter J.; Scott, Anne M.; Walaszczyk, Erin J.; Brant, Cory O.; Buchinger, Tyler; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a rare disease of infancy, with an estimated 1 in 15,000 frequency in the southeast United States, but more common in East Asian countries, with a reported frequency of 1 in 5,000 in Taiwan. Although much is known about the management of biliary atresia, its pathogenesis is still elusive. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) provides a unique opportunity to examine the mechanism and progression of biliary degeneration. Sea lamprey develop through three distinct life stages: larval, parasitic, and adult. During the transition from larvae to parasitic juvenile, sea lamprey undergo metamorphosis with dramatic reorganization and remodeling in external morphology and internal organs. In the liver, the entire biliary system is lost, including the gall bladder and the biliary tree. A newly-developed method called “CLARITY” was modified to clarify the entire liver and the junction with the intestine in metamorphic sea lamprey. The process of biliary degeneration was visualized and discerned during sea lamprey metamorphosis by using laser scanning confocal microscopy. This method provides a powerful tool to study biliary atresia in a unique animal model.

  1. Genes predict long distance migration and large body size in a migratory fish, Pacific lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Jon E; Caudill, Christopher C; Keefer, Matthew L; McIlraith, Brian J; Moser, Mary L; Narum, Shawn R

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of genetic mechanisms underpinning migratory behavior could help predict how changes in genetic diversity may affect future spatiotemporal distribution of a migratory species. This ability would benefit conservation of one such declining species, anadromous Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus). Nonphilopatric migration of adult Pacific lamprey has homogenized population-level neutral variation but has maintained adaptive variation that differentiates groups based on geography, run-timing and adult body form. To investigate causes for this adaptive divergence, we examined 647 adult lamprey sampled at a fixed location on the Columbia River and radiotracked during their subsequent upstream migration. We tested whether genetic variation [94 neutral and adaptive single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously identified from a genomewide association study] was associated with phenotypes of migration distance, migration timing, or morphology. Three adaptive markers were strongly associated with morphology, and one marker also correlated with upstream migration distance and timing. Genes physically linked with these markers plausibly influence differences in body size, which is also consistently associated with migration distance in Pacific lamprey. Pacific lamprey conservation implications include the potential to predict an individual's upstream destination based on its genotype. More broadly, the results suggest a genetic basis for intrapopulation variation in migration distance in migratory species. PMID:25558280

  2. Effects of nonlethal sea lamprey attack on the blood chemistry of lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Carol Cotant; Swink, William D.

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory study examined changes in the blood chemistry of field-caught and hatchery-reared lake trout Salvelinus namaycush subjected to a nonlethal attack by sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus. We measured glucose, total protein, amylase, alkaline phosphatase (ALKP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase, calcium, magnesium, triglycerides, sodium, and potassium with a Kodak Ektachem DT60 Analyzer, Ektachem DTSC Module, and the DTE Module. Mean levels of total protein, AST, ALKP, hematocrit, calcium, magnesium, and sodium decreased significantly (Pa?? 0.05), and mean levels of ALT and potassium increased significantly (Pa?? 0.05) after sea lamprey feeding. Lake trout condition (K) and hematocrit levels also decreased significantly (Pa?? 0.05) after the sea lamprey attack. Frequency distributions of eight lake trout blood chemistry variables and the hematocrit were significantly different before and after a sea lamprey attack. A second study that used hatchery lake trout broodstock measured changes in hematocrit before and after a sea lamprey attack.

  3. Growth, age at metamorphosis, and sex ratio of northern brook lamprey in a tributary of southern Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purvis, Harold A.

    1970-01-01

    Growth was studied of five year classes of the northern brook lamprey, Ichthyomyzon fossor, collected from the Sturgeon River during intervals between treatment of the stream with a lampricide. Growth varied considerably among year classes. Larvae of the 1963 year class were slightly longer at age II and 30% longer at age III than the III-group larvae of the 1960 year class. About 6% of 558 III-group lampreys of the 1963 year class had metamorphosed by 17 August 1966. Although the sex ratio of larvae was about 1:1, 97% of the metamorphosed lampreys were males. The distribution of pigmentation on the caudal fin and upper lip in ammocoetes less than 40 mm long permitted accurate and rapid separation of northern brook lampreys from the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

  4. A practical method for obtaining useful quantities of pheromones from sea lamprey and other fishes for identification and control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fine, J.M.; Sisler, S.P.; Vrieze, L.A.; Swink, W.D.; Sorensen, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    Pheromonally-mediated trapping is currently being developed for use in sea lamprey control in the Laurentian Great Lakes. To identify and test lamprey pheromones a practical procedure was needed to isolate relatively large quantities of pheromone from lamprey holding water. The present study developed such a technique. It employs Amberlite XAD7HP, an adsorbent resin which we found can extract over 80% of the sea lamprey migratory pheromone from larval holding water at low cost and with relative ease. This technique allowed its to collect tens of milligrams of all three components of the sea lamprey migratory pheromone, eventually permitting both identification and successful field testing. This technique might also be used to collect pheromones released by other species of fish.

  5. Purification and characterization of a liver-derived beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase from marine mammal Sotalia fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Gomes Júnior, J E; Souza, D S L; Nascimento, R M; Lima, A L M; Melo, J A T; Rocha, T L; Miller, R N G; Franco, O L; Grossi-de-Sa, M F; Abreu, L R D

    2010-04-01

    A beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.52) was purified from hepatic extracts of Sotalia fluviatilis, order Cetacea. The protein was purified by using ammonium sulfate fractionation and four subsequent chromatographies (Biogel A 1.5 m, Chitin, Deae-Biogel and hydroxyapatite resins). After these purification steps, the enzyme was purified 380.5-fold with an 8.4% yield. The molecular mass (10 kDa) was estimated by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analysis. A Km of 2.72 mM and Vmax 9.5 x 10(-6) micromol/(min x mg) were found for this enzyme, determined by p-nitrophenyl-beta-D: -hexosaminide substrate digestion. Optimal pH and temperature for beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase activity were 5.0 and 60 degrees C, respectively. Enzyme activity was inhibited by sodium selenate (Na(2)SeO(4)), mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (C(12)H(25)SO(4)Na), and activated by zinc, calcium, barium and lithium ions. Characterization of the beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase in Sotalia fluviatilis can be a basis for physiological studies in this species.

  6. Visual potentiation of vestibular responses in lamprey reticulospinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ullén, F; Deliagina, T G; Orlovsky, G N; Grillner, S

    1996-11-01

    The lamprey normally swims with the dorsal side up. Illumination of one eye shifts the set-point of the vestibular roll control system, however, so that the animal swims with a roll tilt towards the source of light (the dorsal light response). A tilted orientation is often maintained for up to 1 min after the stimulation. In present study, the basis for this behaviour was investigated at the neuronal level. The middle rhombencephalic reticular nucleus (MRRN) is considered a main nucleus for the control of roll orientation in lampreys. Practically all MRRN neurons receive vestibular and visual input and project to the spinal cord. Earlier extracellular experiments had shown that optic nerve stimulation potentiates the response to vestibular stimulation in the ipsilateral MRRN. This most likely represents a neural correlate of the dorsal light response. Experiments were carried out in vitro on the isolated brainstem of the silver lamprey (Ichthyomyzon unicuspis). MRRN cells were recorded intracellularly, and the overall activity of descending systems was monitored with bilateral extracellular electrodes. The responses to 10 Hz optic nerve stimulation and 1 Hz vestibular nerve stimulation, and the influence of optic nerve stimulation on the vestibular responses, were investigated. In most preparations, optic nerve stimulation excited practically all ipsilateral MRRN cells. After stimulation, the cell was typically depolarized and showed an increased level of synaptic noise for up to 80 s. In contralateral MRRN neurons, optic nerve stimulation usually evoked hyperpolarization or no response. Vestibular nerve stimulation evoked compound excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) or spikes in approximately 90% of the cells, both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. A smaller subpopulation of MRRN cells (approximately 10%) received vestibular inhibition. In 26 of 48 recorded MRRN cells, the response to vestibular stimulation was potentiated after ipsilateral optic nerve

  7. Chemical Characterization of Lipophilic Constituents in the Skin of Migratory Adult Sea Lamprey from the Great Lakes Region

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, Amila A.; Wagner, C. Michael; Nair, Muraleedharan G.

    2016-01-01

    The sea lamprey (Petromzons marinus) is an invasive ectoparasite of large-bodied fishes that adversely affects the fishing industry and ecology of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Lipid content in the whole sea lamprey and muscles, liver and kidney of metamorphosing larval stages has been reported. Similarly, the fatty acid profile of the rope tissues of sexually-mature male sea lampreys has also been reported. The average body weight of a sub-adult migratory sea lamprey is 250 g, which includes 14.4% skin (36 g). Our preliminary extraction data of an adult sea lamprey skin revealed that it contained approximately 8.5% of lipophilic compounds. Lamprey skin is home to a naturally aversive compound (an alarm cue) that is being developed into a repellent for use in pest management. As part of an ongoing investigation to identify the chemical structure of the sea lamprey alarm cue, we extracted the skin with water and methanol, respectively. The methanolic extract (1.55%) contained exclusively lipophilic compounds and did not include the alarm cue. We chemically characterized all compounds present in the methanolic extract as cholesterol esters (CE), tri- and di-glycerides (TG and DG), cholesterol, free fatty acids (FFA) and minor amounts of plasticizers. The free fatty acids fraction was composed of saturated (41.8%), monounsaturated (40.7%) and polyunsaturated (17.4%) fatty acids, respectively. The plasticizers characterized were phthalate and benzoate and found to be 0.95 mg and 2.54 mg, respectively, per adult sea lamprey skin. This is the first report of the chemical characterization of all the lipophilic constituents in the skin of sub-adult migratory sea lamprey. The CEs isolated and characterized from sea lamprey skin are also for the first time. PMID:27992570

  8. Chemical Characterization of Lipophilic Constituents in the Skin of Migratory Adult Sea Lamprey from the Great Lakes Region.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Amila A; Wagner, C Michael; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2016-01-01

    The sea lamprey (Petromzons marinus) is an invasive ectoparasite of large-bodied fishes that adversely affects the fishing industry and ecology of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Lipid content in the whole sea lamprey and muscles, liver and kidney of metamorphosing larval stages has been reported. Similarly, the fatty acid profile of the rope tissues of sexually-mature male sea lampreys has also been reported. The average body weight of a sub-adult migratory sea lamprey is 250 g, which includes 14.4% skin (36 g). Our preliminary extraction data of an adult sea lamprey skin revealed that it contained approximately 8.5% of lipophilic compounds. Lamprey skin is home to a naturally aversive compound (an alarm cue) that is being developed into a repellent for use in pest management. As part of an ongoing investigation to identify the chemical structure of the sea lamprey alarm cue, we extracted the skin with water and methanol, respectively. The methanolic extract (1.55%) contained exclusively lipophilic compounds and did not include the alarm cue. We chemically characterized all compounds present in the methanolic extract as cholesterol esters (CE), tri- and di-glycerides (TG and DG), cholesterol, free fatty acids (FFA) and minor amounts of plasticizers. The free fatty acids fraction was composed of saturated (41.8%), monounsaturated (40.7%) and polyunsaturated (17.4%) fatty acids, respectively. The plasticizers characterized were phthalate and benzoate and found to be 0.95 mg and 2.54 mg, respectively, per adult sea lamprey skin. This is the first report of the chemical characterization of all the lipophilic constituents in the skin of sub-adult migratory sea lamprey. The CEs isolated and characterized from sea lamprey skin are also for the first time.

  9. Evidence that sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) complete their life cycle within a tributary of the Laurentian Great Lakes by parasitizing fishes in inland lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nicholas; Twohey, Michael B.; Miehls, Scott M.; Cwalinski, Tim A; Godby, Neal A; Lochet, Aude; Slade, Jeffrey W.; Jubar, Aaron K.; Siefkes, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) invaded the upper Laurentian Great Lakes and feeds on valued fish. The Cheboygan River, Michigan, USA, is a large sea lamprey producing tributary to Lake Huron and despite having a renovated dam 2 km from the river mouth that presumably blocks sea lamprey spawning migrations, the watershed upstream of the dam remains infested with larval sea lamprey. A navigational lock near the dam has been hypothesized as the means of escapement of adult sea lampreys from Lake Huron and source of the upper river population (H1). However, an alternative hypothesis (H2) is that some sea lampreys complete their life cycle upstream of the dam, without entering Lake Huron. To evaluate the alternative hypothesis, we gathered angler reports of lamprey wounds on game fishes upstream of the dam, and captured adult sea lampreys downstream and upstream of the dam to contrast abundance, run timing, size, and statolith microchemistry. Results indicate that a small population of adult sea lampreys (n < 200) completed their life cycle upstream of the dam during 2013 and 2014. This is the most comprehensive evidence that sea lampreys complete their life history within a tributary of the upper Great Lakes, and indicates that similar landlocked populations could occur in other watersheds. Because the adult sea lamprey population upstream of the dam is small, complete elimination of the already low adult escapement from Lake Huron might allow multiple control tactics such as lampricides, trapping, and sterile male release to eradicate the population.

  10. Confirmation of Two Sibling Species among Anopheles fluviatilis Mosquitoes in South and Southeastern Iran by Analysis of Cytochrome Oxidase I Gene

    PubMed Central

    Naddaf, Saied Reza; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Vatandoost, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Anopheles fluviatilis, one of the major malaria vectors in Iran, is assumed to be a complex of sibling species. The aim of this study was to evaluate Cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene alongside 28S-D3 as a diagnostic tool for identification of An. fluviatilis sibling species in Iran. Methods: DNA sample belonging to 24 An. fluviatilis mosquitoes from different geographical areas in south and southeastern Iran were used for amplification of COI gene followed by sequencing. The 474–475 bp COI sequences obtained in this study were aligned with 59 similar sequences of An. fluviatilis and a sequence of Anopheles minimus, as out group, from GenBank database. The distances between group and individual sequences were calculated and phylogenetic tree for obtained sequences was generated by using Kimura two parameter (K2P) model of neighbor-joining method. Results: Phylogenetic analysis using COI gene grouped members of Fars Province (central Iran) in two distinct clades separate from other Iranian members representing Hormozgan, Kerman, and Sistan va Baluchestan Provinces. The mean distance between Iranian and Indian individuals was 1.66%, whereas the value between Fars Province individuals and the group comprising individuals from other areas of Iran was 2.06%. Conclusion: Presence of 2.06% mean distance between individuals from Fars Province and those from other areas of Iran is indicative of at least two sibling species in An. fluviatilis mosquitoes of Iran. This finding confirms earlier results based on RAPD-PCR and 28S-D3 analysis. PMID:23378972

  11. Downstream movement of lampreys and fish in the Carp Lake River, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Applegate, Vernon C.

    1961-01-01

    An inclined-screen trap was installed on the Carp River, Emmett County, Michigan, in the spring of 1948 and has been in almost continuous operation since that time. The major goal of this project--a precise determination of the length of the larval life of sea lamprey--was not attained because of the contamination of the stream above the dam with spawning lampreys. The lampreys and other fishes collected in the trap did, however, provide extensive and valuable biological information. The present report documents much of the information, largely in tabular form, accumulated over the operating seasons, 1948-49 through 1957-58; the amount of detail has been varied according to the importance of the topic under consideration or the amount required to bring out a particular point.

  12. Kinematics and flow fields in 3D around swimming lamprey using light field PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Andrea M.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2016-11-01

    The fully time-resolved 3D kinematics and flow field velocities around freely swimming sea lamprey are derived using 3D light field imaging PIV. Lighthill's Elongated Body Theory (EBT) predicts that swimmers with anguilliform kinematics likened to lamprey, and similarly eels, will exhibit relatively poor propulsive efficiency. However, previous experimental studies of eel locomotion utilizing 2D PIV suggest disagreement with EBT estimates of wake properties; although, the thrust force generated by such swimmers has yet to be fully resolved using 3D measurements. A light field imaging array of multiple high-speed cameras is used to perform 3D synthetic aperture PIV around ammocoete sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). Fluid mechanics equations are used to determine thrust force generation, leading experimental studies closer to underpinning the physical mechanisms that enable aquatic locomotion of long, slender undulatory swimmers.

  13. Flowing-recirculated water system for inducing spawning phase sea lampreys to spawn in the laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredricks, Kim T.; Seelye, James G.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a water-recirculating system for inducing spawning of sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) held under laboratory conditions. Water temperature in the system was gradually increased to and maintained at 18 ± 2°C, the optimal temperature for spawning. About 10% freshwater was added daily to prevent buildup of waste products. Sea lampreys were provided substrate (approximately 3–6 cm in diameter) to build nests, and a water velocity of 0.2–0.3 m!s was maintained with an electric trolling motor. Sea lampreys held in this system exhibited characteristic spawning behavior. Prolarvae produced from artificial fertilization of gametes developed according to the standard timeline.

  14. An integrated muscle mechanic-fluid dynamic model of lamprey swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; Tytell, Eric; Fauci, Lisa

    2009-11-01

    In an effort towards a detailed understanding of the generation and control of vertebrate locomotion, including the role of the CPG and its interactions with reflexive feedback, muscle mechanics, and external fluid dynamics, we study a simple vertebrate, the lamprey. Lamprey body undulations are a result of a wave of neural activation that passes from head to tail, causing a wave of muscle activation. These active forces are mediated by passive structural forces. We present recent results from a model that fully couples a viscous, incompressible fluid with nonlinear muscle mechanics. We measure the dependence of the phase lag between activation wave and mechanical wave as a function of model parameters, such as body stiffness and muscle strength. Simulation results are compared to experiments utilizing both real and synthetic lamprey.

  15. Petromyzonol sulfate and its derivatives: the chemoattractants of the sea lamprey.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, K V

    2005-02-01

    Petromyzonol sulfate (PZS) and 3 keto-PZS are bile alocohol derivatives that serve as chemoattractants during the life cycle of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The sulfonate moiety is crucial perhaps conferring the required solubility for the pheromone that is released into the streams and for the specificity to bind to its receptor. During the life cycle of lamprey, larvae produce copious amounts of 5 alpha-cholan-PZS, and trace amounts of allocholic acid (ACA), which attracts adults to the same breeding ground. Later the spermeating males produce 3keto-PZS, and trace amounts of 3-keto-ACA, which attracts the ovulating females, signaling both its reproductive status and its nesting location for successful reproduction. In both stages, a mixture of components serves as pheromone plume, similar to insects. The receptors for the migratory and the reproductive pheromones need to be molecularly cloned and characterized in order to understand the molecular biology of olfaction in the sea lamprey.

  16. Evolution of adaptive immunity: implications of a third lymphocyte lineage in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Kishishita, Natsuko; Nagawa, Fumikiyo

    2014-03-01

    An alternative antigen receptor, named the variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR), was first identified in lampreys in 2004. Since then, the mechanism of VLR diversification via somatic gene assembly and the function of VLR-expressing lymphocytes have been the subject of much research. VLRs comprise leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs and are found only in the most phylogenetically distant vertebrates from mammals, lampreys, and hagfish. Previous reports showed that VLRA and VLRB are reciprocally expressed by lymphocytes that resemble T- and B cells; however, more recent reports show that another VLR, VLRC, is expressed on a third lymphocyte lineage, which may be equivalent to γδ T cells. The existence of three major lymphocyte lineages - one B-cell-like and two T-cell-like - and their development in lampreys, parallels the mammalian adaptive immune system. This suggests that these three cell lineages were present in the common vertebrate ancestor approximately 500 million years ago. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Efficacy of animal anti-fertility compounds against sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ciereszko, Andrzej; Babiak, Igor; Dabrowski, Konrad

    2004-04-15

    Sterile-male-release technique is currently used to control the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) population in the Great Lakes. The chemosterilant (bisazir) used in this program is extremely hazardous; special safety measures are necessary when handling this chemical. Therefore, replacement of bisazir with safer agents is desirable. In this study, we examined the effects of low-toxicity compounds with previously described spermicidal activity (mainly against mammalian sperm) on motility and fertilizing ability of sea lamprey spermatozoa. Nonoxynol-9, benzalkonium chloride, zinc acetate, cupric chloride, cysteamine, tannic acid and propranolol were able to inhibit both sperm motility and fertilizing ability. Effective concentrations of these spermicides ranged from 0.15 to 1%. Therefore, they can be potentially used in further study directed at in vivo sterilization of male sea lampreys.

  18. The lamprey pallium provides a blueprint of the mammalian motor projections from cortex.

    PubMed

    Ocaña, Francisco M; Suryanarayana, Shreyas M; Saitoh, Kazuya; Kardamakis, Andreas A; Capantini, Lorenza; Robertson, Brita; Grillner, Sten

    2015-02-16

    The frontal lobe control of movement in mammals has been thought to be a specific function primarily related to the layered neocortex with its efferent connections. In contrast, we now show that the same basic organization is present even in one of the phylogenetically oldest vertebrates, the lamprey. Stimulation of specific sites in the pallium/cortex evokes eye, trunk, locomotor, or oral movements. The pallial projection neurons target brainstem motor centers and basal ganglia subnuclei and have prominent dendrites extending into the outer molecular layer. They exhibit the characteristic features of pyramidal neurons and elicit monosynaptic glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic potentials in output neurons of the optic tectum, reticulospinal neurons, and, as shown earlier, basal ganglia neurons. Our results demonstrate marked similarities in the efferent functional connectivity and control of motor behavior between the lamprey pallium and mammalian neocortex. Thus, the lamprey motor pallium/cortex represents an evolutionary blueprint of the corresponding mammalian system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Do summer temperatures trigger spring maturation in pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clemens, B.J.; Van De Wetering, S.; Kaufman, J.; Holt, R.A.; Schreck, C.B.

    2009-01-01

    Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus, return to streams and use somatic energy to fuel maturation. Body size decreases, the lamprey mature, spawn, and then die. We predicted that warm, summer temperatures (>20 ??C) would accentuate shrinkage in body size, and expedite sexual maturation and subsequent death. We compared fish reared in the laboratory at diel fluctuating temperatures of 20-24 ??C (mean = 21.8 ??C) with fish reared at cooler temperatures (13.6 ??C). The results confirmed our predictions. Lamprey from the warm water group showed significantly greater proportional decreases in body weight following the summer temperature treatments than fish from the cool water group. A greater proportion of warm water fish sexually matured (100%) and died (97%) the following spring than cool water fish (53% sexually mature, 61% died). Females tended to mature and die earlier than males, most obviously in the warm water group. ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Occurrence of Ergasilus megaceros Wilson, 1916, in the sea lamprey and other fishes from North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muzzall, Patrick M.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    2004-01-01

    Ergasilus megaceros (Copepoda: Ergasilidae) was recovered from the nasal fossae (lamellae) of the olfactory sac in 1 (1.8%) of 56 sea lampreys, Petromyzon marinus Linne, 1758, collected in May 2002 from the Cheboygan River, Michigan. Although the sea lamprey is a new host record for E. megaceros, this fish species may not be a preferred host because of its low prevalence. Ergasilus megaceros is the second ergasilid species reported from the sea lamprey in North America. This is the third report of an ergasilid species infecting the nasal fossae of fishes in North America, with E. rhinos being the only other species reported from this site.

  1. Design of a closed system water tunnel for lamprey swimming analysis.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, C M; Knapp, C F; Jung, R

    1997-01-01

    This work presents a swim mill design that can be used to study locomotor behavior in intact awake lamprey. The design is constrained by the swimming characteristics and anatomy of young adult lamprey and allows for electrophysiological monitoring of muscle activity and imaging of motor behavior. The design has a test section for animal containment and monitoring of motor behavior, a water reservoir, a water pump, and equipment for biological adaptations (water purification, chilling, & aeration systems). The 36 sq. inch acrylic test section is preceded by a turbulence-reducing converging nozzle, while a 1400 gallon reservoir maintains the system's hydrostatic head and acts as a settling chamber. This swim mill design will be used to examine lamprey swimming behavior under different environmental conditions (e.g., water velocity, turbulence, external perturbations).

  2. Production of sea lamprey larvae from nests in two Lake Superior streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1968-01-01

    The life history of the landlocked sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, has been described by several authors, the two most recent of which are Applegate and Wigley. The only information on the production of larvae from nests of the sea lamprey was reported by Applegate, who counted the larvae from three nests in the Ocqueoc River, a tributary of Lake Huron. The present report presents data on the hatching success of sea lamprey larvae from 19 nests in two small tributaries of southern Lake Superior and indicates greater production per nest than that recorded by Applegate. Studies were conducted by personnel of the U.S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries on the Little Garlic River, Marquette County, Michigan, and on the Traverse River, Keweenaw County, Michigan.

  3. Purification and identification of cell surface antigens using lamprey monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuiling; Ali, Shabab; St. Germain, Jonathan; Liu, Yanling; Yu, Xuecong; Jaye, David L.; Moran, Michael F.; Cooper, Max D.; Ehrhardt, Götz R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) B antibodies of the evolutionary distant sea lamprey are structurally distinct from conventional mammalian antibodies. The different protein architecture and large evolutionary distance of jawless vertebrates suggest that VLR antibodies may represent promising tools for biomarker discovery. Here we report the generation of panels of monoclonal VLR antibodies from lamprey larvae immunized with human T cells and the use of a recombinant monoclonal VLR antibody for antigen purification and mass spectrometric identification. We demonstrate that despite predicted low affinity of individual VLR antigen binding units to the antigen, the high avidity resulting from decameric assembly of secreted VLR antibodies allows for efficient antigen capture and subsequent identification by mass spectometry. We show that VLR antibodies detect their antigens with high specificity and can be used in various standard laboratory application techniques. The lamprey antibodies are novel reagents that can complement conventional monoclonal antibodies in multiple scientific research disciplines. PMID:22964555

  4. [Expression and bioactivity effects to Hela of recombinant toxin protein rLj-RGD3 from Lampetra japonica].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Piqiao; Wang, Jihong; Liu, Xin; Chu, Dan; Li, Qingwei

    2009-05-01

    Lj-RGD3 was a toxin from the saliva gland of Lampetra japonica. To study the anti-tumor function of rLj-RGD3 and confirm its biological status and significance, we extracted total RNA from the saliva gland and amplified the cDNA of Lj-RGD3 by RT-PCR. The cDNA of Lj-RGD3 was 357 bp long and encoded a polypeptide composed of 118 amino acids including 2 cysteines, 17 histidines and 3 RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) motifs. We cloned the cDNA into the plasmid pET23b, and expressed the recombinant protein rLj-RGD3 in Escherichia coli BL21. Fusion rLj-RGD3 with the C-terminal his-tag was a 15 kD soluble protein. Using the His-Bind affinity chromatography, we purified rLj-RGD3. Furthermore, we determined the biological activities of rLj-RGD3. To examine the ability of rLj-RGD3 inhibiting Hela cells proliferation, we used MTT assay. The results showed that, rLj-RGD3 inhibited bFGF induced proliferation of Hela cells in a dose-dependent manner, the IC50 value was 2.6 micromol/L. Hoechst staining assay revealed that, the nuclei of the cells treated with rLj-RGD3 were stained much brighter than that of untreated cells due to chromatin condensation. Furthermore, the DNA ladder patterns from the cells treated with rLj-RGD3 were also observed. These results demonstrated that rLj-RGD3 could induce apoptosis of Hela cells. Cell adhesion, migration and invasion are critical processes in tumor metastasis. rLj-RGD3 significantly inhibited adhesion of Hela cells to vironectin in a dose-dependent manner. In order to determine the effect of rLj-RGD3 on Hela cells migration toward bFGF, we used Transwell containing insert filter. rLj-RGD3 showed a significant inhibition on Hela cells migration, the inhibition rate was 60%. In the invasion assay, the Matrigel and Transwell were used to imitate environment in vivo. The results of invasion assay revealed that, rLj-RGD3 significantly inhibited bFGF induced invasion of Hela cells. Taken together, these results revealed that rLj-RGD3 had typical functions

  5. Evolutionary origin of the structure and function of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone: insights from lampreys.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Daukss, Dana; Gazda, Kristen; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Kosugi, Takayoshi; Nozaki, Masumi; Sower, Stacia A; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Gonadotropin (GTH)-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a novel hypothalamic neuropeptide that inhibits GTH secretion in mammals and birds by acting on gonadotropes and GnRH neurons within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnIH and its orthologs that have an LPXRFamide (X = L or Q) motif at the C terminus (LPXRFamide peptides) have been identified in representative species of gnathostomes. However, the identity of an LPXRFamide peptide had yet to be identified in agnathans, the most ancient lineage of vertebrates, leaving open the question of the evolutionary origin of GnIH and its ancestral function(s). In this study, we identified an LPXRFamide peptide gene encoding three peptides (LPXRFa-1a, LPXRFa-1b, and LPXRFa-2) from the brain of sea lamprey by synteny analysis and cDNA cloning, and the mature peptides by immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry. The expression of lamprey LPXRFamide peptide precursor mRNA was localized in the brain and gonad by RT-PCR and in the hypothalamus by in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry showed appositions of lamprey LPXRFamide peptide immunoreactive fibers in close proximity to GnRH-III neurons, suggesting that lamprey LPXRFamide peptides act on GnRH-III neurons. In addition, lamprey LPXRFa-2 stimulated the expression of lamprey GnRH-III protein in the hypothalamus and GTHβ mRNA expression in the pituitary. Synteny and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the LPXRFamide peptide gene diverged from a common ancestral gene likely through gene duplication in the basal vertebrates. These results suggest that one ancestral function of LPXRFamide peptides may be stimulatory compared with the inhibitory function seen in later-evolved vertebrates (birds and mammals).

  6. Neuropeptide Y family receptors Y1 and Y2 from sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Lagman, David; Sundström, Görel; Larhammar, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The vertebrate gene family for neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors expanded by duplication of the chromosome carrying