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Sample records for lamprophyres

  1. Lamprophyric lavas in the Colima graben, SW Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, J. F.; Carmichael, I. S. E.

    1984-12-01

    The Colima graben, located in SW Mexico, is one of three grabens which intersect about 50 km SSW of Guadalajara, forming a triple junction. The 90 km long, 20 60 km wide Colima graben represents a N-S rift of the E-W trending Mexican Volcanic Belt. Since the Early Pliocene, the Colima graben has served as a locus for the eruption of alkaline lavas, the most recent of which are basanites and minettes erupted from Late Pleistocene cinder cones (Luhr and Carmichael 1981). In this paper, we report on older alkaline lavas which crop out in the graben's walls. These rocks include phlogopite- and hornblende-bearing lamprophyres, a phlogopite-kalsilite-ankaratrite, and high-K andesites. These lavas crop out throughout the Colima graben area, and are intimately associated with calc-alkaline lavas in the field. Compared to these, the alkaline rocks are strikingly enriched in the incompatible elements, particularly Ba, Sr, P, and the LREE. Unlike the younger Late Pleistocene alkaline cinder cone lavas, most of the graben wall lamprophyres and the high-K andesites represent magmas that appear to have undergone significant evolution since their generation, including fractionation, crustal contamination, and possible magma mixing. Least-squares modeling indicates that the cinder cone minettes represent reasonable parental magmas for the graben lamprophyres. The occurrence of these alkaline lavas in an active calc-alkaline volcanic arc is unusual, and we suggest that they are a manifestation of the rifting processes which produced the Colima graben.

  2. Geochemical fingerprints of Late Triassic calc-alkaline lamprophyres from the Eastern Pontides, NE Turkey: A key to understanding lamprophyre formation in a subduction-related environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsli, Orhan; Dokuz, Abdurrahman; Kaliwoda, Melanie; Uysal, Ibrahim; Aydin, Faruk; Kandemir, Raif; Fehr, Karl-Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The Eastern Pontides in NE Turkey is one of the major orogenic belts in Anatolia. In this paper, we report our new 40Ar/39Ar dating, mineral chemistry, major and trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic analyses of the lamprophyre intrusions in this region. The lamprophyres are widely scattered and intrude Late Carboniferous granitoid rocks. The lamprophyres exhibit fine-grained textures and are mineralogically uniform. Hornblende 40Ar/39Ar dating yielded a plateau age of 216.01 ± 10.64 Ma. Based on their geochemistry, mineral compositions and paragenesis, the lamprophyres are classified as calc-alkaline lamprophyres in general and spessartites in particular, which are rich in large ion lithophile elements (e.g., Rb, Ba, K) but depleted in Nb and Ti. Our samples exhibit moderate fractionation in LREE patterns approximately 100 times that of chondrite but HREE abundances less than 10 times that of chondrite. These calc-alkaline lamprophyres display a range of ISr (216 Ma) values from 0.70619 to 0.71291 and ɛNd (216 Ma) values from - 1.4 to 4.1, with TDM = 1.11 to 2.20 Ga. Their Pb isotopic ratios indicate an enriched mantle source. The enrichment process is related to metasomatism of a subcontinental lithospheric mantle source, which is caused by a large quantity of H2O-rich fluids, rather than sediments released from oceanic crust at depth during the closure of the Paleotethys Ocean in Triassic times. All of the geochemical data and the trace element modeling suggest that the primary magma of the calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline spessartites was generated at depth by a low degree of partial melting (~ 1-10%) of a previously enriched lithospheric mantle wedge consisting of phlogopite-bearing spinel peridotite. The ascendance of a hot asthenosphere triggered by extensional events caused partial melting of mantle material. The rising melts were accompanied by fractional crystallization and crustal contamination en route to the surface. All of the geochemical

  3. Petrogenesis of lamprophyres from Chhota Udepur area, Narmada rift zone, and its relation to Deccan magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalapathi Rao, N. V.; Dharma Rao, C. V.; Das, Sanjay

    2012-02-01

    Geological setting, petrology and geochemistry of a new find of lamprophyre dykes, intruding the Precambrian basement gneisses from the Chhota Udepur area, Narmada rift zone, Western India, are presented. Of the three lamprophyre dykes, two of them display E-W trend paralleling that of the Narmada rift, extend up to ˜2.5 km in length and constitute the longest yet recorded lamprophyre dykes from the Indian shield. The Chhota Udepur lamprophyres (CUL) show several overlapping mineralogical and geochemical characteristic features displayed by alkaline- and calc-alkaline lamprophyres and hence it is not straight forward to pigeon-hole them in existing lamprophyre classification schemes. They are porphyritic-panidiomorphic with euhedral to sub-hedral phenocrysts and microphenocrysts of olivine (Fo 78.33-78.42 Fa 21.24-21.37), diopsidic augite to titaniferous augite (Wo 54.83-59.03 En 36.75-41.36 Fs 0.1-5.66), biotite and amphibole (kaersutite). Feldspar (orthoclase perthite and plagioclase) is essentially confined to the groundmass along with accessory phases such as apatite and spinel (ti-magnetite). Rare carbonate ocelli are also present. In terms of major element geochemistry the CUL are nepeheline-normative and predominantly sodic (Na 2O > K 2O); yet their K 2O and SiO 2 contents are sufficiently high to signal traits of calc-alkaline lamprophyres. On the other hand, the CUL exclude negative spikes at Nb-Ta which are considered to be a characteristic of subduction-related (calc-alkaline) magmas, are highly evolved (Mg#: 27.82-55.45), enriched in incompatible trace elements (high La/Nb, Zr/Nb) and have fractionated REE distribution patterns (La/Yb N ratios: 35-44). Post-emplacement alteration and crustal contamination have had little influence on their geochemistry. Th/Yb, Ta/Yb, Nb/U and Ce/Pb ratios of the CUL imply an OIB type-enriched mantle source, similar to that displayed by other Deccan-related lamprophyres. A metasomatised (enriched) garnet lherzolite

  4. Origin of sapphires from a lamprophyre dike at Yogo Gulch, Montana, USA: Clues from their melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palke, Aaron C.; Renfro, Nathan D.; Berg, Richard B.

    2016-09-01

    Gem corundum (sapphire) has been mined from an ultramafic lamprophyre dike at Yogo Gulch in central Montana for over 100 years. The sapphires bear signs of corrosion showing that they were not in equilibrium with the lamprophyre that transported them; however, their genesis is poorly understood. We report here the observation of minute glassy melt inclusions in Yogo sapphires. These inclusions are Na- and Ca-rich, Fe-, Mg-, and K-poor silicate glasses with compositions unlike that of the host lamprophyre. Larger, recrystallized melt inclusions contain analcime and calcite drawing a striking resemblance to leucocratic ocelli in the lamprophyre. We suggest here that sapphires formed through partial melting of Al-rich rocks, likely as the lamprophyre pooled at the base of the continental crust. This idea is corroborated by MELTS calculations on a kyanite-eclogite protolith which was presumably derived from a troctolite precursor. These calculations suggest that corundum can form through peritectic melting of kyanite. Linking the melt inclusions petrologically to the lamprophyre represents a significant advancement in our understanding of sapphire genesis and sheds light on how mantle-derived magmas may interact with the continental crust on their ascent to the surface.

  5. Paleoproterozoic mantle enrichment beneath the Fennoscandian Shield: Isotopic insight from carbonatites and lamprophyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Jeremy; Huhma, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    The isotope geochemistry of carbonatite from Naantali, southwest Finland as well as lamprophyres from North Savo, eastern Finland and the NW Ladoga region, northwest Russia has been investigated. These Paleoproterozoic dykes represent melting of an enriched mantle source spread over a ~ 96,000 km2 area within the Fennoscandian Shield and intruded during post-collisional extension. The carbonatites have εNd(T) ranging from -0.8 to + 0.4, while lamprophyres have εNd(T) between -0.8 and + 0.3. 87Sr/86Sr ratios from the primary carbonatite samples from Naantali form a tight cluster between 0.70283 and 0.70303. For the lamprophyres, 87Sr/86Sr ratios range from 0.70327-0.70339 from NW Ladoga and 0.70316-0.70327 from North Savo. These characteristics are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle showing an EMII trend, formed when sediments of mixed Archean and Proterozoic provenance were recycled back into the mantle via subduction during the preceding Svecofennian orogeny. Linear mixing of these subducted sediments and depleted mantle shows that a multistage process of enrichment is required to produce the observed isotope compositions. Batch melting of the subducted sediment first generated hydrous alkaline silicate melt, which crystallised as mica- and amphibole-rich veins in the mantle wedge. Continued melting of the subducted material under higher P-T conditions produced carbonatite melt, which infiltrated preferentially into this vein network. Assuming the silicate melt exerts greater influence on 87Sr/86Sr ratios while the carbonatite more greatly affects 143Nd/144Nd ratios, the model predicts significant regional variation in the silicate metasomatism with more consistent carbonatite metasomatism throughout the Fennoscandian subcontinental lithospheric mantle. The subducted sediments were likely also rich in organic matter, resulting in highly negative δ13C in mantle carbonates. The model predicts a higher content of organic carbon in the sediments in

  6. Petrology and geochemistry of late Cretaceous lamprophyric rocks from North Anatolian Ophiolitic Melange-Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülmez, Fatma; Genç, Can; Prelevic, Dejan

    2014-05-01

    The late Cretaceous lamprophyric rocks from Amasya and Kalecik region occur as dykes, stocks and lava flows intruding volcanoclastic sequence of North Anatolian Ophiolitic Melange. Their major and trace element compositions are very similar and it is not possible to discriminate them as two subgroups according to their geochemical features. The Al2O3 contents are variable, but relatively high (10.66-18.77 wt.%) typical for the ultrapotassic rocks from active orogenic belts. K2O contents (wt.% 1.22-8.39) are variable and Mg numbers (41-60) indicate that they were crystallized from evolved melts. LILE enrichments relative to HFSE, depletions of Nb-Ta and Ti elements are the characteristic features on N-MORB-normalized spider diagrams and this pattern represent the addition of subducted sediment/melt to the source area . The main mineralogic composition of samples from each two regions is clinopyroxene + mica ± feldspar ± olivine ± amphibole ± leucite + opaque minerals. The significant difference is the presence of plagioclase (An47-65) and K-feldspar as matrix in Amasya samples. Also some of the samples from Kalecik contain minor leucite. Based on the mineral paragenesis, Amasya lampropyres are classified as minette-vogesite and Kalecik samples are classified as kersantite-vogesite. Clinopyroxenes are mainly diopsite, salite and fassaitic in composition (Wo 45-50En 26-43 Fs 10-16) for the Kalecik region and displays diopsitic-salitic composition (Wo 44-48En 38-47 Fs 6-16) in Amasya region. The pressure-temperature calculations reveal significant differences for the lamprophyres from Amasya and Kalecik regions. The pressure conditions of the clinopyroxene crystallization for Amasya samples are between 16-24 kbar corresponds to 48-72 Km depth while the crystallization depth of the clinopyroxene from Kalecik lamprophyres is restricted between 12-36 Km. Although ultrapotassic rocks in Turkéy are the products of extension related volcanism in a post

  7. Lamprophyre dike intrusion and the age of the Alpine fault, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A.F.; Barreiro, B.A.; Kimbrough, D.L.; Mattinson, J.M.

    1987-10-01

    The orientations of intrusive rocks from a carbonatitic lamprophyre dike swarm and the history of emplacement relative to country-rock schist structures are compatible with intrusion into tension fractures and Riedel shears formed during initiation of the dextral wrench system of the Alpine fault. New U-Pb and Rb-Sr dates indicate a late Oligocene-early Miocene time of intrusion which, in turn, suggests a mid-Tertiary history for propagation of the Alpine fault plate boundary through South Island, New Zealand.

  8. Paleogene post-collisional lamprophyres in western Yunnan, western Yangtze Craton: Mantle source and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yong-Jun; Campbell McCuaig, T.; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Jourdan, Fred; Hart, Craig J. R.; Hou, Zeng-Qian; Tang, Suo-Han

    2015-09-01

    A suite of lamprophyres, spatially associated with mafic lavas and potassic felsic intrusive rocks, was emplaced between 36.5 ± 0.2 and 33.7 ± 0.5 Ma (based on phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar dating) on the eastern side of the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone in the western Yangtze Craton. These shoshonitic and ultrapotassic intrusive rocks post-date the ~ 60-55 Ma collisional event between the Indian and the Asian continents. They are characterized by: (1) enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements and light rare-earth elements with (La/Sm)n = 3.15-7.15; (2) strong positive Pb spikes; (3) depletion in high-field-strength elements (e.g. Nb/La = 0.08-0.98); (4) high initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.706-0.709) with negative εNd(t) values of - 10.5 to - 0.9; (5) old Nd model ages of 1542-945 Ma; and (6) radiogenic (207Pb/204Pb)i of 15.57-15.70 and (208Pb/204Pb)i (38.70-39.06). These features suggest that the mantle source was metasomatized by Proterozoic subduction beneath the Yangtze Craton. The lamprophyres have similar trace element patterns, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions, as coeval mafic lava, indicating a common source of metasomatized veined continental lithospheric mantle (CLM). Lower degree partial melting of metasomatic veins likely generated the lamprophyres, whereas the coeval mafic lava was likely derived from melting of phlogopite harzburgite. The lamprophyres and mafic lava have similar Sr-Nd isotope systematics as CLM-derived Neoproterozoic mafic rocks and Late Permian Emeishan low-Ti basalt in the region, indicating that they share the same Proterozoic source. We envisage that mantle plumes thermally eroded the Proterozoic metasomatized CLM beneath the western part of the Yangtze Craton during 825-750 Ma and 260-250 Ma, although residual metasomatized domains remained before being tapped by delamination after the India-Asia continental collision during the Paleogene period.

  9. Re-Os and PGE Systematics of Neoarchean Websterite Xenoliths and Diamondiferous Lamprophyres of the Wawa Area, Superior Province, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirey, S. B.; Ayer, J. A.; Wyman, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Michipicoten greenstone belt (MGB) is situated in the Wawa-Abitibi subprovince, a largely juvenile crustal addition to the southern Superior Province. The MGB comprises three mafic to felsic volcanic successions. The Mesoarchean basal succession also contains komatiites and granitoids unconformably overlain by 2 Neoarchean units. Numerous 2.68 Gyr old lamprophyre dikes and their diatreme facies equivalents occur in the youngest succession and are notable for their diamonds and ultramafic xenoliths; they are, in fact, the world’s oldest igneous diamond hosts. This occurrence is ideal for understanding deep-seated petrogenetic processes beneath greenstone belts, the possible subduction origin of diamond, and how juvenile oceanic crust became cratonized to form the continents. The lamprophyres are calc-alkaline or shoshonitic with original minerals mostly replaced by greenschist grade metamorphic assemblages of actinolite+chlorite+albite+epidote+titanite+chromite. They contain xenocrysts of chromite and diamond, and abundant crustal and ultramafic xenoliths. The ultramafic xenoliths are compositionally websteritic and recrystallized to assemblages of actinolite +/- talc. Both ultramafic xenoliths and lamprophyres were studied previously for their major and trace elements and Nd and Pb isotopes [1]. Re-Os and the platinum group elements (PGE) were analyzed in these xenoliths and their lamprophyre hosts to examine their depletion/enrichment history. As expected, lamprophyres are mildly enriched in the incompatible PGE (Pt, Pd) and depleted in the compatible PGE (Os, Ir, Ru) whereas websterites are the reverse. All samples have low Re content that leads to low 187Re/188Os (lamprophyres 0.14 - 0.30; websterites 0.03 - 0.06) and hence yields accurate initial 187Os/188Os. The lamprophyres have initial 187Os/188Os ranging from 0.114 to 0.122 which is enriched by 4-10% over Neoarchean chondritic mantle. Similar relative enrichments are seen in modern lamprophyres such

  10. Petrological and geochemical characteristics of Paleoproterozoic ultramafic lamprophyres and carbonatites from the Chitrangi region, Mahakoshal supracrustal belt, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rajesh K.

    2013-06-01

    A number of ENE-WSW trending Paleoproterozoic dykes and plugs of mafic, ultramafic, alkaline and carbonatite rocks intrude Mahakoshal supracrustal belt (MSB), which is a part of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ). Best exposures of these intrusions are found in the eastern parts of the MSB, particularly in and around Chitrangi area. Many of these intrusions have greenschist facies mineral composition and show sharp contact with supracrustal rocks. However, igneous textures, such as porphyritic/glomeroporphyritic, are still preserved in the form of partly pseudomorphed olivines, phlogopites and pyroxenes. Striking feature observed in some ultramafic samples is the presence of melanite garnet and rounded or elliptical carbonate ocelli. The petrographic characteristics suggest occurrence of carbonate-rich ultramafic lamprophyres; close to aillikite composition. Coarse-grained carbonatites show hypidiomorphic texture and mostly composed of calcite with appreciable amount of silicate minerals like clinopyroxene, phlogopite and olivine (often pseudomorphed by calcite, amphibole and chlorite). It is difficult to establish any direct genetic relationship between carbonatite and ultramafic lamprophyre samples on the basis of their chemistry; they were likely derived from distinct parental melts. High Mg# (up to ~78), and high Ni and Cr contents (up to ~1700 and ~1100, respectively) and low HREE concentration in few ultramafic lamprophyre samples apparently suggest their derivation from a near-primary mantle-derived melts originated at great depths. Geochemistry and presence of carbonate ocellae in ultramafic lamprophyre samples suggest genesis of these silicate rocks and associated carbonatites through liquid immiscibility, however possibility of their derivation through vein-plus-wall-rock melting model cannot be ignored. A multi-stage veined mantle melting model is suitable in the latter case. It is suggested that early stages of rifting in the Mahakoshal region due

  11. Unusual carbonate-rich dikes and lamprophyres in Porcupine Dome, east-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Doden, A.G.; Gold, D.P. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1992-01-01

    Isolated carbonate dikes and lamprophyric plugs are exposed in Porcupine dome, a Laramide structure in east-central Montana. En echelon sets of carbonate dikes strike N70E, consistent with regional lineaments and local normal faults. Individual dikes are steeply dipping, only 30--70 cm in width, and up to 1 km in length. These dikes exhibit unequivocal magmatic characteristics, including chilled margins, flow-aligned micas, multiple intrusive stages, country rock xenoliths, and local small blows'' containing well-rounded carbonate autoliths. Spatially associated with the dikes are small plugs of olivine-phlogopite-garnet-carbonate-bearing silicate rocks and a diatreme of bedded tuffs with xenoliths of country rocks. The dikes consistent primarily of calcite and dolomite, phlogopite, and opaque oxides. Although the dikes are relatively homogeneous mineralogically along strike, some chemical variations are apparent in the vicinity of the plugs/diatreme. Phlogopites and carbonates, common to both dikes and plugs, may provide a genetic link between these spatially associated intrusions. These unusual associations of dikes, plugs and diatremes are not restricted to Porcupine dome, but extend at least as far as the Grassrange - Winnett area, 100 km to the NW. The regional distribution of these small carbonatite bodies suggests a different magmatic process from typical carbonatites and alkaline complexes. The closest analogy is the carbonate dikes in the Premier Diamond Mine, South Africa.

  12. Structural evolution of lamprophyric dikes in Lailai, northeastern coast of Taiwan, deduced from mesoscopic structures in dikes and country rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Cian-Siang; Huang, Wen-Jeng; Lo, Wei; Wang, Tzu-Bin; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2015-04-01

    Lamprophyric dikes are standing in right-stepping en echelon up to 2.3 meters high within the Oligocene Tatungshan formation on the Lai-Lai wave-cut platform in the northeastern coast of Taiwan. The marine platform composed mainly of argillite is the extension of Hsuehshan range, which has the tallest peak of 3,886 m high in Taiwan. The dikes formed at depth in the late Miocene of 9±1.1 Ma ago are exposed on the marine platform nowadays due to the exhumation and Penglai orogeny resulting from the collision of Eurasian plate and Philippine Sea plate, which began in Pleistocene of 5-6 Ma ago. In consequence, folds, faults, joints and other structures are associated with them. In this study, the distribution of the dikes and fractures were mapped by conducting accurate surveys with a total station theodolite and orthorectifying aerial images taken by an unmanned aerial vehicle in different elevations. Electrical resistivity exploration was performed to decipher the arrangement of the dikes underground and the characteristics of the faults. The associated mesoscopic structures were delineated by mapping at a scale of 1: 40 in the field. We infer that the dikes was formed at depth of approximately 2.4 kilometers according to the thickness of overlaying sedimentary rocks formed from late Oligocene to late Miocene. Thus, it excludes the possibility that fractures existed before the lamprophyric magma intruded into the country rocks. Our observations help restore the original status of the current 19 dike segments. We conclude that the lamprophyric magma forcedly and vertically intruded into the Oligocene rocks and the direction change of maximum principle stress at depth of 2.4 kilometers resulted in three or more right-stepping en-echelon dikes.

  13. Petrology and geodynamical interpretation of mantle xenoliths from Late Cretaceous lamprophyres, Villány Mts (S Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nédli, Zsuzsanna; M. Tóth, Tivadar; Downes, Hilary; Császár, Géza; Beard, Andrew; Szabó, Csaba

    2010-06-01

    A Late Cretaceous lamprophyre dyke in the Villány Mts (S Hungary), situated in the Tisza unit, contains abundant spinel lherzolite xenoliths with porphyroclastic textures. Mineral chemistry suggests a relatively fertile mantle, which experienced only 5-7% melt extraction. Differences in porphyroclast and neoblast chemistry and thermobarometric calculations suggest that the mantle section represented by the xenoliths experienced recrystallization at lower PT as it was transported to shallow mantle depths close to the plagioclase stability field, followed by later relaxation. Based on volcanological and sedimentological constraints from the Villány Mts and the neighboring Mecsek Mts, we suggest that the uprise of the subcontinental mantle material was related to a Cretaceous rifting event and lithospheric deformation of the southwestern part of the Tisza unit. Mantle upwelling and formation of lamprophyre melts can be related to generation or reactivation of deep fractures of the lithosphere, during a period of lithospheric extension between the major nappe emplacements (Albian-Cenomanian and Paleocene) of the region.

  14. Geochemistry and radiogenic isotope characteristics of xenoliths in Archean diamondiferous lamprophyres: Implications for the Superior Province cratonic keel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, D. A.; Hollings, P.; Conceição, R. V.

    2015-09-01

    Xenoliths retrieved from lamprophyric hosts in the Michipicoten belt fall into four groups defined by Al-Mg contents but do not include mantle peridotite. Based on immobile trace element abundances, the xenoliths are derived from magmas associated with the main phase of arc volcanism between 2.75 and 2.70 Ga or are co-genetic with the orogenic shoshonite suite. Trace elements distinguish two styles of metasomatism characterized either by LILE enrichment or both LILE and Zr-Hf (± Nb-Ta). The first is likely associated with a hydrous fluid while the second is related to melts that permeated underplated shoshonitic mafic magmas and cumulates or the older sub-arc mantle. The Sm-Nd isotopic compositions of the xenoliths indicate that an aged, highly depleted, source was tapped during the orogenic event. The formation depths of the lamprophyric magmas, and the xenoliths they contain, contrast with the calculated depths to the base of the depleted lithosphere based on xenoliths retrieved from post-Archean kimberlites. The differences imply a late docking of the ~ 150-160 km deep Archean keel beneath the Abitibi-Wawa terrane following the emplacement of major orogenic gold deposits.

  15. Mineralogical and geochemical characterization of a rare ultramafic lamprophyre in the Tandilia belt basement, Río de la Plata Craton, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dristas, Jorge A.; Martínez, Juan Cruz; Massonne, Hans-Joachim; Pimentel, Marcio M.

    2013-04-01

    A metre-thick ultramafic lamprophyre dyke intrudes the basement of the Tandilia belt at the Sierra Alta de Vela, Argentina. A petrological and geochemical study of this rock and associated small dykes indicates a predominantly calc-alkaline trend. Phlogopite K-Ar dating of the ultramafic lamprophyre gave a minimum age of 1928 ± 54 Ma as a late event of the Transamazonian Orogeny, which is well represented in the basement of the Tandilia belt. An electron microprobe study indicates the presence of phlogopite, albite, chromite and Cr-rich phenocrysts and Cr-free microphenocrysts of diopside as primary minerals. Subsequent to deformation at the contacts with the wall rock, metasomatism generated strongly zoned amphibole (edenite, pargasite, Mg-hastingite and tremolite compositions) and andradite as well as chlorite, sericite, albite, apatite and calcite. The central zone of the lamprophyre is almost undeformed and exhibits some ocellar texture. Geochemical and isotopic signatures of the lamprophyre suggest that its magma source may have previously undergone incompatible element enrichment of the mantle source, representing the original precursor magma for the calc-alkaline dyke series of the Sierra Alta de Vela.

  16. Kimberlite, lamproite, ultramafic lamprophyre, and carbonatite relationships on the Dharwar Craton, India; an example from the Khaderpet pipe, a diamondiferous ultramafic with associated carbonatite intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. B.; Haggerty, S. E.; Chatterjee, B.; Beard, A.; Townend, R.

    2013-12-01

    Are kimberlites, lamproites, ultramafic lamprophyres and carbonatites genetically associated or not? There are strong opinions for and against any relationship. The 20 Ha Khaderpet pipe, discovered by Rio Tinto Exploration, is an unusual diamondiferous carbonatite-kimberlite clan rock (KCR) association in the Anumpalle Cluster of the Wajrakarur Kimberlite Field in the Dharwar Craton of Peninsular Indian. The Khaderpet pipe has a discrete sovite phase intrusive into KCR breccia, not noticed elsewhere in the Wajrakarur kimberlite field. Petrographically, the KCR is a clast-supported lithic breccia and crystal lithic tuff, with occasional pelletal lapilli. Clasts show a weak horizontal imbrication. The overall appearance of the tuffs and breccias is suggestive of terminal-blocked, vent accumulations that formed by under pressure, with spallation of country rock causing an abundance of granitoid debris. The sovite phase has up to 95% calcite, occasionally showing flow textured polycrystalline laths set in a minor saponite matrix. There are mineralogical gradations from an olivine-rich ultramafic to a calcite-dominant rock resembling pure carbonatite. Rare REE mineral phases in the carbonatite include allanite and other REE-rich unidentified mineral phases. Xenocrystic high pressure phases in both ultramafic and carbonatite include mantle-derived diamonds, lherzolitic-, eclogitic- and subcalcic-pyrope, Ti-poor andradite, chrome diopside, picrochromite and picroilmenite. Extensive metasomatism in the form of reddening of country rock feldspars by hematite, introduction of green chlorite, and saponitic alteration of breccia clasts and the ultramafic phase is common. The chemistry of the Khaderpet ultramafic component, suggests that the KCR is transitional between kimberlite and ultramafic lamprophyres, like certain other pipes in the Wajrakarur Kimberlite Field, with strong enrichment in LREE, CaO and CO2. However, low MgO (~ 13%) and high CaO (~ 10%) values are more

  17. Petrogenesis of late-Variscan high-K alkali-calcic granitoids and calc-alkalic lamprophyres: The Aber-Ildut/North-Ouessant complex, Armorican Massif, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroff, Martial; Labry, Cyrill; Le Gall, Bernard; Authemayou, Christine; Grosjean, Denise Bussien; Guillong, Marcel

    2015-12-01

    The Aber-Ildut/North-Ouessant Variscan granitoid complex in the Armorican Massif is an example of high-K alkali-calcic zoned pluton, c. 304 Ma in age. A first magmatic batch intruded through a northern EW-trending sinistral transcurrent shear zone, before injecting southwards as a huge horizontal zoned sill, with moderately peraluminous muscovite-free granitoids in the north and strongly peraluminous muscovite-bearing leucogranites to the south. The second magmatic stage resulted in the intrusion of a large two-mica leucogranitic body from a root zone along the same shear zone, prior to the end of crystallization of the first injection. Finally, ultrapotassic dykes, including calc-alkalic lamprophyres (leucominettes), intrude the complex. The strongly peraluminous granites are interpreted as pure melting products of crustal clay-rich pelitic material. All the other petrographic types, including leucominettes, are thought to result from mixing of crustal melts and mantle-derived mafic liquids. Highly silicic tourmaline-bearing leucogranites are significantly affected by a tetrad effect, in relation with REE complexing behavior. Aber-Ildut/North-Ouessant granitoids probably formed during the Variscan late-orogenic stage associated with exhumation and lithospheric thinning, at low pressure and by advective heating of a ≤ 50 km-thick crust from hot metasomatized asthenosphere.

  18. Interaction of extended mantle plume head with ancient lithosphere: evidence from deep-seated xenoliths in basalts and lamprophyre diatremes in Western Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Evgenii

    2016-04-01

    The Middle Cretaceous lamprophyric diatremes of the Jabel Ansaria Ridge contain xenoliths of ancient lower crustal rocks mainly represented by the suite of partly altered garnet granulite and eclogite-like rocks, which were formed at the expense of ferrogabbros and ferroclinopyroxenites most likely in the course of underplating of Fe-Ti basalt. Garnet (Alm26Grs11Py63) megacrysts and coarse-granular garnet-clinopyroxene intergrowths are most likely the varieties of rocks of this series. Garnet megacrysts are represented by large (up to 10 cm in diameter) round "nodules," often molten from the surface. Garnet is usually fractured, and the kelyphite material similar to that in rocks of the eclogite-granulite series occurs in fractures. In addition, we found several intergrowths of garnet with large (up to 3-5 cm in length) crystals of high-Al augite with the low of Ti and Na contents like in rocks of the eclogite-granulite suite. Coarse-grained garnet-clinopyroxene-hornblende rocks with spinel, as well as megacrysts of Al-Ti augite with kaersutite, form the second group in prevalence. This group is close to mantle xenoliths of the "black series" in alkali Fe-Ti basalt worldwide. Kaersutite in these rocks contains gaseous cavities, which provides evidence for the origin of rocks at the expense of a strongly fluidized melt/fluid. In contrast to rocks of the eclogite-granulite series, these rocks did not undergo alteration. Garnet Alm19-26Grs12-13.5Py59-67.5 usually associates with dark opaque spinel. In contrast, the Late Cenozoic plateaubasalts of the region practically do not contain lower crustal xenoliths, whereas xenoliths of mantle spinel lherzolite (fragments of the upper cooled rim of the plume head) are widely abundant. According to data of mineralogical thermobarometry, rocks of the eclogite-granulite suite were formed at 13.5-15.4 kbar (depths of 45-54 km) and 965-1115°C. Rocks of this suite are typical representatives of the continental lower crust

  19. Melt evolution beneath a rifted craton edge: 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope systematics of primitive alkaline basalts and lamprophyres from the SW Baltic Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappe, Sebastian; Smart, Katie A.; Stracke, Andreas; Romer, Rolf L.; Prelević, Dejan; van den Bogaard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    amphibole-rich metasomatic components. The metasomatic components were likely introduced to the lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Baltic Shield margin during extensive Permo-Carboniferous magmatic activity, a scenario that is supported by the geochemical and isotope compositions of ca. 286 Ma lamprophyres from Scania (87Sr/86Sri = 0.7040-0.7054; εNdi = +2.0 to +3.1; εHfi = +6.1 to +9.0; 206Pb/204Pbi = 17.8-18.2). Strong variations in lithosphere thickness and thermal structure across the southern Baltic Shield margin may have caused transient small-scale mantle convection. This resulted in relatively fast and focused upwellings and lateral flow beneath the thinned lithosphere, where mafic alkaline magmas formed by low degrees of decompression melting of sublithospheric mantle. Such a geodynamic scenario would allow for enriched recycled components with low melting points to be preferentially sampled from the more depleted and refractory convecting upper mantle when channeled along a destabilizing craton edge. Similar to the 'lid effect' in oceanic island volcanic provinces, lithospheric architecture may exert strong control on the mantle melting regime, and thus offer a simple explanation for the geochemical resemblance of continental and oceanic intraplate mafic alkaline magmas of high Na/K affinity.

  20. Mafic enclaves in Caucasian granitoids: generation of mantle-looking lamprophyre nodules by reaction with (meta)-sedimentary carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranovich, Leonid; Dubinina, Elena; Nosova, Anna; Avdeenko, Anna

    2010-05-01

    The occurrence of mafic enclaves in granitic plutons is a very common feature, particularly in the late- to post-collision granites. Origin of the enclaves is conventionally ascribed to the magma mingling processes, with the mafic component being derived from an "enriched" mantle source. Here we report geochemical and petrological data on the late-Miocene granitoid stocks and laccolites of the Caucasian Spring Waters region (CSW), which indicate principal involvement of contamination by (meta)-sedimentary carbonates in the origin of mafic nodules. The stocks and laccolites are composed of amphibole-bearing (Amph) granite, granosyenite, syenite and leucogranite varieties. Mafic nodules are rather abundant in granosyenite and syenite, and almost entirely absent in Amph- and leucogranite. All granitoids except for the leucogranites, which are believed to represent late differentiates of the Amph-granites not contaminated by the carbonates, are enriched in Ba and Sr (1227-1766 and 899-1143 ppm, correspondingly). 87Sr/86Sr ratio in the granitoids, recalculated to the intrusion age (8.3 Myr), falls in a narrow range from 0.7083-0.7086, while epsilon Nd(T) varies from -4.2 to -2.1. The epsilon Nd(T) values point to the crustal precursor for the granitoid melts, while the nearly constant 87Sr/86Sr ratio indicates derivation of all granitoid bodies from the same magma reservoir. Mafic nodules in granosyenite and syenite consist of fluorine-rich phlogopite (Phl, up to 5 wt.% F) + clinopyroxene (Cpx) + subordinate plagioclase (Pl, An14-16) + minor carbonate (Carb, 0.2-0.4 wt.% SrO) and apatite. Rare, up to 100 micron sized Sr-rich (up to 2 wt.% SrO) barite (Brt) grains have been identified in the nodules. Stable isotope composition of both Carb (delta 18O = +18.8 per mille, delta 13C = -13.4 per mille) and Brt (delta 34S = +13.5 per mille) indicate (meta)-sedimentary origin of the carbonate precursor rock. Jurassic dolomite-rich evaporates with the required Sr- and S-isotope signature are indeed present in the crustal section of the CSW. A schematic mafic nodule-producing reaction can be written as: Dolomite + Felsic Melt = Phl + Cpx + Carb + CO2 (1). The pressure (P) - temperature (T) parameters of the nodules' formation have been estimated based on the composition of coexisting Phl, Cpx and Pl using Berman and Aranovich (1996) systematic with the correction for the F-content in the biotite solid solution: P = 1.5 kbar; T = 800oC. Model melt calculations to reproduce early Pl phenocrysts (An14-16) showed that the reacting melt must have been water under-saturated at these P-T conditions (3.5 wt.% H2O). The amount of Dolomite required to produce granosyenite and syenite with the measured geochemical features, has been estimated with a mixing model of Dubinina and Lakshtanov (1997) at about 17 wt.% of the felsic melt. Mixing had occured within the mid-crustal magma chamber prior to intrusion to the present-day upper-crustal levels. References: Berman R.G., Aranovich L.Y. Contrib.Mineral.Petrol. 1996. V.126. Р.1-22. Dubinina E.O., Lakshtanov L.Z. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 1997. V. 61. P. 2265-2273.

  1. Age and origin of the Cortlandt Complex, New York: Implications from Sm-Nd data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domenick, M.A.; Basu, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Sm-Nd systematics for nine whole-rock samples of hornblende norites, pyroxenites and a lamprophyre from various parts of the Cortlandt Complex were analyzed. Six of these samples from the central and eastern parts of the complex give an isochron age of 430??34 (2 ??) Ma with an e{open}Nd value of -2.9??0.5, and the other three samples from the western part, including the lamprophyre, define a similar age of 394??33 (2 ??) Ma but with a distinctly different e{open}Nd value of -1.4??0.4. The two different initial 143Nd/144Nd ratios corresponding to these e{open}-values are interpreted to reflect continental crustal contamination of the lamprophyric parental liquid prior to final emplacement and crystal fractionation to produce the different rock types of the complex. The intrusion age of 430 Ma for the complex clearly post-dates the major metamorphic event of the Taconic orogeny. The Nd-isotopic data also suggest a relationship between the Cortlandt Complex and a belt of lamprophyric dike rocks to the west, known as the Beemerville trend, which cuts across the metamorphic trends of the Taconic (Ratcliffe 1981). ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Variscan potassic dyke magmatism of durbachitic affinity at the southern end of the Bohemian Massif (Lower Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitlhofer, Helga; Grasemann, Bernhard; Petrakakis, Konstantin

    2016-06-01

    Dykes in the Strudengau area (SW Moldanubian Zone, Austria) can be mineralogically divided into lamprophyres (spessartites and kersantites) and felsic dykes (granite porphyries, granitic dykes and pegmatoid dykes). Geochemical analyses of 11 lamprophyres and 7 felsic dykes show evidence of fractional crystallization. The lamprophyres are characterized by metaluminous compositions, intermediate SiO2 contents and high amounts of MgO and K2O; these rocks have high Ba (800-3000 ppm) and Sr (250-1000 ppm) contents as well as an enrichment of large-ion lithophile elements over high field strength elements, typical for enriched mantle sources with variable modifications due to fractionation and crustal contamination. This geochemical signature has been reported from durbachites (biotite- and K feldspar-rich mela-syenites particularly characteristic of the Variscan orogen in Central Europe). For most major elements, calculated fractionation trends from crystallization experiments of durbachites give an excellent match with the data from the Strudengau dykes. This suggests that the lamprophyres and felsic dykes were both products of fractional crystallization and subsequent magma mixing of durbachitic and leucogranitic melts. Rb-Sr geochronological data on biotite from five undeformed kersantites and a locally deformed granite porphyry gave cooling ages of c. 334-318 Ma, indicating synchronous intrusion of the dykes with the nearby outcropping Weinsberger granite (part of the South Bohemian Batholith, c. 330-310 Ma). Oriented matrix biotite separated from the locally deformed granite porphyry gave an Rb-Sr age of c. 318 Ma, interpreted as a deformation age during extensional tectonics. We propose a large-scale extensional regime at c. 320 Ma in the Strudengau area, accompanied by plutonism of fractionated magmas of syncollisional mantle-derived sources, mixed with crustal components. This geodynamic setting is comparable to other areas in the Variscan belt documenting an

  3. Mantle evolution in the Variscides of SW England: Geochemical and isotopic constraints from mafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Nicolle E.; Murphy, J. Brendan; Braid, James A.; Shail, Robin K.; Nance, R. Damian

    2016-06-01

    The geology of SW England has long been interpreted to reflect Variscan collisional processes associated with the closure of the Rhenohercynian Ocean and the formation of Pangea. The Cornish peninsula is composed largely of Early Devonian to Late Carboniferous volcanosedimentary successions that were deposited in pre- and syn-collisional basins and were subsequently metamorphosed and deformed during the Variscan orogeny. Voluminous Early Permian granitic magmatism (Cornubian Batholith) is broadly coeval with the emplacement of ca. 280-295 Ma lamprophyric dykes and flows. Although these lamprophyres are well mapped and documented, the processes responsible for their genesis and their relationship with regional Variscan tectonic events are less understood. Pre- to syn-collisional basalts have intra-continental alkalic affinities, and have REE profiles consistent with derivation from the spinel-garnet lherzolite boundary. εNd values for the basalts range from + 0.37 to + 5.2 and TDM ages from 595 Ma to 705 Ma. The lamprophyres are extremely enriched in light rare earth elements, large iron lithophile elements, and are depleted in heavy rare earth elements, suggesting a deep, garnet lherzolite source that was previously metasomatised. They display εNd values ranging from - 1.4 to + 1.4, initial Sr values of ca. 0.706, and TDM ages from 671 Ma to 1031 Ma, suggesting that metasomatism occurred in the Neoproterozoic. Lamprophyres and coeval granite batholiths of similar chemistry to those in Cornwall occur in other regions of the Variscan orogen, including Iberia and Bohemia. By using new geochemical and isotopic data to constrain the evolution of the mantle beneath SW England and the processes associated with the formation of these post-collisional rocks, we may be able to gain a more complete understanding of mantle processes during the waning stages of supercontinent formation.

  4. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of post-collisional ultrapotassic syenites and granites from southernmost Brazil: the Piquiri Syenite Massif.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Lauro V S; Plá-Cid, Jorge; Bitencourt, Maria de Fátima; Stabel, Larissa Z

    2008-06-01

    The Piquiri Syenite Massif, southernmost Brazil, is part of the post-collisional magmatism related to the Neoproterozoic Brasiliano-Pan-African Orogenic Cycle. The massif is about 12 km in diameter and is composed of syenites, granites, monzonitic rocks and lamprophyres. Diopside-phlogopite, diopside-biotite-augite-calcic-amphibole, are the main ferro-magnesian paragenesis in the syenitic rocks. Syenitic and granitic rocks are co-magmatic and related to an ultrapotassic, silica-saturated magmatism. Their trace element patterns indicate a probable mantle source modified by previous, subduction-related metasomatism. The ultrapotassic granites of this massif were produced by fractional crystallization of syenitic magmas, and may be considered as a particular group of hypersolvus and subsolvus A-type granites. Based upon textural, structural and geochemical data most of the syenitic rocks, particularly the fine-grained types, are considered as crystallized liquids, in spite of the abundance of cumulatic layers, schlieren, and compositional banding. Most of the studied samples are metaluminous, with K2O/Na2O ratios higher than 2. The ultrapotassic syenitic and lamprophyric rocks in the Piquiri massif are interpreted to have been produced from enriched mantle sources, OIB-type, like most of the post-collisional shoshonitic, sodic alkaline and high-K tholeiitic magmatism in southernmost Brazil. The source of the ultrapotassic and lamprophyric magmas is probably the same veined mantle, with abundant phlogopite + apatite + amphibole that reflects a previous subduction-related metasomatism. PMID:18506262

  5. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of post-collisional ultrapotassic syenites and granites from southernmost Brazil: the Piquiri Syenite Massif.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Lauro V S; Plá-Cid, Jorge; Bitencourt, Maria de Fátima; Stabel, Larissa Z

    2008-06-01

    The Piquiri Syenite Massif, southernmost Brazil, is part of the post-collisional magmatism related to the Neoproterozoic Brasiliano-Pan-African Orogenic Cycle. The massif is about 12 km in diameter and is composed of syenites, granites, monzonitic rocks and lamprophyres. Diopside-phlogopite, diopside-biotite-augite-calcic-amphibole, are the main ferro-magnesian paragenesis in the syenitic rocks. Syenitic and granitic rocks are co-magmatic and related to an ultrapotassic, silica-saturated magmatism. Their trace element patterns indicate a probable mantle source modified by previous, subduction-related metasomatism. The ultrapotassic granites of this massif were produced by fractional crystallization of syenitic magmas, and may be considered as a particular group of hypersolvus and subsolvus A-type granites. Based upon textural, structural and geochemical data most of the syenitic rocks, particularly the fine-grained types, are considered as crystallized liquids, in spite of the abundance of cumulatic layers, schlieren, and compositional banding. Most of the studied samples are metaluminous, with K2O/Na2O ratios higher than 2. The ultrapotassic syenitic and lamprophyric rocks in the Piquiri massif are interpreted to have been produced from enriched mantle sources, OIB-type, like most of the post-collisional shoshonitic, sodic alkaline and high-K tholeiitic magmatism in southernmost Brazil. The source of the ultrapotassic and lamprophyric magmas is probably the same veined mantle, with abundant phlogopite + apatite + amphibole that reflects a previous subduction-related metasomatism.

  6. Chronology of Late Cretaceous igneous and hydrothermal events at the Golden Sunlight gold-silver breccia pipe, southwestern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Ed; Foord, Eugene E.; Zartman, Robert E.; Pearson, Robert C.; Foster, Fess

    1996-01-01

    Gold mineralization at the Golden Sunlight breccia pipe, southwestern Montana, is related to emplacement of Late Cretaceous alkali-calcic rhyolite and subsequent collapse of the Belt Supergroup wallrock and rhyolite in the pipe. The pipe is inferred to grade downward into an alkalic porphyry molybdenum system. The pipe is cut by alkalic to sub-alkalic lamprophyre dikes and sills, which locally contain high-grade gold where emplaced along late shear zones and vein systems. Determination of the emplacement age of the rhyolite is hampered by inherited lead or inherited Late Archean zircon from the source region of the rhyolite. An emplacement age of about 80 Ma for the rhyolite can be inferred if a basement age of 2,600 Ma is assumed. This Late Archean age is in agreement with basement ages determined in many parts of southwestern Montana. A 206 Pb- 238 U whole-rock date of 84 ? 18 Ma from altered and mineralized Belt Supergroup strata and rhyolite in the breccia pipe indicates hydrothermal alteration related to gold mineralization in Late Cretaceous time. Although sericite is a relatively widespread hydrothermal mineral, attempts to date the very fine grained material by the 40 Ar- 39 Ar method did not provide a spectra that could be interpreted unambiguously. A 40 Ar- 39 Ar plateau date of 76.9 ? 0.5 Ma from biotite phenocrysts in the lamprophyre indciates intrusion of mafic magma and attendant CO 2 metasomatism in the Late Cretaceous. Fission-track data from zircon in the rhyolite are permissive of slow uplift of the Belt Supergroup strata, 1U.S. Geological Survey, Box 25046, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225. 2Golden Sunlight Mines, Inc., 453 MT Highway 2 East, Whitehall, MT 59759. rhyolite, and lamprophyre between 55 and 50 Ma, but the data are not definitive. Rhyolitic welded tuff in the informally named units 7, 9, and 11 of the Elkhorn Mountains Volcanics is most similar in chemistry and age to the rhyolite at the Golden Sunlight mine. Trachybasalt in

  7. Evidence for alkaline igneous activity and associated metasomatism in the Reelfoot rift, south-central Midcontinent, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.B.; Diehl, S.F.; Sutley, S.J. ); Flohr, M.J.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Alkaline igneous magmatism is commonly associated with intracontinental rifts such as the Reelfoot rift (RR). Direct evidence for alkaline magmatism in the area of the RR occurs as lamprophyre and syenite encountered in deep wells. The authors' new studies of lamprophyres and sedimentary rocks from wells in the region provide additional examples of alkaline magmatism and emphasize the effects of related metasomatism. Sedimentary rocks in the Dow Chemical No. 1 Garrigan well, which is not known to contain lamprophyre dikes, probably also were metasomatically altered, as they contain authigenic fluorapatite, Ce-phosphates, and other REE-rich minerals. Enrichments of incompatible and large ion lithophile elements commonly associated with alkaline magmatism occur in the New Madrid test well, near the crest of the Pascola Arch. The carbonate-free fraction of Paleozoic rocks in this well is highly enriched in Nb (500 ppm), Ba (> 5,000 ppm), La (500 ppm), Th (1,000 ppm), and F (2,400 ppm). Abundant inclusion-rich potassium-feldspar cement in a nearby well may also be the result of alkaline metasomatism. Fluorite and elevated F concentrations are found in several wells in the RR, and contrast with stratigraphically correlative platform carbonates of the Ozark uplift, which lack F enrichment. Well and spring water samples above the RR are enriched in fluorine (as much as 5,000 ppb) compared to samples away from the rift which typically have concentrations two orders of magnitude smaller. The data and observations are consistent with relatively widespread alkaline metasomatism, which was associated with the intrusion of alkaline magmas in the RR.

  8. Siderite and its role in the magnetic mineralogy of Mesozoic swarm dikes of Southeast of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berquo, T. S.; Raposo, M. B.; Bowles, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The emplacement of dikes and alkaline complexes found in the Santos-Rio de Janeiro swarm is claimed to be related to processes of the separation of South America and Africa. The referred dikes are diabases and lamprophyres, and they crop out in a pattern where they are parallel to each other. Their dimensions range from a few centimeters up to 2 m wide for the lamprophyres dikes, and up to > 10 m for the diabase dikes. Extensive paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) work has been done in these dikes. In order to study the magnetic mineralogy of these samples different techniques were used, such as: hysteresis loops, field-dependence of magnetic susceptibility (K), K(T) (low and high temperature), low temperature remanent magnetization curves (ZFC/FC), room temperature saturation isothermal magnetization (RTSIRM), AC susceptibility as a function of temperature, and Mossbauer spectroscopy at room temperature and 4.2 K. The ZFC/FC curves of diabase dikes have the typical Verwey transition at around 120 K suggesting magnetite as the magnetic carrier of them. On the other hand, the ZFC/FC remanence curves of the lamprophyres dikes have as the main feature a transition near 38 K. This is diagnostic of the presence of siderite and it is supported also by Mossbauer spectroscopy. The Mossbauer spectra at room temperature are represented by two small sextets associated with magnetite and paramagnetic doublets of Fe3+ and Fe2+. At 4.2 K siderite is below its Tn and has magnetic order, thus the Mossbauer spectra at low temperature show, besides the magnetite sextet and doublets of Fe3+ and Fe2+, an additional sextet that is associated with siderite. The contribution of siderite for the AMS study is being investigated.

  9. The Kimberlites and related rocks of the Kuruman Kimberlite Province, Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Cara L.; Griffin, William L.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Pearson, Norman J.; Shee, Simon R.

    2011-03-01

    The Kuruman Kimberlite Province is comprised of 16 small pipes and dikes and contains some of the oldest known kimberlites (>1.6 Ga). In this study, 12 intrusions are subdivided into three groups with distinct petrology, age, and geochemical and isotopic compositions: (1) kimberlites with groundmass perovskites defining a Pb-Pb isochron age of 1787 ± 69 Ma, (2) orangeite with a U-Pb perovskite age of 124 ± 16 Ma, and (3) ultramafic lamprophyres (aillikite and mela-aillikite) with a zircon U-Pb age of 1642 ± 46 Ma. The magma type varies across the Province, with kimberlites in the east, lamprophyres in the west and orangeite and ultramafic lamprophyres to the south. Differences in the age and petrogenesis of the X007 orangeite and Clarksdale and Aalwynkop aillikites suggest that these intrusions are probably unrelated to the Kuruman Province. Kimberlite and orangeite whole-rock major and trace element compositions are similar to other South African localities. Compositionally, the aillikites typically lie off kimberlite and orangeite trends. Groundmass mineral chemistry of the kimberlites has some features more typical of orangeites. Kimberlite whole-rock Sr and Nd isotopes show zoning across the Province. When the kimberlites erupted at ~1.8 Ga, they sampled a core volume (ca 50 km across) of relatively depleted SCLM that was partially surrounded by a rim of more metasomatized mantle. This zonation may have been related to the development of the adjacent Kheis Belt (oldest rocks ~2.0 Ga), as weaker zones surrounding the more resistant core section of SCLM were more extensively metasomatized.

  10. Complete Analytical Data for Samples of Jurassic Igneous Rocks in the Bald Mountain Mining District, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents all petrographic, major oxide, and trace element data for a set of 109 samples collected during an investigation of Jurassic igneous rocks in the Bald Mountain mining district, Nevada. Igneous rocks in the district include the Bald Mountain stock, quartz-feldspar porphyry dikes, basaltic andesite dikes, aplite sills, and rare lamprophyre dikes. These rocks, although variably altered near intrusion-related mineral deposits, are fresh in many parts of the district. Igneous rocks in the district are hosted by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks.

  11. Uranium and other element analyses of igneous rocks of Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, K.F.

    1982-05-01

    Seventy-six samples of igneous rocks representing a variety of rock types and locations in Arkansas were analyzed by neutron activation analysis for the elements U, Th, Na, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Dy, Yb, Lu, and Hf. Samples were collected from the major igneous intrusions at Granite Mountain, Bauxite, Magnet Cove, Potash Sulfur Springs, and Murfreesboro, representing various syenites, lamprophyres, carbonatite, kimberlite, and periodotite. To make the data available for public use without further delay, this report is being issued without the normal technical and copy editing.

  12. Magmatism and fenitization in the Cretaceous potassium-alkaline-carbonatitic complex of Ipanema São Paulo State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarino, Vincenza; Azzone, Rogério Guitarrari; Brotzu, Pietro; de Barros Gomes, Celso; Melluso, Leone; Morbidelli, Lucio; Ruberti, Excelso; Tassinari, Colombo Celso Gaeta; Brilli, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    The Ipanema alkaline-carbonatitic complex is part of the Meso-Cenozoic alkaline magmatism located within the southeastern part of the Brazilian Platform. Drill-core and field sampling have indicated the occurrence of glimmerites, with subordinate shonkinites (mela-syenites), clinopyroxene-bearing glimmerites, diorites and syenites. The glimmerites are cross-cut by lamprophyric dykes and calciocarbonatites. Fenitization has deeply affected the country rocks, originating dioritic and syenitic rocks. The Ipanema rocks show a distinct potassic affinity. The initial Sr-Nd- isotopic composition of the Ipanema rocks (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70661-0.70754 and 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51169-0.51181) is similar to that of tholeiitic and potassium-rich-alkaline rocks of the Eastern Paraguay. Stable isotope data for the Ipanema calciocarbonatite suggest interaction with fluids at temperatures typical of hydrothermal stages, as hypothesized for other carbonatite complexes from southeastern Brazil. The chemical differences between the lamprophyre, glimmerites, carbonatites, apatitites and magnetitites, and the absence of marked REE enrichment in the evolved lithologies, all indicate that fractional crystallization and accumulus of liquidus phases in a magma reservoir, likely coupled with liquid immiscibility processes, may have played an important role in the genesis of the Ipanema rocks.

  13. Early Jurassic mafic dykes from the Xiazhuang ore district (South China): Implications for tectonic evolution and uranium metallogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian-Xun; Ma, Chang-Qian; Lai, Zhong-Xin; Marks, Michael A. W.; Zhang, Chao; Zhong, Yu-Fang

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive study on zircon U-Pb age dating, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotope data has been conducted on the mafic rocks of the Xiazhuang uranium ore district and adjacent regions in South China. Based on field work and petrographic features, three rock types (the Kuzhukeng gabbro, the WNW-trending dolerite dykes and the NNE-trending lamprophyre dykes) are distinguished. Early Jurassic SHRIMP and LA-ICPMS ages of zircon for the Kuzhukeng gabbro (198 ± 1 Ma) and WNW-trending dolerite dykes (193 ± 4 Ma) have been obtained, which are 50 Ma older than previously thought (being Cretaceous). These geochronologic data provide new evidence for the rarely identified Early Jurassic magmatisms in South China. Whole-rock geochemical data for the Kuzhukeng gabbro and WNW-trending dolerite dykes are similar, both of which being higher in FeO and TiO2 but lower in SiO2 and K2O than the NNE-trending lamprophyre dykes. Trace element characteristics and Sr-Nd isotope data indicate arc-like signatures similar to the Cretaceous southeast coast basalts of China for the lamprophyre dykes, but an OIB-like geochemical affinity for the high-TiO2 mafic rocks similar to the Permo/Triassic Emeishan flood basalts and the Middle Jurassic Ningyuan alkaline basalts. We propose that the lamprophyre dykes formed in an arc volcanic system driven by the subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate. In contrast, the Kuzhukeng gabbro and associated dolerite dykes record the post-orogenic (Indosinian) extension event in the Tethyan tectonic regime. This further implies that the Indosinian extension may have lasted until the Early Jurassic, and therefore, the subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate in south China was probably later than this period. Most U deposits of the Xiazhuang area are located at the intersection between the WNW-trending dolerite dykes and the NNE-trending faults within the Triassic granites of eastern Guidong complex, South China. Previous metallogenesis studies assumed that

  14. Late-Variscan rare metal ore deposition and plume-related magmatism in the eastern European Variscides (D, CZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Located at the northwestern border of the Bohemian Massif in the eastern part of the European Variscides, the Erzgebirge-Krušné hory is one of the most important metallogenic provinces in Europe with a 800-year history of mining. The following rare metal resources are associated with late-Variscan (315 - 280 Ma), postmagmatic mineralization pulses in the Erzgebirge-Krušné hory and surrounded areas: 900 kt Sn, 230 kt W, 10 kt Mo, 1 kt Ta, 300 kt Li, 200 kt Rb, 2 kt Cs, 1.5 kt In, 230 t Ge, 320 t Sc, 14 kt Sb, 10 kt Bi, and 3 kt Ag. At the end of the Variscan Orogeny the regional tectonic regime in Central Europe changed, indicating the beginning of the break-up of the supercontinent. The Late Carboniferous-Early Permian in Europe was a period of widespread basin formation that was associated in many areas with mantle-derived magmatic activity. 300 Ma-old dike swarms in NE England and the Scottish Midland Valley, the Oslo Graben and Scania, radiate from a triple junction in the northernmost part of Jutland. This triple junction marked the axis of a deep-mantle plume centered in this area. In this context it is important to note that the mantle plume center is surrounded by significant lamprophyre intrusions which show in some districts spatial-time relationships to Sn-W-polymetallic, Ag-base metal, and U mineralization. During the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian an extensive magmatic province developed within the present northern and central Europe, intimately with extensional tectonics, in an area stretching from southern Scandinavia, through the North Sea, into Northern Germany. Peak magmatic activity was concentrated in a narrow time-span from 300 to 280 Ma. Simultaneously in Stephanian-Early Permian an intensive bimodal magmatism associated with intra-continental extensional setting occurs in the European Variscides. Permo-Carboniferous volcanism in the Spanish Central System, Iberian Ranges, Cantabrian Chain, Pyrenees and the French Massif Central

  15. Metaconglomerate preserves evidence for kimberlite, diamondiferous root and medium grade terrane of a pre-2.7 Ga Southern Superior protocraton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, M. G.; Afanasiev, V. P.; Bruce, L. F.; Thurston, P. C.; Ryder, J.

    2011-12-01

    We studied heavy minerals extracted from a diamondiferous metaconglomerate that formed 2697-2701 Ma in a successor basin within the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt (MGB) of the Wawa-Abitibi Terrane (Southern Superior Craton). The conglomerate is metamorphosed in the greenschist facies and contains mainly locally derived igneous mafic to felsic detritus, but also very minor components of medium grade metamorphic minerals, diamonds and paragenetic diamond indicator minerals. Comparison of the size distribution, resorbtion and N aggregation of diamonds in nearby Wawa lamprophyres and the metaconglomerate diamonds confirms that the latter were not derived from the proximal lamprophyric source. The heavy minerals in the metaconglomerate include diopside, olivine, corundum, chromite, almandine, pyrope with kelyphitic rims, picroilmenite, amphibole and anorthite. Low abundances of the heavy minerals (several grains per 4-70 tons of the metaconglomerate) are, in part, explained by their complete or partial replacement by the greenschist mineral assemblage. Detrital almandine and amphibole are inferred to originate in amphibolite facies rocks. Cr-diopside, olivine, chromite and anorthite were sourced from mafic-ultramafic anorthosite- and chromitite-bearing layered complexes mapped in the MGB. The presence of pyrope with more than 6 wt.% Cr 2O 3 suggests derivation from a cratonic root. Picroilmenite has compositions typical of kimberlite and unlike that of ultramafic lamprophyres and other unconventional diamondiferous volcanics. The Wawa metaconglomerate, therefore, should be considered analogous to the Witwatersrand successor basin conglomerate in recording indirect evidence for Archean kimberlites. The tight localization of the diamondiferous conglomerate in time and space was controlled by a quick (~ 3 Ma) erosion of the source kimberlite body. The location of the kimberlite-bearing > 2.7 Ga Superior protocraton was inferred from the provenance of the metaconglomerate

  16. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of intrusions at the Golden Pride gold deposit in the Nzega greenstone belt, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwelwa, Shimba; Manya, Shukrani; Vos, Ivo M. A.

    2013-10-01

    The greenstone sequence at Golden Pride gold deposit in Nzega greenstone belt of northern Tanzania is cross-cut by several intrusions whose geochemistry and petrogenesis is unknown. We present major and trace elements geochemistry of the Golden Pride igneous intrusions with the aim of constraining their petrogenesis and their ancient tectonic setting. The Golden Pride intrusions are geochemically categorized into two main rock suites: the granodiorites (which include the porphyries) and the lamprophyres (formerly intermediate intrusions). The granodiorites are characterized by SiO2 contents of 54.5-69.9 wt%, elevated MgO (1.22-3.59 wt%) Cr (up to 54 ppm), Mg# (35-55) pointing to a mantle component in the source. Compared to the TTG and adakites, the granodiorites are characterized by higher K2O (1.52-4.30 wt%), medium HREE (Gd/ErCN = 2.13-3.77) and marked enrichment in Ba and Sr (Ba + Sr = 819-2922 ppm) and are in these respects similar to Archean high Ba-Sr sanukitoids. The rocks in this suite are interpreted to have formed by partial melting of an enriched mantle wedge through two metasomatic events: subduction-related fluids/melts and by metasomatism related to asthenospheric mantle upwelling caused by slab break-off. Compared to the granodiorites, the lamprophyres have higher MgO contents (2.37-3.81 wt%), Cr (60-298 ppm), Co (31-57 ppm) and Mg# (32-40). They also show slight enrichment of the LREE relative to HREE (La/YbCN = 3.3-7.1), moderate Nb-Ti depletion and sub-chondritic Zr/Hf ratios (34-41). These geochemical features are attributed to derivation of the Golden Pride lamprophyres by partial melting of the amphibole-rich metasomatized mantle by slab derived hydrous fluids. Both of the Golden Pride intrusion suites show strong affinity to subduction related magmas and we interpret that the entire greenstone sequence and the associated intrusions at Golden Pride gold deposit formed in a late Archaean convergent margin.

  17. K-Ar and 40Ar/ 39Ar ages of dikes emplaced in the onshore basement of the Santos Basin, Resende area, SE Brazil: implications for the south Atlantic opening and Tertiary reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Eliane; Heilbron, Monica; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; de Morisson Valeriano, Cláudio; César Horta de Almeida, Júlio; Teixeira, Wilson; Thomaz Filho, Antonio

    2005-03-01

    New K-Ar and 40Ar/ 39Ar data of tholeiitic and alkaline dike swarms from the onshore basement of the Santos Basin (SE Brazil) reveal Mesozoic and Tertiary magmatic pulses. The tholeiitic rocks (basalt, dolerite, and microgabbro) display high TiO 2 contents (average 3.65 wt%) and comprise two magmatic groups. The NW-oriented samples of Group A have (La/Yb) N ratios between 15 and 32.3 and range in age from 192.9±2.2 to 160.9±1.9 Ma. The NNW-NNE Group B samples, with (La/Yb) N ratios between 7 and 16, range from 148.3±3 to 133.9±0.5 Ma. The alkaline rocks (syenite, trachyte, phonolite, alkaline basalts, and lamprophyre) display intermediate-K contents and comprise dikes, plugs, and stocks. Ages of approximately 82 Ma were obtained for the lamprophyre dikes, 70 Ma for the syenite plutons, and 64-59 Ma for felsic dikes. Because Jurassic-Early Cretaceous basic dikes have not been reported in SE Brazil, we might speculate that, during the emplacement of Group A dikes, extensional stresses were active in the region before the opening of the south Atlantic Ocean and coeval with the Karoo magmatism described in South Africa. Group B dikes yield ages compatible with those obtained for Serra Geral and Ponta Grossa magmatism in the Paraná Basin and are directly related to the breakup of western Gondwana. Alkaline magmatism is associated with several tectonic episodes that postdate the opening of the Atlantic Ocean and related to the upwelling of the Trindade plume and the generation of Tertiary basins southeast of Brazil. In the studied region, alkaline magmatism can be subdivided in two episodes: the first one represented by lamprophyre dykes of approximately 82 Ma and the second comprised of felsic alkaline stocks of approximately 70 Ma and associated dikes ranging from 64 to 59 Ma.

  18. Subduction-related High- to Ultrahigh-Potassic Rocks of the Ankara-Erzincan Suture Belt of Turkey: a geochemical and isotopic approach to source and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, S. Can; Gulmez, Fatma; Karacik, Zekiye; Tuysuz, Okan; Prelevic, Dejan; Roden, Michael F.; Hames, Willis E.; Zeki Billor, M.

    2014-05-01

    A Late Cretaceous Volcano-sedimantary Succession (LCVS) trends parallel to Neo-Tethyan Suture in North Central Anatolia. Volcanic members of the LCVS consist mainy of coeval leucite phonolite/tephrites, trachytes, lamprophyres and andesitic rocks. Obtained Ar-Ar ages reveal that the volcanic activity occurred between 73.6±0.18 and 76.78±0.19 Ma, contemporaneous with the subduction of the Neo-Tethyan ocean beneath the Pontides. The volcanic rocks of LCVS are classified as alkaline, High- to ultrahigh-K, and silica-saturated and silica-unsaturated, geochemically. Rare calc-alkaline andesitic lavas are also occur within the volcanic sucession. Except the calc-alkaline samples, magmatic members of LCVS have similar major and trace element concentrations similar to the plagioleucitites or ultrapotassic rocks of the active orogenic zones (i.e. the Roman Province ultrapotassic series, Peccerillo, 2005). The multi element patterns on N-MORB- and Chondrite-normalized spider diagrams are characterized by significant LILE and LREE enrichments relative to HFSE and HREE, and display apparent Nb and Ta depletions, implying the subduction-related magmas. 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.704493-0.706090) and 143Nd/144Nd(i) (0.512523-0.512680) isotope ratios are close to the mantle array, and are also in between the Aeolian Islands CA-Potassic rocks (Peccerillo, 2005), BSE and the circum-Mediterranean anorogenic Cenozoic igneous province (CiMACI, Lustrino&Wilson, 2007). Variable Mg# (33-60) evidences that these rocks are the products of evolved melts. The lead isotope values display a trend between EMI and DM, suggesting that the crustal involvement is more effective process during the generation of some lamprophyres relative to the other ultrapotassic rocks of LCVS. The results of clinopyroxene thermobarometry calculations reveal significant differences in depth of crystallization for the rock suites. Some trace element abundances and inter elemental ratios together with their co-variations show

  19. The Magnet Cove Rutile Company mine, Hot Spring County, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinney, Douglas M.

    1949-01-01

    The Magnet Cove Rutile Company mine was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey in November 1944. The pits are on the northern edge of Magnet Cove and have been excavated in the oxidized zone of highly weathered and altered volcanic agglomerate. The agglomerate is composed of altered mafic igneous rocks in a matrix of white to gray clay, a highly altered tuff. The agglomerate appears layered and is composed of tuffaceous clay material below and igneous blocks above. The agglomerate is cut by aplite and lamprophyre dikes. Alkalic syenite dikes crop out on the ridge north of the pits. At the present stage of mine development the rutile seems to be concentrated in a narrow zone beneath the igneous blocks of the agglomerate. Rutile, associated with calcite and pyrite, occurs as disseminated acicular crystals and discontinuous vein-like masses in the altered tuff. Thin veins of rutile locally penetrate the mafic igneous blocks of the agglomerate.

  20. The petrogenesis of oceanic kimberlites and included mantle megacrysts: The Malaitan alnoite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.

    1988-01-01

    The study of unambiguous suboceanic mantle was facilitated by the occurrence of anomalous kimberlite-type intrusives on Malaita in the Solomon Islands. The pseudo-kimberlites were termed alnoites, and are basically mica lamprophyres with melilite in the ground mass. Alnoitic magmas were explosively intruded into the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) 34 Ma ago. The OJP is a vastly overthickened portion of the Pacific plate which now abuts the Indo-Australian plate. Malaita is considered to be the obducted leading edge of the OJP. Initial diapiric upwelling beneath the OJP produced the proto-alnoite magma. After impingement on the rigid lithosphere, megacrysts fractionation occurred, with augites precipitating first, representing the parental magma. Sea water-altered oceanic crust, which underplated the OJP, was assimilated by the proto-alnoite magma during megacrysts fractionation (AFC).

  1. Late Archean mafic volcanism in the Rainy Lake area, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Day, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Late Archean greenstone-granite terrane of the Rainy Lake area of Minnesota contains a bimodal suite of mafic and felsic volcanic and coeval intrusive rocks. New geochemical data show that the mafic rocks occur in three distinct suites: (1) low-Ti olivine- and quartz-tholeiite, (2) high-Ti quartz-tholeiite and basaltic andesite, and (3) calc-alkaline lamprophyric monzodiorite and quartz diorite. The low-Ti tholeiites have only slightly evolved Mg-numbers from 53-63, Ni=125-300 ppm, and MORB-like REE. In contrast, the high-Ti tholeiites are more evolved, with Mg*=26-48, Ni=43-135 ppm, and higher total REE. Compared to the tholeiitic suites, the monzodiorite suite has more primitive Mg-numbers, with Mg*=70-78, Ni<410 ppm, and anomalously high LREE. The two tholeiitic suites cannot be genetically related by simple fractionation from a single parent magma; however, lower degrees of partial melting (<8 percent) of a mantle source (spinel periodotite) with REE=2-4 times chondrites could have produced the high-Ti tholeiites, and higher degrees of melting (20-30 percent) of a similar source could have generated the low-Ti tholeiites. In contrast, the monzodiorite suite must have been generated from either a LREE-rich or (and) a garnet-bearing source (garnet periodotite). The authors conclude that shallow melting (<40-50 km) within the Archean mantle in the Rainy Lake area produced the tholeiitic rocks, and that deep melting (>40-50 km) generated the lamprophyric monzodiorites.

  2. Processes accompanying of mantle plume emplacement into continental lithosphere: Evidence from NW Arabian plate, Western Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Lower crustal xenoliths occurred in the Middle Cretaceous lamprophyre diatremes in Jabel Ansaria (Western Syria) (Sharkov et al., 1992). They are represented mainly garnet granulites and eclogite-like rocks, which underwent by deformations and retrograde metamorphism, and younger fresh pegmatoid garnet-kaersutite-clinopyroxene (Al-Ti augite) rocks; mantle peridotites are absent in these populations. According to mineralogical geothermobarometers, forming of garnet-granulite suite rocks occurred under pressure 13.5-15.4 kbar (depths 45-54 kn) and temperature 965-1115oC. At the same time, among populations of mantle xenoliths in the Late Cenozoic platobasalts of the region, quite the contrary, lower crustal xenoliths are absent, however, predominated spinel lherzolites (fragments of upper cooled rim of a plume head), derived from the close depths (30-40 km: Sharkov, Bogatikov, 2015). From this follows that ancient continental crust was existed here even in the Middle Cretaceous, but in the Late Cenozoic was removed by extended mantle plume head; at that upper sialic crust was not involved in geomechanic processes, because Precambrian metamorphic rocks survived as a basement for Cambrian to Cenozoic sedimentary cover of Arabian platform. In other words, though cardinal rebuilding of deep-seated structure of the region occurred in the Late Cenozoic but it did not affect on the upper shell of the ancient lithosphere. Because composition of mantle xenolithis in basalts is practically similar worldwide, we suggest that deep-seated processes are analogous also. As emplacement of the mantle plume heads accompanied by powerful basaltic magmatism, very likely that range of lower (mafic) continental crust existence is very convenient for extension of plume heads and their adiabatic melting. If such level, because of whatever reasons, was not reached, melting was limited but appeared excess of volatile matters which led to forming of lamprophyre or even kimberlite.

  3. The structural history and mineralization controls of the world-class Geita Hill gold deposit, Geita Greenstone Belt, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanislav, I. V.; Brayshaw, M.; Kolling, S. L.; Dirks, P. H. G. M.; Cook, Y. A.; Blenkinsop, T. G.

    2016-05-01

    The Geita Hill gold deposit is located in the Archean Geita Greenstone Belt and is one of the largest gold deposits in East Africa. The Geita Greenstone Belt experienced a complex deformation and intrusive history that is well illustrated and preserved in and around the Geita Hill gold deposit. Deformation involved early stages of ductile shearing and folding (D1 to D5), during which episodic emplacement of large diorite intrusive complexes, sills, and dykes occurred. These ductile deformation phases were followed by the development of brittle-ductile shear zones and faults (D6 to D8). The last stages of deformation were accompanied by voluminous felsic magmatism involving the intrusion of felsic porphyry dykes, within the greenstone belt, and the emplacement of large granitic bodies now forming the margins of the greenstone belt. Early, folded lamprophyre dykes, and later lamprophyre dykes, crosscutting the folded sequence are common, although volumetrically insignificant. The gold deposit formed late during the tectonic history of the greenstone belt, post-dating ductile deformation and synchronous with the development of brittle-ductile shear zones that overprinted earlier structural elements. The main mineralizing process involved sulfide replacement of magnetite-rich layers in ironstone and locally the replacement of ferromagnesian phases and magnetite in the diorite intrusions. The intersection between the brittle-ductile (D6) Geita Hill Shear Zone and different structural elements of ductile origin (e.g., fold hinges), and the contact between banded ironstone and folded diorite dykes and sills provided the optimal sites for gold mineralization.

  4. Mineralogical and stable isotope studies of gold-arsenic mineralisation in the Sams Creek peralkaline porphyritic granite, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Kevin; Brathwaite, Robert L.

    2006-03-01

    At Sams Creek, a gold-bearing, peralkaline granite porphyry dyke, which has a 7 km strike length and is up to 60 m in thickness, intrudes camptonite lamprophyre dykes and lower greenschist facies metapelites and quartzites of the Late Ordovician Wangapeka formation. The lamprophyre dykes occur as thin (< 3 m) slivers along the contacts of the granite dyke. δ18Omagma values (+5 to +8‰, VSMOW) of the A-type granite suggest derivation from a primitive source, with an insignificant mature crustal contribution. Hydrothermal gold-sulphide mineralisation is confined to the granite and adjacent lamprophyre; metapelite country rocks have only weak hydrothermal alteration. Three stages of hydrothermal alteration have been identified in the granite: Stage I alteration (high fO2) consisting of magnetite-siderite±biotite; Stage II consisting of thin quartz-pyrite veinlets; and Stage III (low fO2) consisting of sulphides, quartz and siderite veins, and pervasive silicification. The lamprophyre is altered to an ankerite-chlorite-sericite assemblage. Stage III sulphide veins are composed of arsenopyrite + pyrite ± galena ± sphalerite ± gold ± chalcopyrite ± pyrrhotite ± rutile ± graphite. Three phases of deformation have affected the area, and the mineralised veins and the granite and lamprophyre dykes have been deformed by two phases of folding, the youngest of which is Early Cretaceous. Locally preserved early-formed fluid inclusions are either carbonic, showing two- or three-phases at room temperature (liquid CO2-CH4 + liquid H2O ± CO2 vapour) or two-phase liquid-rich aqueous inclusions, some of which contain clathrates. Salinities of the aqueous inclusions are in the range of 1.4 to 7.6 wt% NaCl equiv. Final homogenisation temperatures (Th) of the carbonic inclusions indicate minimum trapping temperatures of 320 to 355°C, which are not too different from vein formation temperatures of 340-380°C estimated from quartz-albite stable isotope thermometry. δ18O values

  5. Petrogenesis of Cretaceous adakite-like intrusions of the Gangdese Plutonic Belt, southern Tibet: Implications for mid-ocean ridge subduction and crustal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuan-chuan; Hou, Zeng-qian; Gong, Ying-li; Liang, Wei; Sun, Qing-Zhong; Zhang, Song; Fu, Qiang; Huang, Ke-Xian; Li, Qiu-Yun; Li, Wei

    2014-03-01

    We have conducted a whole-rock geochemical, U-Pb zircon geochronological, and in situ zircon Hf-O isotopic compositional study of rocks in southern Tibet from the Langxian igneous suite (including a lamprophyre dyke, mafic enclaves, a granodiorite, and a two-mica granite) and the Nuri igneous suite (a quartz-diorite). U-Pb zircon dating indicates that the timing of crystallization of the mafic enclaves and host granodiorite of the Langxian suite are ca. 105 Ma and 102 Ma, respectively, that the Langxian lamprophyre dyke and the two-mica granite were emplaced at ca. 96 Ma and 80-76 Ma, respectively, and that the Nuri quartz-diorite was emplaced at ca. 95 Ma. With the exception of the lamprophyre dyke and mafic enclaves in the Langxian area, felsic rocks from the Langxian and Nuri igneous suites all show signs of a geochemical affinity with adakite-like rocks. The high Mg-numbers, high abundance of compatible elements, high ɛNd(t) (2.7 and 2.8) and δ18O (8.9 and 9.2‰) values, elevated zircon ɛHf(t) (11.0-17.0) values, and low 87Sr/86Sr(i) ratios (0.7040), collectively indicate that the Nuri adakite-like quartz-diorite was derived from partial melting of the low temperature altered Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust, and that these dioritic magmas subsequently interacted with peridotite as they rose upwards through the overlying mantle wedge. The observation of identical differentiation trends, similar whole-rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopic compositions, and consistently low (Dy/Yb)N ratios among the Langxian igneous suite rocks, indicates that the adakite-like granodiorite was produced by low-pressure fractional crystallization of precursor magmas now represented by the (relict) mafic enclaves. However, relatively high Al2O3 contents, low MgO, Cr and Ni contents, and low (La/Yb)N and (Dy/Yb)N values indicate that the two-mica granite was derived from partial melting of the southern Tibetan mafic lower crust in the absence of garnet, while isotopic data suggest that at

  6. Jurassic-Paleogene intra-oceanic magmatic evolution of the Ankara Mélange, North-Central Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarifakioglu, E.; Dilek, Y.; Sevin, M.

    2013-11-01

    Oceanic rocks in the Ankara Mélange along the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone (IAESZ) in North-Central Anatolia include locally coherent ophiolite complexes (~179 Ma and ~80 Ma), seamount or oceanic plateau volcanic units with pelagic and reefal limestones (96.6 ± 1.8 Ma), metamorphic rocks with ages of 187.4 ± 3.7 Ma, 158.4 ± 4.2 Ma, and 83.5 ± 1.2 Ma, and subalkaline to alkaline volcanic and plutonic rocks of an island arc origin (~67-63 Ma). All but the arc rocks occur in a shaly-graywacke and/or serpentinite matrix, and are deformed by south-vergent thrust faults and folds that developed in the Middle to Late Eocene due to continental collisions in the region. Ophiolitic volcanic rocks have mid-ocean ridge (MORB) and island arc tholeiite (IAT) affinities showing moderate to significant LILE enrichment and depletion in Nb, Hf, Ti, Y and Yb, which indicate the influence of subduction-derived fluids in their melt evolution. Seamount/oceanic plateau basalts show ocean island basalt (OIB) affinities. The arc-related volcanic rocks, lamprophyric dikes and syeno-dioritic plutons exhibit high-K shoshonitic to medium-to high-K calc-alkaline compositions with strong enrichment in LILE, REE and Pb, and initial ϵNd values between +1.3 and +1.7. Subalkaline arc volcanic units occur in the northern part of the mélange, whereas the younger alkaline volcanic rocks and intrusions (lamprophyre dikes and syeno-dioritic plutons) in the southern part. The Early to Late Jurassic and Late Cretaceous epidote-actinolite, epidote-chlorite and epidote-glaucophane schists represent the metamorphic units formed in a subduction channel in the Northern Neotethys. The Middle to Upper Triassic neritic limestones spatially associated with the seamount volcanic rocks indicate that the Northern Neotethys was an open ocean with its MORB-type oceanic lithosphere by the Early Triassic. The Latest Cretaceous-Early Paleocene island arc volcanic, dike and plutonic rocks with

  7. Jurassic-Paleogene intraoceanic magmatic evolution of the Ankara Mélange, north-central Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarifakioglu, E.; Dilek, Y.; Sevin, M.

    2014-02-01

    Oceanic rocks in the Ankara Mélange along the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone (IAESZ) in north-central Anatolia include locally coherent ophiolite complexes (∼ 179 Ma and ∼ 80 Ma), seamount or oceanic plateau volcanic units with pelagic and reefal limestones (96.6 ± 1.8 Ma), metamorphic rocks with ages of 256.9 ± 8.0 Ma, 187.4 ± 3.7 Ma, 158.4 ± 4.2 Ma, and 83.5 ± 1.2 Ma indicating northern Tethys during the late Paleozoic through Cretaceous, and subalkaline to alkaline volcanic and plutonic rocks of an island arc origin (∼ 67-63 Ma). All but the arc rocks occur in a shale-graywacke and/or serpentinite matrix, and are deformed by south-vergent thrust faults and folds that developed in the middle to late Eocene due to continental collisions in the region. Ophiolitic volcanic rocks have mid-ocean ridge (MORB) and island arc tholeiite (IAT) affinities showing moderate to significant large ion lithophile elements (LILE) enrichment and depletion in Nb, Hf, Ti, Y and Yb, which indicate the influence of subduction-derived fluids in their melt evolution. Seamount/oceanic plateau basalts show ocean island basalt (OIB) affinities. The arc-related volcanic rocks, lamprophyric dikes and syenodioritic plutons exhibit high-K shoshonitic to medium- to high-K calc-alkaline compositions with strong enrichment in LILE, rare earth elements (REE) and Pb, and initial ɛNd values between +1.3 and +1.7. Subalkaline arc volcanic units occur in the northern part of the mélange, whereas the younger alkaline volcanic rocks and intrusions (lamprophyre dikes and syenodioritic plutons) in the southern part. The late Permian, Early to Late Jurassic, and Late Cretaceous amphibole-epidote schist, epidote-actinolite, epidote-chlorite and epidote-glaucophane schists represent the metamorphic units formed in a subduction channel in the northern Neotethys. The Middle to Upper Triassic neritic limestones spatially associated with the seamount volcanic rocks indicate that the northern

  8. Chemistry and petrography of calcite in the KTB pilot borehole, Bavarian Oberpfalz, Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    The KTB pilot borehole in northeast Bavaria, Germany, penetrates 4000 m of gneiss, amphibolite, and subordinate calc-silicate, lamprophyre and metagabbro. There are three types of calcite in the drilled section: 1) metamorphic calcite in calc-silicate and marble; 2) crack-filling calcite in all lithologies; and 3) replacement calcite in altered minerals. Crack-filling and replacement calcite postdate metamorphic calcite. Multiple calcite generations in individual cracks suggest that different generations of water repeatedly flowed through the same cracks. Crack-filling mineral assemblages that include calcite originally formed at temperatures of 150-350??C. Presently, crack-filling calcite is in chemical and isotopic equilibrium with saline to brackish water in the borehole at temperatures of ???120??C. The saline to brackish water contains a significant proportion of meteoric water. Re-equilibration of crack-filling calcite to lower temperatures means that calcite chemistry tells us little about water-rock interactions in the crystal section of temperatures higher than ~120??C. -from Author

  9. Geology, mineralization, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion characteristics of the Novogodnee-Monto oxidized Au-(Cu) skarn and porphyry deposit, Polar Ural, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Serguei G.; Kryazhev, Sergey G.; Dvurechenskaya, Svetlana S.

    2013-06-01

    The Novogodnee-Monto oxidized Au-(Cu) skarn and porphyry deposit is situated in the large metallogenic belt of magnetite skarn and Cu-Au porphyry deposits formed along the Devonian-Carboniferous Urals orogen. The deposit area incorporates nearly contemporaneous Middle-Late Devonian to Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous calc-alkaline (gabbro to diorite) and potassic (monzogabbro, monzodiorite- to monzonite-porphyry, also lamprophyres) intrusive suites. The deposit is represented by magnetite skarn overprinted by amphibole-chlorite-epidote-quartz-albite and then sericite-quartz-carbonate assemblages bearing Au-sulfide mineralization. This mineralization includes early high-fineness (900-990 ‰) native Au associated mostly with cobaltite as well as with chalcopyrite and Co-pyrite, intermediate-stage native Au (fineness 830-860 ‰) associated mostly with galena, and late native Au (760-830 ‰) associated with Te minerals. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope data indicate an involvement of magmatic-hydrothermal high-salinity (>20 wt.% NaCl-equiv.) chloride fluids. The potassic igneous suite may have directly sourced fluids, metals, and/or sulfur. The abundance of Au mineralization is consistent with the oxidized character of the system, and its association with Co-sulfides suggests elevated sulfur fugacity.

  10. Cortlandt-Beemerville magmatic belt: A probable late Taconian alkalic cross trend in the central Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, Nicholas M.

    1981-07-01

    A belt of alkalic to alkalic-calcic pipes, lamprophyres, and intrusive complexes of probable Late Ordovician age extends from the Peach Lake Croton Falls area of Westchester County, New York, about 100 km S80°W to Beemerville, New Jersey. The rocks are intruded across a Taconic dynamothermal belt ranging from sillimanite grade on the east to chlorite grade on the west. Foliated Middle Ordovician and older rocks containing slaty cleavage or coarser grained metamorphic fabrics are crosscut by dikes that are posttectonic to late syntectonic relative to the Taconian dynamothermal events. Analysis of thrust faults and fold structures within this belt suggests that this cross-grain belt of alkalic to weakly alkalic rocks intruded steeply dipping brittle fractures trending N40° to 50°W, N35° to 60°E, and N70° to 80°E and along more ductile zones trending N20° to N70°E. This plutonic activity was restricted to a discrete east-west belt. The clear posttectonic to syntectonic nature of the dikes and the spatial and temporal association with Ordovician tectonism suggest that magmatic activity may be related to fracturing of mantle rock at the junction of two salients of Taconic age that intersect in the New York recess. The tectonic setting of the intrusive belt is unusual because it is associated in space and time with compressional tectonics of the Taconic orogeny, rather than with extensional rifting.

  11. Heteromorphism and crystallization paths of katungites, Navajo volcanic field, Arizona, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.W.; Aldrich, M.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A swarm of thin, isochemical but heteromorphic dikes crops out in the valley of Hasbidito Creek in NE Arizona. The swarm is part of the dominantly potassic, mid-Tertiary Navajo volcanic field of the Colorado Plateau. Whole-rock chemical analyses of five samples from four of the dikes indicate that they are chemically identical to the katungites of Uganda. These dikes show the characteristic seriate-porphyritic texture of lamprophyres. Samples of an olivine-melilitite dike from the same swarm lack this texture and the chemical analysis, while similar to those of the other dikes, shows effects from the incorporation of xenocrystic olivine. Over 20 mineral phases have been identified in the Arizona samples and as many as 18 phases may occur in a single sample. The major phases are phlogopite, olivine, perovskite, opaque oxides, +- melilite and +- clinopyroxene. Based upon the modal mineralogies and textures of ten dike samples, we recognize five general non-equilibrium assemblages. Comparison of these assemblages with recent experimental results shows that they represent various combinations of complete and incomplete reactions. Reaction relations were determined by entering melt and phase compositions into the computer program GENMIX to obtain balanced reactions. By combining petrographic observations with mineral chemical data, balanced reactions from GENMIX, and the recently determined phase diagrams we are able to trace crystallization paths for the katungite magma.

  12. Slab breakoff: a model for Caledonian, Late Granite syn-collisional magmatism in the orthotectonic (metamorphic) zone of Scotland and Donegal, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, M. P.; Ghani, A. A.

    2002-06-01

    None of the existing models for calc-alkaline "Late Granite" (Siluro-Devonian) genesis in the metamorphic Caledonian orogenic belt of Ireland and Scotland fully explains their spatial, age or chemical character. A consistent model must involve the closure of Iapetus Ocean, where slab breakoff is a natural consequence of attempted subduction of continental crust. Expected outcome is a long linear belt of high-K, calc-alkaline magmas, some with characteristic trace element signatures, specifically high Ba, Sr and Zr. Other features include the critical magmatic association of coeval appinite and granite, rapid uplift, erosion and the low-grade regional metamorphism in the Southern Uplands. The linear heat pulse on breakoff is spatially, intensity and time limited producing small volume melts emplaced as separated plutons, over a short time span. Magmatism in the Caledonian metamorphic belt is accurately accounted for by slab breakoff on collision of Baltica with the Scoto-Greenland margin during the Scandian orogeny, following Iapetus Ocean closure. The two chemically, isotopically and areally distinctive suites in the metamorphic belt in Scotland, viz. the Argyll and Cairngorm Suites, can be modelled by reference to the Donegal granites where sequential partial melting of new, lamprophyric underplated crust, then shallower old crust, as heat conduction moved up through the crust on slab breakoff, produced magmas characteristic of the two suites.

  13. A fully coupled three-dimensional THM analysis of the FEBEX in situ test with the ROCMAS Code: Prediction of THM behavior in a bentonite barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a fully coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical analysis of FEBEX--a large underground heater test conducted in a bentonite and fractured rock system. System responses predicted by the numerical analysis--including temperature, moisture content, and bentonite-swelling stress--were compared to field measurements at sensors located in the bentonite. An overall good agreement between predicted and measured system responses shows that coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical processes in a bentonite barrier are well represented by the numerical model. The most challenging aspect of this particular analysis was modeling of the bentonite's mechanical behavior, which at FEBEX turned out to be affected by gaps between prefabricated bentonite blocks. At FEBEX, the swelling pressure did not develop until a few months into the experiment when moisture swelling of bentonite blocks had closed the gaps completely. Moreover, the wetting of the bentonite took place uniformly from the rock and was not impacted by the permeability difference between the Lamprophyres dykes and surrounding rock.

  14. New paleomagnetic data from 1.80-1.75 Ga mafic intrusions of Fennoscandia and Sarmatia: implications for the late Paleoproterozoic paleogeography of Baltica and Laurentia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarevsky, Sergei; Lubnina, Natalia; Sokolov, Svetoslav; Bogdanova, Svetlana

    2016-04-01

    A series of recently dated 1.78-1.75 Ga lamprophyre and shoshonite intrusions are exposed north of Ladoga Lake in southern Karelia (Fennoscandia). We carried out a paleomagnetic study of these intrusions and an additional study of the coeval gabbro-dolerite Ropruchey sill near the Onega Lake. All studied rocks carry a stable primary remanence supported by positive contact tests. We also studied 14 mafic dykes and 1 mafic sill from Ukrainian shield (Sarmatia). Most of these intrusions have been dated or re-dated recently by U-Pb (baddeleyite) method at 1.80-1.75 Ga. Ukrainian dykes also carry a consistent stable bipolar remanence. Two positive contact tests suggest that this remanence is primary. A comparison of new and previously published paleomagnetic data shows a significant difference between Fennoscandian and Sarmatian 1.80-1.75 Ga paleopoles. This implies that the final assemble of Baltica by docking of Volgo-Sarmatia and Fennoscandia occurred after 1.75 Ga. Consequently these two parts of Baltica should be considered as independent blocks in pre-1.75 Ga paleogeographic reconstructions. Using late Paleoproterozoic paleomagnetic data from Laurentia together with geological constraints we have built a new kinematic paleogeographic model for Laurentia and Baltica in the Statherian.

  15. Mantle xenocrysts of Chompolo field of the alkaline volcanics, Aldan shield, South Yakutia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolenko, Evgeny; Tychkov, Nikolay; Afanasiev, Valentin

    2015-04-01

    New mineralogical and chemical constraints for 10 dikes, veins (360-800m) and pipes (60-110 m) of Chompolo field discovered in 1957-1958 are discussed. Feld is located within Central Aldan Archean and Paleoproterozoic granulite-orthogneiss superterrane of Aldan-Stanovoy Shield, with peak of metamorphism - 2.1-1.9 Ga (Smelov, Timofeev, 2007). Originally (Shilina and Zeitlin 1959) and later (Kostrovitsky and Garanin 1992, Ashchepkov, Vladykin et al. 2001) these rocks were classified as kimberlites by mineralogy including pyrope, Cr spinel, and Cr diopside. Panina and Vladykin (1994), Davies et al, (2006) identified them as lamprophyres and lamproites. The age of Chompolo rocks is pre-Jurassic (Vladimirov et. al., 1989) dated by 40Ar/39Ar as 164.7±1 Ma (233.7±2.2 next plato)(unpublished Ashchepkov). The Rb-Sr isochron for lamprophyre "intrusions 104" indicate later age of 131±4 Ma (Zaitsev, Smelov, 2010). Magmatic bodies (Aldanskaya, Sputnik, Gornaya, Ogonek, Perevalnaya, Kilier-E) were studied during 2012-2013 fieldworks. Most of igneous rocks occur as inequigranular volcanic breccias with micro- or crypto-crystalline groundmass of K feldspar (up to 16.3 wt.% K2O, up to 3.2 wt.% FeO), chlorite, opaque minerals, melanocratic xenocrysts and phenocrysts (garnet, pyroxene, amphibole, Cr spinel, apatite, zircon, mica), and abundant xenogenic fragments of wallrock and crystalline basement. Garnet chemistry records the presence of mantle and crustal material. Mantle garnets lack the common megacryst, wehrlite, and high-temperature lherzolite varieties. Mantle mineralization prevails in the Aldan dike and the Sputnik, Gornaya, and Ogonek pipes, while crustal and elcogitic material is in the Perevalnaya and Kilier-E pipes. The Cr spinel consists of (in wt%) 3.5 to 50.9 Al2O3, 18.6-63.5 wt% Cr2O3, 6.1 to 19.1 MgO, and 0 to 1.61 TiO2. Al and Cr in spinels are in inverse proportion. The Chompolo alkaline volcanic rocks are most similar to the Central Aldan lamproites in trace

  16. Petrology, geochemistry and geochonology of the Jacupiranga ultramafic, alkaline and carbonatitic complex (southern Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmyz, Luanna; Arnaud, Nicolas; Biondi, João Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Brazilian carbonatitic complexes are located at the edges of the Paleozoic basins and are usually associated to tectonic crustal flexuring or deep fault zones. The Jacupiranga Complex is a 65 km² ultrabasic-alkaline carbonatitic intrusive body outcroping at the northeastern border of the Paraná Basin, South of São Paulo State (Brazil). The northern portion of the unit is mostly composed of peridotitic rocks, while the southern part contains ijolites, melteigites, clinopyroxenites and carbonatites which host a phosphate deposit, mined since 1966. Even though the carbonatites only represent 1% of the Complex's area, they have concentrated most of the historical petrogenetic studies, leaving almost unknown the petrogenetic and the geochronological characteristics of other rocks. This explains why the few petrogenetic models from the literature are very partial and mostly unsatisfactory. While the peridotitic rocks are largely hindered by the absence of fresh outcrops, the regolith thickness and the high serpentinization degree, field observations and petrographic data notably show a heterogeneous zone around the peridotitic body. That zone is composed of a large variety of lithotypes over a relatively small area (~9 km²), comprising diorites, monzodiorites, alkali feldspar syenites, trachytes, lamprophyres and syenites. Moreover, these rocks present a restricted lateral continuity (decametric) and a lack of the magmatic bedding characteristic of the ijolitic and clinopyroxenitc rocks. The southern clinopyroxenitic zone (~20 km²) is composed of clinopyroxenite and melteigite with prominent magmatic layering, probably of cumulative origin, and a body of carbonatites which outcrops over less than 1 km2 essentially composed of sovite and beforsite, with abundant apatite. The Jacupiranga Complex characteristics indicate that its formation possibly comprises at least five magmatic events which cannot at present be surely ordinated in time: a) the emplacement of the

  17. Petrogenesis of coeval sodic and potassic alkaline magmas at Spanish Peaks, Colorado: Magmatism related to the opening of the Rio Grande rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, A. Brooke Hamil; McGregor, Heath; Roden, Michael F.; Salters, Vincent J. M.; Sarafian, Adam; Leahy, Rory

    2016-07-01

    Approximately coeval, relatively primitive (∼5-10% MgO with exception of a trachyandesite) alkaline mafic dikes and sills at or near Spanish Peaks, CO are divided into relatively sodic and potassic varieties on the basis of K2O/Na2O. Many of these dikes are true lamprophyres. In spite of variable alkali element ratios, the alkaline rocks share a number of geochemical similarities: high LIL element contents, high Ba and similar Sr, Nd and Hf isotope ratios near that of Bulk Earth. One important difference is that the potassic rocks are characterized by lower Al2O3 contents, typically less than 12 wt.%, than the sodic dikes/sills which typically have more than 13 wt.% Al2O3, and this difference is independent of MgO content. We attribute the distinct Al2O3 contents to varying pressure during melting: a mica-bearing, Al-poor vein assemblage for the potassic magmas melted at higher pressure than an aluminous amphibole-bearing vein assemblage for the sodic magmas. Remarkable isotopic and trace element similarities with approximately contemporaneous, nearby Rio Grande rift-related basalts in the San Luis Valley, indicate that the magmatism at Spanish Peaks was rift-related, and that lithosphere sources were shared between some rift magmas and those at Spanish Peaks. High Zn/Fe ratios in the Spanish Peaks mafic rocks point to a clinopyroxene- and garnet-rich source such as lithosphere veined by pyroxenite or eclogite. Lithospheric melting was possibly triggered by foundering of cool, dense lithosphere beneath the Rio Grande rift during the initiation of rifting with the potassic parent magmas generated by higher pressure melting of the foundered lithosphere than the sodic parent magmas. This process, caused by gravitational instability of the lithosphere (Elkins-Tanton, 2007) may be common beneath active continental rifts.

  18. Age and origin of post collision Baltoro granites, south Karakoram, North Pakistan: Insights from in-situ U-Pb, Hf and oxygen isotopic record of zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahar, Munazzam Ali; Mahéo, Gweltaz; Goodell, Philip C.; Pavlis, Terry L.

    2014-09-01

    Origin of post collision plutonism is critical to understand the tectonothermal evolution of the over thickened continental crust in collision zones. This has proven difficult to reconcile with the conventional whole rock geochemical and field based studies alone. We report in-situ study of zircon U-Pb, Hf and O isotopes from five samples of the Baltoro Plutonic Unit (BPU) in south Karakoram. The plutonic unit is the western part of the southern Asian margin of the India-Asia convergent zone. Baltoro granites and a biotite-rich enclave yielded similar and overlapping U-Pb ages ranging from 26 to 15 Ma. Hafnium isotopic composition (εHf (0)) is very heterogeneous ranging from - 17.1 to + 4.4 while the oxygen isotopic composition of the granites is homogeneous with mean δ18O ranging from 7.2 to 9.4‰. Based on U-Pb geochronology and Hf-O isotopic composition, the involvement of two main sources is suggested (1) Cretaceous calc-alkaline Karakoram crust and (2) Karakoram gneisses. Moreover, possible involvement of metasomatized Asian lithospheric mantle is supported by elevated oxygen composition of granites and identical Hf composition of biotite-rich enclave to the mantle derived Baltoro lamprophyre. However, direct contribution from juvenile pristine mantle is unlikely as no juvenile mantle type Hf and oxygen values were obtained. This also precludes the involvement of southward juvenile arc related component of Kohistan-Ladakh batholith. Our new U-Pb and Hf data are comparable to the Mesozoic Karakoram batholith, Miocene two-mica leucogranites in the Pangong Range and magmatism from the Lhasa terrane in south Tibet, suggesting a genetic link between the Karakoram and the rocks to the east. This magmatic event is best explained by lower crust partial melting promoted by both thermal equilibration following crustal thickening and heat advection by ultrapotassic magmas associated with the breakoff of the Indian continental margin.

  19. Numerical simulation of ground-water flow through glacial deposits and crystalline bedrock in the Mirror Lake area, Grafton County, New Hampshire

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Goode, D.J.; Hsieh, P.A.

    1997-12-31

    This report documents the development of a computer model to simulate steady-state (long-term average) flow of ground water in the vicinity of Mirror Lake, which lies at the eastern end of the Hubbard Brook valley in central New Hampshire. The 10-km{sup 2} study area includes Mirror Lake, the three streams that flow into Mirror Lake, Leeman`s Brook, Paradise Brook, and parts of Hubbard Brook and the Pemigewasset River. The topography of the area is characterized by steep hillsides and relatively flat valleys. Major hydrogeologic units include glacial deposits, composed of till containing pockets of sand and gravel, and fractured crystal-line bedrock, composed of schist intruded by granite, pegmatite, and lamprophyre. Ground water occurs in both the glacial deposits and bedrock. Precipitation and snowmelt infiltrate to the water table on the hillsides, flow downslope through the saturated glacial deposits and fractured bedrock, and discharge to streams and to Mirror Lake. The model domain includes the glacial deposits, the uppermost 150 m of bedrock, Mirror Lake, the layer of organic sediments on the lake bottom, and streams and rivers within the study area. A streamflow routing package was included in the model to simulate baseflow in streams and interaction between streams and ground water. Recharge from precipitation is assumed to be areally uniform, and riparian evapotranspiration along stream banks is assumed negligible. The spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity is represented by dividing the model domain into several zones, each having uniform hydraulic properties. Local variations in recharge and hydraulic conductivities are ignored; therefore, the simulation results characterize the general ground-water system, not local details of groundwater movement. 47 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Garnet granulite xenoliths from the Northern Baltic shield- The underplated lower crust of a palaeoproterozoic large igneous province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kempton, P.D.; Downes, H.; Neymark, L.A.; Wartho, J.A.; Zartman, R.E.; Sharkov, E.V.

    2001-01-01

    Garnet granulite facies xenoliths hosted in Devonian lamprophyres from the Kola Peninsula are interpreted to represent the high-grade metamorphic equivalents of continental flood tholeiites, emplaced into the Baltic Shield Archaean lower crust in early Proterozoic time. Geochronological data and similarities in major and trace element geochemistry suggest that the xenoliths formed during the same plume-related magmatic event that created a widespread Palaeoproterozoic large igneous province (LIP) at 2.4-2.5 Ga. They are, thus, the first samples of the lower crust of a Palaeo-proterozoic LIP to be studied in petrological detail. The suite includes mafic granulites (gar + cpx + rutile ?? plag ?? opx ?? phlog ?? amph), felsic granulites (plag + gar + cpx + rutile ?? qtz ?? Kspar ?? phlog ?? amph) and pyroxenites (?? phlog ?? amph), but mafic garnet granulites predominate. Although some samples are restites, there is no evidence for a predominance of magmatic cumulates, as is common for Phanerozoic lower-crustal xenolith suites. Metasediments are also absent. Phlogopite and/or amphibole occur in xenoliths of all types and are interpreted to be metasomatic in origin. The K-rich metasomatic event occurred at ?????0 Ga, and led to substantial enrichment in Rb, K, LREE/HREE, Th/U, Th/Pb and, to a lesser extent, Nb and Ti. The fluids responsible for this metasomatism were probably derived from a second plume that arrived beneath the region at this time. Evidence for partial melting of mafic crust exists in the presence of migmatitic granulites. The timing of migmatization overlaps that of metasomatism, and it is suggested that migmatization was facilitated by the metasomatism. The metamorphism, metasomatism and migmatization recorded in the Kola granulite xenoliths may be representative of the processes responsible for converting Archaean LIP-generated proto-continents into continental crust.

  1. Structural setting and UPb dating of Uranium mineralizations from the Northeastern part of Nigeria (Upper Benue Region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, J. C.; Lancelot, J. R.

    In the Northeastern part of Nigeria (Upper Benue region) uranium mineralizations occur widespread along major fracture zones within the Precambrian crystalline basement bounding the Cretaceous deposits of the Benue trough. In two mineralized areas (Mika and Ghumchi) structural analysis and UPb dating of these mineralizations have been performed. Isotopic data indicate an age of 148 ± 12 M.a. for the crystallization of Mika primary pitchblende, followed by a simple UPb evolution (without leakage of intermediate decay products) and a strong recent mobilization of the uranium (autunite and coffinite formation). The pitchblende crystallized in "en echelon" array megatension gashes due to regional dextral wrench mechanism along a N140E trend. On a regional scale, this fracturing episode and the uranium concentration phase are contemporaneous with the emplacement of a bimodal volcanism dated at 147 ± 7 M.a. which is related to the early stages of opening of the Benue trough (Popoff et al., 1982). Isotopic data of Ghumchi mineralization provide an age of 14 ± 3 m.y. for the crystallization of cryptocrystalline coffinite and like in Mika, actual- and strong mobilization of uranium affect the mineralizations (autunite formation). The mineralizations crystallized along passive preexisting structures (mylonites, faults and lamprophyric dykes) which acted as favorable traps for uranium concentration. Pb/Pb data on galena microcubes, associated with the coffinite, provide an isotopic composition comparable to those of recent alkali basalt series which intrude the African plate (e.g. Mandara-Cameroon, Kenya, Ahaggar, Canary Islands). Then, such a noticeable Pb isotopic composition together with the post-tectonic character and the Neogene age of the Ghumchi mineralization suggest that their crystallization is linked with the emplacement of Neogene alkali basalt lava flows and trachytic plugs which occur in the vicinity of Ghumchi area.

  2. Contrasting methods of fracture trend characterization in crystalline metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Windham quadrangle, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, G.J.; Clark, S.F.

    2000-01-01

    The bedrock of the Windham quadrangle in southeastern New Hampshire consists of deformed early Palaeozoic crystalline metamorphic and intrusive igneous rocks intruded by Mesozoic igneous dikes. Generally, less common northeast striking, steeply dipping fractures developed sub-parallel to the pre-existing tectonic foliation in the Palaeozoic rocks. Mesozoic lamprophyre and diabase dikes intruded along the northeast trending fractures, utilizing the pre-existing anisotropy in the crystalline rocks. Northwest striking, steeply dipping systematic joints and joint sets are the most prominent fractures in the area and, at least in part, post-date the Mesozoic dikes. Sub-horizontal sheeting joints occur in all rock types. Locally, the coincidence of the sub-horizontal fractures with a sub-horizontal Paleozoic cleavage suggests that some of the sheeting fractures utilized the pre-existing ductile anisotropy during unloading. Generally, the metasedimentary rocks show a less complex pattern of fracturing than the intrusive rocks suggesting that rock type is a controlling factor. Metasedimentary rocks in the biotite zone and well-foliated igneous rocks show a greater tendency to fracture along pre-existing bedding and foliation surfaces than metasedimentary rocks in the garnet zone and poorly foliated igneous rocks. A comparison of mapped fracture data and station fracture data indicates that either mapped data or station data can be used to identify regional fracture trends. Local fracture trends can not be identified by limited measurements at a few fracture stations, however, because they do not address spatial variability. Some fracture trends may be scale-dependant because they may be either unique to a local area or present only at regional scales.

  3. Basement reservoir in Zeit Bay oil field, Gulf of Suez

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, I.; Askary, S.

    1988-02-01

    Fractured basement, one of the most important reservoirs of Zeit Bay field, contains nearly one-third of oil in place of the field. The flow rates per well vary from 700 to 9,000 BOPD. Due to its well-established production potential, 60% of the wells for the development of the field were drilled down to basement. The Zeit Bay basement consists of granitic rocks of pegmatitic to coarse porphyritic texture and has equal proportions of alkali feldspars. Dykes of various compositions are present, traversing the granite at different intervals. Dykes include aplite, microsyenite, diabase and lamprophyre. The last two pertain to the post-granitic dykes of late Proterozoic age. The main granitic pluton is related to one of the final stages of the tectonic-magmatic cycle of the Arabo-Nubian shield. The Zeit Bay area was a significant paleohigh until the Miocene, hence its structural picture is very complicated due to the impact of different tectonic movements from the late Precambrian to Cenozoic. The resulting structural elements were carefully investigated and statistically analyzed to decipher the influence of various tectonic events. The presence of high porosity in some intervals and low porosity in others could be tied to the presence of new fractures and the nature of cementing minerals. The relation of mineralized fractures and their depths lead to zonation of porous layers in the granitic pluton. Diagenetic processes on the granitic body and the alteration/resedimentation of the diagenetic products controlled the magnitude and amplitude of the porosity layers. A model has been constructed to illustrate the changes in the primary rock texture and structure with sequential diagenetic processes, taking into consideration the fracture distribution and their opening affinities as related to their depths.

  4. Basement reservoir in Zeit Bay oil field, Gulf of Suez

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, I.; Askary, S.

    1988-01-01

    Fractured basement, one of the most important reservoirs of Zeit Bay field, contains nearly one-third of oil in place of the field. The flow rates per well vary from 700 to 9,000 BOPD. Due to its well-established production potential, 60% of the wells for the development of the field were drilled down to basement. The Zeit Bay basement consist of granitic rocks of pegmatitic to coarse porphyritic texture and has equal proportions of alkali feldspars. Dykes of various compositions are present, traversing the granite at different intervals. Dykes include aplite, microsyenite, diabase and lamprophyre. The last two pertain to the post-granitic dykes of later Proterozoic age. The main granitic luton is related to one of the final stages of the tectonic-magmatic cycle of the Arabo-Nubian sheild. The Zeit Bay area was a significant paleohigh until the Miocene, hence its structural picture is very complicated due to the impact of different tectonic movements from the late Precambrian to Cenozoic. The resulting structural elements were carefully investigated and statistically analyzed to decipher the influence of various tectonic events. The presence of high porosity in some intervals and low porosity in others could be tied to the presence of new fractures and the nature of cementing minerals. The relation of mineralized fractures and their depths lead to zonation of porous layers in the granitic pluton. Diagenetic processes on the granitic body and the alternation/resedimentation of the diagenetic products controlled the magnitude and amplitude of the porosity layers.

  5. U-Pb Geochronology of Devonian Granites in the Meguma Terrane of Nova Scotia, Canada: Evidence for Hotspot Melting of a Neoproterozoic Source.

    PubMed

    Keppie; Krogh

    1999-09-01

    U-Pb isotopic analyses of monazite and zircon from six granitic plutons in the Meguma Terrane yield nearly concordant ages of 373+/-3 Ma, interpreted as the time of intrusion. U-Pb analyses of euhedral zircons with thick rims overgrowing cores, which were abraded to remove all or most of the rim, plot on chords between 370+/-3 and 628+/-33 Ma (Larrys River and Halfway Cove plutons), 372+/-3 and approximately 660 Ma (Shelburne pluton), and 373+/-2 and approximately 732 Ma (Barrington Passage pluton). The upper intercepts are interpreted as the age of magma source, correlatives of which are present in the Avalon Composite Terrane to the north. This basement may be either in depositional or tectonic contact with the overlying Cambro-Ordovician Meguma Group. Other zircons in the granites are generally irregular-euhedral with thin rims, and most U-Pb isotopic analyses fall between two chords from 373-2040 and 373-2300 Ma, with a few lying outside this field. These zircons are probably derived from the country rock (Goldenville Formation), which a previous study has shown contains detrital zircons with concordant U-Pb ages of 3000, 2000, and 600 Ma, and numerous intermediate discordant ages. These new ages, along with published data, document a relatively short (5-10 m.yr.) but voluminous period of magmatism. This age is approximately synchronous with intrusion of mafic rocks and lamprophyre dikes and regional low-pressure metamorphism and was followed by rapid denudation of 5-12 km. These observations may be interpreted in terms of shallowly dipping subduction and overriding of a mantle plume that eventually penetrates through the subducting plate to melt the overriding continental plate. Subsequent northward migration of the plume could explain both the approximately 360 Ma magmatism in the Cobequid Highlands (Avalon Composite Terrane) and the mid-Carboniferous plume-related intrusions around the Magdalen Basin.

  6. The Elk Creek Carbonatite, Southeast Nebraska-An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, M. P. Treves, S. B.

    2005-03-15

    A framework geophysical program in southeastern Nebraska during 1970 identified a near-circular feature having gravity relief of about 8 mgal and a magnetic anomaly of about 800 gammas. Analysis of the geophysical data provided a model of a cylindrical mass of indefinite length with a radius of 5500 ft (1676 m) and beveled at the basement surface at about 600 ft (183 m). At the approximate depth at which Precambrian rocks were expected, the initial test hole (2-B-71) encountered an iron-rich weathered zone overlying carbonate-rich rock. The carbonate rocks consist essentially of dolomite, calcite, and ankerite and lesser amounts of hematite, chlorite, phlogopite, barite, serpentine, pyrochlore, and quartz and contain barium, strontium, and rare earths. Total REE, P2O5, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios confirm the carbonatite identification. Texturally, the rocks range from fragmental to contorted to massive. Associated with the carbonatite are lesser amounts of basalt, lamprophyre, and syenite. Additional exploratory drilling has provided about 80,000 ft (24,384 m) of rock record and has penetrated about 3400 ft (1038 m) of carbonatite. The carbonatite is overlain by marine sediments of Pennsylvanian (Missourian) age. The surrounding Precambrian basement rocks are low-to medium-grade metamorphic gneiss and schist of island arc origin and granitic plutons. The Elk Creek carbonatite is located near the boundary between the Penokean orogen created at about 1.84 Ga (billion years) and the Dawes terrane (1.78 Ga) of the Central Plains orogen. This boundary strongly influenced the geometry of both the Midcontinent Rift System (1.1 Ga) and the Nemaha uplift (0.3 Ga). It is assumed that the emplacement of the Elk Creek carbonatite (0.5 Ga) was influenced similarly by the pre-existing tectonic sutures.

  7. Late Mesozoic crustal extension and rifting on the western edge of the Parana Basin, Paraguay

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraff, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Geophysical and geological evidence indicates that the western edge of the Parana basin in Paraguay was a site of NE-SW directed crustal extension during late Mesozoic time. Major zones of normal faulting in south-eastern Paraguay trend northwesterly on average, and mafic dikes of probable late Mesozoic age have similar orientations. At least two NW-trending zones of tectonic subsidence, each over 200 km long, are now recognized in eastern Paraguay. Most alkalic rocks of south-eastern Paraguay are concentrated along this rift, and occur as simple to composite stocks and ring complexes composed of rocks ranging from foid-syenite to essexite. NW-trending, lamprophyric to phonolitic dikes are associated with some alkalic complexes. The southern zone, located about 125 km southwest, is a composite tectonic basin about 60 km wide and nearly devoid of alkalic rocks. The timing of crustal extension and rifting in eastern Paraguay is largely based on isotopic ages of associated alkalic rocks, which cluster between 150 and 100 Ma (latest Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous). Geologic evidence for the age of faulting and subsidence is consistent with this age range; tectonic depressions were being filled in late Cretaceous to early Cenozoic time. The age range of alkalic rocks in Paraguay contain that of the Serra Geral basalts and spans the time when South America Separated from Africa. This suggests that alkalic activity and crustal extension in eastern Paraguay are grossly related to the Serra Geral extrusive event, and were a manifestation of the breakup of South America and Africa far from the site of final separation.

  8. Cretaceous potassic intrusives with affinities to aillikites from Jharia area: Magmatic expression of metasomatically veined and thinned lithospheric mantle beneath Singhbhum Craton, Eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rajesh K.; Chalapathi Rao, N. V.; Sinha, Anup K.

    2009-11-01

    Cretaceous potassic dykes and sills at the Jharia area intrude the Permo-carboniferous coal-bearing Gondwana sediments of the Eastern Damodar Valley, Singhbhum craton. These intrusives are widely regarded as a part of the Mesozoic alkaline and Rajmahal flood basalt magmatism in the Eastern Indian shield. Jharia intrusives display a wide petrographic diversity; olivine, phlogopite and carbonate are the predominant phases whereas apatite and rutile constitute important accessories. Impoverishment in sodium, silica and alumina and enrichment in potassium, titanium and phosphorous are the hallmark of these rocks and in this aspect they are strikingly similar to the rift-related aillikites (ultramafic lamprophyres) of Aillik Bay, Labrador. Crustal contamination of the Jharia magmas is minimal and the incompatible trace element ratios demonstrate (i) their generation by greater degrees of partial melting of a sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) source similar to that of the kimberlites of Dharwar craton, southern India, and (ii) retention of long-term memories of ancient (Archaean) subduction experienced by their source regions. We infer that a metasomatically veined and thinned lithosphere located at the margin of the Singhbhum craton and the inheritance of an ancient (Archaean) subducted component has played a significant role in deciding the diverging petrological and geochemical characters displayed by the Jharia potassic intrusives: those of kimberlites (orangeites) and lamproites (cratonic signature) and those of aillikites (rift-related signature). A substantial melt component of Jharia potassic intrusives was derived from the SCLM and the melt contribution of the Kerguelen plume is inferred to be minimal.

  9. Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex, Alexander terrane (southeastern Alaska): evidence for Early Jurassic rifting prior to accretion with North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Karl, Susan M.; Keppie, J. Duncan; Kontak, Daniel J.; Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The circular Bokan Mountain complex (BMC) on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, is a Jurassic peralkaline granitic intrusion about 3 km in diameter that crosscuts igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane. The BMC hosts significant rare metal (rare earth elements, Y, U, Th, Zr, and Nb) mineralization related to the last stage of BMC emplacement. U–Pb (zircon) and 40Ar/39Ar (amphibole and whole-rock) geochronology indicates the following sequence of intrusive activity: (i) a Paleozoic basement composed mainly of 469 ± 4 Ma granitic rocks; (ii) intrusion of the BMC at 177 ± 1 Ma followed by rapid cooling through ca. 550 °C at 176 ± 1 Ma that was synchronous with mineralization associated with vertical, WNW-trending pegmatites, felsic dikes, and aegirine–fluorite veins and late-stage, sinistral shear deformation; and (iii) intrusion of crosscutting lamprophyre dikes at >150 Ma and again at ca. 105 Ma. The peralkaline nature of the BMC and the WNW trend of associated dikes suggest intrusion during NE–SW rifting that was followed by NE–SW shortening during the waning stages of BMC emplacement. The 177 Ma BMC was synchronous with other magmatic centres in the Alexander terrane, such as (1) the Dora Bay peralkaline stock and (2) the bimodal Moffatt volcanic suite located ~30 km north and ~100 km SE of the BMC, respectively. This regional magmatism is interpreted to represent a regional extensional event that precedes deposition of the Late Jurassic – Cretaceous Gravina sequence that oversteps the Wrangellia and Alexander exotic accreted terranes and the Taku and Yukon–Tanana pericratonic terranes of the Canadian–Alaskan Cordillera.

  10. Isotopic and geochemical studies of a Pliocene porphyry-Mo system, Rico, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wareham, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    The historic mining district of Rico in southern Colorado Mineral Belt contains a Pliocene porphyry-Mo deposit and peripheral epithermal Pb-Zn-Ag deposits, and hot-springs. The porphyry-Mo mineralization is confined almost exclusively to Precambrian greenstone. The epithermal mineralization is hosted by a Paleozoic and Mesozoic sequence dominated by carbonates, but containing evaporites. The system is geologically complex and focused on a resurgent dome which is cored by a horst of Precambrian strata, and cut by reactivated Precambrian basement shears. The shears have controlled the emplacement of the Laramide and Pliocene granitoids in area. The mineralization is associated with more evolved members of the latter suite. Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotope and minor element data on the granitoid intrusions indicate that they are not simply differentiates of mantle magmas. However, Nd model ages indicate that they are not purely remelts of 1800Ma Precambrian crust. Realistically it is impossible to quantify the relative proportions of crust and mantle material involved in the genesis of the intrusions. Notwithstanding this, the Rico granitoids are isotopically distinct from those associated with Climax-type porphyry-Mo deposits in Colorado. Sd-Nd-Pb isotope and trace element data on a lamprophyre suite in the area suggest two episodes of mafic magmatism; a period whereby the source was predominantly, OIB-type, asthenospheric mantle. [sigma][sup 34]S data and ore deposit paragenesis indicate that the sulphide S has an igneous origin and that the sulphate S was derived by mobilization of Pennsylvanian evaporites. Modelling of the S isotopic data indicates a common S source for the epithermal and porphyry mineralization. The sulphate and sulphide S reservoirs remained essentially decoupled during mineralization. [sigma][sup 34]C data are compatible with the hydrothermal C having been derived by the dissolution and re-precipitation of host sequence carbonate.

  11. A Geochemical Investigation of the Early Cretaceous Ultrapotassic Dykes in the Raniganj Coalfields in Damodar Valley, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jude, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    The early Cretaceous ultrapotassic dyke rocks intruding the Permocarboniferous coal bearing Gondwana sediments of the Eastern Damodar Valley, Singhbum craton, are known for their petrographic and geochemical diversity. They remain a 'Pandora's box of petrological confusion' with a variety of exotic, and potentially diamondiferous, rocks such as lamprophyre, lamproite, orangeite and kimberlite being continuously reported from them for over one century or more. Intra-plate volcanism of this type discloses hidden information about the interior of the Earth. Samples from two dykes intruding Raniganj coalfield is studied here. The samples from Dyke1 are characterized by fine grained texture and phlogopite+apatite+K-feldspar+rutile+ankerite+dolomite+ chromite+chlorite+quartz assemblage while the samples from Dyke2 are characterized by coarse grained texture and phlogopite+ pseudomorphosed-olivine+apatite+ clinopyroxene +dolomite+ankerite+calcite+norsethite+talc+rutile+quartz+Ca-Mg-Fe-Zr silicate+K-feldspar+monazite+ perovskite assemblage. Based on the TiO2-Al2O3-FeO trends observed in phlogopites, the dykes seem to be a lamproite-orangeite transitional variety. The phlogopites observed in Dyke2 show two stages of crystallization defined by Ti-poor overgrowths on Ti-rich cores indicating that Dyke2 consolidated from a melt that fractionated from a magma which was initially emplaced at a different depth while the Dyke 1 phlogopites do not show any such sudden drop in Ti concentration in their rims indicating single stage crystallization. Ti-in-Quartz Thermometry yields temperatures between 769°C to 1115°C for Dyke1 and 779°C to 1019°C for Dyke2 which must corresponds to the emplacement and crystallization of these dykes. Trace element and isotopic ratios can be used to constrain particular mantle source characteristics of the dykes. Rb-Sr method can be used to determine the emplacement ages of these dykes.

  12. U-Pb ages, geochemistry, C-O-Nd-Sr-Hf isotopes and petrogenesis of the Catalão II carbonatitic complex (Alto Paranaíba Igneous Province, Brazil): implications for regional-scale heterogeneities in the Brazilian carbonatite associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarino, Vincenza; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Melluso, Leone; de Barros Gomes, Celso; Tassinari, Colombo Celso Gaeta; Ruberti, Excelso; Brilli, Mauro

    2016-09-01

    The Catalão II carbonatitic complex is part of the Alto Paranaíba Igneous Province (APIP), central Brazil, close to the Catalão I complex. Drill-hole sampling and detailed mineralogical and geochemical study point out the existence of ultramafic lamprophyres (phlogopite-picrites), calciocarbonatites, ferrocarbonatites, magnetitites, apatitites, phlogopitites and fenites, most of them of cumulitic origin. U-Pb data have constrained the age of Catalão I carbonatitic complex between 78 ± 1 and 81 ± 4 Ma. The initial strontium, neodymium and hafnium isotopic data of Catalão II (87Sr/86Sri = 0.70503-0.70599; ɛNdi = -6.8 to -4.7; 176Hf/177Hf = 0.28248-0.28249; ɛHfi = -10.33 to -10.8) are similar to the isotopic composition of the Catalão I complex and fall within the field of APIP kimberlites, kamafugites and phlogopite-picrites, indicating the provenance from an old lithospheric mantle source. Carbon isotopic data for Catalão II carbonatites (δ13C = -6.35 to -5.68 ‰) confirm the mantle origin of the carbon for these rocks. The origin of Catalão II cumulitic rocks is thought to be caused by differential settling of the heavy phases (magnetite, apatite, pyrochlore and sulphides) in a magma chamber repeatedly filled by carbonatitic/ferrocarbonatitic liquids (s.l.). The Sr-Nd isotopic composition of the Catalão II rocks matches those of APIP rocks and is markedly different from the isotopic features of alkaline-carbonatitic complexes in the southernmost Brazil. The differences are also observed in the lithologies and the magmatic affinity of the igneous rocks found in the two areas, thus demonstrating the existence of regional-scale heterogeneity in the mantle sources underneath the Brazilian platform.

  13. Miscellaneous investigations series: Bedrock geologic map of the Lone Mountain pluton area, Esmeralda County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, F.

    1984-12-31

    The joint attitudes were measured in the field and plotted on aerial photos at a scale of 1:24,000. The pluton is intensely jointed, primarily as a result of cooling and movement of the magma within a northwest-trending stress field. Foliation, in general, is poorly developed, and quality varies from area to area, but it is best developed close to the contacts with the metasedimentary rocks. A prominent northwest foliation direction was observed that parallels the northwest elongation of the exposed pluton. Faults in the pluton are difficult to identify because of the homogeneity of the rock. Several faults were mapped in the northern part of the area where they have a northeast trend and intersect the northwest-trending lamprophyre dikes with little apparent displacement. A major fault that bounds the northern part of the pluton is downthrown to the north and strikes northeast. This fault offsets the alluvium, the metasedimentary rocks, and the pluton and forms fault scraps as high as 10 m. Aeromagnetic data (US Geological Survey, 1979) suggest the following: (1) the local magnetic highs in the central part of the Lone Mountain pluton are probably related to topographic highs (peaks) where the flight lines are closer to the pluton; (2) a magnetic low in the northeastern part of Lone Mountain coincides with the pluton-country rock contact, which may be very steep; (3) the contours for the southwestern part of the mapped area indicate that the pluton-country rock contact is not as steep as that in the northeastern part and that the pluton probably coalesces at depth with the Weepah pluton, a pluton exposed south of the mapped area; and (4) the contours for the area of the Lone Mountain pluton express a northwest-trending gradient that parallels the northwest elongation of the Lone Mountain pluton and the northwest-trending stress field. 10 refs.

  14. U-Pb Geochronology of Devonian Granites in the Meguma Terrane of Nova Scotia, Canada: Evidence for Hotspot Melting of a Neoproterozoic Source.

    PubMed

    Keppie; Krogh

    1999-09-01

    U-Pb isotopic analyses of monazite and zircon from six granitic plutons in the Meguma Terrane yield nearly concordant ages of 373+/-3 Ma, interpreted as the time of intrusion. U-Pb analyses of euhedral zircons with thick rims overgrowing cores, which were abraded to remove all or most of the rim, plot on chords between 370+/-3 and 628+/-33 Ma (Larrys River and Halfway Cove plutons), 372+/-3 and approximately 660 Ma (Shelburne pluton), and 373+/-2 and approximately 732 Ma (Barrington Passage pluton). The upper intercepts are interpreted as the age of magma source, correlatives of which are present in the Avalon Composite Terrane to the north. This basement may be either in depositional or tectonic contact with the overlying Cambro-Ordovician Meguma Group. Other zircons in the granites are generally irregular-euhedral with thin rims, and most U-Pb isotopic analyses fall between two chords from 373-2040 and 373-2300 Ma, with a few lying outside this field. These zircons are probably derived from the country rock (Goldenville Formation), which a previous study has shown contains detrital zircons with concordant U-Pb ages of 3000, 2000, and 600 Ma, and numerous intermediate discordant ages. These new ages, along with published data, document a relatively short (5-10 m.yr.) but voluminous period of magmatism. This age is approximately synchronous with intrusion of mafic rocks and lamprophyre dikes and regional low-pressure metamorphism and was followed by rapid denudation of 5-12 km. These observations may be interpreted in terms of shallowly dipping subduction and overriding of a mantle plume that eventually penetrates through the subducting plate to melt the overriding continental plate. Subsequent northward migration of the plume could explain both the approximately 360 Ma magmatism in the Cobequid Highlands (Avalon Composite Terrane) and the mid-Carboniferous plume-related intrusions around the Magdalen Basin. PMID:10504135

  15. Potassium-argon and neutron activation analysis studies of polyhalites near the WIPP site

    SciTech Connect

    Brookins, D.G.; Register, J.K.

    1981-04-01

    Samples of the purest available polyhalite (K/sub 2/Ca/sub 2/Mg(SO/sub 4/)/sub 4/.2H/sub 2/O) were selected from various drill cores or other available specimens. The selected material was very gently crushed by hand to -40/+200 mesh under dehumidified conditions. Radiogenic argon analyses were performed in duplicate on separate aliquots of each sample using conventional K-Ar dating techniques. The argon analyses were performed statically using an AEI MS-10 mass spectrometer. Potassium analyses were done by flame photometry after fusion of the samples with LiBO/sub 3/. The data obtained are of interest for several reasons: (1) the determined polyhalite K-Ar ages agree well with the Rb-Sr isochron age suggesting that the actual last crystallization of the potash ore may have taken place in the Triassic (210 m.y.) rather than in the Latest Permian; (2) polyhalite associated with a lamprophyre dike is reasonably close in age (21.4 m.y.) to the dike itself (31 m.y.) and confirms the age of intrusion of the dike. The nearby melt halite and post-polyhalite sylvite are probably also close to 20 m.y. in age; (3) the polyhalite data refute the old statements made by several authors that this mineral is not suitable for K-Ar dating; (4) polyhalite is apparently a very useful mineral for dating by the K-Ar method. Polyhalites can and should be used for purposes of tracing diagenetic and post-formational events at the WIPP site and in other evaporites.

  16. Origin of mafic and ultramafic cumulates from the Ditrău Alkaline Massif, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál-Molnár, Elemér; Batki, Anikó; Almási, Enikő; Kiss, Balázs; Upton, Brian G. J.; Markl, Gregor; Odling, Nicholas; Harangi, Szabolcs

    2015-12-01

    Mafic-ultramafic cumulates enclosed in gabbroic-dioritic rocks form part of the Mesozoic Ditrău Alkaline Massif in the Eastern Carpathians, Romania. The poikilitic olivine- and pyroxene-rich and nearly mono mineralic hornblendite rocks display typical cumulate textures with early crystallised olivine (Fo75-73), diopside and augite. In the early stages of their genesis the amphibole was intercumulus whilst in later stages it acquired cumulus status as the fractionating magma evolved. Using major and trace element compositions of minerals and whole-rock samples the origin of these cumulates is determined and the parental magma composition and depth of emplacement are calculated. Cumulus clinopyroxene has more primitive composition than intercumulus amphibole suggesting closed system fractionation for the evolution of poikilitic olivine- and pyroxene-rich cumulates. The evolution of the amphibole-rich mesocumulates is more clearly the result of closed system crystallisation dominated by the precipitation of clinopyroxene and amphibole cumulus crystals. Lamprophyre dykes of the Ditrău Alkaline Massif are proposed to reflect multiple basanitic parental magma batches from which the cumulus olivine and clinopyroxene crystallised. Relative to these dykes the calculated equilibrium melts for intercumulus amphibole in the cumulates was more primitive whilst that for the cumulus amphibole was more evolved. The calculated crystallisation temperature and pressure of ~ 1000-1050 °C and ~ 0.7 GPa, based on the composition of the amphiboles, indicate crystallisation at lower crustal depths. Rare earth element compositions are consistent with an intra-plate tectonic setting.

  17. High Resolution Geophysical Characterization of Fractures within a Granitic Pluton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Estaún, A.; Carbonell, R.

    2007-12-01

    The FEBEX underground gallery was excavated in the Aar Granite (Switzerland), a heterogeneous granite containing from very leucocratic facies to granodiorites. The geology of the gallery shows the existence of various sets of fractures with different attributes: geometry, kinematics, fracture infilling, etc. The study of the structural data, new observations on the FEBEX gallery itself and borehole televiewer data acquired in the newly drilled boreholes, have allowed to identify four sets of fractures. The first group of fractures has a typical distribution and characteristics of en echelon tension fractures and were formed in late magmatic stages, according with the paragenesis of the minerals that filled the craks. The main strike is around 300 (280-300). These fractures are deformed and displaced by the other group of faults. The second group corresponds to the lamprophyre dikes, of mantelic origin, with an orientation oblique to the tunnel, and slightly oblique to the first group of fractures (strike, 310-330). They were formed during an extension event well evidenced by their irregular margins and flame structures into the granite. The margins of these dikes show several reactivations as strike slip faults. Geophysical data has been acquired to characterized the fracture network of the surrounding volume within the FEBEX gallery. The geophysic data include new borehole logging such as Natural Gamma and Borehole Ground Penetrating radar. The processing and integration of these different data sets indicates that the GPR record can provide images of a third set of fractures, which are probably fluid filled. This set of fractures a subparallel to the tunnel axis and appear to intersect older boreholes which are nearly perpendicular to the axis of the FEBEX gallery.

  18. Archaean lode gold deposits: the solute source problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrich, R.

    1985-01-01

    On a regional scale lode gold deposits typically occur throughout the entire spectrum of greenstone belt stratigraphy. In the Abitibi Belt lode deposits are sited at the base of the volcanic cycle (Noranda), at the boundary of two volcanic cycles (Timmins) and in the stratigraphically highest groups at Kirkland Lake and Bousquet. The gold deposits are preferentially disposed along major structures apparently demarking rift zones, where extension was accommodated by listric normal faults that subsequently acted as thrusts during compression. These major structures were also sites of emplacement of trondhjemite magmas, lamprophyres and potassic basalts. From previous work Abitibi Belt volcanism spans 2725 to 2703 Ma, batholith emplacement 2675 to 2685 Ma (U-Pb on zircons), and the terminal Matachewan dyke swarm which transects all major structures is 2690 +/- 93 Ma. The lode deposits have age corrected /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr initials of 0.7015 to 0.7025, as well as more radiogenic Pb and higher ..mu.. relative to contemporaneous mantle Sr and Pb isotope ratios. Tourmaline, scheelite, piemontite and apatites separated from 14 deposits all possess /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr 0.7015 to 0.7025. These more radiogenic values contra-indicate a direct mantle source for Sr and Pb, but rather indicate that all mineralizing fluids carry contributions from a felsic crustal source having a significant production of Rb, U and Th radiogenic daughter nuclides as well as from komatiites and tholeiites. Gold, along with an array of lithophile elements including K, Rb, Pb, Li, Sr and CO/sub 2/ were distilled from this mixed source.

  19. Middle Cambrian rift-related volcanism in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica: tectonic implications for the palaeo-Pacific margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Michael L.; Leat, Philip T.; Riley, Teal R.; Storey, Bryan C.; Millar, Ian L.; Randall, Darren E.

    1999-04-01

    The Ellsworth Mountains of West Antarctica represent part of a displaced terrane once situated along the palaeo-Pacific margin of Gondwana, prior to supercontinent break-up, adjacent to South Africa and the Weddell Sea coast of East Antarctica. Middle Cambrian sedimentary rocks of the southern Ellsworth Mountains host locally thick volcanic and subvolcanic rocks forming five igneous centres. Geochemically, most of the igneous samples are mafic, with a subordinate suite of evolved types. The mafic suite is geochemically varied, ranging from MORB (mid-ocean ridge basalt)-like compositions to shoshonitic and lamprophyric (e.g. La N/Yb N = 0.95 to 15.2), with ɛNd i values ranging from +5.2 to -2.0, correlating with Ti/Y. They are interpreted as representing melts derived from more than one mantle source, with the MORB-like rocks being derived from a depleted mantle source, and the more enriched compositions representing partial melting of lithospheric mantle. Silicic rocks contain melt contributions from Late Proterozoic crust, which is inferred to form the basement of the Ellsworth Mountains. We interpret these igneous rocks as having been formed in a continental rift environment, with MORB-like basalts erupted near the rift axis, and melts from lithospheric mantle emplaced on the rift shoulder. Such an interpretation is consistent with the sedimentary host-rock palaeogeography and contemporaneous structures. This Middle Cambrian rift event is correlated spatially and temporally with rift-related sedimentary rocks in South Africa. It is currently unclear what rifted off the southern African-Weddell Sea sector of the Gondwana palaeo-Pacific margin at that time.

  20. Old mantle beneath the Avalon terrane: evidence from Osmium isotopes in spinel peridotite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minarik, W. G.; Hermes, O. D.; Walker, R. J.

    2002-05-01

    Spinel lherzolite xenoliths from mid-Jurassic lamprophyre dikes near Ashaway, R.I. have been analyzed for Os isotopic ratios and Re and Os concentrations. The xenoliths were collected from freshly exposed outcrops, and are minimally serpentinized. Most contain evidence of carbonate metasomatism. Two grams of powdered peridotite was dissolved in aqua regia in sealed Carius tubes, purified using solvent extraction (Os) and anion resin exchange (Re) and analyzed using NTIMS. The bulk xenoliths contain approx. 4 ppb Os, and have 187Re/188Os ratios of 0.04 to 0.2. These low Re concentrations result in minimal correction back to an initial Jurassic 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.1165, which corresponds to a sub-chondritic initial γ Os of -7.4. The minimum model age (TRD) of melt extraction and separation of these lherzolites from the convecting upper mantle using these 187Os/188Os ratios is 1.5 to 1.7 Ga (after Meisel et al., 2001). Major and trace element compositions will be used to estimate the degree of melt depletion in order to refine the constraints on formation of this subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Avalonian supercrustal rocks range from the Neoproterozoic to Permian in age. These preliminary model ages imply that Mesoproterozoic (or older) mantle remains under the Hope Valley subterrane of Avalonia in Rhode Island. This supports evidence from Archean-age zircon cores found in the surrounding Permian-age granites that significantly older lithosphere exists at depth. This lithosphere could be either an old lithosphere core to the Avalonian arc or underthrust West African craton. Models that call for the introduction of asthenospheric mantle during the Alleghanian orogeny or the initiation of Atlantic rifting are not supported by these data.

  1. Offshore Oligo-Miocene volcanic fields within the Corsica-Liguria Basin: Magmatic diversity and slab evolution in the western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réhault, J.-P.; Honthaas, C.; Guennoc, P.; Bellon, H.; Ruffet, G.; Cotten, J.; Sosson, M.; Maury, R. C.

    2012-07-01

    The European and Corsica-Sardinia margins of the Ligurian Sea (western Mediterranean) have been affected by a geochemically diverse igneous activity, offshore and onshore, since the Eocene. This magmatism occurred in a global subduction-related framework. On the European side, the oldest Tertiary magmatism dated at ca. 35 Ma was mainly calc-alkaline. It included the emplacement of plutonic bodies of adakitic affinity, such as the quartz microdiorite laccolith locally referred to as "esterellite". Younger magmatic events on-land within the whole Ligurian domain were mostly medium-K or K-rich calc-alkaline. Miocene volcanic activity was important in Sardinia, where andesites and ignimbrites were erupted during several magmatic cycles. In Corsica, it was minor although it emplaced lamprophyres near Sisco at 15 Ma. Dredging and diving cruises conducted in the Ligurian Sea during the last thirty years allowed us to collect a number of submarine samples. We discuss here their geochemistry (major and trace elements) and their whole-rock K-Ar ages and mineral 40Ar-39Ar plateau ages. Around 15 Ma, minor amounts of adakitic lavas were emplaced off southwestern Corsica, in the deepest part of the Liguria-Corsica Basin. They rested over the thinnest southwestern Corsica Hercynian continental crust. Closer to the coast, contemporaneous calc-alkaline rocks erupted on a less thinned crust. The adakitic events could be indicative of either the final stages of active subduction, or alternatively of a slab tearing linked to the southeastern retreat and steepening of the slab. The latter event could be connected with the end of the Corsica-Sardinia block drifting and its correlative eastern collision. Younger volcanic effusions, dated at 14-6 Ma, occurred mostly northwest and north of Corsica. K-rich calc-alkaline basalts, shoshonites and K-rich trachytes were emplaced during this period, and alkali basalts erupted as early as 12 Ma in Sardinia. In the Toulon area, alkali basalts

  2. Gravity evidence for a mafic intrusion beneath a mineralized zone in the Bondy gneiss complex, Grenville Province, Quebec - Exploration implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufréchou, Grégory; Harris, Lyal B.; Corriveau, Louise; Antonoff, Vladimir

    2011-09-01

    A ground gravity survey over the Bondy gneiss complex and its mineralized iron oxide- and copper-rich hydrothermal system(s) in the Grenville Province of SW Quebec was undertaken to aid mineral exploration in mapping subsurface intrusions. Several kilometric-scale positive Bouguer anomalies were identified that coincide with outcropping mafic and intermediate intrusive rocks of the post peak-metamorphic, 1.17-1.16 Ga mafic to intermediate Chevreuil suite intrusions and a 1.09-1.07 Ga Rolleau ultramafic stock. An additional 4 × 3 kilometre positive gravity anomaly indicates a mafic body underlies part of the metamorphosed hydrothermal system in the area of magnetite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, and chalcopyrite mineralization. Advanced argilic alteration associated with sulphide enrichment here is however indicative of an epithermal system with a felsic intrusion fluid source. As a felsic intrusion cannot explain the positive Bouguer gravity anomaly both felsic and mafic bodies must be present beneath the mineralized zone. Our preferred interpretation based on integrating gravity data and 2D forward gravity modelling with the results of field and geochemical studies is that this anomaly corresponds to a ca. 500 m deep mafic 1.17-1.16 Ga Chevreuil suite pluton that may have provided the source for hydrothermal fluids associated with late ductile shear- and fault-related mineralization or remobilization of early mineralization associated with a felsic pluton into late structures. This interpretation is compatible with gabbro xenoliths in the 1.07 Ga Rivard lamprophyre dyke on the NW margin of the gravity anomaly that bear significant similarities with those of the Chevreuil intrusive suite. The presence of both early felsic and late mafic intrusions beneath a group of three mineral occurrences in the Bondy gneiss complex strengthens their prospectivity in comparison to other mineral occurrences in the area. That early, pre-metamorphic mineralization was upgraded late in the

  3. Archaean multiphase Porosozero sanukitoid pluton of the Kola region: petrological, geochronological and geochemical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, Nikolai; Mokrushin, Artem; Petrovsky, Michail; Elizarov, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    The Porosozero sanukitoid intrusion is located in the greenstone belt of the Kolmozero-Voronja, north-eastern part Fennoscandian (Baltic) Shield. The Porosozero multiphase pluton was formed as a result of the 4 magmatic phases during the period ca. 60 million years. The main phase is represented by a differentiated series of gabbro-diorite - quartz monzodiorite - granodiorite - granite. The zircon TIMS ages of granodiorite and quartz monzodiorites are 2733±6 Ma and 2734±4 Ma, respectively. The second phase is composed of leucogranites formed during intrusion of the residual melt portion from intracrustal source. The age of zircon from leucogranite is 2712±6 Ma. The third phase is represented by the lamprophyre dykes with the zircon age 2680±8 Ma. The late pegmatite veins were formed during the fourth final phase. The volume relationships between the gabbro-diorite, quartz monzodiorites, granodiorites and granites are 5:55:27:13, respectively. The medium weighted composition of the initial melt, calculated from the rock compositions of the first phase is andesite (wt.%): SiO2 = 61.53, TiO2 = 0.58, Al2O3 = 15.74, Fe2O3 = 3.75, FeO = 3.07, MnO = 0.10, MgO = 3.06, CaO = 5.83, Na2O = 3.78, K2O = 2.37. The compositional variation is the result of fractional crystallization. The last magmas may have experienced some crustal contamination. All rocks of the first phase are enriched in Ba (500-800 ppm), Sr (450-700 ppm), K2O (1.8-3.2 wt. %), P2O5 (0.15-0.35), LREE [(La/Yb)N=15-23] and contain high concentrations of Cr (150-400 ppm) and Ni (60-140 ppm), possess high mg# values (0.45-0.65), and show a negative Nb-Ta anomaly. Sm-Nd isotopic data for sanukitoids indicate their formation from a mantle source enriched in LILE and LREE with ɛNd (2740) = +1.02 - +0.36, T(DM)=2.9-2.8 Ga. The Porosozero polyphasic pluton is similar to worldwide Archaean and Phanerozoic magmatic sanukitoide series. The Porosozero pluton formation is determined by the processes of mantle

  4. Alkaline magmatism in the Amambay area, NE Paraguay: The Cerro Sarambí complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, C. B.; Velázquez, V. F.; Azzone, R. G.; Paula, G. S.

    2011-07-01

    considerably more pronounced in the carbonatites. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns point to the high concentration of these elements and to the strong LRE/HRE fractionation. The Amambay rocks are highly enriched in radiogenic Sr and have TDM model ages that vary from 1.6 to 1.1 Ga, suggesting a mantle source enriched in incompatible elements by metasomatic events in Paleo-Mesoproterozoic times. Data are consistent with the derivation of the Cerro Sarambí rocks from a parental magma of lamprophyric (minette) composition and suggest an origin by liquid immiscibility processes for the carbonatites.

  5. Fluids and shear zones in the deep crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Robert C.

    1990-10-01

    The continental deep crust is normally nearly fluid-absent. During and after active tectonism (extension, thrusting or shearing), fluids may be abundant in the deep crust and may be associated with such diverse phenomena as granulite-facies metamorphism, shear zone alkaline granites, carbonatite-lamprophyre-syenite complexes, and various kinds of metasomatism, including region carbonatization, fenitization, granitization, and, probably, extreme large-ion lithophile element depletion. The fluids are H 2O-CO 2 mixtures with variable halogens, alkalis and dissolved silicate constituents. CO 2-rich fluids are inferred from dense carbonic inclusions in some deep-crustal granulites, both volcanic ejecta and uplifted deep-crustal terrains. CO 2-H 2O-dominated fluids must be fairly oxidizing, and may account for upward transport of Au, Sb, As and S from the lower crust and upper mantle, with enrichment of these elements at shallow levels. Crustal sources of abundant CO 2 are not likely, either from meteoric sources or from buried carbonates because of their refractory nature. The most plausible source is asthenospheric carbonatite, kimberlite, and alkali basalt liquids, and volatile-enriched lithosphere. Exsolution of fluids of varying CO 2/H 2O ratios is possible upon freezing of the magmas, depending on depth of magma generation, velocity of ascent and degree of volatile presaturation of the lithosphere. The enriched lithosphere in areas of deep-seated magmatism is an intermediate storage site for CO 2 and H 2O. Melts and fluids are liberated from the mantle under tensional conditions, which can include lithospheric strike-slip faulting (transtension) and even localized tension generated in convergence. The fluids can transport heat upward, which augments their ability to metasomatize and melt the lower crust. Melting of the crust can occur under high-CO 2 fluids at granulite facies conditions to produce syenitic magmas, and this could conceivably be accomplished by

  6. Petrogenesis of postcollisional magmatism at Scheelite Dome, Yukon, Canada: Evidence for a lithospheric mantle source for magmas associated with intrusion-related gold systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mair, John L.; Farmer, G. Lang; Groves, David I.; Hart, Craig J.R.; Goldfarb, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The type examples for the class of deposits termed intrusion-related gold systems occur in the Tombstone-Tungsten belt of Alaska and Yukon, on the eastern side of the Tintina gold province. In this part of the northern Cordillera, extensive mid-Cretaceous postcollisional plutonism took place following the accretion of exotic terranes to the continental margin. The most cratonward of the resulting plutonic belts comprises small isolated intrusive centers, with compositionally diverse, dominantly potassic rocks, as exemplified at Scheelite Dome, located in central Yukon. Similar to other spatially and temporally related intrusive centers, the Scheelite Dome intrusions are genetically associated with intrusion-related gold deposits. Intrusions have exceptional variability, ranging from volumetrically dominant clinopyroxene-bearing monzogranites, to calc-alkaline minettes and spessartites, with an intervening range of intermediate to felsic stocks and dikes, including leucominettes, quartz monzonites, quartz monzodiorites, and granodiorites. All rock types are potassic, are strongly enriched in LILEs and LREEs, and feature high LILE/HFSE ratios. Clinopyroxene is common to all rock types and ranges from salite in felsic rocks to high Mg augite and Cr-rich diopside in lamprophyres. Less common, calcic amphibole ranges from actinolitic hornblende to pargasite. The rocks have strongly radiogenic Sr (initial 87Sr/86Sr from 0.711-0.714) and Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb from 19.2-19.7), and negative initial εNd values (-8.06 to -11.26). Whole-rock major and trace element, radiogenic isotope, and mineralogical data suggest that the felsic to intermediate rocks were derived from mafic potassic magmas sourced from the lithospheric mantle via fractional crystallization and minor assimilation of metasedimentary crust. Mainly unmodified minettes and spessartites represent the most primitive and final phases emplaced. Metasomatic enrichments in the underlying lithospheric mantle

  7. Petrogenesis of orbicular ijolites from the Prairie Lake complex, Marathon, Ontario: Textural evidence from rare processes of carbonatitic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurevinski, Shannon E.; Mitchell, Roger H.

    2015-12-01

    A unique occurrence of orbicular ijolite is hosted in a matrix of contemporaneous holocrystalline ijolite at the 1.1 Ga Prairie Lake Carbonatite Complex (Marathon, Ontario, Canada), and is the only known occurrence of this textural type in a rock of ijolitic composition. This mineralogical and petrological study of this orbicular ijolite highlights many of the differences from other rare occurrences of orbicular rocks described from carbonatites, granites, diorites and lamprophyres. The orbicules occur along distinct, densely packed bands in equigranular nepheline-rich ijolite and range up to 6 cm in diameter. Macroscopically, the orbicules show variability in the mineralogy of their cores. Detailed imaging of the cores shows evidence of quench textures. Radial outward zoning is common near the cores with concentric banding occurring toward the margins of the orbicules. The mineralogy of the orbicules consists of: nepheline; diopside; calcite; apatite; andradite-melanite garnet; titanite; Fe-rich phlogopite; titaniferous magnetite; perovskite; with secondary natrolite, calcite and cancrinite. The mineralogy of the host ijolite is similar to that of the orbicules. Mineral compositions from the orbicular ijolite and the host ijolite are similar. Within the orbicules, anhedral minerals are found occurring in a 'matrix' of garnet throughout the distinct concentric bands. The textures within the concentric bands of the orbicules are best described as annealing recrystallization textures. The rims of the orbicules form interlocking crystals with the host ijolite resulting in near-indistinguishable boundaries. The orbicules are interpreted to represent interaction of a partially-crystallized quenched ijolitic melt, which was in contact with a second pulse of consanguineous ijolite magma. Immersion in the latter resulted in sub-solidus diffusion and annealing recrystallization. Orbicular textures were produced from previously formed quenched ijolite, which was

  8. Experimental constraints on ultrapotassic magmatism from the Bohemian Massif (durbachite series, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parat, Fleurice; Holtz, François; René, Miloš; Almeev, Renat

    2010-03-01

    The equilibrium phase relations of a mafic durbachite (53 wt.% SiO2) from the Třebíč pluton, representative of the Variscan ultrapotassic magmatism of the Bohemian Massif (338-335 Ma), have been determined as a function of temperature (900-1,100°C), pressure (100-200 MPa), and H2O activity (1.1-6.1 wt.% H2O in the melt). Two oxygen fugacity ranges were investigated: close to the Ni-NiO (NNO) buffer and 2.6 log unit above NNO buffer (∆NNO + 2.6). At 1,100°C, olivine is the liquidus phase and co-crystallized with phlogopite and augite at 1,000°C for the whole range of investigated pressure and water content in the melt. At 900°C, the mineral assemblage consists of augite and phlogopite, whereas olivine is not stable. The stability field of both alkali feldspar and plagioclase is restricted to low pressure (100 MPa) at nearly water-saturated conditions (<3-4 wt.% H2O) and T < 900°C. A comparison between experimental products and natural minerals indicates that mafic durbachites have a near-liquidus assemblage of olivine, augite, Ti-rich phlogopite, apatite and zircon, followed by alkali feldspar and plagioclase, similar to the mineral assemblage of minette magma. Natural amphibole, diopside and orthopyroxene were not reproduced experimentally and probably result from sub-solidus reactions, whereas biotite re-equilibrated at low temperature. The crystallization sequence olivine followed by phlogopite and augite reproduces the sequence inferred in many mica-lamprophyre rocks. The similar fractionation trends observed for durbachites and minettes indicate that mafic durbachites are probably the plutonic equivalents of minettes and that K- and Mg-rich magmas in the Bohemian Massif may have been generated from partial melting of a phlogopite-clinopyroxene-bearing metasomatized peridotite. Experimental melt compositions also suggest that felsic durbachites can be generated by simple fractionation of a more mafic parent and mixing with mantle-derived components at

  9. Geology and Fluorspar Deposits of the Levias-Keystone and Dike-Eaton Areas, Crittenden County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trace, Robert Denny

    1962-01-01

    The fault systems of the Levias-Keystone and Dike-Eaton areas, in the Kentucky-Illinois fiuorspar district, are a complex northeastward-trending sys- tem and a simple northwestward-trending system of steeply dipping normal faults, associated in part with a lamprophyre dike. Fluorspar mining started in the area about 1900 and, as of 1945, more than 200,000 tons of crude ore probably has been mined; most of the ore was from the Levias-Keystone area. A small quantity of zinc and lead ore also is present in the Dike-Eaton area. The deposits are localized along faults that displace fiat-lying or low-dipping limestones, sandstones, and shales of the Meramec and Chester series of Missis- sippian age. Movement along most of the faults was principally vertical, with displacement as much as 600 feet. Some horizontal movement occurred along at least one fault. Geologic mapping of the surface and data from underground workings have revealed 13 faults in an area of four-fifths of a square mile. Only a few of these faults are known to contain economically important deposits of fiuorspar. The most abundant vein minerals are calcite and fiuorite with subordinate quantities of sphalerite, galena, barite, and quartz. Some weathering products of sphalerite and galena are present also. The veins are dominantly calcite that contains fiuorite lenses but in places are mainly fiuorite having lesser quantities of calcite. Sphalerite- and galena-bearing deposits are present in the Dike-Eaton area. The ore bodies mainly are the result of fissure filling and replacement of calcite by fiuorite; in addition a small amount of limestone wallrock probably has been replaced. Residual concentrations of high-grade fluorspar in the overburden above faults have yielded some so-called gravel fiuorspar. The position of the veins within the faults may be related to one or more factors such as type of wallrock, change in dip of the fault, and amount of displacement.

  10. Geology and resources of thorium and associated elements in the Wet Mountains area, Fremont and Custer counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armbrustmacher, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Thorium in potentially economic amounts occurs in three types of deposits in the Wet Mountains area of Colorado: (1) quartz-baritethorite veins and fracture zones, (2) carbonatite dikes, and (3) red syenite dikes. The quartz-barite-thorite veins and fracture zones contain the largest resources of thorium; they cut all Precambrian and Paleozoic rock types in the area and tend to strike normal to the foliation in the Proterozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. The veins and fracture zones are end products of the episode of Cambrian alkaline magmatism that also produced rocks of the McClure Mountain Complex, the Gem Park Complex, the complex at Democrat Creek, and associated dikes of carbonatite, lamprophyre, and red syenite. The veins and fracture zones contain an average of 0.46 percent ThO2, 0.21 percent SLREE (total light rare-earth elements), 0.14 percent SHREE (total heavy rare-earth elements), and 0.012 percent Nb2O5; They contain reserves of 64,200 tons ThO2, 29,300 tons SLREE, 19,540 tons SHREE, 1,675 tons Nb2O5; they contain probable potential resources of 160,500 tons ThO2, 73,270 tons SLREE, 48,850 tons SHREE, and 4,185 tons Nb2O5. The carbonatite dikes form two distinct groups: replacement carbonatites and primary magmatic carbonatites. The latter group appears to be the better source of potentially economic commodities. The primary magmatic carbonatites contain an average of 0.17 percent ThO2, 0.0097 percent Nb2O5, 0.0031 percent U3O5, and 2.15 percent total rare-earth oxides. The seven largest dikes contain reserves of 131 tons ThO2, 40 tons Nb2O5, 17 tons U3O5, and 2,500 tons SRE203 (total rare-earth oxides), and probable potential resources of 753 tons ThO2, 228 tons Nb2O5, 105 tons U3O5, and 14,300 tons SRE2O3. The red syenite dikes contain anomalous amounts of thorium, uranium, niobium, and rare-earth elements. Although reserves and probable potential resources have not been calculated, they are likely to be small.

  11. Polytopic Vector Analysis (PVA) modelling of whole-rock and apatite chemistry from the Karkonosze composite pluton (Poland, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowiec, Katarzyna; Słaby, Ewa; Förster, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    This study presents a novel approach for analysing the magma evolution path in composite plutons, applying the so-termed Polytopic Vector Analysis (PVA) to whole-rock and apatite chemistry. As an example of a multiphase magmatic body the Karkonosze granitoid pluton was chosen, which formed by a combination of magma mixing and fractional crystallization of two distinct melts - granitic crust-derived and lamprophyric mantle-derived. The goal was to model end-member magma compositions recorded by apatite and to estimate to what extent these end-members interacted with each other. Although using single minerals as proxies to magma compositions is tricky, the studied apatite well reflects the compositional trends within the magma (e.g., decreasing LREE/Y ratios, varying halogen content, increasing Mn and Na concentrations). The results of PVA simulations for whole-rock geochemistry demonstrate a model similar to that constrained from previous studies. Apart from the main trend of mixing between a felsic (~ 80 wt.% SiO2) and a mafic (~ 53 wt.% SiO2) end-member (EM), an additional process has been recognized, representing most probably the continuous evolution of the mafic end-member, responsible for the compositional diversity of some rocks. One felsic (REE-poor, Mn-F-rich) and one mafic (Cl-Sr-Si-REE-rich) apatite end-members were recognized, whereas the third one represents most probably a fluid component (enriched in Si, Y, Ce and Nd), present at all magmatic stages, however, most prominent during the late stage. The widest range of EM proportions and the highest contribution of the mafic EM are displayed by apatites from the early stage. During the middle and late stages, the apatites present a narrow range of EM proportions, with almost all apatites bearing a felsic signature. This pattern reflects the progressive homogenization of the system. Although the PVA method applied to mineral chemistry poses some limitations, it may provide a more detailed image of the

  12. Temporal distribution of mantle-derived potassic rocks and carbonatites linked to stabilization of mantle lithosphere and redox states during subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle-derived potassic igneous rocks and carbonatites first appear in the geological record in the late Archean, coinciding with major crust-forming events on most continents. The compositions of potassic rocks require sources including discrete ultramafic rocks with phlogopite and pyroxenes, whereas carbonatites and ultramafic lamprophyres (carbonate-rich potassic rocks) require oxidizing conditions in which carbonate is stable. The presence of these source rocks from this time is probably related to the stabilization of mantle lithosphere. If mantle lithosphere had not been stable for considerable periods of time, then melting would be restricted to peridotite, which is not a viable option for strongly potassic rocks. The phlogopite-rich source-rock assemblages that are necessary precursors for potassic melts could be introduced into the lithosphere by either subduction processes or by multiple stages of low-degree melting. Many modern examples involve subducted sedimentary material, which concentrates potassium by the stabilization of micas in subduction metamorphism. Subduction involves a great variety of redox states, but the bulk effect is the return of oxidized material from the surface into the mantle. However, we cannot apply uniformitarianism unthinkingly, because subduction processes at and before 2.7 Ga may have had different redox states. Before the Great Oxidation Event the distribution and abundances of geological formations such as banded iron formations, red beds, and uraninites indicate that geological reservoirs became gradually oxidized, preventing an earlier increase in atmospheric oxygen. This means that the function of the subduction process to oxidize the upper mantle by the return of oxidized rocks from the surface was much weaker in the early Earth. Early continental mantle lithosphere was, therefore, likely to accumulate carbon in reduced form, which would be more easily remobilized in melts through low-temperature redox melting much

  13. Post-collisional and intraplate Cenozoic volcanism in the rifted Apennines/Adriatic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, G.; Beccaluva, L.; Siena, F.

    2008-02-01

    -dependent, with generation of tholeiites to nephelinites/alkaline lamprophyres by decreasing degrees of partial melting ( F = 25 to ≤ 5%) of lherzolite lithospheric sources at progressively increasing depths (ca. 40 to 100 km). Moreover, geochemical features of these anorogenic magmas testify that their mantle sources are remarkable homogeneous, as also confirmed by lack of veining in the VVP mantle xenoliths. This homogeneity suggests that Na-metasomatic agents pervasively affected the overlying Adriatic lithospheric mantle by porous flow mechanisms without causing significant inhomogeneities at a regional scale.

  14. Constraining a SHRIMP U-Pb age: micro-scale characterization of zircons from Saxonian Rotliegend rhyolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasdala, Lutz; Götze, Jens; Pidgeon, Robert T.; Kempe, Ulf; Seifert, Thomas

    We present results of a detailed investigation of zircons from two rhyolites from St. Egidien and Chemnitz, Saxony, using a combination of microprobe techniques (SHRIMP ion probe, Raman microprobe, SEM: SE, BSE, and CL imaging). These rhyolites belong to the so-called ``lower volcanics'', which is the older of two series of Late Variscan volcanic rocks occurring in the Saxonian Sub-Erzgebirge basin (Germany). The purpose of the present contribution is to demonstrate that detailed characterization of zircons, as provided by the different micro-techniques, facilitates soundest interpretation of geochronological data. The zircons (at most 40 to 80 m in size) show oscillatory growth zoning, with reversely correlated CL and BSE signal intensities. These zircons are interpreted to have grown during crystallization of the rhyolite because, apart from some cracking, they do not appear to have experienced any alteration since the time of their growth: The shapes of the zircons and their internal structures revealed by CL and BSE imaging appear to be magmatic, and neither annealing of the accumulated alpha-decay damage nor disturbance of the U-Pb system is observed. The SHRIMP ion probe measurements on the zircons gave a Permian 206Pb/238U age of 278 +/- 5 Ma (95% confidence). The concordance of this age is supported by the correlation between the low degrees of metamictization (estimated from Raman parameters) and the accumulated alpha fluxes (calculated from SHRIMP data). The 278 Ma zircon age is interpreted to represent the age of the ``lower rhyolites'' series and, with that, the age of postkinematic Late Variscan volcanism in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin, which has been related to anorogenic extension and uplift as a result of intracontinental rifting. Because of genetic association of rhyolites in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin and Li-F granites and lamprophyres in the neighbouring Erzgebirge, the rhyolite age also indirectly contributes to the understanding of the geological

  15. Origin of Ti-rich garnets in the groundmass of Wajrakarur field kimberlites, southern India: insights from EPMA and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongre, Ashish N.; Viljoen, K. S.; Rao, N. V. Chalapathi; Gucsik, A.

    2016-04-01

    Although Ti-rich garnets are commonly encountered in the groundmass of many alkaline igneous rocks, they are comparatively rare in kimberlites. Here we report on the occurrence of Ti-rich garnets in the groundmass of the P-15 and KL-3 kimberlites from the diamondiferous Wajrakarur field in the Eastern Dharwar craton of southern India. These garnets contain considerable Ti (11.7-23.9 wt.% TiO2), Ca (31.3-35.8 wt.% CaO), Fe (6.8-15.5 wt.% FeOT) and Cr (0.04-9.7 wt.% Cr2O3), but have low Al (0.2-5.7 wt.% Al2O3). In the case of the P-15 kimberlite they display a range in compositions from andradite to schorlomite, with a low proportion of grossular (andradite(17.7-49.9)schorlomite(34.6-49.5)-grossular(3.7-22.8)-pyrope(1.9-10.4)). A few grains also contain significant chromium and represent a solid solution between schorlomite and uvarovite. The Ti-rich garnets in the KL-3 kimberlite, in contrast, are mostly schorlomitic (54.9-90.9 mol %) in composition. The Ti-rich garnets in the groundmass of these two kimberlites are intimately associated with chromian spinels, perhaps suggesting that the garnet formed through the replacement of spinel. From the textural evidence, it appears unlikely that the garnets could have originated through secondary alteration, but rather seem to have formed through a process in which early magmatic spinels have reacted with late circulating, residual fluids in the final stages of crystallization of the kimberlite magma. Raman spectroscopy provides evidence for low crystallinity in the spinels which is likely to be a result of their partial transformation into andradite during their reaction with a late-stage magmatic (kimberlitic) fluid. The close chemical association of these Ti-rich garnets in TiO2-FeO-CaO space with those reported from ultramafic lamprophyres (UML) is also consistent with results predicted by experimental studies, and possibly implies a genetic link between kimberlite and UML magmas. The occurrence of Ti-rich garnets of

  16. Metasomatic enrichment of Proterozoic mantle south of the Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa: origin of sinusoidal REE patterns in clinopyroxene and garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roex, Anton; Class, Cornelia

    2016-02-01

    indicates regional metasomatism by melts of various compositions. The strong HREEN depletion is interpreted to reflect the effect of initial melt depletion in the early Proterozoic, with melting extending into the spinel stability field requiring an oceanic realm, and again later in the Mesoproterozoic (Namaqua Orogeny). The superimposed incompatible element enrichment indicates subsequent multiple enrichment events by rising alkaline melts similar in composition to kimberlite or ultramafic alkaline lamprophyre, possibly related to Mesozoic plume upwelling beneath the region, that reintroduced clinopyroxene into the depleted Proterozoic harzburgite protolith.

  17. K-T magmatism of western Rajasthan, India: Manifestation of Reunion plume activity or extensional lithospheric tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K.

    2004-12-01

    A number of alkaline plutons have been recorded at the K-T (Cretaceous-Tertiary) boundary in western Rajasthan, India. Significant magmatism occurred at Mundwara, Barmer, Sarnu-Dandali and Tavider. The evolution of the Cambay-Sanchor-Barmer rift during the K-T period resulted in these alkaline complexes at the rift margins. Sedimentary basins are developed in the Barmer and Jaiselmer regions. The magmatism of Mundwara and Sarnu-Dandali is dated at 68.50 Ma and considered as an early pulse of Deccan volcanism. Several workers correlated K-T sedimentary basin evolution, magmatism and other tectonic features of western Rajasthan with the Reunion plume-interaction in the northwestern Indian shield. Alkaline igneous complexes along the rift from the southern part are reported from Phenai Mata, Amba Dongar and Seychelles. The Seychelles was part of the northwestern Indian shield prior to Deccan volcanism. The Mundwara igneous complex represents three distinct circular plutonic bodies - Toa, Mer and Mushala, which are situated in the periphery of an area three kilometers in radius. Besides these, there are numerous concentric and radial dykes of lamprophyre, carbonatite, dolerite and amphibolite. All these three bodies represent different phases of intrusion and are not similar to each other. The alkaline rocks of Sarnu-Dandali occur as dykes and isolated plugs in the desert sand. Carbonatite dykes are also reported from southeast of Barmer. The Tavider outcrop is devoid of any plutonic rock and consists of rhyolite, andesite and basalt. These rocks occur along the Precambrian Malani magmatic lineaments. The development of the Cambay-Sanchor-Barmer rift caused reactivation of Precambrian fractures and resulted in magmatism at the basin margin. The Gondwanaland fragmentation during the Mesozoic era caused extensional tectonics in the northwestern Indian shield. This led to the development of rift basins in Gujarat and western Rajasthan. Deccan volcanism, separation of the

  18. Mesoproterozoic orangeites of Karelia (Kostomuksha-Lentiira): evidence for composition of mantle lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, Alexey; Nosova, Anna; Larionova, Yulia; Kononova, Voctoria; Borisovskiy, Sergey; Kovalchuk, Elena; Griboedova, Irina

    2014-05-01

    The 1.23-1.20 Ga old diamondiferous lamproites and orangeites (kimberlites of II group) of the Kostomuksha-Taloveys and the Lentiira-Kuhmo dyke fields intrude the Archaean crust of the Karelian craton, NE of the East European Platform. Mineral (a trend of compositional evolution of mica, presence of carbonate minerals in basis, composition of olivine) and geochemical (major elements, ratio of trace elements, primitive mantle normalized trace elements patterns) characteristics of these rocks suggest an orangeitic rather than lamproitic or lamprophyric nature. The composition of Phl-Ol orangeites suggests intensive processes of fractional crystallization for their melts. Cpx-Phl-Ol orangeites indicate higher intensity of lithospheric mantle assimilation then other orangeitic types. Phl-Carb orangeites of the Taloveys area and Cpx-Phl-Ol one of the Lentiira area are closest to primary melts. The Ol-Phl-Cpx orangeites of the Lentiira area contain three generations of unaltered olivine that vary in composition and origin: a) xenocryst derived from depleted mantle peridotite; b) orangeitic olivine phenocryst and c) and olivine like early stage crystallization of megacryst assemblage or a product of metasomatic interaction between mantle peridotite and protokimberlitic melt. Orangeites of Kostomuksha-Lentiira have low- and medium-radiogenic value of (87Sr/86Sr)1200 that range from 0.7038 to 0.7067. Phl-Carb orangeites of Taloveys have less radiogenic isotopic composition of Nd (eNd -11 ... -12) then Cpx-Phl-Ol and Phl-Ol orangeites of Kostomuksha (eNd -6.9 ... -9.4). The study of Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic systems suggests that an ancient metasomatic mantle source took part in origin of orangeites. We propose a two-steps model of origin of their source (Kargin et al., 2014): 1) The metasomatic component of mantle source (like as MARID-type veins) formed during Lapland-Kola and/or Svecofennian orogeny events (2.1-1.8 Ga ago). 2) The intrusion of orangeites is comparable by

  19. Concepts for diamond exploration in "on/off craton" areas—British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simandl, George J.

    2004-09-01

    where geological evidences suggest an ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic event followed by rapid tectonic exhumation (which could have prevented complete resorption of diamonds on their journey to the surface) are worth investigating. If UHP rocks were intercepted at depth by syn- or post-subduction diamond elevators, such as kimberlites, lamproites, lamprophyres, nephelinites or other alkali volcanic rocks of deep-seated origin, the diamond potential of the area would be even higher.

  20. The magmatic record in the Arghash region (northeast Iran) and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaminia, Zahra; Karimpour, Mohammad Hassan; Homam, Seyed Massoud; Finger, Fritz

    2013-09-01

    Eocene magmatism in the Arghash Massif is interpreted as related to thermal anomalies in crust and mantle that developed when the Sabzevar subduction system collapsed. The youngest magmatic activities in the Arghash Massif are lamprophyres and small intrusions of quartz-monzodiorite porphyries, which cut through all other rocks including an Oligocene-Miocene conglomerate cover series.

  1. Lead isotope and Pb-Pb model age determinations of ores from Central Europe and their metallogenetic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielicki, K.-H.; Tischendorf, G.

    1991-02-01

    granitoids, and lamprophyric rocks, also favours a close relationship. Pb isotope and other data indicate crustal sources. As the age of the ore associations decreases, crustal influences generally increase, apart from the Roztoky mineralization.

  2. Timing and Style of Deformation Across the Coast Steep Zone, Prince Rupert, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, C.

    2001-12-01

    The Coast Steep Zone (CSZ) is a world-class, crustal-scale structure that extends for at least 800 km along the western boundary of an exhumed Cretaceous to early Tertiary magmatic arc in British Columbia and southeast Alaska. At the latitude of Prince Rupert (54-55° N), the magmatic arc separates the Insular superterrane, accreted to North America in the Cretaceous, from Stikine and other previously accreted terranes. The CSZ is a 2-5 km thick zone of well-foliated steeply east dipping to vertical, upper amphibolite-facies rocks containing orthogneiss, paragneiss and amphibolite. Reflection and refraction seismic data show a ~2 km step in the Moho across the steep zone separating significantly different seismic velocities in the deep crust and upper mantle. This suggests that the CSZ might mark the boundary between two pieces of lithosphere with different geologic histories. West of the CSZ, arc magmatism ceased by 91 Ma with cooling through 300° C by 74 Ma in the west and 55 Ma near the CSZ. Synkinematic intrusion of arc-derived tonalite and quartz diorite persisted east of the CSZ until 52 Ma followed by rapid erosion and cooling through 300° C by 48 Ma. By 46 Ma, fine-grained porphyritic lamprophyre dikes with chilled margins intruded the area. This event was followed by a complex brittle deformation history within the CSZ producing cataclasite, fault gouge, and pseudotachylyte. The pseudotachylyte occurs within a dextral strike slip fault zone and contains spherulites, dendritic microlites, and amygdules, suggesting that faulting occurred within 2 km of the surface. 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating of the pseudotachylyte yielded a precise date of 29.81 Ma. Plate reconstructions at the latitude of Prince Rupert ( ~54° N) show that motion between the Pacific plate and North America switched from mostly convergence to transform (+/- extension) at about 45 Ma, and since 20 Ma the margin has been dominated by transpression. This study shows that exhumation and

  3. Magmatic origin of alkaline meta-igneous rocks from Chamberlindalen, SW Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goluchowska, Karolina; Barker, Abigail; Manecki, Maciej; Czerny, Jerzy; Majka, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on the late Neoproterozoic meta-igneous rocks of SW Svalbard to determine their magmatic evolution, conditions of magma storage and origin. The samples from the Chamberlindalen area form an alkaline igneous suite, from which thin dikes and intrusive bodies have been collected. The rocks in question intrude Late Neoproterozoic metasediments and are surrounded by occurrences of Neoproterozoic metabasalts in contrast to highly alkaline the Chamberlindalen intrusions. The rocks from Chamberlindalen are divided into two groups based on their geochemistry, mineralogy and field relationships. The dikes, classify as minettes, belonging to the lamprophyre group and contain mainly euhedral, elongated phlogopite and additionally clinopyroxene and feldspar. The rest of the samples are highly magnesian and are classified as alkali gabbro. The alkali gabbros contain primary magmatic minerals such as clinopyroxene, calcic amphibole and mica in different proportions. The alkali gabbros are enriched in LREE and HFSE and depleted in P, K and HREE. The minette dikes are always more enriched in HFSE and REE in comparison to the alkali gabbros. The mineral chemistry of the alkali gabbros reveals that pyroxenes are represented by diopside with Wo46-51 En35-46 Fs6-14, and calcic amphibole by kaersutite. The Mg# number for diopside is from 72 - 88, whereas for kaersutite Mg# number is 51 - 74. Thermobarometry calculations for diopside and kaersutite have been performed. In the alkali gabbros from Chamberlindalen, diopside crystallized between 0.7 - 8 kbar and 1152 - 1233°C. Results for kaersutite reveal that they crystallized between 5 - 17 kbar and 1043 - 1215°C. For diopside the main crystallization was between 10 and 38 km, whereas for kaersutite, the main crystallization was between 30 and 50 km. Clinopyroxene and minor kaersutite also show a zone of crystallization at 2 to 10 km. This reflects a main crystallization zone at 10 - 50 km throughout the continental

  4. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic data on the sanukitoid intrusions of the Karelia, Baltic Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, A. V.; Savatenkov, V. M.

    2003-04-01

    Sanukitoid intrusions from the Baltic Shield form post-tectonic differentiated intrusions 2.74-2.72 Ga old (Chekulaev, 1999, Lobach-Zhuchenko et al., 2000). They are represented by alkaline and calc-alkaline types which have high mg# (up to 0.6), strong LREE enrichment (Ce(N)=80-150, Yb(N)=4-7, Ce(N)/Yb(N)>20), high Sr, Ba (>1000 ppm), P2O5 (up to 1.5%) and Cr, Ni concentrations. Some intrusions contain rocks varying from ultramafite to quartz syenite. All sanukitoids are intruded by lamprophyre dykes having similar geochemical signatures. In this study we focus on the Karelian greenstone terrain within the Baltic Shield, in which sanukitoids are restricted to the younger western and central domains (2.7-2.9 Ga). Sanukitoids appear to be absent from the older Vodlozero domain (>3.0 Ga) in eastern Karelia (Lobach-Zhuchenko et al., 2000, Lobach-Zhuchenko et al., in press). About 70 Sm-Nd isotopic data on the sanukitoids of the Karelia were obtained. There is the regional distinction of the isotope composition of the rocks between the Central and West Karelian domains. The initial Epsilon Nd values and TDM range from +1.1 to +2.0 and 2.70-2.85 Ga accordingly in the youngest Central Karelian domain. The West Karelian intrusions yield an initial Epsilon Nd of -0.3- +0.7 and give the older TDM of about 2.82-2.92 Ga. It is to be noted that some intrusions of the Central Karelia domain, occurred closely to the ancient Vodlozero domain, also exhibit a similar range of initial Epsilon Nd and TDM to the intrusions of the West Karelia. There are narrow Nd isotopic compositional ranges within the individual intrusions. Rb-Sr isotopic system was studied in sanukitoids and lamprophyres of differentiated Panozero intrusion, Central Karelia. The initial 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios range from 0.7000 to 0.7021 in these rocks indicating the derivation of these magmas from depleted mantle. Very low initial 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios of the sanukitoids confirm the Nd isotopic characteristics

  5. Pre-eruptive conditions of the Hideaway Park topaz rhyolite: Insights into metal source and evolution of magma parental to the Henderson porphyry molybdenum deposit, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Celestine N.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Todorov, Todor I.; Roberge, Julie; Burgisser, Alain; Adams, David T.; Cosca, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    partitioned. Given that the Henderson deposit contains anomalous abundances of not only Mo, but also W, Pb, Zn, Cu, Bi, Ag, and Mn, we suggest that these metals were sourced from similar fluids exsolved from unerupted portions of the same magmatic system. Trace element ratios imply that Mo was sourced deep, from either the lower crust or metasomatized mantle. The origin of sulfur remains unresolved; however, given the extremely low S solubility of rhyolite melts in the shallow crust we favor the possibility that another source of S might supplement or account for that present in the ore deposit, probably the comagmatic, mantle-derived lamprophyres that occur in minor quantities with the voluminous topaz rhyolites in the area. To account for the 437 Mt of MoS2 (∼1·0 × 106 t Mo) present in the Henderson ore deposit, a volume of ∼45 km3 of Hideaway Park rhyolite magma would have been necessary to supply the Mo (a cylindrical pluton measuring 3·1 km × 6·0 km) along with sparging of ∼6·8 × 105 t of S from ∼0·05 km3 of lamprophyre magma. Based on a weighted mean 40Ar/39Ar age of 27·58 ± 0·24 Ma, similar melt geochemistry, and characteristically F-rich biotite phenocrysts, we conclude that the Hideaway Park tuff was cogenetic with the intrusions at Red Mountain that formed the Henderson deposit.

  6. Andesite petrogenesis in a hybrid arc-rift setting: the Western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Tuena, A.; Vázquez-Duarte, A.; Díaz-Bravo, B.; Mori, L.

    2011-12-01

    The western sector of the Mexican subduction zone is characterized by the steep subduction of one of the youngest slabs on the planet (Rivera plate), and by the existence of a continental rift at ~230 km to the north from the trench (the so-called Tepic-Zacoalco rift, TZR), under which the subducted slab is either extremely deep or even absent (>250 km). The volcanic front is located at ~170 km from the trench and contains abundant potassic-alkaline lamprophyres with strong subduction (Ba/Ta= 1600-6000) and garnet signatures (Gd/Yb= 2-8), that have been recently interpreted as influenced by deep K2O-rich slab melts or supercritical fluids (Gómez-Tuena et al., 2011, GCA). In contrast, the most mafic rocks within the TZR are high-Nb, intraplate-like basalts that appear to derive from low extents of melting of a dryer (Ba/Ta= 800-60) and shallower (Gd/Yb= 2-2.5) mantle source. Even though a simple transition from an arc environment to an extensional tectonic regime is apparent when only the most primitive volcanic rocks are taken into account, the scenario becomes more complicated since at least five stratovolcanoes have been erupting typical arc andesites within the TZR over the last million years (San Juan, Sanganguey, Tepetiltic, Ceboruco and Tequila). Surprisingly, true calc-alkaline basalts that could be parental to andesites have not been found, indicating that andesites may have a direct mantle origin. Indeed, mayor and trace element compositions of volcanic rocks from western Mexico arrange in discrete suites with linear trends that are indicative of mixing, but they form sub-parallel arrays that do not converge to a common primitive basaltic melt, and often follow diverging trends in trace element-ratio plots. Melt-crust interactions likely occurred during magma ascent, since the volcanic rocks frequently include xenoliths and disequilibrium textures, but correlations among isotopic compositions and indexes of fractionation are not clearly observed in the

  7. A tale of two magmas: Petrological insights into mafic and intermediate Plinian volcanism at Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crummy, J. M.; Savov, I. P.; Morgan, D. J.; Wilson, M.; Loughlin, S.; Navarro-Ochoa, C.

    2012-12-01

    recrystallisation and re-equilibration within a compositionally different melt. This composition of the clinopyroxene is similar to that of the Group I magmas. Whole-rock geochemical and Sr and Nd isotopic analyses reveal strong trends in the Group II magmas towards the composition of monogenetic cinder cones composed of phlogopite-bearing alkaline lamprophyre situated to the north of Volcán de Colima. The alkaline magmas are thought to have formed from partial melting of metasomatically enriched veins within the lithospheric mantle. We suggest the high Mg clinopyroxene cores of the Group II magmas crystallised from such alkaline melts, which then mixed with the parental mantle-derived melts of the Group I magmas. Geothermometry and hygrometry based on mineral-mineral and mineral-melt equilibria reveal no correlation between variations in eruption temperature (930-1000°C) and magmatic H2O content (3-6 wt.%) with magma composition. This implies magma composition and volatile content are not controlling the highly explosive mafic and intermediate eruptions at Volcán de Colima, but rather, are driven by very fast ascent rates from source to surface.

  8. Seeking the mantle contribution for the formation of giant ore deposits: Contemporaneous alkaline lamproites and carbonatites in the Kalmakyr and Muruntau ore districts, Tienshan, Uzbekistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltmann, Reimar; Choulet, Flavien

    2014-05-01

    The decline in discoveries of ore deposits contrasted by the rising demand for e-tech metals requires the global mining industry to continuously seek innovation in exploration. Unravelling the source of metals is among the crucial questions in exploration targeting and geologists have often had to recourse to indirect determinations based on the nature of the magma conveying the metals. The relative contributions of mantle and crust in metallogenic processes and the origin of the magmas from either shallow or deep mantle are not fully understood in the current models of ore genesis. To help to resolve this dilemma, research must establish the link between anorogenic (within-plate) and orogenic processes by using a holistic approach featuring crustal processes, mantle dynamics and crust-mantle interactions that may contribute to the magma fertilization. To achieve this, our study focuses on indicators for the involvement of deep-mantle intrusions (lamproites, lamprophyres, etc.), which have the potential to encapsulate pristine samples of the mantle (xenoliths) during magma ascent [1,2]. The Tienshan belt hosting many giant ore deposits is quite exemplary for understanding mantle-crust interactions and identifying the nature of mantle contribution to ore systems. Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope systematics on granitoids [3] showed a variation of crustal to mixed signatures, indicating involvement of both older crustal sources and mantle-derived material, but the mantle source is not clearly assessed. As objects for our case study in Uzbekistan we choose the Kalmakyr Cu-Au porphyry deposit (~ 315 Ma; Chatkal-Kurama continental arc of Middle Tienshan) and the Muruntau orogenic Au deposit (~290 Ma, Turkestan-Alai / Kyzylkum accretionary complex of South Tienshan) to investigate the impact of associated alkaline magmas on the ore-bearing intrusions and mineralization. Field observations and geochronological data shed light on the spatial and temporal relationships between the

  9. High-mg granitoids (sanukitoids) of the Baltic Shield geological setting, geochemical characteristics and implications for the origin of mantle-derived melts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach-Zhuchenko, S.; Chekulaev, V.; Arestova, N.; Kovalenko, A.; Ivanikov, V.; Gooseva, N.; Rollinson, H.

    2003-04-01

    . We propose that the presence of fluid during melting is mainly responsible for the distinction of these trends: the presence of H2O during melting will promote silica oversaturation, whereas in the presence of CO2 melts will be undersaturated in silica [Mysen &Boettcher,1975; Shirie &Hanson,1984] and enriched in K2O [Lamb et al.,1986]. Some sanukitoid plutons are associated with mafic-ultrumafic rocks (Shaaravalampi, Panozero in Karelia, Roaring River Complex, Lac des Iles pluton, OttoStock in Canada [Sutcliffe et al.,1990; Stern&Hanson,1991]. In the Panozero pluton ultramafic rocks occur as net-veins within the felsic rocks, cumulate layers and as fragments within explosive breccias forming pipes and dykes. Mineral composition of the geodes which are composed by calk-spar and actinolith indicates on important role of CO2 in fluid composition. The parental melt of sanukitoids in many studies had composition of Qu-diorite (or monzodiorite) which was formed by partial melting of metasomatised mantle. However, the large volume of mafic-ultramafic units within the sanukitoid plutons and mafic lamprophyres push to assumption of more mafic composition of initial melt followed by differentiation in place of crystallization and /or in intermediate camerae. Mafic initial melt can be produced by incremental batch melting of the depleted mantle (Kushiro,1984) which was metasomatised by H2O-CO2 fluid enriched in some LIL and LRE elements.

  10. Mixing of fluids in hydrothermal ore-forming (Sn,W) systems: stable isotope and rare earth elements data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushchevskaya, T. M.; Popova, J. A.; Velivetskaya, T. A.; Ignatiev, A. V.; Matveeva, S. S.; Limantseva, O. A.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental and physico-chemical modeling data witness to important role of mixing of different type of fluids during tin and tungsten ore formation in hydrothermal systems. Mixing of magmatogeneous fluids, exsolved from granite melts, with exogenic, initially meteoric waters in hydrothermal ore-forming systems may change chemical composition of ore-forming fluid, causing cassiterite and/or wolframite precipitation (Heinrich, 1990; Sushchevskaya, Ryzhenko, 2002). We studied the process of genetically different fluids mixing for two economic Sn-W deposits, situated in the Iultin ore region (North-East of Russia, Chukotka Penninsula). The Iultin and Svetloe deposits are located in the apical parts of close situated leucogranite stocks, formed at the final stage of the Iultin complex emplacement. Both deposits are composed of a series of quartz veins among the flyschoid rocks (T 1-2), cut by the dikes (K1) of lamprophyre, granodiorite porphyre and alpite. The veins of the deposits are dominated by the productive quartz-wolframite-cassiterite-arsenopyrite-muscovite mineral assemblage. Topaz, beryl, fluorite, and albite occur sporadically. The later sulfide (loellingite-stannite-chalcopyrite) and quartz-fluorite-calcite assemblages show insignificant development. The preore quartz veinlets in host hornfels contain disseminated iron sulfides, chalcopyrite, muscovite. Isotopic (H, O, Ar) study of minerals, supplemented by oxygen isotope data of host granites and metamorphic rocks gave us possibility to conclude, that at the Iultin and the Svetloye deposits fluid mixing was fixed on the early stages of deposit formation and could be regarded as probable cause of metal (W, Sn) precipitation. During postore time the intensive involvement of isotopically light exogenic waters have changed: a) the initial character of oxygen isotope zonality; b) the initial hydrogen isotope composition of muscovites, up to meteoric calculated values for productive fluid (while the δ18O

  11. Alteration and arenization processes of granitic waste rock piles from former uranium Mines in Limousin, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzari, Aisha; Boekhout, Flora; Gérard, Martine; Galoisy, Laurence; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2014-05-01

    France counts approximately 200 former uranium mines, 50 of which are located in the Limousin region. Mining activities between 1945 and 2001 have generated close to 200 000 tons of waste rocks in the Limousin, with uranium levels corresponding essentially to the geological background. Waste rock piles from three former mining sites in this region, were selected according to their age, uranium content and petrological signature. These sites are part of the two-mica granitic complex of St Sylvestre massif, formed 324 million years ago. Granitic blocks that build up the waste rock piles have experienced different processes and intensities of alteration before their emplacement at the surface. These processes are responsible for the petrological heterogeneity throughout the waste rock pile at the time of construction. It is important to make a distinction within waste rocks between natural-cut-off waste rocks and economic-cut-off waste rocks. The latter represents a minority and is linked to stock prices. Natural-cut-off waste rocks contain about 20 ppm of uranium; economic-cut-off waste rocks contain about 100 to 300 ppm of uranium. The aims of this study are to 1) assess the neo-formation of U-bearing minerals hosted by these rocks, and 2) to characterize the weathering processes since the construction of the rock piles, including both mechanical and chemical processes. The structure of the waste rocks piles, from metric blocks to boulders of tens centimeters, induces an enhanced weathering rate, compared to a granitic massif. Mechanical fracturing and chemical leaching by rainwater (arenization) of the waste rocks produce a sandy-silty alteration phase. Silty-clay weathering aureoles of submetric-granitic blocks evolving into technic soil are mainly located below growing birch trees. Sampling on the rock piles was restricted to surface rocks. Samples collected consist mainly of granites, and rare lamprophyres with a high radiometric signal, thereby especially

  12. Petrology and mineralogy of the La Peña igneous complex, Mendoza, Argentina: An alkaline occurrence in the Miocene magmatism of the Southern Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Diego Sebastián; Galliski, Miguel Ángel; Márquez-Zavalía, María Florencia; Colombo, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The La Peña alkaline igneous complex (LPC) is located in the Precordillera (32°41‧34″ S - 68°59‧48″ W) of Mendoza province, Argentina, above the southern boundary of the present-day flat-slab segment. It is a 19 km2 and 5 km diameter subcircular massif emplaced during the Miocene (19 Ma) in the Silurian-Devonian Villavicencio Fm. The LPC is composed of several plutonic and subvolcanic intrusions represented by: a cumulate of clinopyroxenite intruded by mafic dikes and pegmatitic gabbroic dikes, isolated bodies of malignite, a central intrusive syenite that develops a wide magmatic breccia in the contact with clinopyroxenite, syenitic and trachytic porphyries, a system of radial and ring dikes of different compositions (trachyte, syenite, phonolite, alkaline lamprophyre, tephrite), and late mafic breccias. The main minerals that form the LPC, ordered according to their abundance, are: pyroxene (diopside, hedenbergite), calcium amphibole (pargasite, ferro-pargasite, potassic-ferro-pargasite, potassic-hastingsite, magnesio-hastingsite, hastingsite, potassic-ferro-ferri-sadanagaite), trioctahedral micas (annite-phlogopite series), plagioclase (bytownite to oligoclase), K-feldspar (sanidine and orthoclase), nepheline, sodalite, apatite group minerals (fluorapatite, hydroxylapatite), andradite, titanite, magnetite, spinel, ilmenite, and several Cu-Fe sulfides. Late hydrothermal minerals are represented by zeolites (scolecite, thomsonite-Ca), epidote, calcite and chlorite. The trace element patterns, coupled with published data on Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, suggest that the primary magma of the LPC was generated in an initially depleted but later enriched lithospheric mantle formed mainly by a metasomatized spinel lherzolite, and that this magmatism has a subduction-related signature. The trace elements pattern of these alkaline rocks is similar to other Miocene calc-alkaline occurrences from the magmatic arc of the Southern Central Andes. Mineral and whole

  13. Two Distinct Sets of Magma Sources in Cretaceous Rocks From Magnet Cove, Prairie Creek, and Other Igneous Centers of the Arkansas Alkaline Province, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, G. I.; Carlson, R. W.; Eby, G. N.

    2008-12-01

    Two distinct sets of magma sources from the Arkansas alkaline province (~106-89 Ma) are revealed by Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of olivine lamproites vs. other alkalic rock types, including carbonatite, ijolite, lamprophyres, tephrite, malignite, jacupirangite, phonolite, trachyte, and latite. Isotopic compositions of diamond-bearing olivine lamproites from Prairie Creek and Dare Mine Knob point to Proterozoic lithosphere as an important source, and previous Re-Os isotopic data indicate derivation from subcontinental mantle lithosphere. Both sources were probably involved in lamproite generation. Magnet Cove carbonatites and other alkalic magmas were likely derived from an asthenospheric source. Lamproite samples are isotopically quite different from other rock types in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic space. Although three lamproite samples from Prairie Creek have a large range of SiO2 contents (40-60 wt %), initial values of ɛNd (-10 to -13), 206Pb/204Pb (16.61-16.81), 207Pb/204Pb (15.34-15.36), and 208Pb/204Pb (36.57-36.76) are low and similar. Only 87Sr/86Sr(i) displays a wide range in the Prairie Creek lamproites (0.70627-0.70829). A fourth lamproite from Dare Mine Knob has the most negative ɛNd(i) of -19. Lamproite isotope values show a significant crustal component and isotopically overlap subalkalic rhyolites from the Black Hills (SD), which assimilated Proterozoic crust. Six samples of carbonatite, ijolite, and jacupirangite from Magnet Cove and Potash Sulphur Springs exhibit the most depleted Sr-Nd isotopic signatures of all samples. For these rock types, 87Sr/86Sr(i) is 0.70352 - 0.70396, and ɛNd(i) is +3.8 - +4.3. Eight other rock types have a narrow range of ɛNd(i) (+1.9 - +3.7), but a wide range of 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.70424 - 0.70629). These 14 samples comprise a fairly tight cluster of Pb isotopic values: 206Pb/204Pb (18.22-19.23), 207Pb/204Pb (15.54-15.62), and 208Pb/204Pb (38.38-38.94), suggesting very little crustal assimilation. They are most similar to EM-2

  14. Dyke belt in North Western margin of Siberian platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, Victor

    2015-04-01

    The Early Triassic dyke swarm belt is strengthening at about 500 km (50-60 km width) along the northern margin of Siberian platform. Its locations is limited from the north by rift structure of the Yenisei-Khatanga trough, and from the south by Kystyktah-Ayan-Ambardah uprise. From west to east dyke belt is crossing Norilsk, Kamensky and Maimecha-Kotuiskaya province. In this direction the composition of dykes changing from basic rthrough alkali-basic to alkali-ultramafic varieties. The sickness of dykes varies from 0,5-10m up to 90 m and length - from 5-15 m to 140 km. The orientation of the bulk of dykes coincides with the direction of the major structural and tectonic lineaments of the region. Dykes are often refer to the fault planes. The composition of dykes may vary along the stretches. The density of hundreds of basaltic dykes and small intrusions in the dyke swarms is not permanent and sometimes essentially uneven. They form a compact dyke swarms of dykes, stocks and sub layering bodies veins. In dyke package on Huor-Uyallah river here are 20 subparallel dykes of different chemical composition at a distance of 2 km Lack of the evidence of the dykes crossing allows to assume their formation during the same magmatic cycle. Dykes cross cut through the entire incision of basaltic plateau. They did not created the flow effusions and refer to the final stage trap magmatism. Ar/Ar age of the youngest dykes in the province Kamenska 238-247 Ma. the age of lamproite dyke in Norilsk province is 235 Ma. Dykes are represented by dolerites trachydolerites, syenites, minettes, lamprophyres (camptonite, spessartite, vosgesite), avgitites, melanephelinite, alnoites, limburgites alkaline picrites, meimechites. Their content vary widely: SiO2 - 35,7-62,6; TiO2- 0,4-7,5; Al2O3- 4,4-17,5; Fe2O3- 4,6-20,6; MnO- 0,08-0,44; MgO- 0,8-31,5; CaO- 0,7-15,4; Na2O- 0,01-6,5; K2O 0,8-5,3 wt.%; P2O5 0,1-1,2 wt.%. The h Bolsheavamskaya volcanic basin in Kamensky province is most abundant in

  15. Petrology of the Rainy Lake area, Minnesota, USA-implications for petrotectonic setting of the archean southern Wabigoon subprovince of the Canadian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Warren C.

    1990-08-01

    The Rainy Lake area in northern Minnesota and southwestern, Ontario is a Late Archean (2.7 Ga) granite-greenstone belt within the Wabigoon subprovince of the Canadian Shield. In Minnesota the rocks include mafic and felsic volcanic rocks, volcaniclastic, chemical sedimentary rocks, and graywacke that are intrucded by coeval gabbro, tonalite, and granodiorite. New data presented here focus on the geochemistry and petrology of the Minnesota part of the Rainy Lake area. Igneous rocks in the area are bimodal. The mafic rocks are made up of three distinct suites: (1) low-TiO2 tholeiite and gabbro that have slightly evolved Mg-numbers (63 49) and relatively flat rare-earth element (REE) patterns that range from 20 8 x chondrites (Ce/YbN=0.8 1.5); (2) high-TiO2 tholeiite with evolved Mg-numbers (46 29) and high total REE abundances that range from 70 40 x chondrites (Ce/YbN=1.8 3.3), and (3) calc-alkaline basaltic andesite and geochemically similar monzodiorite and lamprophyre with primitive Mg-numbers (79 63), enriched light rare-earth elements (LREE) and depleted heavy rare-earth elements (HREE). These three suites are not related by partial melting of a similar source or by fractional crystallization of a common parental magma; they resulted from melting of heterogeneous Archean mantle. The felsic rocks are made up of two distinct suites: (1)low-Al2O3 tholeiitic rhyolite, and (2) high-Al2O3 calc-alkaline dacite and rhyolite and consanguineous tonalite. The tholeiitic felsic rocks are high in Y, Zr, Nb, and total REE that are unfractionated and have pronounced negative Eu anomalies. The calcalkaline felsic rocks are depleted in Y, Zr, and Nb, and the REE that are highly fractionated with high LREE and depleted HREE, and display moderate negative Eu anomalies. Both suites of felsic rocks were generated by partial melting of crustal material. The most reasonable modern analog for the paleotectonic setting is an immature island arc. The bimodal volcanic rocks are

  16. Petrology of the Rainy Lake area, Minnesota, USA-implications for petrotectonic setting of the archean southern Wabigoon subprovince of the Canadian Shield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Rainy Lake area in northern Minnesota and southwestern, Ontario is a Late Archean (2.7 Ga) granite-greenstone belt within the Wabigoon subprovince of the Canadian Shield. In Minnesota the rocks include mafic and felsic volcanic rocks, volcaniclastic, chemical sedimentary rocks, and graywacke that are intrucded by coeval gabbro, tonalite, and granodiorite. New data presented here focus on the geochemistry and petrology of the Minnesota part of the Rainy Lake area. Igneous rocks in the area are bimodal. The mafic rocks are made up of three distinct suites: (1) low-TiO2 tholeiite and gabbro that have slightly evolved Mg-numbers (63-49) and relatively flat rare-earth element (REE) patterns that range from 20-8 x chondrites (Ce/YbN=0.8-1.5); (2) high-TiO2 tholeiite with evolved Mg-numbers (46-29) and high total REE abundances that range from 70-40 x chondrites (Ce/YbN=1.8-3.3), and (3) calc-alkaline basaltic andesite and geochemically similar monzodiorite and lamprophyre with primitive Mg-numbers (79-63), enriched light rare-earth elements (LREE) and depleted heavy rare-earth elements (HREE). These three suites are not related by partial melting of a similar source or by fractional crystallization of a common parental magma; they resulted from melting of heterogeneous Archean mantle. The felsic rocks are made up of two distinct suites: (1)low-Al2O3 tholeiitic rhyolite, and (2) high-Al2O3 calc-alkaline dacite and rhyolite and consanguineous tonalite. The tholeiitic felsic rocks are high in Y, Zr, Nb, and total REE that are unfractionated and have pronounced negative Eu anomalies. The calcalkaline felsic rocks are depleted in Y, Zr, and Nb, and the REE that are highly fractionated with high LREE and depleted HREE, and display moderate negative Eu anomalies. Both suites of felsic rocks were generated by partial melting of crustal material. The most reasonable modern analog for the paleotectonic setting is an immature island arc. The bimodal volcanic rocks are

  17. Mineralogy and petrology of leucite ankaratrites with affinities to kamafugites and carbonatites from the Kayıköy area, Isparta, SW Anatolia, Turkey: Implications for the influences of carbonatite metasomatism into the parental mantle sources of silica-undersaturated potassic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caran, Şemsettin

    2016-07-01

    /Eu, elevated CaO/Al2O3 and (La/Yb)N ratios], (ii) consistency of parental magma compositions with experimental melt compositions for carbonated peridotites, and (iii) geochemical and isotopic affinities to kamafugites and carbonatites, it is inferred that the carbonatitic melts infiltrated the mantle sources of Kayıköy leucite ankaratritic magma, and induced the depletion of its SiO2 contents. Carbonate-bearing phonolitic parental melts formed by mixing of both silicate and carbonate-asthenospheric melts from convecting mantle, react with wall-rock peridotite to form diopside + phlogopite + olivine + apatite metasomatic veins as wehrlitic metasomes. Partial melting of such newly generated wehrlitic metasomes in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle resulted in the parental melts of Kayıköy leucite ankaratrites. Results also imply that the nature and composition of asthenosphere-derived silicate melts (basanitic, phonolitic or tephriphonolitic in composition) and percentage of mixed carbonatitic melts lead to the formation of discrete mantle metasomes within the Inner Isparta Angle lithospheric mantle. These metasomes are conducive to the generation of coeval potassic magmas with contrasting geochemical signatures (e.g., lamproitic, lamprophyric, kamafugitic) in a single tectonic setting.

  18. Stratigraphy and structure of the western Kentucky fluorspar district

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trace, R.D.; Amos, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    Rivers and their major tributaries. Many mafic dikes and a few mafic sills are present. The mafic rocks are mostly altered mica peridotites or lamprophyres that are composed of carbonate minerals, serpentine, chlorite, and biotite and contain some hornblende, pyroxene, and olivine. Most of the dikes are in a north-north west-trending belt 6 to 8 mi wide and strike N. 20 0 -30 0 W. The dikes dip from 80 0 to 90 0 and are commonly 5 to 10 ft wide. Radioisotopic study indicates that the dikes are Early Permian in age. The district is just southeast of the intersection of the east-trending Rough Creek-Shawneetown and northeast-trending New Madrid fault systems. The district's principal structural features are a northwest-trending domal anticline, the Tolu Arch, and a series of steeply dipping to nearly vertical normal faults and fault zones that trend dominantly northeastward and divide the area into elongated northeast-trending grabens and horsts. Formation of these grabens and horsts was one of the major tectonic events in the district. Vertical displacement may be as much as 3,000 ft but commonly ranges from a few feet to a few hundred feet; no substantial horizontal movement is believed to have taken place. Many cross faults having only a few feet of displacement trend northwestward and are occupied at places by mafic dikes. Faulting was mostly post-Early Permian to pre-middle Cretaceous in age. Many theories have been advanced to explain the structural history of the district. A generally acceptable overall hypothesis that would account for all the structural complexities, however, is still lacking. Useful structural data, such as the structural differences between the grabens and the horsts, have been obtained, however, from the recently completed geologic mapping. Mapping also has more clearly shown the alinement of the Tolu Arch, the belt of dikes, and an unusually deep graben (the Griffith Bluff graben); this alinement suggests that possibl

  19. Cathodoluminescence of diamond as an indicator of its metamorphic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Maya; Bruce, Loryn; Longo, Micaela; Ryder, John; Dobrzhinetskaya, Larissa

    2010-05-01

    Diamond displays a supreme resistance to chemical and mechanical weathering, ensuring its survival through complex and prolonged crustal processes, including metamorphism and exhumation. For these reasons, volcanic sources and secondary and tertiary collectors for detrital placer diamonds, like Ural or Bingara diamonds, may be difficult to determine. If metamorphic processes leave their marks on diamond, they can be used to reconstruct crustal geologic processes and ages of primary diamondiferous volcanics. Four diamond suites extracted from metamorphic rocks have been characterized using optical CL, infrared and CL spectroscopy, and photoluminescence at the liquid nitrogen temperature. The studied diamonds are from the ~2.7 Ga sedimentary conglomerate and lamprophyric breccia metamorphosed in the greenschist facies (Wawa, Northern Ontario, Canada) during the 2.67 Ga Kenoran orogeny, and from the ultra-high pressure (UHP) terranes of Kokchetav (Kazakhstan) and Erzgebirge (Germany) exhumated in the Paleozoic. Wawa diamonds (Type IaAB and Type II) displayed green, yellow, orange, and red CL colours controlled by the CL emittance at 520, 576 nm, and between 586 and 664 nm. The UHP terranes diamonds show much weaker CL; few luminescent stones display CL peaks at 395, 498, 528 nm and a broad band at 580-668 nm. In contrast, most common diamonds found in unmetamorphosed rocks, i.e. octahedrally grown Type IaAB stones, luminescence blue emitting light at ~415-440 nm and 480-490 nm. There is a noticeable difference between cathodoluminescence of these diamonds and diamonds in metamorphic rocks. The studied diamonds that experienced metamorphism show a shift of CL emission to longer wavelengths (above 520 nm) and to green, yellow and red CL colours. Photoluminescence has the high resolution necessary to assign luminescence to specific optical centers of diamond. Diamonds in metamorphic rocks contain H3 (pairs of substitutional nitrogen atoms separated by a vacancy) and NVo

  20. Unusual Cathodoluminescence in Diamonds: Evidence for Metamorphism or a Source Characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. F.; Longo, M.; Kopylova, M.; Ryder, J.

    2009-05-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a useful means of diamond "fingerprinting". CL-active cratonic macrodiamonds usually cathodoluminesce blue or yellow, and always exhibit prominent wide CL emittance peaks at 430-450 nm and 480-490 nm. Exceptions to this norm are diamond suites recently discovered in the Archean rocks metamorphosed in the greenschist facies. These macrodiamonds cathodoluminesce red, orange and yellow, and invariably exhibit the most prominent CL peak at 520 nm. The diamond suites with the unusual CL are derived from two different locations within the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt (Southern Superior craton), near the town of Wawa (Ontario). One suite is extracted from the 2.68-2.74 Ga polymict volcanic breccias and lamprophyres and the other suite - from the 2.68 Ga sedimentary conglomerates grading into overlying sandstones of the Dore assemblage. The diamondiferous conglomerates are found in an area 8 km south of the breccias and 12 km northeast of Wawa. CL emittance of macrodiamonds (> 0.5 mm) extracted from the breccias consists of a broad band at 520 nm, a sharp peak at 575.5 nm, and several lines at 550-670 nm. The conglomerate macrodiamonds mostly show a dominant peak at 520 nm, whereas corresponding microdiamonds exhibit two peaks at about 576 and 600 nm. None of the diamonds show a maximum peak at 420 nm. Polycrystalline stones from conglomerates show distinct CL spectra and colours for all intergrown crystals in the same diamond. The relative abundances of the CL colors of the conglomerate diamonds are orange-red (46%), yellow (28%), orange-green (10%), green (6%), and non-uniform colors (10%). These colours are more diverse than mostly orange CL colours in the breccia diamonds; this results from a larger variety of positions and intensity of CL peaks in the conglomerate diamonds. We propose two models for explaining the presence of the 520 nm CL peak in the breccia and conglomerate diamonds in Wawa. The first model suggests metamorphism as the

  1. Experimental study of the P-T stability of phlogopite in metasomatised peridotite with varying H2O contents in the deep cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaxley, Greg; Rosenthal, Anja

    2014-05-01

    Phlogopite is an important metasomatic, hydrous, potassic phase in peridotite from on- and off-cratonic lithospheric mantle. It is significant in petrogenesis of exotic mantle-derived magmas such as micaceous kimberlites, ultramafic lamprophyres, kamafugites, lamproites and olivine basanites[1-6]. Along with other potassic hydrous agents (fluids/melts), phlogopite is a major repository for potassium, H2O and F in K-enriched peridotitic mantle down to ~200 km or more (≡6 GPa[7-10]). Although some recent studies delineated phlogopite stability in peridotite at a given bulk H2O content1[1,8-10,12], we lack experimental investigations close to the limits of phlogopite stability in a model mantle composition enriched in K (i.e. by metasomatic agents) with varying amounts of H2O over a pressure range of 4-6 GPa, i.e. from ≡120 to 200 km deep. Variations in the %H2O available however determine the shape and location of the solidus, and hence the onset of partial melting of a K-enriched mantle enriched[8,13]. Our experimental base composition (HPK2) is fertile peridotite + 0.5wt% K2O. Mixes HPK2-0 and HPK2-13 were prepared by blending powdered high purity oxides or carbonates of Si, Ti, Al, Mg, Cr, Ni, Mn, Ca, Na and K. Mg(OH)2 was included in HPK2-13 to produce a mix with 13wt% H2O. HPK2-0 is anhydrous. HPK2-0 and HPK2-13 were blended to create 3 additional mixes with identical compositions but varying H2O contents, nominally 0.2, 2 and 5wt% H2O. Experiments were run in Au, AuPd or graphite (in Pt) capsules at 4-6 GPa and 1050-1350°C. Run products were analysed by EDS on a SEM. Experiments crystallized assemblages of olivine + orthopyroxene ± clinopyroxene ± garnet ± rutile ± phlogopite. We define the temperature stability limit of phlogopite in potassic-peridotite between 1200 and 1250°C at 4 GPa and <1300°C at 5 GPa, consistent with interpolation of data from previous lower[1] and higher pressure[14] investigations. We also demonstrate the leaching effect of

  2. Numerical simulation of ground-water flow through glacial deposits and crystalline bedrock in the Mirror Lake area, Grafton County, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, Claire R.; Goode, Daniel J.; Hsieh, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the development of a computer model to simulate steady-state (long-term average) flow of ground water in the vicinity of Mirror Lake, which lies at the eastern end of the Hubbard Brook valley in central New Hampshire. The 10-km2 study area includes Mirror Lake, the three streams that flow into Mirror Lake, Leeman's Brook, Paradise Brook, and parts of Hubbard Brook and the Pemigewasset River. The topography of the area is characterized by steep hillsides and relatively flat valleys. Major hydrogeologic units include glacial deposits, composed of till containing pockets of sand and gravel, and fractured crystalline bedrock, composed of schist intruded by granite, pegmatite, and lamprophyre. Ground water occurs in both the glacial deposits and bedrock. Precipitation and snowmelt infiltrate to the water table on the hillsides, flow downslope through the saturated glacial deposits and fractured bedrock, and discharge to streams and to Mirror Lake. The model domain includes the glacial deposits, the uppermost 150m of bedrock, Mirror Lake, the layer of organic sediments on the lake bottom, and streams and rivers within the study area. A streamflow routing package was included in the model to simulate baseflow in streams and interaction between streams and ground water. Recharge from precipitation is assumed to be areally uniform, and riparian evapotranspiration along stream banks is assumed negligible. The spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity is represented by dividing the model domain into several zones, each having uniform hydraulic properties. Local variations in recharge and hydraulic conductivities are ignored; therefore, the simulation results characterize the general ground-water system, not local details of ground-water movement. The model was calibrated using a nonlinear regression method to match hydraulic heads measured in piezometers and wells, and baseflow in three inlet streams to Mirror Lake. Model calibration indicates that

  3. Martian alkaline basites chemically resemble basic rocks of the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    " (syenite, granite) for Mars [5]. Actually the martian missions successively discovered andesite, dacite, low-Fe highlands. Now "Spirit" has found on a small outlier of highlands -Columbia Hills -a batch of thinly layered gently dipping light rocks that surely are not impact melts as at very short distance there is a sharp transition from light Fe-poor to ultrabasic rocks (on opposite slopes of this small hill) [6]. This layered sequence of more or less altered and weathered rocks resembles differentiated sequences of Lovozero and other alkaline and UB-alkaline massifs of Kola Peninsula (though fresh and much richer in alkalis). Here we compare compositions of alkaline basic rocks of Columbia Hills (dyke or sill [4]) with that of basic volcanics and a later dyke at Lovozero. 5 analyses in wt.%: 1-Backstay (tra1 chybasalt) & 2-Irvine (basalt) of CH, 3-augiteporphyrite, 4-essexite-porphyrite, 5- alkali- lamprophyre dyke of Lovozero. SiO2 -49.9, 47.7, 45.78, 48.09, 41.57; TiO2 - 0.93, 1.07, 7.80, 2.35, 2.92; Al2 O3 -13.2; 10.8, 8.08; 13.74; 11.77; Fe2 O3 -3.40, 7.79 (4.99), 5.90, 6.00, 4.53; FeO -10.6, 12.5 (15.0), 8.65, 7.60, 8.28; MnO -0.25, 0.37, 0.12, 0.17, 0.28; MgO -8.36, 10.8, 7.61, 7.19, 10.59; CaO -6.09, 6.12, 10.73, 8.77, 11.24; Na2 O -4.02, 2.72, 2.80, 2.84, 3.63; K2 O -1.02, 0.69, 1.97, 2.09, 1.38. Compositional similarities between basites occurring in alkaline conditions on both planets can be found. References: [1] Kochemasov G.G. (1999) Theorems of wave planetary tectonics // Geophys. Res. Abstr., v. 1, # 3, 700; [2] Gellert R. et al. (2006) JGR Planets, v. 111, #E2, EO2505; [3] Squyres S.W. et al. (2006) JGR Planets, v.111, #E2, EO2511; [4] McSween H.Y. et al. (2006) JGR Planets, submitted ; [5] Kochemasov G. G. (1995) Golombek M.P., Edgett K.S., Rice J.W. Jr. (Eds). Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop II: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region and Field trips to the Channeled Scabland, Washington. LPI Tech. Rpt. 95-01. Pt.1.LPI, Houston, 1995, 63 pp.; [6

  4. Geology and ore deposits of the Pioche district, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westgate, L.G.; Knopf, Adolph

    1932-01-01

    which was discovered accidentally during the prospecting of the fissure veins. The ore deposits of the district comprise three groups (1) silver-bearing fissure veins in quartzite; (2) silver-bearing mineralized granite porphyry; (3) replacement deposits in limestone and dolomite. All of them appear to have been formed at about the same time, in the epoch of mineralization that occurred shortly after the intrusion of the granitic rocks and their allied dikes of granite porphyry and lamprophyre. The entire present output of the district is coming from the replacement deposits in limestone and dolomite, but exploratory work is still in progress on the fissure veins and mineralized porphyry. The replacement deposits include both replacement fissure veins and stratiform ("bedded") replacement deposits. The replacement fissure veins dip steeply and cut across the bedding of the carbonate rocks in which they are inclosed. They are thoroughly oxidized, as deep at least as 1,100 feet, for on none of them have the mine workings penetrated to water level, and they are highly manganiferous and limonitic and low in silica. At-certain horizons stratiform replacement deposits extend out as lateral branches from the fissure veins. Deposits of this kind occur mainly in the Mendha limestone, Highland Peak limestone, and Lyndon limestone. The stratigraphic range is therefore at least 5,500 feet, and as some of the fissure veins extend down through the underlying Pioche shale the indicated range may exceed 6,500 feet. The most notable representatives of the replacement fissure veins are at the Bristol mine, where they yield silver-bearing copper-leadzinc ores. So far unique among the ore bodies of the district is the pipe of wad and pyrolusite ore at the Jackrabbit mine, the periphery of the pipe consisting of a girdle of extraordinarily coarse white calcite spar produced by the recrystallization of the surrounding limestones. The stratiform replacement deposits that are attracting most

  5. Mantle Samples Included in Volcanic Rocks: Xenoliths and Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, D. G.; Canil, D.; Shirey, S. B.

    2003-12-01

    samples of mantle available beneath many areas. Because they are erupted rapidly, they freeze in the mineralogical and chemical signatures of their depth of origin, in contrast to massifs which tend to re-equilibrate extensively during emplacement into the crust. In addition, many xenolith suites, particularly those erupted by kimberlites, provide samples from a considerably greater depth range than massifs. Over 3,500 mantle xenolith localities are currently known. The location and nature of many of these occurrences are summarized by Nixon (1987). A historical perspective on their study is given by Nixon (1987) and Menzies (1990a). Mantle xenoliths from any tectonic setting are most commonly described from three main igneous/pyroclastic magma types (where no genetic relationships are implied):(i) Alkalic basalts sensu-lato (commonly comprising alkali basalt-basanites and more evolved derivatives), nephelinites and melilitites.(ii) Lamprophyres and related magmas (e.g., minettes, monchiquites, and alnoites) and lamproites.(iii) The kimberlite series (Group I and Group II or orangeites; Mitchell, 1995).Although mantle xenoliths most commonly occur in primitive members of the above alkaline rocks, rare occurrences have been noted in more evolved magmas such as phonolites and trachytes (e.g., Irving and Price, 1981).To simplify matters and to circumvent the petrographic complexities of alkaline volcanic rocks in general, we will use the term "alkalic and potassic mafic magmas" to include alkalic basalts, nephelinites, melilitites, and lamprophyres. Occurrence of xenoliths in such magmas can be compared to those occurring in kimberlites and related rocks. As a general rule, the spectrum of mantle xenoliths at a given location varies with host rock type. In particular, alkalic and potassic mafic magmas tend to erupt peridotites belonging predominantly to the spinel-facies, whereas kimberlites erupt both spinel and garnet-facies peridotites (Nixon, 1987; Harte and Hawkesworth